WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface temperature melt

  1. Inferring snow pack ripening and melt out from distributed ground surface temperature measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-O. Schmid

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal snow cover and its melting are heterogeneous both in space and time. Describing and modelling this variability are important because it affects divers phenomena such as runoff, ground temperatures or slope movements. This study investigates the derivation of melting characteristics based on spatial clusters of temperature measurements. Results are based on data from Switzerland where ground surface temperatures were measured with miniature loggers (iButtons at 40 locations, referred to as footprints. At each footprint, ten iButtons have been distributed randomly few cm below the ground surface over an area of 10 m × 10 m. Footprints span elevations of 2100–3300 m a.s.l. and slope angles of 0–55°, as well as diverse slope expositions and types of surface cover and ground material. Based on two years of temperature data, the basal ripening date and the melt-out date are determined for each iButton, aggregated to the footprint level and further analysed. The date of melt out could be derived for nearly all iButtons, the ripening date could be extracted for only approximately half of them because it requires ground freezing below the snow pack. The variability within a footprint is often considerable and one to three weeks difference between melting or ripening of the points in one footprint is not uncommon. The correlation of mean annual ground surface temperatures, ripening date and melt-out date is moderate, making them useful intuitive complementary measured for model evaluation.

  2. Surface Temperature and Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet, 2000 - 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Koeing, Lora S.; Box, Jason E.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced melting along with surface-temperature increases measured using infrared satellite data, have been documented for the Greenland Ice Sheet. Recently we developed a climate-quality data record of ice-surface temperature (IST) of the Greenland Ice Sheet using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) IST product -- http://modis-snow-ice.gsfc.nasa.gov.Using daily and mean-monthly MODIS IST maps from the data record we show maximum extent of melt for the ice sheet and its six major drainage basins for a 12-year period extending from March of 2000 through December of 2011. The duration of the melt season on the ice sheet varies in different drainage basins with some basins melting progressively earlier over the study period. Some (but not all) of the basins also show a progressively-longer duration of melt. The short time of the study period (approx 12 years) precludes an evaluation of statistically-significant trends. However the dataset provides valuable information on natural variability of IST, and on the ability of the MODIS instrument to capture changes in IST and melt conditions in different drainage basins of the ice sheet.

  3. Variability of Surface Temperature and Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet, 2000-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Comiso, Josefino, C.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Koenig, Lora S.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced melting along with surface-temperature increases measured using infrared satellite data, have been documented for the Greenland Ice Sheet. Recently we developed a climate-quality data record of ice-surface temperature (IST) of the Greenland Ice Sheet using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 1ST product -- http://modis-snow-ice.gsfc.nasa.gov. Using daily and mean monthly MODIS 1ST maps from the data record we show maximum extent of melt for the ice sheet and its six major drainage basins for a 12-year period extending from March of 2000 through December of 2011. The duration of the melt season on the ice sheet varies in different drainage basins with some basins melting progressively earlier over the study period. Some (but not all) of the basins also show a progressively-longer duration of melt. The short time of the study period (approximately 12 years) precludes an evaluation of statistically-significant trends. However the dataset provides valuable information on natural variability of IST, and on the ability of the MODIS instrument to capture changes in IST and melt conditions indifferent drainage basins of the ice sheet.

  4. Surface Transformations and Water Uptake on Liquid and Solid Butanol near the Melting Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Papagiannakopoulos, Panos; Thomson, Erik S; Markovic, Nikola; Pettersson, Jan B C

    2013-01-01

    Water interactions with organic surfaces are of central importance in biological systems and many Earth system processes. Here we describe experimental studies of water collisions and uptake kinetics on liquid and solid butanol from 160 to 200 K. Hyperthermal D2O molecules (0.32 eV) undergo efficient trapping on both solid and liquid butanol, and only a minor fraction scatters inelastically after an 80% loss of kinetic energy to surface modes. Trapped molecules either desorb within a few ms, or are taken up by the butanol phase during longer times. The water uptake and surface residence time increase with temperature above 180 K indicating melting of the butanol surface 4.5 K below the bulk melting temperature. Water uptake changes gradually across the melting point and trapped molecules are rapidly lost by diffusion into the liquid above 190 K. This indicates that liquid butanol maintains a surface phase with limited water permeability up to 5.5 K above the melting point. These surface observations are indic...

  5. Greenland ice sheet surface temperature, melt and mass loss: 2000-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D.K.; Williams, R.S.; Luthcke, S.B.; DiGirolamo, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    A daily time series of 'clear-sky' surface temperature has been compiled of the Greenland ice sheet (GIS) using 1 km resolution moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) land-surface temperature (LST) maps from 2000 to 2006. We also used mass-concentration data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to study mass change in relationship to surface melt from 2003 to 2006. The mean LST of the GIS increased during the study period by ???0.27??Ca-1. The increase was especially notable in the northern half of the ice sheet during the winter months. Melt-season length and timing were also studied in each of the six major drainage basins. Rapid (meltwater is flowing rapidly to the base of the ice sheet, causing acceleration of outlet glaciers, thus highlighting the metastability of parts of the GIS and the vulnerability of the ice sheet to air-temperature increases. If air temperatures continue to rise over Greenland, increased surface melt will play a large role in ice-sheet mass loss.

  6. Slowdown of global surface air temperature increase and acceleration of ice melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, André; Yin, Qiuzhen; Nifenecker, Hervé; Poitou, Jean

    2017-07-01

    Although recent decades have been the warmest since 1850, and global mean temperatures during 2015 and 2016 beat all instrumental records, the rate of increase in global surface air temperature (GSAT) significantly decreased at the beginning of the 21st Century. In this context, we examine the roles of ice melting and associated increase in sea-water mass, both of which significantly increased at the same time as GSAT decreased. Specifically, we show that (1) the slowdown of the rate of increase in GSAT between the specific periods 1992-2001 and 2002-2011 exists in all three climate records analyzed and is statistically significant at the 5% level amounting between 0.029 and 0. 036°C/yr and leaving an energy of 14.8-18.4 1019 J/yr available; (2) the increase of the atmosphere-related ice melt between these two periods amounts to 316 Gt/yr which requires 10.5 1019 J/yr, that is, between 57% and 71% of the energy left by the slowdown; and (3) the energy budget shows, therefore, that the heat required to melt this additional 316 Gt/yr of ice is of the same order as the energy needed to warm the atmosphere during the decade 2002-2011 as much as during the previous one, suggesting a redistribution of heat within the atmosphere-cryosphere system.

  7. Effect of Melt Temperature on Surface Films Formed on Molten AZ91D Alloy Protected by Graphite Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weihong; Zhou, Jixue; Ma, Baichang; Wang, Jinwei; Wu, Jianhua; Yang, Yuansheng

    2017-08-01

    Graphite powder was adopted to prevent AZ91D alloy from oxidizing during melting and casting. The microstructure of the resultant surface films, formed at 933 K, 973 K, 1013 K, and 1053 K (660 °C, 700 °C, 740 °C, and 780 °C) for 30 minutes, was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometer, and X-ray diffraction, and the phase composition of the surface films was analyzed by the standard Gibbs free energy change of the reactions between the graphite powder, the alloy melt, and the ambient atmosphere. The effect and mechanism of melt temperature on the resultant surface films were also discussed. The results indicated that the surface films, of which the surface morphology comprised folds and wrinkles, were composed of a protective layer and MgF2 particles. The protective layer was contributive to the prevention of the molten alloy from oxidizing, and consisted of magnesium, oxygen, fluorine, carbon, and a small amount of aluminium existing in the form of MgO, MgF2, C, and MgAl2O4. The layer thickness was 200 to 900 nm. The melt temperature may affect the surface films through the increased interaction between the graphite powder, the melt, and the ambient atmosphere. The oxygen content and thickness of the protective layer decreased and then increased, while the height of the folds increased with melt temperature.

  8. Spray forming: A numerical investigation of the influence of the gas to melt ratio on the billet surface temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini; Hattel, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between the Gas to Melt Ratio (GMR) and the surface temperature of an evolving billet surface in spray forming is investigated numerically. The basis for the analysis is an integrated approach for modelling the entire spray forming process. This model includes the droplet atomisa...

  9. Temperature dependence of the slip length in polymer melts at attractive surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servantie, J; Müller, M

    2008-07-11

    Using Couette and Poiseuille flows, we extract the temperature dependence of the slip length, delta, from molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained polymer model in contact with an attractive surface. delta is dictated by the ratio of bulk viscosity and surface mobility. At weakly attractive surfaces, lubrication layers form; delta is large and increases upon cooling. Close to the glass transition temperature Tg, very large slip lengths are observed. At a more attractive surface, a sticky surface layer is built up, giving rise to small slip lengths. Upon cooling, delta decreases at high temperatures, passes through a minimum, and grows for T-->Tg. At strongly attractive surfaces, the Navier-slip condition fails to describe Couette and Poiseuille flows simultaneously. The simulations are corroborated by a schematic, two-layer model suggesting that the observations do not depend on details of the computational model.

  10. Disordering and Melting of Aluminum Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoltze, Per; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Landman, U.

    1988-01-01

    We report on a molecular-dynamics simulation of an Al(110) surface using the effective-medium theory to describe the interatomic interactions. The surface region is found to start melting ≅200 K below the bulk melting temperature with a gradual increase in the thickness of the disordered layer as...

  11. Methods for Melting Temperature Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Qi-Jun

    Melting temperature calculation has important applications in the theoretical study of phase diagrams and computational materials screenings. In this thesis, we present two new methods, i.e., the improved Widom's particle insertion method and the small-cell coexistence method, which we developed in order to capture melting temperatures both accurately and quickly. We propose a scheme that drastically improves the efficiency of Widom's particle insertion method by efficiently sampling cavities while calculating the integrals providing the chemical potentials of a physical system. This idea enables us to calculate chemical potentials of liquids directly from first-principles without the help of any reference system, which is necessary in the commonly used thermodynamic integration method. As an example, we apply our scheme, combined with the density functional formalism, to the calculation of the chemical potential of liquid copper. The calculated chemical potential is further used to locate the melting temperature. The calculated results closely agree with experiments. We propose the small-cell coexistence method based on the statistical analysis of small-size coexistence MD simulations. It eliminates the risk of a metastable superheated solid in the fast-heating method, while also significantly reducing the computer cost relative to the traditional large-scale coexistence method. Using empirical potentials, we validate the method and systematically study the finite-size effect on the calculated melting points. The method converges to the exact result in the limit of a large system size. An accuracy within 100 K in melting temperature is usually achieved when the simulation contains more than 100 atoms. DFT examples of Tantalum, high-pressure Sodium, and ionic material NaCl are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of the method in its practical applications. The method serves as a promising approach for large-scale automated material screening in which

  12. Structural and elemental analysis of melt-processible high-temperature superconductors by surface science and x-ray diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, A.M.; Sheng, Z.Z.; El Ali, A.; Mooney, G.D.; Nelson, A.J.; Goral, J.; Kazmerski, L.L.

    1988-11-15

    We report the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), microprobe analysis (wavelength dispersive and energy dispersive spectroscopies), secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), and x-ray diffraction measurements on a series of melt-processed high critical-temperature superconductors. The superconductors were synthesized through a melt reaction between TbBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub x/ and nonstoichiometric rare-earth Ba-Cu-O oxides. The melt-processed samples are dense, largely void-free superconductors with critical temperatures in the 90--95 K range. Microprobe and SIMS data show the absence of Tb in surfaces of the interiors of samples which had been fractured to expose the interior regions. Comparative microprobe and SEM data are included for conventionally prepared sintered samples. Comparative x-ray diffraction studies are presented which show that the melt-processed samples studied have diffraction patterns nearly identical to those of sintered (rare earth)Ba/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub x/ samples. In two of the three Y-based melt-processed superconductors studied, the compound stoichiometry from microprobe analysis is Y/sub 1/Ba/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub x/. The evidence presented indicates that the TbBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub x/ decomposes during the melt reaction.

  13. SURFACE MELTING OF ALUMINIUM ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    Veit, S.; Albert, D; Mergen, R.

    1987-01-01

    The wear properties of aluminium base alloys are relatively poor. Laser surface melting and alloying has proved successful in many alloy systems as a means of significantly improving the surface properties. The present work describes experiments designed to establish the scope of laser treatment of aluminium alloys. Aluminium does not absorb CO2 laser light as well as other metals which necessitated first a general study of absorption caotings. Aluminium alloys offer fewer opportunities than ...

  14. Thermal Fatigue Behaviour of Co-Based Alloy Coating Obtained by Laser Surface Melt-Casting on High Temperature Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal fatigue behaviour of C o-based alloy coating obtained by laser surface melt-casting on the high tempe rature alloy GH33 was studied. The results show that after each time of thermal cycling, the final residual stress was formed in the melt-casting layer which is attributed to the thermal stress and structural stress. Through the first 50 times of thermal cycling, the morphology of coating still inherits the laser casting one, but the dendrites get bigger; After the second 50 times of thermal cycling, corrosion pits emerge from coating, and mostly in the places where coating and substrate meet. The fatigue damage type of coating belongs to stress corrosi on.

  15. Surface reconstruction precursor to melting in Au309 clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyi Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The melting of gold cluster is one of essential properties of nanoparticles and revisited to clarify the role played by the surface facets in the melting transition by molecular dynamics simulations. The occurrence of elaborate surface reconstruction is observed using many-body Gupta potential as energetic model for 309-atom (2.6 nm decahedral, cuboctahedral and icosahedral gold clusters. Our results reveal for the first time a surface reconstruction as precursor to the melting transitions. The surface reconstruction lead to an enhanced melting temperature for (100 faceted decahedral and cuboctahedral cluster than (111 faceted icosahedral gold cluster, which form a liquid patch due to surface vacancy.

  16. Monitoring snow melt characteristics on the Greenland ice sheet using a new MODIS land surface temperature and emissivity product (MOD21)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulley, G. C.; Hall, D. K.; Hook, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) and emissivity are sensitive energy-balance parameters that control melt and energy exchange between the surface and the atmosphere. MODIS LST is currently used to monitor melt zones on glaciers and can be used for glacier or ice sheet mass balance calculations. Much attention has been paid recently to the warming of the Arctic in the context of global warming, with a focus on the Greenland ice sheet because of its importance with sea-level rise. Various researchers have shown a steady decline in the extent of the Northern Hemisphere sea ice, both the total extent and the extent of the perennial or multiyear ice. Surface melt characteristics over the Greenland ice sheet have been traditionally monitored using the MODIS LST and albedo products (e.g. MOD11 and MOD10A1). Far fewer studies have used thermal emissivity data to monitor surface melt characteristics due to the lack of suitable data. In theory, longwave emissivity combined with LST information should give a more direct measure of snow melt characteristics since the emissivity is an intrinsic property of the surface, whereas the albedo is dependent on other factors such as solar zenith angle, and shadowing effects. Currently no standard emissivity product exists that can dynamically retrieve changes in longwave emissivity consistently over long time periods. This problem has been addressed with the new MOD21 product, which uses the ASTER TES algorithm to dynamically retrieve LST and spectral emissivity (bands 29, 31, 32) at 1-km resolution. In this study we show that using a new proposed index termed the snow emissivity difference index (SEDI) derived from the MOD21 longwave emissivity product, combined with the LST, will improve our understanding of snow melt and freezeup dynamics on ice sheets such as Greenland. The results also suggest that synergistic use of both thermal-based and albedo data will help to improve our understanding of snow melt dynamics on glaciers and ice

  17. Surface-Induced Melting of Metal Nanoclusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Quan-Wen; ZHU Ru-Zeng; WEI Jiu-An; WEN Yu-Hua

    2004-01-01

    @@ We investigate the size effect on melting of metal nanoclusters by molecular dynamics simulation and thermodynamic theory based on Kofman's melt model. By the minimization of the free energy of metal nanoclusters with respect to the thickness of the surface liquid layer, it has been found that the nanoclusters of the same metal have the same premelting temperature Tpre = T0 - T0(γsv -γlv -γst)/(ρLξ) (T0 is the melting point of bulk metal, γsv the solid-vapour interfacial free energy, γlv the liquid-vapour interfacial free energy, γsl the solid-liquid interfacial free energy, ρ the density of metal, L the latent heat of bulk metal, and ξ the characteristic length of surface-interface interaction) to be independent of the size of nanoclusters, so that the characteristic length ξ ofa metal can be obtained easily by Tpre, which can be obtained by experiments or molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The premelting temperature Tpre of Cu is obtained by MD simulations, then ξ is obtained.The melting point Tcm is further predicted by free energy analysis and is in good agreement with the result of our MD simulations. We also predict the maximum premelting-liquid width of Cu nanoclusters with various sizes and the critical size, below which there is no premelting.

  18. Photometric analysis of the structure evolution on the Pb-19.4%Sn melt surface in the S-L temperature range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyakhovitskii M.M.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure evolution of alloys in solidification range is considered as the first-order phase transformation from the solid state to the liquid one, which occurs by the mechanism of nucleation and growth of more symmetrical phase to less symmetrical crystalline phase. The kinetic regularities of this transformation are studied by the method of the photometric analysis of structure images (PHASI, which makes it possible to establish the temperature dependence of the relationship between the solid and liquid phases and their distribution on the melt surface. The PHASI method is based on the combined analysis of the brightness spectra of the visible light reflections from the sample surface and of the distribution of its scattering centers in different intensity intervals. The data on the structure evolution of the Sn+19.4%Pb alloy upon melting and solidification were considered in parallel with the measured spectra of sound signals. It was revealed that a distinct maximum is observed in the temperature dependence of radiation energy in the temperature range of phase transformation from the liquid into the solid state and hot crack formation occurs near the transition zone in the region of the contact of the ingot with the crucible.

  19. Melt processed high-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The achievement of large critical currents is critical to the applications of high-temperature superconductors. Recent developments have shown that melt processing is suitable for producing high J c oxide superconductors. Using magnetic forces between such high J c oxide superconductors and magnets, a person could be levitated.This book has grown largely out of research works on melt processing of high-temperature superconductors conducted at ISTEC Superconductivity Research Laboratory. The chapters build on melt processing, microstructural characterization, fundamentals of flux pinning, criti

  20. Modeling the melting temperature of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Zhu, Tian-Shu

    2016-06-22

    The effect of size, composition and dimension on the melting temperature of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys was investigated by considering the interatomic interaction. The established thermodynamics model without any arbitrarily adjustable parameters can be used to predict the melting temperature of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys. It is found that, the melting temperature and interatomic interaction of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys decrease with the decrease in size and the increasing composition of the lower surface energy metal. Moreover, for the nanoscaled bimetallic alloys with the same size and composition, the dependence of the melting temperature on the dimension can be sequenced as follows: nanoparticles > nanowires > thin films. The accuracy of the developed model is verified by the recent experimental and computer simulation results.

  1. Analysis of Contact Melting Driven by Surface Heat Flux Around a Cylinder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.S. Zhao; W.Z. Chen; F.R. Sun; Z.Y. Chen

    2008-01-01

    The contact melting of phase change material around a moving horizontal cylindrical heat source, which descended under its own weight, is investigated in this article. A melting model under constant surface heat flux is established. The analytical results for thickness and pressure distributions inside melt layer and steady melting velocity are obtained by using contact melting theory. The melting law is discussed, and compared with that of contact melting driven by temperature difference. It is found that quasi-steady melting velocity is determined by heat flux of heat source, and the variation of heat source density has less effect on melting velocity.

  2. 3He melting pressure temperature scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halperin, W.P.; Archie, C.N.; Richardson, R.C.;

    1976-01-01

    The latent heat for solidification of **3He has been measured along the **3He melting curve between 23 and 1 mK. A temperature scale is established which depends only on measurements of heat, pressure and volume, and on the condition that the entropy of solid **3He approaches R ln 2 at high...... temperatures. The A feature of the melting curve which suggests itself as a thermometric fixed point is found to be T//A equals 2. 75 plus or minus 0. 11 mK. The agreement between this value and independent measurements of T//A, based on nuclear or electronic paramagnetism, Johnson noise thermometry...

  3. Atomic simulations for surface-initiated melting of Nb(111)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xi-yuan; WU Dan

    2009-01-01

    A modified analytic embedded-atom model(MAEAM) was applied to investigate surface premelting and melting behaviors of Nb(111) plane by molecular dynamics(MD) simulations. First the relaxation of surface interface space at 300 K was studied. Then a number N of the disordered atoms per unit area was determined at the given temperatures to investigate the surface premelting and melting evolution. The obtained results indicated that the premelting phenomena occurred at about 1 100 K and a liquid-like layer emerged on (111) plane simultaneously. As temperature increased up to 2 200 K, the number N grew logarithmically for short-range metallic interactions. Upon 2 350 K surface melting generated originally and the number N increased exponentially with the incremental temperature.

  4. Laser melting of carbide tool surface: Model and experimental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S., E-mail: bsyilbas@kfupm.edu.sa [ME Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 1913, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Shuja, S.Z.; Khan, S.M.A.; Aleem, A. [ME Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 1913, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-09-15

    Laser controlled melting is one of the methods to achieve structural integrity in the surface region of the carbide tools. In the present study, laser heating of carbide cutting tool and temperature distribution in the irradiated region are examined. The phase change process during the heating is modeled using the enthalpy-porosity method. The influence of laser pulse intensity distribution across the irradiated surface ({beta}) on temperature distribution and melt formation is investigated. An experiment is carried out and the microstructural changes due to laser consecutive pulse heating is examined using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is found that melt depth predicted agrees with the experimental results. The maximum depth of the melt layer moves away from the symmetry axis with increasing {beta}.

  5. Laser melting of carbide tool surface: Model and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Shuja, S. Z.; Khan, S. M. A.; Aleem, A.

    2009-09-01

    Laser controlled melting is one of the methods to achieve structural integrity in the surface region of the carbide tools. In the present study, laser heating of carbide cutting tool and temperature distribution in the irradiated region are examined. The phase change process during the heating is modeled using the enthalpy-porosity method. The influence of laser pulse intensity distribution across the irradiated surface ( β) on temperature distribution and melt formation is investigated. An experiment is carried out and the microstructural changes due to laser consecutive pulse heating is examined using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is found that melt depth predicted agrees with the experimental results. The maximum depth of the melt layer moves away from the symmetry axis with increasing β.

  6. 3He melting pressure temperature scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halperin, W.P.; Archie, C.N.; Richardson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    The latent heat for solidification of **3He has been measured along the **3He melting curve between 23 and 1 mK. A temperature scale is established which depends only on measurements of heat, pressure and volume, and on the condition that the entropy of solid **3He approaches R ln 2 at high...

  7. Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX); Mireles, Jose (Universidad Aut%C3%94onoma de Ciudad Ju%C3%94arez Ciudad Ju%C3%94arez, Mexico); Marquez, Noel (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX); Quinones, Stella (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX)

    2011-11-01

    This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

  8. Optimization of Temperatures Heating Melt and Annealing Soft Magnetic Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsepelev, Vladimir; Starodubtsev, Yuri

    2017-05-01

    Taking into account the concept of the quasi-chemical model of the liquid micro-non-uniform composition and the research made on the physical properties of the Fe-based melts being crystallized, the unique technology of the melt time-temperature treatment has been developed. Amorphous ribbons produced using this technology require optimal annealing temperatures to be specifically selected. Temperature dependences of the kinematic viscosity of a multicomponent Fe72.5Cu1Nb2Mo1.5Si14B9 melt have been studied. A critical temperature is detected above which the activation energy of viscous flow of the melt changes. Upon cooling the overheated melt, the temperature curves of the kinematic viscosity become linear within the given coordinates. In amorphous ribbon produced in the mode with overheating the melt above the critical temperature, the enthalpy of crystallization grows, the following heat treatment results in an increase in magnetic permeability.

  9. Snow melt on sea ice surfaces as determined from passive microwave satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark R.

    1987-01-01

    SMMR data for the year 1979, 1980 and 1984 have been analyzed to determine the variability in the onset of melt for the Arctic seasonal sea ice zone. The results show melt commencing in either the Kara/Barents Seas or Chukchi Sea and progressing zonally towards the central Asian coast (Laptev Sea). Individual regions had interannual variations in melt onset in the 10-20 day range. To determine whether daily changes occur in the sea ice surface melt, the SMMR 18 and 37 GHz brightness temperature data are analyzed at day/night/twilight periods. Brightness temperatures illustrate diurnal variations in most regions during melt. In the East Siberian Sea, however, daily variations are observed in 1979, throughout the analysis period, well before any melt would usually have commenced. Understanding microwave responses to changing surface conditions during melt will perhaps give additional information about energy budgets during the winter to summer transition of sea ice.

  10. Accurate thermodynamic relations of the melting temperature of nanocrystals with different shapes and pure theoretical calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jinhua; Fu, Qingshan; Xue, Yongqiang, E-mail: xyqlw@126.com; Cui, Zixiang

    2017-05-01

    Based on the surface pre-melting model, accurate thermodynamic relations of the melting temperature of nanocrystals with different shapes (tetrahedron, cube, octahedron, dodecahedron, icosahedron, nanowire) were derived. The theoretically calculated melting temperatures are in relative good agreements with experimental, molecular dynamic simulation and other theoretical results for nanometer Au, Ag, Al, In and Pb. It is found that the particle size and shape have notable effects on the melting temperature of nanocrystals, and the smaller the particle size, the greater the effect of shape. Furthermore, at the same equivalent radius, the more the shape deviates from sphere, the lower the melting temperature is. The value of melting temperature depression of cylindrical nanowire is just half of that of spherical nanoparticle with an identical radius. The theoretical relations enable one to quantitatively describe the influence regularities of size and shape on the melting temperature and to provide an effective way to predict and interpret the melting temperature of nanocrystals with different sizes and shapes. - Highlights: • Accurate relations of T{sub m} of nanocrystals with various shapes are derived. • Calculated T{sub m} agree with literature results for nano Au, Ag, Al, In and Pb. • ΔT{sub m} (nanowire) = 0.5ΔT{sub m} (spherical nanocrystal). • The relations apply to predict and interpret the melting behaviors of nanocrystals.

  11. Impact ejecta-induced melting of surface ice deposits on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, David K.; Head, James W.

    2016-12-01

    Fluvial features present around impact craters on Mars can offer insight into the ancient martian climate and its relationship to the impact cratering process. The widespread spatial and temporal distribution of surface ice on Mars suggests that the interaction between impact cratering and surface ice could have been a relatively frequent occurrence. We explore the thermal and melting effects on regional surface ice sheets in this case, where an impact event occurs in regional surface ice deposits overlying a regolith/bedrock target. We provide an estimate for the post-impact temperature of martian ejecta as a function of crater diameter, and conduct thermal modeling to assess the degree to which contact melting of hot ejecta superposed on surface ice deposits can produce meltwater and carve fluvial features. We also evaluate whether fluvial features could form as a result of basal melting of the ice deposits in response to the thermal insulation provided by the overlying impact ejecta. Contact melting is predicted to occur immediately following ejecta emplacement over the course of hundreds of years to tens of kyr. Basal melting initiates when the 273 K isotherm rises through the crust and reaches the base of the ice sheet ∼0.1 to ∼1 Myr following the impact. We assess the range of crater diameters predicted to produce contact and basal melting of surface ice sheets, as well as the melt fluxes, volumes, timescales, predicted locations of melting (relative to the crater), and the associated hydraulic and hydrologic consequences. We find that the heat flux and surface temperature conditions required to produce contact melting are met throughout martian history, whereas the heat flux and surface temperature conditions to produce basal melting are met only under currently understood ancient martian thermal conditions. For an impact into a regional ice sheet, the contact and basal melting mechanisms are predicted to generate melt volumes between ∼10-1 and 105 km3

  12. Temperature dependence of densities of Sb and Bi melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG HaoRan; SUN ChunJing; WANG Rui; QI XiaoGang; ZHANG Ning

    2007-01-01

    The densities of Sb and Bi melts were investigated by an improved Archimedean method. The results show that the density of the Sb melt decreases linearly with increasing temperature, but the density of the Bi melt firstly increases and then decreases as the temperature increases. There is a maximum density value of 10.002 g/cm3 at 310℃, about 39℃ above the melting point. The temperature dependence of the Sb melt is well fitted with the expression ρ= 6.8590-5.8105×10-4T, and that of the Bi melt is fitted with ρ=10.3312-1.18×10-3T. The results were discussed from a microstructure viewpoint.

  13. Effects of surface shape on the geometry and surface topography of the melt pool in low-power density laser melting

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Youngdeuk

    2011-04-15

    The quantitative correlations between workpiece volume and melt pool geometry, as well as the flow and thermal features of the melt pool are established. Thermocapillary convections in melt pool with a deformable free surface are investigated with respect to surface shape and laser intensity. When the contact angle between the tangent to the top surface and the vertical wall at the hot center is acute, the free surface flattens, compared with that of the initial free surface. Otherwise, the free surface forms a bowl-like shape with a deep crater and a low peripheral rim when the contact angle at the hot center is obtuse. Increasing the workpiece volume at a fixed laser intensity and a negative radial height gradient cause linear decreases in the geometric size and magnitude of flow and temperature of the melt pool. Conversely, linear increases are observed with a positive radial height gradient. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  14. The impact of melt ponds on summertime microwave brightness temperatures and sea-ice concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kern, Stefan; Rösel, Anja; Pedersen, Leif Toudal

    2016-01-01

    Sea-ice concentrations derived from satellite microwave brightness temperatures are less accurate during summer. In the Arctic Ocean the lack of accuracy is primarily caused by melt ponds, but also by changes in the properties of snow and the sea-ice surface itself. We investigate the sensitivity...... of eight sea-ice concentration retrieval algorithms to melt ponds by comparing sea-ice concentration with the melt-pond fraction. We derive gridded daily sea-ice concentrations from microwave brightness temperatures of summer 2009. We derive the daily fraction of melt ponds, open water between ice floes......, and the ice-surface fraction from contemporary Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectance data. We only use grid cells where the MODIS sea ice concentration, which is the melt-pond fraction plus the ice-surface fraction, exceeds 90 %. For one group of algorithms, e.g., Bristol and Comiso...

  15. A simple classical approach for the melting temperature of inert-gas nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, K. K.

    2006-02-01

    Like the metal and semiconductor nanoparticles, the melting temperature of free inert-gas nanoparticles decreases with decreasing size. The variation is linear with the inverse of the particle size for large nanoparticles and deviates from the linearity for small nanoparticles. The decrease in the melting temperature is slower for free nanoparticles with non-wetting surfaces, while the decrease is faster for nanoparticles with wetting surfaces. Though the depression of the melting temperature has been reported for inert-gas nanoparticles in porous glasses, superheating has also been observed when the nanoparticles are embedded in some matrices. By using a simple classical approach, the influence of size, geometry and the matrix on the melting temperature of nanoparticles is understood quantitatively and shown to be applicable for other materials. It is also shown that the classical approach can be applied to understand the size-dependent freezing temperature of nanoparticles.

  16. Surface reconstruction precursor to melting in Au309 clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Fuyi Chen; Li, Z. Y.; Roy L. Johnston

    2011-01-01

    The melting of gold cluster is one of essential properties of nanoparticles and revisited to clarify the role played by the surface facets in the melting transition by molecular dynamics simulations. The occurrence of elaborate surface reconstruction is observed using many-body Gupta potential as energetic model for 309-atom (2.6 nm) decahedral, cuboctahedral and icosahedral gold clusters. Our results reveal for the first time a surface reconstruction as precursor to the melting transitions. ...

  17. Rise in central west Greenland surface melt unprecedented over the last three centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusel, Luke; Das, Sarah; Osman, Matthew; Evans, Matthew; Smith, Ben; McConnell, Joe; Noël, Brice; van den Broeke, Michiel

    2017-04-01

    Greenland Ice Sheet surface melting has intensified and expanded over the last several decades and is now a leading component of ice sheet mass loss. Here, we constrain the multi-century temporal evolution of surface melt across central west Greenland by quantifying layers of refrozen melt within well-dated firn and ice cores collected in 2014 and 2015, as well as from a core collected in 2004. We find significant agreement among ice core, satellite, and regional climate model melt datasets over recent decades, confirming the fidelity of the ice core melt stratigraphy as a reliable record of past variability in the magnitude of surface melt. We also find a significant correlation between the melt records derived from our new 100-m GC-2015 core (2436 m.a.s.l.) and the older (2004) 150-m D5 core (2472 m.a.s.l.) located 50 km to the southeast. This agreement demonstrates the robustness of the ice core-derived melt histories and the potential for reconstructing regional melt evolution from a single site, despite local variability in melt percolation and refreeze processes. Our array of upper percolation zone cores reveals that although the overall frequency of melt at these sites has not increased, the intensification of melt over the last three decades is unprecedented within at least the last 365 years. Utilizing the regional climate model RACMO 2.3, we show that this melt intensification is a nonlinear response to warming summer air temperatures, thus underscoring the heightened sensitivity of this sector of Greenland to further climate warming. Finally, we examine spatial correlations between the ice core melt records and modeled melt fields across the ice sheet to assess the broader representation of each ice core record. This analysis reveals wide-ranging significant correlations, including to modeled meltwater runoff. As such, our ice core melt records may furthermore offer unique, observationally-constrained insights into past variability in ice sheet mass loss.

  18. Thermal equivalence of DNA duplexes without calculation of melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Gerald; Haslam, Niall; Whiteford, Nava; Prügel-Bennett, Adam; Essex, Jonathan W.; Neylon, Cameron

    2006-01-01

    The common key to nearly all processes involving DNA is the hybridization and melting of the double helix: from transmission of genetic information and RNA transcription, to polymerase chain reaction and DNA microarray analysis, DNA mechanical nanodevices and DNA computing. Selecting DNA sequences with similar melting temperatures is essential for many applications in biotechnology. We show that instead of calculating these temperatures, a single parameter can be derived from a statistical-mechanics model that conveniently represents the thermodynamic equivalence of DNA sequences. This parameter is shown to order experimental melting temperatures correctly, is much more readily obtained than the melting temperature, and is easier to handle than the numerous parameters of empirical regression models.

  19. Dynamic Melting of Freezing Droplets on Ultraslippery Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Fuqiang; Wu, Xiaomin; Wang, Lingli

    2017-03-08

    Condensed droplet freezing and freezing droplet melting phenomena on the prepared ultraslippery superhydrophobic surface were observed and discussed in this study. Although the freezing delay performance of the surface is common, the melting of the freezing droplets on the surface is quite interesting. Three self-propelled movements of the melting droplets (ice- water mixture) were found including the droplet rotating, the droplet jumping, and the droplet sliding. The melting droplet rotating, which means that the melting droplet rotates spontaneously on the superhydrophobic surface like a spinning top, is first reported in this study and may have some potential applications in various engineering fields. The melting droplet jumping and sliding are similar to those occurring during condensation but have larger size scale and motion scale, as the melting droplets have extra-large specific surface area with much more surface energy available. These self-propelled movements make all the melting droplets on the superhydrophobic surface dynamic, easily removed, which may be promising for the anti-icing/frosting applications.

  20. Defects Can Increase the Melting Temperature of DNA-Nanoparticle Assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Nolan C

    2006-01-01

    DNA-gold nanoparticle assemblies have shown promise as an alternative technology to DNA microarrays for DNA detection and RNA profiling. Understanding the effect of DNA sequences on the melting temperature of the system is central to developing reliable detection technology. We studied the effects of DNA base-pairing defects, such as mismatches and deletions, on the melting temperature of DNA-nanoparticle assemblies. We found that, contrary to the general assumption that defects lower the melting temperature of DNA, some defects increase the melting temperature of DNA-linked nanoparticle assemblies. The effects of mismatches and deletions were found to depend on the specific base pair, the sequence, and the location of the defects. Our results demonstrate that the surface-bound DNA exhibit hybridization behavior different from that of free DNA. Such findings indicate that a detailed understanding of DNA-nanoparticle assembly phase behavior is required for quantitative interpretation of DNA-nanoparticle aggreg...

  1. Modeling the Temperature Fields of Copper Powder Melting in the Process of Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saprykin, A. A.; Ibragimov, E. A.; Babakova, E. V.

    2016-08-01

    Various process variables influence on the quality of the end product when SLM (Selective Laser Melting) synthesizing items of powder materials. The authors of the paper suggest using the model of distributing the temperature fields when forming single tracks and layers of copper powder PMS-1. Relying on the results of modeling it is proposed to reduce melting of powder particles out of the scanning area.

  2. Combining Modis and Quikscat Data to Delineate Surface and Near-Surface Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Nghiem, Son V.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Neumann, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades, increasing melt has been measured on the Greenland Ice Sheet, along with mass loss as determined from satellite data, Monitoring the state of the Greenland Ice Sheet becomes critical especially because it is actively losing mass, and the ice sheet has a sea-level rise potential of 7 in. However measurement of the extent of surface melt varies depending on the sensor used, whether it is passive or active microwave or visible or thermal infrared. We have used remote-sensing data products to study surface and near-surface melt characteristics of the Greenland Ice Sheet. We present a blended MODIS-QS melt daily product for 2007 [1]. The products, including Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) daily land-surface temperature (LST) and a special daily melt product derived from the QuikSCAT (QS) scatterometer [2,3] show consistency in delineating the melt boundaries on a daily basis in the 2007 melt season [I], though some differences are identified. An assessment of maximum melt area for the 2007 melt shows that the QSCAT product detects a greater amount of melt (862,769 square kilometers) than is detected by the MODIS LST product (766,184 square kilometers). The discrepancy is largely because the QS product can detect both surface and near-surface melt and the QS product captures melt if it occurred anytime during the day while the MODIS product is obtained from a point in time on a given day. However on a daily bases, other factors influence the measurement of melt extent. In this work we employ the digital-elevation model of Bamber et al. [4] along with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) data to study some areas and time periods in detail during the 2007 melt season. We focus on times in which the QS and MODIS LST products do not agree exactly. We use NCEP and elevation data to analyze the atmospheric factors forcing the melt process, to gain an improved understanding of the conditions that lead to melt

  3. Experimental study on the free surface deformation in the oxide melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG; Yong; JIN; Weiqing; PAN; Xiuhong; YODA; Shinichi

    2005-01-01

    Experiments on the thermocapillary convection of high temperature Bi12SiO20 melts have been carried out in the in situ observation system. The steady flow pattern comprises of the main trunk and branches, which is deemed as the surface deformation.The oscillatory thermocapillary convection is characterized by the oscillatory main trunk and traveling branches. The transition of the melt from steady spatial to oscillatory behavior under the temperature differences 120, 60 and 10 K has been considered. The free surface deformation is observed to transform with the change of the applied temperature difference, which manifests that the thermocapillary convection is sensitive to the temperature difference. Moreover, taking the temperature distribution into account,it is noted that the deformation is formed in the colder area of the melt. The oscillatory frequency of the main trunk, which is also sensitive to the applied temperature difference,increases with the rise of temperature.

  4. Greenland Ice Sheet surface melt:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kang Yang; ManChun Li

    2014-01-01

    Surface melt has great impacts on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) mass balance and thereby has become the focus of significant GrIS research in recent years. The production, transport, and release processes of surface meltwater are the keys to understanding the poten-tial impacts of the GrIS surface melt. These hydrological processes can elucidate the following scientific questions:How much melt-water is produced atop the GrIS? What are the characteristics of the meltwater-formed supraglacial hydrological system? How does the meltwater influence the GrIS motion? The GrIS supraglacial hydrology has a number of key roles and yet continues to be poorly understood or documented. This paper summarizes the current understanding of the GrIS surface melt, emphasizing the three essential supraglacial hydrological processes:(1) meltwater production:surface melt modeling is an important approach to acquire surface melt information, and areas, depths, and volumes of supraglacial lakes extracted from remotely sensed imagery can also provide surface melt information;(2) meltwater transport:the spatial distributions of supraglacial lakes, supraglacial streams, moulins, and crevasses demonstrate the characteristics of the supraglacial hydrological system, revealing the meltwater transport process;and (3) meltwater release:the release of meltwater into the englacial and the subglacial ice sheet has important but undetermined impacts on the GrIS motion. The correlation between surface runoff and the GrIS motion speed is employed to understand these influences.

  5. Tsiolkovskiy Crater Thermophysical Anomaly: Massive Impact Melt or Surface Modification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhagen, Benjamin; Neish, C.; Williams, J.; Petro, N.; Hayne, P.; Bandfield, J.

    2013-10-01

    Analyses of data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer have been used to identify an area of elevated rock abundance and nighttime soil temperature in and around Tsiolkovskiy Crater. Previous studies (e.g. Bandfield et al., 2011) have established a clear relationship between Diviner-derived rock abundances and crater age (most rocks are weathered into regolith within ~1 Ga) that would indicate a relatively young age for Tsiolkovskiy. However, the previously published ages for Tsiolkovskiy’s mare-fill (a lower limit on the crater age) are generally within the range 3.5 ± 0.3 Ga. To study the discrepancy between crater age and apparent “fresh” appearance we have used new datasets from Diviner, Mini-RF, and LROC to probe the near-surface regolith at variable depth and scales. We evaluated several hypotheses for the origin of this anomaly including: (1) inaccuracies in the published age estimates, (2) unusually high abundances of locally-derived, highly competent impact melt, (3) inclusion of significant blocky material from Aristarchus antipodal ejecta, and (4) recent surface modification or disruption. The results of our study favor (2) locally-derived, highly competent impact melt, and (5) recent surface modification or disruption over other mechanisms. This presentation will focus on describing the implications of the favored mechanisms.

  6. Evolution of melt-vapor surface tension in silicic volcanic systems: Experiments with hydrous melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, M.; Sisson, T.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluate the melt-vapor surface tension (??) of natural, water-saturated dacite melt at 200 MPa, 950-1055??C, and 4.8-5.7 wt % H2O. We experimentally determine the critical supersaturation pressure for bubble nucleation as a function of dissolved water and then solve for ?? at those conditions using classical nucleation theory. The solutions obtained give dacite melt-vapor surface tensions that vary inversely with dissolved water from 0.042 (??0.003) J m-2 at 5.7 wt% H2O to 0.060 (??0.007) J m-2 at 5.2 wt% H2O to 0.073 (??0.003) J m-2 at 4.8 wt% H2O. Combining our dacite results with data from published hydrous haplogranite and high-silica rhyolite experiments reveals that melt-vapor surface tension also varies inversely with the concentration of mafic melt components (e.g., CaO, FeOtotal, MgO). We develop a thermodynamic context for these observations in which melt-vapor surface tension is represented by a balance of work terms controlled by melt structure. Overall, our results suggest that cooling, crystallization, and vapor exsolution cause systematic changes in ?? that should be considered in dynamic modeling of magmatic processes.

  7. Surface tension of polymer melts - experimental investigations of its effect on polymer-polymer adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    The surface tension of polymer melts is important for the bond strength of two component polymer parts through their roles in the process of wetting, adsorption and adhesion. This investigation deals with the influence of the melt surface tension and substrate surface energy on the polymer......-polymer bond strength during two component polymer processing. Polymer materials PS, POM, ABS, PEl, PEEK and PC are chosen for the investigation. Pendant drop method showed that in case of PS and POM, the melt surface tension was decreased with increasing temperature. The substrate surface energies....... The results and discussion presented in this paper reflect the temperature dependent behaviours of the surface tension and surface energy of polymers and their effects on the polymer-polymer bond strength....

  8. Surface tension of polymer melts - experimental investigations of its effects on polymer-polymer adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    The surface tension of polymer melts is important for the bond strength of two component polymer parts through their roles in the process of wetting, adsorption and adhesion. This investigation deals with the influence of the melt surface tension and substrate surface energy on the polymer......-polymer bond strength during two component polymer processing. Polymer materials PS, POM, ABS, PEI, PEEK and PC are chosen for the investigation. Pendant drop method showed that in case of PS and POM, the melt surface tension was decreased with increasing temperature. The substrate surface energies....... The results and discussion presented in this paper reflect the temperature dependent behaviours of the surface tension and surface energy of polymers and their effects on the polymer-polymer bond strength....

  9. Experimental and theoretical evidence for bilayer-by-bilayer surface melting of crystalline ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, M. Alejandra; Kling, Tanja; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; van Zadel, Marc-Jan; Mezger, Markus; Jochum, Mara N.; Cyran, Jenée D.; Smit, Wilbert J.; Bakker, Huib J.; Shultz, Mary Jane; Morita, Akihiro; Donadio, Davide; Nagata, Yuki; Bonn, Mischa; Backus, Ellen H. G.

    2017-01-01

    On the surface of water ice, a quasi-liquid layer (QLL) has been extensively reported at temperatures below its bulk melting point at 273 K. Approaching the bulk melting temperature from below, the thickness of the QLL is known to increase. To elucidate the precise temperature variation of the QLL, and its nature, we investigate the surface melting of hexagonal ice by combining noncontact, surface-specific vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and spectra calculated from molecular dynamics simulations. Using SFG, we probe the outermost water layers of distinct single crystalline ice faces at different temperatures. For the basal face, a stepwise, sudden weakening of the hydrogen-bonded structure of the outermost water layers occurs at 257 K. The spectral calculations from the molecular dynamics simulations reproduce the experimental findings; this allows us to interpret our experimental findings in terms of a stepwise change from one to two molten bilayers at the transition temperature. PMID:27956637

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations on surface properties of silicon dioxide melts

    CERN Document Server

    Röder, A

    2000-01-01

    In the present thesis the surface properties of a silicon dioxide melt were studied. As first systems drops (i.e. sytems without periodic boundary conditions) of N=432, 1536, as well as 4608 atoms were considered. The second analyzed geometry corresponds to that of a thin film, i. e. periodic boundary conditions in x- and y-direction were present, while in z-direction one had a free surface. In this case a system of N=1152 atoms was considered. As model potential the two-body potential proposed by Beest, Kramer, and van Santen was applied. For both geometries five temperatures were considered, which lied in the range of 3000 K

  11. Effect of low temperature melt on solidification structure of A356 alloy with melt thermal treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何树先; 王俊; 孙宝德; 周尧和

    2001-01-01

    The influence of the low temperature melt (LTM) structure on solidification structure of the sample with melt thermal treatment (MTT) process was studied. And the mechanism of the MTT process was analyzed with cluster theory. It is shown that the final solidification structure is dependent mainly on the structure of LTM. Dendrites will appear in the solidification structure if the structure of LTM is dendritic before MTT. Otherwise, non-dendritic grains will appear in the solidification structure. And the lower the temperature of LTM, the more remarkable the effect of the LTM structure is.

  12. Effect of coupling between melt shape and temperature field on electromagnetic shaping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the analyses of electromagnetic pressure on melt and heat induced in melt, the ratio of heat to pressure Q0/pm was defined. It was given that the relationship between Q0/pm and thickness a, electromagnetic parameter μγ of melt and electric current frequency f under electromagnetic confinement and shaping process. If the value of Q0/pm is big, any adjustment on melt shape will easily cause a variation of temperature in melt. In this situation, there appears a more sensitive interaction between shape and temperature field and a more narrow adjustment range for this process. Experiments on some thin plate samples with a cross-section of 6  mm×18  mm have been done in two kinds of induction coils respectively. The results show that as the coil with a trumpet inside wall is used and the positions of melt top and S/L interface are properly selected, the melt periphery is nearly vertical and the temperature gradient ahead of S/L interface is high. On this condition, a more stable and wider coupling between shape and temperature field has been continuously maintained and samples with smooth surface and unidirectional crystals have been successfully obtained.

  13. Interaction of rhyolite melts with monazite, xenotime, and zircon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, James R.

    2015-05-01

    The interfacial contact region between a rhyolite melt and the accessory minerals monazite, xenotime, and zircon is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. On all surfaces, major structural rearrangement extends about 1 nm into the melt from the interface. As evidenced by the structural perturbations in the ion distribution profiles, the affinity of the melt for the surface increases in going from monazite to xenotime to zircon. Alkali ions are enriched in the melt in contact with an inert wall, as well as at the mineral surfaces. Melt in contact with zircon has a particularly strong level of aluminum enrichment. In xenotime, the enrichment of aluminum is less than that in zircon, but still notable. In monazite, the aluminum enrichment in the contact layer is much less. It is expected that the relative surface energies of these accessory minerals will be a strong function of the aluminum content of the melt and that nucleation of zircon, in particular, would be easier for melts with higher aluminum concentration. The crystal growth rate for zircon is expected to be slower at a higher aluminum concentration because of the effectiveness of aluminum in solvating the zircon surface. The variable interfacial concentration profiles across the series of accessory minerals will likely affect the kinetics of trace element incorporation, as the trace elements must compete with the major elements for surface sites on the growing accessory minerals.

  14. Pressure dependence of the melting temperature of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Vinet, Pascal; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    A new method for the analysis of the experimental data for the pressure dependence of the melting temperature of metals is presented. The method combines Lindemann's law, the Debye model, and a first-order equation of state with the experimental observation that the Grueneisen parameter divided by the volume is constant. It is observed that, based on these assumptions, in the absence of phase transitions, plots of the logarithm of the normalized melting temperature versus the logarithm of the normalized pressure are straight lines. It is found that the normalized-melting--temperature versus normalized-pressure curves accurately satisfy the linear relationship for Al, Ag, Au, Cs, Cu, K, Na, Pt, and Rb. In addition, this technique provides a sensitive tool for detecting phase transitions.

  15. Probing the microscopic flexibility of DNA from melting temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Gerald; Essex, Jonathan W.; Neylon, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    The microscopic flexibility of DNA is a key ingredient for understanding its interaction with proteins and drugs but is still poorly understood and technically challenging to measure. Several experimental methods probe very long DNA samples, but these miss local flexibility details. Others mechanically disturb or modify short molecules and therefore do not obtain flexibility properties of unperturbed and pristine DNA. Here, we show that it is possible to extract very detailed flexibility information about unmodified DNA from melting temperatures with statistical physics models. We were able to retrieve, from published melting temperatures, several established flexibility properties such as the presence of highly flexible TATA regions of genomic DNA and support recent findings that DNA is very flexible at short length scales. New information about the nanoscale Na+ concentration dependence of DNA flexibility was determined and we show the key role of ApT and TpA steps when it comes to ion-dependent flexibility and melting temperatures.

  16. How much can Greenland melt? An upper bound on mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet through surface melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Bassis, J. N.

    2015-12-01

    With observations showing accelerated mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet due to surface melt, the Greenland Ice Sheet is becoming one of the most significant contributors to sea level rise. The contribution of the Greenland Ice Sheet o sea level rise is likely to accelerate in the coming decade and centuries as atmospheric temperatures continue to rise, potentially triggering ever larger surface melt rates. However, at present considerable uncertainty remains in projecting the contribution to sea level of the Greenland Ice Sheet both due to uncertainty in atmospheric forcing and the ice sheet response to climate forcing. Here we seek an upper bound on the contribution of surface melt from the Greenland to sea level rise in the coming century using a surface energy balance model coupled to an englacial model. We use IPCC Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP8.5, RCP6, RCP4.5, RCP2.6) climate scenarios from an ensemble of global climate models in our simulations to project the maximum rate of ice volume loss and related sea-level rise associated with surface melting. To estimate the upper bound, we assume the Greenland Ice Sheet is perpetually covered in thick clouds, which maximize longwave radiation to the ice sheet. We further assume that deposition of black carbon darkens the ice substantially turning it nearly black, substantially reducing its albedo. Although assuming that all melt water not stored in the snow/firn is instantaneously transported off the ice sheet increases mass loss in the short term, refreezing of retained water warms the ice and may lead to more melt in the long term. Hence we examine both assumptions and use the scenario that leads to the most surface melt by 2100. Preliminary models results suggest that under the most aggressive climate forcing, surface melt from the Greenland Ice Sheet contributes ~1 m to sea level by the year 2100. This is a significant contribution and ignores dynamic effects. We also examined a lower bound

  17. High Temperature Protonic Conductors by Melt Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    ceramic materials of BaCe1 -xNdxO3-a and Ba3(CaNb2)O9 that exhibit high temperature protonic conductance and superior mechanical properties at elevated...TEM). The mechanical behavior BaCe1 -xNdxO3-a (x=0 to 0.2) and Ba3(CaNb2)O9 ceramics in the elastic, brittle and plastic regime will be studied...spatial variations of compositions in BaCe1 -xNdxO3-a and Ba3(CaNb2)O9 following high temperature wet atmosphere treatment will be measured using a

  18. Determination of Reactive Surface Area of Melt Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourcier,W.L.; Roberts, S.; Smith, D.K.; Hulsey, S.; Newton,L.; Sawvel, A.; Bruton, C.; Papelis, C.; Um, W.; Russell, C. E.; Chapman,J.

    2000-10-01

    A comprehensive investigation of natural and manmade silicate glasses, and nuclear melt glass was undertaken in order to derive an estimate of glass reactive surface area. Reactive surface area is needed to model release rates of radionuclides from nuclear melt glass in the subsurface. Because of the limited availability of nuclear melt glasses, natural volcanic glass samples were collected which had similar textures and compositions as those of melt glass. A flow-through reactor was used to measure the reactive surface area of the analog glasses in the presence of simplified NTS site ground waters. A measure of the physical surface area of these glasses was obtained using the BET gas-adsorption method. The studies on analog glasses were supplemented by measurement of the surface areas of pieces of actual melt glass using the BET method. The variability of the results reflect the sample preparation and measurement techniques used, as well as textural heterogeneity inherent to these samples. Based on measurements of analog and actual samples, it is recommended that the hydraulic source term calculations employ a range of 0.001 to 0.01 m{sup 2}/g for the reactive surface area of nuclear melt glass.

  19. Evaluation of Surface and Near-Surface Melt Characteristics on the Greenland Ice Sheet using MODIS and QuikSCAT Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Nghiem, Son V.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2009-01-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet has been the focus of much attention recently because of increasing melt in response to regional climate warming. To improve our ability to measure surface melt, we use remote-sensing data products to study surface and near-surface melt characteristics of the Greenland Ice Sheet for the 2007 melt season when record melt extent and runoff occurred. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) daily land-surface temperature (LST), MODIS daily snow albedo, and a special diurnal melt product derived from QuikSCAT (QS) scatterometer data, are all effective in measuring the evolution of melt on the ice sheet. These daily products, produced from different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, are sensitive to different geophysical features, though QS- and MODIS-derived melt generally show excellent correspondence when surface melt is present on the ice sheet. Values derived from the daily MODIS snow albedo product drop in response to melt, and change with apparent grain-size changes. For the 2007 melt season, the QS and MODIS LST products detect 862,769 square kilometers and 766,184 square kilometers of melt, respectively. The QS product detects about 11% greater melt extent than is detected by the MODIS LST product probably because QS is more sensitive to surface melt, and can detect subsurface melt. The consistency of the response of the different products demonstrates unequivocally that physically-meaningful melt/freeze boundaries can be detected. We have demonstrated that these products, used together, can improve the precision in mapping surface and near-surface melt extent on the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  20. Future projections of the Greenland ice sheet energy balance driving the surface melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Franco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, simulations at 25 km resolution are performed over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS throughout the 20th and 21st centuries, using the regional climate model MAR forced by four RCP scenarios from three CMIP5 global circulation models (GCMs, in order to investigate the projected changes of the surface energy balance (SEB components driving the surface melt. Analysis of 2000–2100 melt anomalies compared to melt results over 1980–1999 reveals an exponential relationship of the GrIS surface melt rate simulated by MAR to the near-surface air temperature (TAS anomalies, mainly due to the surface albedo positive feedback associated with the extension of bare ice areas in summer. On the GrIS margins, the future melt anomalies are preferentially driven by stronger sensible heat fluxes, induced by enhanced warm air advection over the ice sheet. Over the central dry snow zone, the surface albedo positive feedback induced by the increase in summer melt exceeds the negative feedback of heavier snowfall for TAS anomalies higher than 4 °C. In addition to the incoming longwave flux increase associated with the atmosphere warming, GCM-forced MAR simulations project an increase of the cloud cover decreasing the ratio of the incoming shortwave versus longwave radiation and dampening the albedo feedback. However, it should be noted that this trend in the cloud cover is contrary to that simulated by ERA-Interim–forced MAR for recent climate conditions, where the observed melt increase since the 1990s seems mainly to be a consequence of more anticyclonic atmospheric conditions. Finally, no significant change is projected in the length of the melt season, which highlights the importance of solar radiation absorbed by the ice sheet surface in the melt SEB.

  1. Pathway from subducting slab to surface for melt and fluids beneath Mount Rainier

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGary, R. Shane; Evans, Rob L.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Elsenbeck, Jimmy; Rondenay, Stéphane

    2014-07-01

    Convergent margin volcanism originates with partial melting, primarily of the upper mantle, into which the subducting slab descends. Melting of this material can occur in one of two ways. The flow induced in the mantle by the slab can result in upwelling and melting through adiabatic decompression. Alternatively, fluids released from the descending slab through dehydration reactions can migrate into the hot mantle wedge, inducing melting by lowering the solidus temperature. The two mechanisms are not mutually exclusive. In either case, the buoyant melts make their way towards the surface to reside in the crust or to be extruded as lava. Here we use magnetotelluric data collected across the central state of Washington, USA, to image the complete pathway for the fluid-melt phase. By incorporating constraints from a collocated seismic study into the magnetotelluric inversion process, we obtain superior constraints on the fluids and melt in a subduction setting. Specifically, we are able to identify and connect fluid release at or near the top of the slab, migration of fluids into the overlying mantle wedge, melting in the wedge, and transport of the melt/fluid phase to a reservoir in the crust beneath Mt Rainier.

  2. Model of temperature field for the preparation process of melt-spun NdFeB powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖彬; 李岩峰; 王会杰; 李安华; 朱明刚; 李卫; 张跃

    2014-01-01

    Melt-spun ribbons which are the important raw material for hot-deformed magnets can be prepared by single-roller melt-spinning. In order to prepare well-structured ribbons, the model of temperature field for single-roller melt-spinning process was constructed in this work. The heat conduction in this process was simplified as one dimensional heat conduction problem. It was shown by modeling that, the temperature field in the melt-spinning before solidification in this model could be described as this equa-tionT(x,t)=Tmoexp[-k(x-x0)-k2αt]+T0. The temperatureT(x,t) of the alloy melts decreased with increased positionx and cooling timet exponentially from the wheel-free surface to the wheel-side surface. The constantk determined the decrease speed of alloy tempera-tureT(x,t), which was proportional to the interfacial heat transfer coefficienth and the interfacial area of heat conductionA0, but in-versely proportional to the thermal conductivityK.x0 was the thickness of the alloy melt. With increasedx0, the temperature differ-ence between wheel-free surface and the wheel-side surface became larger, which would lead to larger difference in grain size. In ex-periments, the influence of melt-spinning process parameters on the temperature field model was discussed, such as cooling roller materials, wheel speed, and so on. Melt-spun ribbons prepared by single-roller melt spinning at different wheel speed were investi-gated and magnetic properties of die-upset magnets from melt-spun ribbons on different cooling roller were analyzed. The variation of grain size in the depth direction consisted with temperature field model. This model provided directions for the preparation of melt-spun ribbons with uniformly distributed fine grains, which were very necessary for producing hot-deformed magnets with high magnetic performance.

  3. Atmospheric Drivers of Greenland Surface Melt Revealed by Self-Organizing Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioduszewski, J. R.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Hammann, A.; Tedesco, M.; Noble, E. U.; Stroeve, J. C.; Mote, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent acceleration in surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) has occurred concurrently with a rapidly warming Arctic and has been connected to persistent, anomalous atmospheric circulation patterns over Greenland. To identify synoptic setups favoring enhanced GrIS surface melt and their decadal changes, we develop a summer Arctic synoptic climatology by employing self-organizing maps. These are applied to daily 500 hPa geopotential height fields obtained from the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications reanalysis, 1979-2014. Particular circulation regimes are related to meteorological conditions and GrIS surface melt estimated with outputs from the Modèle Atmosphérique Régional. Our results demonstrate that the largest positive melt anomalies occur in concert with positive height anomalies near Greenland associated with wind, temperature, and humidity patterns indicative of strong meridional transport of heat and moisture. We find an increased frequency in a 500 hPa ridge over Greenland coinciding with a 63% increase in GrIS melt between the 1979-1988 and 2005-2014 periods, with 75.0% of surface melt changes attributed to thermodynamics, 17% to dynamics, and 8.0% to a combination. We also confirm that the 2007-2012 time period has the largest dynamic forcing relative of any period but also demonstrate that increased surface energy fluxes, temperature, and moisture separate from dynamic changes contributed more to melt even during this period. This implies that GrIS surface melt is likely to continue to increase in response to an ever warmer future Arctic, regardless of future atmospheric circulation patterns.

  4. Shock Melting Temperature of Initially Porous Iron and Indication for Melting Curve of Iron at High Pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xi-Jun; ZHANG Dai-Yu; LIU Fu-Sheng; JING Fu-Qian

    2004-01-01

    The melting curve ofiron is crucial for modelling of the earth's internal heat structures and to understand melting of solids at high pressures. However, the measured melting temperatures of iron at high pressures are disparate so far. We measured the shocked interface (porous iron/sapphire window) temperatures of a kind of porous iron. By using a model for shock temperature measurement [High Pressures Res. 2 (1990) 159] and the previous results of sound velocity measurements [Chin. Phys. Lett. 18 (2001) 852], we determine the melting temperatures of iron at shock compression high pressures of 145 and 171 Gpa. They are consistent with the results reported by other shock compression experiments. Based on the possible different melting mechanisms of iron in diamond anvil cell and in shock compression, the corrected melting temperatures of iron at high pressures become more consistent.

  5. Divergent trajectories of Antarctic surface melt under two twenty-first-century climate scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusel, Luke D.; Frey, Karen E.; Das, Sarah B.; Karnauskas, Kristopher B.; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; van Meijgaard, Erik; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2015-12-01

    Ice shelves modulate Antarctic contributions to sea-level rise and thereby represent a critical, climate-sensitive interface between the Antarctic ice sheet and the global ocean. Following rapid atmospheric warming over the past decades, Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves have progressively retreated, at times catastrophically. This decay supports hypotheses of thermal limits of viability for ice shelves via surface melt forcing. Here we use a polar-adapted regional climate model and satellite observations to quantify the nonlinear relationship between surface melting and summer air temperature. Combining observations and multimodel simulations, we examine melt evolution and intensification before observed ice shelf collapse on the Antarctic Peninsula. We then assess the twenty-first-century evolution of surface melt across Antarctica under intermediate and high emissions climate scenarios. Our projections reveal a scenario-independent doubling of Antarctic-wide melt by 2050. Between 2050 and 2100, however, significant divergence in melt occurs between the two climate scenarios. Under the high emissions pathway by 2100, melt on several ice shelves approaches or surpasses intensities that have historically been associated with ice shelf collapse, at least on the northeast Antarctic Peninsula.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of surface melting behaviours of the V (110) plane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xi-Yuan; Hu Wang-Yu; Yuan Xiao-Jian; Cai Xin-Hua

    2008-01-01

    The modified analytic embedded-atom method and molecular dynamics simulations are applied to the investigation of the surface premelting and melting behaviours of the V (110) plane by calculating the interlayer relaxation, the layer structure factor and atomic snapshots in this paper. The results obtained indicate that the premelting phenomenon occurs on the V(110) surface at about 1800K and then a liquid-like layer, which approximately keeps the same thickness up to 2020K, emerges on it. We discover that the temperature 2020K the V(110) surface starts to melt and is in a completely disordered state at the temperature of 2140K under the melting point for the bulk vanadium.

  7. The impact of melt ponds on summertime microwave brightness temperatures and sea-ice concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Stefan; Rösel, Anja; Toudal Pedersen, Leif; Ivanova, Natalia; Saldo, Roberto; Tage Tonboe, Rasmus

    2016-09-01

    Sea-ice concentrations derived from satellite microwave brightness temperatures are less accurate during summer. In the Arctic Ocean the lack of accuracy is primarily caused by melt ponds, but also by changes in the properties of snow and the sea-ice surface itself. We investigate the sensitivity of eight sea-ice concentration retrieval algorithms to melt ponds by comparing sea-ice concentration with the melt-pond fraction. We derive gridded daily sea-ice concentrations from microwave brightness temperatures of summer 2009. We derive the daily fraction of melt ponds, open water between ice floes, and the ice-surface fraction from contemporary Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectance data. We only use grid cells where the MODIS sea-ice concentration, which is the melt-pond fraction plus the ice-surface fraction, exceeds 90 %. For one group of algorithms, e.g., Bristol and Comiso bootstrap frequency mode (Bootstrap_f), sea-ice concentrations are linearly related to the MODIS melt-pond fraction quite clearly after June. For other algorithms, e.g., Near90GHz and Comiso bootstrap polarization mode (Bootstrap_p), this relationship is weaker and develops later in summer. We attribute the variation of the sensitivity to the melt-pond fraction across the algorithms to a different sensitivity of the brightness temperatures to snow-property variations. We find an underestimation of the sea-ice concentration by between 14 % (Bootstrap_f) and 26 % (Bootstrap_p) for 100 % sea ice with a melt-pond fraction of 40 %. The underestimation reduces to 0 % for a melt-pond fraction of 20 %. In presence of real open water between ice floes, the sea-ice concentration is overestimated by between 26 % (Bootstrap_f) and 14 % (Bootstrap_p) at 60 % sea-ice concentration and by 20 % across all algorithms at 80 % sea-ice concentration. None of the algorithms investigated performs best based on our investigation of data from summer 2009. We suggest that those algorithms which are

  8. Simulation of temperature and flow fields in an inductively heated melt growth system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavakoli, M.H.; Mohammadi-Manesh, E.; Omid, S. [Physics Department, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    The goal of the research presented here is to apply a global analysis of an inductively heated Czochralski furnace for a real sapphire crystal growth system and predict the characteristics of the temperature and flow fields in the system. To do it, for the beginning stage of a sapphire growth process, influence of melt and gas convection combined with radiative heat transfer on the temperature field of the system and the crystal-melt interface have been studied numerically using the steady state two-dimensional finite element method. For radiative heat transfer, internal radiation through the grown crystal and surface to surface radiation for the exposed surfaces have been taken into account. The numerical results demonstrate that there are a powerful vortex which arises from the natural convection in the melt and a strong and large vortex that flows upwards along the afterheater side wall and downwards along the seed and crystal sides in the gas part. In addition, a wavy shape has been observed for the crystal-melt interface with a deflection towards the melt. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Marangoni driven turbulence in high energy surface melting processes

    CERN Document Server

    Kidess, Anton; Righolt, Bernhard W; Kleijn, Chris R

    2016-01-01

    Experimental observations of high-energy surface melting processes, such as laser welding, have revealed unsteady, often violent, motion of the free surface of the melt pool. Surprisingly, no similar observations have been reported in numerical simulation studies of such flows. Moreover, the published simulation results fail to predict the post-solidification pool shape without adapting non-physical values for input parameters, suggesting the neglect of significant physics in the models employed. The experimentally observed violent flow surface instabilities, scaling analyses for the occurrence of turbulence in Marangoni driven flows, and the fact that in simulations transport coefficients generally have to be increased by an order of magnitude to match experimentally observed pool shapes, suggest the common assumption of laminar flow in the pool may not hold, and that the flow is actually turbulent. Here, we use direct numerical simulations (DNS) to investigate the role of turbulence in laser melting of a st...

  10. Syntheses of neptunium trichloride and measurements of its melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hirokazu; Takano, Masahide; Kurata, Masaki; Minato, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Neptunium trichloride (NpCl3) of high purity was synthesized by the solid state reaction of neptunium nitride with cadmium chloride. Lattice parameters of hexagonal NpCl3 were determined from the powder X-ray diffraction pattern to be a = 0.7428 ± 0.0001 nm and c = 0.4262 ± 0.0003 nm, which fairly agree with the reported values. The melting temperature of NpCl3 was measured on a sample of about 1 mg, hermetically encapsulated in a gold crucible with a differential thermal analyzer. The value determined was 1070 ± 3 K which is close to the recommended value (1075 ± 30 K) derived from the mean value of the melting temperature of UCl3 and of PuCl3.

  11. Surface Temperature Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Ruedy, Reto

    2012-01-01

    Small global mean temperature changes may have significant to disastrous consequences for the Earth's climate if they persist for an extended period. Obtaining global means from local weather reports is hampered by the uneven spatial distribution of the reliably reporting weather stations. Methods had to be developed that minimize as far as possible the impact of that situation. This software is a method of combining temperature data of individual stations to obtain a global mean trend, overcoming/estimating the uncertainty introduced by the spatial and temporal gaps in the available data. Useful estimates were obtained by the introduction of a special grid, subdividing the Earth's surface into 8,000 equal-area boxes, using the existing data to create virtual stations at the center of each of these boxes, and combining temperature anomalies (after assessing the radius of high correlation) rather than temperatures.

  12. Surface characterization and wear behaviour of laser surface melted AISI 316L stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study concerns an in depth investigation of the influence of laser surface melting of AISI 316L stainless steel using Ar and N2 as shrouding atmosphere. Laser surface melting has been carried out using a 5 kW continuous wave (CW) fibre...

  13. Extended T-index models for glacier surface melting: a case study from Chorabari Glacier, Central Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakoti, Indira; Kesarwani, Kapil; Mehta, Manish; Dobhal, D. P.

    2016-10-01

    Two enhanced temperature-index (T-index) models are proposed by incorporating meteorological parameters viz. relative humidity, wind speed and net radiation. The models are an attempt to explore different climatic variables other than temperature affecting glacier surface melting. Weather data were recorded at Chorabari Glacier using an automatic weather station during the summers of 2010 (July 10 to September 10) and 2012 (June 10 to October 25). The modelled surface melt is validated against the measured point surface melting at the snout. Performance of the developed models is evaluated by comparing with basic temperature-index model and is quantified through different efficiency criteria. The results suggest that proposed models yield considerable improvement in surface melt simulation . Consequently, the study reveals that glacier surface melt depends not only on temperature but also on weather parameters viz. relative humidity, wind speed and net radiation play a significant role in glacier surface melting. This approach provides a major improvement on basic temperature-index method and offers an alternative to energy balance model.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation for surface melting and self-preservation effect of methane hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The surface melting process of structure sI methane hydrate is simulated at T = 240, 260, 280, and 300 K using NVT molecular dynamics method. The simulation results show that a quasi-liquid layer will be formed during the melting process. The density distribution, translation, orientation, and dynamic properties of water molecules in the quasi-liquid layer are calculated as a function of the distance normal to the interface, which indicates the performance of quasi-liquid layer exhibits a continuous change from crystal-like to liquid-like. The quasi-liquid layer plays as a resistance of mass transfer restraining the diffusion of water and methane molecules during the melting process. The resistance of quasi-liquid layer will restrain methane molecules diffuse from hydrate phase to gas phase and slow the melting process, which can be considered as a possible mechanism of self-preservation effect. The performance of quasi-liquid layer is more crystal-like when the temperature is lower than the melt- ing-point of water, which will exhibit an obvious self-preservation. The self-preservation will weaken while the temperature is higher than the melting-point of water because of the liquid-like performance of the quasi-liquid layer.

  15. Effects of Humidity and Surfaces on the Melt Crystallization of Ibuprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il Won Kim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Melt crystallization of ibuprofen was studied to understand the effects of humidity and surfaces. The molecular self-assembly during the amorphous-to-crystal transformation was examined in terms of the nucleation and growth of the crystals. The crystallization was on Al, Au, and self-assembled monolayers with –CH3, –OH, and –COOH functional groups. Effects of the humidity were studied at room temperature (18–20 °C with relative humidity 33%, 75%, and 100%. Effects of the surfaces were observed at −20 °C (relative humidity 36% to enable close monitoring with slower crystal growth. The nucleation time of ibuprofen was faster at high humidity conditions probably due to the local formation of the unfavorable ibuprofen melt/water interface. The crystal morphologies of ibuprofen were governed by the nature of the surfaces, and they could be associated with the growth kinetics by the Avrami equation. The current study demonstrated the effective control of the melt crystallization of ibuprofen through the melt/atmosphere and melt/surface interfaces.

  16. Onset and end of the summer melt season over sea ice: thermal structure and surface energy perspective from SHEBA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, P.O.G. [University of Colorado, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), Boulder, CO (United States); National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Earth Systems Research Laboratory, Physical Sciences Division (NOAA/ESRL/PSD), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Various measurements from the Surface Heat Flux of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment have been combined to study structures and processes producing the onset and end of summer melt over Arctic sea ice. The analysis links the surface energy budget to free-troposphere synoptic variables, clouds, precipitation, and in-ice temperatures. The key results are (1) SHEBA melt-season transitions are associated with atmospheric synoptic events (2) onset of melt clearly occurs on May 28, while the end of melt is produced by a sequence of three atmospheric storm events over a 28-day period producing step-like reductions in the net surface energy flux. The last one occurs on August 22.; (3) melt onset is primarily due to large increases in the downwelling longwave radiation and modest decreases in the surface albedo; (4) decreases in the downwelling longwave radiation occur for all end-of-melt transition steps, while increases in surface albedo occur for the first two; (5) decreases in downwelling shortwave radiation contribute only to the first end-of-melt transition step; (6) springtime free-tropospheric warming preconditions the atmosphere-ice system for the subsequent melt onset; and (7) melt-season transitions also mark transitions in system responses to radiative energy flux changes because of invariant melt-season surface temperatures. The extensive SHEBA observations enable an understanding of the complex processes not available from other field program data. The analysis provides a basis for future testing of the generality of the results, and contributes to better physical understanding of multi-year analyses of melt-season trends from less extensive data sets. (orig.)

  17. Surface melt and ponding on Larsen C Ice shelf and the impact of foehn winds

    OpenAIRE

    Luckman, Adrian; Elvidge, Andrew; Jansen, Daniela; Kulessa, Bernd; Kuipers-Munneke, Peter; King, John; Barrand, Nick

    2014-01-01

    A common precursor to ice shelf disintegration, most notably that of Larsen B Ice Shelf, is unusually intense or prolonged surface melt and the presence of surface standing water. However, there has been little research into detailed patterns of melt on ice shelves or the nature of summer melt ponds. We investigated surface melt on Larsen C Ice Shelf at high resolution using Envisat advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) data and explored melt ponds in a range of satellite image...

  18. Human neuronal tau promoting the melting temperature of DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The hyperchromic effect of ultraviolet spectroscopy shows that adding recombinant human neuronal tau to the solution of calf thymus DNA will promote the melting temperature (Tm) from 67℃ to 81℃. Similar result has been detected when adding tau to plasmid pBluescript-Ⅱ SK, by raising Tm from 75℃ to 85℃. The kinetics of thermal denaturation of DNA with tau is much slower than that of control. It suggests that tau may stabilize the double helix conformation of DNA.

  19. MODIS Surface Temperatures for Cryosphere Studies (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D. K.; Comiso, J. C.; DiGirolamo, N. E.; Shuman, C. A.; Riggs, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have used Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land-surface temperature (LST) and ice-surface temperature (IST) products for several applications in studies of the cryosphere. A climate-quality climate data record (CDR) of the IST of the Greenland ice sheet has been developed and was one of the data sources used to monitor the extreme melt event covering nearly the entire Greenland ice sheet on 11 - 12 July 2012. The IST CDR is available online for users to employ in models, and to study temperature distributions and melt trends on the ice sheet. We continue to assess accuracy of the IST product through comparative analysis with air temperature data from the NOAA Logan temperature sensor at Summit Station, Greenland. We find a small offset between the air temperature and the IST with the IST being slightly lower which is consistent with findings of other studies. The LST data product has been applied in studies of snow melt in regions where snow is a significant water resource. We have used LST data in seasonally snow-covered areas such as the Wind River Range, Wyoming, to monitor the relationship between LST and seasonal streamflow. A close association between a sudden and sustained increase in LST and complete snowmelt, and between melt-season maximum LST and maximum daily streamflow has been documented. Use of LST and MODIS snow-cover and products in hydrological models increases the accuracy of the modeled prediction of runoff. The IST and LST products have also been applied to study of sea ice, e.g. extent and concentration, and lake ice, such as determining ice-out dates, and these efforts will also be described.

  20. Surface Characterization of Laser Surface Melted NiTi Shape Memory Alloy in Hanks' Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUIZhen-duo; ZHUSheng-li; MANHauchung; YANGXian-jin

    2004-01-01

    The surface of Ti-50.8Ni at% shape memory alloy was melted by an Nd-YAG laser. The Ti/Ni and Ti4+/ Tiatomic concentration ratios at the surface were changed significantly. The Ni ion release rate of the laser melted surface was much lower than that of the mechanical polished samples. A calcium-phosphorous layer with high Ca/P ratio was detected after immersion in Hanks' solution.

  1. Surface Characterization of Laser Surface Melted NiTi Shape Memory Alloy in Hanks' Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Zhen-duo; ZHU Sheng-li; MAN Hauchung; YANG Xian-jin

    2004-01-01

    The surface of Ti-50.8Ni at% shape memory alloy was melted by an Nd-YAG laser. The Ti/Ni and Ti4+/Ti atomic concentration ratios at the surface were changed significantly. The Ni ion release rate of the laser melted surface was much lower than that of the mechanical polished samples. A calcium-phosphorous layer with high Ca/P ratio was detected after immersion in Hanks' solution.

  2. Surface tension driven flow in glass melts and model fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcneil, T. J.; Cole, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Surface tension driven flow has been investigated analytically and experimentally using an apparatus where a free column of molten glass or model fluids was supported at its top and bottom faces by solid surfaces. The glass used in the experiments was sodium diborate, and the model fluids were silicone oils. In both the model fluid and glass melt experiments, conclusive evidence was obtained to prove that the observed flow was driven primarily by surface tension forces. The experimental observations are in qualitative agreement with predictions from the theoretical model.

  3. Surface Heat Budget and Solar Radiation Allocation at a Melt Pond During Summer in the Central Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shugang; ZHAO Jinping; SHI Jiuxin; JIAO Yutian

    2014-01-01

    The heat budget of a melt pond surface and the solar radiation allocation at the melt pond are studied using the 2010 Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition data collected in the central Arctic. Temperature at a melt pond surface is proportional to the air temperature above it. However, the linear relationship between the two varies, depending on whether the air temperature is higher or lower than 0℃. The melt pond surface temperature is strongly influenced by the air temperature when the latter is lower than 0℃. Both net longwave radiation and turbulent heat flux can cause energy loss in a melt pond, but the loss by the latter is larger than that by the former. The turbulent heat flux is more than twice the net longwave radiation when the air temperature is lower than 0℃. More than 50%of the radiation energy entering the pond surface is absorbed by pond water. Very thin ice sheet on the pond surface (black ice) appears when the air temperature is lower than 0℃; on the other hand, only a small percentage (5.5%) of net longwave in the solar radiation is absorbed by such a thin ice sheet.

  4. Measurements of true polymer melt temperature in a circular cross-sectional duct by moving temperature sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patcharaphun,S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to design and develop an experimental apparatus and a temperature sensor in order to measure true melt temperature rise due to the shear heating during the flow. The designed apparatus featured two different forms, one being the polymer melt flowing past the stationary sensor (so-called moving piston, and the other being the sensor moving along the stationary polymer melt (so-called moving sensor. By subtracting the temperature data obtained by moving sensor from those obtained by moving piston the true melt temperature rise could be yielded. The temperature data were collected using a high-speed data logger and a computer. The effects of melt/piston velocity, initial melts temperature and various types of polymer melts used were of interest in this work. It was found that the experimental apparatus designed and used in this work was very effective and gave reasonably accurate

  5. Investigation on recalescence temperatures of deeply undercooled melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X. L.; Liu, F.; Hou, H.; Zhao, Y. H.; Gu, T.; Wang, S. Y.; Yan, F.

    2016-12-01

    According to the theory of classic thermodynamics, any transformation is driven by the decrease of Gibbs free energy of the system. Solidification pertains to the first order transformation and obeys this basic law. The Gibbs free energy of the condensed phases of metals and alloys is closely related to the temperature and composition of the system. Thus we can describe rapid solidification process in a more precise way by using quantitative thermodynamic calculation. In combination with solidification kinetics theory, we calculated the evolution of the thermodynamic parameters during rapid solidification process. On this basis, we proposed a criterion for the end point of recalescence process and built a physical model for describing rapid solidification process and predicting recalescence temperatures of undercooled melts. Good agreement can be achieved between the present model prediction and experimental data.

  6. MEaSUREs Greenland Surface Melt Daily 25km EASE-Grid 2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set offers users a 25 km daily record of surface/near-surface melting on the Greenland Ice Sheet. The presence of melting is determined from brightness...

  7. GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations: Ship, fixed/drifting buoy, and CMAN in-situ surface temperature. Global Telecommunication System (GTS) Data. The...

  8. Local protrusions formed on Si(111) surface by surface melting and solidification under applied tensile stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, T.; Tomitori, M.

    2016-09-01

    The surface structure and composition of Si(111) was modified, by heating it to 1300 °C in ultrahigh vacuum under an external tensile stress. A stress of approximately 1 GPa was applied, by pressing on the center of the rear side of the sample. This process produced two protrusions of approximately 100 μm in height, to the left and right of the center. Scanning Auger electron spectroscopy revealed Fe, Cr, Ni, and C impurities at the top of one protrusion, and C at the top of the other. These impurities likely diffused into the tops of the protrusions during heating, and segregated to the local surface during cooling when the protrusions formed. The protrusion formation mechanism is discussed. Their formation was related to non-uniform surface temperature, electromigration, piezoresistivity, freezing-point depression due to surface alloying with the impurities, and volume expansion during solidification from surface melting. These findings provide a perspective on controlling surface structures and compositions using heat and stress to induce self-assembly.

  9. The Dynamic Role of Melt-Vapor Surface Tension in Magmatic Degassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, M.; Sisson, T.

    2004-05-01

    It is well known from classical nucleation theory that melt-vapor surface tension (σ ) critically influences both the supersaturation pressure needed to initiate eruptive degassing (Δ Pcritical) and the rate of gas bubble nucleation (J ). Here we highlight an important aspect of melt-vapor surface tension that is generally ignored, namely, that σ is dynamic quantity responsive to the changes in melt composition, water content, and temperature that occur during magma storage and ascent. Crystallization, degassing, and cooling impart a time-dependency to σ that must be considered in any effort to accurately model eruption processes. In this study, we document changes to σ in natural, water-saturated dacitic melt at 200 MPa and 950-1055° C and 5.7-4.8 wt% H2O. Rather than traditional macroscopic measurements (sessile drop, capillarity, detachment techniques), we experimentally determine the Δ Pcritical of bubble nucleation during depressurization from 200 MPa as a function of T and wt% H2O (techniques as in Mangan and Sisson, E&PSL, 2000), and then solve for σ at those conditions using classical nucleation theory (Blander and Katz, AIChE Jour., 1975). Meshing experiment and theory gives σ = 42 (±3), 60 (±7), 73 (±3) mN/m at T= 950, 1000, 1055° C, and H2O = 5.7 (±0.1), 5.3 (±0.2), 4.8 (±0.1) wt%, respectively. Our data show a negative dependence of σ on dissolved water content of -33 mN/m/wt% H2O and a positive dependence of σ on temperature of +0.30 mN/m/° C. Comparable relationships between σ and changing water content and temperature were obtained in sessile-drop style experiments using hydrous haplogranite melts (Bagdassarov et al., Amer. Mineral., 2000). To illustrate how the observed σ -H2O-T dependencies might impact degassing models we consider two idealized regimes. The first is a storage regime in which isobaric cooling and crystallization in the magma chamber gradually increases the H2O content of the residual melt. Surface tension is

  10. Temperature Effects on Aluminoborosilicate Glass and Melt Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Stebbins, J. F.

    2008-12-01

    Quantitative determination of the atomic-scale structure of multi-component oxide melts, and the effects of temperature on them, is a complex problem. Ca- and Na- aluminoborosilicates are especially interesting, not only because of their major role in widespread technical applications (flat-panel computer displays, fiber composites, etc.), but because the coordination environments of two of their main network cations (Al3+ and B3+) change markedly with composition and temperature is ways that may in part be analogous to processes in silicate melts at high pressures in the Earth. Here we examine a series of such glasses with different cooling rates, chosen to evaluate the role modifier cation field strength (Ca2+ vs. Na+) and of non-bridging oxygen (NBO) content. To explore the effects of fictive temperature, fast quenched and annealed samples were compared. We have used B-11 and Al-27 MAS NMR to measure the different B and Al coordinations and calculated the contents of non-bridging oxygens (NBO). Lower cooling rates increase the fraction of [4]B species in all compositions. The conversion of [3]B to [4]B is also expected to convert NBO to bridging oxygens, which should affect thermodynamic properties such as configurational entropy and configurational heat capacity. For four compositions with widely varying compositions and initial NBO contents, analysis of the speciation changes with the same, simple reaction [3]B = [4]B + NBO yields similar enthalpy values of 25±7 kJ/mol. B-11 triple quantum MAS NMR allows as well the proportions of [3]B boroxol ring and non-ring sites to be determined, and reveals more [3]B boroxol ring structures present in annealed (lower temperature) glasses. In situ, high-temperature MAS NMR spectra have been collected on one of the Na-aluminoborosilicate and on a sodium borate glass at 14.1 T. The exchange of boron between the 3- and 4-coordinated sites is clearly observed well above the glass transition temperatures, confirming the

  11. Modelling the size effect on the melting temperature of nanoparticles, nanowires and nanofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safaei, A [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, PO Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shandiz, M Attarian [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, PO Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sanjabi, S [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, PO Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Barber, Z H [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge University, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-30

    A model has been developed to account for the dependence of melting temperature on the size of nanosolids (nanoparticles, nanowires and nanofilms). In this model the effect of particle size and shape, lattice and surface packing factor, and the coordination number of the lattice and of the surface crystalline planes are considered. A general equation is proposed, having nonlinear form as a function of the reciprocal of nanosolid size. This model is consistent with reported experimental data for nanoparticles of In and Au, nanowires of Pb and In, and nanofilms of In.

  12. Physics of solid and liquid alkali halide surfaces near the melting point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zykova-Timan, T.; Ceresoli, D.; Tartaglino, U.; Tosatti, E.

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents a broad theoretical and simulation study of the high-temperature behavior of crystalline alkali halide surfaces typified by NaCl(100), of the liquid NaCl surface near freezing, and of the very unusual partial wetting of the solid surface by the melt. Simulations are conducted using two-body rigid-ion Born-Mayer-Huggins-Fumi-Tosi (BMHFT) potentials, with full treatment of long-range Coulomb forces. After a preliminary check of the description of bulk NaCl provided by these potentials, which seems generally good even at the melting point, we carry out a new investigation of solid and liquid surfaces. Solid NaCl(100) is found in this model to be very anharmonic and yet exceptionally stable when hot. It is predicted by a thermodynamic integration calculation of the surface free energy that NaCl(100) should be a well-ordered, nonmelting surface, metastable even well above the melting point. By contrast, the simulated liquid NaCl surface is found to exhibit large thermal fluctuations and no layering order. In spite of that, it is shown to possess a relatively large surface free energy. The latter is traced to a surface entropy deficit, reflecting some kind of surface short-range order. We show that the surface short-range order is most likely caused by the continuous transition of the bulk ionic melt into the vapor, made of NaCl molecules and dimers rather than of single ions. Finally, the solid-liquid interface free energy is derived through Young's equation from direct simulation of partial wetting of NaCl(100) by a liquid droplet. The resulting interface free energy is large, in line with the conspicuous solid-liquid 27% density difference. A partial wetting angle near 50° close to the experimental value of 48° is obtained in the process. It is concluded that three elements, namely, the exceptional anharmonic stability of the solid (100) surface, the molecular short-range order at the liquid surface, and the costly solid-liquid interface, all

  13. Delineation of Surface and Near-Surface Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet Using MODIS and QuikSCAT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Nghiem, Son V.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Neumann, Gregory; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of MODIS and QuikSCAT data to measure the surface and sub-surface melting on the Greenland Ice Sheet. The project demonstrated the consistence of this technique for measuring the ice melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet. The blending of the two instruments data allows for determination of surface vs subsurface melting. Also, the use of albedo maps can provide information about the intensity of the melting.

  14. Melting heat transfer in the MHD flow of a third-grade fluid over a variable-thickness surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Kiran, Asmara; Imtiaz, Maria; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Ayub, M.

    2017-06-01

    The present study addresses the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of a third-grade fluid over a nonlinear stretched surface with variable thickness. The heat transfer phenomenon is discussed through melting. The system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations is attained by considering proper transformations. Convergent series solutions of velocity and temperature are developed. Fluid flow, temperature, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are examined through graphs for different parameters. It is noted that velocity and temperature decrease with decreasing the wall thickness parameter. It is also revealed that the temperature distribution enhances for increasing values of the Prandtl number. Here the velocity field reduces for increasing values of the melting parameter.

  15. GISS Surface Temperature Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The GISTEMP dataset is a global 2x2 gridded temperature anomaly dataset. Temperature data is updated around the middle of every month using current data files from...

  16. Studying regimes of convective heat transfer in the production of high-temperature silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volokitin, O. G.; Sheremet, M. A.; Shekhovtsov, V. V.; Bondareva, N. S.; Kuzmin, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies of the production of high-temperature silicate melts using the energy of low-temperature plasma in a conceptually new setup. A mathematical model of unsteady regimes of convective heat and mass transfer is developed and numerically implemented under the assumption of non-Newtonian nature of flow in the melting furnace with plasma-chemical synthesis of high-temperature silicate melts. Experiments on melting silicate containing materials were carried out using the energy of low-temperature plasma. The dependence of dynamic viscosity of various silicate materials (basalt, ash, waste of oil shale) was found experimentally.

  17. Surface melt and ponding of Larsen C Ice Shelf and the impact of foehn winds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luckman, Adrian; Elvidge, Andrew; Jansen, Daniela; Kulessa, Bernd; Kuipers Munneke, Peter|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831891; King, John; Barrand, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    A common precursor to ice shelf disintegration, most notably that of Larsen B Ice Shelf, is unusually intense or prolonged surface melt and the presence of surface standing water. However, there has been little research into detailed patterns of melt on ice shelves or the nature of summer melt

  18. Adhesion of Polymer Composite Melt to PTFE at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, David; Debies, Thomas; McVeigh, Dan

    2007-03-01

    A novel technique for measuring the adhesive force between a thin molten polyester composite film and a PTFE surface is presented in the paper. The molten film was prepared by first depositing powdery composite particles on a substrate and then heating the powdery film on the substrate to the test temperature through a heated pressure nip between two conformable rollers comprising a PTFE overcoat at a speed up to 400 mm/s. The adhesive force is measured by wedging a bendable metal knife into the interface between the molten film and PTFE near the exit of the heating nip. Strain gauges were mounted on both sides of the metal knife. The differential strain gauge reading resulting from the degree of the knife bending is calibrated against standard weights. The technique was used to investigate the effects of the substrate, substrate roughness, molten film thickness, temperature and type of wax additive on the adhesion of the molten composite film to PTFE. On the effects of temperature and type of wax, we found that the adhesive force remains relatively constant at low temperature, and then drops significantly, in some instances to zero, as the temperature further increases. A phenomenological model is proposed to explain the effects of main temperature and the wax additive. The model is evidenced by the surface segregation of wax from the polyester composite film as determined by XPS.

  19. Future projections of the Greenland ice sheet energy balance driving the surface melt, developed using the regional climate MAR model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Franco

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 25 km-simulations are performed over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS throughout the 20th and 21st centuries, using the regional climate model MAR forced by four RCP scenarios from two CMIP5 global circulation models, in order to investigate the projected changes of the surface energy balance (SEB components driving the surface melt. Analysis of 2000–2100 melt anomalies compared to melt results over 1980–1999 reveals an exponential relationship of the GrIS surface melt rate simulated by MAR to the near-surface temperature (TAS anomalies, mainly due to the surface albedo positive feedback associated with the extension of bare ice areas in summer. On the GrIS margins, the future melt anomalies are rather driven by stronger sensible heat fluxes, induced by enhanced warm air advections over the ice sheet. Over the central dry snow zone, the increase of melt surpasses the negative feedback from heavier snowfall inducing therefore a decrease of the summer surface albedo even at the top of the ice sheet. In addition to the incoming longwave flux increase associated to the atmosphere warming, MAR projects an increase of the cloud cover decreasing the ratio of the incoming shortwave versus longwave radiation and dampening the albedo feedback. However, it should be noted that this trend in the cloud cover is contrary to that simulated by ERA-INTERIM-forced MAR over current climate, where the observed melt increase since the 1990's seems rather to be a consequence of more anticyclonic atmospheric conditions. Finally, no significant change is projected in the length of the melt season. This timing highlights the importance of solar radiation in the melt SEB.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of laser induced surface melting in orthorhombic Al13Co4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, S.; Roth, J.; Trebin, H.-R.

    2010-10-01

    Laser induced surface melting of the aluminum-cobalt alloy Al13Co4 is investigated. For the simulations of the lattice ions we use molecular dynamics, while for the time evolution of the electron temperature a generalized heat-conduction equation is solved. Energy transfer between the sub-systems is allowed by an electron-phonon coupling term. This combined treatment of the electronic and atomic systems is an extension of the well-known two-temperature model [Anisimov et al. in JETP Lett. 39(2), 1974]. The alloy shows large structural affinity to decagonal quasicrystals, which have an in-plane five-fold symmetry,while in perpendicular direction the planes are stacked periodically. As a consequence we observe slight anisotropic melting behavior.

  1. Effect of laser surface melting treatment on properties of electric copper busbar joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁工英; 宋晓平; 顾林喻

    2001-01-01

    Electrical conductance and temperature of electric copper busbar joints were measured under different torque moments. Experimental results show that laser surface melting can increase hardness and refine structure of the copper, and it does not deteriorate electric resistance. Meanwhile, the temperature of laser treated joints under electric current is slightly lower than that of original sample. Salt spray test shows that laser treated sample has better salt spray corrosion resistance than the original sample does. The electric resistance of both laser-treated and original samples are increased with salt spray time. For the same salt spray time, the electric resistance of busbar joint is decreased with increasing torque moment.

  2. Divergent trajectories of Antarctic ice shelf surface melt under 21st century climate scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusel, L. D.; Frey, K. E.; Das, S. B.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; van Meijgaard, E.

    2014-12-01

    Antarctic ice shelves represent a critical interface between continental ice masses and the surrounding ocean. Breakup events of several ice shelves in recent decades have been linked to an increase in intense surface melting, and have in turn lead to cascading effects including accelerated glacier discharge into the ocean. In this study, we utilized sophisticated regional and global climate models (GCMs) to assess potential future surface melt trajectories across Antarctica under two climate scenarios (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5). RACMO2.1, a polar-adapted regional atmospheric climate model, was forced by the ERA-Interim reanalysis (1980-2010) and by two GCMs, EC-EARTH and HadGEM2-ES (2007-2100). Using RACMO2.1, we observed an exponential growth function well represents the relationship between ice shelf surface meltwater production and mean summer (DJF) 2-meter air temperature (t2m). We employed this melt-t2m relationship to project melt using t2m output from an ensemble of five CMIP5-based GCMs incorporating the NCAR Community Land Model 4 (CLM4), following spatial downscaling and bias correction using t2m from ERA-Interim-forced RACMO2.1. Our resulting GCM-derived melt projections provide an independent and methodologically unique perspective into potential future melt pathways, complementary to those derived from RACMO2.1. Most notably, both RACMO2.1 and the CMIP5 ensemble reveal divergent trajectories of meltwater production beyond 2050 under the two climate scenarios. For many ice shelves in RCP4.5, meltwater production through 2100 remains at levels comparable to present. Conversely, under RCP8.5 all methods indicate non-linear melt intensification, resulting in a four-fold increase in the Antarctic-wide meltwater volume by the end of the 21st century. For some ice shelves, including Larsen C and Wilkins (Antarctic Peninsula), and Shackleton and West (Wilkes Land), spatially averaged end-of-century meltwater production within RCP8.5 approaches or surpasses levels

  3. Phase change nanocomposites with tunable melting temperature and thermal energy storage density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minglu; Wang, Robert Y.

    2013-07-01

    Size-dependent melting decouples melting temperature from chemical composition and provides a new design variable for phase change material applications. To demonstrate this potential, we create nanocomposites that exhibit stable and tunable melting temperatures through numerous melt-freeze cycles. These composites consist of a monodisperse ensemble of Bi nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a polyimide (PI) resin matrix. The Bi NPs operate as the phase change component whereas the PI resin matrix prevents nanoparticle coalescence during melt-freeze cycles. We tune melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion in these composites by varying the NP diameter. Adjusting the NP volume fraction also controls the composite's thermal energy storage density. Hence it is possible to leverage size effects to tune phase change temperature and energy density in phase change materials.Size-dependent melting decouples melting temperature from chemical composition and provides a new design variable for phase change material applications. To demonstrate this potential, we create nanocomposites that exhibit stable and tunable melting temperatures through numerous melt-freeze cycles. These composites consist of a monodisperse ensemble of Bi nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a polyimide (PI) resin matrix. The Bi NPs operate as the phase change component whereas the PI resin matrix prevents nanoparticle coalescence during melt-freeze cycles. We tune melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion in these composites by varying the NP diameter. Adjusting the NP volume fraction also controls the composite's thermal energy storage density. Hence it is possible to leverage size effects to tune phase change temperature and energy density in phase change materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and additional DSC data on nanocomposites and pure PI resin. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02842a

  4. Computation and measurement of air temperature distribution of an industrial melt blowing die

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Li-Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The air flow field of the dual slot die on an HDF-6D melt blowing non-woven equipment is computed numerically. A temperature measurement system is built to measure air temperatures. The computation results tally with the measured results proving the correctness of the computation. The results have great valuable significance in the actual melt blowing production.

  5. Numerical modeling of inward and outward melting of high temperature PCM in a vertical cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, S.; Saman, W. Y.; Bruno, F.; Tay, N. H. S.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical study of inward and outward melting of a high temperature PCM in cylindrical enclosures were performed, using FLUENT 15. For validation purposes, numerical modeling of inward melting of a low temperature PCM was initially conducted and the predicted results were compared with the experimental data from the literature. The validated model for the low temperature PCM was used for two high temperature cases; inward melting of a high temperature PCM in a cylindrical enclosure and outward melting in a cylindrical case with higher aspect ratio. The results of this study show that the numerical model developed is capable of capturing the details of melting process with buoyancy driven convection for RaPCM and can be used for the design and optimization of a latent heat thermal storage unit.

  6. Temperature dependence of surface nanobubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkelaar, R.P.; Seddon, James Richard Thorley; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    The temperature dependence of nanobubbles was investigated experimentally using atomic force microscopy. By scanning the same area of the surface at temperatures from 51 °C to 25 °C it was possible to track geometrical changes of individual nanobubbles as the temperature was decreased.

  7. The Impact Of Snow Melt On Surface Runoff Of Sava River In Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, A.; Brilly, M.; Vidmar, A.; Kobold, M.

    2009-04-01

    Snow is a type of precipitation in the form of crystalline water ice, consisting of a multitude of snowflakes that fall from clouds. Snow remains on the ground until it melts or sublimates. Spring snow melt is a major source of water supply to areas in temperate zones near mountains that catch and hold winter snow, especially those with a prolonged dry summer. In such places, water equivalent is of great interest to water managers wishing to predict spring runoff and the water supply of cities downstream. In temperate zone like in Slovenia the snow melts in the spring and contributes certain amount of water to surface flow. This amount of water can be great and can cause serious floods in case of fast snow melt. For this reason we tried to determine the influence of snow melt on the largest river basin in Slovenia - Sava River basin, on surface runoff. We would like to find out if snow melt in Slovenian Alps can cause spring floods and how serious it can be. First of all we studied the caracteristics of Sava River basin - geology, hydrology, clima, relief and snow conditions in details for each subbasin. Furtermore we focused on snow and described the snow phenomenom in Slovenia, detailed on Sava River basin. We collected all available data on snow - snow water equivalent and snow depth. Snow water equivalent is a much more useful measurement to hydrologists than snow depth, as the density of cool freshly fallen snow widely varies. New snow commonly has a density of between 5% and 15% of water. But unfortunately there is not a lot of available data of SWE available for Slovenia. Later on we compared the data of snow depth and river runoff for some of the 40 winter seasons. Finally we analyzed the use of satellite images for Slovenia to determine the snow cover for hydrology reason. We concluded that snow melt in Slovenia does not have a greater influence on Sava River flow. The snow cover in Alps can melt fast due to higher temperatures but the water distributes

  8. Influence of Air Temperature Difference on the Snow Melting Simulation of SWAT Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAN, Y.; Onishi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The temperature-index models are commonly used to simulate the snowmelt process in mountain areas because of its good performance, low data requirements, and computational simplicity. Widely used distributed hydrological model: Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is also using a temperature-index module. However, the lack of monitoring air temperature data still involves uncertainties and errors in its simulation performance especially in data sparse area. Thus, to evaluate the different air temperature data influence on the snow melt of the SWAT model, five different air temperature data are applied in two different Russia basins (Birobidjan basin and Malinovka basin). The data include the monitoring air temperature data (TM), NCEP reanalysis data (TNCEP), the dataset created by inverse distance weighted interpolation (IDW) method (TIDW), the dataset created by improved IDW method considering the elevation influence (TIDWEle), and the dataset created by using linear regression and MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) data (TLST). Among these data, the TLST , the TIDW and TIDWEle data have the higher spatial density, while the TNCEP and TM DATA have the most valid monitoring value for daily scale. The daily simulation results during the snow melting seasons (March, April and May) showed reasonable results in both test basins for all air temperature data. While R2 and NSE in Birobidjan basin are around 0.6, these values in Malinovka basin are over 0.75. Two methods: Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) and Sequential Uncertainty Fitting, version. 2 (SUFI-2) were used for model calibration and uncertainty analysis. The evolution index is p-factor which means the percentage of measured data bracketed by the 95% Prediction Uncertainty (95PPU). The TLST dataset always obtained the best results in both basins compared with other datasets. On the other hand, the two IDW based method get the worst results among all the scenarios. Totally, the

  9. Thermal performance of a heat storage module using PCM's with different melting temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, M.M.; Kanzawa, A.

    1989-05-01

    The performance of a heat storage unit consisting of number of vertical cylindrical capsules filled with phase change materials, with air flowing across them for heat exchange has been analyzed. Earlier theoretical models did not consider temperature distribution in the radial direction within the capsules, an assumption that limits their applications for small diameter capsules. The mathematical model developed in this work is based on solving the heat conduction equation in both melt and solid phases in cylindrical coordinates, taking into account the radial temperature distribution in both phases. Heat flux was then evaluated at the surface of the first row of the capsules to determine the temperature of the air leaving that row by a simple heat balance. It was found that such computation may be carried out for every few rows rather than for a single row to minimize computer time. The simulation study showed a significant improvement in the rate of heat transfer during heat charge and discharge when phase change materials with different melting temperatures were used.

  10. In Situ X-Ray Diffraction Study on Surface Melting of Bi Nanoparticles Embedded in a SiO2 Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Ming; Huo, Kai-Tuo; Liu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Bi nanoparticles embedded in a SiO2 matrix were prepared via the high energy ball milling method. The melting behavior of Bi nanoparticles was studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and high-temperature in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). DSC cannot distinguish the surface melting from ‘bulk’ melting of the Bi nanoparticles. The XRD intensity of the Bi nanoparticles decreases progressively during the in situ heating process. The variation in the normalized integrated XRD intensity versus temperature is related to the average grain size of Bi nanoparticles. Considering the effects of temperature on Debye—Waller factor and Lorentz-polarization factor, we discuss the XRD results in accordance with surface melting. Our results show that the in situ XRD technique is effective to explore the surface melting of nanoparticles.

  11. Martian low-temperature alteration materials in shock-melt pockets in Tissint: Constraints on their preservation in shergottite meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchka, C. R.; Herd, C. D. K.; Walton, E. L.; Guan, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2017-08-01

    We apply an array of in situ analytical techniques, including electron and Raman microscopy, electron and ion probe microanalysis, and laser ablation mass spectrometry to the Tissint martian meteorite in order to find and elucidate a geochemical signature characteristic of low-temperature alteration at or near the martian surface. Tissint contains abundant shock-produced quench-crystallized melt pockets containing water in concentrations ranging from 73 to 1730 ppm; water content is positively correlated with Cl content. The isotopic composition of hydrogen in the shock-produced glass ranges from δD = 2559 to 4422‰. Water is derived from two distinct hydrogen reservoirs: the martian near-surface (>500‰) and the martian mantle (-100‰). In one shock melt pocket comprising texturally homogeneous vesiculated glass, the concentration of H in the shock melt decreases while simultaneously becoming enriched in D, attributable to the preferential loss of H over D to the vesicle while the pocket was still molten. While igneous sulfides are pyrrhotite in composition (Fe0.88-0.90S), the iron to sulfur ratios of spherules in shock melt pockets are elevated, up to Fe1.70S, which we attribute to shock-oxidation of igneous pyrrhotite and the formation of hematite at high temperature. The D- and Cl-enrichment, and higher oxidation of the pockets (as indicated by hematite) support a scenario in which alteration products formed within fractures or void spaces within the rock; the signature of these alteration products is preserved within shock melt (now glass) which formed upon collapse of these fractures and voids during impact shock. Thermal modeling of Tissint shock melt pockets using the HEAT program demonstrates that the shock melt pockets with the greatest potential to preserve a signature of aqueous alteration are small, isolated from other regions of shock melt, vesicle-free, and glassy.

  12. connecting the dots between Greenland ice sheet surface melting and ice flow dynamics (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, J. E.; Colgan, W. T.; Fettweis, X.; Phillips, T. P.; Stober, M.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation is of a 'unified theory' in glaciology that first identifies surface albedo as a key factor explaining total ice sheet mass balance and then surveys a mechanistic self-reinforcing interaction between melt water and ice flow dynamics. The theory is applied in a near-real time total Greenland mass balance retrieval based on surface albedo, a powerful integrator of the competing effects of accumulation and ablation. New snowfall reduces sunlight absorption and increases meltwater retention. Melting amplifies absorbed sunlight through thermal metamorphism and bare ice expansion in space and time. By ';following the melt'; we reveal mechanisms linking existing science into a unified theory. Increasing meltwater softens the ice sheet in three ways: 1.) sensible heating given the water temperature exceeds that of the ice sheet interior; 2.) Some infiltrating water refreezes, transferring latent heat to the ice; 3.) Friction from water turbulence heats the ice. It has been shown that for a point on the ice sheet, basal lubrication increases ice flow speed to a time when an efficient sub-glacial drainage network develops that reduces this effect. Yet, with an increasing melt duration the point where the ice sheet glides on a wet bed increases inland to a larger area. This effect draws down the ice surface elevation, contributing to the ';elevation feedback'. In a perpetual warming scenario, the elevation feedback ultimately leads to ice sheet loss reversible only through much slower ice sheet growth in an ice age environment. As the inland ice sheet accelerates, the horizontal extension pulls cracks and crevasses open, trapping more sunlight, amplifying the effect of melt accelerated ice. As the bare ice area increases, the direct sun-exposed crevassed and infiltration area increases further allowing the ice warming process to occur more broadly. Considering hydrofracture [a.k.a. hydrofracking]; surface meltwater fills cracks, attacking the ice integrity

  13. Surface tension of polymer melts - experimental investigations of its effect on polymer-polymer adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    The surface tension of polymer melts is important for the bond strength of two component polymer parts through their roles in the process of wetting, adsorption and adhesion. This investigation deals with the influence of the melt surface tension and substrate surface energy on the polymer...

  14. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2015-07-01

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re ˜2 ×104- 3 ×105 and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface.

  15. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2015-07-24

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re∼2×104–3×105 and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface.

  16. Microstructural changes due to laser surface melting of an AISI 304 stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    d?Oliveira A.S.C.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Several techniques can be used to improve surface properties. These can involve changes on the surface chemical composition (such as alloying and surface welding processes or on the surface microstructure, such as hardening and melting. In the present work surface melting with a 3kW CO2 cw laser was done to alter surface features of an AISI 304 stainless steel. Microstructure characterisation was done by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers and Knoop microhardness tests evaluated mechanical features after surface melting. Phase transformation during rapid solidification is analysed and discussed.

  17. Bacterial communities of surface mixed layer in the Pacific sector of the western Arctic Ocean during sea-ice melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dukki; Kang, Ilnam; Ha, Ho Kyung; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Ok-Sun; Lee, Bang Yong; Cho, Jang-Cheon; Hur, Hor-Gil; Lee, Yoo Kyung

    2014-01-01

    From July to August 2010, the IBRV ARAON journeyed to the Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean to monitor bacterial variation in Arctic summer surface-waters, and temperature, salinity, fluorescence, and nutrient concentrations were determined during the ice-melting season. Among the measured physicochemical parameters, we observed a strong negative correlation between temperature and salinity, and consequently hypothesized that the melting ice decreased water salinity. The bacterial community compositions of 15 samples, includicng seawater, sea-ice, and melting pond water, were determined using a pyrosequencing approach and were categorized into three habitats: (1) surface seawater, (2) ice core, and (3) melting pond. Analysis of these samples indicated the presence of local bacterial communities; a deduction that was further corroborated by the discovery of seawater- and ice-specific bacterial phylotypes. In all samples, the Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria taxa composed the majority of the bacterial communities. Among these, Alphaproteobacteria was the most abundant and present in all samples, and its variation differed among the habitats studied. Linear regression analysis suggested that changes in salinity could affect the relative proportion of Alphaproteobacteria in the surface water. In addition, the species-sorting model was applied to evaluate the population dynamics and environmental heterogeneity in the bacterial communities of surface mixed layer in the Arctic Ocean during sea-ice melting.

  18. Bacterial communities of surface mixed layer in the Pacific sector of the western Arctic Ocean during sea-ice melting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dukki Han

    Full Text Available From July to August 2010, the IBRV ARAON journeyed to the Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean to monitor bacterial variation in Arctic summer surface-waters, and temperature, salinity, fluorescence, and nutrient concentrations were determined during the ice-melting season. Among the measured physicochemical parameters, we observed a strong negative correlation between temperature and salinity, and consequently hypothesized that the melting ice decreased water salinity. The bacterial community compositions of 15 samples, includicng seawater, sea-ice, and melting pond water, were determined using a pyrosequencing approach and were categorized into three habitats: (1 surface seawater, (2 ice core, and (3 melting pond. Analysis of these samples indicated the presence of local bacterial communities; a deduction that was further corroborated by the discovery of seawater- and ice-specific bacterial phylotypes. In all samples, the Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria taxa composed the majority of the bacterial communities. Among these, Alphaproteobacteria was the most abundant and present in all samples, and its variation differed among the habitats studied. Linear regression analysis suggested that changes in salinity could affect the relative proportion of Alphaproteobacteria in the surface water. In addition, the species-sorting model was applied to evaluate the population dynamics and environmental heterogeneity in the bacterial communities of surface mixed layer in the Arctic Ocean during sea-ice melting.

  19. Investigating the highest melting temperature materials: A laser melting study of the TaC-HfC system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedillos-Barraza, Omar; Manara, Dario; Boboridis, K.; Watkins, Tyson; Grasso, Salvatore; Jayaseelan, Daniel D.; Konings, Rudy J. M.; Reece, Michael J.; Lee, William E.

    2016-12-01

    TaC, HfC and their solid solutions are promising candidate materials for thermal protection structures in hypersonic vehicles because of their very high melting temperatures (>4000 K) among other properties. The melting temperatures of slightly hypostoichiometric TaC, HfC and three solid solution compositions (Ta1‑xHfxC, with x = 0.8, 0.5 and 0.2) have long been identified as the highest known. In the current research, they were reassessed, for the first time in the last fifty years, using a laser heating technique. They were found to melt in the range of 4041–4232 K, with HfC having the highest and TaC the lowest. Spectral radiance of the hot samples was measured in situ, showing that the optical emissivity of these compounds plays a fundamental role in their heat balance. Independently, the results show that the melting point for HfC0.98, (4232 ± 84) K, is the highest recorded for any compound studied until now.

  20. The Effect of Si on the Melting Temperature of Iron up to 24 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Fei, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth's outer core consists of iron plus about 10wt% light elements, such as oxygen, sulfur, silicon, carbon, and hydrogen, based on geophysical and geochemical observations, cosmochemical arguments, and mineral physics data. Among the proposed light elements, silicon (Si) is considered as one of the leading candidates in the Earth's core. For Mercury, its core could contain substantial amount of Si if it is accreted under relatively reduced environment. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the effect of Si on the melting temperature of iron at high pressure in order to provide an estimate of the core temperature for a Si-bearing core. We have carried out a series of high-pressure melting experiments on Fe-17wt%Si in the multi-anvil apparatus. The experiments were conducted using an 8/3 assembly with rhenium heater and MgO capsule. The quenched samples were examined with the scanning electron microscope equipped with a silicon drift detector EDS. Quenching textures and composition mappings of the recovered samples were used as the melting criteria. The melting temperatures of Fe-17wt%Si are 1800K, 2070K, 2170K, and 2270K at 10GP, 15GPa, 20GPa and 24GPa respectively. The result is consistent with the melting curve at low pressure (up to 5.5 GPa) based on the measurements of the discontinuities in temperature and pressure dependence of electrical resistance. Compared with the melting temperature of fcc iron, the P-T slope of the melting curve of Fe-17wt%Si is larger than that of pure Fe, indicating that the melting temperature depression becomes smaller at high pressure which may lead to change of melting relations at higher pressure. The new data provide constraints on the thermal structure of Mercury's core and a basis for extrapolation to higher pressure. Key words: melting temperature, high pressure, Fe-Si, outer core

  1. Surface melt-induced acceleration of Greenland ice-sheet flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwally, H Jay; Abdalati, Waleed; Herring, Tom; Larson, Kristine; Saba, Jack; Steffen, Konrad

    2002-07-12

    Ice flow at a location in the equilibrium zone of the west-central Greenland Ice Sheet accelerates above the midwinter average rate during periods of summer melting. The near coincidence of the ice acceleration with the duration of surface melting, followed by deceleration after the melting ceases, indicates that glacial sliding is enhanced by rapid migration of surface meltwater to the ice-bedrock interface. Interannual variations in the ice acceleration are correlated with variations in the intensity of the surface melting, with larger increases accompanying higher amounts of summer melting. The indicated coupling between surface melting and ice-sheet flow provides a mechanism for rapid, large-scale, dynamic responses of ice sheets to climate warming.

  2. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring..., LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Documents and Cargo Information § 153.908 Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge:...

  3. Relationship between Thermodynamic Parameters for Mn-Fe Melt and Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Er-bao; DONG Yuan-chi; GUO Shang-xing; WU Bao-guo

    2004-01-01

    The carbon solubility in Mn-Fe melts were measured at 1 350 ℃,1 375 ℃,1 425 ℃ and 1 450 ℃,and accordingly the calculated equations were obtained. By thermodynamic derivation and calculation, some relationships between thermodynamic parameters for Mn-Fe melt and temperature were obtained.

  4. Surface Modification by Means of Laser Melting Combined with Shot Peening : A Novel Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordhuis, J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1992-01-01

    Among the available laser applications laser surface melting has turned out to be a powerful technique for the production of wear-resistant layers. Despite the advantages of this process, laser surface melting results in tensile stresses which may assist crack propagation. In this paper it will be

  5. SURFACE MODIFICATION BY MEANS OF LASER MELTING COMBINED WITH SHOT PEENING - A NOVEL-APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NOORDHUIS, J; DEHOSSON, JTM

    1992-01-01

    Among the available laser applications laser surface melting has turned out to be a powerful technique for the production of wear-resistant layers. Despite the advantages of this process, laser surface melting results in tensile stresses which may assist crack propagation. In this paper it will be

  6. Surface Modification by Means of Laser Melting Combined with Shot Peening : A Novel Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordhuis, J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1992-01-01

    Among the available laser applications laser surface melting has turned out to be a powerful technique for the production of wear-resistant layers. Despite the advantages of this process, laser surface melting results in tensile stresses which may assist crack propagation. In this paper it will be s

  7. SURFACE MODIFICATION BY MEANS OF LASER MELTING COMBINED WITH SHOT PEENING - A NOVEL-APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NOORDHUIS, J; DEHOSSON, JTM

    1992-01-01

    Among the available laser applications laser surface melting has turned out to be a powerful technique for the production of wear-resistant layers. Despite the advantages of this process, laser surface melting results in tensile stresses which may assist crack propagation. In this paper it will be s

  8. On the determination of the equilibrium melting temperature of polybutylene terephthalate (PBT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luz, Alexandre P. da; Bretas, Rosario E.S. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais. Ncleo de Reologia e Processamento de Polimeros]. E-mail: bretas@power.ufscar.br; Marinelli, Alessandra L. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Centro de Caracterizacao e Desenvolvimento de Materiais]. E-mail: alucas@ccdm.ufscar.br; Farah, Marcelo [Braskem S.A., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: marcelo.farah@braskem.com.br; Torriani, Iris [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas (Brazil)]. E-mails: tomas@lnls.br; torriani@lnls.br

    2005-07-01

    In this work, the equilibrium melting temperature, T{sub m}{sup 0}, of a PBT sample using the classical Hoffman-Weeks (H-W) Method and the Method proposed by Marand and Hoffman was evaluated. We also investigated the influence of the pre-melting temperature, T{sub pm}, that is the temperature of the melt prior to the isothermal crystallization, and different rates during the heating DSC scan, on the values of the T{sub m}{sup 0} calculated. The results show that the evaluation of the equilibrium melting temperatures of polymers is quite dependent of the experimental conditions used to crystallize the sample and the method used to evaluate it. (author)

  9. Thermophysical properties of liquid Ni around the melting temperature from molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozas, R. E.; Demiraǧ, A. D.; Toledo, P. G.; Horbach, J.

    2016-08-01

    Thermophysical properties of liquid nickel (Ni) around the melting temperature are investigated by means of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, using three different embedded atom method potentials to model the interactions between the Ni atoms. Melting temperature, enthalpy, static structure factor, self-diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, and thermal diffusivity are compared to recent experimental results. Using ab initio MD simulation, we also determine the static structure factor and the mean-squared displacement at the experimental melting point. For most of the properties, excellent agreement is found between experiment and simulation, provided the comparison relative to the corresponding melting temperature. We discuss the validity of the Hansen-Verlet criterion for the static structure factor as well as the Stokes-Einstein relation between self-diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity. The thermal diffusivity is extracted from the autocorrelation function of a wavenumber-dependent temperature fluctuation variable.

  10. Anisotropic surface melting in lyotropic cubic crystals. Part 1: Pn3m/L1 interface, poor faceting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, J; Plötzing, T; Rohe, D; Pieranski, P

    2006-02-01

    From experiments with ice or metal crystals, in the vicinity of their crystal/liquid/vapor triple points, it is known that melting of crystals starts on their surfaces and is anisotropic. It is shown here by direct observations under an optical microscope that this anisotropic surface melting phenomenon occurs also in lyotropic systems. In the case of C12EO2/water mixture, it takes place in the vicinity of the peritectic Pn3m/L3/L1 triple point. Above the peritectic triple point, where the Pn3m and L1 phases coexist in the bulk, the surface of a Pn3m-in-L1 crystal is composed of (111)-type facets surrounded by rough surfaces. The angular junction suggests that rough surfaces are wet by a L3-like layer while facets stay "dry". This is analogous to the pre-melting at rough surfaces in solid crystals. Upon cooling below the peritectic triple point, where L3 and L1 phases coexist in the bulk, a thick layer of the L3 phase grows from the pre-melted, rough Pn3m/L1 interface. Simultaneously, facets stay dry and their radius decreases. In this tri-phasic configuration, stable in a narrow temperature range, the L3/L1 and L3/Pn3m interfaces have shapes of constant mean curvature surfaces having common borders: edges of facets.

  11. Tensile Properties of Al-12Si Fabricated via Selective Laser Melting (SLM at Different Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konda Gokuldoss Prashanth

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing processes such as selective laser melting (SLM are attracting increasing attention and are regarded as the manufacturing technology of the future, because of their ability to produce near net shaped components of theoretically any shape with added functionality. Various properties, including mechanical, tribological, welding, and corrosion properties, of Al-12Si alloys fabricated via SLM have been extensively studied. However, all of these studies were carried out at ambient conditions. Nevertheless, under working conditions, these alloys experience service temperatures ranging between 373 and 473 K. The present study focuses on the evaluation of the mechanical properties of SLM-fabricated Al-12Si alloys in this temperature range. For this, Al-12Si alloy specimens were annealed at 573 K, a temperature well beyond the test temperature in order to provide a stable microstructure during tensile testing. The plasticity of these materials increases along with the size of the dimples on the fracture surface with increasing tensile test temperature. Moreover, the annealed Al-12Si alloy exhibits appreciable tensile properties when tested between 373 K and 473 K. The results suggest that Al-12Si samples fabricated via SLM may be ideal candidates for automotive applications such as pistons and cylinder heads.

  12. Surface treatment of 0Cr19Ni9 stainless steel SMAW joint by plasma melting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗伟; 栾景飞; 严密

    2002-01-01

    Micro-plasma are surface melting of 0Crl9Ni9 shielded metal are welding joint with a micro-plasma are welder produced a thin surface melted layer with a refined microtructure. The surface treatment changed the anodie polarization behavior in 0.5 mol/L H2SO4 solution. The polarization tests showed that for the as-welded joint both the heat-affected zone and the weld metal decreased in resis-tance to corrosion compared with the as-received parent material while for the micro-plasma are surface melted joint the corrosion resistance increased significantly. This increase in corrosion resistance is attributed to the rapid solidification of the melted layer. Rapid solidification of the melted layer refines its mierostrueture, decreases its mierosegregation, and inhibits the precipitation of chromium carbides at the grain boundaries.

  13. A thermodynamical model for the surface tension of silicate melts in contact with H2O gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Simone; Battaglia, Maurizio; Trigila, Raffaello

    2016-01-01

    Surface tension plays an important role in the nucleation of H2O gas bubbles in magmatic melts and in the time-dependent rheology of bubble-bearing magmas. Despite several experimental studies, a physics based model of the surface tension of magmatic melts in contact with H2O is lacking. This paper employs gradient theory to develop a thermodynamical model of equilibrium surface tension of silicate melts in contact with H2O gas at low to moderate pressures. In the last decades, this approach has been successfully applied in studies of industrial mixtures but never to magmatic systems. We calibrate and verify the model against literature experimental data, obtained by the pendant drop method, and by inverting bubble nucleation experiments using the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT). Our model reproduces the systematic decrease in surface tension with increased H2O pressure observed in the experiments. On the other hand, the effect of temperature is confirmed by the experiments only at high pressure. At atmospheric pressure, the model shows a decrease of surface tension with temperature. This is in contrast with a number of experimental observations and could be related to microstructural effects that cannot be reproduced by our model. Finally, our analysis indicates that the surface tension measured inverting the CNT may be lower than the value measured by the pendant drop method, most likely because of changes in surface tension controlled by the supersaturation.

  14. Melting and solidification processes in a moving graphite-covered titanium surface subjected to multi-pulse laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, B.; Hantzpergue, J.-J.; Benayoun, S.; L'Huillier, J.-P.

    2001-05-01

    Experimental results of surface melting by pulsed Nd-YAG laser irradiation of titanium covered with graphite powder were analysed in comparison with the results of numerical simulations. The simulations of the thermal events, such as the maximum of temperature gradient at the surface and the duration of the liquid state after irradiation, were found due to a semi-analytic model of the space-time temperature distributions which were induced by the irradiation treatments. These simulations were required in order to calculate a series of integrals by Simpson's numerical method. They have allowed us to explain the experimental results such as the incorporation of carbon in melted zone, which produces titanium carbide and possible graphite inclusions, as a function of the irradiation parameters. The perpetual absence in the thickness and the exceptional presence at the surface of the solidification structure resulting from the plane-front growth of titanium carbide have, moreover, been justified.

  15. Applicability of low-melting-point microcrystalline wax to develop temperature-sensitive formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kohei; Kimura, Shin-Ichiro; Iwao, Yasunori; Itai, Shigeru

    2017-10-30

    Low-melting-point substances are widely used to develop temperature-sensitive formulations. In this study, we focused on microcrystalline wax (MCW) as a low-melting-point substance. We evaluated the drug release behavior of wax matrix (WM) particles using various MCW under various temperature conditions. WM particles containing acetaminophen were prepared using a spray congealing technique. In the dissolution test at 37°C, WM particles containing low-melting-point MCWs whose melting was starting at approx. 40°C (Hi-Mic-1045 or 1070) released the drug initially followed by the release of only a small amount. On the other hand, in the dissolution test at 20 and 25°C for WM particles containing Hi-Mic-1045 and at 20, 25, and 30°C for that containing Hi-Mic-1070, both WM particles showed faster drug release than at 37°C. The characteristic drug release suppression of WM particles containing low-melting-point MCWs at 37°C was thought attributable to MCW melting, as evidenced by differential scanning calorimetry analysis and powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Taken together, low-melting-point MCWs may be applicable to develop implantable temperature-sensitive formulations that drug release is accelerated by cooling at administered site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Surface treatment of 0Cr19Ni9 stainless steel SMAW jointby plasma melting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗伟; 栾景飞; 严密

    2002-01-01

    Micro-plasma arc surface melting of 0Cr19Ni9 shielded metal arc welding joint with a micro-plasma arc welder produced a thin surface melted layer with a refined microstructure. The surface treatment changed the anodic polarization behavior in 0.5 mol/L H2SO4 solution. The polarization tests showed that for the as-welded joint both the heat-affected zone and the weld metal decreased in resistance to corrosion compared with the as-Received parent material while for the micro-plasma arc surface melted joint the corrosion resistance increased significantly. This increase in corrosion resistance is attributed to the rapid solidification of the melted layer. Rapid solidification of the melted layer refines its microstructure, decreases its microsegregation, and inhibits the precipitation of chromium carbides at the grain boundaries.received parent material while for the micro-plasma arc surface melted joint the corrosion resistance increased significantly. This increase in corrosion resistance is attributed to the rapid solidification of the melted layer. Rapid solidification of the melted layer refines its microstructure, decreases its microsegregation, and inhibits the precipitation of chromium carbides at the grain boundaries.

  17. The surface temperature of Europa

    CERN Document Server

    Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    Previous estimates of the surface temperature of Jupiter's moon, Europa, neglected the effect of the eccentricity of Jupiter's orbit around the Sun, the effect of the eclipse of Europa (i.e., the relative time that Europa is within the shadow of Jupiter), and the effect of Europa's internal heating. Here we estimate the surface temperature of Europa, when Europa's obliquity, eclipse and internal heating, as well as the eccentricity of Jupiter, are all taken into account. For a typical internal heating rate of 0.05 W/m$^2$ (corresponding to an ice thickness of about 10 kms), the equator, pole, and global mean surface temperatures are 101.7 K, 45.26 K, and 94.75 K, respectively. We found that the temperature at the high latitudes is significantly affected by the internal heating. We also studied the effect of the internal heating on the mean thickness of Europa's icy shell and conclude that the polar region temperature can be used to constrain the internal heating and the depth of the ice. Our approach and form...

  18. Surface energy balance of seasonal snow cover for snow-melt estimation in N–W Himalaya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prem Datt; P K Srivastava; P S Negi; P K Satyawali

    2008-10-01

    This study describes time series analysis of snow-melt,radiation data and energy balance for a seasonal snow cover at Dhundi field station of SASE,which lies in Pir Panjal range of the N –W Himalaya,for a winter season from 13 January to 12 April 2005.The analysis shows that mean snow surface temperature remains very close to the melting temperature of snow.It was found close to -1°C for the complete observational period which makes the snow pack at Dhundi moist from its beginning.The average air temperature over this period was found to be 3.5°C with hourly average variation from -5.5°C to 13°C. The snow surface at this station received a mean short wave radiation of 430 W m−2, out of which 298 W m−2 was re flected back by the snow surface with mean albedo value of 0.70. The high average temperature and more absorption of solar radiation resulted in higher thermal state of the snowpack which was further responsible for faster and higher densification of the snowpack. Net radiation energy was the major component of surface energy budget with a mean value of 83 W m−2. Bulk transfer model was used to calculate turbulent fluxes. The net energy was utilized for satisfying cold content and snow-melt by using measured snow surface temperature and density of snow pack. The mean square error between calculated and measured daily snow-melt was found to be approximately 6.6 mm of water equivalent.

  19. Quantifying the surface energy fluxes in South Greenland during the 2012 high melt episodes using in-situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fausto, Robert; van As, Dirk; Box, Jason; Colgan, William; Langen, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Two high melt episodes occurred on the Greenland ice sheet in July 2012, during which nearly the entire ice sheet surface experienced melting. Observations from an automatic weather station (AWS) in the lower ablation area in South Greenland reveal the largest daily melt rates (up to 28 cm d-1 ice equivalent) ever recorded on the ice sheet. The two melt episodes lasted 6 days, equivalent to 6% of the June-August melt period, but contributed 14 % to the total annual ablation of 8.5 m ice equivalent. We employ a surface energy balance model driven by AWS data to quantify the relative importance of the energy budget components contributing to melt through the melt season. During the days with largest daily melt rates, surface turbulent heat input peaked at 552 Wm-2, 77 % of the surface melt energy, which is otherwise typically dominated by absorbed solar radiation. We find that rain contributed ca. 7 % to melt during these episodes.

  20. Shifts in coastal Antarctic marine microbial communities during and after melt water-related surface stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piquet, Anouk M. -T.; Bolhuis, Henk; Meredith, Michael P.; Buma, Anita G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Antarctic coastal waters undergo major physical alterations during summer. Increased temperatures induce sea-ice melting and glacial melt water input, leading to strong stratification of the upper water column. We investigated the composition of micro-eukaryotic and bacterial communities in Ryder Ba

  1. Manufacturing of a high-temperature resistojet heat exchanger by selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romei, F.; Grubišić, A. N.; Gibbon, D.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents the design, manufacturing and postproduction analysis of a novel high-temperature spacecraft resistojet heat exchanger manufactured through selective laser melting to validate the manufacturing approach. The work includes the analysis of critical features of a heat exchanger with integrated converging-diverging nozzle as a single piece element. The metrology of the component is investigated using optical analysis and profilometry to verify the integrity of components. High-resolution micro-Computed Tomography (CT) is applied as a tool for volumetric non-destructive inspection and conformity since the complex geometry of the thruster does not allow internal examination. The CT volume data is utilised to determine a surface mesh on which a novel perform coordinate measurement technique is applied for nominal/actual comparison and wall thickness analysis. A thin-wall concentric tubular heat exchanger design is determined to meet dimensional accuracy requirements. The work indicates the production of fine structures with feature sizes below 200 μm in 316L stainless via selective laser melting is feasible and opens up new possibilities for the future developments in multiple industries.

  2. Experimental investigations of melting at ultra-high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavner, Abby

    The laser-heated diamond anvil cell is an important experimental tool used to access the high pressures and temperatures existing in the interior of the Earth and other planets. The ability to measure a temperature at high pressures is established, and the melting curves of elemental platinum and a complex aggregate, Allende meteorite, are determined. The melting curve of platinum was determined using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell in the pressure range of 12 to 70 GPa. The melting temperature at a given pressure is bracketed by a combination of visual observations and corresponding temperature measurements. The complete melting curve is built up from a series of melting experiments as a function of pressure, performed under different experimental conditions in the diamond cell; however, the placement of the phase boundary is inherently uncertain, due to an experimental "region of indifference" as the phase boundary is approached. To quantify the uncertainties, a statistical method using the logistic model is presented to provide best-fit phase boundaries to the platinum melting data, and can be generalized to fit phase boundary data of any sort. The high-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of Allende meteorite, a chondritic meteorite serving as a model of a primordial terrestrial planet, was investigated in the pressure and temperature ranges of 15 to 70 GPa and 1000 to 4000 K. The melting curve determined here overlaps and is in excellent agreement with previous piston-cylinder and multi-anvil measurements on the same material (Agee, et al., 1995). X-ray diffraction analysis of phases quenched from high pressure and temperature, and high pressure phases both before and after heating, are in good agreement with previous work. The phase diagram of Allende meteorite can be used to constrain events in the early geological evolution of the terrestrial planets.

  3. Effects of water, depth and temperature on partial melting of mantle-wedge fluxed by hydrous sediment-melt in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Ananya; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Tsuno, Kyusei; Nelson, Jared

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the partial melting of variable bulk H2O-bearing parcels of mantle-wedge hybridized by partial melt derived from subducted metapelites, at pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions applicable to the hotter core of the mantle beneath volcanic arcs. Experiments are performed on mixtures of 25% sediment-melt and 75% fertile peridotite, from 1200 to 1300 °C, at 2 and 3 GPa, with bulk H2O concentrations of 4 and 6 wt.%. Combining the results from these experiments with previous experiments containing 2 wt.% bulk H2O (Mallik et al., 2015), it is observed that all melt compositions, except those produced in the lowest bulk H2O experiments at 3 GPa, are saturated with olivine and orthopyroxene. Also, higher bulk H2O concentration increases melt fraction at the same P-T condition, and causes exhaustion of garnet, phlogopite and clinopyroxene at lower temperatures, for a given pressure. The activity coefficient of silica (ϒSiO2) for olivine-orthopyroxene saturated melt compositions (where the activity of silica, aSiO2 , is buffered by the reaction olivine + SiO2 = orthopyroxene) from this study and from mantle melting studies in the literature are calculated. In melt compositions generated at 2 GPa or shallower, with increasing H2O concentration, ϒSiO2 increases from transition from non-ideal mixing as OH- in the melt (ϒSiO2 2 GPa, ϒSiO2 >1 at higher H2O concentrations in the melt, indicate requirement of excess energy to incorporate molecular H2O in the silicate melt structure, along with a preference for bridging species and polyhedral edge decorations. With vapor saturation in the presence of melt, ϒSiO2 decreases indicating approach towards ideal mixing of H2O in silicate melt. For similar H2O concentrations in the melt, ϒSiO2 for olivine-orthopyroxene saturated melts at 3 GPa is higher than melts at 2 GPa or shallower. This results in melts generated at 3 GPa being more silica-poor than melts at 2 GPa. Thus, variable bulk H2O and pressure of

  4. A preliminary view on adsorption of organics on ice at temperatures close to melting point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangrui; Waldner, Astrid; Orlando, Fabrizio; Artiglia, Luca; Ammann, Markus; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    -level spectroscopies to reveal the behaviour of adsorption and dissociation on ice. Additionally, pure ice and amine doped ice will be compared for their surface structure change at different temperatures, which will indicate the differences of surface disordering caused by different factors. For instance, we will have a chance to know better if impurities will cause local disordering, i.e. forming hydration shell, which challenges the traditional picture of a homogenous disordered doped ice surface. The findings of this study could not only improve our understanding of how acidic organics adsorb to ice, and of their chemical properties on ice, but also have potentials to know better the behaviour of pure ice at temperatures approaching to the melting point.

  5. Melt Patterns and Dynamics in Alaska and Patagonia Derived from Passive Microwave Brightness Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Semmens

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaciers and icefields are critical components of Earth’s cryosphere to study and monitor for understanding the effects of a changing climate. To provide a regional perspective of glacier melt dynamics for the past several decades, brightness temperatures (Tb from the passive microwave sensor Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I were used to characterize melt regime patterns over large glacierized areas in Alaska and Patagonia. The distinctness of the melt signal at 37V-GHz and the ability to acquire daily data regardless of clouds or darkness make the dataset ideal for studying melt dynamics in both hemispheres. A 24-year (1988–2011 time series of annual Tb histograms was constructed to (1 characterize and assess temporal and spatial trends in melt patterns, (2 determine years of anomalous Tb distribution, and (3 investigate potential contributing factors. Distance from coast and temperature were key factors influencing melt. Years of high percentage of positive Tb anomalies were associated with relatively higher stream discharge (e.g., Copper and Mendenhall Rivers, Alaska, USA and Rio Baker, Chile. The characterization of melt over broad spatial domains and a multi-decadal time period offers a more comprehensive picture of the changing cryosphere and provides a baseline from which to assess future change.

  6. Size and Shape Dependence on Melting Temperature of Gallium Nitride Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paneerselvam Antoniammal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of variation of the size and shape effect on the melting property of gallium nitride nanoparticles with their spherical and cylindrical geometrical feature is theoretically explored. A numerical thermodynamical model has been devoted for the study. A comparative investigation is made between the two shapes, at the range of ~3 nm dia. The cylindrical GaN nanoparticles, whose melting point has been reported to decrease with decreasing particle radius, become larger than spherical-shaped nanoparticles. The melting temperature obtained in the present study is in line with the function of radius of curvature.

  7. Melt nucleating and the three-dimension steady model of the temperature fluctuation with convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingwen Chen; Renji Sun; Zidong Wang; Fengying Wang

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional steady model of temperature fluctuation with melt convection is studied. It is proved that there exists a unique and stable solution in the model and the solution is expressed in a Fourier series form. It theoretically conf1rms the mechanism of melt nucleating: as long as the convection with transverse directions exists, the melt temperature on the front of the solidliquid interface would be not only periodical along the direction which is perpendicular to the direction of crystal growth, but also oscillatory and exponential decay along the direction of crystal growth; this oscillatory property, i.e. temperature fluctuation, leads to local supercooling, accelerates local temperature fluctuation and then results in a large number of nuclei.

  8. Melting of the Primitive Mercurian Mantle, Insights into the Origin of Its Surface Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujibar, A.; Righter, K.; Rapp, J. F.; Ross, D. K.; Pando, K. M.; Danielson, L. R.; Fontaine, E.

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings of the MESSENGER mission on Mercury have brought new evidence for its reducing nature, widespread volcanism and surface compositional heteregeneity. MESSENGER also provided major elemental ratios of its surface that can be used to infer large-scale differentiation processes and the thermal history of the planet. Mercury is known as being very reduced, with very low Fe-content and high S and alkali contents on its surface. Its bulk composition is therefore likely close to EH enstatite chondrites. In order to elucidate the origin of the chemical diversity of Mercury's surface, we determined the melting properties of EH enstatite chondrites, at pressures between 1 bar and 3 GPa and oxygen fugacity of IW-3 to IW-5, using piston-cylinder experiments, combined with a previous study on EH4 melting at 1 bar. We found that the presence of Ca-rich sulfide melts induces significant decrease of Ca-content in silicate melts at low pressure and low degree of melting (F). Also at pressures lower than 3 GPa, the SiO2-content decreases with F, while it increases at 3 GPa. This is likely due to the chemical composition of the bulk silicate which has a (Mg+Fe+Ca)/Si ratio very close to 1 and to the change from incongruent to congruent melting of enstatite. We then tested whether the various chemical compositions of Mercury's surface can result from mixing between two melting products of EH chondrites. We found that the majority of the geochemical provinces of Mercury's surface can be explained by mixing of two melts, with the exception of the High-Al plains that require an Al-rich source. Our findings indicate that Mercury's surface could have been produced by polybaric melting of a relatively primitive mantle.

  9. Melting temperatures of MgO under high pressure by micro-texture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, T.; Ohfuji, H.; Nishi, M.; Irifune, T.

    2017-06-01

    Periclase (MgO) is the second most abundant mineral after bridgmanite in the Earth's lower mantle, and its melting behaviour under pressure is important to constrain rheological properties and melting behaviours of the lower mantle materials. Significant discrepancies exist between the melting temperatures of MgO determined by laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) and those based on dynamic compressions and theoretical predictions. Here we show the melting temperatures in earlier LHDAC experiments are underestimated due to misjudgment of melting, based on micro-texture observations of the quenched samples. The high melting temperatures of MgO suggest that the subducted cold slabs should have higher viscosities than previously thought, suggesting that the inter-connecting textural feature of MgO would not play important roles for the slab stagnation in the lower mantle. The present results also predict that the ultra-deep magmas produced in the lower mantle are peridotitic, which are stabilized near the core-mantle boundary.

  10. Surface Melt and Firn Density Evolution in the Western Greenland Percolation Zone Over the Past 50 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeter, K.; Osterberg, E. C.; Hawley, R. L.; Thundercloud, Z. R.; Marshall, H. P.; Ferris, D. G.; Lewis, G.

    2016-12-01

    Predictions of the Greenland Ice Sheet's (GIS) contribution to sea-level rise in a warming climate depend on our ability to model the surface mass balance (SMB) processes occurring across the ice sheet. These processes are poorly constrained in the percolation zone, the region of the ice sheet where surface melt refreezes in the firn, thus preventing that melt from directly contributing to GIS mass loss. In this way, the percolation zone serves as a buffer to higher temperatures increasing mass loss. However, it is unknown how the percolation zone is evolving in a changing climate and to what extent the region will continue to serve as a buffer to future runoff. We collected seven shallow ( 22-30 m) firn cores from the Western Greenland percolation zone in May-June 2016 as part of the Greenland Traverse for Accumulation and Climate Studies (GreenTrACS) project. Here we present data on melt layer stratigraphy, density, and annual accumulation for each core to determine: (1) the temporal and spatial accumulation and melt refreeze patterns in the percolation zone of W. Greenland over the past 40 - 55 years, and (2) the impacts of changing melt and refreeze patterns on the near-surface density profile of the percolation zone. Three of the GreenTrACS firn cores re-occupy firn core sites collected in the 1970's-1990's, allowing us to more accurately quantify the evolution of the percolation zone surface melt and firn density during the most recent decades of summertime warming. This work is the basis for broader investigations into how changes in W. Greenland summertime climate are impacting the SMB of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Melting Temperatures of SrF2and BaF2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-yu Huang; Xin-lu Cheng; Chao-lei Fan; Qiong Chen; Xiao-li Yuan

    2009-01-01

    The shell-model molecular dynamics method was applied to simulate the melting temper-atures of SrF2 and BaF2 at elevated temperatures and high pressures. The same method was used to calculate the equations of state for SrF2 and BaF2 over the pressure range of 0.1 MPa-3 GPa and 0.1 MPa-7 GPa. Compared with previous results for equations of state, the maximum errors are 0.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Considering the pre-melting in the fluorite-type crystals, we made the necessary corrections for the simulated melting temper-atures of SrF2 and BaF2. Consequently, the melting temperatures of SrF2 and BaF2 were obtained for high pressures. The melting temperatures of SrF2 and BaF2 that were obtained by the simulation are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  12. Sediment plume response to surface melting and supraglacial lake drainages on the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, Vena W.; Smith, Laurence C; Rennermalm, Asa K.

    2009-01-01

    of a downstream sediment plume in Kangerlussuaq Fjord by comparing: (1) plume area and suspended sediment concentration from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery and field data; (2) ice-sheet melt extent from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) passive microwave data; and (3......) supraglacial lake drainage events from MODIS. Results confirm that the origin of the sediment plume is meltwater release from the ice sheet. Interannual variations in plume area reflect interannual variations in surface melting. Plumes appear almost immediately with seasonal surface-melt onset, provided...... the estuary is free of landfast sea ice. A seasonal hysteresis between melt extent and plume area suggests late-season exhaustion in sediment supply. Analysis of plume sensitivity to supraglacial events is less conclusive, with 69% of melt pulses and 38% of lake drainage events triggering an increase in plume...

  13. Microstructure evolution during surface alloying of ductile iron and austempered ductile iron by electron beam melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulzar, A.; Akhter, J. I.; Ahmad, M.; Ali, G.; Mahmood, M.; Ajmal, M.

    2009-07-01

    Alloying and microstructural modification of surfaces by electron beam has become popular to tailor the surface properties of materials. Surface modification of as-received ductile iron, Ni-plated ductile iron and Ni-plated austempered ductile iron was carried out by electron beam melting to improve the surface properties. Martensitic structure evolved in the heat affected zone and ledeburite structure was produced in the molten zone of the ductile iron. Microhardness of the melted specimens enhanced considerably as compared to the as-received samples. However the microhardness of melted Ni-plated samples is lower than that of the unplated specimens. X-ray diffraction clearly revealed the formation of an austenite and Fe 3C phases in the electron beam molten zone. The broadening of peaks suggests refinement of the microstructure as well as internal stresses generated during electron beam melting.

  14. Microstructure evolution during surface alloying of ductile iron and austempered ductile iron by electron beam melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulzar, A. [Materials Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Akhter, J.I. [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmad, M., E-mail: maqomer@yahoo.com [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ali, G. [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mahmood, M. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ajmal, M. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2009-07-30

    Alloying and microstructural modification of surfaces by electron beam has become popular to tailor the surface properties of materials. Surface modification of as-received ductile iron, Ni-plated ductile iron and Ni-plated austempered ductile iron was carried out by electron beam melting to improve the surface properties. Martensitic structure evolved in the heat affected zone and ledeburite structure was produced in the molten zone of the ductile iron. Microhardness of the melted specimens enhanced considerably as compared to the as-received samples. However the microhardness of melted Ni-plated samples is lower than that of the unplated specimens. X-ray diffraction clearly revealed the formation of an austenite and Fe{sub 3}C phases in the electron beam molten zone. The broadening of peaks suggests refinement of the microstructure as well as internal stresses generated during electron beam melting.

  15. Influence of temperature and chemical composition on phase transformations of selected oxide melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dobrovská

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with structural changes of solid phase of selected oxide systems during their transition into liquid state. Analyses concerned poly-component systems forming basis of casting powders for CCM mould. Industrially used oxide system with prevailing contents of CaO–Al2O3–SiO2 components and with numerous accompanying admixtures was tested. Investigation was focused on temperatures, during which individual phases disappear and precipitate, as well as on influence of CaO content on phase composition at selected temperatures. The experiments were realised with use of original methodology consisting of shock cooling of the tested melt in liquid nitrogen. Thus obtained samples were further investigated by X-ray diffraction phase analyses at ambient temperatures. The obtained results provide additional data on physical-chemical properties of oxide systems, such as surface tension, viscosity, sintering intervals, etc., which can be used in technological practice for appropriate lubrication effect of casting powders in the mould.

  16. Shear Melting and High Temperature Embrittlement: Theory and Application to Machining Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability.

  17. Shear melting and high temperature embrittlement: theory and application to machining titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J

    2015-04-24

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability.

  18. Neural Network Approach to Predict Melt Temperature in Injection Molding Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Among the processing conditions of injection molding, temperature of the melt entering the mold plays a significant role in determining the quality of molded parts. In our previous research, a neural network was developed to predict, the melt temperature in the barrel during the plastication phase. In this paper, a neural network is proposed to predict the melt temperature at the nozzle exit during the injection phase. A typical two layer neural network with back propagation learning rules is used to model the relationship between input and output in the injection phase. The preliminary results show that the network works well and may be used for on-line optimization and control of injection molding processes.

  19. Utilizing Rice Husk Briquettes in Firing Crucible Furnace for Low Temperature Melting Metals in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Musa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The search for alternative fuels for firing crucible furnace for low temperature melting metals has become mandatory, as a result of the pollution problem associated with the use of fossil fuels, the expense of electricity and also deforestation as a result of the use of charcoal. An agricultural waste, rice husk, in briquette form was used as an alternative fuel to fire crucible furnace to melt lead, zinc and aluminium. Results showed that lead and zinc melted and reached their pouring temperatures of 3840C and 5300C in 70 minutes and 75 minutes respectively. Aluminium was raised to a maximum temperature of 5200C in 75 and 100 minutes.The average concentration of the pollutants (CO, SO2and NOX were found to be below the tolerance limit and that of TSP (Total Suspended Particulates was found to be within the tolerance limit stipulated by Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA in Nigeria.

  20. Patterns in new dimensionless quantities containing melting temperature, and their dependence on pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. WALZER

    1980-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationships existing between melting temperature and other
    macroscopic physical quantities are investigated. A new dimensionless
    quantity Q(1 not containing the Grtineisen parameter proves to be suited for serving in future studies as a tool for the determination of the melting temperature in the outer core of the Earth. The pressure dependence of more general dimensionless quantities Q„ is determined analytically and, for the chemical elements, numerically, too. The patterns of various interesting dimensionless quantities are shown in the Periodic Table and compared.

  1. First-Principles Calculations for Structures and Melting Temperature of Si6 Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yu-Lin; CHEN Xiang-Rong; ZHOU Xiao-Lin; CHENG Xiao-Hong; YANG Xiang-Dong

    2006-01-01

    @@ We investigate the structures and the melting temperature of the Si6 cluster by using the first-principles pseudopotential method in real space and Langevin molecular dynamics. It is shown that the ground structure of the Si6 cluster is a square bipyramid, and the corresponding melting temperature is about 1923 K. In the heating procedure, the structures of the Si6 cluster change from high symmetry structures containing 5-8 bonds, via prolate structures containing 3-4 bonds, to oblate structures containing 1-2 bonds.

  2. Effect of laser surface melting in tensile properties of type 304L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akgun, O.V.; Inal, O.T. (New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Materials and Metallurgical Engineering Dept., Socorro, NM (US)); Lovato, M.L.; Jervist, T.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (US))

    1992-07-15

    In previous study the authors showed laser surface melting (LSM) to increase yield strength of 304 austenitic stainless steels. A consistent increase approximately 10% was also observed in the hardness of the melted layer compared to that of the substrate. Austentic stainless steels do not transform to martensite during laser processing. The microstructure is observed to contain only austenite and some retained {delta}-ferrite due to rapid cooling. Therefore, the hardness increase observed was interpreted to be due to microstructural modifications, namely in the formation of austenite {delta}-ferrite duplex structure as well as a refinement in the subgrain structure. The alloy used in this study, type 304L, is a lower carbon modification of type 304 for welding applications. Lower carbon content minimizes carbide precipitation in the heat affected zone of welds. In an annealed condition type 304L has lower mechanical properties than type 304. This paper reports on this present study which was undertaken to verify if a material that possesses an initially high yield strength, type 304L, would exhibit a similar increase in its yield strength and the magnitude of this enhancement at different test temperatures (22, 100, 200 and 300{degrees}C).

  3. A temperature-dependent surface free energy model for solid single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tianbao; Fang, Daining; Yang, Yazheng

    2017-01-01

    A temperature-dependent theoretical model for the surface free energy of the solid single crystals is established. This model relates the surface free energy at the elevated temperatures to that at the reference temperature, the temperature-dependent specific heat at constant pressure and coefficient of the linear thermal expansion, the heat of phase transition, the melting heat, and the vapor heat. As examples, the surface free energies of Fe, Cu, Al, Ni, and Pb from 0 K to melting points are calculated and are in reasonable agreement with these from Tyson's theories and the experimental results. This model has obvious advantages compared to Tyson's semi-empirical equations from the aspect of physical meaning, applicable condition, and accuracy. The study shows that the surface free energy of the solid single crystals firstly remains approximately constant and then decreases linearly as temperature increases from 0 K to melting point.

  4. Laser controlled melting of pre-treated zirconia surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S., E-mail: bsyilbas@kfupm.edu.sa [ME Department, KFUPM, Dhahran 31261, (Saudi Arabia); Akhtar, S.S. [ME Department, KFUPM, Dhahran 31261, (Saudi Arabia); Karatas, C. [Engineering College, Hacettepe University, (Turkey)

    2011-05-15

    Laser treatment of pre-prepared zirconia surface is carried out. The pre-prepared surface, prior to laser treatment, consists of 50 {mu}m carbon film and 7% titanium carbide particles, which are imbedded in the carbon film. The microstructural and morphological changes in the laser treated surface layer are examined using optical and scanning electron microscopes, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The fracture toughness of the laser treated surface is measured and the residual stress formed at the surface vicinity is determined from the X-ray diffraction technique. It is found that the microhardness of the laser treated surface increased slightly due to the dense layer formed at the surface vicinity. However, the laser treatment process reduces the fracture toughness of the surface due to improved surface hardness and the residual stress formed in the surface vicinity.

  5. High DNA melting temperature predicts transcription start site location in human and mouse.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dineen, David G

    2009-12-01

    The accurate computational prediction of transcription start sites (TSS) in vertebrate genomes is a difficult problem. The physicochemical properties of DNA can be computed in various ways and a many combinations of DNA features have been tested in the past for use as predictors of transcription. We looked in detail at melting temperature, which measures the temperature, at which two strands of DNA separate, considering the cooperative nature of this process. We find that peaks in melting temperature correspond closely to experimentally determined transcription start sites in human and mouse chromosomes. Using melting temperature alone, and with simple thresholding, we can predict TSS with accuracy that is competitive with the most accurate state-of-the-art TSS prediction methods. Accuracy is measured using both experimentally and manually determined TSS. The method works especially well with CpG island containing promoters, but also works when CpG islands are absent. This result is clear evidence of the important role of the physical properties of DNA in the process of transcription. It also points to the importance for TSS prediction methods to include melting temperature as prior information.

  6. Prediction of melting temperatures in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures using thermodynamic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Guimarães, Nuno; Wengel, Jesper; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe

    2016-01-01

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA hybridization, i.e. the process of self-assembly of one, two or more complementary nucleic acid strands, has been studied for many years. The appearance of the nearest-neighbor model led to several theoretical and experimental papers on DNA thermodynamics that provide reasonably accurate thermodynamic information on nucleic acid duplexes and allow estimation of the melting temperature. Because there are no thermodynamic models specifically developed to predict the hybridization temperature of a probe used in a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure, the melting temperature is used as a reference, together with corrections for certain compounds that are used during FISH. However, the quantitative relation between melting and experimental FISH temperatures is poorly described. In this review, various models used to predict the melting temperature for rRNA targets, for DNA oligonucleotides and for nucleic acid mimics (chemically modified oligonucleotides), will be addressed in detail, together with a critical assessment of how this information should be used in FISH.

  7. Dynamic yield and tensile strength of aluminum single crystals at temperatures up to the melting point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanel, G. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Baumung, K.; Singer, J.

    2001-07-01

    This article presents experimental results of the dynamic yield strength and dynamic tensile strength ({open_quotes}spall strength{close_quotes}) of aluminum single crystals at shock-wave loading as a function of temperature. The load duration was {similar_to}40 and {similar_to}200 ns. The temperature varied from 20 to 650{degree}C which is only by 10{degree}C below the melting temperature. A linear growth of the dynamic yield strength by more than a factor of 4 was observed within this temperature range. This is attributed to the phonon drag effect on the dislocation motion. High dynamic tensile strength was maintained over the whole temperature range, including the conditions at which melting should start in a material under tension. This could be an indication of the existence of superheated states in solid crystals. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Oscillatory subglacial drainage in the absence of surface melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Schoof

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of strong diurnal cycling in basal water pressure records obtained during the melt season is well-established for many glaciers. The behaviour of the drainage system outside the melt season is less well understood. Here we present borehole observations from a surge-type valley glacier in the St Elias Mountains, Yukon Territory, Canada. These indicate the onset of strongly correlated multi-day oscillations in water pressure in multiple boreholes straddling a main drainage axis, starting several weeks after the disappearance of a dominant diurnal mode in August 2011 and persisting until at least January 2012, when multiple data loggers suffered power failure. Jökulhlaups provide a template for understanding spontaneous water pressure oscillations not driven by external supply variability. Using a subglacial drainage model, we show that water pressure oscillations can also be driven on a much smaller scale by the interaction between conduit growth and distributed water storage in smaller water pockets, basal crevasses and moulins, and that oscillations can be triggered when water supply drops below a critical value. We suggest this in combination with a steady background supply of water from groundwater or englacial drainage as a possible explanation for the observed wintertime pressure oscillations.

  9. Influence of Controlled Cooling in Bimodal Scaffold Fabrication Using Polymers with Different Melting Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Padilla, Hernan; Mendoza-Buenrostro, Christian; Cardenas, Diego; Rodriguez-Garcia, Aida; Rodriguez, Ciro A

    2017-06-11

    The combination of different materials and capabilities to manufacture at several scales open new possibilities in scaffold design for bone regeneration. This work is focused on bimodal scaffolds that combine polylactic acid (PLA) melt extruded strands with polycaprolactone (PCL) electrospun fibers. This type of bimodal scaffold offers better mechanical properties, compared to the use of PCL for the extruded strands, and provides potential a means for controlled drug and/or growth factor delivery through the electrospun fibers. The technologies of fused deposition modeling (FDM) and electrospinning were combined to create 3D bimodal constructs. The system uses a controlled cooling system allowing the combination of polymers with different melting temperatures to generate integrated scaffold architecture. The thermoplastic polymers used in the FDM process enhance the mechanical properties of the bimodal scaffold and control the pore structure. Integrated layers of electrospun microfibers induce an increase of the surface area for cell culture purposes, as well as potential in situ controlled drug and/or growth factor delivery. The proposed bimodal scaffolds (PLA extruded strands and PCL electrospun fibers) show appropriate morphology and better mechanical properties when compared to the use of PCL extruded strands. On average, bimodal scaffolds with overall dimensions of 30 × 30 × 2.4 mm³ (strand diameter of 0.5 mm, strand stepover of 2.5 mm, pore size of 2 mm, and layer height of 0.3 mm) showed scaffold stiffness of 23.73 MPa and compression strength of 3.85 MPa. A cytotoxicity assay based human fibroblasts showed viability of the scaffold materials.

  10. Influence of Controlled Cooling in Bimodal Scaffold Fabrication Using Polymers with Different Melting Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan Lara-Padilla

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The combination of different materials and capabilities to manufacture at several scales open new possibilities in scaffold design for bone regeneration. This work is focused on bimodal scaffolds that combine polylactic acid (PLA melt extruded strands with polycaprolactone (PCL electrospun fibers. This type of bimodal scaffold offers better mechanical properties, compared to the use of PCL for the extruded strands, and provides potential a means for controlled drug and/or growth factor delivery through the electrospun fibers. The technologies of fused deposition modeling (FDM and electrospinning were combined to create 3D bimodal constructs. The system uses a controlled cooling system allowing the combination of polymers with different melting temperatures to generate integrated scaffold architecture. The thermoplastic polymers used in the FDM process enhance the mechanical properties of the bimodal scaffold and control the pore structure. Integrated layers of electrospun microfibers induce an increase of the surface area for cell culture purposes, as well as potential in situ controlled drug and/or growth factor delivery. The proposed bimodal scaffolds (PLA extruded strands and PCL electrospun fibers show appropriate morphology and better mechanical properties when compared to the use of PCL extruded strands. On average, bimodal scaffolds with overall dimensions of 30 × 30 × 2.4 mm3 (strand diameter of 0.5 mm, strand stepover of 2.5 mm, pore size of 2 mm, and layer height of 0.3 mm showed scaffold stiffness of 23.73 MPa and compression strength of 3.85 MPa. A cytotoxicity assay based human fibroblasts showed viability of the scaffold materials.

  11. Summer and Fall Sea Ice Processes in the Amundsen Sea: Bottom melting, surface flooding and snow ice formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackley, S. F.; Perovich, D. K.; Weissling, B.; Elder, B. C.

    2011-12-01

    Two ice mass balance buoys were deployed on the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica, ice pack near January 1, 2011. Below freezing air and snow temperatures and sea ice and seawater temperatures at the freezing point at this time indicated that summer melt had not yet commenced. Over the next two months, however, while snow depths changed by less than 0.1m, ice thickness decreased, from bottom melting, by 0.9-1.0m. As snow temperature records did not show temperatures ever reaching the melting point, no surface melt was recorded during the summer period and the small snow depth changes were presumed to occur by consolidation or wind scouring. Water temperatures above the freezing point caused the observed bottom melting from mid January to late February. During the ice loss periods, progressive flooding by sea water at the base of the snow pack was recorded by temperature sensors, showing an increase in the depth of flooded snow pack of 0.4m by the end of the summer period in late February. We hypothesize that progressive flooding of the surface snow pack gives a mechanism for nutrient replenishment in these upper layers, and continuous high algal growth can therefore occur in the flooded snow layer during summer. An underice radiometer recorded light transmission through the ice and snow at selective wavelengths sensitive to chlorophyll. These radiometric results will be presented to examine this algal growth hypothesis. This flooded layer then refroze from the top down into snow ice as air temperatures dropped during March and April, showing that the layer had refrozen as snow ice on the top surface of the ice. Refreezing of the flooded layer gives an ice growth mechanism at the end of summer of 0.2 m to 0.4m of new ice growth over the majority of the ice pack. The snow ice growth in areas covered with pack ice gives salt fluxes commensurate with new ice growth in the autumn expansion of the ice edge over open water. These high salt fluxes therefore represent a marked

  12. Experimental constraints on melting temperatures in the MgO-SiO2 system at lower mantle pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Marzena A.; Lord, Oliver T.; Myhill, Robert; Thomson, Andrew R.; Wang, Weiwei; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Walter, Michael J.

    2017-08-01

    Eutectic melting curves in the system MgO-SiO2 have been experimentally determined at lower mantle pressures using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) techniques. We investigated eutectic melting of bridgmanite plus periclase in the MgO-MgSiO3 binary, and melting of bridgmanite plus stishovite in the MgSiO3-SiO2 binary, as analogues for natural peridotite and basalt, respectively. The melting curve of model basalt occurs at lower temperatures, has a shallower dT / dP slope and slightly less curvature than the model peridotitic melting curve. Overall, melting temperatures detected in this study are in good agreement with previous experiments and ab initio simulations at ∼25 GPa (Liebske and Frost, 2012; de Koker et al., 2013). However, at higher pressures the measured eutectic melting curves are systematically lower in temperature than curves extrapolated on the basis of thermodynamic modelling of low-pressure experimental data, and those calculated from atomistic simulations. We find that our data are inconsistent with previously computed melting temperatures and melt thermodynamic properties of the SiO2 endmember, and indicate a maximum in short-range ordering in MgO-SiO2 melts close to Mg2SiO4 composition. The curvature of the model peridotite eutectic relative to an MgSiO3 melt adiabat indicates that crystallization in a global magma ocean would begin at ∼100 GPa rather than at the bottom of the mantle, allowing for an early basal melt layer. The model peridotite melting curve lies ∼ 500 K above the mantle geotherm at the core-mantle boundary, indicating that it will not be molten unless the addition of other components reduces the solidus sufficiently. The model basalt melting curve intersects the geotherm at the base of the mantle, and partial melting of subducted oceanic crust is expected.

  13. Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST) dataset is a global monthly sea surface temperature analysis derived from the International Comprehensive...

  14. NOAA Global Surface Temperature (NOAAGlobalTemp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Global Surface Temperature Dataset (NOAAGlobalTemp) is a merged land–ocean surface temperature analysis (formerly known as MLOST) (link is external). It is...

  15. Simulation of shock-induced melting of Ni using molecular dynamics coupled to a two-temperature model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koči, L.; Bringa, E. M.; Ivanov, D. S.; Hawreliak, J.; McNaney, J.; Higginbotham, A.; Zhigilei, L. V.; Belonoshko, A. B.; Remington, B. A.; Ahuja, R.

    2006-07-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we study shock-induced melting in Ni with an embedded atom method (EAM). Dynamic melting is probed by the pair correlation function, and we find a melting lattice temperature of Tmelt=6400±300K for a melting pressure of Pmelt=275±10GPa . When a combined MD+TTM (two-temperature model) approach is used to include electronic heat conduction and electron-phonon coupling, Pmelt and Tmelt change. For a given pressure, the temperature behind the shock decreases due to electronic heat diffusion into the cold, unshocked material. This cooling of the material behind the shock slightly increases the melting pressure compared to simulations without electronic heat conduction and electron-phonon coupling. The decrease in the temperature behind the shock front is enhanced if the electron-phonon coupling is artificially made larger. We also explore the feasibility of using x-ray diffraction to detect melting.

  16. Linear thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity and melting temperature of Am-MOX and Np-MOX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieur, D., E-mail: damien.prieur@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Belin, R.C. [CEA, DEN, DEC/SPUA/LMPC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez Durance (France); Manara, D.; Staicu, D. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Richaud, J.-C. [CEA, DEN, DEC/SPUA/LMPC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez Durance (France); Vigier, J.-F. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Scheinost, A.C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Somers, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Martin, P. [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC/LLCC, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance cedex (France)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The thermal properties of Np- and Am-MOX solid solutions were investigated. • Np- and Am-MOX solid solutions exhibit the same linear thermal expansion. • The thermal conductivity of Am-MOX is about 10% higher than that of Np-MOX. • The melting temperatures of Np-MOX and Am-MOX are 3020 ± 30 K and 3005 ± 30 K, respectively. - Abstract: The thermal properties of Np- and Am-MOX solid solution materials were investigated. Their linear thermal expansion, determined using high temperature X-ray diffraction from room temperature to 1973 K showed no significant difference between the Np and the Am doped MOX. The thermal conductivity of the Am-MOX is about 10% higher than that of Np-MOX. The melting temperatures of Np-MOX and Am-MOX, measured using a laser heating self crucible arrangement were 3020 ± 30 K and 3005 ± 30 K, respectively.

  17. Flavor dependence of baryon melting temperature in effective models of QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Sintes, Benjamin; Aichelin, Joerg

    2015-06-01

    We apply the three-flavor (Polyakov-)Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model to generate baryons as quark-diquark bound states using many-body techniques at finite temperature. All the baryonic states belonging to the octet and decuplet flavor representations are generated in the isospin-symmetric case. For each state we extract the melting temperature at which the baryon may decay into a quark-diquark pair. We seek for an evidence of the strangeness dependence of the baryon melting temperature as suggested by the statistical thermal models and supported by lattice quantum chromodynamics results. A clear and robust signal for this claim is found, pointing to a flavor dependence of the hadronic deconfinement temperature.

  18. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Thermodynamic modeling to explain the high degree of carbon solubility possible in austenitic grades under the LTCSS process and experimental validation of model results • Corrosion testing to determine the corrosion resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Erosion testing to determine the erosion resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Wear testing to quantify the wear resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Fatigue testing for quantifying the extent of improvement from the LTCSS process • Component treating and testing under simulated and in-line commercial operations XRD verified expanded austenite lattice, with no evidence of carbide precipitation. Carbon concentration profiles via Auger and electron dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) showed carbon levels in excess of 12 at. % in treated, type 316 SS. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of pulled-to-failure treated tensile specimens showed slip bands and no de-cohesion of the treated layer, verifying that the layer remains ductile. Compressive stresses in excess of 2 GPa (300 ksi) have been calculated at the surface of the case. Phase diagram (CALPHAD) (ThermoCalc) and Wagner dilute solution thermodynamic models were developed that calculate the solubility of carbon in austenite as a function of alloying content for the process time and temperature. Several commercial alloys have been modeled, and the model has been used to design experimental alloys with enhanced affinity for carbon solubility at treatment temperatures. Four experimental alloys were melted, rolled, and manufactured into test specimens, and the LTCSS treatment indicated successfully enhanced results and validated the predictions based on thermodynamic modeling. Electrochemical polarization curves show a 600 to 800 mV increase in pitting potential in treated (900-1000 mV) versus non-treated (200-300 mV) type 316 in chloride solutions. Treated 316L showed crevice-corrosion behavior similar to that of Ti-6

  19. High-temperature apparatus for chaotic mixing of natural silicate melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgavi, D.; Petrelli, M.; Vetere, F. P.; González-García, D.; Perugini, D., E-mail: diego.perugini@unipg.it [Department of Physics and Geology, Petro-Volcanology Research Group (PVRG), University of Perugia, Piazza Università, Perugia 06100 (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    A unique high-temperature apparatus was developed to trigger chaotic mixing at high-temperature (up to 1800 °C). This new apparatus, which we term Chaotic Magma Mixing Apparatus (COMMA), is designed to carry out experiments with high-temperature and high-viscosity (up to 10{sup 6} Pa s) natural silicate melts. This instrument allows us to follow in time and space the evolution of the mixing process and the associated modulation of chemical composition. This is essential to understand the dynamics of magma mixing and related chemical exchanges. The COMMA device is tested by mixing natural melts from Aeolian Islands (Italy). The experiment was performed at 1180 °C using shoshonite and rhyolite melts, resulting in a viscosity ratio of more than three orders of magnitude. This viscosity ratio is close to the maximum possible ratio of viscosity between high-temperature natural silicate melts. Results indicate that the generated mixing structures are topologically identical to those observed in natural volcanic rocks highlighting the enormous potential of the COMMA to replicate, as a first approximation, the same mixing patterns observed in the natural environment. COMMA can be used to investigate in detail the space and time development of magma mixing providing information about this fundamental petrological and volcanological process that would be impossible to investigate by direct observations. Among the potentials of this new experimental device is the construction of empirical relationships relating the mixing time, obtained through experimental time series, and chemical exchanges between the melts to constrain the mixing-to-eruption time of volcanic systems, a fundamental topic in volcanic hazard assessment.

  20. Origin of Invariant Gel Melting Temperatures in the c-T Phase Diagram of an Organogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Elliot; Blanc, Christophe; Al Ouahabi, Abdelaziz; Maurin, David; Le Parc, Rozenn; Bantignies, Jean-Louis; Guenet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Dominique; Mésini, Philippe J

    2016-05-17

    Binary c-T phase diagrams of organogelators in solvent are frequently simplified to two domains, gel and sol, even when the melting temperatures display two distinct regimes, an increase with T and a plateau. Herein, the c-T phase diagram of an organogelator in solvent is elucidated by rheology, DSC, optical microscopy, and transmitted light intensity measurements. We evidence a miscibility gap between the organogelator and the solvent above a threshold concentration, cL. In this domain the melting or the formation of the gel becomes a monotectic transformation, which explains why the corresponding temperatures are nonvariant above cL. As shown by further studies by variable temperature FTIR and NMR, different types of H-bonds drive both the liquid-liquid phase separation and the gelation.

  1. Microstructural Characterization and Wear Behavior of Nano-Boride Dispersed Coating on AISI 304 Stainless Steel by Hybrid High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Spraying Laser Surface Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant; Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta

    2015-07-01

    The current study concerns the detailed microstructural characterization and investigation of wear behavior of nano-boride dispersed coating developed on AISI 304 stainless steel by high velocity oxy-fuel spray deposition of nickel-based alloy and subsequent laser melting. There is a significant refinement and homogenization of microstructure with improvement in microhardness due to laser surface melting (1200 VHN as compared to 945 VHN of as-sprayed and 250 VHN of as-received substrate). The high temperature phase stability of the as-coated and laser melted surface has been studied by differential scanning calorimeter followed by detailed phase analysis at room and elevated temperature. There is a significant improvement in wear resistance of laser melted surface as compared to as-sprayed and the as-received one due to increased hardness and reduced coefficient of friction. The mechanism of wear has been investigated in details. Corrosion resistance of the coating in a 3.56 wt pct NaCl solution is significantly improved (4.43 E-2 mm/year as compared to 5 E-1 mm/year of as-sprayed and 1.66 mm/year of as-received substrate) due to laser surface melting as compared to as-sprayed surface.

  2. Development of a new laboratory technique for high-temperature thermal emission spectroscopy of silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rachel J.; Ramsey, Michael S.; King, Penelope L.

    2013-05-01

    the prevalence of glass and molten silicates in volcanic environments, and the important role of surface emissivity in thermal infrared (TIR) measurements, it is imperative to characterize accurately the spectral features associated with silicate glasses and melts. A microfurnace has been developed specifically for use with a laboratory Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer to collect the first in situ TIR emission spectra of actively melting and cooling silicate glasses. The construction, implementation, and calibration of the microfurnace spectrometer system are presented here. Initial testing of the microfurnace is also discussed, which includes acquisition of thermal emission spectra of a quartz powder (unmelted), a melted and cooled oligoclase feldspar, and glassy melt of rhyolitic composition. Unlike a solid material, which may only have bending and stretching vibrations within its molecular structure, a fully molten material will exhibit several more degrees of freedom in structural movement, thus changing its spectral character. Differences in spectral behavior and morphology are observed between a glass in a solid state and its molten counterpart, confirming previous field measurements of lower emissivity upon melting. This laboratory microfurnace system has been designed to quantify the TIR emission spectral behavior of glassy materials in various physical states. Ultimately, it is hoped that the microfurnace data will help improve the ability of field-based, airborne, and spaceborne TIR data to characterize glassy volcanic terranes.

  3. Massive Ice Layer Formed by Refreezing of Ice-shelf Surface Melt Ponds: Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Bryn; Luckman, Adrian; Ashmore, David; Bevan, Suzanne; Kulessa, Bernd; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Jansen, Daniela; O'Leary, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Surface melt ponds now form frequently on ice shelves across the northern sector of the Antarctic Peninsula in response to regional warming and local föhn winds. A potentially important, but hitherto unknown, consequence of this surface melting and ponding is the formation of high-density near-surface ice from the refreezing of that water. We report the discovery and physical character of a massive subsurface ice layer located in an area of intense melting and intermittent ponding on Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica. We combine borehole optical televiewer logging and ground-based radar measurements with remote sensing and firn modelling to investigate the formation and spatial extent of this layer, found to be tens of kilometres across and tens of metres deep. The presence of this ice layer has the effect of raising local ice shelf density by ~190 kg m^-3 and temperature by 5 - 10 degrees C above values found in areas unaffected by ponding and hitherto used in models of ice-shelf fracture and flow.

  4. Formation of recent martian debris flows by melting of near-surface ground ice at high obliquity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costard, F; Forget, F; Mangold, N; Peulvast, J P

    2002-01-04

    The observation of small gullies associated with recent surface runoff on Mars has renewed the question of liquid water stability at the surface of Mars. The gullies could be formed by groundwater seepage from underground aquifers; however, observations of gullies originating from isolated peaks and dune crests question this scenario. We show that these landforms may result from the melting of water ice in the top few meters of the martian subsurface at high obliquity. Our conclusions are based on the analogy between the martian gullies and terrestrial debris flows observed in Greenland and numerical simulations that show that above-freezing temperatures can occur at high obliquities in the near surface of Mars, and that such temperatures are only predicted at latitudes and for slope orientations corresponding to where the gullies have been observed on Mars.

  5. Formation of Recent Martian Debris Flows by Melting of Near-Surface Ground Ice at High Obliquity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costard, F.; Forget, F.; Mangold, N.; Peulvast, J. P.

    2002-01-01

    The observation of small gullies associated with recent surface runoff on Mars has renewed the question of liquid water stability at the surface of Mars. The gullies could be formed by groundwater seepage from underground aquifers; however, observations of gullies originating from isolated peaks and dune crests question this scenario. We show that these landforms may result from the melting of water ice in the top few meters of the martian subsurface at high obliquity. Our conclusions are based on the analogy between the martian gullies and terrestrial debris flows observed in Greenland and numerical simulations that show that above-freezing temperatures can occur at high obliquities in the near surface of Mars, and that such temperatures are only predicted at latitudes and for slope orientations corresponding to where the gullies have been observed on Mars.

  6. The Pacific sea surface temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglass, David H., E-mail: douglass@pas.rochester.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States)

    2011-12-05

    The Pacific sea surface temperature data contains two components: N{sub L}, a signal that exhibits the familiar El Niño/La Niña phenomenon and N{sub H}, a signal of one-year period. Analysis reveals: (1) The existence of an annual solar forcing F{sub S}; (2) N{sub H} is phase locked directly to F{sub S} while N{sub L} is frequently phase locked to the 2nd or 3rd subharmonic of F{sub S}. At least ten distinct subharmonic time segments of N{sub L} since 1870 are found. The beginning or end dates of these segments have a near one-to-one correspondence with the abrupt climate changes previously reported. Limited predictability is possible. -- Highlights: ► El Niño/La Niña consists of 2 components phase-locked to annual solar cycle. ► The first component N{sub L} is the familiar El Niño/La Niña effect. ► The second N{sub H} component has a period of 1 cycle/year. ► N{sub L} can be phase-locked to 2nd or 3rd subharmonic of annual cycle. ► Ends of phase-locked segments correspond to abrupt previously reported climate changes.

  7. The Origin of the Compositional Diversity of Mercury's Surface Constrained From Experimental Melting of Enstatite Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujibar, A.; Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L.

    2015-01-01

    Mercury is known as an endmember planet as it is the most reduced terrestrial planet with the highest core/mantle ratio. MESSENGER spacecraft has shown that its surface is FeO-poor (2-4 wt%) and Srich (up to 6-7 wt%), which confirms the reducing nature of its silicate mantle. Moreover, high resolution images revealed large volcanic plains and abundant pyroclastic deposits, suggesting important melting stages of the Mercurian mantle. This interpretation was confirmed by the high crustal thickness (up to 100 km) derived from Mercury's gravity field. This is also corroborated by a recent experimental result that showed that Mercurian partial melts are expected to be highly buoyant within the Mercurian mantle and could have risen from depths as high as the core-mantle boundary. In addition MESSENGER spacecraft provided relatively precise data on major elemental compositions of Mercury's surface. These results revealed important chemical and mineralogical heterogeneities that suggested several stages of differentiation and re-melting processes. However, the extent and nature of compositional variations produced by partial melting remains poorly constrained for the particular compositions of Mercury (very reducing conditions, low FeO-contents and high sulfur-contents). Therefore, in this study, we investigated the processes that lead to the various compositions of Mercury's surface. Melting experiments with bulk Mercury-analogue compositions were performed and compared to the compositions measured by MESSENGER.

  8. Estimating Temporal Redistribution of Surface Melt Water into Upper Stratigraphy of the Juneau Icefield, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilner, J.; Smith, B.; Moore, T.; Campbell, S. W.; Slavin, B. V.; Hollander, J.; Wolf, J.

    2015-12-01

    The redistribution of winter accumulation from surface melt into firn or deeper layers (i.e. internal accumulation) remains a poorly understood component of glacier mass balance. Winter accumulation is usually quantified prior to summer melt, however the time window between accumulation and the onset of melt is minimal so this is not always possible. Studies which are initiated following the onset of summer melt either neglect sources of internal accumulation or attempt to estimate melt (and therefore winter accumulation uncertainty) through a variety of modeling methods. Here, we used ground-penetrating radar (GPR) repeat common midpoint (CMP) surveys with supporting common offset surveys, mass balance snow pits, and probing to estimate temporal changes in water content within the winter accumulation and firn layers of the southern Juneau Icefield, Alaska. In temperate glaciers, radio-wave velocity is primarily dependent on water content and snow or firn density. We assume density changes are temporally slow relative to water flow through the snow and firn pack, and therefore infer that changing radio-wave velocities measured by successive CMP surveys result from flux in surface melt through deeper layers. Preliminary CMP data yield radio-wave velocities of 0.15 to 0.2 m/ns in snowpack densities averaging 0.56 g cm-3, indicating partially to fully saturated snowpack (4-9% water content). Further spatial-temporal analysis of CMP surveys is being conducted. We recommend that repeat CMP surveys be conducted over a longer time frame to estimate stratigraphic water redistribution between the end of winter accumulation and maximum melt season. This information could be incorporated into surface energy balance models to further understanding of the influence of internal accumulation on glacier mass balance.

  9. Linear thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity and melting temperature of Am-MOX and Np-MOX

    OpenAIRE

    PRIEUR DAMIEN; BELIN R. C.; Manara, Dario; Staicu, Dragos; RICHAUD J.-C.; VIGIER JEAN-FRANCOIS; Scheinost A.C.; Somers, Joseph; Martin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The thermal properties of Np- and Am-MOX solid solution materials were investigated. Their linear thermal expansion, determined using high temperature X-ray diffraction from room temperature to 1973 K showed no significant difference between the Np and the Am doped MOX. The thermal conductivity of the Am-MOX is about 10% higher than that of Np-MOX. The melting temperatures of Np-MOX and Am-MOX, measured using a laser heating self crucible arrangement were 3020 ± 30 K and 3005 ± 30 K, respecti...

  10. A study on structural analysis of highly corrosive melts at high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtori, N

    2002-01-01

    When sodium is burned at high temperature in the atmosphere, it reacts simultaneously with H sub 2 O in the atmosphere so that it can produce high temperature melt of sodium hydroxide as a solvent. If this melt includes peroxide ion (O sub 2 sup 2 sup -), it will be a considerably active and corrosive for iron so that several sodium iron double oxides will be produced as corrosion products after the reaction with steel structures. The present study was carried out in order to investigate the ability of presence of peroxide ion in sodium hydroxide solvent at high temperature and that of identification of the several corrosion products using laser Raman spectroscopy. The measurement system with ultraviolet laser was developed simultaneously in the present work to improve the ability of the measurement at high temperature. As results from the measurements, the possibility of the presence of peroxide ion was shown up to 823K in sodium peroxide and 823K in the melt of sodium hydroxide mixed with sodium peroxide. A...

  11. Effects of TIG Surface Melting and Chromium Surface Alloying on Microstructure,Hardness and Wear Resistance of ADI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Amirsadeghi; M Heydarzadeh Sohi; S F Kashani Bozorg

    2008-01-01

    Microhardness and wear resistance of different mierostruetures formed by TIG (tungsten inert gas) surface melting and chromium surface alloying (using ferrochromium) of ADI (austempered ductile iron) were studied.Surface melting resulted in the formation of a ledeburitic structure in the melted zone,and this structure has a hardness up to 896 HV as compared to 360 HV in that of ADI.Moreover,chromium surface alloying resulted in the formation of different structures including:(1) a hypereuteetic structure consisting of primary (Fe,Cr)7C3 carbides and a eutectie matrix of transformed austenite (into martensite and retained austenite),as also (Fe,Cr)7C3 carbides,with a hardness of 1 078 HV;(2) a hypoeutectic structure consisting of the same eutectic along with transformed primary austenite,with a hardness of 755 HV;and (3) a ledeburitic structure with an acieular morphology and a hardness of 896 HV.The results also indicated that surface melting reduced the wear rate of the ADI by approximately 37%.Also,chromium surface alloying yielded a superior wear behavior and reduced the wear rate of the treated specimens by about 38% and 70%,depending on the structures formed.

  12. [Effect of single-stranded and double-stranded breaks on the melting temperature of phage T2 DNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurgaĭtis, A P; Lazurkin, Iu S; Bannikov, Iu A

    1979-01-01

    The effect of single- and double-stranded breaks in DNA phage T2, on the melting temperature of this DNA in the 0,05 M SSC solution, was investigated. The number of cleavages per 1000 nucleotide pairs varied in the range of 0 to 10. It is shown that single- and double-stranded breaks affect the melting temperature with approximately (within 20%) the same efficiency. The relationship between the melting temperature shift (delta Tm) and the number of cleavages is non-linear. The magnitude of the effect is characterized by delta Tm of 2 +/- 0.4 degrees C for the average inter-cleavage distance of 200 base pairs. It is shown that the observed melting curves are non-equilibrium ones, which is probably due to the fact that the effect of cleavages on the melting temperature is largely results from the complete and practically irreversible separation of strands.

  13. Depth Profiling of Melting and Metallization in Si(111) and Si(001) Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnella, R.; Ali, M.; Abbas, M.; D'Amico, F.; Principi, E.; di Cicco, A.

    2011-10-01

    An original approach for measuring the depth profile of melting and metallization of the Si(111) and Si(001) surfaces is proposed and applied. The different probing depths of the Auger electron and electron energy loss (EELS) spectroscopies are exploited to study the number of molten and metallic layers within 5-30 Å from the surface up to about 1650 K. Melting is limited to 3 atomic layers in Si(001) in the range 1400-1650 K while the number of molten layers grows much faster (5 layers at about 1500 K) in Si(111) as also indicated by the L3-edge shift observed by EELS. The relationship between melting and metallization is briefly discussed.

  14. Surface temperature measurements of diamond

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available ) and the waist position (z0) 3. TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS There are many methods to measure the temperature of a body. Here we used a thermocou- ple and a pyrometer, while future plans involve emission spectroscopy. A thermocouple is a temperature... sensor that consists of two wires con- nected together made from different metals, which produces an electrical voltage that is dependant on tem- perature. A Newport electronic thermocou- ple was used to meas- ured temperature. It can measure...

  15. Physical metallurgy of laser surface melted plastic mould steels: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colaço, R.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the potential of laser surface melting to improve the surface characteristics of plastic mould steels, using a typical plastic mould steel (DIN X43Cr12 as a case study. After laser surface melting the microstructure of this steel is formed by fine dendrites of austenite partially transformed into martensite. Although the equilibrium solidification phase is 8- ferrite, the formation of primary austenite is kinetically favored and this phase tends to predominate at the high solidification speeds used in laser processing. It was observed that the volume fraction of retained austenite depends critically on the laser processing parameters, so that the microstructure can change from almost completely martensitic to almost completely austenitic by changing the laser processing parameters. Laser melted tool steels show remarkable secondary hardening after tempering at suitable temperatures. In DIN X42Cr13 the secondary hardening peak temperature after LSM (600°C is 100°C higher than after conventional heat treatment (500°C, due to the presence of large amounts of retained austenite. It was observed that this phase only destabilizes above 600°C, due to the precipitation of M7C3 and stress relieving. After destabilization, retained austenite transforms into martensite during cooling. Secondary hardening is due to the transformation of retained austenite into martensite and to the precipitation of M7C3 and M23C6 carbides.

    El objetivo del presente trabajo es ilustrar el potencial de la fusión superficial mediante láser para la mejora de las características estructurales de los moldes de acero para plásticos, centrándolo en el caso concreto del acero DIN X42Cr13. Tras el tratamiento de fusión superficial mediante láser, la microestructura del material está formada por dendritas finas de austenita parcialmente transformadas en

  16. Surface Quality Research for Selective Laser Melting of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Król M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the innovative technology of producing the components is Selective Laser Melting (SLM belongs to additive manufacturing techniques. SLM technology has already been successfully applied in the automotive, aerospace and medical industries. Despite progress in material flexibility and mechanical performances, relatively poor surface finish still presents a significant weakness in the SLM process.

  17. The 1958-2009 Greenland ice sheet surface melt and the mid-tropospheric atmospheric circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fettweis, X.; Mabille, G.; Erpicum, M.; Nicolay, S.; van den Broeke, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess the impact of the mid-tropospheric circulation over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) on surface melt, as simulated by the regional climate model MAR, an automatic Circulation type classification (CTC) based on 500 hPa geopotential height from reanalyses is developed. General circula

  18. Phase relations study on the melting and crystallization regions of the Bi-2223 high temperature superconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polasek Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The melting and solidification behavior of Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3 O10 (Bi-2223 precursors has been studied. Nominal compositions corresponding to excess of liquid, Ca2CuO3 and CuO have been investigated. Each sample was made by packing a precursor powder into a silver crucible, in order to approximately simulate the situation found in 2223 silver-sheathed tapes. The samples were partially melted and then slow-cooled, being quenched from different temperatures and analyzed through X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS. The precursors decomposed peritectically during melting, forming liquid and solid phases. Very long plates with compositions falling in the vicinity of the 2223 primary phase field formed upon slow-cooling. The 2223 phase may have been formed and the results suggest that long grains of this phase might be obtained by melting and crystallization if the exact peritectic region and the optimum processing conditions are found.

  19. Modelling global fresh surface water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, L.P.H. van; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, M.T.H. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature directly determines a range of water physical properties including vapour pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, and the solubility of oxygen and other gases. Indirectly water temperature acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing sediment

  20. Modelling global fresh surface water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, L.P.H. van; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, M.T.H. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature directly determines a range of water physical properties including vapour pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, and the solubility of oxygen and other gases. Indirectly water temperature acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing sediment concentrati

  1. Property-Composition-Temperature Modeling of Waste Glass Melt Data Subject to a Randomization Restriction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Cooley, Scott K.

    2008-10-01

    Properties such as viscosity and electrical conductivity of glass melts are functions of melt temperature as well as glass composition. When measuring such a property for several glasses, the property is typically measured at several temperatures for one glass, then at several temperatures for the next glass, and so on. This data-collection process involves a restriction on randomization, which is referred to as split-plot experiment. The split-plot data structure must be accounted for in developing property-composition-temperature models and the corresponding uncertainty equations for model predictions. Instead of ordinary least squares (OLS) regression methods, generalized least squares (GLS) regression methods using restricted maximum likelihood (REML) estimation must be used. This article describes the methodology for developing property-composition-temperature models and corresponding prediction uncertainty equations using the GLS/REML regression approach. Viscosity data collected on 197 simulated nuclear waste glasses are used to illustrate the GLS/REML methods for developing a viscosity-composition-temperature model and corresponding equations for model prediction uncertainties. The correct results using GLS/REML regression are compared to the incorrect results obtained using OLS regression.

  2. Rapidly solidified surface melts of Ni-B-Si-Cr brazing alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, T. R.; Ayers, J. D.

    1981-10-01

    Sintered powder layers of a Ni-based brazing alloy were consolidated by scanned electron beam radiation to produce a continuous fused coating. The surface of this coating was then remelted by laser and electron beams under differing conditions, resulting in a variety of resolidification structures. Alloy BNi2 was chosen for these studies because it exhibits substantial hardening on grain refinement and because it can be prepared in the glassy state relatively easily. Surface microhardness for BNi2 reaches a maximum of about 1200 DPH at a cooling rate approaching 105 K/s. For higher quench rates, hardness decreases and ductility increases. As the cooling rate approaches 107 k/s, overlapping beam scans produce an extended amorphous surface. A solidification rate higher than that needed to produce an amorphous structure in a single melt pass is necessary to avoid surface cracking or crystallization when overlapping melt passes are employed.

  3. Influence of surface melting effects and availability of reagent ions on LDI-MS efficiency after UV laser irradiation of Pd nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silina, Yuliya E; Koch, Marcus; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the influence of surface morphology, reagent ions and surface restructuring effects on atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization (LDI) for small molecules after laser irradiation of palladium self-assembled nanoparticular (Pd-NP) structures has been systematically studied. The dominant role of surface morphology during the LDI process, which was previously shown for silicon-based substrates, has not been investigated for metal-based substrates before. In our experiments, we demonstrated that both the presence of reagent ions and surface reorganization effects--in particular, melting--during laser irradiation was required for LDI activity of the substrate. The synthesized Pd nanostructures with diameters ranging from 60 to 180 nm started to melt at similar temperatures, viz. 890-898 K. These materials exhibited different LDI efficiencies, however, with Pd-NP materials being the most effective surface in our experiments. Pd nanostructures of diameters >400-800 nm started to melt at higher temperatures, >1000 K, making such targets more resistant to laser irradiation, with subsequent loss of LDI activity. Our data demonstrated that both melting of the surface structures and the presence of reagent ions were essential for efficient LDI of the investigated low molecular weight compounds. This dependence of LDI on melting points was exploited further to improve the performance of Pd-NP-based sampling targets. For example, adding sodium hypophosphite as reducing agent to Pd electrolyte solutions during synthesis lowered the melting points of the Pd-NP materials and subsequently gave reduced laser fluence requirements for LDI.

  4. Influence of Annealing Temperature on CZTS Thin Film Surface Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenmei; Han, Junfeng; Ge, Jun; Peng, Xianglin; Liu, Yunong; Jian, Yu; Yuan, Lin; Xiong, Xiaolu; Cha, Limei; Liao, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    In this work, copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS) films were deposited by direct current sputtering and the samples were annealed in different oven-set temperatures and atmosphere (Ar and H2S). The surface evolution was investigated carefully by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The surface of the as-sputtered precursor contained little Cu and large amounts of Zn and Sn. The metallic precursor was continuous and compact without pinholes or cracks. With the increase of the temperature from room temperature to 250°C, Cu atoms diffused to the film surface to form Cu1- x S and covered other compounds. Some small platelets were smaller than 500 nm spreading randomly in the holes of the film surfaces. When the temperature reached 350°C, Zn and Sn atoms began to diffuse to the surface and react with S or Cu1- x S. At 400°C, SEM showed the melting of large particles and small particles with a size from 100 nm to 200 nm in the background of the film surface. Excess Zn segregated towards the surface regions and formed ZnS phase on the surface. In addition, the signal of sodium in the CZTS surface was observed above 400°C. At 600°C, a large amount of regular structures with clear edges and corners were observed in the film surface in SEM images. A clear recrystallized process on the surface was assumed from those observations.

  5. A Direct Comparison between Static and Dynamic Melting Temperature Determinations below 100 GPa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yu-Huai; HUANG Hai-Jun; LIU Fu-Sheng; YANG Mei-Xia; JING Fu-Qian

    2005-01-01

    @@ A preliminary experiment of sound velocity measurements for porous iron with initial average density of 6.275 g/cm3 has been performed at pressures below 100 GPa, in order to clarify a long-standing problem that the static melting temperature Tm, mostly below 100 GPa due to its technical limitations, is notably lower than the extrapolated melting data inferred from the shock wave experiments made above 200 GPa, for the sake of making a direct comparison between the experimental static and dynamic melting temperatures in the same pressure region.With the lately proposed Hugoniot sound velocity data analysis technique [Chin. Phys. Lett. 22 (2005) 863], the results deduced from this Hugoniot sound velocity measurement is Tm = 3200 K at 87GPa and Tm = 3080 K at80 GPa, which are in good agreement with the two latest static data ofTm = 3510 K at 105 GPa and Tm = 2750 K at 58 GPa, which utilized modern improved double-side laser heating and in situ accurate x-ray diffraction techniques in experiments. It can be concluded that consensus Tm data would be obtained from static and shock wave experiments in the case that the recently improved techniques are adopted in investigations.

  6. Role of surface temperature in fluorocarbon plasma-surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Caleb T.; Overzet, Lawrence J.; Goeckner, Matthew J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, PO Box 830688, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    This article examines plasma-surface reaction channels and the effect of surface temperature on the magnitude of those channels. Neutral species CF{sub 4}, C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, and C{sub 3}F{sub 8} are produced on surfaces. The magnitude of the production channel increases with surface temperature for all species, but favors higher mass species as the temperature is elevated. Additionally, the production rate of CF{sub 2} increases by a factor of 5 as the surface temperature is raised from 25 Degree-Sign C to 200 Degree-Sign C. Fluorine density, on the other hand, does not change as a function of either surface temperature or position outside of the plasma glow. This indicates that fluorine addition in the gas-phase is not a dominant reaction. Heating reactors can result in higher densities of depositing radical species, resulting in increased deposition rates on cooled substrates. Finally, the sticking probability of the depositing free radical species does not change as a function of surface temperature. Instead, the surface temperature acts together with an etchant species (possibly fluorine) to elevate desorption rates on that surface at temperatures lower than those required for unassisted thermal desorption.

  7. Ponded Impact Melt Dynamics and its Effects on Pond Surface Morphology - Insights from King Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, J. W.; DiCarlo, N.; Enns, A. C.; Hawke, B. R.; Hiesinger, H.; Robinson, M. S.; Sato, H.; Speyerer, E.; van der Bogert, C.; Wagner, R.; Young, K. E.; LROC Science Team

    2011-12-01

    King crater is a 77-km diameter impact feature located at 5.0°N and 120.5°E on the lunar farside. Previous work delimited King crater with an asymmetric distribution of ejecta that includes a large impact melt pond (~385 square kilometer surface area), located in nearby Al-Tusi crater. The pond provides an opportunity to study the behavior of a large impact melt deposit. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) and Narrow Angle Cameras (NAC) [1] imaged King crater from a nominal 50 km altitude at pixel scales of 100 meters and up to 0.5 meters, respectively providing the means to create geologic maps for the region. Digital terrain/elevation models (DTMs) were derived [2] from both WAC and NAC images for the area, and supplemented the mapping effort. The high-resolution (50 cm/p) NAC images show fine details within the Al-Tusi melt pond that raise questions about melt pond dynamics and evolution. These include both positive- and negative-relief features, anomalous crater morphologies, and flow features that show variable degrees of melt viscosity. WAC DTM processing reveals a horizontal and relatively flat (at the 20 m contour interval) pond, demonstrating that an equipotential surface was achieved during initial melt accumulation. The NAC DTM shows kilometer-scale zones of topographic down-warping within the 20 m contour interval. The perimeters of these depressed areas show moderate to high spatial correlation with the occurrence of negative relief features (~10 to 100 m in length). Such sagging may have occurred as the result of contraction and/or compaction within the melt both during and following cooling, with the negative relief features resulting from consequent structural failure and separation of the thickening surface crust. The variability in the degree of contraction/compaction may be explained by the presence of underlying hummocky ejecta deposits (which probably also explains the positive relief features) emplaced by

  8. In-Core-Instrumentation Methods for 3-Dimensional Distribution Information of Reactor Core Temperatures and Melt-down

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yeong Cheol [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Myoung; Kim, Sung Jun [Woojin Inc., Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    The tsunami-induced nuclear accident at Japanese Fukushima power plants in March 2011 has revealed some weaknesses in the severe accident monitoring system. The plant instrumentation did not provide utility, safety experts, and government officials with adequate and reliable information. The information on the reactor core damage and coolability is critical for making decisions correctly as well as in a timely manner during the course of the mitigation of severe accidents. Current Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)s have an In-Core-Instrumentation (ICI) system that measures the temperature distribution of the top surface (i.e. Core Exit Temperatures) of the reactor core mainly to indicate when to begin Severe Accident Mitigation Guidelines (SAMG). This design concept giving only the core exit temperature has limitations in terms of sufficiency as well as availability of the information necessary for diagnosis on the status of the degraded core and the effectiveness of the measures taken as mitigation strategies. The reactor core exit temperatures are not sufficient to support the assessment of the degree of the core damage and the location of the molten core debris and recognition whether the core damage progresses on or it is mitigated. The ICI location being at the top of the reactor core also makes the ICI thermocouples vulnerable to melt-down because the upper part of the reactor core uncovers first, thereby melt down at the early stage of the accident. This means that direct indication of reactor core temperature will be lost and unavailable during the later stages of severe accident. To address the aforementioned weaknesses of the current ICIs, it is necessary to develop a new ICI system that provides information that is more expanded and more reliable for accident mitigation. With the enhanced information available, the SAMG can be prepared in more refined and effective way based on the direct and suitable indication of status of damages and the 3-dimensional

  9. The seasonal cycle and interannual variability of surface energy balance and melt in the ablation zone of the west Greenland ice sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. van den Broeke

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the seasonal cycle and interannual variability of the surface energy balance (SEB in the ablation zone of the west Greenland ice sheet, using seven years (September 2003–August 2010 of hourly observations from three automatic weather stations (AWS. The AWS are situated along the 67° N latitude circle at elevations of 490 m a.s.l. (S5, 1020 m a.s.l. (S6 and 1520 m a.s.l. (S9 at distances of 6, 38 and 88 km from the ice sheet margin. The hourly AWS data are fed into a model that calculates all SEB components and melt rate; the model allows for shortwave radiation penetration in ice and time-varying surface momentum roughness. Snow depth is prescribed from albedo and sonic height ranger observations. Modelled and observed surface temperatures for non-melting conditions agree very well, with RMSE's of 0.97–1.26 K. Modelled and observed ice melt rates at the two lowest sites also show very good agreement, both for total cumulative and 10-day cumulated amounts. Melt frequencies and melt rates at the AWS sites are discussed. Although absorbed shortwave radiation is the most important energy source for melt at all three sites, interannual melt variability at the lowest site is driven mainly by variability in the turbulent flux of sensible heat. This is explained by the quasi-constant summer albedo in the lower ablation zone, limiting the influence of the melt-albedo feedback, and the proximity of the snow free tundra, which heats up considerably in summer.

  10. Study of inter-annual variations in surface melting over Amery Ice Shelf, East Antarctica, using space-borne scatterometer data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S R Oza; R K K Singh; N K Vyas; Abhijit Sarkar

    2011-04-01

    The widespread retreat of glaciers can be considered as a response to the climate change. Being the largest retreating glacier–ice shelf system in East Antarctica, the Amery Ice Shelf–Lambert Glacier system plays an important role in contributing to sea level rise as well as the surrounding environment and climate. The present study is focused on the investigation of surface melting over the ice shelf using QuikSCAT Ku-band scatterometer data for more than 100 months covering the period from January 2000 to July 2009. The corresponding weather data of Davis Station was obtained from the website of Australian Antarctic Division. Very prominent dips in the backscatter observed in the month of January form a distinct signature caused by physical process of significant melting of the ice/snow surface. The steep increase again in February is attributed to the initiation of the freezing phenomenon. The derived melting index compared well with the passive microwave-based melting index derived by other researchers. A strong relationship was found between the scatterometer-derived melting index and the cumulative monthly mean air temperature. The highest melting was observed in the summer (January) of 2004, and thereafter gradual cooling appeared to take place in the subsequent years. The snow pack thickness, inferred from the backscatter variations, was found to be higher during winters (June) of 2004 and 2005, compared with other years.

  11. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Thermodynamic modeling to explain the high degree of carbon solubility possible in austenitic grades under the LTCSS process and experimental validation of model results • Corrosion testing to determine the corrosion resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Erosion testing to determine the erosion resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Wear testing to quantify the wear resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Fatigue testing for quantifying the extent of improvement from the LTCSS process • Component treating and testing under simulated and in-line commercial operations XRD verified expanded austenite lattice, with no evidence of carbide precipitation. Carbon concentration profiles via Auger and electron dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) showed carbon levels in excess of 12 at. % in treated, type 316 SS. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of pulled-to-failure treated tensile specimens showed slip bands and no de-cohesion of the treated layer, verifying that the layer remains ductile. Compressive stresses in excess of 2 GPa (300 ksi) have been calculated at the surface of the case. Phase diagram (CALPHAD) (ThermoCalc) and Wagner dilute solution thermodynamic models were developed that calculate the solubility of carbon in austenite as a function of alloying content for the process time and temperature. Several commercial alloys have been modeled, and the model has been used to design experimental alloys with enhanced affinity for carbon solubility at treatment temperatures. Four experimental alloys were melted, rolled, and manufactured into test specimens, and the LTCSS treatment indicated successfully enhanced results and validated the predictions based on thermodynamic modeling. Electrochemical polarization curves show a 600 to 800 mV increase in pitting potential in treated (900-1000 mV) versus non-treated (200-300 mV) type 316 in chloride solutions. Treated 316L showed crevice-corrosion behavior similar to that of Ti-6

  12. Transient High-Temperature Processing of Silicates in Fulgurites as Analogues for Meteorite and Impact Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, J.; Thackrey, S.; Muirhead, D. K.; Wright, A. J.

    2008-03-01

    A fulgurite from the Sahara yielded petrographic data valuable as an analogue for highly reduced meteorite and impact melts, including iron silicide formation, devolatilization features, zircon melting and extreme melt heterogeneity.

  13. TSDC study of XLPE recrystallization effects in the melting range of temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego, J. A.; Belana, J.; Òrrit, J.; Sellarès, J.; Mudarra, M.; Cañadas, J. C.

    2006-05-01

    The electrical properties of crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE), employed in mid-voltage cable insulation are studied using thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction. A complex heteropolar peak appears by TSDC between 50 and 110 °C, with a maximum at 105 °C. These measurements reveal that there is an optimal polarization temperature (Tpo) around 90 °C. For this polarization temperature, the measured discharge peak area is maximum. Although the presence of a Tpo is common in the study of relaxations by TSDC, in this case one would expect a monotonic decrease in the TSDC response with increasing polarization temperatures due to the decrease in the total crystalline fraction. In this paper, TSDC curves obtained under several conditions are interpreted in terms of recrystallization processes in XLPE during the polarization stage, if the sample is polarized in the melting temperature range. In this case, the recrystallization of a fraction of the material molten at this temperature promotes the formation of more stable and defect-free crystals. The presence of recrystallization processes is detected by DSC and confirmed by x-ray diffractometry. TSDC measurements have been performed with samples polarized at several temperatures (Tp) cooling from the melt or heating from room temperature. Also, TSDC results are obtained with previous annealing or with several cooling rates. These results allow us to infer that crystalline material grown from recrystallization processes that take place in the polarization stage attains a particularly stable polarization. Possible microscopical causes of this effect are discussed.

  14. Experimental study on liquid immiscibility of lamprophyre-sulfide melt at high temperature and high pressure and its geological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bo; HUANG Zhilong; ZHU Chengming

    2009-01-01

    With lamprophyre and pyrite from the Laowangzhai gold deposit, Yunnan Province, China, as starting materials, and at pressures from 1.5 to 3.0 GPa and temperatures from 1160 to 1560℃, an experimental study was carried out on the liquid immiscibility of lamprophyre-sulfide melt at high temperature and ultra-high pressure in the DS-29A cubic 3600T/6-type high pressure apparatus. Results showed that the liquid immiscibility of lampropyre-sulfide melt in the magmatic system would happen during the early magmatic evolution (high temperature and high pressure conditions) and was controlled by temperature and pressure. The sulfide melt which was separated from the lamprophyric melt would make directional movement in the temperature and pressure field and assemble in the low-temperature and low-pressure region. Because the density of SM is higher than that of the lamprophyric melt, the former would gather together at the bottom of the magma chamber and there would exist a striking boundary between the two melts. On the other hand, the results also suggested that there would be little possibility for lamprophyric magma to carry massive gold, and lamprophyres can't provide many of ore-forming materials (Au) in the processes of gold mineralization.

  15. Dependence of snow melting and surface-atmosphere interactions on the forest structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterman, J.; Staenz, K.; Itten, K. I.; Kukla, G.

    1988-01-01

    The surface albedo and the surface roughness for forested areas with snow on the ground are expressed in terms of the tree silhouette parameter, s, the projection on the vertical plane of trees per unit area. The absorption of insolation (direct solar beam) is quantitatively described for a horizontal snow surface with vertical tree trunks, stressing the role of the bark at snow level as triggering the snow melt. Measurement of s by field sampling in two forested sites in central Switzerland yielded values ranging from 1.8 to 2.1.

  16. Silicate melt structure at high temperatures and pressures: concepts and questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    A great deal is now known about the structure of glass-forming silicate (and other oxide) liquids, from decades of research on quenched glasses of interest to the geosciences and technology. However, specific structural information and derived general concepts from such studies are only the starting point for thinking about melts at temperatures far above the glass transition, and for high pressures and compositions that do not result in quenchable glasses. This talk will attempt to briefly summarize what we know about temperature and pressure effects on melt structure, emphasizing questions yet to be clearly answered. As examples of the latter, we are yet to have a quantitative structural explanation of the all-important configurational entropy and enthalpy of even simple silicate compositions, suggesting that short-lived and possibly ill-defined defect structures account for much of the non-vibrational energy taken up on heating to liquidus temperatures. At least in the pressure range before major increases in silicon coordination (which probably includes the upper mantle source regions for most modern mafic magmas), known changes in cation coordination are not enough to account for known changes in density, either at high T/P or in quenched and decompressed glasses. And even the basic concepts of silicate melt structure, such as `network formers' and `network modifiers' are inadequate in a high pressure liquid comprised primarily of cations with 6, 7 or 8-fold coordination. Such kinds of questions pose important and intriguing challenges for structural thinking based on improved computational models and rapid advances in in-situ, high P/T structural measurements.

  17. Can the thermodynamic melting temperature of sucrose, glucose, and fructose be measured using rapid-scanning differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Won; Thomas, Leonard C; Schmidt, Shelly J

    2011-04-13

    The loss of crystalline structure in sucrose, glucose, and fructose has been shown to be due to the kinetic process of thermal decomposition (termed apparent melting), rather than thermodynamic melting. The purpose of this research was to investigate whether or not it is possible to scan quickly enough to suppress the kinetic process of thermal decomposition and reach the thermodynamic melting temperature of these sugars using a new rapid-scanning DSC. Indium, a thermodynamic melting material, and sucrose, glucose, and fructose were analyzed at three heating rates from 1 to 25 °C/min using standard DSC and at seven heating rates from 50 to 2000 °C/min using rapid-scanning DSC. Thermodynamic melting was achieved when the onset temperature (T(m onset)) of the endothermic peak leveled off to a constant value independent of heating rate. The T(m onset) for indium was constant (156.74 ± 0.42 °C) at all heating rates. In the case of fructose, the T(m onset) increased considerably until a heating rate of approximately 698 °C/min, after which the average T(m onset) for the remaining three heating rates was constant at 135.83 ± 1.14 °C. Thus, 135.83 °C is proposed to be the thermodynamic melting temperature of fructose. It is important to note that the heating rate at which this thermodynamic melting temperature is achieved is most likely influenced by the type and amount of trace components (e.g., water and salts) contained in the fructose, which are known to vary widely in sugars. In the case of sucrose and glucose, thermodynamic melting temperatures were not able to be obtained, because the upper limit heating rate used was not fast enough to suppress thermal decomposition and achieve thermodynamic melting, perhaps due to the higher apparent T(m onset) for sucrose and glucose compared to that for fructose.

  18. Selective laser melting of Ti6Al4V alloy for biomedical applications: Temperature monitoring and microstructural evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadroitsev, I., E-mail: ihar.yadroitsau@enise.fr [Université de Lyon, Ecole Nationale d’Ingénieurs de Saint-Etienne, 58 rue Jean Parot, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Krakhmalev, P. [Karlstad University, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, SE-651 88 Karlstad (Sweden); Yadroitsava, I. [Université de Lyon, Ecole Nationale d’Ingénieurs de Saint-Etienne, 58 rue Jean Parot, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Temperature measurements of molten pool were done using CCD camera. • Temperature of molten pool versus scanning speed and laser power was determined. • Microstructures and microhardness of SLM samples were analyzed. • Influence of heat treatment on microstructure were discussed and presented. -- Abstract: Selective laser melting (SLM) is a kind of additive manufacturing where parts are made directly from 3D CAD data layer-by-layer from powder material. SLM products are used in various industries including aerospace, automotive, electronic, chemical, biomedical and other high-tech areas. The properties of the parts produced by SLM depend strongly on the material nature, characteristics of each single track and each single layer, as well as the strength of the connections between them. Studying the temperature distribution during SLM is important because temperature gradient and heat transfer determine the microstructure and finally mechanical properties of the SLM part. In this study a CCD camera was applied for determination of the surface temperature distribution and the molten pool size of Ti6Al4V alloy. The investigation of the microstructure evolution after different heat treatments was carried out to determine the microstructure in terms of applicability for the biomedical industry.

  19. MELT WIRE SENSORS AVAILABLE TO DETERMINE PEAK TEMPERATURES IN ATR IRRADIATION TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. L. Davis; D. Knudson; J. Daw; J. Palmer; J. L. Rempe

    2012-07-01

    In April 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to advance US leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development and help address the nation's energy security needs. In support of this new program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced temperature sensors for irradiation testing. Although most efforts emphasize sensors capable of providing real-time data, selected tasks have been completed to enhance sensors provided in irradiation locations where instrumentation leads cannot be included, such as drop-in capsule and Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) or 'rabbit' locations. To meet the need for these locations, the INL has developed melt wire temperature sensors for use in ATR irradiation testing. Differential scanning calorimetry and environmental testing of prototypical sensors was used to develop a library of 28 melt wire materials, capable of detecting peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 85 to 1500°C. This paper will discuss the development work and present test results.

  20. Surface structure and properties of Ti6Al4V alloy laser melted at cryogenic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zielińskia

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The research work has been to determine whether surface melting of the Ti6Al4V bioalloy with thehigh power laser, when immersed in liquid nitrogen, would result in an appearance of hard and thick surfacelayer, containing new structural constituents.Design/methodology/approach: The laser melting of the Ti6Al4V alloy has been made by the CO2 laser atdifferent laser beam energy and scan rate. The specimens have been immersed in liquid nitrogen bath duringlaser treatment. The Vickers microhardness of cross-sections of the surface layer has been measured, and themicroscopic examinations have been performed with the SEM.Findings: The laser melting at cryogenic conditions has resulted in creation of the modified surface layer, upto 1.5 mm thick with HAZ, of properties and structures different from those of the base metal. The layer hasbeen well adjacent to base metal, its microhardness being significantly higher. The numerous zones have beenobserved within the surface layer, with nitrogen-containing martensite and titanium nitride structures. Thenegative effect has been an initiation of surface cracks. The laser beam energy has influenced the presence ofdifferent zones, their thickness, and number of cracks.Research limitations/implications: So far research has shown that proposed technique can create thick andhard surface layer, containing new structural important components. The new research is necessary in order toestablish the laser treatment parameters which permit to avoid cracking and determine the phase constituentsand crystallinity within the surface layer.Practical implications: The elaborated technique may be useful in order to improve the surface properties ofthe Ti alloys for biomedical applications.Originality/value: The paper shows original in the world-scale results of laser treatment of the Ti bioalloy atcryogenic conditions.

  1. The surface quasiliquid melt acceleration and the role of thermodynamic phase in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, Bryan F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We show that melt acceleration in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic solids is a manifestation of the surface quasiliquid phase. We derive a single universal rate law for melt acceleration that is a simple function of the metastable liquid activity below the melting point, and has a zero order term proportional to the quasiliquid thickness. We argue that the underlying mechanisms of this model will provide a molecular definition for the stability of the class of secondary explosives.

  2. Size Dependence of the Melting Temperature of Metallic Films: Two Possible Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Samsonov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The size dependence was investigated of the melting temperature Tm of metallic films (tin and copper on different substrate (amorphous carbon, another infusible metal, i.e. the dependence of Tm on the film thickness h. It was found that the effect of interfacial boundary can result in the growth of Tm for thin metallic films on the carbon substrate in comparison with the corresponding bulk value. For the metal 1 / metal 2 system the size dependence of Tm seems to be less pronounced and Tm decreases with decreasing thickness h.

  3. Mathematical modeling of localized melting around graphite nodules during laser surface hardening of austempered ductile iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A.; Manna, I.

    2000-10-01

    An attempt has been made to mathematically predict the optimum conditions of laser surface hardening (LSH) of austempered ductile iron (ADI) that can ensure a predominantly martensitic microstructure and preclude partial/complete dissolution of graphite nodules in the laser hardened zone during laser irradiation. The exercise involves prediction of the thermal profile (using the Ashby and Easterling model), and consequently, the carbon diffusion profile around the graphite nodules at different depths from the surface for the given conditions of LSH. Microstructural investigations have been carried out by optical and scanning electron microscopy to study the morphology, shape and width of the partially/completely melted graphite nodules as a function of the LSH parameters. Finally, the predicted maximum width of the melted zone around the graphite nodules is compared with the relevant experimental data to validate the proposed model.

  4. [A study of phonon vibration like modes for aggregation structure in silicate melts by high temperature Raman spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pei-Cang; Li, Ru-Bi; Shang, Tong-Ming; Zhou, Jian; Sun, Jian-Hua; You, Jing-Lin

    2010-05-01

    Silicate melts are special fractal dimension system that is metastable state of near-way order and far-way disorder. In this paper, the size of nanometer aggregation structure and the frequences of phonon vibration like mode in the low dimension silicate series (CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 and Na2-Al2O3-SiO2 series) synthesized via high temperature melting and sol gel methods were measured by means of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), low wavenumber Raman spectrum (LWRS) and high temperature Raman spectrum (HTRS in situ measuring). The nanometer self-similarity aggregation structure(it's size is about a few nm to a few tens nm) and phonic phonon vibration like modes of low temperature silicate gel, high temperature silicate melts and it's quenching glasses phases were obtained. So a quantitative method by HTRS for measuring the aggregation size in the high temperature melts was established. The results showed that the aggregation size of the silicate melts is smaller at high temperature than at room temperature and the number of bridge oxygen in one Si-O tetrahedron in network structure units is decreasing at high temperature. This study work provides important theory and information for deliberating geochemistry characteristic, crystallization & evolution of natural magma and enhancing performance of low dimension silicate matelials.

  5. Effect of ultrasonic stirring on temperature distribution and grain refinement in Al- 1.65% Si alloy melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A series of experiments were conducted for Al-1.65%Si (mass fraction) alloy melt to study the formation of grain refining structure with ultrasonic stirring. The cooling curves of ingots with ultrasonic were measured and compared with those without ultrasonic. At the same time, the effect of the time of ultrasonic stirring on solidification structure of ingots was investigated. The influence of ultrasonic on the grain-refining efficiency of ingots was analyzed. In order to well understand the melts behavior under ultrasonic, by using ammonium chloride solution, the simulation experiment was carried out and the temperature distribution in ingot with or without ultrasonic was compared. The results indicate that the ultrasonic reduces the temperature inhomogeneity of melt, i.e.the ultrasonic helps to homogenize the melt temperature. The effect of stirring and heat generation in ingot start to occur with increasing the time of ultrasonic stirring.

  6. Gravity increased by lunar surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, James

    2013-04-01

    Quantitatively large effects of lunar surface temperature on apparent gravitational force measured by lunar laser ranging (LLR) and lunar perigee may challenge widely accepted theories of gravity. LLR data grouped by days from full moon shows the moon is about 5 percent closer to earth at full moon compared to 8 days before or after full moon. In a second, related result, moon perigees were least distant in days closer to full moon. Moon phase was used as proxy independent variable for lunar surface temperature. The results support the prediction by binary mechanics that gravitational force increases with object surface temperature.

  7. Computer simulation study of surface wave dynamics at the crystal--melt interface

    CERN Document Server

    Benet, Jorge; Sanz, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We study, by means of computer simulations, the crystal-melt interface of three different systems: hard-spheres, Lennard Jones and the TIP4P/2005 water model. In particular, we focus on the dynamics of surface waves. We observe that the processes involved in the relaxation of surface waves are characterized by distinct time scales: a slow one related to the continuous recrystallization and melting, that is governed by capillary forces; and a fast one which we suggest to be due to a combination of processes that quickly cause small perturbations to the shape of the interface (like e. g. Rayleigh waves, subdiffusion, or attachment/detachment of particles to/from the crystal). The relaxation of surface waves becomes dominated by the slow process as the wavelength increases. Moreover, we see that the slow relaxation is not influenced by the details of the microscopic dynamics. In a time scale characteristic for the diffusion of the liquid phase, the relaxation dynamics of the crystal-melt interface of water is ar...

  8. Sediment plume response to surface melting and supraglacial lake drainages on the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, Vena W.; Smith, Laurence C; Rennermalm, Asa K.

    2009-01-01

    Increased mass losses from the Greenland ice sheet and inferred contributions to sea-level rise have heightened the need for hydrologic observations of meltwater exiting the ice sheet. We explore whether temporal variations in ice-sheet surface hydrology can be linked to the development of a down...... area. We conclude that remote sensing of sediment plume behavior offers a novel tool for detecting the presence, timing and interannual variability of meltwater release from the ice sheet....... of a downstream sediment plume in Kangerlussuaq Fjord by comparing: (1) plume area and suspended sediment concentration from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery and field data; (2) ice-sheet melt extent from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) passive microwave data; and (3......) supraglacial lake drainage events from MODIS. Results confirm that the origin of the sediment plume is meltwater release from the ice sheet. Interannual variations in plume area reflect interannual variations in surface melting. Plumes appear almost immediately with seasonal surface-melt onset, provided...

  9. Room-temperature sliding wear properties of laser melt deposited Cr13Ni5Si2/γalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Yanli; WANG Huaming

    2007-01-01

    A wear-resistant alloy consisting of Cr13Ni5Si2 ternary silicide dendrites and the interdendritic nickel-base solid solution (γ) was designed and fabricated by the laser melting/continuous deposition (LMCD) process.The wear resistance of Cr13Ni5Si2/γalloy was evaluated on an MM-200 block-on-wheel dry sliding wear tester at room temperature. Results indicate that the Cr13Ni5Si2/γ alloy has excellent wear resistance and extremely low load-sensitivity of wear under dry sliding wear test conditions due to the high toughness and the high strength,as well as the transferred cover-layer on the worn surface of the alloy.

  10. Wetting Angles and Surface Tension of Ge(1-x)Si(x) Melts on Different Substrate Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croell, A.; Kaiser, N.; Szofran, F. R.; Cobb, S. D.; Volz, M. P.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The wetting angles and the surface tension of Ge(1-x)Si(x) melts (0.02 less than x less than 0.13) have been measured on various substrate materials using the sessile drop technique. Fused quartz, sapphire, SiC, glassy carbon, pBN, AIN, and Si3N4 have been used as substrates. The highest and most stable wetting angles were found for pBN substrates with 164 +/- 8 deg., either under forming gas with an additional carbon getter in the system or under active vacuum. The surface tension measurements resulted in a value of +2.2 x 10(exp -3) N/m.at%Si for the concentration dependence delta(gamma)/(delta)C. For the composition range measured, the temperature dependence (delt)gamma/(delta)T showed values similar to those of pure Ge, on average -0.07 x 10(exp -3) N/mK.

  11. DENSITY, EQUILIBRIUM HEAT OF FUSION AND EQUILIBRIUM MELTING TEMPERATURE OF NYLON 1010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Jinhua; MO Zishen; CHEN Donglin

    1990-01-01

    The density, equilibrium heat of fusion and equilibrium melting temperature of Nylon 1010 were determined by means of infrared spectrum, differential scanning calorimetry, wide angle X-ray diffraction and density measurement techniques. According to Starkweather 's method crystalline density ρc and amorphous density ρa were estimated to be 1.098 and 1.003 g/cm3 respectively by extrapolating the straight lines of the IR absorbance against density to zero intensity. Owing to the less intense in absorbance and less sensitive to the change in crystallinity of the amorphors band the thus obtained ρc was too low in value.Thereby the value of the ratio ρc / ρa is far less than generally accepted mean value for most crystalline polymers. Accordingly, traditional X-raydiffraction method was used through determining the crystalline dimension(a=4.9(A), b=5.4(A) , c=27.8(A) , α=4 9 °β=77.0 °γ= 63.5 ° ) , and a rather correct value of ρc or the crystal density 1. 13 g/cm3 was obtained . The equilibrium heat of fusion Δ H 0m was estimated to be 244.0 J/g plotting Δ Hm's of specimens with different crystallinity against their corresponding specific volumes Vsp and extrapolating to completely crystalline condition ( Vcsp = 1 /ρc) As to the equilibrium melting temperature T0m ,because of the easiness ofrecrystallization of melt crystallized Nylon 1010 specimen ,the well-known Hoffman's Tm-Tc method failed in determining this value and an usually rarely used Kamide double extrapolation method was adopted. The so obtained value of T0m 487 seems to be fairly reasonable.

  12. Molecular dynamics studies of the melting of butane and hexane monolayers adsorbed on the basal-plane surface of graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Newton, J. C.; Taub, H.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of molecular steric properties on the melting of quasi-two-dimensional solids is investigated by comparing results of molecular dynamics simulations of the melting of butane and hexane monolayers adsorbed on the basal-plane surface of graphite. These molecules differ only in their leng...

  13. Sea Surface Temperature Average_SST_Master

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sea surface temperature collected via satellite imagery from http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/data/gridded/data.noaa.ersst.html and averaged for each region using ArcGIS...

  14. OW NOAA GOES Sea-Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset contains satellite-derived sea-surface temperature measurements collected by means of the Geostationary Orbiting Environmental Satellite. The data is...

  15. evaluation of land surface temperature parameterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1 DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS, ADEYEMI COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, ONDO, ... Surface temperature (Ts) is vital to the study of land-atmosphere interactions and climate variabilities. .... value = 0.167 m3m-3), and very low for dry days (mean.

  16. Monthly Near-Surface Air Temperature Averages

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global surface temperatures in 2010 tied 2005 as the warmest on record. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) was established in 1982 as part...

  17. Sea Surface Temperature (14 KM North America)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Product shows local sea surface temperatures (degrees C). It is a composite gridded-image derived from 8-km resolution SST Observations. It is generated every 48...

  18. Analysed foundation sea surface temperature, global

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The through-cloud capabilities of microwave radiometers provide a valuable picture of global sea surface temperature (SST). To utilize this, scientists at Remote...

  19. Light absorption and partitioning in Arctic Ocean surface waters: impact of multi year ice melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bélanger

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ice melting in the Arctic Ocean exposes the surface water to more radiative energy with poorly understood effects on photo-biogeochemical processes and heat deposition in the upper ocean. In August 2009, we documented the vertical variability of light absorbing components at 37 stations located in the southeastern Beaufort Sea including both Mackenzie river-influenced waters and polar mixed layer waters. We found that melting multi-year ice released significant amount of non-algal particulates (NAP near the sea surface relative to sub-surface waters. NAP absorption coefficients at 440 nm (aNAP(440 immediately below the sea surface (0- were on average 3-fold (up to 10-fold higher compared to sub-surface values measured at 2–3 m depth. The impact of this unusual feature on the light transmission and remote sensing reflectance (Rrs was further examined using a radiative transfer model. A 10-fold particle enrichment homogeneously distributed in the first meter of the water column slightly reduced photosynthetically available and usable radiation (PAR and PUR by ~6% and ~8%, respectively, relative to a fully homogenous water column with low particles concentration. In terms of Rrs, the particle enrichment significantly flattered the spectrum by reducing the Rrs by up to 20% in the blue-green spectral region (400–550 nm. These results highlight the impact of melt water on the concentration of particles at sea surface, and the need for considering nonuniform vertical distribution of particles in such systems when interpreting remotely sensed ocean color. Spectral slope of aNAP spectra calculated in the UV domain decreased with depth suggesting that this parameter is sensitive to detritus composition and/or diagenesis state (e.g., POM photobleaching.

  20. Oxidation/Corrosion Behaviour of ODS Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in Pb Melt at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Yaskiv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead-based melts (Pb, Pb-Bi are considered as candidate coolants and spallation neutron targets due to their excellent thermophysical and nuclear properties. However, the corrosion of structural materials remains a major issue. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS ferritic/martensitic steels are considered for high temperature application for both fission and fusion reactor concepts. The oxidation/corrosion kinetics in a static oxygen-saturated Pb melt at temperature of 550°C as well as the morphology and composition of scales formed on ferritic/martensitic Fe-9Cr-1.5W and ferritic Fe-14Cr-1.5W ODS steels have been investigated. Both materials showed homogeneous multiple, dense scales that consisted of typical combination of Fe3O4 as outer sublayer and (Fe,Cr3O4 as inner sublayer. A nonuniform growth of inner oxide sublayers into the metal matrix as well as a good adhesion to the metal substrate is observed. With the prolongation of exposure from 240 to 1000 h, observed scales grow from 35 µm to 45 µm for ODS Fe-9Cr steel and from 40 µm to 60 µm for ODS Fe-14Cr steel with the thinning rates of 0,22 and 0,31 mm/year correspondingly. The mechanism of scales formation is discussed.

  1. Noncontact Laser Calorimetry of High Temperature Melts in a Static Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Hiroyuki; Kobatake, Hidekazu; Tsukada, Takao; Awaji, Satoshi

    Numerical simulations are widely used for high value-added materials processing such as semiconductor crystal growth, casting of super high-temperature alloys for a jet-engine turbine blade, and for welding in automobile manufacturing [1, 2]. Process modeling involving a liquid-to-solid transition requires precise thermophysical properties of materials in the solid and liquid state at temperatures near their melting points. However, high-temperature materials such as liquid silicon are chemically reactive and are easily contaminated by their containers and contact materials. Therefore, it remains extremely difficult to measure the thermophysical properties of high-temperature liquids. Especially, the thermal conductivity of a high-temperature liquid is a difficult property to measure because of the existence of the buoyancy and Marangoni convections in the liquid. Not only from process modeling but also from a scientific perspective, thermal conductivity data of high-temperature metallic or semiconductor liquids are important to investigate whether the Wiedemann—Franz law [3] is applicable to them.

  2. Near–surface air temperature and snow skin temperature comparison from CREST-SAFE station data with MODIS land surface temperature data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Pérez Díaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Land Surface Temperature (LST is a key variable (commonly studied to understand the hydrological cycle that helps drive the energy balance and water exchange between the Earth's surface and its atmosphere. One observable constituent of much importance in the land surface water balance model is snow. Snow cover plays a critical role in the regional to global scale hydrological cycle because rain-on-snow with warm air temperatures accelerates rapid snow-melt, which is responsible for the majority of the spring floods. Accurate information on near-surface air temperature (T-air and snow skin temperature (T-skin helps us comprehend the energy and water balances in the Earth's hydrological cycle. T-skin is critical in estimating latent and sensible heat fluxes over snow covered areas because incoming and outgoing radiation fluxes from the snow mass and the air temperature above make it different from the average snowpack temperature. This study investigates the correlation between MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS LST data and observed T-air and T-skin data from NOAA-CREST-Snow Analysis and Field Experiment (CREST-SAFE for the winters of 2013 and 2014. LST satellite validation is imperative because high-latitude regions are significantly affected by climate warming and there is a need to aid existing meteorological station networks with the spatially continuous measurements provided by satellites. Results indicate that near-surface air temperature correlates better than snow skin temperature with MODIS LST data. Additional findings show that there is a negative trend demonstrating that the air minus snow skin temperature difference is inversely proportional to cloud cover. To a lesser extent, it will be examined whether the surface properties at the site are representative for the LST properties within the instrument field of view.

  3. Near-surface air temperature and snow skin temperature comparison from CREST-SAFE station data with MODIS land surface temperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Díaz, C. L.; Lakhankar, T.; Romanov, P.; Muñoz, J.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Yu, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key variable (commonly studied to understand the hydrological cycle) that helps drive the energy balance and water exchange between the Earth's surface and its atmosphere. One observable constituent of much importance in the land surface water balance model is snow. Snow cover plays a critical role in the regional to global scale hydrological cycle because rain-on-snow with warm air temperatures accelerates rapid snow-melt, which is responsible for the majority of the spring floods. Accurate information on near-surface air temperature (T-air) and snow skin temperature (T-skin) helps us comprehend the energy and water balances in the Earth's hydrological cycle. T-skin is critical in estimating latent and sensible heat fluxes over snow covered areas because incoming and outgoing radiation fluxes from the snow mass and the air temperature above make it different from the average snowpack temperature. This study investigates the correlation between MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST data and observed T-air and T-skin data from NOAA-CREST-Snow Analysis and Field Experiment (CREST-SAFE) for the winters of 2013 and 2014. LST satellite validation is imperative because high-latitude regions are significantly affected by climate warming and there is a need to aid existing meteorological station networks with the spatially continuous measurements provided by satellites. Results indicate that near-surface air temperature correlates better than snow skin temperature with MODIS LST data. Additional findings show that there is a negative trend demonstrating that the air minus snow skin temperature difference is inversely proportional to cloud cover. To a lesser extent, it will be examined whether the surface properties at the site are representative for the LST properties within the instrument field of view.

  4. The Combustion Synthesis Process of Al-Ti-C System in an Elevated-temperature Al-melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    One of the main disadvantages of combustion synthesis of ceramic/metal composite materials is the relatively high level of porosity present in the products.To synthesize TiC/Al composites with a dense structure,this paper proposes a novel application of an elevated-temperature Al-melt to directly ignite and simultaneously infiltrate Al-Ti-C preform dipped in the melt.The emphasis was placed on the combustion synthesis process and microstructural evalution of the preform in the melt,by a liquid quenching test combined with the measurement of the temperature history of the dipped preform.The results show that the combustion synthesis process of the preform in the elevated-temperature melt involves a series of reactions,and that higher temperature of the melt is favourable for the formation of TiC.The synthesized TiC/Al composites exhibit a dense structure,which is attributed to the infiltration of the melt into the preform.

  5. Improvement of the Sintered Surface and Bulk of the Product Via Differentiating Laser Sintering (Melting) Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saprykina, N. A.; Saprykin, A. A.; Arkhipova, D. A.; Borovikov, I. F.

    2016-08-01

    Selective laser sintering (melting) enables using metal powdered materials to manufacture products of any geometrical complexity, requiring no preliminary costs to prepare processing equipment. However, quality of the sintered surface is often inadequate as against the product manufactured traditionally. Manufacturing a high quality product requires solution of such vital task as prediction of the sintered surface roughness. The authors address to the effect of laser sintering modes on roughness of the surface, sintered of copper powdered material PMS-l (IIMC-1). The dependence of roughness of the surface layer sintered of copper powder material PMS-l upon sintering process conditions is expressed mathematically. The authors suggest differentiating sintering modes to improve the sintered surface and the bulk of the product and dividing them into rough, semi-finishing, and finishing ones.

  6. Behavior Of Austempered Ductile Irons (ADI) Subjected To Laser Surface Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. L.; Fagoaga, I.; Liceaga, J. F.; Sanz Justes, Pedro; Jasnowski, Kazie S.

    1989-03-01

    The near surface microstructure of 3 austempered ductile irons has been modified using laser surface melting (LSM). A white cast iron layer was produced to depths of up to 500 microns. The microstructure of this region varied depending upon the parameters used. A heat affected zone (HAZ) appeared at an abrupt transition between the LSM zone and the substrate. The size of the HAZ, which varied between 20 and 200 microns was predominately affected by the pass velocity in the range of energies used. The hardness profiles showed large variations in the Haz probably due to varing tempering effects from the subsequent passes.

  7. Surface energy balance, melt and sublimation at Neumayer Station, East Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broeke, M.R.; König-Langlo, G.; Picard, G.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; Lenaerts, J.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    A surface energy balance model is forced by 13 years of high-quality hourly observations from the Antarctic coastal station Neumayer. The model accurately reproduces observed surface temperatures. Surface sublimation is significant in summer, when absorbed solar radiation heats the surface. Includin

  8. Crystallization and structure of cast A390.0 alloy with melt overheating temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Piątkowski

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research on the influence of melt overheating temperature on crystallization parameters and primary structure of cast AlSi17Cu5Mg (A390.0 alloy overheated to temperature: 820 °C, 880 °C, 940 °C and 1 000 °C. It was found that the degree of overheating influences the change of microstructure significantly and morphologies of primary silicon of the castings from Al-Si alloys. Research has shown that the overheating of the liquid metal bath is one of the methods of finding more applications of hypereutectic Al-Si system alloys without the addition of modifiers.

  9. Prediction of melting temperatures in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures using thermodynamic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Guimarães, Nuno; Wengel, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA hybridization, i.e. the process of self-assembly of one, two or more complementary nucleic acid strands, has been studied for many years. The appearance of the nearest-neighbor model led to several theoretical and experimental papers on DNA thermody......Abstract The thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA hybridization, i.e. the process of self-assembly of one, two or more complementary nucleic acid strands, has been studied for many years. The appearance of the nearest-neighbor model led to several theoretical and experimental papers on DNA...... thermodynamics that provide reasonably accurate thermodynamic information on nucleic acid duplexes and allow estimation of the melting temperature. Because there are no thermodynamic models specifically developed to predict the hybridization temperature of a probe used in a fluorescence in situ hybridization...

  10. An experimental study on the effect of temperature and melt composition on the partitioning of nickel between olivine and silicate melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzler, R.J.; Grove, T.L.; Recca, S.I. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Experiments in the simple system CaO-MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}Na{sub 2}O-FeO were carried out to investigate the control of temperature and melt composition on the partitioning of nickel between olivine and silicate melt (D{sup oliv/liq}{sub Ni}). Eleven experiments determine the influence of changing forsterite (Of) content on D{sup oliv/liq}{sub Ni} in this simple system. The equation of Hart and Davis (1978) that accounts for the variation of D{sup oliv/liq}{sub Ni} in terms of MgO content of the silicate liquid is tested using experimental data from iron-bearing simple and natural systems and found to be inadequate to explain the observed variation of D{sup oliv/liq}{sub Ni}. Two different equations are formulated to describe the partitioning behavior of Ni between olivine and silicate melt. The first is similar to that of Hart and Davis (1978) and uses an expression for Ni-Mg exchange between olivine and silicate melt. The second uses an expression for the Ni-olivine formation reaction. The Ni-Mg exchange equation for D{sup oliv/liq}{sub Ni} depends on the forsterite content of the olivine and the mole fraction MgO{sup liq}, and predicts the experimentally determined values within {plus minus}13% relative average error. The Ni-olivine formation reaction equation for D{sup oliv/liq}{sub Ni} depends on temperature, mole fraction SiO{sup liq}{sub 2}, and melt compositional terms that arise from a symmetric, binary, Margules formulation of the activity coefficients for NiO{sup liq} and SiO{sup liq}{sub 2}. This equation predicts the experimentally determined values within {plus minus}9% relative average error.

  11. Surface energy budget of landfast sea ice during the transitions from winter to snowmelt and melt pond onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Else, B.G.T.; Papakyriakou, T.N.; Raddatz, R.

    2014-01-01

    Relatively few sea ice energy balance studies have successfully captured the transition season of warming, snowmelt, and melt pond formation. In this paper, we report a surface energy budget for landfast sea ice that captures this important period. The study was conducted in the Canadian Arctic......, but it delivered enough energy to significantly hasten melt onset had it occurred earlier in the season. Changes in the frequency, duration, and timing of synoptic-scale weather events that deliver clouds and/or strong turbulent heat fluxes may be important in explaining observed changes in sea ice melt onset......) combined with the seasonal increase in incoming shortwave radiation then triggered snowmelt onset. Melt progressed with a rapid reduction in albedo and attendant increases in shortwave energy absorption, resulting in melt pond formation 8 days later. The key role of longwave radiation in initiating melt...

  12. Urban aerosol effects on surface insolation and surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, M.; Burian, S. J.; Remer, L. A.; Shepherd, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    Urban aerosol particulates may play a fundamental role in urban microclimates and city-generated mesoscale circulations via its effects on energy balance of the surface. Key questions that need to be addressed include: (1) How do these particles affect the amount of solar energy reaching the surface and resulting surface temperature? (2) Is the effect the same in all cities? and (3) How does it vary from city to city? Using NASA AERONET in-situ observations, a radiative transfer model, and a regional climate mode (MM5), we assess aerosol effects on surface insolation and surf ace temperature for dense urban-polluted regions. Two big cities, one in a developing country (Beijing, P.R. China) and another in developed country (New York City, USA), are selected for inter-comparison. The study reveals that aerosol effects on surface temperature depends largely on aerosols' optical and chemical properties as well as atmosphere and land surface conditions, such as humidity and land cover. Therefore, the actual magnitudes of aerosol effects differ from city to city. Aerosol measurements from AERONET show both average and extreme cases for aerosol impacts on surface insolation. In general, aerosols reduce surface insolation by 30Wm-2. Nevertheless, in extreme cases, such reduction can exceed 100 Wm-2. Consequently, this reduces surface skin temperature 2-10C in an urban environment.

  13. High temperature (salt melt) corrosion tests with ceramic-coated steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schütz, Adelheid [University Bayreuth, Metals and Alloys, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Günthner, Martin; Motz, Günter [University Bayreuth, Ceramic Materials Engineering, L.-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Greißl, Oliver [EnBW Kraftwerke AG, Schelmenwasenstraße 13-15, D-70567 Stuttgart (Germany); Glatzel, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.glatzel@uni-bayreuth.de [University Bayreuth, Metals and Alloys, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    Thermal recycling of refuse in waste-to-energy plants reduces the problems connected to waste disposal, and is an alternative source of electric energy. However, the combustion process in waste incinerators results in a fast degradation of the steam-carrying superheater steel tubes by corrosive attack and abrasive wear. Higher firing temperatures are used to increase their efficiency but lead to higher corrosion rates. It is more economical to apply protective coatings on the superheater steel tubes than to replace the base material. In-situ tests were conducted in a waste-to-energy plant first in order to identify and quantify all involved corrosive elements. Laboratory scale experiments with salt melts were developed accordingly. The unprotected low-alloyed steel displayed substantial local corrosion. Corrosion was predominant along the grain boundaries of α-ferrite. The corrosion rate was further increased by FeCl{sub 3} and a mixture of HCL and FeCl{sub 3}. Coatings based on pre-ceramic polymers with specific filler particles were engineered to protect superheater tubes. Tests proved their suitability to protect low-alloYed steel tubes from corrosive attack under conditions typical for superheaterS in waste incinerators, rendering higher firing temperatures in waste-to-energy plants possible. - Highlights: • Corrosion wall thickness losses of 400 μm/2 weeks occurred in a waste incinerator. • Abrasion is a major problem on superheater tubes in waste incinerators. • Laboratory salt melt tests can simulate metal corrosion in waste incinerators. • Corrosion protection coatings for steel (temperature: max. 530 °C) were developed. • Higher steam temperatures are possible in WIs with the developed coatings.

  14. Modeling of global surface air temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusakova, M. A.; Karlin, L. N.

    2012-04-01

    A model to assess a number of factors, such as total solar irradiance, albedo, greenhouse gases and water vapor, affecting climate change has been developed on the basis of Earth's radiation balance principle. To develop the model solar energy transformation in the atmosphere was investigated. It's a common knowledge, that part of the incoming radiation is reflected into space from the atmosphere, land and water surfaces, and another part is absorbed by the Earth's surface. Some part of outdoing terrestrial radiation is retained in the atmosphere by greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide) and water vapor. Making use of the regression analysis a correlation between concentration of greenhouse gases, water vapor and global surface air temperature was obtained which, it is turn, made it possible to develop the proposed model. The model showed that even smallest fluctuations of total solar irradiance intensify both positive and negative feedback which give rise to considerable changes in global surface air temperature. The model was used both to reconstruct the global surface air temperature for the 1981-2005 period and to predict global surface air temperature until 2030. The reconstructions of global surface air temperature for 1981-2005 showed the models validity. The model makes it possible to assess contribution of the factors listed above in climate change.

  15. Biomechanical and histological evaluation of roughened surface titanium screws fabricated by electron beam melting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Various fabrication methods are used to improve the stability and osseointegration of screws within the host bone. The aim of this study was to investigate whether roughened surface titanium screws fabricated by electron beam melting can provide better stability and osseointegration as compared with smooth titanium screws in sheep cervical vertebrae. METHODS: Roughened surface titanium screws, fabricated by electron beam melting, and conventional smooth surface titanium screws were implanted into sheep for 6 or 12 weeks (groups A and B, respectively. Bone ingrowth and implant stability were assessed with three-dimensional imaging and reconstruction, as well as histological and biomechanical tests. RESULTS: No screws in either group showed signs of loosening. Fibrous tissue formation could be seen around the screws at 6 weeks, which was replaced with bone at 12 weeks. Bone volume/total volume, bone surface area/bone volume, and the trabecular number were significantly higher for a define region of interest surrounding the roughened screws than that surrounding the smooth screws at 12 weeks. Indeed, for roughened screws, trabecular number was significantly higher at 12 weeks than at 6 weeks. On mechanical testing, the maximum pullout strength was significantly higher at 12 weeks than at 6 weeks, as expected; however, no significant differences were found between smooth and roughened screws at either time point. The maximum torque to extract the roughened screws was higher than that required for the smooth screws. CONCLUSIONS: Electron beam melting is a simple and effective method for producing a roughened surface on titanium screws. After 12 weeks, roughened titanium screws demonstrated a high degree of osseointegration and increased torsional resistance to extraction over smooth titanium screws.

  16. Biomechanical and histological evaluation of roughened surface titanium screws fabricated by electron beam melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Cai, Hong; Lv, Jia; Zhang, Ke; Leng, Huijie; Wang, Zhiguo; Liu, Zhongjun

    2014-01-01

    Various fabrication methods are used to improve the stability and osseointegration of screws within the host bone. The aim of this study was to investigate whether roughened surface titanium screws fabricated by electron beam melting can provide better stability and osseointegration as compared with smooth titanium screws in sheep cervical vertebrae. Roughened surface titanium screws, fabricated by electron beam melting, and conventional smooth surface titanium screws were implanted into sheep for 6 or 12 weeks (groups A and B, respectively). Bone ingrowth and implant stability were assessed with three-dimensional imaging and reconstruction, as well as histological and biomechanical tests. No screws in either group showed signs of loosening. Fibrous tissue formation could be seen around the screws at 6 weeks, which was replaced with bone at 12 weeks. Bone volume/total volume, bone surface area/bone volume, and the trabecular number were significantly higher for a define region of interest surrounding the roughened screws than that surrounding the smooth screws at 12 weeks. Indeed, for roughened screws, trabecular number was significantly higher at 12 weeks than at 6 weeks. On mechanical testing, the maximum pullout strength was significantly higher at 12 weeks than at 6 weeks, as expected; however, no significant differences were found between smooth and roughened screws at either time point. The maximum torque to extract the roughened screws was higher than that required for the smooth screws. Electron beam melting is a simple and effective method for producing a roughened surface on titanium screws. After 12 weeks, roughened titanium screws demonstrated a high degree of osseointegration and increased torsional resistance to extraction over smooth titanium screws.

  17. Glacier surface melt characterization and trend analysis (1992-2011) in the Russian High Arctic from combined resolution-enhanced scatterometer and passive microwave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, M.; Ramage, J. M.; Semmens, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Global warming has been pronounced in the remote glacierized archipelagoes (Severnaya Zemlya, Novaya Zemlya and Franz Josef Land) of the Russian High Arctic (RHA) and its effect on the low altitude, high latitude small ice caps needs examination. The timing and spatial variability of snow melt onset, duration and intensity are key factors influencing mass balance and the ice marginal hydrological system as well as important indicators of glacial response to anthropogenic and natural forcings. Characterization and trend analysis of RHA glacier melt behaviors provide insight about assessing the mass loss rate under recent Arctic climate change. However, due to the harsh environment, long term records of glaciological data for RHA are limited, necessitating the application of remotely sensed data to accomplish the research. The high sensitivity to liquid water and the ability to penetrate non-precipitating clouds enables microwave remote sensing to detect glacier surface melt. The appearance of melt water in snow dramatically decreases the returned scatterometer radar signal from active microwave sensors and sharply augments passive microwave emission. Based on this feature, we combined resolution-enhanced ERS-1/2 C-band (1992-2000), QuickSCAT Ku-band (2000-2009), ASCAT C-band (2009-2011) scatterometer data and SSMI 37 GHz (1995-2007) vertically polarized passive microwave products from Brigham Young University and analyzed glacier surface melt trends from 1992 to 2011 with a spatial resolution downscaled to 4.45km. We concatenated scatterometer derived melt behaviors by overlapping years and refined the results based on passive microwave data. Cross-validation shows that melt timing to be consistent between the active and passive sensors. Trend analysis (α < 0.005) reveals that the average glacier surface melt onset date occurs earlier by approximately 0.85 days/year in Severnaya Zemlya which outpaced the mean advancing rate in the pan-Arctic. Surrounded by ocean

  18. Widespread Refreezing of Both Surface and Basal Melt Water Beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, R. E.; Tinto, K. J.; Das, I.; Wolovick, M.; Chu, W.; Creyts, T. T.; Frearson, N.

    2013-12-01

    The isotopically and chemically distinct, bubble-free ice observed along the Greenland Ice Sheet margin both in the Russell Glacier and north of Jacobshavn must have formed when water froze from subglacial networks. Where this refreezing occurs and what impact it has on ice sheet processes remain unclear. We use airborne radar data to demonstrate that freeze-on to the ice sheet base and associated deformation produce large ice units up to 700 m thick throughout northern Greenland. Along the ice sheet margin, in the ablation zone, surface meltwater, delivered via moulins, refreezes to the ice sheet base over rugged topography. In the interior, water melted from the ice sheet base is refrozen and surrounded by folded ice. A significant fraction of the ice sheet is modified by basal freeze-on and associated deformation. For the Eqip and Petermann catchments, representing the ice sheet margin and interior respectively, extensive airborne radar datasets show that 10%-13% of the base of the ice sheet and up to a third of the catchment width is modified by basal freeze-on. The interior units develop over relatively subdued topography with modest water flux from basal melt where conductive cooling likely dominates. Steps in the bed topography associated with subglacial valley networks may foster glaciohydraulic supercooling. The ablation zone units develop where both surface melt and crevassing are widespread and large volumes of surface meltwater will reach the base of the ice sheet. The relatively steep topography at the upslope edge of the ablation zone units combined with the larger water flux suggests that supercooling plays a greater role in their formation. The ice qualities of the ablation zone units should reflect the relatively fresh surface melt whereas the chemistry of the interior units should reflect solute-rich basal melt. Changes in basal conditions such as the presence of till patches may contribute to the formation of the large basal units near the

  19. Self-heating probe instrument and method for measuring high temperature melting volume change rate of material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junwei; Wang, Zhiping; Lu, Yang; Cheng, Bo

    2013-03-01

    The castings defects are affected by the melting volume change rate of material. The change rate has an important effect on running safety of the high temperature thermal storage chamber, too. But the characteristics of existing measuring installations are complex structure, troublesome operation and low precision. In order to measure the melting volume change rate of material accurately and conveniently, a self-designed measuring instrument, self-heating probe instrument, and measuring method are described. Temperature in heating cavity is controlled by PID temperature controller; melting volume change rate υ and molten density are calculated based on the melt volume which is measured by the instrument. Positive and negative υ represent expansion and shrinkage of the sample volume after melting, respectively. Taking eutectic LiF+CaF2 for example, its melting volume change rate and melting density at 1 123 K are -20.6% and 2 651 kg·m-3 measured by this instrument, which is only 0.71% smaller than literature value. Density and melting volume change rate of industry pure aluminum at 973 K and analysis pure NaCl at 1 123 K are detected by the instrument too. The measure results are agreed with report values. Measuring error sources are analyzed and several improving measures are proposed. In theory, the measuring errors of the change rate and molten density which are measured by the self-designed instrument is nearly 1/20-1/50 of that measured by the refitted mandril thermal expansion instrument. The self-designed instrument and method have the advantages of simple structure, being easy to operate, extensive applicability for material, relatively high accuracy, and most importantly, temperature and sample vapor pressure have little effect on the measurement accuracy. The presented instrument and method solve the problems of complicated structure and procedures, and large measuring errors for the samples with high vapor pressure by existing installations.

  20. Ice-Atmosphere Interactions on the Devon Ice Cap, Canada: The Effects of Climate Warming on Surface Energy Balance, Melting, and Firn Stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascon, Gabrielle

    In order to better constrain the magnitude of projected sea-level rise from Canadian Arctic glaciers during the 21st century warming, it is critical to understand the environmental mechanisms that enhance surface warming and melt, and how the projected increase in surface melt will translate into increased runoff. Between 2004 and 2010, a 4 °C increase in mean air summer temperature, and a 6.1 day yr-1 increase in melt season duration were observed on the Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut. At the same time, a combination of strengthening of the 500 hPa ridge over the Arctic in June-July, and more frequent south-westerly low-pressure systems in August after 2005 created atmospheric conditions that contributed to an increase in the surface energy balance of the ice cap. At 1400m elevation, these changes led to a doubling of the available melt energy and surface melt between 2007 and 2010. Currently, refreezing of meltwater in firn buffers the relationship between increased surface melt and runoff. Between 2007 and 2012, increased meltwater percolation and infiltration ice formation associated with high surface melt rates modified the stratigraphy of firn in the ice cap's accumulation area very substantially. Growth of a 0.5-4.5 m thick ice layer that filled much of the pore volume of the upper part of the firn reduced vertical percolation of meltwater into deeper parts of the firn. This progressively limited the water storage potential of the firn reservoir, and likely caused a significant increase in surface runoff. An evaluation of the snowpack model Crocus against ground observations for the period 2004-2012 showed that, although the model simulated observed density/depth profiles relatively well at all sites, its representation of heterogeneous percolation as a homogeneous process created conditions that favoured excessive near-surface freezing. At the same time, Crocus's parameterization of the permeability of ice layers forced meltwater to percolate through them

  1. Rapid Melt and Resolidification of Surface Layers Using Intense, Pulsed Ion Beams Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renk, Timothy J.

    1998-10-02

    The emerging technology of pulsed intense ion beams has been shown to lead to improvements in surface characteristics such as hardness and wear resistance, as well as mechanical smoothing. We report hereon the use of this technology to systematically study improvements to three types of metal alloys - aluminum, iron, and titanium. Ion beam tieatment produces a rapid melt and resolidification (RMR) of the surface layer. In the case of a predeposited thin-fihn layer, the beam mixes this layer into the substrate, Ieading to improvements that can exceed those produced by treatment of the alloy alone, In either case, RMR results in both crystal refinement and metastable state formation in the treated surface layer not accessible by conventional alloy production. Although more characterization is needed, we have begun the process of relating these microstructural changes to the surface improvements we discuss in this report.

  2. Micro- and nano-porous surface patterns prepared by surface-confined directional melt crystallization of solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byoung Soo; Kim, Hyun Jin; An, Suyeong; Chi, Sangwon; Kim, Junseok; Lee, Jonghwi

    2017-07-01

    Recently, numerous attempts have been made to engineer micro- and nano-porous surface patterns or to develop convenient preparation methods for the practical applications of self-cleaning surfaces, water-repellent surfaces, novel textures, etc. Herein, we introduce a simple, cheap, and repeatable crystallization-based method to produce porous surface structures, on any surface of already fabricated polymeric materials. Contact of the solvent phase with cooled polymer surfaces enabled the limited dissolution of the surfaces and the subsequent extremely fast melt crystallization of the solvent. After removing the crystals, various micro- and nano-porous patterns were obtained, whose pore sizes ranged over three orders of magnitude. Pore depth was linearly dependent on the dissolution time. Crystal growth was mainly directed normal to the surfaces, but it was also controlled in-plane, resulting in cylindrical or lamellar structures. Superhydrophobic surfaces were successfully prepared on both polystyrene and polycarbonate. This process offers a novel surface engineering tool for a variety of polymer surfaces, whose topology can be conveniently controlled over a wide range by crystal engineering.

  3. Slip of polymer melts over micro/nano-patterned metallic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Marzieh; Konaganti, Vinod Kumar; Moradi, Sona; Doufas, Antonios K; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G

    2016-12-06

    The slip behavior of high-density polyethylenes (HDPEs) is studied over surfaces of different topology and surface energy. Laser ablation has been used to micro/nano-pattern the surface of dies in order to examine the effect of surface roughness on slip. In addition, fluoroalkyl silane-based coatings on smooth and patterned substrates were used to understand the effect of surface energy on slip. Surface roughness and surface energy effects were incorporated into the double reptation slip model (Ebrahimi et al., J. Rheol., 2015, 59, 885-901) in order to predict the slip velocity of studied polymers on different substrates. It was found that for dies with rough surfaces, polymer melt penetrates into the cavities of the substrate (depending on the depth and the distance between the asperities), thus decreasing wall slip. On the other hand, silanization of the surface increases the slip velocity of polymers in the case of smooth die, although it has a negligible effect on rough dies. Interestingly, the slip velocity of the studied polymers on various substrates of different degrees of roughness and surface energy, were brought into a mastercurve by modifying the double reptation slip velocity model.

  4. Experimental evidence for thermal generation of interstitials in a metallic crystal near the melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonova, E. V.; Mitrofanov, Yu P.; Konchakov, R. A.; Vinogradov, A. Yu; Kobelev, N. P.; Khonik, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    The only intrinsic point defects of simple crystalline metals known from solid state physics are vacancies and interstitials. It is widely believed that while vacancies play a major role in crystal properties and their concentration reaches relatively big values near the melting temperature T m, interstitials essentially do not occur in thermodynamic equilibrium and their influence on properties is minor. Here, taking aluminum single crystals as an example, we present compelling experimental evidence for rapid thermoactivated growth of interstitial concentration upon approaching T m. Using high precision measurements of the shear modulus we found a diaelastic effect of up to -1.5% near T m. It is argued that this effect is mostly due to the generation of dumbbell (split) interstitials. The interstitial concentration c i rapidly increases upon approaching T m and becomes only 2-3 times smaller than that of vacancies just below T m. The reason for this c i -increase is conditioned by a decrease of the Gibbs free energy with temperature, which in turn originates from the high formation entropy of dumbbell interstitials and a decrease of their formation enthalpy at high c i . Special molecular dynamic simulation confirmed all basic aspects of the proposed interpretation. The results obtained (i) demonstrate the significance of interstitial concentration near T m that could lead to the revaluation of vacancy concentration at high temperatures, (ii) suggest that dumbbell interstitials play a major role in the melting mechanism of monatomic metallic crystals and (iii) support a new avenue for in-depth understanding of glassy metals.

  5. High temperature phase transition of mixed (PuO2 + ThO2) investigated by laser melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Böhler, R.; Cakir, P.; Benes, O.; Hein, H.; Konings, R.J.M.; Manara, D.

    2014-01-01

    A laser heating approach combined with fast pyrometry in a thermal arrest method was used to provide new data for the melting/solidification phase transition in mixed (PuO2 + ThO2) at high temperature. At low concentration of ThO2 in PuO2 a minimum in the solidification temperature in the pseudo bin

  6. Extraction of temperature dependent electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity from silicon microwires self-heated to melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Gokhan; Adnane, Lhacene; Gokirmak, Ali; Silva, Helena

    2012-09-01

    Temperature-dependent electrical resistivity, ρ(T), and thermal conductivity, k(T), of nanocrystalline silicon microwires self-heated to melt are extracted by matching simulated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics to experimental I-V characteristics. Electrical resistivity is extracted from highly doped p-type wires on silicon dioxide in which the heat losses are predominantly to the substrate and the self-heating depends mainly on ρ(T) of the wires. The extracted ρ(T) decreases from 11.8 mΩ cm at room-temperature to 5.2 mΩ cm at 1690 K, in reasonable agreement with the values measured up to ˜650 K. Electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity are extracted from suspended highly doped n-type silicon wires in which the heat losses are predominantly through the wires. In this case, measured ρ(T) (decreasing from 20.5 mΩ cm at room temperature to 12 mΩ cm at 620 K) is used to extract ρ(T) at higher temperatures (decreasing to 1 mΩ cm at 1690 K) and k(T) (decreasing from 30 W m-1 K-1 at room temperature to 20 W m-1 K-1 at 1690 K). The method is tested by using the extracted parameters to model wires with different dimensions. The experimental and simulated I-V curves for these wires show good agreement up to high voltage and temperature levels. This technique allows extraction of the electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity up to very high temperatures from self-heated microstructures.

  7. Correlation between the band gap expansion and melting temperature depression of nanostructured semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianwei, E-mail: jwl189@163.com; Zhao, Xinsheng [Laboratory for Quantum Design of Functional Material, School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Liu, Xinjuan [Center for Coordination Bond and Electronic Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Zheng, Xuejun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Yang, Xuexian [Department of Physics, Jishou University, Jishou 416000, Hunan (China); Zhu, Zhe [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2015-09-28

    The band gap and melting temperature of a semiconductor are tunable with the size and shape of the specimen at the nanometer scale, and related mechanisms remain as yet unclear. In order to understand the common origin of the size and shape effect on these two seemingly irrelevant properties, we clarify, correlate, formulate, and quantify these two properties of GaAs, GaN, InP, and InN nanocrystals from the perspectives of bond order-length-strength correlation using the core-shell configuration. The consistency in the theoretical predictions, experimental observations, and numerical calculations verify that the broken-bond-induced local bond contraction and strength gain dictates the band gap expansion, while the atomic cohesive energy loss due to bond number reduction depresses the melting point. The fraction of the under-coordinated atoms in the skin shell quantitatively determines the shape and size dependency. The atomic under-coordination in the skin down to a depth of two atomic layers inducing a change in the local chemical bond is the common physical origin.

  8. Synergistically improved thermal conductivity of polyamide-6 with low melting temperature metal and graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Jia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Low melting temperature metal (LMTM-tin (Sn was introduced into polyamide-6 (PA6 and PA6/graphite composites respectively to improve the thermal conductivity of PA6 by melt processing (extruding and injection molding. After introducing Sn, the thermal conductivity of PA6/Sn was nearly constant because of the serious agglomeration of Sn. However, when 20 wt% (5.4 vol% of Sn was added into PA6 containing 50 wt% (33.3 vol% of graphite, the thermal conductivity of the composite was dramatically increased to 5.364 versus 1.852 W·(m·K–1 for the PA6/graphite composite, which suggests that the incorporation of graphite and Sn have a significant synergistic effect on the thermal conductivity improvement of PA6. What is more, the electrical conductivity of the composite increased nearly 8 orders of magnitudes after introducing both graphite and Sn. Characterization of microstructure and energy dispersive spectrum analysis (EDS indicates that the dispersion of Sn in PA6/graphite/Sn was much more uniform than that of PA6/Sn composite. According to Differential Scanning Calorimetry measurement and EDS, the uniform dispersion of Sn in PA6/graphite/Sn and the high thermal conductivity of PA6/graphite/Sn are speculated to be related with the electron transfer between graphite and Sn, which makes Sn distribute evenly around the graphite layers.

  9. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 2 Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The global land surface temperature databank contains monthly timescale mean, max, and min temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was developed...

  10. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 2 Daily

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The global land surface temperature databank contains monthly timescale mean, max, and min temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was developed...

  11. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 3 Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Land Surface Temperature Databank contains monthly timescale mean, maximum, and minimum temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was...

  12. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 1 Daily

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The global land surface temperature databank contains monthly timescale mean, max, and min temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was developed...

  13. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 1 Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The global land surface temperature databank contains monthly timescale mean, max, and min temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was developed...

  14. Upper mantle temperatures from teleseismic tomography of French Massif Central including effects of composition, mineral reactions, anharmonicity, anelasticity and partial melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Stephan V.; Zeyen, Hermann; Stoll, Gerald; Werling, Friederike; Altherr, Rainer; Fuchs, Karl

    1996-03-01

    A new technique for interpretation of 3-D seismic tomographic models in terms of temperature, degree of partial melt and rock composition is presented and tested. We consider both anharmonic and anelastic temperature effects on seismic velocities as well as the effects of mineral reactions, composition and partial melt. It is shown that composition effect is small (less than 1% of velocity) if there are no strongly depleted, Mg-rich harzburgites. We calculate anharmonic temperature derivatives of seismic velocities from compositions of mantle xenoliths. The parameters of a non-linear frequency and temperature-dependent model of attenuation have been taken from published laboratory experiments and calibrated using global Q observations in the upper mantle. For every block of the tomographic model we calculate the absolute temperature and melt fraction required to fit the observed Vp perturbation, the average temperature of the tomographic layer being constrained by the observed surface heat flow. With these temperatures we calculate attenuation, density, Vp and Vs from petrophysical modelling, using the average for 80 mantle xenoliths samples from the French Massif Central. The technique is applied to a recently published 3-D teleseismic P wave tomographic model of the upper mantle beneath the French Massif Central. The observed velocity perturbations are probably caused there by variations in temperature. Temperature does not reach the dry solidus temperature (except for a few tomographic blocks), although it comes close to it at the depth of 60-100 km below volcanic areas. At high subsolidus temperatures the contribution of anelasticity to velocity perturbations is at least as important as the combined effect of anharmonicity and mineral reactions. Our model is consistent with the Pn velocities from refraction seismic studies, QS estimations from surface waves, observed gravity, geoid, topography and surface heat flow, as well as with the composition and

  15. Microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of laser surface melted Ti6Al4V alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Soderlind, Julie; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2014-04-01

    Laser surface melting (LSM) of Ti6Al4V alloy was carried out with an aim to improve properties such as microstructure and wear for implant applications. The alloy substrate was melted at 250W and 400W at a scan velocity of 5mm/s, with input energy of 42J/mm(2) and 68J/mm(2), respectively. The results showed that equiaxed α+β microstructure of the substrate changes to mixture of acicular α in β matrix after LSM due to high cooling rates in the range of 2.25×10(-3)K/s and 1.41×10(-3)K/s during LSM. Increasing the energy input increased the thickness of remelted region from 779 to 802µm and 1173 to 1199µm. Similarly, as a result of slow cooling rates under present experimental conditions, the grain size of the alloy increased from 4.8μm to 154-199μm. However, the hardness of the Ti6Al4V alloy increased due to LSM melting and resulted in lowest in vitro wear rate of 3.38×10(-4)mm(3)/Nm compared to untreated substrate with a wear rate of 6.82×10(-4)mm(3)/Nm.

  16. Calibration of surface temperature on rocky exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap Jagadeesh, Madhu

    2016-07-01

    Study of exoplanets and the search for life elsewhere has been a very fascinating area in recent years. Presently, lots of efforts have been channelled in this direction in the form of space exploration and the ultimate search for the habitable planet. One of the parametric methods to analyse the data available from the missions such as Kepler, CoRoT, etc, is the Earth Similarity Index (ESI), defined as a number between zero (no similarity) and one (identical to Earth), introduced to assess the Earth likeness of exoplanets. A multi-parameter ESI scale depends on the radius, density, escape velocity and surface temperature of exoplanets. Our objective is to establish how exactly the individual parameters, entering the interior ESI and surface ESI, are contributing to the global ESI, using the graphical analysis. Presently, the surface temperature estimates are following a correction factor of 30 K, based on the Earth's green-house effect. The main objective of this work in calculations of the global ESI using the HabCat data is to introduce a new method to better estimate the surface temperature of exoplanets, from theoretical formula with fixed albedo factor and emissivity (Earth values). From the graphical analysis of the known data for the Solar System objects, we established the calibration relation between surface and equilibrium temperatures for the Solar System objects. Using extrapolation we found that the power function is the closest description of the trend to attain surface temperature. From this we conclude that the correction term becomes very effective way to calculate the accurate value of the surface temperature, for further analysis with our graphical methodology.

  17. Integrative inversion of land surface component temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wenjie; XU Xiru

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the row winter wheat was selected as the example to study the component temperature inversion method of land surface target in detail. The result showed that the structural pattern of row crop can affect the inversion precision of component temperature evidently. Choosing appropriate structural pattern of row crop can improve the inversion precision significantly. The iterative method combining inverse matrix was a stable method that was fit for inversing component temperature of land surface target. The result of simulation and field experiment showed that the integrative method could remarkably improve the inversion accuracy of the lighted soil surface temperature and the top layer canopy temperature, and enhance inversion stability of components temperature. Just two parameters were sufficient for accurate atmospheric correction of multi-angle and multi-spectral thermal infrared data: atmospheric transmittance and the atmospheric upwelling radiance. If the atmospheric parameters and component temperature can be inversed synchronously, the really and truly accurate atmospheric correction can be achieved. The validation using ATSRII data showed that the method was useful.

  18. Melt onset over Arctic sea ice controlled by atmospheric moisture transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortin, Jonas; Svensson, Gunilla; Graversen, Rune G.; Kapsch, Marie-Luise; Stroeve, Julienne C.; Boisvert, Linette N.

    2016-06-01

    The timing of melt onset affects the surface energy uptake throughout the melt season. Yet the processes triggering melt and causing its large interannual variability are not well understood. Here we show that melt onset over Arctic sea ice is initiated by positive anomalies of water vapor, clouds, and air temperatures that increase the downwelling longwave radiation (LWD) to the surface. The earlier melt onset occurs; the stronger are these anomalies. Downwelling shortwave radiation (SWD) is smaller than usual at melt onset, indicating that melt is not triggered by SWD. When melt occurs early, an anomalously opaque atmosphere with positive LWD anomalies preconditions the surface for weeks preceding melt. In contrast, when melt begins late, clearer than usual conditions are evident prior to melt. Hence, atmospheric processes are imperative for melt onset. It is also found that spring LWD increased during recent decades, consistent with trends toward an earlier melt onset.

  19. A characterization of Greenland Ice Sheet surface melt and runoff in contemporary reanalyses and a regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eCullather

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available For the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS, large-scale melt area has increased in recent years and is detectable via remote sensing, but its relation to runoff is not known. Historical, modeled melt area and runoff from Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA-Replay, the Interim Re-Analysis of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ERA-I, the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR, the Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR, and the Arctic System Reanalysis (ASR are examined. These sources compare favorably with satellite-derived estimates of surface melt area for the period 2000-2012. Spatially, the models markedly disagree on the number of melt days in the interior of the southern part of the ice sheet, and on the extent of persistent melt areas in the northeastern GrIS. Temporally, the models agree on the mean seasonality of daily surface melt and on the timing of large-scale melt events in 2012. In contrast, the models disagree on the amount, seasonality, spatial distribution, and temporal variability of runoff. As compared to global reanalyses, time series from MAR indicate a lower correlation between runoff and melt area (r2 = 0.805. Runoff in MAR is much larger in the second half of the melt season for all drainage basins, while the ASR indicates larger runoff in the first half of the year. This difference in seasonality for the MAR and to an extent for the ASR provide a hysteresis in the relation between runoff and melt area, which is not found in the other models. The comparison points to a need for reliable observations of surface runoff.

  20. Direct Selective Laser Sintering/Melting of High Density Alumina Powder Layers at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, J.; Meyers, S.; Kruth, J. P.; Vleugels, J.

    Direct selective laser sintering (SLS) or selective laser melting (SLM) are additive manufacturing techniques that can be used to produce three-dimensional ceramic parts directly, without the need for a sacrificial binder. In this paper, a low laser energy density is applied to SLS/SLM high density powder layers of sub-micrometer alumina at elevated temperatures (up to 800̊C). In order to achieve this, a furnace was designed and built into a commercial SLS machine. This furnace was able to produce a homogeneously heated cylindrical zone with a height of 60 mm and a diameter of 32 mm. After optimizing the layer deposition and laser scanning parameters, two ceramic parts with a density up to 85% and grain sizes as low as 5 μm were successfully produced.

  1. Recent progress in the melt-process technique of high-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Ikuta, H; Mizutani, U

    1999-01-01

    Recently, the performance of high-temperature super conductors prepared by the melt-process technique has been greatly improved. This progress was accomplished by the addition of Ag into the starting materials of the Sm-Ba-CuO $9 system, which prevents the formation of severe macro-sized cracks in the finished samples. The magnetic flux density trapped by this material has now reached 9 T at 25 K, which is comparable to the magnetic flux density produced by $9 ordinary superconducting magnets. The amount of magnetic flux density that can be trapped by the sample is limited by the mechanical strength rather than superconducting properties of the material. The increase in the mechanical $9 strength of the material is important both for further improvement of the material properties and for ensuring reliability of the material in practical applications. (20 refs).

  2. A yttrium-containing high-temperature titanium alloy additively manufactured by selective electron beam melting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    逯圣路; 汤慧萍; 马前; 洪权; 曾立英

    2015-01-01

    A yttrium-containing high-temperature titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-2.7Sn-4Zr-0.4Mo-0.45Si-0.1Y, mass fraction, %) has been additively manufactured using selective electron beam melting (SEBM). The resulting microstructure and textures were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and compared with the conventionally manufactured form. A notable distinct difference of microstructures is that additive manufacturing by SEBM enables homogeneous precipitation of fine Y2O3 dispersoids in the size range of 50−250 nm throughout the as-fabricated alloy, despite the presence of just trace levels of oxygen (7×10−4, mass fraction) and yttrium (10−3, mass fraction) in the alloy. In contrast, the conventionally manufactured alloy shows inhomogeneously distributed coarse Y2O3 precipitates, including cracked or debonded Y2O3 particles.

  3. Radiative flow of MHD Jeffrey fluid past a stretching sheet with surface slip and melting heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalidas Das

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates numerically the influence of melting heat transfer and thermal radiation on MHD stagnation point flow of an electrically conducting non-Newtonian fluid (Jeffrey fluid over a stretching sheet with partial surface slip. The governing equations are reduced to non-linear ordinary differential equations by using a similarity transformation and then solved numerically by using Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg method. The effects of pertinent parameters on the flow and heat transfer fields are presented through tables and graphs, and are discussed from the physical point of view. Our analysis revealed that the fluid temperature is higher in case of Jeffrey fluid than that in the case of Newtonian fluid. It is also observed that the wall stress increases with increasing the values of slip parameter but the effect is opposite for the rate of heat transfer at the wall.

  4. Thermal performance of a heat storage module using PCM's with different melting temperature; Experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, M.M. (Chemical Engineering Dept., College of Engineering, Univ. of Basrah (IQ)); Kim, Y.; Kansawa, A. (Chemical Engineering Dept., Tokyo Inst. of Technology, O-Okayama, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo 152 (JP))

    1990-05-01

    A latent heat storage module was constructed, consisting of 45 cylindrical capsules fixed vertically in 15 rows. The capsules, made of 0.335-m long copper tubes having external diameters of 31.8 mm, were fixed in an insulated rectangular duct. Three commercial waxes having melting temperatures of 44{degrees}C, 53{degrees}C, and 64{degrees}C were selected. Each of the three sets of 15 tubes was filled with different wax. For comparison purposes, experiments were also done with a single commercial wax, having a melting temperature of 53{degrees}C, in all the tubes. During heat charge, hot air flowed across the capsules such that the melting temperature of the waxes decreased in the flow direction. Air flow direction was reversed during heat discharge. This paper reports that experimental measurements showed some improvement in the heat transfer rates during both heat charge and discharge when three types of PCM's were used.

  5. Effect of laser surface melting on microstructure and corrosion characteristics of AM60B magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cancan [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Liang, Jun, E-mail: jliang@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhou, Jiansong, E-mail: jszhou@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Lingqian [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Qingbiao [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Laser surface melting was used on AM60B Mg alloy. • The microstructure, composition and corrosion behavior of the as-received and LSM treated specimens were compared. • The laser treated alloy exhibited better corrosion resistance than the as-received one in the long term. • A model of two different corrosion mechanisms was established. - Abstract: Surface modification of laser surface melting (LSM) was applied to the AM60B magnesium alloy using a 10 kW continuous-wave CO{sub 2} laser. The microstructure, composition and corrosion resistance of AM60B magnesium alloy after LSM treatment were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and corrosion tests, respectively. Results showed that the LSM treatment produced a continuous and homogeneous modified layer with refined grains, enriched Al element and redistributed intermetallic compounds on AM60B alloy. The corrosion resistance of the AM60B alloy was enhanced by the LSM treatment. The enhancement of the corrosion resistance was mainly attributed to the reduced corrosion susceptibility of Al enriched α-Mg matrix and the barrier effect of uniformly distributed β-phase of the LSM modified layer.

  6. RF Breakdown in Accelerator Structures: From Plasma Spots to Surface Melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, P

    2005-03-31

    Plasma spots are known to form at field emission sites in regions of high dc or rf electric field. Several mechanisms for the formation of plasma spots in an rf field have been proposed, and one such mechanism which fits experimental data is presented in this paper. However, a plasma spot by itself does not produce breakdown. A single plasma spot, with a lifetime on the order of 30 ns, extracts only a negligible amount of energy from the rf field. The evidence for its existence is a small crater, on the order of 10 {micro}m in diameter, left behind on the surface. In this paper we present a model in which plasma spots act as a trigger to produce surface melting on a macroscopic scale ({approx} 0.1 mm2). Once surface melting occurs, a plasma that is capable of emitting several kiloamperes of electrons can form over the molten region. A key observation that must be explained by any theory of breakdown is that the probability of breakdown is independent of time within the rf pulse breakdown is just as likely to occur at the beginning of the pulse as toward the end. In the model presented here, the conditions for breakdown develop over many pulses until a critical threshold for breakdown is reached.

  7. High pressure and temperature structure of liquid and solid Cd: implications for the melting curve of Cd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, S. V.; Geballe, Z. M.; Godwal, B. K.; Kalkan, B.; Williams, Q.; Jeanloz, R.

    2014-12-01

    The structure of cadmium was characterized in both the solid and liquid forms at pressures to 10 GPa using in situ x-ray diffraction measurements in a resistively heated diamond anvil cell. The distorted hexagonal structure of solid cadmium persists at high pressures and temperatures, with anomalously large c/a ratio of Cd becoming larger as the melting curve is approached. The measured structure factor S(Q) for the melt reveals that the cadmium atoms are spaced about 0.6 Angstroms apart. The melt structure remains notably constant with increasing pressure, with the first peak in the structure factor remaining mildly asymmetric, in accord with the persistence of an anisotropic bonding environment within the liquid. Evolution of powder diffraction patterns up to the temperature of melting revealed the stability of the ambient-pressure hcp structure up to a pressure of 10 GPa. The melting curve has a positive Clausius-Clapeyron slope, and its slope is in good agreement with data from other techniques. We find deviations in the melting curve from Lindemann law type behavior for pressures above 1 GPa.

  8. Study of Internal Channel Surface Roughnesses Manufactured by Selective Laser Melting in Aluminum and Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkanen, Jukka; Calignano, Flaviana; Trevisan, Francesco; Lorusso, Massimo; Ambrosio, Elisa Paola; Manfredi, Diego; Fino, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Interest in additive manufacturing (AM) has gained considerable impetus over the past decade. One of the driving factors for AM success is the ability to create unique designs with intrinsic characteristics as, e.g., internal channels used for hydraulic components, cooling channels, and heat exchangers. However, a couple of the main problems in internal channels manufactured by AM technologies are the high surface roughness obtained and the distortion of the channel shape. There is still much to understand in these design aspects. In this study, a cylindrical geometry for internal channels to be built with different angles with respect to the building plane in AlSi10Mg and Ti6Al4V alloys by selective laser melting was considered. The internal surfaces of the channels produced in both materials were analyzed by means of a surface roughness tester and by optical and electron microscopy to evaluate the effects of the material and design choices.

  9. Surface valence transformation during thermal activation and hydrogenation thermodynamics of Mg-Ni-Y melt-spun ribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiebang; Song, Wenjie; Kou, Hongchao; Li, Jinshan

    2016-05-01

    In this work, phase compositions and chemical valence states on the surface and subsurface of Mg67Ni33-xYx (x = 0, 1, 3, 6) ribbons during thermal activation have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that the surface contaminants of melt-spun ribbons are mainly MgO, NiO, Y2O3 and organics. The oxides/hydroxides of Mg67Ni33-xYx (x = 0, 1, 3, 6) melt-spun ribbons are removed from the surface during thermal activation. Surface chemical valence firstly transforms from oxidized state to the metallic one during thermal activation, which accounts for hydrogenation of Mg67Ni33-xYx melt-spun ribbons. Hydrogen absorption capacities of Mg67Ni33-xYx (x = 0, 1, 3, 6) melt-spun ribbons are enhanced with the increase of cycle numbers during thermal activation. Hydrogenation thermodynamics of activated Mg67Ni33-xYx (x = 0, 1, 3, 6) melt-spun ribbons have been also compared and correlated with the surface valence transformation. The obtained enthalpy of hydride formation is -55.5, -50.5, -46.9 and -48.6 kJ/mol for Mg67Ni33-xYx melt-spun ribbons with x = 0, 1, 3 and 6, respectively.

  10. Predicting critical temperatures of ionic and non-ionic fluids from thermophysical data obtained near the melting point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Volker C

    2015-10-14

    In the correlation and prediction of thermophysical data of fluids based on a corresponding-states approach, the critical temperature Tc plays a central role. For some fluids, in particular ionic ones, however, the critical region is difficult or even impossible to access experimentally. For molten salts, Tc is on the order of 3000 K, which makes accurate measurements a challenging task. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) decompose thermally between 400 K and 600 K due to their organic constituents; this range of temperatures is hundreds of degrees below recent estimates of their Tc. In both cases, reliable methods to deduce Tc based on extrapolations of experimental data recorded at much lower temperatures near the triple or melting points are needed and useful because the critical point influences the fluid's behavior in the entire liquid region. Here, we propose to employ the scaling approach leading to universal fluid behavior [Román et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 124512 (2005)] to derive a very simple expression that allows one to estimate Tc from the density of the liquid, the surface tension, or the enthalpy of vaporization measured in a very narrow range of low temperatures. We demonstrate the validity of the approach for simple and polar neutral fluids, for which Tc is known, and then use the methodology to obtain estimates of Tc for ionic fluids. When comparing these estimates to those reported in the literature, good agreement is found for RTILs, whereas the ones for the molten salts NaCl and KCl are lower than previous estimates by 10%. The coexistence curve for ionic fluids is found to be more adequately described by an effective exponent of βeff = 0.5 than by βeff = 0.33.

  11. Relaxation dynamics of femtosecond-laser-induced temperature modulation on the surfaces of metals and semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Yoann, E-mail: levy@fzu.cz [HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics CAS, Za Radnicí 828, 25241 Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic); Derrien, Thibault J.-Y. [HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics CAS, Za Radnicí 828, 25241 Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic); Bulgakova, Nadezhda M. [HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics CAS, Za Radnicí 828, 25241 Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic); S.S. Kutateladze Institute of Thermophysics SB RAS, 1 Lavrentyev ave., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Gurevich, Evgeny L. [Chair of Applied Laser Technologies, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstraße 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Mocek, Tomáš [HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics CAS, Za Radnicí 828, 25241 Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • The surface temperature dynamics in Ti and Si is studied upon fs laser irradiation. • To model conditions of LIPSS formation, the laser energy coupling is modulated. • Temperature modulation survives more than 10 ps in Ti and more than 50 ps in Si. • Under certain conditions, periodic nano-melting develops along the surface. - Abstract: Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) is a complicated phenomenon which involves periodic spatial modulation of laser energy absorption on the irradiated surface, transient changes in optical response, surface layer melting and/or ablation. The listed processes strongly depend on laser fluence and pulse duration as well as on material properties. This paper is aimed at studying the spatiotemporal evolution of a periodic modulation of the deposited laser energy, once formed upon irradiation of metal (Ti) and semiconductor (Si) surfaces. Assuming that the incoming laser pulse interferes with a surface electromagnetic wave, the resulting sinusoidal modulation of the absorbed laser energy is introduced into a two-dimensional two-temperature model developed for titanium and silicon. Simulations reveal that the lattice temperature modulation on the surfaces of both materials following from the modulated absorption remains significant for longer than 50 ps after the laser pulse. In the cases considered here, the partially molten phase exists 10 ps in Ti and more than 50 ps in Si, suggesting that molten matter can be subjected to temperature-driven relocation toward LIPSS formation, due to the modulated temperature profile on the material surfaces. Molten phase at nanometric distances (nano-melting) is also revealed.

  12. Temperature measurements of partially-melted tin as a function of shock pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifter, Achim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Furlanetto, Michael R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holtkamp, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Obst, Andrew W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Payton, J R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stone, J B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tabaka, L J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grover, M [NST; Macrum, G [NST; Stevens, G D [NST; Swift, D C [LLNL; Turley, W D [NST; Veeser, L R [NST

    2009-01-01

    Equilibrium equation of state theory predicts that the free surface release temperature of shock loaded tin will show a plateau of 505 K in the pressure range from 19.5 to 33.0 GPa, corresponding to the solid-liquid mixed-phase region. In this paper we report free surface temperature measurements on shock-loaded tin from 15 to 31 GPa using multi-wavelength optical pyrometry. The shock waves were generated by direct contact of detonating high explosive with the sample. The pressure in the sample was determined by free surface velocity measurements using Photon Doppler Velocimetry. The emitted thermal radiance was measured at four wavelength bands in the near IR region from 1.5 to 5.0 {micro}m. The samples in most of the experiments had diamond-turned surface finishes, with a few samples being polished or ball rolled. At pressures higher than 25 GPa the measured free surface temperatures were higher than the predicted 505 K and increased with increasing pressure. This deviation could be explained by hot spots and/or variations in surface emissivity and requires a further investigation.

  13. Temperature limit values for gripping cold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malchaire, J.; Geng, Q.; Den Hartog, E.; Havenith, G.; Holmer, I.; Piette, A.; Powell, S.L.; Rintamäki, H.; Rissanen, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. At the request of the European Commission and in the framework of the European Machinery Directive, research was conducted jointly in five different laboratories to develop specifications for surface temperature limit values for the gripping and handling of cold items. Methods. Four

  14. Temperature limit values for gripping cold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malchaire, J.; Geng, Q.; Den Hartog, E.; Havenith, G.; Holmer, I.; Piette, A.; Powell, S.L.; Rintamäki, H.; Rissanen, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. At the request of the European Commission and in the framework of the European Machinery Directive, research was conducted jointly in five different laboratories to develop specifications for surface temperature limit values for the gripping and handling of cold items. Methods. Four hund

  15. Surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, L.

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation we study the surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis. For heterogeneous reactions, such as gas-solid catalytic reactions, the reactions take place at the interfaces between the two phases: the gas and the solid catalyst. Large amount of reaction heats are released

  16. Surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, L.

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation we study the surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis. For heterogeneous reactions, such as gas-solid catalytic reactions, the reactions take place at the interfaces between the two phases: the gas and the solid catalyst. Large amount of reaction heats are released

  17. Trend patterns in global sea surface temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, S.M.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2009-01-01

    Isolating long-term trend in sea surface temperature (SST) from El Nino southern oscillation (ENSO) variability is fundamental for climate studies. In the present study, trend-empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, a robust space-time method for extracting trend patterns, is applied...

  18. Prospects and challenges of iron pyroelectrolysis in magnesium aluminosilicate melts near minimum liquidus temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, N M; Kovalevsky, A V; Mikhalev, S M; Costa, F M; Frade, J R

    2015-04-14

    Although steel production by molten oxide electrolysis offers potential economic and environmental advantages over classic extractive metallurgy, its feasibility is far from being convincingly demonstrated, mainly due to inherent experimental difficulties exerted by harsh conditions and lack of knowledge regarding relevant mechanisms and physico-chemical processes in the melts. The present work was intended to demonstrate the concept of pyroelectrolysis at very high temperature near the minimum liquidus point of magnesium aluminosilicate, being conducted under electron-blocking conditions using yttria-stabilized zirconia cells, and to provide a new insight into electrochemistry behind this process. Significant current yields are possible for pyroelectrolysis performed in electron-blocking mode using a solid electrolyte membrane to separate the anode and the molten electrolyte. Parasitic electrochemical processes rise gradually as the concentration of iron oxide dissolved in the molten electrolytes is depleted, impairing faradaic efficiency. Reduction of silica to metallic silicon was identified as a significant contribution to those parasitic currents, among other plausible processes. Direct pyroelectrolysis without electron blocking was found much less plausible, due to major limitations on faradaic efficiency imposed by electronic leakage and insufficient ionic conductivity of the aluminosilicate melt. Ohmic losses may consume an excessive fraction of the applied voltage, thus failing to sustain the Nernst potential required for reduction to metallic iron. The results suggest the need for further optimization of the molten electrolyte composition to promote ionic conductivity and to suppress electronic transport contribution, possibly, by tuning the Al/Si ratio and altering the network-forming/modifying behaviour of the iron cations.

  19. Studies of Behavior Melting Temperature Characteristics for Multi Thermocouple In-Core Instrument Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Donghyup; Chae, Myoungeun; Kim, Sungjin; Lee, Kyulim [Woojin inc, Hwasung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Bottom-up type in-core instruments (ICIs) are used for the pressurized water reactors of OPR-1000, APR- 1400 in order to measure neutron flux and temperature in the reactor. It is a well-known technique and a proven design using years in the nuclear field. ICI consists of one pair of K-type thermocouple, five self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) and one back ground detector. K-type thermocouple's purpose is to measure the core exit temperature (CET) in the reactor. The CET is a very important factor for operating nuclear power plants and it is 327 .deg. C when generally operating the reactor in the nuclear power plant(NPP) in case of OPR- 1000. If the CET will exceed 650 .deg. C, Operators in the main control room should be considered to be an accident situation in accordance with a severe accident management guidance(SAMG). The Multi Thermocouple ICI is a new designed ICI assuming severe accident conditions. It consists of four more thermocouples than the existing design, so it has five Ktype thermocouples besides the thermocouple measuring CET is located in the same elevation as the ICI. Each thermocouple is able to be located in the desired location as required. The Multi Thermocouple ICI helps to measure the temperature distribution of the entire reactor. In addition, it will measure certain point of melted core because of the in-vessel debris of nuclear fuel when an accident occurs more seriously. In this paper, to simulate a circumstance such as a nuclear reactor severe accident was examined. In this study, the K-type thermocouples of Multi Thermocouple ICI was confirmed experimentally to be able to measure up to 1370 .deg. C before the thermocouples have been melted. And after the thermocouples were melted by debris, it was able to be monitored that the signal of EMF directed the infinite value of voltage. Therefore through the results of the test, it can be assumed that if any EMF data among the Multi Thermocouple ICI will direct the infinite value

  20. Surface properties and corrosion behavior of Co-Cr alloy fabricated with selective laser melting technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xian-zhen; Chen, Jie; Xiang, Nan; Wei, Bin

    2013-01-01

    We sought to study the corrosion behavior and surface properties of a commercial cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy which was fabricated with selective laser melting (SLM) technique. For this purpose, specimens were fabricated using different techniques, such as SLM system and casting methods. Surface hardness testing, microstructure observation, surface analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical corrosion test were carried out to evaluate the corrosion properties and surface properties of the specimens. We found that microstructure of SLM specimens was more homogeneous than that of cast specimens. The mean surface hardness values of SLM and cast specimens were 458.3 and 384.8, respectively; SLM specimens showed higher values than cast ones in hardness. Both specimens exhibited no differences in their electrochemical corrosion properties in the artificial saliva through potentiodynamic curves and EIS, and no significant difference via XPS. Therefore, we concluded that within the scope of this study, SLM-fabricated restorations revealed good surface properties, such as proper hardness, homogeneous microstructure, and also showed sufficient corrosion resistance which could meet the needs of dental clinics.

  1. Testing recent charge-on-spring type polarizable water models. I. Melting temperature and ice properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Péter T.; Bertsyk, Péter; Baranyai, András

    2012-11-01

    We determined the freezing point of eight molecular models of water. All models use the charge-on-spring (COS) method to express polarization. The studied models were the COS/G2, COS/G3 [H. Yu and W. F. van Gunsteren, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 9549 (2004), 10.1063/1.1805516], the COS/B2 [H. Yu, T. Hansson, and W. F. van Gunsteren, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 221 (2003), 10.1063/1.1523915], the SWM4-DP [G. Lamoureux, A. D. MacKerell, Jr., and B. Roux, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 5185 (2003), 10.1063/1.1598191], the SWM4-NDP [G. Lamoureux, E. Harder, I. V. Vorobyov, B. Roux, and A. D. MacKerell, Jr., Chem. Phys. Lett. 418, 245 (2006), 10.1016/j.cplett.2005.10.135], and three versions of our model, the BKd1, BKd2, and BKd3. The BKd1 is the original Gaussian model [P. T. Kiss, M. Darvas, A. Baranyai, and P. Jedlovszky, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114706 (2012), 10.1063/1.3692602] with constant polarization and with a simple exponential repulsion. The BKd2 applies field-dependent polarizability [A. Baranyai and P. T. Kiss, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 234110 (2011), 10.1063/1.3670962], while the BKd3 model has variable size to approximate the temperature-density (T-ρ) curve of water [P. T. Kiss and A. Baranyai, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 084506 (2012), 10.1063/1.4746419]. We used the thermodynamic integration (TI) and the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation to determine the equality of the free energy for liquid water and hexagonal ice (Ih) at 1 bar. We used the TIP4P and the SPC/E models as reference systems of the TI. The studied models severely underestimate the experimental melting point of ice Ih. The calculated freezing points of the models are the following: COS/G2, 215 K; COS/G3, 149 K; SWM4-DP, 186 K; BKd1, 207 K; BKd2, 213 K; BKd3, 233 K. The freezing temperature of the SWM4-NDP system is certainly below 120 K. It might even be that the water phase is more stable than the ice Ih at 1 bar in the full temperature range. The COS/B2 model melts below 100 K. The best result was obtained for the BKd3 model which

  2. [Comparison of surface characteristics and cytocompatibility of Ti-6Al-4V alloy fabricated with select laser melting and electron beam melting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, B J; Wang, H; Yan, R Z; Wang, C; Li, R X; Hu, M

    2016-12-09

    Objective: To evaluate the surface characteristics and cytocompatibility of Ti-6Al-4V alloy fabricated using select laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM) technique. Methods: Ti-6Al-4V alloy specimens were fabricated with SLM and EBM. A wrought form of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was used as a control. Its properties were evaluated using component analysis, contact angle test, surface roughness, surface topography, cell ultrastructure, cell attachment and proliferation observation, metal ion precipitation examination. Results: The roughness of SLM and EBM specimens was suitable for cell attachment but not the best. The character of SLM and EBM specimens was hydrophobic (>65°). The surface topography of EBM and SLM specimens were similar, but were not the best type for cell attachment. The components of Ti-alloy oxide film were detected in all the specimens. The content of Ti, Al, V ions of EBM, SLM and wrought specimens were very low and did not affect the cell attachment and proliferation. The ultrastructure of cell was normal, and the cytomembrane was intact. The number of cells was similar to each other among the three kinds of specimens and increased obviously with the culture time. Conclusions: The results of the study suggested that EBM and SLM Ti-6Al-4V specimens possessed good surface characteristics. However, the surface modification are needed further.

  3. Sensitive response of the Greenland Ice Sheet to surface melt drainage over a soft bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougamont, M; Christoffersen, P; Hubbard, A L; Fitzpatrick, A A; Doyle, S H; Carter, S P

    2014-09-29

    The dynamic response of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) depends on feedbacks between surface meltwater delivery to the subglacial environment and ice flow. Recent work has highlighted an important role of hydrological processes in regulating the ice flow, but models have so far overlooked the mechanical effect of soft basal sediment. Here we use a three-dimensional model to investigate hydrological controls on a GrIS soft-bedded region. Our results demonstrate that weakening and strengthening of subglacial sediment, associated with the seasonal delivery of surface meltwater to the bed, modulates ice flow consistent with observations. We propose that sedimentary control on ice flow is a viable alternative to existing models of evolving hydrological systems, and find a strong link between the annual flow stability, and the frequency of high meltwater discharge events. Consequently, the observed GrIS resilience to enhanced melt could be compromised if runoff variability increases further with future climate warming.

  4. DISAGGREGATION OF GOES LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURES USING SURFACE EMISSIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate temporal and spatial estimation of land surface temperatures (LST) is important for modeling the hydrological cycle at field to global scales because LSTs can improve estimates of soil moisture and evapotranspiration. Using remote sensing satellites, accurate LSTs could be routine, but unfo...

  5. Surface defects and temperature on atomic friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, O Y; Mazo, J J, E-mail: yovany@unizar.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-09-07

    We present a theoretical study of the effect of surface defects on atomic friction in the stick-slip dynamical regime of a minimalistic model. We focus on how the presence of defects and temperature change the average properties of the system. We have identified two main mechanisms which modify the mean friction force of the system when defects are considered. As expected, defects change the potential profile locally and thus affect the friction force. But the presence of defects also changes the probability distribution function of the tip slip length and thus the mean friction force. We corroborated both effects for different values of temperature, external load, dragging velocity and damping. We also show a comparison of the effects of surface defects and surface disorder on the dynamics of the system. (paper)

  6. The melting temperature of liquid water with the effective fragment potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brorsen, Kurt R.; Willow, Soohaeng Y.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2015-09-17

    Direct simulation of the solid-liquid water interface with the effective fragment potential (EFP) via the constant enthalpy and pressure (NPH) ensemble was used to estimate the melting temperature (Tm) of ice-Ih. Initial configurations and velocities, taken from equilibrated constant pressure and temperature (NPT) simulations at T = 300 K, 350 K and 400 K, respectively, yielded corresponding Tm values of 378±16 K, 382±14 K and 384±15 K. These estimates are consistently higher than experiment, albeit to the same degree with previously reported estimates using density functional theory (DFT)-based Born-Oppenheimer simulations with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional plus dispersion corrections (BLYP-D). KRB was supported by a Computational Science Graduate Fellowship from the Department of Energy. MSG was supported by a U.S. National Science Foundation Software Infrastructure (SI2) grant (ACI – 1047772). SSX acknowledges support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  7. Two-temperature relaxation and melting after absorption of femtosecond laser pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Inogamov, N A; Ashitkov, S I; Khokhlov, V A; Petrov, Yu V; Komarov, P S; Agranat, M B; Anisimov, S I; Nishihara, K

    2008-01-01

    The theory and experiments concerned with the electron-ion thermal relaxation and melting of overheated crystal lattice constitute the subject of this paper. The physical model includes two-temperature equation of state, many-body interatomic potential, the electron-ion energy exchange, electron thermal conductivity, and optical properties of solid, liquid, and two phase solid-liquid mixture. Two-temperature hydrodynamics and molecular dynamics codes are used. An experimental setup with pump-probe technique is used to follow evolution of an irradiated target with a short time step 100 fs between the probe femtosecond laser pulses. Accuracy of measurements of reflection coefficient and phase of reflected probe light are ~1% and $\\sim 1\\un{nm}$, respectively. It is found that, {\\it firstly}, the electron-electron collisions make a minor contribution to a light absorbtion in solid Al at moderate intensities; {\\it secondly}, the phase shift of a reflected probe results from heating of ion subsystem and kinetics o...

  8. Fabrication of microfibrous and nano-/microfibrous scaffolds: melt and hybrid electrospinning and surface modification of poly(L-lactic acid) with plasticizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young Il; Park, Ko Eun; Lee, Seung Jin; Park, Won Ho

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA) fibrous scaffolds were prepared by electrospinning from a PLA melt containing poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as a plasticizer to obtain thinner fibers. The effects of PEG on the melt electrospinning of PLA were examined in terms of the melt viscosity and fiber diameter. Among the parameters, the content of PEG had a more significant effect on the average fiber diameter and its distribution than those of the spinning temperature. Furthermore, nano-/microfibrous silk fibroin (SF)/PLA and PLA/PLA composite scaffolds were fabricated by hybrid electrospinning, which involved a combination of solution electrospinning and melt electrospinning. The SF/PLA (20/80) scaffolds consisted of a randomly oriented structure of PLA microfibers (average fiber diameter = 8.9 µm) and SF nanofibers (average fiber diameter = 820 nm). The PLA nano-/microfiber (20/80) scaffolds were found to have similar pore parameters to the PLA microfiber scaffolds. The PLA scaffolds were treated with plasma in the presence of either oxygen or ammonia gas to modify the surface of the fibers. This approach of controlling the surface properties and diameter of fibers could be useful in the design and tailoring of novel scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  9. Fabrication of Microfibrous and Nano-/Microfibrous Scaffolds: Melt and Hybrid Electrospinning and Surface Modification of Poly(L-lactic acid with Plasticizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Il Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable poly(L-lactic acid (PLA fibrous scaffolds were prepared by electrospinning from a PLA melt containing poly(ethylene glycol (PEG as a plasticizer to obtain thinner fibers. The effects of PEG on the melt electrospinning of PLA were examined in terms of the melt viscosity and fiber diameter. Among the parameters, the content of PEG had a more significant effect on the average fiber diameter and its distribution than those of the spinning temperature. Furthermore, nano-/microfibrous silk fibroin (SF/PLA and PLA/PLA composite scaffolds were fabricated by hybrid electrospinning, which involved a combination of solution electrospinning and melt electrospinning. The SF/PLA (20/80 scaffolds consisted of a randomly oriented structure of PLA microfibers (average fiber diameter = 8.9 µm and SF nanofibers (average fiber diameter = 820 nm. The PLA nano-/microfiber (20/80 scaffolds were found to have similar pore parameters to the PLA microfiber scaffolds. The PLA scaffolds were treated with plasma in the presence of either oxygen or ammonia gas to modify the surface of the fibers. This approach of controlling the surface properties and diameter of fibers could be useful in the design and tailoring of novel scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  10. Ikaite crystals in melting sea ice – implications for pCO2 and pH levels in Arctic surface waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rysgaard, Søren; Glud, R.N.; Lennert, K.

    2012-01-01

    chemical transformations occur in sea ice with a possible effect on CO 2 and pH conditions in surface waters. Here, we report on biogeochemical conditions, microscopic examinations and x-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals from a melting 1.7 km 2 (0.5-1 m thick) drifting ice floe in the Fram Strait...... during summer. Our findings show that ikaite crystals are present throughout the sea ice but with larger crystals appearing in the upper ice layers. Ikaite crystals placed at elevated temperatures disintegrated into smaller crystallites and dissolved. During our field campaign in late June, melt reduced...... within the ice floe of 0.3-1.3 mmol m -2 sea ice d -1. Finally, the presence of ikaite in sea ice and the dissolution of the mineral during melting of the sea ice and mixing of the melt water into the surface oceanic mixed layer accounted for half of the estimated pCO 2 uptake. © Author(s) 2012....

  11. Surface temperature distribution in broiler houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MS Baracho

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Brazilian meat production scenario broiler production is the most dynamic segment. Despite of the knowledge generated in the poultry production chain, there are still important gaps on Brazilian rearing conditions as housing is different from other countries. This research study aimed at analyzing the variation in bird skin surface as function of heat distribution inside broiler houses. A broiler house was virtually divided into nine sectors and measurements were made during the first four weeks of the grow-out in a commercial broiler farm in the region of Rio Claro, São Paulo, Brazil. Rearing ambient temperature and relative humidity, as well as light intensity and air velocity, were recorded in the geometric center of each virtual sector to evaluate the homogeneity of these parameters. Broiler surface temperatures were recorded using infrared thermography. Differences both in surface temperature (Ts and dry bulb temperature (DBT were significant (p<0.05 as a function of week of rearing. Ts was different between the first and fourth weeks (p<0.05 in both flocks. Results showed important variations in rearing environment parameters (temperature and relative humidity and in skin surface temperature as a function of week and house sector. Air velocity data were outside the limits in the first and third weeks in several sectors. Average light intensity values presented low variation relative to week and house sector. The obtained values were outside the recommended ranges, indicating that broilers suffered thermal distress. This study points out the need to record rearing environment data in order to provide better environmental control during broiler grow-out.

  12. Light absorption and partitioning in Arctic Ocean surface waters: impact of multiyear ice melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bélanger

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ice melting in the Arctic Ocean exposes the surface water to more radiative energy with poorly understood effects on photo-biogeochemical processes and heat deposition in the upper ocean. In August 2009, we documented the vertical variability of light absorbing components at 37 stations located in the southeastern Beaufort Sea including both Mackenzie River-influenced waters and polar mixed layer waters. We found that melting multiyear ice released significant amount of non-algal particulates (NAP near the sea surface relative to subsurface waters. NAP absorption coefficients at 440 nm (aNAP(440 immediately below the sea surface were on average 3-fold (up to 10-fold higher compared to subsurface values measured at 2–3 m depth. The impact of this unusual feature on the light transmission and remote sensing reflectance (Rrs was further examined using a radiative transfer model. A 10-fold particle enrichment homogeneously distributed in the first meter of the water column slightly reduced photosynthetically available and usable radiation (PAR and PUR by ∼6 and ∼8%, respectively, relative to a fully homogenous water column with low particle concentration. In terms of Rrs, the particle enrichment significantly flattered the spectrum by reducing the Rrs by up to 20% in the blue-green spectral region (400–550 nm. These results highlight the impact of meltwater on the concentration of particles at sea surface, and the need for considering non-uniform vertical distribution of particles in such systems when interpreting remotely sensed ocean color. Spectral slope of aNAP spectra calculated in the UV (ultraviolet domain decreased with depth suggesting that this parameter is sensitive to detritus composition and/or diagenesis state (e.g., POM (particulate organic matter photobleaching.

  13. Rheology Guided Rational Selection of Processing Temperature To Prepare Copovidone-Nifedipine Amorphous Solid Dispersions via Hot Melt Extrusion (HME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fengyuan; Su, Yongchao; Zhang, Jingtao; DiNunzio, James; Leone, Anthony; Huang, Chengbin; Brown, Chad D

    2016-10-03

    The production of amorphous solid dispersions via hot melt extrusion (HME) relies on elevated temperature and prolonged residence time, which can result in potential degradation and decomposition of thermally sensitive components. Herein, the rheological properties of a physical mixture of polymer and an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) were utilized to guide the selection of appropriate HME processing temperature. In the currently studied copovidone-nifedipine system, a critical temperature, which is substantially lower (∼13 °C) than the melting point of crystalline API, was captured during a temperature ramp examination and regarded as the critical point at which the API could molecularly dissolve into the polymer. Based on the identification of this critical point, various solid dispersions were prepared by HME processing below, at, and above the critical temperature (both below and above the melting temperature (Tm) of crystalline API). In addition, the resultant extrudates along with two control solid dispersions prepared by physical mixing and cryogenic milling were assessed by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, hot stage microscopy, rheology, and solid-state NMR. Physicochemical properties of resultant solid dispersions indicated that the identified critical temperature is sufficient for the polymer-API system to reach a molecular-level mixing, manifested by the transparent and smooth appearance of extrudates, the absence of API crystalline diffraction and melting peaks, dramatically decreased rheological properties, and significantly improved polymer-API miscibility. Once the critical temperature has been achieved, further raising the processing temperature only results in limited improvement of API dispersion, reflected by slightly reduced storage modulus and complex viscosity and limited improvement in miscibility.

  14. Structural investigation of room-temperature ionic liquids and high-temperature ionic melts using triplet correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhabal, Debdas; Gupta, Aditya; Kashyap, Hemant K.

    2017-03-01

    We use means of molecular dynamics simulation to understand the local structural arrangements in three trihexyltetradecylphosphonium (P6,6,6 ,14 +) based room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) by using triplet correlation functions (TCFs) along with pair correlation functions (PCFs) and X-ray scattering structure functions (S(q)s). The anions in these RTILs are either spherically symmetric but with different effective sizes (bromide (Br-) and tetrafluoroborate (BF4-)) or angular such as dicyanamide (DCA-). The simulated PCFs, S(q)s, and TCFs of the three RTILs have been compared with three high-temperature ionic melts (HTIMs); NaBr, NaCl, and NaF. In general, the pair correlation function gives angle-averaged probability as a function of inter-particle distance whereas the TCFs associated with equilateral and isosceles triangle configurations can be used to delineate angle-resolved information of liquids structure within nearest solvation shells. For the three ionic liquids studied, a very careful examination of co-ionic and counter-ionic TCFs associated with the equilateral triangular configuration within the nearest solvation shells of the ions reveals that co-ions (cat-cat-cat and an-an-an) favor close-packed local arrangement, but with lower probability for the DCA- RTIL. Co-ionic and counter-ionic TCFs obtained for HTIMs are found to be similar to that of RTILs with spherical anions. The TCFs associated with the isosceles triangle configuration signify that the ionic liquid with Br- anions tends to exhibit larger anion-cation-anion angle than that in the other two RTILs. Moreover, diffused counter-ionic angular correlations are observed in the DCA- system. We also observed angle-dependent charge ordering in all the three RTILs although its extent is enhanced for RTILs with spherical anions, very similar to what we find for NaBr, NaCl, and NaF melts. This study suggests that the presence of charge ordering is a generic feature of both the RTILs and HTIMs.

  15. Geomagnetic effects on the average surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballatore, P.

    Several results have previously shown as the solar activity can be related to the cloudiness and the surface solar radiation intensity (Svensmark and Friis-Christensen, J. Atmos. Sol. Terr. Phys., 59, 1225, 1997; Veretenenkoand Pudovkin, J. Atmos. Sol. Terr. Phys., 61, 521, 1999). Here, the possible relationships between the averaged surface temperature and the solar wind parameters or geomagnetic activity indices are investigated. The temperature data used are the monthly SST maps (generated at RAL and available from the related ESRIN/ESA database) that represent the averaged surface temperature with a spatial resolution of 0.5°x0.5° and cover the entire globe. The interplanetary data and the geomagnetic data are from the USA National Space Science Data Center. The time interval considered is 1995-2000. Specifically, possible associations and/or correlations of the average temperature with the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component and with the Kp index are considered and differentiated taking into account separate geographic and geomagnetic planetary regions.

  16. Limits to future expansion of surface-melt-enhanced ice flow into the interior of western Greenland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poinar, Kristin; Joughin, Ian; Das, Sarah B.; Behn, Mark D.; Lenaerts, Jan T M; Van Den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2015-01-01

    Moulins are important conduits for surface meltwater to reach the bed of the Greenland Ice Sheet. It has been proposed that in a warming climate, newly formed moulins associated with the inland migration of supraglacial lakes could introduce surface melt to new regions of the bed, introducing or

  17. Surface carburizing of Ti-6Al-4V alloy by laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, A. F.; Abboud, J. H.; Benyounis, K. Y.

    2010-03-01

    Surface carburizing of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy using laser melting has been investigated experimentally, with the aim of increasing surface hardness and hence improving related properties such as wear and erosion resistance. The surface of the material was coated with graphite prior to laser irradiation. Carburizing was achieved by a laser alloying mechanism, which includes melting the substrate and dissolution of the graphite in the liquid state. Two different types of lasers were used: (i) a continuous wave CO 2 (CW CO 2) laser with a maximum power of 3 kW, and (ii) a pulsating Nd-YAG laser with a maximum power per pulse of 100 W. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, EDS-analysis, and X-ray diffraction were carried out to analyze the microstructure and identify phases of the carburized layers. The results show that the carburized layers produced by CW CO 2 and Nd-YAG lasers are macroscopically homogeneous and have gradient features. The microstructures consisted of TiC crystals in the matrix of α'-Ti. The TiC crystals are either in the form of particles or dendrites. The depths to which these layers extend ranged from about 0.2-0.5 mm, depending on the treatment parameters. The volume fraction of the dendrites was found to decrease with increasing laser power or increasing traverse speed. Microhardness has been found to be directly related to the volume fraction and the size of the TiC phase. It increased to a value ranging from 500 to 800 Hv as compared to 350 Hv for the as-received substrate.

  18. Processes controlling surface, bottom and lateral melt of Arctic sea ice in a state of the art sea ice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsamados, Michel; Feltham, Daniel; Petty, Alek; Schroeder, David; Flocco, Daniela

    2015-10-13

    We present a modelling study of processes controlling the summer melt of the Arctic sea ice cover. We perform a sensitivity study and focus our interest on the thermodynamics at the ice-atmosphere and ice-ocean interfaces. We use the Los Alamos community sea ice model CICE, and additionally implement and test three new parametrization schemes: (i) a prognostic mixed layer; (ii) a three equation boundary condition for the salt and heat flux at the ice-ocean interface; and (iii) a new lateral melt parametrization. Recent additions to the CICE model are also tested, including explicit melt ponds, a form drag parametrization and a halodynamic brine drainage scheme. The various sea ice parametrizations tested in this sensitivity study introduce a wide spread in the simulated sea ice characteristics. For each simulation, the total melt is decomposed into its surface, bottom and lateral melt components to assess the processes driving melt and how this varies regionally and temporally. Because this study quantifies the relative importance of several processes in driving the summer melt of sea ice, this work can serve as a guide for future research priorities. © 2015 The Author(s).

  19. Melting heat transfer in stagnation point flow of carbon nanotubes towards variable thickness surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hayat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work concentrates on the mathematical modeling for stagnation point flow of nanofluids over an impermeable stretching sheet with variable thickness. Carbon nanotubes [single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs] as the nanoparticles are utilized. Water and kerosene oil are taken as the base fluids. Heat transfer through melting effect is discussed. Transformation procedure is adapted to obtain the non-linear ordinary differential equations from the fundamental laws of mass, linear momentum and energy. The optimal values of convergence control parameters and corresponding individual and total residual errors for SWCNTs and MWCNTs are computed by means of homotopy analysis method (HAM based BVPh 2.0. Characteristics of different involved parameters on the velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are discussed. Higher velocity profile is observed for wall thickness parameter in case of water carbon nanotubes when compared with the kerosene oil carbon nanotubes.

  20. Relaxation dynamics of femtosecond-laser-induced temperature modulation on the surfaces of metals and semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Yoann; Derrien, Thibault J.-Y.; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Gurevich, Evgeny L.; Mocek, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) is a complicated phenomenon which involves periodic spatial modulation of laser energy absorption on the irradiated surface, transient changes in optical response, surface layer melting and/or ablation. The listed processes strongly depend on laser fluence and pulse duration as well as on material properties. This paper is aimed at studying the spatiotemporal evolution of a periodic modulation of the deposited laser energy, once formed upon irradiation of metal (Ti) and semiconductor (Si) surfaces. Assuming that the incoming laser pulse interferes with a surface electromagnetic wave, the resulting sinusoidal modulation of the absorbed laser energy is introduced into a two-dimensional two-temperature model developed for titanium and silicon. Simulations reveal that the lattice temperature modulation on the surfaces of both materials following from the modulated absorption remains significant for longer than 50 ps after the laser pulse. In the cases considered here, the partially molten phase exists 10 ps in Ti and more than 50 ps in Si, suggesting that molten matter can be subjected to temperature-driven relocation toward LIPSS formation, due to the modulated temperature profile on the material surfaces. Molten phase at nanometric distances (nano-melting) is also revealed.

  1. Aluminosilicate melts and glasses at 1 to 3 GPa: Temperature and pressure effects on recovered structural and density changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, S; Stebbins, Jonathan; Hankins, William B.; Sisson, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    In the pressure range in the Earth’s mantle where many basaltic magmas are generated (1 to 3 GPa) (Stolper et al. 1981), increases in the coordination numbers of the network-forming cations in aluminosilicate melts have generally been considered to be minor, although effects on silicon and particularly on aluminum coordination in non-bridging oxygen-rich glasses from the higher, 5 to 12 GPa range, are now well known. Most high-precision measurements of network cation coordination in such samples have been made by spectroscopy (notably 27Al and 29Si NMR) on glasses quenched from high-temperature, high-pressure melts synthesized in solid-media apparatuses and decompressed to room temperature and 1 bar pressure. There are several effects that could lead to the underestimation of the extent of actual structural (and density) changes in high-pressure/temperature melts from such data. For non-bridging oxygen-rich sodium and calcium aluminosilicate compositions in the 1 to 3 GPa range, we show here that glasses annealed near to their glass transition temperatures systematically record higher recovered increases in aluminum coordination and in density than samples quenched from high-temperature melts. In the piston-cylinder apparatus used, rates of cooling through the glass transition are measured as very similar for both higher and lower initial temperatures, indicating that fictive temperature effects are not the likely explanation of these differences. Instead, transient decreases in melt pressure during thermal quenching, which may be especially large for high initial run temperatures, of as much as 0.5 to 1 GPa, may be responsible. As a result, the equilibrium proportion of high-coordinated Al in this pressure range may be 50 to 90% greater than previously estimated, reaching mean coordination numbers (e.g., 4.5) that are probably high enough to significantly affect melt properties. New data on jadeite (NaAlSi2O6) glass confirm that aluminum coordination increase

  2. A study on the impact of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose on the viscosity of PEG melt suspensions using surface plots and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ching Mien; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chan, Lai Wah

    2015-04-01

    An understanding of the rheological behaviour of polymer melt suspensions is crucial in pharmaceutical manufacturing, especially when processed by spray congealing or melt extruding. However, a detailed comparison of the viscosities at each and every temperature and concentration between the various grades of adjuvants in the formulation will be tedious and time-consuming. Therefore, the statistical method, principal component analysis (PCA), was explored in this study. The composite formulations comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) of ten different grades (K100 LV, K4M, K15M, K100M, E15 LV, E50 LV, E4M, F50 LV, F4M and Methocel VLV) at various concentrations were prepared and their viscosities at different temperatures determined. Surface plots showed that concentration of HPMC had a greater effect on the viscosity compared to temperature. Particle size and size distribution of HPMC played an important role in the viscosity of melt suspensions. Smaller particles led to a greater viscosity than larger particles. PCA was used to evaluate formulations of different viscosities. The complex viscosity profiles of the various formulations containing HPMC were successfully classified into three clusters of low, moderate and high viscosity. Formulations within each group showed similar viscosities despite differences in grade or concentration of HPMC. Formulations in the low viscosity cluster were found to be sprayable. PCA was able to differentiate the complex viscosity profiles of different formulations containing HPMC in an efficient and time-saving manner and provided an excellent visualisation of the data.

  3. Melt onset over Arctic sea ice controlled by atmospheric moisture transport

    OpenAIRE

    Mortin, J.; G. Svensson; Graversen, R.; Kapsch, M.; Stroeve, J.; Boisvert, L.

    2016-01-01

    The timing of melt onset affects the surface energy uptake throughout the melt season. Yet the processes triggering melt and causing its large interannual variability are not well understood. Here we show that melt onset over Arctic sea ice is initiated by positive anomalies of water vapor, clouds, and air temperatures that increase the downwelling longwave radiation (LWD) to the surface. The earlier melt onset occurs; the stronger are these anomalies. Downwelling shortwave radiation (SWD) is...

  4. Phase equilibrium in argon films stabilized by homogeneous surfaces and thermodynamics of two-stage melting transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ustinov, E. A., E-mail: eustinov@mail.wplus.net [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 26 Polytechnicheskaya, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-21

    Freezing of gases adsorbed on open surfaces (e.g., graphite) and in narrow pores is a widespread phenomenon which is a subject of a large number of publications. Modeling of the gas/liquid–solid transition is usually accomplished with a molecular simulation technique. However, quantitative analysis of the gas/liquid–solid coexistence and thermodynamic properties of the solid layer still encounters serious difficulties. This is mainly due to the effect of simulation box size on the lattice constant. Since the lattice constant is a function of loading and temperature, once the ordering transition has occurred, the simulation box size must be corrected in the course of simulation according to the Gibbs–Duhem equation. A significant problem is also associated with accurate prediction of the two-dimensional liquid–solid coexistence because of a small difference in densities of coexisting phases. The aim of this study is thermodynamic analysis of the two-dimensional phase coexistence in systems involving crystal-like free of defects layers in narrow slit pores. A special attention was paid to the determination of triple point temperatures. It is shown that intrinsic properties of argon monolayer adsorbed on the graphite surface are similar to those of isolated monolayer accommodated in the slit pore having width of two argon collision diameters. Analysis of the latter system is shown to be clearer and less time-consuming than the former one, which has allowed for explanation of the experimentally observed two-stage melting transition of argon monolayer on graphite without invoking the periodic surface potential modulation and orientational transition.

  5. Use of high-resolution melting and melting temperature-shift assays for specific detection and identification of Bacillus anthracis based on single nucleotide discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzelle, Sylviane; Mendy, Christiane; Laroche, Séverine; Madani, Nora

    2011-11-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are important diagnostic markers for the detection and differentiation of Bacillus anthracis. High-Resolution Melting (HRM) and Melting Temperature (Tm)-shift methods are two approaches that enable SNP detection without the need for expensive labeled probes. We evaluated the potential diagnostic capability of those methods to discriminate B. anthracis from the other members of the B. cereus group. Two assays targeting B. anthracis-specific SNPs in the plcR and gyrA genes were designed for each method and used to genotype a panel of 155 Bacilli strains. All B. anthracis isolates (n=65) were correctly and unambiguously identified. Assays also proved to be appropriate for the direct genotyping of biological samples. They could reliably detect B. anthracis in contaminated organs containing as little as 10(3)CFU/ml, corresponding to a few genome equivalents per reaction. The HRM and Tm-shift applications described here represent valuable tools for specific identification of B. anthracis at reduced cost.

  6. Annealing and surface conduction on Hydrogen peroxide treated bulk melt-grown, single crystal ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mtangi, W., E-mail: wilbert.mtangi@up.ac.za [University of Pretoria, Physics Department, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Nel, J.M.; Auret, F.D.; Chawanda, A.; Diale, M. [University of Pretoria, Physics Department, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Nyamhere, C. [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Physics Department, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    We report on the studies carried out on hydrogen peroxide treated melt-grown, bulk single crystal ZnO samples. Results show the existence of two shallow donors in the as-received ZnO samples with energy levels (37.8{+-}0.3) meV that has been suggested as Zn{sub i} related and possibly H-complex related and (54.5{+-}0.9) meV, which has been assigned to an Al-related donor. Annealing studies performed on the hydrogen peroxide treated samples reveal the existence of a conductive channel in the samples in which new energy levels have been observed, Zn vacancies, related to the Group I elements, X{sub Zn}. The surface donor volume concentration of the conductive channel was calculated from a theory developed by Look (2007) . Results indicate an increase in the surface volume concentration with increasing annealing temperature from 60 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} at 200 Degree-Sign C to 4.37 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} at 800 Degree-Sign C.

  7. Novel microstructural growth in the surface of Inconel 625 by the addition of SiC under electron beam melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, M., E-mail: maqomer@yahoo.com [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ali, G.; Ahmed, Ejaz; Haq, M.A.; Akhter, J.I. [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-06-15

    Electron beam melting is being used to modify the microstructure of the surfaces of materials due to its ability to cause localized melting and supercooling of the melt. This article presents an experimental study on the surface modification of Ni-based superalloy (Inconel 625) reinforced with SiC ceramic particles under electron beam melting. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques have been applied to characterize the resulted microstructure. The results revealed growth of novel structures like wire, rod, tubular, pyramid, bamboo and tweezers type morphologies in the modified surface. In addition to that fibrous like structure was also observed. Formation of thin carbon sheet has been found at the regions of decomposed SiC. Electron beam modified surface of Inconel 625 alloy has been hardened twice as compared to the as-received samples. Surface hardening effect may be attributed to both the formation of the novel structures as well as the introduction of Si and C atom in the lattice of Inconel 625 alloy.

  8. Experimentally-determined carbon isotope fractionation in and between methane-bearing melt and fluid to upper mantle temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    2016-07-01

    The behavior of melts and fluids is at the core of understanding formation and evolution of the Earth. To advance our understanding of their role, high-pressure/-temperature experiments were employed to determine melt and fluid structure together with carbon isotope partitioning within and between (CH4 +H2O +H2)-saturated aluminosilicate melts and (CH4 +H2O +H2)-fluids. The samples were characterized with vibrational spectroscopy while at temperatures and pressures from 475° to 850 °C and 92 to 1158 MPa, respectively. The solution equilibrium is 2CH4 +Qn = 2 CH3- +H2O +Q n + 1 where the superscript, n, in the Qn-notation describes silicate species where n denotes the number of bridging oxygen. The solution equilibrium affects the carbon isotope fractionation factor between melt and fluid, αmelt/fluid. Moreover, it is significantly temperature-dependent. The αmelt/fluid < 1 with temperatures less than about 1050 °C, and is greater than 1 at higher temperature. Methane-bearing melts can exist in the upper mantle at fO2 ≤fO2 (MW) (Mysen et al., 2011). Reduced (Csbnd H)-species in present-day upper mantle magma, therefore, are likely. During melting and crystallization in this environment, the δ13C of melts increases with temperature at a rate of ∼ 0.6 ‰ /°C. From the simple-system data presented here, at T ≤ 1050°C, melt in equilibrium with a peridotite-(CH4 +H2O +H2)-bearing mantle source will be isotopically lighter than fluid. At higher temperatures, melts will be isotopically heavier. Degassing at T ≤ 1050°C will shift δ13C of degassed magma to more positive values, whereas degassing at T ≥ 1050°C, will reduce the δ13C of the degassed magma.

  9. The international surface temperature initiative's global land surface databank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrimore, J. H.; Rennie, J.; Gambi de Almeida, W.; Christy, J.; Flannery, M.; Gleason, B.; Klein-Tank, A.; Mhanda, A.; Ishihara, K.; Lister, D.; Menne, M. J.; Razuvaev, V.; Renom, M.; Rusticucci, M.; Tandy, J.; Thorne, P. W.; Worley, S.

    2013-09-01

    The International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) consists of an end-to-end process for land surface air temperature analyses. The foundation is the establishment of a global land surface Databank. This builds upon the groundbreaking efforts of scientists in the 1980s and 1990s. While using many of their principles, a primary aim is to improve aspects including data provenance, version control, openness and transparency, temporal and spatial coverage, and improved methods for merging disparate sources. The initial focus is on daily and monthly timescales. A Databank Working Group is focused on establishing Stage-0 (original observation forms) through Stage-3 data (merged dataset without quality control). More than 35 sources of data have already been added and efforts have now turned to development of the initial version of the merged dataset. Methods have been established for ensuring to the extent possible the provenance of all data from the point of observation through all intermediate steps to final archive and access. Databank submission procedures were designed to make the process of contributing data as easy as possible. All data are provided openly and without charge. We encourage the use of these data and feedback from interested users.

  10. Mantle potential temperature estimates of basalt from the surface of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellnutt, J. Gregory

    2016-10-01

    The crater density and distribution of Venus indicates the average surface age is younger (≤1 Ga) than most terrestrial planets and satellites in the Solar System. The type and rate (i.e. equilibrium, catastrophic or differential) of volcanism associated with the stagnant lid tectonic system of Venus is a first order problem that has yet to be resolved but is directly related to the thermal conditions of the mantle. The calculated primary melt composition of basalt at the Venera 14 landing site is high-Mg basalt to picrite with a mantle potential temperature estimate similar to terrestrial ambient mantle (1370 ± 70 °C). The calculated accumulated fractional melting curves indicate the olivine compositions from the melt have Mg# of 89-91. The results show that the thermal regime required to generate the primary melt composition of the Venera 14 basalt was not anomalously high (i.e. mantle-plume system) but rather consistent with a lithospheric tensional rift system. The juxtaposition of high thermal regime structures (e.g. Beta Regio) and 'ambient' mantle potential temperature estimates of the Venera 14 basalt suggests that the relatively young surface of Venus is the result of volcanism from a combination of thermal systems that resurfaced the planet at variable rates.

  11. The surface temperature of free evaporating drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodulin, V. Y.; Letushko, V. N.; Nizovtsev, M. I.; Sterlyagov, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    Complex experimental and theoretical investigation of heat and mass transfer processes was performed at evaporation of free liquid drops. For theoretical calculation the emission-diffusion model was proposed. This allowed taking into account the characteristics of evaporation of small droplets, for which heat and mass transfer processes are not described in the conventional diffusion model. The calculation results of evaporation of droplets of different sizes were compared using two models: the conventional diffusion and emission-diffusion models. To verify the proposed physical model, the evaporation of droplets suspended on a polypropylene fiber was experimentally investigated. The form of droplets in the evaporation process was determined using microphotographing. The temperature was measured on the surfaces of evaporating drops using infrared thermography. The experimental results have showed good agreement with the numerical data for the time of evaporation and the temperature of evaporating drops.

  12. Low temperature surface conductivity of hydrogenated diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauerer, C.; Ertl, F.; Nebel, C.E.; Stutzmann, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Walter-Schottky-Inst. fuer Physikalische Grundlagen der Halbleiterelektronik; Bergonzo, P. [LIST(CEA-Recherche Technology)/DIMIR/SIAR/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Williams, O.A.; Jackman, R.A. [University Coll., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

    2001-07-23

    Conductivity and Hall experiments are performed on hydrogenated poly-CVD, atomically flat homoepitaxially grown Ib and natural type IIa diamond layers in the regime 0.34 to 400 K. For all experiments hole transport is detected with sheet resistivities at room temperature in the range 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 5} {omega}/{radical}. We introduce a transport model where a disorder induced tail of localized states traps holes at very low temperatures (T < 70 K). The characteristic energy of the tail is in the range of 6 meV. Towards higher temperatures (T > 70 K) the hole density is approximately constant and the hole mobility {mu} is increasing two orders of magnitude. In the regime 70 K < T < 200 K, {mu} is exponentially activated with 22 meV, above it follows a {proportional_to}T{sup 3/2} law. The activation energy of the hole density at T < 70 K is governed by the energy gap between holes trapped in the tail and the mobility edge which they can propagate. In the temperature regime T < 25 K an increasing hole mobility is detected which is attributed to transport in delocalized states at the surface. (orig.)

  13. Enhanced Surface Warming and Accelerated Snow Melt in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau Induced by Absorbing Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K.; Kim, Maeng-Ki; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Lee, Woo-Seop

    2010-01-01

    Numerical experiments with the NASA finite-volume general circulation model show that heating of the atmosphere by dust and black carbon can lead to widespread enhanced warming over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and accelerated snow melt in the western TP and Himalayas. During the boreal spring, a thick aerosol layer, composed mainly of dust transported from adjacent deserts and black carbon from local emissions, builds up over the Indo-Gangetic Plain, against the foothills of the Himalaya and the TP. The aerosol layer, which extends from the surface to high elevation (approx.5 km), heats the mid-troposphere by absorbing solar radiation. The heating produces an atmospheric dynamical feedback the so-called elevated-heat-pump (EHP) effect, which increases moisture, cloudiness, and deep convection over northern India, as well as enhancing the rate of snow melt in the Himalayas and TP. The accelerated melting of snow is mostly confined to the western TP, first slowly in early April and then rapidly from early to mid-May. The snow cover remains reduced from mid-May through early June. The accelerated snow melt is accompanied by similar phases of enhanced warming of the atmosphere-land system of the TP, with the atmospheric warming leading the surface warming by several days. Surface energy balance analysis shows that the short-wave and long-wave surface radiative fluxes strongly offset each other, and are largely regulated by the changes in cloudiness and moisture over the TP. The slow melting phase in April is initiated by an effective transfer of sensible heat from a warmer atmosphere to land. The rapid melting phase in May is due to an evaporation-snow-land feedback coupled to an increase in atmospheric moisture over the TP induced by the EHP effect.

  14. Temperature-induced anomalous structural changes of Al-12wt.%Sn-4wt.%Si melt and its influence on as-cast structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhiming

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the viscosity of liquid Al-12wt.%Sn-4wt.%Si was studied with a high-temperature viscosity apparatus. Anomalous changes of viscosity of the melt were found at 1,103 K and 968 K in the cooling process, which indicates anomalous structural changes of the melt. It is calculated that the anomalous structural change is associated with an abrupt decrease of atomic clusters’ size and activation energy in the melt. According to the temperature of the anomalous structural changes, melt heat treatment process (quenching from superheat to pouring temperature was performed on Al-12wt.%Sn-4wt.%Si melt prior to pouring, aimed to keep the small atomic clusters from higher temperature to lower pouring temperature. The results suggest that relatively small atomic clusters at the pouring temperature in the melt could generate a deep under-cooling of nucleation in the subsequent solidification process, and refine the as-cast structure. After being quenched from superheating to pouring temperature, the relatively small atomic clusters, especially the Si-Si clusters in the melt will grow to equilibrium state (relatively big atomic clusters with holding time, resulting in the prominent coarsening of the Si morphology in the as-cast structure.

  15. Biodegradable polyester films from renewable aleuritic acid: surface modifications induced by melt-polycondensation in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesús Benítez, José; Alejandro Heredia-Guerrero, José; Inmaculada de Vargas-Parody, María; Cruz-Carrillo, Miguel Antonio; Morales-Flórez, Victor; de la Rosa-Fox, Nicolás; Heredia, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Good water barrier properties and biocompatibility of long-chain biopolyesters like cutin and suberin have inspired the design of synthetic mimetic materials. Most of these biopolymers are made from esterified mid-chain functionalized ω-long chain hydroxyacids. Aleuritic (9,10,16-trihydroxypalmitic) acid is such a polyhydroxylated fatty acid and is also the major constituent of natural lac resin, a relatively abundant and renewable resource. Insoluble and thermostable films have been prepared from aleuritic acid by melt-condensation polymerization in air without catalysts, an easy and attractive procedure for large scale production. Intended to be used as a protective coating, the barrier's performance is expected to be conditioned by physical and chemical modifications induced by oxygen on the air-exposed side. Hence, the chemical composition, texture, mechanical behavior, hydrophobicity, chemical resistance and biodegradation of the film surface have been studied by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), nanoindentation and water contact angle (WCA). It has been demonstrated that the occurrence of side oxidation reactions conditions the surface physical and chemical properties of these polyhydroxyester films. Additionally, the addition of palmitic acid to reduce the presence of hydrophilic free hydroxyl groups was found to have a strong influence on these parameters.

  16. NUMERICAL MODELLING OF VELOCITY AND TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE BUOYANCY CONVECTION EFFECT IN KNbO3 MELT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Numerical modelling of velocity and temperature fields in high-temperature KNbO3 melt of a loop-shaped Pt wire heater is carried out by using the commercial com putational code ANSYS for the mathematical solution of the governing equations.Based on the experimental boundary conditions and the Boussinesq approximation,the numerical modelling of a steady and two-dimensional model is applied to study the process under consideration of the buoyancy-driven convection condition. The result is compared with the previous experimental and theoretical data obtained in our laboratory, and the former is in agreement with the latter. Thus a theoretical guide for reasonable growth conditions is provided by studying in depth the real fluid flow effects in the crystal growth from the melt.

  17. Effects of Stretching Ratio and Temperature on Phase Transition of Melt-spun Poly (Vinylidene Fluoride) Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hua; REN Ping; ZHANG Guifang; XIAO Changfa

    2006-01-01

    The effects of stretching ratio and stretching temperature on phase transition of melt-spun poly ( vinylidene fluoride ) fibers were investigated and analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy, wide angle Xray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy. The β phase exists in the as-spun fiber. The β phase content increases as the stretching ratio increases. When the stretching temperature is lower than 100 ℃ , enhancing temperature is good for the transition of phase α to β. By contrast, when the stretching temperature is higher than 100 ℃ , enhancing temperature is unfavourable for the transition of phase α to β. Increasing the draw temperature increases the α-phase content.

  18. Modeling of surface melting and resolidification for pure metals and binary alloys: Effect of non-equilibrium kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G.X.; Matthys, E.F. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Environmental Engineering

    1995-12-31

    A one-dimensional model including non-equilibrium phenomena was developed for surface melting and resolidification of both pure metals and binary alloys substrates. Non-equilibrium kinetics from crystal growth theory are introduced in the model to treat both non-equilibrium melting and resolidification. The modelled problem involves a moving boundary with both heat and solute diffusions and is solved by an implicit control volume integral method with solid/liquid interface immobilization by coordinate transformation. For illustration of the model applicability, the authors have analyzed laser surface melting of pure metals (Al, Cu, Ni, Ti) and dilute Al-Cu alloys, and some typical results are presented. The computation results show large solid overheating and melt undercooling which result from the high heat flux and the slow kinetics. The melt undercooling is maintained during most of the resolidification process and so is the high solidification rate. Complex interface velocity variations during the earlier stages of resolidification were obtained and result from interactions between various physical mechanisms. A strong effect of the solute on the interface velocity was also predicted.

  19. Temperature Dependence of Electrical Resistance of Woven Melt-Infiltrated SiCf/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew P.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have successfully shown the use of electrical resistance (ER)measurements to monitor room temperature damage accumulation in SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites (SiCf/SiC) Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). In order to determine the feasibility of resistance monitoring at elevated temperatures, the present work investigates the temperature dependent electrical response of various MI (Melt Infiltrated)-CVI (Chemical Vapor Infiltrated) SiC/SiC composites containing Hi-Nicalon Type S, Tyranno ZMI and SA reinforcing fibers. Test were conducted using a commercially available isothermal testing apparatus as well as a novel, laser-based heating approach developed to more accurately simulate thermomechanical testing of CMCs. Secondly, a post-test inspection technique is demonstrated to show the effect of high-temperature exposure on electrical properties. Analysis was performed to determine the respective contribution of the fiber and matrix to the overall composite conductivity at elevated temperatures. It was concluded that because the silicon-rich matrix material dominates the electrical response at high temperature, ER monitoring would continue to be a feasible method for monitoring stress dependent matrix cracking of melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC composites under high temperature mechanical testing conditions. Finally, the effect of thermal gradients generated during localized heating of tensile coupons on overall electrical response of the composite is determined.

  20. Ikaite crystals in melting sea ice – implications for pCO2 and pH levels in Arctic surface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. G. Leakey

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A major issue of Arctic marine science is to understand whether the Arctic Ocean is, or will be, a source or sink for air–sea CO2 exchange. This has been complicated by the recent discoveries of ikaite (a polymorph of CaCO3·6H2O in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice, which indicate that multiple chemical transformations occur in sea ice with a possible effect on CO2 and pH conditions in surface waters. Here, we report on biogeochemical conditions, microscopic examinations and x-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals from a melting 1.7 km2 (0.5–1 m thick drifting ice floe in the Fram Strait during summer. Our findings show that ikaite crystals are present throughout the sea ice but with larger crystals appearing in the upper ice layers. Ikaite crystals placed at elevated temperatures disintegrated into smaller crystallites and dissolved. During our field campaign in late June, melt reduced the ice floe thickness by 0.2 m per week and resulted in an estimated 3.8 ppm decrease of pCO2 in the ocean surface mixed layer. This corresponds to an air–sea CO2 uptake of 10.6 mmol m−2 sea ice d−1 or to 3.3 ton km−2 ice floe week−1. This is markedly higher than the estimated primary production within the ice floe of 0.3–1.3 mmol m−2 sea ice d−1. Finally, the presence of ikaite in sea ice and the dissolution of the mineral during melting of the sea ice and mixing of the melt water into the surface oceanic mixed layer accounted for half of the estimated pCO2 uptake.

  1. Brief communication "Important role of the mid-tropospheric atmospheric circulation in the recent surface melt increase over the Greenland ice sheet"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettweis, X.; Hanna, E.; Lang, C.; Belleflamme, A.; Erpicum, M.; Gallée, H.

    2013-02-01

    Since 2007, there has been a series of surface melt records over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS), continuing the trend towards increased melt observed since the end of the 1990's. The last two decades are characterized by an increase of negative phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) favouring warmer and drier summers than normal over GrIS. In this context, we use a circulation type classification based on daily 500 hPa geopotential height to evaluate the role of atmospheric dynamics in this surface melt acceleration for the last two decades. Due to the lack of direct observations, the interannual melt variability is gauged here by the summer (June-July-August) mean temperature from reanalyses at 700 hPa over Greenland; analogous atmospheric circulations in the past show that ~70% of the 1993-2012 warming at 700 hPa over Greenland has been driven by changes in the atmospheric flow frequencies. Indeed, the occurrence of anticyclones centred over the GrIS at the surface and at 500 hPa has doubled since the end of 1990's, which induces more frequent southerly warm air advection along the western Greenland coast and over the neighbouring Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA). These changes in the NAO modes explain also why no significant warming has been observed these last summers over Svalbard, where northerly atmospheric flows are twice as frequent as before. Therefore, the recent warmer summers over GrIS and CAA cannot be considered as a long-term climate warming but are more a consequence of NAO variability affecting atmospheric heat transport. Although no global model from the CMIP5 database projects subsequent significant changes in NAO through this century, we cannot exclude the possibility that the observed NAO changes are due to global warming.

  2. Equivalence of chain conformations in the surface region of a polymer melt and a single Gaussian chain nder critical conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skvortsov, A.M.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Fleer, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    In the melt polymer conformations are nearly ideal according to Flory's ideality hypothesis. Silberberg generalized this statement for chains in the interfacial region. We check the Silberberg argument by analyzing the conformations of a probe chain end-grafted at a solid surface in a sea of floatin

  3. Effect of Alkali-Acid-Heat Chemical Surface Treatment on Electron Beam Melted Porous Titanium and Its Apatite Forming Ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bsat, S.; Yavari, S.; Munsch, M.; Valstar, E.R.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced additive manufacturing techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM), can produce highly porous structures that resemble the mechanical properties and structure of native bone. However, for orthopaedic applications, such as joint prostheses or bone substitution, the surface must also be bi

  4. X-ray measurement of residual stresses in laser surface melted Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, J.M.; van Brussel, B.A.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Reed, R.C.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the residual stresses in laser surface melted Ti-6Al-4V, determined using X-ray diffraction methods. The principal result is that there is an increase in the transverse residual stress with each successive, overlapping laser track. The result can be used to explain the ob

  5. Effect of Alkali-Acid-Heat Chemical Surface Treatment on Electron Beam Melted Porous Titanium and Its Apatite Forming Ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bsat, S.; Yavari, S.; Munsch, M.; Valstar, E.R.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced additive manufacturing techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM), can produce highly porous structures that resemble the mechanical properties and structure of native bone. However, for orthopaedic applications, such as joint prostheses or bone substitution, the surface must also be

  6. Surface studies on aluminized and thermally oxidized superalloy 690 substrates interacted with simulated nuclear waste and sodium borosilicate melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufali, C.; Kshirsagar, R. J.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.; Sengupta, P.; Dutta, R. S.; Dey, G. K.

    2014-04-01

    Aluminized and thermally oxidized Ni-Cr-Fe based superalloy 690 substrates with Al2O3 layer on top have been exposed in nitrate based environment (simulated high level nuclear liquid waste) at 373 K for 216 hours and sodium borosilicate melt at 1248 K for 192 hours. The surfaces of exposed samples have been characterized by using Electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). Elemental X-ray mapping on coated specimen that exposed in simulated nuclear waste solution revealed that the surface is enriched with Ni, Cr and Al. X-ray mapping on surface of the specimen that interacted with sodium borosilicate melt indicated that the surface is composed of Al, Fe, Ni and Cr.

  7. Surface studies on aluminized and thermally oxidized superalloy 690 substrates interacted with simulated nuclear waste and sodium borosilicate melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusufali, C., E-mail: yusuf@barc.gov.in; Sengupta, P.; Dutta, R. S.; Dey, G. K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India); Kshirsagar, R. J. [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India); Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P. [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Aluminized and thermally oxidized Ni-Cr-Fe based superalloy 690 substrates with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer on top have been exposed in nitrate based environment (simulated high level nuclear liquid waste) at 373 K for 216 hours and sodium borosilicate melt at 1248 K for 192 hours. The surfaces of exposed samples have been characterized by using Electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). Elemental X-ray mapping on coated specimen that exposed in simulated nuclear waste solution revealed that the surface is enriched with Ni, Cr and Al. X-ray mapping on surface of the specimen that interacted with sodium borosilicate melt indicated that the surface is composed of Al, Fe, Ni and Cr.

  8. Electrical conductivity measurements on silicate melts using the loop technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waff, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    A new method is described for measurement of the electrical conductivity of silicate melts under controlled oxygen partial pressure at temperatures to 1550 C. The melt samples are suspended as droplets on platinum-rhodium loops, minimizing iron loss from the melt due to alloying with platinum, and providing maximum surface exposure of the melt to the oxygen-buffering gas atmosphere. The latter provides extremely rapid equilibration of the melt with the imposed oxygen partial pressure. The loop technique involves a minimum of setup time and cost, provides reproducible results to within + or - 5% and is well suited to electrical conductivity studies on silicate melts containing redox cations.

  9. Modelling the influence of the gas to melt ratio on the fraction solid of the surface in spray formed billets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Pryds, Nini

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the relationship between the Gas to Melt Ratio (GMR) and the solid fraction of an evolving billet surface is investigated numerically. The basis for the analysis is a recently developed integrated procedure for modelling the entire spray forming process. This model includes...... is the summation of “local” droplet size distributions along the r-axis of the spray cone. The criterion for a successful process has been a predefined process window characterised by a desired solid fraction range at a certain distance from the atomizer. Inside this process window, the gas and melt flows have...

  10. A Reference Equation of State for the Thermodynamic Properties of Ethane for Temperatures from the Melting Line to 675 K and Pressures up to 900 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücker, D.; Wagner, W.

    2006-03-01

    A new formulation for the thermodynamic properties of the fluid phase of ethane in the form of a fundamental equation explicit in the Helmholtz energy is presented. The functional form of the residual part was developed using state-of-the-art linear and nonlinear optimization algorithms. It contains 44 coefficients which were fitted to selected data for the thermal and caloric properties of ethane both in the single-phase region and on the liquid-vapor phase boundary. This work provides information on the available experimental data for the thermodynamic properties of ethane and presents all details of the new formulation. The new equation of state describes the pρT surface of ethane with an uncertainty in density of less than 0.02%-0.03% (coverage factor k=2 corresponding to a level of confidence of about 95%) from the melting line up to temperatures of 520 K and pressures of 30 MPa. In the gaseous and supercritical region, high precision speed of sound data are represented generally within less than 0.015%. Other reliable data sets are represented within their experimental uncertainties. The primary data, to which the equation was fitted, cover the fluid region from the melting line to temperatures of 675 K and pressures of 900 MPa. Beyond this range the equation shows reasonable extrapolation behavior up to very high temperatures and pressures. In addition to the equation of state, independent equations for the vapor pressure, the saturated-liquid and saturated-vapor densities, and the melting pressure are given. Tables of thermodynamic properties calculated from the new formulation are listed in the Appendix.

  11. The effects of polymer melt rheology on the replication of surface microstructures in isothermal moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Torbjörn Gerhard; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    of 9.4 micrometer, a width of 22 micrometer and a distance between the channels of 18 micrometer. The channels were positioned parallel to the incoming molten plastic flow. The polymer melt was frozen just before the flow-front of the melt reached the end of the inserts. The partly replicated...

  12. Surface chemistry of Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaithilingam, Jayasheelan, E-mail: Jayasheelan.Vaithilingam@nottingham.ac.uk [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, School of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Prina, Elisabetta [School of Pharmacy, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Goodridge, Ruth D.; Hague, Richard J.M. [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, School of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Edmondson, Steve [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Rose, Felicity R.A.J. [School of Pharmacy, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Christie, Steven D.R. [Department of Chemistry, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) has previously been shown to be a viable method for fabricating biomedical implants; however, the surface chemistry of SLM fabricated parts is poorly understood. In this study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the surface chemistries of (a) SLM as-fabricated (SLM-AF) Ti6Al4V and (b) SLM fabricated and mechanically polished (SLM-MP) Ti6Al4V samples and compared with (c) traditionally manufactured (forged) and mechanically polished Ti6Al4V samples. The SLM–AF surface was observed to be porous with an average surface roughness (Ra) of 17.6 ± 3.7 μm. The surface chemistry of the SLM-AF was significantly different to the FGD-MP surface with respect to elemental distribution and their existence on the outermost surface. Sintered particles on the SLM-AF surface were observed to affect depth profiling of the sample due to a shadowing effect during argon ion sputtering. Surface heterogeneity was observed for all three surfaces; however, vanadium was witnessed only on the mechanically polished (SLM-MP and FGD-MP) surfaces. The direct and indirect 3T3 cell cytotoxicity studies revealed that the cells were viable on the SLM fabricated Ti6Al4V parts. The varied surface chemistry of the SLM-AF and SLM-MP did not influence the cell behaviour. - Highlights: • Surface chemistry of selective laser melted (SLM) Ti6Al4V parts was compared with conventionally forged Ti6Al4V parts. • The surface elemental compositions of the SLM as-fabricated surfaces were significantly different to the forged surface. • Surface oxide-layer of the SLM as-fabricated was thicker than the polished SLM surfaces and the forged Ti6Al4V surfaces.

  13. A self-contained 3He melting curve thermometer for dissemination of the PLTS-2000 temperature scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvarts, Dm; Adams, A.; Lusher, C. P.; Körber, R.; Cowan, B. P.; Noonan, P.; Saunders, J.; Mikheev, V. A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a self-contained 3He melting curve thermometer (MCT), which is compact and easy to operate and makes a reliable tool for the direct dissemination of the new provisional low-temperature scale, PLTS-2000. It is based on a cylindrical pressure gauge and uses a tunnel diode oscillator circuit for capacitive read-out. The gas-handling system uses a set of relief valves and an electronic pressure sensor, enabling the thermometer to be fully automated, including the calibration procedure. The performance of the MCT was evaluated by comparison with a current-sensing noise thermometer in the temperature range from 20 to 700 mK.

  14. Satellite Sensed Skin Sea Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlon, Craig

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of spatial and temporal changes the global climate rely heavily on the use of computer models. Unfortunately, such models cannot provide the basis for climate prediction because key physical processes are inadequately treated. Consequently, fine tuning procedures are often used to optimize the fit between model output and observational data and the validation of climate models using observations is essential if model based predictions of climate change are to be treated with any degree of confidence. Satellite Sea Surface Temperature (SST) observations provide high spatial and temporal resolution data which is extremely well suited to the initialization, definition of boundary conditions and, validation of climate models. In the case of coupled ocean-atmosphere models, the SST (or more correctly the 'Skin' SST (SSST)) is a fundamental diagnostic variable to consider in the validation process. Daily global SST maps derived from satellite sensors also provide adequate data for the detection of global patterns of change which, unlike any other SST data set, repeatedly extend into the southern hemisphere extra-tropical regions. Such data are essential to the success of the spatial 'fingerprint' technique, which seeks to establish a north-south asymmetry where warming is suppressed in the high latitude Southern Ocean. Some estimates suggest that there is a greater than 80% chance of directly detecting significant change (97.5 % confidence level) after 10-12 years of consistent global observations of mean sea surface temperature. However, these latter statements should be qualified with the assumption that a negligible drift in the observing system exists and that biases between individual instruments required to derive a long term data set are small. Given that current estimates for the magnitude of global warming of 0.015 K yr(sup -1) - 0.025 K yr(sup -1), satellite SST data sets need to be both accurate and stable if such a warming trend is to

  15. Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST), Version 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST) dataset is a global monthly sea surface temperature analysis on a 2x2 degree grid derived from the...

  16. NOAA Global Surface Temperature Dataset, Version 4.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Global Surface Temperature Dataset (NOAAGlobalTemp) is derived from two independent analyses: the Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST)...

  17. HTPro: Low-temperature Surface Hardening of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Low-temperature surface hardening of stainless steel provides the required performance properties without affecting corrosion resistance.......Low-temperature surface hardening of stainless steel provides the required performance properties without affecting corrosion resistance....

  18. Merged Land and Ocean Surface Temperature, Version 3.5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The historical Merged Land-Ocean Surface Temperature Analysis (MLOST) is derived from two independent analyses, an Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature...

  19. Correlations between Inter-Annual Variations in Arctic Sea Ice Extent, Greenland Surface Melt, and Boreal Snow Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Thorstena; Stroeve, Julienne C.; Armstrong, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    Intensification of global warming in recent decades has caused a rise of interest in year-to-year and decadal-scale climate variability in the Arctic. This is because the Arctic is believed to be one of the most sensitive and vulnerable regions to climatic changes. For over two decades satellite passive microwave observations have been utilized to continuously monitor the Arctic environment. Derived parameters include sea ice cover, snow cover and snow water equivalent over land, and Greenland melt extent and length of melt season. Most studies have primarily concentrated on trends and variations of individual variables. In this study we investigated how variations in sea ice cover, Greenland surface melt, and boreal snow cover are correlated. This was done on hemispheric as well as on regional scales. Latest results will be presented including data from the summer of 2004.

  20. Correlations between Inter-Annual Variations in Arctic Sea Ice Extent, Greenland Surface Melt, and Boreal Snow Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Thorstena; Stroeve, Julienne C.; Armstrong, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    Intensification of global warming in recent decades has caused a rise of interest in year-to-year and decadal-scale climate variability in the Arctic. This is because the Arctic is believed to be one of the most sensitive and vulnerable regions to climatic changes. For over two decades satellite passive microwave observations have been utilized to continuously monitor the Arctic environment. Derived parameters include sea ice cover, snow cover and snow water equivalent over land, and Greenland melt extent and length of melt season. Most studies have primarily concentrated on trends and variations of individual variables. In this study we investigated how variations in sea ice cover, Greenland surface melt, and boreal snow cover are correlated. This was done on hemispheric as well as on regional scales. Latest results will be presented including data from the summer of 2004.

  1. Sequence diversity within the HA-1 gene as detected by melting temperature assay without oligonucleotide probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattiuz Pier

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags are self-peptides derived from common cellular proteins and presented by MHC class I and II molecules. Disparities in mHags are a potential risk for the development of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD in the recipients of bone marrow from HLA-identical donors. Two alleles have been identified in the mHag HA-1. The correlation between mismatches of the mHag HA-1 and GvHD has been suggested and methods to facilitate large-scale testing were afterwards developed. Methods We used sequence specific primer (SSP PCR and direct sequencing to detect HA-1 gene polymorphisms in a sample of 131 unrelated Italian subjects. We then set up a novel melting temperature (Tm assay that may help identification of HA-1 alleles without oligonucleotide probes. Results We report the frequencies of HA-1 alleles in the Italian population and the presence of an intronic 5 base-pair deletion associated with the immunogeneic allele HA-1H. We also detected novel variable sites with respect to the consensus sequence of HA-1 locus. Even though recombination/gene conversion events are documented, there is considerable linkage disequilibrium in the data. The gametic associations between HA-1R/H alleles and the intronic 5-bp ins/del polymorphism prompted us to try the Tm analysis with SYBR® Green I. We show that the addition of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO during the assay yields distinct patterns when amplicons from HA-1H homozygotes, HA-1R homozygotes, and heterozygotes are analysed. Conclusion The possibility to use SYBR® Green I to detect Tm differences between allelic variants is attractive but requires great caution. We succeeded in allele discrimination of the HA-1 locus using a relatively short (101 bp amplicon, only in the presence of DMSO. We believe that, at least in certain assets, Tm assays may benefit by the addition of DMSO or other agents affecting DNA strand conformation and stability.

  2. Methane excess in Arctic surface water-triggered by sea ice formation and melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, E; Rudels, B; Schauer, U; Mau, S; Dieckmann, G

    2015-11-10

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas.

  3. Methane excess in Arctic surface water- triggered by sea ice formation and melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, E.; Rudels, B.; Schauer, U.; Mau, S.; Dieckmann, G.

    2015-11-01

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas.

  4. Revisiting the melting temperature of NpO2 and the challenges associated with high temperature actinide compound measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Böhler, R.; Welland, M.J.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Janssen, A.; Eloirdi, R.; Konings, R.J.M.; Manara, D.

    2012-01-01

    This work revisits the melting behaviour of neptunium dioxide, an actinide compound which can be produced in the nuclear fuel during operation, and which has an important impact on the nuclear fuel and waste radioactivity especially on the very long term. The present experimental approach employs re

  5. Middle Pliocene sea surface temperature variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, H.J.; Chandler, M.A.; Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    Estimates of sea surface temperature (SST) based upon foraminifer, diatom, and ostracod assemblages from ocean cores reveal a warm phase of the Pliocene between about 3.3 and 3.0 Ma. Pollen records and plant megafossils, although not as well dated, show evidence for a warmer climate at about the same time. Increased greenhouse forcing and altered ocean heat transport are the leading candidates for the underlying cause of Pliocene global warmth. Despite being a period of global warmth, this interval encompasses considerable variability. Two new SST reconstructions are presented that are designed to provide a climatological error bar for warm peak phases of the Pliocene and to document the spatial distribution and magnitude of SST variability within the mid-Pliocene warm period. These data suggest long-term stability of low-latitude SST and document greater variability in regions of maximum warming. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Effect of chain stiffness and temperature on the dynamics and microstructure of crystallizable bead-spring polymer melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hong T.; Hoy, Robert S.

    2016-11-01

    We contrast the dynamics in model unentangled polymer melts of chains of three different stiffnesses: flexible, intermediate, and rodlike. Flexible and rodlike chains, which readily solidify into close-packed crystals (respectively, with randomly oriented and nematically aligned chains), display simple melt dynamics with Arrhenius temperature dependence and a discontinuous change upon solidification. Intermediate-stiffness chains, however, are fragile glass-formers displaying Vogel-Fulcher dynamical arrest, despite the fact that they also possess a nematic-close-packed crystalline ground state. To connect this difference in dynamics to the differing microstructure of the melts, we examine how various measures of structure, including cluster-level metrics recently introduced in studies of colloidal systems, vary with chain stiffness and temperature. No clear static-structural cause of the dynamical arrest is found. However, we find that the intermediate-stiffness chains display qualitatively different dynamical heterogeneity. Specifically, their stringlike motion (cooperative rearrangement) is correlated along chain backbones in a way not found for either flexible or rodlike chains. This activated "crawling" motion is clearly associated with the dynamical arrest observed in these systems, and illustrates one way in which factors controlling the crystallization versus glass formation competition in polymers can depend nonmonotonically on chain stiffness.

  7. Impact of Atlantic sea surface temperatures on the warmest global surface air temperature of 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Riyu

    2005-03-01

    The year 1998 is the warmest year in the record of instrumental measurements. In this study, an atmospheric general circulation model is used to investigate the role of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in this warmth, with a focus on the role of the Atlantic Ocean. The model forced with the observed global SSTs captures the main features of land surface air temperature anomalies in 1998. A sensitivity experiment shows that in comparison with the global SST anomalies, the Atlantic SST anomalies can explain 35% of the global mean surface air temperature (GMAT) anomaly, and 57% of the land surface air temperature anomaly in 1998. The mechanisms through which the Atlantic Ocean influences the GMAT are likely different from season to season. Possible detailed mechanisms involve the impact of SST anomalies on local convection in the tropical Atlantic region, the consequent excitation of a Rossby wave response that propagates into the North Atlantic and the Eurasian continent in winter and spring, and the consequent changes in tropical Walker circulation in summer and autumn that induce changes in convection over the tropical Pacific. This in turn affects climate in Asia and Australia. The important role of the Atlantic Ocean suggests that attention should be paid not only to the tropical Pacific Ocean, but also to the tropical Atlantic Ocean in understanding the GMAT variability and its predictability.

  8. Evaluation of Foaming Behavior of Glass Melts by High-Temperature Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    Optical monitoring techniques can record in situ the size of glass samples during a dynamic heating process. This allowed us to study sintering and expansion rate of panel glass from cathode ray tube using MnO2 as foaming agent. We show the maximum expansion rate of glass melt foaming (in situ va...

  9. Highly temporally resolved response to seasonal surface melt of the Zachariae and 79N outlet glaciers in Northeast Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathmann, N. M.; Hvidberg, C. S.; Solgaard, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The seasonal response to surface melting of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream outlets, Zachariae and 79N, is investigated using new highly temporally resolved surface velocity maps for 2016 combined with numerical modelling. The seasonal speed-up at 79N of 0.15km/yr is suggested to be driven...... by a decrease in effective basal pressure induced by surface melting, whereas for Zachariae its 0.11km/yr seasonal speed-up correlates equally well with the break-up of its large ice mélange. We investigate the influence 76km long floating tongue at 79N, finding it provides little resistance and that most...

  10. Structure and property of metal melt Ⅱ—Evolution of atomic clusters in the not high temperature range above liquidus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the theory of micro-inhomogeneity of liquid metal,a calculation model is established for the quantitative description of the structural information of metal melts.Only by thermophysical property parameters and basic structural parameters of solid metal,can this model produce the main information of melt structure,including the relative concentration of active atoms,size of atomic clusters and number of short-range order atoms.Based on this model,the main structural information of Al and Ni melts in the not high range above the liquidus is calculated,with results in good agreement with experimental values.Besides,analyzed is the influence of superheating temperature and atomic number on the melt structural information of the first (IA) and second main group (IIA) elements.With temperature increasing,melt structural information regularly changes for both IA and IIA elements.With the atomic number increasing,melt structural information of IA elements changes regularly,for the crystal structures of the IA elements are all of bcc lattice type.However,no notable regular change of melt structural information for IIA elements has been found,mainly because the lattice type of IIA elements is of hcp-fcc-bcc transition.The present work presents an effective way for better understanding metal melt structure and for forecasting the change of the physical property of metal melts.

  11. Turbulent Flow past High Temperature Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Thangam, Siva; Carlucci, Pasquale; Buckley, Liam; Carlucci, Donald

    2014-11-01

    Flow over high-temperature surfaces subject to wall heating is analyzed with applications to projectile design. In this study, computations are performed using an anisotropic Reynolds-stress model to study flow past surfaces that are subject to radiative flux. The model utilizes a phenomenological treatment of the energy spectrum and diffusivities of momentum and heat to include the effects of wall heat transfer and radiative exchange. The radiative transport is modeled using Eddington approximation including the weighted effect of nongrayness of the fluid. The time-averaged equations of motion and energy are solved using the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation with an efficient finite-volume algorithm. The model is applied for available test cases to validate its predictive capabilities for capturing the effects of wall heat transfer. Computational results are compared with experimental data available in the literature. Applications involving the design of projectiles are summarized. Funded in part by U.S. Army, ARDEC.

  12. Wetting Angle and Surface Tension of Germanium Melts on Different Substrate Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, N.; Croell, A.; Szofran, F. R.; Benz, K. W.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The sessile drop technique has been used to measure the wetting angle and the surface tension of molten germanium (Ge) on various substrate materials. Sapphire, fused silica, glassy carbon, graphite, SiC, carbon-based aerogel, pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN), AlN, Si3N4, and CVD diamond were used as substrate materials. In addition, the effects of different cleaning procedures and surface treatments on the wetting behavior were investigated. The highest wetting angles with values around 170 deg. were found for pBN substrates under active vacuum or with a slight overpressure of 5N Argon or forming gas (2% Hydrogen in 5N Argon). The measurement of the surface tension and its temperature dependence for Ge under a forming gas atmosphere resulted in gamma(T) = 591 - 0.077 (T-T(sub m).

  13. Use of satellite land surface temperatures in the EUSTACE global surface air temperature analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, D.; Good, E.; Rayner, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    EUSTACE (EU Surface Temperatures for All Corners of Earth) is a Horizon2020 project that will produce a spatially complete, near-surface air temperature (NSAT) analysis for the globe for every day since 1850. The analysis will be based on both satellite and in situ surface temperature observations over land, sea, ice and lakes, which will be combined using state-of-the-art statistical methods. The use of satellite data will enable the EUSTACE analysis to offer improved estimates of NSAT in regions that are poorly observed in situ, compared with existing in-situ based analyses. This presentation illustrates how satellite land surface temperature (LST) data - sourced from the European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) GlobTemperature project - will be used in EUSTACE. Satellite LSTs represent the temperature of the Earth's skin, which can differ from the corresponding NSAT by several degrees or more, particularly during the hottest part of the day. Therefore the first challenge is to develop an approach to estimate global NSAT from satellite observations. Two methods will be trialled in EUSTACE, both of which are summarised here: an established empirical regression-based approach for predicting NSAT from satellite data, and a new method whereby NSAT is calculated from LST and other parameters using a physics-based model. The second challenge is in estimating the uncertainties for the satellite NSAT estimates, which will determine how these data are used in the final blended satellite-in situ analysis. This is also important as a key component of EUSTACE is in delivering accurate uncertainty information to users. An overview of the methods to estimate the satellite NSATs is also included in this presentation.

  14. Metal matrix-metal nanoparticle composites with tunable melting temperature and high thermal conductivity for phase-change thermal storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wu, Hsinwei; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-02-24

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) are of broad interest for thermal storage and management applications. For energy-dense storage with fast thermal charging/discharging rates, a PCM should have a suitable melting temperature, large enthalpy of fusion, and high thermal conductivity. To simultaneously accomplish these traits, we custom design nanocomposites consisting of phase-change Bi nanoparticles embedded in an Ag matrix. We precisely control nanoparticle size, shape, and volume fraction in the composite by separating the nanoparticle synthesis and nanocomposite formation steps. We demonstrate a 50-100% thermal energy density improvement relative to common organic PCMs with equivalent volume fraction. We also tune the melting temperature from 236-252 °C by varying nanoparticle diameter from 8.1-14.9 nm. Importantly, the silver matrix successfully prevents nanoparticle coalescence, and no melting changes are observed during 100 melt-freeze cycles. The nanocomposite's Ag matrix also leads to very high thermal conductivities. For example, the thermal conductivity of a composite with a 10% volume fraction of 13 nm Bi nanoparticles is 128 ± 23 W/m-K, which is several orders of magnitude higher than typical thermal storage materials. We complement these measurements with calculations using a modified effective medium approximation for nanoscale thermal transport. These calculations predict that the thermal conductivity of composites with 13 nm Bi nanoparticles varies from 142 to 47 W/m-K as the nanoparticle volume fraction changes from 10 to 35%. Larger nanoparticle diameters and/or smaller nanoparticle volume fractions lead to larger thermal conductivities.

  15. Coordinated Hard Sphere Mixture (CHaSM): A simplified model for oxide and silicate melts at mantle pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Aaron S.; Asimow, Paul D.; Stevenson, David J.

    2015-08-01

    We develop a new model to understand and predict the behavior of oxide and silicate melts at extreme temperatures and pressures, including deep mantle conditions like those in the early Earth magma ocean. The Coordinated Hard Sphere Mixture (CHaSM) is based on an extension of the hard sphere mixture model, accounting for the range of coordination states available to each cation in the liquid. By utilizing approximate analytic expressions for the hard sphere model, this method is capable of predicting complex liquid structure and thermodynamics while remaining computationally efficient, requiring only minutes of calculation time on standard desktop computers. This modeling framework is applied to the MgO system, where model parameters are trained on a collection of crystal polymorphs, producing realistic predictions of coordination evolution and the equation of state of MgO melt over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. We find that the typical coordination number of the Mg cation evolves continuously upward from 5.25 at 0 GPa to 8.5 at 250 GPa. The results produced by CHaSM are evaluated by comparison with predictions from published first-principles molecular dynamics calculations, indicating that CHaSM is accurately capturing the dominant physics controlling the behavior of oxide melts at high pressure. Finally, we present a simple quantitative model to explain the universality of the increasing Grüneisen parameter trend for liquids, which directly reflects their progressive evolution toward more compact solid-like structures upon compression. This general behavior is opposite that of solid materials, and produces steep adiabatic thermal profiles for silicate melts, thus playing a crucial role in magma ocean evolution.

  16. Effect of Melt Temperature and Hold Pressure on the Weld-Line Strength of an Injection Molded Talc-Filled Polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanxin Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tensile stress-strain behavior coupled with fractography was used to investigate the weld-line strength of an injection molded 40 w% talc-filled polypropylene. The relationship between processing conditions, microstructure, and tensile strength was established. Fracture surface of the weld line exhibited skin-core morphology with different degrees of talc particle orientations in the core and in the skin. Experimental results also showed that the thickness of the core decreased and the thickness of the skins increased with increasing melt temperature and increasing hold pressure, which resulted in an increase of yield strength and yield strain with increasing melt temperature and increasing hold pressure. Finally, a three-parameter nonlinear constitutive model was developed to describe the strain softening behavior of the weld-line strength of talc-filled polypropylene. The parameters in this model are the modulus E, the strain exponent m, and the compliance factor β. The simulated stress-strain curves from the model are in good agreement with the test data, and both m and β are functions of skin-core thickness ratio.

  17. The calcium fluoride effect on properties of cryolite melts feasible for low-temperature production of aluminum and its alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkacheva, O.; Dedyukhin, A.; Redkin, A.; Zaikov, Yu.

    2017-07-01

    The CaF2 effect on the liquidus temperature, electrical conductivity and alumina solubility in the potassium-sodium and potassium-lithium cryolite melts with cryolite ratio (CR = (nKF+nMF)/nAlF3, M = Li, Na) 1.3 was studied. The liquidus temperature in the quisi-binary system [KF-LiF-AlF3]-CaF2 changes with the same manner as in the [KF-NaF-AlF3]-CaF2. The electrical conductivity in the KF-NaF-AlF3-CaF2 melt decreases with increasing the CaF2 content, but it slightly raises with the first small addition of CaF2 into the KF-LiF-AlF3-CaF2 melts, enriched with KF, which was explained by the increased K+ ions mobility due to their relatively low ionic potential. The contribution of the Li+ cations in conductivity of the KF-LiF-AlF3-CaF2 electrolyte is not noteworthy. The Al2O3 solubility in the KF-NaF-AlF3 electrolyte rises with the increasing KF content, but the opposite tendency is observed in the cryolite mixtures containing CaF2. The insoluble compounds - KCaAl2F9 or KCaF3 - formed in the molten mixtures containing potassium and calcium ions endorse the increase of the liquidus temperature. The calcium fluoride effect on the side ledge formation in the electrolytic cell during low-temperature aluminum electrolysis is discussed.

  18. Melting temperatures of H2O up to 72 GPa measured in a diamond anvil cell using CO2 laser heating technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, T; Kuwayama, Y; Yagi, T

    2014-02-21

    The melting curve of H2O from 49 to 72 GPa was determined by using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Double-sided CO2 laser heating technique was employed in order to heat the sample directly. Discontinuous changes of the heating efficiency attributed to the H2O melting were observed between 49 and 72 GPa. The obtained melting temperatures at 49 and 72 GPa are 1200 and 1410 K, respectively. We found that the slope of the melting curve significantly decreases with increasing pressure, only 5 K/GPa at 72 GPa while 44 K/GPa at 49 GPa. Our results suggest that the melting curve does not intersect with the isentropes of Uranus and Neptune, and hence, H2O should remain in the liquid state even at the pressure and temperature conditions found deep within Uranus and Neptune.

  19. Non-linear effects of initial melt temperatures on microstructures and mechanical properties during quenching process of liquid Cu46Zr54 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yun-Fei; Liu, Rang-Su; Tian, Ze-An; Liang, Yong-Chao; Zhang, Hai-Tao; Hou, Zhao-Yang; Liu, Hai-Rong; Zhang, Ai-long; Zhou, Li-Li; Peng, Ping; Xie, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    A MD simulation of liquid Cu46Zr54 alloys has been performed for understanding the effects of initial melt temperatures on the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties during quenching process. By using several microstructural analyzing methods, it is found that the icosahedral and defective icosahedral clusters play a key role in the microstructure transition. All the final solidification structures obtained at different initial melt temperatures are of amorphous structures, and their structural and mechanical properties are non-linearly related to the initial melt temperatures, and fluctuated in a certain range. Especially, there exists a best initial melt temperature, from which the glass configuration possesses the highest packing density, the optimal elastic constants, and the smaller extent of structural softening under deforming.

  20. Surface morphology and physical properties of partially melt textured Mn doped Bi-2223

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu Verma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The samples of Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3-xMnxO10+δ (x = 0.0 to 0.30 were prepared by the standard solid-state reaction method. The phase identification characteristics of synthesized (HTSC materials were explored through powder X-ray diffractometer reveals that all the samples crystallize in orthorhombic structure with lattice parameters a = 5.4053 Å, b = 5.4110 Å and c = 37.0642 Å up to Mn concentration of x = 0.30. The critical temperature (Tc measured by standard four probe method has been found to depress from 108 K to 70 K as Mn content (x increases from 0.00 to 0.30. The effects of sintering temperature on the surface morphology of Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3-xMnxO10+δ have also been investigated. The surface morphology investigated through scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy (SEM & AFM results that voids are decreasing but grains size increases as the Mn concentration increases besides, nanosphere like structures on the surface of the Mn doped Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3-xMnxO10+δ (Bi-2223 samples.

  1. An Infrared Study of Ambient Temperature Chloroaluminates as a Function of Melt Acidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    ionic interaction more closely. Water has also * T"Z _ t I , .... ... ... ± . ... . . .. . . ",, . . . . - . -3- been added to the melt in an attempt...studies of this molten salt system (2,3) and of a similar 7-methyl 3-ethyl imidazolium chloride (ImCl) system (2). Both provided good evidence of ionic ... interaction (particularly on the basic side) and Wilkes et al proposed several oligomers to explain the observed behavior. This problem has not been

  2. High-temperature corrosion of metals in the salt and metallic melts containing rare earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, V. V.; Abramov, A. V.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.; Belikov, S. V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Polovov, I. B.; Rebrin, O. I.

    2016-09-01

    A complex of independent methods was employed to study the corrosion resistance of molybdenum, zirconium, tantalum and tungsten in chloride, chloride-fluoride and fluoride-oxide melts based on LiCl, CaCl2, NaCl- KCl, LiF, and containing rare earths. Tests were conducted for 30 h at 750-1050 °C. The metals showed excellent corrosion resistance in fused chlorides (the corrosion rates were below 0.0005 g/(m2 h). Despite the presence of chemically active fluoride ions in the chloride-fluoride melts, the metals studied also showed very low corrosion rates, except molybdenum, for which the rate of corrosion was 0,8 g/(m2 h). The corrosion resistance of tantalum was considerably reduced in the fluoride-oxide melts; the corrosion rate was over 1 g/(m2 h) corresponding to the 8-th grade of stability and placing tantalum to the group of "low stability" materials.

  3. Cloud screening and melt water detection over melting sea ice using AATSR/SLSTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomina, Larysa; Heygster, Georg

    2014-05-01

    With the onset of melt in the Arctic Ocean, the fraction of melt water on sea ice, the melt pond fraction, increases. The consequences are: the reduced albedo of sea ice, increased transmittance of sea ice and affected heat balance of the system with more heat passing through the ice into the ocean, which facilitates further melting. The onset of melt, duration of melt season and melt pond fraction are good indicators of the climate state of the Arctic and its change. In the absence of reliable sea ice thickness retrievals in summer, melt pond fraction retrieval from satellite is in demand as input for GCM as an indicator of melt state of the sea ice. The retrieval of melt pond fraction with a moderate resolution radiometer as AATSR is, however, a non-trivial task due to a variety of subpixel surface types with very different optical properties, which give non-unique combinations if mixed. In this work this has been solved by employing additional information on the surface and air temperature of the pixel. In the current work, a concept of melt pond detection on sea ice is presented. The basis of the retrieval is the sensitivity of AATSR reflectance channels 550nm and 860nm to the amount of melt water on sea ice. The retrieval features extensive usage of a database of in situ surface albedo spectra. A tree of decisions is employed to select the feasible family of in situ spectra for the retrieval, depending on the melt stage of the surface. Reanalysis air temperature at the surface and brightness temperature measured by the satellite sensor are analyzed in order to evaluate the melting status of the surface. Case studies for FYI and MYI show plausible retrieved melt pond fractions, characteristic for both of the ice types. The developed retrieval can be used to process the historical AATSR (2002-2012) dataset, as well as for the SLSTR sensor onboard the future Sentinel-3 mission (scheduled for launch in 2015), to keep the continuity and obtain longer time sequence

  4. Dimensional Accuracy and Surface Roughness Analysis for AlSi10Mg Produced by Selective Laser Melting (SLM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamarudin K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective Laser Melting (SLM is an Additive Manufacturing (AM technique that built 3D part in a layer-by-layer method by melting the top surface layer of a powder bed with a high intensity laser according to sliced 3D CAD data. AlSi10Mg alloy is a traditional cast alloy that is broadly used for die-casting process and used in automotive industry due its good mechanical properties. This paper seeks to investigate the requirement SLM in rapid tooling application. The feasibility study is done by examining the surface roughness and dimensional accuracy as compared to the benchmark part produced through the SLM process with constant parameters. The benchmark produced by SLM shows the potential of SLM in a manufacturing application particularly in moulds.

  5. Temperature-Induced Liquid-Liquid Transition in Metallic Melts: A Brief Review on the New Physical Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Qiu Zu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the nature of liquid structures and properties remains an open problem for many fundamental and applied fields. It is well known that there is no other defined phase line above liquidus (TL in phase diagrams of ordinary alloys. However, via resorts of internal friction, electric resistivity, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, solidification, etc., the results of our research on lots of single- and multiple-component melts show a novel physical image: temperature induced liquid-liquid structure transition (TI-LLST can occur above TL. Moreover, the solidification behaviors and structures out of the melts that experienced TI-LLST are distinct from those out of the melts before TI-LLST. In this paper, some typical examples of TI-LLST and characteristic aspects of the TI-LLST are briefly reviewed, in which the main contents are limited in our own achievements, although other groups have also observed similar phenomena using different methods. In the sense of phenomenology, TI-LLST reported here is quite different from other recognized liquid transitions, i.e., there are only a few convincing cases of liquid P, Si, C, H2O, Al2O3-Y2O3, etc. in which the transition occurs, either induced by pressure or at a supercooled state and near liquidus.

  6. Monitoring temperature and pressure over surfaces using sensitive paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Viramontes, J. Ascención; Moreno Hernández, David; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Morán Loza, José Miguel; García Arreola, Alicia

    2007-03-01

    Two techniques for monitoring temperature and pressure variations over surfaces using sensitive paints are presented. The analysis is done by the acquisition of a set of images of the surface under analysis. The surface is painted by a paint called Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) for pressure measurements and Temperature Sensitive Paints (TSP) for temperature measurements. These kinds of paints are deposited over the surface under analysis. The recent experimental advances in calibration process are presented in this paper.

  7. Formation of recent gullies and debris-flows on Mars by the melting of near-surface ground ice at high obliquity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, F.; Costard, F.; Mangold, N.; Peulvast, J.-P.

    2001-11-01

    The observation of small gullies associated with recent surface run-off on Mars by Mars Global Surveyor has renewed the question of liquid water stability at the surface of Mars. In their initial analyses, Malin and Edgett [1] suggested that the gullies could be formed by groundwater seepage from underground aquifers. However, observations of gullies originating from the top of peaks question this scenario. We show here that these landforms are more likely to result from the melting of liquid water in the first meter of the Martian subsurface at high obliquity. On the one hand, this is suggested by the analogy between the martian gullies and terrestrial debris flows observed in Greenland which are known to result from the thawing of near-surface ground when above-freezing temperatures are reached. On the other hand, numerical simulations show that above-freezing temperatures can occur at high obliquities in the near-surface of Mars, and that such temperatures are only predicted at latitudes and for slope orientations corresponding exactly to where the gullies have been observed on Mars. [1] Malin M.C. and Edgett K.E. Science 288, 2330-2335 (2000).

  8. Growth Twinning and Generation of High-Frequency Surface Nanostructures in Ultrafast Laser-Induced Transient Melting and Resolidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedao, Xxx; Shugaev, Maxim V; Wu, Chengping; Douillard, Thierry; Esnouf, Claude; Maurice, Claire; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Pigeon, Florent; Garrelie, Florence; Zhigilei, Leonid V; Colombier, Jean-Philippe

    2016-07-26

    The structural changes generated in surface regions of single crystal Ni targets by femtosecond laser irradiation are investigated experimentally and computationally for laser fluences that, in the multipulse irradiation regime, produce sub-100 nm high spatial frequency surface structures. Detailed experimental characterization of the irradiated targets combining electron back scattered diffraction analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals the presence of multiple nanoscale twinned domains in the irradiated surface regions of single crystal targets with (111) surface orientation. Atomistic- and continuum-level simulations performed for experimental irradiation conditions reproduce the generation of twinned domains and establish the conditions leading to the formation of growth twin boundaries in the course of the fast transient melting and epitaxial regrowth of the surface regions of the irradiated targets. The observation of growth twins in the irradiated Ni(111) targets provides strong evidence of the role of surface melting and resolidification in the formation of high spatial frequency surface structures. This also suggests that the formation of twinned domains can be used as a sensitive measure of the levels of liquid undercooling achieved in short pulse laser processing of metals.

  9. The effect of impurities on the surface melt of a glacier in the Suntar Khayata Mountain Range, Russian Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozomu eTakeuchi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated characteristics of impurities and their impact on the ablation of Glacier No.31 in the Suntar-Khayata Mountain Range in Russian Siberia during summer 2014. Positive degree-day factors (PDDFs obtained from 20 stake measurements distributed across the glacier’s ablation area varied from 3.00 to 8.55 mm w.e. K-1 day-1. The surface reflectivity measured with a spectrometer as a proxy for albedo, ranged from 0.09 to 0.62, and was negatively correlated with the PDDF, suggesting that glacier ablation is controlled by surface albedo on the studied glacier. Mass of total insoluble impurities on the ice surface varied from 0.1 to 45.2 g m-2 and was not correlated with surface reflectivity, suggesting that albedo is not directly conditioned by the mass of the impurities. Microscopy of impurities revealed that they comprised mineral particles, cryoconite granules, and ice algal cells filled with dark-reddish pigments (Ancylonema nordenskioldii. There was a significant negative correlation between surface reflectivity and algal biomass or organic matter, suggesting that the ice algae and their products are the most effective constituents in defining glacier surface albedo. Our results suggest that the melting of ice surface was enhanced by the growth of ice algae, which increased the melting rate 1.6 - 2.6 times greater than that of the impurity free bare-ice.

  10. A study of accurate latent heat measurement for a PCM with a low melting temperature using T-history method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peck, Jong Hyeon [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Energy System Team, 35-3 Ipjang-myeon, Chonan 330-820 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Jun [College of Architecture, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chaedong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Hiki [School of Mechanical and Industrial System Engineering, KyungHee University, Yongin 449-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-15

    When the latent heat of a phase change material (PCM) with a lower melting point than ambient temperature was assessed according to the standard T-history method using a vertically oriented test tube, a temperature gradient occurred in the longitudinal direction of the tube due to natural convection. This led to a decrease in the accuracy of the latent heat of fusion measurement. In this study, the accuracy of the measurement with the original T-history method was improved without decreasing the test's simplicity and convenience by setting the test tube horizontally. The heat transfer to the vapor-layer of the tube under volume change during melting was assumed to be negligible and the results were calculated using the two inflection points of temperature as the start and end of latent heat period. Under these assumptions, the results agree closely with other reference data. And, the new method proposed in this study showed a remarkable reduction in data scattering. (author)

  11. Influence of Low-Temperature Plasma Treatment on The Liquid Filtration Efficiency of Melt-Blown PP Nonwovens in The Conditions of Simulated Use of Respiratory Protective Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majchrzycka Katarzyna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Filtering nonwovens produced with melt-blown technology are one of the most basic materials used in the construction of respiratory protective equipment (RPE against harmful aerosols, including bio- and nanoaerosols. The improvement of their filtering properties can be achieved by the development of quasi-permanent electric charge on the fibres. Usually corona discharge method is utilized for this purpose. In the presented study, it was assumed that the low-temperature plasma treatment could be applied as an alternative method for the manufacturing of conventional electret nonwovens for the RPE construction. Low temperature plasma treatment of polypropylene nonwovens was carried out with various process gases (argon, nitrogen, oxygen or air in a wide range of process parameters (gas flow velocity, time of treatment and power supplied to the reactor electrodes. After the modification, nonwovens were evaluated in terms of filtration efficiency of paraffin oil mist. The stability of the modification results was tested after 12 months of storage and after conditioning at elevated temperature and relative humidity conditions. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy and ATR-IR spectroscopy were used to assess changes in surface topography and chemical composition of the fibres. The modification of melt-blown nonwovens with nitrogen, oxygen and air plasma did not result in a satisfactory improvement of the filtration efficiency. In case of argon plasma treatment, up to 82% increase of filtration efficiency of paraffin oil mist was observed in relation to untreated samples. This effect was stable after 12 months of storage in normal conditions and after thermal conditioning in (70 ± 3°C for 24 h. The use of low-temperature plasma treatment was proven to be a promising improvement direction of filtering properties of nonwovens used for the protection of respiratory tract against harmful aerosols.

  12. Measurement of thermophysical properties of high temperature melt using electromagnetic levitation technique under microgravity conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Masahito; Hibiya, Taketoshi; 渡邉 匡人; 日比谷 孟俊

    2007-01-01

    Microgravity conditions have advantages of measurement of the surface tension and the viscosity of metallic alloys by the oscillating drop method with an Electromagnetic Levitation (EML) device. Since under microgravity conditions the surface oscillation spectra have a single peak and an exponential decay of the surface oscillations, we can obtain the surface tension and the viscosity by analyzing the surface oscillation spectra. However, the surface oscillation spectra have many peaks in som...

  13. Effects of Ce concentrations on ignition temperature and surface tension of Mg-9wt.%Al alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Zhenghua

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys are well known for their excellent properties, but the potential issues with oxidation and burning during melting and casting largely limit its industrial applications. The addition of Ce in magnesium alloys can significantly raise ignition-proof performance and change the structure of the oxide film on the surface of the molten metal as well as the surface tension values. Surface tension is an important physical parameter of the metal melts, and it plays an important role in the formation of surface oxide film. In this present work, the ignition temperature and the surface tension of Mg-9wt.%Al alloy with different Ce concentrations were studied. Surface tensions was measured using the maximum bubble pressure method (MBPM. Ignition temperature was measured using NiCr-NiSi type thermocouples and was monitored and recorded via a WXT-604 desk recording device. The results show that the ignition point of Mg-9wt.%Al alloy can be effectively elevated by adding Ce. The ignition temperature reaches its highest point of 720 ℃ when the addition of Ce is 1wt.%. The surface tension of the molten Mg-9wt.%Al alloy decreases exponentially with the increase of Ce addition at the same temperature. Similarly, the experiment also shows that the surface tension of Mg-9wt.%Al alloy decreases exponentially with the increase of temperature.

  14. A benchmark initiative on mantle convection with melting and melt segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeling, Harro; Dannberg, Juliane; Dohmen, Janik; Kalousova, Klara; Maurice, Maxim; Noack, Lena; Plesa, Ana; Soucek, Ondrej; Spiegelman, Marc; Thieulot, Cedric; Tosi, Nicola; Wallner, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    In recent years a number of mantle convection models have been developed which include partial melting within the asthenosphere, estimation of melt volumes, as well as melt extraction with and without redistribution at the surface or within the lithosphere. All these approaches use various simplifying modelling assumptions whose effects on the dynamics of convection including the feedback on melting have not been explored in sufficient detail. To better assess the significance of such assumptions and to provide test cases for the modelling community we carry out a benchmark comparison. The reference model is taken from the mantle convection benchmark, cases 1a to 1c (Blankenbach et al., 1989), assuming a square box with free slip boundary conditions, the Boussinesq approximation, constant viscosity and Rayleigh numbers of 104 to 10^6. Melting is modelled using a simplified binary solid solution with linearly depth dependent solidus and liquidus temperatures, as well as a solidus temperature depending linearly on depletion. Starting from a plume free initial temperature condition (to avoid melting at the onset time) five cases are investigated: Case 1 includes melting, but without thermal or dynamic feedback on the convection flow. This case provides a total melt generation rate (qm) in a steady state. Case 2 is identical to case 1 except that latent heat is switched on. Case 3 includes batch melting, melt buoyancy (melt Rayleigh number Rm) and depletion buoyancy, but no melt percolation. Output quantities are the Nusselt number (Nu), root mean square velocity (vrms), the maximum and the total melt volume and qm approaching a statistical steady state. Case 4 includes two-phase flow, i.e. melt percolation, assuming a constant shear and bulk viscosity of the matrix and various melt retention numbers (Rt). These cases are carried out using the Compaction Boussinseq Approximation (Schmeling, 2000) or the full compaction formulation. For cases 1 - 3 very good agreement

  15. Analysis of solidification and melting of Pcm with energy generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiji, Latif M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The City College of the City University of New York, New York, NY 10031 (United States); Gaye, Salif [Ecole Superieure Polytechnique, Enseignant a l' ESP BP A10, Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, Thies (Senegal)

    2006-04-01

    One-dimensional solidification and melting of a slab with uniform volumetric energy generation is examined analytically. A sudden change in surface temperature triggers phase transformation and interface motion. Analytic solutions are obtained using a quasi-steady approximation. Unlike solidification, the melting case is characterized by a pure liquid phase and a mixture of solid and liquid at the fusion temperature. The solution is governed by a single energy generation parameter. Temperature profiles, interface location and steady state conditions are presented for solidification and melting. Results are applied to two examples: solidification of a nuclear material and melting of ice. [Author].

  16. Estimation of sea surface temperature (SST) using marine seismic data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sinha, S.K.; Dewangan, P.; Sain, K.

    .g. Wu et al. [1999]). However, due to the skin effect, sea surface temperatures as measured by satellites can be very different from temperatures a few centimeters below the sea surface (i.e. in-situ temperatures) [Emery et al., 1994]. Therefore...

  17. Noncontact Monitoring of Surface Temperature Distribution by Laser Ultrasound Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Akira; Ihara, Ikuo

    2011-07-01

    A laser ultrasound scanning method for measuring a surface temperature distribution of a heated material is presented. An experiment using an aluminum plate heated up to 120 °C is carried out to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. A series of one-dimensional surface acoustic wave (SAW) measurements within an area of a square on the aluminum surface are performed by scanning a pulsed laser for generating SAW using a galvanometer system, where the SAWs are detected at a fixed location on the surface. An inverse analysis is then applied to SAW data to determine the surface temperature distribution in a certain direction. The two-dimensional distribution of the surface temperature in the square is constructed by combining the one-dimensional surface temperature distributions obtained within the square. The surface temperature distributions obtained by the proposed method almost agrees with those obtained using an infrared radiation camera.

  18. Temperature of Earth's Deep Interior Constrained from Melting of Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 at High Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Zhao, J.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Hu, M. Y.; Toellner, T.; Murphy, C. A.; Prakapenka, V.

    2015-12-01

    The melting points of fcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe have been measured up to Mbar pressure. We use laser heated diamond anvil cells, time-resolved synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and a recently developed fast temperature readout spectrometer to carry out these measurements. X-ray photons at 57Fe's resonant energy with 1 meV bandwidth are focused on the sample in a laser heated diamond anvil cell, and when melting occurs, the characteristic Mössbauer signal abruptly decreases. Thus, time-resolved Mössbauer spectroscopy provides an excellent diagnostic for the first melt formed in the sample chamber. The thermal contributions of pressure of Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe have been constrained by combining nuclear resonant inelastic scattering and high temperature X-ray diffraction measurements. We find that the melting curve of Fe is systematically higher than the melting curve of Fe0.9Ni0.1, while the 1-σ temperature uncertainties of both melting curves overlap. The pressure dependencies of the melting temperature of fcc-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 are measured, and the best-fit melting curves are located in the region bounded by previous studies. Our results may help reach a consensus on the high pressure melting curves of Fe and Fe-Ni alloys. We calculate the fcc-hcp-liquid triple points of Fe0.9Ni0.1and Fe, complemented by experiments with Mössbauer spectroscopy. The upper bound of Earth's inner core-outer core boundary temperature is estimated from our results, and the upper bound of the temperature at Earth's core-mantle boundary is computed with an adiabatic model. We discuss the implications of these temperatures on the phase relations of deep Earth materials. References:Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and B. Chen (2011): Melting and thermal pressure of hcp-Fe from the phonon density of states, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 188, 114-120 Jackson, J.M., W. Sturhahn, M. Lerche, J. Zhao, T.S. Toellner, E.E. Alp, S.V. Sinogeikin, J

  19. Bone ingrowth potential of electron beam and selective laser melting produced trabecular-like implant surfaces with and without a biomimetic coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, J.E.; Hannink, G.J.; Verdonschot, N.J.; Buma, P.

    2013-01-01

    The bone ingrowth potential of trabecular-like implant surfaces produced by either selective laser melting (SLM) or electron beam melting (EBM), with or without a biomimetic calciumphosphate coating, was examined in goats. For histological analysis and histomorphometry of bone ingrowth depth and bon

  20. Bone ingrowth potential of electron beam and selective laser melting produced trabecular-like implant surfaces with and without a biomimetic coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, J.E.; Hannink, G.J.; Verdonschot, N.J.; Buma, P.

    2013-01-01

    The bone ingrowth potential of trabecular-like implant surfaces produced by either selective laser melting (SLM) or electron beam melting (EBM), with or without a biomimetic calciumphosphate coating, was examined in goats. For histological analysis and histomorphometry of bone ingrowth depth and

  1. Polymeric Shape-Memory Micro-Patterned Surface for Switching Wettability with Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria García-Huete

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An innovative method to switch the wettability of a micropatterned polymeric surface by thermally induced shape memory effect is presented. For this purpose, first polycyclooctene (PCO is crosslinked with dycumil peroxide (DCP and its melting temperature, which corresponds with the switching transition temperature (Ttrans, is measured by Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA in tension mode. Later, the shape memory behavior of the bulk material is analyzed under different experimental conditions employing a cyclic thermomechanical analysis (TMA. Finally, after creating shape memory micropillars by laser ablation of crosslinked thermo-active polycyclooctene (PCO, shape memory response and associated effect on water contact angle is analyzed. Thus, deformed micropillars cause lower contact angle on the surface from reduced roughness, but the original hydrophobicity is restored by thermally induced recovery of the original surface structure.

  2. A Climate-Data Record (CDR) of the "Clear-Sky" Surface Temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Comiso, Josefino C.; DiGirolamo, Nocolo E.; Shuman, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a climate-data record (CDR) of "clear-sky" ice-surface temperature (IST) of the Greenland Ice Sheet using Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. The CDR provides daily and monthly-mean IST from March 2000 through December 2010 on a polar stereographic projection at a resolution of 6.25 km. The CDR is amenable to extension into the future using Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) data. Regional "clear-sky" surface temperature increases since the early 1980s in the Arctic, measured using Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) infrared data, range from 0.57 +/- 0.02 to 0.72 +/- 0.1 c per decade. Arctic warming has important implications for ice-sheet mass balance because much of the periphery of the Greenland Ice Sheet is already near O C during the melt season, and is thus vulnerable to rapid melting if temperatures continue to increase. An increase in melting of the ice sheet would accelerate sea-level rise, an issue affecting potentially billions of people worldwide. The IST CDR will provide a convenient data set for modelers and for climatologists to track changes of the surface temperature of the ice sheet as a whole and of the individual drainage basins on the ice sheet. The daily and monthly maps will provide information on surface melt as well as "clear-sky" temperature. The CDR will be further validated by comparing results with automatic-weather station data and with satellite-derived surface-temperature products.

  3. In-situ observation of isothermal CaSiO3 crystallization in CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 melts: A study of the effects of temperature and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Chen, Gong; Yan, Peng-Cheng; Planpain, Bart; Moelans, Nele; Guo, Muxing

    2014-09-01

    The crystallization behavior of CaSiO3 in different CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 melts was comprehensively investigated in-situ with a confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) over a wide range of temperatures. The observations clearly indicate a transition from a faceted to dendritic crystal morphology with decreasing temperature. The undercooling required for dendritic growth increases with decreasing Al2O3 (under same basicity) and increasing basicity. The dendrite structure becomes finer at higher growth rates with a lower Al2O3 and higher basicity. The growth rates of different dendrites are time-independent. With increasing temperature, the growth rate first increases and then decreases. The observed dendrite tip radii are compared with those obtained from Ivantsov theory in 2D and 3D. With decreasing temperature, the growth conditions in the CSLM experiments appeared to shift from 3D (with the dendrite tip below the surface melt) close to 2D (with the dendrite tip on top of the surface melt).

  4. Surface Substructure and Properties of ZrB2p/6061Al Composite Treated by Laser Surface Melting under Extreme Cooling Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yida; Chao, Yuhjin; Luo, Zhen; Huang, Yongxian; Cai, Yangchuan; Deng, Lingzhu; Guo, Weijia; Lei, Yuchen; Lu, Tong; Wang, Zihao

    2017-01-01

    Particulate reinforcement composite ZrB2p/6061Al was fabricated from Al-K2ZrF6-KBF4 by a direct melt reaction. Laser surface melting was used to improve the surface strength of the in situ ZrB2p/6061Al composite, which includes a series of laser-melted composites with different laser power and cooling conditions processed by a 2-kW yttrium aluminum garnet laser generator. The surface substructure of these laser-treated specimens was investigated by light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry and transmission electron microscopy. The penetration depth of the molten pool increases with increases in power density, and decreases with increases in the degree of undercooling. The Vickers hardness of the laser-melted composites reached 60-75.2 HV in liquid nitrogen and 56-64.0 HV in air, and increased by 50.4 % and 28 %. Grain refinement with decreased cellular spacing is important in strength performance. Because of a thermocapillary flow vortex and α-Al phase precipitation, nano-ZrB2 particles were distributed along the cellular dendrite boundary as observed by scanning electron microscopy. This was considered to be a key factor responsible for the improved mechanical composite properties. When cooling under liquid nitrogen, the thermal mismatch stress between particles and the matrix generates a high dislocation density. The dislocation grows along the interface between the matrix and particles and provides the laser-melted composites with additional strength.

  5. Surface chemistry of Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaithilingam, Jayasheelan; Prina, Elisabetta; Goodridge, Ruth D; Hague, Richard J M; Edmondson, Steve; Rose, Felicity R A J; Christie, Steven D R

    2016-10-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) has previously been shown to be a viable method for fabricating biomedical implants; however, the surface chemistry of SLM fabricated parts is poorly understood. In this study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the surface chemistries of (a) SLM as-fabricated (SLM-AF) Ti6Al4V and (b) SLM fabricated and mechanically polished (SLM-MP) Ti6Al4V samples and compared with (c) traditionally manufactured (forged) and mechanically polished Ti6Al4V samples. The SLM-AF surface was observed to be porous with an average surface roughness (Ra) of 17.6±3.7μm. The surface chemistry of the SLM-AF was significantly different to the FGD-MP surface with respect to elemental distribution and their existence on the outermost surface. Sintered particles on the SLM-AF surface were observed to affect depth profiling of the sample due to a shadowing effect during argon ion sputtering. Surface heterogeneity was observed for all three surfaces; however, vanadium was witnessed only on the mechanically polished (SLM-MP and FGD-MP) surfaces. The direct and indirect 3T3 cell cytotoxicity studies revealed that the cells were viable on the SLM fabricated Ti6Al4V parts. The varied surface chemistry of the SLM-AF and SLM-MP did not influence the cell behaviour.

  6. Adiabatic Joule Heating of Copper from 4 K to the Melting Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Guillet, Alain; Delamarre, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Considering a copper wire heated by Joule effect and the variation of its resistivity and specific heat with temperature, we established numerical and analytical solutions (between 293 and 1356 K for the latter) for the evolution of its temperature over time. The Temperature vs. Time evolution follows a Lambertian function. The calculations are based on the assumption of adiabatic heating and uniform current distribution within the wire. We demonstrate that at very low temperature the heating...

  7. Technique for the estimation of surface temperatures from embedded temperature sensing for rapid, high energy surface deposition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Tyson R.; Schunk, Peter Randall; Roberts, Scott Alan

    2014-07-01

    Temperature histories on the surface of a body that has been subjected to a rapid, highenergy surface deposition process can be di cult to determine, especially if it is impossible to directly observe the surface or attach a temperature sensor to it. In this report, we explore two methods for estimating the temperature history of the surface through the use of a sensor embedded within the body very near to the surface. First, the maximum sensor temperature is directly correlated with the peak surface temperature. However, it is observed that the sensor data is both delayed in time and greatly attenuated in magnitude, making this approach unfeasible. Secondly, we propose an algorithm that involves tting the solution to a one-dimensional instantaneous energy solution problem to both the sensor data and to the results of a one-dimensional CVFEM code. This algorithm is shown to be able to estimate the surface temperature 20 C.

  8. Ikaite crystals in melting sea ice – implications for pCO2 and pH levels in Arctic surface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. G. Leakey

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A major issue of Arctic marine science is to understand whether the Arctic Ocean is, or will be, a source or sink for air-sea CO2 exchange. This has been complicated by the recent discoveries of ikaite (CaCO3·6H2O in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice, which indicate that multiple chemical transformations occur in sea ice with a possible effect on CO2 and pH conditions in surface waters. Here we report on biogeochemical conditions, microscopic examinations and x-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals from an actively melting 1.7 km2 (0.5–1 m thick drifting ice floe in the Fram Strait during summer. Our findings show that ikaite crystals are present throughout the sea ice but with larger crystals appearing in the upper ice layers. Ikaite crystals placed at elevated temperatures gradually disintegrated into smaller crystallites and dissolved. During our field campaign in late June, melt reduced the ice flow thickness by ca. 0.2 m per week and resulted in an estimated 1.6 ppm decrease of pCO2 in the ocean surface mixed layer. This corresponds to an air-sea CO2 uptake of 11 mmol m−2 sea ice d−1 or to 3.5 ton km−2 ice floe week−1.

  9. Determination of Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Potential Urban Heat Island Effect in Parts of Lagos State using Satellite ... Changes in temperature appear to be closely related to concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  10. Modelling of the isothermal replication of surface microstructures in polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Eriksson, Torbjörn Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    to the incoming molten plastic flow. Just before the flow-front of the melt reached the end of the inserts the polymer was frozen. The replicated PC and PS micro-structures were examined using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Uniaxial elongational viscosity and linear viscoelasticity were used...

  11. The effects of polymer melt rheology on the replication of surface microstructures in isothermal moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Torbjörn Gerhard; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    Series of isothermal compression moulding experiments were performed with a polycarbonate and a polystyrene melt in a hot press. The bottom plate in the hot press was equipped with a microstructured nickel insert. The insert contained 10 parallel, rectangularly shaped microchannels with a depth o...

  12. Greenland Ice Sheet Melt from MODIS and Associated Atmospheric Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa; Hall, Dorothy K.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Worthen, Denise L.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2014-01-01

    Daily June-July melt fraction variations over the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) derived from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (2000-2013) are associated with atmospheric blocking forming an omega-shape ridge over the GIS at 500hPa height (from NCEPNCAR). Blocking activity with a range of time scales, from synoptic waves breaking poleward ( 5 days) to full-fledged blocks (5 days), brings warm subtropical air masses over the GIS controlling daily surface temperatures and melt. The temperature anomaly of these subtropical air mass intrusions is also important for melting. Based on the largest MODIS melt years (2002 and 2012), the area-average temperature anomaly of 2 standard deviations above the 14-year June-July mean, results in a melt fraction of 40 or more. Summer 2007 had the most blocking days, however atmospheric temperature anomalies were too small to instigate extreme melting.

  13. Influence of Contact Angle, Growth Angle and Melt Surface Tension on Detached Solidification of InSb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhen; Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.

    2000-01-01

    We extended the previous analysis of detached solidification of InSb based on the moving meniscus model. We found that for steady detached solidification to occur in a sealed ampoule in zero gravity, it is necessary for the growth angle to exceed a critical value, the contact angle for the melt on the ampoule wall to exceed a critical value, and the melt-gas surface tension to be below a critical value. These critical values would depend on the material properties and the growth parameters. For the conditions examined here, the sum of the growth angle and the contact angle must exceed approximately 130, which is significantly less than required if both ends of the ampoule are open.

  14. Growth of GaAs from a free surface melt under controlled arsenic pressure in a partially confined configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatos, H. C.; Lagowski, J.; Wu, Y.

    1988-01-01

    A partially confined configuration for the growth of GaAs from melt in space was developed, consisting of a triangular prism containing the seed crystal and source material in the form of a rod. It is suggested that the configuration overcomes two obstacles in the growth of GaAs in space: total confinement in a quartz crucible and lack of arsenic pressure control. Ground tests of the configuration show that it is capable of crystal growth in space and is useful for studying the growth of GaAs from a free-surface melt on earth. The resulting chemical composition, electrical property variations, and phenomenological models to account for the results are presented.

  15. Crystal structure and nanotopographical features on the surface of heat-treated and anodized porous titanium biomaterials produced using selective laser melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin Yavari, S., E-mail: s.aminyavari@tudelft.nl [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); FT Innovations BV, Braamsluiper 1, 5831 PW Boxmeer (Netherlands); Wauthle, R. [KU Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Section Production Engineering, Machine Design and Automation (PMA), Celestijnenlaan 300B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); LayerWise NV, Kapeldreef 60, Leuven (Belgium); Böttger, A.J. [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Schrooten, J. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 PB 2450, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Weinans, H. [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Department of Orthopedics and Department of Rheumatology, UMC Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Zadpoor, A.A. [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-01-30

    Porous titanium biomaterials manufactured using additive manufacturing techniques such as selective laser melting are considered promising materials for orthopedic applications where the biomaterial needs to mimic the properties of bone. Despite their appropriate mechanical properties and the ample pore space they provide for bone ingrowth and osseointegration, porous titanium structures have an intrinsically bioinert surface and need to be subjected to surface bio-functionalizing procedures to enhance their in vivo performance. In this study, we used a specific anodizing process to build a hierarchical oxide layer on the surface of porous titanium structures made by selective laser melting of Ti6Al4V ELI powder. The hierarchical structure included both nanotopographical features (nanotubes) and micro-features (micropits). After anodizing, the biomaterial was heat treated in Argon at different temperatures ranging between 400 and 600 °C for either 1 or 2 h to improve its bioactivity. The effects of applied heat treatment on the crystal structure of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes and the nanotopographical features of the surface were studied using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was shown that the transition from the initial crystal structure, i.e. anatase, to rutile occurs between 500 and 600 °C and that after 2 h of heat treatment at 600 °C the crystal structure is predominantly rutile. The nanotopographical features of the surface were found to be largely unchanged for heat treatments carried out at 500 °C or below, whereas they were partially or largely disrupted after heat treatment at 600 °C. The possible implications of these findings for the bioactivity of porous titanium structures are discussed.

  16. Crystal structure and nanotopographical features on the surface of heat-treated and anodized porous titanium biomaterials produced using selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin Yavari, S.; Wauthle, R.; Böttger, A. J.; Schrooten, J.; Weinans, H.; Zadpoor, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Porous titanium biomaterials manufactured using additive manufacturing techniques such as selective laser melting are considered promising materials for orthopedic applications where the biomaterial needs to mimic the properties of bone. Despite their appropriate mechanical properties and the ample pore space they provide for bone ingrowth and osseointegration, porous titanium structures have an intrinsically bioinert surface and need to be subjected to surface bio-functionalizing procedures to enhance their in vivo performance. In this study, we used a specific anodizing process to build a hierarchical oxide layer on the surface of porous titanium structures made by selective laser melting of Ti6Al4V ELI powder. The hierarchical structure included both nanotopographical features (nanotubes) and micro-features (micropits). After anodizing, the biomaterial was heat treated in Argon at different temperatures ranging between 400 and 600 °C for either 1 or 2 h to improve its bioactivity. The effects of applied heat treatment on the crystal structure of TiO2 nanotubes and the nanotopographical features of the surface were studied using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was shown that the transition from the initial crystal structure, i.e. anatase, to rutile occurs between 500 and 600 °C and that after 2 h of heat treatment at 600 °C the crystal structure is predominantly rutile. The nanotopographical features of the surface were found to be largely unchanged for heat treatments carried out at 500 °C or below, whereas they were partially or largely disrupted after heat treatment at 600 °C. The possible implications of these findings for the bioactivity of porous titanium structures are discussed.

  17. Temperature dependent droplet impact dynamics on flat and textured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azar Alizadeh; Vaibhav Bahadur; Sheng Zhong; Wen Shang; Ri Li; James Ruud; Masako Yamada; Liehi Ge; Ali Dhinojwala; Manohar S Sohal (047160)

    2012-03-01

    Droplet impact dynamics determines the performance of surfaces used in many applications such as anti-icing, condensation, boiling and heat transfer. We study impact dynamics of water droplets on surfaces with chemistry/texture ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and across a temperature range spanning below freezing to near boiling conditions. Droplet retraction shows very strong temperature dependence especially for hydrophilic surfaces; it is seen that lower substrate temperatures lead to lesser retraction. Physics-based analyses show that the increased viscosity associated with lower temperatures can explain the decreased retraction. The present findings serve to guide further studies of dynamic fluid-structure interaction at various temperatures.

  18. A theory of multilayer adsorption on rough surfaces in terms of clustering and melting BET piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerofolini, G. F.; Meda, L.

    1998-10-01

    An equation is proposed on theoretical grounds for the description of equilibrium adsorption of vapours below their critical temperature on solid adsorbents. Like in the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) theory, each surface site is described as the origin of an adsorbed pile; differently from the BET theory, however, the piles are allowed to undergo a branching process when the equilibrium pressure is increased; vapour condensation is assumed to occur when all the available space is filled. This growth is described by an isotherm behaving as the BET equation in the monolayer region, as the Anderson or Brunauer-Skalny-Bodor extension of the BET equation just above the monolayer, and as the Frenkel-Halsey-Hill equation at higher coverage. For suitable choice of its free parameters, the proposed equation accounts for all isotherms of type I, II and III of Brunauer classification.

  19. Rotation of a melting ice at the surface of a pool

    CERN Document Server

    Dorbolo, S; Dubois, C; Caps, H; Vandewalle, N; Darbois-Texier, B

    2015-01-01

    Large circular ice blocks up to 80 m of diameter have been observed on frozen river around the world. This rare event has been reported in a publication in 1993. This fascinating self-fashioned object slowly rotates at about 1$^o$ per second. In this paper, we report a model experiment consisting in a 85 mm of diameter ice disc at the surface of a thermalised pool. The rotation speed has been found to increase with the bath temperature. Using particle image velocimetry technique, we evidence the presence of a vortex below the ice block. This vortex results from the descending flow of high density water at 4$^o$C. The vorticity of the vortex induces the rotation of the ice block. This mechanism is generic of any vertical flow that generates a vortex which induces the rotation of a floating object.

  20. Laser melting of uranium carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utton, C. A.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Jardin, R.; Noel, H.; Guéneau, C.; Manara, D.

    2009-03-01

    In the context of the material research aimed at supporting the development of nuclear plants of the fourth Generation, renewed interest has recently arisen in carbide fuels. A profound understanding of the behaviour of nuclear materials in extreme conditions is of prime importance for the analysis of the operation limits of nuclear fuels, and prediction of possible nuclear reactor accidents. In this context, the main goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of laser induced melting experiments on stoichiometric uranium carbides; UC, UC1.5 and UC2. Measurements were performed, at temperatures around 3000 K, under a few bars of inert gas in order to minimise vaporisation and oxidation effects, which may occur at these temperatures. Moreover, a recently developed investigation method has been employed, based on in situ analysis of the sample surface reflectivity evolution during melting. Current results, 2781 K for the melting point of UC, 2665 K for the solidus and 2681 K for the liquidus of U2C3, 2754 K for the solidus and 2770 K for the liquidus of UC2, are in fair agreement with early publications where the melting behaviour of uranium carbides was investigated by traditional furnace melting methods. Further information has been obtained in the current research about the non-congruent (solidus-liquidus) melting of certain carbides, which suggest that a solidus-liquidus scheme is followed by higher ratio carbides, possibly even for UC2.

  1. Temperature-Dependent Raman Spectra and Microstructure of Barium Metaborate Crystals and Its Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤静林; 蒋国昌; 侯怀宇; 吴永全; 陈辉; 徐匡迪

    2002-01-01

    We have measured the Raman spectra of β- and α-barium metaborate in crystal and liquid states from room temperature to 1873K, with a semiconductor laser as the laser source, coupled with a time-resolved detection system to eliminate the dense thermal emission background when temperature was considerably high.Temperature-dependent Raman spectra can clearly indicate that the phase transformation from β- to α-barium metaborate has been completed during 1273 - 1300 K. Variations of different kinds of microstructure units with temperature are identified and discussed.

  2. Melting relations in the Fe-S-Si system at high pressure and temperature: Implications for the thermal structure of the planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakairi, T.; Ohtani, E.; Sakai, T.; Kamada, S.; Sakamaki, T.; Hirao, N.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the Earth's core is mainly composed of iron and contains light elements to account for its density deficit. Alloying with light elements significantly affects the physical properties of iron and depresses its melting temperature. Therefore, the melting relation of the Fe-light elements system is the key to clarify the thermal structure of the Earth's core. Although there are many candidates for light elements in the core, sulfur and silicon are considered to be the major light elements. Some geochemical models predicted that sulfur and silicon could be present not only in the core of the Earth but also in the core of other terrestrial planets such as Mars and Mercury. To better understand the properties of the planetary cores, we investigated the melting relations of the Fe-S-Si system under high-pressure conditions. Here, we report the melting relations in the Fe-S-Si system up to 60 GPa. Melting experiments were performed in the pressure range of 20-60 GPa and the temperature range of 1300-2500 K using a double-sided laser-heated diamond anvil cell combined with X-ray diffraction technique. In situ X-ray diffraction experiments were conducted at the BL10XU beamline of the SPring-8 facility. The melting detection was based on disappearance of the X-ray diffraction peaks of the sample. On the basis of X-ray diffraction patterns, we confirmed that iron-silicon alloy which hcp and fcc structure and Fe3S are stable phases under subsolidus conditions. Both solidus and liquidus temperatures are significantly lower than the melting temperature of pure Fe and increases with pressure in this study. In order to draw the melting curve as a function of pressure, we fitted the present results using the Simon's equation. Our results could provide important constraints on the thermal structure of the planetary cores.

  3. Ablation from calving and surface melt at lake-terminating Bridge Glacier, British Columbia, 1984-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernos, M.; Koppes, M.; Moore, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    Bridge Glacier is a lake-calving glacier in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia and has retreated over 3.55 km since 1972. The majority of this retreat has occurred since 1991. This retreat is substantially greater than what has been inferred from regional climate indices, suggesting that it has been driven primarily by calving as the glacier retreated across an overdeepened basin. In order to better understand the primary drivers of ablation, surface melt (below the equilibrium line altitude, ELA) and calving were quantified during the 2013 melt season using a distributed energy balance model (DEBM) and time-lapse imagery. Calving, estimated using areal change, velocity measurements, and assuming flotation were responsible for 23 % of the glacier's ablation below the ELA during the 2013 melt season and were limited by modest flow speeds and a small terminus cross-section. Calving and surface melt estimates from 1984 to 2013 suggest that calving was consistently a smaller contributor of ablation. Although calving was estimated to be responsible for up to 49 % of the glacier's ablation for individual seasons, averaged over multiple summers it accounted between 10 and 25 %. Calving was enhanced primarily by buoyancy and water depths, and fluxes were greatest between 2005 and 2010 as the glacier retreated over the deepest part of Bridge Lake. The recent rapid rate of calving is part of a transient stage in the glacier's retreat and is expected to diminish within 10 years as the terminus recedes into shallower water at the proximal end of the lake. These findings are in line with observations from other lake-calving glacier studies across the globe and suggest a common large-scale pattern in calving-induced retreat in lake-terminating alpine glaciers. Despite enhancing glacial retreat, calving remains a relatively small component of ablation and is expected to decrease in importance in the future. Hence, surface melt remains the primary driver of ablation at Bridge

  4. The impact of coniferous forest temperature on incoming longwave radiation to melting snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments were conducted in Rocky Mountain evergreen forests of differing density, insolation and latitude to test whether air temperatures are suitable surrogates for canopy temperature in estimating sub-canopy longwave irradiance to snow. Under conditions of low to no insolation then air temper...

  5. Very high-temperature impact melt products as evidence for cosmic airbursts and impacts 12,900 years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Ted E; Hermes, Robert E; Moore, Andrew M T; Kennett, Douglas J; Weaver, James C; Wittke, James H; DeCarli, Paul S; Bischoff, James L; Hillman, Gordon C; Howard, George A; Kimbel, David R; Kletetschka, Gunther; Lipo, Carl P; Sakai, Sachiko; Revay, Zsolt; West, Allen; Firestone, Richard B; Kennett, James P

    2012-07-10

    It has been proposed that fragments of an asteroid or comet impacted Earth, deposited silica- and iron-rich microspherules and other proxies across several continents, and triggered the Younger Dryas cooling episode 12,900 years ago. Although many independent groups have confirmed the impact evidence, the hypothesis remains controversial because some groups have failed to do so. We examined sediment sequences from 18 dated Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) sites across three continents (North America, Europe, and Asia), spanning 12,000 km around nearly one-third of the planet. All sites display abundant microspherules in the YDB with none or few above and below. In addition, three sites (Abu Hureyra, Syria; Melrose, Pennsylvania; and Blackville, South Carolina) display vesicular, high-temperature, siliceous scoria-like objects, or SLOs, that match the spherules geochemically. We compared YDB objects with melt products from a known cosmic impact (Meteor Crater, Arizona) and from the 1945 Trinity nuclear airburst in Socorro, New Mexico, and found that all of these high-energy events produced material that is geochemically and morphologically comparable, including: (i) high-temperature, rapidly quenched microspherules and SLOs; (ii) corundum, mullite, and suessite (Fe(3)Si), a rare meteoritic mineral that forms under high temperatures; (iii) melted SiO(2) glass, or lechatelierite, with flow textures (or schlieren) that form at > 2,200 °C; and (iv) particles with features indicative of high-energy interparticle collisions. These results are inconsistent with anthropogenic, volcanic, authigenic, and cosmic materials, yet consistent with cosmic ejecta, supporting the hypothesis of extraterrestrial airbursts/impacts 12,900 years ago. The wide geographic distribution of SLOs is consistent with multiple impactors.

  6. Melt Inclusion Analysis of RBT 04262 with Relationship to Shergottites and Mars Surface Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S. A.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Martian meteorite RBT 04262 is in the shergottite class. It displays the two lithologies typically found in "lherzolitic shergottites": one with a poikilitic texture of large pyroxene enclosing olivine and another with non-poikilitic texture. In the case of RBT 04262, the latter strongly ressembles an olivine- phyric shergottite which led the initial classification of this meteorite in that class. RBT 04262 has been studied with regards to its petrology, geochemistry and cosmic ray exposure and belongs to the enriched oxidized end-member of the shergottites. Studies on RBT 04262 have primarily focused on the bulk rock composition or each of the lithologies independently. To further elucidate RBT 04262's petrology and use it to better understand Martian geologic history, an in-depth study of its melt inclusions (MI) is being conducted. The MI chosen for this study are found within olivine grains. MI are thought to be trapped melts of the crystallizing magma preserved by the encapsulating olivine and offer snapshots of the composition of the magma as it evolves. Some MI, in the most Mg-rich part of the olivine of olivine-pyric shergottites, may even be representative of the meteorite parent melt.

  7. Estimation of Surface Heat Flux and Surface Temperature during Inverse Heat Conduction under Varying Spray Parameters and Sample Initial Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aamir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck’s sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m2 was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa.

  8. Estimation of surface heat flux and surface temperature during inverse heat conduction under varying spray parameters and sample initial temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Aqeel-ur-Rehman; Wang, Hong; Zubair, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm) 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck's sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF) within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m(2) was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa.

  9. Induction heating pure vapor source of high temperature melting point materials on electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsumi, Osamu; Kato, Yushi; Matsui, Yuuki; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Uchida, Takashi; Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2010-02-01

    Multicharged ions that are needed are produced from solid pure material with high melting point in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. We develop an evaporator by using induction heating (IH) with multilayer induction coil, which is made from bare molybdenum or tungsten wire without water cooling and surrounding the pure vaporized material. We optimize the shapes of induction coil and vaporized materials and operation of rf power supply. We conduct experiment to investigate the reproducibility and stability in the operation and heating efficiency. IH evaporator produces pure material vapor because materials directly heated by eddy currents have no contact with insulated materials, which are usually impurity gas sources. The power and the frequency of the induction currents range from 100 to 900 W and from 48 to 23 kHz, respectively. The working pressure is about 10(-4)-10(-3) Pa. We measure the temperature of the vaporized materials with different shapes, and compare them with the result of modeling. We estimate the efficiency of the IH vapor source. We are aiming at the evaporator's higher melting point material than that of iron.

  10. Interaction processes between vacancies and dislocations in molybdenum in the temperature range around 0.3 of the melting temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelada-Lambri, G.I. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Avenida Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Lambri, O.A. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Avenida Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica Rosario, Member of the CONICET' s Research Staff (Argentina)], E-mail: olambri@fceia.unr.edu.ar; Bozzano, P.B. [Laboratorio de Microscopia Electronica, Unidad de Actividad Materiales, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin (Argentina); Garcia, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao, Pais Vasco (Spain); Celauro, C.A. [Reactor Nuclear RA-4, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Riobamba y Berruti, 2000 Rosario (Argentina)

    2008-10-15

    Mechanical spectroscopy, electrical resistivity and transmission electron microscopy studies have been performed on pre-strained neutron irradiated single crystalline molybdenum in order to check the interaction processes between vacancies and dislocations in the temperature range between room temperature and 1273 K. The anelastic relaxation in molybdenum which appears between 800 K and 1273 K has been separated in two different physical mechanisms depending on the temperature of appearance of the relaxation peak. The physical mechanism which controls the damping peak appearing at around 800 K was related with the dragging of jogs by the dislocation under movement assisted by vacancy diffusion. The damping peak which appears at higher temperatures of about 1000 K was more consistent with the formation and diffusion of vacancies assisted by the dislocation movement.

  11. Hot melt extrusion for amorphous solid dispersions: temperature and moisture activated drug-polymer interactions for enhanced stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarode, Ashish L; Sandhu, Harpreet; Shah, Navnit; Malick, Waseem; Zia, Hossein

    2013-10-07

    Hot melt extrudates (HMEs) of indomethacin (IND) with Eudragit EPO and Kollidon VA 64 and those of itraconazole (ITZ) with HPMCAS-LF and Kollidon VA 64 were manufactured using a Leistritz twin screw extruder. The milled HMEs were stored at controlled temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were collected after specified time periods for 3 months. The stability of amorphous HMEs was assessed using moisture analysis, thermal evaluation, powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, HPLC, and dissolution study. In general, the moisture content increased with time, temperature, and humidity levels. Amorphous ITZ was physically unstable at very high temperature and humidity levels, and its recrystallization was detected in the HMEs manufactured using Kollidon VA 64. Although physical stability of IND was better sustained by both Eudragit EPO and Kollidon VA 64, chemical degradation of the drug was identified in the stability samples of HMEs with Eudragit EPO stored at 50 °C. The dissolution rates and the supersaturation levels were significantly decreased for the stability samples in which crystallization was detected. Interestingly, the supersaturation was improved for the stability samples of IND:Eudragit EPO and ITZ:HPMCAS-LF, in which no physical or chemical instability was observed. This enhancement in supersaturation was attributed to the temperature and moisture activated electrostatic interactions between the drugs and their counterionic polymers.

  12. Predicting monsoon rainfall and pressure indices from sea surface temperature

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.

    The relationship between the sea surface temperature (SST) in the Indian Ocean and monsoon rainfall has been examined by using 21 years data set (1967-87) of MOHSST.6 (Met. Office Historical Sea Surface Temperature data set, obtained from U.K. Met...

  13. Metal surface temperature induced by moving laser beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, G.R.B.E.; Meijer, J.

    1995-01-01

    Whenever a metal is irradiated with a laser beam, electromagnetic energy is transformed into heat in a thin surface layer. The maximum surface temperature is the most important quantity which determines the processing result. Expressions for this maximum temperature are provided by the literature fo

  14. Recent trends in sea surface temperature off Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lluch-Cota, S.E.; Tripp-Valdéz, M.; Lluch-Cota, D.B.; Lluch-Belda, D.; Verbesselt, J.; Herrera-Cervantes, H.; Bautista-Romero, J.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in global mean sea surface temperature may have potential negative implications for natural and socioeconomic systems; however, measurements to predict trends in different regions have been limited and sometimes contradictory. In this study, an assessment of sea surface temperature change si

  15. Recent trends in sea surface temperature off Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lluch-Cota, S.E.; Tripp-Valdéz, M.; Lluch-Cota, D.B.; Lluch-Belda, D.; Verbesselt, J.; Herrera-Cervantes, H.; Bautista-Romero, J.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in global mean sea surface temperature may have potential negative implications for natural and socioeconomic systems; however, measurements to predict trends in different regions have been limited and sometimes contradictory. In this study, an assessment of sea surface temperature change

  16. Reintroducing radiometric surface temperature into the Penman-Monteith formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mallick, Kaniska; Bøgh, Eva; Trebs, Ivonne;

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate a novel method to physically integrate radiometric surface temperature (TR) into the Penman-Monteith (PM) formulation for estimating the terrestrial sensible and latent heat fluxes (H and λE) in the framework of a modified Surface Temperature Initiated Closure (STIC). It combi...

  17. Interferometric measurements of sea surface temperature and emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Lars; Bakan, Stephan

    1997-09-01

    A new multispectral method to derive sea surface emissivity and temperature by using interferometer measurements of the near surface upwelling radiation in the infrared window region is presented. As reflected sky radiation adds substantial spectral variability to the otherwise spectrally smooth surface radiation, an appropriate estimate of surface emissivity allows the measured upwelling radiation to be corrected for the reflected sky component. The remaining radiation, together with the estimated surface emissivity, yields an estimate of the sea surface temperature. Measurements from an ocean pier in the Baltic Sea in October 1995 indicate an accuracy of about 0.1 K for the sea surface temperature thus derived. A strong sea surface skin effect of about 0.6 K is found in that particular case.

  18. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Surface/Near Surface Indication - Characterization of Surface Anomalies from Magnetic Particle and Liquid Penetrant Indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, John [university of Alabama - Birmingham

    2014-02-20

    The systematic study and characterization of surface indications has never been conducted. Producers and users of castings do not have any data on which they can reliably communicate the nature of these indications or their effect on the performance of parts. Clearly, the ultimate intent of any work in this area is to eliminate indications that do in fact degrade properties. However, it may be impractical physically and/or financially to eliminate all surface imperfections. This project focused on the ones that actually degrade properties. The initial work was to identify those that degrade properties. Accurate numerical simulations of casting service performance allow designers to use the geometric flexibility of castings and the superior properties of steel to produce lighter weight and more energy efficient components for transportation systems (cars and trucks), construction, and mining. Accurate simulations increase the net melting energy efficiency by improving casting yield and reducing rework and scrap. Conservatively assuming a 10% improvement in yield, approximately 1.33 x 1012 BTU/year can be saved with this technology. In addition, CO2 emissions will be reduced by approximately 117,050 tons per year.

  19. Age-surface temperature estimation model: When will oil palm plantation reach the same surface temperature as natural forest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushayati, S. B.; Hermawan, R.; Meilani, R.

    2017-01-01

    Oil palm plantation has often been accused as the cause of global warming. However, along with its growth, it would be able to decrease surface temperature. The question is ‘when will the plantation be able to reach the same surface temperature as natural forest’. This research aimed to estimate the age of oil palm plantation that create similar surface temperature to those in natural forest (land cover before the opening and planting of oil palm). The method used in this research was spatial analysis of land cover and surface temperature distribution. Based on the spatial analysis of surface temperature, five points was randomly taken from each planting age (age 1 15 years). Linear regression was then employed in the analysis. The linear regression formula between surface temperature and age of oil palm plantation was Y = 26.002 – 0.1237X. Surface temperature will decrease as much as 0.1237 ° C with one year age growth oil palm. Surface temperature that was similar to the initial temperature, when the land cover was natural forest (23.04 °C), was estimated to occur when the oil palm plantation reach the age 24 year.

  20. Record Summer Melt in Greenland in 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tedesco, M.; Fettweis, X.; van den Broeke, M.R.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Smeets, C.J.P.P.; van de Berg, W.J.; Serreze, M.C.; Box, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    As Arctic temperatures increase, there is growing concern about the melting of the Greenland ice sheet, which reached a new record during the summer of 2010. Understanding the changing surface mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet requires appreciation of the close links among changes in surface a

  1. Statistical analysis of global surface air temperature and sea level using cointegration methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmith, Torben; Johansen, Søren; Thejll, Peter

    Global sea levels are rising which is widely understood as a consequence of thermal expansion and melting of glaciers and land-based ice caps. Due to physically-based models being unable to simulate observed sea level trends, semi-empirical models have been applied as an alternative for projecting...... of future sea levels. There is in this, however, potential pitfalls due to the trending nature of the time series. We apply a statistical method called cointegration analysis to observed global sea level and surface air temperature, capable of handling such peculiarities. We find a relationship between sea...... level and temperature and find that temperature causally depends on the sea level, which can be understood as a consequence of the large heat capacity of the ocean. We further find that the warming episode in the 1940s is exceptional in the sense that sea level and warming deviates from the expected...

  2. Statistical analysis of global surface temperature and sea level using cointegration methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Torben; Johansen, Søren; Thejll, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Global sea levels are rising which is widely understood as a consequence of thermal expansion and melting of glaciers and land-based ice caps. Due to the lack of representation of ice-sheet dynamics in present-day physically-based climate models being unable to simulate observed sea level trends......, semi-empirical models have been applied as an alternative for projecting of future sea levels. There is in this, however, potential pitfalls due to the trending nature of the time series. We apply a statistical method called cointegration analysis to observed global sea level and land-ocean surface air...... temperature, capable of handling such peculiarities. We find a relationship between sea level and temperature and find that temperature causally depends on the sea level, which can be understood as a consequence of the large heat capacity of the ocean. We further find that the warming episode in the 1940s...

  3. Measurement of solid-liquid interfacial energy in the In-Bi eutectic alloy at low melting temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marasli, N [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Akbulut, S [Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Ocak, Y [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Keslioglu, K [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Boeyuek, U [Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Kaya, H [Department of Science Education, Education Faculty, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Cadirli, E [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Nigde University, Nigde (Turkey)

    2007-12-19

    The Gibbs-Thomson coefficient and solid-liquid interfacial energy of the solid In solution in equilibrium with In Bi eutectic liquid have been determined to be (1.46 {+-} 0.07) x 10{sup -7} K m and (40.4 {+-} 4.0) x 10{sup -3} J m{sup -2} by observing the equilibrated grain boundary groove shapes. The grain boundary energy of the solid In solution phase has been calculated to be (79.0 {+-} 8.7) x 10{sup -3} J m{sup -2} by considering force balance at the grain boundary grooves. The thermal conductivities of the In-12.4 at.% Bi eutectic liquid phase and the solid In solution phase and their ratio at the eutectic melting temperature (72 deg. C) have also been measured with radial heat flow apparatus and Bridgman-type growth apparatus.

  4. Discrimination of closely homologous HPV types by nonisotopic in situ hybridization: definition and derivation of tissue melting temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, C S; Graham, A K; Flannery, D M; Burns, J; McGee, J O

    1990-10-01

    It is generally assumed that nucleic acid association during in situ hybridization reactions is similar to that of nucleic acid association in solution. This assumption has been investigated by detecting closely homologous human papillomavirus types 6 and 11 by in situ hybridization as a model for the evaluation of stringency conditions in clinical biopsies. By examining matched and mismatched, labelled and target sequences under various stringency conditions, empirical DNA-DNA stability curves and their derivative equations for tissue melting temperatures (Tmt) were derived. The corresponding values for Tmt are 10-20 degrees C higher than their solution equivalents. These data, supported by polymerase chain reaction experiments, demonstrate that closely homologous viral DNAs cross linked in tissue by formaldehyde fixation do not interact with the corresponding labelled probes as predicted from solution kinetic equations. This not only has theoretical implications but is also relevant to the accuracy of clinical diagnostic testing.

  5. Size-dependent melting temperature,melting entropy and melting enthalpy of metallic nanoparticles with ball shape%球形金属纳米颗粒熔化温度、熔化熵及熔化焓的尺寸效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍开拓; 陈晓明

    2014-01-01

    根据结合能的键能模型,研究了球形金属纳米颗粒熔化相关热力学量的尺寸效应。在该模型中引入3个因子:晶体致密度k因子(晶胞中原子总体积与晶胞体积的比值);β因子(晶体中表面原子与内部原子结合能的比值)和qs因子(晶面被表面原子占据的比值)。在考虑上述因子后,通过模型预测具有自由表面球形金属纳米颗粒的熔化温度、熔解熵、熔解焓等热力学量的尺寸依赖性,并将所得结果与相关实验数据、分子动力学模拟结果、液滴模型以及前人提出的模型进行了比较。结果显示,对于Au和Al纳米粒子熔化温度的尺寸效应,该模型相比之前的模型更接近实验结果,与Ag和Cu纳米粒子熔化熵与熔化焓的分子动力学结果吻合较好。%Size-dependent melting thermodynamic quantities of metallic nanoparticles with ball shape are studied theoretically based on bond energy model.Three factors are introduced in the present model. The k factor,i.e.,efficiency of space filling of crystal lattice (the ratio between the volume of the atoms in a crystal cell and that of the crystal cell).Theβfactor (the ratio between the cohesive energy of sur-face atom and interior atom of a crystal).The qs factor (the packing fraction on a surface crystalline plane).With considering these factors,the melting temerature,melting entropy and melting enthalpy of free standing metallic nahoparticles with ball shape are predicated by the present model.The obtained model is also compared with the reported experimental data ,molecular dynamics simulation results and the liquid drop model and the model by Qi.For the size effect on melting temperature of Au and Al nan-oparticles,the results show that the present model is more close to the experimental data compared with the model by Qi.Compared with the molecular dynamics simulation results,it is show that such model can successfully predict the size

  6. Atomistic Modelling of Confined Polypropylene Chains between Ferric Oxide Substrates at Melt Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gooneie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The interactions and conformational characteristics of confined molten polypropylene (PP chains between ferric oxide (Fe2O3 substrates were investigated by molecular dynamics (MD simulations. A comparative analysis of the adsorbed amount shows strong adsorption of the chains on the high-energy surface of Fe2O3. Local structures formed in the polymer film were studied utilizing density profiles, orientation of bonds, and end-to-end distance of chains. At interfacial regions, the backbone carbon-carbon bonds of the chains preferably orient in the direction parallel to the surface while the carbon-carbon bonds with the side groups show a slight tendency to orient normal to the surface. Based on the conformation tensor data, the chains are compressed in the normal direction to the substrates in the interfacial regions while they tend to flatten in parallel planes with respect to the surfaces. The orientation of the bonds as well as the overall flattening of the chains in planes parallel to the solid surfaces are almost identical to that of the unconfined PP chains. Also, the local pressure tensor is anisotropic closer to the solid surfaces of Fe2O3 indicating the influence of the confinement on the buildup imbalance of normal and tangential pressures.

  7. Ikaite crystals in melting sea ice – implications for pCO2 and pH levels in Arctic surface waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rysgaard, Søren; Glud, R.N.; Lennert, K.

    2012-01-01

    A major issue of Arctic marine science is to understand whether the Arctic Ocean is, or will be, a source or sink for air-sea CO 2 exchange. This has been complicated by the recent discoveries of ikaite (a polymorph of CaCO 3•6H 2O) in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice, which indicate that multiple...... chemical transformations occur in sea ice with a possible effect on CO 2 and pH conditions in surface waters. Here, we report on biogeochemical conditions, microscopic examinations and x-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals from a melting 1.7 km 2 (0.5-1 m thick) drifting ice floe in the Fram Strait...... during summer. Our findings show that ikaite crystals are present throughout the sea ice but with larger crystals appearing in the upper ice layers. Ikaite crystals placed at elevated temperatures disintegrated into smaller crystallites and dissolved. During our field campaign in late June, melt reduced...

  8. Surface tension and its temperature coefficient of molten tin determined with the sessile drop method at different oxygen partial pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhang Fu; Mukai, Kusuhiro; Takagi, Katsuhiko; Ohtaka, Masahiko; Huang, Wen Lai; Liu, Qiu Sheng

    2002-10-15

    The surface tension of molten tin has been determined by the sessile drop method at temperatures ranging from 523 to 1033 K and in the oxygen partial pressure (P(O(2))) range from 2.85 x 10(-19) to 8.56 x 10(-6) MPa, and its dependence on temperature and oxygen partial pressure has been analyzed. At P(O(2))=2.85 x 10(-19) and 1.06 x 10(-15) MPa, the surface tension decreases linearly with the increase of temperature and its temperature coefficients are -0.151 and -0.094 mN m(-1) K(-1), respectively. However, at high P(O(2)) (3.17 x 10(-10), 8.56 x 10(-6) MPa), the surface tension increases with the temperature near the melting point (505 K) and decreases above 723 K. The surface tension decrease with increasing P(O(2)) is much larger near the melting point than at temperatures above 823 K. The contact angle between the molten tin and the alumina substrate is 158-173 degrees, and the wettability is poor.

  9. Electrochemical Behaviors of Fe2+ and Sm3+ in Urea-NaBr Low Temperature Melt and Their Inductive Codeposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童叶翔; 刘鹏; 刘莉治; 杨绮琴

    2001-01-01

    The cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and chronoamperometry were used to study the behaviors of Fe2+ on Pt, Cu, Ag and Ti electrodes in urea-NaBr melt at 373 K. Electroreduction of Fe2+ to metallic Fe is irreversible in one step. The exchange current density determined on Ti electrode is 2.68×10-5 A·cm-2. Sm3+ does not reduce to Sm alone, but can be inductively codeposited with Fe2+. Sm-Fe alloy film contained over 90% Sm (mass fraction) can be obtained by potentiostatic electrolysis and galvanostatic electrolysis on Cu substrate. The Sm content in the alloy is related to the cathode potential, current density and the Sm3+/Fe2+ molar ratio. The surface state of the Sm-Fe deposit was studied by scanning electron microscopy.

  10. Multitechnique characterisation of 304L surface states oxidised at high temperature in steam and air atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamede, Anne-Sophie; Nuns, Nicolas; Cristol, Anne-Lise; Cantrel, Laurent; Souvi, Sidi; Cristol, Sylvain; Paul, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    In case of a severe accident occurring in a nuclear reactor, surfaces of the reactor coolant system (RCS), made of stainless steel (304L) rich in Cr (>10%) and Ni (8-12%), are oxidised. Fission products (FPs) are released from melt fuel and flow through the RCS. A part of them is deposited onto surfaces either by vapour condensation or by aerosol deposition mechanisms. To be able to understand the nature of interactions between these FPs and the RCS surfaces, a preliminary step is to characterize the RSC surface states in steam and air atmosphere at high temperatures. Pieces of 304L stainless steel have been treated in a flow reactor at two different temperatures (750 °C and 950 °C) for two different exposition times (24 h and 72 h). After surfaces analysing by a unique combination of surface analysis techniques (XPS, ToF-SIMS and LEIS), for 304L, the results show a deep oxide scale with multi layers and the outer layer is composed of chromium and manganese oxides. Oxide profiles differ in air or steam atmosphere. Fe2O3 oxide is observed but in minor proportion and in all cases no nickel is detected near the surface. Results obtained are discussed and compared with the literature data.

  11. Does Ice Dissolve or Does Halite Melt? A Low-Temperature Liquidus Experiment for Petrology Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, John B.

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of the compositions and temperatures of H2O-NaCl brines in equilibrium with ice can be used as an easy in-class experimental determination of a liquidus. This experiment emphasizes the symmetry of the behavior of brines with regard to the minerals ice and halite and helps to free students from the conceptual tethers of one-component…

  12. Does Ice Dissolve or Does Halite Melt? A Low-Temperature Liquidus Experiment for Petrology Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, John B.

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of the compositions and temperatures of H2O-NaCl brines in equilibrium with ice can be used as an easy in-class experimental determination of a liquidus. This experiment emphasizes the symmetry of the behavior of brines with regard to the minerals ice and halite and helps to free students from the conceptual tethers of one-component…

  13. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  14. Development of a Climate-Data Record (CDR) of the Surface Temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorthy K.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Shuman, Christopher A.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Stock, Larry V.

    2010-01-01

    Regional "clear sky" surface temperature increases since the early 1980s in the Arctic, measured using Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) infrared data, range from 0.57+/-0.02 deg C to 72+/-0.10 deg C per decade. Arctic warming has important implications for ice-sheet mass balance because much of the periphery of the Greenland Ice Sheet is already near 0 deg C during the melt season, and is thus vulnerable to rapid melting if temperatures continue to increase. An increase in melting of the ice sheet would accelerate sea-level rise, an issue affecting potentially billions of people worldwide. To quantify the ice-surface temperature (IST) of the Greenland Ice Sheet, and to provide an IST dataset of Greenland for modelers that provides uncertainties, we are developing a climate-data record (CDR) of daily "clear-sky" IST of the Greenland Ice Sheet, from 1982 to the present using AVHRR (1982 - present) and Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data (2000 - present) at a resolution of approximately 5 km. Known issues being addressed in the production of the CDR are: time-series bias caused by cloud cover (surface temperatures can be different under clouds vs. clear areas) and cross-calibration in the overlap period between AVHRR instruments, and between AVHRR and MODIS instruments. Because of uncertainties, mainly due to clouds, time-series of satellite IST do not necessarily correspond with actual surface temperatures. The CDR will be validated by comparing results with automatic-weather station data and with satellite-derived surface-temperature products and biases will be calculated.

  15. Melting Properties of Medium-Sized Silicon Nanoclusters: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haipeng; Xu, Runfeng; Bi, Zetong; Shen, Xiaopeng; Han, Kui

    2017-07-01

    The structures and melting properties of the medium-sized silicon nanoclusters have been comparatively studied using the molecular dynamics method. Structural and thermodynamic parameters are used to characterize the melting properties of the clusters. The size dependence of the melting temperature of silicon nanoclusters is determined using the computation results. Different from the homogeneous melting of bulk silicon, melting of silicon nanoparticles proceeds over a finite temperature range due to surface effects, which shows the heterogeneous melting of nanoclusters. We found that the melting starts at the cluster surface and progressively shifts into the core region. This study provides a fundamental perspective on the melting behaviors of semiconductor silicon nanoclusters at the atomistic level.

  16. Surface Observation and Pore Size Analyses of Polypropylene/Low-Melting Point Polyester Filter Materials: Influences of Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jia-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes making filter materials with polypropylene (PP and low-melting point (LPET fibers. The influences of temperatures and times of heat treatment on the morphology of thermal bonding points and average pore size of the PP/LPET filter materials. The test results indicate that the morphology of thermal bonding points is highly correlated with the average pore size. When the temperature of heat treatment is increased, the fibers are joined first with the thermal bonding points, and then with the large thermal bonding areas, thereby decreasing the average pore size of the PP/LPET filter materials. A heat treatment of 110 °C for 60 seconds can decrease the pore size from 39.6 μm to 12.0 μm.

  17. Optimization of pulsed Nd:YAG laser melting of gray cast iron at different spot sizes for enhanced surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulhishamuddin, A. R.; Aqida, S. N.; Rahim, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a laser surface modification process of gray cast iron using different laser spot size with an aims to eliminate graphite phase and achieve minimum surface roughness and maximum depth of molten zone and microhardness properties. The laser processing was conducted using JK300HPS Nd:YAG twin lamp laser source pulse TEM00 mode, 50 W average power, 1064 nm wavelength and different laser spot sizes of 1.0 mm, 1.2 mm, 1.4 mm and 1.7 mm. Three controlled parameter were peak power (Pp), pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and traverse speed (v). Increasing spot size the parameter setting where peak power is increased and pulse repetition frequency and traverse speed is decreased. The modified surface of laser surface melting was characterized for metallographic study, surface roughness and hardness. Metallographic study and surface morphology were conducted using optical microscope while hardness properties were measured using Vickers scale. Surface roughness was measured using a 2D stylus profilometer. From metallographic study, the graphite phase was totally eliminated from the molten zone and formed white zone. This phenomenon affected hardness properties of the modified surface where maximum hardness of 955.8 HV0.1 achieved. Optimization of laser surface modification was conducted for minimum surface roughness and maximum depth of modified layer and hardness properties. From the optimization, the higher desirability is 0.902. The highest depth of molten zone obtain from spot size 1.4 mm at 132 µm and the highest hardness is 989 HV0.1 at laser's spot size 1.0 mm. The surface roughness increased when the spot size increased from 3.10 µm to 7.31 µm. These finding indicate potential application of enhanced gray cast iron in high wear resistance automotive components such as cylinder liner and break disc.

  18. Evaluation of MODIS Land Surface Temperature with In Situ Snow Surface Temperature from CREST-SAFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Diaz, C. L.; Lakhankar, T.; Romanov, P.; Munoz, J.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Yu, Y.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the procedure and results of a temperature-based validation approach for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Land Surface Temperature (LST) product provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Terra and Aqua Earth Observing System satellites using in situ LST observations recorded at the Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology Center - Snow Analysis and Field Experiment (CREST-SAFE) during the years of 2013 (January-April) and 2014 (February-April). A total of 314 day and night clear-sky thermal images, acquired by the Terra and Aqua satellites, were processed and compared to ground-truth data from CREST-SAFE with a frequency of one measurement every 3 min. Additionally, this investigation incorporated supplementary analyses using meteorological CREST-SAFE in situ variables (i.e. wind speed, cloud cover, incoming solar radiation) to study their effects on in situ snow surface temperature (T-skin) and T-air. Furthermore, a single pixel (1km2) and several spatially averaged pixels were used for satellite LST validation by increasing the MODIS window size to 5x5, 9x9, and 25x25 windows for comparison. Several trends in the MODIS LST data were observed, including the underestimation of daytime values and nighttime values. Results indicate that, although all the data sets (Terra and Aqua, diurnal and nocturnal) showed high correlation with ground measurements, day values yielded slightly higher accuracy ( 1°C), both suggesting that MODIS LST retrievals are reliable for similar land cover classes and atmospheric conditions. Results from the CREST-SAFE in situ variables' analyses indicate that T-air is commonly higher than T-skin, and that a lack of cloud cover results in: lower T-skin and higher T-air minus T-skin difference (T-diff). Additionally, the study revealed that T-diff is inversely proportional to cloud cover, wind speed, and incoming solar radiation. Increasing the MODIS window size

  19. Estimation of minimum surface temperature at stage ll (Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Dimri

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting minimum surface temperature at a station, Stage II, located in mountainous region requires information on the meteorological fields. An attempt has been made to develop a statistical model for forecasting minimum temperature at ground level using previous years' data. Surface data were collected at StageII (longitude 73 oB, latitude 34 oN, and altitude 2650 m. Atmospheric variables are influenced by complex orography and surface features to a great extent. In the present study, statistical relationship between atmosphere parameters and minimum temperature at the site has been established. Multivariate linear regression analysis has been used to establish the relationship to predict the minimum surface temperature for the following day. A comparison between the observed and the calculated forecast minimum temperature has been made. Most of the cases are well predicted (multiple correlation coefficient of 0.94.

  20. Laser controlled melting of pre-prepared inconel 718 alloy surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Aleem, B. J.; Hashmi, M. S. J.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2011-11-01

    Laser treatment of Inconel 718 alloy surface is carried out. The alloy surface is coated with a carbon layer containing 7% TiC particles prior to the laser treatment. The carbon coating provides increased absorption of the incident laser beam and holds TiC particles. The microstrutural and morphological changes in the laser treated region are examined using optical and scanning electron microscopes, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The microhardness of the surface is measured and the residual stress formed at the surface vicinity is determined from the XRD technique. It is found that partial dissolution of carbide particles takes place at the surface. The composition of fine grains at the surface vicinity, nitride compounds formed, and dissolution of Laves phase at the surface region enhances the hardness at the treated surface. In addition, laser treated surface is free from the micro-crack network and cavities.

  1. Grain refinement of commercial pure Al treated by Pulsed Magneto-Oscillation on the top surface of melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercial pure Al can be refined by Pulsed Magneto-Oscillation (PMO treatment applied via a plate induction coil above the top surface of the melt. The proportion of the equiaxed zone area increases with decreasing Height to Diameter (H/D ratios from 3.5 to1.8 and further to 1.0. Meanwhile, it increases and then decreases with increasing peak current for the three kinds of ingots with H/D ratios of 3.5, 1.8 and 1.0, respectively. However, when the H/D ratio decreases to 0.44, the area proportion of equiaxed zone can reach the maximum value with a lower peak current. FEA software simulation indicates that smaller H/D ratio results in larger current density, electromagnetic force and convection on the top surface of the melt, favoring nucleation and subsequent grain formation. Through evaluating Joule heating effect by PMO, it was found that the proper amount of Joule heating benefits grain refinement. Excessive Joule heating can reduce the size of the equiaxed zone and change the growth morphology of the grains.

  2. A Solvent-Free Surface Suspension Melt Technique for Making Biodegradable PCL Membrane Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntornnond, Ratima; An, Jia; Tijore, Ajay; Leong, Kah Fai; Chua, Chee Kai; Tan, Lay Poh

    2016-03-21

    In tissue engineering, there is limited availability of a simple, fast and solvent-free process for fabricating micro-porous thin membrane scaffolds. This paper presents the first report of a novel surface suspension melt technique to fabricate a micro-porous thin membrane scaffolds without using any organic solvent. Briefly, a layer of polycaprolactone (PCL) particles is directly spread on top of water in the form of a suspension. After that, with the use of heat, the powder layer is transformed into a melted layer, and following cooling, a thin membrane is obtained. Two different sizes of PCL powder particles (100 µm and 500 µm) are used. Results show that membranes made from 100 µm powders have lower thickness, smaller pore size, smoother surface, higher value of stiffness but lower ultimate tensile load compared to membranes made from 500 µm powder. C2C12 cell culture results indicate that the membrane supports cell growth and differentiation. Thus, this novel membrane generation method holds great promise for tissue engineering.

  3. Relationship between flow speed variability of three tidewater glaciers and surface melt intensity in Greenland between 1979 and 2006

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lei; WANG Dongxiao

    2013-01-01

    The margin of the Greenland ice sheet has undergone rapid changes over the past decade as a result of the thinning,acceleration,and retreat of many fast-flowing tidewater outlet glaciers.Satellite observations show that three major tidewater outlet glaciers in Greenland retreated between 2000 and 2005,with synchronous increases in flow speed,causing a deficit in ice sheet mass budget and the potential for sea level rise.In this study,we investigated whether this acceleration was related to surface melt processes,and found that both flow speed and positive degree day (PDD) anomalies of the three glaciers varied together,indicating a causal relationship.Jakobshavn Isbrae had lower flow speeds before 2000,during which PDD anomalies were negative,except for modest warming in 1993 and 1995.From 1999-2000,during which it is thought a threshold was passed,the flow speed of the glacier started to increase.However,the two glaciers in east Greenland showed a delayed response.Abrupt warming occurred in the vicinity of the two glaciers around 2001,but flow speed did not increase until 2003 for the Helheim Glacier,and until 2004 for the Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier.Furthermore,the two eastern glaciers switched to a deceleration mode more quickly than Jakobshavn Isbrae.The observed differences in both acceleration and deceleration among the glaciers suggest that the relationship between surface melt and outlet glacier dynamics is not simple but complex.

  4. North American regional climate reconstruction from ground surface temperature histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaume-Santero, Fernando; Pickler, Carolyne; Beltrami, Hugo; Mareschal, Jean-Claude

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of the PAGES NAm2k project, 510 North American borehole temperature-depth profiles were analyzed to infer recent climate changes. To facilitate comparisons and to study the same time period, the profiles were truncated at 300 m. Ground surface temperature histories for the last 500 years were obtained for a model describing temperature changes at the surface for several climate-differentiated regions in North America. The evaluation of the model is done by inversion of temperature perturbations using singular value decomposition and its solutions are assessed using a Monte Carlo approach. The results within 95 % confidence interval suggest a warming between 1.0 and 2.5 K during the last two centuries. A regional analysis, composed of mean temperature changes over the last 500 years and geographical maps of ground surface temperatures, show that all regions experienced warming, but this warming is not spatially uniform and is more marked in northern regions.

  5. Understanding changes in the Arctic basin sea ice mass budget as simulated by CCSM4: Implications from melt season characteristics and the surface albedo feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, D. A.; Holland, M. M.; Bailey, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Observations reveal alarming drops in Arctic sea ice extent, and climate models project that further changes will occur that could have global repercussions. An important aspect of this change is the surface albedo feedback, driven by the contrast between the albedos of snow/ice and the open ocean. In response to warming, this feedback enhances ice melt and amplifies surface warming in the Arctic. The newly released, fully coupled Community Climate System Model Version 4 (CCSM4) is used to assess long-term changes in the Arctic sea ice mass budget. Analysis of monthly-averaged mass budget time series from the 20th and 21st centuries revealed drastic changes from 1980-2050, the focus years of this study. While numerous factors determine the Arctic sea ice mass budget, we focus on the surface melt terms as they are most closely related to the surface albedo feedback. During the study period, annually averaged difference plots of sea ice thickness and area both revealed substantial decreases across the entire Arctic domain. Helping to clarify these long-term changes, new daily output data from this model allowed for the examination of melt season characteristics such as melt onset and cessation dates as well as season duration. One of the most interesting aspects was the shift to earlier melt onset dates throughout the Arctic Basin. This shift, coupled with the seasonal solar cycle has substantial implications. Earlier onset dates imply an earlier decrease of albedo that overlaps with the seasonal maximum of downward shortwave radiation. This leads to increases in shortwave absorption and results in amplified ice melt that directly impacts the strength of the surface albedo feedback. The strong relationship between earlier melt onset dates and increased absorbed radiation therefore is a key factor influencing Arctic amplification. This figure is created from daily model output and displays changes in melt season duration, end date, and onset date from the first and

  6. Sensitivity of Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance to perturbations in sea surface temperature and sea ice cover: a study with the regional climate model MAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, B.; Fettweis, X.; van de Berg, W. J.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Erpicum, M.

    2014-10-01

    During recent summers (2007-2012), several surface melt records were broken over the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). The extreme summer melt resulted in part from a persistent negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), favoring warmer atmospheric conditions than normal over the GrIS. Simultaneously, large anomalies in sea ice cover (SIC) and sea surface temperature (SST) were observed in the North Atlantic, suggesting a possible connection. To assess the direct impact of 2007-2012 SIC and SST anomalies on GrIS surface mass balance (SMB), a set of sensitivity experiments was carried out with the regional climate model MAR forced by ERA-Interim. These simulations suggest that perturbations in SST and SIC in the seas surrounding Greenland do not considerably impact GrIS SMB, as a result of the katabatic wind blocking effect. These offshore-directed winds prevent oceanic near-surface air, influenced by SIC and SST anomalies, from penetrating far inland. Therefore, the ice sheet SMB response is restricted to coastal regions, where katabatic winds cease. A topic for further investigation is how anomalies in SIC and SST might have indirectly affected the surface melt by changing the general circulation in the North Atlantic region, hence favoring more frequent warm air advection towards the GrIS.

  7. Surface cracking and melting of different tungsten grades under transient heat and particle loads in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Y., E-mail: ykikuchi@eng.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kitagawa, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Surface damage of pure tungsten (W), W alloys with 2 wt.% tantalum (W–Ta) and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) W coating on a reduced activation material of ferritic steel (F82H) due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed (∼0.3 ms) deuterium plasma irradiation has been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. Surface cracks appeared on a pure W sample exposed to 10 plasma pulses of ∼0.3 MJ m{sup −2}, while a W–Ta sample did not show surface cracks with similar pulsed plasma irradiation. The energy density threshold for surface cracking was significantly increased by the existence of the alloying element of tantalum. No surface morphology change of a VPS W coated F82H sample was observed under 10 plasma pulses of ∼0.3 MJ m{sup −2}, although surface melting and cracks in the resolidification layer occurred at higher energy density of ∼0.9 MJ m{sup −2}. There was no indication of exfoliation of the W coating from the substrate of F82H after the pulsed plasma exposures.

  8. Surface cracking and melting of different tungsten grades under transient heat and particle loads in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kitagawa, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.; Ueda, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Surface damage of pure tungsten (W), W alloys with 2 wt.% tantalum (W-Ta) and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) W coating on a reduced activation material of ferritic steel (F82H) due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed (˜0.3 ms) deuterium plasma irradiation has been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. Surface cracks appeared on a pure W sample exposed to 10 plasma pulses of ˜0.3 MJ m-2, while a W-Ta sample did not show surface cracks with similar pulsed plasma irradiation. The energy density threshold for surface cracking was significantly increased by the existence of the alloying element of tantalum. No surface morphology change of a VPS W coated F82H sample was observed under 10 plasma pulses of ˜0.3 MJ m-2, although surface melting and cracks in the resolidification layer occurred at higher energy density of ˜0.9 MJ m-2. There was no indication of exfoliation of the W coating from the substrate of F82H after the pulsed plasma exposures.

  9. Ground-based measurement of surface temperature and thermal emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owe, M.; Van De Griend, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    Motorized cable systems for transporting infrared thermometers have been used successfully during several international field campaigns. Systems may be configured with as many as four thermal sensors up to 9 m above the surface, and traverse a 30 m transect. Ground and canopy temperatures are important for solving the surface energy balance. The spatial variability of surface temperature is often great, so that averaged point measurements result in highly inaccurate areal estimates. The cable systems are ideal for quantifying both temporal and spatial variabilities. Thermal emissivity is also necessary for deriving the absolute physical temperature, and measurements may be made with a portable measuring box.

  10. Two-stage melting of Au-Pd nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Rosales, Sergio J; Fernandez-Navarro, Carlos; Pérez-Tijerina, Eduardo; Montejano-Carrizales, Juan Martín; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2006-07-06

    Several series of molecular dynamics runs were performed to simulate the melting transition of bimetallic cuboctahedral nanoparticles of gold-palladium at different relative concentrations to study their structural properties before, in, and after the transition. The simulations were made in the canonical ensemble, each series covering a range of temperatures from 300 to 980 K, using the Rafii-Tabar version of the Sutton and Chen interatomic potential for metallic alloys. We found that the melting transition temperature has a strong dependence on the relative concentrations of the atomic species. We also found that, previous to the melting transition, the outer layer of the nanoparticle gets disordered in what can be thought as a premelting stage, where Au atoms near the surface migrate to the surface and remain there after the particle melts as a whole. The melting of the surface below Tm is consistent with studies of the interaction of a TEM electron beam with Au and Au-Pd nanoparticles.

  11. Characterization of AZ31 magnesium alloy by duplex process combining laser surface melting and plasma electrolytic oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cancan; Liang, Jun; Zhou, Jiansong; Li, Qingbiao; Wang, Lingqian

    2016-09-01

    Top ceramic coatings were fabricated on the laser surface melting (LSM) modified AZ31 alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in a phosphate electrolyte. The effect of LSM treatment on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of the bare and PEO treated AZ31 alloy was evaluated. Results showed that LSM treatment produced a homogeneous modified layer with redistributed intermetallic compounds, resulting in enhanced corrosion resistance of AZ31 alloy. The LSM treatment had no obvious influence on the surface and cross-sectional microstructures of the PEO coatings on AZ31 alloy. Besides, MgO was the main constituent for PEO coatings, regardless of LSM pretreatment. However, the long-term corrosion properties of the PEO coated AZ31 alloy with LSM pretreatment revealed large enhancement. Based on the analysis of microstructure and corrosion property, the corrosion mechanisms of the PEO and LSM-PEO coated AZ31 alloy were proposed.

  12. Effects of topographical surface modifications of electron beam melted Ti-6Al-4V titanium on human fetal osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponader, Sabine; Vairaktaris, Eleftherios; Heinl, Peter; Wilmowsky, Cornelius V; Rottmair, Andreas; Körner, Carolin; Singer, Robert F; Holst, Stefan; Schlegel, Karl A; Neukam, Friedrich W; Nkenke, Emeka

    2008-03-15

    The aim of the study was to assess the suitability of different Ti-6Al-4V surfaces produced by the electron beam melting (EBM) process as matrices for attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB 1.19). Human osteoblasts were cultured in vitro on smooth and rough-textured Ti-6Al-4V alloy disks. By means of cell number and vitality and SEM micrographs cell attachment and proliferation were observed. The differentiation rate was examined by using quantitative real-time PCR analysis for the gene expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), type I collagen (Coll-I), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteocalcin (OC). After 3 days of incubation there was a significant higher vitality (p /= 56.9 microm) reduced proliferation of hFOB cells. Surface characteristics of titanium can easily be changed by EBM in order to further improve proliferation. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Vertical and horizontal surface displacements near Jakobshavn Isbræ driven by melt-induced and dynamic ice loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karina; Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Spada, G.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze Global Positioning System (GPS) time series of relative vertical and horizontal surface displacements from 2006 to 2012 at four GPS sites located between ∼5 and ∼150 km from the front of Jakobshavn Isbræ (JI) in west Greenland. Horizontal displacements during 2006–2010 at KAGA, ILUL, a...... to 2006–2010. The sudden change in vertical and horizontal displacements is due to enhanced melt-induced ice loss in 2010 and 2012....... of surface elevations from 2006, 2009, and 2010. However, horizontal displacements during 2010–2012 at KAGA and ILUL are directed more towards the west suggesting a change in the spatial distribution of the ice mass loss. In addition, we observe an increase in the uplift rate during 2010–2012 as compared...

  14. Effect of milling temperatures on surface area, surface energy and cohesion of pharmaceutical powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Umang V; Wang, Zihua; Olusanmi, Dolapo; Narang, Ajit S; Hussain, Munir A; Tobyn, Michael J; Heng, Jerry Y Y

    2015-11-10

    Particle bulk and surface properties are influenced by the powder processing routes. This study demonstrates the effect of milling temperatures on the particle surface properties, particularly surface energy and surface area, and ultimately on powder cohesion. An active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of industrial relevance (brivanib alaninate, BA) was used to demonstrate the effect of two different, but most commonly used milling temperatures (cryogenic vs. ambient). The surface energy of powders milled at both cryogenic and room temperatures increased with increasing milling cycles. The increase in surface energy could be related to the generation of surface amorphous regions. Cohesion for both cryogenic and room temperature milled powders was measured and found to increase with increasing milling cycles. For cryogenic milling, BA had a surface area ∼ 5× higher than the one obtained at room temperature. This was due to the brittle nature of this compound at cryogenic temperature. By decoupling average contributions of surface area and surface energy on cohesion by salinization post-milling, the average contribution of surface energy on cohesion for powders milled at room temperature was 83% and 55% at cryogenic temperature.

  15. MODIFICATION OF CARBON STEEL BY LASER SURFACE MELTING: PART I: EFFECT OF LASER BEAM TRAVELLING SPEED ON MICROSTRUCTURAL FEATURES AND SURFACE HARDNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem F. El-Labban

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to improve the surface hardness of carbon steel by application of laser surface melting of effective conditions. The travelling speed of laser beam during this treatment is one of the important treatment conditions. This study aims to investigate the effect of laser surface melting with different beam speeds on macro and microstructure as well as the hardness distribution through the thickness of carbon steel. To achieve this target, three different travelling speeds (1500, 1000 and 500 mm min-1 at a constant beam power of 800 W were chosen in this study. The resulted laser treated specimens were investigated in macro and microscopically scale using optical and scanning electron microscope. Hardness measurements were also carried out through the thickness of the laser treated specimens. The laser treated areas with all used travelling speeds results in melted and solidified zone on the surface of the steel. In the same time, Plates of acicular martensite structure were observed within the upper part of the melted and solidified zone in almost all experimental conditions, while some bainite structure in ferrite grains are detected in its lower part. By increasing the travelling speed, the depth of the laser treated zone was decreases, while travelling speed has much less significant effect on the laser treated zone width. The size of the formed martensite plates was increased by decreasing the travelling speed from 1500 to 500 mm min-1. On the other hand, the travelling speed has a straight effect on the length of the acicular martensite; as the travelling speed increases, the acicular martensite became longer, while it shows fine acicular martensite at lower travelling speeds. The depth that full martensite structure can be reached is increased by increasing travelling speed. At lower travelling speed (500 mm min-1, large amount of bainite structure is observed at the center of the treated zone up to its lower end. The

  16. Viscous Dissipation Effects on the Motion of Casson Fluid over an Upper Horizontal Thermally Stratified Melting Surface of a Paraboloid of Revolution: Boundary Layer Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Ajayi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of a non-Newtonian fluid flow past an upper surface of an object that is neither a perfect horizontal/vertical nor inclined/cone in which dissipation of energy is associated with temperature-dependent plastic dynamic viscosity is considered. An attempt has been made to focus on the case of two-dimensional Casson fluid flow over a horizontal melting surface embedded in a thermally stratified medium. Since the viscosity of the non-Newtonian fluid tends to take energy from the motion (kinetic energy and transform it into internal energy, the viscous dissipation term is accommodated in the energy equation. Due to the existence of internal space-dependent heat source; plastic dynamic viscosity and thermal conductivity of the non-Newtonian fluid are assumed to vary linearly with temperature. Based on the boundary layer assumptions, suitable similarity variables are applied to nondimensionalized, parameterized and reduce the governing partial differential equations into a coupled ordinary differential equations. These equations along with the boundary conditions are solved numerically using the shooting method together with the Runge-Kutta technique. The effects of pertinent parameters are established. A significant increases in Rex1/2Cfx is guaranteed with St when magnitude of β is large. Rex1/2Cfx decreases with Ec and m.

  17. Room temperature magneto-structural transition in Al for Sn substituted Ni–Mn–Sn melt spun ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziarz, W. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 W. Reymonta Str., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Czaja, P., E-mail: p.czaja@imim.pl [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 W. Reymonta Str., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Szczerba, M.J. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 W. Reymonta Str., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Przewoźnik, J.; Kapusta, C. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Department of Solid State Physics, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Żywczak, A.; Stobiecki, T. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronics, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Cesari, E. [Department de Fisica, Universitat de Illes Balears, Ctra. de Valldemossa, km 7.5, Palma de Mallorca E-07071 (Spain); Dutkiewicz, J. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 W. Reymonta Str., 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2013-12-15

    Martensitic and magnetic transformations in Ni{sub 48}Mn{sub 39.5}Sn{sub 12.5−x}Al{sub x} (x=0, 1, 2, 3) Heusler alloy ribbons were investigated. It is demonstrated that both magnetic and structural transformations occur in all of the studied samples. It is also shown that substitution of Sn with Al causes the martensitic transformation (MT) and the reverse martensitic transformation (RMT) temperatures to increase to room temperature (ΔT{sub MT}=49 K; ΔT{sub RMT}=43 K), whereas the Curie temperature of martensite T{sub C}{sup M} decreases (ΔT=36 K) and the Curie temperature of austenite T{sub C}{sup A} remains practically insensitive to Al introduction. This then allows to tune T{sub C}{sup A} and the MT temperature leading to their coincidence at ambient temperature. The austenite phase with the L2{sub 1} type structure has been identified to exist in all the samples regardless of composition. On the other hand the structure of martensite has been shown to be sensitive to composition. It has been determined as the 10 M martensite with (32{sup ¯}) stacking sequence in Al free samples and the 4O martensite with the stacking periodicity (31{sup ¯}) in Al containing samples. In addition, the splitting of the field cooling (FC) and the field heating (FH) thermo-magnetic curves at low (50 Oe) magnetic field and below the T{sub C}{sup M} has been attributed to intermartensitic transition. The application of large magnetic field (50 kOe) has shown the existence of two distinct ferromagnetic states with a considerable hysteresis loop. The properties of these materials make them promising for magnetocaloric applications. - Highlights: • Al for Sn substituted Ni–Mn–Sn based ferromagnetic Heusler alloys were produced by melt spinning. • Martensitic, reverse martensitic and intermartensitic transformations were observed, their temperatures and magnitude changed with Al substitution. • Different types of martensite structures were identified depending on Al

  18. Investigation of the temperature dependence of the critical state in melt processed YBa2Cu3O7-∂ thick films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, C. D.; Cardwell, D. A.; Alford, N. McN.

    1995-03-01

    The inter- and intra-grain critical current densities of melt processed YBa2Cu3O7-∂ (YBCO) thick films have been measured as a function of temperature using vibrating sample magnetometry. The width of the M-H hysteresis curve has been observed to scale with the cube of the sample width for temperatures up to ˜70 K and applied fields of greater than 1 T which implies that current flows on the length scale of the sample over this temperature and field regime. An exponential decrease of magnetic moment hysteresis with temperature up to ˜70 K and between ˜80 K and Tc has been observed and attributed to the dominance of inter- and intra-granular current, respectively. An empirical model is presented to account for the observed dependence of the critical current density on temperature, based upon weak link behavior within the ``Hub and Spoke'' like morphology characteristic of melt processed YBCO thick films.

  19. TEMPERATURE CONTROL CIRCUIT FOR SURFACE ACOUSTIC WAVE (SAW RESONATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Mohamad Ashari

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW resonators are key components in oscillators, frequency synthesizers and transceivers. One of the drawbacks of SAW resonators are that its piezoelectric substrates are highly sensitive to ambient temperature resulting in performance degradation. This work propose a simple circuit design which stabalizes the temperature of the SAW resonator, making it independet of temperature change. This circuit is based on the oven control method which elevates the temperature of the resonator to a high temperature, making it tolerant to minor changes in ambient temperature.This circuit consist of a temperature sensor, heaters and a comparator which turn the heater on or off depending on the ambient temperature. Several SAW resonator were tested using this circuit. Experimental results indicate the temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF decreases from maximum of 130.44/°C to a minimum of -1.11/°C. 

  20. Influence of Grain Boundary on Melting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王暾; 周富信; 刘曰武

    2001-01-01

    The temperature behaviour of an Al bicrystal with surfaces consisting of (110) and (111) crystals is simulated using molecular dynamics. The result shows that the (110) crystal losses its crystalline order at 820K, whereas the disorder does not propagate through the (111) crystal at this temperature. Instead, some disordered atoms are recrystallized into the (111) crystal and the initial grain boundary changes into a stable order-disorder interface. Thus, it was discovered that at a temperature near its melting point, the (111) crystal grew and obstructed the propagation of disorder. Such an obstruction is helpfulfor understanding melting.

  1. Selective laser melting additive manufactured Inconel 718 superalloy parts: High-temperature oxidation property and its mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qingbo; Gu, Dongdong

    2014-10-01

    This work presented a comprehensive study of high-temperature oxidation behaviors and mechanisms of Selective laser melting (SLM) processed Inconel 718 superalloy parts using different methods including isothermal oxidation testing, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The experimental results revealed that the oxidation process of the tested parts processed at a lower volumetric laser energy density experienced the severe spallation. On reasonably increasing the applied volumetric laser energy density, the oxidation kinetics of the as-produced parts obeyed a parabolic law, exhibiting the significantly improved oxidation resistance performance. The constitutional phases within the oxidation film were identified and the corresponding formation mechanisms were elucidated in detail according to the thermodynamic principles. The cross-sectional morphologies of oxidized Inconel 718 parts indicated that the oxidation microstructure mainly consisted of an external oxidation layer and an internal oxidation zone. The oxidation process was controlled by the outward diffusion of oxide forming elements and inward penetration of oxygen, by which the interaction mechanisms between the microstructures and internal oxidation zones were clarified. On the basis of the experimental results and theoretical analyses, the physical oxidation mechanisms were accordingly established to illustrate the oxidation behaviors of SLM-processed Inconel 718 parts at elevated operative temperatures.

  2. Mapping the body surface temperature of cattle by infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Marcia Saladini Vieira; da Silva, Suelen Corrêa; Salles, Fernando André; Roma, Luiz Carlos; El Faro, Lenira; Bustos Mac Lean, Priscilla Ayleen; Lins de Oliveira, Celso Eduardo; Martello, Luciane Silva

    2016-12-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) is an alternative non-invasive method that has been studied as a tool for identifying many physiological and pathological processes related to changes in body temperature. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the body surface temperature of Jersey dairy cattle in a thermoneutral environment in order to contribute to the determination of a body surface temperature pattern for animals of this breed in a situation of thermal comfort. Twenty-four Jersey heifers were used over a period of 35 days at APTA Brazil. Measurements were performed on all animals, starting with the physiological parameters. Body surface temperature was measured by IRT collecting images in different body regions: left and right eye area, right and left eye, caudal left foreleg, cranial left foreleg, right and left flank, and forehead. High correlations were observed between temperature and humidity index (THI) and right flank, left flank and forehead temperatures (0.85, 0.81, and 0.81, respectively). The IRT variables that exhibited the five highest correlation coefficients in principal component 1 were, in decreasing order: forehead (0.90), right flank (0.87), left flank (0.84), marker 1 caudal left foreleg (0.83), marker 2 caudal left foreleg (0.74). The THI showed a high correlation coefficient (0.88) and moderate to low correlations were observed for the physiological variables rectal temperature (0.43), and respiratory frequency (0.42). The thermal profile obtained indicates a surface temperature pattern for each region studied in a situation of thermal comfort and may contribute to studies investigating body surface temperature. Among the body regions studied, IRT forehead temperature showed the highest association with rectal temperature, and forehead and right and left flank temperatures are strongly associated with THI and may be adopted in future studies on thermoregulation and body heat production.

  3. Cloud Masking and Surface Temperature Distribution in the Polar Regions Using AVHRR and other Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Joey C.

    1995-01-01

    Surface temperature is one of the key variables associated with weather and climate. Accurate measurements of surface air temperatures are routinely made in meteorological stations around the world. Also, satellite data have been used to produce synoptic global temperature distributions. However, not much attention has been paid on temperature distributions in the polar regions. In the polar regions, the number of stations is very sparse. Because of adverse weather conditions and general inaccessibility, surface field measurements are also limited. Furthermore, accurate retrievals from satellite data in the region have been difficult to make because of persistent cloudiness and ambiguities in the discrimination of clouds from snow or ice. Surface temperature observations are required in the polar regions for air-sea-ice interaction studies, especially in the calculation of heat, salinity, and humidity fluxes. They are also useful in identifying areas of melt or meltponding within the sea ice pack and the ice sheets and in the calculation of emissivities of these surfaces. Moreover, the polar regions are unique in that they are the sites of temperature extremes, the location of which is difficult to identify without a global monitoring system. Furthermore, the regions may provide an early signal to a potential climate change because such signal is expected to be amplified in the region due to feedback effects. In cloud free areas, the thermal channels from infrared systems provide surface temperatures at relatively good accuracies. Previous capabilities include the use of the Temperature Humidity Infrared Radiometer (THIR) onboard the Nimbus-7 satellite which was launched in 1978. Current capabilities include the use of the Advance Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aboard NOAA satellites. Together, these two systems cover a span of 16 years of thermal infrared data. Techniques for retrieving surface temperatures with these sensors in the polar regions have

  4. eMODIS Global Land Surface Temperature Version 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The EROS Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (eMODIS) Aqua Land Surface Temperature (LST) product is similar to the Land Processes Distributed Active...

  5. 2002 Average Monthly Sea Surface Temperature for California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA/ NASA AVHRR Oceans Pathfinder sea surface temperature data are derived from the 5-channel Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) on board the...

  6. 2003 Average Monthly Sea Surface Temperature for California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA/ NASA AVHRR Oceans Pathfinder sea surface temperature data are derived from the 5-channel Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) on board the...

  7. Sea surface temperature anomalies in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.

    . Further analysis has shown that the sea surface anomalies are well correlated to the anomalies of air temperature and latent heat flux values; whereas they are least correlated to the anomalies of wind stress and net radiation values, except over...

  8. An Estimation of Land Surface Temperatures from Landsat ETM+ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr-Adeline

    2 National Authority for Remote Sensing and Space Sciences, Cairo, Egypt. 3University of ... Keywords: Urban growth, urban heat Island, land surface temperatures, satellite remote sensing .... observed target includes green vegetation or not.

  9. Global 1-km Sea Surface Temperature (G1SST)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — JPL OurOcean Portal: A daily, global Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data set is produced at 1-km (also known as ultra-high resolution) by the JPL ROMS (Regional Ocean...

  10. COBE-SST2 Sea Surface Temperature and Ice

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A new sea surface temperature (SST) analysis on a centennial time scale is presented. The dataset starts in 1850 with monthly 1x1 means and is periodically updated....

  11. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Arabian Sea during winter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Ghosh, A.K.

    Surface layer temperature inversion in the south eastern Arabian Sea, during winter has been studied using Bathythermograph data collected from 1132 stations. It is found that the inversion in this area is a stable seasonal feature...

  12. Seasonal Sea Surface Temperature Averages, 1985-2001 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of four images showing seasonal sea surface temperature (SST) averages for the entire earth. Data for the years 1985-2001 are averaged to...

  13. 1996 Average Monthly Sea Surface Temperature for California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA/ NASA AVHRR Oceans Pathfinder sea surface temperature data are derived from the 5-channel Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) on board the...

  14. 2000 Average Monthly Sea Surface Temperature for California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA/ NASA AVHRR Oceans Pathfinder sea surface temperature data are derived from the 5-channel Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) on board the...

  15. OW NOAA Pathfinder/GAC Sea-Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset contains satellite-derived sea-surface temperature measurements collected by means of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer - Global Area Coverage...

  16. OW NOAA AVHRR-GAC Sea-Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset contains satellite-derived sea-surface temperature measurements collected by means of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer - Global Area Coverage...

  17. NOAA High-Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Analysis Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archive covers two high resolution sea surface temperature (SST) analysis products developed using an optimum interpolation (OI) technique. The analyses have a...

  18. Tropical sea surface temperatures and the earth's orbital eccentricity cycles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, S.M.; Fernandes, A.A.; Mohan, R.

    The tropical oceanic warm pools are climatologically important regions because their sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are positively related to atmospheric greenhouse effect and the cumulonimbus-cirrus cloud anvil. Such a warm pool is also present...

  19. A benchmark initiative on mantle convection with melting and melt segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeling, Harro; Dohmen, Janik; Wallner, Herbert; Noack, Lena; Tosi, Nicola; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Maurice, Maxime

    2015-04-01

    In recent years a number of mantle convection models have been developed which include partial melting within the asthenosphere, estimation of melt volumes, as well as melt extraction with and without redistribution at the surface or within the lithosphere. All these approaches use various simplifying modelling assumptions whose effects on the dynamics of convection including the feedback on melting have not been explored in sufficient detail. To better assess the significance of such assumptions and to provide test cases for the modelling community we initiate a benchmark comparison. In the initial phase of this endeavor we focus on the usefulness of the definitions of the test cases keeping the physics as sound as possible. The reference model is taken from the mantle convection benchmark, case 1b (Blanckenbach et al., 1989), assuming a square box with free slip boundary conditions, the Boussinesq approximation, constant viscosity and a Rayleigh number of 1e5. Melting is modelled assuming a simplified binary solid solution with linearly depth dependent solidus and liquidus temperatures, as well as a solidus temperature depending linearly on depletion. Starting from a plume free initial temperature condition (to avoid melting at the onset time) three cases are investigated: Case 1 includes melting, but without thermal or dynamic feedback on the convection flow. This case provides a total melt generation rate (qm) in a steady state. Case 2 includes batch melting, melt buoyancy (melt Rayleigh number Rm), depletion buoyancy and latent heat, but no melt percolation. Output quantities are the Nusselt number (Nu), root mean square velocity (vrms) and qm approaching a statistical steady state. Case 3 includes two-phase flow, i.e. melt percolation, assuming a constant shear and bulk viscosity of the matrix and various melt retention numbers (Rt). These cases should be carried out using the Compaction Boussinseq Approximation (Schmeling, 2000) or the full compaction

  20. Calibration of micro-thermal analysis for the detection of glass transition temperatures and melting points: repeatability and reproducibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, H.R.

    2008-01-01

    Micro-thermal analysis (μTATM) is a technique in which thermal analysis is performed on surfaces of test specimens on a small (ca. 2×2 μm) scale. Like any thermal analysis technique, interpretation of results benefits from accurate temperature information and knowledge of the precision of the result