WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface thermal features

  1. Thermal Behaviour of Unusual Local-Scale Surface Features on Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, F.; Capria, M. T.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Palomba, E.; Grassi, D.; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Sunshine, J. M.; McCord, T. B.; Titus, T. N.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Toplis, M. J.; Forni, O.; Sykes, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    On Vesta, the region of the infrared spectrum beyond approximately 3.5 micrometers is dominated by the thermal emission of the asteroid's surface, which can be used to determine surface temperature by means of temperature-retrieval algorithms. The thermal behavior of areas of unusual albedo seen at the local scale can be related to physical properties that can provide information about the origin of those materials. Dawn's Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) hyperspectral cubes are used to retrieve surface temperatures, with high accuracy as long as temperatures are greater than 180 K. Data acquired in the Survey phase (23 July through 29 August 2011) show several unusual surface features: 1) high-albedo (bright) and low-albedo (dark) material deposits, 2) spectrally distinct ejecta, 3) regions suggesting finer-grained materials. Some of the unusual dark and bright features were re-observed by VIR in the subsequent High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) phases at increased pixel resolution. To calculate surface temperatures, we applied a Bayesian approach to nonlinear inversion based on the Kirchhoff law and the Planck function. These results were cross-checked through application of alternative methods. Here we present temperature maps of several local-scale features that were observed by Dawn under different illumination conditions and different local solar times. Some bright terrains have an overall albedo in the visible as much as 40% brighter than surrounding areas. Data from the IR channel of VIR show that bright regions generally correspond to regions with lower thermal emission, i.e. lower temperature, while dark regions correspond to areas with higher thermal emission, i.e. higher temperature. This behavior confirms that many of the dark appearances in the VIS mainly reflect albedo variations. In particular, it is shown that during maximum daily insolation, dark features in the equatorial region may rise to

  2. Thermal infrared remote sensing of surface features for renewable resource applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The subjects of infrared remote sensing of surface features for renewable resource applications is reviewed with respect to the basic physical concepts involved at the Earth's surface and up through the atmosphere, as well as the historical development of satellite systems which produce such data at increasingly greater spatial resolution. With this general background in hand, the growth of a variety of specific renewable resource applications using the developing thermal infrared technology are discussed, including data from HCMM investigators. Recommendations are made for continued growth in this field of applications.

  3. Thermal Analysis of Unusual Local-scale Features on the Surface of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, F.; Capria, M. T.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Capaccioni, F.; Palomba, E.; Zambon, F.; Ammannito, E.; Blewett, D. T.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Denevi, B. W.; Li, J.-Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Palmer, E.; Sunshine, J. M.; Titus, T. N.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-01-01

    At 525 km in mean diameter, Vesta is the second-most massive object in the main asteroid belt of our Solar System. At all scales, pyroxene absorptions are the most prominent spectral features on Vesta and overall, Vesta mineralogy indicates a complex magmatic evolution that led to a differentiated crust and mantle [1]. The thermal behavior of areas of unusual albedo seen on the surface at the local scale can be related to physical properties that can provide information about the origin of those materials. Dawn's Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) [2] hyperspectral images are routinely used, by means of temperature-retrieval algorithms, to compute surface temperatures along with spectral emissivities. Here we present temperature maps of several local-scale features of Vesta that were observed by Dawn under different illumination conditions and different local solar times.

  4. A Near-Infrared and Thermal Imager for Mapping Titan's Surface Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, S.; Hewagma, T.; Jennings, D. E.; Nixon, C.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 10% of the solar insolation reaches the surface of Titan through atmospheric spectral windows. We will discuss a filter based imaging system for a future Titan orbiter that will exploit these windows mapping surface features, cloud regions, polar storms. In the near-infrared (NIR), two filters (1.28 micrometer and 1.6 micrometer), strategically positioned between CH1 absorption bands, and InSb linear array pixels will explore the solar reflected radiation. We propose to map the mid, infrared (MIR) region with two filters: 9.76 micrometer and 5.88-to-6.06 micrometers with MCT linear arrays. The first will map MIR thermal emission variations due to surface albedo differences in the atmospheric window between gas phase CH3D and C2H4 opacity sources. The latter spans the crossover spectral region where observed radiation transitions from being dominated by thermal emission to solar reflected light component. The passively cooled linear arrays will be incorporated into the focal plane of a light-weight thin film stretched membrane 10 cm telescope. A rad-hard ASIC together with an FPGA will be used for detector pixel readout and detector linear array selection depending on if the field-of-view (FOV) is looking at the day- or night-side of Titan. The instantaneous FOV corresponds to 3.1, 15.6, and 31.2 mrad for the 1, 5, and 10 micrometer channels, respectively. For a 1500 km orbit, a 5 micrometer channel pixel represents a spatial resolution of 91 m, with a FOV that spans 23 kilometers, and Titan is mapped in a push-broom manner as determined by the orbital path. The system mass and power requirements are estimated to be 6 kg and 5 W, respectively. The package is proposed for a polar orbiter with a lifetime matching two Saturn seasons.

  5. Specific Features of Chip Making and Work-piece Surface Layer Formation in Machining Thermal Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Yaroslavtsev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of unique engineering structural and performance properties inherent in metallic composites characterizes wear- and erosion-resistant high-temperature coatings made by thermal spraying methods. This allows their use both in manufacturing processes to enhance the wear strength of products, which have to operate under the cyclic loading, high contact pressures, corrosion and high temperatures and in product renewal.Thermal coatings contribute to the qualitative improvement of the technical level of production and product restoration using the ceramic composite materials. However, the possibility to have a significantly increased product performance, reduce their factory labour hours and materials/output ratio in manufacturing and restoration is largely dependent on the degree of the surface layer quality of products at their finishing stage, which is usually provided by different kinds of machining.When machining the plasma-sprayed thermal coatings, a removing process of the cut-off layer material is determined by its distinctive features such as a layered structure, high internal stresses, low ductility material, high tendency to the surface layer strengthening and rehardening, porosity, high abrasive properties, etc. When coatings are machined these coating properties result in specific characteristics of chip formation and conditions for formation of the billet surface layer.The chip formation of plasma-sprayed coatings was studied at micro-velocities using an experimental tool-setting microscope-based setup, created in BMSTU. The setup allowed simultaneous recording both the individual stages (phases of the chip formation process and the operating force factors.It is found that formation of individual chip elements comes with the multiple micro-cracks that cause chipping-off the small particles of material. The emerging main crack in the cut-off layer of material leads to separation of the largest chip element. Then all the stages

  6. Long‐term TIR imagery processing for spatiotemporal monitoring of surface thermal features in volcanic environment: A case study in the Campi Flegrei (Southern Italy)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vilardo, G; Sansivero, F; Chiodini, G

    2015-01-01

    ...‐surface thermal features of an area affected by diffuse degassing. Long‐term infrared time series images were processed without taking into account atmospheric conditions and emissivity estimations...

  7. Fusion of spectral and shape features for identification of urban surface cover types using reflective and thermal hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segl, K.; Roessner, S.; Heiden, U.; Kaufmann, H.

    The urban environment is characterized by an intense multifunctional use of available spaces, where the preservation of open green spaces is of special importance. For this purpose, area-wide urban biotope mapping based on CIR aerial photographs has been carried out for the large cities in Germany during the last 10 years. Because of dynamic urban development and high mapping costs, the municipal authorities are interested in effective methods for mapping urban surface cover types, which can be used for evaluation of ecological conditions in urban structures and supporting updates of biotope maps. Against this background, airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data of the DAIS 7915 instrument have been analyzed for a test site in the city of Dresden (Germany) with regard to their potential for automated material-oriented identification of urban surface cover types. Previous investigations have shown that the high spectral and spatial variabilities of these data require the development of special methods, which are capable of dealing with the resulting mixed-pixel problem in its specific characteristics in urban areas. Earlier, methodological developments led to an approach based on a combination of spectral classification and pixel-oriented unmixing techniques to facilitate sensible endmember selection based on the reflective bands of the DAIS instrument. This approach is now extended by a shape-based classification technique including the thermal bands of the DAIS instrument to improve the detection of buildings during the process of identifying seedling pixels, which represent the starting points for linear spectral unmixing. This new approach increases the reliability of differentiation between buildings and open spaces, leading to more accurate results for the spatial distribution of surface cover types. Thus, the new approach significantly enhances the exploitation of the information potential of the hyperspectral DAIS 7915 data for an area-wide identification

  8. Surface Features of Nanocrystalline Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Miglierini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline alloys are prepared by controlled annealing of metallic glass precursors. The latter are obtained by rapid quenching of a melt on a rotating wheel. This process leads to structural deviation of the produced ribbons’ surfaces. Structural features of as-quenched and thermally annealed 57Fe81Mo8Cu1B10 ribbons were studied employing Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectrometry (CEMS and Conversion X-ray Mössbauer Spectrometry (CXMS. Enrichment of the alloy’s composition in 57Fe helped in identification of surface crystallites that were formed even during the production process. Magnetite and bcc-Fe were found at the wheel side of the as-quenched ribbons whereas only bcc-Fe nanocrystals were uncovered at the opposite air side. Accelerated formation of bcc-Fe was observed in this side of the ribbons after annealing. The relative content of magnetite at the wheel side was almost stable in near surface areas (CEMS and in more deep subsurface regions (CXMS. It vanished completely after annealing at 550 °C. No magnetite was observed at the air side of the ribbons regardless the annealing temperature and/or depth of the scanned regions.

  9. Reconstructing NURBS Surface with Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Chunhua

    2006-01-01

    The method of reconstructing NURBS surface with features is proposed in this paper. Features including boundary curves and feature points are recognized from the scanned data. An initial surface is constructed with boundary curves. The desired NURBS is determined by modifying the initial surface to pass through feature points. Lagrange multiplier is used to find the solution. The error analysis is then done. Examples are given to verify the algorithm at last. The method can keep some features fixed and be widely used in CAD modeling.

  10. Vesta surface thermal properties map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capria, Maria Teresa; Tosi, F.; De Santis, Maria Cristina; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Frigeri, A.; Zambon, F; Fonte, S.; Palomba, E.; Turrini, D.; Titus, T.N.; Schroder, S.E.; Toplis, M.J.; Liu, J.Y.; Combe, J.-P.; Raymond, C.A.; Russell, C.T.

    2014-01-01

    The first ever regional thermal properties map of Vesta has been derived from the temperatures retrieved by infrared data by the mission Dawn. The low average value of thermal inertia, 30 ± 10 J m−2 s−0.5 K−1, indicates a surface covered by a fine regolith. A range of thermal inertia values suggesting terrains with different physical properties has been determined. The lower thermal inertia of the regions north of the equator suggests that they are covered by an older, more processed surface. A few specific areas have higher than average thermal inertia values, indicative of a more compact material. The highest thermal inertia value has been determined on the Marcia crater, known for its pitted terrain and the presence of hydroxyl in the ejecta. Our results suggest that this type of terrain can be the result of soil compaction following the degassing of a local subsurface reservoir of volatiles.

  11. Influence of grain orientation on evolution of surface features in fatigued polycrystalline copper: a comparison of thermal and uniaxial mechanical fatigue results

    CERN Document Server

    Aicheler, M

    2010-01-01

    Surface state plays a major role in the crack nucleation process of pure metals in the High-Cycle-Fatigue (HCF) as well as in the Ultra-High-Cycle-Fatigue (UHCF) regime. Therefore, in studies dealing with HCF or UHCF, special attention is paid to the evolution of surface degradation during fatigue life. The accelerating structures of the future Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) under study at CERN will be submitted to a high number of thermal-mechanical fatigue cycles, arising from Radio Frequency (RF) induced eddy currents, causing local superficial cyclic heating. The number of cycles during the foreseen lifetime of CLIC reaches 2x10(11). Fatigue may limit the lifetime of CLIC structures. In order to assess the effects of superficial fatigue, specific tests are defined and performed on polycrystalline Oxygen Free Electronic (OFE) grade Copper, a candidate material for the structures. Surface degradation depends on the orientation of near-surface grains. Copper samples thermally fatigued in two different fatigu...

  12. Influence of grain orientation on evolution of surface features in fatigued polycrystalline copper: A comparison of thermal and uniaxial mechanical fatigue results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aicheler, Markus, E-mail: markus.aicheler@cern.c [EN-MME-MM Metallurgy and Metrology, CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    Surface state plays a major role in the crack nucleation process of pure metals in the High-Cycle-Fatigue (HCF) as well as in the Ultra-High-Cycle-Fatigue (UHCF) regime. Therefore, in studies dealing with HCF or UHCF, special attention is paid to the evolution of surface degradation during fatigue life. The accelerating structures of the future Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) under study at CERN will be submitted to a high number of thermal-mechanical fatigue cycles, arising from Radio Frequency (RF) induced eddy currents, causing local superficial cyclic heating. The number of cycles during the foreseen lifetime of CLIC reaches 2x10{sup 11}. Fatigue may limit the lifetime of CLIC structures. In order to assess the effects of superficial fatigue, specific tests are defined and performed on polycrystalline Oxygen Free Electronic (OFE) grade Copper, a candidate material for the structures. Surface degradation depends on the orientation of near-surface grains. Copper samples thermally fatigued in two different fatigue experiments, pulsed laser and pulsed RF-heating, underwent postmortem Electron Backscattered Diffraction measurements. Samples fatigued by pulsed laser show the same trend in the orientation-fatigue damage behavior as samples fatigued by pulsed RF-heating. It is clearly observed that surface grains, oriented [1 1 1] with respect to the surface, show significantly more damage than surface grains oriented [1 0 0]. Results arising from a third fatigue experiment, the ultrasound (US) swinger, are compared to the results of the mentioned experiments. The US swinger is an uniaxial mechanical fatigue test enabling to apply within several days a total number of cycles representative of the life of the CLIC structures, thanks to a high repetition rate of 24 kHz. For comparison, laser fatigue experiments have much lower repetition rates. The dependence of surface degradation on grain orientation of samples tested by the US swinger was monitored during the fatigue

  13. Thermal radiation from magnetic neutron star surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Azorin, J F; Pons, J A

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the thermal emission from magnetic neutron star surfaces in which the cohesive effects of the magnetic field have produced the condensation of the atmosphere and the external layers. This may happen for sufficiently cool atmospheres with moderately intense magnetic fields. The thermal emission from an isothermal bare surface of a neutron star shows no remarkable spectral features, but it is significantly depressed at energies below some threshold energy. However, since the thermal conductivity is very different in the normal and parallel directions to the magnetic field lines, the presence of the magnetic field is expected to produce a highly anisotropic temperature distribution, depending on the magnetic field geometry. In this case, the observed flux of such an object looks very similar to a BB spectrum, but depressed in a nearly constant factor at all energies. This results in a systematic underestimation of the area of the emitter (and therefore its size) by a factor 5-10 (2-3).

  14. D Surface Generation from Aerial Thermal Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaei, B.; Samadzadegan, F.; Dadras Javan, F.; Hasani, H.

    2015-12-01

    Aerial thermal imagery has been recently applied to quantitative analysis of several scenes. For the mapping purpose based on aerial thermal imagery, high accuracy photogrammetric process is necessary. However, due to low geometric resolution and low contrast of thermal imaging sensors, there are some challenges in precise 3D measurement of objects. In this paper the potential of thermal video in 3D surface generation is evaluated. In the pre-processing step, thermal camera is geometrically calibrated using a calibration grid based on emissivity differences between the background and the targets. Then, Digital Surface Model (DSM) generation from thermal video imagery is performed in four steps. Initially, frames are extracted from video, then tie points are generated by Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm. Bundle adjustment is then applied and the camera position and orientation parameters are determined. Finally, multi-resolution dense image matching algorithm is used to create 3D point cloud of the scene. Potential of the proposed method is evaluated based on thermal imaging cover an industrial area. The thermal camera has 640×480 Uncooled Focal Plane Array (UFPA) sensor, equipped with a 25 mm lens which mounted in the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The obtained results show the comparable accuracy of 3D model generated based on thermal images with respect to DSM generated from visible images, however thermal based DSM is somehow smoother with lower level of texture. Comparing the generated DSM with the 9 measured GCPs in the area shows the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) value is smaller than 5 decimetres in both X and Y directions and 1.6 meters for the Z direction.

  15. Thermal Behavior of Unusual Local-Scale Features on Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Federico; Capria, Maria Teresa; DeSanctis, Maria Cristina; Palomba, Ernesto; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Titus, Timothy; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Li, Jian-Yang; Russell, Christopher T.

    2012-01-01

    On Vesta, the thermal behavior of areas of unusual albedo seen at the local scale can be related to physical properties that can provide information about the origin of those materials. Dawn's Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) hyperspectral cubes are used to retrieve surface temperatures and emissivities, with high accuracy as long as temperatures are greater than 180 K. Data acquired in the Survey phase (23 July through 29 August 2011) show several unusual surface features: 1) high-albedo (bright) and low-albedo (dark) material deposits, 2) spectrally distinct ejecta and pitted materials, 3) regions suggesting finer-grained materials. Some of the unusual dark and bright features were re-observed by VIR in the subsequent High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) phases at increased pixel resolution. In particular, bright and dark surface materials on Vesta, and pitted materials, are currently being investigated by the Dawn team. In this work we present temperature maps and emissivities of several local-scale features that were observed by Dawn under different illumination conditions and different local solar times. To calculate surface temperatures, we applied a Bayesian approach to nonlinear inversion based on the Kirchhoff law and the Planck function, and whose results were compared with those provided by the application of alternative methods. Data from the IR channel of VIR show that bright regions generally correspond to regions with lower thermal emission, i.e. lower temperature, while dark regions correspond to areas with higher thermal emission, i.e. higher temperature. This behavior confirms that many of the dark appearances in the VIS mainly reflect albedo variations, and not, for example, shadowing. During maximum daily insolation, dark features in the equatorial region may rise to temperatures greater than 270 K, while brightest features stop at roughly 258 K for similar local solar times. However, pitted

  16. Surface characterization based upon significant topographic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc, J; Grime, D; Blateyron, F, E-mail: fblateyron@digitalsurf.fr [Digital Surf, 16 rue Lavoisier, F-25000 Besancon (France)

    2011-08-19

    Watershed segmentation and Wolf pruning, as defined in ISO 25178-2, allow the detection of significant features on surfaces and their characterization in terms of dimension, area, volume, curvature, shape or morphology. These new tools provide a robust way to specify functional surfaces.

  17. Multi-feature fusion for thermal face recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yin; Lv, Mingsong; Wei, Yangjie; Guan, Nan; Yi, Wang

    2016-07-01

    Human face recognition has been researched for the last three decades. Face recognition with thermal images now attracts significant attention since they can be used in low/none illuminated environment. However, thermal face recognition performance is still insufficient for practical applications. One main reason is that most existing work leverage only single feature to characterize a face in a thermal image. To solve the problem, we propose multi-feature fusion, a technique that combines multiple features in thermal face characterization and recognition. In this work, we designed a systematical way to combine four features, including Local binary pattern, Gabor jet descriptor, Weber local descriptor and Down-sampling feature. Experimental results show that our approach outperforms methods that leverage only a single feature and is robust to noise, occlusion, expression, low resolution and different l1 -minimization methods.

  18. Universal Features of Quantized Thermal Conductance of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Watanabe, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2003-01-01

    The universal features of quantized thermal conductance of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are revealed through theoretical analysis based on the Landauer theory of heat transport. The phonon-derived thermal conductance of semiconducting CNTs exhibits a universal quantization in the low temperature limit, independent of the radius or atomic geometry. The temperature dependence follows a single curve given in terms of temperature scaled by the phonon energy gap. The thermal conductance of metallic CNT...

  19. Thermal smoothing of rough surfaces in vacuo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, G.

    1986-01-01

    The derivation of equations governing the smoothing of rough surfaces, based on Mullins' (1957, 1960, and 1963) theories of thermal grooving and of capillarity-governed solid surface morphology is presented. As an example, the smoothing of a one-dimensional sine-shaped surface is discussed.

  20. Multipole surface solitons in layered thermal media

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Torner, Lluis

    2008-01-01

    We address the existence and properties of multipole solitons localized at a thermally insulating interface between uniform or layered thermal media and a linear dielectric. We find that in the case of uniform media, only surface multipoles with less than three poles can be stable. In contrast, we reveal that periodic alternation of the thermo-optic coefficient in layered thermal media makes possible the stabilization of higher order multipoles.

  1. On orbit surfacing of thermal control surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Substrates to be contaminated and contamination source were prepared. Additional information on paint spray method apparatus was obtained. Silver teflon second surface mirror samples and S 13 GLO paint samples were mounted, photographed under the microscope and measured to establish baseline data. Atomic oxygen cleaning and spray painting are being considered. Electrostatic powder and plasma spray coating systems appear to have serious drawbacks.

  2. Metacatalog of Planetary Surface Features for Multicriteria Evaluation of Surface Evolution: the Integrated Planetary Feature Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, Henrik

    2016-10-01

    We have created a metacatalog, or catalog or catalogs, of surface features of Mars that also includes the actual data in the catalogs listed. The goal is to make mesoscale surface feature databases available in one place, in a GIS-ready format. The databases can be directly imported to ArcGIS or other GIS platforms, like Google Mars. Some of the catalogs in our database are also ingested into the JMARS platform.All catalogs have been previously published in a peer-reviewed journal, but they may contain updates of the published catalogs. Many of the catalogs are "integrated", i.e. they merge databases or information from various papers on the same topic, including references to each individual features listed.Where available, we have included shapefiles with polygon or linear features, however, most of the catalogs only contain point data of their center points and morphological data.One of the unexpected results of the planetary feature metacatalog is that some features have been described by several papers, using different, i.e., conflicting designations. This shows the need for the development of an identification system suitable for mesoscale (100s m to km sized) features that tracks papers and thus prevents multiple naming of the same feature.The feature database can be used for multicriteria analysis of a terrain, thus enables easy distribution pattern analysis and the correlation of the distribution of different landforms and features on Mars. Such catalog makes a scientific evaluation of potential landing sites easier and more effective during the selection process and also supports automated landing site selections.The catalog is accessible at https://planetarydatabase.wordpress.com/.

  3. Robust Features Of Surface Electromyography Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, M. I.; Miskon, M. F.; Yaacob, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, application of robotics in human life has been explored widely. Robotics exoskeleton system are one of drastically areas in recent robotic research that shows mimic impact in human life. These system have been developed significantly to be used for human power augmentation, robotics rehabilitation, human power assist, and haptic interaction in virtual reality. This paper focus on solving challenges in problem using neural signals and extracting human intent. Commonly, surface electromyography signal (sEMG) are used in order to control human intent for application exoskeleton robot. But the problem lies on difficulty of pattern recognition of the sEMG features due to high noises which are electrode and cable motion artifact, electrode noise, dermic noise, alternating current power line interface, and other noise came from electronic instrument. The main objective in this paper is to study the best features of electromyography in term of time domain (statistical analysis) and frequency domain (Fast Fourier Transform).The secondary objectives is to map the relationship between torque and best features of muscle unit activation potential (MaxPS and RMS) of biceps brachii. This project scope use primary data of 2 male sample subject which using same dominant hand (right handed), age between 20-27 years old, muscle diameter 32cm to 35cm and using single channel muscle (biceps brachii muscle). The experiment conduct 2 times repeated task of contraction and relaxation of biceps brachii when lifting different load from no load to 3kg with ascending 1kg The result shows that Fast Fourier Transform maximum power spectrum (MaxPS) has less error than mean value of reading compare to root mean square (RMS) value. Thus, Fast Fourier Transform maximum power spectrum (MaxPS) show the linear relationship against torque experience by elbow joint to lift different load. As the conclusion, the best features is MaxPS because it has the lowest error than other features and show

  4. Thermal Tomography of Asteroid Surface Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alan W.; Drube, Line

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the surface thermal inertia of an asteroid can provide insight into its surface structure: porous material has a lower thermal inertia than rock. We develop a means to estimate thermal inertia values of asteroids and use it to show that thermal inertia appears to increase with spin period in the case of main-belt asteroids (MBAs). Similar behavior is found on the basis of thermophysical modeling for near-Earth objects (NEOs). We interpret our results in terms of rapidly increasing material density and thermal conductivity with depth, and provide evidence that thermal inertia increases by factors of 10 (MBAs) to 20 (NEOs) within a depth of just 10 cm. Our results are consistent with a very general picture of rapidly changing material properties in the topmost regolith layers of asteroids and have important implications for calculations of the Yarkovsky effect, including its perturbation of the orbits of potentially hazardous objects and those of asteroid family members after the break-up event. Evidence of a rapid increase of thermal inertia with depth is also an important result for studies of the ejecta-enhanced momentum transfer of impacting vehicles (“kinetic impactors”) in planetary defense.

  5. Dialogical surface text features in abstracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid García-Østbye

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A sample driven description of Research Article-Comment-Reply (RA-C-R abstracts in terms of abstract sentence length, reference, possessive structures, modal verbs and word range was carried out to find out whether their surface text features showed some trace of a dialogical construction of knowledge within the psychology discourse community. The study served an exploratory purpose. A Boolean search was conducted in the PsycLIT database yielding a sample of 149 PsycLIT RA-C-R abstracts (13,978 words. Relative frequency percent distributions were calculated for all variables, including reported speech verbs. Specific comparisons with a Medline corpus were conducted and variations were accounted for in terms of scientific discourse characteristics, field, database policies, and dialogical nature; that is, in the framework provided by the strands of research of quantitative applied linguistics, social concerns in genre analysis and the model monopoly theory developed in the implementation in sociology of the systems theory. The results suggest: (i a word range affected by both psychology as a discipline and the dialogical content on which PsycLIT RA-C-R abstracts report; (ii a complementarity of reference and possessive structures characterised by features of scientific discourse, feedback genres and dialogical dimensions; (iii the presence of both deontic and epistemic modality in the modal verbs of our sample; (iv and also that abstract length, sentence length and number of sentences per paragraph in our sample may not vary greatly in general terms from those of the social sciences.

  6. Thermal Tomography of Asteroid Surface Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the surface thermal inertia of an asteroid can provide insight into surface structure: porous material has a lower thermal inertia than rock. We develop a means to estimate thermal inertia values of asteroids and use it to show that thermal inertia appears to increase with spin period in the case of main-belt asteroids (MBAs). Similar behavior is found on the basis of thermophysical modeling for near-Earth objects (NEOs). We interpret our results in terms of rapidly increasing material density and thermal conductivity with depth, and provide evidence that thermal inertia increases by factors of 10 (MBAs) to 20 (NEOs) within a depth of just 10 cm. Our results are consistent with a very general picture of rapidly changing material properties in the topmost regolith layers of asteroids and have important implications for calculations of the Yarkovsky effect, including its perturbation of the orbits of potentially hazardous objects and those of asteroid family members after the break-up event. Eviden...

  7. Metallic superhydrophobic surfaces via thermal sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabi, Hamed; Wang, Wei; Popat, Ketul C.; Kwon, Gibum; Holland, Troy B.; Kota, Arun K.

    2017-06-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces (i.e., surfaces extremely repellent to water) allow water droplets to bead up and easily roll off from the surface. While a few methods have been developed to fabricate metallic superhydrophobic surfaces, these methods typically involve expensive equipment, environmental hazards, or multi-step processes. In this work, we developed a universal, scalable, solvent-free, one-step methodology based on thermal sensitization to create appropriate surface texture and fabricate metallic superhydrophobic surfaces. To demonstrate the feasibility of our methodology and elucidate the underlying mechanism, we fabricated superhydrophobic surfaces using ferritic (430) and austenitic (316) stainless steels (representative alloys) with roll off angles as low as 4° and 7°, respectively. We envision that our approach will enable the fabrication of superhydrophobic metal alloys for a wide range of civilian and military applications.

  8. 3D SURFACE GENERATION FROM AERIAL THERMAL IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Khodaei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aerial thermal imagery has been recently applied to quantitative analysis of several scenes. For the mapping purpose based on aerial thermal imagery, high accuracy photogrammetric process is necessary. However, due to low geometric resolution and low contrast of thermal imaging sensors, there are some challenges in precise 3D measurement of objects. In this paper the potential of thermal video in 3D surface generation is evaluated. In the pre-processing step, thermal camera is geometrically calibrated using a calibration grid based on emissivity differences between the background and the targets. Then, Digital Surface Model (DSM generation from thermal video imagery is performed in four steps. Initially, frames are extracted from video, then tie points are generated by Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT algorithm. Bundle adjustment is then applied and the camera position and orientation parameters are determined. Finally, multi-resolution dense image matching algorithm is used to create 3D point cloud of the scene. Potential of the proposed method is evaluated based on thermal imaging cover an industrial area. The thermal camera has 640×480 Uncooled Focal Plane Array (UFPA sensor, equipped with a 25 mm lens which mounted in the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV. The obtained results show the comparable accuracy of 3D model generated based on thermal images with respect to DSM generated from visible images, however thermal based DSM is somehow smoother with lower level of texture. Comparing the generated DSM with the 9 measured GCPs in the area shows the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE value is smaller than 5 decimetres in both X and Y directions and 1.6 meters for the Z direction.

  9. Feature Extraction by Wavelet Decomposition of Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Singh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new approach to surface acoustic wave (SAW chemical sensor array design and data processing for recognition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs based on transient responses. The array is constructed of variable thickness single polymer-coated SAW oscillator sensors. The thickness of polymer coatings are selected such that during the sensing period, different sensors are loaded with varied levels of diffusive inflow of vapour species due to different stages of termination of equilibration process. Using a single polymer for coating the individual sensors with different thickness introduces vapour-specific kinetics variability in transient responses. The transient shapes are analysed by wavelet decomposition based on Daubechies mother wavelets. The set of discrete wavelet transform (DWT approximation coefficients across the array transients is taken to represent the vapour sample in two alternate ways. In one, the sets generated by all the transients are combined into a single set to give a single representation to the vapour. In the other, the set of approximation coefficients at each data point generated by all transients is taken to represent the vapour. The latter results in as many alternate representations as there are approximation coefficients. The alternate representations of a vapour sample are treated as different instances or realisations for further processing. The wavelet analysis is then followed by the principal component analysis (PCA to create new feature space. A comparative analysis of the feature spaces created by both the methods leads to the conclusion that both methods yield complimentary information: the one reveals intrinsic data variables, and the other enhances class separability. The present approach is validated by generating synthetic transient response data based on a prototype polyisobutylene (PIB coated 3-element SAW sensor array exposed to 7 VOC vapours: chloroform, chlorobenzene o

  10. Geometric features for voxel-based surface recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Yarotsky, Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a library of geometric voxel features for CAD surface recognition/retrieval tasks. Our features include local versions of the intrinsic volumes (the usual 3D volume, surface area, integrated mean and Gaussian curvature) and a few closely related quantities. We also compute Haar wavelet and statistical distribution features by aggregating raw voxel features. We apply our features to object classification on the ESB data set and demonstrate accurate results with a small number of s...

  11. Thermal Properties of Moving UV Features in Prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Therese A.

    2003-01-01

    Multi-thermal features with speeds of 5-70 kilometers per second perpendicular to the line of sight are common in the prominences which showed traceable motions. These speeds are noticeably higher than the typical speeds of 5-20 kilometers per second observed in H-alpha data from "quiet" prominences and are more typical of "activated" prominences in which H-alpha blob speeds of up to 40 kilometers per second have been reported. In order to make a more quantitative determination of the thermal properties of the moving features seen in the UV, we use the SOHO instruments SUMER and CDS to take a time series of exposures from a single pointing position, providing a measurement of spectral line properties as a function of time and position along the slit. The resulting observations in lines spectral lines in a range of "transition region" temperatures allow us to analyze the thermal properties of the moving prominence sources as a function of time.

  12. Features of Functioning the Integrated Building Thermal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morozov Maxim N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of the building heating system, consisting of energy source, a distributed automatic control system, elements of individual heating unit and heating system is designed. Application Simulink of mathematical package Matlab is selected as a platform for the model. There are the specialized application Simscape libraries in aggregate with a wide range of Matlab mathematical tools allow to apply the “acausal” modeling concept. Implementation the “physical” representation of the object model gave improving the accuracy of the models. Principle of operation and features of the functioning of the thermal model is described. The investigations of building cooling dynamics were carried out.

  13. Local thermal properties of the surface of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capria, M. T.; Tosi, F.; Capaccioni, F.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Palomba, E.; Ammannito, E.; Carraro, F.; Fonte, S.; Titus, T. N.; Combe, J.-P.; Toplis, M.; Sunshine, J.; Fulchignoni, M.; Russel, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2012-04-01

    Temperature information has been obtained from the Dawn/VIR (Visible InfraRed imaging spectrometer) spectra acquired during the Vesta campaign. When combined with a thermophysical model, these temperatures can be used to derive surface thermal properties. Thermal properties are sensitive to several physical characteristics of the surface that are not all spatially resolved. Thus, the derivation of surface temperatures and thermal inertia can lead to the characterization of surface and sub-surface properties of Vesta and the determination of regolith properties. The model we are using solves the heat conduction equation and provide the temperature as a function of thermal conductivity, albedo, emissivity, density and specific heat. The model is applied to the actual shape of Vesta: for any given location, characterized by a well-defined illumination condition and a given UTC time to compute the thermal inertia that results in model temperatures providing a best-fit to surface temperatures as retrieved by VIR. The model has been already applied to the first Vesta full-disk data to derive the global average thermal inertia of Vesta. The values obtained are typical of fine-grained, unconsolidated materials (i.e. dust) and suggest a surface in which a dust layer is wide-spread on coarser regolith. The model is now being applied on small regions of the surface of Vesta. Specific regions are selected because they are interesting for some reason or appear different from the surroundings, such as, for example, dark and bright spots and other peculiar features. Given a location, the thermophysical code is applied until the obtained temperatures are matching (best-fit techniques are used) the temperatures derived from the VIR spectra. The thermal inertia, thermal conductivity, albedo and roughness values are then assumed to be characterizing the location under analysis. The results of the model must be carefully checked and interpreted by taking into account the context (from

  14. Fractal-like receiver geometries and features for increased light trapping and thermal efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Clifford K.; Christian, Joshua M.; Yellowhair, Julius; Ortega, Jesus; Andraka, Charles

    2016-05-01

    Novel designs to increase light trapping and thermal efficiency of concentrating solar receivers at multiple length scales have been conceived and tested. The fractal-like geometries and features are introduced at both macro (meters) and meso (millimeters to centimeters) scales. Advantages include increased solar absorptance, reduced thermal emittance, and increased thermal efficiency. Radial and linear structures at the meso (tube shape and geometry) and macro (total receiver geometry and configuration) scales redirect reflected solar radiation toward the interior of the receiver for increased absorptance. Hotter regions within the interior of the receiver can reduce thermal emittance due to reduced local view factors to the environment, and higher concentration ratios can be employed with similar surface irradiances to reduce the effective optical aperture, footprint, and thermal losses. Coupled optical/fluid/thermal models have been developed to evaluate the performance of these designs relative to conventional designs, and meso-scale tests have been performed. Results show that fractal-like structures and geometries can increase the thermal efficiency by several percentage points at both the meso and macro scales, depending on factors such as intrinsic absorptance. The impact was more pronounced for materials with lower intrinsic solar absorptances (<0.9). The goal of this work is to increase the effective solar absorptance of oxidized substrate materials from ~0.9 to 0.95 or greater using these fractal-like geometries without the need for coatings.

  15. Thermal characterization of nanoporous 'black silicon' surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Logan; Duan, Wenqi; Toor, Fatima

    2016-09-01

    In this work we characterize the thermal conductivity properties of nanoprous `black silicon' (bSi). We fabricate the nanoporous bSi using the metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) process utilizing silver (Ag) metal as the etch catalyst. The MACE process steps include (i) electroless deposition of Ag nanoparticles on the Si surface using silver nitrate (AgNO3) and hydrofluoric acid (HF), and (ii) a wet etch in a solution of HF and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The resulting porosity of bSi is dependent on the ratio of the concentration of HF to (HF + H2O2); the ratio is denoted as rho (ρ). We find that as etch time of bSi increases the thermal conductivity of Si increases as well. We also analyze the absorption of the bSi samples by measuring the transmission and reflection using IR spectroscopy. This study enables improved understanding of nanoporous bSi surfaces and how they affect the solar cell performance due to the porous structures' thermal properties.

  16. Surface osteosarcoma: Clinical features and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nouri

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Histological grade of malignancy is the main point to assess in surface osteosarcoma since it determines treatment and prognosis. Low grade lesions should be treated by wide resection, while high grade lesions need more aggressive surgical approach associated to post operative chemotherapy.

  17. Breast Surface Temperature Distribution of the Normal Females by Infrared Thermal Imaging and Feature Analysis%健康女性乳腺体表温度分布红外热成像与特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑜华; 叶真; 包中涛; 杨洪钦; 谢树森

    2012-01-01

    The breast surface temperature of 60 normal females was measured by infrared thermal imaging and the distribution of breast surface temperature was obtained. The results show that the bilateral breast surface temperature of the normal females is symmetric and is high positively related. The correlation coefficient is larger than 0. 90. The mean temperature of the left breast is slightly higher than that of the right one and the difference between them is less than about 0. 4 ℃. The temperature of mammilla is lower than that of the peripheral tissue. The average temperature of breast surface decreases with age's increment. The research results can provide the normative database of the normal females' breast surface temperature, which can be useful for health assessment and disease diagnoses of the females' breast.%利用红外热像仪对60例健康女性进行乳腺红外热扫描,获得乳腺体表的温度分布.结果表明:健康女性左右乳腺的体表温度基本呈对称分布,且具有高度的正相关,相关系数大于0.9.左乳的平均温度略高于右乳,两侧温差在0.40℃以内.乳头区的温度与周围乳腺组织相比明显较低.乳腺体表平均温度随年龄的增长而下降.本实验初步建立了健康女性乳腺体表温度分布特征的参考标准,实验结果为女性乳腺的健康评估和疾病诊断提供了数据参考,具有重要的临床应用价值.

  18. The Vegetation Red Edge Spectroscopic Feature as a Surface Biomarker

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S

    2002-01-01

    The search for Earth-like extrasolar planets is in part motivated by the potential detection of spectroscopic biomarkers. Spectroscopic biomarkers are spectral features that are either consistent with life, indicative of habitability, or provide clues to a planet's habitability. Most attention so far has been given to atmospheric biomarkers, gases such as O2, O3, H2O, CO, and CH4. Here we discuss surface biomarkers. Surface biomarkers that have large, distinct, abrupt changes in their spectra may be detectable in an extrasolar planet's spectrum at wavelengths that penetrate to the planetary surface. Earth has such a surface biomarker: the vegetation "red edge" spectroscopic feature. Recent interest in Earth's surface biomarker has motivated Earthshine observations of the spatially unresolved Earth and two recent studies may have detected the vegetation red edge feature in Earth's hemispherically integrated spectrum. A photometric time series in different colors should help in detecting unusual surface feature...

  19. Bioadhesion to model thermally responsive surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejewski, Brett Paul

    This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two surfaces: mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of hexa(ethylene glycol) and alkyl thiolates (mixed SAM) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm). The synthesis of hexa(ethylene gylcol) alkyl thiol (C11EG 6OH) is presented along with the mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance results. The gold substrates were imaged prior to SAM formation with atomic force micrscopy (AFM). Average surface roughness of the gold substrate was 0.44 nm, 0.67 nm, 1.65 nm for 15, 25 and 60 nm gold thickness, respectively. The height of the mixed SAM was measured by ellipsometry and varied from 13 to 28°A depending on surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH. The surface mole fraction of C11EG6OH for the mixed SAM was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with optimal thermal responsive behavior in the range of 0.4 to 0.6. The mixed SAM surface was confirmed to be thermally responsive by contact angle goniometry, 35° at 28°C and ˜55° at 40°C. In addition, the mixed SAM surfaces were confirmed to be thermally responsive for various aqueous mediums by tensiometry. Factors such as oxygen, age, and surface mole fraction and how they affect the thermal responsive of the mixed SAM are discussed. Lastly, rat fibroblasts were grown on the mixed SAM and imaged by phase contrast microscopy to show inhibition of attachment at temperatures below the molecular transition. Qualitative and quantitative measurements of the fibroblast adhesion data are provided that support the hypothesis of the mixed SAM exhibits a dominantly non-fouling molecular conformation at 25°C whereas it exhibits a dominantly fouling molecular conformation at 40°C. The adhesion of six model proteins: bovine serum albumin, collagen, pyruvate kinase, cholera toxin subunit B, ribonuclease, and lysozyme to the model thermally responsive mixed SAM were examined using AFM. All six proteins possessed adhesion to the pure component alkyl thiol, in

  20. Updated Mars Mission Architectures Featuring Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Mitchell A.; Percy, Thomas K.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) can potentially enable routine human exploration of Mars and the solar system. By using nuclear fission instead of a chemical combustion process, and using hydrogen as the propellant, NTP systems promise rocket efficiencies roughly twice that of the best chemical rocket engines currently available. The most recent major Mars architecture study featuring NTP was the Design Reference Architecture 5.0 (DRA 5.0), performed in 2009. Currently, the predominant transportation options being considered are solar electric propulsion (SEP) and chemical propulsion; however, given NTP's capabilities, an updated architectural analysis is needed. This paper provides a top-level overview of several different architectures featuring updated NTP performance data. New architectures presented include a proposed update to the DRA 5.0 as well as an investigation of architectures based on the current Evolvable Mars Campaign, which is the focus of NASA's current analyses for the Journey to Mars. Architectures investigated leverage the latest information relating to NTP performance and design considerations and address new support elements not available at the time of DRA 5.0, most notably the Orion crew module and the Space Launch System (SLS). The paper provides a top level quantitative comparison of key performance metrics as well as a qualitative discussion of improvements and key challenges still to be addressed. Preliminary results indicate that the updated NTP architectures can significantly reduce the campaign mass and subsequently the costs for assembly and number of launches.

  1. Methane Lunar Surface Thermal Control Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta, David W.; Sutherlin, Steven G.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffrey R.; Jurns, John M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA is considering propulsion system concepts for future missions including human return to the lunar surface. Studies have identified cryogenic methane (LCH4) and oxygen (LO2) as a desirable propellant combination for the lunar surface ascent propulsion system, and they point to a surface stay requirement of 180 days. To meet this requirement, a test article was prepared with state-of-the-art insulation and tested in simulated lunar mission environments at NASA GRC. The primary goals were to validate design and models of the key thermal control technologies to store unvented methane for long durations, with a low-density high-performing Multi-layer Insulation (MLI) system to protect the propellant tanks from the environmental heat of low Earth orbit (LEO), Earth to Moon transit, lunar surface, and with the LCH4 initially densified. The data and accompanying analysis shows this storage design would have fallen well short of the unvented 180 day storage requirement, due to the MLI density being much higher than intended, its substructure collapse, and blanket separation during depressurization. Despite the performance issue, insight into analytical models and MLI construction was gained. Such modeling is important for the effective design of flight vehicle concepts, such as in-space cryogenic depots or in-space cryogenic propulsion stages.

  2. Total System Performance Assessment- License Application Design Selection (LADS) Phase 1 Analysis for Higher Thermal Loa (Feature 26)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Erb

    1999-06-11

    The objective of this report is to evaluate the effect of potential changes to the TSPA-VA base case design on long-term repository performance. The design feature that is evaluated in this report is a higher thermal load (Feature 26 or F26). The following paragraph briefly describes the motivation for evaluating higher thermal loading. Higher thermal load has been identified as a design feature that might have a beneficial effect on long-term repository performance. A higher thermal load will increase temperatures and decrease relative humidity on the waste package surface. The decrease in relative humidity may delay the onset of corrosion, thus delaying the failure of waste packages and the release of radionuclides from the engineered barrier system (EBS). For the current calculation a thermal load of 109 MTU/acre (metric tons of uranium per acre) is considered. Two cases are evaluated, one with the base case inventory and a higher thermal load and a second with an increased inventory that would cover the current repository footprint at the higher thermal load. This report documents the modeling assumptions and calculations conducted to evaluate the long-term performance of higher thermal loading. The performance measure for this evaluation is dose-rate. Results are presented that compare the dose-rate time histories with the new design feature to that for the TSPA-VA base case calculation (CRWMS M&O, 1998a).

  3. Thermal stability of soils and detectability of intrinsic soil features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, Christian; Kucerik, Jiri

    2014-05-01

    applicability of thermogravimetry for soil property determination. Despite of the extreme diversity of individual substances in soils, the thermal decay can be predicted with simple mathematical models. For example, the sum of mass losses in the large temperature interval from 100 °C to 550 °C (known from organic matter determination by ignition mass loss in past) can be predicted using TML in two small temperature intervals: 130 - 140 °C and 320 - 330 °C. In this case, the coefficient of determination between measured and calculated results reached an R2 above 0.97. Further, we found close autocorrelations between thermal mass losses in different temperature intervals. They refer to interrelations between evaporation of bound water and thermal decay of organo-mineral complexes in soils less affected by human influence. In contrast, deviations from such interrelations were found under extreme environmental conditions and in soils under human use. Those results confirm current knowledge about influence of clay on both water binding and organic matter accumulation during natural soil formation. Therefore, these interrelations between soil components are discussed as intrinsic features of soils which open the opportunity for experimental distinction of natural soils from organic and inorganic materials which do not have pedogenetic origin.

  4. Manufacturing of Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Nanoscale and Microscale Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-06-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will develop a technology that will enable nanoscale and microscale superhydrophobic (SHP) features to be imaged onto surfaces for the high-volume manufacturing of water-repellent components and coatings.

  5. Autonomous Aerobraking Using Thermal Response Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Jill L.; Dec, John A.; Tolson, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    Aerobraking is a proven method of significantly increasing the science payload that can be placed into low Mars orbits when compared to an all propulsive capture. However, the aerobraking phase is long and has mission cost and risk implications. The main cost benefit is that aerobraking permits the use of a smaller and cheaper launch vehicle, but additional operational costs are incurred during the long aerobraking phase. Risk is increased due to the repeated thermal loading of spacecraft components and the multiple attitude and propulsive maneuvers required for successful aerobraking. Both the cost and risk burdens can be significantly reduced by automating the aerobraking operations phase. All of the previous Mars orbiter missions that have utilized aerobraking have increasingly relied on onboard calculations during aerobraking. Even though the temperature of spacecraft components has been the limiting factor, operational methods have relied on using a surrogate variable for mission control. This paper describes several methods, based directly on spacecraft component maximum temperature, for autonomously predicting the subsequent aerobraking orbits and prescribing apoapsis propulsive maneuvers to maintain the spacecraft within specified temperature limits. Specifically, this paper describes the use of thermal response surface analysis in predicting the temperature of the spacecraft components and the corresponding uncertainty in this temperature prediction.

  6. Autonomous Aerobraking: Thermal Analysis and Response Surface Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec, John A.; Thornblom, Mark N.

    2011-01-01

    A high-fidelity thermal model of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter was developed for use in an autonomous aerobraking simulation study. Response surface equations were derived from the high-fidelity thermal model and integrated into the autonomous aerobraking simulation software. The high-fidelity thermal model was developed using the Thermal Desktop software and used in all phases of the analysis. The use of Thermal Desktop exclusively, represented a change from previously developed aerobraking thermal analysis methodologies. Comparisons were made between the Thermal Desktop solutions and those developed for the previous aerobraking thermal analyses performed on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter during aerobraking operations. A variable sensitivity screening study was performed to reduce the number of variables carried in the response surface equations. Thermal analysis and response surface equation development were performed for autonomous aerobraking missions at Mars and Venus.

  7. Thermal instability of DLC film surface morphology - an AFM study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswaran, R.; Thiruvadigal, D. John; Gopalakrishnan, C.

    2012-06-01

    The surface morphology of the DLC film during thermal annealing at particular temperature above the graphitization temperature shows blistering and buckling and also delaminates from the substrate. The DLC film shows poor thermal stability at higher temperature.

  8. An ontology design pattern for surface water features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E.; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, E. Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities exist due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology for other more context-dependent ontologies. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex or specialized surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this ontology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is implemented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided in this paper. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. Also provided is a discussion of why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, especially the previously developed Surface Network pattern. Finally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through an annotated geospatial dataset and sample queries using the classes of the Surface Water pattern.

  9. Thermal slip for liquids at rough solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengbin; Chen, Yongping; Peterson, G. P.

    2014-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to examine the thermal slip of liquids at rough solid surfaces as characterized by fractal Cantor structures. The temperature profiles, potential energy distributions, thermal slip, and interfacial thermal resistance are investigated and evaluated for a variety of surface topographies. In addition, the effects of liquid-solid interaction, surface stiffness, and boundary condition on thermal slip length are presented. Our results indicate that the presence of roughness expands the low potential energy regions in adjacent liquids, enhances the energy transfer at liquid-solid interface, and decreases the thermal slip. Interestingly, the thermal slip length and thermal resistance for liquids in contact with solid surfaces depends not only on the statistical roughness height, but also on the fractal dimension (i.e., topographical spectrum).

  10. Gas and isotope chemistry of thermal features in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfeld, D.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Hunt, Andrew G.; Shanks, W.C. Pat; Evans, William

    2011-01-01

    This report presents 130 gas analyses and 31 related water analyses on samples collected from thermal features at Yellowstone between 2003 and 2009. An overview of previous studies of gas emissions at Yellowstone is also given. The analytical results from the present study include bulk chemistry of gases and waters and isotope values for water and steam (delta18O, dealtaD), carbon dioxide (delta13C only), methane (delta13C only), helium, neon, and argon. We include appendixes containing photos of sample sites, geographic information system (GIS) files including shape and kml formats, and analytical results in spreadsheets. In addition, we provide a lengthy discussion of previous work on gas chemistry at Yellowstone and a general discussion of the implications of our results. We demonstrate that gases collected from different thermal areas often have distinct chemical signatures, and that differences across the thermal areas are not a simple function of surface temperatures or the type of feature. Instead, gas chemistry and isotopic composition are linked to subsurface lithologies and varying contributions from magmatic, crustal, and meteoric sources.

  11. METHOD TO EXTRACT BLEND SURFACE FEATURE IN REVERSE ENGINEERING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Zhen; Ke Yinglin; Sun Qing; Kelvin W; Huang Xiaoping

    2003-01-01

    A new method of extraction of blend surface feature is presented. It contains two steps: segmentation and recovery of parametric representation of the blend. The segmentation separates the points in the blend region from the rest of the input point cloud with the processes of sampling point data, estimation of local surface curvature properties and comparison of maximum curvature values. The recovery of parametric representation generates a set of profile curves by marching throughout the blend and fitting cylinders. Compared with the existing approaches of blend surface feature extraction, the proposed method reduces the requirement of user interaction and is capable of extracting blend surface with either constant radius or variable radius. Application examples are presented to verify the proposed method.

  12. Near-field thermal imaging of nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, A.; Wischnath, U. F.; Welker, J.; Huth, O.; Rüting, F.; Biehs, S.-A.

    2008-11-01

    We show that a near-field scanning thermal microscope, which essentially detects the local density of states of the thermally excited electromagnetic modes at nanometer distances from some material, can be employed for nanoscale imaging of structures on that material's surface. This finding is explained theoretically by an approach which treats the surface structure perturbatively.

  13. Spectral features in isolated neutron stars induced by inhomogeneous surface temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Viganò, Daniele; Rea, Nanda; Pons, José A

    2014-01-01

    The thermal X-ray spectra of several isolated neutron stars display deviations from a pure blackbody. The accurate physical interpretation of these spectral features bears profound implications for our understanding of the atmospheric composition, magnetic field strength and topology, and equation of state of dense matter. With specific details varying from source to source, common explanations for the features have ranged from atomic transitions in the magnetized atmospheres or condensed surface, to cyclotron lines generated in a hot ionized layer near the surface. Here we quantitatively evaluate the X-ray spectral distortions induced by inhomogeneous temperature distributions of the neutron star surface. To this aim, we explore several surface temperature distributions, we simulate their corresponding general relativistic X-ray spectra (assuming an isotropic, blackbody emission), and fit the latter with a single blackbody model. We find that, in some cases, the presence of a spurious 'spectral line' is requ...

  14. Exploiting surface features for the prediction of podcast preference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsagkias, M.; Larson, M.; de Rijke, M.

    2009-01-01

    Podcasts display an unevenness characteristic of domains dominated by user generated content, resulting in potentially radical variation of the user preference they enjoy. We report on work that uses easily extractable surface features of podcasts in order to achieve solid performance on two podcast

  15. An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Gaurav [Ohio University; Mark, David [University at Buffalo (SUNY); Kolas, Dave [Raytheon BBN Technologies; Varanka, Dalia [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Romero, Boleslo E [University of California, Santa Barbara; Feng, Chen-Chieh [National University of Singapore; Usery, Lynn [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Liebermann, Joshua [Tumbling Walls, LLC; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

  16. Observed Asteroid Surface Area in the Thermal Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Wright, E. L.; Bauer, J.; Grav, T.; Kramer, E.; Sonnett, S.

    2017-02-01

    The rapid accumulation of thermal infrared observations and shape models of asteroids has led to increased interest in thermophysical modeling. Most of these infrared observations are unresolved. We consider what fraction of an asteroid’s surface area contributes the bulk of the emitted thermal flux for two model asteroids of different shapes over a range of thermal parameters. The resulting observed surface in the infrared is generally more fragmented than the area observed in visible wavelengths, indicating high sensitivity to shape. For objects with low values of the thermal parameter, small fractions of the surface contribute the majority of thermally emitted flux. Calculating observed areas could enable the production of spatially resolved thermal inertia maps from non-resolved observations of asteroids.

  17. Ultrasonic Nanocoining of Sub-micrometer Surface Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, William John, Jr.

    The goal of this work is to develop a machining process to rapidly generate large areas of sub-micrometer surface features in industrially-feasible amounts of time. These surface features, inspired by designs found in nature, can be sized to produce desired behavior including anti-reflective (AR), superhydrophobic, or syperhydrophilic properties. Current methods of producing these features produce high-fidelity replications, but often require several steps to complete and are not economically feasible in a mass-production setting. This process uses a diamond die containing thousands of subwavelength features mounted to a high speed actuator on the axis of a diamond turning machine. The die is pressed into the workpiece with an elliptical path that matches the surface speed of the moving workpiece and minimizes distortion caused by mismatches in velocity. These die indents are tiled together to create large areas of uniform features, which can then be easily transferred to pliable coatings. Because the die is small (20x20 im), the indentations must occur rapidly (40 kHz) to make nanocoining an industrially feasible process. To produce the ultrasonic 2-D motion for indenting, an actuator was designed that resonates in two orthogonal directions at the same frequency. Analytical solutions were first used to determine the approximate geometry to achieve the desired resonant behavior. Finite element analysis (FEA) is then employed to fine-tune the geometry of the device to meet amplitude requirements. Prototypes were constructed and measured to demonstrate the utility of the proposed design method. A controller is designed and implemented to automatically track the resonant frequency and maintain the desired actuator behavior to ensure the indents are formed uniformly over large areas despite piezoelectric self-heating effects and other environmental affects that impact device resonance. Other control strategies that are required for maintaining uniform spacing of

  18. Laser pulse heating of surfaces and thermal stress analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir S; Al-Aqeeli, Nasser; Al-Qahtani, Hussain M

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces laser pulse heating and thermal stress analysis in materials surface. Analytical temperature treatments and stress developed in the surface region are also explored. The book will help the reader analyze the laser induced stress in the irradiated region and presents solutions for the stress field. Detailed thermal stress analysis in different laser pulse heating situations and different boundary conditions are also presented. Written for surface engineers.

  19. Variable Surface Area Thermal Radiator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Due to increased complexity of spacecraft and longer expected life, more sophisticated and complex thermal management schemes are needed that will be capable of...

  20. Benchmarking of 50 nm features in thermal nanoimprint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gourgon, C.; Chaix, N.; Schift, H.;

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this benchmarking is to establish a comparison of several tools and processes used in thermal NIL with Si stamps at the nanoscale among the authors' laboratories. The Si stamps have large arrays of 50 nm dense lines and were imprinted in all these laboratories in a similar to 100...

  1. THERMAL AND PHYSICAL FEATURES OF MAGNETIC AND ELECTRIC GRINDING PROCESS OF GAS AND THERMAL PROTECTIVE COATINGS

    OpenAIRE

    N. V. Spiridonov; I. O. Sokorov; M. V. Niaroda

    2008-01-01

    The paper reveals thermal zones of magnetic and electric grinding process. The influence of electric and physical parameters of magnetic and electric grinding on temperature in the zone of gas and thermal protective coatings has been established in the paper.

  2. Mid-infrared thermal imaging for an effective mapping of surface materials and sub-surface detachments in mural paintings: integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffara, C.; Parisotto, S.; Mariotti, P. I.

    2015-06-01

    Cultural Heritage is discovering how precious is thermal analysis as a tool to improve the restoration, thanks to its ability to inspect hidden details. In this work a novel dual mode imaging approach, based on the integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography (TQR) in the mid-IR is demonstrated for an effective mapping of surface materials and of sub-surface detachments in mural painting. The tool was validated through a unique application: the "Monocromo" by Leonardo da Vinci in Italy. The dual mode acquisition provided two spatially aligned dataset: the TQR image and the thermal sequence. Main steps of the workflow included: 1) TQR analysis to map surface features and 2) to estimate the emissivity; 3) projection of the TQR frame on reference orthophoto and TQR mosaicking; 4) thermography analysis to map detachments; 5) use TQR to solve spatial referencing and mosaicking for the thermal-processed frames. Referencing of thermal images in the visible is a difficult aspect of the thermography technique that the dual mode approach allows to solve in effective way. We finally obtained the TQR and the thermal maps spatially referenced to the mural painting, thus providing the restorer a valuable tool for the restoration of the detachments.

  3. Squeezing of thermal and quantum fluctuations: Universal features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik; Flensberg, Karsten

    1993-01-01

    We study the classical and quantum fluctuations of a general damped forced oscillator close to a bifurcation instability. Near the instability point, the fluctuations are strongly phase correlated and are squeezed. In the limit of low damping, it is shown that the system has universal features wh...

  4. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (require an eight-week in vitro culture period prior to implantation—too long for immediate clinical bedside applications. Previous in vitro studies have shown that nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  5. Surface Electromyography Feature Extraction Based on Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Akhavan Mahdavi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering the vast variety of EMG signal applications such as rehabilitation of people suffering from some mobility limitations, scientists have done much research on EMG control system. In this regard, feature extraction of EMG signal has been highly valued as a significant technique to extract the desired information of EMG signal and remove unnecessary parts. In this study, Wavelet Transform (WT has been applied as the main technique to extract Surface EMG (SEMG features because WT is consistent with the nature of EMG as a nonstationary signal. Furthermore, two evaluation criteria, namely, RES index (the ratio of a Euclidean distance to a standard deviation and scatter plot are recruited to investigate the efficiency of wavelet feature extraction. The results illustrated an improvement in class separability of hand movements in feature space. Accordingly, it has been shown that only the SEMG features extracted from first and second level of WT decomposition by second order of Daubechies family (db2 yielded the best class separability.

  6. Anisotropic features on the thermal conductivity of a deep argillaceous formation

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Morales, Enrique Edgar; Sau Valenzuela, Núria; Lima, Analice; Van Baelen, Hervé; Sillen, Xavier; Li, Xiangling

    2015-01-01

    An experimental study on Ypresian clays – one of the potential deep and sedimentary clay formations in Belgium for the geological disposal of heat-emitting radioactive waste – has been undertaken to systematically study anisotropic features on the thermal conductivity using a setup with thermal flux measurement. A careful pre-conditioning protocol before the thermal tests has been followed to ensure a very high degree of saturation and the closure of fissures/gaps along bedding planes. Therma...

  7. Emergent geometry, thermal CFT and surface/state correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Wen-Cong; Shu, Fu-Wen; Wu, Meng-He

    2017-09-01

    We study a conjectured correspondence between any codimension-two convex surface and a quantum state (SS-duality for short). By applying thermofield double formalism to the SS-duality, we show that thermal geometries naturally emerge as a result of hidden quantum entanglement between two boundary CFTs. We therefore propose a general framework to emerge the thermal geometry from CFT at finite temperature, without knowing many details about the thermal CFT. As an example, the case of 2d CFT is considered. We calculate its information metric and show that it is either BTZ black hole or thermal AdS as expected.

  8. Interpretation of Impact Features on the Surface of the WFPC-2 Radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Kou, J.-C.

    2011-01-01

    An examination of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) radiator assembly was conducted at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) during the summer of 2009. Immediately apparent was the predominance of impact features resident only in the thermal paint layer; similar phenomenology was observed during a prior survey of the WFPC-1 radiator. As well, larger impact features displayed spallation zones, darkened areas, and other features not encountered in impacts onto bare surfaces. Whereas the characterization of impact features by depth and diameter on unpainted surfaces has been long established, the mitigation provided by the painted layer presented a challenge to further analysis of the WFPC-2 features; a literature search revealed no systematic characterization of the ballistic limit equations of painted or coated surfaces. In order to characterize the impactors responsible for the observed damage, an understanding of the cratering and spallation phenomenology of the painted surface was required. To address that challenge, NASA sponsored a series of hypervelocity calibration shots at the White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). This effort required the following activities: the production, painting, and artificial ageing of test coupons in a manner similar to the actual radiator; the determination of the test matrix parameters projectile diameter and material (mass density), impact velocity, and impact angle, so as to enable both an adequate characterization of the impact by projectile and impact geometry and support hydrocode modeling to fill in and extend the applicability of the calibration shots; the selection of suitable projectiles; logistics; and an analysis of feature characteristics upon return of the coupons. This paper reports the results of the test campaign and presents ballistic limit equations for painted surfaces. We also present initial results of our interpretation methodologies.

  9. CosmoQuest: A software platform for surface feature mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Pamela

    2016-07-01

    While many tools exist for allowing individuals to mark features in images, it has previously been unwieldy to get entire teams collaboratively mapping out surface features, and to statistically compare each team members contributions. Our CSB software was initially developed to facilitate crowd-sourcing projects, including CosmoQuest's "Moon Mappers" project. Statistically study of its results (Robbins et al 2014) has shown that professionals using this software get results that are as good as those they get using other commonly used software packages. This has lead to an expansion of the software to facilitate professional science use of the software. In order to allow the greatest use of CSB, and to facilitate better science collaboration, CosmoQuest now allows teams to create private projects. Basic features include: using their own data sets, allowing multiple team members to annotate the images, performing basic statistics on the resulting data, downloading all results in either .sql or .csv formats. In this presentation, we will overview how best to use CSB to improve your own science collaboration. Current applications include surface science and transient object identification, and published results include both crater maps and the discovery of KBOs.

  10. Decorative Surfaces Obtained through Thermal Zyncking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Radu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface morphology of the galvanized sheets is formed after the solidification of the melted metal, carried along the carrier strap during its extraction from the zinc bath. The surface layer quality depends on the fluidity of the melting, on its superficial tension and on the solidification characteristics, according to the chemical composition of the melting. The elements of micro-alloys can improve the surface of galvanized steel with qualities such as: uniformity, texture, luminosity. Depending on the combination elements of micro-alloying the surface can have different types of metallic layers with an important effect on the coating morphology. The research we made revealed the important effect it had for alloys with Al, Sn, Bi, Pb on the coating layer morphology.

  11. THERMAL AND PHYSICAL FEATURES OF MAGNETIC AND ELECTRIC GRINDING PROCESS OF GAS AND THERMAL PROTECTIVE COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Spiridonov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reveals thermal zones of magnetic and electric grinding process. The influence of electric and physical parameters of magnetic and electric grinding on temperature in the zone of gas and thermal protective coatings has been established in the paper.

  12. Surface charge features of kaolinite particles and their interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishal

    Kaolinite is both a blessing and a curse. As an important industrial mineral commodity, kaolinite clays are extensively used in the paper, ceramic, paint, plastic and rubber industries. In all these applications the wettability, aggregation, dispersion, flotation and thickening of kaolinite particles are affected by its crystal structure and surface properties. It is therefore the objective of this research to investigate selected physical and surface chemical properties of kaolinite, specifically the surface charge of kaolinite particles. A pool of advanced analytical techniques such as XRD, XRF, SEM, AFM, FTIR and ISS were utilized to investigate the morphological and surface chemistry features of kaolinite. Surface force measurements revealed that the silica tetrahedral face of kaolinite is negatively charged at pH>4, whereas the alumina octahedral face of kaolinite is positively charged at pH8. Based on electrophoresis measurements, the apparent iso-electric point for kaolinite particles was determined to be less than pH 3. In contrast, the point of zero charge was determined to be pH 4.5 by titration techniques, which corresponds to the iso-electric point of between pH 4 and 5 as determined by surface force measurements. Results from kaolinite particle interactions indicate that the silica face--alumina face interaction is dominant for kaolinite particle aggregation at low and intermediate pH values, which explains the maximum shear yield stress at pH 5-5.5. Lattice resolution images reveal the hexagonal lattice structure of these two face surfaces of kaolinite. Analysis of the silica face of kaolinite showed that the center of the hexagonal ring of oxygen atoms is vacant, whereas the alumina face showed that the hexagonal surface lattice ring of hydroxyls surround another hydroxyl in the center of the ring. High resolution transmission electron microscopy investigation of kaolinite has indicated that kaolinite is indeed composed of silica/alumina bilayers

  13. Analysis of EEG features of neuronal surface antibody associated encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-hua WEI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical manifestations, EEG and head MRI features of neuronal surface antibody associated encephalitis, and to investigate the role of EEG in determining the relapse or fluctuation of this disease, characteristics of EEG corresponding to head MRI, and EEG features in different clinical stages. Methods A total of 23 patients with neuronal surface antibody associated encephalitis were divided into ascent, climax, descent and recovery stage according to their clinical course. The relation between EEG background activity, distribution of slow wave, epileptiform discharge, extreme delta brush (EDB and relapse or fluctuation of the disease was analyzed. The relation between EEG features and head MRI abnormalities, and also EEG features in different stages were analyzed. Results There were 19 anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor encephalitis patients, 3 anti-leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1 antibody associated encephalitis and one anti-γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor (GABABR antibody associated encephalitis. The frequencies of clinical presentations were psychological or cognitive dysfunction, epileptic seizure, conscious disturbance, speech dysfunction and movement disorder in descending order. Within 30.50 d from onset, 6 patients demonstrated slow wave background, of whom 2 relapsed or fluctuated; 5 patients had α rhythm background and none of them relapsed or fluctuated. In patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, the difference in first hospital stay (Z = -0.785, P = 0.433 and relapse or fluctuation (Fisher's exact probability: P = 0.155 between EDB group and non-EDB group was not significant. There was no apparent correlation between EEG background activities and head MRI abnormalities in different stages. In ascent and climax stage, EEG background activities were predominantly slow wave, and the distribution of slow wave was relatively broader. EEG background changed to α rhythm from descent stage

  14. Touching Textured Surfaces: Cells in Somatosensory Cortex Respond Both to Finger Movement and to Surface Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darian-Smith, Ian; Sugitani, Michio; Heywood, John; Karita, Keishiro; Goodwin, Antony

    1982-11-01

    Single neurons in Brodmann's areas 3b and 1 of the macaque postcentral gyrus discharge when the monkey rubs the contralateral finger pads across a textured surface. Both the finger movement and the spatial pattern of the surface determine this discharge in each cell. The spatial features of the surface are represented unambiguously only in the responses of populations of these neurons, and not in the responses of the constituent cells.

  15. A novel approach to generate random surface thermal loads in piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa Garrido, Oriol, E-mail: oriol.costa@ijs.si; El Shawish, Samir; Cizelj, Leon

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Approach for generating continuous and time-dependent random thermal fields. • Temperature fields simulate fluid mixing thermal loads at fluid–wall interface. • Through plane-wave decomposition, experimental temperature statistics are reproduced. • Validation of the approach with a case study from literature. • Random surface thermal loads generation for future thermal fatigue analyses of piping. - Abstract: There is a need to perform three-dimensional mechanical analyses of pipes, subjected to complex thermo-mechanical loadings such as the ones evolving from turbulent fluid mixing in a T-junction. A novel approach is proposed in this paper for fast and reliable generation of random thermal loads at the pipe surface. The resultant continuous and time-dependent temperature fields simulate the fluid mixing thermal loads at the fluid–wall interface. The approach is based on reproducing discrete fluid temperature statistics, from experimental readings or computational fluid dynamic simulation's results, at interface locations through plane-wave decomposition of temperature fluctuations. The obtained random thermal fields contain large scale instabilities such as cold and hot spots traveling at flow velocities. These low frequency instabilities are believed to be among the major causes of the thermal fatigue in T-junction configurations. The case study found in the literature has been used to demonstrate the generation of random surface thermal loads. The thermal fields generated with the proposed approach are statistically equivalent (within the first two moments) to those from CFD simulations results of similar characteristics. The fields maintain the input data at field locations for a large set of parameters used to generate the thermal loads. This feature will be of great advantage in future sensitivity fatigue analyses of three-dimensional pipe structures.

  16. Ground-based measurement of surface temperature and thermal emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owe, M.; Van De Griend, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    Motorized cable systems for transporting infrared thermometers have been used successfully during several international field campaigns. Systems may be configured with as many as four thermal sensors up to 9 m above the surface, and traverse a 30 m transect. Ground and canopy temperatures are important for solving the surface energy balance. The spatial variability of surface temperature is often great, so that averaged point measurements result in highly inaccurate areal estimates. The cable systems are ideal for quantifying both temporal and spatial variabilities. Thermal emissivity is also necessary for deriving the absolute physical temperature, and measurements may be made with a portable measuring box.

  17. Feature-preserving surface mesh smoothing via suboptimal Delaunay triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhanheng; Yu, Zeyun; Holst, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A method of triangular surface mesh smoothing is presented to improve angle quality by extending the original optimal Delaunay triangulation (ODT) to surface meshes. The mesh quality is improved by solving a quadratic optimization problem that minimizes the approximated interpolation error between a parabolic function and its piecewise linear interpolation defined on the mesh. A suboptimal problem is derived to guarantee a unique, analytic solution that is significantly faster with little loss in accuracy as compared to the optimal one. In addition to the quality-improving capability, the proposed method has been adapted to remove noise while faithfully preserving sharp features such as edges and corners of a mesh. Numerous experiments are included to demonstrate the performance of the method.

  18. Geologically recent small-scale surface features in Meridiani Planum and Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, David

    2014-05-01

    Enigmatic small scale (run-off may occur occasionally under present conditions in low, near-equatorial latitudes on Mars; short-lived (even for just a few minutes) meltwater emission and flow at the surface could erode gutters before evaporating. The decomposition of buried pockets of methane clathrates, which theoretical considerations suggest might be present and stable even in equatorial regions, could give rise to both methane venting (leveed fissures) and transient surface water (gutters). Another possibility is the decomposition, due to local changes in thermal conditions, of hydrated magnesium sulphates in the bedrock, releasing liquid water. Whatever their explanation, these features hint at previously unrecognized, young martian surface processes which may even be active at the present day; in this context, the apparent downslope extension of a discrete dark dust streak on Burns Cliff (inside Endurance Crater), during Opportunity's approach to that locality, is particularly thought-provoking.

  19. Drop formation by thermal fluctuations at an ultralow surface tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennequin, Y; Aarts, D G A L; van der Wiel, J H; Wegdam, G; Eggers, J; Lekkerkerker, H N W; Bonn, Daniel

    2006-12-15

    We present experimental evidence that drop breakup is caused by thermal noise in a system with a surface tension that is more than 10(6) times smaller than that of water. We observe that at very small scales classical hydrodynamics breaks down and the characteristic signatures of pinch-off due to thermal noise are observed. Surprisingly, the noise makes the drop size distribution more uniform, by suppressing the formation of satellite droplets of the smallest sizes. The crossover between deterministic hydrodynamic motion and stochastic thermally driven motion has repercussions for our understanding of small-scale hydrodynamics, important in many problems such as micro- or nanofluidics and interfacial singularities.

  20. Modeling the impact of solid surfaces in thermal degradation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuma, Christian; Laino, Teodoro; Martin, Elyette; Stolz, Steffen; Curioni, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    First-principles simulations are carried out to generate reaction profiles for the initial steps of the thermal decomposition of glycerol, propylene glycol, and triacetin over the surfaces of pseudo-amorphous carbon and silica, crystalline zirconia [001], and crystalline alumina (0001).

  1. Sea surface temperature mapping using a thermal infrared scanner

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Pandya, R.M.; Mathur, K.M.; Charyulu, R.J.K.; Rao, L.V.G.

    1 metre water column below the sea surface. A thermal infrared scanner developed by the Space Applications Centre (ISRO), Ahmedabad was operated on board R.V. Gaveshani in April/May 1984 for mapping SST over the eastern Arabian Sea. SST values...

  2. Nano-Localized Thermal Analysis and Mapping of Surface and Sub-Surface Thermal Properties Using Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Maria J; Amaral, Joao S; Silva, Nuno J O; Amaral, Vitor S

    2016-12-01

    Determining and acting on thermo-physical properties at the nanoscale is essential for understanding/managing heat distribution in micro/nanostructured materials and miniaturized devices. Adequate thermal nano-characterization techniques are required to address thermal issues compromising device performance. Scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) is a probing and acting technique based on atomic force microscopy using a nano-probe designed to act as a thermometer and resistive heater, achieving high spatial resolution. Enabling direct observation and mapping of thermal properties such as thermal conductivity, SThM is becoming a powerful tool with a critical role in several fields, from material science to device thermal management. We present an overview of the different thermal probes, followed by the contribution of SThM in three currently significant research topics. First, in thermal conductivity contrast studies of graphene monolayers deposited on different substrates, SThM proves itself a reliable technique to clarify the intriguing thermal properties of graphene, which is considered an important contributor to improve the performance of downscaled devices and materials. Second, SThM's ability to perform sub-surface imaging is highlighted by thermal conductivity contrast analysis of polymeric composites. Finally, an approach to induce and study local structural transitions in ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni-Mn-Ga thin films using localized nano-thermal analysis is presented.

  3. Combination of 3D skin surface texture features and 2D ABCD features for improved melanoma diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; John, Nigel W; Smith, Lyndon; Sun, Jiuai; Smith, Melvyn

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional asymmetry, border irregularity, colour variegation and diameter (ABCD) features are important indicators currently used for computer-assisted diagnosis of malignant melanoma (MM); however, they often prove to be insufficient to make a convincing diagnosis. Previous work has demonstrated that 3D skin surface normal features in the form of tilt and slant pattern disruptions are promising new features independent from the existing 2D ABCD features. This work investigates that whether improved lesion classification can be achieved by combining the 3D features with the 2D ABCD features. Experiments using a nonlinear support vector machine classifier show that many combinations of the 2D ABCD features and the 3D features can give substantially better classification accuracy than using (1) single features and (2) many combinations of the 2D ABCD features. The best 2D and 3D feature combination includes the overall 3D skin surface disruption, the asymmetry and all the three colour channel features. It gives an overall 87.8 % successful classification, which is better than the best single feature with 78.0 % and the best 2D feature combination with 83.1 %. These demonstrate that (1) the 3D features have additive values to improve the existing lesion classification and (2) combining the 3D feature with all the 2D features does not lead to the best lesion classification. The two ABCD features not selected by the best 2D and 3D combination, namely (1) the border feature and (2) the diameter feature, were also studied in separate experiments. It found that inclusion of either feature in the 2D and 3D combination can successfully classify 3 out of 4 lesion groups. The only one group not accurately classified by either feature can be classified satisfactorily by the other. In both cases, they have shown better classification performances than those without the 3D feature in the combinations. This further demonstrates that (1) the 3D feature can be used to

  4. HIGH VELOCITY THERMAL GUN FOR SURFACE PREPARATION AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Gorlach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many surface preparation and treatment processes utilise compressed air to propel particles against surfaces in order to clean and treat them. The effectiveness of the processes depends on the velocity of the particles, which in turn depends on the pressure of the compressed air. This paper describes a thermal gun built on the principles of High Velocity Air Fuel (HVAF and High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF processes. The designed apparatus can be used for abrasive blasting, coating of surfaces, cutting of rocks, removing rubber from mining equipment, cleaning of contaminations etc.

  5. Emergent geometry, thermal CFT and surface/state correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Gan, Wen-Cong; Wu, Meng-He

    2016-01-01

    We study a conjectured correspondence between any codimension two convex surface and a quantum state (SS-duality for short). By generalizing thermofield double formalism to continuum version of the multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz (cMERA) and using the SS-duality, we propose a general framework to emerge the thermal geometry from CFT at finite temperature. As an example, the case of $2d$ CFT is considered carefully. We calculate its information metric and show that it is the BTZ black hole or the thermal AdS as expectation.

  6. Early detection and classification of powdery mildew-infected rose leaves using ANFIS based on extracted features of thermal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mehrnoosh; Minaei, Saeid; Safaie, Naser; Torkamani-Azar, Farah

    2016-05-01

    Spatial and temporal changes in surface temperature of infected and non-infected rose plant (Rosa hybrida cv. 'Angelina') leaves were visualized using digital infrared thermography. Infected areas exhibited a presymptomatic decrease in leaf temperature up to 2.3 °C. In this study, two experiments were conducted: one in the greenhouse (semi-controlled ambient conditions) and the other, in a growth chamber (controlled ambient conditions). Effect of drought stress and darkness on the thermal images were also studied in this research. It was found that thermal histograms of the infected leaves closely follow a standard normal distribution. They have a skewness near zero, kurtosis under 3, standard deviation larger than 0.6, and a Maximum Temperature Difference (MTD) more than 4. For each thermal histogram, central tendency, variability, and parameters of the best fitted Standard Normal and Laplace distributions were estimated. To classify healthy and infected leaves, feature selection was conducted and the best extracted thermal features with the largest linguistic hedge values were chosen. Among those features independent of absolute temperature measurement, MTD, SD, skewness, R2l, kurtosis and bn were selected. Then, a neuro-fuzzy classifier was trained to recognize the healthy leaves from the infected ones. The k-means clustering method was utilized to obtain the initial parameters and the fuzzy "if-then" rules. Best estimation rates of 92.55% and 92.3% were achieved in training and testing the classifier with 8 clusters. Results showed that drought stress had an adverse effect on the classification of healthy leaves. More healthy leaves under drought stress condition were classified as infected causing PPV and Specificity index values to decrease, accordingly. Image acquisition in the dark had no significant effect on the classification performance.

  7. Characterizing Thermal features in Norris Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Using Multi- spectral Remote Sensing Data and Dynamic Calibration Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, C. C.; Queen, L. P.; Heasler, H. P.; Jaworowski, C.

    2007-12-01

    A thermal infrared remote sensing project was implemented to develop methods for identifying, classifying, and mapping thermal features. This study is directed at geothermal features, with the expectation that new protocols developed here will apply to the wildland fire thermal environment. Airborne multi-spectral digital imagery were acquired over the geothermally active Norris Basin region of Yellowstone National Park, USA. Two image acquisitions were flown, with one acquisition near solar noon and the other at night. Raw data from the five sensors were uncalibrated, so a vicarious calibration procedure was developed to compute reflectance for the visible and NIR bands using an independently calibrated hyperspectral dataset. Calibration of the thermal sensor band utilized a dynamic, in-scene calibration procedure that exploited natural, pseudo-invariant thermal reference targets instrumented with in situ kinetic temperature recorders. The calibrated reflectance and radiant temperature data from each acquisition were processed and analyzed to develop a suite of thermal attributes, including radiant temperatures, a daytime-nighttime temperature difference (DeltaT), albedo, an albedo derivative (one minus albedo), and apparent thermal inertia (ATI). The albedo terms were computed using a published weighed-average albedo algorithm based on ratios of the narrowband red and near-infrared (NIR) reflectances to total solar irradiance for the respective red and NIR bandpasses. The weighing factors for each band were the proportion of total solar irradiance incident on the surface within each segment represented by a respective bandpass. In the absence of verifiable "truth," a step-wise chain of unsupervised classification and multivariate analysis exercises was performed, drawing heavily on "fuzzy truth" to assess the quality, efficiency, and efficacy of classification procedures and results. A final classification synthesizes a "geothermal phenomenology" comprised of

  8. Thermally tailored gradient topography surface on elastomeric thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sudeshna; Bhandaru, Nandini; Das, Ritopa; Harikrishnan, G; Mukherjee, Rabibrata

    2014-05-14

    We report a simple method for creating a nanopatterned surface with continuous variation in feature height on an elastomeric thin film. The technique is based on imprinting the surface of a film of thermo-curable elastomer (Sylgard 184), which has continuous variation in cross-linking density introduced by means of differential heating. This results in variation of viscoelasticity across the length of the surface and the film exhibits differential partial relaxation after imprinting with a flexible stamp and subjecting it to an externally applied stress for a transient duration. An intrinsic perfect negative replica of the stamp pattern is initially created over the entire film surface as long as the external force remains active. After the external force is withdrawn, there is partial relaxation of the applied stresses, which is manifested as reduction in amplitude of the imprinted features. Due to the spatial viscoelasticity gradient, the extent of stress relaxation induced feature height reduction varies across the length of the film (L), resulting in a surface with a gradient topography with progressively varying feature heights (hF). The steepness of the gradient can be controlled by varying the temperature gradient as well as the duration of precuring of the film prior to imprinting. The method has also been utilized for fabricating wettability gradient surfaces using a high aspect ratio biomimetic stamp. The use of a flexible stamp allows the technique to be extended for creating a gradient topography on nonplanar surfaces as well. We also show that the gradient surfaces with regular structures can be used in combinatorial studies related to pattern directed dewetting.

  9. Surface dielectric relaxation: probing technique and its application to thermal activation dynamics of polymer surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Masashi

    2010-09-01

    For dynamic analyses of a polymer surface, a dielectric relaxation measurement technique with parallel electrodes placed away from the surface was developed. In this technique, a liquid heating medium was filled in the space between the polymer surface and the electrodes. The construction that maintains the surface can clarify the physical interactions between the liquid and the bare surface and controlling the temperature of the liquid reveals the thermal activation property of the surface. The dielectric relaxation spectrum of the surface convoluted into the bulk and liquid spectra can be obtained by a reactance analysis and the surface spectrum is expressed with an equivalent resistance-capacitance parallel circuit. On the basis of the electromechanical analogy, the electric elements can be converted into mechanical elements that indicate the viscoelasticity of the polymer surface. Using these measurement and analysis techniques, the electric and mechanical properties of the surface of a gelatinized chloroprene rubber sample were analyzed.

  10. Tailorable Surface Morphology of 3D Scaffolds by Combining Additive Manufacturing with Thermally Induced Phase Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Luca, Andrea; de Wijn, Joost R; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Camarero-Espinosa, Sandra; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2017-08-01

    The functionalization of biomaterials substrates used for cell culture is gearing towards an increasing control over cell activity. Although a number of biomaterials have been successfully modified by different strategies to display tailored physical and chemical surface properties, it is still challenging to step from 2D substrates to 3D scaffolds with instructive surface properties for cell culture and tissue regeneration. In this study, additive manufacturing and thermally induced phase separation are combined to create 3D scaffolds with tunable surface morphology from polymer gels. Surface features vary depending on the gel concentration, the exchanging temperature, and the nonsolvent used. When preosteoblasts (MC-3T3 cells) are cultured on these scaffolds, a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity is measured for submicron surface topography, suggesting a potential role on early cell differentiation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Determination of thermal/dynamic characteristics of lava flow from surface thermal measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Melnik, Oleg; Korotkii, Alexander; Tsepelev, Igor; Kovtunov, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    Rapid development of ground based thermal cameras, drones and satellite data allows getting repeated thermal images of the surface of the lava flow. Available instrumentation allows getting a large amount of data during a single lava flow eruption. These data require development of appropriate quantitative techniques to link subsurface dynamics with observations. We present a new approach to assimilation of thermal measurements at lava's surface to the bottom of the lava flow to determine lava's thermal and dynamic characteristics. Mathematically this problem is reduced to solving an inverse boundary problem. Namely, using known conditions at one part of the model boundary we determine the missing condition at the remaining part of the boundary. Using an adjoint method we develop a numerical approach to the mathematical problem based on the determination of the missing boundary condition and lava flow characteristics. Numerical results show that in the case of smooth input data lava temperature and velocity can be determined with a high accuracy. A noise imposed on the smooth input data results in a less accurate solution, but still acceptable below some noise level. The proposed approach to assimilate measured data brings an opportunity to estimate thermal budget of the lava flow.

  12. THERMAL FRACTURE OF FUNCTIONALLY GRADED PLATE WITH PARALLEL SURFACE CRACKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuezhong Feng; Zhihe Jin

    2009-01-01

    This work examines the fracture behavior of a functionally graded material (FGM) plate containing parallel surface cracks with alternating lengths subjected to a thermal shock. The thermal stress intensity factors (TSIFs) at the tips of long and short cracks are calculated using a singular integral equation technique. The critical thermal shock △T_c that causes crack initiation is calculated using a stress intensity factor criterion. Numerical examples of TSIFs and △T_c for an Al_2O_3/Si_3N_4 FGM plate are presented to illustrate the effects of thermal property gradation, crack spacing and crack length ratio on the TSIFs and △T_c. It is found that for a given crack length ratio, the TSIFs at the tips of both long and short cracks can be reduced significantly and △T_c can be enhanced by introducing appropriate material gradation. The TSIFs also decrease dramatically with a decrease in crack spacing. The TSIF at the tips of short cracks may be higher than that for the long cracks under certain crack geometry conditions. Hence, the short cracks instead of long cracks may first start to grow under the thermal shock loading.

  13. Improving Energy Efficiency In Thermal Oil Recovery Surface Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy Nadella, Narayana

    2010-09-15

    Thermal oil recovery methods such as Cyclic Steam Stimulation (CSS), Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) and In-situ Combustion are being used for recovering heavy oil and bitumen. These processes expend energy to recover oil. The process design of the surface facilities requires optimization to improve the efficiency of oil recovery by minimizing the energy consumption per barrel of oil produced. Optimization involves minimizing external energy use by heat integration. This paper discusses the unit processes and design methodology considering thermodynamic energy requirements and heat integration methods to improve energy efficiency in the surface facilities. A design case study is presented.

  14. Non-Thermal Effects on CO-NO Surface Catalytic Reaction on Square Surface: Monte Carlo Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Khalid; A. U. Qaisrani; W. Ahmad

    2005-01-01

    @@ A Monte Carlo simulation of the CO-NO heterogeneous catalytic reaction over a square surface has already been studied with a model based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism. The results of this study are well known. Here we study the effects of transient non-thermal mobility of monomer (CO) based on precursor mechanism, diffusion of adsorbed nitrogen and oxygen atoms, on the phase diagram. The interesting feature of this model is the yield of a steady reactiw window, while simple LH mechanism is not capable of producing a steady reactive state.

  15. Suitable features selection for monitoring thermal condition of electrical equipment using infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, A. S. N.; Taib, S.

    2013-11-01

    Monitoring the thermal condition of electrical equipment is necessary for maintaining the reliability of electrical system. The degradation of electrical equipment can cause excessive overheating, which can lead to the eventual failure of the equipment. Additionally, failure of equipment requires a lot of maintenance cost, manpower and can also be catastrophic- causing injuries or even deaths. Therefore, the recognition processof equipment conditions as normal and defective is an essential step towards maintaining reliability and stability of the system. The study introduces infrared thermography based condition monitoring of electrical equipment. Manual analysis of thermal image for detecting defects and classifying the status of equipment take a lot of time, efforts and can also lead to incorrect diagnosis results. An intelligent system that can separate the equipment automatically could help to overcome these problems. This paper discusses an intelligent classification system for the conditions of equipment using neural networks. Three sets of features namely first order histogram based statistical, grey level co-occurrence matrix and component based intensity features are extracted by image analysis, which are used as input data for the neural networks. The multilayered perceptron networks are trained using four different training algorithms namely Resilient back propagation, Bayesian Regulazation, Levenberg-Marquardt and Scale conjugate gradient. The experimental results show that the component based intensity features perform better compared to other two sets of features. Finally, after selecting the best features, multilayered perceptron network trained using Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm achieved the best results to classify the conditions of electrical equipment.

  16. Aerial visible-thermal infrared hyperspectral feature extraction technology and its application to object identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie-lin, Zhang; Jun-hu, Wang; Mi, Zhou; Yan-ju, Huang; Ding, Wu

    2014-03-01

    Based on aerial visible-thermal infrared hyperspectral imaging system (CASI/SASI/TASI) data, field spectrometer data and multi-source geological information, this paper utilizes the hyperspectral data processing and feature extraction technology to identify uranium mineralization factors, the spectral features of typical tetravalent, hexavalent uranium minerals and mineralization factors are established, and hyperspectral logging technology for drill cores and trench also are developed, the relationships between radioactive intensity and spectral characteristics are built. Above methods have been applied to characterize uranium mineralization setting of granite-type and sandstone-type uranium deposits in south and northwest China, the successful outcomes of uranium prospecting have been achieved.

  17. Exploring microstructure and surface features of Chinese coins using non-invasive approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Ruishi, E-mail: rxie@foxmail.com [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Li, Yuanli [Department of Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Guo, Baogang; Hu, Hailong; Jiang, Linhai [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • The microstructure and surface features of Chinese coins were systematically explored. • The application of non-invasive techniques enables unambiguous explorations of the component, morphology, microstructure and physical properties of the coins. • This work provides a new insight into exploration of surface properties of precious metal objects, metallic artefacts as well as monuments without causing any damage to them. - Abstract: Despite the apparent significance of Chinese coins, the knowledge about the surface properties of the coins is still largely unknown. To date, most analytical techniques (e.g., cross-section analysis, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, thermal analysis) require the partial or total destruction of the investigated sample, which is fatal to precious objects (e.g., artefacts and monuments). Herein, we systematically investigate the surface of a series of one yuan Chinese coins to disclose their chemical composition, morphology, and microstructure features using non-invasive techniques. Investigations were performed with scanning electron microscopy, coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The application of these approaches enables unambiguous explorations of the component, morphology, microstructure and physical properties of the samples without destroying them. The identification of the coins was achieved in light of the name of issuing authority and floral pattern. The morphology observations of the samples display that these coins possess mostly homogeneous surfaces; hence such a finding allows the formulation of a possible minting technology. Besides, the energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has proved of great role in exploring these coins, mainly because of its detectability to easily probe the presence of certain minor elements, which is critical in understanding surface finishing technologies, and production processes. The findings manifest that the coins were made

  18. Rapid Manufacturing of Reconfigurable Satellite Panels with Embedded Electronics, Embedded Thermal Devices, and Novel Structural Features

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Quinn; Stucker, Brent

    2006-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Satellite Manufacturing (CASM) at Utah State University has been investigating the use of new, advanced manufacturing technologies for the rapid manufacture of highly capable satellite panels. Using Ultrasonic Consolidation it is now possible to additively manufacture (a.k.a. rapid prototype) aluminum structures with embedded electronics, thermal devices, internal structural features, and fibers. CASM has built and tested embedded USB networks, electronic devices, ther...

  19. Feature-based handling of surface faults in compact disc players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a novel method called feature-based control is presented. The method is designed to improve compact disc players’ handling of surface faults on the discs. The method is based on a fault-tolerant control scheme, which uses extracted features of the surface faults to remove those from...... the detector signals used for control during the occurrence of surface faults. The extracted features are coefficients of Karhunen–Loève approximations of the surface faults. The performance of the feature-based control scheme controlling compact disc players playing discs with surface faults has been...

  20. Thermal analysis of dry eye subjects and the thermal impulse perturbation model of ocular surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aizhong; Maki, Kara L; Salahura, Gheorghe; Kottaiyan, Ranjini; Yoon, Geunyoung; Hindman, Holly B; Aquavella, James V; Zavislan, James M

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we explore the usage of ocular surface temperature (OST) decay patterns to distinguished between dry eye patients with aqueous deficient dry eye (ADDE) and meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). The OST profiles of 20 dry eye subjects were measured by a long-wave infrared thermal camera in a standardized environment (24 °C, and relative humidity (RH) 40%). The subjects were instructed to blink every 5 s after 20 ∼ 25 min acclimation. Exponential decay curves were fit to the average temperature within a region of the central cornea. We find the MGD subjects have both a higher initial temperature (p thermal impulse perturbation (TIP) model. We conclude that long-wave-infrared thermal imaging is a plausible tool in assisting with the classification of dry eye patient.

  1. Features of molten pool free surface in laser processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of static characteristics of free surface of molten pools in laser processing, starting with the change of surface tension, the uniform numerical models are developed for both the liquid and solid regions of metals by applying the enthalpy source method and the porous region model. The flow and heat transfer characteristics in the molten pools and the distribution of surface tension on free surface are disclosed. The shape of free surface is analyzed by considering the static forces on the free surface and by combining with the calculated results of the molten pool. The model is applied to analyzing the laser processing of AISI 304 stainless steel, and the effects of different processing tech nics and material properties on shaping of free surface are discussed.

  2. Laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voumard, Pierre; Zenobi, Renato

    1995-10-01

    A complete study on the energy partitioning upon laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces was undertaken. The measurements include characterization of the aniline-quartz adsorption system using temperature-programmed desorption, the extrapolation of quasiequilibrium desorption temperatures to the regime of laser heating rates on the order of 109-1010 K/s by computational means, measurement of the kinetic energy distributions of desorbing aniline using a pump-probe method, and the determination of internal energies with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. The measurements are compared to calculations of the surface temperature rise and the resulting desorption rates, based on a finite-difference mathematical description of pulsed laser heating. While the surface temperature of laser-heated silica reaches about 600-700 K at the time of desorption, the translational temperature of laser-desorbed aniline was measured to be Tkin=420±60 K, Tvib was 360±60 K, and Trot was 350±100 K. These results are discussed using different models for laser-induced thermal desorption from surfaces.

  3. Thermal annealing of laser damage precursors on fused silica surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, N; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Laurence, T A; Suratwala, T I; Steele, W A; Feit, M D; Wang, L L

    2012-03-19

    Previous studies have identified two significant precursors of laser damage on fused silica surfaces at fluenes below {approx} 35 J/cm{sup 2}, photoactive impurities in the polishing layer and surface fractures. In the present work, isothermal heating is studied as a means of remediating the highly absorptive, defect structure associated with surface fractures. A series of Vickers indentations were applied to silica surfaces at loads between 0.5N and 10N creating fracture networks between {approx} 10{micro}m and {approx} 50{micro}m in diameter. The indentations were characterized prior to and following thermal annealing under various times and temperature conditions using confocal time-resolved photo-luminescence (CTP) imaging, and R/1 optical damage testing with 3ns, 355nm laser pulses. Significant improvements in the damage thresholds, together with corresponding reductions in CTP intensity, were observed at temperatures well below the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). For example, the damage threshold on 05.N indentations which typically initiates at fluences <8 J/cm{sup 2} could be improved >35 J/cm{sup 2} through the use of a {approx} 750 C thermal treatment. Larger fracture networks required longer or higher temperature treatment to achieve similar results. At an annealing temperature > 1100 C, optical microscopy indicates morphological changes in some of the fracture structure of indentations, although remnants of the original fracture and significant deformation was still observed after thermal annealing. This study demonstrates the potential of using isothermal annealing as a means of improving the laser damage resistance of fused silica optical components. Similarly, it provides a means of further understanding the physics associated with optical damage and related mitigation processes.

  4. Feature selective temporal prediction of Alzheimer's disease progression using hippocampus surface morphometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsao, Sinchai; Gajawelli, Niharika; Zhou, Jiayu; Shi, Jie; Ye, Jieping; Wang, Yalin; Leporé, Natasha

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present our results of using machine learning to predict temporal behavior changes in Alzheimers Disease using entire topological feature maps of the hippocampus surface (2100 feature points...

  5. Spatial-temporal features of thermal images for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estupinan Roldan, Kevin; Ortega Piedrahita, Marco A.; Benitez, Hernan D.

    2014-02-01

    Disorders associated with repeated trauma account for about 60% of all occupational illnesses, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) being the most consulted today. Infrared Thermography (IT) has come to play an important role in the field of medicine. IT is non-invasive and detects diseases based on measuring temperature variations. IT represents a possible alternative to prevalent methods for diagnosis of CTS (i.e. nerve conduction studies and electromiography). This work presents a set of spatial-temporal features extracted from thermal images taken in healthy and ill patients. Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers test this feature space with Leave One Out (LOO) validation error. The results of the proposed approach show linear separability and lower validation errors when compared to features used in previous works that do not account for temperature spatial variability.

  6. Oxide cathode mechanisms: Electronic and structural features of oxide cathode surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, J.; Nunan, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes studies made upon systems selected for their ability to model various important features of oxide cathodes and the mechanisms which enable them to function as efficient thermionic emitters at moderate temperatures. An account is given of experiments which aimed to simulate conditions upon the surfaces of polycrystalline samples of alkaline earth oxides (e.g., SrO and BaO/SrO or MgO and BaO/MgO) at various stages of their preparation in similiar fashion to that used in the thermal activation of oxide cathodes. Accounts are given of experiments which examined the interaction between the gases O2, N2O, H2 or Ch4 and appropriately preactivated surface of pure and mixed alkaline earth oxide samples. Accounts are given of experiments involving the controlled deposition in UHV conditions of zero-valent Ba ad-atoms-in amounts ranging from submonolayer to multilayer coverage - upon layers of SrO or BaO previously prepared in UHV conditions by evaporation of the corresponding metal and its subsequent oxidation. UPS spectra have been undertaken in order to examine surfaces of samples prepared by evaporation of barium metal or strontium metal and to study effects upon the UPS spectra by exposures to the gases N20, O2 and CH4.

  7. Local thermal property analysis by scanning thermal microscopy of an ultrafine-grained copper surface layer produced by surface mechanical attrition treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, F.A. [Suzhou Institute for Nonferrous Metals Processing Technology, No. 200 Shenxu Road, Suzhou Industrial Park, Suzhou 215021 (China) and Unite de Thermique et d' Analyse Physique, Laboratoire d' Energetique et d' Optique, Universite de Reims, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: guofuan@yahoo.com; JI, Y.L. [Suzhou Institute for Nonferrous Metals Processing Technology, No. 200 Shenxu Road, Suzhou Industrial Park, Suzhou 215021 (China); Trannoy, N. [Unite de Thermique et d' Analyse Physique, Laboratoire d' Energetique et d' Optique, Universite de Reims, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Lu, J. [LASMIS, Universite de Technologie de Troyes, 12 Rue Marie Curie, Troyes 10010 (France)

    2006-06-15

    Scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) was used to map thermal conductivity images in an ultrafine-grained copper surface layer produced by surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT). It is found that the deformed surface layer shows different thermal conductivities that strongly depend on the grain size of the microstructure: the thermal conductivity of the nanostructured surface layer decreases obviously when compared with that of the coarse-grained matrix of the sample. The role of the grain boundaries in thermal conduction is analyzed in correlation with the heat conduction mechanism in pure metal. A theoretical approach, based on this investigation, was used to calculate the heat flow from the probe tip to the sample and then estimate the thermal conductivities at different scanning positions. Experimental results and theoretical calculation demonstrate that SThM can be used as a tool for the thermal property and microstructural analysis of ultrafine-grained microstructures.

  8. Characters of surface deformation and surface wave in thermal capillary convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN; Li; KANG; Qi; HU; Wenrei

    2006-01-01

    In the field of fluid mechanics, free surface phenomena is one of the most important physical processes. In the present research work, the surface deformation and surface wave caused by temperature difference of sidewalls in a rectangular cavity have been investigated. The horizontal cross-section of the container is 52 mm×42 mm, and there is a silicon oil layer of height 3.5 mm in the experimental cavity. Temperature difference between the two side walls of the cavity is increased gradually, and the flow on the liquid layer will develop from stable convection to un-stable convection. An optical diagnostic system consisting of a modified Michelson interferometer and image processor has been developed for study of the surface deformation and surface wave of thermal capillary convection. The Fourier transformation method is used to interferometer fringe analysis. The quantitative results of surface deformation and surface wave have been calculated from a serial of the interference fringe patterns. The characters of surface deformation and surface wave have been obtained. They are related with temperature gradient and surface tension. Surface deformation is fluctuant with time, which shows the character of surface wave. The cycle period of the wave is 4.8 s, and the amplitudes are from 0 to 0.55 μm. The phase of the wave near the cool side of the cavity is opposite and correlative to that near the hot side. The present experiment proves that the surface wave of thermal capillary convection exists on liquid free surface, and it is wrapped in surface deformation.

  9. Characteristics of Turbulent Airflow Deduced from Rapid Surface Thermal Fluctuations: An Infrared Surface Anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, Milad; Breitenstein, Daniel; Or, Dani

    2017-07-01

    The intermittent nature of turbulent airflow interacting with the surface is readily observable in fluctuations of the surface temperature resulting from the thermal imprints of eddies sweeping the surface. Rapid infrared thermography has recently been used to quantify characteristics of the near-surface turbulent airflow interacting with the evaporating surfaces. We aim to extend this technique by using single-point rapid infrared measurements to quantify properties of a turbulent flow, including surface exchange processes, with a view towards the development of an infrared surface anemometer. The parameters for the surface-eddy renewal (α and β ) are inferred from infrared measurements of a single-point on the surface of a heat plate placed in a wind tunnel with prescribed wind speeds and constant mean temperatures of the surface. Thermally-deduced parameters are in agreement with values obtained from standard three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer measurements close to the plate surface (e.g., α = 3 and β = 1/26 (ms)^{-1} for the infrared, and α = 3 and β = 1/19 (ms)^{-1} for the sonic-anemometer measurements). The infrared-based turbulence parameters provide new insights into the role of surface temperature and buoyancy on the inherent characteristics of interacting eddies. The link between the eddy-spectrum shape parameter α and the infrared window size representing the infrared field of view is investigated. The results resemble the effect of the sampling height above the ground in sonic anemometer measurements, which enables the detection of larger eddies with higher values of α . The physical basis and tests of the proposed method support the potential for remote quantification of the near-surface momentum field, as well as scalar-flux measurements in the immediate vicinity of the surface.

  10. Thermal instability of GaSb surface oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, K.; Matsukura, Y.; Suzuki, R.; Aoki, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the development of InAs/GaSb Type-II superlattice (T2SL) infrared photodetectors, the surface leakage current at the mesa sidewall must be suppressed. To achieve this requirement, both the surface treatment and the passivation layer are key technologies. As a starting point to design these processes, we investigated the GaSb oxide in terms of its growth and thermal stability. We found that the formation of GaSb oxide was very different from those of GaAs. Both Ga and Sb are oxidized at the surface of GaSb. In contrast, only Ga is oxidized and As is barely oxidized in the case of GaAs. Interestingly, the GaSb oxide can be formed even in DI water, which results in a very thick oxide film over 40 nm after 120 minutes. To examine the thermal stability, the GaSb native oxide was annealed in a vacuum and analyzed by XPS and Raman spectroscopy. These analyses suggest that SbOx in the GaSb native oxide will be reduced to metallic Sb above 300°C. To directly evaluate the effect of oxide instability on the device performance, a T2SL p-i-n photodetector was fabricated that has a cutoff wavelength of about 4 μm at 80 K. As a result, the surface leakage component was increased by the post annealing at 325°C. On the basis of these results, it is possible to speculate that a part of GaSb oxide on the sidewall surface will be reduced to metallic Sb, which acts as an origin of additional leakage current path.

  11. Abnormal thermal effects on the surface plasmon resonance of Ag nanoparticles on the surface of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Han; Ding, Ruiqiang [State Key Laboratory for Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Li, Meicheng, E-mail: mcli@ncepu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Suzhou Institute, North China Electric Power University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Li, Yingfeng; Yang, Ganghai; Song, Dandan; Yu, Yue; Trevor, Mwenya [State Key Laboratory for Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2015-06-01

    The thermal effects on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Ag nanoparticles on the silicon surface have been studied. It is found that unusual blue shifts and narrowing of the SPR troughs occur as the temperature increases from 323 K to 363 K. At low temperature range (from 273 K to 323 K), the SPR troughs have the normal red shifts and broadening as in previous studies. The change of SPR is attributed to the thermal induced electron transport between particles and substrate, and is analyzed using samples with different particle sizes. This work reveals the mechanism of thermal effects on the plasmonic properties of Ag nanoparticles on the surface of silicon and offers useful information for designing of SPR devices. - Highlights: • Unusual blue shift of the SPR troughs is observed at 343 K. • Red shift of the SPR troughs is observed at 323 K. • The mechanism relies on the thermal induced surface electron transport. • Particle sizes play an important role in the change of the SPR troughs.

  12. Thermal hehavior of Surface Mounted Devices (SMD) packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Werner; Moeller, Werner

    The thermal behavior of Surface Mounted Devices (SMD) packaging was investigated on an easily variable type. The effect of basic materials, chip carriers, and bonding, soldering, glueing and casting techniques was examined, considering the most important quantities, switching time and power. The test results show that cooling measures in the chip domain, such as chip bonding, chip casting, and chip carrier lining, are especially efficient for short switching times. The basic materials, even with heat sinks, become only important for longer switching times. The chip temperature of a conventional FR4/LCCC packaging was halved by the application of novel packaging materials, without changing the cooling mechanisms and the power.

  13. Surface interactions with electromagnetic spectrum relevant to solar thermal propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonometti, Joseph Alexander John

    1997-11-01

    Elements of solar thermal rocket propulsion systems were experimentally examined to quantify the most significant physical parameters related to concentrating and capturing solar energy. A detailed examination of the sun's electromagnetic flux impingement upon a solar concentrator, redirection to a secondary reflector or refractor optic and absorption in an opaque cavity surface are presented. Research performed includes the analysis and design of a unique high temperature solar laboratory at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, its construction and subsequent operation. The entire facility was a prerequisite to conducting this experimental research and is the result of an initial two-year research effort. Four primary elements were experimentally examined and their relationship to the solar heating profile analyzed to optimize it for use in a solar thermal upper stage. The first was the comparison of concentrator types to define the incident energy profile with the conclusion that their type or quality was insignificant to the thermal heating profile in an absorber cavity. Rigid, thin-film and Fresnel concentrators were experimentally assessed. The second element was the evaluation of the absorber geometry's length-to-diameter ratio of a cylindrical cavity and included the addition of a secondary optic. The secondary optic was recognized as a requirement in the solar thermal rocket and could either improve the flux distribution on the cavity wall using a refractor with extractor rod, or hinder it as in using a parabolic reflector. The third was direct measurement of absorber material properties at elevated temperatures. Reflectivity, absorptivity and emissivity were determined for rhenium at 1000 Kelvin. The reflectivity measurements included both diffuse and specular reflection components and sample coupons of rhenium and niobium were shown to decrease in reflectivity when heated to temperatures approaching 1200 degrees Kelvin. The methodology was unique in

  14. Adsorption, Diffusion and Thermal Desorption Features of Cyclopentane and Cyclohexane in Silicalite-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN, Lin-Hai; SONG, Li-Juan; ZHANG, Xiao-Tong; TANG, Ke; DAI, Zhen-Hua; SUN, Zhao-Lin

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption, diffusion and thermal desorption features of cyclopentane and cyclohexane in silicalite-1 have been investigated using the intelligent gravimetric technique. Both the saturation adsorption loadings and diffusion coefficient of cyclopentane were greater than those of cyclohexane. The diffusivity of cyclopentane was about one order of magnitude greater than that of cyclohexane at the same temperature and initial loading. For cyclopentane, there was only one kind of desorption process at adsorption loadings lower than 4 muc (molecule per unit cell), but two desorption processes appeared at the adsorption loadings higher than 4 muc. While for cyclohexane, one desorption process was found in the whole range of loadings. Both thermal desorption peaks of cyclopentane and cyclohexane moved to higher temperature region with increasing loading.

  15. Surface and Electrical Properties of Electro-Coagulated Thermal Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilkaya, S. S.; Okutan, M.; Içelli, O.; Yalçın, Z.

    2015-05-01

    The Electro-Coagulated Thermal Waste (ECTW) sample of the impedance spectroscopy investigation for electrical modulus and conductivity are presented. Electrical properties via temperature and frequency dependent impedance spectroscopy were investigated. Real and imaginary parts of electrical modulus were measured at various frequencies and a related Cole-Cole plot was acquired as well. The surface resistivity of the ECTW was measured by the four-point probe measurement technique, yielding a relatively high surface resistivity. As a result of this study, an effective building shielding material, which is a cost effective alternative, is proposed. The activation energy values were calculated from the Arrhenius plots at different frequencies. The transition region in this plot may be attributed to activation of ionic conductivity at lower temperatures.

  16. Recent applications of liquid metals featuring nanoscale surface oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Taylor V.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2016-05-01

    This proceeding describes recent efforts from our group to control the shape and actuation of liquid metal. The liquid metal is an alloy of gallium and indium which is non-toxic, has negligible vapor pressure, and develops a thin, passivating surface oxide layer. The surface oxide allows the liquid metal to be patterned and shaped into structures that do not minimize interfacial energy. The surface oxide can be selectively removed by changes in pH or by applying a voltage. The surface oxide allows the liquid metal to be 3D printed to form free-standing structures. It also allows for the liquid metal to be injected into microfluidic channels and to maintain its shape within the channels. The selective removal of the oxide results in drastic changes in surface tension that can be used to control the flow behavior of the liquid metal. The metal can also wet thin, solid films of metal that accelerates droplets of the liquid along the metal traces .Here we discuss the properties and applications of liquid metal to make soft, reconfigurable electronics.

  17. Featuring the nucleosome surface as a therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Isabel Torres Gomes; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Santos, Guilherme Martins

    2015-05-01

    Chromatin is the major regulator of gene expression and genome maintenance. Proteins that bind the nucleosome, the repetitive unit of chromatin, and the histone H4 tail are critical to establishing chromatin architecture and phenotypic outcomes. Intriguingly, nucleosome-binding proteins (NBPs) and the H4 tail peptide compete for the same binding site at an acidic region on the nucleosome surface. Although the essential facts about the nucleosome were revealed 17 years ago, new insights into its atomic structure and molecular mechanisms are still emerging. Several complex nucleosome:NBP structures were recently revealed, characterizing the NBP-binding sites on the nucleosome surface. Here we discuss the potential of the nucleosome surface as a therapeutic target and the impact and development of exogenous nucleosome-binding molecules (eNBMs).

  18. Features of surface topography and the geological activity of Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    According to the data "New Horizons" of the spacecraft, researchers were able to specify the diameter of Pluto-2374 km. Its surface temperature in the equatorial region varies from 33 to 55 K over the planet's orbital period around the Sun in ~248 years. Presumably the surface of Pluto has a rocky base covered with a mantle of water ice, of frozen methane, nitrogen, ammonia and CO. Due to the large eccentricity of the orbit of Pluto, as it approaches the Sun, the ice melts, and the atmosphere is formed mainly of nitrogen and methane; while removing of the planet from the Sun - the atmosphere freezes out again.

  19. Sensitivity enhancement of surface thermal lens technique with a short-wavelength probe beam: Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaorong [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Key Laboratory of Optical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610209 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Bincheng [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Key Laboratory of Optical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610209 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Surface thermal lens is a highly sensitive photothermal technique to measure low absorption losses of various solid materials. In such applications, the sensitivity of surface thermal lens is a key parameter for measuring extremely low absorption. In this paper, we experimentally investigated the influence of probe beam wavelength on the sensitivity of surface thermal lens for measuring the low absorptance of optical laser components. Three probe lasers with wavelength 375 nm, 633 nm, and 1570 nm were used, respectively, to detect the surface thermal lens amplitude of a highly reflective coating sample excited by a cw modulated Gaussian beam at 1064 nm. The experimental results showed that the maximum amplitude of surface thermal lens signal obtained at corresponding optimized detection distance was inversely proportional to the wavelength of the probe beam, as predicted by previous theoretical model. The sensitivity of surface thermal lens could, therefore, be improved by detecting surface thermal lens signal with a short-wavelength probe beam.

  20. Upwelling filaments are cold, typically narrow features in surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    strong offshore flows and often terminate in eddy-like structures ... model initiated with observed velocity profiles. Mc-. Creary et al. ... These are a forced equatorward flow at the surface ...... 1991 — Dynamical simulations of filament formation and evolution in ... MOOERS, C. N. K. and A. R. ROBINSON 1984 — Turbulent jets.

  1. The Surface Features of Four Microcomputer Reading Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Virginia N.

    1984-01-01

    Uses the Bradley Inventory of Reading Comprehension Software to evaluate surface characteristics (including documentation and instructional design) of microcomputer reading comprehension programs produced by Scott Foresman, Random House, Control Data Corporation, and Basic Learning Systems. All four programs received high scores, but the Scott…

  2. FEATURES OF GEODEFORMATION CHANGES OF NEAR SURFACE SEDIMENTARY ROCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Larionov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of the deformation process in the near surface sedimentary rocks, which has been carried out in a seismically active region of Kamchatka peninsular since 2007,are presented. The peculiarity of the experiments on the registration of geodeformations is the application of a laser deformograph-interferometer constructed according to the Michelson interferometer scheme.

  3. [Quantitative estimation of CaO content in surface rocks using hyperspectral thermal infrared emissivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Fu; Zhang, Xue-Wen; Huang, Zhao-Qiang; Yang, Hang; Zhang, Fei-Zhou

    2011-11-01

    The objective of the present paper is to study the quantitative relationship between the CaO content and the thermal infrared emissivity spectra. The surface spectral emissivity of 23 solid rocks samples were measured in the field and the first derivative of the spectral emissivity was also calculated. Multiple linear regression (MLR), principal component analysis (PCR) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) were modeled and the regression results were compared. The results show that there is a good relationship between CaO content and thermal emissivity spectra features; emissivities become lower when CaO content increases in the 10.3-13 mm region; the first derivative spectra have a better predictive ability compared to the original emissivity spectra.

  4. Peculiar features of modeling of thermal processes of the cutting area in the SOLIDWORKS SIMULATION system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepchin Ya.A.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Management of thermo-physical process of cutting zone by changing certain parameters of the cutting regime, tool geometry or coolant using allows to achieve a higher level of handling performance. The forecasting of thermal processes during metal cutting is characterized by the multifactor of the model and the nonlinearity of the connection between the temperature field of the cutting zone and the processing parameters. Therefore realistic modeling of these processes with regard to the maximum number of influencing factors which will minimize the time and cost of experimental studies is very important. The research investigates the use of computer-aided design SolidWorks Simulation system to analyze the thermal processes occurring in the cutting zone during finishing turning of hardened circular steel cutting blade of superhard material. While modeling, the distribution of heat generated in cut (in the zone of plastic deformation of the workpiece and on the surfaces of friction of the cutting blade with chips and the treated surface is observed by four flows: to the tool, chips, workpiece and the environment. The limiting conditions for the existence of the developed model-geometric, physical and temporal limits are defined. Simulation is performed in steady and transient modes. Control of adequacy of simulation results is made. The conclusions of the analysis of opportunities of CAD SolidWorks Simulation System for research of thermal processes the cutting zone are drawn.

  5. Broad features of surface ozone variations over Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shende, R. R.; Jayaraman, K.; Sreedharan, C. R.; Tiwari, V. S.

    1994-01-01

    Surface ozone concentration at three Indian stations - New Delhi (28.6 deg N), Pune (18.5 deg N) and Thiruvananthapuram (formerly Trivandrum (8.3 deg N) - has been measured since 1973 with the help of an electrochemical continuous ozone recorder. These stations show diurnal, seasonal and annual cycles in surface ozone. Daily changes show that the minimum value occurs at sunrise and maximum in the afternoon. As regards seasonal variations, Thiruvananthapuram and Pune have a minimum value during monsoon season (June to August) while at New Delhi the minimum value occurs in January. However, New Delhi also records low ozone amount during monsoon season identical to the amounts show at Thiruvananthapuram and Pune. The annual cycles at these stations have been compared with similar measurements in the northern and southern hemispheres. The Indian measurements agree well with the annual cycles at these stations. Further, the analysis of the Indian data indicates that the major contribution in surface ozone comes from the natural sources like stratospheric-tropospheric exchange, turbulence, and mixing in the boundary layer; however, a small contribution from anthropogenic sources cannot be ruled out at Pune and probably at New Delhi, especially in winter and summer seasons.

  6. Thermal control of sequential on-surface transformation of a hydrocarbon molecule on a copper surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shigeki; Haapasilta, Ville; Lindner, Benjamin D.; Tahara, Kazukuni; Spijker, Peter; Buitendijk, Jeroen A.; Pawlak, Rémy; Meier, Tobias; Tobe, Yoshito; Foster, Adam S.; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-09-01

    On-surface chemical reactions hold the potential for manufacturing nanoscale structures directly onto surfaces by linking carbon atoms in a single-step reaction. To fabricate more complex and functionalized structures, the control of the on-surface chemical reactions must be developed significantly. Here, we present a thermally controlled sequential three-step chemical transformation of a hydrocarbon molecule on a Cu(111) surface. With a combination of high-resolution atomic force microscopy and first-principles computations, we investigate the transformation process in step-by-step detail from the initial structure to the final product via two intermediate states. The results demonstrate that surfaces can be used as catalysing templates to obtain compounds, which cannot easily be synthesized by solution chemistry.

  7. Engineered biomimicry: polymeric replication of surface features found on insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsifer, Drew P.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2011-04-01

    By combining the modified conformal-evaporated-film-by-rotation (M-CEFR) technique with nickel electroforming, we have produced master negatives of nonplanar biotemplates. An approximately 250-nm-thick conformal coating of nanocrystaline nickel is deposited on a surface structure of interest found in class Insecta, and the coating is then reinforced with a roughly 60-μm-thick structural layer of nickel by electroforming. This structural layer endows the M-CEFR coating with the mechanical robustness necessary for casting or stamping multiple polymer replicas of the biotemplate. We have made master negatives of blowfly corneas, beetle elytrons, and butterfly wings.

  8. A multi-perspective dynamic feature concept in adaptive NC machining of complex freeform surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xu; Li, Yingguang; Gao, James

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new concept of feature for freeform surface machining that defines the changes in feature status during real manufacturing situations which have not been sufficiently addressed by current international standards and previous research in feature technology. These changes are multi-perspective, including (i) changes in depth-of-cut: the geometry of a feature in the depth-of-cut direction changes during different machining operations such as roughing, semi-finishing and fin...

  9. Quantitative reconstruction of thermal and dynamic characteristics of lava flow from surface thermal measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkii, Alexander; Kovtunov, Dmitry; Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Tsepelev, Igor; Melnik, Oleg

    2016-06-01

    We study a model of lava flow to determine its thermal and dynamic characteristics from thermal measurements of the lava at its surface. Mathematically this problem is reduced to solving an inverse boundary problem. Namely, using known conditions at one part of the model boundary we determine the missing condition at the remaining part of the boundary. We develop a numerical approach to the mathematical problem in the case of steady-state flow. Assuming that the temperature and the heat flow are prescribed at the upper surface of the model domain, we determine the flow characteristics in the entire model domain using a variational (adjoint) method. We have performed computations of model examples and showed that in the case of smooth input data the lava temperature and the flow velocity can be reconstructed with a high accuracy. As expected, a noise imposed on the smooth input data results in a less accurate solution, but still acceptable below some noise level. Also we analyse the influence of optimization methods on the solution convergence rate. The proposed method for reconstruction of physical parameters of lava flows can also be applied to other problems in geophysical fluid flows.

  10. Features of Ion-Electronic Emission from Surface of Semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kurochka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of the research value of the current of the secondary electrons in the ion-beam etching of various semiconductors. Shows the setup and electrical circuit of the experiment. An experimental study to determine the dependence of the current of the secondary electrons from the band gap Eg and the height of the potential barrier (electron affinity eχ. It is shown that in the conditions of ion-beam etching of the semiconductor is the penetration of the electric field, which leads to a shift of the energy levels of electrons in the surface layer. Found that the ion-electronic signal emission silicon n-type is higher than the p-type silicon.

  11. Evaluation of thermal resistance of building insulations with reflective surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Št'astník, S.

    2012-09-01

    The thermal resistance of advanced insulation materials, applied namely in civil engineering, containing reflective surfaces and air gaps, cannot be evaluated correctly using the valid European standards because of presence of the dominant nonlinear radiative heat transfer and other phenomena not included in the recommended computational formulae. The proper general physical analysis refers to rather complicated problems from classical thermodynamics, whose both existence theory and numerical analysis contain open questions and cannot be done in practice when the optimization of composition of insulation layers is required. This paper, coming from original experimental results, demonstrates an alternative simplified computational approach, taking into account the most important physical processes, useful in the design of modern insulation systems.

  12. Improvements to a Response Surface Thermal Model for Orion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stephen W.; Walker, William Q.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to determine if a Design of Experiments (DOE)/Response Surface Methodology could be applied to on-orbit thermal analysis and produce a set of Response Surface Equations (RSE) that predict Orion vehicle temperatures within 10 F. The study used the Orion Outer Mold Line model. Five separate factors were identified for study: yaw, pitch, roll, beta angle, and the environmental parameters. Twenty-three external Orion components were selected and their minimum and maximum temperatures captured over a period of two orbits. Thus, there are 46 responses. A DOE case matrix of 145 runs was developed. The data from these cases were analyzed to produce a fifth order RSE for each of the temperature responses. For the 145 cases in the DOE matrix, the agreement between the engineering data and the RSE predictions was encouraging with 40 of the 46 RSEs predicting temperatures within the goal band. However, the verification cases showed most responses did not meet the 10 F goal. After reframing the focus of the study to better align the RSE development with the purposes of the model, a set of RSEs for both the minimum and maximum radiator temperatures was produced which predicted the engineering model output within +/-4 F. Therefore, with the correct application of the DOE/RSE methodology, RSEs can be developed that provide analysts a fast and easy way to screen large numbers of environments and assess proposed changes to the RSE factors.

  13. Comparison of MESSENGER Optical Images with Thermal and Radar Data for the Surface of MERCURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, D. T.; Coman, E. I.; Chabot, N. L.; Izenberg, N. R.; Harmon, J. K.; Neish, C.

    2010-12-01

    Images collected by the MESSENGER spacecraft during its three Mercury flybys cover nearly the entire surface of the planet that was not imaged by Mariner 10. The MESSENGER data now allow us to observe features at optical wavelengths that were previously known only through remote sensing in other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. For example, the Mariner 10 infrared (IR) radiometer made measurements along a track on the night side of Mercury during the spacecraft's first encounter in 1974. Analysis of the IR radiometer data identified several thermal anomalies that we have correlated to craters with extensive rays or ejecta deposits, including Xiao Zhao and Eminescu. The thermal properties are consistent with a greater exposure of bare rock (exposed in steep walls or as boulders and cobbles) in and around these craters compared with the lower-thermal-inertia, finer-grained regolith of the surrounding older surface. The portion of Mercury not viewed by Mariner 10 has also been imaged by Earth-based radar. The radar backscatter gives information on the wavelength-scale surface roughness. Arecibo S-band (12.6-cm wavelength) radar observations have produced images of Eminescu and also revealed two spectacular rayed craters (Debussy and Hokusai) that have since been imaged by MESSENGER. We are examining radial profiles for these craters, extracted from both the radar images and MESSENGER narrow-angle camera mosaics, that extend from the crater center outwards to a distance of several crater diameters. Comparison of optical and radar profiles for the craters, as well as similar profiles for lunar craters, can provide insight into ejecta deposition, the effect of surface gravity on the cratering process, and space weathering.

  14. Radar, visual and thermal characteristics of Mars - Rough planar surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, G. G.

    1980-05-01

    High-resolution Viking Orbiter images contain significant information on Martian surface roughness at 25- to 100-m lateral scales, while earth-based radar observations of Mars are sensitive to roughness at lateral scales of 1 to 30 m or more. High-rms slopes predicted for the Tharsis-Memnonia-Amazonis volcanic plains from extremely weak radar returns are qualitatively confirmed by the Viking image data. Large-scale, curvilinear ridges on lava flows in the Memnonia Fossae region are interpreted as innate flow morphology caused by compressional foldover of moving lava sheets of possible rhyolite-dacite composition. The presence or absence of a recent mantle of fine-grained eolian material on the volcanic surfaces studied was determined by the visibility of fresh impact craters with diameters less than 50 m. Lava flows with surfaces modified by eolian erosion and deposition occur west-northwest of Apollinaris Patera at the border of the cratered equatorial uplands and southern Elysium Planitia. Nearby yardangs, for which radar observations indicate very high-rms slopes, are similar to terrestrial features of similar origin.

  15. Local-Scale Simulations of Nucleate Boiling on Micrometer Featured Surfaces: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitaraman, Hariswaran [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Moreno, Gilberto [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Narumanchi, Sreekant V [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-03

    A high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based model for bubble nucleation of the refrigerant HFE7100 on micrometer-featured surfaces is presented in this work. The single-fluid incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, along with energy transport and natural convection effects are solved on a featured surface resolved grid. An a priori cavity detection method is employed to convert raw profilometer data of a surface into well-defined cavities. The cavity information and surface morphology are represented in the CFD model by geometric mesh deformations. Surface morphology is observed to initiate buoyancy-driven convection in the liquid phase, which in turn results in faster nucleation of cavities. Simulations pertaining to a generic rough surface show a trend where smaller size cavities nucleate with higher wall superheat. This local-scale model will serve as a self-consistent connection to larger device scale continuum models where local feature representation is not possible.

  16. Generating Sub-Micron Features On Rough Surfaces Using Optical Trap Assisted Nanopatterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Fardel, Romain; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    Near-field intensity enhancement enables laser modification of materials with feature sizes below the classical diffraction limit. However, the need to maintain close distances between the objective element and the substrate typically limit demonstrations of this technology to flat surfaces, even though there are many cases where the ability to produce sub-micron features on rough or structured surfaces are needed. Here, we show the use of a new technique, optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN), for the production of nanoscale features on rippled substrates. The ability to position a microbead near-field objective close to the surface without the need for active feedback and control allows one to continuously move the bead across a rough surface without sticking. Sub-micron patterning of polyimide is demonstrated on surfaces with 1.1 μm steps showing good uniformity. Finally, the enabling technology allows for straightforward parallelization where multiple patterns can be created simultaneously over surface.

  17. Lava lake surface characterization by thermal imaging: Erta 'Ale volcano (Ethiopia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spampinato, L.; Oppenheimer, C.; Calvari, S.; Cannata, A.; Montalto, P.

    2008-12-01

    Active lava lakes represent the exposed, uppermost part of convecting magma systems and provide windows into the dynamics of magma transport and degassing. Erta 'Ale volcano located within the Danakil Depression in Ethiopia hosts one of the few permanent convecting lava lakes, probably active for a century or more. We report here on the main features of the lava lake surface based on observations from an infrared thermal camera made on 11 November 2006. Efficient magma circulation was reflected in the sustained transport of the surface, which was composed of pronounced incandescent cracks that separated wide plates of cooler crust. These crossed the lake from the upwelling to the downwelling margin with mean speeds ranging between 0.01 and 0.15 m s-1. Hot spots eventually opened in the middle of crust plates and/or along cracks. These produced mild explosive activity lasting commonly between ˜10 and ˜200 s. Apparent temperatures of cracks ranged between ˜700 and 1070°C, and of crust between ˜300 and 500°C. Radiant power output of the lake varied between ˜45 and 76 MW according to the superficial activity and continuous resurfacing of the lake. Time series analysis of the radiant power output data reveals cyclicity with a period of ˜10 min. The combination of visual and thermal observations with apparent mean temperatures and convection rates allows us to interpret these signals as the periodic release of hot overpressured gas bubbles at the lake surface.

  18. Importance of initial buoyancy field on evolution of mantle thermal structure: Implications of surface boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Glišović

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there has been significant progress in the seismic imaging of mantle heterogeneity, the outstanding issue that remains to be resolved is the unknown distribution of mantle temperature anomalies in the distant geological past that give rise to the present-day anomalies inferred by global tomography models. To address this question, we present 3-D convection models in compressible and self-gravitating mantle initialised by different hypothetical temperature patterns. A notable feature of our forward convection modelling is the use of self-consistent coupling of the motion of surface tectonic plates to the underlying mantle flow, without imposing prescribed surface velocities (i.e., plate-like boundary condition. As an approximation for the surface mechanical conditions before plate tectonics began to operate we employ the no-slip (rigid boundary condition. A rigid boundary condition demonstrates that the initial thermally-dominated structure is preserved, and its geographical location is fixed during the evolution of mantle flow. Considering the impact of different assumed surface boundary conditions (rigid and plate-like on the evolution of thermal heterogeneity in the mantle we suggest that the intrinsic buoyancy of seven superplumes is most-likely resolved in the tomographic images of present-day mantle thermal structure. Our convection simulations with a plate-like boundary condition reveal that the evolution of an initial cold anomaly beneath the Java-Indonesian trench system yields a long-term, stable pattern of thermal heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle that resembles the present-day Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs, especially below the Pacific. The evolution of subduction zones may be, however, influenced by the mantle-wide flow driven by deeply-rooted and long-lived superplumes since Archean times. These convection models also detect the intrinsic buoyancy of the Perm Anomaly that has been identified as a unique

  19. Attenuating the surface Urban Heat Island within the Local Thermal Zones through land surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiong; Ouyang, Wanlu

    2017-02-01

    Inefficient mitigation of excessive heat is attributed to the discrepancy between the scope of climate research and conventional planning practice. This study approaches this problem at both domains. Generally, the study, on one hand, claims that the climate research of the temperature phenomenon should be at local scale, where implementation of planning and design strategies can be more feasible. On the other hand, the study suggests that the land surface factors should be organized into zones or patches, which conforms to the urban planning and design manner. Thus in each zone, the land surface composition of those excessively hot places can be compared to the zonal standard. The comparison gives guidance to the modification of the land surface factors at the target places. Specifically, this study concerns the Land Surface Temperature (LST) in Wuhan, China. The land surface is classified into Local Thermal Zones (LTZ). The specifications of temperature sensitive land surface factors are relative homogeneous in each zone and so is the variation of the LST. By extending the city scale analysis of Urban Heat Island into local scale, the Local Surface Urban Heat Islands (LSUHIs) are extracted. Those places in each zone that constantly maintain as LSUHI and exceed the homogenous LST variation are considered as target places or hotspots with higher mitigation or adaptation priority. The operation is equivalent to attenuate the abnormal LST variation in each zone. The framework is practical in the form of prioritization and zoning, and mitigation strategies are essentially operated locally.

  20. Thermal expansion compensator having an elastic conductive element bonded to two facing surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determan, William (Inventor); Matejczyk, Daniel Edward (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A thermal expansion compensator is provided and includes a first electrode structure having a first surface, a second electrode structure having a second surface facing the first surface and an elastic element bonded to the first and second surfaces and including a conductive element by which the first and second electrode structures electrically and/or thermally communicate, the conductive element having a length that is not substantially longer than a distance between the first and second surfaces.

  1. Thermally anomalous features in the subsurface of Enceladus's south polar terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, A.; Leyrat, C.; Janssen, M. A.; Choblet, G.; Tobie, G.; Bourgeois, O.; Lucas, A.; Sotin, C.; Howett, C.; Kirk, R.; Lorenz, R. D.; West, R. D.; Stolzenbach, A.; Massé, M.; Hayes, A. H.; Bonnefoy, L.; Veyssière, G.; Paganelli, F.

    2017-03-01

    Saturn's moon Enceladus is an active world. In 2005, the Cassini spacecraft witnessed for the first time water-rich jets venting from four anomalously warm fractures (called sulci) near its south pole1,2. Since then, several observations have provided evidence that the source of the material ejected from Enceladus is a large underground ocean, the depth of which is still debated3-6. Here, we report on the first and only opportunity that Cassini's RADAR instrument7,8 had to observe Enceladus's south polar terrain closely, targeting an area a few tens of kilometres north of the active sulci. Detailed analysis of the microwave radiometry observations highlights the ongoing activity of the moon. The instrument recorded the microwave thermal emission, revealing a warm subsurface region with prominent thermal anomalies that had not been identified before. These anomalies coincide with large fractures, similar or structurally related to the sulci. The observations imply the presence of a broadly distributed heat production and transport system below the south polar terrain with 'plate-like' features and suggest that a liquid reservoir could exist at a depth of only a few kilometres under the ice shell at the south pole. The detection of a possible dormant sulcus further suggests episodic geological activity.

  2. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM) phase images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helas, G.; Andreae, M. O.

    2008-10-01

    We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM) phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly shows deposits of distinguishable material on the surface. We apply this technique to dust aerosol particles from the Sahara collected over the Atlantic Ocean and describe micro-features on the surfaces of such particles.

  3. Casimir-Polder forces in the presence of thermally excited surface modes

    CERN Document Server

    Laliotis, Athanasios; Maurin, Isabelle; Ducloy, Martial; Bloch, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Casimir-Polder interaction addresses fundamental issues for understanding vacuum and thermal fluctuations. It is highly sensitive to surface waves which, in the near field, govern the thermal emission of a hot surface. Here we use optical reflection spectroscopy to monitor the atom-surface interaction between a Cs*(7D3/2) atom and a hot sapphire surface at a distance ~ 100 nm. In our experiments, that explore a large range of temperatures (500-1000K) the hot surface is at thermal equilibrium with the vacuum. The observed increase of the interaction with temperature, by up to 50 %, relies on the coupling between atomic virtual transitions in the infrared range and thermally excited surface-polariton modes. We extrapolate our findings to a broad distance range, from the isolated free atom to the short distances relevant to physical chemistry. Our work also opens the prospect of controlling atom surface interactions by engineering thermal fields.

  4. A new procedure for characterizing textured surfaces with a deterministic pattern of valley features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godi, Alessandro; Kühle, A; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    In recent years there has been the development of a high number of manufacturing methods for creating textured surfaces which often present deterministic patterns of valley features. Unfortunately, suitable methodologies for characterizing them are lacking. Existing standards cannot in fact...

  5. Retention of features on a mapped Drosophila brain surface using a Bézier-tube-based surface model averaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guan-Yu; Wu, Cheng-Chi; Shao, Hao-Chiang; Chang, Hsiu-Ming; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Chen, Yung-Chang

    2012-12-01

    Model averaging is a widely used technique in biomedical applications. Two established model averaging methods, iterative shape averaging (ISA) method and virtual insect brain (VIB) method, have been applied to several organisms to generate average representations of their brain surfaces. However, without sufficient samples, some features of the average Drosophila brain surface obtained using the above methods may disappear or become distorted. To overcome this problem, we propose a Bézier-tube-based surface model averaging strategy. The proposed method first compensates for disparities in position, orientation, and dimension of input surfaces, and then evaluates the average surface by performing shape-based interpolation. Structural features with larger individual disparities are simplified with half-ellipse-shaped Bézier tubes, and are unified according to these tubes to avoid distortion during the averaging process. Experimental results show that the average model yielded by our method could preserve fine features and avoid structural distortions even if only a limit amount of input samples are used. Finally, we qualitatively compare our results with those obtained by ISA and VIB methods by measuring the surface-to-surface distances between input surfaces and the averaged ones. The comparisons show that the proposed method could generate a more representative average surface than both ISA and VIB methods.

  6. Robust Feature Detection and Local Classification for Surfaces Based on Moment Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The stable local classification of discrete surfaces with respect to features such as edges and corners or concave and convex regions, respectively, is as quite difficult as well as indispensable for many surface processing applications. Usually, the feature detection is done via a local curvature analysis. If concerned with large triangular and irregular grids, e.g., generated via a marching cube algorithm, the detectors are tedious to treat and a robust classification is hard to achieve. He...

  7. Correlation of Thermally Induced Pores with Microstructural Features Using High Energy X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menasche, David B.; Shade, Paul A.; Lind, Jonathan; Li, Shiu Fai; Bernier, Joel V.; Kenesei, Peter; Schuren, Jay C.; Suter, Robert M.

    2016-11-01

    Combined application of a near-field High Energy Diffraction Microscopy measurement of crystal lattice orientation fields and a tomographic measurement of pore distributions in a sintered nickel-based superalloy sample allows pore locations to be correlated with microstructural features. Measurements were carried out at the Advanced Photon Source beamline 1-ID using an X-ray energy of 65 keV for each of the measurement modes. The nickel superalloy sample was prepared in such a way as to generate significant thermally induced porosity. A three-dimensionally resolved orientation map is directly overlaid with the tomographically determined pore map through a careful registration procedure. The data are shown to reliably reproduce the expected correlations between specific microstructural features (triple lines and quadruple nodes) and pore positions. With the statistics afforded by the 3D data set, we conclude that within statistical limits, pore formation does not depend on the relative orientations of the grains. The experimental procedures and analysis tools illustrated are being applied to a variety of materials problems in which local heterogeneities can affect materials properties.

  8. Thermal effects of λ = 808 nm GaAlAs diode laser irradiation on different titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannelli, Marco; Lasagni, Massimo; Bani, Daniele

    2015-12-01

    Diode lasers are widely used in dental laser treatment, but little is known about their thermal effects on different titanium implant surfaces. This is a key issue because already a 10 °C increase over the normal body temperature can induce bone injury and compromise osseo-integration. The present study aimed at evaluating the temperature changes and surface alterations experienced by different titanium surfaces upon irradiation with a λ = 808 nm diode laser with different settings and modalities. Titanium discs with surfaces mimicking different dental implant surfaces including TiUnite and anodized, machined surfaces were laser-irradiated in contact and non-contact mode, and with and without airflow cooling. Settings were 0.5-2.0 W for the continuous wave mode and 10-45 μJ, 20 kHz, 5-20 μs for the pulsed wave mode. The results show that the surface characteristics have a marked influence on temperature changes in response to irradiation. The TiUnite surface, corresponding to the osseous interface of dental implants, was the most susceptible to thermal rise, while the machined surfaces, corresponding to the implant collar, were less affected. In non-contact mode and upon continuous wave emission, the temperature rose above the 50 °C tissue damage threshold. Scanning electron microscopy investigation of surface alterations revealed that laser treatment in contact mode resulted in surface scratches even when no irradiation was performed. These findings indicate that the effects of diode laser irradiation on implant surfaces depend on physical features of the titanium coating and that in order to avoid thermal or physical damage to implant surface the irradiation treatment has to be carefully selected.

  9. Surface Defect Target Identification on Copper Strip Based on Adaptive Genetic Algorithm and Feature Saliency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewu Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the stability and robustness of visual inspection system (VIS, a new surface defect target identification method for copper strip based on adaptive genetic algorithm (AGA and feature saliency is proposed. First, the study uses gray level cooccurrence matrix (GLCM and HU invariant moments for feature extraction. Then, adaptive genetic algorithm, which is used for feature selection, is evaluated and discussed. In AGA, total error rates and false alarm rates are integrated to calculate the fitness value, and the probability of crossover and mutation is adjusted dynamically according to the fitness value. At last, the selected features are optimized in accordance with feature saliency and are inputted into a support vector machine (SVM. Furthermore, for comparison, we conduct experiments using the selected optimal feature subsequence (OFS and the total feature sequence (TFS separately. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can guarantee the correct rates of classification and can lower the false alarm rates.

  10. The surface velocity feature of Glacier No.1 at the headwater of Urumqi River,Tianshan Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The movement of a glacier can redistribute glacier mass balance and change water and thermal conditions of the glacier.Thus,the glacier can maintain its dynamic balance.Surface velocity of a glacier is a basic feature of glacier movement.With successive monthly observations from 2006 to 2008,we obtained spatial and temporal variations for surface velocity of Glacier No.1 at the headwater of Urumqi River,Tianshan Mountain.Dynamic simulation was used to verify the findings.Results show that altitudinal distribution of glacier velocity was influenced by synthetic effects such as glacier thickness,slope,and bedrock morphology.However,seasonal variation was influenced by changing glacier thickness.

  11. Features of wind field over the sea surface in the coastal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzikova, A. K.; Kudryavtsev, V. N.; Myasoedov, A. G.; Chapron, B.; Zilitinkevich, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we analyze SAR wind field features, in particular the effects of wind shadowing. These effects represent the dynamics of the internal atmospheric boundary layer, which is formed due to the transition of the air flow arriving from the rough land surface to the "smooth" water surface. In the wind-shadowed area, the flow accelerates, and a surface wind stress increases with fetch. The width of the shadow depends not only on the wind speed and atmospheric boundary layer stratification, but also on geographic features such as windflow multiple transformations over the complex surface land-Lake Chudskoe-land-Gulf of Finland. Measurements showed that, in the area of wind acceleration, the surface stress normalized by an equilibrium value (far from the coast) is a universal function of dimensionless fetch Xf/G. Surface wind stress reaches an equilibrium value at Xf/G ≈ 0.4, which is the scale of the planetary-boundary-layer relaxation.

  12. Practical Calculation of Thermal Deformation and Manufacture Error uin Surface Grinding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周里群; 李玉平

    2002-01-01

    The paper submits a method to calculate thermal deformation and manufacture error in surface grinding.The author established a simplified temperature field model.and derived the thermal deformaiton of the ground workpiece,It is found that there exists not only a upwarp thermal deformation,but also a parallel expansion thermal deformation.A upwarp thermal deformation causes a concave shape error on the profile of the workpiece,and a parallel expansion thermal deformation causes a dimension error in height.The calculations of examples are given and compared with presented experiment data.

  13. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Design Parameters for Hydronic Embedded Thermally Active Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos-Meson, Victor; Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; E. Poulsen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates the principal design parameters affecting the thermal performance of embedded hydronic Thermally Active Surfaces (TAS), combining the Response Surface Method (RSM) with the Finite Elements Method (FEM). The study ranks the combined effects of the parameters on the heat flux...

  14. LEDs on HVPE grown GaN substrates: Influence of macroscopic surface features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SK. S. Rahman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the strong influence of GaN substrate surface morphology on optical properties and performance of light emitting devices grown on freestanding GaN. As-grown freestanding HVPE GaN substrates show excellent AFM RMS and XRD FWHM values over the whole area, but distinctive features were observed on the surface, such as macro-pits, hillocks and facets extending over several millimeters. Electroluminescence measurements reveal a strong correlation of the performance and peak emission wavelength of LEDs with each of these observed surface features. This results in multiple peaks and non-uniform optical output power for LEDs on as-grown freestanding GaN substrates. Removal of these surface features by chemical mechanical polishing results in highly uniform peak wavelength and improved output power over the whole wafer area.

  15. Directional Characteristics of Thermal-Infrared Beaming from Atmosphereless Planetary Surfaces - A New Thermophysical Model

    CERN Document Server

    Rozitis, Ben

    2012-01-01

    We present a new rough-surface thermophysical model (Advanced Thermophysical Model or ATPM) that describes the observed directional thermal emission from any atmosphereless planetary surface. It explicitly incorporates partial shadowing, scattering of sunlight, selfheating and thermal-infrared beaming (re-radiation of absorbed sunlight back towards the Sun as a result of surface roughness). The model is verified by accurately reproducing ground-based directional thermal emission measurements of the lunar surface using surface properties that are consistent with the findings of the Apollo missions and roughness characterised by an RMS slope of ~32 degrees. By considering the wide range of potential asteroid surface properties, the model implies a beaming effect that cannot be described by a simple parameter or function. It is highly dependent on the illumination and viewing angles as well as surface thermal properties and is predominantly caused by macroscopic rather than microscopic roughness. Roughness alter...

  16. Investigations of micron and submicron wear features of diseased human cartilage surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhongxiao; Baena, Juan C; Wang, Meiling

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common disease. However, its causes and morphological features of diseased cartilage surfaces are not well understood. The purposes of this research were (a) to develop quantitative surface characterization techniques to study human cartilages at a micron and submicron scale and (b) to investigate distinctive changes in the surface morphologies and biomechanical properties of the cartilages in different osteoarthritis grades. Diseased cartilage samples collected from osteoarthritis patients were prepared for image acquisition using two different techniques, that is, laser scanning microscopy at a micrometer scale and atomic force microscopy at a nanometer scale. Three-dimensional, digital images of human cartilages were processed and analyzed quantitatively. This study has demonstrated that high-quality three-dimensional images of human cartilage surfaces could be obtained in a hydrated condition using laser scanning microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Based on the numerical data extracted from improved image quality and quantity, it has been found that osteoarthritis evolution can be identified by specific surface features at the micrometer scale, and these features are amplitude and functional property related. At the submicron level, the spatial features of the surfaces were revealed to differ between early and advanced osteoarthritis grades. The effective indentation moduli of human cartilages effectively revealed the cartilage deterioration. The imaging acquisition and numerical analysis methods established allow quantitative studies of distinctive changes in cartilage surface characteristics and better understanding of the cartilage degradation process.

  17. Feature Selection for Intelligent Firefighting Robot Classification of Fire, Smoke, and Thermal Reflections Using Thermal Infrared Images

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Jong-Hwan; Jo, Seongsik; Lattimer, Brian Y

    2016-01-01

    ... tasks [1-5]. One task is locating a fire inside of a structure outside the robot field of view (FOV). Fire, smoke, and their thermal reflections can be clues to determine a heading that will ul...

  18. Comparison of Observed Surface Temperatures of 4 Vesta to the KRC Thermal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, T. N.; Becker, K. J.; Anderson, J. A.; Capria, M. T.; Tosi, F.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Palomba, E.; Grassi, D.; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Combe, J.-P.; McCord, T. B.; Li, J.-Y.; Russell, C. T.; Ryamond, C. A.; Mittlefehldt, D.; Toplis, M.; Forni, O.; Sykes, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we will compare ob-served temperatures of the surface of Vesta using data acquired by the Dawn [1] Visible and Infrared Map-ping Spectrometer (VIR-MS) [2] during the approach phase to model results from the KRC thermal model. High thermal inertia materials, such as bedrock, resist changes in temperature while temperatures of low thermal inertia material, such as dust, respond quickly to changes in solar insolation. The surface of Vesta is expected to have low to medium thermal inertia values, with the most commonly used value being extremely low at 15 TIU [4]. There are several parameters which affect observed temperatures in addition to thermal inertia: bond albedo, slope, and surface roughness. In addition to these parameters, real surfaces are rarely uniform monoliths that can be described by a single thermal inertia value. Real surfaces are often vertically layered or are mixtures of dust and rock. For Vesta's surface, with temperature extremes ranging from 50 K to 275 K and no atmosphere, even a uniform monolithic surface may have non-uniform thermal inertia due to temperature dependent thermal conductivity.

  19. Multiscale vascular surface model generation from medical imaging data using hierarchical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkers, Eric J; Taylor, Charles A

    2008-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of blood flow from image-based patient specific models can provide useful physiologic information for guiding clinical decision making. A novel method for the generation of image-based, 3-D, multiscale vascular surface models for CFD is presented. The method generates multiscale surfaces based on either a linear triangulated or a globally smooth nonuniform rational B-spline (NURB) representation. A robust local curvature analysis is combined with a novel global feature analysis to set mesh element size. The method is particularly useful for CFD modeling of complex vascular geometries that have a wide range of vasculature size scales, in conditions where 1) initial surface mesh density is an important consideration for balancing surface accuracy with manageable size volumetric meshes, 2) adaptive mesh refinement based on flow features makes an underlying explicit smooth surface representation desirable, and 3) semi-automated detection and trimming of a large number of inlet and outlet vessels expedites model construction.

  20. Tuning thermal transport in ultrathin silicon membranes by surface nanoscale engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Sanghamitra; Reparaz, J Sebastian; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C; Graczykowski, Bartlomiej; Wagner, Markus R; Sledzinska, Marianna; Shchepetov, Andrey; Prunnila, Mika; Ahopelto, Jouni; Sotomayor-Torres, Clivia M; Donadio, Davide

    2015-04-28

    A detailed understanding of the connections of fabrication and processing to structural and thermal properties of low-dimensional nanostructures is essential to design materials and devices for phononics, nanoscale thermal management, and thermoelectric applications. Silicon provides an ideal platform to study the relations between structure and heat transport since its thermal conductivity can be tuned over 2 orders of magnitude by nanostructuring. Combining realistic atomistic modeling and experiments, we unravel the origin of the thermal conductivity reduction in ultrathin suspended silicon membranes, down to a thickness of 4 nm. Heat transport is mostly controlled by surface scattering: rough layers of native oxide at surfaces limit the mean free path of thermal phonons below 100 nm. Removing the oxide layers by chemical processing allows us to tune the thermal conductivity over 1 order of magnitude. Our results guide materials design for future phononic applications, setting the length scale at which nanostructuring affects thermal phonons most effectively.

  1. Thermal and neutron-physical features of the nuclear reactor for a power pulsation plant for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, É. G.; Kaminskii, A. S.; Konyukhov, G. V.; Pavshuk, V. A.; Turbina, T. A.

    2012-05-01

    We have explored the possibility of creating small-size reactors with a high power output with the provision of thermal stability and nuclear safety under standard operating conditions and in emergency situations. The neutron-physical features of such a reactor have been considered and variants of its designs preserving the main principles and approaches of nuclear rocket engine technology are presented.

  2. Structural Features of Boron-Doped Si(113) Surfaces Simulated by ab initio Calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Long-Zhong; LIU Zheng-Hui; ZHANG Zhao-Hui

    2008-01-01

    Based on ab initio calculations, boron-doped Si(113) surfaces have been simulated and atomic structures of the surfaces have been proposed. It has been determined that surface features of empty and filled states that are separately localized at pentamers and adatoms indicates a low surface density of B atoms, while it is attributed to heavy doping of B atoms at the second layer that pentamers and adatoms are both present in an image of scanning tunnelling microscopy. B doping at the second layer should be balanced by adsorbed B or Si atoms beside the adatoms and inserted B interstitials below the adatoms.

  3. Model-based defect detection on structured surfaces having optically unresolved features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Daniel; Henning, Andrew J; Sherlock, Ben; Leach, Richard K; Coupland, Jeremy; Giusca, Claudiu L

    2015-10-20

    In this paper, we demonstrate, both numerically and experimentally, a method for the detection of defects on structured surfaces having optically unresolved features. The method makes use of synthetic reference data generated by an observational model that is able to simulate the response of the selected optical inspection system to the ideal structure, thereby providing an ideal measure of deviation from nominal geometry. The method addresses the high dynamic range challenge faced in highly parallel manufacturing by enabling the use of low resolution, wide field of view optical systems for defect detection on surfaces containing small features over large regions.

  4. Evaluation of surface EMG features for the recognition of American Sign Language gestures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmidou, Vasiliki E; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J; Panas, Stavros M

    2006-01-01

    In this work, analysis of the surface electromyogram (sEMG) signal is proposed for the recognition of American sign language (ASL) gestures. To this purpose, sixteen features are extracted from the sEMG signal acquired from the user's forearm, and evaluated by the Mahalanobis distance criterion. Discriminant analysis is used to reduce the number of features used in the classification of the signed ASL gestures. The proposed features are tested against noise resulting in a further reduced set of features, which are evaluated for their discriminant ability. The classification results reveal that 97.7% of the inspected ASL gestures were correctly recognized using sEMG-based features, providing a promising solution to the automatic ASL gesture recognition problem.

  5. Dynamic characterization for tumor- and deformation-induced thermal contrasts on breast surface: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Zhan, Wang; Loew, Murray H.

    2009-02-01

    Understanding the complex relationship between the thermal contrasts on the breast surface and the underlying physiological and pathological factors is important for thermogram-based breast cancer detection. Our previous work introduced a combined thermal-elastic modeling method with improved ability to simultaneously characterize both elastic-deformation-induced and tumor-induced thermal contrasts on the breast. In this paper, the technique is further extended to investigate the dynamic behaviors of the breast thermal contrasts during cold stress and thermal recovery procedures in the practice of dynamic thermal imaging. A finite-element method (FEM) has been developed for dynamic thermal and elastic modeling. It is combined with a technique to address the nonlinear elasticity of breast tissues, as would arise in the large deformations caused by gravity. Our simulation results indicate that different sources of the thermal contrasts, such as the presence of a tumor, and elastic deformation, have different transient time courses in dynamic thermal imaging with cold-stress and thermal-recovery. Using appropriate quantifications of the thermal contrasts, we find that the tumor- and deformation-induced thermal contrasts show opposite changes in the initial period of the dynamic courses, whereas the global maxima of the contrast curves are reached at different time points during a cold-stress or thermal-recovery procedure. Moreover, deeper tumors generally lead to smaller peaks but have larger lags in the thermal contrast time course. These findings suggest that dynamic thermal imaging could be useful to differentiate the sources of the thermal contrast on breast surface and hence to enhance tumor detectability.

  6. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM phase images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Andreae

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly shows deposits of distinguishable material on the surface. We apply this technique to dust aerosol particles from the Sahara collected over the Atlantic Ocean and describe micro-features on the surfaces of such particles.

  7. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM phase images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Helas

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly shows deposits of distinguishable material on the surface. We apply this technique to dust aerosol particles from the Sahara collected over the Atlantic Ocean and describe micro-features on the surfaces of such particles.

  8. Surface features on Sahara soil dust particles made visible by atomic force microscope (AFM) phase images

    OpenAIRE

    Andreae, M. O.; G. Helas

    2008-01-01

    We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM) phase images can reveal surface features of soil dust particles, which are not evident using other microscopic methods. The non-contact AFM method is able to resolve topographical structures in the nanometer range as well as to uncover repulsive atomic forces and attractive van der Waals' forces, and thus gives insight to surface properties. Though the method does not allow quantitative assignment in terms of chemical compound description, it clearly...

  9. Contributions of feature shapes and surface cues to the recognition of facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sormaz, Mladen; Young, Andrew W; Andrews, Timothy J

    2016-10-01

    Theoretical accounts of face processing often emphasise feature shapes as the primary visual cue to the recognition of facial expressions. However, changes in facial expression also affect the surface properties of the face. In this study, we investigated whether this surface information can also be used in the recognition of facial expression. First, participants identified facial expressions (fear, anger, disgust, sadness, happiness) from images that were manipulated such that they varied mainly in shape or mainly in surface properties. We found that the categorization of facial expression is possible in either type of image, but that different expressions are relatively dependent on surface or shape properties. Next, we investigated the relative contributions of shape and surface information to the categorization of facial expressions. This employed a complementary method that involved combining the surface properties of one expression with the shape properties from a different expression. Our results showed that the categorization of facial expressions in these hybrid images was equally dependent on the surface and shape properties of the image. Together, these findings provide a direct demonstration that both feature shape and surface information make significant contributions to the recognition of facial expressions.

  10. Aspherical surfaces design for extreme ultraviolet lithographic objective with correction of thermal aberration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Li, Yanqiu

    2016-09-01

    At present, few projection objectives for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography pay attention to correct thermal aberration in optical design phase, which would lead to poor image quality in a practical working environment. We present an aspherical modification method for helping the EUV lithographic objective additionally correct the thermal aberration. Based on the thermal aberration and deformation predicted by integrated optomechanical analysis, the aspherical surfaces in an objective are modified by an iterative algorithm. The modified aspherical surfaces could correct the thermal aberration and maintain the initial high image quality in a practical working environment. A six-mirror EUV lithographic objective with 0.33-numerical aperture is taken as an example to illustrate the presented method. The results show that the thermal aberration can be corrected effectively, and the image quality of the thermally deformed system is improved to the initial design level, which proves the availability of the method.

  11. Surface Coatings for Low Emittance in the Thermal Surveillance Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    radiation emanating from the sky during the day and at night [13]; 2 - (2) -the geometry, surface topography, and surface cleanliness of the target and the... surface cleanliness . A description of terms and definitions used in reflectometry is provided by Judd [19] and Overington (20]. Measurement standards

  12. Thermal Performance of Hollow Clay Brick with Low Emissivity Treatment in Surface Enclosures

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Fioretti; Paolo Principi

    2014-01-01

    External walls made with hollow clay brick or block are widely used for their thermal, acoustic and structural properties. However, the performance of the bricks frequently does not conform with the minimum legal requirements or the values required for high efficiency buildings, and for this reason, they need to be integrated with layers of thermal insulation. In this paper, the thermal behavior of hollow clay block with low emissivity treatment on the internal cavity surfaces has been invest...

  13. Study of Dynamic Features of Surface Plasma in High-Power Disk Laser Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王腾; 高向东; Katayatna SEIJI; 金小莉

    2012-01-01

    High-speed photography was used to obtain the dynamic changes in the surface plasma during a high-power disk laser welding process. A color space clustering algorithm to extract the edge information of the surface plasma region was developed in order to improve the accuracy of image processing. With a comparative analysis of the plasma features, i.e., area and height, and the characteristics of the welded seam, the relationship between the surface plasma and the stability of the laser welding process was characterized, which provides a basic understanding for the real-time monitoring of laser welding.

  14. Thermal Performance of Hollow Clay Brick with Low Emissivity Treatment in Surface Enclosures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Fioretti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available External walls made with hollow clay brick or block are widely used for their thermal, acoustic and structural properties. However, the performance of the bricks frequently does not conform with the minimum legal requirements or the values required for high efficiency buildings, and for this reason, they need to be integrated with layers of thermal insulation. In this paper, the thermal behavior of hollow clay block with low emissivity treatment on the internal cavity surfaces has been investigated. The purpose of this application is to obtain a reduction in the thermal conductivity of the block by lowering the radiative heat exchange in the enclosures. The aims of this paper are to indicate a methodology for evaluating the thermal performance of the brick and to provide information about the benefits that should be obtained. Theoretical evaluations are carried out on several bricks (12 geometries simulated with two different thermal conductivities of the clay, using a finite elements model. The heat exchange procedure is implemented in accordance with the standard, so as to obtain standardized values of the thermal characteristics of the block. Several values of emissivity are hypothesized, related to different kinds of coating. Finally, the values of the thermal transmittance of walls built with the evaluated blocks have been calculated and compared. The results show how coating the internal surface of the cavity provides a reduction in the thermal conductivity of the block, of between 26% and 45%, for a surface emissivity of 0.1.

  15. Two-Dimension Sorting and Selection Algorithm featuring Thermal Balancing Control for Modular Multilevel Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangwongwanich, Ariya; Máthé, Lászlo; Teodorescu, Remus

    2016-01-01

    With the aim to solve the unbalanced thermal behavior in the modular multilevel converter, introduced by mismatch in the submodule parameters, a thermal balancing control strategy is proposed here. The proposed solution ensures a balanced junction temperature for the power devices, while...

  16. Structure and wettability property of the growth and nucleation surfaces of thermally treated freestanding CVD diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xiaoqiang; Cheng, Shaoheng; Ma, Yibo; Wu, Danfeng; Liu, Junsong; Wang, Qiliang; Yang, Yizhou; Li, Hongdong

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the surface features and wettability properties of the (1 0 0)-textured freestanding chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond films after thermal exposure in air at high temperature. Thermal oxidation at proper conditions eliminates selectively nanodiamonds and non-diamond carbons in the films. The growth side of the films contains (1 0 0)-oriented micrometer-sized columns, while its nucleation side is formed of nano-sized tips. The examined wettability properties of the as-treated diamond films reveal a hydrophilicity and superhydrophilicity on the growth surface and nucleation surface, respectively, which is determined by oxygen termination and geometry structure of the surface. When the surface termination is hydrogenated, the wettability of nucleation side converted from superhydrophilicity to high hydrophobicity, while the hydrophilicity of the growth side does not change significantly. The findings open a possibility for realizing freestanding diamond films having not only novel surface structures but also multifunction applications, especially proposed on the selected growth side or nucleation side in one product.

  17. The thermal energy of a scalar field on a unidimensional Riemann surface

    CERN Document Server

    Elizalde, E

    2002-01-01

    We discuss some controverted aspects of the evaluation of the thermal energy of a scalar field on a unidimensional Riemann surface. The calculations are carried out using a generalised zeta function approach.

  18. Thermal diffusion of potassium on the modified iron surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narkiewicz, U. [Institute of Chemical and Environment Engineering, Technical University of Szczecin, PuIaskiego 10, 70-322 Szczecin (Poland)]. E-mail: urszula.narkiewicz@ps.pl; Moszynski, D. [Institute of Chemical and Environment Engineering, Technical University of Szczecin, PuIaskiego 10, 70-322 Szczecin (Poland); BrosIawski, M. [Institute of Chemical and Environment Engineering, Technical University of Szczecin, PuIaskiego 10, 70-322 Szczecin (Poland)

    2005-10-31

    The diffusion of potassium on the polycrystalline iron surface modified by adsorbed oxygen and nitrogen has been studied by means of AES. The migration of potassium atoms has been observed independently on the constitution of the iron surface in the temperature range between 300 and 450 deg. C. The final concentration of potassium on the iron surface increases with temperature from 300 to 400 deg. C, irrespective of what atoms accompany potassium on the surface. At 450 deg. C, the final level of potassium concentration is decreased. The profiles of the concentration on the surface along the line crossing the source of potassium were also acquired. Applying the diffusion model of finite source, the diffusion coefficient of potassium for oxygen-covered and nitrogen-covered surfaces were evaluated.

  19. Investigation of thermal effect on exterior wall surface of building material at urban city area

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Fadhil Md Din, Hazlini Dzinun, M. Ponraj, Shreeshivadasan Chelliapan, Zainura Zainun Noor, Dilshah Remaz, Kenzo Iwao

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the investigation of heat impact on the vertical surfaces of buildings based on their thermal behavior. The study was performed based on four building materials that is commonly used in Malaysia; brick, concrete, granite and white concrete tiles. The thermal performances on the building materials were investigated using a surface temperature sensor, data logging system and infrared thermography. Results showed that the brick had the capability to absorb and store heat gre...

  20. Effect of surface topographic features on the optical properties of skin: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangli; Chen, Jianfeng; Zhao, Zuhua; Zhao, Gang; Dong, Erbao; Chu, Jiaru; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-10-01

    Tissue-simulating phantoms are used to validate and calibrate optical imaging systems and to understand light transport in biological tissue. Light propagation in a strongly turbid medium such as skin tissue experiences multiple scattering and diffuse reflection from the surface. Surface roughness introduces phase shifts and optical path length differences for light which is scattered within the skin tissue and reflected from the surface. In this paper, we study the effect of mismatched surface roughness on optical measurement and subsequent determination of optical properties of skin tissue. A series of phantoms with controlled surface features and optical properties corresponding to normal human skin are fabricated. The fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantoms with known surface roughness follows a standard soft lithography process. Surface roughness of skin-simulating phantoms are measured with Bruker stylus profiler. The diffuse reflectance of the phantom is validated by a UV/VIS spectrophotometer. The results show that surface texture and roughness have considerable influence on the optical characteristics of skin. This study suggests that surface roughness should be considered as an important contributing factor for the determination of tissue optical properties.

  1. Ion microprobe elemental analyses of impact features on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jerry L.; Wortman, Jim J.; Griffis, Dieter P.; Simon, Charles G.

    1991-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact features on several of the electro-active dust sensors utilized in the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) were subjected to elemental analysis using an ion microprobe. The negatively biased dust sensor surfaces acted as ion traps for cations produced in the plasma plumes of impacting particles. Impactor residue surrounds most impact features to two or three feature diameters. After etching away a layer of carbonaceous/silicaceous surface contamination, low mass resolution elemental survey scans are used to tentatively identify the presence of impactor debris. High mass resolution two-dimensional elemental maps and three dimensional depth profiling of the feature and surrounding area show the distribution and relative composition of the debris. The location of these sensors on the six primary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) sides provides a unique opportunity to further define the debris environment. Researchers applied the same techniques to impact and contaminant features on a set of ultra-pure, highly polished single crystal germanium wafer witness plates that were mounted on row 12 and exposed to the environment during the entire mission.

  2. Characterization and optimization of illumination vector for contouring surface form and feature using DSPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chaolong; Prasad A. S., Guru; Chan, Kelvin H. K.; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-06-01

    Surface defect or damage is one of the critical factors leading to the failure of engineering materials and structures. The methodologies for the measurement of surface shape and feature or defect have been extensively explored and developed over the past few decades, including both contact and non-contact methods. Speckle pattern interferometry, as a non-contact optical method, has been demonstrated to effectively contour the surface shape through adjusting the illumination vector. However, few studies have been made to investigate the effect of the initial position of the illumination source as well as the source translation direction. In this paper, we report to carry out a study of measuring the surface form and feature using digital speckle pattern interferometry system via a slight translation of illumination source. Through theoretically analyzing the sensitivity factor along with the experimental validation, it is shown that the contouring fringe is more sensitive to the surface height with an off-axis illumination than the paraxial illumination. It is also found that translating the source along axial and lateral direction can be both used for the surface shape re-construction.

  3. Uncertainty of diagnostic features measured by laser vibrometry: The case of optically non-cooperative surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinelli, G.; Paone, N.

    2012-12-01

    This paper discusses the uncertainty in the measurement of characteristic features by laser Doppler vibrometry useful to industrial diagnostics when measuring on polished, highly reflective, low diffusive surfaces, such as the enamelled metal sheet of the cabinet of electrical household appliances. This case is relevant to on-line quality control applications, where it is not possible to adopt any surface treatment to improve optical scattering properties. The paper illustrates in particular the effect of drop-out noise on the measured vibration signal and develops a joint analysis of drop-out noise due to poor optical properties and its effect on the diagnostic process, presented in statistical terms. A non-dimensional quantity is introduced to describe the amplitude of the Doppler signal and the presence of drop-out noise is shown to be correlated to its amplitude. Starting from the consideration that drop-out noise is impulsive, with a pseudo-random occurrence, this paper presents an experimental assessment of uncertainty in the measurement of some spectral features used for the diagnosis of electrical appliances on the production line. It can be seen that the effect of drop-out leads to an increase in scatter and to a systematic shift in the distribution of the features examined; this effect is relatively larger for features with low amplitude. The Monte Carlo simulation of measurement uncertainty propagation confirms the same trend and allows statistical distributions to be obtained for the features, thereby enabling us to draw some conclusions as regards diagnostic errors. This study shows that in the presence of pseudo-random drop-out noise a diagnosis based on spectral features with low amplitude has poor reliability and false-positives are highly probable. An analysis of this occurrence is made for cases of production exhibiting features with different statistical distributions and possible actions to limit such problem are highlighted.

  4. Near-surface Thermal Infrared Imaging of a Mixed Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, D. M.; Helliker, B. R.; Richardson, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Measurement of an organism's temperature is of basic physiological importance and therefore necessary for ecosystem modeling, yet most models derive leaf temperature from energy balance arguments or assume it is equal to air temperature. This is because continuous, direct measurement of leaf temperature outside of a controlled environment is difficult and rarely done. Of even greater challenge is measuring leaf temperature with the resolution required to understand the underlying energy balance and regulation of plant processes. To measure leaf temperature through the year, we have mounted a high-resolution, thermal infrared camera overlooking the canopy of a temperate deciduous forest. The camera is co-located with an eddy covariance system and a suite of radiometric sensors. Our camera measures longwave thermal infrared (λ = 7.5-14 microns) using a microbolometer array. Suspended in the canopy within the camera FOV is a matte black copper plate instrumented with fine wire thermocouples that acts as a thermal reference for each image. In this presentation, I will discuss the challenges of continuous, long-term field operation of the camera, as well as measurement sensitivity to physical and environmental parameters. Based on this analysis, I will show that the uncertainties in converting radiometric signal to leaf temperature are well constrained. The key parameter for minimizing uncertainty is the emissivity of the objects being imaged: measuring the emissivity to within 0.01 enables leaf temperature to be calculated to within 0.5°C. Finally, I will present differences in leaf temperature observed amongst species. From our two-year record, we characterize high frequency, daily, and seasonal thermal signatures of leaves and crowns, in relation to environmental conditions. Our images are taken with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to quantify the preferential heating of sunlit portions of the canopy and the cooling effect of wind gusts. Future work will

  5. Structural features and thermal property of propionylated starches with different amylose/amylopectin ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Shuyan; Zhang, Binjia; Qiao, Dongling; Pu, Huayin; Liu, Siyuan; Li, Lin

    2017-04-01

    This work concerned the effects of amylose/amylopectin ratio on the structure and thermal stability of propionylated starches with high degree of substitution (DS). Four starches with different amylose content were used to obtain propionylated starches. Acylation partly disrupted granule morphology of native starches, and the imperfection and porous structures of starch granule were intensified along with the increased amylose content. It was noted that the crystalline structure of starch was destroyed and thus intense acylation occurred in both amorphous and crystalline regions. The acylated starch with high-amylose content displayed more ordered region compared to low-amylose starch. Acylation enhanced the thermal stability of starch, and this effect became more evident as the amylose content increased. Thus, the amylose/amylopectin ratio has been confirmed capable of affecting the structure and thermal behaviors of hydrophobic propionylated starch, which is of value for the design of starchy materials with tailored thermal stability.

  6. Decreased lung carcinoma cell density on select polymer nanometer surface features for lung replacement therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Zhang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Lijuan Zhang1, Young Wook Chun2, Thomas J Webster21Department of Chemistry and 2Division of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI USAAbstract: Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA has been widely used as a biomaterial in regenerative medicine because of its biocompatibility and biodegradability properties. Previous studies have shown that cells (such as bladder smooth muscle cells, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts respond differently to nanostructured PLGA surfaces compared with nanosmooth surfaces. The purpose of the present in vitro research was to prepare PLGA films with various nanometer surface features and determine whether lung cancer epithelial cells respond differently to such topographies. To create nanosurface features on PLGA, different sized (190 nm, 300 nm, 400 nm, and 530 nm diameter polystyrene beads were used to cast polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS molds which were used as templates to create nanofeatured PLGA films. Atomic force microscopy (AFM images and root mean square roughness (RMS values indicated that the intended spherical surface nanotopographies on PLGA with RMS values of 2.23, 5.03, 5.42, and 36.90 nm were formed by employing 190, 300, 400, and 530 nm beads. A solution evaporation method was also utilized to modify PLGA surface features by using 8 wt% (to obtain an AFM RMS value of 0.62 nm and 4 wt% (to obtain an AFM RMS value of 2.23 nm PLGA in chloroform solutions. Most importantly, lung cancer epithelial cells adhered less on the PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 0.62, 2.23, and 5.42 nm after four hours of culture compared with any other PLGA surface created here. After three days, PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 0.62 nm had much lower cell density than any other sample. In this manner, PLGA with specific nanometer surface features may inhibit lung cancer cell density which may provide an important biomaterial for the treatment of lung cancer (from drug delivery to regenerative medicine.Keywords: nanotechnology

  7. The surface roughness of (433) Eros as measured by thermal-infrared beaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozitis, B.

    2017-01-01

    In planetary science, surface roughness is regarded to be a measure of surface irregularity at small spatial scales, and causes the thermal-infrared beaming effect (i.e. re-radiation of absorbed sunlight back towards to the Sun). Typically, surface roughness exhibits a degeneracy with thermal inertia when thermophysical models are fitted to disc-integrated thermal-infrared observations of asteroids because of this effect. In this work, it is demonstrated how surface roughness can be constrained for near-Earth asteroid (433) Eros (i.e. the target of NASA's NEAR Shoemaker mission) when using the Advanced Thermophysical Model with thermal-infrared observations taken during an `almost pole-on' illumination and viewing geometry. It is found that the surface roughness of (433) Eros is characterized by an rms slope of 38 ± 8° at the 0.5-cm spatial scale associated with its thermal-infrared beaming effect. This is slightly greater than the rms slope of 25 ± 5° implied by the NEAR Shoemaker laser ranging results when extrapolated to this spatial scale, and indicates that other surface shaping processes might operate, in addition to collisions and gravity, at spatial scales under one metre in order to make asteroid surfaces rougher. For other high-obliquity asteroids observed during `pole-on' illumination conditions, the thermal-infrared beaming effect allows surface roughness to be constrained when the sub-solar latitude is greater than 60°, and if the asteroids are observed at phase angles of less than 40°. They will likely exhibit near-Earth asteroid thermal model beaming parameters that are lower than expected for a typical asteroid at all phase angles up to 100°.

  8. Infrared thermal mapping of the martian surface and atmosphere: first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, H H; Chase, S C; Miner, E D; Palluconi, F D; Münch, G; Neugebauer, G; Martin, T Z

    1976-08-27

    The Viking infrared thermal mapper measures the thermal emission of the martian surface and atmosphere and the total reflected sunlight. With the high resolution and dense coverage being achieved, planetwide thermal structure is apparent at large and small scales. The thermal behavior of the best-observed areas, the landing sites, cannot be explained by simple homogeneous models. The data contain clear indications for the relevance of additional factors such as detailed surface texture and the occurrence of clouds. Areas in the polar night have temperatures distinctly lower than the CO(2) condensation point at the surface pressure. This observation implies that the annual atmospheric condensation is less than previously assumed and that either thick CO(2) clouds exist at the 20-kilometer level or that the polar atmosphere is locally enriched by noncondensable gases.

  9. Infrared thermal mapping of the Martian surface and atmosphere - First results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, H. H.; Martin, T. Z.; Chase, S. C., Jr.; Miner, E. D.; Palluconi, F. D.; Muench, G.; Neugebauer, G.

    1976-01-01

    The Viking infrared thermal mapper measures the thermal emission of the Martian surface and atmosphere and the total reflected sunlight. With the high resolution and dense coverage being achieved, planetwide thermal structure is apparent at large and small scales. The thermal behavior of the best-observed areas, the landing sites, cannot be explained by simple homogeneous models. The data contain clear indications for the relevance of additional factors such as detailed surface texture and the occurrence of clouds. Areas in the polar night have temperatures distinctly lower than the CO2 condensation point at the surface pressure. This observation implies that the annual atmospheric condensation is less than previously assumed and that either thick CO2 clouds exist at the 20-kilometer level or that the polar atmosphere is locally enriched by noncondensable gases.

  10. Sensitivity of Venus surface emissivity retrieval to model variations of CO2 opacity, cloud features, and deep atmosphere temperature field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, David; Arnold, Gabriele; Haus, Rainer

    2012-07-01

    The Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) aboard ESA's Venus Express space probe has acquired a wealth of nightside emission spectra from Venus and provides the first global database for systematic atmospheric and surface studies in the IR. The infrared mapping channel (VIRTIS-M-IR) sounds the atmosphere and surface at high spatial and temporal resolution and coverage. Quantitative analyses of data call for a sophisticated radiative transfer simulation model of Venus' atmosphere to be used in atmospheric and surface parameter retrieval procedures that fit simulated spectra to the measured data. The surface emissivity can be retrieved from VIRTIS-M-IR measurements in the transparency windows around 1 μm, but it is not easy to derive, since atmospheric influences strongly interfere with surface information. There are mainly three atmospheric model parameters that may affect quantitative results of surface emissivity retrievals: CO_2 opacity, cloud features, and deep atmosphere temperature field. The CO_2 opacity with respect to allowed transitions is usually computed by utilizing a suitable line data base and certain line shape models that consider collisional line mixing. Both line data bases and shape models are not well established from measurements under the environmental conditions in the deep atmosphere of Venus. Pressure-induced additional continuum absorption introduces further opacity uncertainties. The clouds of Venus are usually modeled by a four-modal distribution of spherical droplets of about 75% sulfuric acid, where each mode is characterized by a different mean and standard deviation of droplet size distribution and a different initial altitude abundance profile. The influence of possible cloud mode variations on surface emissivity retrieval results is investigated in the paper. Future retrieval procedures will aim at a separation of cloud mode and surface emissivity variations using different atmospheric windows sounded by

  11. Enhanced Thermal Transport of Surfaces with Superhydrophobic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Deposition 4 3. Results/ Analysis 5 4. Conclusion 7 5. References 8 Distribution List 9 iv List of Figures Fig. 1 Contact angle...by measuring the contact angle (σ) formed between a droplet of liquid and the surface (Fig. 1). Qualitatively , surfaces with a water contact angle...several seconds and dried with filtered nitrogen. The samples were then immersed in 0.01-M aqueous solution of silver nitrate for 20 s. The deposition

  12. Thermal desorption from surfaces with laser-induced defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabelski, Pawel; Panczyk, Tomasz; Rudzinski, Wladyslaw

    2002-12-30

    Monte Carlo simulation method was used to mimic surface damage development caused by short laser pulses. The influence of pulsed laser irradiation on the creation of defect concentration was examined in the case of a model surface. In particular, the dependence of the intact surface area on a number of laser scans was studied and compared with the experimental results obtained for Rh(1 1 1) crystal face. Changes in the adsorptivoperties of the surface produced by laser irradiation are explained with the help of a simple geometric model connecting the laser intensity and the disordered area generated by a single laser shot. It was demonstrated that exponential decay of the Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) signal with the number of laser scans, which is observed experimentally, may result directly from the overlapping of the laser spots created on the surface. This effect becomes enhanced when the laser intensity, hence the spot size, increases. The importance of laser-induced defects in the kinetics of catalytic/separation processes was examined in the case of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectra from surfaces subjected to a different number of laser shots. The spectra were simulated by employing the Monte Carlo method as well as by application of the absolute rate theory (ART) coupled with the mean field approximation. The results obtained with both methods were in a good agreement even when weak lateral interactions in the adsorbed phase were allowed.

  13. Formation of Combined Surface Features of Protrusion Array and Wrinkles atop Shape-Memory Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, W. M.; Tong, T. H.

    We demonstrate a simple and cost-effective approach to realize two combined surface features of different scales together, namely submillimeter-sized protrusion array and microwrinkles, atop a polystyrene shape-memory polymer. Two different types of protrusions, namely flat-top protrusion and crown-shaped protrusion, were studied. The array of protrusions was produced by the Indentation-Polishing-Heating (IPH) process. Compactly packed steel balls were used for making array of indents. A thin gold layer was sputter deposited atop the polymer surface right after polishing. After heating for shape recovery, array of protrusions with wrinkles on the top due to the buckling of gold layer was produced.

  14. Constraints on the lithospheric structure of Venus from mechanical models and tectonic surface features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Maria T.

    1987-01-01

    The evidence for the extensional or compressional origins of some prominent Venusian surface features disclosed by radar images is discussed. Using simple models, the hypothesis that the observed length scales (10-20 km and 100-300 km) of deformations are controlled by dominant wavelengths arising from unstable compression or extension of the Venus lithosphere is tested. The results show that the existence of tectonic features that exhibit both length scales can be explained if, at the time of deformation, the lithosphere consisted of a crust that was relatively strong near the surface and weak at its base, and an upper mantle that was stronger than or nearly comparable in strength to the upper crust.

  15. Design of vector quantizer for image compression using self-organizing feature map and surface fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laha, Arijit; Pal, Nikhil R; Chanda, Bhabatosh

    2004-10-01

    We propose a new scheme of designing a vector quantizer for image compression. First, a set of codevectors is generated using the self-organizing feature map algorithm. Then, the set of blocks associated with each code vector is modeled by a cubic surface for better perceptual fidelity of the reconstructed images. Mean-removed vectors from a set of training images is used for the construction of a generic codebook. Further, Huffman coding of the indices generated by the encoder and the difference-coded mean values of the blocks are used to achieve better compression ratio. We proposed two indices for quantitative assessment of the psychovisual quality (blocking effect) of the reconstructed image. Our experiments on several training and test images demonstrate that the proposed scheme can produce reconstructed images of good quality while achieving compression at low bit rates. Index Terms-Cubic surface fitting, generic codebook, image compression, self-organizing feature map, vector quantization.

  16. Surface features of central North America: a synoptic view from computer graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    A digital shaded-relief image of the 48 contiguous United States shows the details of large- and small-scale landforms, including several linear trends. The features faithfully reflect tectonism, continental glaciation, fluvial activity, volcanism, and other surface-shaping events and processes. The new map not only depicts topography accurately and in its true complexity, but does so in one synoptic view that provides a regional context for geologic analysis unobscured by clouds, culture, vegetation, or artistic constraints. -Author

  17. Sub-surface paleochannel detection in DeGrussa area, Western Australia, using thermal infrared remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Sanchari; Chudasama, Bijal; Porwal, Alok; González-Álvarez, Ignacio

    2016-05-01

    Thermal Infrared (TIR) remote sensing measures emitted radiation of Earth in the thermal region of electromagnetic spectrum. This information can be useful in studying sub-surface features such as buried palaeochannels, which are ancient river systems that have dried up over time and are now buried under soil cover or overlying sediments in the present landscape. Therefore they have little or no expression on the surface topography. Study of these paleo channels has wide applications in the fields of uranium exploration and ground water hydrology. Identifying paleo channels using remote sensing technique is a cost-effective means of narrowing down search areas and thereby aids in ground exploration. The difference in thermal properties between the paleo channel-fill sediments and the surrounding bed-rock is the key to demarcate these channels. This study uses five TIR bands of day-time Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) L1A data for delineation of paleo-systems in the DeGrussa area of the Capricorn Orogen in Western Australia. The temperature-emissivity separation algorithm is applied to obtain kinetic temperature and emissivity images. Sharp contrasts in kinetic temperature and emissivity values are used to demarcate the channel boundaries. Profiles of topographic elevation, temperature and emissivity values are plotted for different sections of the interpreted channels and compared to distinguish the surface channels from sub-surface channels, and also to interpret the thickness and nature of the paleo channel-fill sediments. The results are validated using core-drilling litho logs and field exploration data.

  18. Memory for surface features of unfamiliar melodies: independent effects of changes in pitch and tempo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, E Glenn; Stalinski, Stephanie M; Marks, Bradley M

    2014-01-01

    A melody's identity is determined by relations between consecutive tones in terms of pitch and duration, whereas surface features (i.e., pitch level or key, tempo, and timbre) are irrelevant. Although surface features of highly familiar recordings are encoded into memory, little is known about listeners' mental representations of melodies heard once or twice. It is also unknown whether musical pitch is represented additively or interactively with temporal information. In two experiments, listeners heard unfamiliar melodies twice in an initial exposure phase. In a subsequent test phase, they heard the same (old) melodies interspersed with new melodies. Some of the old melodies were shifted in key, tempo, or key and tempo. Listeners' task was to rate how well they recognized each melody from the exposure phase while ignoring changes in key and tempo. Recognition ratings were higher for old melodies that stayed the same compared to those that were shifted in key or tempo, and detrimental effects of key and tempo changes were additive in between-subjects (Experiment 1) and within-subjects (Experiment 2) designs. The results confirm that surface features are remembered for melodies heard only twice. They also imply that key and tempo are processed and stored independently.

  19. Thermal dynamics of silver clusters grown on rippled silica surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Mukul; Ranjan, Mukesh; Jolley, Kenny; Lloyd, Adam; Smith, Roger; Mukherjee, Subroto

    2017-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been deposited on silicon rippled patterned templates at an angle of incidence of 70° to the surface normal. The templates are produced by oblique incidence argon ion bombardment and as the fluence increases, the periods and heights of the structures increase. Structures with periods of 20 nm, 35 nm and 45 nm have been produced. Moderate temperature vacuum annealing shows the phenomenon of cluster coalescence following the contour of the more exposed faces of the ripple for the case of 35 nm and 45 nm but not at 20 nm where the silver aggregates into larger randomly distributed clusters. In order to understand this effect, the morphological changes of silver nanoparticles deposited on an asymmetric rippled silica surface are investigated through the use of molecular dynamics simulations for different deposition angles of incidence between 0° and 70° and annealing temperatures between 500 K and 900 K. Near to normal incidence, clusters are observed to migrate over the entire surface but for deposition at 70°, a similar patterning is observed as in the experiment. The random distribution of clusters for the periodicity ≈ of 20 nm is linked to the geometry of the silica surface which has a lower ripple height than the longer wavelength structures. Calculations carried out on a surface with such a lower ripple height also demonstrate a similar effect.

  20. Surface and morphological features of laser-irradiated silicon under vacuum, nitrogen and ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayat, Asma, E-mail: asmahayat@gcu.edu.pk; Bashir, Shazia; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Laser irradiation effects on Si surface have been explored. • An Excimer Laser was used as a source. • SEM analysis was performed to explore surface morphology. • Raman spectroscopy analysis was carried out to find crystallographical alterations. - Abstract: Laser-induced surface and structural modification of silicon (Si) has been investigated under three different environments of vacuum, nitrogen (100 Torr) and ethanol. The interaction of 1000 pulses of KrF (λ ≈ 248 nm, τ ≈ 18 ns, repetition rate ≈ 30 Hz) Excimer laser at two different fluences of 2.8 J/cm{sup 2} and 4 J/cm{sup 2} resulted in formation of various kinds of features such as laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), spikes, columns, cones and cracks. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets is explored by Raman spectroscopy. SEM analysis exhibits a non-uniform distribution of micro-scale pillars and spikes at the central ablated regime of silicon irradiated at low laser fluence of 2.8 J/cm{sup 2} under vacuum. Whereas cones, pits, cavities and ripples like features are seen at the boundaries. At higher fluence of 4 J/cm{sup 2}, laser induced periodic structures as well as micro-columns are observed. In the case of ablation in nitrogen environment, melting, splashing, self-organized granular structures and cracks along with redeposition are observed at lower fluence. Such types of small scaled structures in nitrogen are attributed to confinement and shielding effects of nitrogen plasma. Whereas, a crater with multiple ablative layers is formed in the case of ablation at higher fluence. Significantly different surface morphology of Si is observed in the case of ablation in ethanol. It reveals the formation of cavities along with small scale pores and less redeposition. These results reveal that the growth of surface and morphological features of irradiated Si are strongly

  1. Reduced adhesion of macrophages on anodized titanium with select nanotube surface features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajyalakshmi, Amancherla; Ercan, Batur; Balasubramanian, K; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    One of the important prerequisites for a successful orthopedic implant apart from being osteoconductive is the elicitation of a favorable immune response that does not lead to the rejection of the implant by the host tissue. Anodization is one of the simplest surface modification processes used to create nanotextured and nanotubular features on metal oxides which has been shown to improve bone formation. Anodization of titanium (Ti) leads to the formation of TiO(2) nanotubes on the surface, and the presence of these nanotubes mimics the natural nanoscale features of bone, which in turn contributes to improved bone cell attachment, migration, and proliferation. However, inflammatory cell responses on anodized Ti remains to be tested. It is hypothesized that surface roughness and surface feature size on anodized Ti can be carefully manipulated to control immune cell (specifically, macrophages) responses. Here, when Ti samples were anodized at 10 V in the presence of 1% hydrofluoric acid (HF) for 1 minute, nanotextured (nonnanotube) surfaces were created. When anodization of Ti samples was carried out with 1% HF for 10 minutes at 15 V, nanotubes with 40-50 nm diameters were formed, whereas at 20 V with 1% HF for 10 minutes, nanotubes with 60-70 nm diameters were formed. In this study, a reduced density of macrophages was observed after 24 hours of culture on nanotextured and nanotubular Ti samples which were anodized at 10, 15, and 20 V, compared with conventional unmodified Ti samples. This in vitro study thus demonstrated a reduced density of macrophages on anodized Ti, thereby providing further evidence of the greater efficacy of anodized Ti for orthopedic applications.

  2. Reduced adhesion of macrophages on anodized titanium with select nanotube surface features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian K

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Amancherla Rajyalakshmi1, Batur Ercan2,3, K Balasubramanian1, Thomas J Webster2,31Non-Ferrous Materials Technology Development Centre, Hyderabad, India; 2School of Engineering, 3Department of Orthopedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: One of the important prerequisites for a successful orthopedic implant apart from being osteoconductive is the elicitation of a favorable immune response that does not lead to the rejection of the implant by the host tissue. Anodization is one of the simplest surface modification processes used to create nanotextured and nanotubular features on metal oxides which has been shown to improve bone formation. Anodization of titanium (Ti leads to the formation of TiO2 nanotubes on the surface, and the presence of these nanotubes mimics the natural nanoscale features of bone, which in turn contributes to improved bone cell attachment, migration, and proliferation. However, inflammatory cell responses on anodized Ti remains to be tested. It is hypothesized that surface roughness and surface feature size on anodized Ti can be carefully manipulated to control immune cell (specifically, macrophages responses. Here, when Ti samples were anodized at 10 V in the presence of 1% hydrofluoric acid (HF for 1 minute, nanotextured (nonnanotube surfaces were created. When anodization of Ti samples was carried out with 1% HF for 10 minutes at 15 V, nanotubes with 40–50 nm diameters were formed, whereas at 20 V with 1% HF for 10 minutes, nanotubes with 60–70 nm diameters were formed. In this study, a reduced density of macrophages was observed after 24 hours of culture on nanotextured and nanotubular Ti samples which were anodized at 10, 15, and 20 V, compared with conventional unmodified Ti samples. This in vitro study thus demonstrated a reduced density of macrophages on anodized Ti, thereby providing further evidence of the greater efficacy of anodized Ti for orthopedic applications.Keywords: anodization, titanium

  3. Contributions of feature shapes and surface cues to the recognition and neural representation of facial identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Timothy J; Baseler, Heidi; Jenkins, Rob; Burton, A Mike; Young, Andrew W

    2016-10-01

    A full understanding of face recognition will involve identifying the visual information that is used to discriminate different identities and how this is represented in the brain. The aim of this study was to explore the importance of shape and surface properties in the recognition and neural representation of familiar faces. We used image morphing techniques to generate hybrid faces that mixed shape properties (more specifically, second order spatial configural information as defined by feature positions in the 2D-image) from one identity and surface properties from a different identity. Behavioural responses showed that recognition and matching of these hybrid faces was primarily based on their surface properties. These behavioural findings contrasted with neural responses recorded using a block design fMRI adaptation paradigm to test the sensitivity of Haxby et al.'s (2000) core face-selective regions in the human brain to the shape or surface properties of the face. The fusiform face area (FFA) and occipital face area (OFA) showed a lower response (adaptation) to repeated images of the same face (same shape, same surface) compared to different faces (different shapes, different surfaces). From the behavioural data indicating the critical contribution of surface properties to the recognition of identity, we predicted that brain regions responsible for familiar face recognition should continue to adapt to faces that vary in shape but not surface properties, but show a release from adaptation to faces that vary in surface properties but not shape. However, we found that the FFA and OFA showed an equivalent release from adaptation to changes in both shape and surface properties. The dissociation between the neural and perceptual responses suggests that, although they may play a role in the process, these core face regions are not solely responsible for the recognition of facial identity.

  4. The effect of surface roughness on thermal-elasto-hydrodynamic model of contact mechanical seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, QingFeng; Liu, Ying; Huang, WeiFeng; Suo, ShuangFu; Wang, YuMing

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of surface roughness on sealing clearance, pressure distribution, friction torque and leakage is studied by the thermal-elasto-hydrodynamic mixed lubrication model. A convergent nominal clearance is formed by the pressure deformation and thermal deformation of the seal faces. This causes more serious wear in the inner side than that of the outer side of the contact area. Mass leakage increases with the growing of the surface roughness. The temperature and thermal deformation on the seal surface increases substantially if the roughness is reduced. The contact mechanical seals have consistent performance when the standard deviation of surface roughness is approximately 0.2 μm. In order to validate the theoretical analysis model, a method combining the measurement of three-dimensioned profile and Raman spectrum is proposed.

  5. Spectral Analysis of Surface Features of Subaquaeous Pyroclastic Flow Deposits Around Santorini Volcano, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croff, K. L.; Sigurdsson, H.; Carey, S.; Alexandri, M.; Sakellariou, D.; Nomikou, P.

    2006-12-01

    Multibeam bathymetry mapping and seismic airgun surveys of the submarine region around the Santorini volcanic field in the Hellenic Arc (Greece) have revealed regions of terraced or step-like topography. These features may be related to the transport and deposition of submarine pyroclastic flows from the last major eruption of this volcano (~3600yrs. B.P.). The uppermost sediment sequence identified in seismic records has an average thickness of approximately 29 meters and may represent the pyroclastic flow deposits from this eruption. These terraced or step-like features are mainly located in areas that are approximately five kilometers offshore and at depths in the range of 200 to 800 meters. The seafloor in these areas has slope ratios on the order of 1:20. Profiles of the seafloor topography were sampled from seismic profiles that radiate from the Sanotrini caldera in five regions of interest. Spectral analysis of seafloor topography has been carried out to determine spectral characteristics of these features, including power spectrum, periodicity and amplitude of the waveforms, variance, and roughness of topography. The results are compared to surface features of the subaqueous pyroclastic deposits from the 1883 explosive eruption of Krakatau (Indonesia) and other areas with similar environments, to determine the parameters that are characteristic of this new feature of submarine volcaniclastic deposits.

  6. Thermal impact of waste emplacement and surface cooling associated with geologic disposal of nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Mangold, D.C.; Spencer, R.K.; Tsang, C.F.

    1982-08-01

    The thermal effects associated with the emplacement of aged radioactive wastes in a geologic repository were studied, with emphasis on the following subjects: the waste characteristics, repository structure, and rock properties controlling the thermally induced effects; the current knowledge of the thermal, thermomechanical, and thermohydrologic impacts, determined mainly on the basis of previous studies that assume 10-year-old wastes; the thermal criteria used to determine the repository waste loading densities; and the technical advantages and disadvantages of surface cooling of the wastes prior to disposal as a means of mitigating the thermal impacts. The waste loading densities determined by repository designs for 10-year-old wastes are extended to older wastes using the near-field thermomechanical criteria based on room stability considerations. Also discussed are the effects of long surface cooling periods determined on the basis of far-field thermomechanical and thermohydrologic considerations. The extension of the surface cooling period from 10 years to longer periods can lower the near-field thermal impact but have only modest long-term effects for spent fuel. More significant long-term effects can be achieved by surface cooling of reprocessed high-level waste.

  7. Coupled computational fluid-thermal investigation of hypersonic flow over a quilted dome surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostoich, Christopher; Bodony, Daniel; Geubelle, Philippe

    2009-11-01

    The hypersonic environment is characterized by the high temperatures that are generated in the fluid at a vehicle surface. In the effort to enable the operation of lightweight, reusable hypersonic vehicles, flexible, thin thermal protection panels have been considered to mitigate thermal loads. High surface temperatures create through-the-thickness thermal gradients which cause the panels to bow, resulting in changes to the external flow field and leading to a fully coupled fluid-thermal-structural problem. Certain aspects of the fluid-thermal (no structural) coupling were examined in a 1980s NASA Langley experiment of a Mach 5.74 laminar boundary past an array of spherical domes. We reexamine this case computationally using a high-fidelity Navier-Stokes solver coupled with a thermal solver to investigate the effects on the flow and resulting heat load on the structure due to the bowed panels. Specifically the surface temperature, surface heat flux, and downstream boundary developments are reported, and compared with experiment.

  8. [Study on Hollow Brick Wall's Surface Temperature with Infrared Thermal Imaging Method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming-fang; Yin, Yi-hua

    2015-05-01

    To address the characteristic of uneven surface temperature of hollow brick wall, the present research adopts soft wares of both ThermaCAM P20 and ThermaCAM Reporter to test the application of infrared thermal image technique in measuring surface temperature of hollow brick wall, and further analyzes the thermal characteristics of hollow brick wall, and building material's impact on surface temperature distribution including hollow brick, masonry mortar, and so on. The research selects the construction site of a three-story-high residential, carries out the heat transfer experiment, and further examines the exterior wall constructed by 3 different hollow bricks including sintering shale hollow brick, masonry mortar and brick masonry. Infrared thermal image maps are collected, including 3 kinds of sintering shale hollow brick walls under indoor heating in winter; and temperature data of wall surface, and uniformity and frequency distribution are also collected for comparative analysis between 2 hollow bricks and 2 kinds of mortar masonry. The results show that improving heat preservation of hollow brick aid masonry mortar can effectively improve inner wall surface temperature and indoor thermal environment; non-uniformity of surface temperature decreases from 0. 6 to 0. 4 °C , and surface temperature frequency distribution changes from the asymmetric distribution into a normal distribution under the condition that energy-saving sintering shale hollow brick wall is constructed by thermal mortar replacing cement mortar masonry; frequency of average temperature increases as uniformity of surface temperature increases. This research provides a certain basis for promotion and optimization of hollow brick wall's thermal function.

  9. Reduced near-surface thermal inversions in 2005-06 in the southeastern Arabian Sea (Lakshadweep Sea)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nisha, K.; Rao, S.A.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Rao, R.R.; GirishKumar, M.S.; Pankajakshan, T.; Ravichandran, M.; Rajesh, S.; Girish, K.; Johnson, Z.; Anuradha, M.; Gavaskar, S.S.M.; Suneel, V.; Krishna, S.M.

    relatively cooler near-surface thermal regime persisted owing to prolonged upwelling until November 2005. In addition, the observed local surface wind field was relatively stronger, and the net surface heat gain to the ocean was weaker over the Lakshadweep...

  10. HYDROTHEMAL ALTERATION MAPPING USING FEATURE-ORIENTED PRINCIPAL COMPONENT SELECTION (FPCS METHOD TO ASTER DATA:WIKKI AND MAWULGO THERMAL SPRINGS, YANKARI PARK, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Abubakar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal systems are essentially associated with hydrothermal alteration mineral assemblages such as iron oxide/hydroxide, clay, sulfate, carbonate and silicate groups. Blind and fossilized geothermal systems are not characterized by obvious surface manifestations like hot springs, geysers and fumaroles, therefore, they could not be easily identifiable using conventional techniques. In this investigation, the applicability of Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER were evaluated in discriminating hydrothermal alteration minerals associated with geothermal systems as a proxy in identifying subtle Geothermal systems at Yankari Park in northeastern Nigeria. The area is characterized by a number of thermal springs such as Wikki and Mawulgo. Feature-oriented Principal Component selection (FPCS was applied to ASTER data based on spectral characteristics of hydrothermal alteration minerals for a systematic and selective extraction of the information of interest. Application of FPCS analysis to bands 5, 6 and 8 and bands 1, 2, 3 and 4 datasets of ASTER was used for mapping clay and iron oxide/hydroxide minerals in the zones of Wikki and Mawulgo thermal springs in Yankari Park area. Field survey using GPS and laboratory analysis, including X-ray Diffractometer (XRD and Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD were carried out to verify the image processing results. The results indicate that ASTER dataset reliably and complementarily be used for reconnaissance stage of targeting subtle alteration mineral assemblages associated with geothermal systems.

  11. Effect of deformation on the thermal conductivity of granular porous media with rough grain surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Roohollah; Hejazi, S. Hossein; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2017-08-01

    Heat transfer in granular porous media is an important phenomenon that is relevant to a wide variety of problems, including geothermal reservoirs and enhanced oil recovery by thermal methods. Resistance to flow of heat in the contact area between the grains strongly influences the effective thermal conductivity of such porous media. Extensive experiments have indicated that the roughness of the grains' surface follows self-affine fractal stochastic functions, and thus, the contact resistance cannot be accounted for by models based on smooth surfaces. Despite the significance of rough contact area, the resistance has been accounted for by a fitting parameter in the models of heat transfer. In this Letter we report on a study of conduction in a packing of particles that contains a fluid of a given conductivity, with each grain having a rough self-affine surface, and is under an external compressive pressure. The deformation of the contact area depends on the fractal dimension that characterizes the grains' rough surface, as well as their Young's modulus. Excellent qualitative agreement is obtained with experimental data. Deformation of granular porous media with grains that have rough self-affine fractal surface is simulated. Thermal contact resistance between grains with rough surfaces is incorporated into the numerical simulation of heat conduction under compressive pressure. By increasing compressive pressure, thermal conductivity is enhanced more in the grains with smoother surfaces and lower Young's modulus. Excellent qualitative agreement is obtained with the experimental data.

  12. Lipase degradation of plasticized polyvinyl chloride endotracheal tube surfaces to create nanoscale features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Mary C; Webster, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) endotracheal tubes (ETTs) nanoetched with a fungal lipase have been shown to reduce bacterial growth and biofilm formation and could be an inexpensive solution to the complex problem of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Although bacterial growth and colonization on these nanoetched materials have been well characterized, little is known about the mechanism by which the fungal lipase degrades the PVC and, thus, alters its properties to minimize bacteria functions. This study used X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) to better describe the surface chemistry of both unetched and lipase nanoetched PVC ETT. ATR-FTIR analysis of the unetched and treated surfaces showed a similar presence of a plasticizer. This was confirmed by XPS analysis, which showed an increase of carbon and the presence of oxygen on both unetched and nanoetched surfaces. A quantitative comparison of the FTIR spectra revealed significant correlations (Pearson’s correlation, R=0.997 [R2=0.994, Pinfrared peaks due to the degradation of the plasticizer by the fungal lipase. In contrast, results from this study did demonstrate significantly increased nanoscale surface features on the lipase etched compared to non-etched PVC ETTs. This led to a change in surface energetics, which altered ion adsorption to the ETTs. Thus, these results showed that PVC surfaces nanoetched with a 0.1% lipase solution for 48 hours have no significant change on surface chemistry but do significantly increase nanoscale surface roughness and alters ion adsorption, which suggests that the unique properties of these materials, including their previously reported ability to decrease bacterial adhesion and growth, are due to the changes in the degree of the nanoscale roughness, not changes in their surface chemistry. PMID:28352177

  13. Differential surface models for tactile perception of shape and on-line tracking of features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemami, H.

    1987-01-01

    Tactile perception of shape involves an on-line controller and a shape perceptor. The purpose of the on-line controller is to maintain gliding or rolling contact with the surface, and collect information, or track specific features of the surface such as edges of a certain sharpness. The shape perceptor uses the information to perceive, estimate the parameters of, or recognize the shape. The differential surface model depends on the information collected and on the a priori information known about the robot and its physical parameters. These differential models are certain functionals that are projections of the dynamics of the robot onto the surface gradient or onto the tangent plane. A number of differential properties may be directly measured from present day tactile sensors. Others may have to be indirectly computed from measurements. Others may constitute design objectives for distributed tactile sensors of the future. A parameterization of the surface leads to linear and nonlinear sequential parameter estimation techniques for identification of the surface. Many interesting compromises between measurement and computation are possible.

  14. In vitro bioactivity of micro metal injection moulded stainless steel with defined surface features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Brose

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Micrometre- and nanometre-scale surface structuring with ordered topography features may dramatically enhance orthopaedic implant integration. In this study we utilised a previously optimised micron metal injection moulding (µ-MIM process to produce medical grade stainless steel surfaces bearing micrometre scale, protruding, hemispheres of controlled dimensions and spatial distribution. Additionally, the structured surfaces were characterised by the presence of submicrometre surface roughness resulting from metal grain boundary formation. Following cytocompatibility (cytotoxicity evaluation using 3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line, the effect on primary human cell functionality was assessed focusing on cell attachment, shape and cytoskeleton conformation. In this respect, and by day 7 in culture, significant increase in focal adhesion size was associated with the microstructured surfaces compared to the planar control. The morphological conformation of the seeded cells, as revealed by fluorescence cytoskeleton labelling, also appeared to be guided in the vertical dimension between the hemisphere bodies. Quantitative evaluation of this guidance took place using live cytoplasm fluorescence labelling and image morphometry analysis utilising both, compactness and elongation shape descriptors. Significant increase in cell compactness was associated with the hemisphere arrays indicating collective increase in focused cell attachment to the hemisphere bodies across the entire cell population. Micrometre-scale hemisphere array patterns have therefore influenced cell attachment and conformation. Such influence may potentially aid in enhancing key cellular events such as, for example, neo-osteogenesis on implanted orthopaedic surfaces.

  15. The Surface Roughness of (433) Eros as Measured by Thermal-Infrared Beaming

    CERN Document Server

    Rozitis, Ben

    2016-01-01

    In planetary science, surface roughness is regarded to be a measure of surface irregularity at small spatial scales, and causes the thermal-infrared beaming effect (i.e. re-radiation of absorbed sunlight back towards to the Sun). Typically, surface roughness exhibits a degeneracy with thermal inertia when thermophysical models are fitted to disc-integrated thermal-infrared observations of asteroids because of this effect. In this work, it is demonstrated how surface roughness can be constrained for near-Earth asteroid (433) Eros (i.e. the target of NASA's NEAR Shoemaker mission) when using the Advanced Thermophysical Model with thermal-infrared observations taken during an "almost pole-on" illumination and viewing geometry. It is found that the surface roughness of (433) Eros is characterised by an RMS slope of 38 $\\pm$ 8{\\deg} at the 0.5-cm spatial scale associated with its thermal-infrared beaming effect. This is slightly greater than the RMS slope of 25 $\\pm$ 5{\\deg} implied by the NEAR Shoemaker laser ran...

  16. Integration of Urban Features into a Coupled Groundwater-Surface Water Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, A. S.; Welty, C.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    To better understand the feedbacks between urban development and water availability, we are coupling an integrated hydrologic model with an urban growth model, both of the Baltimore, Maryland, USA region. The urban growth model SLEUTH has been calibrated, validated and run by collaborators at Shippensburg University. We are using ParFlow.CLM as the integrated hydrologic model. This model is applied to the 13,000 sq. km. Baltimore metropolitan area, which spans the Gunpowder and Patapsco watersheds. The model domain includes both Piedmont and Coastal Plain physiographic provinces. We have incorporated characteristics of both the natural hydrogeologic system and the superimposed urban environment. Standard hydrogeologic information such as hydraulic conductivity of fractured bedrock, Coastal Plain sediments, and surficial soils, as well as saprolite thickness, porosity, and specific storage properties have been included. We have also quantified a number of aspects representing urban development, such as residential and municipal well pumping, municipal reservoir use, lawn watering, and water supply pipe leakage estimates. We have represented impervious surface coverage using low surface hydraulic conductivity values. The land surface fluxes in CLM (Common Land Model) use surface land cover and therefore represent reduced evapotranspiration in urban areas. A study of urban and natural watershed inflows and inflows in this region indicated some urban features significantly modify catchment water balances. We are particularly interested in the effects of these urban hydrologic features on groundwater recharge in the Baltimore area. Prior to inclusion of subsurface heterogeneity, we initialized the model by running it hourly from 2000 to 2007. The initialization was generated by a dynamic spin-up process, using the UMBC High Performance Computing Facility. Observed meteorological forcing, such as hourly precipitation and air temperature, are used by the land surface

  17. Zinc (hydr)oxide/graphite oxide/AuNPs composites: role of surface features in H₂S reactive adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakoudakis, Dimitrios A; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2014-12-15

    Zinc hydroxide/graphite oxide/AuNPs composites with various levels of complexity were synthesized using an in situ precipitation method. Then they were used as H2S adsorbents in visible light. The materials' surfaces were characterized before and after H2S adsorption by various physical and chemical methods (XRD, FTIR, thermal analysis, potentiometric titration, adsorption of nitrogen and SEM/EDX). Significant differences in surface features and synergistic effects were found depending on the materials' composition. Addition of graphite oxide and the deposition of gold nanoparticles resulted in a marked increase in the adsorption capacity in comparison with that on the zinc hydroxide and zinc hydroxide/AuNP. Addition of AuNPs to zinc hydroxide led to a crystalline ZnO/AuNP composite while the zinc hydroxide/graphite oxide/AuNP composite was amorphous. The ZnOH/GO/AuNPs composite exhibited the greatest H2S adsorption capacity due to the increased number of OH terminal groups and the conductive properties of GO that facilitated the electron transfer and consequently the formation of superoxide ions promoting oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. AuNPs present in the composite increased the conductivity, helped with electron transfer to oxygen, and prevented the fast recombination of the electrons and holes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling the surface stored thermal energy in asphalt concrete pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matić Bojan J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regression analysis is used to develop models for minimal daily pavement surface temperature, using minimal daily air temperature, day of the year, wind speed and solar radiation as predictors, based on data from Awbari, Lybia,. Results were compared with existing SHRP and LTPP models. This paper also presents the models to predict surface pavement temperature depending on the days of the year using neural networks. Four annual periods are defined and new models are formulated for each period. Models using neural networks are formed on the basis of data gathered on the territory of the Republic of Serbia and are valid for that territory. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 36017

  19. Examining the Impact of Question Surface Features on Students' Answers to Constructed-Response Questions on Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Michele; Haudek, Kevin C.; Prevost, Luanna; Urban-Lurain, Mark; Merrill, John

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in science education assessment is that students often focus on surface features of questions rather than the underlying scientific principles. We investigated how student written responses to constructed-response questions about photosynthesis vary based on two surface features of the question: the species of plant and the order of…

  20. Thermal Conductance of a Surface Phonon-Polariton Crystal Made up of Polar Nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez-Miranda, Jose; Joulain, Karl; Ezzahri, Younes

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate that the energy transport of surface phonon-polaritons can be large enough to be observable in a crystal made up of a three-dimensional assembly of nanorods of silicon carbide. The ultralow phonon thermal conductivity of this nanostructure along with its high surface area-to-volume ratio allows the predominance of the polariton energy over that generated by phonons. The dispersion relation, propagation length, and thermal conductance of polaritons are numerically determined as functions of the radius and temperature of the nanorods. It is shown that the thermal conductance of a crystal with nanorods at 500 K and diameter (length) of 200 nm (20 μm) is 0.55 nW·K-1, which is comparable to the quantum of thermal conductance of polar nanowires.

  1. Analytical prediction of sub surface thermal history in translucent tissue phantoms during plasmonic photo thermotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Dhar, Purbarun; Narasimhan, Arunn; Das, Sarit K

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of thermal history in biological tissues during laser based hyperthermia is essential to achieve necrosis of tumour orcarcinoma cells. A semi analytical model to predict sub surface thermal history in translucent, soft, bio tissue mimics has been proposed. The model can accurately predict the spatio temporal temperature variations along depth and the anomalous thermal behaviour in such media, viz. occurrence of sub surface temperature peaks. Based on opto thermal properties, the augmented temperature and shift of the peak positions in case of gold nanostructure mediated tissue phantom hyperthermia can be predicted. Employing inverse approach, the absorbance coefficient of nano graphene infused tissue mimics is determined from the peak temperature and found to provide appreciably accurate predictions along depth. Furthermore, a simplistic, dimensionally consistent correlation to theoretically determine the position of the peak in such media is proposed and found to be consistent with experiments and ...

  2. Robust and thermal-healing superhydrophobic surfaces by spin-coating of polydimethylsiloxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Mengying; Peng, Shan; Deng, Wanshun; Yang, Xiaojun; Miao, Kai; Wen, Ni; Miao, Xinrui; Deng, Wenli

    2017-12-15

    Superhydrophobic surfaces easily lose their excellent water-repellency after damages, which limit their broad applications in practice. Thus, the fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces with excellent durability and thermal healing should be taken into consideration. In this work, robust superhydrophobic surfaces with thermal healing were successfully fabricated by spin-coating method. To achieve superhydrophobicity, cost-less and fluoride-free polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was spin-coated on rough aluminum substrates. After being spin-coated for one cycle, the superhydrophobic PDMS coated hierarchical aluminum (PDMS-H-Al) surfaces showed excellent tolerance to various chemical and mechanical damages in lab, and outdoor damages for 90days. When the PDMS-H-Al surfaces underwent severe damages such as oil contamination (peanut oil with high boiling point) or sandpaper abrasion (500g of force for 60cm), their superhydrophobicity would lose. Interestingly, through a heating process, cyclic oligomers generating from the partially decomposed PDMS acted as low-surface-energy substance on the damaged rough surfaces, leading to the recovery of superhydrophobicity. The relationship between the spin-coating cycles and surface wettability was also investigated. This paper provides a facile, fluoride-free and efficient method to fabricate superhydrophobic surfaces with thermal healing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Surface and morphological features of laser-irradiated silicon under vacuum, nitrogen and ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Asma; Bashir, Shazia; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced surface and structural modification of silicon (Si) has been investigated under three different environments of vacuum, nitrogen (100 Torr) and ethanol. The interaction of 1000 pulses of KrF (λ ≈ 248 nm, τ ≈ 18 ns, repetition rate ≈ 30 Hz) Excimer laser at two different fluences of 2.8 J/cm2 and 4 J/cm2 resulted in formation of various kinds of features such as laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), spikes, columns, cones and cracks. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets is explored by Raman spectroscopy. SEM analysis exhibits a non-uniform distribution of micro-scale pillars and spikes at the central ablated regime of silicon irradiated at low laser fluence of 2.8 J/cm2 under vacuum. Whereas cones, pits, cavities and ripples like features are seen at the boundaries. At higher fluence of 4 J/cm2, laser induced periodic structures as well as micro-columns are observed. In the case of ablation in nitrogen environment, melting, splashing, self-organized granular structures and cracks along with redeposition are observed at lower fluence. Such types of small scaled structures in nitrogen are attributed to confinement and shielding effects of nitrogen plasma. Whereas, a crater with multiple ablative layers is formed in the case of ablation at higher fluence. Significantly different surface morphology of Si is observed in the case of ablation in ethanol. It reveals the formation of cavities along with small scale pores and less redeposition. These results reveal that the growth of surface and morphological features of irradiated Si are strongly dependent upon the laser fluence as well as environmental conditions. The difference in surface morphology is attributable to cooling, confinement and shielding effects as well as difference in plasma temperature, density and pressure of environmental media that corresponds to different energy deposition

  4. Numerical Study of Thermal Boundary Layer on a Continuous Moving Surface in Power Law Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao ZHANG; Xinxin ZHANG; Liancun ZHENG

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates flow and heat transfer of power law fluids on a continuous moving surface. The temperature distribution is obtained numerically by considering the effect of the power law viscosity on thermal diffusivity and the characteristics of the flow and heat transfer are analyzed. The results show that the distribution of the thermal boundary layer depends not only on the velocity ratio parameter of the plate, but also on the power law index and Prandtl number of fluids.

  5. Extraction of surface-related features in a recurrent model of V1-V2 interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Weidenbacher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Humans can effortlessly segment surfaces and objects from two-dimensional (2D images that are projections of the 3D world. The projection from 3D to 2D leads partially to occlusions of surfaces depending on their position in depth and on viewpoint. One way for the human visual system to infer monocular depth cues could be to extract and interpret occlusions. It has been suggested that the perception of contour junctions, in particular T-junctions, may be used as cue for occlusion of opaque surfaces. Furthermore, X-junctions could be used to signal occlusion of transparent surfaces. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this contribution, we propose a neural model that suggests how surface-related cues for occlusion can be extracted from a 2D luminance image. The approach is based on feedforward and feedback mechanisms found in visual cortical areas V1 and V2. In a first step, contours are completed over time by generating groupings of like-oriented contrasts. Few iterations of feedforward and feedback processing lead to a stable representation of completed contours and at the same time to a suppression of image noise. In a second step, contour junctions are localized and read out from the distributed representation of boundary groupings. Moreover, surface-related junctions are made explicit such that they are evaluated to interact as to generate surface-segmentations in static images. In addition, we compare our extracted junction signals with a standard computer vision approach for junction detection to demonstrate that our approach outperforms simple feedforward computation-based approaches. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A model is proposed that uses feedforward and feedback mechanisms to combine contextually relevant features in order to generate consistent boundary groupings of surfaces. Perceptually important junction configurations are robustly extracted from neural representations to signal cues for occlusion and transparency. Unlike

  6. Monitoring surface geothermal features using time series of aerial and ground-based photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, C.; van Manen, S. M.; Graham, D.

    2010-12-01

    Geothermal systems are of high conservation and scientific value and monitoring of these is an important management tool to assess natural variations and changes resulting from development and utilization. This study examines time series of aerial and ground-based photographs of geothermal areas within the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand. A time series of aerial photographs from 1946-2007 of the Broadlands Road Scenic Reserve (Taupo, New Zealand) highlights large changes to this small area as the result of the start of geothermal fluid production for the nearby Wairakei power plant in 1958 and other causes. Prior to the opening of the plant the area was not geothermally active, but expansion of steam zones due to pressure drawdown has resulted in significant thermal changes in the subsurface. These subsurface thermal changes are evident in the aerial photographs as the appearance of hydrothermal eruption craters and areas of thermal bare ground, which are too hot for vegetation to grown on. In addition, in the late 1960’s thermotolerant vegetation started to establish itself in the adjacent area. Changes in the surface area covered by each of these, reflect changes in the geothermal system as well as changes in management (e.g. exclusion of livestock), and a time series of these changes has been produced using ArcMap™. Monthly photographs of surface geothermal expressions in the Rotorua area show changes in colour and size of chloride springs with time. Colour and size changes are difficult to quantify due to varying exposure settings, weather conditions, and vantage points. However, these qualitative descriptions can be combined with quantitative time series such as temperature measurements, to provide better insight into surface changes that have occurred at this geothermal field. This study highlights the value of both qualitative and quantitative data that can be obtained from time series of photographs, including photographs that were obtained before the

  7. Assessing thermal conductivity of composting reactor with attention on varying thermal resistance between compost and the inner surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongjiang; Niu, Wenjuan; Ai, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic estimation of heat transfer through composting reactor wall was crucial for insulating design and maintaining a sanitary temperature. A model, incorporating conductive, convective and radiative heat transfer mechanisms, was developed in this paper to provide thermal resistance calculations for composting reactor wall. The mechanism of thermal transfer from compost to inner surface of structural layer, as a first step of heat loss, was important for improving insulation performance, which was divided into conduction and convection and discussed specifically in this study. It was found decreasing conductive resistance was responsible for the drop of insulation between compost and reactor wall. Increasing compost porosity or manufacturing a curved surface, decreasing the contact area of compost and the reactor wall, might improve the insulation performance. Upon modeling of heat transfers from compost to ambient environment, the study yielded a condensed and simplified model that could be used to conduct thermal resistance analysis for composting reactor. With theoretical derivations and a case application, the model was applicable for both dynamic estimation and typical composting scenario. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Virtual laparoscopy: Initial experience with three-dimensional ultrasonography to characterize hepatic surface features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimoto, Tadashi, E-mail: tad_sekimoto@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Maruyama, Hitoshi, E-mail: maru-cib@umin.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Kondo, Takayuki, E-mail: takakondonaika@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Shimada, Taro, E-mail: bobtaro51@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Takahashi, Masanori, E-mail: machat1215@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Yokosuka, Osamu, E-mail: yokosukao@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Otsuka, Masayuki, E-mail: otsuka-m@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of General Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Miyazaki, Masaru, E-mail: masaru@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of General Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670 (Japan); Mine, Yoshitaka, E-mail: yoshitaka.mine@toshiba.co.jp [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Ultrasound Systems Division, Ultrasound Systems Development Department, Otawara, Tochigi (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: To examine the potential utility of 3D-reconstructed sonograms to distinguish cirrhotic from non-cirrhotic livers by demonstrating hepatic surface characteristics. Materials and methods: A preliminary phantom study was performed to examine the potential resolution of 3D images, recognizing surface irregularities as a difference in height. In a prospective clinical study of 31 consecutive patients with ascites (21 cirrhosis, 10 non-cirrhosis), liver volume data were acquired by transabdominal mechanical scanning. The hepatic surface features of cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic patients were compared by 2 independent reviewers. Intra- and inter-operator/reviewer agreements were also examined. Results: The phantom study revealed that 0.4 mm was the minimum recognizable difference in height on the 3D sonograms. The hepatic surface image was successfully visualized in 74% patients (23/31). Success depended on the amount of ascites; visualization was 100% with ascites of 10 mm or more between the hepatic surface and abdominal wall. The images showed irregularity of the hepatic surface in all cirrhotic patients. The surface appearance was confirmed as being very similar in 3 patients who had both 3D sonogram and liver resection for transplantation. The ability to distinguish cirrhotic liver from non-cirrhotic liver improved with the use of combination of 2D- and 3D-imaging versus 2D-imaging alone (sensitivity, p = 0.02; accuracy, p = 0.02) or 3D-imaging alone (sensitivity, p = 0.03). Intra-/inter-operator and inter-reviewer agreement were excellent (κ = 1.0). Conclusion: 3D-based sonographic visualization of the hepatic surface showed high reliability and reproducibility, acting as a virtual laparoscopy method, and the technique has the potential to improve the diagnosis of cirrhosis.

  9. Periodic changes in shallow lunat crust caused by Sun's heating and thermal diffusivity near the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, T.; Eitzel, M.; Yano, T.

    2007-12-01

    Analysis of Apollo 17 data (continuous data from 1976 to 1977) by the cross-correlation approach for seismic noise led us to two new discoveries, one related to the source of noise and the other on the periodic changes in seismic parameters due to extreme temperature changes near the surface. It has been shown previously by Larose et al. (2005) that Green's functions, dominated by Rayleigh waves, can be retrieved from cross-correlation of seismic noise in Apollo 17 data. We first confirmed their correlation results and further analyzed the details in GreenA?"qfs functions. The first discovery is that the sources of noise that lead to construction of Green's functions are (most likely) thermal moonquakes. This is suggested in the Rayleigh-wave observations that show diurnal variation (29.5 days) in amplitudes, but one can directly confirm a correlation between the statistics of thermal moonquakes and Rayleigh wave amplitudes. This is in contrast to the terrestrial case where ocean-generated seismic noise plays a critical role in the cross-correlation approach. This has implications for future planetary seismology as many planets lack oceans but may have thermal quakes caused by drastic temperature changes near the surface. Second, diurnal temporal variations in group velocity are detected, showing a strong correlation with the temporal variation of lunar surface temperature. This can be explained by the Sun's thermal effects which cause changes in density and seismic velocities near the surface. These effects are measurable on the moon since surface temperature changes as much as 270 K within the diurnal period. Depending on the thermal diffusivity of the medium, the depth extent of this thermal effect varies considerably. Inversion for thermal diffusivity using the changes in group velocity dispersion resulted in an estimate 10**(-7) (m**2/s) for the upper few meters.

  10. Tri-modal Person Re-identification with RGB, Depth and Thermal Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelmose, Andreas; Bahnsen, Chris; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Person re-identification is about recognizing people who have passed by a sensor earlier. Previous work is mainly based on RGB data, but in this work we for the first time present a system where we combine RGB, depth, and thermal data for re-identification purposes. First, from each of the three ...... classifier. The tri-modal system is evaluated on a new RGB-D-T dataset, showing successful results in re-identification scenarios....

  11. Absorption features caused by oscillations of electrons on the surface of a quark star

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, R X; Weber, F; Yu, J W; Molodtsova, I V

    2011-01-01

    If quark stars exist, they may be enveloped in thin electron layers (electron seas), which uniformly surround the entire star. These layers will be affected by the magnetic fields of quark stars in such a way that the electron seas would transmit hydromagnetic cyclotron waves, as studied in this paper. Particular attention is devoted to vortex hydrodynamical oscillations of the electron sea. The frequency spectrum of these oscillations is derived in analytic form. If the thermal X-ray spectra of quark stars are modulated by vortex hydrodynamical vibrations, the thermal spectra of compact stars, foremost cental compact objects (CCOs) and X-ray dim isolated neutron stars (XDINSs), could be used to verify the existence of these vibrational modes observationally. The central compact object 1E 1207.4-5209 appears particularly interesting in this context, since its absorption features at 0.7 keV and 1.4 keV can be comfortably explained in the framework of the hydro-cyclotron oscillation model.

  12. Integrated surface/subsurface permafrost thermal hydrology: Model formulation and proof-of-concept simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Scott L.; Coon, Ethan T.; Atchley, Adam L.; Berndt, Markus; Garimella, Rao; Moulton, J. David; Svyatskiy, Daniil; Wilson, Cathy J.

    2016-08-01

    The need to understand potential climate impacts and feedbacks in Arctic regions has prompted recent interest in modeling of permafrost dynamics in a warming climate. A new fine-scale integrated surface/subsurface thermal hydrology modeling capability is described and demonstrated in proof-of-concept simulations. The new modeling capability combines a surface energy balance model with recently developed three-dimensional subsurface thermal hydrology models and new models for nonisothermal surface water flows and snow distribution in the microtopography. Surface water flows are modeled using the diffusion wave equation extended to include energy transport and phase change of ponded water. Variation of snow depth in the microtopography, physically the result of wind scour, is modeled phenomenologically with a diffusion wave equation. The multiple surface and subsurface processes are implemented by leveraging highly parallel community software. Fully integrated thermal hydrology simulations on the tilted open book catchment, an important test case for integrated surface/subsurface flow modeling, are presented. Fine-scale 100 year projections of the integrated permafrost thermal hydrological system on an ice wedge polygon at Barrow Alaska in a warming climate are also presented. These simulations demonstrate the feasibility of microtopography-resolving, process-rich simulations as a tool to help understand possible future evolution of the carbon-rich Arctic tundra in a warming climate.

  13. New perspectives on thermal and hyperthermal oxidation of silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilov, Umedjon

    The growth of (ultra)thin silica (SiO2) layers on crystalline silicon (c-Si) and controlling the thickness of SiO2 is an important issue in the fabrication of microelectronics and photovoltaic devices (e.g., MOSFETs, solar cells, optical fibers etc.). Such ultrathin oxide can be grown and tuned even at low temperature (including room temperature), by hyperthermal oxidation or when performed on non-planar Si surfaces (e.g., Si nanowires or spheres). However, hyperthermal silica growth as well as small Si-NW oxidation in general and the initial stages in particular have not yet been investigated in full detail. This work is therefore devoted to controlling ultrathin silica thickness on planar and non-planar Si surfaces, which can open new perspectives in nanodevice fabrication. The simulation of hyperthermal (1-100 eV) Si oxidation demonstrate that at low impact energy (nanotechnology. Above the transition temperature such core-shell nanowires are completely converted to a-SiO2 nanowires. It can be concluded that an accurate control over the interfacial stress by choosing a suitable oxidation temperature and Si-NW diameter can lead to precise nanoscale control over the Si-core radius. All investigations were carried out by applying molecular dynamics calculations using the ReaxFF potential, allowing a accurately study of the underpinning physical and chemical processes.

  14. Feature-Adaptive Rendering of Loop Subdivision Surfaces on Modern GPUs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄韵岑; 冯结青; 崔元敏; 杨宝光

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel approach for real-time rendering Loop subdivision surfaces on modern graphics hardware. Our algorithm evaluates both positions and normals accurately, thus providing the true Loop subdivision surface. The core idea is to recursively refine irregular patches using a GPU compute kernel. All generated regular patches are then directly evaluated and rendered using the hardware tessellation unit. Our approach handles triangular control meshes of arbitrary topologies and incorporates common subdivision surface features such as semi-sharp creases and hierarchical edits. While surface rendering is accurate up to machine precision, we also enforce a consistent bitwise evaluation of positions and normals at patch boundaries. This is particularly useful in the context of displacement mapping which strictly requires matching surface normals. Furthermore, we incorporate efficient level-of-detail rendering where subdivision depth and tessellation density can be adjusted on-the-fly. Overall, our algorithm provides high-quality results at real-time frame rates, thus being ideally suited to interactive rendering applications such as video games or authoring tools.

  15. Surface Rupture and Geotechnical Features of The July 2, 2013 Tanah Gayo Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudrik Rahmawan Daryono

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An assessment of surface rupture and collateral ground failures can help to evaluate the impact of future earthquakes. This paper presents the results of a field survey conducted to map the surface rupture and geotechnical phenomena associated with the ground shaking during the July 2, 2013 earthquakes in Tanah Gayo Highland. The objectives of this survey are to document and to characterize the surface ruptures as well as to identify types of earthquake-induced ground failures. Results of the survey identified four best sites of possible surface rupture. Two locations are obvious surface ruptures that can be traced on primary topographic feature of the active fault segment from the north to the south, crossing Pantan Terong Hill. The fault segment has a total mapped length of 19 km, with WNW trending zone and a dextral rupture offset. The ground shaking also resulted in landslides and liquefaction in areas underlain by very fine-grained tuffaceous sands. Based on the field survey, it can be concluded that the newly defined active fault segment, the Pantan Terong segment, is likely the segment that ruptured at the July 2, 2013 Tanah Gayo earthquake. Due to the soil types and unstable rocky slopes in the hilly Central Aceh region, large-scale landslides are primary risks during an earthquake event in this region.

  16. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants to enhance osteogenic activity and in vivo osseointegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Lv, Kaige; Zhang, Wenjie; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-08-01

    Thermal oxidation, which serves as a low-cost, effective and relatively simple/facile method, was used to modify a micro-structured titanium surface in ambient atmosphere at 450 °C for different time periods to improve in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. The surface morphology, crystallinity of the surface layers, chemical composition and chemical states were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cell behaviours including cell adhesion, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were observed in vitro study. The ability of the titanium surface to promote osseointegration was evaluated in an in vivo animal model. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants maintained the microstructure and, thus, both slightly changed the nanoscale structure of titanium and enhanced the crystallinity of the titanium surface layer. Cells cultured on the three oxidized titanium surfaces grew well and exhibited better osteogenic activity than did the control samples. The in vivo bone-implant contact also showed enhanced osseointegration after several hours of oxidization. This heat-treated titanium enhanced the osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs and improved osseointegration in vivo, suggesting that surface thermal oxidation could potentially be used in clinical applications to improve bone-implant integration.

  17. Compositional variability across Mercury's surface revealed by MESSENGER measurements of variations in thermal neutron count rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplowski, P. N.; Lawrence, D. J.; Goldsten, J. O.; Nittler, L. R.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements by MESSENGER's Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) have revealed variations in the flux of thermal neutrons across Mercury's northern hemisphere. These variations are interpreted to originate from spatial variations in surface elemental composition. In particular, the measurements are sensitive to the near-surface abundances of elements that absorb thermal neutrons, including major rock-forming elements such as Fe and Ti, minor elements such as Mn and Cl, and rare-earth elements such as Gd and Sm. We have constructed a map of thermal neutron variability across the surface and compared it with known variations in elemental composition and with the distribution of geologic units. Development of the map included the derivation of the macroscopic thermal neutron absorption cross section across the surface, a quantity whose value and variability provides useful constraints on the formation and geochemical evolution of Mercury's crust. Finally, by combining the thermal neutron measurements with previously reported elemental measurements from the GRNS and MESSENGER's X-Ray Spectrometer, we have derived constraints on the abundances of neutron-absorbing elements, including previously unreported limits for some minor and rare-earth elements.

  18. Formation of plasmonic silver nanoparticles using rapid thermal annealing at low temperature and study in reflectance reduction of Si surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Bidyut; Dhasmana, Hrishikesh; Verma, Abhishek; Kumar, Amit; Pratap Chaudhary, Shiv; Jain, V. K.

    2017-09-01

    This work presents studies of plasmonic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) formation at low temperatures (200 °C-300 °C) onto Si surface by sputtering followed with rapid thermal processing (RTP) for different time durations(5-30 min). The study reveals that 20 min RTP at all temperatures show minimum average size of AgNPs (60.42 nm) with corresponding reduction in reflectance of Si surface from 40.12% to mere 1.15% only in wavelength region 300-800 nm for RTP at 200 °C. A detailed supporting growth mechanism is also discussed. This low temperature technique can be helpful in achieving efficiency improvement in solar cells via reflectance reduction with additional features such as reproducibility, minimal time and very good adhesion without damaging underlying layers device parameters.

  19. Bulk Surfaces Coated with Triangular Silver Nanoplates: Antibacterial Action Based on Silver Release and Photo-Thermal Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnese D’Agostino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A layer of silver nanoplates, specifically synthesized with the desired localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR features, was grafted on amino-functionalized bulk glass surfaces to impart a double antibacterial action: (i the well-known, long-term antibacterial effect based on the release of Ag+; (ii an “on demand” action which can be switched on by the use of photo-thermal properties of silver nano-objects. Irradiation of these samples with a laser having a wavelength falling into the so called “therapeutic window” of the near infrared region allows the reinforcement, in the timescale of minutes, of the classical antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles. We demonstrate how using the two actions allows for almost complete elimination of the population of two bacterial strains of representative Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  20. The influence of the base material surface preparation on the properties of thermally sprayed coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marušić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using specimens, a research was conducted to determine the influence of the base material surface preparation for 42CrMo4 on the final coating, prior to actual thermal spraying. During thermal spraying, an Al-Ni-alloy was used as an interlayer before the actual coating with Cr-Mo-Ni. The surface hardness and the hardness distribution across the thickness of the sprayed coating were measured and the structure of respective sprayed coatings was photographed. A comparison of experimental results enabled the identification of the particular material preparation method with an optimal ratio of the satisfactory coating thickness and its hardness.

  1. Pathogenic and nonpathogenic Acanthamoeba spp. in thermally polluted discharges and surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Jonckheere, J.F.

    1981-02-01

    During spring and autumn, the total number of amoebae and the number of acanthamoeba species able to grow at 37 degrees C were determined in six thermally polluted factory discharges and the surrounding surface waters. The isolated Acanthamoeba strains were studied for growth in axenic medium, cytopathic effect in Vito cell cultures, and virulence in mice. Although more amoebae were isolated in autumn, the number of Acanthamoeba species was lower than in spring, when the percent of pathogenic strains among the isolates was highest. Higher concentrations of amoebae were found in warm discharges, and more virulent strains occurred in thermal discharges than in surface waters.

  2. Mean shift texture surface detection based on WT and COM feature image selection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yan-fang; SHI Peng-fei

    2006-01-01

    Mean shift is a widely used clustering algorithm in image segmentation. However, the segmenting results are not so good as expected when dealing with the texture surface due to the influence of the textures. Therefore, an approach based on wavelet transform (WT), co-occurrence matrix (COM) and mean shift is proposed in this paper. First, WT and COM are employed to extract the optimal resolution approximation of the original image as feature image. Then, mean shift is successfully used to obtain better detection results. Finally, experiments are done to show this approach is effective.

  3. Evaluation of land ownership, lease status, and surface features in five geopressured geothermal prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackenbracht, W.N.

    1981-05-01

    This study was accomplished for the purpose of gathering information pertaining to land and lease ownership, surface features and use and relevant environmental factors in the Lake Theriot (West and East), Kaplan, Bayou Hebert and Freshwater Bayou geopressured geothermal prospects in Louisiana, and the Blessing geopressured geothermal prospect in Texas. This information and recommendations predicated upon it will then be used to augment engineering and geological data utilized to select geopressured geothermal test well sites within the prospects. The five geopressured geothermal prospects are briefly described and recommendations given.

  4. [The surface degradation of various light-cured composite resins by thermal cycling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, S; Nomoto, R; Harashima, I; Hirasawa, T

    1990-01-01

    The durability of four commercially available light-cured composite resins was investigated by thermal cycling, GR containing inorganic fillers treated with the graft polymerization of acryl ester, LF inorganic fillers treated with a silane coupling agent, PC silanized inorganic fillers and organic composite fillers, and the MFR-type SI containing the organic composite fillers. These materials were given 10,000, 30,000 and 50,000 thermal cycles (4 degrees C-60 degrees C) and the deterioration of materials by thermal cycling was evaluated by the measurement of the mechanical properties and the SEM observations of the surface of the thermocycled materials. Compressive strength and bending elastic moduli for all materials did not change greatly by thermal cycling. However, bending strength, toothbrush abrasion resistance and surface hardness decreased with increasing number of thermal cycles between 0 and 30,000, and changed little after 30,000 cycles. The percentage of bending strength after 50,000 thermal cycles to that of the non-thermocycled sample was 75% for GR, 60% for LF, 50% for PC and 65% for SI, respectively. Deterioration of materials was observed as cracks on the surface, which generated at the interface of the filler and matrix. The cracks generated relatively earlier during thermal cycling for SI and PC which contained the organic composite filler, later for LF which contained the silanized inorganic fillers, and the number of cracks on LF were fewer than SI and PC. On the other hand, for GR, no cracks were observed even after 50,000 thermal cycles. From these results, it can be presumed that the pre-treatment of filler by the graft polymerization is more effective to improve the durability of composite resin.

  5. Feature-preserving surface mesh smoothing via suboptimal Delaunay triangulation ☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhanheng; Yu, Zeyun; Holst, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A method of triangular surface mesh smoothing is presented to improve angle quality by extending the original optimal Delaunay triangulation (ODT) to surface meshes. The mesh quality is improved by solving a quadratic optimization problem that minimizes the approximated interpolation error between a parabolic function and its piecewise linear interpolation defined on the mesh. A suboptimal problem is derived to guarantee a unique, analytic solution that is significantly faster with little loss in accuracy as compared to the optimal one. In addition to the quality-improving capability, the proposed method has been adapted to remove noise while faithfully preserving sharp features such as edges and corners of a mesh. Numerous experiments are included to demonstrate the performance of the method. PMID:23580890

  6. Plume and surface feature structure and compositional effects on Europa's global exosphere: Preliminary Europa mission predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teolis, B. D.; Wyrick, D. Y.; Bouquet, A.; Magee, B. A.; Waite, J. H.

    2017-03-01

    A Europa plume source, if present, may produce a global exosphere with complex spatial structure and temporal variability in its density and composition. To investigate this interaction we have integrated a water plume source containing multiple organic and nitrile species into a Europan Monte Carlo exosphere model, considering the effect of Europa's gravity in returning plume ejecta to the surface, and the subsequent spreading of adsorbed and exospheric material by thermal desorption and re-sputtering across the entire body. We consider sputtered, radiolytic and potential plume sources, together with surface adsorption, regolith diffusion, polar cold trapping, and re-sputtering of adsorbed materials, and examine the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the exospheric density and composition. These models provide a predictive basis for telescopic observations (e.g. HST, JWST) and planned missions to the Jovian system by NASA and ESA. We apply spacecraft trajectories to our model to explore possible exospheric compositions which may be encountered along proposed flybys of Europa to inform the spatial and temporal relationship of spacecraft measurements to surface and plume source compositions. For the present preliminary study, we have considered four cases: Case A: an equatorial flyby through a sputtered only exosphere (no plumes), Case B: a flyby over a localized sputtered 'macula' terrain enriched in non-ice species, Case C: a south polar plume with an Enceladus-like composition, equatorial flyby, and Case D: a south polar plume, flyby directly through the plume.

  7. Influence of surface scattering on the thermal properties of spatially confined GaN nanofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yang; Zhu, Lin-Li

    2016-08-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN), the notable representative of third generation semiconductors, has been widely applied to optoelectronic and microelectronic devices due to its excellent physical and chemical properties. In this paper, we investigate the surface scattering effect on the thermal properties of GaN nanofilms. The contribution of surface scattering to phonon transport is involved in solving a Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). The confined phonon properties of GaN nanofilms are calculated based on the elastic model. The theoretical results show that the surface scattering effect can modify the cross-plane phonon thermal conductivity of GaN nanostructures completely, resulting in the significant change of size effect on the conductivity in GaN nanofilm. Compared with the quantum confinement effect, the surface scattering leads to the order-of-magnitude reduction of the cross-plane thermal conductivity in GaN nanofilm. This work could be helpful for controlling the thermal properties of GaN nanostructures in nanoelectronic devices through surface engineering. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11302189 and 11321202) and the Doctoral Fund of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 20130101120175).

  8. Biomaterial design for specific cellular interactions: Role of surface functionalization and geometric features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolhar, Poornima

    The areas of drug delivery and tissue engineering have experienced extraordinary growth in recent years with the application of engineering principles and their potential to support and improve the field of medicine. The tremendous progress in nanotechnology and biotechnology has lead to this explosion of research and development in biomedical applications. Biomaterials can now be engineered at a nanoscale and their specific interactions with the biological tissues can be modulated. Various design parameters are being established and researched for design of drug-delivery carriers and scaffolds to be implanted into humans. Nanoparticles made from versatile biomaterial can deliver both small-molecule drugs and various classes of bio-macromolecules, such as proteins and oligonucleotides. Similarly in the field of tissue engineering, current approaches emphasize nanoscale control of cell behavior by mimicking the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) unlike, traditional scaffolds. Drug delivery and tissue engineering are closely connected fields and both of these applications require materials with exceptional physical, chemical, biological, and biomechanical properties to provide superior therapy. In the current study the surface functionalization and the geometric features of the biomaterials has been explored. In particular, a synthetic surface for culture of human embryonic stem cells has been developed, demonstrating the importance of surface functionalization in maintaining the pluripotency of hESCs. In the second study, the geometric features of the drug delivery carriers are investigated and the polymeric nanoneedles mediated cellular permeabilization and direct cytoplasmic delivery is reported. In the third study, the combined effect of surface functionalization and geometric modification of carriers for vascular targeting is enunciated. These studies illustrate how the biomaterials can be designed to achieve various cellular behaviors and control the

  9. Importance of initial buoyancy field on evolution of mantle thermal structure:Implications of surface boundary conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petar Glisovic; Alessandro M. Forte

    2015-01-01

    Although there has been significant progress in the seismic imaging of mantle heterogeneity, the outstanding issue that remains to be resolved is the unknown distribution of mantle temperature anomalies in the distant geological past that give rise to the present-day anomalies inferred by global tomography models. To address this question, we present 3-D convection models in compressible and self-gravitating mantle initialised by different hypothetical temperature patterns. A notable feature of our forward convection modelling is the use of self-consistent coupling of the motion of surface tectonic plates to the underlying mantle flow, without imposing prescribed surface velocities (i.e., plate-like boundary condition). As an approximation for the surface mechanical conditions before plate tectonics began to operate we employ the no-slip (rigid) boundary condition. A rigid boundary condition dem-onstrates that the initial thermally-dominated structure is preserved, and its geographical location is fixed during the evolution of mantle flow. Considering the impact of different assumed surface boundary conditions (rigid and plate-like) on the evolution of thermal heterogeneity in the mantle we suggest that the intrinsic buoyancy of seven superplumes is most-likely resolved in the tomographic images of present-day mantle thermal structure. Our convection simulations with a plate-like boundary condition reveal that the evolution of an initial cold anomaly beneath the Java-Indonesian trench system yields a long-term, stable pattern of thermal heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle that resembles the present-day Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs), especially below the Pacific. The evolution of sub-duction zones may be, however, influenced by the mantle-wide flow driven by deeply-rooted and long-lived superplumes since Archean times. These convection models also detect the intrinsic buoyancy of the Perm Anomaly that has been identified as a unique slow feature

  10. Thermal Diffusion Processes in Metal-Tip-Surface Interactions: Contact Formation and Adatom Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Jonsson, Hannes

    1996-01-01

    We have carried out computer simulations to identify and characterize various thermally activated atomic scale processes that can play an important role in room temperature experiments where a metal tip is brought close to a metal surface. We find that contact formation between the tip...... and the surface can occur by a sequence of atomic hop and exchange processes which become active on a millisecond time scale when the tip is about 3-5 Angstrom from the surface. Adatoms on the surface are stabilized by the presence of the tip and energy barriers for diffusion processes in the region under the tip...

  11. Decoding subtle forearm flexions using fractal features of surface electromyogram from single and multiple sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Dinesh

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying finger and wrist flexion based actions using a single channel surface electromyogram (sEMG can lead to a number of applications such as sEMG based controllers for near elbow amputees, human computer interface (HCI devices for elderly and for defence personnel. These are currently infeasible because classification of sEMG is unreliable when the level of muscle contraction is low and there are multiple active muscles. The presence of noise and cross-talk from closely located and simultaneously active muscles is exaggerated when muscles are weakly active such as during sustained wrist and finger flexion. This paper reports the use of fractal properties of sEMG to reliably identify individual wrist and finger flexion, overcoming the earlier shortcomings. Methods SEMG signal was recorded when the participant maintained pre-specified wrist and finger flexion movements for a period of time. Various established sEMG signal parameters such as root mean square (RMS, Mean absolute value (MAV, Variance (VAR and Waveform length (WL and the proposed fractal features: fractal dimension (FD and maximum fractal length (MFL were computed. Multi-variant analysis of variance (MANOVA was conducted to determine the p value, indicative of the significance of the relationships between each of these parameters with the wrist and finger flexions. Classification accuracy was also computed using the trained artificial neural network (ANN classifier to decode the desired subtle movements. Results The results indicate that the p value for the proposed feature set consisting of FD and MFL of single channel sEMG was 0.0001 while that of various combinations of the five established features ranged between 0.009 - 0.0172. From the accuracy of classification by the ANN, the average accuracy in identifying the wrist and finger flexions using the proposed feature set of single channel sEMG was 90%, while the average accuracy when using a combination

  12. Mathematical modeling of temperature mapping over skin surface and its implementation in thermal disease diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhong-Shan; Liu, Jing

    2004-09-01

    In non-invasive thermal diagnostics, accurate correlations between the thermal image on skin surface and interior human pathophysiology are often desired, which require general solutions for the bioheat equation. In this study, the Monte Carlo method was implemented to solve the transient three-dimensional bio-heat transfer problem with non-linear boundary conditions (simultaneously with convection, radiation and evaporation) and space-dependent thermal physiological parameters. Detailed computations indicated that the thermal states of biological bodies, reflecting physiological conditions, could be correlated to the temperature or heat flux mapping recorded at the skin surface. The effect of the skin emissivity and humidity, the convective heat transfer coefficient, the relative humidity and temperature of the surrounding air, the metabolic rate and blood perfusion rate in the tumor, and the tumor size and number on the sensitivity of thermography are comprehensively investigated. Moreover, several thermal criteria for disease diagnostic were proposed based on statistical principles. Implementations of this study for the clinical thermal diagnostics are discussed.

  13. Thermal Stability of Surface Layer Microstructures of Commercially Pure Titanium Treated by High Energy Shot Peening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-juan; CHEN Chun-huan; REN Rui-ming

    2004-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium was treated by high energy shot peening, and annealed at a series of temperatures. The surface layers are characterized by means of scan electronic microscope, X-Ray diffraction, transmission electronic microscope and micro-hardness testing machine. The results showed that microhardness of surface layers decreases with anneal temperature, the tendency of microhardness is similar to unannealed one, in other words, the more close to the surface, the more rapidly the hardness decreases, after reaches the depth of 50 μm, the decrease becomes steadily. But the sub-surface microhardness decreased suddenly over 500 ℃, From 550 ℃ to 650 ℃, the microhardness of surface layers almost unchanged.Observing by TEM and SEM, the grain sizes of pure titanium surface layers have increased below 500 ℃; Deformation twins begin disappearing obviously at 550 ℃; The nano-scaled grains within about 10 micrometers from surface existed even at 550℃.Surface nanocrystallization is well known as one of important methods to improve surface properties. The thermal stability of nanocrystalline microstructures was related to their preparation and application. The commercial pure Ti thermal stability of nanocrystalline and deformed microstructures induced by high-energy-shot-peening (HESP) technique was investigated. The nanostructured surface and deformed sub-surface layers of specimens were prepared through HESP treatment. The thermal stability was characterized through XRD analyses of surface layers, SEM and TEM microstructure observation and microhardness measurement of specimens annealed in different temperature in the air after HESP treatments. The results showed that after HESP treatment, the microhardness of surface layers increased with treatment time, especially in the rang of about 40 micrometers from the surface, the microhardness increase was obvious. The surface microhardness decreased gradually with annealing temperature, but the sub-surface

  14. The stellar spectral features of nearby galaxies in the near infrared: tracers of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, Rogério; Mason, Rachel E.; Martins, Lucimara P.; Rodríguez-Ardila, Alberto; Ho, Luis C.; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Lira, Paulina; Gonzalez Martin, Omaira; Ruschel-Dutra, Daniel; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Flohic, Helene; McDermid, Richard M.; Ramos Almeida, Cristina; Thanjavur, Karun; Winge, Claudia

    2015-07-01

    We analyse the stellar absorption features in high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) near-infrared (NIR) spectra of the nuclear region of 12 nearby galaxies, mostly spirals. The features detected in some or all of the galaxies in this sample are the TiO (0.843 and 0.886 μm), VO (1.048 μm), CN (1.1 and 1.4 μm), H2O (1.4 and 1.9 μm) and CO (1.6 and 2.3 μm) bands. The C2 (1.17 and 1.76 μm) bands are generally weak or absent, although C2 (1.76 μm) may be weakly present in the mean galaxy spectrum. A deep feature near 0.93 μm, likely caused by CN, TiO and/or ZrO, is also detected in all objects. Fitting a combination of stellar spectra to the mean spectrum shows that the absorption features are produced by evolved stars: cool giants and supergiant stars in the early- or thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (E-AGB or TP-AGB) phases. The high luminosity of TP-AGB stars, and the appearance of VO and ZrO features in the data, suggest that TP-AGB stars dominate these spectral features. However, a contribution from other evolved stars is also likely. Comparison with evolutionary population synthesis models shows that models based on empirical libraries that predict relatively strong NIR features provide a more accurate description of the data. However, none of the models tested accurately reproduces all of the features observed in the spectra. To do so, the models will need to not only improve the treatment of TP-AGB stars, but also include good quality spectra of red giant and E-AGB stars. The uninterrupted wavelength coverage, high S/N and quantity of features we present here will provide a benchmark for the next generation of models aiming to explain and predict the NIR properties of galaxies.

  15. Microstructural features and properties of plasma sprayed YPSZ/NiCrAlY thermal barrier coating (TBC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙大谦; 王文权; 宣兆志; 宫文彪

    2004-01-01

    The plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) consists of NiCrAlY bond coating and yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YPSZ) top coating. NiCrAlY coating mainly contains Ni solid solution with face centered cubic lattice, Al2O3 oxides and pores. The most obvious feature of YPSZ coating with tetragonal zirconia is a lot of vertical microcracks in this coating. The thermal insulation capability of the TBC increased with an increase in YPSZ coating thickness, the temperature drop across the TBC increasing from 60℃ to 92℃ with increasing YPSZ coating thickness with increasing YPSZ coating thickness and cracks initiated mainly in original vertical microcrack tips of the YPSZ coating and propagated not only along YPSZ coating / NiCrAlY coating interface but also through into two stages: transient oxidation stage with rapid oxidation rate and steady oxidation stage with slow oxidation. Their transition time was favorable to increase YPSZ coating toughness and to decrease the pores and oxides of the TBC system for improving thermal shock resistance and oxidation resistance of the TBC.

  16. The Wear behavior of UHMWPE against Surface Modified CP-Titanium by Thermal Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.T. Prayoga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of thermal oxidation duration on hardness, roughness, and wettability of the CP-titanium surfaces were investigated in this paper. The thermal oxidation treatment was done at 700 oC for 12-36 hours in an air atmosphere. The wear behavior of the UHMWPE sliding against treated thermal oxidation of the CP-titanium was tested by a pin-on-plate tribometer under lubrication of the solution of 75 % distilled water and 25 % bovine serum. The results showed that the layer of the oxide titanium was formed on the surface after being treated by the thermal oxidation for 12-36 hours. The oxide titanium layer was dominated by rutile form of TiO2, that offers an improvement of hardness and wettability of the CP-titanium surfaces. The average wear factor of the UHMWPE reduced significantly when the sliding against of the CP-titanium was modified by the thermal oxidation, and the lowest average wear factor was reached when the sliding against the 12 hour oxidized CP-titanium counterfaces.

  17. Surface modification of cellulose acetate membrane using thermal annealing to enhance produced water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusworo, T. D., E-mail: tdkusworo@che.undip.ac.id; Aryanti, N., E-mail: nita.aryanti@gmail.com; Firdaus, M. M. H.; Sukmawati, H. [Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Diponegoro University Prof. Soedarto Street, Tembalang, Semarang, 50239, Phone/Fax : (024)7460058 (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    This study is performed primarily to investigate the effect of surface modification of cellulose acetate using thermal annealing on the enhancement of membrane performance for produced water treatment. In this study, Cellulose Acetate membranes were casted using dry/wet phase inversion technique. The effect of additive and post-treatment using thermal annealing on the membrane surface were examined for produced water treatment. Therma annealing was subjected to membrane surface at 60 and 70 °C for 5, 10 and 15 second, respectively. Membrane characterizations were done using membrane flux and rejection with produced water as a feed, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) analysis. Experimental results showed that asymmetric cellulose acetate membrane can be made by dry/wet phase inversion technique. The results from the Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) analysis was also confirmed that polyethylene glycol as additivie in dope solution and thermal annealing was affected the morphology and membrane performance for produced water treatment, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs showed that the selective layer and the substructure of membrane became denser and more compact after the thermal annealing processes. Therefore, membrane rejection was significantly increased while the flux was slighty decreased, respectively. The best membrane performance is obtained on the composition of 18 wt % cellulose acetate, poly ethylene glycol 5 wt% with thermal annealing at 70° C for 15 second.

  18. Rayleigh surface waves, phonon mode conversion, and thermal transport in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Leon; Knezevic, Irena

    We study the effects of phonon mode conversion and Rayleigh (surface) waves on thermal transport in nanostructures. We present a technique to calculate thermal conductivity in the elastic-solid approximation: a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solution of the elastic or scalar wave equations combined with the Green-Kubo formula. The technique is similar to an equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, captures phonon wave behavior, and scales well to nanostructures that are too large to simulate with many other techniques. By imposing fixed or free boundary conditions, we can selectively turn off mode conversion and Rayleigh waves to study their effects. In the example case of graphenelike nanoribbons with rough edges, we find that mode conversion among bulk modes has little effect on thermal transport, but that conversion between bulk and Rayleigh waves can significantly reduce thermal conductivity. With increasing surface disorder, Rayleigh waves readily become trapped by the disorder and draw energy away from the propagating bulk modes, which lowers thermal conductivity. We discuss the implications on the accuracy of popular phonon-surface scattering models that stem from scalar wave equations and cannot capture mode conversion to Rayleigh waves.

  19. Comparison of unsteady pressure fields on turrets with different surface features using pressure-sensitive paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeyev, Stanislav; De Lucca, Nicholas; Jumper, Eric J.; Hird, Kyle; Juliano, Thomas J.; Gregory, James W.; Thordahl, James; Wittich, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    Spatially temporally resolved unsteady pressure fields on a surface of a hemisphere-on-cylinder turret with either a flat or a conformal window with realistic features such as gaps and "smile" cutouts were characterized using fast-response pressure-sensitive paint at M = 0.33 for several window viewing angles. Various statistical properties of pressure fields were computed, and geometry effects on the unsteady pressure fields were analyzed and discussed. Proper orthogonal decomposition was also used to extract dominant pressure modes and corresponding temporal coefficients and to analyze and compare instantaneous pressure structures for different turret geometric features and the window viewing angles. An unsteady separation off the turret and a recirculation region downstream of the turret were identified as dominant sources of the unsteady pressure. It was found that while all geometric features affected the unsteady pressure field, the "smiles," positioned spanwise-symmetrically on both sides of the turret, were the leading cause of these changes, followed by the looking forward flat window. The gaps, the side- and the back-looking flat window introduced only small local changes.

  20. An efficient plate heater with uniform surface temperature engineered with effective thermal materials

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yichao; He, Sailing; Ma, Yungui

    2014-01-01

    Extended from its electromagnetic counterpart, transformation thermodynamics applied to thermal conduction equations can map a virtual geometry into a physical thermal medium, realizing the manipulation of heat flux with almost arbitrarily desired diffusion paths, which provides unprecedented opportunities to create thermal devices unconceivable or deemed impossible before. In this work we employ this technique to design an efficient plate heater that can transiently achieve a large surface of uniform temperature powered by a small thermal source. As opposed to the traditional approach of relying on the deployment of a resistor network, our approach fully takes advantage of an advanced functional material system to guide the heat flux to achieve the desired temperature heating profile. A different set of material parameters for the transformed device has been developed, offering the parametric freedom for practical applications. As a proof of concept, the proposed devices are implemented with engineered therm...

  1. Structural, thermal and optical absorption features of heavy metal oxides doped tellurite rich glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaky, Kawa M.; Lakshminarayana, G.; Baki, S. O.; Kityk, I. V.; Taufiq-Yap, Y. H.; Mahdi, M. A.

    In order to improve tellurite glass stability to be applicable for optical fiber amplifier applications, glasses with the composition of (70 - x)TeO2. (10)ZnO. (10)WO3. (5)Na2O. (5)TiO2. (x)Bi2O3 (x = 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mol%) have been produced and characterized using the related methods. Structural properties were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) which confirms the non-crystalline structure and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs also confirm the XRD results. The energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis profiles show that all the mentioned elements are present in the prepared glasses. Following the IR spectra, all the tellurium bonds such as stretching vibrations of TeO4 tbp and TeO3/TeO3+1 unit are revealed. Raman spectra confirm the presence of different functional groups, actually, it shows bands mainly in four spectral regions: R1 (65-150) cm-1, R2 (280-550) cm-1, R3 (880-950) cm-1 and R4 (916-926) cm-1 and the identified bands are assigned to respective molecular groups. The thermal study was carried out using Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) which indicates good thermal stability of the synthesized glasses with increasing Bi concentration. From the optical absorption spectra, we evaluated cut-off edge wavelengths and found increasing cutoff wavelength with an increase in Bi2O3 concentration. In the UV-Visible region, optical band gap energy and allowed transitions were investigated using three methods; direct, indirect, and absorption spectrum fitting (ASF), and band gaps from indirect and ASF were matched.

  2. The Effects of Thermal Preconditioning on Oncogenic and Intraspinal Cord Growth Features of Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiang; Han, Inbo; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; Aljuboori, Zaid; Anderson, Jamie E; Chi, John H; Zafonte, Ross D; Teng, Yang D

    2016-12-13

    The adult rodent spinal cord presents an inhibitory environment for donor cell survival, impeding efficiency for xenograft-based modeling of gliomas. We postulated that mild thermal preconditioning may influence the fate of the implanted tumor cells. To test this hypothesis, high-grade human astrocytoma G55 and U87 cells were cultured under 37C and 38.5C to mimic regular experimental or core body temperatures of rodents, respectively. In vitro, the 38.5C-conditioned cells, relative to 37C, grew slightly faster. Compared to U87 cells, G55 cells demonstrated a greater response to the temperature difference. Hyperthermal culture markedly increased production of Hsp27 in most G55 cells, but only promoted transient expression of cancer stem cell marker CD133 in a small cell subpopulation. We subsequently transplanted G55 cells following 37C or 38.5C culture into the C2 or T10 spinal cord of adult female immunodeficient rats (3 rats/each locus/per temperature; total: 12 rats). Systematic analyses revealed that 38.5C-preconditioned G55 cells grew more malignantly at either C2 or T10 as determined by tumor size, outgrowth profile, resistance to bolus intratumor administration of 5-fluorouracil (0.1 mol), and posttumor survival (p0.05; n=6/group). Therefore, thermal preconditioning of glioma cells may be an effective way to influence the in vitro and in vivo oncological contour of glioma cells. Future studies are needed for assessing the potential oncogenic modifying effect of hyperthermia regimens on glioma cells.

  3. Structure and Surface Characterization of Nanostructured Tio2 Coatings Deposited Via HVOF Thermal Spray Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryamossadat Bozorgtabar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide coatings were deposited by high velocity oxy-fuel spraying (HVOF with the use of agglomerated P25/20 nano-powder and different spraying parameters (e.g. fuel/flow ratio to determine their influence on the microstructure, crystalline structure and surface feature of the coatings. The microstructure of as-sprayed TiO2 coatings was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. Surface features were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The results showed that the fuel and oxygen flow ratio have an important influence on the microstructure, anatase content, surface chemical state and surface feature of the TiO2 coatings

  4. Surface-impedance approach solves problems with the thermal Casimir force between real metals

    CERN Document Server

    Geyer, B; Mostepanenko, V M

    2003-01-01

    The surface impedance approach to the description of the thermal Casimir effect in the case of real metals is elaborated starting from the free energy of oscillators. The Lifshitz formula expressed in terms of the dielectric permittivity depending only on frequency is shown to be inapplicable in the frequency region where a real current may arise leading to Joule heating of the metal. The standard concept of a fluctuating electromagnetic field on such frequencies meets difficulties when used as a model for the zero-point oscillations or thermal photons in the thermal equilibrium inside metals. Instead, the surface impedance permits not to consider the electromagnetic oscillations inside the metal but taking the realistic material properties into account by means of the effective boundary condition. An independent derivation of the Lifshitz-type formulas for the Casimir free energy and force between two metal plates is presented within the impedance approach. It is shown that they are free of the contradiction...

  5. Thermal Advantages for Solar Heating Systems with a Glass Cover with Antireflection Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Shah, Louise Jivan

    2003-01-01

    Investigations elucidate how a glass cover with antireflection surfaces can improve the efficiency of a solar collector and the thermal performance of solar heating systems. The transmittances for two glass covers for a flat-plate solar collector were measured for different incidence angles...... was determined for different solar heating systems. Three systems were investigated: solar domestic hot water systems, solar heating systems for combined space heating demand and domestic hot water supply, and large solar heating plants. The yearly thermal performance of the systems was calculated by detailed...... simulation models with collectors with a normal glass cover and with a glass cover with antireflection surfaces. The calculations were carried out for different solar fractions and temperature levels of the solar heating systems. These parameters influence greatly the thermal performance associated...

  6. Surface Response of Brominated Carbon Media on Laser and Thermal Excitation: Optical and Thermal Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multian, Volodymyr V.; Kinzerskyi, Fillip E.; Vakaliuk, Anna V.; Grishchenko, Liudmyla M.; Diyuk, Vitaliy E.; Boldyrieva, Olga Yu.; Kozhanov, Vadim O.; Mischanchuk, Oleksandr V.; Lisnyak, Vladyslav V.; Gayvoronsky, Volodymyr Ya.

    2017-02-01

    The present study is objected to develop an analytical remote optical diagnostics of the functionalized carbons surface. Carbon composites with up to 1 mmol g-1 of irreversibly adsorbed bromine were produced by the room temperature plasma treatment of an activated carbon fabric (ACF) derived from polyacrylonitrile textile. The brominated ACF (BrACF) was studied by elastic optical scattering indicatrix analysis at wavelength 532 nm. The obtained data were interpreted within results of the thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry. The bromination dramatically reduces the microporosity producing practically non-porous material, while the incorporated into the micropores bromine induces the dielectric and structural impact on surface polarizability and conductivity due to the charging effect. We have found that the elastic optical scattering in proper solid angles in the forward and the backward hemispheres is sensitive to the kind of the bromine bonding, e.g., physical adsorption or chemisorption, and the bromination level, respectively, that can be utilized for the express remote fabrication control of the nanoscale carbons with given interfaces.

  7. Stream/bounce event perception reveals a temporal limit of motion correspondence based on surface feature over space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, Yousuke; Kawabe, Takahiro; Gyoba, Jiro

    2011-01-01

    We examined how stream/bounce event perception is affected by motion correspondence based on the surface features of moving objects passing behind an occlusion. In the stream/bounce display two identical objects moving across each other in a two-dimensional display can be perceived as either streaming through or bouncing off each other at coincidence. Here, surface features such as colour (Experiments 1 and 2) or luminance (Experiment 3) were switched between the two objects at coincidence. The moment of coincidence was invisible to observers due to an occluder. Additionally, the presentation of the moving objects was manipulated in duration after the feature switch at coincidence. The results revealed that a postcoincidence duration of approximately 200 ms was required for the visual system to stabilize judgments of stream/bounce events by determining motion correspondence between the objects across the occlusion on the basis of the surface feature. The critical duration was similar across motion speeds of objects and types of surface features. Moreover, controls (Experiments 4a-4c) showed that cognitive bias based on feature (colour/luminance) congruency across the occlusion could not fully account for the effects of surface features on the stream/bounce judgments. We discuss the roles of motion correspondence, visual feature processing, and attentive tracking in the stream/bounce judgments.

  8. Stream/Bounce Event Perception Reveals a Temporal Limit of Motion Correspondence Based on Surface Feature over Space and Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousuke Kawachi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We examined how stream/bounce event perception is affected by motion correspondence based on the surface features of moving objects passing behind an occlusion. In the stream/bounce display two identical objects moving across each other in a two-dimensional display can be perceived as either streaming through or bouncing off each other at coincidence. Here, surface features such as colour (Experiments 1 and 2 or luminance (Experiment 3 were switched between the two objects at coincidence. The moment of coincidence was invisible to observers due to an occluder. Additionally, the presentation of the moving objects was manipulated in duration after the feature switch at coincidence. The results revealed that a postcoincidence duration of approximately 200 ms was required for the visual system to stabilize judgments of stream/bounce events by determining motion correspondence between the objects across the occlusion on the basis of the surface feature. The critical duration was similar across motion speeds of objects and types of surface features. Moreover, controls (Experiments 4a–4c showed that cognitive bias based on feature (colour/luminance congruency across the occlusion could not fully account for the effects of surface features on the stream/bounce judgments. We discuss the roles of motion correspondence, visual feature processing, and attentive tracking in the stream/bounce judgments.

  9. Surface morphology changes of graphene on flexible PET substrate upon thermal annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Monica; Lee, Jong Min; Park, Won Il; Yi, Dong Kee; Paik, Ungyu; Lee, Chang-Lyoul

    2011-11-01

    The performance of a polymer photovoltaic device using multilayered graphene on an amorphous PET substrate as the electrode was studied. The changes in surface morphology of graphene coated polyethylene terephthalate (PETG) substrate upon thermal annealing were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and current-voltage characteristics. The root mean square (RMS) roughness of PETG substrate before annealing was 36.5 nm that decreased to 11.5 nm after 10 min thermal annealing at 110 degrees C. The mean grain size of the substrate decreased from 2301 nm2 to 848 nm2. The PETG surface became smooth when thermally annealed as the voids created by the bubbles in the graphene layer were filled up with thermal expansion of the PET substrate. However, cracks present initially on the graphene due to surface stress between the graphene and PET layer grew further upon annealing that deteriorated the device performance. This study on the graphene surface morphology change upon annealing and the consequent drop in device performance vis-à-vis an ITO glass electrode shows potential drawback of solar cell device fabrication on such flexible substrates.

  10. Estimation of Thermal Contact Conductance between Blank and Tool Surface in Hot Stamping Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Zahari; Hanafiah Shaharudin, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    In hot stamping, the determination of the thermal contact conductance values between the blank and tool surface during the process is crucial for the purpose of simulating the blank rapid cooling inside the tool using finite element analysis (FEA). The thermal contact conductance value represents the coefficient of the heat transfer at the surface of two solid bodies in contact and is known to be influenced greatly by the applied pressure. In order to estimate the value and its dependency on applied pressure, the process of hot stamping was replicated and simplified into a process of compression of heated flat blank in between the tool at different applied pressure. The temperature of the blank and tool surface were measured by means of thermocouples installed inside the tool. Based on the measured temperature, the thermal contact conductance between the surfaces was calculated using Newton's cooling law equation. The calculated value was then used to simulate the blank cooling inside the tool using FEA commercial software. This paper describes an experimental approach to estimate the thermal contact conductance between a blank made of Boron Steel (USIBOR 1500) and tool made of Tool Steel (STAVAX). Its dependency on applied pressure is also studied and the experimental results were then compared with FEA simulations.

  11. Thermal and Dynamic Properties of Volcanic Lava Inferred from Measurements on its Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.; Korotkii, A.; Kovtunov, D.; Tsepelev, I.; Melnik, O. E.

    2015-12-01

    Modern remote sensing technologies allow for detecting the absolute temperature at the surface of volcanic lava, and the heat flow could be then inferred from the Stefan-Boltzmann law. Is it possible to use these surface thermal data to constrain the thermal and dynamic conditions inside the lava? We propose a quantitative approach to reconstruct temperature and velocity in the steady-state volcanic lava flow from thermal observations at its surface. This problem is reduced to a combination of the direct and inverse problems of mass- and heat transport. Namely, using known conditions at the lava surface we determine the missing condition at the bottom of lava (the inverse problem) and then search for the physical properties of lava - temperature and flow velocity - inside the lava (the direct problem). Assuming that the lava rheology and the thermal conductivity are temperature-dependent, we determine the flow characteristics in the model domain using an adjoint method. We show that in the case of smooth input data (observations) the lava temperature and the flow velocity can be reconstructed with a high accuracy. The noise imposed on the smooth input data results in a less accurate solution, but still acceptable below some noise level.

  12. The Surface-to-Volume Ratio in Thermal Physics: From Cheese Cube Physics to Animal Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planinsic, Gorazd; Vollmer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The surface-to-volume ratio is an important quantity in thermal physics. For example it governs the behaviour of heating or cooling of physical objects as a function of size like, e.g. cubes or spheres made of different material. The starting point in our paper is the simple physics problem of how cheese cubes of different sizes behave if heated…

  13. Temperature Mapping of Air Film-Cooled Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces Using Phosphor Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness for jet engine components are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. Phosphor thermometry offers several advantages for mapping temperatures of air film cooled surfaces. While infrared thermography has been typically applied to study air film cooling effectiveness, temperature accuracy depends on knowing surface emissivity (which may change) and correcting for effects of reflected radiation. Because decay time-based full-field phosphor thermometry is relatively immune to these effects, it can be applied advantageously to temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces. In this presentation, an overview will be given of efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center to perform temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces in a burner rig test environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and the strengths and limitations of this method for studying air film cooling effectiveness are discussed.

  14. Challenges related to flotation cleaning of oil shales. Issues due to compositional and surface features and post-grinding surface behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altun N. Emre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil shale is an important energy resource alternative. Despite its recognition as an unconventional oil source, oil shale is also considered as an important solid fossil fuel alternative to coal and lignites due to the solid form and remarkable extent of organic content. Utilization possibilites, similar to coal and lignites, have been considered in the past decades and direct use of oil shales in thermal power production has been possible in countries like Estonia and China. In the perspective of utilization of oil shales in a similar manner to coal and lignites, problems and restrictions related to the inorganic ash-making and potentially pollutant constituents are applied. In this respect, cleaning of this important energy source through mineral processing methods, particularly by flotation, is an outstanding option. However, on the basis of unique features and distinctive characteristics, treatment of oil shales like a type of coal is a big perception and may be highly misleading. This paper discusses specific challenges regarding flotation behavior of oil shales with reference to the surface characteristics and behavior of oil shale entities – probably the most important aspect that determines the efficiency and success of the flotation based cleaning process.

  15. Mining for diagnostic information in body surface potential maps: A comparison of feature selection techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCullagh Paul J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In body surface potential mapping, increased spatial sampling is used to allow more accurate detection of a cardiac abnormality. Although diagnostically superior to more conventional electrocardiographic techniques, the perceived complexity of the Body Surface Potential Map (BSPM acquisition process has prohibited its acceptance in clinical practice. For this reason there is an interest in striking a compromise between the minimum number of electrocardiographic recording sites required to sample the maximum electrocardiographic information. Methods In the current study, several techniques widely used in the domains of data mining and knowledge discovery have been employed to mine for diagnostic information in 192 lead BSPMs. In particular, the Single Variable Classifier (SVC based filter and Sequential Forward Selection (SFS based wrapper approaches to feature selection have been implemented and evaluated. Using a set of recordings from 116 subjects, the diagnostic ability of subsets of 3, 6, 9, 12, 24 and 32 electrocardiographic recording sites have been evaluated based on their ability to correctly asses the presence or absence of Myocardial Infarction (MI. Results It was observed that the wrapper approach, using sequential forward selection and a 5 nearest neighbour classifier, was capable of choosing a set of 24 recording sites that could correctly classify 82.8% of BSPMs. Although the filter method performed slightly less favourably, the performance was comparable with a classification accuracy of 79.3%. In addition, experiments were conducted to show how (a features chosen using the wrapper approach were specific to the classifier used in the selection model, and (b lead subsets chosen were not necessarily unique. Conclusion It was concluded that both the filter and wrapper approaches adopted were suitable for guiding the choice of recording sites useful for determining the presence of MI. It should be noted however

  16. The Surface Finish of Thermally Aged Carbon Fibre Reinforced Composites Using E-glass as a Surface Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, M. L.; Fox, B. L.

    2015-10-01

    This work investigated the effect of woven E-glass mass (25 g/m2, 50 g/m2, 85 g/m2, 135 g/m2) on the painted surface finish of various thermoset (EPIKOTETM RIM935, EPIKOTETM 04434, Ultratec LpTM ES300, Ultratec LpTM SPV6035) carbon fibre composite laminates, before and after aging at 95 °C for 168 h. The as-moulded laminate surfaces were evaluated using surface profilometry techniques and the painted and aged surfaces were evaluated using a wave-scan distinctness of image (DOI) instrument. It was found that the 25 g/m2 E-glass surface layer assisted with reducing the roughness of the as-moulded surfaces and the long-term waviness of the painted surfaces due to the increase in resin-richness at the surface. The EPIKOTETM 04434 resin system that contained diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF) epoxy had the least change in long-term waviness with thermal aging due to the rigid fluorene-based backbone in comparison to the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) systems.

  17. Use of infrared cameras for monitoring and research at Costa Rican volcanoes and thermal features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, C. J.; Mora-Amador, R.; González, G.

    2012-12-01

    Since November 2010, the Costa Rican volcanoes and hot springs began monitored and research by 5 infrared cameras, 4 steady fixed FLIR A320 and 1 portable FLIR P660. All the A320's are located on different settings depending on the volcano or the constant use. At Turrialba volcano 2 of the cameras are set permanent at the crater rim, focused on the new vents formed on January 2010 and 2012, from there at ≈500m it is possible to monitor 24/7 the temperature of the gases from the new vents plus the direction and speed of the plumes, that data helps the improve of the use of equipment like Mini-DOAS, MultiGas or FTIR; at Poás volcano the camera is permanent fixed on a bunker structure located at ≈650m from the active hyperacid hot lagoon, from there it is possible to cover the complete crater with the use of a wide angle lens, that way is safely to track phreatic eruptions, observe convective cells from the lagoon, fumaroles activity, as well as temperature, direction and speed of the gas plume. Finally the last A320 is set for temporary set up, so far is being used on places like Arenal volcano because of the changing of the pattern of the lava flows and gas plume, also at Rincón de la Vieja crater rim because so far is difficult to set up a permanent camera, and finally to do over flights on active volcanoes. The FLIR P660, it has been used to carry out periodic measurements of specific thermal spots. At Turrialba and Poás volcanoes, it is possible to get closer views, measuring more precise inaccessible high temperature fumaroles like the new vents at Turrialba or the ones at Poás dome, places that can reach temperatures of more than 600°C, also is being a lot of support to track lagoon convection cells (61°C), fumaroles migration, lagoon phreatic eruptions (130°C), and better characterization of hot springs, small hot lagoons, and mud pools, with temperatures of ≈ 90C that allow the life of extreme organisms to survive. The use of the thermal cameras

  18. Feature extraction and classifcation in surface grading application using multivariate statistical projection models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats-Montalbán, José M.; López, Fernando; Valiente, José M.; Ferrer, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present an innovative way to simultaneously perform feature extraction and classification for the quality control issue of surface grading by applying two well known multivariate statistical projection tools (SIMCA and PLS-DA). These tools have been applied to compress the color texture data describing the visual appearance of surfaces (soft color texture descriptors) and to directly perform classification using statistics and predictions computed from the extracted projection models. Experiments have been carried out using an extensive image database of ceramic tiles (VxC TSG). This image database is comprised of 14 different models, 42 surface classes and 960 pieces. A factorial experimental design has been carried out to evaluate all the combinations of several factors affecting the accuracy rate. Factors include tile model, color representation scheme (CIE Lab, CIE Luv and RGB) and compression/classification approach (SIMCA and PLS-DA). In addition, a logistic regression model is fitted from the experiments to compute accuracy estimates and study the factors effect. The results show that PLS-DA performs better than SIMCA, achieving a mean accuracy rate of 98.95%. These results outperform those obtained in a previous work where the soft color texture descriptors in combination with the CIE Lab color space and the k-NN classi.er achieved a 97.36% of accuracy.

  19. Features of deformation of metal body surfaces under impact of a water jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aganin, A. A.; Khismatullina, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model and computational results on dynamics of a perfect elastic-plastic body under the load arising during impact of a high-velocity liquid jet with the hemispherical end. The body is simulated by the isotropic linearly-elastic semi-space, its plastic state is described by the von Mises condition. The dependence of features of the body surface deformation on the body material is studied. The problem is considered in the axisymmetric statement. The axis of symmetry is that of the jet. The loaded domain is a circle with its radius rapidly growing from zero to the jet radius. The pressure in the loaded domain is non-uniform both in time and space. Three metal alloys (aluminium, copper-nickel and steel) are considered as the body material. The loading of the body surface in all the cases corresponds to the impact of a water jet with the radius 100 pm and the velocity 300 m/s. It has been shown that under such impact a nanometer pit arises on the body surface at the center of the domain of the jet action. The profile of the pit and its maximal depth depend on the body material.

  20. Feature, design intention and constraint preservation for direct modeling of 3D freeform surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Luoting; Kara, Levent Burak; Shimada, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    Direct modeling has recently emerged as a suitable approach for 3D free-form shape modeling in industrial design. It has several advantages over the conventional, parametric modeling techniques, including natural user interactions, as well as the underlying, automatic feature-preserving shape deformation algorithms. However, current direct modeling packages still lack several capabilities critical for product design, such as managing aesthetic design intentions, and enforcing dimensional, geometric constraints. In this paper, we describe a novel 3D surface editing system capable of jointly accommodating aesthetic design intentions expressed in the form of surface painting and color-coded annotations, as well as engineering constraints expressed as dimensions. The proposed system is built upon differential coordinates and constrained least squares, and is intended for conceptual design that involves frequent shape tuning and explorations. We also provide an extensive review of the state-of-the-art direct modeling approaches for 3D mesh-based, freeform surfaces, with an emphasis on the two broad categories of shape deformation algorithms developed in the relevant field of geometric modeling. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Surface Features Parameterization and Equivalent Roughness Height Estimation of a Real Subglacial Conduit in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Liu, X.; Manko ff, K. D.; Gulley, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    The surfaces of subglacial conduits are very complex, coupling multi-scale roughness, large sinuosity, and cross-sectional variations together. Those features significantly affect the friction law and drainage efficiency inside the conduit by altering velocity and pressure distributions, thus posing considerable influences on the dynamic development of the conduit. Parameterizing the above surface features is a first step towards understanding their hydraulic influences. A Matlab package is developed to extract the roughness field, the conduit centerline, and associated area and curvature data from the conduit surface, acquired from 3D scanning. By using those data, the characteristic vertical and horizontal roughness scales are then estimated based on the structure functions. The centerline sinuosities, defined through three concepts, i.e., the traditional definition of a fluvial river, entropy-based sinuosity, and curvature-based sinuosity, are also calculated and compared. The cross-sectional area and equivalent circular diameter along the centerline are also calculated. Among those features, the roughness is especially important due to its pivotal role in determining the wall friction, and thus an estimation of the equivalent roughness height is of great importance. To achieve such a goal, the original conduit is firstly simplified into a straight smooth pipe with the same volume and centerline length, and the roughness field obtained above is then reconstructed into the simplified pipe. An OpenFOAM-based Large-eddy-simulation (LES) is then performed based on the reconstructed pipe. Considering that the Reynolds number is of the order 106, and the relative roughness is larger than 5% for 60% of the conduit, we test the validity of the resistance law for completely rough pipe. The friction factor is calculated based on the pressure drop and mean velocity in the simulation. Working together, the equivalent roughness height can be calculated. However, whether the

  2. Preparing Al-Mg Substrate for Thermal Spraying: Evaluation of Surface State After Different Pretreatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukauskaitė, R.; Valiulis, A. V.; Černašėjus, O.; Škamat, J.; Rębiś, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    The article deals with the pretreatment technique for preparing the surface of aluminum alloy EN AW 5754 before thermal spray. The surface after different pretreatments, including degreasing with acetone, chemical etching with acidic and alkali solutions, grit-blasting, cathodic cleaning, and some combinations of these techniques, has been studied. The investigation of pre-treated surfaces covered the topographical study (using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and 3D profilometry), the chemical analysis by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the evaluation of surface wettability (sessile drop method), and the assessment of surface free energy. Compared with all the techniques used in present work, the cathodic cleaning and its combination with grit-blasting provide the most preferable chemistry of the surface. Due to the absence of hydroxides at the surface and, possible, due to the diffusion of magnesium to the surface of substrate, the surface wettability and the surface free energy have been significantly improved. No direct correlation between the surface topography and the surface wettability has been established.

  3. Surface and thermal properties of collagen/hyaluronic acid blends containing chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Katarzyna; Sionkowska, Alina; Grabska, Sylwia; Kaczmarek, Beata

    2016-11-01

    The structure and surface properties of binary and ternary blends containing collagen (Coll), hyaluronic acid (HA) and chitosan (Ch) were investigated by contact angle measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Thin films of Coll/HA and Coll/HA/Ch blends have been formed by casting methods from aqueous acid solutions. The surface roughness, hydrophobic/hydrophilic character and thermal stability of Coll/HA were changed after addition of chitosan. Thermal stability of binary blends increase upon the addition of chitosan. The results of contact angle and the surface free energy revealed that hyaluronic acid films are more polar than collagen and chitosan films. The surface energy and its polar and dispersive components of binary and ternary blends were calculated and more hydrophilic films were produced by the addition of HA and chitosan, also resulting in more thermally stabile materials. These results demonstrate that collagen interacts with hyaluronic acid and chitosan changing the surface properties of polymer films.

  4. Thermal transport study across interface “nanostructured solid surface / fluid” by photoacoustic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitenko, K.; Isaiev, M.; Pastushenko, A.; Andrusenko, D.; Kuzmich, A.; Lysenko, V.; Burbelo, R.

    2017-01-01

    In the paper the experimental study of heat transport across the interface “porous silicon/liquid” by photoacoustic technique is reported. Two cases with and without liquid covering of porous silicon surface were considered. Thermal perturbations were excited at the surface of porous silicon as a result of absorption of the light with modulated intensity. The resulting thermal-elastic stresses arising in the system were registered with piezoelectric transducer. The amplitude-frequency dependencies of the voltage on the piezoelectric electrodes were measured. The presence of the liquid film leads to decreasing of the amplitude of photoacoustic signal as a result of the thermal energy evacuation from the porous silicon into the liquid. The experimental dependencies were fitted with the results of simulation that takes into account heat fluxes separation at the porous silicon/liquid interface. With the presented method one can precisely measure heat fluxes transferred from the solid into contacting fluid. Moreover, the presented approach can be easily adopted for the thermal conductivity study of the different nanofluids as well as thermal resistance at the interface nanostructured solid/fluid.

  5. Thermal, spectral, and surface properties of LED light-polymerized bulk fill resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pişkin, Mehmet Burçin; Atalı, Pınar Yılmaz; Figen, Aysel Kantürk

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the thermal, spectral, and surface properties of four different bulk fill materials – SureFil SDR (SDR, Dentsplay DETREY), QuixFil (QF, Dentsplay DETREY), X-tra base (XB, Voco) X-tra fil (XF, Voco) – polymerized by light-emitting diode (LED). Resin matrix, filler type, size and amount, and photoinitiator types influence the degree of conversion. LED-cured bulk fill composites achieved sufficient polymerization. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis revealed different patterns of surface roughness, depending on the composite material. Bulk fill materials showed surface characteristics similar to those of nanohybrid composites. Based on the thermal analysis results, glass transition (T(g)) and initial degradation (T(i)) temperatures changed depending on the bulk fill resin composites.

  6. Simultaneous dopant diffusion and surface passivation in a single rapid thermal cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lachiq, A.; Slaoui, A.; Georgopoulos, L.; Ventura, L.; Monna, R.; Muller, J.C. [Laboratoire PHASE, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    1996-09-01

    Results on simultaneous formation of emitter/back-surface field or emitter/surface passivation in a single rapid thermal cycle are presented. We have investigated the diffusion kinetics of dopant elements like phosphorus, boron (from a doped spin-on glass (SOD) film), aluminium (from evaporated films) or aluminium-boron (from an Al-B SOD film). In particular, we have shown that rapid thermal co-diffusion of P and Al (or Al-B) leads to low sheet resistances, optical emitter profiles and a high gettering effect. Furthermore, the possibility of using the remaining SOD films as a surface passivation layer was investigated. Dark saturation current measurements as deduced from the photoconductivity decay technique demonstrate the passivation effect of the remaining SOD film. The highest efficiency of 12.8% obtained was achieved on SOD oxide-coated solar cells. (author)

  7. Transient Thermal Model and Analysis of the Lunar Surface and Regolith for Cryogenic Fluid Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Robert J.; Plachta, David W.; Yasan, Mohammad M.

    2008-01-01

    A transient thermal model of the lunar surface and regolith was developed along with analytical techniques which will be used to evaluate the storage of cryogenic fluids at equatorial and polar landing sites. The model can provide lunar surface and subsurface temperatures as a function of latitude and time throughout the lunar cycle and season. It also accounts for the presence of or lack of the undisturbed fluff layer on the lunar surface. The model was validated with Apollo 15 and Clementine data and shows good agreement with other analytical models.

  8. Modification of proteins with cyclodextrins prevents aggregation and surface adsorption and increases thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashar, Deepali; Cui, DaWei; Bandyopadhyay, Debjyoti; Luk, Yan-Yeung

    2011-11-01

    This work describes a general approach for preventing protein aggregation and surface adsorption by modifying proteins with β-cyclodextrins (βCD) via an efficient water-driven ligation. As compared to native unmodified proteins, the cyclodextrin-modified proteins (lysozyme and RNase A) exhibit significant reduction in aggregation, surface adsorption and increase in thermal stability. These results reveal a new chemistry for preventing protein aggregation and surface adsorption that is likely of different mechanisms than that by modifying proteins with poly(ethylene glycol).

  9. Iceberg ploughmark features on bottom surface of the South-Eastern Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorokhov, Dmitry; Sivkov, Vadim; Dorokhova, Evgenia; Krechik, Viktor

    2016-04-01

    A detail swath bathymetry, side-scan sonar and acoustic profiling combined with sediment sampling during the 64th cruise of RV "Academic Mstislav Keldysh" (October 2015) allowed to identify new geomorphological features of the South-Eastern Baltic Sea bottom surface. The extended chaotic ploughmarks (furrows) in most cases filled with thin layer of mud were discovered on surface of the Gdansk-Gotland sill glacial deposits. They are observed on the depth of more than 70 m and have depth and width from 1 to 10 m. Most of them are v- or u-shaped stepped depressions. The side-scan records of similar geomorpholoical features are extensively reported from Northern Hemisphere and Antarctica (Goodwin et al., 1985; Dowdeswell et al., 1993). Ploughmarks are attributed to the action of icebergs scouring into the sediment as they touch bottom. We are suggest that furrows discovered in the South-Eastern Baltic Sea are also the result of iceberg scouring during the Baltic Ice Lake stage (more than 11 600 cal yr BP (Bjorck, 2008)). This assumption confirmed by occurrence of fragmental stones and boulders on the sea bottom surface which are good indicators of iceberg rafting (Lisitzin, 2003). Ice ploughmarks at sea bottom surface were not occurred before in the South-Eastern Baltic Sea. The study was financed by Russian Scientific Fund, grant number 14-37-00047. References Bjorck S. The late Quaternary development of the Baltic Sea Basin. In: The BACC Author Team (eds) Assessment of climate change for the Baltic Sea Basin. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. 2008. Dowdeswell J. A., Villinger H., Whittington R. J., Marienfeld P. Iceberg scouring in Scoresby Sund and on the East Greenland continental shelf // Marine Geology. V. 111. N. 1-2. 1993. P. 37-53. Goodwin C. R., Finley J. C., Howard L. M. Ice scour bibliography. Environmental Studies Revolving Funds Report No. 010. Ottawa. 1985. 99 pp. Lisitzin A. P. Sea-Ice and Iceberg Sedimentation in the Ocean: Recent and Past. Springer

  10. Short term memory for single surface features and bindings in ageing: A replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isella, Valeria; Molteni, Federica; Mapelli, Cristina; Ferrarese, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    In the present study we replicated a previous experiment investigating visuo-spatial short term memory binding in young and older healthy individuals, in the attempt to verify the pattern of impairment that can be observed in normal elderly for short term memory for single items vs short term memory for bindings. Assessing a larger sample size (25 young and 25 older subjects), using a more appropriate measure of accuracy for a change detection task (A'), and adding the evaluation of speed of performance, we confirmed that old normals show a decline in short term memory for bindings of shape and colour that is of comparable extent, and not major, to the decline in memory for single shapes and single colours. The absence of a specific deficit of short term memory for conjunctions of surface features seems to distinguish cognitive ageing from Alzheimer's Disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of thermal post-treatment on some surface-related properties of oriented strandboards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Henrique Soares Del Menezzi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A very promising method for improving the dimensional stability of oriented strandboard (OSB has been studied in Brazil since 2001. According to this method, the OSB is thermally treated under mild conditions using a hot-press, where it is reheated without high level of compression stress. The properties of the treated OSB panels are different from and enhanced compared to those untreated ones. It means that the treated OSB can be used in more severe uses, like concrete formwork. This paper aims to evaluate the effect of the proposed thermal treatment on nail-holding capability and on surface hardness of OSB. Samples from 42 commercials OSB were thermally treated according to two levels of temperature (190°C and 220°C and three heating times (12, 16 and 20 min using a single opening hot-press. For comparison, control panels were kept untreated. The following surface-related properties were evaluated: Janka hardness, nail-holding capability in a plane normal to the surface, in the edge of the panel, water absorption and thickness swelling (TS of edge sealed samples, and four surface roughness parameters. According to the Dunnett test, there were significant differences between treated and untreated panels for nail-holding, dimensional stability and surface roughness. The factorial ANOVA identified that the temperature was the main factor governing these properties while the duration of the treatment had lesser effect. It was concluded that the proposed thermal treatment improved significantly dimensional stability and did not affect adversely the nail-holding capability and surface roughness of the treated OSB

  12. Structural, thermal and surface characterization of thermoplastic polyurethanes based on poly(dimethylsiloxane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pergal Marija V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the synthesis, structure and physical properties of two series of thermoplastic polyurethanes based on hydroxypropyl terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane (HP-PDMS or hydroxyethoxy propyl terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane (EO-PDMS as a soft segment, and 4,4’-methylenediphenyl diisocyanate and 1,4-butanediol as a hard segment were investigated. Each series is composed of samples prepared with a different soft segment. The polyurethanes were synthesized by two-step polyaddition in solution. The effects of the type and content of PDMS segments on the structure, thermal and surface properties of copolymers were studied by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and two-dimensional NMR (HMBC and ROESY spectroscopy, GPC, DSC, TGA, WAXS, SEM, water contact angle and water absorption measurements. Thermal properties investigated by DSC indicated that the presence of soft PDMS segments lowers the glass transition and melting temperatures of the hard phase as well as the degree of crystallinity. SEM analysis of copolymers with a lower soft segment content confirmed the presence of spherulite superstructures, which arise from the crystallization of the hard segments. When compared with polyurethanes prepared from HP-PDMS, copolymers synthesized from EO-PDMS with the same content of the soft segments have higher degree of crystallinity, better thermal stability and less hydrophobic surface. Our results show that the synthesized polyurethanes have good thermal and surface properties, which could be further modified by changing the type or content of the soft segments.

  13. A dynamic tester to evaluate the thermal and moisture behaviour of the surface of textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbin; Xu, Weilin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The thermal and moisture behaviour of the microclimate of textiles is crucial in determining the physiological comfort of apparel, but it has not been investigated sufficiently due to the lack of particular evaluation techniques. Based on sensing, temperature controlling and wireless communicating technology, a specially designed tester has been developed in this study to evaluate the thermal and moisture behaviour of the surface of textiles in moving status. A temperature acquisition system and a temperature controllable hotplate have been established to test temperature and simulate the heat of human body, respectively. Relative humidity of the surface of fabric in the dynamic process has been successfully tested through sensing. Meanwhile, wireless communication technology was applied to transport the acquired data of temperature and humidity to computer for further processing. Continuous power supply was achieved by intensive contact between an elastic copper plate and copper ring on the rotating shaft. This tester provides the platform to evaluate the thermal and moisture behaviour of textiles. It enables users to conduct a dynamic analysis on the temperature and humidity together with the thermal and moisture transport behaviour of the surface of fabric in moving condition. Development of this tester opens the door of investigation on the micro-climate of textiles in real time service, and eventually benefits the understanding of the sensation comfort and wellbeing of apparel wearers.

  14. Design of Ag nanorods for sensitivity and thermal stability of surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lingwei; Zhang, Zhengjun; Huang, Hanchen

    2017-10-01

    The technology of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has found many applications and may find more if it can possess both sensitivity and thermal stability. This paper reports a rational design of Ag nanorods to simultaneously achieve two competing goals: the sensitivity and the thermal stability of SERS substrates. The Ag nanorods are designed and synthesized using physical vapor deposition under the condition of glancing angle incidence. The working pressure of the vacuum chamber is controlled so the mean free path of depositing atoms is comparable to the dimension of the chamber, so as to grow Ag nanorods with small diameter, and small but clear separation for optimal SERS sensitivity. Such Ag nanorods are further capped with Al2O3 on their top surfaces to reduce the diffusion-induced coarsening at high temperatures, and thereby to improve the thermal stability for SERS detections. Meanwhile, since the side surfaces of Ag nanorods are not coated with oxides in this approach, the SERS sensitivity is largely preserved while good thermal stability is achieved.

  15. Rupture features of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Chile earthquake extracted from surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Ling; Hwang, Ruey-Der; Jhuang, Yi-Shan; Lin, Cai-Yi

    2017-03-01

    This study used the rupture directivity theory to derive the fault parameters of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Chile earthquake on the basis of the azimuth-dependent source duration obtained from the Rayleigh-wave phase velocity. Results revealed that the 2010 Chile earthquake featured asymmetric bilateral faulting. The two rupture directions were N171°E (northward) and N17°E (southward), with rupture lengths of approximately 313 and 118 km, respectively, and were related to the locking degree in the source region. The entire source duration was approximately 187 s. After excluding the rise time from the source duration, the northward rupture velocity was approximately 2.02 km/s, faster than the southward rupture velocity (1.74 km/s). On average, the rupture velocity derived from this study was slower than that estimated from finite-fault inversion; however, several historical earthquakes in the Chile region also showed slow rupture velocity when using low-frequency signals, as surface waves do. Two earlier studies through global-positioning-system data analysis showed that the static stress drop of 50-70 bars for the 2010 Chile earthquake was higher than that for subduction-zone earthquakes. Hence, a remarkable feature was that the 2010 Chile earthquake had a slow rupture velocity and a high static stress drop, which suggested an inverse relationship between rupture velocity and static stress drop.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. An Analysis of Thermally-Related Surface Rainfall Budgets Associated with Convective and Stratiform Rainfall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yushu; Xiaofan LI

    2011-01-01

    Both water vapor and heat processes play key roles in producing surface rainfall.While the water vapor effects of sea surface temperature and cloud radiative and microphysical processes on surface rainfall have been investigated in previous studies,the thermal effects on rainfall are analyzed in this study using a series of two-dimensional equilibrium cloud-resolving model experiments forced by zonally-uniform,constant,large-scale zonal wind and zero large-scale vertical velocity.The analysis of thermally-related surface rainfall budget reveals that the model domain mean surface rain rate is primarily associated with the mean infrared cooling rate.Convective rainfall and transport of hydrometeor concentration from convective regions to raining stratiform regions corresponds to the heat divergence over convective regions,whereas stratiform rainfall corresponds to the transport of hydrometeor concentration from convective regions and heat divergence over raining stratiform regions.The heat divergence over convective regions is mainly balanced by the heat convergence over rainfall-free regions,which is,in turn,offset by the radiative cooling over rainfall-free regions.The sensitivity experiments of rainfall to the effects of sea surface temperature and cloud radiative and microphysical processes show that the sea surface temperature and cloud processes affect convective rainfall through the changes in infrared cooling rate over rainfall-free regions and transport rate of heat from convective regions to rainfall-free regions.

  17. Thermal Marangoni Convection of Two-phase Dusty Fluid Flow along a Vertical Wavy Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Siddiqa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the influence of thermal Marangoni convection on boundary layer flow of two-phase dusty fluid along a vertical wavy surface. The dimensionless boundary layer equations for two-phase problem are reduced to a convenient form by primitive variable transformations (PVF and then integrated numerically by employing the implicit finite difference method along with the Thomas Algorithm. The effect of thermal Marangoni convection, dusty water and sinusoidal waveform are discussed in detail in terms of local heat transfer rate, skin friction coefficient, velocity and temperature distributions. This investigation reveals the fact that the water-particle mixture reduces the rate of heat transfer, significantly.

  18. Methods for estimating pressure and thermal loads induced by elevon deflections on hypersonic-vehicle surfaces with turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, L. G., II; Johnson, C. B.

    1981-01-01

    Empirical anaytic methods are presented for calculating thermal and pressure distributions in three-dimensional, shock-wave turbulent-boundary-layer, interaction-flow regions on the surface of controllable hypersonic aircraft and missiles. The methods, based on several experimental investigations, are useful and reliable for estimating both the extent and magnitude of the increased thermal and pressure loads on the vehicle surfaces.

  19. Surface modification of several dental substrates by non-thermal, atmospheric plasma brush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingsheng; Zhang, Ying; Driver, M. Sky; Caruso, Anthony N.; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to reveal the effectiveness of non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush in surface wettability and modification of four dental substrates. Methods Specimens of dental substrates including dentin, enamel, and two composites Filtek Z250, Filtek LS Silorane were prepared (~2 mm thick, ~10 mm diameter). The prepared surfaces were treated for 5–45 s with a non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush working at temperatures from 36 to 38 °C. The plasma-treatment effects on these surfaces were studied with contact-angle measurement, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results The non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush was very efficient in improving the surface hydrophilicity of four substrates studied. The results indicated that water contact angle values decreased considerably after only 5 s plasma treatment of all these substrates. After 30 s treatment, the values were further reduced to <5°, which was close to a value for super hydrophilic surfaces. XPS analysis indicated that the percent of elements associated with mineral in dentin/enamel or fillers in the composites increased. In addition, the percent of carbon (%C) decreased while %O increased for all four substrates. As a result, the O/C ratio increased dramatically, suggesting that new oxygen-containing polar moieties were formed on the surfaces after plasma treatment. SEM surface images indicated that no significant morphology change was induced on these dental substrates after exposure to plasmas. Significance Without affecting the bulk properties, a super-hydrophilic surface could be easily achieved by the plasma brush treatment regardless of original hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of dental substrates tested. PMID:23755823

  20. Laws of thermal diffusion of individual molecules on the gold surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sändig, Nadja; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2011-08-14

    By molecular dynamics simulations, we describe and discuss the mobility of single molecules on a metal surface. The calculated trajectories of 28 different molecules show that diffusion, subdiffusion and superdiffusion regimes exist. The trajectories also share some common features, which are expressed in the form of power laws that link the length of the path walked by the molecule, the molecular mass, and the surface-molecule interaction energy. The values of the exponents of the laws are easily rationalized and provide insight into the molecular behaviour on the surface. The calculations also show that the adsorption is governed by the combination of van der Waals and Coulomb molecule-surface interactions.

  1. Hydrochemical features of the northern Latium (central Italy) with particular reference to the Stigliano thermal springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldi, P.; Ferrara, G.C.

    1976-01-01

    A report is presented on investigations of thermo-mineral springs in part of northern Latium. Based on such physicochemical parameters as temperature, salinity and ionic content, two main water systems were determined to exist. One occurs in the volcanic surface rocks (200 to 300 m depth) and the other in a confined reservoir at a depth of 600 to 1,200 m. The study showed that the deep reservoir is a hot water system with temperatures below 100/sup 0/C. The waters of the Stigliano springs may be traced to their source even though they exhibit different chemistry. The differences seem to be due to processes of differential cooling and of fractional evaporation.

  2. Obtaining 3d models of surface snow and ice features (penitentes) with a Xbox Kinect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Lindsey; Partan, Benjamin; Pętlicki, Michał; MacDonell, Shelley

    2014-05-01

    Penitentes are snow or ice spikes that can reach several metres in height. They are a common feature of snow and ice surfaces in the semi-arid Andes as their formation is favoured by very low humidity, persistently low temperatures and sustained high solar radiation. While the conditions of their formation are relatively well constrained it is not yet clear how their presence influences the rate of mass loss and meltwater production from the mountain cryosphere and there is a need for accurate measurements of ablation within penitente fields through time in order to evaluate how well existing energy balance models perform for surfaces with penitentes. The complex surface morphology poses a challenge to measuring the mass loss at snow or glacier surfaces as (i) the spatial distribution of surface lowering within a penitente field is very heterogeneous, and (ii) the steep walls and sharp edges of the penitentes limit the line of sight view for surveying from fixed positions. In this work we explored whether these problems can be solved by using the Xbox Kinect sensor to generate small scale digital terrain models (DTMs) of sample areas of snow and ice penitentes. The study site was Glaciar Tapado in Chile (30°08'S; 69°55'W) where three sample sites were monitored from November 2013 to January 2014. The range of the Kinect sensor was found to be restricted to about 1 m over snow and ice, and scanning was only possible after dusk. Moving the sensor around the penitente field was challenging and often resulted in fragmented scans. However, despite these challenges, the scans obtained could be successfully combined in MeshLab software to produce good surface representations of the penitentes. GPS locations of target stakes in the sample plots allow the DTMs to be orientated correctly in space so the morphology of the penitente field and the volume loss through time can be fully described. At the study site in snow penitentes the Kinect DTM was compared with the quality

  3. Thermal development of latent fingermarks on porous surfaces--further observations and refinements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Di Fei; Sommerville, Daniel; Brown, Adam G; Shimmon, Ronald G; Reedy, Brian J; Tahtouh, Mark

    2011-01-30

    In a further study of the thermal development of fingermarks on paper and similar surfaces, it is demonstrated that direct contact heating of the substrate using coated or ceramic surfaces at temperatures in excess of 230°C produces results superior to those obtained using hot air. Fingermarks can also be developed in this way on other cellulose-based substrates such as wood and cotton fabric, though ridge detail is difficult to obtain in the latter case. Fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that the phenomena observed during the thermal development of fingermarks can be reproduced simply by heating untreated white copy paper or filter paper, or these papers treated with solutions of sodium chloride or alanine. There is no evidence to suggest that the observed fluorescence of fingermarks heated on paper is due to a reaction of fingermark constituents on or with the paper. Instead, we maintain that the ridge contrast observed first as fluorescence, and later as brown charring, is simply an acceleration of the thermal degradation of the paper. Thermal degradation of cellulose, a major constituent of paper and wood, is known to give rise to a fluorescent product if sufficient oxygen is available [1-5]. However, the absence of atmospheric oxygen has only a slight effect on the thermal development of fingermarks, indicating that there is sufficient oxygen already present in paper to allow the formation of the fluorescent and charred products. In a depletion study comparing thermal development of fingermarks on paper with development using ninhydrin, the thermal technique was found to be as sensitive as ninhydrin for six out of seven donors. When thermal development was used in sequence with ninhydrin and DFO, it was found that only fingermarks that had been developed to the fluorescent stage (a few seconds of heating) could subsequently be developed with the other reagents. In the reverse sequence, no useful further development was noted for fingermarks that were

  4. Effect of Prior Austenite Grain Size Refinement by Thermal Cycling on the Microstructural Features of As-Quenched Lath Martensite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Javier; Santofimia, Maria Jesus

    2016-11-01

    Current trends in steels are focusing on refined martensitic microstructures to obtain high strength and toughness. An interesting manner to reduce the size of martensitic substructure is by reducing the size of the prior austenite grain (PAG). This work analyzes the effect of PAGS refinement by thermal cycling on different microstructural features of as-quenched lath martensite in a 0.3C-1.6Si-3.5Mn (wt pct) steel. The application of thermal cycling is found to lead to a refinement of the martensitic microstructures and to an increase of the density of high misorientation angle boundaries after quenching; these are commonly discussed to be key structural parameters affecting strength. Moreover, results show that as the PAGS is reduced, the volume fraction of retained austenite increases, carbides are refined and the concentration of carbon in solid solution as well as the dislocation density in martensite increase. All these microstructural modifications are related with the manner in which martensite forms from different prior austenite conditions, influenced by the PAGS.

  5. Wettability Control of Gold Surfaces Modified with Benzenethiol Derivatives: Water Contact Angle and Thermal Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatara, Shingo; Kuzumoto, Yasutaka; Kitamura, Masatoshi

    2016-04-01

    The water wettability of Au surfaces has been controlled using various benzenethiol derivatives including 4-methylbenzenethiol, pentafluorobenzenethiol, 4-flubrobenzenethiol, 4-methoxy-benzenethiol, 4-nitrobenzenethiol, and 4-hydroxybenzenethiol. The water contact angle of the Au surface modified with the benzenethiol derivative was found to vary in the wide range of 30.9° to 88.3°. The contact angle of the modified Au films annealed was also measured in order to investigate their thermal stability. The change in the contact angle indicated that the modified surface is stable at temperatures below about 400 K. Meanwhile, the activation energy of desorption from the modified surface was estimated from the change in the contact angle. The modified Au surface was also examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  6. The effect of polyether functional polydimethylsiloxane on surface and thermal properties of waterborne polyurethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guikai; Lu, Ming; Rui, Xiaoping

    2017-03-01

    Waterborne polyurethanes (WPU) modified with polyether functional polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were synthesized by pre-polymerization method using isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and 1,4-butanediol (BDO) as hard segments and polybutylene adipate glycol (PBA) and polyether functional PDMS as soft segments. The effect of polyether functional PDMS on phase separation, thermal properties, surface properties including surface composition, morphology and wettability were investigated by FTIR, contact angle measurements, ARXPS, SEM-EDS, AFM, TG and DSC. The results showed that the compatibility between urethane hard segment and PDMS modified with polyether was good, and there was no distinct phase separation in both bulk and surface of WPU films. The degradation temperature and low temperature flexibility increased with increasing amounts of polyether functional PDMS. The enrichment of polyether functional PDMS with low surface energy on the surface imparted excellent hydrophobicity to WPU films.

  7. Investigation of thermal processes during test operation of ingot mould with composite surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of grey cast iron EN-GJL-200 ingot mould, by put directly in founding process a composite surface layer on the basis of corundum Al2O3 and quartz sand SiO2. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase in hardness and abrasive wear resistance of cast steel and cast iron castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generally applied welding technology (surfacing by welding and thermal spraying. The results of studies show, that is positive influence of composite surface layer with ceramic particles on increase in life of cast iron ingot moulds.

  8. Tuning the surface chemistry of lubricant-derived phosphate thermal films: The effect of boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadaro, F.; Rossi, A.; Lainé, E.; Woodward, P.; Spencer, N. D.

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the interactions among the various additives in a lubricant is important because they can have a major influence on the performance of blends under tribological conditions. The present investigation is focused on the interactions occurring between ZnDTP and dispersant molecules in an oil formulation, and on their reactivity under purely thermal conditions in the presence of air-oxidized iron surfaces. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) was performed on undiluted blends at different temperatures, while angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) was exploited to investigate the surface reactivity on oxidized iron surfaces. The results indicate that the dispersant, generally added to blends for preventing the deposition of sludge, varnish and soot on the surface, might also inhibit the reaction of all other additives with the steel surface.

  9. External Thermal Insulation Composite Systems: Critical Parameters for Surface Hygrothermal Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Barreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available External Thermal Insulation Composite Systems (ETICS are often used in Europe. Despite its thermal advantages, low cost, and ease of application, this system has serious problems of biological growth causing the cladding defacement. Recent studies pointed that biological growth is due to high values of surface moisture content, which mostly results from the combined effect of exterior surface condensation, wind-driven rain, and drying process. Based on numerical simulation, this paper points the most critical parameters involved in hygrothermal behaviour of ETICS, considering the influence of thermal and hygric properties of the external rendering, the effect of the characteristics of the façade, and the consequences of the exterior and interior climate on exterior surface condensation, wind-driven rain, and drying process. The model used was previously validated by comparison with the results of an “in situ” campaign. The results of the sensitivity analyses show that relative humidity and temperature of the exterior air, atmospheric radiation, and emissivity of the exterior rendering are the parameters that most influence exterior surface condensation. Wind-driven rain depends mostly on horizontal rain, building’s height, wind velocity, and orientation. The drying capacity is influenced by short-wave absorbance, incident solar radiation, and orientation.

  10. Surface and thermal effects on vibration of embedded alumina nanobeams based on novel Timoshenko beam model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B AMIRIAN; R HOSSEINI-ARA; H MOOSAVI

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the free vibration analysis of circular alumina (Al2O3) nanobeams in the presence of surface and thermal effects resting on a Pasternak foun-dation. The system of motion equations is derived using Hamilton’s principle under the assumptions of the classical Timoshenko beam theory. The effects of the transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia are also considered within the framework of the mentioned theory. The separation of variables approach is employed to discretize the governing equa-tions which are then solved by an analytical method to obtain the natural frequencies of the alumina nanobeams. The results show that the surface effects lead to an increase in the natural frequency of nanobeams as compared with the classical Timoshenko beam model. In addition, for nanobeams with large diameters, the surface effects may increase the natural frequencies by increasing the thermal effects. Moreover, with regard to the Pasternak elastic foundation, the natural frequencies are increased slightly. The results of the present model are compared with the literature, showing that the present model can capture correctly the surface effects in thermal vibration of nanobeams.

  11. Surface modification of austenitic thermal-spray coatings by low-temperature nitrocarburizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, T.; Mehner, T.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    Thermal-spray coatings of austenitic materials are mainly used under corrosive conditions. The relatively poor wear resistance strongly limits their use. In comparative studies between nitrocarburized and untreated thermal-spray coatings, the influence of the nitrogen and carbon enrichment on the properties of the coatings and the microstructure was investigated. The cross-section micrograph of the nitrocarburized coating shows the S-phase formation in the surface layer region. The depth profile of the nitrogen and carbon concentration was determined by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOS) analysis. A selective enrichment of the surface layer region with nitrogen and carbon by means of thermochemical heat treatment increases the wear resistance. The interstitially dissolved nitrogen and carbon causes the formation of strong compressive residual stresses and high surface hardness. Increases in the service life of existing applications or new material combinations with face-centred cubic friction partners are possible. In the absence of dimensional change, uniform as well as partial nitrogen enrichment of the thermal spray coating is possible. Nitrocarburized coatings demonstrate a significant improvement in adhesive wear resistance and extremely high surface hardness.

  12. Facile synthesis of thermally stable poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-modified gold surfaces by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Sun, Kai; Wu, Zhaoqiang; Lu, Jianhong; Song, Bo; Tong, Weifang; Shi, Xiujuan; Chen, Hong

    2012-06-26

    Well-controlled polymerization of N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP) on Au surfaces by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) was carried out at room temperature by a silanization method. Initial attempts to graft poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) layers from initiators attached to alkanethiol monolayers yielded PVP films with thicknesses less than 5 nm. The combined factors of the difficulty in the controllable polymerization of NVP and the instability of alkanethiol monolayers led to the difficulty in the controlled polymerization of NVP on Au surfaces. Therefore, the silanization method was employed to form an adhesion layer for initiator attachment. This method allowed well-defined ATRP polymerization to occur on Au surfaces. Water contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and reflectance Fourier transform infrared (reflectance FTIR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the modified surfaces. The PVP-modified gold surface remained stable at 130 °C for 3 h, showing excellent thermal stability. Thus, postfunctionalization of polymer brushes at elevated temperatures is made possible. The silanization method was also applied to modify SPR chips and showed potential applications in biosensors and biochips.

  13. A Multi-Channel Method for Retrieving Surface Temperature for High-Emissivity Surfaces from Hyperspectral Thermal Infrared Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinke Zhong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface temperature (ST of high-emissivity surfaces is an important parameter in climate systems. The empirical methods for retrieving ST for high-emissivity surfaces from hyperspectral thermal infrared (HypTIR images require spectrally continuous channel data. This paper aims to develop a multi-channel method for retrieving ST for high-emissivity surfaces from space-borne HypTIR data. With an assumption of land surface emissivity (LSE of 1, ST is proposed as a function of 10 brightness temperatures measured at the top of atmosphere by a radiometer having a spectral interval of 800–1200 cm−1 and a spectral sampling frequency of 0.25 cm−1. We have analyzed the sensitivity of the proposed method to spectral sampling frequency and instrumental noise, and evaluated the proposed method using satellite data. The results indicated that the parameters in the developed function are dependent on the spectral sampling frequency and that ST of high-emissivity surfaces can be accurately retrieved by the proposed method if appropriate values are used for each spectral sampling frequency. The results also showed that the accuracy of the retrieved ST is of the order of magnitude of the instrumental noise and that the root mean square error (RMSE of the ST retrieved from satellite data is 0.43 K in comparison with the AVHRR SST product.

  14. Beacons and surface features differentially influence human reliance on global and local geometric cues when reorienting in a virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodily, Kent D; Kilday, Zachary A; Eastman, Caroline K; Gaskin, Katherine A; Graves, April A; Roberts, Jonathan E; Sturz, Bradley R

    2013-02-01

    In the reorientation literature, non-geometric cues include discrete objects (e.g., beacons) and surface-based features (e.g., colors, textures, and odors). To date, these types of non-geometric cues have been considered functionally similar, and it remains unknown whether beacons and surface features differentially influence the extent to which organisms reorient via global and local geometric cues. In the present experiment, we trained human participants to approach a location in a trapezoid-shaped enclosure uniquely specified by global and local geometric cues. We explored the role of beacons on the use of geometric cues by training participants in the presence or absence of uniquely-colored beacons. We explored the role of surface features on the use of geometric cues by recoloring two adjacent walls at the correct location and/or adding a line on the floor which corresponded to the major principal axis of the enclosure. All groups were then tested in novel-shaped enclosures in the absence of unique beacons and surface features to assess the relative use of global and local geometric cues. Results suggested that beacons facilitated the use of global geometric cues, whereas surface features either facilitated or hindered the use of geometric cues, depending on the feature. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Application of remote sensing to thermal pollution analysis. [satellite sea surface temperature measurement assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiser, H. W.; Lee, S. S.; Veziroglu, T. N.; Sengupta, S.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive numerical model development program for near-field thermal plume discharge and far field general circulation in coastal regions is being carried on at the University of Miami Clean Energy Research Institute. The objective of the program is to develop a generalized, three-dimensional, predictive model for thermal pollution studies. Two regions of specific application of the model are the power plants sites at the Biscayne Bay and Hutchinson Island area along the Florida coastline. Remote sensing from aircraft as well as satellites are used in parallel with in situ measurements to provide information needed for the development and verification of the mathematical model. This paper describes the efforts that have been made to identify problems and limitations of the presently available satellite data and to develop methods for enhancing and enlarging thermal infrared displays for mesoscale sea surface temperature measurements.

  16. Thermally driven transverse transports and magnetic dynamics on a topological surface capped with a ferromagnet strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ming-Xun; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, Shi-Han; Qiu, Jian-Ming; Yang, Mou; Wang, Rui-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically study thermally driven transport of the Dirac fermions on the surface of a topological insulator capped with a ferromagnet strip. The generation and manipulation of anomalous Hall and Nernst effects are analyzed, in which the in-plane magnetization of the ferromagnet film is found to take a decisive role. This scenario is distinct from that modulated by Berry phase where the in-plane magnetization is independent. We further discuss the thermal spin-transfer torque as a backaction of the thermoelectric transports on the magnetization and calculate the dynamics of the anomalous Hall and Nernst effects self-consistently. It is found that the magnitude of the long-time steady Hall and Nernst conductance is determined by competition between the magnetic anisotropy and current-induced effective anisotropy. These results open up a possibility of magnetically controlling the transverse thermoelectric transports or thermally manipulating the magnet switching.

  17. Modification of a metallic surface in a vacuum arc discharge plasma using thermally stimulated ion diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muboyadzhyan, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    A new process for modifying a metallic surface in a vacuum arc discharge plasma using thermally stimulated ion diffusion is considered. The effect of the bias voltage (negative substrate potential) on the processes that occur on the surface of a treated part is studied when the substrate material interacts with an accelerated metallic-ion flow. The phase and elemental compositions of the modified layer are studied for substrates made of nickel-based superalloys, austenitic and martensitic steels, and titanium-based alloys. The heat resistance, the salt corrosion resistance, and the corrosion cracking resistance of steels and titanium-based alloys are investigated after their modification in vacuum arc plasmas of pure metals (Ti, Zr, Al, Cr, Y) and related alloys. The surface modification caused by the thermally stimulated ion saturation of the surfaces of parts made from structural materials is shown to change the structural-phase states of their surfaces and, correspondingly, the properties of these materials in relation to the state of the surface.

  18. Application of a new feature extraction and optimization method to surface defect recognition of cold rolled strips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Considering that the surface defects of cold rolled strips are hard to be recognized by human eyes under high-speed circumstances, an automatic recognition technique was discussed. Spectrum images of defects can be got by fast Fourier transform (FFT) and sum of valid pixels (SVP), and its optimized center region, which concentrates nearly all energies, are extracted as an original feature set. Using genetic algorithm to optimize the feature set, an optimized feature set with 51 features can be achieved.Using the optimized feature set as an input vector of neural networks, the recognition effects of LVQ neural networks have been studied. Experiment results show that the new method can get a higher classification rate and can settle the automatic recognition problem of surface defects on cold rolled strips ideally.

  19. Influence of soil moisture content on surface albedo and soil thermal parameters at a tropical station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugathan, Neena; Biju, V.; Renuka, G.

    2014-06-01

    Half hourly data of soil moisture content, soil temperature, solar irradiance, and reflectance are measured during April 2010 to March 2011 at a tropical station, viz., Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India (76°59'E longitude and 8°29'N latitude). The monthly, seasonal and seasonal mean diurnal variation of soil moisture content is analyzed in detail and is correlated with the rainfall measured at the same site during the period of study. The large variability in the soil moisture content is attributed to the rainfall during all the seasons and also to the evaporation/movement of water to deeper layers. The relationship of surface albedo on soil moisture content on different time scales are studied and the influence of solar elevation angle and cloud cover are also investigated. Surface albedo is found to fall exponentially with increase in soil moisture content. Soil thermal diffusivity and soil thermal conductivity are also estimated from the subsoil temperature profile. Log normal dependence of thermal diffusivity and power law dependence of thermal conductivity on soil moisture content are confirmed.

  20. Influence of soil moisture content on surface albedo and soil thermal parameters at a tropical station

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neena Sugathan; V Biju; G Renuka

    2014-07-01

    Half hourly data of soil moisture content, soil temperature, solar irradiance, and reflectance are measured during April 2010 to March 2011 at a tropical station, viz., Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India (76° 59’E longitude and 8°29’N latitude). The monthly, seasonal and seasonal mean diurnal variation of soil moisture content is analyzed in detail and is correlated with the rainfall measured at the same site during the period of study. The large variability in the soil moisture content is attributed to the rainfall during all the seasons and also to the evaporation/movement of water to deeper layers. The relationship of surface albedo on soil moisture content on different time scales are studied and the influence of solar elevation angle and cloud cover are also investigated. Surface albedo is found to fall exponentially with increase in soil moisture content. Soil thermal diffusivity and soil thermal conductivity are also estimated from the subsoil temperature profile. Log normal dependence of thermal diffusivity and power law dependence of thermal conductivity on soil moisture content are confirmed.

  1. Phonon surface scattering controlled length dependence of thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guofeng; Guo, Yuan; Li, Baohua; Yang, Liwen; Zhang, Kaiwang; Tang, Minghua; Zhang, Gang

    2013-09-21

    We present a kinetic model to investigate the anomalous thermal conductivity in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) by focusing on the mechanism of phonon-boundary scattering. Our theoretical model takes into account the anharmonic phonon-phonon scattering and the angle-dependent phonon scattering from the SiNWs surface. For SiNWs with diameter of 27.2 nm, it is found that in the case of specular reflection at lateral boundaries, the thermal conductivity increases as the length increases, even when the length is up to 10 μm, which is considerably longer than the phonon mean free path (MFP). Thus the phonon-phonon scattering alone is not sufficient for obtaining a normal diffusion in nanowires. However, in the case of purely diffuse reflection at lateral boundaries, the phonons diffuse normally and the thermal conductivity converges to a constant when the length of the nanowire is greater than 100 nm. Our model demonstrates that for observing the length dependence of thermal conductivity experimentally, nanowires with smooth and non-contaminated surfaces, and measuring at low temperature, are preferred.

  2. Whisker/Cone growth on the thermal control surfaces experiment no. S0069

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiener, James M.; Coston, James E., Jr.; Miller, Edgar R.; Mell, Richard J.; Wilkes, Donald R.

    1995-01-01

    An unusual surface 'growth' was found during scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigations of the Thermal Control Surface Experiment (TCSE) S0069 front thermal cover. This 'growth' is similar to the cone type whisker growth phenomena as studied by G. K. Wehner beginning in the 1960's. Extensive analysis has identified the most probable composition of the whiskers to be a silicate type glass. Sources of the growth material are outgassing products from the experiment and orbital atomic oxygen, which occurs naturally at the orbital altitudes of the LDEF mission in the form of neutral atomic oxygen. The highly ordered symmetry and directionality of the whiskers are attributed to the long term (5.8 year) stable flight orientation of the LDEF.

  3. Investigation of thermal effect on exterior wall surface of building material at urban city area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Fadhil Md Din, Hazlini Dzinun, M. Ponraj, Shreeshivadasan Chelliapan, Zainura Zainun Noor, Dilshah Remaz, Kenzo Iwao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the investigation of heat impact on the vertical surfaces of buildings based on their thermal behavior. The study was performed based on four building materials that is commonly used in Malaysia; brick, concrete, granite and white concrete tiles. The thermal performances on the building materials were investigated using a surface temperature sensor, data logging system and infrared thermography. Results showed that the brick had the capability to absorb and store heat greater than other materials during the investigation period. The normalized heat (total heat/solar radiation of the brick was 0.093 and produces high heat (51% compared to granite, confirming a substantial amount of heat being released into the atmosphere through radiation and convection. The most sensitive material that absorbs and stores heat was in the following order: brick > concrete > granite > white concrete tiles. It was concluded that the type of exterior wall material used in buildings had significant impact to the environment.

  4. Investigation of thermal effect on exterior wall surface of building material at urban city area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Md Din, Mohd Fadhil; Dzinun, Hazlini; Ponraj, M.; Chelliapan, Shreeshivadasan; Noor, Zainura Zainun [Institute of Environmental Water Resources and Management (IPASA), Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Remaz, Dilshah [Faculty of Built Environment, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Iwao, Kenzo [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the investigation of heat impact on the vertical surfaces of buildings based on their thermal behavior. The study was performed based on four building materials that is commonly used in Malaysia; brick, concrete, granite and white concrete tiles. The thermal performances on the building materials were investigated using a surface temperature sensor, data logging system and infrared thermography. Results showed that the brick had the capability to absorb and store heat greater than other materials during the investigation period. The normalized heat (total heat/solar radiation) of the brick was 0.093 and produces high heat (51% compared to granite), confirming a substantial amount of heat being released into the atmosphere through radiation and convection. The most sensitive material that absorbs and stores heat was in the following order: brick > concrete > granite > white concrete tiles. It was concluded that the type of exterior wall material used in buildings had significant impact to the environment.

  5. Electrochemical and thermal grafting of alkyl grignard reagents onto (100) silicon surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegunta, Sri Sai S; Ngunjiri, Johnpeter N; Flake, John C

    2009-11-03

    Passivation of (100) silicon surfaces using alkyl Grignard reagents is explored via electrochemical and thermal grafting methods. The electrochemical behavior of silicon in methyl or ethyl Grignard reagents in tetrahydrofuran is investigated using cyclic voltammetry. Surface morphology and chemistry are investigated using atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results show that electrochemical pathways provide an efficient and more uniform passivation method relative to thermal methods, and XPS results demonstrate that electrografted terminations are effective at limiting native oxide formation for more than 55 days in ambient conditions. A two-electron per silicon mechanism is proposed for electrografting a single (1:1) alkyl group per (100) silicon atom. The mechanism includes oxidation of two Grignard species and subsequent hydrogen abstraction and alkylation reaction resulting in a covalent attachment of alkyl groups with silicon.

  6. Design and construction of a compact module of surfaces treatment by thermal shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylvester, G.; Zambra, M.; Soto, L. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Casilla 188 D, Santiago (Chile); Feugeas, J.; Clausse, A.; Bruzzone, H. [Red Interinstitucional de Plasmas Densos y Magnetizados (PLADEMA) (Argentina)

    2002-07-01

    Research on surfaces treatment by thermal shock is currently being pursued at The Institute of Physics of the University of Rosario (IFUR), using plasma focus systems. Thus, the effect of the thermal shock, due to the incidence of highly energetic, short duration, plasma beams, on metallic surfaces, offers interesting possibilities for application in steels, increasing their resistance to the wear and microhardness. This work addresses the design and construction of a compact plasma focus module (30x30xl00 cm{sup 3}), generating pulses of ions, with a duration of 200 to 500 nanoseconds and an emission frequency under 10 Hz. The energy deposited is 10 J at a fluence of 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} per pulse. (Author)

  7. Numerical modeling for analyzing thermal surface anomalies induced by underground coal fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessling, Stefan; Kessels, Winfried; Wuttke, Manfred W. [Leibniz Institute for Applied Geosciences, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany); Kuenzer, Claudia [Institute of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, IPF, Vienna University of Technology, Gusshausstr. 27-29, A-1040 Wien (Austria)

    2008-05-07

    Coal seams burning underneath the surface are recognized all over the world and have drawn increasing public attention in the past years. Frequently, such fires are analyzed by detecting anomalies like increased exhaust gas concentrations and soil temperatures at the surface. A proper analysis presumes the understanding of involved processes, which determine the spatial distribution and dynamic behavior of the anomalies. In this paper, we explain the relevance of mechanical and energy transport processes with respect to the occurrence of temperature anomalies at the surface. Two approaches are presented, aiming to obtain insight into the underground coal fire situation: In-situ temperature mapping and numerical simulation. In 2000 to 2005, annual temperature mapping in the Wuda (Inner Mongolia, PR China) coal fire area showed that most thermal anomalies on the surface are closely related to fractures, where hot exhaust gases from the coal fire are released. Those fractures develop due to rock mechanical failure after volume reduction in the seams. The measured signals at the surface are therefore strongly affected by mechanical processes. More insight into causes and effects of involved energy transport processes is obtained by numerical simulation of the dynamic behavior of coal fires. Simulations show the inter-relation between release and transport of thermal energy in and around underground coal fires. Our simulation results show a time delay between the coal fire propagation and the observed appearance of the surface temperature signal. Additionally, the overall energy flux away from the burning coal seam into the surrounding bedrock is about 30-times higher than the flux through the surface. This is of particular importance for an estimation of the energy released based on surface temperature measurements. Finally, the simulation results also prove that a fire propagation rate estimated from the interpretation of surface anomalies can differ from the actual

  8. Detecting urbanization effects on surface and subsurface thermal environment--a case study of Osaka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shaopeng; Taniguchi, Makoto; Yamano, Makoto; Wang, Chung-ho

    2009-04-15

    Tremendous efforts have been devoted to improve our understanding of the anthropogenic effects on the atmospheric temperature change. In comparison, little has been done in the study of the human impacts on the subsurface thermal environment. The objective of this study is to analyze surface air temperature records and borehole subsurface temperature records for a better understanding of the urban heat island effects across the ground surface. The annual surface air temperature time series from six meteorological stations and six deep borehole temperature profiles of high qualities show that Osaka has been undergoing excess warming since late 19th century. The mean warming rate in Osaka surface air temperature is about 2.0 degrees C/100a over the period from 1883 to 2006, at least half of which can be attributed to the urban heat island effects. However, this surface air temperature warming is not as strong as the ground warming recorded in the subsurface temperature profiles. The surface temperature anomaly from the Osaka meteorological record can only account for part of the temperature anomaly recorded in the borehole temperature profiles. Surface air temperature is conventionally measured around 1.5 m above the ground; whereas borehole temperatures are measured from rocks in the subsurface. Heat conduction in the subsurface is much less efficient than the heat convection of the air above the ground surface. Therefore, the anthropogenic thermal impacts on the subsurface can be more persistent and profound than the impacts on the atmosphere. This study suggests that the surface air temperature records alone might underestimate the full extent of urban heat island effects on the subsurface environment.

  9. Thermal dynamics-based mechanism for intense laser-induced material surface vaporization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Kumar; S Dash; A K Tyagi; Baldev Raj

    2008-09-01

    Laser material processing involving welding, ablation and cutting involves interaction of intense laser pulses of nanosecond duration with a condensed phase. Such interaction involving high brightness radiative flux causes multitude of non-linear events involving thermal phase transition at soild–liquid–gas interfaces. A theoretical perspective involving thermal dynamics of the vaporization process and consequent non-linear multiple thermal phase transitions under the action of laser plasma is the subject matter of the present work. The computational calculations were carried out where titanium (Ti) was treated as a condensed medium. The solution to the partial differential equations governing the thermal dynamics and the underlying phase transition event in the multiphase system is based on non-stationary Eulerian variables. The Mach number depicts significant fluctuations due to thermal instabilities associated with the laser beam flux and intensity. A conclusive amalgamation has been established which relates material surface temperature profile to laser intensity, laser flux and the pressure in the plasma cloud.

  10. Retrieving Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity from Multispectral and Hyperspectral Thermal Infrared Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Simon; Hulley, Glynn; Nicholson, Kerry

    2017-04-01

    Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity (LST&E) data are critical variables for studying a variety of Earth surface processes and surface-atmosphere interactions such as evapotranspiration, surface energy balance and water vapor retrievals. LST&E have been identified as an important Earth System Data Record (ESDR) by NASA and many other international organizations Accurate knowledge of the LST&E is a key requirement for many energy balance models to estimate important surface biophysical variables such as evapotranspiration and plant-available soil moisture. LST&E products are currently generated from sensors in low earth orbit (LEO) such as the NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments on the Terra and Aqua satellites as well as from sensors in geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) such as the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and airborne sensors such as the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES). LST&E products are generated with varying accuracies depending on the input data, including ancillary data such as atmospheric water vapor, as well as algorithmic approaches. NASA has identified the need to develop long-term, consistent, and calibrated data and products that are valid across multiple missions and satellite sensors. We will discuss the different approaches that can be used to retrieve surface temperature and emissivity from multispectral and hyperspectral thermal infrared sensors using examples from a variety of different sensors such as those mentioned, and planned new sensors like the ECOsystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station (ECOSTRESS) and the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI). We will also discuss a project underway at NASA to develop a single unified product from some the individual sensor products and assess the errors associated with the product.

  11. Surface and upper air meteorological features during onset phase of 2003 monsoon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O P Singh; H R Hatwar; Onkari Prasad

    2007-08-01

    The second campaign of the Arabian Sea Monsoon Experiment (ARMEX-II) was conducted in two phases viz., March–April and May–June 2003. In the present work, the buoy and ocean research vessel data collected during the second phase of ARMEX-II have been analysed to bring out the characteristic features of monsoon onset. The results have shown that the thermodynamical features such as build up of lower tropospheric instability and increased height of zero degree isotherm occurred about a week before the monsoon onset over Kerala and adjoining southeast Arabian Sea. There was a sharp fall in the temperature difference between 850 and 500 hPa, and the height of zero degree isotherm about 2–3 days before the monsoon onset. The flux of sensible heat was positive (sea to air) over south Arabian Sea during the onset phase. Over the Bay of Bengal higher negative (air to sea) values of sensible flux prevailed before the monsoon onset which became less negative with the advance of monsoon over that region. The pre-onset period was characterized by large sea surface temperature (SST) gradient over the Arabian Sea with rapid decrease towards north of the warm pool region. The buoy observations have shown that SST remained close to 30.5°C in the warm pool region during the pre-onset period in 2003 but only 2–3 degrees away (north of this region) SSTs were as low as 28.5-29°C. An interesting aspect of sea level pressure (SLP) variability over the Indian seas during the onset phase of summer monsoon 2003 was undoubtedly, the highest SLP in the warm pool region inspite of very high SSTs.

  12. Quantifying riverine surface currents from time sequences of thermal infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puleo, J.A.; McKenna, T.E.; Holland, K.T.; Calantoni, J.

    2012-01-01

    River surface currents are quantified from thermal and visible band imagery using two methods. One method utilizes time stacks of pixel intensity to estimate the streamwise velocity at multiple locations. The other method uses particle image velocimetry to solve for optimal two-dimensional pixel displacements between successive frames. Field validation was carried out on the Wolf River, a small coastal plain river near Landon, Mississippi, United States, on 26-27 May 2010 by collecting imagery in association with in situ velocities sampled using electromagnetic current meters deployed 0.1 m below the river surface. Comparisons are made between mean in situ velocities and image-derived velocities from 23 thermal and 6 visible-band image sequences (5 min length) during daylight and darkness conditions. The thermal signal was a small apparent temperature contrast induced by turbulent mixing of a thin layer of cooler water near the river surface with underlying warmer water. The visible-band signal was foam on the water surface. For thermal imagery, streamwise velocities derived from the pixel time stack and particle image velocimetry technique were generally highly correlated to mean streamwise current meter velocities during darkness (r 2 typically greater than 0.9) and early morning daylight (r 2 typically greater than 0.83). Streamwise velocities from the pixel time stack technique had high correlation for visible-band imagery during early morning daylight hours with respect to mean current meter velocities (r 2 > 0.86). Streamwise velocities for the particle image velocimetry technique for visible-band imagery had weaker correlations with only three out of six correlations performed having an r 2 exceeding 0.6. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Thermally induced stresses in boulders on airless body surfaces, and implications for rock breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaro, J. L.; Byrne, S.; Le, J.-L.

    2017-09-01

    This work investigates the macroscopic thermomechanical behavior of lunar boulders by modeling their response to diurnal thermal forcing. Our results reveal a bimodal, spatiotemporally-complex stress response. During sunrise, stresses occur in the boulders' interiors that are associated with large-scale temperature gradients developed due to overnight cooling. During sunset, stresses occur at the boulders' exteriors due to the cooling and contraction of the surface. Both kinds of stresses are on the order of 10 MPa in 1 m boulders and decrease for smaller diameters, suggesting that larger boulders break down more quickly. Boulders ≤ 30 cm exhibit a weak response to thermal forcing, suggesting a threshold below which crack propagation may not occur. Boulders of any size buried by regolith are shielded from thermal breakdown. As boulders increase in size (>1 m), stresses increase to several 10 s of MPa as the behavior of their surfaces approaches that of an infinite halfspace. As the thermal wave loses contact with the boulder interior, stresses become limited to the near-surface. This suggests that the survival time of a boulder is not only controlled by the amplitude of induced stress, but also by its diameter as compared to the diurnal skin depth. While stresses on the order of 10 MPa are enough to drive crack propagation in terrestrial environments, crack propagation rates in vacuum are not well constrained. We explore the relationship between boulder size, stress, and the direction of crack propagation, and discuss the implications for the relative breakdown rates and estimated lifetimes of boulders on airless body surfaces.

  14. Rejection of surface background in thermal detectors: The ABSuRD project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canonica, L., E-mail: lucia.canonica@lngs.infn.it [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, AQ (Italy); Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C. [Università di Milano Bicocca e INFN Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Bucci, C.; Calvano, S.; Di Vacri, M.L. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, AQ (Italy); Goett, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gorla, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, AQ (Italy); Pavan, M. [Università di Milano Bicocca e INFN Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Yeh, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-12-21

    Thermal detectors have recently achieved a leading role in the fields of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Dark Matter searches thanks to their excellent energy resolution and to the wide choice of absorber materials. In these fields the background coming from surface contaminations is frequently dominant. ABSuRD (A Background Surface Rejection Detector) is a scintillation-based approach for tagging this type of background. We discuss the innovative application of this technique in non-scintillating bolometric detectors which will allow for a more favorable signal to background ratio.

  15. Atmospheric correction of LANDSAT TM thermal band using surface energy balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Alain; Devaux-Ros, Claire; Moran, M. Susan

    1994-01-01

    Thermal infrared data of LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) are hardly used, probably due to the difficulties met when trying to correct them for atmospheric effects. A method for correcting these data was designed, based on surface energy balance estimation of known wet and dry targets included in the TM image to be corrected. This method, only using the image itself and local meteorological data was tested and validated on various surfaces: agricultural, forest and rangeland. The root mean square error on corrected temperatures is on the order of 1C.

  16. Self-Healing Thermal Annealing: Surface Morphological Restructuring Control of GaN Nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Michele; Li, Haoning; Zubialevich, Vitaly Z.; Kusch, Gunnar; Schmidt, Michael; Collins, Timothy; Glynn, Colm; Martin, Robert W.; O’Dwyer, Colm; Morris, Michael D.; Holmes, Justin D.; Parbrook, Peter J.

    2016-12-07

    With advances in nanolithography and dry etching, top-down methods of nanostructuring have become a widely used tool for improving the efficiency of optoelectronics. These nano dimensions can offer various benefits to the device performance in terms of light extraction and efficiency, but often at the expense of emission color quality. Broadening of the target emission peak and unwanted yellow luminescence are characteristic defect-related effects due to the ion beam etching damage, particularly for III–N based materials. In this article we focus on GaN based nanorods, showing that through thermal annealing the surface roughness and deformities of the crystal structure can be “self-healed”. Correlative electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy show the change from spherical nanorods to faceted hexagonal structures, revealing the temperature-dependent surface morphology faceting evolution. The faceted nanorods were shown to be strain- and defect-free by cathodoluminescence hyperspectral imaging, micro-Raman, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In-situ TEM thermal annealing experiments allowed for real time observation of dislocation movements and surface restructuring observed in ex-situ annealing TEM sampling. This thermal annealing investigation gives new insight into the redistribution path of GaN material and dislocation movement post growth, allowing for improved understanding and in turn advances in optoelectronic device processing of compound semiconductors.

  17. Carbon nanotubes dispersed polymer nanocomposites: mechanical, electrical, thermal properties and surface morphology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nitin Sankar; Mamilla Nagarjun Reddy; R Krishna Prasad

    2016-02-01

    The various properties and surface morphology of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dispersed polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) matrix were studied to determine their usefulness in various applications. The tensile strength, Young's modulus and electrical breakdown strength of CNT/polymer composites were 0.35MPa, 1.2MPa and 8.1 kV, respectively. The thermal conductivity and dielectric constant for the material having 4.28 wt% CNT were 0.225 W m−1 K−1 and 2.329, respectively. The CNT/polymer composites are promising functional composites with improved mechanical and electrical properties. The scanning electron microscope analysis of surface morphology of PDMS/CNT composite showed that the rough surface texture on nanocomposite has large surface area with circular pores. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed the functional groups present in polymer nanocomposite.

  18. Study of Distinctive Regional Features of Surface Solar Radiation in North and East China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关福来; 郑有飞; 蔡子颖; 于长文; 张楠

    2011-01-01

    Solar radiation is an important energy source for plants on the earth and also a major component of the global energy balance.Variations in solar radiation incident at the earth's surface profoundly affect the human and terrestrial environment,including the climate change.To provide useful information for predicting the future climate change in China,distinctive regional features in spatial and temporal variations of the surface solar radiation (SSR) and corresponding attributions (such as cloud and aerosol) are analyzed based on SSR observations and other meteorological measurements in North and East China from 1961 to 2007.Multiple models,such as the plane-parallel radiative transfer model,empirical and statistical models,and corrclation and regrcssion analysis methods are used in the study.The results are given as follows.(1) During 1961-2007,the total SSR in North China went through a process from quickly “dimming” to slowly “dimming”,while in East China,a significant transition from “dimming” to “brightening” occurred.Although there are some differences between thc two regional variation trends,long-term variations in SSR in the two regions are basically consistent with the observation worldwide.(2) Between the 1960s and 1980s,in both North and East China,aerosols played a critical rolc in the radiation dimming.However,after 1989,different variation trends of SSR occurred in North and East China,indicating that aerosols were not the dominant factor.(3) Cloud cover contributed less to the variation of SSR in North China,but was thc major attribution in East China and played a promoting role in the reversal of SSR from dimming to brightening,especially in the “remarkable brightening” period,with its contribution as high as 70%.

  19. Robust affine-invariant feature points matching for 3D surface reconstruction of complex landslide scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, André; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Allemand, Pascal; Skupinski, Grzegorz; Deseilligny, Marc-Pierrot

    2013-04-01

    Multi-view stereo surface reconstruction from dense terrestrial photographs is being increasingly applied for geoscience applications such as quantitative geomorphology, and a number of different software solution and processing streamlines have been suggested. For image matching, camera self-calibration and bundle block adjustment, most approaches make use of scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) to identify homologous points in multiple images. SIFT-like point matching is robust to apparent translation, rotation, and scaling of objects in multiple viewing geometries but the number of correctly identified matching points typically declines drastically with increasing angles between the viewpoints. For the application of multi-view stereo of complex landslide scenes, the viewing geometry is often constrained by the local topography and barriers such as rocks and vegetation occluding the target. Under such conditions it is not uncommon to encounter view angle differences of > 30% that hinder the image matching and eventually prohibit the joint estimation of the camera parameters from all views. Recently an affine invariant extension of the SIFT detector (ASIFT) has been demonstrated to provide more robust matches when large view-angle differences become an issue. In this study the ASIFT detector was adopted to detect homologous points in terrestrial photographs preceding 3D reconstruction of different parts (main scarp, toe) of the Super-Sauze landslide (Southern French Alps). 3D surface models for different time periods and different parts of the landslide were derived using the multi-view stereo framework implemented in MicMac (©IGN). The obtained 3D models were compared with reconstructions using the traditional SIFT detectors as well as alternative structure-from-motion implementations. An estimate of the absolute accuracy of the photogrammetric models was obtained through co-registration and comparison with high-resolution terrestrial LiDAR scans.

  20. A Circular Polarizer with Beamforming Feature Based on Frequency Selective Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jia Yuan; Wan, Xiang; Ren, Jian; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-01-01

    We propose a circular polarizer with beamforming features based on frequency selective surface (FSS), in which a modified anchor-shaped unit cell is used to reach the circular polarizer function. The beamforming characteristic is realized by a particular design of the unit-phase distribution, which is obtained by varying the scale of the unit cell. Instead of using plane waves, a horn antenna is designed to feed the phase-variant FSS. The proposed two-layer FSS is fabricated and measured to verify the design. The measured results show that the proposed structure can convert the linearly polarized waves to circularly polarized waves. Compared with the feeding horn antenna, the transmitted beam of the FSS-added horn is 14.43° broader in one direction, while 3.77° narrower in the orthogonal direction. To our best knowledge, this is the first time to realize circular polarizer with beamforming as the extra function based on FSS, which is promising in satellite and communication systems for potential applications due to its simple design and good performance.

  1. Gross Morphological Features of the Organ Surface Primo-Vascular System Revealed by Hemacolor Staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Jeong Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The primo-vascular system (PVS, which consists of primo-vessels (PVs and primo-nodes (PNs, is a novel thread-like structure identified in many animal species. Various observational methods have been used to clarify its anatomical properties. Here, we used Hemacolor staining to examine the gross morphology of organ-surface PVS in rats. We observed a sinus structure (20–50 μm with a remarkably low cellularity within PNs and PVs and several lines of ductules (3–5 μm filled with single cells or granules (~1 μm in PV. Both sinuses and ductules were linearly aligned along the longitudinal axis of the PVS. Such morphology of the PVS was further confirmed by acridine orange staining. In PN slices, there was a honeycomb-like structure containing the granules with pentagonal lumens (~10 μm. Both PVs and PNs were densely filled with WBCs, RBCs, and putative mast cells (MCs, which were 90.3%, 5.9%, and 3.8% of the cell population, respectively. Granules in putative MCs showed spontaneous vibrating movements. In conclusion, the results show that Hemacolor, a simple and rapid staining system, can reveal the gross morphological features reported previously. Our findings may help to elucidate the structure and function of the PVS in normal and disease states in future studies.

  2. Accurate single-sequence prediction of solvent accessible surface area using local and global features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraggi, Eshel; Zhou, Yaoqi; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2014-11-01

    We present a new approach for predicting the Accessible Surface Area (ASA) using a General Neural Network (GENN). The novelty of the new approach lies in not using residue mutation profiles generated by multiple sequence alignments as descriptive inputs. Instead we use solely sequential window information and global features such as single-residue and two-residue compositions of the chain. The resulting predictor is both highly more efficient than sequence alignment-based predictors and of comparable accuracy to them. Introduction of the global inputs significantly helps achieve this comparable accuracy. The predictor, termed ASAquick, is tested on predicting the ASA of globular proteins and found to perform similarly well for so-called easy and hard cases indicating generalizability and possible usability for de-novo protein structure prediction. The source code and a Linux executables for GENN and ASAquick are available from Research and Information Systems at http://mamiris.com, from the SPARKS Lab at http://sparks-lab.org, and from the Battelle Center for Mathematical Medicine at http://mathmed.org.

  3. A Circular Polarizer with Beamforming Feature Based on Frequency Selective Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jia Yuan; Wan, Xiang; Ren, Jian; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-01-01

    We propose a circular polarizer with beamforming features based on frequency selective surface (FSS), in which a modified anchor-shaped unit cell is used to reach the circular polarizer function. The beamforming characteristic is realized by a particular design of the unit-phase distribution, which is obtained by varying the scale of the unit cell. Instead of using plane waves, a horn antenna is designed to feed the phase-variant FSS. The proposed two-layer FSS is fabricated and measured to verify the design. The measured results show that the proposed structure can convert the linearly polarized waves to circularly polarized waves. Compared with the feeding horn antenna, the transmitted beam of the FSS-added horn is 14.43° broader in one direction, while 3.77° narrower in the orthogonal direction. To our best knowledge, this is the first time to realize circular polarizer with beamforming as the extra function based on FSS, which is promising in satellite and communication systems for potential applications due to its simple design and good performance. PMID:28128345

  4. Accurate single-sequence prediction of solvent accessible surface area using local and global features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraggi, Eshel; Zhou, Yaoqi; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    We present a new approach for predicting the Accessible Surface Area (ASA) using a General Neural Network (GENN). The novelty of the new approach lies in not using residue mutation profiles generated by multiple sequence alignments as descriptive inputs. Instead we use solely sequential window information and global features such as single-residue and two-residue compositions of the chain. The resulting predictor is both highly more efficient than sequence alignment based predictors and of comparable accuracy to them. Introduction of the global inputs significantly helps achieve this comparable accuracy. The predictor, termed ASAquick, is tested on predicting the ASA of globular proteins and found to perform similarly well for so-called easy and hard cases indicating generalizability and possible usability for de-novo protein structure prediction. The source code and a Linux executables for GENN and ASAquick are available from Research and Information Systems at http://mamiris.com, from the SPARKS Lab at http://sparks-lab.org, and from the Battelle Center for Mathematical Medicine at http://mathmed.org. PMID:25204636

  5. Surface-effects-dominated thermal and mechanical responses of zinc oxide nanobelts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.J.Kulkarni; M.Zhou

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics(MD)simulations are carried out to characterize the mechanical and thermal responses of [ol(l)o]-oriented ZnO nanobelts with lateral dimensions of 21.22(A)×18.95(A),31.02(A)×29.42(A) and 40.81(A)×39.89(A) over the temperature range of 300-1000 K. The Young's modulus and thermal conductivity of the nanobelts are evaluated. Significant surface effects on properties due to the highsurface-to-volume ratios of the nanobelts are observed. For the mechanical response, surface-stress-induced internal stress plays an important role. For the thermal response, surface scattering of phonons dominates. Calculations show that the Young's modulus is higher than the corresponding value for bulk ZnO and decreases by~33%as the lateral dimensions increase from 21.22(A)×18.95(A) to 40.8l(A)×39.89(A).The thermal conductivity is one order of magnitude lower than the corresponding value for bulk ZnO single crystal and decreases with wire size. Specifically, the conductivity of the 21.22(A)×18.95(A) beltis approximately(31-18)% lower than that of the 40.81(A)×39.89(A) belt over the temperature range analyzed. A significant dependence of properties on temperature is also observed. with the Young's modulus decreasing on average by 12% and the conductivity decreasing by 50% as temperature increases from 300 K to 1000 K.

  6. Thermal anomaly at the Earth's surface associated with a lava tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piombo, Antonello; Di Bari, Marco; Tallarico, Andrea; Dragoni, Michele

    2016-10-01

    Lava tubes are frequently encountered in volcanic areas. The formation of lava tubes has strong implications on the volcanic hazard during effusive eruptions. The thermal dissipation of lava flowing in a tube is reduced in respect to the lava flowing in an open channel so the lava may threaten areas that would not be reached by flows in open channels: for this reason it is important to detect the presence of lava tubes. In this work we propose a model to detect the presence and the characteristics of lava tubes by their thermal footprint at the surface. We model numerically the temperature distribution and the heat flow, both in the steady and the transient state, and we take into account the principal thermal effects due to the presence of an active lava tube, i.e. the conduction to the ground and the atmosphere, the convection and the radiation in the atmosphere. We assume that lava fluid is at high temperature, in motion inside a sloping tube under the gravity force. The thermal profile across the tube direction, in particular the width of the temperature curve, allows to evaluate the depth of the tube. The values of maximum temperature and of tube depth allow to estimate the area of the tube section. The shape of the temperature curve and its asymmetry can give information about the geometry of the tube. If we observe volcanic areas at different times by thermal cameras, we can detect anomalies and evaluate their causes during an eruption; in particular, we can evaluate whether they are due to active lava flows or not and what is their state. For lava tubes, we can connect thermal anomalies with lava tube position, characteristics and state.

  7. Effect of Illumination Angle on the Performance of Dusted Thermal Control Surfaces in a Simulated Lunar Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    2009-01-01

    JSC-1A lunar simulant has been applied to AZ93 and AgFEP thermal control surfaces on aluminum substrates in a simulated lunar environment. The temperature of these surfaces was monitored as they were heated with a solar simulator using varying angles of incidence and cooled in a 30 K coldbox. Thermal modeling was used to determine the solar absorptivity (a) and infrared emissivity (e) of the thermal control surfaces in both their clean and dusted states. It was found that even a sub-monolayer of dust can significantly raise the a of either type of surface. A full monolayer can increase the a/e ratio by a factor of 3 to 4 over a clean surface. Little angular dependence of the a of pristine thermal control surfaces for both AZ93 and AgFEP was observed, at least until 30 from the surface. The dusted surfaces showed the most angular dependence of a when the incidence angle was in the range of 25 to 35 . Samples with a full monolayer, like those with no dust, showed little angular dependence in a. The e of the dusted thermal control surfaces was within the spread of clean surfaces, with the exception of high dust coverage, where a small increase was observed at shallow angles.

  8. Decay of isolated surface features driven by the Gibbs-Thomson effect in analytic model and simulation

    OpenAIRE

    McLean, James G.; Krishnamachari, B.; Peale, D. R.; Chason, E.; Sethna, James P.; Cooper, B. H.

    1996-01-01

    A theory based on the thermodynamic Gibbs-Thomson relation is presented which provides the framework for understanding the time evolution of isolated nanoscale features (i.e., islands and pits) on surfaces. Two limiting cases are predicted, in which either diffusion or interface transfer is the limiting process. These cases correspond to similar regimes considered in previous works addressing the Ostwald ripening of ensembles of features. A third possible limiting case is noted for the specia...

  9. Development of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma system for surface modification of polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasih, T. P.

    2017-04-01

    Non-thermal plasma has become one of the new technologies which are highly developed now days. This happens because the cold plasma using the principle of generated reactive gases that have the ability to modify the surface properties of a material or product without changing the original characteristics of the material. The purpose of this study is to develop a cold plasma system that operates at atmospheric pressure and investigates the effect of cold plasma treatment to change the surface characteristics of the polymer material polyethylene (PE) at various time conditions. We are successfully developing a non-thermal plasma system that can operate at atmospheric pressure and can be run with Helium or Argon gas. The characteristics of plasma will be discussed from the view of its electrical property, plasma discharge regime andoperation temperature. Experiment results on plasma treatment on PE material shows the changes of surface properties of originally hydrophobic material PE becomes hydrophilic by only few seconds of plasma treatment and level of hydrophilicity become greater with increasing duration of plasma treatment. Confirmation of this is shown by the measurement of contact angle of droplets of water on the surface of PE are getting smaller.

  10. Non-thermal desorption from interstellar dust grains via exothermic surface reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Garrod, R T; Herbst, E

    2007-01-01

    Aims: The gas-phase abundance of methanol in dark quiescent cores in the interstellar medium cannot be explained by gas-phase chemistry. In fact, the only possible synthesis of this species appears to be production on the surfaces of dust grains followed by desorption into the gas. Yet, evaporation is inefficient for heavy molecules such as methanol at the typical temperature of 10 K. It is necessary then to consider non-thermal mechanisms for desorption. But, if such mechanisms are considered for the production of methanol, they must be considered for all surface species. Methods: Our gas-grain network of reactions has been altered by the inclusion of a non-thermal desorption mechanism in which the exothermicity of surface addition reactions is utilized to break the bond between the product species and the surface. Our estimated rate for this process derives from a simple version of classical unimolecular rate theory with a variable parameter only loosely contrained by theoretical work. Results: Our results ...

  11. Optical and thermal properties in ultrafast laser surface nanostructuring on biodegradable polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Shuhei; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the effect of optical and thermal properties in laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) formation on a poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), a biodegradable polymer. Surface properties of biomaterials are known to be one of the key factors in tissue engineering. Methods to process biomaterial surfaces have been studied widely to enhance cell adhesive and anisotropic properties. LIPSS formation has advantages in a dry processing which is able to process complex-shaped surfaces without using a toxic chemical component. LIPSS, however, was difficult to be formed on PLLA due to its thermal and optical properties compared to other polymers. To obtain new perspectives in effect of these properties above, LIPSS formation dependences on wavelength, pulse duration and repetition rate have been studied. At 800 nm of incident wavelength, high-spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL) was formed after applying 10000 femtosecond pulses at 1.0 J/cm2 in laser fluence. At 400 nm of the wavelength, HSFL was formed at fluences higher than 0.20 J/cm2 with more than 3000 pulses. Since LIPSS was less formed with lower repetition rate, certain heat accumulation may be required for LIPSS formation. With the pulse duration of 2.0 ps, higher laser fluence as well as number of pulses compared to the case of 120 fs was necessary. This indicates that multiphoton absorption process is essential for LIPSS formation. Study on biodegradation modification was also performed.

  12. Mechanical, Thermal Degradation, and Flammability Studies on Surface Modified Sisal Fiber Reinforced Recycled Polypropylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of surface treated sisal fiber on the mechanical, thermal, flammability, and morphological properties of sisal fiber (SF reinforced recycled polypropylene (RPP composites was investigated. The surface of sisal fiber was modified with different chemical reagent such as silane, glycidyl methacrylate (GMA, and O-hydroxybenzene diazonium chloride (OBDC to improve the compatibility with the matrix polymer. The experimental results revealed an improvement in the tensile strength to 11%, 20%, and 31.36% and impact strength to 78.72%, 77%, and 81% for silane, GMA, and OBDC treated sisal fiber reinforced recycled Polypropylene (RPP/SF composites, respectively, as compared to RPP. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC, and heat deflection temperature (HDT results revealed improved thermal stability as compared with RPP. The flammability behaviour of silane, GMA, and OBDC treated SF/RPP composites was studied by the horizontal burning rate by UL-94. The morphological analysis through scanning electron micrograph (SEM supports improves surface interaction between fiber surface and polymer matrix.

  13. Thermal inertia as an indicator of rockiness variegation on near-Earth asteroid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Lagoa, Victor; Delbo, Marco; Hanus, Josef

    2016-10-01

    Determining key physical properties of asteroids such as sizes and albedos or reflectance spectra is crucial to understand their origins and the processes that they have undergone during their evolution. In particular, one of the aims of NEOShield-2 project, funded by the European Union's Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation programme, is to physically characterize small near Earth asteroids (NEA) in an effort to determine effective mitigation strategies in case of impact with our planet [Harris et al. 2013 2013AcAau,90,80H].We performed thermophysical modelling of NEAs, such as (1685) Toro, and potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs), such as (33342) 1998 WT24. In addition to size, thermophysical models (TPM) of asteroids can constrain the surface thermal inertia, which is related to the material composition and physical nature, namely its "rockiness" or typical size of the particles on its surface. These have observable effects on the surface temperature distribution as a function of time and thus on the thermal infrared fluxes we observe, to which we can fit our model.In the case of WT24, its thermal inertia has been previously constrained to be in the range 100-300 SI units [Harris et al. 2007, Icarus 188, 414H]. But this was based on a spherical shape model approximation since no shape model was available by the time. Such a low thermal inertia value seems in disagreement with a relatively high metal content of the enstatite chondrites, the meteorite type to which WT24, classified as an E-type [Lazzarin et al. 2004 A&A 425L, 25L], has been spectrally associated. Using a three-dimensional model and spin vector based on radar observations [Busch et al. 2008 Icarus 197, 375B], our TPM produces a higher best-fitting value of the thermal inertia. We also find the intriguing possibility that the hemisphere of WT24 dominated by concave terrains, possibly be the result of an impact crater, has a higher thermal inertia. This would be similar to the case of our Moon

  14. Decay of isolated surface features driven by the Gibbs-Thomson effect in an analytic model and a simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, J.G.; Krishnamachari, B.; Peale, D.R. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-2501 (United States); Chason, E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Sethna, J.P.; Cooper, B.H. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-2501 (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A theory based on the thermodynamic Gibbs-Thomson relation is presented that provides the framework for understanding the time evolution of isolated nanoscale features (i.e., islands and pits) on surfaces. Two limiting cases are predicted, in which either diffusion or interface transfer is the limiting process. These cases correspond to similar regimes considered in previous works addressing the Ostwald ripening of ensembles of features. A third possible limiting case is noted for the special geometry of {open_quotes}stacked{close_quotes} islands. In these limiting cases, isolated features are predicted to decay in size with a power-law scaling in time: A{proportional_to}(t{sub 0}{minus}t){sup n}, where A is the area of the feature, t{sub 0} is the time at which the feature disappears, and n=2/3 or 1. The constant of proportionality is related to parameters describing both the kinetic and equilibrium properties of the surface. A continuous-time Monte Carlo simulation is used to test the application of this theory to generic surfaces with atomic scale features. A method is described to obtain macroscopic kinetic parameters describing interfaces in such simulations. Simulation and analytic theory are compared directly, using measurements of the simulation to determine the constants of the analytic theory. Agreement between the two is very good over a range of surface parameters, suggesting that the analytic theory properly captures the necessary physics. It is anticipated that the simulation will be useful in modeling complex surface geometries often seen in experiments on physical surfaces, for which application of the analytic model is not straightforward. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Decay of isolated surface features driven by the Gibbs-Thomson effect in an analytic model and a simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, James G.; Krishnamachari, B.; Peale, D. R.; Chason, E.; Sethna, James P.; Cooper, B. H.

    1997-01-01

    A theory based on the thermodynamic Gibbs-Thomson relation is presented that provides the framework for understanding the time evolution of isolated nanoscale features (i.e., islands and pits) on surfaces. Two limiting cases are predicted, in which either diffusion or interface transfer is the limiting process. These cases correspond to similar regimes considered in previous works addressing the Ostwald ripening of ensembles of features. A third possible limiting case is noted for the special geometry of ``stacked'' islands. In these limiting cases, isolated features are predicted to decay in size with a power-law scaling in time: A~(t0-t)n, where A is the area of the feature, t0 is the time at which the feature disappears, and n=2/3 or 1. The constant of proportionality is related to parameters describing both the kinetic and equilibrium properties of the surface. A continuous-time Monte Carlo simulation is used to test the application of this theory to generic surfaces with atomic scale features. A method is described to obtain macroscopic kinetic parameters describing interfaces in such simulations. Simulation and analytic theory are compared directly, using measurements of the simulation to determine the constants of the analytic theory. Agreement between the two is very good over a range of surface parameters, suggesting that the analytic theory properly captures the necessary physics. It is anticipated that the simulation will be useful in modeling complex surface geometries often seen in experiments on physical surfaces, for which application of the analytic model is not straightforward.

  16. Thermally aware, durable nanoengineered surfaces with high speed liquid impalement resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Manish; Peng, Chaoyi; Chen, Zhuyang

    2016-11-01

    Highly hydrophobic nanoengineered surfaces delaying freezing down to -20 degrees Centigrade for a day, sustaining dropwise steam condensation under high rate steam shear for several days, sustaining mechanical abrasion and high strains have attracted strong interest recently. Particularly, anti-icing and dropwise condensation promotion require thermally conductive surfaces with careful nucleation control - of ice germs or droplets, respectively - using precise surface nanotexture. Scalability of surface manufacture is an additional challenge. In the current presentation, we will demonstrate a pathway to address these needs. Anodisation of metallic substrate is first used to obtain nanotextured surfaces with a precision of approx. 200 nm. Next, rationally formulated nanocomposites comprising solution processed fluorinated copolymers and nanoparticle dispersions were spray coated on the anodized metals. The resulting nanocomposite coatings were superhydrophobic with approx. 20 nm precision in surface texture. The surface durability is assessed using tape peel, sand abrasion, and droplet and water jet impact tests up to 30 m/s. High speed jet splashing is recorded at speeds >10 m/s to demonstrate the influence of jet diameter on splashing characteristics. This work was partly supported by EPSRC Grant EP/N006577/1.

  17. OUT-OF-FOCUS REGION SEGMENTATION OF 2D SURFACE IMAGES WITH THE USE OF TEXTURE FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Anding

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A segmentation method of out-of-focus image regions for processed metal surfaces, based on focus textural features is proposed. Such regions contain small amount of useful information. The object of study is a metal surface, which has a cone shape. Some regions of images are blurred because the depth of field of industrial cameras is limited. Automatic removal of out-of-focus regions in such images is one of the possible solutions to this problem. Focus texture features were used to calculate characteristics that describe the sharpness of particular image area. Such features are used in autofocus systems of microscopes and cameras, and their application for segmentation of out-of-focus regions of images is unusual. Thirty-four textural features were tested on a set of metal surface images with out-of-focus regions. The most useful features, usable for segmentation of an image more accurately, are an average grey level and spatial frequency. Proposed segmentation method of out-of-focus image regions for metal surfaces can be successfully applied for evaluation of processing quality of materials with the use of industrial cameras. The method has simple implementation and high calculating speed.

  18. Weathering performance of surface of thermally modified wood finished with nanoparticles-modified waterborne polyacrylate coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklečić, Josip; Turkulin, Hrvoje; Jirouš-Rajković, Vlatka

    2017-06-01

    In this research the samples of thermally modified (TMT) beech wood samples, finished with waterborne polyacrylate clear coatings modified with nano-sized ZnO and TiO2-rutil were naturally and artificially exposed to weathering conditions. To extend the lifetime of wood and maintain its natural look, the research and development of clear coatings with minimal use of harmful chemicals has become very important. Therefore nano-sized inorganic UV absorbers are increasingly used to enhance the durability of the coating and wood substrate, still retaining the transparency of the coating. During exposure the visual inspection was performed, further the changes of colour, gloss and adhesion were recorded. Interaction of the film with the thermally modified substrate surface were studied. Results showed that the addition of TiO2-rutil and ZnO nanoparticles to the waterborne polyacrylate coating improved the colour stability of thermally modified beech-wood. However, nano-sized ZnO increased the cracking and peeling, and caused the loss in adhesion strength of the film on thermally modified beech wood.

  19. Photo-thermal modulation of surface plasmon polariton propagation at telecommunication wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, S; Weeber, J-C; Zacharatos, F; Hassan, K; Bernardin, T; Cluzel, B; Fatome, J; Finot, C

    2013-09-23

    We report on photo-thermal modulation of thin film surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) excited at telecom wavelengths and traveling at a gold/air interface. By operating a modulated continuous-wave or a Q-switched nanosecond pump laser, we investigate the photo-thermally induced modulation of SPP propagation mediated by the temperature-dependent ohmic losses in the gold film. We use a fiber-to-fiber characterization set-up to measure accurately the modulation depth of the SPP signal under photo-thermal excitation. On the basis of these measurements, we extract the thermo-plasmonic coefficient of the SPP mode defined as the temperature derivative of the SPP damping constant. Next, we introduce a figure of merit which is relevant to characterize the impact of temperature onto the properties of bounded or weakly leaky SPP modes supported by a given metal at a given wavelength. By combining our measurements with tabulated values of the temperature-dependent imaginary part of gold dielectric function, we compute the thermo-optical coefficients (TOC) of gold at telecom wavelengths. Finally, we investigate a pulsed photo-thermal excitation of the SPP in the nanosecond regime. The experimental SPP depth of modulation obtained in this situation are found to be in fair agreement with the modulation depths computed by using our values of gold TOC.

  20. Ground Plane and Near-Surface Thermal Analysis for NASA's Constellation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarre, Joseph F.; Amundsen, Ruth M.; Scola, Salvatore; Leahy, Frank F.; Sharp, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Most spacecraft thermal analysis tools assume that the spacecraft is in orbit around a planet and are designed to calculate solar and planetary fluxes, as well as radiation to space. On NASA Constellation projects, thermal analysts are also building models of vehicles in their pre-launch condition on the surface of a planet. This process entails making some modifications in the building and execution of a thermal model such that the radiation from the planet, both reflected albedo and infrared, is calculated correctly. Also important in the calculation of pre-launch vehicle temperatures are the natural environments at the vehicle site, including air and ground temperatures, sky radiative background temperature, solar flux, and optical properties of the ground around the vehicle. A group of Constellation projects have collaborated on developing a cohesive, integrated set of natural environments that accurately capture worst-case thermal scenarios for the pre-launch and launch phases of these vehicles. The paper will discuss the standardization of methods for local planet modeling across Constellation projects, as well as the collection and consolidation of natural environments for launch sites. Methods for Earth as well as lunar sites will be discussed.

  1. Surface Thermal Insulation and Pipe Cooling of Spillways during Concrete Construction Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhenhong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Given that spillways adopt a hydraulic thin concrete plate structure, this structure is difficult to protect from cracks. The mechanism of the cracks in spillways shows that temperature stress is the major reason for cracks. Therefore, an effective way of preventing cracks is a timely and reasonable temperature-control program. Studies show that one effective prevention method is surface thermal insulation combined with internal pipe cooling. The major factors influencing temperature control effects are the time of performing thermal insulation and the ways of internal pipe cooling. To solve this problem, a spillway is taken as an example and a three-dimensional finite element program and pipe cooling calculation method are adopted to conduct simulation calculation and analysis on the temperature fields and stress fields of concretes subject to different temperature-control programs. The temperature-control effects are then compared. Optimization results show that timely and reasonable surface thermal insulation and water-flowing mode can ensure good temperature-control and anticrack effects. The method has reference value for similar projects.

  2. Thermally induced growth of ZnO nanocrystals on mixed metal oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inayat, Alexandra; Makky, Ayman; Giraldo, Jose; Kuhnt, Andreas; Busse, Corinna; Schwieger, Wilhelm

    2014-06-23

    An in situ method for the growth of ZnO nanocrystals on Zn/Al mixed metal oxide (MMO) surfaces is presented. The key to this method is the thermal treatment of Zn/Al layered double hydroxides (Zn/Al LDHs) in the presence of nitrate anions, which results in partial demixing of the LDH/MMO structure and the subsequent crystallization of ZnO crystals on the surface of the forming MMO layers. In a first experimental series, thermal treatment of Zn/Al LDHs with different fractions of nitrate and carbonate in the interlayer space was examined by thermogravimetry coupled with mass spectrometry (TG-MS) and in situ XRD. In a second experimental series, Zn/Al LDHs with only carbonate in the interlayer space were thermally treated in the presence of different amounts of an external nitrate source (NH4NO3). All obtained Zn/Al MMO samples were analysed by electron microscopy, nitrogen physisorption and powder X-ray diffraction. The gas phase formed during nitrate decomposition turned out to be responsible for the formation of crystalline ZnO nanoparticles. Accordingly, both interlayer nitrate and the presence of ammonium nitrate led to the formation of supported ZnO nanocrystals with mean diameters between 100 and 400 nm, and both methods offer the possibility to tailor the amount and size of the ZnO crystals by means of the amount of nitrate.

  3. Gender Recognition from Human-Body Images Using Visible-Light and Thermal Camera Videos Based on a Convolutional Neural Network for Image Feature Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dat Tien; Kim, Ki Wan; Hong, Hyung Gil; Koo, Ja Hyung; Kim, Min Cheol; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2017-03-20

    Extracting powerful image features plays an important role in computer vision systems. Many methods have previously been proposed to extract image features for various computer vision applications, such as the scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT), speed-up robust feature (SURF), local binary patterns (LBP), histogram of oriented gradients (HOG), and weighted HOG. Recently, the convolutional neural network (CNN) method for image feature extraction and classification in computer vision has been used in various applications. In this research, we propose a new gender recognition method for recognizing males and females in observation scenes of surveillance systems based on feature extraction from visible-light and thermal camera videos through CNN. Experimental results confirm the superiority of our proposed method over state-of-the-art recognition methods for the gender recognition problem using human body images.

  4. Gender Recognition from Human-Body Images Using Visible-Light and Thermal Camera Videos Based on a Convolutional Neural Network for Image Feature Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dat Tien; Kim, Ki Wan; Hong, Hyung Gil; Koo, Ja Hyung; Kim, Min Cheol; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2017-01-01

    Extracting powerful image features plays an important role in computer vision systems. Many methods have previously been proposed to extract image features for various computer vision applications, such as the scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT), speed-up robust feature (SURF), local binary patterns (LBP), histogram of oriented gradients (HOG), and weighted HOG. Recently, the convolutional neural network (CNN) method for image feature extraction and classification in computer vision has been used in various applications. In this research, we propose a new gender recognition method for recognizing males and females in observation scenes of surveillance systems based on feature extraction from visible-light and thermal camera videos through CNN. Experimental results confirm the superiority of our proposed method over state-of-the-art recognition methods for the gender recognition problem using human body images. PMID:28335510

  5. Atmospheric Pressure non-thermal plasmas for surface treatment of polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiao-Feng; Wen, Chun-Hsiang; Wei, Hsiao-Kuan; Kou, Chwung-Shan

    2006-10-01

    Interest has grown over the past few years in applying atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas to surface treatment. In this work, we used an asymmetric glow dielectric-barrier discharge (GDBD), at atmospheric pressure in nitrogen, to improve the surface hydrophilicity of three kinds of polymer films, biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP), polyimide (PI), and triacetyl cellulose (TAC). This set-up consists of two asymmetric electrodes covered by dielectrics. And to prevent the filamentary discharge occur, the frequency, gas flow rate and uniformity of gas flow distribution should be carefully controlled. The discharge performance is monitored through an oscilloscope, which is connected to a high voltage probe and a current monitor. The physical and chemical properties of polymer surfaces before and after GDBD treatment were analyzed via water contact angle (CA) measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques.

  6. Vibration analysis of viscoelastic inhomogeneous nanobeams incorporating surface and thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Barati, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the free vibration investigation of nonlocal strain gradient-based viscoelastic functionally graded (FG) nanobeams on viscoelastic medium considering surface stress effects. Nonlocal strain gradient theory possesses a nonlocal stress field parameter and a length scale parameter for more accurate prediction of mechanical behavior of nanostructures. Surface energy effect is incorporate to the nonlocal strain gradient theory employing Gurtin-Murdoch elasticity theory. Thermo-elastic material properties of nanobeam are graded in thickness direction using power-law distribution. Hamilton's principal is utilized to obtain the governing equations of FG nanobeam embedded in viscoelastic medium. The effects of surface stress, length scale parameter, nonlocal parameter, viscoelastic medium, internal damping constant, thermal loading, power-law index and boundary conditions on vibration frequencies of viscoelastic FGM nanobeams are discussed in detail.

  7. Surface studies of the thermal decomposition of triethylgallium on GaAs (100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrell, A. J.; Wee, A. T. S.; Fairbrother, D. H.; Singh, N. K.; Foord, J. S.; Davies, G. J.; Andrews, D. A.

    1990-10-01

    The adsorption and surface decomposition of triethylgallium (TEG) on GaAs (100) has been studied using XPS and thermal desorption techniques. TEG is found to adsorb in a molecular form on the Ga rich (4×1) surface below 150 K. As the surface temperature is raised, this molecular state dissociates to form Ga and adsorbed ethyl species. The overall cracking reaction occurs in competition with the desorption of TEG and diethylgallium (DEG). Under the conditions of our experiments the adsorbed ethyl species formed above are found to dissociate above 600 K to form mainly gas phase ethene and hydrogen with traces of ethane, resulting in the formation of a pure Ga layer within the sensitivity limits imposed by XPS.

  8. Ground surface temperature reconstructions: Using in situ estimates for thermal conductivity acquired with a fiber-optic distributed thermal perturbation sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freifeld, B.M.; Finsterle, S.; Onstott, T.C.; Toole, P.; Pratt, L.M.

    2008-10-10

    We have developed a borehole methodology to estimate formation thermal conductivity in situ with a spatial resolution of one meter. In parallel with a fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (DTS), a resistance heater is deployed to create a controlled thermal perturbation. The transient thermal data is inverted to estimate the formation's thermal conductivity. We refer to this instrumentation as a Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensor (DTPS), given the distributed nature of the DTS measurement technology. The DTPS was deployed in permafrost at the High Lake Project Site (67 degrees 22 minutes N, 110 degrees 50 minutes W), Nunavut, Canada. Based on DTPS data, a thermal conductivity profile was estimated along the length of a wellbore. Using the thermal conductivity profile, the baseline geothermal profile was then inverted to estimate a ground surface temperature history (GSTH) for the High Lake region. The GSTH exhibits a 100-year long warming trend, with a present-day ground surface temperature increase of 3.0 {+-} 0.8 C over the long-term average.

  9. Peculiar features of composition of carbonyl components of surface lipids in aquatic plants

    OpenAIRE

    І. О. Alexeevs’ka; V. M. Shepelenko; N. I. Shtemenko

    2006-01-01

    Carbonyl components content of aquatic plants’ surface lipids has been studied. High concentration of oxo-compounds in surface lipids of aquatic plants has been shown. It could reach 60 % of total value. Sufficient heterogeneity of surface lipids has been demonstrated. Unsaturated character of oxo-components in aquatic plants’ surface lipids has been assumed in the present work.

  10. DEFINITION OF DENSITY OF THE THERMAL STATIONARY STREAMS ON A SURFACES OF A SLEEVE OF CYLINDER COMBUSTION ENGINE BY A METHOD OF OPTIMUM FILTRATION KALMANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZARENBIN V. G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. At research warmly intensity and thermal weariness of internal combustion engines (ICE the knowledge and the analysis of local temperatures and thermal streams in the basic details forming the chamber of combustion is defining. Theoretically the problem consists in the decision of the equation of heat conductivity at the set features of course of thermal processes on border of bodies. Thus there is a problem of accuracy of the decision since it depends on accuracy of the task of real boundary conditions which can be received only by means of physical experiment and corresponding metrological maintenance. Unlike temperature the thermal stream cannot be measured directly, therefore it define on a difference of temperatures (thermal gradient a method or a calorimetric method. Definition of density of streams with the help as named gauges of a thermal stream when the measured temperatures are used at the decision of a return problem of heat conductivity for chosen thermometric an element is most extended. In this case, except the requirement of one-dimensionality of distribution of temperatures, linearity and the minimum distortion of temperature fields of thermal system, there are considerable difficulties of calculation derivative of the measured temperature. To perspective it is possible to carry methods of researches which it is accepted to name cybernetic diagnostics or identification of systems. Their essence consists that the deformed information on object is compared to its mathematical model and then are defined its condition, parameters or entrance influences by minimization of square-law function are nonviscous. In work definition of density of thermal stationary streams on surfaces of a sleeve of cylinder ICE by a method of optimum filtration Kalmana and also an estimation of their reliability and accuracy is made. Possibility of application of filtration Kalmana is shown at experimental researches in ICE. The purpose

  11. Thermal neutrons' flux near the Earth's surface as an evidence of the crustal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigaeva, Ekaterina; Nechayev, Oleg; Volodichev, Nikolay; Antonova, Valentina; Kryukov, Sergey; Chubenko, Alexander; Shchepetov, Alexander

    There are some ideas about the Earth’s global seismic activity appearance due to tidal forces. At the same time, the correlations between the big series of the earthquakes and the New and Full Moons and between the New and Full Moons and the increasings of the thermal neutrons’ flux from the Earth’s crust were observed. It is as though there are internal links between these three natural phenomena and the physical reasons for their appearance are the same. The paper presents the results of the ground-based thermal neutrons observations during different time periods characterized with phenomena in the near-Earth space (for instance, the New and Full Moon). Basing on the up-to-date conception of the tidal waves influence on the Earth's crust the authors confirm the role of the Moon in the production of the neutron flux near the Earth's surface.

  12. Land surface thermal characterization of Asian-pacific region with Japanese geostationary satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyoshi, K.; Tamura, M.

    2010-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a significant indicator of energy balance at the Earth's surface. It is required for a wide variety of climate, hydrological, ecological, and biogeochemical studies. Although LST is highly variable both temporally and spatially, it is impossible for polar-orbiting satellite to detect hourly changes in LST, because the satellite is able to only collect data of the same area at most twice a day. On the other hand, geostationary satellite is able to collect hourly data and has a possibility to monitor hourly changes in LST, therefore hourly measurements of geostationary satellite enables us to characterize detailed thermal conditions of the Earth's surface and improve our understanding of the surface energy balance. Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT) is a Japanese geostationary satellite launched in 2005 and covers Asia-Pacific region. MTSAT provides hourly data with 5 bands including two thermal infrared (TIR) bands in the 10.5-12.5 micron region. In this research, we have developed a methodology to retrieve hourly LST from thermal infrared data of MTSAT. We applied Generalized Split-window (GSW) equation to estimate LST from TIR data. First, the brightness temperatures measured at sensor on MTSAT was simulated by radiative transfer code (MODTRAN), and the numerical coefficients of GSW equation were optimized based on the simulation results with non-linear minimization algorithm. The standard deviation of derived GSW equation was less than or equal to 1.09K in the case of viewing zenith angle lower than 40 degree and 1.73K in 60 degree. Then, spatial distributions of LST have been mapped optimized GSW equation with brightness temperatures of MTSAT IR1 and IR2 and emissivity map from MODIS product. Finally, these maps were validated with MODIS LST product (MOD11A1) over four Asian-pacific regions such as Bangkok, Tokyo, UlanBator and Jakarta , It is found that RMSE of these regions were 4.57K, 2.22K, 2.71K and 3.92K

  13. Thermal Inertia Determination of C-type Asteroid Ryugu from in-situ Surface Brightness Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Maximilian; Grott, Matthias; Knollenberg, Jörg; Kührt, Ekkehard; Pelivan, Ivanka

    2016-10-01

    The Japanese Hayabusa-2 mission is a sample-return mission currently on its way to the C-type asteroid Ryugu. Hayabusa-2 carries the small lander MASCOT (Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout), whose scientific payload includes the infrared radiometer MARA. The primary science goal of MARA is to determine Ryugu's surface brightness temperatures at the landing site for a full asteroid rotation, which will be measured using a long-pass filter, an 8 to 12 µm bandpass, as well as four narrow bandpasses centered at wavelengths between 5 and 15 µm. From these measurements, surface thermal inertia will be derived, but because MARA performs single pixel measurements, heterogeneity in the field of view cannot be resolved. Yet, the surface will likely exhibit different surface textures, and thermal inertia in the field of view could vary from 600 (small rocks) to 50 Jm-2s-0.5K-1 (fine regolith grains). Sub-pixel heterogeneity is a common problem when interpreting radiometer data, since the associated ambiguities cannot be resolved without additional information on surface texture. For MARA, this information will be provided by the MASCOT camera, and in the present paper we have investigated to what extent different thermal inertias can be retrieved from MARA data. To test the applied approach, we generated synthetic MARA data using a thermal model of Ryugu, assuming different thermal inertias for sections of the field of view. We find that sub-pixel heterogeneity systematically deforms the diurnal temperature curve so that it is not possible to fit the data using a single thermal inertia value. However, including the area fractions of the different surface sections enables us to reconstruct the different thermal inertias to within 10% assuming appropriate measurement noise. The presented approach will increase robustness of the Ryugu thermal inertia determination and results will serve as a ground truth for the global measurements performed by the thermal infrared mapper (TIR) on

  14. Global trends in lake surface temperatures observed using multi-sensor thermal infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Philipp; Hook, Simon J.; Radocinski, Robert G.; Corlett, Gary K.; Hulley, Glynn C.; Schladow, S. Geoffrey; Steissberg, Todd E.

    2010-05-01

    Recent research has shown that the temperature of lakes and other inland water bodies does not only act as a good indicator of climate variability but under certain conditions can even increase more rapidly than the regional air temperature. Further investigation of this phenomenon in particular and of the interaction between lake temperature and climate variability in general requires extensive observations of lake temperature on a global scale. Current in situ records are limited in their spatial and/or temporal coverage and are thus insufficient for this task. However, a nearly 30-year archive of satellite-derived thermal infrared imagery from multiple sensors is available at this point and can be used to fill this data gap. We describe research on utilizing the existing archive of spaceborne thermal infrared imagery to generate multi-decadal time series of lake surface temperature for 170 of the largest lakes worldwide. The data used for this purpose includes imagery from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR), the series of (Advanced) Along-Track Scanning Radiometers ((A)ATSR), and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Used in combination, these data sets offer a gapless time series of daily to near-daily thermal infrared retrievals from 1981 through present. In this contribution we demonstrate using comprehensive in situ data at Lake Tahoe, California/Nevada, that lake water surface temperature can be estimated using these sensors with an accuracy of up to 0.2 K. We further show that accurate continuous time series of water surface temperature can be derived from the data and that these time series can be used to detect significant trends in the temporal thermal behavior of lakes and other inland water bodies worldwide. Complementing our recent case study for lakes in California and Nevada for which a rapid increase in mean nighttime summertime lake surface temperatures of 0.11 K per year on average was found, we present

  15. Experimental investigation of thermal conductivity coefficient and heat exchange between fluidized bed and inclined exchange surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Stojanovic

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental research of thermal conductivity coefficients of the siliceous sand bed fluidized by air and an experimental investigation of the particle size influence on the heat transfer coefficient between fluidized bed and inclined exchange surfaces. The measurements were performed for the specific fluidization velocity and sand particle diameters d p=0.3, 0.5, 0.9 mm. The industrial use of fluidized beds has been increasing rapidly in the past 20 years owing to their useful characteristics. One of the outstanding characteristics of a fluidized bed is that it tends to maintain a uniform temperature even with nonuniform heat release. On the basis of experimental research, the influence of the process's operational parameters on the obtained values of the bed's thermal conductivity has been analyzed. The results show direct dependence of thermal conductivity on the intensity of mixing, the degree of fluidization, and the size of particles. In the axial direction, the coefficients that have been treated have values a whole order higher than in the radial direction. Comparison of experimental research results with experimental results of other authors shows good agreement and the same tendency of thermal conductivity change. It is well known in the literature that the value of the heat transfer coefficient is the highest in the horizontal and the smallest in the vertical position of the heat exchange surface. Variation of heat transfer, depending on inclination angle is not examined in detail. The difference between the values of the relative heat transfer coefficient between vertical and horizontal heater position for all particle sizes reduces by approximately 15% with the increase of fluidization rate.

  16. Factorial Based Response Surface Modeling with Confidence Intervals for Optimizing Thermal Optical Transmission Analysis of Atmospheric Black Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    We demonstrate how thermal-optical transmission analysis (TOT) for refractory light-absorbing carbon in atmospheric particulate matter was optimized with empirical response surface modeling. TOT employs pyrolysis to distinguish the mass of black carbon (BC) from organic carbon (...

  17. [Correlative analysis of the diversity patterns of regional surface water, NDVI and thermal environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jin-Long; Zhang, Xue-Lei

    2012-10-01

    Taking Zhengzhou City, the capital of Henan Province in Central China, as the study area, and by using the theories and methodologies of diversity, a discreteness evaluation on the regional surface water, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and land surface temperature (LST) distribution was conducted in a 2 km x 2 km grid scale. Both the NDVI and the LST were divided into 4 levels, their spatial distribution diversity indices were calculated, and their connections were explored. The results showed that it was of operability and practical significance to use the theories and methodologies of diversity in the discreteness evaluation of the spatial distribution of regional thermal environment. There was a higher overlap of location between the distributions of surface water and the lowest temperature region, and the high vegetation coverage was often accompanied by low land surface temperature. In 1988-2009, the discreteness of the surface water distribution in the City had an obvious decreasing trend. The discreteness of the surface water distribution had a close correlation with the discreteness of the temperature region distribution, while the discreteness of the NDVI classification distribution had a more complicated correlation with the discreteness of the temperature region distribution. Therefore, more environmental factors were needed to be included for a better evaluation.

  18. Implications of Adhesion Studies for Dust Mitigation on Thermal Control Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Berkebile, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments measuring the adhesion forces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (10 (exp -10) torr) between a synthetic volcanic glass and commonly used space exploration materials have recently been described. The glass has a chemistry and surface structure typical of the lunar regolith. It was found that Van der Waals forces between the glass and common spacecraft materials was negligible. Charge transfer between the materials was induced by mechanically striking the spacecraft material pin against the glass plate. No measurable adhesion occurred when striking the highly conducting materials, however, on striking insulating dielectric materials the adhesion increased dramatically. This indicates that electrostatic forces dominate over Van der Waals forces under these conditions. The presence of small amounts of surface contaminants was found to lower adhesive forces by at least two orders of magnitude, and perhaps more. Both particle and space exploration material surfaces will be cleaned by the interaction with the solar wind and other energetic processes and stay clean because of the extremely high vacuum (10 (exp -12) torr) so the atomically clean adhesion values are probably the relevant ones for the lunar surface environment. These results are used to interpret the results of dust mitigation technology experiments utilizing textured surfaces, work function matching surfaces and brushing. They have also been used to reinterpret the results of the Apollo 14 Thermal Degradation Samples experiment.

  19. Thermally Sprayed Coatings as Effective Tool Surfaces in Sheet Metal Forming Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, V.; Witulski, J.; Brosius, A.; Trompeter, M.; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2011-06-01

    Two approaches to produce wear-resistant effective surfaces for deep drawing tools by thermal arc wire spraying of hard materials are presented. Arc wire spraying is a very economic coating technique due to a high deposition rate. The coated surface is very rough compared to that of conventional sheet metal forming tools. In the first approach, the coated surface is smoothed in a subsequent CNC-based incremental roller burnishing process. In this process, the surface asperities on the surface are flattened, and the roughness is significantly reduced. In the second approach, the hard material coatings are not sprayed directly on the tool but on a negative mould. Afterward, the rough "as-sprayed" side of the coating is backfilled with a polymer. The bonded hard metal shell is removed from the negative mould and acts as the surface of the hybrid sheet metal forming tool. Sheet metal forming experiments using tools based on these two approaches demonstrate that they are suitable to form high-strength steels. Owing to a conventional body of steel or cast iron, the first approach is suitable for large batch sizes. The application of the second approach lies within the range of small up to medium batch size productions.

  20. Thermal shock behaviour of blisters on W surface during combined steady-state/pulsed plasma loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, W.; Xu, B.; Luo, G.-N.; Li, C.; Qu, S. L.; Morgan, T. W.; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-09-01

    The thermal shock behaviour of blister-covered W surfaces during combined steady-state/pulsed plasma loading was studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The W samples were first exposed to steady-state D plasma to induce blisters on the surface, and then the blistered surfaces were exposed to steady-state/pulsed plasma. Growth and cracking of blisters were observed after the exposure to the steady-state/pulsed plasma, while no obvious damage occurred on the surface area not covered with blisters. The results confirm that blisters induced by D plasma might represent weak spots on the W surface when exposed to transient heat load of ELMs. The cracks on blisters were different from the cracks due to the transient heat loads reported before, and they were assumed to be caused by stress and strain due to the gas expansion inside the blisters during the plasma pulses. Moreover, most of cracks were found to appear on the blisters formed on grains with surface orientation near [1 1 1].

  1. Thermal Elasto-Hydrodynamic Lubrication by Non - Fluids with Rough Surfaces: its Application to Spur Gear Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian M.

    1995-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the behavior of thermal elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication by non-Newtonian fluids under rough surfaces has been conducted. The study consists of two parts. In the first part, a general line contact elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication model is derived, which integrates several critical effects such as rheological characteristics of lubricants, roughness and temperature into one system. A more effective numerical algorithm is adopted to obtains the solutions under wide ranges of operating conditions. Observations and extensive discussions of the results lead to further understand the phenomena of the different interactions among the various factors in a elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication process. In the second part, the forgoing theory is applied to the specific problem of the spur gear transmission. Various kinematics and dynamics features associated with the lubrication process in the spur gear have been investigated. The results has shown that the pitch point EHL film thickness does not reliably represent the minimum EHL film thickness. The full thermal EHL calculation along the line of action is needed in order to predict the minimum film thickness and pressure peak more precisely. The actual location of the minimum film thickness along the line of action is strongly influenced by the dynamic load sharing profile. Surface roughness has the moderate effect on the gear lubrication. The effects become more significant when the roughness amplitudes approach the nominal film thickness. Non-Newtonian behavior of lubricants may significantly alter the level of the minimum film thickness and temperature distribution, but has only small effect on pressure peak.

  2. A thermal monitoring sheet with low influence from adjacent waterbolus for tissue surface thermometry during clinical hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F; Stauffer, Paul R

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a complete thermal analysis of a novel conformal surface thermometer design with directional sensitivity for real-time temperature monitoring during hyperthermia treatments of large superficial cancer. The thermal monitoring sheet (TMS) discussed in this paper consists of a 2-D array of fiberoptic sensors embedded between two layers of flexible, low-loss, and thermally conductive printed circuit board (PCB) film. Heat transfer across all interfaces from the tissue surface through multiple layers of insulating dielectrics surrounding the small buried temperature sensor and into an adjacent temperature-regulated water coupling bolus was studied using 3-D thermal simulation software. Theoretical analyses were carried out to identify the most effective differential TMS probe configuration possible with commercially available flexible PCB materials and to compare their thermal responses with omnidirectional probes commonly used in clinical hyperthermia. A TMS sensor design that employs 0.0508-mm Kapton MTB and 0.2032-mm Kapton HN flexible polyimide films is proposed for tissue surface thermometry with low influence from the adjacent waterbolus. Comparison of the thermal simulations with clinical probes indicates the new differential TMS probe design to outperform in terms of both transient response and steady-state accuracy in selectively reading the tissue surface temperature, while decreasing the overall thermal barrier of the probe between the coupling waterbolus and tissue surface.

  3. Tunable wideband-directive thermal emission from SiC surface using bundled graphene sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inampudi, Sandeep; Mosallaei, Hossein

    2017-09-01

    Coherent thermal radiation emitters based on diffraction gratings inscribed on surface of a polar material, such as silicon carbide, always possess high angular dispersion resulting in wideband-dispersive or monochromatic-directive emission. In this paper, we identify roots of the high angular dispersion as the rapid surface phonon polariton (SPhP) resonance of the material surface and the misalignment of the dispersion curve of the diffraction orders of the grating with respect to light line. We minimize the rapid variation of SPhP resonance by compensating the material dispersion using bundled graphene sheets and mitigate the misalignment by a proper choice of the grating design. Utilizing a modified form of rigorous coupled wave analysis to simultaneously incorporate atomic-scale graphene sheets and bulk diffraction gratings, we accurately compute the emissivity profiles of the composite structure and demonstrate reduction in the angular dispersion of thermal emission from as high as 30∘ to as low as 4∘ in the SPhP dominant wavelength range of 11-12 μ m . In addition, we demonstrate that the graphene sheets via their tunable optical properties allow a fringe benefit of dynamical variation of the angular dispersion to a wide range.

  4. Influence of thermal and surface effects on vibration behavior of nonlocal rotating Timoshenko nanobeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiri, Majid; Shafiei, Navvab; Akbarshahi, Amir

    2016-07-01

    This paper is proposed to study the free vibration of a rotating Timoshenko nanobeam based on the nonlocal theory considering thermal and surface elasticity effects. The governing equations and the related boundary conditions are derived using the Hamilton's principle. In order to solve the problem, generalized differential quadrature method is applied to discretize the governing differential equations corresponding to clamped-simply and clamped-free boundary conditions. In this article, the influences of some parameters such as nonlocal parameter, angular velocity, thickness of the nanobeam, and thermal and surface elasticity effects on the free vibration of the rotating nanobeam are investigated, and the results are compared for different boundary conditions. The results show that the surface effect and the nonlocal parameter and the temperature changes have significant roles, and they should not be ignored in the vibrational study of rotating nanobeams. Also, the angular velocity and the hub radius have more significant roles than temperature change effects on the nondimensional frequency. It is found that the nonlocal parameter behavior and the temperature change behavior on the frequency are different in the first mode for the rotating cantilever nanobeam.

  5. A Feature-adaptive Subdivision Method for Real-time 3D Reconstruction of Repeated Topology Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jinhua; Wang, Yanjie; Sun, Honghai

    2017-03-01

    It's well known that rendering for a large number of triangles with GPU hardware tessellation has made great progress. However, due to the fixed nature of GPU pipeline, many off-line methods that perform well can not meet the on-line requirements. In this paper, an optimized Feature-adaptive subdivision method is proposed, which is more suitable for reconstructing surfaces with repeated cusps or creases. An Octree primitive is established in irregular regions where there are the same sharp vertices or creases, this method can find the neighbor geometry information quickly. Because of having the same topology structure between Octree primitive and feature region, the Octree feature points can match the arbitrary vertices in feature region more precisely. In the meanwhile, the patches is re-encoded in the Octree primitive by using the breadth-first strategy, resulting in a meta-table which allows for real-time reconstruction by GPU hardware tessellation unit. There is only one feature region needed to be calculated under Octree primitive, other regions with the same repeated feature generate their own meta-table directly, the reconstruction time is saved greatly for this step. With regard to the meshes having a large number of repeated topology feature, our algorithm improves the subdivision time by 17.575% and increases the average frame drawing time by 0.2373 ms compared to the traditional FAS (Feature-adaptive Subdivision), at the same time the model can be reconstructed in a watertight manner.

  6. Tungsten Incorporation into Gallium Oxide: Crystal Structure, Surface and Interface Chemistry, Thermal Stability and Interdiffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio, E. J.; Mates, T. E.; Manandhar, S.; Nandasiri, M.; Shutthanandan, V.; Ramana, C. V.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten (W) incorporated gallium oxide (Ga2O3) (GWO) thin films were deposited by radio-frequency magnetron co-sputtering of W-metal and Ga2O3-ceramic targets. Films were produced by varying sputtering power applied to the W-target in order to achieve variable W-content (0-12 at%) into Ga2O3 while substrate temperature was kept constant at 500 °C. Chemical composition, chemical valence states, microstructure and crystal structure of as-deposited and annealed GWO films were evaluated as a function of W-content. The structural and chemical analyses indicate that the samples deposited without any W-incorporation are stoichiometric, nanocrystalline Ga2O3 films, which crystallize in β-phase monoclinic structure. While GWO films also crystallize in monoclinic β-Ga2O3 phase, W-incorporation induces surface amorphization as revealed by structural studies. The chemical valence state of Ga ions probed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analyses is characterized by the highest oxidation state i.e., Ga3+. No changes in Ga chemical state are noted for variable W-incorporation in the range of 0-12 at%. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) analyses indicate the uniform distribution of W-content in the GWO films. However, XPS analyses indicate the formation of mixed valence states for W ions, which may be responsible for surface amorphization in GWO films. GWO films were stable up to 900 oC, at which point thermally induced secondary phase (W-oxide) formation was observed. A transition to mesoporous structure coupled with W interdiffusion occurs due to thermal annealing as derived from the chemical analyses at the GWO films’ surface as well as depth-profiling towards the GWO-Si interface. A model has been formulated to account for the mechanism of W-incorporation, thermal stability and interdiffusion via pore formation in GWO films.

  7. Synergetic use of SAR and Thermal Infrared data to study the physical properties of the lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saran, Sriram; Das, Anup; Mohan, Shiv; Chakraborty, Manab

    2014-11-01

    The surface layer of the Moon preserves vital evidences of lunar impact and cratering processes due to the absence of any Aeolian and fluvial erosion processes acting on it. By examining these evidences, which are recorded throughout the evolutionary history of the Moon, several basic aspects of lunar science can be understood, and this has direct relevance to the surfaces of other airless bodies within the solar system. In this study, rock abundance data obtained from Thermal Infrared (TIR) observations and radar Circular Polarization Ratio (CPR) data sets obtained from polarimetric SAR observations were correlated at some sample sites on the lunar surface. Preliminary results yielded qualitative and quantitative estimates for surface rock abundances. Except at distal ejecta deposits of young, bright craters a general correlation was observed between the two datasets. Mixed results were observed from the impact melt flows where the situation is complex due to the possible subsurface-volume and volume-subsurface interactions of the radar waves. But the flow features were clearly separated from the interior and ejecta regions of their parent craters in terms of CPR and rock abundances. The extent and distributions of pyroclastic deposits and dark haloed regions could not be distinctly identified at the resolution of datasets utilized. Near Gerasimovich D crater, the Diviner Radiometer has provided the first TIR observations of a newly discovered impact melt flow which was not visible in the optical imagery. This facilitated the first ever quantitative comparisons of the radar CPR and rock abundance values near such a region. Also, significant differences in spatial patterns between the radar and rock concentration data sets were observed, owing to the differences in the sensitivity of the two observations.

  8. Identification of a basaltic component on the Martian surface from Thermal Emission Spectrometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, P.R.; Bandfield, J.L.; Smith, M.D.; Hamilton, V.E.; Clark, R.N.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument collected 4.8 ?? 106 spectra of Mars during the initial aerobraking and science-phasing periods of the mission (September 14, 1997, through April 29, 1998). Two previously developed atmosphere-removal models were applied to data from Cimmeria Terra (25?? S, 213?? W). The surface spectra derived for these two models agree well, indicating that the surface and atmosphere emission can be separated and that the exact atmosphere-removal model used has little effect on the derived surface composition. The Cimmeria spectra do not match terrestrial high-silica igneous rocks (granite and rhyolite), ultramafic igneous rocks, limestone, or quartz- and clay-rich sandstone and siltstone. A particulate (sand-sized) sample of terrestrial flood basalt does provide an excellent match in both spectral shape and band depth to the Cimmeria spectrum over the entire TES spectral range. No unusual particle size effects are required to account for the observed spectral shape and depth. The implied grain size is consistent with the thermal inertia and albedo of this region, which indicate a sand-sized surface with little dust. The identification of basalt is consistent with previous indications of pyroxene and basalt-like compositions from visible/ near-infrared and thermal-infrared spectral measurements. A linear spectral deconvolution model was applied to both surface-only Cimmeria spectra using a library of 60 minerals to determine the composition and abundance of the component minerals. Plagioclase feldspar (45%; 53%) and clinopyroxene (26%; 19%) were positively identified above an estimated detection threshold of 10-15% for these minerals. The TES observations provide the first identification of feldspars on Mars. The best fit to the Mars data includes only clinopyroxene compositions; no orthopyroxene compositions are required to match the Cimmeria spectra. Olivine (12%; 12%) and sheet silicate (15%; 11%) were

  9. The Benefit of Surface Uniformity for Encoding Boundary Features in Visual Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jung-Oh

    2011-01-01

    Using a change detection paradigm, the present study examined an object-based encoding benefit in visual working memory (VWM) for two boundary features (two orientations in Experiments 1-2 and two shapes in Experiments 3-4) assigned to a single object. Participants remembered more boundary features when they were conjoined into a single object of…

  10. Analysis of Viking infrared thermal mapping data of Mars. The effects of non-ideal surfaces on the derived thermal properties of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Jakosky, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal interia of the surface of Mars varies spatially by a factor of eight. This is attributable to changes in the average particle size of the fine material, the surface elevation, the atmospheric opacity due to dust, and the fraction of the surface covered by rocks and fine material. The effects of these non-ideal properties on the surface temperatures and derived thermal inertias are modeled, along with the the effects of slopes, CO2 condensed onto the surface, and layering of fine material upon solid rock. The non-ideal models are capable of producing thermal behavior similar to that observed by the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper, including a morning delay in the post-dawn temperature rise and an enhanced cooling in the afternoon relative to any ideal, homogeneous model. The enhanced afternoon cooling observed at the Viking-1 landing site is reproduced by the non-ideal models while that atop Arsia Mons volcano is not, but may be attributed to the observing geometry.

  11. Methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Karen A.; Zatorski, Raymond A.

    2007-10-02

    Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

  12. Microstructure Analysis of Laser Remelting for Thermal Barrier Coatings on the Surface of Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Bin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the preparation and organization performance of thermal barrier coatings (TCBs on the surface of titanium were studied experimentally. Nanostructured 8 wt% yttria partially stabilized zirconia coatings were deposited by air plasma spraying. The microstructure of nanostructured and the conventional coating was studied after laser remelting. It has shown that formed a network of micro-cracks and pits after laser remelting on nanostructured coatings. With the decrease of the laser scanning speed, mesh distribution of micro cracks was gradually thinning on nanostructured coatings. Compared with conventional ceramic layers, the mesh cracks of nanostructured coating is dense and the crack width is small.

  13. Experimental measurement of surface temperatures during flame-jet induced thermal spallation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, M. A.; Tester, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal spallation is a method whereby the surface of a rock is rapidly heated causing small (100 1000 μm) flakes or spalls, to form. When applied to drilling, a supersonic, high temperature (2600 K) gas jet is directed at the rock to provide the heat source and sweep away the spalls. Previous studies of thermal spallation drilling indicate that penetration rates of up to 30 m/hr (100 ft/hr), approximately ten times greater than commonly obtained using conventional rotary mechanical methods, can be achieved in competent, non-fractured hard rock such as granite. A total direct operating cost for drilling in granite using a flame-jet spallation drill was estimated by Browning (1981) to be approximately 9/m in 1991 (about 3/ft) compared to “trouble-free” well drilling costs for conventional rotary methods in similar rock to depths of 3 to 7 km (10000 to 21000 ft) of 300 to 900/m (100 to 300/ft) (Tester and Herzog, 1990, 1992). The Browning estimates for spallation drilling are obviously optimistic in that they don't include capital costs for the rig and associated hardware. However, the substantially higher penetration rates, significantly reduced wear of downhole components, and the high efficiency of rock communition in comparison to rotary methods suggest that substantial cost reductions could be possible in deep drilling applications. For example, in the construction of hot dry rock geothermal power plants where rotary mechanical methods are used for well drilling to depths of (4 to 5 km), about half of the initial capital cost would be required for well drilling alone (Tester and Herzog, 1992). The current study has focused on gaining a better understanding of both the rock failure mechanism that occurs during thermal spallation and the heat transfer from the gas jet to the rock surface. Rock mechanics modeling leads to an expression for the surface temperature during spallation as a function of rock physical properties and the incident heat flux. Surface

  14. Correlation between Pd metal thickness and thermally stable perpendicular magnetic anisotropy features in [Co/Pd]n multilayers at annealing temperatures up to 500 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwang Guk An

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We examine highly stable perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA features of [Co/Pd]10 multilayers (MLs versus Pd thickness at various ex-situ annealing temperatures. Thermally stable PMA characteristics were observed up to 500 °C, confirming the suitability of these systems for industrial applications at this temperature. Experimental observations suggest that the choice of equivalent Co and Pd layer thicknesses in a ML configuration ensures thermally stable PMA features, even at higher annealing temperatures. X-ray diffraction patterns and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images were obtained to determine thickness, post-annealing PMA behavior, and to explore the structural features that govern these findings.

  15. Thermal and Photochemical Reactions of NO2 on a Chromium (III) Oxide Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, N.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    Chromium oxide (Cr2O3) is a major component of the oxide layer on stainless steel surfaces. It is also widely used as pigment in paints and roofs and as a protective coating on various surfaces. While many studies have focused on the catalytic activity of Cr2O3 surfaces for selective catalytic reduction (SCR), less attention has been paid to its surface chemistry involving atmospherically important species such as NO2 under atmospheric conditions. In this study, we have investigated thermal and photochemical reactions of NO2 in the presence and the absence of water vapor, using a thin layer of Cr2O3 as a model for the surface of stainless steel as well as other similarly coated surfaces in the boundary layer. A 30 nm thick Cr2O3 film was deposited on a germanium attenuated total reflectance (ATR) crystal, and the changes in the surface species were monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Upon NO2 adsorption, nitrate (NO3-) ions appeared likely coordinated to Cr3+ ion(s). The NO3- peaks reversibly shifted when water vapor was added, suggesting that NO3- become solvated. Irradiation at 311 nm led to a decrease in NO3- ions under both dry and humid conditions. The major gas-phase species formed by the irradiation was NO under dry conditions, while NO2 was mainly formed in the presence of H2O. Possible mechanisms and the implications for heterogeneous NO2 chemistry in the boundary layer will be discussed. The results will also be compared to similar chemistry on other surfaces.

  16. Internal Physical Features of a Land Surface Model Employing a Tangent Linear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Runhua; Cohn, Stephen E.; daSilva, Arlindo; Joiner, Joanna; Houser, Paul R.

    1997-01-01

    The Earth's land surface, including its biomass, is an integral part of the Earth's weather and climate system. Land surface heterogeneity, such as the type and amount of vegetative covering., has a profound effect on local weather variability and therefore on regional variations of the global climate. Surface conditions affect local weather and climate through a number of mechanisms. First, they determine the re-distribution of the net radiative energy received at the surface, through the atmosphere, from the sun. A certain fraction of this energy increases the surface ground temperature, another warms the near-surface atmosphere, and the rest evaporates surface water, which in turn creates clouds and causes precipitation. Second, they determine how much rainfall and snowmelt can be stored in the soil and how much instead runs off into waterways. Finally, surface conditions influence the near-surface concentration and distribution of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. The processes through which these mechanisms interact with the atmosphere can be modeled mathematically, to within some degree of uncertainty, on the basis of underlying physical principles. Such a land surface model provides predictive capability for surface variables including ground temperature, surface humidity, and soil moisture and temperature. This information is important for agriculture and industry, as well as for addressing fundamental scientific questions concerning global and local climate change. In this study we apply a methodology known as tangent linear modeling to help us understand more deeply, the behavior of the Mosaic land surface model, a model that has been developed over the past several years at NASA/GSFC. This methodology allows us to examine, directly and quantitatively, the dependence of prediction errors in land surface variables upon different vegetation conditions. The work also highlights the importance of accurate soil moisture information. Although surface

  17. How do features of dressage arenas influence training surface properties which are potentially associated with lameness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Rachel C; Walters, Juli; Snart, Hannah; Dyson, Sue; Parkin, Tim

    2010-11-01

    Results from a previous study indicated that there are specific arena surface characteristics that are associated with an increased likelihood of lameness in dressage horses. It is important to understand what modifiable arena factors lead to these detrimental surface characteristics. The aim of this study was to describe the use of training surfaces and arenas for United Kingdom dressage horses and to investigate any relationships between arena/surface variables and detrimental surface characteristics. Data from a questionnaire returned by 22.5% of all 11,363 registered members of British Dressage were used for the study. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were developed with each of the previously identified surface characteristics as dependent variables. Respondents reported that the majority of arenas were privately owned, sized 20 × 40 m and had a sand and rubber surface. The results indicated that wax-coated and sand and rubber surfaces were associated with less detrimental surface properties than sand, sand and PVC, woodchips or grass. Woodchips were most strongly associated with the detrimental characteristic of slipping, and sand with tripping. The findings indicated that any arena surface should have a base, with limestone the recommended surface, and that crushed concrete was best avoided. This information supported previous studies in racehorses that indicated that surface maintenance is essential, especially when many horses are using an arena daily. Problems were less likely if an arena was privately owned. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. A new surface catalytic model for silica-based thermal protection material for hypersonic vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Kai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Silica-based materials are widely employed in the thermal protection system for hypersonic vehicles, and the investigation of their catalytic characteristics is crucially important for accurate aerothermal heating prediction. By analyzing the disadvantages of Norman’s high and low temperature models, this paper combines the two models and proposes an eight-reaction combined surface catalytic model to describe the catalysis between oxygen and silica surface. Given proper evaluation of the parameters according to many references, the recombination coefficient obtained shows good agreement with experimental data. The catalytic mechanisms between oxygen and silica surface are then analyzed. Results show that with the increase of the wall temperature, the dominant reaction contributing to catalytic coefficient varies from Langmuir–Hinshelwood (LH recombination (TW  1350 K. The surface coverage of chemisorption areas varies evidently with the dominant reactions in the high temperature (HT range, while the surface coverage of physisorption areas varies within quite low temperature (LT range (TW < 250 K. Recommended evaluation of partial parameters is also given.

  19. Estimation of surface heat flux for ablation and charring of thermal protection material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei-qi; He, Kai-feng; Zhou, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Ablation of the thermal protection material of the reentry hypersonic flight vehicle is a complex physical and chemical process. To estimate the surface heat flux from internal temperature measurement is much more complex than the conventional inverse heat conduction problem case. In the paper, by utilizing a two-layer pyrogeneration-plane ablation model to model the ablation and charring of the material, modifying the finite control volume method to suit for the numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation with variable-geometry, the CGM along with the associated adjoint problem is developed to estimate the surface heat flux. This estimation method is verified with a numerical example at first, the results show that the estimation method is feasible and robust. The larger is the measurement noise, the greater is the deviation of the estimated result from the exact value, and the measurement noise of ablated surface position has a significant and more direct influence on the estimated result of surface heat flux. Furthermore, the estimation method is used to analyze the experimental data of ablation of blunt Carbon-phenolic material Narmco4028 in an arc-heater. It is shown that the estimated surface heat flux agrees with the heating power value of the arc-heater, and the estimation method is basically effective and potential to treat the engineering heat conduction problem with ablation.

  20. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1013 to 1015 n/cm2. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1015 to 1016 n/cm2 with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  1. Surface Study of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared by Thermal-CVD of Camphor Precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azira, A. A.; Rusop, M.

    2010-03-01

    Surface morphology study on the influence of starting carbon materials by using thermal chemical vapor deposition (Thermal-CVD) to produced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated. The CNTs derived from camphor were synthesized as the precursor material due to low sublimation temperature, which indirectly maybe cost effective. The major parameters are also evaluated in order to obtain high-yield and high-quality CNTs. The prepared CNTs are examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) to determine the microstructure of nanocarbons. The FESEM investigation of the CNTs formed on the support catalysts provides evidence that camphor is suitable as a precursor material for nanotubes formation. The high-temperature graphitization process induced by the Thermal-CVD enables the hydrocarbons to act as carbon sources and changes the aromatic species into the layered graphite structure of CNTs. The camphoric hydrocarbons not only found acts as the precursors but also enhances the production rate and the quality of CNTs.

  2. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 10(exp 13) to 10(exp 15) n per square centimeters. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 10(exp 15) to 10(exp 16) n per square centimeters with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  3. RESEARCH ON DISTURBED MECHANISM OF THERMAL NOISES OF THE SURFACE IN ABRUPT GEOTHERMAL ANOMALY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Geothermal anomaly as a physical phenomenon of an active and latent volcanic area would be well recognized, and abrupt geothermal anomaly should also be understood. However, in practical work, thermal infrared remote sensing techniques are frequently used to monitor geothermal flows of the earth. But then, except for this type of thermal source in the surface thermal field, there still exist a lot of noises in the area where the abrupt geothermal anomaly is generated. By Analyzing the reason, we find that it is brought about by the non-boundless projectioncharacteristics of objects.These noises may be divided into two classes: system noises and random noises. If disturbednoises have comparative stable time sequence law and space sequence law, the noises are called system noises. And because system noises have a certain law, it is easy toremove the noises. On the contrary, if disturbed noises have not law oftime sequence and space sequence, the noises are called random noises. The random noises have the character of non-linearity, uncertainty and indeterminism. For this case, this paper discusses the disturbed mechanism of these noises as well as how to remove them.

  4. Surface, thermal, and mechanical properties of composites and nanocomposites of polyurethane/PTFE nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbinder, P. S.; Peruzzo, P. J.; de Siervo, A.; Amalvy, J. I.

    2014-08-01

    Films from blends of polyurethane and nano-polytetrafluoroethylene aqueous dispersions (PU/nanoPTFE) were prepared, and the effect of the addition of different amounts of PTFE nanoparticles (50 nm) was studied. The changes in the superficial properties of the films were studied by means of XPS, ATR/FTIR, and contact angle measurements. SEM and TEM results are also included. The contact angle values confirm the surface hydrophobicity of composite films. Even though nanoparticles are present in the bulk, higher concentrations of particles appear at the surface in samples with lower nanoPTFE content (up to 10 wt%), as revealed by XPS. Higher amounts of nanoPTFE particles cause aggregation. The mechanical and thermal properties of composites are also discussed.

  5. The influence of surface functionalisation on the electrical properties and thermal stability of nanodiamonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Joseph O; Li, Pei; Chaudhary, Aysha; Edgington, Robert; Jackman, Richard B., E-mail: r.jackman@ucl.ac.uk [London Centre for Nanotechnology and the Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-07

    Detonation nanodiamond (ND) has recently emerged as a useful new class of diamond material. However, to date there has been little investigation of the electrical properties of this material. Due to the nanoscale dimensions, the surface functionalisation of the individual ND is of particular importance to the characteristics of ND films. Here, hydrogen and oxygen termination of ND, verified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, are shown to strongly influence the electronic properties of NDs. Hydrogen terminated ND exhibiting a far greater resilience to thermal decomposition when compared to the oxygen terminated NDs. Moreover, H-NDs also displayed so-called “surface conductivity,” a property displayed by hydrogen-terminated bulk diamond films, whilst O-NDs display properties high resistivity. These results indicate that under the correct conditions ND layers can display similar electrical properties to “bulk” diamond thin films.

  6. The influence of surface functionalisation on the electrical properties and thermal stability of nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Joseph O.; Li, Pei; Chaudhary, Aysha; Edgington, Robert; Jackman, Richard B.

    2014-10-01

    Detonation nanodiamond (ND) has recently emerged as a useful new class of diamond material. However, to date there has been little investigation of the electrical properties of this material. Due to the nanoscale dimensions, the surface functionalisation of the individual ND is of particular importance to the characteristics of ND films. Here, hydrogen and oxygen termination of ND, verified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, are shown to strongly influence the electronic properties of NDs. Hydrogen terminated ND exhibiting a far greater resilience to thermal decomposition when compared to the oxygen terminated NDs. Moreover, H-NDs also displayed so-called "surface conductivity," a property displayed by hydrogen-terminated bulk diamond films, whilst O-NDs display properties high resistivity. These results indicate that under the correct conditions ND layers can display similar electrical properties to "bulk" diamond thin films.

  7. Crystalline silicon surface passivation by thermal ALD deposited Al doped ZnO thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannath Panigrahi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The evidence of good quality silicon surface passivation using thermal ALD deposited Al doped zinc oxide (AZO thin films is demonstrated. AZO films are prepared by introducing aluminium precursor in between zinc and oxygen precursors during the deposition. The formation of AZO is confirmed by ellipsometry, XRD and Hall measurements. Effective minority carrier lifetime (τeff greater than 1.5ms at intermediate bulk injection levels is realized for symmetrically passivated p-type silicon surfaces under optimised annealing conditions of temperature and time in hydrogen ambient. The best results are realised at 450°C annealing for >15min. Such a layer may lead to implied open circuit voltage gain of 80mV.

  8. Evaluation of lateral resolution of scanning surface microscopy by total internal reflection with thermal lens effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimosaka, Takuya; Izako, Masakazu; Uchiyama, Katsumi; Hobo, Toshiyuki

    2003-06-01

    We have developed a novel method for in situ and non-destructive surface analyses, or a total internal reflection with thermal lens spectroscopy (TIR-TLS), which has sufficient sensitivity to monitor phenomena in thin films, such as lipid bilayers. In this study, we applied TIR-TLS to microscopy for surface analyses, and we experimentally obtained its lateral resolution using the edge of a chromium film made by a photolithography technique. The obtained resolution was 20 microm, which was 60% of the diameter of an excitation beam at the interface. The estimated resolution with a simple model agreed with the experimental one, and from this model, TIR-TLS microscopy has the same resolution as that of ordinary optical microscopy. The microscopy by TIR-TLS was applied to a sample whose contrast was too weak to be visually seen, and an image of the sample was obtained without any loss of resolution.

  9. EFFECTS OF BLENDING CHITOSAN WITH PEG ON SURFACE MORPHOLOGY,CRYSTALLIZATION AND THERMAL PROPERTIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-hao He; Rui Xue; De-bin Yang; Ying Liu; Rui Song

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradable blend films composed of chitosan and PEG with various composition ratios were prepared. The chemical structure of the blend films was characterized with FTIR and X-ray, which showed no chemical bond formations but certain interactions probably coming from the hydrogen bonds. Morphologies of these blend films were viewed using AFM and SEM, suggesting that pure chitosan film had a smooth surface structure and the blend films surface showed a plenty of holes with varying size. Through the DMA measurement, it was found that there existed differences in the peak area and position of the blend films, and the peak at the glass transition temperature became significantly weaker and was markedly wider with the increasing content of PEG. The obtained results showed that the crystallinity of chitosan was suppressed and partially destroyed; and this should have an influence on the thermal behaviors and dynamic mechanical properties of the blend films.

  10. Use of the discriminant Fourier-derived cepstrum with feature-level post-processing for surface electromyographic signal classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinpu; Zhu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Dingguo

    2009-12-01

    Myoelectrical pattern classification is a crucial part in multi-functional prosthesis control. This paper investigates a discriminant Fourier-derived cepstrum (DFC) and feature-level post-processing (FLPP) to discriminate hand and wrist motions using the surface electromyographic signal. The Fourier-derived cepstrum takes advantage of the Fourier magnitude or sub-band power energy of signals directly and provides flexible use of spectral information changing with different motions. Appropriate cepstral coefficients are selected by a proposed separability criterion to construct DFC features. For the post-processing, FLPP which combines features from several analysis windows is used to improve the feature performance further. In this work, two classifiers (a linear discriminant classifier and quadratic discriminant classifier) without hyper-parameter optimization are employed to simplify the training procedure and avoid the possible bias of feature evaluation. Experimental results of the 11-motion problem show that the proposed DFC feature outperforms traditional features such as time-domain statistics and autoregressive-derived cepstrum in terms of the classification accuracy, and it is a promising method for the multi-functionality and high-accuracy control of myoelectric prostheses.

  11. Shape, thermal and surface properties determination of a candidate spacecraft target asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, LiangLiang; Ji, Jianghui; Wang, Su

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a 3D convex shape model of (175706) 1996 FG3, which consists of 2040 triangle facets and 1022 vertices, is derived from the known light curves. The best-fitting orientation of the asteroid's spin axis is determined to be λ = 237.27° and β = -83.8° considering the observation uncertainties, and its rotation period is ˜3.5935 h. Using the derived shape model, we adopt the so-called advanced thermophysical model (ATPM) to fit three published sets of mid-infrared observations of 1996 FG3, so as to evaluate its surface properties. Assuming the primary and the secondary bear identical shape, albedo, thermal inertia and surface roughness, the best-fitting parameters are obtained from the observations. The geometric albedo and effective diameter of the asteroid are reckoned to be pv = 0.045 ± 0.002, D_eff=1.69^{+0.05}_{-0.02} km. The diameters of the primary and secondary are determined to be D1=1.63^{+0.04}_{-0.03} km and D2=0.45^{+0.04}_{-0.03} km, respectively. The surface thermal inertia Γ is derived to be a low value of 80 ± 40 Jm-2 s-0.5 K-1 with a roughness fraction fR of 0.8^{+0.2}_{-0.4}. This indicates that the primary possibly has a regolith layer on its surface, which is likely to be covered by a mixture of dust, fragmentary rocky debris and sand. The minimum regolith depth is estimated to be 5-20 mm from the simulations of subsurface temperature distribution, indicating that 1996 FG3 could be a very suitable target for a sample return mission.

  12. Two-Phase Thermal Switching System for a Small, Extended Duration Lunar Surface Science Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, David C.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; OConnor, Brian F.; Wirzburger, Melissa J.; Abel, Elisabeth D.; Stouffer, Chuck J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a novel thermal control system for the Warm Electronics Box (WEB) on board a small lunar surface lander intended to support science activities anywhere on the lunar surface for an extended duration of up to 6 years. Virtually all lander electronics, which collectively dissipate about 60 W in the reference mission, are contained within the WEB. These devices must be maintained below 323 K (with a goal of 303 K) during the nearly 15-earth-day lunar day, when surface temperatures can reach 390K, and above 263 K during the nearly 15-earth-day lunar night, when surface temperatures can reach 100K. Because of the large temperature swing from lunar day-to-night, a novel thermal switching system was required that would be able to provide high conductance from WEB to radiator(s) during the hot lunar day and low (or negligible) conductance during the cold lunar night. The concept that was developed consists of ammonia variable conductance heat pipes (VCHPs) to collect heat from WEB components and a polymer wick propylene loop heat pipe (LHP) to transport the collected heat to the radiator(s). The VCHPs autonomously maximize transport when the WEB is warm and autonomously shut down when the WEB gets cold. The LHP autonomously shuts down when the VCHPs shut down. When the environment transitions from lunar night to day, the VCHPs and LHP autonomously turn back on. Out of 26 analyzed systems, this novel arrangement was able to best achieve the combined goals of zero control power, autonomous operation, long life, low complexity, low T, and landed tilt tolerance.

  13. AURORA: A FORTRAN program for modeling well stirred plasma and thermal reactors with gas and surface reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeks, E.; Grcar, J.F.; Kee, R.J. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Thermal and Plasma Processes Dept.; Moffat, H.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Surface Processing Sciences Dept.

    1996-02-01

    The AURORA Software is a FORTRAN computer program that predicts the steady-state or time-averaged properties of a well mixed or perfectly stirred reactor for plasma or thermal chemistry systems. The software was based on the previously released software, SURFACE PSR which was written for application to thermal CVD reactor systems. AURORA allows modeling of non-thermal, plasma reactors with the determination of ion and electron concentrations and the electron temperature, in addition to the neutral radical species concentrations. Well stirred reactors are characterized by a reactor volume, residence time or mass flow rate, heat loss or gas temperature, surface area, surface temperature, the incoming temperature and mixture composition, as well as the power deposited into the plasma for non-thermal systems. The model described here accounts for finite-rate elementary chemical reactions both in the gas phase and on the surface. The governing equations are a system of nonlinear algebraic relations. The program solves these equations using a hybrid Newton/time-integration method embodied by the software package TWOPNT. The program runs in conjunction with the new CHEMKIN-III and SURFACE CHEMKIN-III packages, which handle the chemical reaction mechanisms for thermal and non-thermal systems. CHEMKIN-III allows for specification of electron-impact reactions, excitation losses, and elastic-collision losses for electrons.

  14. Maximizing the Use of Satellite Thermal Infrared Data for Advancing Land Surface Temperature Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Q.; Fu, P.; Gao, F.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a crucial parameter in investigating environmental, ecological processes and climate change at various scales, and is also valuable in the studies of evapotranspiration, soil moisture conditions, surface energy balance, and urban heat islands. These studies require thermal infrared (TIR) images at both high temporal and spatial resolution to retrieve LST. However, currently, no single satellite sensors can deliver TIR data at both high temporal and spatial resolution. Thus, various algorithms/models have been developed to enhance the spatial or the temporal resolution of TIR data, but rare of those can enhance both spatial and temporal details. This paper presents a new data fusion algorithm for producing Landsat-like LST data by blending daily MODIS and periodic Landsat TM datasets. The original Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM) was improved and modified for predicting thermal radiance and LST data by considering annual temperature cycle (ATC) and urban thermal landscape heterogeneity. The technique of linear spectral mixture analysis was employed to relate the Landsat radiance with the MODIS one, so that the temporal changes in radiance can be incorporated in the fusion model. This paper details the theoretical basis and the implementation procedures of the proposed data fusion algorithm, Spatio-temporal Adaptive Data Fusion Algorithm for Temperature mapping (SADFAT). A case study was conducted that predicted LSTs of five dates in 2005 from July to October in Los Angeles County, California. The results indicate that the prediction accuracy for the whole study area ranged from 1.3 K to 2 K. Like existing spatio-temporal data fusion models, the SADFAT method has a limitation in predicting LST changes that were not recorded in the MODIS and/or Landsat pixels due to the model assumption.

  15. Fine-scale features on the sea surface in SAR satellite imagery – Part 1: Simultaneous in-situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brusch

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This work is aimed at identifying the origin of fine-scale features on the sea surface in synthetic aperture radar (SAR imagery with the help of in-situ measurements as well as numerical models (presented in a companion paper. We are interested in natural and artificial features starting from the horizontal scale of the upper ocean mixed layer, around 30–50 m. These features are often associated with three-dimensional upper ocean dynamics. We have conducted a number of studies involving in-situ observations in the Straits of Florida during SAR satellite overpass. The data include examples of sharp frontal interfaces, wakes of surface ships, internal wave signatures, as well as slicks of artificial and natural origin. Atmospheric processes, such as squall lines and rain cells, produced prominent signatures on the sea surface. This data has allowed us to test an approach for distinguishing between natural and artificial features and atmospheric influences in SAR images that is based on a co-polarized phase difference filter.

  16. Features of electromagnetic waves in a complex plasma due to surface plasmon resonances on macroparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Vladimirov, S V

    2015-01-01

    The dielectric properties of complex plasma containing either metal or dielectric spherical inclusions (macroparticles, dust) are investigated. We focus on surface plasmon resonances on the macroparticle surfaces and their effect on electromagnetic wave propagation. It is demonstrated that the presence of surface plasmon oscillations significantly modifies plasma electromagnetic properties by resonances and cutoffs in the effective permittivity. This leads to related branches of electromagnetic waves and to the wave band gaps. The results are discussed in the context of dusty plasma experiments.

  17. Textural, surface, thermal and sorption properties of the functionalized activated carbons and carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowicki Piotr

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two series of functionalised carbonaceous adsorbents were prepared by means of oxidation and nitrogenation of commercially available activated carbon and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The effect of nitrogen and oxygen incorporation on the textural, surface, thermal and sorption properties of the adsorbents prepared was tested. The materials were characterized by elemental analysis, low-temperature nitrogen sorption, thermogravimetric study and determination of the surface oxygen groups content. Sorptive properties of the materials obtained were characterized by the adsorption of methylene and alkali blue 6B as well as copper(II ions. The final products were nitrogen- and oxygen-enriched mesoporous adsorbents of medium-developed surface area, showing highly diverse N and O-heteroatom contents and acidic-basic character of the surface. The results obtained in our study have proved that through a suitable choice of the modification procedure of commercial adsorbents it is possible to produce materials with high sorption capacity towards organic dyes as well as copper(II ions.

  18. Surface evolution of polycarbonate/polyethylene terephthalate blends induced by thermal treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licciardello, A.; Auditore, A.; Samperi, F.; Puglisi, C

    2003-01-15

    Bisphenol-A polycarbonate (PC) and polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) blends are known to undergo, upon thermal treatment (melt mixing), exchange reactions leading to the formation of copolymers having a final structure that is also affected by consecutive reactions involving CO{sub 2} and ethylene carbonate losses. In this work we followed the evolution of the surface composition of this system during the melt mixing at 270 deg. C, both with and without catalysts, by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS). The static SIMS spectra obtained at different treatment times show the appearance of peaks related to newly formed structures and also the modification of the relative intensities of peaks characteristic of both the initial constituents of the blend. From the variation of the relative intensities of peaks related to the bisphenol-A unit of PC and to the phthalate structure of PET, it is shown that after the first stages of melt mixing the surface is PC enriched and that with the progressive formation of a random copolymer the phthalate units increase their concentration at the surface of the system. Hence, as final result of the melt mixing process, the surface composition tends to reflect the relative amount of the repeating units in the bulk.

  19. Surface evolution of polycarbonate/polyethylene terephthalate blends induced by thermal treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licciardello, A.; Auditore, A.; Samperi, F.; Puglisi, C.

    2003-01-01

    Bisphenol-A polycarbonate (PC) and polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) blends are known to undergo, upon thermal treatment (melt mixing), exchange reactions leading to the formation of copolymers having a final structure that is also affected by consecutive reactions involving CO 2 and ethylene carbonate losses. In this work we followed the evolution of the surface composition of this system during the melt mixing at 270 °C, both with and without catalysts, by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS). The static SIMS spectra obtained at different treatment times show the appearance of peaks related to newly formed structures and also the modification of the relative intensities of peaks characteristic of both the initial constituents of the blend. From the variation of the relative intensities of peaks related to the bisphenol-A unit of PC and to the phthalate structure of PET, it is shown that after the first stages of melt mixing the surface is PC enriched and that with the progressive formation of a random copolymer the phthalate units increase their concentration at the surface of the system. Hence, as final result of the melt mixing process, the surface composition tends to reflect the relative amount of the repeating units in the bulk.

  20. Modification of the cellulosic component of hemp fibers using sulfonic acid derivatives: Surface and thermal characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G; Bressler, David C

    2015-12-10

    The aim of this study was to characterize the surface, morphological, and thermal properties of hemp fibers treated with two commercially available, inexpensive, and water soluble sulfonic acid derivatives. Specifically, the cellulosic component of the fibers were targeted, because cellulose is not easily removed during chemical treatment. These acids have the potential to selectively transform the surfaces of natural fibers for composite applications. The proposed method proceeds in the absence of conventional organic solvents and high reaction temperatures. Surface chemical composition and signature were measured using gravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). XPS data from the treated hemp fibers were characterized by measuring the reduction in O/C ratio and an increase in abundance of the C-C-O signature. FTIR confirmed the reaction with the emergence of peaks characteristic of disubstituted benzene and amino groups. Grafting of the sulfonic derivatives resulted in lower surface polarity. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that treated fibers were characterized by lower percent degradation between 200 and 300 °C, and a higher initial degradation temperature.

  1. Relation between the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Impact Factors under Severe Surface Thermal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinhuan Ao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reported a comprehensive analysis on the diurnal variation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL in summer of Badain Jaran Desert and discussed deeply the effect of surface thermal to ABL, including the Difference in Surface-Air Temperature (DSAT, net radiation, and sensible heat, based on limited GPS radiosonde and surface observation data during two intense observation periods of experiments. The results showed that (1 affected by topography of the Tibetan Plateau, the climate provided favorable external conditions for the development of Convective Boundary Layer (CBL, (2 deep CBL showed a diurnal variation of three- to five-layer structure in clear days and five-layer ABL structure often occurred about sunset or sunrise, (3 the diurnal variation of DSAT influenced thickness of ABL through changes of turbulent heat flux, (4 integral value of sensible heat which rapidly converted by surface net radiation had a significant influence on the growth of CBL throughout daytime. The cumulative effect of thick RML dominated the role after CBL got through SBL in the development stage, especially in late summer, and (5 the development of CBL was promoted and accelerated by the variation of wind field and distribution of warm advection in high and low altitude.

  2. Effect of Simulant Type on the Absorptance and Emittance of Dusted Thermal Control Surfaces in a Simulated Lunar Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo program the effects of lunar dust on thermal control surfaces was found to be more significant than anticipated, with several systems overheating due to deposition of dust on them. In an effort to reduce risk to future missions, a series of tests has been initiated to characterize the effects of dust on these surfaces, and then to develop technologies to mitigate that risk. Given the variations in albedo across the lunar surface, one variable that may be important is the darkness of the lunar dust, and this study was undertaken to address that concern. Three thermal control surfaces, AZ-93 white paint and AgFEP and AlFEP second surface mirrors were dusted with three different lunar dust simulants in a simulated lunar environment, and their integrated solar absorptance ( ) and thermal emittance ( ) values determined experimentally. The three simulants included JSC-1AF, a darker mare simulant, NU-LHT-1D, a light highlands simulant, and 1:1 mixture of the two. The response of AZ-93 was found to be slightly more pronounced than that of AgFEP. The increased with fractional dust coverage in both types of samples by a factor of 1.7 to 3.3, depending on the type of thermal control surface and the type of dust. The of the AZ-93 decreased by about 10 percent when fully covered by dust, while that of AgFEP increased by about 10 percent. It was found that / varied by more than a factor of two depending on the thermal control surface and the darkness of the dust. Given that the darkest simulant used in this study may be lighter than the darkest dust that could be encountered on the lunar surface, it becomes apparent that the performance degradation of thermal control surfaces due to dust on the Moon will be strongly dependent on the and of the dust in the specific locality

  3. Near-Surface Crevasse Detection in Ice Sheets using Feature-Based Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, L.; Walker, B.; Lever, J.; Arcone, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    In 2014, a team of Dartmouth, CRREL, and University of Maine researchers conducted the first of three annual ground-penetrating radar surveys of the McMurdo Shear Zone using robot-towed instruments. This survey provides over 100 transects of a 5.7 km x 5.0 km grid spanning the width of the shear zone at spacing of approximately 50 m. Transect direction was orthogonal to ice flow. Additionally, a dense 200 m x 200 m grid was surveyed at 10 m spacing in both the N-S and W-E directions. Radar settings provided 20 traces/sec, which combined with an average robot speed of 1.52 m/s, provides a trace every 7.6 cm. The robot towed two antenna units at 400 MHz and 200 MHz center frequencies, with the former penetrating to approximately 19 m. We establish boundaries for the shear zone over the region surveyed using the 400 MHz antenna data, and we geo-locate crevasses using feature-based machine learning classification of GPR traces into one of three classes - 1) firn, 2) distinct crevasses, and 3) less distinct or deeper features originating within the 19 m penetration depth. Distinct crevasses feature wide, hyperbolic reflections with strike angles of 35-40° to transect direction and clear voids. Less distinct or deeper features range from broad diffraction patterns with no clear void to overlapping diffractions extending tens of meters in width with or without a clear void. The classification is derived from statistical features of unprocessed traces and thus provides a computationally efficient means for eventual real-time classification of GPR traces. Feature-based classification is shown to be insensitive to artifacts related to rolling or pitching motion of the instrument sled and also provides a means of assessing crevasse width and depth. In subsequent years, we will use feature-based classification to estimate ice flow and evolution of individual crevasses.

  4. Thermal migration of deuterium implanted in graphite: Influence of free surface proximity and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guillou, M.; Moncoffre, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Pipon, Y.; Ammar, M. R.; Rouzaud, J. N.; Deldicque, D.

    2016-03-01

    This paper is a contribution to the study of the behavior of activation products produced in irradiated nuclear graphite, graphite being the moderator of the first French generation of CO2 cooled nuclear fission reactors. This paper is focused on the thermal release of Tritium, a major contributor to the initial activity, taking into account the role of the free surfaces (open pores and graphite surface). Two kinds of graphite were compared. On one hand, Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG), a model well graphitized graphite, and on the other hand, SLA2, a porous less graphitized nuclear graphite. Deuterium ion implantation at three different energies 70, 200 and 390 keV allows simulating the presence of Tritium at three different depths, corresponding respectively to projected ranges Rp of 0.75, 1.7 and 3.2 μm. The D isotopic tracing is performed thanks to the D(3He,p)4He nuclear reaction. The graphite structure is studied by Raman microspectrometry. Thermal annealing is performed in the temperature range 200-1200 °C up to 300 h annealing time. As observed in a previous study, the results show that the D release occurs according to three kinetic regimes: a rapid permeation through open pores, a transient regime corresponding to detrapping and diffusion of D located at low energy sites correlated to the edges of crystallites and finally a saturation regime attributed to detrapping of interstitial D located at high energy sites inside the crystallites. Below 600 °C, D release is negligible whatever the implantation depth and the graphite type. The present paper clearly puts forward that above 600 °C, the D release decreases at deeper implantation depths and strongly depends on the graphite structure. In HOPG where high energy sites are more abundant, the D release is less dependent on the surface proximity compared to SLA2. In SLA2, in which the low energy sites prevail, the D release curves are clearly shifted towards lower temperatures when D is located

  5. Thermal migration of deuterium implanted in graphite: Influence of free surface proximity and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guillou, M. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Moncoffre, N., E-mail: n.moncoffre@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); CEA/DEN – Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Pipon, Y. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Institut Universitaire Technologique, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Ammar, M.R. [CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Université Orléans, CS90055, F-45071 Orléans cedex 2 (France); Rouzaud, J.N.; Deldicque, D. [Laboratoire de Géologie de l’Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, UMR CNRS ENS 8538, F-75231 Paris cedex 5 (France)

    2016-03-15

    This paper is a contribution to the study of the behavior of activation products produced in irradiated nuclear graphite, graphite being the moderator of the first French generation of CO{sub 2} cooled nuclear fission reactors. This paper is focused on the thermal release of Tritium, a major contributor to the initial activity, taking into account the role of the free surfaces (open pores and graphite surface). Two kinds of graphite were compared. On one hand, Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG), a model well graphitized graphite, and on the other hand, SLA2, a porous less graphitized nuclear graphite. Deuterium ion implantation at three different energies 70, 200 and 390 keV allows simulating the presence of Tritium at three different depths, corresponding respectively to projected ranges R{sub p} of 0.75, 1.7 and 3.2 μm. The D isotopic tracing is performed thanks to the D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction. The graphite structure is studied by Raman microspectrometry. Thermal annealing is performed in the temperature range 200–1200 °C up to 300 h annealing time. As observed in a previous study, the results show that the D release occurs according to three kinetic regimes: a rapid permeation through open pores, a transient regime corresponding to detrapping and diffusion of D located at low energy sites correlated to the edges of crystallites and finally a saturation regime attributed to detrapping of interstitial D located at high energy sites inside the crystallites. Below 600 °C, D release is negligible whatever the implantation depth and the graphite type. The present paper clearly puts forward that above 600 °C, the D release decreases at deeper implantation depths and strongly depends on the graphite structure. In HOPG where high energy sites are more abundant, the D release is less dependent on the surface proximity compared to SLA2. In SLA2, in which the low energy sites prevail, the D release curves are clearly shifted towards lower

  6. A 1-D Analytical Model for the Thermally Induced Stresses in the Mould Surface During Die Casting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper; Hansen, Preben

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an anlytically based method for predicting the normal stresses in a die mold surface exposed to a thermal load. A example of application of the method is the high-pressure di casting process where the surface stresses in critical cases lead to cracks. Expressions for the normal...

  7. Evaluation of the surface urban heat island effect in the city of Madrid by thermal remote sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobrino, J.; Oltra-Carrio, R; Jimenez-Munoz, J.C.; Franch, B.; Hidalgo, V.; Mattar, C.; Julien, Y.; Cuenca, J.; Romaguera, M.; Gomez, J.A.; Miguel, de E.; Bianchi, R.; Paganini, M.

    2013-01-01

    The surface urban heat island (SUHI) effect is defined as the increased surface temperatures in urban areas in contrast to cooler surrounding rural areas. In this article, the evaluation of the SUHI effect in the city of Madrid (Spain) from thermal infrared (TIR) remote-sensing data is presented. Th

  8. Evaluation of Haney-Type Surface Thermal Boundary Conditions Using a Coupled Atmosphere and Ocean Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A coupled atmosphere-ocean model developed at the Institute for Space Studies at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (Russell et al., 1995) was used to verify the validity of Haney-type surface thermal boundary condition, which linearly connects net downward surface heat flux Q to air / sea temperature difference △T by a relaxation coefficient k. The model was initiated from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) atmospheric observations for 1 December 1977, and from the National Ocean Data Center (NODC) global climatological mean December temperature and salinity fields at 1° ×1° resolution. The time step is 7.5 minutes. We integrated the model for 450 days and obtained a complete model-generated global data set of daily mean downward net surface flux Q, surface air temperature TA,and sea surface temperature To. Then, we calculated the cross-correlation coefficients (CCC) between Q and △T. The ensemble mean CCC fields show (a) no correlation between Q and △T in the equatorial regions, and (b) evident correlation (CCC≥ 0.7) between Q and △T in the middle and high latitudes.Additionally, we did the variance analysis and found that when k= 120 W m-2K-1, the two standard deviations, σrq and σk△T, are quite close in the middle and high latitudes. These results agree quite well with a previous research (Chu et al., 1998) on analyzing the NCEP re-analyzed surface data, except that a smaller value of k (80 W m-2K-1) was found in the previous study.

  9. Simulated sensitivity of the tropical climate to extratropical thermal forcing: tropical SSTs and African land surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talento, Stefanie; Barreiro, Marcelo

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) response to extratropical thermal forcing applied to an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to slab ocean and land models. We focus on the relative roles of the atmosphere, tropical sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and continental surface temperatures in the ITCZ response to the imposed forcing. The forcing consists of cooling in one hemisphere and warming in the other poleward of 40°, with zero global average. Three sets of experiments are performed: in the first the slab ocean and land models are applied globally; in the second the tropical SSTs are kept fixed while the slab land model is applied globally; in the third, in addition, surface temperatures over Africa are kept fixed. Realistic boundary surface conditions are used. We find that the ITCZ shifts towards the warmer hemisphere and that the stronger the forcing, the larger the shift. When the constraint of fixed tropical SST is imposed we find that the ITCZ response is strongly weakened, but it is still not negligible in particular over the Atlantic Ocean and Africa where the precipitation anomalies are of the order of 20 and 60 %, respectively, of the magnitude obtained without the SST restriction. Finally, when the constraint of the African surface temperature is incorporated we find that the ITCZ response completely vanishes, indicating that the ITCZ response to the extratropical forcing is not possible just trough purely atmospheric processes, but needs the involvement of either the tropical SST or the continental surface temperatures. The clear-sky longwave radiation feedback is highlighted as the main physical mechanism operating behind the land-based extratropical to tropical communication.

  10. Verification of a thermal simulation tool for moving objects on the lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Philipp; Reiss, Philipp

    2013-04-01

    The thermal environment of the Moon is a challenge for the design and successful operation of rovers and scientific instruments, especially for dynamic, mobile situations. Examples range from transport and stability of volatile samples in transport devices at the lunar poles to an analysis instrument, to astronauts exploring varied terrain. A dynamic thermal simulation tool for moving objects on the lunar surface was created and its verification for several test cases against Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter DIVINER brightness temperature data is presented here. The Thermal Moon Simulator (TherMoS) allows the prediction of incoming heat fluxes on a mobile object on the lunar surface and subsequent object temperatures. A model for regolith temperatures based on the models presented in [1,2] was set in a MATLAB simulation context. A time-marching numerical finite-difference approach was used to calculate the temperatures for log-distributed regolith depth nodes to a depth of 2m. The lunar interior heat flux was set to 0.033 [W ? m-2], based on the early publications of [3]. The incoming heat fluxes are calculated with a ray tracing algorithm. Parallel solar rays and their diffuse reflected components lead to the solar heat flux for each surface element. Additionally each surface element emits hemispherical, diffuse infrared rays that are absorbed by the object as well as other lunar surface elements. The lunar topography is represented in a triangular mesh. The topography is either derived from Kaguya LALT data or generated artificially. In the latter case craters and boulders are placed manually or randomly in a level terrain. This approach is restricted to bowl shaped primary craters with a boulder size and spatial distribution that takes into account the region (mare or highland) and the parent crater diameter [4,5,6]. A thermal boulder model is integrated, based on work performed by [7]. This model also uses a finite-difference numerical approach to compute boulder

  11. A Useful Tool for Atmospheric Correction and Surface Temperature Estimation of Landsat Infrared Thermal Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivalland, Vincent; Tardy, Benjamin; Huc, Mireille; Hagolle, Olivier; Marcq, Sébastien; Boulet, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    Land Surface temperature (LST) is a critical variable for studying the energy and water budgets at the Earth surface, and is a key component of many aspects of climate research and services. The Landsat program jointly carried out by NASA and USGS has been providing thermal infrared data for 40 years, but no associated LST product has been yet routinely proposed to community. To derive LST values, radiances measured at sensor-level need to be corrected for the atmospheric absorption, the atmospheric emission and the surface emissivity effect. Until now, existing LST products have been generated with multi channel methods such as the Temperature/Emissivity Separation (TES) adapted to ASTER data or the generalized split-window algorithm adapted to MODIS multispectral data. Those approaches are ill-adapted to the Landsat mono-window data specificity. The atmospheric correction methodology usually used for Landsat data requires detailed information about the state of the atmosphere. This information may be obtained from radio-sounding or model atmospheric reanalysis and is supplied to a radiative transfer model in order to estimate atmospheric parameters for a given coordinate. In this work, we present a new automatic tool dedicated to Landsat thermal data correction which improves the common atmospheric correction methodology by introducing the spatial dimension in the process. The python tool developed during this study, named LANDARTs for LANDsat Automatic Retrieval of surface Temperature, is fully automatic and provides atmospheric corrections for a whole Landsat tile. Vertical atmospheric conditions are downloaded from the ERA Interim dataset from ECMWF meteorological organization which provides them at 0.125 degrees resolution, at a global scale and with a 6-hour-time step. The atmospheric correction parameters are estimated on the atmospheric grid using the commercial software MODTRAN, then interpolated to 30m resolution. We detail the processing steps

  12. Influence of deposition temperature of thermal ALD deposited Al2O3 films on silicon surface passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Neha; Gope, Jhuma; Vandana, Panigrahi, Jagannath; Singh, Rajbir; Singh, P. K.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of deposition temperature (Tdep) and subsequent annealing time (tanl) of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide (Al2O3) films on silicon surface passivation (in terms of surface recombination velocity, SRV) is investigated. The pristine samples (as-deposited) show presence of positive fixed charges, QF. The interface defect density (Dit) decreases with increase in Tdep which further decreases with tanl up to 100s. An effective surface passivation (SRV<8 cm/s) is realized for Tdep ≥ 200 °C. The present investigation suggests that low thermal budget processing provides the same quality of passivation as realized by high thermal budget process (tanl between 10 to 30 min).

  13. Predicting internal white oak (Quercus alba) log defect features using surface defect indicator measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph E. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    As hardwood trees grow and develop, surface defects such as limb stubs and wounds are overgrown and encapsulated into the tree. Evidence of these defects can remain on the tree's surface for decades and in many instances for the life of the tree. The location and severity of internal defects dictate the quality and value of products that can be obtained from logs...

  14. Effective aerodynamic roughness estimated from airborne laser altimeter measurements of surface features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, AC; Kustas, WP; Ritchie, JC; Klaassen, W; Menenti, M; Rango, A; Prueger, JH

    2003-01-01

    Aerodynamic roughness length (z(0)) and displacement height (d(0)) are important surface parameters for estimating surface fluxes in numerical models. These parameters are generally determined from wind flow characteristics using logarithmic wind profiles measured at a meteorological tower or by

  15. Effective aerodynamic roughness estimated from airborne laser altimeter measurements of surface features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, AC; Kustas, WP; Ritchie, JC; Klaassen, W; Menenti, M; Rango, A; Prueger, JH

    2003-01-01

    Aerodynamic roughness length (z(0)) and displacement height (d(0)) are important surface parameters for estimating surface fluxes in numerical models. These parameters are generally determined from wind flow characteristics using logarithmic wind profiles measured at a meteorological tower or by bal

  16. Surface Functionality Features of Porous Silicon Prepared and Treated in Different Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. M. Spivak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrophilic layers of porous silicon are prepared by single- or two-step anodization and characterized by evaluating their surface hydrophilicity and contents of functional groups using IR spectroscopy and adsorption of acid-base indicators with different pKa values. The surface functional composition of the synthesized samples is shown to be adjustable depending on the anodization current density. The surface of samples obtained at anodization current density 30 mA/cm2 is predominantly occupied with pKa 2.5 corresponding to ≡Si–OH groups. The increase of current density to 80 mA/cm2 results in the increase of surface functional nonuniformity with the formation of versatile centers, primarily Lewis acidic sites corresponding to Si atoms, as indicated by selective indicator adsorption in agreement with the disappearance of Si–H bonds in IR spectra and overall surface disordering according to SEM and AFM data.

  17. Comparison of Citrus Fruit Surface Defect Classification using Discrete Wavelet Transform, Stationary Wavelet Transform and Wavelet Packet Transform Based Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vijayarekha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to classify the citrus fruit images based on the external defect using the features extracted in the spectral domain (transform based and to compare the performance of each of the feature set. Automatic classification of agricultural produce by machine vision technology plays a very important role as it improves the quality of grading. Multi resolution analysis using wavelets yields better results for pattern recognition and object classification. This study details about an image processing method applied for classifying three external surface defects of citrus fruit using wavelet transforms based features and an artificial neural network. The Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT, Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT and Wavelet Packet Transform (WPT features viz. mean and standard deviation of the details and approximations were extracted from citrus fruit images and used for classifying the defects. The DWT and SWT features were extracted from 40x40 sub-windows of the fruit image. The WPT features were extracted from the full fruit image of size 640x480. The classification results pertaining to the three wavelet transforms are reported and discussed.

  18. Computation of fractal features based on the fractal analysis of surface electromyogram to estimate force of contraction of different muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poosapadi Arjunan, Sridhar; Kumar, Dinesh Kant

    2014-01-01

    This research study investigates the fractal properties of surface Electromyogram (sEMG) to estimate the force levels of contraction of three muscles with different cross-sectional areas (CSA): m. quadriceps--vastus lateralis, m. biceps brachii, andm. flexor digitorum superficialis. The fractal features were computed based on the fractal analysis of sEMG, signal recorded while performing sustained muscle contraction at different force levels. A comparison was performed between the fractal features and five other features reported in the literature. Linear regression analysis was carried out to determine the relationship between the force of contraction (20-100%) and features of sEMG. The results from the coefficients of regression r² show that the new fractal feature, maximum fractal length of the signal has highest correlation (range 0.88-0.90) when compared with other features which ranges from 0.34 to 0.74 for the three different muscles. This study suggests that the estimation of various levels of sustained contraction of muscles with varied CSA will provide a better insight into the biomechanics model that involves muscle properties and muscle activation.

  19. A Software Tool for Atmospheric Correction and Surface Temperature Estimation of Landsat Infrared Thermal Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Tardy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature (LST is an important variable involved in the Earth’s surface energy and water budgets and a key component in many aspects of environmental research. The Landsat program, jointly carried out by NASA and the USGS, has been recording thermal infrared data for the past 40 years. Nevertheless, LST data products for Landsat remain unavailable. The atmospheric correction (AC method commonly used for mono-window Landsat thermal data requires detailed information concerning the vertical structure (temperature, pressure and the composition (water vapor, ozone of the atmosphere. For a given coordinate, this information is generally obtained through either radio-sounding or atmospheric model simulations and is passed to the radiative transfer model (RTM to estimate the local atmospheric correction parameters. Although this approach yields accurate LST data, results are relevant only near this given coordinate. To meet the scientific community’s demand for high-resolution LST maps, we developed a new software tool dedicated to processing Landsat thermal data. The proposed tool improves on the commonly-used AC algorithm by incorporating spatial variations occurring in the Earth’s atmosphere composition. The ERA-Interim dataset (ECMWFmeteorological organization was used to retrieve vertical atmospheric conditions, which are available at a global scale with a resolution of 0.125 degrees and a temporal resolution of 6 h. A temporal and spatial linear interpolation of meteorological variables was performed to match the acquisition dates and coordinates of the Landsat images. The atmospheric correction parameters were then estimated on the basis of this reconstructed atmospheric grid using the commercial RTMsoftware MODTRAN. The needed surface emissivity was derived from the common vegetation index NDVI, obtained from the red and near-infrared (NIR bands of the same Landsat image. This permitted an estimation of LST for the entire

  20. Simultaneous inversion of multiple land surface parameters from MODIS optical-thermal observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Han; Liang, Shunlin; Xiao, Zhiqiang; Shi, Hanyu

    2017-06-01

    Land surface parameters from remote sensing observations are critical in monitoring and modeling of global climate change and biogeochemical cycles. Current methods for estimating land surface variables usually focus on individual parameters separately even from the same satellite observations, resulting in inconsistent products. Moreover, no efforts have been made to generate global products from integrated observations from the optical to Thermal InfraRed (TIR) spectrum. Particularly, Middle InfraRed (MIR) observations have received little attention due to the complexity of the radiometric signal, which contains both reflected and emitted radiation. In this paper, we propose a unified algorithm for simultaneously retrieving six land surface parameters - Leaf Area Index (LAI), Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FAPAR), land surface albedo, Land Surface Emissivity (LSE), Land Surface Temperature (LST), and Upwelling Longwave radiation (LWUP) by exploiting MODIS visible-to-TIR observations. We incorporate a unified physical radiative transfer model into a data assimilation framework. The MODIS visible-to-TIR time series datasets include the daily surface reflectance product and MIR-to-TIR surface radiance, which are atmospherically corrected from the MODIS data using the Moderate Resolution Transmittance program (MODTRAN, ver. 5.0). LAI was first estimated using a data assimilation method that combines MODIS daily reflectance data and a LAI phenology model, and then the LAI was input to the unified radiative transfer model to simulate spectral surface reflectance and surface emissivity for calculating surface broadband albedo and emissivity, and FAPAR. LST was estimated from the MIR-TIR surface radiance data and the simulated emissivity, using an iterative optimization procedure. Lastly, LWUP was estimated using the LST and surface emissivity. The retrieved six parameters were extensively validated across six representative sites with

  1. Near-field thermal radiative emission of materials demonstrating near infrared surface polariton resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Spencer Justin

    Surface polariton mediated near-field radiative transfer exceeds the blackbody limit by orders of magnitude and is quasimonochromatic. Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power generation consists of converting thermal radiation into useful electrical energy and exhibits a peak performance near the TPV cell bandgap, which is typically located within the near infrared bandwidth. Therefore, an ideal emission source for a nanoscale gap TPV device, in which the emitter and cell are separated by no more than one peak emitted wavelength, will sustain surface polariton resonance at or near the TPV cell bandgap in the near infrared. To date, few materials have been identified that satisfy this requirement. The first objective of this dissertation is to theoretically explore dielectric Mie resonance-based (DMRB) electromagnetic metamaterials for the potential to sustain near infrared surface polariton resonance. Electromagnetic metamaterials are composite media, consisting of subwavelength, repeating unit structures called "meta-atoms." The microscopic configuration of the meta-atom can be engineered, dictating the effective macroscale electromagnetic properties of the bulk metamaterial, including the surface polariton resonance wavelength. DMRB metamaterials consist of dielectric nanoparticles within a host medium and are analyzed using an effective medium theory. The local density of electromagnetic states, an indicator of possibly harvestable energy near an emitting surface, is calculated for two DMRB metamaterials: spherical nanoparticles of 1) silicon carbide, and 2) silicon embedded in a host medium. Results show that the surface polariton resonance of these metamaterials is tunable and, for the silicon metamaterial only, is found in the near infrared bandwidth, making it a viable candidate for use in a nano-TPV device. In order to demonstrate the practicality thereof, the second objective is to fabricate and characterize DMRB metamaterials. Specimens are fabricated by hand

  2. Real time non-rigid surface detection based on binary robust independent elementary features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuin-Mu Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The surface deformation detection of an object has been a very popular research project in recent years; in human vision, we can easily detect the location of the target and that scale of the surface rotation, and change of the viewpoint makes the surface deformation, but in a vision of the computer is a challenge. In those backgrounds of questions, we can propose a framework that is the surface deformation, which is based on the detection method of BRIEF to calculate object surface deformation. But BRIEF calculation has some problem that can’t rotate and change character; we also propose a useful calculation method to solve the problem, and the method proved by experiment can overcome the problem, by the way, it's very useful. The average operation time every picture in continuous image is 50∼80 ms in 2.5 GHz computer, let us look back for some related estimation technology of surface deformation, and there are still a few successful project that is surface deformation detection in the document.

  3. Computation and Evaluation of Features of Surface Electromyogram to Identify the Force of Muscle Contraction and Muscle Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar P. Arjunan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between force of muscle contraction and muscle fatigue with six different features of surface electromyogram (sEMG was determined by conducting experiments on thirty-five volunteers. The participants performed isometric contractions at 50%, 75%, and 100% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC. Six features were considered in this study: normalised spectral index (NSM5, median frequency, root mean square, waveform length, normalised root mean square (NRMS, and increase in synchronization (IIS index. Analysis of variance (ANOVA and linear regression analysis were performed to determine the significance of the feature with respect to the three factors: muscle force, muscle fatigue, and subject. The results show that IIS index of sEMG had the highest correlation with muscle fatigue and the relationship was statistically significant (P0.05.

  4. Influence of surface morphology and microstructure on performance of CVD tungsten coating under fusion transient thermal loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Youyun; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Jianbao; Feng, Fan; Lv, Yanwei; Song, Jiupeng; Chen, Jiming

    2016-12-01

    Thick tungsten coatings have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a rapid growth rate. A series of tungsten coatings with different thickness and surface morphology were prepared. The surface morphology, microstructure and preferred orientation of the CVD tungsten coatings were investigated. Thermal shock analyses were performed by using an electron beam facility to study the influence of the surface morphology and the microstructure on the thermal shock resistance of the CVD tungsten coatings. Repetitive (100 pulses) ELMs-like thermal shock loads were applied at various temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C with pulse duration of 1 ms and an absorbed power density of up to 1 GW/m2. The results of the tests demonstrated that the specific surface morphology and columnar crystal structure of the CVD tungsten have significant influence on the surface cracking threshold and crack propagation of the materials. The CVD tungsten coatings with a polished surface show superior thermal shock resistance as compared with that of the as-deposited coatings with a rough surface.

  5. On the early and developed stages of surface condensation: competition mechanism between interfacial and condensate bulk thermal resistances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Wang, Hua Sheng

    2016-10-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the early and developed stages of surface condensation. We find that the liquid-vapor and solid-liquid interfacial thermal resistances depend on the properties of solid and fluid, which are time-independent, while the condensate bulk thermal resistance depends on the condensate thickness, which is time-dependent. There exists intrinsic competition between the interfacial and condensate bulk thermal resistances in timeline and the resultant total thermal resistance determines the condensation intensity for a given vapor-solid temperature difference. We reveal the competition mechanism that the interfacial thermal resistance dominates at the onset of condensation and holds afterwards while the condensate bulk thermal resistance gradually takes over with condensate thickness growing. The weaker the solid-liquid bonding, the later the takeover occurs. This competition mechanism suggests that only when the condensate bulk thermal resistance is reduced after it takes over the domination can the condensation be effectively intensified. We propose a unified theoretical model for the thermal resistance analysis by making dropwise condensation equivalent to filmwise condensation. We further find that near a critical point (contact angle being ca. 153°) the bulk thermal resistance has the least opportunity to take over the domination while away from it the probability increases.

  6. Influence of Different Surface Treatments of H13 Hot Work Die Steel on Its Thermal Fatigue Behaviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Thermal fatigue checking is the general failure of hot work die steels, which is relative with the structures and properties of the steels and the stress alternated during the employment. The Uddeholm test method on thermal fatigue is used to compare the behaviors of different samples, which are treated with plasma nitriding、plasma sulfur-carbon-nitriding、 boronizing or not treated. The results show that the nitriding improves the thermal fatigue property of the tool steel, while the plasma sulfur-carbon-nitriding and the boronizing impair the property. The mechanisms are induced as follows. By increasing the hardness and changing the stress distribution in the surface layer, surface treatment can decrease the plastic deformation and the tensile stress during the cycling. Therefore,the generation and growth of the cracks are restrained. On the other hand, as results of surface treating, in the surface layer the toughness declines and the expanding coefficient ascendes; the latter change caused the strengthening of the tensile and compressive stress during the cycling. Thus the resistance to thermal fatigue is weakened. Whether or not the surface treatment is favor to thermal fatigue of tool steels relies on which factor is dominant.

  7. Polarization dependent formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures near stepped features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ryan D.; Torralva, Ben; Adams, David P.; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2014-06-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are formed near 110 nm-tall Au microstructured edges on Si substrates after single-pulse femtosecond irradiation with a 150 fs pulse centered near a 780 nm wavelength. We investigate the contributions of Fresnel diffraction from step-edges and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation to LIPSS formation on Au and Si surfaces. For certain laser polarization vector orientations, LIPSS formation is dominated by SPP excitation; however, when SPP excitation is minimized, Fresnel diffraction dominates. The LIPSS orientation and period distributions are shown to depend on which mechanism is activated. These results support previous observations of the laser polarization vector influencing LIPSS formation on bulk surfaces.

  8. Polarization dependent formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures near stepped features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-06-09

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are formed near 110 nm-tall Au microstructured edges on Si substrates after single-pulse femtosecond irradiation with a 150 fs pulse centered near a 780 nm wavelength. We investigate the contributions of Fresnel diffraction from step-edges and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation to LIPSS formation on Au and Si surfaces. For certain laser polarization vector orientations, LIPSS formation is dominated by SPP excitation; however, when SPP excitation is minimized, Fresnel diffraction dominates. The LIPSS orientation and period distributions are shown to depend on which mechanism is activated. These results support previous observations of the laser polarization vector influencing LIPSS formation on bulk surfaces.

  9. Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis Modeling for Analysis of Flood Design Features at the Picayune Strand Restoration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 6 -1 4 Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis Modeling for Analysis of Flood Design Features at the Picayune...impacting the level of flood protection of adjacent landowners. To ensure the current level of flood protection is maintained, a hydrologic model was...Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA) model was selected for this effort. The GSSHA model simulates fully coupled rainfall distribution, extraction

  10. SAR Analysis of the ocean surface : aplication to the NW mediterranean marine pollution and dynamic features

    OpenAIRE

    Redondo Apraiz, José Manuel; Platonov, A.; Grau Barceló, Joan

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between multiple scales in nature and mainly in turbulent flows produces fractals or multifractal structures. We use multi-fractal analysis to investigate the scales and influence of stratification in different types of surface eddies in the ocean, and specially, near the coastline. We will also show and discuss the structure and residence time in oil spills and slicks in the ocean surface. This method, of multifractal analysis on the intensity SAR signals, as an example will ...

  11. Construction of Renewable Superhydrophobic Surfaces via Thermally Induced Phase Separation and Mechanical Peeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Zhu; Yuan Yu; Qing-Yun Wu; Lin Gu

    2017-01-01

    We report a simple preparation method of a renewable superhydrophobic surface by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) and mechanical peeling.Porous polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes with hierarchical structures were prepared by a TIPS process under different cooling conditions,which were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry.After peeling off the top layer,rough structures with hundreds of nanometers to several microns were obtained.A digital microscopy determines that the surface roughness of peeled PVDF membranes is much higher than that of the original PVDF membrane,which is important to obtain the superhydrophobicity.Water contact angle and sliding angle measurements demonstrate that the peeled membrane surfaces display superhydrophobicity with a high contact angle (152°) and a low sliding angle (7.2°).Moreover,the superhydrophobicity can be easily recovered for many times by a simple mechanical peeling,identical to the original superhydrophobicity.This simple preparation method is low cost,and suitable for large-scale industrialization,which may offer more opportunities for practical applications.

  12. Surface Pre-treatment for Thermally Sprayed ZnAl15 Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Knoch, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    Pre-treatment of substrates is an important step in thermal spraying. It is widely accepted that mechanical interlocking is the dominant adhesion mechanism for most substrate-coating combinations. To prevent premature failure, minimum coating adhesion strength, surface preparation grades, and roughness parameters are often specified. For corrosion-protection coatings for offshore wind turbines, an adhesion strength ≥ 5 MPa is commonly assumed to ensure adhesion over service lifetime. In order to fulfill this requirement, Rz > 80 µm and a preparation grade of Sa3 are common specifications. In this study, the necessity of these requirements is investigated using the widely used combination of twin-wire arc-sprayed ZnAl15 on S355J2 + N as a test case. By using different blasting media and parameters, the correlation between coating adhesion and roughness parameters is analyzed. The adhesion strength of these systems is measured using a test method allowing measurements on real parts. The results are compared to DIN EN 582:1993, the European equivalent of ASTM-C633. In another series of experiments, the influence of surface pre-treatment grades Sa2.5 and Sa3 is considered. By combining the results of these three sets of experiments, a guideline for surface pre-treatment and adhesion testing on real parts is proposed for the considered system.

  13. Surface thermal analysis of North Brabant cities and neighbourhoods during heat waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyre Echevarria Icaza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island effect is often associated with large metropolises. However, in the Netherlands even small cities will be affected by the phenomenon in the future (Hove et al., 2011, due to the dispersed or mosaic urbanisation patterns in particularly the southern part of the country: the province of North Brabant. This study analyses the average night time land surface temperature (LST of 21 North-Brabant urban areas through 22 satellite images retrieved by Modis 11A1 during the 2006 heat wave and uses Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper to map albedo and normalized difference temperature index (NDVI values. Albedo, NDVI and imperviousness are found to play the most relevant role in the increase of night-time LST. The surface cover cluster analysis of these three parameters reveals that the 12 “urban living environment” categories used in the region of North Brabant can actually be reduced to 7 categories, which simplifies the design guidelines to improve the surface thermal behaviour of the different neighbourhoods thus reducing the Urban Heat Island (UHI effect in existing medium size cities and future developments adjacent to those cities.

  14. Hydrophilic modification of polyethersulfone porous membranes via a thermal-induced surface crosslinking approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Li-Jun; Zhao, Wen-Zhen

    2009-05-01

    A thermal-induced surface crosslinking process was employed to perform a hydrophilic surface modification of PES porous membranes. Difunctional poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) was used as the main crosslinking modifier. The addition of trifunctional trimethylolpropane trimethylacrylate (TMPTMA) into the reaction solutions accelerated the crosslinking progress of PEGDA on PES membranes. The membrane surface morphology and chemical composition were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. The mass gains (MG) of the modified membranes could be conveniently modulated by varying the PEGDA concentration and crosslinking time. The measurements of water contact angle showed that the hydrophilicity of PES membranes was remarkably enhanced by the coating of crosslinked PEGDA layer. When a moderate mass gain of about 150 μg/cm 2 was reached, both the permeability and anti-fouling ability of PES membranes could be significantly improved. Excessive mass gain not only contributed little to the anti-fouling ability, but also brought a deteriorated permeability to PES membranes.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REID, ROBERT S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PEARSON, J. BOSIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEWART, ERIC T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-16

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  16. Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T.; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    A water based shielding system is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. The use of water may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a representative lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated at various power levels in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to anchor a CFD model. Performance of a water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted by CFD models anchored to test data. The accompanying viewgraph presentation includes the following topics: 1) Testbed Configuration; 2) Core Heater Placement and Instrumentation; 3) Thermocouple Placement; 4) Core Thermocouple Placement; 5) Outer Tank Thermocouple Placement; 6) Integrated Testbed; 7) Methodology; 8) Experimental Results: Core Temperatures; 9) Experimental Results; Outer Tank Temperatures; 10) CFD Modeling; 11) CFD Model: Anchored to Experimental Results (1-g); 12) CFD MOdel: Prediction for 1/6-g; and 13) CFD Model: Comparison of 1-g to 1/6-g.

  17. Surface laser-glazing of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, C. [University of Minho, Physics Department, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Portinha, A. [University of Minho, Physics Department, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Ribeiro, R.M. [University of Minho, Physics Department, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)]. E-mail: ricardo@fisica.uminho.pt; Teixeira, V. [University of Minho, Physics Department, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Costa, M.F. [University of Minho, Physics Department, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Oliveira, C.R. [Instituto de Desenvolvimentoe Inovacao Tecnologica (IDIT), 4520-102 Santa Maria da Feira (Portugal); University Lusiada, 4760-108 Vila Nova de Famalicao (Portugal)

    2005-07-15

    Atmospheric plasma-sprayed (APS) ZrO{sub 2}-8%WtY{sub 2}O{sub 3} thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were subjected to a CO{sub 2} continuous wave laser-glazing process in order to generate an external dense layer produced by different processing parameters. For that purpose, different beam scanning speeds and track overlapping were chosen. Surface roughness has been reduced significantly after laser-glazing. Despite the surface crack network, all laser-glazed specimens presented a fully dense and porous free external layer with a columnar microstructure. Surface cracks along the densified layer were found to have tendency to be oriented in two perpendicular directions, one in the direction of the laser beam travel, the other perpendicular to it. Moreover, the cracks parallel to the beam moving direction are found to be on the overlapping zone, coinciding with the edge of the subsequent track. The cracks along the densified layer are vertical and tend to branch and deviate from the vertical direction within the porous PS coating. The largest overlapping allied to the smallest amount of irradiated energy generated the most uniform layer with the shortest crack branches within the PS coating. For the as-sprayed coating, the XRD results revealed mainly t' non-transformable tetragonal zirconia with a small percentage of residual monoclinic zirconia. All glazed coatings presented only t' non-transformable tetragonal zirconia with some variations on preferable crystal orientation.

  18. Impact of various surface covers on water and thermal regime of Technosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodešová, Radka; Fér, Miroslav; Klement, Aleš; Nikodem, Antonín; Teplá, Daniela; Neuberger, Pavel; Bureš, Petr

    2014-11-01

    Different soil covers influence water and thermal regimes in soils within urban areas. Knowledge of these regimes is needed, particularly when assessing effectiveness of energy gathering from soils using horizontal ground heat exchangers. The goal of this study was to calibrate the model HYDRUS-1D for simulating coupled water and thermal regime in Technosol type soils with grass cover, and to use this model for predicting water and thermal regimes under different materials covering the soil surface. For this purpose soil water contents were measured at depths of 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 and 100 cm at 4 locations and temperatures were measured at depths of 20, 40, 80, 120, 150 and 180 cm at three locations (all covered by grass) from June 2011 to December 2012. In addition sensors for simultaneous measuring soil water contents and temperatures were installed under different soil covers (grass, bark chips, sand, basalt gravel and concrete paving) at a depth of 7. The parameters of soil hydraulic properties were obtained on the 100-cm3 undisturbed soil samples using the multi-step outflow experiment and numerical inversion of the measured transient flow data using HYDRUS-1D. HYDRUS-1D was then used to simulated the water regime within the soil profile under the grass cover using climatic data from June 2011 to December 2012 and some of the soil hydraulic parameters were additionally numerically optimized using soil water contents measured at all depths. Water flow and heat transport were then simulated using these parameters, measured thermal properties and temperatures measured close to the surface applied as a top boundary condition. Simulated temperatures at all depths successfully approximated the measured data. Next, water and thermal regimes under another 4 different surface covers were simulated. Soil hydraulic properties of different materials were partly measured and partly optimized when simulating soil water regime from June 2011 to December 2012 using the soil

  19. The influence of nanostructurizing deformation-thermal treatment on strain-ing and fracture features of quenched grade 50 steel upon static and cyclic loading

    OpenAIRE

    Саврай, Р. А.; Макаров, А. В.; Малыгина, И. Ю.; Давыдова, Н. А.

    2014-01-01

    Straining and fracture features upon static and cyclic loading of quenched grade 50 steel (with 0.51 wt.% of C) subjected to nanostructurizing deformation-thermal treatment, which includes frictional treatment and optimized tem-pering at temperature of 350°С have been investigated. It is established that combined nanostructurizing treatment alters the character of development of a plastic yielding upon loading and makes it more uniform. This is expressed in disappearance of the yield point el...

  20. Detection of Crystalline Hematite Mineralization on Mars by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer: Evidence for Near-surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, P. R.; Bandfield, J. L.; Clark, R. N.; Edgett, K. S.; Hamilton, V. E.; Hoefen, T.; Kieffer, H. H.; Kuzmin, R. O.; Lane, M. D.; Malin, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission has discovered a remarkable accumulation of crystalline hematite ((alpha-Fe2O3) that covers an area with very sharp boundaries approximately 350 by 350-750 km in size centered near 2 S latitude between 0 and 5 W longitude (Sinus Meridiani). Crystalline hematite is uniquely identified by the presence of fundamental vibrational absorption features centered near 300, 450, and >525/cm, and by the absence of silicate fundamentals in the 1000/cm region. Spectral features resulting from atmospheric CO2, dust, and water ice were removed using a radiative transfer model. The spectral properties unique to Sinus Meridiani were emphasized by removing the average spectrum of the surrounding region. The depth and shape of the hematite fundamental bands show that the hematite is crystalline and relatively coarse grained (>5-10 micron). Diameters up to and greater than 100s of micrometers are permitted within the instrumental noise and natural variability of hematite spectra. Hematite particles 30 micron in diameter to 40-60% for unpacked 10 micron powders. The hematite in Sinus Meridiani is thus distinct from the fine-grained (diameter <5-10 micron), red, crystalline hematite considered, on the basis of visible, near-IR data, to be a minor spectral component in Martian bright regions like Olympus-Amazonis. Sinus Meridiani hematite is closely associated with a smooth, layered, friable surface that is interpreted to be sedimentary in origin. This material may be the uppermost surface in the region, indicating that it could be a late-stage sedimentary unit, or it could be a layered portion of the heavily cratered plains units. We consider five possible mechanisms for the formation of coarse-grained, crystalline hematite. These processes fall into two classes depending on whether they require a significant amount of near-surface water: (1) chemical precipitation that includes origin by (a

  1. Biomimetic Bacterial Identification Platform Based on Thermal Wave Transport Analysis (TWTA) through Surface-Imprinted Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen Redeker, Erik; Eersels, Kasper; Akkermans, Onno; Royakkers, Jeroen; Dyson, Simba; Nurekeyeva, Kunya; Ferrando, Beniamino; Cornelis, Peter; Peeters, Marloes; Wagner, Patrick; Diliën, Hanne; van Grinsven, Bart; Cleij, Thomas Jan

    2017-05-12

    This paper introduces a novel bacterial identification assay based on thermal wave analysis through surface-imprinted polymers (SIPs). Aluminum chips are coated with SIPs, serving as synthetic cell receptors that have been combined previously with the heat-transfer method (HTM) for the selective detection of bacteria. In this work, the concept of bacterial identification is extended toward the detection of nine different bacterial species. In addition, a novel sensing approach, thermal wave transport analysis (TWTA), is introduced, which analyzes the propagation of a thermal wave through a functional interface. The results presented here demonstrate that bacterial rebinding to the SIP layer resulted in a measurable phase shift in the propagated wave, which is most pronounced at a frequency of 0.03 Hz. In this way, the sensor is able to selectively distinguish between the different bacterial species used in this study. Furthermore, a dose-response curve was constructed to determine a limit of detection of 1 × 10(4) CFU mL(-1), indicating that TWTA is advantageous over HTM in terms of sensitivity and response time. Additionally, the limit of selectivity of the sensor was tested in a mixed bacterial solution, containing the target species in the presence of a 99-fold excess of competitor species. Finally, a first application for the sensor in terms of infection diagnosis is presented, revealing that the platform is able to detect bacteria in clinically relevant concentrations as low as 3 × 10(4) CFU mL(-1) in spiked urine samples.

  2. Thermal Fatigue Behaviour of Co-Based Alloy Coating Obtained by Laser Surface Melt-Casting on High Temperature Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal fatigue behaviour of C o-based alloy coating obtained by laser surface melt-casting on the high tempe rature alloy GH33 was studied. The results show that after each time of thermal cycling, the final residual stress was formed in the melt-casting layer which is attributed to the thermal stress and structural stress. Through the first 50 times of thermal cycling, the morphology of coating still inherits the laser casting one, but the dendrites get bigger; After the second 50 times of thermal cycling, corrosion pits emerge from coating, and mostly in the places where coating and substrate meet. The fatigue damage type of coating belongs to stress corrosi on.

  3. Layer resolved spectroscopy of potassium adsorbed on a Ru(001) surface: Photoemission and thermal desorption study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrbek, J. (Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (US)); Shek, M. (Department of Physics, Hunter College of CUNY, New York, New York 10021); Sham, T.K. (Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7, Canada); Xu, G. (Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, 11973)

    1989-11-01

    High-resolution photoemission spectroscopy and thermal desorption were used to study the coverage dependence of the K 3{ital p}{sub 3/2,1/2} core levels of K overlayers on Ru(001). Three doublets were observed to evolve sequentially and to shift to higher binding energy with increasing coverage of potassium. The doublets were assigned to photoemission from the interface (first layer), bulk'' (second layer), and surface (third layer). Spin--orbit splitting was observed for the first time in the condensed potassium phase by photoemission. The results are discussed in terms of the equivalent core approximation using a Born--Haber cycle. In the thermal desorption data three coverage regimes can be distinguished: a first layer desorbing with first-order kinetics and a strongly decreasing heat of adsorption ({ital E}{sub {ital A}} =2.80--0.87 eV); a second layer with zero-order desorption kinetics and {ital E}{sub {ital A}} =0.78 eV; a third layer and multilayers with the same kinetic order but with {ital E}{sub {ital A}} increasing from 0.78 to 0.93 eV, which is close to the heat of sublimation of potassium.

  4. Thermal-hydraulics and safety analysis of sectored compact reactor for lunar surface power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schriener, T. M. [Inst. for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Dept., Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); El-Genk, M. S. [Inst. for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Dept., Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mechanical Engineering Dept., Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The liquid NaK-cooled, fast-neutron spectrum, Sectored Compact Reactor (SCoRe-N 5) concept has been developed at the Univ. of New Mexico for lunar surface power applications. It is loaded with highly enriched UN fuel pins in a triangular lattice, and nominally operates at exit and inlet coolant temperatures of 850 K and 900 K. This long-life reactor generates up to 1 MWth continuously for {>=} 20 years. To avoid a single point failure in reactor cooling, the core is divided into 6 sectors that are neutronically and thermally coupled, but hydraulically independent. This paper performs a 3-D the thermal-hydraulic analysis of SCoRe--N 5 at nominal operation temperatures and a power level of 1 MWth. In addition, the paper investigates the potential of continuing reactor operation at a lower power in the unlikely event that one sector in the core experiences a loss of coolant (LOC). Redesigning the core with a contiguous steel matrix enhances the cooling of the sector experiencing a LOC. Results show that with a core sector experiencing a LOC, SCORE-N 5 could continue operating safely at a reduced power of 166.6 kWth. (authors)

  5. Stereochemistry and thermal stability of tartaric acid on the intrinsically chiral Cu{531} surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldanza, Silvia; Ardini, Jacopo; Giglia, Angelo; Held, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically chiral metal surfaces provide enantiospecific reaction environments without the need of co-adsorbed modifiers. Amongst the intrinsically chiral copper surfaces, Cu{531} has the smallest unit cell and the highest density of chiral sites. XPS, NEXAFS and TPD were employed to investigate the adsorption and decomposition behaviour of the two chiral enantiomers of tartaric acid on this surface. The results obtained from XPS and NEXAFS show that at saturation coverage both enantiomers of tartaric acid adsorb in a μ4 configuration through the two carboxylic groups, which are rotated with respect to each other by 90° ± ≈ 15° within the surface plane. At intermediate coverage the R,R enantiomer adopts a similar configuration, but the S,S enantiomer is different and shows a high degree of dissociation. Growth of multilayers is observed at high exposures when the sample is kept at below 370 K. TPD experiments show that multilayers desorb between 390 K and 470 K and decomposition of the chemisorbed layer occurs between 470 K and 600 K. The desorption spectra support a two-step decomposition mechanism with a Odbnd Cdbnd Cdbnd O or HO-HCdbnd CH-OH intermediate that leads to production of CO2 and CO. Enantiomeric differences are observed in the desorption features related to the decomposition of the chemisorbed layer.

  6. Pulsar Polar Cap Heating and Surface Thermal X-Ray Emission I. Curvature Radiation Pair Fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K; Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alexander G.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the effect of pulsar polar cap (PC) heating produced by positrons returning from the upper pair formation front. Our calculations are based on a self-consistent treatment of the pair dynamics and the effect of electric field screening by the returning positrons. We calculate the resultant X-ray luminosities, and discuss the dependence of the PC heating efficiencies on pulsar parameters, such as characteristic spin-down age, spin period, and surface magnetic field strength. In this study we concentrate on the regime where the pairs are produced in a magnetic field by curvature photons emitted by accelerating electrons. Our theoretical results are not in conflict with the available observational X-ray data and suggest that the effect of PC heating should significantly contribute to the thermal X-ray fluxes from middle-aged and old pulsars. The implications for current and future X-ray observations of pulsars are briefly outlined.

  7. The effect of surface roughness on lattice thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zan; Ni, Zhonghua; Zhao, Ruijie; Chen, Minhua; Bi, Kedong; Chen, Yunfei

    2011-07-01

    A theoretic model is presented to take into account the roughness effects on phonon transport in Si nanowires (NWs). Based on the roughness model, an indirect Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is carried out to predict the lattice thermal conductivities of the NWs with different surface qualities. Through fitting the experimental data with the MC predictions, the scattering strength on phonons from the boundary, umklapp phonon-phonon processes and impurities can be estimated. It is found that the scattering on phonons by the roughness cell boundaries in a rough nanowire can reduce the phonon mean free path to be smaller than the nanowire diameter, the Casimir limit of the phonon mean free path in a flat nanowire for phonons engaged in completely diffused boundary scattering processes.

  8. Possible high absorptance and low emittance selective surface for high temperature solar thermal collectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q C; Kelly, J C; Mills, D R

    1991-05-01

    Optical reflectivity measurements show that the reflectivity of Ge is dramatically reduced in the wavelength 0.3-1.4-microm range after high dose oxygen ion implantation. To explain such greatly reduced reflectivity, a model has been developed for the reflectivity of high dose oxygen implanted germanium. Our experimentally measured and calculated reflectivities show that, for a layered structure consisting of a Ge and GeO(2) mixture on Ge on GeO(2) on a Cu substrate, a low reflectivity of 0-10% in the solar spectrum is obtained, together with a high reflectivity approximately 100% in the 1.7-25-microm wavelength range. This is close to that of an ideal selective surface for solar energy thermal collectors operating at high temperatures from 300 to 500 degrees C.

  9. Human thermal sensation: frequency response to sinusoidal stimuli at the surface of the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ring, J.W.; de Dear, Richard; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    1993-01-01

    The question of how the human organism perceives changing thermal stimuli has been recently studied and reported in experiments where these stimuli were either ramps and plateaux or simply step changes. Other experiments have been done in which the stimuli have been periodically varying airflows...... function. This function is then compared with the functional form found in two experiments where the stimuli were pulsating airflows of differing frequency. The PSI model seems to simulate well the form of the response of the human skin system to varying temperature changes of a whole range of frequencies....... A psychosensory intensity (PSI) model has been developed to relate experimentally derived sensation data to simulated cutaneous thermoreceptor responses to the temperature ramp-plateaux and step stimuli applied to the skin surface by thermodes. From the point of view of signal processing, a natural extension...

  10. Signals for a Transition from Surface to Bulk Emission in Thermal Multifragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Beaulieu, L; Kwiatkowski, K K; De Souza, R T; Hsi, W C; Pienkowski, L; Back, B B; Bracken, D S; Breuer, H; Cornell, E A; Gimeno-Nogues, F; Ginger, D S; Gushue, S; Korteling, R G; Laforest, R; Martin, E; Morley, K B; Ramakrishnan, E; Remsberg, L P; Rowland, D; Ruangma, A; Viola, V E; Wang, G; Winchester, E M; Yennello, S J

    2000-01-01

    Excitation-energy-gated two-fragment correlation functions have been studied between 2 to 9A MeV of excitation energy for equilibrium-like sources formed in $\\pi^-$ and p + $^{197}$Au reactions at beam momenta of 8,9.2 and 10.2 GeV/c. Comparison of the data to an N-body Coulomb-trajectory code shows a decrease of one order of magnitude in the fragment emission time in the excitation energy interval 2-5A MeV, followed by a nearly constant breakup time at higher excitation energy. The observed decrease in emission time is shown to be strongly correlated with the increase of the fragment emission probability, and the onset of thermally-induced radial expansion. This result is interpreted as evidence consistent with a transition from surface-dominated to bulk emission expected for spinodal decomposition.

  11. Investigation on surface figuration and microstructure of laser glazed nanostructure zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Binghua; WANG Hongying; HAO Yunfei; TANG Weijie

    2009-01-01

    CO2 continuous wave laser beam had been applied to the laser glazing of plasma sprayed nanostructure zirconia thermal barrier coatings. The effects of luser glazing processing parameters on the surface figuration and microstructure change had been carried out, the microstructure and phase composition of the coatings had been evaluated by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD). SEM observation indicates that the microstructure of the as-glazed coating could be altered from single columnar structure to a combination of the columnar grain and fine equiaxed grain with the different laser glazing conditions. XRD analysis illustrates that the predominance phase of the as-glazed coating is the metastable tetragonal phase, and the glazed coating with the single columnar structure has shown the clear orientation in (220) and (400) peaks while the other coatings do not show that.

  12. Analysis of organic contaminants from silicon wafer and disk surfaces by thermal desorption-GC-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camenzind, Mark J.; Ahmed, Latif; Kumar, Anurag

    1999-03-01

    Organic contaminants can affect semiconductor wafer processing including gate oxide integrity, polysilicon growth, deep ultraviolet photoresist line-width, and cleaning & etching steps. Organophosphates are known to counter dope silicon wafers. Organic contaminants in disk drives can cause failures due to stiction or buildup on the heads. Therefore, it is important to identify organic contaminants adsorbed on wafer or disk surfaces and find their sources so they can be either completely eliminated or at least controlled. Dynamic headspace TD-GC-MS (Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry) methods are very sensitive and can be used to identify organic contaminants on disks and wafers, in air, or outgassing from running drives or their individual components.

  13. Effect of surface modification of Grewia optiva fibres on their physicochemical and thermal properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amar S Singha; Ashvinder K Rana

    2012-12-01

    This paper deals with the surface modification of Grewia optiva fibre through benzoylation and graft copolymerization process. Benzoylation of Grewia optiva fibre has been carried out on mercerized fibre with varying concentrations of benzoyl chloride solution. Graft copolymerization of acrylonitrile (AN) onto Grewia optiva fibre was carried out with ceric ammonium nitrate as the redox initiator in aqueous medium under the influence of microwave radiation. Raw, graft copolymerized and benzoylated fibres were subjected to evaluation of some of their properties like swelling behaviour, moisture absorbance and chemical resistance behaviour. It has been observed that 5% benzoyl chloride treated and graft copolymerized Grewia optiva show more resistance towards moisture, water and chemicals when compared with that of raw fibre. Further morphological, structural changes, thermal stability and crystallinity of raw, graft copolymerized, pretreated and benzoylated fibres have also been studied by SEM, FTIR, TGA and XRD techniques.

  14. An introductory analysis of digital infrared thermal imaging guided oral cancer detection using multiresolution rotation invariant texture features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, M.; Das Gupta, R.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Anjum, N.; Patsa, S.; Ray, J. G.

    2017-03-01

    This manuscript presents an analytical treatment on the feasibility of multi-scale Gabor filter bank response for non-invasive oral cancer pre-screening and detection in the long infrared spectrum. Incapability of present healthcare technology to detect oral cancer in budding stage manifests in high mortality rate. The paper contributes a step towards automation in non-invasive computer-aided oral cancer detection using an amalgamation of image processing and machine intelligence paradigms. Previous works have shown the discriminative difference of facial temperature distribution between a normal subject and a patient. The proposed work, for the first time, exploits this difference further by representing the facial Region of Interest(ROI) using multiscale rotation invariant Gabor filter bank responses followed by classification using Radial Basis Function(RBF) kernelized Support Vector Machine(SVM). The proposed study reveals an initial increase in classification accuracy with incrementing image scales followed by degradation of performance; an indication that addition of more and more finer scales tend to embed noisy information instead of discriminative texture patterns. Moreover, the performance is consistently better for filter responses from profile faces compared to frontal faces.This is primarily attributed to the ineptness of Gabor kernels to analyze low spatial frequency components over a small facial surface area. On our dataset comprising of 81 malignant, 59 pre-cancerous, and 63 normal subjects, we achieve state-of-the-art accuracy of 85.16% for normal v/s precancerous and 84.72% for normal v/s malignant classification. This sets a benchmark for further investigation of multiscale feature extraction paradigms in IR spectrum for oral cancer detection.

  15. Developments in convective heat transfer models featuring seamless and selected detail surfaces, employing electroless plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalmach, C. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Several model/instrument concepts employing electroless metallic skin were considered for improvement of surface condition, accuracy, and cost of contoured-geometry convective heat transfer models. A plated semi-infinite slab approach was chosen for development and evaluation in a hypersonic wind tunnel. The plated slab model consists of an epoxy casting containing fine constantan wires accurately placed at specified surface locations. An electroless alloy was deposited on the plastic surface that provides a hard, uniformly thick, seamless skin. The chosen alloy forms a high-output thermocouple junction with each exposed constantan wire, providing means of determining heat transfer during tunnel testing of the model. A selective electroless plating procedure was used to deposit scaled heatshield tiles on the lower surface of a 0.0175-scale shuttle orbiter model. Twenty-five percent of the tiles were randomly selected and plated to a height of 0.001-inch. The purpose was to assess the heating effects of surface roughness simulating misalignment of tiles that may occur during manufacture of the spacecraft.

  16. Age-related leaf characteristics of surface features and ultrastructure of Dendropanax morbifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Woo; Koo, Young Kuk; Yoon, Chul Jong

    2012-02-01

    Age-related morphological and anatomical changes were investigated by light and electron microscopy with juvenile and adult leaves of Dendropanax morbifera. Most juvenile leaves were glossy and palmate with five deep and narrow lobes divided nearly to two-thirds of the leaf base. Adult leaves were thick and possessed three lobes divided nearly to half of the leaf base. Stomata were ovoid and found on the abaxial surface. The epicuticular waxes of the plant included platelets, angular rodlets and threads. Platelets were attached to the surface at various angles. Distinct angular rodlets could be found on either the adaxial or the abaxial surface. Platelets on surface undulations occurred exclusively on the abaxial surface of adult leaves. Juvenile leaves were ca. 150 μm thick and had few intercellular spaces. Adult leaves were nearly two times thicker than juvenile leaves, and showed highly vacuolated cells and large intercellular spaces. The cuticle proper was apparent on the epidermis and showed distinctly alternating lamellate structures in juvenile leaves. The epidermal cell wall of adult leaves was covered with a cuticle layer for which a lamellate structure was not found. These results suggest that the species is heteroblastic in leaf characteristics with increasing leaf age.

  17. Mixed-Mode Fracture Behavior and Related Surface Topography Feature of a Typical Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, L.; Xie, L. Z.; Xie, H. P.; Ai, T.; He, B.

    2016-08-01

    The geo-mechanical properties of reservoirs, especially the morphology of the rock surface and the fracture properties of rocks, are of great importance in the modeling and simulation of hydraulic processes. To better understand these fundamental issues, five groups of mixed-mode fracture tests were conducted on sandstone using edge-cracked semi-circular bend specimens. Accordingly, the fracture loads, growth paths and fracture surfaces for different initial mixities of the mixed-mode loadings from pure mode I to pure mode II were then determined. A surface topography measurement for each rough fracture surface was conducted using a laser profilometer, and the fractal properties of these surfaces were then investigated. The fracture path evolution mechanism was also investigated via optical microscopy. Moreover, the mixed-mode fracture strength envelope and the crack propagation trajectories of sandstone were theoretically modeled using three widely accepted fracture criteria (i.e., the MTS, MSED and MERR criterions). The published test results in Hasanpour and Choupani (World Acad Sci Eng Tech 41:764-769, 2008) for limestone were also theoretically investigated to further examine the effectiveness of the above fracture criteria. However, none of these criteria could accurately predict the fracture envelopes of both sandstone and limestone. To better estimate the fracture strength of mixed-mode fractures, an empirical maximum tensile stress (EMTS) criterion was proposed and found to achieve good agreement with the test results. Finally, a uniformly pressurized fracture model was simulated for low pressurization rates using this criterion.

  18. Structural and compositional modification of a barium boroaluminosilicate glass surface by thermal poling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Nicholas J. [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, University Park, PA (United States); Science and Technology Division, Corning Incorporated, Corning, NY (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, University Park, PA (United States)

    2014-08-15

    In addition to inducing second-order nonlinear properties, significant structural and compositional alteration can be imparted to glass surfaces during the process of thermal poling. In this work, we focus on how thermal poling affects a structurally complex, nominally alkali-free boroaluminosilicate display glass composition. We provide evidence for electrolysis of the glass network, characterized by the migration of both cations (Ba{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}) and anions (O{sup -}, F{sup -}) towards opposing electrode interfaces. This process results in oxidation of the positively biased electrode and forms a network-former rich, modifier-depleted glass surface layer adjacent to the anodic interface. The modified glass layer thickness is qualitatively correlated to the oxidation resistance of the electrode material, while extrinsic ions such as H{sup +}/H{sub 3}O{sup +} at not found in the depletion layer to compensate for the migration of modifier cations out of the region. Rather, FTIR spectroscopy suggests a local restructuring of the B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} network species to accommodate the charge imbalance created by the exodus of network-modifying cations, specifically the conversion of tetrahedral B(4) to trigonal B(3) as Ba or Na ions are removed from B-related sites in the parent network. The resultant poling-induced depletion layer exhibits enhanced hydrolytic resistance under acidic conditions, and the IR spectra are substantially unlike those produced by acid leaching the same glass. (orig.)

  19. Invariant Surface EMG Feature Against Varying Contraction Level for Myoelectric Control Based on Muscle Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiayuan; Zhang, Dingguo; Sheng, Xinjun; Li, Shunchong; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2015-05-01

    Variations in muscle contraction effort have a substantial impact on performance of pattern recognition based myoelectric control. Though incorporating changes into training phase could decrease the effect, the training time would be increased and the clinical viability would be limited. The modulation of force relies on the coordination of multiple muscles, which provides a possibility to classify motions with different forces without adding extra training samples. This study explores the property of muscle coordination in the frequency domain and found that the orientation of muscle activation pattern vector of the frequency band is similar for the same motion with different force levels. Two novel features based on discrete Fourier transform and muscle coordination were proposed subsequently, and the classification accuracy was increased by around 11% compared to the traditional time domain feature sets when classifying nine classes of motions with three different force levels. Further analysis found that both features decreased the difference among different forces of the same motion ) and maintained the distance among different motions p > 0.1). This study also provided a potential way for simultaneous classification of hand motions and forces without training at all force levels.

  20. Thermal effects generated by high-intensity focused ultrasound beams at normal incidence to a bone surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell, Diane M; Myers, Matthew R

    2010-01-01

    Experiments and computations were performed to study factors affecting thermal safety when high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) beams are normally incident (i.e., beam axis normal to the interface) upon a bone/soft-tissue interface. In particular, the temperature rise and thermal dose were determined as a function of separation between the beam focus and the interface. Under conditions representative of clinical HIFU procedures, it was found that the thermal dose at the bone surface can exceed the threshold for necrosis even when the beam focus is more than 4 cm from the bone. Experiments showed that reflection of the HIFU beam from the bone back into the transducer introduced temperature fluctuations of as much as +/-15% and may be an important consideration for safety analyses at sufficiently high acoustic power. The applicability of linear propagation models in predicting thermal dose near the interface was also addressed. Linear models, while underpredicting thermal dose at the focus, provided a conservative (slight overprediction) estimate of thermal dose at the bone surface. Finally, temperature rise due to absorption of shear waves generated by the HIFU beam in the bone was computed. Modeling shear-wave propagation in the thermal analysis showed that the predicted temperature rise off axis was as much as 30% higher when absorption of shear waves is included, indicating that enhanced heating due to shear-wave absorption is potentially important, even for normally incident HIFU beams.

  1. Changing the surface properties on naval steel as result of non-thermal plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatiuc, B.; Sabău, A.; Dumitrache, C. L.; Hnatiuc, M.; Crețu, M.; Astanei, D.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of corrosion, related to Biofouling formation, is an issue with very high importance in the maritime domain. According to new rules, the paints and all the technologies for the conditioning of naval materials must fulfil more restrictive environmental conditions. In order to solve this issue, different new clean technologies have been proposed. Among them, the use of non-thermal plasmas produced at atmospheric pressure plays a very important role. This study concerns the opportunity of plasma treatment for preparation or conditioning of naval steel OL36 type. The plasma reactors chosen for the experiments can operate at atmospheric pressure and are easy to use in industrial conditions. They are based on electrical discharges GlidArc and Spark, which already proved their efficiency for the surface activation or even for coatings of the surface. The non-thermal character of the plasma is ensured by a gas flow blown through the electrical discharges. One power supply has been used for reactors that provide a 5 kV voltage and a maximum current of 100 mA. The modifications of the surface properties and composition have been studied by XPS technique (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). There were taken into consideration 5 samples: 4 of them undergoing a Mini-torch plasma, a Gliding Spark, a GlidArc with dry air and a GlidArc with CO2, respectively the fifth sample which is the untreated witness. Before the plasma treatment, samples of naval steel were processed in order to obtain mechanical gloss. The time of treatment was chosen to 12 minutes. In the spectroscopic analysis, done on a ULVAC-PHI, Inc. PHI 5000 Versa Probe scanning XPS microprobe, a monocromated Al Kα X-ray source with a spot size of 100 μm2 was used to scan each sample while the photoelectrons were collected at a 45-degree take-off angle. Differences were found between atomic concentrations in each individual case, which proves that the active species produced by each type of plasma affects

  2. Microstructural features of water fern Salvinia natans (L. All. organ surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Shcherbatiuk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of the organs surface of the water fern Salvinia natans (L. All. has been studied under scanning electron microscope. It was established that the existence on the border between air and water environments is suported by specific microstructure of floating leaves. The adaxial side of floating leaves has well-developed cuticle and stomata placed below the level of epidermis, while abaxial surface of such leaves and submerged modified leaves are characterized by ultra-thin cell walls of the epidermis and numerous filamentous trichomes. We calculated number of stomata per unit area of leaves and the average diameter of stomata. It is claimed that the structure of wall of the sporocarp promotes the passage of the annual summer-green rhythm. Sporocarp provides diving of mega- and microsporangia to the bottom of the water reservoir in autumn and their raising on the water surface in the spring after destruction of its walls.

  3. Surface functionalization on the thermal conductivity of graphene–polymer nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingchao Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Exploring thermal transport in graphene–polymer nanocomposite is significant to its applications with better thermal properties. Interfacial thermal conductance between graphene and polymer matrix plays a critical role in the improvement of thermal conductivity of graphene–polymer nanocomposite. Unfortunately, it is still challenging to understand the interfacial thermal transport between graphene nanofiller and polymer matrix at small material length scale. To this end, using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD simulations, we investigate the interfacial thermal conductance of graphene–polyethylene (PE nanocomposite. The influence of functionalization with hydrocarbon chains on the interfacial thermal conductance of graphene–polymer nanocomposites was studied, taking into account the effects of model size and thermal conductivity of graphene. An analytical model is also used to calculate the thermal conductivity of nanocomposite. The results are considered to contribute to the development of new graphene–polymer nanocomposites with tailored thermal properties.

  4. Ultrasmooth reaction-sintered silicon carbide surface resulting from combination of thermal oxidation and ceria slurry polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xinmin; Dai, Yifan; Deng, Hui; Guan, Chaoliang; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2013-06-17

    An ultrasmooth reaction-sintered silicon carbide surface with an rms roughness of 0.424 nm is obtained after thermal oxidation for 30 min followed by ceria slurry polishing for 30 min. By SEM-EDX analysis, we investigated the thermal oxidation behavior of RS-SiC, in which the main components are Si and SiC. As the oxidation rate is higher in the area with defects, there are no scratches or cracks on the surface after oxidation. However, a bumpy structure is formed after oxidation because the oxidation rates of Si and SiC differ. Through a theoretical analysis of thermal oxidation using the Deal-Grove model and the removal of the oxide layer by ceria slurry polishing in accordance with the Preston equation, a model for obtaining an ultrasmooth surface is proposed and the optimal processing conditions are presented.

  5. Symmetry plays a key role in the erasing of patterned surface features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzaquen, Michael; Salez, Thomas; Raphaël, Elie [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Théorique, UMR CNRS Gulliver 7083, ESPCI ParisTech, PSL Research University, 75005 Paris (France); Ilton, Mark; Massa, Michael V.; Fowler, Paul [Department