WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface temperature heat

  1. Estimation of Surface Heat Flux and Surface Temperature during Inverse Heat Conduction under Varying Spray Parameters and Sample Initial Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aamir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck’s sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m2 was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa.

  2. Estimation of surface heat flux and surface temperature during inverse heat conduction under varying spray parameters and sample initial temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Aqeel-ur-Rehman; Wang, Hong; Zubair, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm) 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck's sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF) within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m(2) was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa.

  3. Low temperature heating and high temperature cooling embedded water based surface heating and cooling systems

    CERN Document Server

    Babiak, Jan; Petras, Dusan

    2009-01-01

    This Guidebook describes the systems that use water as heat-carrier and when the heat exchange within the conditioned space is more than 50% radiant. Embedded systems insulated from the main building structure (floor, wall and ceiling) are used in all types of buildings and work with heat carriers at low temperatures for heating and relatively high temperature for cooling.

  4. Estimation of Surface Temperature and Heat Flux by Inverse Heat Transfer Methods Using Internal Temperatures Measured While Radiantly Heating a Carbon/Carbon Specimen up to 1920 F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Michelle; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Glass, David

    2015-01-01

    The ability to solve the heat conduction equation is needed when designing materials to be used on vehicles exposed to extremely high temperatures; e.g. vehicles used for atmospheric entry or hypersonic flight. When using test and flight data, computational methods such as finite difference schemes may be used to solve for both the direct heat conduction problem, i.e., solving between internal temperature measurements, and the inverse heat conduction problem, i.e., using the direct solution to march forward in space to the surface of the material to estimate both surface temperature and heat flux. The completed research first discusses the methods used in developing a computational code to solve both the direct and inverse heat transfer problems using one dimensional, centered, implicit finite volume schemes and one dimensional, centered, explicit space marching techniques. The developed code assumed the boundary conditions to be specified time varying temperatures and also considered temperature dependent thermal properties. The completed research then discusses the results of analyzing temperature data measured while radiantly heating a carbon/carbon specimen up to 1920 F. The temperature was measured using thermocouple (TC) plugs (small carbon/carbon material specimens) with four embedded TC plugs inserted into the larger carbon/carbon specimen. The purpose of analyzing the test data was to estimate the surface heat flux and temperature values from the internal temperature measurements using direct and inverse heat transfer methods, thus aiding in the thermal and structural design and analysis of high temperature vehicles.

  5. Daytime sensible heat flux estimation over heterogeneous surfaces using multitemporal land-surface temperature observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellví, F.; Cammalleri, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Maltese, A.; Rossi, F.

    2016-05-01

    Equations based on surface renewal (SR) analysis to estimate the sensible heat flux (H) require as input the mean ramp amplitude and period observed in the ramp-like pattern of the air temperature measured at high frequency. A SR-based method to estimate sensible heat flux (HSR-LST) requiring only low-frequency measurements of the air temperature, horizontal mean wind speed, and land-surface temperature as input was derived and tested under unstable conditions over a heterogeneous canopy (olive grove). HSR-LST assumes that the mean ramp amplitude can be inferred from the difference between land-surface temperature and mean air temperature through a linear relationship and that the ramp frequency is related to a wind shear scale characteristic of the canopy flow. The land-surface temperature was retrieved by integrating in situ sensing measures of thermal infrared energy emitted by the surface. The performance of HSR-LST was analyzed against flux tower measurements collected at two heights (close to and well above the canopy top). Crucial parameters involved in HSR-LST, which define the above mentioned linear relationship, were explained using the canopy height and the land surface temperature observed at sunrise and sunset. Although the olive grove can behave as either an isothermal or anisothermal surface, HSR-LST performed close to H measured using the eddy covariance and the Bowen ratio energy balance methods. Root mean square differences between HSR-LST and measured H were of about 55 W m-2. Thus, by using multitemporal thermal acquisitions, HSR-LST appears to bypass inconsistency between land surface temperature and the mean aerodynamic temperature. The one-source bulk transfer formulation for estimating H performed reliable after calibration against the eddy covariance method. After calibration, the latter performed similar to the proposed SR-LST method.

  6. Seasonal Spatial Patterns of Surface Water Temperature, Surface Heat Fluxes and Meteorological Forcing Over Lake Geneva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani Rahaghi, A.; Lemmin, U.; Bouffard, D.; Riffler, M.; Wunderle, S.; Barry, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    In many lakes, surface heat flux (SHF) is the most important component controlling the lake's energy content. Accurate methods for the determination of SHF are valuable for water management, and for use in hydrological and meteorological models. Large lakes, not surprisingly, are subject to spatially and temporally varying meteorological conditions, and hence SHF. Here, we report on an investigation for estimating the SHF of a large European lake, Lake Geneva. We evaluated several bulk formulas to estimate Lake Geneva's SHF based on different data sources. A total of 64 different surface heat flux models were realized using existing representations for different heat flux components. Data sources to run the models included meteorological data (from an operational numerical weather prediction model, COSMO-2) and lake surface water temperature (LSWT, from satellite imagery). Models were calibrated at two points in the lake for which regular depth profiles of temperature are available, and which enabled computation of the total heat content variation. The latter, computed for 03.2008-12.2012, was the metric used to rank the different models. The best calibrated model was then selected to calculate the spatial distribution of SHF. Analysis of the model results shows that evaporative and convective heat fluxes are the dominant terms controlling the spatial pattern of SHF. The former is significant in all seasons while the latter plays a role only in fall and winter. Meteorological observations illustrate that wind-sheltering, and to some extent relative humidity variability, are the main reasons for the observed large-scale spatial variability. In addition, both modeling and satellite observations indicate that, on average, the eastern part of the lake is warmer than the western part, with a greater temperature contrast in spring and summer than in fall and winter whereas the SHF spatial splitting is stronger in fall and winter. This is mainly due to negative heat flux

  7. Heat waves measured with MODIS land surface temperature data predict changes in avian community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas P. Albright; Anna M. Pidgeon; Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; Murray K. Clayton; Curtis H. Flather; Patrick D. Culbert; Volker C. Radeloff

    2011-01-01

    Heat waves are expected to become more frequent and severe as climate changes, with unknown consequences for biodiversity. We sought to identify ecologically-relevant broad-scale indicators of heat waves based on MODIS land surface temperature (LST) and interpolated air temperature data and assess their associations with avian community structure. Specifically, we...

  8. A new simplified model to calculate surface temperature and heat transfer of radiant floor heating and cooling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaozhou; Zhao, Jianing; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new simplified model to calculate surface temperature and heat transfer of radiant floor heating and cooling system was proposed and established using the conduction shape factor. Measured data from references were used to validate the proposed model. The results showed that the ......In this paper, a new simplified model to calculate surface temperature and heat transfer of radiant floor heating and cooling system was proposed and established using the conduction shape factor. Measured data from references were used to validate the proposed model. The results showed...... that the maximum differences between the calculated surface temperature and heat transfer using the proposed model and the measured data were 0.8 ºC and 8.1 W/m2 for radiant floor heating system when average water temperature between 40 ºC and 60 ºC. For the corresponding values were 0.3 ºC and 2.0 W/m2...... for radiant floor cooling systems when average water temperature between 10 ºC and 20 ºC. Numerically simulated data in this study were also used to validate the proposed model. The results showed that the surface temperature and heat transfer of radiant floor calculated by the proposed model agreed very well...

  9. On-Line Life Monitoring Technique for Tube Bundles of Boiler High-Temperature Heating Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Dong; Wang Zhongyuan

    2005-01-01

    High-temperature heating surface such as superheater and reheater of large-sized utility boiler all experiences a relatively severe working conditions. The failure of boiler tubes will directly impact the safe and economic operation of boiler. An on-line life monitoring model of high-temperature heating surface was set up according to the well-known L-M formula of the creep damages. The tube wall metal temperature and working stress was measured by on-line monitoring, and with this model, the real-time calculation of the life expenditure of the heating surface tube bundles were realized. Based on the technique the on-line life monitoring and management system of high-temperature heating surface was developed for a 300 MW utility boiler. An effective device was thus suggested for the implementation of the safe operation and the condition-based maintenance of utility boilers.

  10. A temperature prediction-correction method for estimating surface soil heat flux from soil temperature and moisture data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Surface soil heat flux is a component of surface energy budget and its estimation is needed in land-atmosphere interaction studies. This paper develops a new simple method to estimate soil heat flux from soil temperature and moisture observations. It gives soil temperature profile with the thermal diffusion equation and, then, adjusts the temperature profile with differences between observed and computed soil temperatures. The soil flux is obtained through integrating the soil temperature profile. Compared with previous methods, the new method does not require accurate thermal conductivity. Case studies based on observations, synthetic data, and sensitivity analyses show that the new method is preferable and the results obtained with it are not sensitive to the availability of temperature data in the topsoil. In addition, we pointed out that the soil heat flux measured with a heat-plate can be quite erroneous in magnitude though its phase is accurate.

  11. Using distributed temperature sensing to monitor field scale dynamics of ground surface temperature and related substrate heat flux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bense, V.F.; Read, T.; Verhoef, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present one of the first studies of the use of distributed temperature sensing (DTS) along fibre-optic cables to purposely monitor spatial and temporal variations in ground surface temperature (GST) and soil temperature, and provide an estimate of the heat flux at the base of the canopy layer

  12. Control of surface temperature of an aluminum alloy billet by air flow during a heating process at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young [KITECH, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joon Hong [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The procedure of semi-solid forming is composed of heating a billet, forming, compression holding and ejecting step. There are several methods to heat a billet during semi-solid forming process such as electric heating and induction heating. Usually in semi-solid forming process, induction heating has been adopted to achieve more uniform temperature of semi-solid material. Although induction heating is better method than any others, however, there is still difference of temperature between internal part and surface part of semi-solid material. Worse yet, in case of high liquid fraction of semi-solid material, liquid of the billet will flow down though solid of the billet still remains, which is very difficult to handle. In the present study, induction heating of the billet during thixoforging process with forced surface cooling has been performed to obtain more uniform distribution of temperature, microstructure and shape of the billet. Distribution of temperature of the billets was measured and compared with that of conventional distribution of temperature. Microscopic and macroscopic aspects of the billets were discussed according to location of the measuring points. By this new induction heating method, not only temperature distributions over the whole billet become uniform, but also control of temperature distribution between inside and outside part of the billet is possible as user's experimental intentions,.

  13. Boiling Heat Transfer Measurements on Highly Conductive Surfaces Using Microscale Heater and Temperature Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Bae, S. W.; Whitten, M. W.; Mullen, J. D.; Quine, R. W.; Kalkur, T. S.

    1999-01-01

    Two systems have been developed to study boiling heat transfer on the microscale. The first system utilizes a 32 x 32 array of diodes to measure the local temperature fluctuations during boiling on a silicon wafer heated from below. The second system utilizes an array of 96 microscale heaters each maintained at constant surface temperature using electronic feedback loops. The power required to keep each heater at constant temperature is measured, enabling the local heat transfer coefficient to be determined. Both of these systems as well as some preliminary results are discussed.

  14. The TX-model - a quantitative heat loss analysis of district heating pipes by means of IR surface temperature measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinki, Heimo [ZW Energiteknik, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1996-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of analysing the temperature profile at the ground surface above buried district heating pipes in such a way that would enable the quantitative determination of heat loss from the pair of pipes. In practical applications, it is supposed that this temperature profile is generated by means of advanced IR-thermography. For this purpose, the principle of the TX - model has been developed, based on the fact that the heat losses from pipes buried in the ground have a temperature signature on the ground surface. Qualitative analysis of this temperature signature is very well known and in practical use for detecting leaks from pipes. These techniques primarily make use of relative changes of the temperature pattern along the pipe. In the quantitative heat loss analysis, however, it is presumed that the temperature profile across the pipes is related to the pipe heat loss per unit length. The basic idea is that the integral of the temperature profile perpendicular to the pipe, called TX, is a function of the heat loss, but is also affected by other parameters such as burial depth, heat diffusivity, wind, precipitation and so on. In order to analyse the parameters influencing the TX- factor, a simulation model for the energy balance at the ground surface has been developed. This model includes the heat flow from the pipe to the surface and the heat exchange at the surface with the environment due to convection, latent heat change, solar and long wave radiation. The simulation gives the surprising result that the TX factor is by and large unaffected during the course of a day even when the sun is shining, as long as other climate conditions are relatively stable (low wind, no rain, no shadows). The results from the simulations were verified at different sites in Denmark, Finland, Sweden and USA through a co-operative research program organised and partially financed by the IEA District Heating Programme, Task III, and

  15. Nonlinear Nanofluid Flow over Heated Vertical Surface with Sinusoidal Wall Temperature Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Motsa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear density temperature variations in two-dimensional nanofluid flow over heated vertical surface with a sinusoidal wall temperature are investigated. The model includes the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. Using the boundary layer approximation, the two-dimensional momentum, heat, and mass transfer equations are transferred to nonlinear partial differential equations form and solved numerically using a new method called spectral local linearisation method. The effects of the governing parameters on the fluid properties and on the heat and nanomass transfer coefficients are determined and shown graphically.

  16. Urban surface temperature behaviour and heat island effect in a tropical planned city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Adeb Qaid; Ossen, Dilshan Remaz; Jamei, Elmira; Manaf, Norhashima Abd; Said, Ismail; Ahmad, Mohd Hamdan

    2015-02-01

    Putrajaya is a model city planned with concepts of a "city in the garden" and an "intelligent city" in the tropics. This study presents the behaviour of the surface temperature and the heat island effect of Putrajaya. Findings show that heat island intensity is 2 °C on average at nighttime and negligible at daytime. But high surface temperature values were recorded at the main boulevard due to direct solar radiation incident, street orientation in the direction of northeast and southwest and low building height-to-street width ratio. Buildings facing each other had cooling effect on surfaces during the morning and evening hours; conversely, they had a warming effect at noon. Clustered trees along the street are effective in reducing the surface temperature compared to scattered and isolated trees. Surface temperature of built up areas was highest at noon, while walls and sidewalks facing northwest were hottest later in the day. Walls and sidewalks that face northwest were warmer than those that face southeast. The surface temperatures of the horizontal street surfaces and of vertical façades are at acceptable levels relative to the surface temperature of similar surfaces in mature cities in subtropical, temperate and Mediterranean climates.

  17. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmondson, Jill L; Stott, Iain; Davies, Zoe G

    2016-01-01

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface...... in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce...... the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health....

  18. IDENTIFYING THE LOCAL SURFACE URBAN HEAT ISLAND THROUGH THE MORPHOLOGY OF THE LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Current characterization of the Land Surface Temperature (LST at city scale insufficiently supports efficient mitigations and adaptations of the Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI at local scale. This research intends to delineate the LST variation at local scale where mitigations and adaptations are more feasible. At the local scale, the research helps to identify the local SUHI (LSUHI at different levels. The concept complies with the planning and design conventions that urban problems are treated with respect to hierarchies or priorities. Technically, the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite image products are used. The continuous and smooth latent LST is first recovered from the raw images. The Multi-Scale Shape Index (MSSI is then applied to the latent LST to extract morphological indicators. The local scale variation of the LST is quantified by the indicators such that the LSUHI can be identified morphologically. The results are promising. It can potentially be extended to investigate the temporal dynamics of the LST and LSUHI. This research serves to the application of remote sensing, pattern analysis, urban microclimate study, and urban planning at least at 2 levels: (1 it extends the understanding of the SUHI to the local scale, and (2 the characterization at local scale facilitates problem identification and support mitigations and adaptations more efficiently.

  19. Analytic computation on the forcible thawing temperature field formed by a single heat transfer pipe with unsteady outer surface temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chi; YANG Wei-hao; QI Jia-gen; ZHANG Tao

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive and systematic research on the forcible thawing temperature field formed by a single heat transfer pipe with unsteady outer surface temperature was carried out by analytic computation according to the theory of similitude.The distribution law of thawing temperature field,calculation formulas of thawing radius b,heat flux density q and average thawing temperature (T) were obtained.It theoretically explains that the main influential factors of thawing radius b,heat flux density q and thawing average temperature (T) are K,f,Lλ and ω(f),but Lc affects little.Finally,based on the forcible thawing project of Hulusu air shaft lining,the field data indicate that the analytical formulas of this article are comparatively accurate.

  20. A One-Source Approach for Estimating Land Surface Heat Fluxes Using Remotely Sensed Land Surface Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmin Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The partitioning of available energy between sensible heat and latent heat is important for precise water resources planning and management in the context of global climate change. Land surface temperature (LST is a key variable in energy balance process and remotely sensed LST is widely used for estimating surface heat fluxes at regional scale. However, the inequality between LST and aerodynamic surface temperature (Taero poses a great challenge for regional heat fluxes estimation in one-source energy balance models. To address this issue, we proposed a One-Source Model for Land (OSML to estimate regional surface heat fluxes without requirements for empirical extra resistance, roughness parameterization and wind velocity. The proposed OSML employs both conceptual VFC/LST trapezoid model and the electrical analog formula of sensible heat flux (H to analytically estimate the radiometric-convective resistance (rae via a quartic equation. To evaluate the performance of OSML, the model was applied to the Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX in United States and the Multi-Scale Observation Experiment on Evapotranspiration (MUSOEXE in China, using remotely sensed retrievals as auxiliary data sets at regional scale. Validated against tower-based surface fluxes observations, the root mean square deviation (RMSD of H and latent heat flux (LE from OSML are 34.5 W/m2 and 46.5 W/m2 at SMACEX site and 50.1 W/m2 and 67.0 W/m2 at MUSOEXE site. The performance of OSML is very comparable to other published studies. In addition, the proposed OSML model demonstrates similar skills of predicting surface heat fluxes in comparison to SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System. Since OSML does not require specification of aerodynamic surface characteristics, roughness parameterization and meteorological conditions with high spatial variation such as wind speed, this proposed method shows high potential for routinely acquisition of latent heat flux estimation

  1. FLOW VELOCITY AND SURFACE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FROM URBAN CANOPY SURFACES BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraja Subramania Pillai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC from urban building surfaces by numerical simulation. The thermal effects produced by geometrical and physical properties of urban areas generate a relatively differential heating and uncomfortable environment compared to rural regions called as Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomena. The urban thermal comfort is directly related to the CHTC from the urban canopy surfaces. This CHTC from urban canopy surfaces expected to depend upon the wind velocity flowing over the urban canopy surfaces, urban canopy configurations, building surface temperature etc. But the most influential parameter on CHTC has not been clarified yet. Urban canopy type experiments in thermally stratified wind tunnel have normally been used to study the heat transfer issues. But, it is not an easy task in wind tunnel experiments to evaluate local CHTC, which vary on individual canyon surfaces such as building roof, walls and ground. Numerical simulation validated by wind tunnel experiments can be an alternative for the prediction of CHTC from building surfaces in an urban area. In our study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to validate the low-Reynolds-number k- ε model which was used for the evaluation of CHTC from surfaces. The calculated CFD results showed good agreement with experimental results. After this validation, the effects of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on CHTC from urban building surfaces were investigated. It has been found that the change in velocity remarkably affects the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces and change in surface temperature has almost no effect over the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces.

  2. FLOW VELOCITY AND SURFACE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FROM URBAN CANOPY SURFACES BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraja Subramania Pillai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC from urban building surfaces by numerical simulation. The thermal effects produced by geometrical and physical properties of urban areas generate a relatively differential heating and uncomfortable environment compared to rural regions called as Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomena. The urban thermal comfort is directly related to the CHTC from the urban canopy surfaces. This CHTC from urban canopy surfaces expected to depend upon the wind velocity flowing over the urban canopy surfaces, urban canopy configurations, building surface temperature etc. But the most influential parameter on CHTC has not been clarified yet. Urban canopy type experiments in thermally stratified wind tunnel have normally been used to study the heat transfer issues. But, it is not an easy task in wind tunnel experiments to evaluate local CHTC, which vary on individual canyon surfaces such as building roof, walls and ground. Numerical simulation validated by wind tunnel experiments can be an alternative for the prediction of CHTC from building surfaces in an urban area. In our study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to validate the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model which was used for the evaluation of CHTC from surfaces. The calculated CFD results showed good agreement with experimental results. After this validation, the effects of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on CHTC from urban building surfaces were investigated. It has been found that the change in velocity remarkably affects the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces and change in surface temperature has almost no effect over the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces.

  3. Trends in Extremes of Surface Humidity, Temperature, and Summertime Heat Stress in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the past half century, the mean summertime temperature in China has increased, with nights warm ing more than days. Using surface station observations, we show that the frequency of extreme heat-stress events in China, caused by extremely hot and humid days as well as by heatwaves lasting for a few days, has increased over the period from 1951 to 1994. When humidity is high, hot weather can cause heat stress in humans. The increased heat-stress trend may pose a public health problem.

  4. Corrections for Convective Heat Flux Gauges Subjected to a Surface Temperature Discontinuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, M.; Reinarts, T.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been carried out in an effort to determine the convective heat transfer corrections for circular heat flux gauges subjected to a surface temperature discontinuity. Solutions were obtained at a Reynolds number Of 1 x 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 4. The CFD results are compared with the existing correlations for the correction factors. In general, the CFD corrections exceed those provided by the correlations. The discrepancy increases with increasing upstream surface temperature, thus indicating the role of property variations, which are not accounted for in the correlations. A quasi-two-dimensional analysis is also performed to treat the cylindrical geometry of the heat flux gauges by area-averaging the computed two-dimensional results from CFD.

  5. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, J L; Stott, I; Davies, Z G; Gaston, K J; Leake, J R

    2016-09-19

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a mid-sized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11 months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health.

  6. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, J. L.; Stott, I.; Davies, Z. G.; Gaston, K. J.; Leake, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a mid-sized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11 months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health.

  7. Heat Transfer Measurement and Modeling in Rigid High-Temperature Reusable Surface Insulation Tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Knutson, Jeffrey R.; Cunnington, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Heat transfer in rigid reusable surface insulations was investigated. Steady-state thermal conductivity measurements in a vacuum were used to determine the combined contribution of radiation and solid conduction components of heat transfer. Thermal conductivity measurements at higher pressures were then used to estimate the effective insulation characteristic length for gas conduction modeling. The thermal conductivity of the insulation can then be estimated at any temperature and pressure in any gaseous media. The methodology was validated by comparing estimated thermal conductivities with published data on a rigid high-temperature silica reusable surface insulation tile. The methodology was also applied to the alumina enhanced thermal barrier tiles. Thermal contact resistance for thermal conductivity measurements on rigid tiles was also investigated. A technique was developed to effectively eliminate thermal contact resistance on the rigid tile s cold-side surface for the thermal conductivity measurements.

  8. Assessment of land surface temperature and heat fluxes over Delhi using remote sensing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Surya Deb; Kant, Yogesh; Mitra, Debashis

    2015-01-15

    Surface energy processes has an essential role in urban weather, climate and hydrosphere cycles, as well in urban heat redistribution. The research was undertaken to analyze the potential of Landsat and MODIS data in retrieving biophysical parameters in estimating land surface temperature & heat fluxes diurnally in summer and winter seasons of years 2000 and 2010 and understanding its effect on anthropogenic heat disturbance over Delhi and surrounding region. Results show that during years 2000-2010, settlement and industrial area increased from 5.66 to 11.74% and 4.92 to 11.87% respectively which in turn has direct effect on land surface temperature (LST) and heat fluxes including anthropogenic heat flux. Based on the energy balance model for land surface, a method to estimate the increase in anthropogenic heat flux (Has) has been proposed. The settlement and industrial areas has higher amounts of energy consumed and has high values of Has in all seasons. The comparison of satellite derived LST with that of field measured values show that Landsat estimated values are in close agreement within error of ±2 °C than MODIS with an error of ±3 °C. It was observed that, during 2000 and 2010, the average change in surface temperature using Landsat over settlement & industrial areas of both seasons is 1.4 °C & for MODIS data is 3.7 °C. The seasonal average change in anthropogenic heat flux (Has) estimated using Landsat & MODIS is up by around 38 W/m(2) and 62 W/m(2) respectively while higher change is observed over settlement and concrete structures. The study reveals that the dynamic range of Has values has increased in the 10 year period due to the strong anthropogenic influence over the area. The study showed that anthropogenic heat flux is an indicator of the strength of urban heat island effect, and can be used to quantify the magnitude of the urban heat island effect.

  9. Influences of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages on the land surface fluxes and radiative temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Meyers, T. P. [NOAA ATDD; Pallardy, Stephen G. [University of Missouri; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Yang, Bai [ORNL; Heuer, Mark [ATDD, NOAA; Hosman, K. P. [University of Missouri; Liu, Qing [ORNL; Riggs, Jeffery S [ORNL; Sluss, Daniel Wayne [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    We conducted observations and modeling at a forest site to assess importance of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages for land-atmosphere interactions. We used the terrestrial ecosystem Fluxes And Pools Integrated Simulator (FAPIS). We first examined FAPIS performance by testing its predictions with and without biomass energy storages against measurements of surface energy and CO2 fluxes. We then evaluated the magnitudes and temporal patterns of the calculated biomass energy storages. Effects of energy storages on flux exchanges and variations of radiative temperature were investigated by contrasting FAPIS simulations with and without the storages. We found that with the storages, FAPIS predictions agreed with measurements well; without them, FAPIS performance deteriorated for all surface energy fluxes. The biomass heat storage and biochemical energy storage had clear diurnal patterns with typical ranges from -50 to 50 and -3 to 20 Wm-2, respectively; these typical ranges were exceeded substantially when there were sudden changes in atmospheric conditions. Without-storage simulations produced larger sensible and latent heat fluxes during the day but smaller fluxes (more negative values) at night as compared with with-storage simulations. Similarly, without-storage simulations had higher surface radiative temperature during the day but lower radiative temperature at night, indicating that the biomass energy storages act to dampen diurnal temperature range. Therefore, biomass heat and biochemical energy storages are an integral and substantial part of the surface energy budget and play a role in modulating land surface temperatures and must be considered in studies of land - atmosphere interactions and climate modeling.

  10. Modelling snowpack surface temperature in the Canadian Prairies using simplified heat flow models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Purushottam Raj; Yew Gan, Thian

    2005-11-01

    Three practical schemes for computing the snow surface temperature Ts, i.e. the force-restore method (FRM), the surface conductance method (SCM), and the Kondo and Yamazaki method (KYM), were assessed with respect to Ts retrieved from cloud-free, NOAA-AVHRR satellite data for three land-cover types of the Paddle River basin of central Alberta. In terms of R2, the mean Ts, the t-test and F-test, the FRM generally simulated more accurate Ts than the SCM and KYM. The bias in simulated Ts is usually within several degrees Celsius of the NOAA-AVHRR Ts for both the calibration and validation periods, but larger errors are encountered occasionally, especially when Ts is substantially above 0 °C. Results show that the simulated Ts of the FRM is more consistent than that of the SCM, which in turn was more consistent than that of the KYM. This is partly because the FRM considers two aspects of heat conduction into snow, a stationary-mean diurnal (sinusoidal) temperature variation at the surface coupled to a near steady-state ground heat flux, whereas the SCM assumes a near steady-state, simple heat conduction, and other simplifying assumptions, and the KYM does not balance the snowpack heat fluxes by assuming the snowpack having a vertical temperature profile that is linear. Copyright

  11. Trends of urban surface temperature and heat island characteristics in the Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benas, Nikolaos; Chrysoulakis, Nektarios; Cartalis, Constantinos

    2016-09-01

    Urban air temperature studies usually focus on the urban canopy heat island phenomenon, whereby the city center experiences higher near surface air temperatures compared to its surrounding non-urban areas. The Land Surface Temperature (LST) is used instead of urban air temperature to identify the Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI). In this study, the nighttime LST and SUHI characteristics and trends in the seventeen largest Mediterranean cities were investigated, by analyzing satellite observations for the period 2001-2012. SUHI averages and trends were based on an innovative approach of comparing urban pixels to randomly selected non-urban pixels, which carries the potential to better standardize satellite-derived SUHI estimations. A positive trend for both LST and SUHI for the majority of the examined cities was documented. Furthermore, a 0.1 °C decade-1 increase in urban LST corresponded to an increase in SUHI by about 0.04 °C decade-1. A longitudinal differentiation was found in the urban LST trends, with higher positive values appearing in the eastern Mediterranean. Examination of urban infrastructure and development factors during the same period revealed correlations with SUHI trends, which can be used to explain differences among cities. However, the majority of the cities examined show considerably increased trends in terms of the enhancement of SUHI. These findings are considered important so as to promote sustainable urbanization, as well as to support the development of heat island adaptation and mitigation plans in the Mediterranean.

  12. Sensible and latent heat flux from radiometric surface temperatures at the regional scale: methodology and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Miglietta

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The CarboEurope Regional Experiment Strategy (CERES was designed to develop and test a range of methodologies to assess regional surface energy and mass exchange of a large study area in the south-western part of France. This paper describes a methodology to estimate sensible and latent heat fluxes on the basis of net radiation, surface radiometric temperature measurements and information obtained from available products derived from the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG geostationary meteorological satellite, weather stations and ground-based eddy covariance towers. It is based on a simplified bulk formulation of sensible heat flux that considers the degree of coupling between the vegetation and the atmosphere and estimates latent heat as the residual term of net radiation. Estimates of regional energy fluxes obtained in this way are validated at the regional scale by means of a comparison with direct flux measurements made by airborne eddy-covariance. The results show an overall good matching between airborne fluxes and estimates of sensible and latent heat flux obtained from radiometric surface temperatures that holds for different weather conditions and different land use types. The overall applicability of the proposed methodology to regional studies is discussed.

  13. Estimating surface turbulent heat fluxes from land surface temperature and soil moisture observations using the particle batch smoother

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Dong, Jianzhi; Steele-Dunne, Susan C.; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-11-01

    Surface heat fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere and play a crucial role in meteorology, hydrology, and climate change studies, but in situ observations are costly and difficult. It has been demonstrated that surface heat fluxes can be estimated from assimilation of land surface temperature (LST). One approach is to estimate a neutral bulk heat transfer coefficient (CHN) to scale the sum of turbulent heat fluxes, and an evaporative fraction (EF) that represents the partitioning between fluxes. Here the newly developed particle batch smoother (PBS) is implemented. The PBS makes no assumptions about the prior distributions and is therefore well-suited for non-Gaussian processes. It is also particularly advantageous for parameter estimation by tracking the entire prior distribution of parameters using Monte Carlo sampling. To improve the flux estimation on wet or densely vegetated surfaces, a simple soil moisture scheme is introduced to further constrain EF, and soil moisture observations are assimilated simultaneously. This methodology is implemented with the FIFE 1987 and 1988 data sets. Validation against observed fluxes indicates that assimilating LST using the PBS significantly improves the flux estimates at both daily and half-hourly timescales. When soil moisture is assimilated, the estimated EFs become more accurate, particularly when the surface heat flux partitioning is energy-limited. The feasibility of extending the methodology to use remote sensing observations is tested by limiting the number of LST observations. Results show that flux estimates are greatly improved after assimilating soil moisture, particularly when LST observations are sparse.

  14. Toronto’s Urban Heat Island—Exploring the Relationship between Land Use and Surface Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Hussain

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island effect is linked to the built environment and threatens human health during extreme heat events. In this study, we analyzed whether characteristic land uses within an urban area are associated with higher or lower surface temperatures, and whether concentrations of “hot” land uses exacerbate this relationship. Zonal statistics on a thermal remote sensing image for the City of Toronto revealed statistically significant differences between high average temperatures for commercial and resource/industrial land use (29.1 °C, and low average temperatures for parks and recreational land (25.1 °C and water bodies (23.1 °C. Furthermore, higher concentrations of either of these land uses were associated with more extreme surface temperatures. We also present selected neighborhoods to illustrate these results. The paper concludes by recommending that municipal planners and decision-makers formulate policies and regulations that are specific to the problematic land uses, in order to mitigate extreme heat.

  15. HEAT TREATMENTS OF HIGH TEMPERATURE DRIED NORWAY SPRUCE BOARDS: SACCHARIDES AND FURFURALS IN SAPWOOD SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olov Karlsson,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates that migrate to wood surfaces in sapwood during drying might influence properties such as mould susceptibility and colour. Sugars on the surface of Norway spruce boards during various heat treatments were studied. Samples (350mmx125mmx25mm were double-stacked, facing sapwood-side outwards, and dried at 110oC to a target moisture content (MC of 40%. Dried sub-samples (80 mm x 125 mm x 25 mm were stacked in a similar way and further heated at 110oC and at 130oC for 12, 24, and 36 hours, respectively. Glucose, fructose, and sucrose as well as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF and furfural in the sapwood surface layer of treated wood were analysed using HPLC (RI- and UV-detectors. Carbohydrates degraded to a lower extent at 110oC than at 130oC. Furfural and to a larger extent HMF increased with treatment period and temperature. Heat treatment led to a decrease in lightness and hue of the sapwood surface of sub-samples, while chroma increased somewhat. Furthermore, considerably faster degradation (within a few minutes of the carbohydrates on the surface of the dried spruce boards was observed when single sub-samples were conductively hot pressed at 200oC. Treatment period and initial MC influenced the presence of the carbohydrates in wood surface as well as colour change (Eab of the hot pressed sub-samples.

  16. Influence of mold surface temperature on polymer part warpage in rapid heat cycle molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, G. R.; Pacher, G. A.; Pichler, A.; Friesenbichler, W.; Gruber, D. P.

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic mold surface temperature control was examined for its influence on the warpage. A test mold, featuring two different rapid heat cycle molding (RHCM) technologies was used to manufacture complex plate-shaped parts having different ribs, varying thin-wall regions, and both, circular and rectangular cut-outs. The mold's nozzle side is equipped with the areal heating and cooling technology BFMOLD®, where the heating/cooling channels are replaced by a ball-filled slot near the cavity surface flooded through with hot and cold water sequentially. Two local electrical ceramic heating elements are installed into the mold's ejection side. Based on a 23 full-factorial design of experiments (DoE) plan, varying nozzle temperature (Tnozzle), rapid heat cycle molding temperature (TRHCM) and holding pressure (pn), specimens of POM were manufactured systematically. Five specimens were examined per DoE run. The resulting warpage was measured at 6 surface line scans per part using the non-contact confocal topography system FRT MicroProf®. Two warpage parameters were calculated, the curvature of a 2nd order approximation a, and the vertical deflection at the profile center d. Both, the influence strength and the acting direction of the process parameters and their interactions on a and d were calculated by statistical analysis. Linear mathematical process models were determined for a and d to predict the warpage as a function of the process parameter settings. Finally, an optimum process setting was predicted, based on the process models and Microsoft Excel GRG solver. Clear and significant influences of TRHCM, pn, Tnozzle, and the interaction of TRHCM and pn were determined. While TRHCM was dominant close to the gate, pn became more effective as the flow length increased.

  17. Heated Surface Temperatures Measured by Infrared Detector in a Cascade Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Investigators have used infrared devices to accurately measure heated surface temperatures. Several of these applications have been for turbine heat transfer studies involving film cooling and surface roughness, typically, these measurements use an infrared camera positioned externally to the test section. In cascade studies, where several blades are used to ensure periodic flow, adjacent blades block the externally positioned camera's views of the test blade. To obtain a more complete mapping of the surface temperatures, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center fabricated a probe with an infrared detector to sense the blade temperatures. The probe size was kept small to minimize the flow disturbance. By traversing and rotating the probe, using the same approach as for total pressure surveys, one can find the blade surface temperatures. Probe mounted infrared detectors are appropriate for measuring surface temperatures where an externally positioned infrared camera is unable to completely view the test object. This probe consists of a 8-mm gallium arsenide (GaAs) lens mounted in front of a mercury-cadmium-zinc-tellurium (HgCdZnTe) detector. This type of photovoltaic detector was chosen because of its high sensitivity to temperature when the detector is uncooled. The particular application is for relatively low surface temperatures, typically ambient to 100 C. This requires a detector sensitive at long wavelengths. The detector is a commercial product enclosed in a 9-mm-diameter package. The GaAs lens material was chosen because of its glass-like hardness and its good long-wavelength transmission characteristics. When assembled, the 6.4-mm probe stem is held in the traversing actuator. Since the entire probe is above the measurement plane, the flow field disturbance in the measurement plane is minimized. This particular probe body is somewhat wider than necessary, because it was designed to have replaceable detectors and lenses. The signal for the detector is

  18. Waste Tyres as Heat Sink to Reduce the Driveway Surface Temperatures in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniza Abdul Aziz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of roads and driveways are on the rise as automobiles are now a necessity to all. This excessive development with its requirements increased the urban heat temperature and the generation of waste tyres. Waste tyre management has therefore been taken seriously by developed countries and since the European directive to ban used tyre products and whole tire disposal from landfill in 2003 and 2006 respectively, many researchers have looked for alternative ways to use the waste tyre. In Malaysia, The Smart and Cool Home Developer attempted to develop an eco-house by utilising waste tyre as the foundation for the driveway and claimed that the buried tyres act as a heat sink for the concrete and reduce the surface temperature of the driveway. Hence investigations were conducted on two sample houses to investigate this phenomenon. Findings from this pilot study show that waste tyres do act as a heat sink to the concrete driveways which affect the ambient temperature and relative humidity of the immediate surroundings.

  19. Long-term evolution of tidal heating and surface temperature on extrasolar planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanova, Michaela; Behounkova, Marie

    2015-04-01

    Increasing number of detected extrasolar planets provides a unique statistical set that may help us to improve our knowledge about planetary evolution. Indirect detection methods employed in search for exoplanets are most sensitive to objects orbiting close to their host star and this criterion gets particularly important in the case of low-mass terrestrial planets. Here, we focus on long-term orbital and thermal evolution of a single planet subjected to stellar tides. Our approach combines evaluation of surface temperature as well as numerical computation of tidal effects on planetary orbit and internal heating. By calculating the tidal evolution of the orbit [1], we analyze the effect of initial orbital parameters (eccentricity, semi-major axis and rotational frequency) on secular changes in surface temperature and tidal dissipation. The maximum surface temperature and temperature gradient is computed during the process and it evolves together with the semi-major axis, the eccentricity and the ratio of spin and orbital frequency. Significant increase in the surface temperature is observed when the planet encounters a spin-orbit resonance. We solve the heat diffusion equation numerically for both 1D and 3D geometry in a thin spherical shell corresponding to a subsurface layer (see e.g. [2]), where the upper boundary condition is given by energy equilibrium and is strongly non-linear in temperature due to Stefan-Boltzmann law. Additionally, we solve the viscoelastic response to the tidal loading during orbital evolution. Following the method of [3,4], the tidal heating is evaluated for Maxwell or Andrade rheology in the time domain. We study disturbing potential caused by the body's deformation, the time dependence of phase lag and time lag during one orbit and compare our results with traditionally used constant tidal lag models (e.g. [1,5]). The effect of a 3D internal structure on the disturbing potential is investigated as well. This study is our first step

  20. Temperature field modeling in laser-heated metals for laser cleaning of surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oane, Mihai; Apostol, Ileana; Timcu, Adrian

    2003-10-01

    Laser induced surface cleaning is the adequate method in a large variety of industrial domains as microelectronics, optics, photonics. By comparison to chemical and/or mechanical cleaning, laser cleaning has the advantage of a very good selectivity on the surface and in depth of the material, no surface contamination, without stress in the material volume and environmental safe. It seems that laser cleaning can be developed in a method to be currently used in microelectronic industry. For an efficient laser cleaning of metallic thin films without damage of the silicon wafer, a careful optimization of the incident laser energy, fluence, intensity and number of laser pulses is needed. We have developed an analytical procedure to study the temperature fields in pulsed laser heated solids, for a deeper knowledge of the laser-thin film substrate interaction.

  1. Effect of temperature-dependent surface heat transfer coefficient on the maximum surface stress in ceramics during quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Y. F.; Song, F.; Jiang, C. P.; Xu, X. H.; Wei, J. C.; Zhou, Z. L.

    2016-02-01

    We study the difference in the maximum stress on a cylinder surface σmax using the measured surface heat transfer coefficient hm instead of its average value ha during quenching. In the quenching temperatures of 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 and 800°C, the maximum surface stress σmmax calculated by hm is always smaller than σamax calculated by ha, except in the case of 800°C; while the time to reach σmax calculated by hm (fmmax) is always earlier than that by ha (famax). It is inconsistent with the traditional view that σmax increases with increasing Biot number and the time to reach σmax decreases with increasing Biot number. Other temperature-dependent properties also have a small effect on the trend of their mutual ratios with quenching temperatures. Such a difference between the two maximum surface stresses is caused by the dramatic variation of hm with temperature, which needs to be considered in engineering analysis.

  2. Three-dimensional flow of an Oldroyd-B fluid over a bidirectional stretching surface with prescribed surface temperature and prescribed surface heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayat Tasawar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper concentrates on the mathematical modelling for three-dimensional flow of an incompressible Oldroyd- B fluid over a bidirectional stretching surface. Mathematical formulation incorporates the effect of internal heat source/sink. Two cases of heat transfer namely the prescribed surface temperature (PST and prescribed surface heat flux (PHF are considered. Computations for the governing nonlinear flow are presented using homotopy analysis method. Comparison of the present analysis is shown with the previous limiting result. The obtained results are discussed by plots of interesting parameters for both PST and PHF cases. We examine that an increase in Prandtl number leads to a reduction in PST and PHF. It is noted that both PST and PHF are increased with an increase in source parameter. Further we have seen that the temperature is an increasing function of ratio parameter

  3. BOILING OF WATER AND ORGANIC LIQUIDS ON LOW-TEMPERATURE POROUS SURFACES OF HEAT PIPES

    OpenAIRE

    Шаповал, Андрій Андрійович; Панов, Євген Миколайович; Сауліна, Юлія Валеріївна; Романчук, Борис Васильович; Трубійчук, Р. П.

    2015-01-01

    The experimental study results of the influence of porous metal fiber structures on the intensity of two-phase heat transfer of water and acetone boiling on porous surfaces in conditions of free movement and capillary transport of liquids are presented in the article. The experiments were realized using specially designed experimental installation simulated the operating conditions of heat pipes and thermosyphons. Such conditions are typical for two-phase heat transfer devices – heat pipes an...

  4. In situ synchrotron IR study relating temperature and heating rate to surface functional group changes in biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirtania, Kawnish; Tanner, Joanne; Kabir, Kazi Bayzid; Rajendran, Sharmen; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2014-01-01

    Three types of woody biomass were investigated under pyrolysis condition to observe the change in the surface functional groups by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) technique with increasing temperature under two different (5 and 150°C/min) heating rates. The experiments were carried out in situ in the infrared microscopy beamline (IRM) of the Australian Synchrotron. The capability of the beamline made it possible to focus on single particles to obtain low noise measurements without mixing with KBr. At lower heating rate, the surface functional groups were completely removed by 550°C. In case of higher heating rate, a delay was observed in losing the functional groups. Even at a high temperature, significant number of functional groups was retained after the higher heating rate experiments. This implies that at considerably high heating rates typical of industrial reactors, more functional groups will remain on the surface.

  5. Modeling Heat Transfer to Explain Observed Temperature Anomalies in Near-Surface Ice, Greenland Ice Sheet Ablation Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, B. H.; Harper, J. T.; Meierbachtol, T. W.; Humphrey, N. F.; Johnson, J. V.

    2016-12-01

    Measured ice temperatures in over 30 boreholes at 6 different field sites within the Greenland Ice Sheet ablation area indicate that the near-surface ice temperature warms toward the margin. The rate of warming is significantly greater than the atmospheric lapse rate, meaning that the mean annual ice temperature is far warmer than the mean annual air temperature near the margin. Theoretically, ice within 15 meters of the surface should oscillate seasonally around the mean air temperature. However, observations of mean ice and air temperatures differ by as much as 5 degrees Celsius. Here we numerically model heat transfer in ice to investigate the physical processes that could drive this discrepancy. Modeling results are compared to measured ice temperatures in the first 20 meters of ice below the surface. First, we model pure conduction to analyze the thermal effect of snow accumulation, a fixed melting temperature, ablation at the ice surface, emergent flow of ice, and long-term changes in the mean air temperature. Next, we consider a secondary process beyond pure conduction with the air - a latent heat flux which adds energy by refreezing meltwater below the surface. While our measurement locations have no open crevasses exposed to the surface, borehole field observations reveal that void spaces exist below the ice surface. These subsurface voids could provide a route for water to move to depth where it then refreezes and adds energy to the surrounding ice, thus warming ice above the mean air temperature. Finally, we use the near-surface results as a boundary condition for heat transfer through the full thickness of the ice column. The subsequent model output is compared to borehole temperature measurements at depth to examine the effect of near-surface heat transfer on the rest of the ice column.

  6. Effects of pouring temperature and slurry viscosity on heat transfer and surface roughness in lost foam casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayganpour, A.; Idris, M. H.; Izman, S.; Farahany, S.

    2012-06-01

    The effects of pouring temperature and slurry viscosity in terms of heat transfer on surface roughness during lost foam casting (LFC) of LM6 alloy were investigated experimentally. Heat transfer of molten materials is an important factors to changes the microstructure which is considered in the present study. It is primarily dependent on the pouring temperature, casting thickness, mould material, mould temperature and surrounding medium. The pouring temperature changed from 700 to740°C and slurry viscosity altered from 20 to 36 sec. A full 2-level factorial design experimental technique was used to identify the significant factors that effect on surface roughness of castings. The results show that surface roughness improved by lower pouring temperature, whereas slurry viscosity has less influence on the quality of surface.

  7. Scraped surface heat exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chetan S; Hartel, Richard W

    2006-01-01

    Scraped surface heat exchangers (SSHEs) are commonly used in the food, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries for heat transfer, crystallization, and other continuous processes. They are ideally suited for products that are viscous, sticky, that contain particulate matter, or that need some degree of crystallization. Since these characteristics describe a vast majority of processed foods, SSHEs are especially suited for pumpable food products. During operation, the product is brought in contact with a heat transfer surface that is rapidly and continuously scraped, thereby exposing the surface to the passage of untreated product. In addition to maintaining high and uniform heat exchange, the scraper blades also provide simultaneous mixing and agitation. Heat exchange for sticky and viscous foods such as heavy salad dressings, margarine, chocolate, peanut butter, fondant, ice cream, and shortenings is possible only by using SSHEs. High heat transfer coefficients are achieved because the boundary layer is continuously replaced by fresh material. Moreover, the product is in contact with the heating surface for only a few seconds and high temperature gradients can be used without the danger of causing undesirable reactions. SSHEs are versatile in the use of heat transfer medium and the various unit operations that can be carried out simultaneously. This article critically reviews the current understanding of the operations and applications of SSHEs.

  8. Distortion of Near-Surface Seawater Temperature Structure by a Moored-Buoy Hull and Its Effect on Skin Temperature and Heat Flux Estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Ando

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that the accuracy of temperature measurements by surface-moored buoys may be affected by distortions of the near-surface temperature structure by the buoy hull on calm, sunny days. We obtained the first definite observational evidence that the temperature near the hull was not horizontally homogeneous at the same nominal depth. We observed large temperature differences of 1.0 K or more between thermometers at 0.2 m depth. The distortion of the surface temperature field yielded an error in estimates of daytime net surface heat flux up to more than 30 Wm–2.

  9. Two-dimensional monitoring of surface temperature distribution of a heated material by laser-ultrasound scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, I.; Yamada, H.; Takahashi, M.

    2011-01-01

    A non-contact method with a laser-ultrasonic technique for measuring two-dimensional temperature distribution on a material surface is presented. The method consists of a laser-ultrasonic measurement of a one-dimensional temperature distribution on a material surface and its two-dimensional area mapping. The surface temperature is basically determined from a temperature dependence of the velocity of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagating on a material surface. One-dimensional surface temperature distributions are determined by an inverse analysis consisting of a SAW measurement and a finite difference calculation. To obtain a two-dimensional distribution of surface temperature on a material surface, SAW measurements within the area of a square on the surface are performed by a pulsed laser scanning with a galvanometer system. The inverse analysis is then applied to each of the SAW data to determine the surface temperature distribution in a certain direction, and the obtained one-dimensional distributions are combined to construct a two-dimensional distribution of surface temperature. It has been demonstrated from the experiment with a heated aluminum plate that the temperature distributions of the area of a square on the aluminium surface determined by the ultrasonic method almost agree with those measured using an infrared camera.

  10. Synergistic effects of hydrogen plasma exposure, pulsed laser heating and temperature on rhodium surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marot, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Doerner, R. P.; Umstadter, K.; Wagner, R. S.; Mathys, D.; Duggelin, M.; Meyer, E.

    2013-01-01

    The combined effect of hydrogen plasma exposure and surface heating, either continuous or by short laser pulses (5 ns), on the surface morphology of rhodium layers has been studied. Investigations were performed by reflectivity measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray

  11. Instrumental system for the quick relief of surface temperatures in fumaroles fields and steam heated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diliberto, Iole; Cappuzzo, Santo; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Cosenza, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    .g. in mofettes and diffuse degassing areas). The occurrence of thermal anomalies at the surface often reveals that a process of steam condensation is occurring below the ground and that CO2 fluxes are being released on the surface. A thermal map of steam heated grounds therefore highlights boundaries of underground steam advection and also the more suitable sites for geochemical monitoring. Pirogips has been assembled for the quick acquisition of surface parameters related to the exhaling activity of volcanic systems. It has been formerly tested in a controlled environment, after in the well known fumaroles areas of Vulcano island, and then in the volcanic system El Machin (Colombia) for the field survey preliminary to the installation of new monitoring stations. The preliminary test and the first field experiences confirmed that pirogips acquires the surface temperatures quickly and with good detail. The combination of sensors supplies the advantage of in situ methods (i.e. accuracy of the direct measurement by thermocouple) and those of ground-based remote sensing techniques (i.e. quickness of measurement process), at the same time reducing the main disadvantages of each method. A home-made data-logger combines the acquired parameters and returns a data-string allowing an easy visualization of acquired data on geo-referenced maps. The string of data returns the position of acquisition (lat, long, WGS84), surface temperature (either derived by the pyrometer and by thermocouple), ambient temperature, barometric pressure and air moisture. -References -Diliberto I.S., Gurrieri S., Valenza M. (2002) Relationships between diffuse CO2 emissions and volcanic activity on the island of Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy) during the period 1984-1994 Bulletin of Volcanology vol 64: 219-228. -Diliberto I.S., (2013) Time series analysis of high temperature fumaroles monitored on the island of Vulcano (Aeolian Archipelago, italy). Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research

  12. Seasonal variations of air-sea heat fluxes and sea surface temperature in the northwestern Pacific marginal seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Na; WU Dexing; LIN Xiaopei; MENG Qingjia

    2014-01-01

    Using a net surface heat flux (Qnet) product obtained from the objectively analyzed air-sea fluxes (OAFlux) project and the international satellite cloud climatology project (ISCCP), and temperature from the simple ocean data assimilation (SODA), the seasonal variations of the air-sea heat fluxes in the northwestern Pa-cific marginal seas (NPMS) and their roles in sea surface temperature (SST) seasonality are studied. The seasonal variations of Qnet, which is generally determined by the seasonal cycle of latent heat flux (LH), are in response to the advection-induced changes of SST over the Kuroshio and its extension. Two dynamic regimes are identified in the NPMS:one is the area along the Kuroshio and its extension, and the other is the area outside the Kuroshio. The oceanic thermal advection dominates the variations of SST and hence the sea-air humidity plays a primary role and explains the maximum heat losing along the Kuroshio. The heat transported by the Kuroshio leads to a longer period of heat losing over the Kuroshio and its Extension. Positive anomaly of heat content corresponds with the maximum heat loss along the Kuroshio. The oceanic advection controls the variations of heat content and hence the surface heat flux. This study will help us understand the mechanism controlling variations of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system in the NPMS. In the Kuroshio region, the ocean current controls the ocean temperature along the main stream of the Ku-roshio, and at the same time, forces the air-sea fluxes.

  13. Rayleigh surface acoustic wave as an efficient heating system for biological reactions: investigation of microdroplet temperature uniformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux-Marchand, Thibaut; Beyssen, Denis; Sarry, Frederic; Elmazria, Omar

    2015-04-01

    When a microdroplet is put on the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave path, longitudinal waves are radiated into the liquid and induce several phenomena such as the wellknown surface acoustic wave streaming. At the same time, the temperature of the microdroplet increases as it has been shown. In this paper, we study the temperature uniformity of a microdroplet heated by Rayleigh surface acoustic wave for discrete microfluidic applications such as biological reactions. To precisely ascertain the temperature uniformity and not interfere with the biological reaction, we used an infrared camera. We then tested the temperature uniformity as a function of three parameters: the microdroplet volume, the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave frequency, and the continuous applied radio frequency power. Based on these results, we propose a new device structure to develop a future lab on a chip based on reaction temperatures.

  14. Use of postmortem temperature decay response surface plots of heat transport in the human eye to predict time of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Jimmy L

    2014-03-01

    A finite element heat transfer model of the human eye was previously constructed and applied to experimental postmortem temperature decay curves collected in eyeballs of ten human bodies. The model was applied in the early postmortem period of 0–24 h under conditions of natural convection–radiation. Based upon this previous model, response surfaces for postmortem temperature decay were constructed based upon variable ranges of the natural convective–radiation heat transfer coefficient from 7–13 W/m2 K, ambient temperatures of 10–33°C, and times of 0–24 h. Mathematical equations to describe these response surfaces have been developed. This response surface method is demonstrated for use by coroners/medical personnel to estimate time of death from recorded field temperature data collected over a 30-min period. Sensitivity of the model to small changes in the key variable of ambient temperature is explored. The response surface model is applied to two cases of previously collected experimental eyeball temperature data. This response surface model method is only valid for constant surrounding temperatures, conditions of natural convection, no radiation effects, and postmortem times of 0–24 h.

  15. Effects of local heat and cold treatment on surface and articular temperature of arthritic knees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterveld, Frederikus G.J.; Rasker, Johannes J.

    1994-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the effects of locally applied heat and cold treatments on skin and intraarticular temperature in patients with arthritis. Methods. Thirty-nine patients with arthritis of the knee were divided at random into 4 treatment groups (ice chips, nitrogen cold air, ligno-

  16. Sensible and latent heat flux from radiometric surface temperatures at the regional scale: methodology and validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miglietta, F.; Gioli, B.; Brunet, Y.; Hutjes, R.W.A.; Matese, A.; Sarrat, C.; Zaldei, A.

    2009-01-01

    The CarboEurope Regional Experiment Strategy (CERES) was designed to develop and test a range of methodologies to assess regional surface energy and mass exchange of a large study area in the south-western part of France. This paper describes a methodology to estimate sensible and latent heat fluxes

  17. High Efficiency, High Temperature Foam Core Heat Exchanger for Fission Surface Power Systems, Phase II Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fission-based power systems with power levels of 30 to ≥100 kWe will be needed for planetary surface bases. Development of high temperature, high efficiency...

  18. Impacts of Irrigation on the Heat Fluxes and Near-Surface Temperature in an Inland Irrigation Area of Northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jiang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Irrigated agriculture has the potential to alter regional to global climate significantly. We investigate how irrigation will affect regional climate in the future in an inland irrigation area of northern China, focusing on its effects on heat fluxes and near-surface temperature. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model, we compare simulations among three land cover scenarios: the control scenario (CON, the irrigation scenario (IRR, and the irrigated cropland expansion scenario (ICE. Our results show that the surface energy budgets and temperature are sensitive to changes in the extent and spatial pattern of irrigated land. Conversion to irrigated agriculture at the contemporary scale leads to an increase in annual mean latent heat fluxes of 12.10 W m−2, a decrease in annual mean sensible heat fluxes of 8.85 W m−2, and a decrease in annual mean temperature of 1.3 °C across the study region. Further expansion of irrigated land increases annual mean latent heat fluxes by 18.08 W m−2, decreases annual mean sensible heat fluxes by 12.31 W m−2, and decreases annual mean temperature by 1.7 °C. Our simulated effects of irrigation show that changes in land use management such as irrigation can be an important component of climate change and need to be considered together with greenhouse forcing in climate change assessments.

  19. Evaporation of liquid microdroplets levitated above a solid surface heated below the saturation temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, D. P.; Zaitsev, D. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a study of the interaction of liquid microdroplets falling on a solid surface whose temperature is varied from 75 °C to 155 °C. It has been shown for the first time that droplet levitation above a solid surface is possible at a temperature below the saturation temperature. It has been found that for levitated droplets, the specific evaporation rate is constant in time, but for sessile droplets, it increases sharply. The evaporation rate for sessile droplet was found an order of magnitude higher than that for levitated droplets.

  20. Temperature distributions in laser-heated semi-infinite and finite-thickness media with convective surface losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loze, M K; Wright, C D

    1998-10-01

    The temperature distributions produced within semi-infinite and finite-thickness media heated by a moving laser beam with a Gaussian power-density profile are examined by use of a time-domain method. Convective losses, described by Newton's law of cooling, from the medium surfaces are included. Various medium absorption models are considered. The solutions are given as single integrals with respect to time of simple functions. The resulting expressions have been used to examine the role of surface losses in information storage and medical applications. The role of convective losses in optical recording systems is found to be insignificant. However, for medical applications, combined convective and evaporative surface losses represent an important surface-heat-loss mechanism.

  1. Inferring near surface soil temperature time series from different land uses to quantify the variation of heat fluxes into a shallow aquifer in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfersberger, Hans; Rock, Gerhard; Draxler, Johannes C.

    2017-09-01

    Different land uses exert a strong spatially distributed and temporal varying signal of heat fluxes from the surface in or out of the ground. In this paper we show an approach to quantify the heat fluxes into a groundwater body differentiating between near surface soil temperatures under grass, forest, asphalt, agriculture and surface water bodies and heat fluxes from subsurface structures like heated basements or sewage pipes. Based on observed time series of near surface soil temperatures we establish individual parameters (e.g. shift, moving average) of a simple empirical function that relates air temperature to soil temperature. This procedure is useful since air temperature time series are readily available and the complex energy flux processes at the soil atmosphere interface do not need to be described in detail. To quantify the heat flux from heated subsurface structures that have lesser depths to the groundwater table the 1D heat conduction module SoilTemp is developed. Based on soil temperature time series observed at different depths in a research lysimeter heat conduction and heat storage capacity values are calibrated disregarding their dependence on the water content. With SoilTemp the strong interaction between time series of groundwater temperature and groundwater level, near surface soil temperatures and the basement temperatures in heated buildings could be evaluated showing the dynamic nature of thermal gradients. The heat fluxes from urban areas are calculated considering the land use patterns within a spatial unit by mixing the heat fluxes from basements with those under grass and asphalt. The heat fluxes from sewage pipes and of sewage leakage are shown to be negligible for evaluated pipe diameters and sewage discharges. The developed methodology will allow to parameterize the upper boundary of heat transport models and to differentiate between the heat fluxes from different surface usages and their dynamics into the subsurface.

  2. Relationships of surface air temperature anomalies over Europe to persistence of atmospheric circulation patterns conducive to heat waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kyselý

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Heat waves are among natural hazards with the most severe consequences for human society, including pronounced mortality impacts in mid-latitudes. Recent studies have hypothesized that the enhanced persistence of atmospheric circulation may affect surface climatic extremes, mainly the frequency and severity of heat waves. In this paper we examine relationships between the persistence of the Hess-Brezowsky circulation types conducive to summer heat waves and air temperature anomalies at stations over most of the European continent. We also evaluate differences between temperature anomalies during late and early stages of warm circulation types in all seasons. Results show that more persistent circulation patterns tend to enhance the severity of heat waves and support more pronounced temperature anomalies. Recent sharply rising trends in positive temperature extremes over Europe may be related to the greater persistence of the circulation types, and if similar changes towards enhanced persistence affect other mid-latitudinal regions, analogous consequences and implications for temperature extremes may be expected.

  3. A simple mathematical procedure to estimate heat flux in machining using measured surface temperature with infrared laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hocine Mzad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Several techniques have been developed over time for the measurement of heat and the temperatures generated in various manufacturing processes and tribological applications. Each technique has its own advantages and disadvantages. The appropriate technique for temperature measurement depends on the application under consideration as well as the available tools for measurement. This paper presents a procedure for a simple and accurate determination of the time-varying heat flux at the workpiece–tool interface of three different metals under known cutting conditions. A portable infrared thermometer is used for surface temperature measurements. A spline smoothing interpolation of the surface temperature history enables to determine the local heat flux produced during stock removal. The measured temperature is represented by a third-order spline approximation. Nonetheless, the accuracy of polynomial interpolation depends on how close are the interpolated points; an increase in degree cannot be used to increase the accuracy. Although the data analysis is relatively complicated, the computing time is very small.

  4. Numerical modelling of temperature fields in the flow boiling liquid through a vertical minichannel with an enhanced heating surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hożejowska Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of heat transfer research on flow boiling in a rectangular minichannel positioned vertically, with an enhanced surface. One of the channel walls was made of thin foil powered by direct current. This foil is enhanced on the side contacting fluid in the minichannel. It is possible to observe both surfaces of the minichannel through two openings covered with glass panes. One allows detecting temperature of the plain side of the foil by liquid crystal thermography. The opposite surface of the minichannel (from the enhanced side of the foil can be observed through the other glass pane. The observations of the flow structures allowed to calculate the void fraction for some cross-sections of selected two phase flow images. In mathematical modelling of the considered process stationary heat transfer in a glass pane, heating foil and boiling liquid can be described with Laplace equation, Poisson equation and energy equation, respectively. For completeness of the model a corresponding system of boundary conditions was given. The two-dimensional temperature fields of glass pane, heating foil and fluid was computed with the Trefftz method. The equalizing calculus used to smooth the measured data has reduced errors.

  5. Natural convection of nanofluid in a wavy cavity in the presence of magnetic field on variable heat surface temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javaherdeh, Korosh; Moslemi, Mehdi; Shahbazi, Mona [University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    A numerical analysis has been performed to investigate the laminar natural convection heat characteristics in a wavy cavity filled with CuO/water nanofluid. One of the sinusoidal walls (BC) is at the volatile high temperature and the opposite wavy surface is at a stable low temperature and the two other walls are considered flat and insulated while the uniform magnetic field is considered. Performing the analysis, the governing equations are given in terms of the stream function-vorticity formulation. In order to solve the nondimensionalized equations, discretizing with second-order accurate central difference method is performed then the successive under relaxation method with appropriate boundary conditions is considered. To validate the numerical model, various comparisons with previously published studies have been conducted and the results are in a good agreement. The main objective is to survey the effects of the Rayleigh number, Hartmann number, and nanoparticles volume fraction on the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics. The results are illustrated in contours of stream function, constant temperature, and Nusselt number. The results show that the presence of the magnetic field the local Nusselt number decreases at the hot wall. Moreover, the enhancement in the heat transfer performance increases with an increasing nanoparticle concentration. However, for all values of Rayleigh number, the presence of nanoparticles leads to significant enhancement in heat transfer and the increase of Rayleigh number causes the heat transfer mechanism to change from conduction to convection.

  6. CORRELATION ANALYSIS OF SURFACE TEMPERATURE OF ROOFTOPS, STREETSCAPES AND URBAN HEAT ISLAND EFFECT: CASE STUDY OF CENTRAL SYDNEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Sharifi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cities are frequently experiencing artificial heat stress, known as the Urban Heat Island (UHI effect. The UHI effect is commonly present in cities due to increased urbanization, where anthropogenic heat and human modifications have altered the characteristics of surfaces and atmosphere. Urban structure, land cover and metabolism are underlined as UHI key contributors and can result in higher urban densities being up to 10°C hotter compared to their peri-urban surroundings. The UHI effect increases the health-risk of spending time outdoors and boosts the need for energy consumption, particularly for air-conditioning during summer. Under investigation is what urban features are more resilient to the surface layer Urban Heat Island (sUHI effect in precinct scale. In the context of Sydney, this ongoing research aims to explore the most heat resilient urban features at precinct scale. This UHI investigation covers five highdensity precincts in central Sydney and is based on a nocturnal remote-sensing thermal image of central Sydney taken on 6 February 2009. Comparing the surface temperature of streetscapes and buildings’ rooftops (dominant urban horizontal surfaces, indicates that open spaces and particularly streetscapes are the most sensitive urban elements to the sUHI effect. The correlations between street network intensity, open space ratio, urban greenery ratio and the sUHI effect is being analysed in Sydney’s high-density precincts. Results indicate that higher open space ratio and street network intensity correlate significantly to higher sUHI effect at precinct scale. Meanwhile, 10% increase in the urban greenery can effectively decrease the precinct temperature by 0.6°C.

  7. Transient heat transfer behavior of water spray evaporative cooling on a stainless steel cylinder with structured surface for safety design application in high temperature scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Hong, Wang; Xun, Zhu; Song, Sihong; Sajid, Muhammad

    2017-02-01

    High heat transfer performance of spray cooling on structured surface might be an additional measure to increase the safety of an installation against any threat caused by rapid increase in the temperature. The purpose of present experimental study is to explore heat transfer performance of structured surface under different spray conditions and surface temperatures. Two cylindrical stainless steel samples were used, one with pyramid pins structured surface and other with smooth surface. Surface heat flux of 3.60, 3.46, 3.93 and 4.91 MW/m2 are estimated for sample initial average temperature of 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C, respectively for an inlet pressure of 1.0 MPa. A maximum cooling rate of 507 °C/s was estimated for an inlet pressure of 0.7 MPa at 900 °C for structured surface while for smooth surface maximum cooling rate of 356 °C/s was attained at 1.0 MPa for 700 °C. Structured surface performed better to exchange heat during spray cooling at initial sample temperature of 900 °C with a relative increase in surface heat flux by factor of 1.9, 1.56, 1.66 and 1.74 relative to smooth surface, for inlet pressure of 0.4, 0.7, 1.0 and 1.3 MPa, respectively. For smooth surface, a decreasing trend in estimated heat flux is observed, when initial sample temperature was increased from 600 to 900 °C. Temperature-based function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Limited published work is available about the application of structured surface spray cooling techniques for safety of stainless steel structures at very high temperature scenario such as nuclear safety vessel and liquid natural gas storage tanks.

  8. Transient heat transfer behavior of water spray evaporative cooling on a stainless steel cylinder with structured surface for safety design application in high temperature scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Hong, Wang; Xun, Zhu; Song, Sihong; Sajid, Muhammad

    2016-05-01

    High heat transfer performance of spray cooling on structured surface might be an additional measure to increase the safety of an installation against any threat caused by rapid increase in the temperature. The purpose of present experimental study is to explore heat transfer performance of structured surface under different spray conditions and surface temperatures. Two cylindrical stainless steel samples were used, one with pyramid pins structured surface and other with smooth surface. Surface heat flux of 3.60, 3.46, 3.93 and 4.91 MW/m2 are estimated for sample initial average temperature of 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C, respectively for an inlet pressure of 1.0 MPa. A maximum cooling rate of 507 °C/s was estimated for an inlet pressure of 0.7 MPa at 900 °C for structured surface while for smooth surface maximum cooling rate of 356 °C/s was attained at 1.0 MPa for 700 °C. Structured surface performed better to exchange heat during spray cooling at initial sample temperature of 900 °C with a relative increase in surface heat flux by factor of 1.9, 1.56, 1.66 and 1.74 relative to smooth surface, for inlet pressure of 0.4, 0.7, 1.0 and 1.3 MPa, respectively. For smooth surface, a decreasing trend in estimated heat flux is observed, when initial sample temperature was increased from 600 to 900 °C. Temperature-based function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Limited published work is available about the application of structured surface spray cooling techniques for safety of stainless steel structures at very high temperature scenario such as nuclear safety vessel and liquid natural gas storage tanks.

  9. Sea and land surface temperatures, ocean heat content, Earth's energy imbalance and net radiative forcing over the last decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieng, Habib B.; Cazenave, Anny; Meyssignac, Benoit; Schuckmann, Karina

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's global mean surface temperature (GMST) has increased less rapidly since the early 2000s than during the previous decades. Here we investigate the regional distribution of the reported temperature slowdown, focusing on the 2003-2014 decade of most complete global datasets. We find that both land surface temperature (LST) and sea surface temperature (SST) have increased at a rate significantly lower than over the previous decades with small regional differences. While confirming cooling of eastern tropical Pacific during the last decade, our results show that the reduced rate of change is a global phenomenon. We further evaluate the time derivative of full-depth ocean heat content to determine the planetary energy imbalance based on three different approaches: in situ measurements, ocean reanalysis and an indirect measure through the global sea level budget. For the 2003-2014 time span, it is estimated to 0.5 +/- 0.06 Wm-2, 0.64 +/- 0.04 Wm-2, and 0.6 +/- 0.07 Wm-2, respectively for the 3 approaches. We constrain the ocean heat uptake rates using the EBAF energy imbalance time series from the CERES/TOA project and find significant agreement at interannual scales. Finally, we compute the net radiative forcing of the last decade, considering the radiative feedback from observed GMST and the 3 different rates of the total ocean heat content. We obtain values of 1.6 +/- 0.19 Wm-2, 1.75 +/- 0.17 Wm-2, and 1.70 +/- 0.19 Wm-2, respectively over 2003-2014. We find no evidence of decrease in the net radiative forcing in the recent years, but rather increase compared to the previous decades.

  10. Sea surface temperature of the coastal zones of France. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, P. Y.; Frouin, R.; Cassanet, G.; Verger, F. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. HCMM data analysis shows some mesoscale features which were previously expected to occur: summer coastal upwellings in the Gulf of Lions, tidal fronts bordering the English Channel, and cooler surface waters at the continental shelf break. The analysis of the spectral variance density spectra show that the interpretation of the data usually is limited by the HCMM radiometric performance (noise levels) at wavenumbers below 5 km in the oceanic areas; from this analysis it may also be concluded that a decrease of the radiometric noise level down to 0.1 k against an increase of the ground resolution up to 2 km would give a better optimum of the radiometric performances in the oceanic areas. HCMM data appear to be useful for analysis of the sea surface temperature field, particularly in the very coastal area by profiting from the ground resolution of 500 m.

  11. An experimental investigation on dynamics and heat transfer associated with a single droplet impacting on a hot surface above the Leidenfrost point temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.; Kim, H. [Kyung Hee Univ., Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2016-07-15

    During large loss-of-coolant accidents in nuclear reactors, water splatters as the quench front propagates at the quenching surface, and many droplets of different sizes and velocities are generated and carried with the steam in the cooling channel. Heat transfer due to droplets striking an overheated fuel rod above the Leidenfrost point temperature is important for predicting the peak cladding temperature. This study investigated the dynamics and heat transfer characteristics when a single droplet at room temperature collided with a surface at 425 C experimentally, using synchronized high-speed video and infrared cameras. Various physical parameters related to heat transfer model development were measured, including the residence time, spreading diameter, local heat flux distribution, effective heat transfer area, average vapor film thickness, and total heat transfer per collision. The measured data were compared with the values of the physical parameters predicted by existing mechanistic models.

  12. Heat Transfer and Observation of Droplet-Surface Interactions During Air-Mist Cooling at CSP Secondary System Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta L., Mario E.; Mejía G., M. Esther; Castillejos E., A. Humberto

    2016-04-01

    Air-mists are key elements in the secondary cooling of modern thin steel slab continuous casters. The selection of water, W, and air, A, flow rates, and pressures in pneumatic nozzles open up a wide spectrum of cooling possibilities by their influence on droplet diameter, d, droplet velocity, v, and water impact flux, w. Nonetheless, due to the harsh environment resulting from the high temperatures and dense mists involved, there is very little information about the correlation between heat flux extracted, - q, and mist characteristics, and none about the dynamics of drop-wall interactions. For obtaining both kinds of information, this work combines a steady-state heat flux measuring method with a visualization technique based on a high-speed camera and a laser illumination system. For wall temperatures, T w, between ~723 K and ~1453 K (~450 °C and ~1180 °C), which correspond to film boiling regime, it was confirmed that - q increases with increase in v, w, and T w and with decrease in d. It should be noticed, however, that the increase in w generally decreases the spray cooling effectiveness because striking drops do not evaporate efficiently due to the interference by liquid remains from previous drops. Visualization of the events happening close to the surface also reveals that the contact time of the liquid with the surface is very brief and that rebounding, splashing, sliding, and levitation of drops lead to ineffective contact with the surface. At the center of the mist footprint, where drops impinge nearly normal to the surface those with enough momentum establish intimate contact with it before forming a vapor layer that pushes away the remaining liquid. Also, some drops are observed sliding upon the surface or levitating close to it; these are drops with low momentum which are influenced by the deflecting air stream. At footprint positions where oblique impingement occurs, frequently drops are spotted sliding or levitating and liquid films flowing in

  13. Heat flux and temperature determination on the control rod outer surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taler, J.; Cebula, A. [Cracow Univ. of Tech., Cracow (Poland); Marcinkiewicz, J.; Tinoco, H. [Forsmarks Kraftgrupp AB, Osthammar (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    The paper presents heat transfer calculation results concerning a control rod of Unit 3 of Forsmark Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The part of the control rod, which is the object of interest, is surrounded by a mixing region of hot and cold flows and, as a consequence, is subjected to thermal fluctuations. The paper describes a numerical test which validates the method based on the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP). The comparison of the results achieved by two methods, CFD and IHCP, including a description of the IHCP method used in the calculation process, shows a very good agreement between the methods. (author)

  14. Verification of heat flux and temperature calculation on the control rod outer surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taler, Jan; Cebula, Artur

    2011-12-01

    The paper presents heat transfer calculation results concerning a control rod of Forsmark Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The part of the control rod, which is the object of interest, is surrounded by a mixing region of hot and cold flows and, as a consequence, is subjected to thermal fluctuations. The paper describes a numerical test which validates the method based on the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP). The comparison of the results achieved by two methods, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and IHCP, including a description of the IHCP method used in the calculation process, shows a very good agreement between the methods.

  15. Low temperature nuclear heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotakorpi, J.; Tarjanne, R. (comps.)

    1977-08-01

    The meeting was concerned with the use of low grade nuclear heat for district heating, desalination, process heat, and agriculture and aquaculture. The sessions covered applications and demand, heat sources, and economics.

  16. High Efficiency, High Temperature Foam Core Heat Exchanger for Fission Surface Power Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fission-based power systems are anticipated for various planetary surface human base applications with power levels of 30?100+ kWe. The development of high...

  17. Time series decomposition of remotely sensed land surface temperature and investigation of trends and seasonal variations in surface urban heat islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Jinling; Zhan, Wenfeng; Chen, Yunhao; Wang, Mengjie; Wang, Jinfei

    2016-03-01

    Previous time series methods have difficulties in simultaneous characterization of seasonal, gradual, and abrupt changes of remotely sensed land surface temperature (LST). This study proposed a model to decompose LST time series into trend, seasonal, and noise components. The trend component indicates long-term climate change and land development and is described as a piecewise linear function with iterative breakpoint detection. The seasonal component illustrates annual insolation variations and is modeled as a sinusoidal function on the detrended data. This model is able to separate the seasonal variation in LST from the long-term (including gradual and abrupt) change. Model application to nighttime Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)/LST time series during 2000-2012 over Beijing yielded an overall root-mean-square error of 1.62 K between the combination of the decomposed trend and seasonal components and the actual MODIS/LSTs. LST decreased (~ -0.086 K/yr, p sixth ring roads. The decreasing trend was stronger over croplands than over urban lands (p < 0.05), resulting in an increasing trend in surface urban heat island intensity (SUHII, 0.022 ± 0.006 K/yr). This was mainly attributed to the trends in urban-rural differences in rainfall and albedo. The SUHII demonstrated a concave seasonal variation primarily due to the seasonal variations of urban-rural differences in temperature cooling rate (related to canyon structure, vegetation, and soil moisture) and surface heat dissipation (affected by humidity and wind).

  18. Numerical analysis of influence of heat load on temperature of battery surface with cooling by a two-phase closed thermosyphon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnoshlykov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical analysis of thermal conditions of a two-phase closed thermosyphon using the software package ANSYS FLUENT has been carried out. Time dependence of temperature of heat source surface, which characterize the efficiency of thermosyphon at critical temperatures of batteries have been obtained.

  19. A coupled force-restore model of surface temperature and soil moisture using the maximum entropy production model of heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S.-Y.; Wang, J.

    2016-07-01

    A coupled force-restore model of surface soil temperature and moisture (FRMEP) is formulated by incorporating the maximum entropy production model of surface heat fluxes and including the gravitational drainage term. The FRMEP model driven by surface net radiation and precipitation are independent of near-surface atmospheric variables with reduced sensitivity to the uncertainties of model input and parameters compared to the classical force-restore models (FRM). The FRMEP model was evaluated using observations from two field experiments with contrasting soil moisture conditions. The modeling errors of the FRMEP predicted surface temperature and soil moisture are lower than those of the classical FRMs forced by observed or bulk formula based surface heat fluxes (bias 1 ~ 2°C versus ~4°C, 0.02 m3 m-3 versus 0.05 m3 m-3). The diurnal variations of surface temperature, soil moisture, and surface heat fluxes are well captured by the FRMEP model measured by the high correlations between the model predictions and observations (r ≥ 0.84). Our analysis suggests that the drainage term cannot be neglected under wet soil condition. A 1 year simulation indicates that the FRMEP model captures the seasonal variation of surface temperature and soil moisture with bias less than 2°C and 0.01 m3 m-3 and correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.9 with observations, respectively.

  20. To Determination of Heating Speed of Surface Element of Module Industrial Furnace Recuperator of High-Temperature Heat Technologies at Engineering and Automotive and Tractor Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Shidlovsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains an analysis of thermal stressed state of a cast-iron recuperator element wall in the case when a cast-iron needle recuperator operates in the state of  elasticity and elastic-plasticity.Heating speed evaluation of  heat-exchange surface at furnace start-up is given in the paper. 

  1. Heat engines and heat pumps in a hydrostatic atmosphere: How surface pressure and temperature control wind power output and circulation cell size

    CERN Document Server

    Makarieva, A M; Nefiodov, A V; Sheil, D; Nobre, A D; Shearman, P L; Li, B -L

    2015-01-01

    The gross spatial features of the atmospheric kinetic energy budget are analytically investigated. Kinetic energy generation is evaluated in a hydrostatic atmosphere where the axisymmetric circulation cells are represented by Carnot cycles. The condition that kinetic energy generation is positive in the lower atmosphere is shown to limit the poleward cell extension via a relationship between the meridional differences in surface pressure and temperature $\\Delta p_s$ and $\\Delta T_s$: an upper limit to cell size exists when $\\Delta p_s$ increases sublinearly with $\\Delta T_s$. This is the case for the Hadley cells as demonstrated here using data from MERRA re-analysis. The limited cell size necessitates the appearance of heat pumps -- circulation cells with negative work output where the low-level air moves towards colder areas. These cells consume the positive work output of heat engines -- cells where the low-level air moves towards the warmer areas -- and can in principle drive the global efficiency of atmo...

  2. Temperature dependence of the probability of "small heating" and spectrum of UCNs up-scattered on the surface of Fomblin oil Y-HVAC 18/8

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvizhevsky, V V; Lambrecht, A; Reynaud, S; Lychagin, E V; Muzychka, A Yu; Nekhaev, G V; Strelkov, A V

    2016-01-01

    We performed precision measurements of the probability of small heating and spectrum of UCNs up-scattered on the surface of hydrogen-free oil Fomblin Y-HVAC 18/8 as a function of temperature. The probability is well reproducible, does not depend on sample thickness and does not evolve in time. It is equal (9.8+-0.2)10^(-6) at the ambient temperature. The spectrum coincides with those measured with solid-surface and nanoparticle samples. Indirect arguments indicate that spectrum shape weakly depends on temperature. Measured experimental data can be satisfactory described both within the model of near-surface nanodroplets and the model of capillary waves.

  3. Passive heating of the ground surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyburczyk, Anna

    2016-03-01

    The phenomenon of phase change is one of the most important contemporary issues of thermal engineering. In particular, this applies to all kinds of heat exchanger systems, which should achieve the highest possible efficiency while reducing investment and operating costs. Some of these systems are heat pipes or thermosyphons, which, among others, are used for the heat transfer, temperature stabilization and the regulation of heat flux density. Additionally, they are passive systems, and therefore do not require an external power supply. Heat pipes can be used to stabilize the surface temperature of roads and driveways. Large heat tubes can be applied for heating the surface of bridges and overpasses, which become icy in unfavorable climatic conditions. The paper presents research on the test facility, whose main component is a long vertical copper fin. The temperature at the base of the fin was kept constant for a given series of measurements. Heat receiving fluid was ethanol at atmospheric pressure. The measurement methodology and the results of investigations were discussed. The surface temperature distribution was measured with the infrared camera, and on this basis the local values of heat flow and the heat transfer coefficient were determined. The results were presented as boiling curves for both the fin with the smooth surface and the one covered with a metal capillary-porous structure. The results obtained are useful in the design of heat exchangers, including passive heating of the ground.

  4. Passive heating of the ground surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyburczyk Anna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of phase change is one of the most important contemporary issues of thermal engineering. In particular, this applies to all kinds of heat exchanger systems, which should achieve the highest possible efficiency while reducing investment and operating costs. Some of these systems are heat pipes or thermosyphons, which, among others, are used for the heat transfer, temperature stabilization and the regulation of heat flux density. Additionally, they are passive systems, and therefore do not require an external power supply. Heat pipes can be used to stabilize the surface temperature of roads and driveways. Large heat tubes can be applied for heating the surface of bridges and overpasses, which become icy in unfavorable climatic conditions. The paper presents research on the test facility, whose main component is a long vertical copper fin. The temperature at the base of the fin was kept constant for a given series of measurements. Heat receiving fluid was ethanol at atmospheric pressure. The measurement methodology and the results of investigations were discussed. The surface temperature distribution was measured with the infrared camera, and on this basis the local values of heat flow and the heat transfer coefficient were determined. The results were presented as boiling curves for both the fin with the smooth surface and the one covered with a metal capillary-porous structure. The results obtained are useful in the design of heat exchangers, including passive heating of the ground.

  5. The surface temperature of Europa

    CERN Document Server

    Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    Previous estimates of the surface temperature of Jupiter's moon, Europa, neglected the effect of the eccentricity of Jupiter's orbit around the Sun, the effect of the eclipse of Europa (i.e., the relative time that Europa is within the shadow of Jupiter), and the effect of Europa's internal heating. Here we estimate the surface temperature of Europa, when Europa's obliquity, eclipse and internal heating, as well as the eccentricity of Jupiter, are all taken into account. For a typical internal heating rate of 0.05 W/m$^2$ (corresponding to an ice thickness of about 10 kms), the equator, pole, and global mean surface temperatures are 101.7 K, 45.26 K, and 94.75 K, respectively. We found that the temperature at the high latitudes is significantly affected by the internal heating. We also studied the effect of the internal heating on the mean thickness of Europa's icy shell and conclude that the polar region temperature can be used to constrain the internal heating and the depth of the ice. Our approach and form...

  6. Temperature drops in heat pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, A.M.; Khalifa, A.M.A.; Akyurt, M.

    1986-01-01

    The role of entrainment in limiting heat pipe power handling capacity is discussed. The effect of entrainment on the measured temperature field in the integral heat pipe of a split system solar cooker is analyzed. An experimental set-up depicting a heat loop is presented, along with test results.

  7. Earth's surface heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Davies

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a revised estimate of Earth's surface heat flux that is based upon a heat flow data-set with 38 347 measurements, which is 55% more than used in previous estimates. Our methodology, like others, accounts for hydrothermal circulation in young oceanic crust by utilising a half-space cooling approximation. For the rest of Earth's surface, we estimate the average heat flow for different geologic domains as defined by global digital geology maps; and then produce the global estimate by multiplying it by the total global area of that geologic domain. The averaging is done on a polygon set which results from an intersection of a 1 degree equal area grid with the original geology polygons; this minimises the adverse influence of clustering. These operations and estimates are derived accurately using methodologies from Geographical Information Science. We consider the virtually un-sampled Antarctica separately and also make a small correction for hot-spots in young oceanic lithosphere. A range of analyses is presented. These, combined with statistical estimates of the error, provide a measure of robustness. Our final preferred estimate is 47±2 TW, which is greater than previous estimates.

  8. The effect of misleading surface temperature estimations on the sensible heat fluxes at a high Arctic site – the Arctic turbulence experiment 2006 on Svalbard (ARCTEX-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bareiss

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The observed rapid climate warming in the Arctic requires improvements in permafrost and carbon cycle monitoring, accomplished by setting up long-term observation sites with high-quality in-situ measurements of turbulent heat, water and carbon fluxes as well as soil physical parameters in an Arctic landscape. But accurate quantification and well adapted parameterizations of turbulent fluxes in polar environments presents fundamental problems in soil-snow-ice-vegetation-atmosphere interaction studies. One of these problems is the accurate estimation of the surface or aerodynamic temperature T(0 required to force most of the bulk aerodynamic formula currently used. Results from the Arctic-Turbulence-Experiment (ARCTEX-2006 performed on Svalbard during the winter/spring transition 2006 helped to better understand the physical exchange and transport processes of energy. The existence of an untypical temperature profile close to the surface in the Arctic spring at Svalbard could be proven to be one of the major issues hindering estimation of the appropriate surface temperature. Thus, it is essential to adjust the set-up of measurement systems carefully when applying flux-gradient methods that are commonly used to force atmosphere-ocean/land-ice models. The results of a comparison of different sensible heat-flux parameterizations with direct measurements indicate that only the use of a hydrodynamic three-layer temperature-profile model achieves enough accuracy for heat flux calculations as it reliably reproduces the temporal variability of the surface temperature.

  9. Method of determination of temperature and heat resistance of the points on the integrated circuit crystal surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov V. M.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Method for visualization of integrated circuit (IC surface temperature by means of the liquid crystal film deposited from solution on its surface is proposed. The boundaries of local regions represent isotherms with corresponding phase transitions. On the base of isotherms positions and consumed by IC power thermal resistances between crystal and environment are determined.

  10. Heats of transfer in the diffusion layer before the surface and the surface temperature for a catalytic hydrogen oxidation (H2 + (1/2)O2 --> H2O) reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lianjie; Koper, Ger J M; Bedeaux, Dick

    2006-03-23

    The surface temperature and surface mole fractions are calculated for a catalytic hydrogen oxidation reaction over a Pt/Al2O3 catalyst pellet. The thermodynamics of irreversible processes was used in order to ensure the correct introduction of coupled heat and mass transfer. Two pathways, one using the 4 x 4 resistivity matrix and the other using a simplified effective conductivity matrix, were proven to yield equivalent results. By using expressions for the thermal diffusion coefficients, heats of transfer, and the Maxwell-Stefan diffusion coefficients given in the literature, available experimental data could be reproduced. The Dufour effect was found to be negligible for the prediction of the surface temperature. Neglecting the Soret effect would increase the predicted value of the surface temperature significantly-more than 30 K out of an average of about 400 K. It is found that the reaction rate can be used to predict the surface temperature.

  11. The Effect of Local Heat and Cold Therapy on the Intraarticular and Skin Surface Temperature of the Knee

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effects of local application of ice chips, ligno-paraffin, short-wave diathermy, and nitrogen-cold air on skin and intraarticular temperature. Methods. Forty-two healthy subjects were divided into 4 treatment groups. A temperature probe was inserted into the knee joint cavity and another placed on the overlying skin, and changes in temperature over 3 hours, by treatment group, were recorded. Results. The mean skin surface temperature dropped from 27.9°C to 11.5°C af...

  12. Temperature Uniformity of Heated Mold Plate by Oscillating Heat Pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamonpet Patrapon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniformity of the temperature in the mold plate is of paramount important since it will affect the dimensional stability of the part produced. To provide uniform temperature to the metal plate, many factors need to be considered such as choice of heating technology, uniformity of a heat source, a type of control, etc. This paper aims to study the temperature uniformity of metal plate using closed-loop oscillating heat pipe (CLOHP as a heat transfer device. The metal plates which were P-20 with the size of 306 x 130 mm2 were used. Metal plate was gouged to a depth of 3 mm for installing the CLOHP. Distances from the heating device to the metal plate surface were 5 and 10 mm. The surface temperatures of the metal plate were controlled at 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, and 130°C. Sixteen pointa of temperature were recorded. The results were then compared to those using the heat source as the cartridge heater arranged in the similar way with the same heating capacity. Once the system entered the steady state, it was found that the temperature distribution of metal plate using the CLOHP has a deviation in the range of ± 1.00°C and ± 0.94°C at the CLOHP depth of 5 mm. and 10 mm., respectively. While those of using cartridge heater deviated in the range of ± 1.35°C and ± 1.16°C. Compare to the recommended value from the ASTM Standard that the mold surface temperature need to be in the range of ± 2.0°C, the CLOHP shows the very promising results.

  13. The effect of misleading surface temperature estimations on the sensible heat fluxes at a high Arctic site – the Arctic Turbulence Experiment 2006 on Svalbard (ARCTEX-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lüers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The observed rapid climate warming in the Arctic requires improvements in permafrost and carbon cycle monitoring, accomplished by setting up long-term observation sites with high-quality in-situ measurements of turbulent heat, water and carbon fluxes as well as soil physical parameters in Arctic landscapes. But accurate quantification and well adapted parameterizations of turbulent fluxes in polar environments presents fundamental problems in soil-snow-ice-vegetation-atmosphere interaction studies. One of these problems is the accurate estimation of the surface or aerodynamic temperature T(0 required to force most of the bulk aerodynamic formulae currently used. Results from the Arctic-Turbulence-Experiment (ARCTEX-2006 performed on Svalbard during the winter/spring transition 2006 helped to better understand the physical exchange and transport processes of energy. The existence of an atypical temperature profile close to the surface in the Arctic spring at Svalbard could be proven to be one of the major issues hindering estimation of the appropriate surface temperature. Thus, it is essential to adjust the set-up of measurement systems carefully when applying flux-gradient methods that are commonly used to force atmosphere-ocean/land-ice models. The results of a comparison of different sensible heat-flux parameterizations with direct measurements indicate that the use of a hydrodynamic three-layer temperature-profile model achieves the best fit and reproduces the temporal variability of the surface temperature better than other approaches.

  14. Thermal Sprayed Aluminium for Subsea Heat Exchanger Surfaces : Effect of Temperature on Protection Current Requirement and Calcareous Development

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Håvard

    2014-01-01

    More and more equipment in the Oil and Gas Industry are being placed Subsea. Thisincludes subsea coolers with high internal temperatures. With high temperatures comewith challenges within material selection and corrosion. Traditional material choices like carbon steel and organic coatings with cathodic protection (CP) is not an option for subsea coolers. This is due to insulating properties to the organic coatings and the dense calcareous deposits which form on the surface of the steel.Therma...

  15. Satellite sea surface temperatures along the West Coast of the United States during the 2014-2016 northeast Pacific marine heat wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentemann, Chelle L.; Fewings, Melanie R.; García-Reyes, Marisol

    2017-01-01

    From January 2014 to August 2016, sea surface temperatures (SSTs) along the Washington, Oregon, and California coasts were significantly warmer than usual, reaching a maximum SST anomaly of 6.2°C off Southern California. This marine heat wave occurred alongside the Gulf of Alaska marine heat wave and resulted in major disturbances in the California Current ecosystem and massive economic impacts. Here we use satellite and blended reanalysis products to report the magnitude, extent, duration, and evolution of SSTs and wind stress anomalies along the West Coast of the continental United States during this event. Nearshore SST anomalies along the entire coast were persistent during the marine heat wave, and only abated seasonally, during spring upwelling-favorable wind stress. The coastal marine heat wave weakened in July 2016 and disappeared by September 2016.

  16. Dual active surface heat flux gage probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-02-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  17. Indoor temperatures for calculating room heat loss and heating capacity of radiant heating systems combined with mechanical ventilation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaozhou; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Fang, Lei;

    2016-01-01

    system were determined according to the principle of heat transfer. A model to predict indoor temperatures in the room was proposed, and it was determined that the predicted indoor temperatures agreed well with the measured data. Qualitative analyses of the effects of heated surface temperature and air...... change rates on the indoor temperatures were performed using the proposed model. When heated surface temperatures and air change rates were from 21.0 to 29.0 degrees C and from 0.5 to 4.0 h-1, the indoor temperatures for calculating the transmission heat loss and ventilation heat loss were between 20.......8% for calculating the transmission heat loss and ventilation heat loss, respectively, and between 16.0% and 17.4% for calculating the heating capacity of the hybrid system. Due to large relative calculation errors, it is necessary to consider the effect of heated surface and cool supply air on indoor temperatures...

  18. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  19. Prediction of Turbulent Heat Fluxes by Assimilation of Remotely Sensed Land Surface Temperature and Soil Moisture Data into an Ensemble-Based Data Assimilation Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, T.; Bateni, S. M.; Liu, S.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate estimation of turbulent heat fluxes is important for water resources planning and management, irrigation scheduling, and weather forecast. Land surface models (LSMs) can be used to simulate turbulent heat fluxes over large-scale domains. However, the application of LSMs is hindered due to the high uncertainty in model parameters and state variables. In this study, a dual-pass ensemble-based data assimilation (DA) approach is developed to estimate turbulent heat fluxes. Initially, the common land model (CoLM) is used as the LSM (open-loop), and thereafter the ensemble Kalman filter is employed to optimize the CoLM parameters and variables. The first pass of the DA scheme optimizes vegetation parameters of CoLM (which are related to the leaf stomatal conductance) on a weekly-basis by assimilating the MODIS land surface temperature (LST) data. The second pass optimizes the soil moisture state of CoLM on a daily-basis by assimilating soil moisture observations from Cosmic-ray instrument. The ultimate goal is to improve turbulent heat fluxes estimates from CoLM by optimizing its vegetation parameters and soil moisture state via assimilation of LST and soil moisture data into the proposed DA system. The DA approach is tested over a wet and densely vegetated site, called Daman in northwest of China. Results indicate that the CoLM (open-loop) model typically underestimates latent heat flux and overestimates sensible heat flux. By assimilation of LST in the first pass, the turbulent heat fluxes are improved compared to those of the open-loop. These fluxes become even more accurate by assimilation of soil moisture in the second pass of the DA approach. These findings illustrate that the introduced DA approach can successfully extract information in LST and soil moisture data to optimize the CoLM parameters and states and improve the turbulent heat fluxes estimates.

  20. Transient, three-dimensional heat transfer model for the laser assisted machining of silicon nitride: 1. Comparison of predictions with measured surface temperature histories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozzi, J.C.; Pfefferkorn, F.E.; Shin, Y.C. [Purdue University, (United States). Laser Assisted Materials Processing Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering; Incropera, F.P. [University of Notre Dame, (United States). Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Department

    2000-04-01

    Laser assisted machining (LAM), in which the material is locally heated by an intense laser source prior to material removal, provides an alternative machining process with the potential to yield higher material removal rates, as well as improved control of workpiece properties and geometry, for difficult-to-machine materials such as structural ceramics. To assess the feasibility of the LAM process and to obtain an improved understanding of governing physical phenomena, experiments have been performed to determine the thermal response of a rotating silicon nitride workpiece undergoing heating by a translating CO{sub 2} laser and material removal by a cutting tool. Using a focused laser pyrometer, surface temperature histories were measured to determine the effect of the rotational and translational speeds, the depth of cut, the laser-tool lead distance, and the laser beam diameter and power on thermal conditions. The measurements are in excellent agreement with predictions based on a transient, three-dimensional numerical solution of the heating and material removal processes. The temperature distribution within the unmachined workpiece is most strongly influenced by the laser power and laser-tool lead distance, as well as by the laser/tool translational velocity. A minimum allowable operating temperature in the material removal region corresponds to the YSiAlON glass transition temperature, below which tool fracture may occur. In a companion paper, the numerical model is used to further elucidate thermal conditions associated with laser assisted machining. (author)

  1. Are Advecting Processes in the Vadose Zone of the Albuquerque Basin Altering the Conductive Heat Transfer Signal From Surface Temperature Change ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    Temperature measurements ( T logs ) in the deep vadose zone ( about 60m to 120m depth ) of the Albuquerque Basin have been repeated over the past year at four piezometer nests. The measurements were made with a very fast time response thermistor, which allowed data to be taken every meter going down hole. This depth resolution of temperature data permits a rather detailed observation of the thermal regime in the vadose zone. At one site ( Lincoln Middle School ) the temperature profile below 20m clearly shows a conductive profile resulting from surface temperature change due to urbanization and nearby ( about 10m ) asphalt pavement. At the other three sites the cause of non-linearity in the T log is less certain. Temperature records suggest about 1 deg C increase in near surface air temperature over the past thirty years at the Albuquerque airport; although this data may also be affected by urbanization. The Tome and 98th Street sites are being approached by paved roads and urbanization. At the Tome site expressions representing horizontal advection are the statistically preferred fit to the T log from about 25m to 58m ( F statistic ). At the 98th Street site an expression representing a surface temperature step best fits the T log from 20m to about 75m; however, the temperature step (about 1 deg C to 2 deg C, 3 to 15 yr ago ) is variable between logs, and the profile of the T log with abrupt discontinuities may suggest other than just conductive heat transfer. The fourth piezometer nest at the Mesa del Sol site is the most remote of the sites considered, with as little nearby surface disturbance as might be expected for a drilling location. At depths between 30m and 70m the expressions representing surface temperature change, horizontal advection, and vertical advection, all fit the T log reasonably well. The temperature step expression suggests about 1 deg C to 1.8 deg C surface temperature increase about 13 yr to 28 yr ago. Deeper in the vadose zone, from about

  2. Identification of the Heat Transfer Coefficient at the Charge Surface Heated on the Chamber Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gołdasz A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The inverse method was applied to determine the heat flux reaching the charge surface. The inverse solution was based upon finding the minimum of the error norm between the measured and calculated temperatures. The charge temperature field was calculated with the finite element method by solving the heat transfer equation for a square charge made of 15HM steel heated on all its surfaces. On the basis of the mean value of heat flux, the value of the heat transfer coefficient at each surface was determined depending on the surface temperature of the material heated.

  3. Geothermal Heat Flux Assessment Using Remote Sensing Land Surface Temperature and Simulated Data. Case Studies at the Kenyan Rift and Yellowstone Geothermal Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaguera, M.; Vaughan, R. G.; Ettema, J.; Izquierdo-Verdiguier, E.; Hecker, C.; van der Meer, F. D.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we propose an innovative approach to assess the geothermal heat flux anomalies in the regions of the Kenyan Rift and the Yellowstone geothermal areas. The method is based on the land surface temperature (LST) differences obtained between remote sensing data and land surface model simulations. The hypothesis is that the model simulations do not account for the subsurface geothermal heat source in the formulation. Remote sensing of surface emitted radiances is able to detect at least the radiative portion of the geothermal signal that is not in the models. Two methods were proposed to assess the geothermal component of LST (LSTgt) based on the aforementioned hypothesis: a physical model and a data mining approach. The LST datasets were taken from the Land Surface Analysis Satellite Application Facilities products over Africa and the Copernicus Programme for North America, at a spatial resolution of 3-5 km. These correspond to Meteosat Second Generation and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system satellites data respectively. The Weather Research and Forecasting model was used to simulate LST based on atmospheric and surface characteristics using the Noah land surface model. The analysis was carried out for a period of two months by using nighttime acquisitions. Higher spatial resolution images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer data were also used on the Kenyan area to produce similar outputs employing existing methods. The comparison of the results from both methods and areas illustrated the potential of the data and methodologies for geothermal applications.

  4. Satellite-Based Surface Heat Budgets and Sea Surface Temperature Tendency in the Tropical Eastern Indian and Western Pacific Oceans for the 1997/98 El Nino and 1998/99 La Nina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Lin, Po-Hsiung

    2002-01-01

    The 1997/98 is a strong El Nino warm event, while the 1998/99 is a moderate La Nina cold event. We have investigated surface heat budgets and sea surface temperature (SST) tendency for these two events in the tropical western Pacific and eastern Indian Oceans using satellite-retrieved surface radiative and turbulent fluxes. The radiative fluxes are taken from the Goddard Satellite-retrieved Surface Radiation Budget (GSSRB), derived from radiance measurements of the Japanese Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 5. The GSSRB covers the domain 40 deg S - 4 deg N, 90 deg E-17 deg W and a period from October 1997 to December 2000. The spatial resolution is 0.5 deg x 0.5 deg lat-long and the temporal resolution is 1 day. The turbulent fluxes are taken from Version 2 of the Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF-2). The GSSTF-2 has a spatial resolution of 1 deg x 1 deg lat-long over global Oceans and a temporal resolution of 1 day covering the period July 1987-December 2000. Daily turbulent fluxes are derived from the S S M (Special Sensor Microwave/Imager) surface wind and surface air humidity, and the SST and 2-m air temperature of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, using a stability-dependent bulk flux algorithm. The changes of surface heat budgets, SST and tendency, cloudiness, wind speed, and zonal wind stress of the 1997/98 El Nino relative to the1998/99 La Nina for the northern winter and spring seasons are analyzed. The relative changes of surface heat budgets and SST tendency of the two events are quite different between the tropical eastern Indian and western Pacific Oceans. For the tropical western Pacific, reduced solar heating (more clouds) is generally associated with decreased evaporative cooling (weaker winds), and vise versa. The changes in evaporative cooling over-compensate that of solar heating and dominate the spatial variability of the changes in net surface heating. Both solar heating and evaporative cooling offset each other to reduce

  5. Tropical Warm Pool Surface Heat Budgets and Temperature: Contrasts Between 1997-98 El Nino and 1998-99 La Nina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Lin, Po-Hsiung; Wang, Kung-Hwa

    2003-01-01

    Seasonal and interannual variations of the net surface heating F(sub NET) and sea surface temperature tendency (T(sub s)/dt) in the tropical eastern Indian and western Pacific Oceans are studied. The surface heat fluxes are derived from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager and Japanese Geostationary Meteorological Satellite radiance measurements for the period October 1997-September 2000. It is found that the magnitude of solar heating is lager than that of evaporative cooling, but the spatial variation of the latter is significantly large than the former. As a result, the spatial variations of seasonal and interannual variability of F(sub NET), follow closely that of evaporative cooling. Seasonal variations of F(sub NET) and T(sub s)/dt are significantly correlated, except for the equatorial western Pacific. The high correlation is primarily attributable to high correlation between seasonal cycles of solar heating and T(sub s)/dt. The change of F(sub NET) between 1997-98 El Nino and 1998-99 La Nina is significantly larger in the tropical eastern Indian Ocean than tropical western Pacific. For the former region, the reduced evaporative cooling arising from weakened winds during the El Nino is generally associated with enhanced solar heating due to decreased cloudiness, and thus increases the interannual variability of F(sub NET). For the latter region, the reduced evaporative cooling due to weakened winds is generally associated with but exceeds the reduced solar heating arising from increased cloudiness, and vise versa. Thus the interannual variability of F(sub NET) is reduced due to this offsetting effect. Interannual variations of F(sub NET) and T(sub s)/dt have very low correlation. This is most likely related to interannual variability of ocean dynamics, which includes the variations of solar radiation penetrating through oceanic mixed layer, upwelling of cold thermocline water, Indonesian throughflow for transporting heat from the Pacific to Indian Ocean, and

  6. Observed and simulated sensitivities of summertime urban surface air temperatures to anthropogenic heat in downtown areas of two Japanese Major Cities, Tokyo and Osaka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikegawa, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Ai; Ohashi, Yukitaka; Ihara, Tomohiko; Shigeta, Yoshinori

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the sensitivities of surface air temperatures to anthropogenic heat (AH) were investigated in downtowns of the two Japanese major cities, Tokyo and Osaka. First, meteorological measurements were made with the simultaneous monitoring of electricity demand in a contrastive couple of a downtown commercial area (C-area) and a residential area (R-area) within each city in summer 2007. From the measurements, the areal-mean surface air temperatures were obtained as and for each of the C-area and R-area, respectively. Using the actual electricity demand and the estimated motor fuels consumption, their areal total was evaluated as the energy-consumption-basis AH. The estimated C-areas' AH indicated greater values up to 220 W/m2 on weekdays and remarkable decrease about by half on weekends, whereas that in the R-areas showed less values of 10-20 W/m2 stably. Then, on calm and fine days were found to be systematically decreased from weekdays to weekends in both cities roughly indicating a proportional relationship with the reductions in the C-areas' AH on weekends. The result suggested a common afternoon sensitivity for both C-areas of around 1.0°C/100 W/m2, which indicated an intensity of the AH impact on surface air temperature there. Next, to simulate the observed AH impact, the authors' CM-BEM (a multilayer urban canopy model coupled with a building energy model) was newly implemented in the mesoscale Weather Research and Forecasting (WMF) model. This new system, WRF-CM-BEM, was applied to Tokyo and almost reasonably validated from the aspects of the reproducibility of urban surface air temperature and electricity demand in the observation areas. The simulations also suggested that WRF-CM-BEM underestimated the observed air temperature sensitivity to AH in the Tokyo C-area roughly by half but still in the same order of magnitude.

  7. Estimating Urban Heat Island Effects on the Temperature Series of Uccle (Brussels, Belgium Using Remote Sensing Data and a Land Surface Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiq Hamdi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, the urban heat island effects on the temperature time series of Uccle (Brussels, Belgium during the summers months 1960–1999 was estimated using both ground-based weather stations and remote sensing imagery, combined with a numerical land surface scheme including state-of-the-art urban parameterization, the Town Energy Balance Scheme. Analysis of urban warming based on remote sensing method reveals that the urban bias on minimum temperature is rising at a higher rate, 2.5 times (2.85 ground-based observed more, than on maximum temperature, with a linear trend of 0.15 °C (0.19 °C ground-based observed and 0.06 °C (0.06 °C ground-based observed per decade respectively. The results based on remote sensing imagery are compatible with estimates of urban warming based on weather stations. Therefore, the technique presented in this work is a useful tool in estimating the urban heat island contamination in long time series, countering the drawbacks of a ground-observational approach.

  8. The temperature field and heat transfer in the porthole of the Space Shuttle - Outer surface under the 3rd kind nonlinear boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Heping; Yu, Qizheng; Zhang, Jizhou

    In this paper, the transient combined heat transfer in the silicon glass porthole of Space Shuttle is studied by control volume method, ray tracing method and spectral band model. The temperature field in the silicon glass and heat flux entering the space cabin are given under the 3rd kind nonlinear boundary condition. The computational results show, if the radiation in the silicon glass is omitted, the errors for temperature fields are not too evident, but for heat flux are quite large.

  9. Surface Temperature Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Ruedy, Reto

    2012-01-01

    Small global mean temperature changes may have significant to disastrous consequences for the Earth's climate if they persist for an extended period. Obtaining global means from local weather reports is hampered by the uneven spatial distribution of the reliably reporting weather stations. Methods had to be developed that minimize as far as possible the impact of that situation. This software is a method of combining temperature data of individual stations to obtain a global mean trend, overcoming/estimating the uncertainty introduced by the spatial and temporal gaps in the available data. Useful estimates were obtained by the introduction of a special grid, subdividing the Earth's surface into 8,000 equal-area boxes, using the existing data to create virtual stations at the center of each of these boxes, and combining temperature anomalies (after assessing the radius of high correlation) rather than temperatures.

  10. Temperature simulation of EMC aluminum ingot with induced heat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The numerical simulation of temperature field of electromagnetic casting (EMC) aluminum ingots is an effective and also necessary approach to study the temperature field and forecast the quality of EMC ingot, or optimize the technological parameters. In EMC, the alternating electromagnetic field can produce induced current and heat within the surface layer. To calculate the temperature field precisely, the induced heat should be taken into account. The induced heat has been coupled into the calculation formula of temperature field of unit volume per unit time, which provides a convenient and also precise method to calculate the temperature field. Besides, the effect of induced heat on the temperature field of ingot has been simulated and discussed. The results show that the induced heat has large influences on the height of liquid column and the surface temperature of ingot.

  11. Application of Abaqus to analysis of the temperature field in elements heated by moving heat sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Piekarska

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerical analysis of thermal phenomena occurring during laser beam heating is presented in this paper. Numerical models of surface andvolumetric heat sources were presented and the influence of different laser beam heat source power distribution on temperature field wasanalyzed. Temperature field was obtained by a numerical solution the transient heat transfer equation with activity of inner heat sources using finite element method. Temperature distribution analysis in welded joint was performed in the ABAQUS/Standard solver. The DFLUXsubroutine was used for implementation of the movable welding heat source model. Temperature-depended thermophysical properties for steelwere assumed in computer simulations. Temperature distribution in laser beam surface heated and butt welded plates was numericallyestimated.

  12. Effects of landscape composition and pattern on land surface temperature: An urban heat island study in the megacities of Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estoque, Ronald C; Murayama, Yuji; Myint, Soe W

    2017-01-15

    Due to its adverse impacts on urban ecological environment and the overall livability of cities, the urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon has become a major research focus in various interrelated fields, including urban climatology, urban ecology, urban planning, and urban geography. This study sought to examine the relationship between land surface temperature (LST) and the abundance and spatial pattern of impervious surface and green space in the metropolitan areas of Bangkok (Thailand), Jakarta (Indonesia), and Manila (Philippines). Landsat-8 OLI/TIRS data and various geospatial approaches, including urban-rural gradient, multiresolution grid-based, and spatial metrics-based techniques, were used to facilitate the analysis. We found a significant strong correlation between mean LST and the density of impervious surface (positive) and green space (negative) along the urban-rural gradients of the three cities, depicting a typical UHI profile. The correlation of impervious surface density with mean LST tends to increase in larger grids, whereas the correlation of green space density with mean LST tends to increase in smaller grids, indicating a stronger influence of impervious surface and green space on the variability of LST in larger and smaller areas, respectively. The size, shape complexity, and aggregation of the patches of impervious surface and green space also had significant relationships with mean LST, though aggregation had the most consistent strong correlation. On average, the mean LST of impervious surface is about 3°C higher than that of green space, highlighting the important role of green spaces in mitigating UHI effects, an important urban ecosystem service. We recommend that the density and spatial pattern of urban impervious surfaces and green spaces be considered in landscape and urban planning so that urban areas and cities can have healthier and more comfortable living urban environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Effect of Local Heat and Cold Therapy on the Intraarticular and Skin Surface Temperature of the Knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterveld, F.G.J.; Rasker, J.J.; Jacobs, J.W.G.; Overmars, H.J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effects of local application of ice chips, ligno-paraffin, short-wave diathermy, and nitrogen-cold air on skin and intraarticular temperature. Methods. Forty-two healthy subjects were divided into 4 treatment groups. A temperature probe was inserted into the knee joint ca

  14. Link between Surface and Subsurface Urban Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Susanne; Bayer, Peter; Olesen, Folke; Goettsche, Frank; Blum, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Urban heat islands exist in all diverse layers of modern cities, such as surface and subsurface. While both layers are typically investigated separately, the coupling of surface and subsurface urban heat islands is insufficiently understood. Hence, this study focuses on the interrelation of both zones and the influence of additional underground heat sources, such as heated basements, on this interaction. Using satellite derived land surface temperatures and interpolated groundwater temperature measurements the spatial properties of both heat islands are compared. Significant correlations of 0.5 up to more than 0.8 are found between surface and subsurface urban heat islands. If groundwater flow is considered this correlation increases by approximately 10%. Next we analyzed the dissimilarities between both heat islands in order to understand the interaction between the urban surface and subsurface. We find that local groundwater hotspots under the city center and industrial areas are not revealed in satellite derived land surface temperatures. Overall groundwater temperatures are higher than land surface temperatures in 95% of the analyzed area due to the influence of below ground anthropogenic heat sources such as sewage systems, district heating systems, and especially elevated basement temperatures. Thus, an estimation method is proposed that relates groundwater temperatures to mean annual land surface temperatures, building density, and elevated basement temperatures. Using this method regional groundwater temperatures can be accurately estimated with a mean absolute error of 0.9 K. Since land surface temperatures and building densities are available from remote sensing, this method has the potential for a large scale estimations of urban groundwater temperatures. Thus, it is feasible to detect subsurface urban heat islands on a global level and to investigate sustainable geothermal potentials using satellite derived data.

  15. Coastal sea-surface temperature anomalies during the 2014-2016 northeast Pacific marine heat wave: regional variability, timing, and relation to wind stress anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentemann, C. L.; Fewings, M. R.; Garcia-Reyes, M.

    2016-12-01

    In 2014-2016, sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) in the region along the Washington, Oregon, and California coasts were significantly warmer than usual, with a maximum SST anomaly of 6.2°C measured near Santa Barbara. This marine heat wave was associated with major ecosystem disturbances, including a toxic algae bloom of Pseudo-nitzschia that had massive economic and ecological impacts. Here, we use satellite and blended reanalysis products to report the magnitude, extent, duration, and evolution of SST, wind stress, and wind stress curl anomalies along the west coast of the continental United States during 2014-2016. Using high-resolution wind stress instead of the Bakun upwelling index shows clear differences in upwelling phenology in 2015.

  16. Evaporation of nanofluid droplet on heated surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeung Chan Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an experiment on the evaporation of nanofluid sessile droplet on a heated surface was conducted. A nanofluid of 0.5% volumetric concentration mixed with 80-nm-sized CuO powder and pure water were used for experiment. Droplet was applied to the heated surface, and images of the evaporation process were obtained. The recorded images were analyzed to find the volume, diameter, and contact angle of the droplet. In addition, the evaporative heat transfer coefficient was calculated from experimental result. The results of this study are summarized as follows: the base diameter of the droplet was maintained stably during the evaporation. The measured temperature of the droplet was increased rapidly for a very short time, then maintained constantly. The nanofluid droplet was evaporated faster than the pure water droplet under the experimental conditions of the same initial volume and temperature, and the average evaporative heat transfer coefficient of the nanofluid droplet was higher than that of pure water. We can consider the effects of the initial contact angle and thermal conductivity of nanofluid as the reason for this experimental result. However, the effect of surface roughness on the evaporative heat transfer of nanofluid droplet appeared unclear.

  17. Mapping Land Surface Temperature and Land Cover to Detect Urban Heat Island Effect: A Case Study of Tarkwa, South West Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Soakodan Aduah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban Heat Island (UHI effect controls internal climates of buildings and affects energy use and comfort of urban dwellers. The objective of this study was to detect UHI from Land Surface Temperature (LST and to investigate whether land cover has any influence on UHI in Tarkwa, South West Ghana using satellite remote sensing techniques. A Landsat 7 ETM+ image, DEM and meteorological data were used to generate a land cover map with the maximum likelihood classification algorithm whiles LST was modeled with the Landsat Plank’s curve. Validation of the LST map was achieved by comparing it with air temperature measured at the UMaT meteorological station. The mean modeled LST of 298.60 Kelvin compared well with the mean observed air temperature of 298.30 Kelvin. Furthermore, LST ranged between 289 and 305 Kelvin while urban areas and bare soils had higher LSTs than vegetated areas implying that higher NDVI areas are associated with lower temperatures. Hence, LST maps produced indicated the existence of UHI effect in the Tarkwa area. From the study it is evident that impervious and non-evaporative surfaces have high LSTs due to absence of vegetation. Therefore, uncontrolled land cover changes may intensify the UHI effect. The study has proven that remote sensing can be used in operational mapping of LST for climate studies, vegetation monitoring and detecting UHIs in the humid regions of Ghana. This confirms the important role Earth observation and geoinformation technology can play in environmental monitoring and management as global climate and land cover changes.

  18. High temperature absorption compression heat pump for industrial waste heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinholdt, Lars; Horntvedt, B.; Nordtvedt, S. R.

    2016-01-01

    Heat pumps are currently receiving extensive interest because they may be able to support the integration of large shares of fluctuating electricity production based on renewable sources, and they have the potential for the utilization of low temperature waste heat from industry. In most industries......, the needed temperature levels often range from 100°C and up, but until now, it has been quite difficult to find heat pump technologies that reach this level, and thereby opening up the large-scale heat recovery in the industry. Absorption compression heat pumps can reach temperatures above 100°C......, and they have proved themselves a very efficient and reliable technology for applications that have large temperature changes on the heat sink and/or heat source. The concept of Carnot and Lorenz efficiency and its use in the analysis of system integration is shown. A 1.25 MW system having a Carnot efficiency...

  19. Investigation and optimization of the depth of flue gas heat recovery in surface heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalov, V. V.; Bespalov, V. I.; Melnikov, D. V.

    2017-09-01

    Economic issues associated with designing deep flue gas heat recovery units for natural gas-fired boilers are examined. The governing parameter affecting the performance and cost of surface-type condensing heat recovery heat exchangers is the heat transfer surface area. When firing natural gas, the heat recovery depth depends on the flue gas temperature at the condenser outlet and determines the amount of condensed water vapor. The effect of the outlet flue gas temperature in a heat recovery heat exchanger on the additionally recovered heat power is studied. A correlation has been derived enabling one to determine the best heat recovery depth (or the final cooling temperature) maximizing the anticipated reduced annual profit of a power enterprise from implementation of energy-saving measures. Results of optimization are presented for a surface-type condensing gas-air plate heat recovery heat exchanger for the climatic conditions and the economic situation in Tomsk. The predictions demonstrate that it is economically feasible to design similar heat recovery heat exchangers for a flue gas outlet temperature of 10°C. In this case, the payback period for the investment in the heat recovery heat exchanger will be 1.5 years. The effect of various factors on the optimal outlet flue gas temperature was analyzed. Most climatic, economical, or technological factors have a minor effect on the best outlet temperature, which remains between 5 and 20°C when varying the affecting factors. The derived correlation enables us to preliminary estimate the outlet (final) flue gas temperature that should be used in designing the heat transfer surface of a heat recovery heat exchanger for a gas-fired boiler as applied to the specific climatic conditions.

  20. Effects of temperature dependent conductivity and absorptive/generative heat transfer on MHD three dimensional flow of Williamson fluid due to bidirectional non-linear stretching surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, S.; Khalil-ur-Rehman; Malik, M. Y.; Hussain, Arif; Khan, Mair

    Present work is communicated to identify characteristics of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) three dimensional boundary layer flow of Williamson fluid confined by a bidirectional stretched surface. Conductivity of working fluid is assumed to be temperature dependent. Generative/absorptive heat transfer is also taken into account. Mathematical model is formulated in the form of partial expressions and then transmuted into ordinary differential equations with the help of newfangled set of similarity transformations. The resulting non-linear differential system of equations is solved numerically with the aid of Runge-Kutta algorithm supported by shooting method. Flow features are exemplified quantitatively through graphs. Scintillating results for friction factor and convective heat transfer are computed and scrutinized tabularly. Furthermore, the accuracy of present results is tested with existing literature and we found an excellent agreement. It is inferred that velocity along x-direction mounts whereas along y-direction depreciates for incrementing values of stretching ratio parameter. Moreover, it is also elucidated that non-linearity index tends to decrement the velocity and thermal distributions of fluid flow.

  1. Study on Surface Heat Budget of Various Pavements for Urban Heat Island Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Takebayashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface heat budgets of various pavement surfaces are studied with the aim of mitigating the urban heat island effect. In this study, the thermal characteristics of pavements are examined using data from observations. The net radiation, surface temperature, temperature under the surface, conduction heat flux, and core weight for each experimental surface are recorded, together with the weather conditions at the time of observation. The latent heat flux is estimated from the observed weight of the cores. The surface heat budget under the same weather conditions is examined, and the sensible heat flux from each target surface is calculated. The parameters that influence the surface heat budget, for example, solar reflectance (albedo, evaporative efficiency, heat conductivity, and heat capacity, are examined. On a typical summer day, the maximum reduction in the sensible heat flux from that on a normal asphalt surface is about 150 W/m2 for an asphalt surface with water-retaining material and about 100 W/m2 for a cement concrete surface with water-retaining material, depending on the albedo of each surface.

  2. GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations: Ship, fixed/drifting buoy, and CMAN in-situ surface temperature. Global Telecommunication System (GTS) Data. The...

  3. Temperature Distribution and Heat Saturating Time of Regenerative Heat Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li JIA; Ying MAO; Lixin YANG

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, heat transfer of the ceramic honeycomb regenerator was numerically simulated based on the computational fluid dynamics numerical analysis software CFX5. The longitudinal temperature distribution of regenerator and gas were obtained. The variation of temperature with time was discussed. In addition, the effects of some parameters such as switching time, gas temperature at the inlet of regenerator, height of regenerator and specific heat of the regenerative materials on heat saturating time were discussed. It provided primarily theoretic basis for further study of regenerative heat transfer mechanism.

  4. High temperature thermographic measurements of laser heated silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elhadj, S; Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Cooke, D J; Bude, J D; Johnson, M; Feit, M; Draggoo, V; Bisson, S E

    2009-11-02

    In situ spatial and temporal surface temperature profiles of CO{sub 2} laser-heated silica were obtained using a long wave infrared (LWIR) HgCdTe camera. Solutions to the linear diffusion equation with volumetric and surface heating are shown to describe the temperature evolution for a range of beam powers, over which the peak surface temperature scales linearly with power. These solutions were used with on-axis steady state and transient experimental temperatures to extract thermal diffusivity and conductivity for a variety of materials, including silica, spinel, sapphire, and lithium fluoride. Experimentally-derived thermal properties agreed well with reported values and, for silica, thermal conductivity and diffusivity are shown to be approximately independent of temperature between 300 and 2800K. While for silica our analysis based on a temperature independent thermal conductivity is shown to be accurate, for other materials studied this treatment yields effective thermal properties that represent reasonable approximations for laser heating. Implementation of a single-wavelength radiation measurement in the semi-transparent regime is generally discussed, and estimates of the apparent temperature deviation from the actual outer surface temperature are also presented. The experimental approach and the simple analysis presented yield surface temperature measurements that can be used to validate more complex physical models, help discriminate dominant heat transport mechanisms, and to predict temperature distribution and evolution during laser-based material processing.

  5. High temperature thermographic measurements of laser heated silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhadj, Selim; Yang, Steven T.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Cooke, Diane J.; Bude, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Michael; Feit, Michael; Draggoo, Vaughn; Bisson, Scott E.

    2009-10-01

    In situ spatial and temporal surface temperature profiles of CO2 laser-heated silica were obtained using a long wave infrared (LWIR) HgCdTe camera. Solutions to the linear diffusion equation with volumetric and surface heating are shown to describe the temperature evolution for a range of beam powers, over which the peak surface temperature scales linearly with power. These solutions were used with on-axis steady state and transient experimental temperatures to extract thermal diffusivity and conductivity for a variety of materials, including silica, spinel, sapphire, and lithium fluoride. Experimentally-derived thermal properties agreed well with reported values and, for silica, thermal conductivity and diffusivity are shown to be approximately independent of temperature between 300 and 2800K. While for silica our analysis based on a temperature independent thermal conductivity is shown to be accurate, for other materials studied this treatment yields effective thermal properties that represent reasonable approximations for laser heating. Implementation of a single-wavelength radiation measurement in the semi-transparent regime is generally discussed, and estimates of the apparent temperature deviation from the actual outer surface temperature are also presented. The experimental approach and the simple analysis presented yield surface temperature measurements that can be used to validate more complex physical models, help discriminate dominant heat transport mechanisms, and to predict temperature distribution and evolution during laser-based material processing.

  6. High Temperature Thermoacoustic Heat Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tijani, H.; Spoelstra, S. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-07-15

    Thermoacoustic technology can provide new types of heat pumps that can be deployed in different applications. Thermoacoustic heat pumps can for example be applied in dwellings to generate cooling or heating. Typically, space and water heating makes up about 60% of domestic and office energy consumption. The application of heat pumps can contribute to achieve energy savings and environmental benefits by reducing CO2 and NOx emissions. This paper presents the study of a laboratory scale thermoacoustic-Stirling heat pump operating between 10C and 80C which can be applied in domestics and offices. The heat pump is driven by a thermoacoustic-Stirling engine. The experimental results show that the heat pump pumps 250 W of heat at 60C at a drive ratio of 3.6 % and 200 W at 80C at a drive ratio of 3.5 %. The performance for both cases is about 40% of the Carnot performance. The design, construction, and performance measurements of the heat pump will be presented and discussed.

  7. Matlab based automatization of an inverse surface temperature modelling procedure for Greenland ice cores using an existing firn densification and heat diffusion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Michael; Kobashi, Takuro; Kindler, Philippe; Guillevic, Myriam; Leuenberger, Markus

    2016-04-01

    In order to study Northern Hemisphere (NH) climate interactions and variability, getting access to high resolution surface temperature records of the Greenland ice sheet is an integral condition. For example, understanding the causes for changes in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and related effects for the NH [Broecker et al. (1985); Rahmstorf (2002)] or the origin and processes leading the so called Dansgaard-Oeschger events in glacial conditions [Johnsen et al. (1992); Dansgaard et al., 1982] demand accurate and reproducible temperature data. To reveal the surface temperature history, it is suitable to use the isotopic composition of nitrogen (δ15N) from ancient air extracted from ice cores drilled at the Greenland ice sheet. The measured δ15N record of an ice core can be used as a paleothermometer due to the nearly constant isotopic composition of nitrogen in the atmosphere at orbital timescales changes only through firn processes [Severinghaus et. al. (1998); Mariotti (1983)]. To reconstruct the surface temperature for a special drilling site the use of firn models describing gas and temperature diffusion throughout the ice sheet is necessary. For this an existing firn densification and heat diffusion model [Schwander et. al. (1997)] is used. Thereby, a theoretical δ15N record is generated for different temperature and accumulation rate scenarios and compared with measurement data in terms of mean square error (MSE), which leads finally to an optimization problem, namely the finding of a minimal MSE. The goal of the presented study is a Matlab based automatization of this inverse modelling procedure. The crucial point hereby is to find the temperature and accumulation rate input time series which minimizes the MSE. For that, we follow two approaches. The first one is a Monte Carlo type input generator which varies each point in the input time series and calculates the MSE. Then the solutions that fulfil a given limit

  8. Role of surface temperature in fluorocarbon plasma-surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Caleb T.; Overzet, Lawrence J.; Goeckner, Matthew J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, PO Box 830688, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    This article examines plasma-surface reaction channels and the effect of surface temperature on the magnitude of those channels. Neutral species CF{sub 4}, C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, and C{sub 3}F{sub 8} are produced on surfaces. The magnitude of the production channel increases with surface temperature for all species, but favors higher mass species as the temperature is elevated. Additionally, the production rate of CF{sub 2} increases by a factor of 5 as the surface temperature is raised from 25 Degree-Sign C to 200 Degree-Sign C. Fluorine density, on the other hand, does not change as a function of either surface temperature or position outside of the plasma glow. This indicates that fluorine addition in the gas-phase is not a dominant reaction. Heating reactors can result in higher densities of depositing radical species, resulting in increased deposition rates on cooled substrates. Finally, the sticking probability of the depositing free radical species does not change as a function of surface temperature. Instead, the surface temperature acts together with an etchant species (possibly fluorine) to elevate desorption rates on that surface at temperatures lower than those required for unassisted thermal desorption.

  9. Integrated Temperature Sensors based on Heat Diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vroonhoven, C.P.L.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the theory, design and implementation of a new class of integrated temperature sensors, based on heat diffusion. In such sensors, temperature is sensed by measuring the time it takes for heat to diffuse through silicon. An on-chip thermal delay can be determined by geometry and

  10. GISS Surface Temperature Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The GISTEMP dataset is a global 2x2 gridded temperature anomaly dataset. Temperature data is updated around the middle of every month using current data files from...

  11. Boiling Heat Transfer in High Temperature Generator of Absorption Chiller/Heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Enomoto, Eiichi; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    The heat transfer performance of forced convective boiling was tested using a high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater, the rear furnace wall of which was composed of two different surfaces; i. e., plain and sprayed heated surfaces. These two surfaces were bisymmetrically set. Wall surface temperatures of both the fire and fluid sides were measured at three locations along the upward flow direction in each heated surface for determining the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient. Nickel-chromium and alumina were employed as the spray materials. The test results show that the sprayed surface can yield a marked elevation in the heat transfer performance due to boiling on the plain surface. Therefore the level of heated surface temperature is largely reduced by means of the spraying surface treatment. This implies that the spraying would much improve a corrosive condition of the heated surface.

  12. The measurement of surface heat flux using the Peltier effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shewen, E.C. (Pavement Management Systems Ltd., Cambridge, Ontario (Canada)); Hollands, K.G.T., Raithby, G.D. (Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-08-01

    Calorimetric methods for measuring surface heat flux use Joulean heating to keep the surface isothermal. This limits them to measuring the heat flux of surfaces that are hotter than their surroundings. Presented in this paper is a method whereby reversible Peltier effect heat transfer is used to maintain this isothermality, making it suitable for surfaces that are either hotter or colder than the surroundings. The paper outlines the theory for the method and describes physical models that have been constructed, calibrated, and tested. The tested physical models were found capable of measuring heat fluxes with an absolute accuracy of 1 percent over a wide range of temperature (5-50C) and heat flux (15-500 W/m{sup 2}), while maintaining isothermality to within 0.03 K. A drawback of the method is that it appears to be suited only for measuring the heat flux from thick metallic plates.

  13. Surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, L.

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation we study the surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis. For heterogeneous reactions, such as gas-solid catalytic reactions, the reactions take place at the interfaces between the two phases: the gas and the solid catalyst. Large amount of reaction heats are released

  14. Surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, L.

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation we study the surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis. For heterogeneous reactions, such as gas-solid catalytic reactions, the reactions take place at the interfaces between the two phases: the gas and the solid catalyst. Large amount of reaction heats are released

  15. Measuring Specific Heats at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersande, Jan W.; Zoltan, Andrew; Wood, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Flash apparatus for measuring thermal diffusivities at temperatures from 300 to 1,000 degrees C modified; measures specific heats of samples to accuracy of 4 to 5 percent. Specific heat and thermal diffusivity of sample measured. Xenon flash emits pulse of radiation, absorbed by sputtered graphite coating on sample. Sample temperature measured with thermocouple, and temperature rise due to pulse measured by InSb detector.

  16. Determination of Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Potential Urban Heat Island Effect in Parts of Lagos State using Satellite ... Changes in temperature appear to be closely related to concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  17. Low Temperature Heating and High Temperature Cooling in Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazanci, Ongun Berk

    , a single-family house designed for plus-energy targets and equipped with a radiant water-based floor heating and cooling system was studied by means of full-scale measurements, dynamic building simulations and thermodynamic evaluation tools. Thermal indoor environment and energy performance of the house...... performance of heating and cooling systems for achieving the same thermal indoor environment. The results show that it is crucial to minimize the heating and cooling demands in the design phase since these demands determine the terminal units and heat sources and sinks that could be used. Low temperature...... heating and high temperature cooling systems (a radiant water-based floor heating and cooling system in this study) proved to be superior to compared systems, evaluated with different system analysis tools; energy, exergy, and entransy. Radiant systems should be coupled to appropriate heating and cooling...

  18. Laser pulse heating of surfaces and thermal stress analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir S; Al-Aqeeli, Nasser; Al-Qahtani, Hussain M

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces laser pulse heating and thermal stress analysis in materials surface. Analytical temperature treatments and stress developed in the surface region are also explored. The book will help the reader analyze the laser induced stress in the irradiated region and presents solutions for the stress field. Detailed thermal stress analysis in different laser pulse heating situations and different boundary conditions are also presented. Written for surface engineers.

  19. The surface heat island of Rotterdam and its relationship with urban surface characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, L.; Zwart, S.; Verhagen, H.; Mauri, E.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal infrared high resolution satellite images from Landsat sensors were used to spatially quantify the surface heat island (SHI) of Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Based on surface temperature maps retrieved on 15 summer days since 1984, the average surface temperature of each district and neighbo

  20. Temperature dependence of surface nanobubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkelaar, R.P.; Seddon, James Richard Thorley; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    The temperature dependence of nanobubbles was investigated experimentally using atomic force microscopy. By scanning the same area of the surface at temperatures from 51 °C to 25 °C it was possible to track geometrical changes of individual nanobubbles as the temperature was decreased.

  1. Low-temperature heat transfer in nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Glavin, B. A.

    2000-01-01

    The new regime of low-temperature heat transfer in suspended nanowires is predicted. It takes place when (i) only ``acoustic'' phonon modes of the wire are thermally populated and (ii) phonons are subject to the effective elastic scattering. Qualitatively, the main peculiarities of heat transfer originate due to appearance of the flexural modes with high density of states in the wire phonon spectrum. They give rise to the $T^{1/2}$ temperature dependence of the wire thermal conductance. The e...

  2. Effect of the heating surface enhancement on the heat transfer coefficient for a vertical minichannel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piasecka Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to estimate effect of the heating surface enhancement on FC-72 flow boiling heat transfer for a vertical minichannel 1.7 mm deep, 24 mm wide and 360 mm long. Two types of enhanced heating surfaces were used: one with minicavities distributed unevenly, and the other with capillary metal fibrous structure. It was to measure temperature field on the plain side of the heating surface by means of the infrared thermography and to observe the two-phase flow patterns on the enhanced foil side. The paper analyses mainly the impact of the microstructured heating surface on the heat transfer coefficient. The results are presented as heat transfer coefficient dependences on the distance along the minichannel length. The data obtained using two types of enhanced heating surfaces in experiments was compared with the data when smooth foil as the heating surface was used. The highest local values of heat transfer coefficient were obtained using enhanced foil with minicavities - in comparison to other cases. Local values of heat transfer coefficient received for capillary fibrous structure were the lowest, even compared with data obtained for smooth foil. Probably this porous structure caused local flow disturbances.

  3. Heat transfer interface between a high temperature heat source and a heat sink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    du Pre, F.K.; Jaspers, H.A.

    1977-10-11

    A heat-transfer interface between and separating a high temperature heat source and a heat sink is formed by the adjacent walls of the heat source and heat sink with a thin gap between these walls and helium gas sealed in the gap, the walls preferably defining concentric hemispheres; this interface being particularly feasible as separable walls of the heater portion of a Stirling engine and a heat source.

  4. Temperature distribution of an infinite slab under point heat source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Zhao-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature field in an infinite slab under an instantaneous or continuous point heat source is studied numerically. The numerical results reveal the temperature distribution and its change regularity, which are significant for the temperature control encountered in many practical manufacturing processes, such as the laser treatment processes on the surface of films, welding and cutting, and even the design of measuring devices for thermal properties of material.

  5. Attributing the impacts of land-cover changes in temperate regions on surface temperature and heat fluxes to specific causes: Results from the first LUCID set of simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boisier, J.P.; Noblet-Ducoudré, de N.; Pitman, A.J.; Cruz, F.T.; Delire, C.; Hurk, van den B.J.J.M.; Molen, van der M.K.; Müller, C.; Voldoire, A.

    2012-01-01

    Surface cooling in temperate regions is a common biogeophysical response to historical Land-Use induced Land Cover Change (LULCC). The climate models involved in LUCID show, however, significant differences in the magnitude and the seasonal partitioning of the temperature change. The LULCC-induced c

  6. Natural ventilation and surface temperature distribution of piglet crate heated floors Ventilação natural e temperatura da superfície de pisos aquecidos em escamoteadores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Mendes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This research had the objective of evaluating the influence of the natural ventilation on the surface temperature distribution of heated crates. The research used six crates from a farrowing room in a commercial swine production farm located in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Three crates were heated using a heat mat while the other three had the environment heated by incandescent light bulbs (200W fixed on the lateral wall. The surface temperature of the crate's floor (1.55x0.55m was registered in 36 points, distributed in 18 quadrants (0.26x0.18m using an infrared thermometer in three different conditions of the room's natural ventilation: opened, semi-opened, and closed lateral curtain. The isotherms and the temperature distribution of the floor heat were processed using the SURFER® (1995, and the statistical analysis was done using the MINITAB® (Statistical..., 2002. It was found that the room's natural ventilation had a significant influence on crate floor surface temperature distribution. The crate with a heat mat system provided higher temperatures and led to a more homogeneous surface temperature distribution.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a influência da ventilação natural sobre a distribuição da temperatura na superfície de pisos aquecidos em escamoteadores. Foram avaliados seis escamoteadores da maternidade de uma granja de suínos localizada no estado de São Paulo. Dentre os escamoteadores avaliados, três deles usavam piso aquecido para o acondicionamento dos leitões, e os outros usavam lâmpadas incandescentes (200W, fixadas na parede lateral do interior do escamoteador. A temperatura da superfície do piso (1,55x0,55m foi registrada medindo-se 36 pontos distribuídos em 18 quadrantes (0,26x0,18m, por meio de um termômetro infravermelho, em três diferentes condições de ventilação natural: com cortina lateral aberta, semiaberta e totalmente fechada. As isotermas e a distribuição da temperatura sobre o piso

  7. Pool Boiling Heat Transfer on structured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, J.; Olbricht, M.; Müller, B.; Luke, A.

    2016-09-01

    The development in the process and energy sector shows the importance of efficient utilization of available resources to improve thermal devices. To achieve this goal, all thermal components have to be optimized continuously. Various applications of multi-phase heat and mass transfer have to be improved. Therefore, the heat transfer and the influence of surface roughness in nucleate boiling with the working fluid propane is experimentally investigated on structured mild steel tubes, because only few data are available in the literature. The mild steel tube is sandblasted to obtain different surface roughness. The measurements are carried out over wide ranges of heat flux and pressure. The experimental results are compared with correlations from literature and the effect of surface roughness on the heat transfer is discussed. It is shown that the heat transfer coefficient increases with increasing surface roughness, heat flux and reduced pressure at nucleate pool boiling.

  8. Surfaces for high heat dissipation with no Leidenfrost limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Seyed Mohammad; Irajizad, Peyman; Kashyap, Varun; Farokhnia, Nazanin; Ghasemi, Hadi

    2017-07-01

    Heat dissipation from hot surfaces through cooling droplets is limited by the Leidenfrost point (LFP), in which an insulating vapor film prevents direct contact between the cooling droplet and the hot surface. A range of approaches have been developed to raise this limit to higher temperatures, but the limit still exists. Recently, a surface architecture, decoupled hierarchical structure, was developed that allows the suppression of LFP completely. However, heat dissipation by the structure in the low superheat region was inferior to other surfaces and the structure required an extensive micro/nano fabrication procedure. Here, we present a metallic surface structure with no LFP and high heat dissipation capacity in all temperature ranges. The surface features the nucleate boiling phenomenon independent of the temperature with an approximate heat transfer coefficient of 20 kW m-2 K-1. This surface is developed in a one-step process with no micro/nano fabrication. We envision that this metallic surface provides a unique platform for high heat dissipation in power generation, photonics/electronics, and aviation systems.

  9. Flow impinging effect of critical heat flux and nucleation boiling heat transfer on a downward facing heating surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Huai-En; Chen, Mei-Shiue; Chen, Jyun-Wei; Lin, Wei-Keng; Pei, Bau-Shei [National Tsing Hua Univ., Taiwan (China). Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Science

    2015-05-15

    Boiling heat transfer has a high heat removal capability in convective cooling. However, the heat removal capability of downward-facing boiling is significantly worse than that of upward-facing cases because of the confined buoyancy effect. This study was inspired by the conception of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) condition relevant to the in-vessel retention (IVR) design of Westinghouse AP1000 plant. In the present study, a small-scale test facility had been established to investigate the local phenomena of boiling heat transfer under a downward-facing horizontal heated surface with impinging coolant flow. In this study, the surface temperature, heat flux information and several specific scenes of bubbles are taken down throughout the boiling processes for detailed investigation. It is observed that bubbles are confined under the downward-facing heated surface, which causes a worse heat transfer rate and a lower critical heat flux (CHF) limit than upward-facing boiling. Nevertheless, the impinging coolant flow is found to disturb the thermal boundary layer formed by the heated surface, so the CHF increases with an increase of coolant flow rate. In addition, during nucleate boiling, it is discovered that the growth, combination and dissipation of bubbles induce turbulent wakes and therefore enhance the heat transfer capability.

  10. Noncontact Monitoring of Surface Temperature Distribution by Laser Ultrasound Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Akira; Ihara, Ikuo

    2011-07-01

    A laser ultrasound scanning method for measuring a surface temperature distribution of a heated material is presented. An experiment using an aluminum plate heated up to 120 °C is carried out to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. A series of one-dimensional surface acoustic wave (SAW) measurements within an area of a square on the aluminum surface are performed by scanning a pulsed laser for generating SAW using a galvanometer system, where the SAWs are detected at a fixed location on the surface. An inverse analysis is then applied to SAW data to determine the surface temperature distribution in a certain direction. The two-dimensional distribution of the surface temperature in the square is constructed by combining the one-dimensional surface temperature distributions obtained within the square. The surface temperature distributions obtained by the proposed method almost agrees with those obtained using an infrared radiation camera.

  11. Heat transfer enhancement accompanying Leidenfrost state suppression at ultrahigh temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Arjang; Wurz, Jillian; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2014-10-14

    The well-known Leidenfrost effect is the formation of a vapor layer between a liquid and an underlying hot surface. This insulating vapor layer severely degrades heat transfer and results in surface dryout. We measure the heat transfer enhancement and dryout prevention benefits accompanying electrostatic suppression of the Leidenfrost state. Interfacial electric fields in the vapor layer can attract liquid toward the surface and promote wetting. This principle can suppress dryout even at ultrahigh temperatures exceeding 500 °C, which is more than 8 times the Leidenfrost superheat for organic solvents. Robust Leidenfrost state suppression is observed for a variety of liquids, ranging from low electrical conductivity organic solvents to electrically conducting salt solutions. Elimination of the vapor layer increases heat dissipation capacity by more than 1 order of magnitude. Heat removal capacities exceeding 500 W/cm(2) are measured, which is 5 times the critical heat flux (CHF) of water on common engineering surfaces. Furthermore, the heat transfer rate can be electrically controlled by the applied voltage. The underlying science is explained via a multiphysics analytical model which captures the coupled electrostatic-fluid-thermal transport phenomena underlying electrostatic Leidenfrost state suppression. Overall, this work uncovers the physics underlying dryout prevention and demonstrates electrically tunable boiling heat transfer with ultralow power consumption.

  12. Low-temperature heat transfer in nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, B A

    2001-05-07

    A new regime of low-temperature heat transfer in suspended nanowires is predicted. It takes place when (i) only "acoustic" phonon modes of the wire are thermally populated and (ii) phonons are subject to the effective elastic scattering. Qualitatively, the main peculiarities of heat transfer originate due to the appearance of the flexural modes with high density of states in the wire phonon spectrum. They give rise to the T(1/2) temperature dependence of the wire thermal conductance. Experimental situations where the new regime is likely to be detected are discussed.

  13. Natural convection heat and mass transfer in MHD fluid flow past a moving vertical plate with variable surface temperature and concentration in a porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Javaherdeh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation of two-dimensional steady laminar free convection flow with heat and mass transfer past a moving vertical plate in a porous medium subjected to a transverse magnetic field is carried out. The temperature and concentration level at the plate surface are assumed to follow a power-law type of distribution. The governing non-linear set of equations is solved numerically employing a fully implicit finite difference method. Results are presented to illustrate the influence of different parameters such as Grashof number (Gr, porosity parameter (Kp, magnetic field parameter (Mn and exponents in the power law variation of the surface temperature and concentration, m and n. The dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are analyzed and numerical data for the local Nusselt number and Sherwood number are presented. The study accentuates the significance of the relevant parameters.

  14. Microscale surface modifications for heat transfer enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostanci, Huseyin; Singh, Virendra; Kizito, John P; Rini, Daniel P; Seal, Sudipta; Chow, Louis C

    2013-10-09

    In this experimental study, two surface modification techniques were investigated for their effect on heat transfer enhancement. One of the methods employed the particle (grit) blasting to create microscale indentations, while the other used plasma spray coating to create microscale protrusions on Al 6061 (aluminum alloy 6061) samples. The test surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal scanning laser microscopy. Because of the surface modifications, the actual surface area was increased up to 2.8× compared to the projected base area, and the arithmetic mean roughness value (Ra) was determined to vary from 0.3 μm for the reference smooth surface to 19.5 μm for the modified surfaces. Selected samples with modified surfaces along with the reference smooth surface were then evaluated for their heat transfer performance in spray cooling tests. The cooling system had vapor-atomizing nozzles and used anhydrous ammonia as the coolant in order to achieve heat fluxes up to 500 W/cm(2) representing a thermal management setting for high power systems. Experimental results showed that the microscale surface modifications enhanced heat transfer coefficients up to 76% at 500 W/cm(2) compared to the smooth surface and demonstrated the benefits of these practical surface modification techniques to enhance two-phase heat transfer process.

  15. Temperature change and stress distribution analysis of die surface in Al-alloy die casting process and experimental study on die heat check

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Xinping; Zhao Guoqun; Wu Bingyao

    2008-01-01

    The temperature change of the die surface in practical aluminum alloy die casting process was analyzed,and a 2D model was formulated on the basis of a deep concave round cavity without sliding core to analyze the stress distributions along the die surface in detail. Equipment was designed to test the thermal state of the die steel in different thermal loading conditions. The results of stress analysis showed that, the value of thermal stress (maximum 1.5 GPa) caused in the die filling and die spraying stages was larger than the mechanical stress (maximum 85 MPa)caused in the die locking stage. The results of the thermal check experiment showed that there were three stages of die dissolving, and that the stress distribution shown by the samples' cracking routine was close to the die surface stress analysis.

  16. Inverse Estimation of Transient Heat Flux to Slab Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Miao; YANG Kai; LIU Yun-fei; GAO Xiao-wei

    2012-01-01

    The transient heat flux was calculated using a model for inverse heat conduction problems based on temper- ature measurements. The unknown heat flux was taken as an optimization variable and solved by minimizing the differences between the calculated temperatures and the measured ones. Several examples were given to show the ef- fectiveness and the accuracy of the inverse algorithm in estimating the transient heat flux to a slab surface. The re sults show that the inverse approach can be applied in the steel industry or in other areas where the target of investi- gation is inaccessible to direct measurements or difficult to be directly modeled.

  17. Boiling heat transfer region with independence of the wall temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlenbruch, G. H. D.; Schmidt, J.

    Extensive measurements of the intensive cooling of hot-rolled wires with temperatures between 1000 °C and 1100 °C are analysed. The analysis proves the existence of a convection-controlled boiling region, which has been previously observed by few authors in the case of high mass fluxes and high liquid subcooling. This region is characterised by an independence of the heat flux of the surface temperature. The heat flux depends essentially on the Reynolds number, the main influence parameter of the single phase convection, and on the liquid subcooling.

  18. Sea surface temperature anomalies in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.

    . Further analysis has shown that the sea surface anomalies are well correlated to the anomalies of air temperature and latent heat flux values; whereas they are least correlated to the anomalies of wind stress and net radiation values, except over...

  19. An Estimation of Land Surface Temperatures from Landsat ETM+ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr-Adeline

    2 National Authority for Remote Sensing and Space Sciences, Cairo, Egypt. 3University of ... Keywords: Urban growth, urban heat Island, land surface temperatures, satellite remote sensing .... observed target includes green vegetation or not.

  20. Heat Transfer Enhancement in Turbulent Flows by Blocked Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur YEMENİCİ

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the heat transfer analyses over flat and blocked surfaces were carried out in turbulent flow under the influence of the block height. A constant-temperature hot wire anemometer was used to the velocity and turbulent intensity measurements, while temperature values were measured by copper-constantan thermocouples. The average Stanton numbers for block heights of 15 and 25 mm were higher than those of flat surface by %38 and %84, respectively. The results showed that the presence of the blocks increased the heat transfer and the enhancement rose with block heights

  1. The surface temperature of free evaporating drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodulin, V. Y.; Letushko, V. N.; Nizovtsev, M. I.; Sterlyagov, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    Complex experimental and theoretical investigation of heat and mass transfer processes was performed at evaporation of free liquid drops. For theoretical calculation the emission-diffusion model was proposed. This allowed taking into account the characteristics of evaporation of small droplets, for which heat and mass transfer processes are not described in the conventional diffusion model. The calculation results of evaporation of droplets of different sizes were compared using two models: the conventional diffusion and emission-diffusion models. To verify the proposed physical model, the evaporation of droplets suspended on a polypropylene fiber was experimentally investigated. The form of droplets in the evaporation process was determined using microphotographing. The temperature was measured on the surfaces of evaporating drops using infrared thermography. The experimental results have showed good agreement with the numerical data for the time of evaporation and the temperature of evaporating drops.

  2. Metal surface temperature induced by moving laser beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, G.R.B.E.; Meijer, J.

    1995-01-01

    Whenever a metal is irradiated with a laser beam, electromagnetic energy is transformed into heat in a thin surface layer. The maximum surface temperature is the most important quantity which determines the processing result. Expressions for this maximum temperature are provided by the literature fo

  3. Reintroducing radiometric surface temperature into the Penman-Monteith formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mallick, Kaniska; Bøgh, Eva; Trebs, Ivonne;

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate a novel method to physically integrate radiometric surface temperature (TR) into the Penman-Monteith (PM) formulation for estimating the terrestrial sensible and latent heat fluxes (H and λE) in the framework of a modified Surface Temperature Initiated Closure (STIC). It combi...

  4. Boiling and quenching heat transfer advancement by nanoscale surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong; Xu, Cheng; Zhao, Yang; Ziegler, Kirk J; Chung, J N

    2017-07-21

    All power production, refrigeration, and advanced electronic systems depend on efficient heat transfer mechanisms for achieving high power density and best system efficiency. Breakthrough advancement in boiling and quenching phase-change heat transfer processes by nanoscale surface texturing can lead to higher energy transfer efficiencies, substantial energy savings, and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. This paper reports breakthrough advancements on both fronts of boiling and quenching. The critical heat flux (CHF) in boiling and the Leidenfrost point temperature (LPT) in quenching are the bottlenecks to the heat transfer advancements. As compared to a conventional aluminum surface, the current research reports a substantial enhancement of the CHF by 112% and an increase of the LPT by 40 K using an aluminum surface with anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) nanoporous texture finish. These heat transfer enhancements imply that the power density would increase by more than 100% and the quenching efficiency would be raised by 33%. A theory that links the nucleation potential of the surface to heat transfer rates has been developed and it successfully explains the current finding by revealing that the heat transfer modification and enhancement are mainly attributed to the superhydrophilic surface property and excessive nanoscale nucleation sites created by the nanoporous surface.

  5. Optimal usage of low temperature heat sources to supply district heating by heat pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pieper, Henrik; Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Markussen, Wiebke Brix

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on the optimal usage of different low temperature heat sources to supply district heating by heat pumps. The study is based on data for the Copenhagen region. The heat sources were prioritized based on the coefficient of performance calculated for each hour....... Groundwater, seawater and air heat sources were compared with each other as well as to a scenario consisting of a combination of these heat sources. In addition, base load and peak load units were included. Characteristic parameters were the coefficient of performance, the number of full load hours...

  6. Cyclic high temperature heat storage using borehole heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boockmeyer, Anke; Delfs, Jens-Olaf; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The transition of the German energy supply towards mainly renewable energy sources like wind or solar power, termed "Energiewende", makes energy storage a requirement in order to compensate their fluctuating production and to ensure a reliable energy and power supply. One option is to store heat in the subsurface using borehole heat exchangers (BHEs). Efficiency of thermal storage is increasing with increasing temperatures, as heat at high temperatures is more easily injected and extracted than at temperatures at ambient levels. This work aims at quantifying achievable storage capacities, storage cycle times, injection and extraction rates as well as thermal and hydraulic effects induced in the subsurface for a BHE storage site in the shallow subsurface. To achieve these aims, simulation of these highly dynamic storage sites is performed. A detailed, high-resolution numerical simulation model was developed, that accounts for all BHE components in geometrical detail and incorporates the governing processes. This model was verified using high quality experimental data and is shown to achieve accurate simulation results with excellent fit to the available experimental data, but also leads to large computational times due to the large numerical meshes required for discretizing the highly transient effects. An approximate numerical model for each type of BHE (single U, double U and coaxial) that reduces the number of elements and the simulation time significantly was therefore developed for use in larger scale simulations. The approximate numerical model still includes all BHE components and represents the temporal and spatial temperature distribution with a deviation of less than 2% from the fully discretized model. Simulation times are reduced by a factor of ~10 for single U-tube BHEs, ~20 for double U-tube BHEs and ~150 for coaxial BHEs. This model is then used to investigate achievable storage capacity, injection and extraction rates as well as induced effects for

  7. Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikas, John Michael; Colmenares, Tulio Rafael; Zhang, Etuan; Marino, Marian; Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Ryan, Robert Charles; Beer, Gary Lee; Dombrowski, Robert James; Jaiswal, Namit

    2009-12-22

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  8. Microstructure and room temperature mechanical properties of mullite fibers after heat-treatment at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi; Cheng, Haifeng, E-mail: chfcfc@163.com; Liu, Haitao; Wang, Jun

    2013-08-20

    The composition and microstructure of Nitivy ALF 2880D fibers after heat-treatment at elevated temperatures are investigated by XRD, FT-IR, SEM and TEM analyses. Tensile properties of as-received and heat-treated fiber bundles have been studied. The results show that as-received fibers consist of γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, amorphous silica, and a little boron oxide. During heat-treatment process, boron oxide firstly melts and flows, resulting in large amount of liquid ravines, and then volatilizes, leaving several holes on fiber surface. Reaction between γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and amorphous silica begins when heat-treated temperature is above 1100 °C, and completes at 1300 °C. As heat-treated temperature increases from 1100 °C to 1400 °C, grain growth of mullite starts and leads to the reduction of room temperature tensile strength of fibers. Tensile strength of fibers stays stable when heat-treated temperature is below 1200 °C, while the strength retention of fibers sharply decreased to 50% after heat-treatment at 1300 °C.

  9. Barents Sea heat – transport, storage and surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ø. Skagseth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity of the Barents Sea to variation in ocean heat transport and surface fluxes is explored using a 1-D column model. Mean monthly ocean transport and atmospheric forcing are synthesised and force model results that reproduce the observed winter convection and surface warming and freshening well. Model results are compared to existing estimates of the ocean to air heat fluxes and horizontally averaged profiles for the southern and northern Barents Sea. Our results indicate that the ~70 TW of heat transported to the Barents Sea by ocean currents is lost in the southern Barents Sea as latent, sensible, and long wave radiation, each contributing 23–39 TW to the total heat loss. Solar radiation adds 26 TW in the south, as there is no significant ice production. The northern Barents Sea, the major part of the area, receives little ocean heat transport. This leads to a mixed layer at the freezing point during winter and significant ice production. There is little net surface heat loss in the north, the balance is achieved by long wave loss removing most of the solar heating, and the model also suggests a positive sensible heat gain. During the last decade the Barents Sea has experienced an atmospheric warming and an increased ocean heat transport. Despite large changes the Barents Sea heat loss remains robust, the temperature adjusts, and the yearly cycle remains. Decreasing the ocean heat transport below 50 TW starts a transition towards Arctic conditions. The heat loss in the Barents Sea depend on the effective area for cooling, and an increased heat transport probably leads to a spreading of warm water further north.

  10. Determination of the heating temperature of potholes surface on road pavement in the process of repairs using hot asphalt concrete mixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giyasov Botir Iminzhonovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the process of roads construction the necessary transport and operational characteristics should be achieved, which depend on the quality of the applied, material and technologies. Under the loads of transport means and the influence of weather conditions on the road pavement deformations and destructions occur, which lead to worsening of transport and operational characteristics, decrease of operational life of the road and they are often the reason of road accidents. According to the data of the Strategic Research Center of "Rosgosstrah" more than 20 % of road accidents in Russia occur due to bad quality of road pavement. One of the main directions in traffic security control and prolongation of operational life for road pavement of non-rigid type is road works, as a result of which defects of pavement are eliminated and in case of timely repairs of high quality the operational life of the road increases for several years. The most widely used material for non-rigid pavement repairs is hot road concrete mixes and in case of adherence to specifications they provide high quality of works. The authors investigate the problems of hot asphalt concrete mixes for repairs of road surfaces of non-rigid type. The results of the study hot asphalt concrete mix’s temperature regimes are offered in case of repair works considering the temperature delivered to the work site and the ambient temperature depending on the type of mix and class of bitumen.

  11. The surface heat flow of the Arabian Shield in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, A.; Förster, H.-J.; Masarweh, R.; Masri, A.; Tarawneh, K.; Desert Group

    2007-04-01

    Surface heat flow in southern Jordan (western part of the Arabian Plate) was determined in a dense cluster of five, up to 900-m-deep boreholes that have encountered sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic (Ordovician and Silurian) age. These rocks are underlain by an igneous and metamorphic basement, which has been studied for its radiogenic heat production, along the eastern margin of the Dead Sea Transform (DST) fault system. The heat flow, calculated from continuous temperature logs and laboratory-measured thermal conductivity of drillcores and surface samples, averages to 60.3 ± 3.4 mW m -2 and contrasts the common view of the late Proterozoic-consolidated Arabian Shield constituting a low heat-flow province of ⩽45 mW m -2. Although only characterizing an area of about 300 km 2, this average is unlikely representing a positive local anomaly caused by voluminous HHP granites/rhyolites at shallow depths. Instead, a heat flow of 60 mW m -2 is considered a robust estimate of the Phanerozoic conductive surface heat flow not only for Jordan, but for the Arabian Shield in areas unaffected by younger reactivation. The large variation in conductive heat flow (36-88 mW m -2) previously observed in Jordan, southern Syria, and Saudi Arabia is irreconcilable with their broad similarity in lithosphere structure and composition and rather reflects a combination of factors including low-quality temperature data and insufficient knowledge on thermal rock properties.

  12. Turbulent Flow past High Temperature Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Thangam, Siva; Carlucci, Pasquale; Buckley, Liam; Carlucci, Donald

    2014-11-01

    Flow over high-temperature surfaces subject to wall heating is analyzed with applications to projectile design. In this study, computations are performed using an anisotropic Reynolds-stress model to study flow past surfaces that are subject to radiative flux. The model utilizes a phenomenological treatment of the energy spectrum and diffusivities of momentum and heat to include the effects of wall heat transfer and radiative exchange. The radiative transport is modeled using Eddington approximation including the weighted effect of nongrayness of the fluid. The time-averaged equations of motion and energy are solved using the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation with an efficient finite-volume algorithm. The model is applied for available test cases to validate its predictive capabilities for capturing the effects of wall heat transfer. Computational results are compared with experimental data available in the literature. Applications involving the design of projectiles are summarized. Funded in part by U.S. Army, ARDEC.

  13. Heat driven refrigeration cycle at low temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Yijian; HONG Ronghua; CHEN Guangming

    2005-01-01

    Absorption refrigeration cycle can be driven by low-grade thermal energy, such as solar energy, geothermal energy and waste heat. It is beneficial to save energy and protect environment. However, the applications of traditional absorption refrigeration cycle are greatly restricted because they cannot achieve low refrigeration temperature. A new absorption refrigeration cycle is investigated in this paper, which is driven by low-grade energy and can get deep low refrigeration temperature. The mixture refrigerant R23+R134a and an absorbent DMF are used as its working fluid. The theoretical results indicate that the new cycle can achieve -62℃ refrigeration temperature when the generation temperature is only 160℃. This refrigeration temperature is much lower than that obtained by traditional absorption refrigeration cycle. Refrigeration temperature of -47.3℃ has been successfully achieved by experiment for this new cycle at the generation temperature of 157℃, which is the lowest temperature obtained by absorption refrigeration system reported in the literature up to now. The theoretical and experimental results prove that new cycle can achieve rather low refrigeration temperature.

  14. Heat in the Barents Sea: transport, storage, and surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. H. Smedsrud

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A column model is set up for the Barents Sea to explore sensitivity of surface fluxes and heat storage from varying ocean heat transport. Mean monthly ocean transport and atmospheric forcing are synthesised and force the simulations. Results show that by using updated ocean transports of heat and freshwater the vertical mean hydrographic seasonal cycle can be reproduced fairly well.

    Our results indicate that the ~70 TW of heat transported to the Barents Sea by ocean currents is lost in the southern Barents Sea as latent, sensible, and long wave radiation, each contributing 23–39 TW to the total heat loss. Solar radiation adds 26 TW in the south, as there is no significant ice production.

    The northern Barents Sea receives little ocean heat transport. This leads to a mixed layer at the freezing point during winter and significant ice production. There is little net surface heat loss annually in the north. The balance is achieved by a heat loss through long wave radiation all year, removing most of the summer solar heating.

    During the last decade the Barents Sea has experienced an atmospheric warming and an increased ocean heat transport. The Barents Sea responds to such large changes by adjusting temperature and heat loss. Decreasing the ocean heat transport below 50 TW starts a transition towards Arctic conditions. The heat loss in the Barents Sea depend on the effective area for cooling, and an increased heat transport leads to a spreading of warm water further north.

  15. Technical paper: Environmental heat stress in football is increased in synthetic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Fernando Aragón Vargas

    2012-01-01

    Environmental heat stress is the result of ambient temperature, radiation, and relative humidity. During football practice on synthetic surfaces and no roof, solar radiation causes an important temperature increase of the playing surface. This technical note explains how heat stress is calculated according to the WBGT index (which does not consider playing surface temperature), and quantifies the increase in a synthetic surface compared to natural grass on the same site. Football practice sho...

  16. Limitations of floor heating - optimum heating surface design. Grenzen der Deckenheizung - optimale Heizflaechengestaltung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glueck, B.

    1994-06-01

    The publication on the use of cooling floors for heating purposes has resulted in the following questions amongst the professionals: Can rooms with relatively poor thermal insulation and customary outside air filtration, also be thermophysiologically heated in a permissible manner with radiant floor surfaces How do corner areas behave Can the radiator design be optimized where radiated temperature distribution is concerned The effects and the present limitations are indicated by means of practical examples. (orig.)

  17. Experimental study of energy performance in low-temperature hydronic heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesaraki, Arefeh; Bourdakis, Eleftherios; Ploskić, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Energy consumption, thermal environment and environmental impacts were analytically and experimentally studied for different types of heat emitters. The heat emitters studied were conventional radiator, ventilation radiator, and floor heating with medium-, low-, and very-low-temperature supply...... in the climate chamber were supply and return water temperature from the heat emitters, indoor temperature, and heat emitter surface temperature. Experiments showed that the mean supply water temperature for floor heating was the lowest, i.e. 30°C, but it was close to the ventilation radiator, i.e. 33°C....... The supply water temperature in all measurements for conventional radiator was significantly higher than ventilation radiator and floor heating; namely, 45°C. Experimental results indicated that the mean indoor temperature was close to the acceptable level of 22°C in all cases. For energy calculations...

  18. Surface heat loads on the ITER divertor vertical targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, J. P.; Carpentier-Chouchana, S.; Escourbiac, F.; Hirai, T.; Panayotis, S.; Pitts, R. A.; Corre, Y.; Dejarnac, R.; Firdaouss, M.; Kočan, M.; Komm, M.; Kukushkin, A.; Languille, P.; Missirlian, M.; Zhao, W.; Zhong, G.

    2017-04-01

    The heating of tungsten monoblocks at the ITER divertor vertical targets is calculated using the heat flux predicted by three-dimensional ion orbit modelling. The monoblocks are beveled to a depth of 0.5 mm in the toroidal direction to provide magnetic shadowing of the poloidal leading edges within the range of specified assembly tolerances, but this increases the magnetic field incidence angle resulting in a reduction of toroidal wetted fraction and concentration of the local heat flux to the unshadowed surfaces. This shaping solution successfully protects the leading edges from inter-ELM heat loads, but at the expense of (1) temperatures on the main loaded surface that could exceed the tungsten recrystallization temperature in the nominal partially detached regime, and (2) melting and loss of margin against critical heat flux during transient loss of detachment control. During ELMs, the risk of monoblock edge melting is found to be greater than the risk of full surface melting on the plasma-wetted zone. Full surface and edge melting will be triggered by uncontrolled ELMs in the burning plasma phase of ITER operation if current models of the likely ELM ion impact energies at the divertor targets are correct. During uncontrolled ELMs in pre-nuclear deuterium or helium plasmas at half the nominal plasma current and magnetic field, full surface melting should be avoided, but edge melting is predicted.

  19. Integration of space heating and hot water supply in low temperature district heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmegaard, Brian; Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Markussen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    electric heating and three heat pump solutions applying R134a and R744. The results show that conventional solutions at lowest possible temperature have the highest exergetic efficiency of 28% and lowest annual cost of € 690 for a 159 m2 house. The best low temperature system is an R134a heat pump with hot......District heating may supply many consumers efficiently, but the heat loss from the pipes to the ground is a challenge. The heat loss may be lowered by decreasing the network temperatures for which reason low temperature networks are proposed for future district heating. The heating demand...... of the consumers involves both domestic hot water and space heating. Space heating may be provided at low temperature in low energy buildings. Domestic hot water, however, needs sufficient temperatures to avoid growth of legionella. If the network temperature is below the demand temperature, supplementary heating...

  20. Temperature dependent droplet impact dynamics on flat and textured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azar Alizadeh; Vaibhav Bahadur; Sheng Zhong; Wen Shang; Ri Li; James Ruud; Masako Yamada; Liehi Ge; Ali Dhinojwala; Manohar S Sohal (047160)

    2012-03-01

    Droplet impact dynamics determines the performance of surfaces used in many applications such as anti-icing, condensation, boiling and heat transfer. We study impact dynamics of water droplets on surfaces with chemistry/texture ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and across a temperature range spanning below freezing to near boiling conditions. Droplet retraction shows very strong temperature dependence especially for hydrophilic surfaces; it is seen that lower substrate temperatures lead to lesser retraction. Physics-based analyses show that the increased viscosity associated with lower temperatures can explain the decreased retraction. The present findings serve to guide further studies of dynamic fluid-structure interaction at various temperatures.

  1. Surface temperature distribution in broiler houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MS Baracho

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Brazilian meat production scenario broiler production is the most dynamic segment. Despite of the knowledge generated in the poultry production chain, there are still important gaps on Brazilian rearing conditions as housing is different from other countries. This research study aimed at analyzing the variation in bird skin surface as function of heat distribution inside broiler houses. A broiler house was virtually divided into nine sectors and measurements were made during the first four weeks of the grow-out in a commercial broiler farm in the region of Rio Claro, São Paulo, Brazil. Rearing ambient temperature and relative humidity, as well as light intensity and air velocity, were recorded in the geometric center of each virtual sector to evaluate the homogeneity of these parameters. Broiler surface temperatures were recorded using infrared thermography. Differences both in surface temperature (Ts and dry bulb temperature (DBT were significant (p<0.05 as a function of week of rearing. Ts was different between the first and fourth weeks (p<0.05 in both flocks. Results showed important variations in rearing environment parameters (temperature and relative humidity and in skin surface temperature as a function of week and house sector. Air velocity data were outside the limits in the first and third weeks in several sectors. Average light intensity values presented low variation relative to week and house sector. The obtained values were outside the recommended ranges, indicating that broilers suffered thermal distress. This study points out the need to record rearing environment data in order to provide better environmental control during broiler grow-out.

  2. Experimental investigation on effects of liquid subcooling on droplet collision heat transfer above Leidenfrost temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Junseok; Kim, Hyungdae [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, the droplet-wall collision heat transfer experiments above the Leidenfrost point temperature were conducted to experimentally investigate the effects of droplet subcooling. Dynamic behavior of a droplet impinging on the heated wall and the temperature distribution were simultaneously measured using synchronized HSV camera (Phantom v7.3) and infrared camera (FLIR SC6000, 3-5 μm). Heat transfer experiments during collision of a subcooled droplet with a heated surface above the Leidenfrost temperature were conducted by varying temperature of droplet from 40 to 100 °C under the conditions that the collision velocity and wall temperature were maintained constant at 0.7 m/s at 500 °C, respectively. When increasing subcooling of a liquid droplet colliding on a surface heated above Leidenfrost temperature, vapor film thickness decreases while residence time increases. Those effects significantly increase heat transfer amount beyond values predicted by existing correlations.

  3. Investigation of Si(001) stable surfaces in alternating current heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, T.; Koguchi, M.

    2016-11-01

    The topography of a Si(001) vicinal surface is investigated using reflection electron microscopy (REM) during alternating current (AC) heating of the surface in ultra-high vacuum. The normal direction of the surface is slightly tilted from the [001] direction at θx or θy on the x or y axis (they are orthogonal directions in the Si(001) surface), and the average widths of the terraces (a or b in x or y axis) are determined by θx or θy; the direction perpendicular to the incidence electron beam on the surface is selected as the x (horizontal) axis in each REM image. Alternating current heating changes each initial surface from stable to double-domain (DD), in which 2 × 1 and 1 × 2 terraces are arranged regularly with approximately equal width, at its transition temperature Tc; the dimer rows are parallel to the x or y axis in the 1 × 2 or 2 × 1 terraces. There are two types of stable surfaces in the vicinal surface. At temperatures below its Tc, the surface with horizontally (vertically) long terraces, where b a), changes to a 2 × 1 (1 × 2) surface with wide 2 × 1 (1 × 2) and narrow 1 × 2 (2 × 1) terraces. The terrace, the short side of which is parallel to its dimer row direction, grows to create a stable surface by thermal diffusion of Si atoms at temperatures below Tc. During AC heating, thermal diffusion plays a key role in analyzing the kinetics of the atoms on the surface because the thermal effect acts as the driving force for the atoms that have not yet evaporated from the surface. Then, by evaporating atoms from the vicinal surface, AC heating creates a DD surface at temperatures between its Tc and 1100 °C and a rugged surface consisting of small 2 × 1 and 1 × 2 terraces at temperatures above 1100 °C.

  4. Integration of space heating and hot water supply in low temperature district heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmegaard, Brian; Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Markussen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    is required by the consumer. We study conventional district heating at different temperatures and compare the energy and exergetic efficiency and annual heating cost to solutions that utilize electricity for supplementary heating of domestic hot water in low temperature district heating. This includes direct...... electric heating and three heat pump solutions applying R134a and R744. The results show that conventional solutions at lowest possible temperature have the highest exergetic efficiency of 28% and lowest annual cost of € 690 for a 159 m2 house. The best low temperature system is an R134a heat pump with hot......District heating may supply many consumers efficiently, but the heat loss from the pipes to the ground is a challenge. The heat loss may be lowered by decreasing the network temperatures for which reason low temperature networks are proposed for future district heating. The heating demand...

  5. 三维内外热耦合计算热气防冰系统表面温度%Three-dimensional conjugate heat transfer simulation for the surface temperature of wing hot-air anti-icing system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卜雪琴; 林贵平; 郁嘉

    2009-01-01

    提出了一种三维内外强固传热耦合计算热气防冰系统表面温度的方法并进行算例计算.外部表面传热系数计算采用附面层积分方法,内部热气流动与换热采用CFD(计算流体动力学)方法,利用FLU-ENT的用户自定义甬数UDFs(user~defined functions)实现蒙皮外表面热载荷计算及热流边界条件的自动加载,使迭代自动推进.对表面温度及外部热载倚进行亚松弛来稳定迭代计算,用强固传热耦合迭代来加快计算速度.所研究的三维热气防冰系统表面温度计算新方法可应用于防冰系统的热性能验证及系统优化.%The conjugate heat transfer of a 3-D wing hot-air anti-icing system was studied and a method for calculation of the surface temperature was presented in this paper. The method employed the commercial software package FLUENT and its user-defined functions (UDFs) to integrate tightly the external heat flux, internal heat flux and the thermal conduction in the skin. The external convective heat transfer coefficient was computed using the boundary layer integrated method, and the internal hot air flow and heat transfer was modeled using FLUENT. The iteration for the sequential coupling of internal, external and conductive heat transfer was implemented by automatically calculating the external heat flux and setting the heat flux boundary condition on the external surface with UDFs. This new method for a wing anti-icing system can be applied to verification of its feasibility and validity.

  6. Temperature Evaluation of Heat Transferring Body while Preparing Temperature Chart of Heating Technologies and Metal Thermal Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Nesenchuk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems pertaining to temperature evaluation of a heat transferring body in the operational space of high temperature installations. A formula for evaluation of this temperature has been written down in the paper. Calculation of a heating transferring body (furnace makes it possible to realize temperature chart parameters in the plant heating technologies and steel thermal treatment.

  7. Measured Performance of a Low Temperature Air Source Heat Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.K. Johnson

    2013-09-01

    A 4-ton Low Temperature Heat Pump (LTHP) manufactured by Hallowell International was installed in a residence near New Haven, Connecticut and monitored over two winters of operation. After attending to some significant service issues, the heat pump operated as designed. This report should be considered a review of the dual compressor “boosted heat pump” technology. The Low Temperature Heat Pump system operates with four increasing levels of capacity (heat output) as the outdoor temperature drops.

  8. Low-temperature heat capacity of magnetic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, A. V.

    2008-12-01

    This paper continues the previous investigation into a recently discovered phenomenon of magnetic fluid solidification at temperatures essentially exceeding the freezing point of the base fluid. Physically, this phenomenon is related to the fact that at decreasing temperatures the magnetic fluid loses fluidity (with its viscosity tending to infinity) at a temperature higher than the freezing point of the base fluid. The main factor determining the freezing point is the type of the surface-active substance covering the particles. A group of different surfactants is examined with the aim of finding the lowest possible solidification temperature. The best result is obtained for linoleic acid (-100°C). In order to gain a deeper insight into the mechanisms of fluid solidification, a series of thermophysical measurements has been done. Heat capacity measurements made for an isooctane-based magnetic fluid stabilized by oleic acid at a temperature ranging from -130°C to 0 did not reveal any noticeable heat capacity anomalies in the vicinity of the solidification temperature. This suggests that the solidification of the magnetic fluid proceeds without phase transition. The highest peak of the heat flux is observed at the freezing point of isooctane. The position of the maximum slightly changes with the concentration of magnetic particles. With an increase of the concentration the temperature of the heat flux maximum decreases. In the presence of free oleic acid in isooctane a low peak is observed at a temperature of about -15°C. The peak position is independent of the oleic acid concentration. Tables 1, Figs 7, Refs 1.

  9. CDC WONDER: Daily Air Temperatures and Heat Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Daily Air Temperature and Heat Index data available on CDC WONDER are county-level daily average air temperatures and heat index measures spanning the years...

  10. Embedded water-based surface heating part 2: experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    : hybrid 3D numerical model. Journal of Building Physics 33: 357-391). The thermal response of the system is tested in both long (16 h) and short (30 min) cycle experiments where the water flow alters between on and off. Temperature distribution, within the floor construction, and the heat exchange process...... are studied throughout the test cycles. The model underestimates the steady-state heat exchange from the pipe loop by 16% when boundary conditions and thermal properties according to the reference case are applied. Temperatures at the floor surface are assessed with good precision while temperatures......The transient operation of an embedded water-based floor heating system has been studied by means of a numerical simulation tool. Prior to this study, Caccavelli and Richard (Caccavelli D, Richard P (1994) Etude portant sur le dimensionnement d'un plancher chauffant a eau chaude en CIC. Rapport n...

  11. Revisiting the global surface energy budgets with maximum-entropy-production model of surface heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Yu; Deng, Yi; Wang, Jingfeng

    2016-10-01

    The maximum-entropy-production (MEP) model of surface heat fluxes, based on contemporary non-equilibrium thermodynamics, information theory, and atmospheric turbulence theory, is used to re-estimate the global surface heat fluxes. The MEP model predicted surface fluxes automatically balance the surface energy budgets at all time and space scales without the explicit use of near-surface temperature and moisture gradient, wind speed and surface roughness data. The new MEP-based global annual mean fluxes over the land surface, using input data of surface radiation, temperature data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (NASA CERES) supplemented by surface specific humidity data from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), agree closely with previous estimates. The new estimate of ocean evaporation, not using the MERRA reanalysis data as model inputs, is lower than previous estimates, while the new estimate of ocean sensible heat flux is higher than previously reported. The MEP model also produces the first global map of ocean surface heat flux that is not available from existing global reanalysis products.

  12. Revisiting the global surface energy budgets with maximum-entropy-production model of surface heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Yu; Deng, Yi; Wang, Jingfeng

    2017-09-01

    The maximum-entropy-production (MEP) model of surface heat fluxes, based on contemporary non-equilibrium thermodynamics, information theory, and atmospheric turbulence theory, is used to re-estimate the global surface heat fluxes. The MEP model predicted surface fluxes automatically balance the surface energy budgets at all time and space scales without the explicit use of near-surface temperature and moisture gradient, wind speed and surface roughness data. The new MEP-based global annual mean fluxes over the land surface, using input data of surface radiation, temperature data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (NASA CERES) supplemented by surface specific humidity data from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), agree closely with previous estimates. The new estimate of ocean evaporation, not using the MERRA reanalysis data as model inputs, is lower than previous estimates, while the new estimate of ocean sensible heat flux is higher than previously reported. The MEP model also produces the first global map of ocean surface heat flux that is not available from existing global reanalysis products.

  13. The Influence Of Burner Locations In The Heating Furnace On The Charge Temperature Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rywotycki M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Charge heating in industrial furnaces is a difficult and complex process. There are many physical phenomena which influence heat transfer. At the charge surface heat transfer takes place by radiation and convection. In order to ensure correct operation of the technological system, it is necessary to achieve the required charge temperature in the whole volume and ensure its uniformity.

  14. Insensitivity of Ion Motional Heating Rate to Trap Material over a Large Temperature Range

    CERN Document Server

    Chiaverini, J

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of trapped-ion motional-state heating rates in niobium and gold surface-electrode ion traps over a range of trap-electrode temperatures from approximately 4 K up to room temperature (295 K) in a single apparatus. Using the sideband-ratio technique after resolved-sideband cooling of single ions to the motional ground state, we find low-temperature heating rates more than two orders of magnitude below the room-temperature values and approximately equal to the lowest measured heating rates in similarly-sized cryogenic traps. We find similar behavior in the two very different electrode materials, suggesting that the anomalous heating process is dominated by non-material-specific surface contaminants. Through precise control of the temperature of cryopumping surfaces, we also identify conditions under which elastic collisions with the background gas can lead to an apparent steady heating rate, despite rare collisions.

  15. Exergetic evaluation of heat pump booster configurations in a low temperature district heating network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Elmegaard, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In order to minimise losses in a district heating network, one approach is to lower the temperature difference between working media and soil. Considering only direct heat exchange, the minimum forward temperature level is determined by the demand side, as energy services are required at a certain...... temperature. As domestic hot water is required at a temperature range where legionella is no longer a threat, forward temperatures in a traditional low temperature district heating network cannot be lowered beyond approximately 55 ºC. One solution is to boost the temperature of the forward tap water stream...... with a heat pump, as the remaining heat demands are often not required at temperature levels as high as the tap water. The scope of this work is to evaluate the power consumption and second law efficiency of booster heat pumps for tap water production in a low temperature district heating network. The heat...

  16. Comparison of Four Models of Radiative Heat Transfer Between Flat Surface to Evaluate the Temperature Field Based on Example of the Continuous Casting Mould

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rywotycki M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research concerning the influence of radiative heat transfer on the strand and mould interface. The four models for determining the heat transfer boundary conditions within the primary cooling zone for the continuous casting process of steel have been presented. A cast slab - with dimensions of 1280×220 mm - has been analysed. Models describing the heat transfer by radiation have been specified and applied in the numerical calculations. The problem has been solved by applying the finite element method and the self-developed software. The simulation results, along with their analysis, have been presented. The developed models have been verified based on the data obtained from the measurements at the industrial facility.

  17. The dependence of surface temperature on IGBTs load and ambient temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Čaja; Marek, Patsch

    2015-05-01

    Currently, older power electronics and electrotechnics are improvement and at the same time developing new and more efficient devices. These devices produce in their activities a significant part of the heat which, if not effectively drained, causing damage to these elements. In this case, it is important to develop new and more efficient cooling system. The most widespread of modern methods of cooling is the cooling by heat pipe. This contribution is aimed at cooling the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) elements by loop heat pipe (LHP). IGBTs are very prone to damage due to high temperatures, and therefore is the important that the surface temperature was below 100°C. It was therefore created a model that examined what impact of surface temperature on the IGBT element and heat removal at different load and constant ambient temperature.

  18. The dependence of surface temperature on IGBTs load and ambient temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Čaja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, older power electronics and electrotechnics are improvement and at the same time developing new and more efficient devices. These devices produce in their activities a significant part of the heat which, if not effectively drained, causing damage to these elements. In this case, it is important to develop new and more efficient cooling system. The most widespread of modern methods of cooling is the cooling by heat pipe. This contribution is aimed at cooling the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT elements by loop heat pipe (LHP. IGBTs are very prone to damage due to high temperatures, and therefore is the important that the surface temperature was below 100°C. It was therefore created a model that examined what impact of surface temperature on the IGBT element and heat removal at different load and constant ambient temperature.

  19. Energy and exergy analysis of low temperature district heating network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hongwei; Svendsen, Svend

    2012-01-01

    Low temperature district heating with reduced network supply and return temperature provides better match of the low quality building heating demand and the low quality heating supply from waste heat or renewable energy. In this paper, a hypothetical low temperature district heating network...... is designed to supply heating for 30 low energy detached residential houses. The network operational supply/return temperature is set as 55 °C/25 °C, which is in line with a pilot project carried out in Denmark. Two types of in-house substations are analyzed to supply the consumer domestic hot water demand....... The space heating demand is supplied through floor heating in the bathroom and low temperature radiators in the rest of rooms. The network thermal and hydraulic conditions are simulated under steady state. A district heating network design and simulation code is developed to incorporate the network...

  20. Reduction of trapped ion anomalous heating by in situ surface plasma cleaning

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, Robert; Chiaverini, John; Sage, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous motional heating is a major obstacle to scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions. While the source of this heating is not yet understood, several previous studies suggest that surface contaminants may be largely responsible. We demonstrate an improvement by a factor of four in the room-temperature heating rate of a niobium surface electrode trap by in situ plasma cleaning of the trap surface. This surface treatment was performed with a simple homebuilt coil assembly and commercially-available matching network and is considerably gentler than other treatments, such as ion milling or laser cleaning, that have previously been shown to improve ion heating rates. We do not see an improvement in the heating rate when the trap is operated at cryogenic temperatures, pointing to a role of thermally-activated surface contaminants in motional heating whose activity may freeze out at low temperatures.

  1. Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST) dataset is a global monthly sea surface temperature analysis derived from the International Comprehensive...

  2. NOAA Global Surface Temperature (NOAAGlobalTemp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Global Surface Temperature Dataset (NOAAGlobalTemp) is a merged land–ocean surface temperature analysis (formerly known as MLOST) (link is external). It is...

  3. Vertical Distribution of Air Temperatures in Heated Dwelling Rooms

    OpenAIRE

    Šikula, Ondřej

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents an experimental and theoretic research on one of factors influencing the indoor climate in dwelling rooms heated by heating systems, the vertical distribution of temperatures. The paper summarizes results from simulation of the room heated by a gas space heater and a plate radiator. Among main factors causing unfavorable distribution of temperatures in a room belong insufficient elimination of cold dropping airflows and high temperature of heating air. The paper presents...

  4. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Sea Surface Temperature -WHOI, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Ocean Surface Bundle (OSB) Climate Data Record (CDR) consist of three parts: sea surface temperature, near-surface atmospheric properties, and heat fluxes....

  5. Technical paper: Environmental heat stress in football is increased in synthetic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Aragón Vargas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Environmental heat stress is the result of ambient temperature, radiation, and relative humidity. During football practice on synthetic surfaces and no roof, solar radiation causes an important temperature increase of the playing surface. This technical note explains how heat stress is calculated according to the WBGT index (which does not consider playing surface temperature, and quantifies the increase in a synthetic surface compared to natural grass on the same site. Football practice should be avoided during those hours with the highest solar radiation and temperature on this type of surface.

  6. A novel method to improve the performance of heat exchanger--Temperature fields coordination of fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zengyuan; WEI Shu; CHENG Xinguang

    2004-01-01

    The methods to enhance the heat transfer in heat exchanger may be classified into two levels: one is to improve the heat transfer coefficient; the other is to upgrade the whole arrangement of the heat exchangers. For the second level, the performance of heat exchanger can be upgraded by increasing the coordination degree between the temperature fields of cold and hot fluids. When the temperature distributions are similar to each other, the temperature difference field (TDF) is more uniform, which means that the temperature fields are more coordinated with each other. For the cross-flow heat exchanger, rearrangement of the heat exchange surface area should improve the heat transfer effectiveness, which is even equal to that of the counter-flow heat exchanger when the surface area is reassigned optimally. For the multi-stream heat exchanger, the thermal performance is also dependent on the uniformity of the TDF, and the parallel-flow arrangement may achieve higher heat exchange effectiveness than the counter-flow arrangement, which indicates that the performance of heat exchanger depends on the coordination degree of temperature fields instead of the flow arrangement.

  7. Heat flow evolution of the Earth from paleomantle temperatures: Evidence for increasing heat loss since ∼2.5 Ga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Javier

    2017-08-01

    Earth currently loses two to five times as much heat through its surface as it is internally produced by radioactivity. This proportion cannot be extrapolated into the past, because it would imply high interior temperatures and catastrophic melting of the planet in ancient times. The heat loss evolution of the Earth cannot therefore be described by a constant heat flow decreasing. This is consistent with previous work finding that the mantle heated up until ∼2.5-3.0 Ga and then progressively cooled down. The present work derives a first-order heat loss evolution of the Earth by comparing the evolution of the total heat content of the silicate Earth (as described by mantle potential temperatures deduced from the melting conditions of ancient non-arc basalts) with the total radioactive heat production. The results show that the heat flow was declining, and the mantle heating-up, until ∼2.5 Ga, but that after this time the heat flow has been slowly (but constantly) increasing, and the mantle cooling-down, until the present-day. The change in heat loss trend is roughly coeval with other major geological, geochemical and environmental changes, and could indicate the starting of the modern-style of plate tectonics. This work provides therefore the first quantitative evidence of change in terrestrial heat loss regime, and suggests that substantial variations in the internal heat budget occurred during Earth's history.

  8. Correlation of Forced-convection Heat-transfer Data for Air Flowing in Smooth Platinum Tube with Long-approach Entrance at High Surface and Inlet-air Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmon, Leland G; Sams, Eldon W

    1950-01-01

    A heat-transfer investigation was conducted with air in an electrically heated platinum tube with long-approach entrance, inside diameter of 0.525 inch, and effective heat-transfer length of 24 inches over ranges of Reynolds number up to 320,000, average inside-tube-wall temperature up to 3053 degrees R, and inlet-air temperature up to 1165 degrees R. Correlation of data by the conventional Nusselt relation resulted in separation of data with tube-wall temperature. Good correlation was obtained, however, by use of a modified Reynolds number.

  9. Measurements of mixed convective heat transfer to low temperature helium in a horizontal channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeroshenko, V. M.; Kuznetsov, Y. V.; Shevchenko, O. A.; Hendricks, R. C.; Daney, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A horizontal 2.85 m long, 19 mm i.d. stainless steel heated circular channel was employed to measure coefficients of heat transfer to low temperature helium flow. Experimental parameters range from 6.5 to 15 K, from 0.12 to 0.3 MPa at heat fluxes up to 1000 W/m square and Reynolds numbers from 9,000 to 20,000. A significantly nonuniform distribution of heat transfer coefficients over the tube periphery is observed. Difference between temperatures on the upper and lower surfaces of the stainless steel channel wall was found to reach 9 K. It was noted that the highest temperature on the wall outer surface is displaced from its uppermost point. Measurements of local flow temperatures revealed vortical structure of the flow. The displacement of the point with the highest temperature is attributable to the effect of vortices. The relationships for calculating local and averaged coefficients of heat transfer are proposed.

  10. Industrial Heat Pump for a High Temperature District Heating Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Claus Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    by excess thermal energy from thermal solar panels. An industrial heat pump system using the natural refrigerant ammonia, is extracting the thermal energy from the storage when needed, and produce hot water at 85°C, for the district heating grid. The heat pump also acts as contributor to electricity grid...

  11. Challenges in Smart Low-Temperature District Heating Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hongwei; Wang, Stephen Jia

    2014-01-01

    Previous research and development shows that low temperature district heating (LTDH) system is economic feasible for low energy buildings and buildings at sparse areas. Coupling with reduced network temperature and well-designed district heating (DH) networks, LTDH can reduce network heat loss...

  12. The lowering of sea surface temperature in the east central Arabian sea associated with a cyclone

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Rao, D.P.; Sastry, J.S.

    An analysis of thermal Structure in the East Central Arabian Sea associated with a moderate cyclone is presented. The heat storage and the heat budget components have been computed. Under the influence of the cyclone the Sea Surface Temperature (SST...

  13. Middle Pliocene sea surface temperature variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, H.J.; Chandler, M.A.; Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    Estimates of sea surface temperature (SST) based upon foraminifer, diatom, and ostracod assemblages from ocean cores reveal a warm phase of the Pliocene between about 3.3 and 3.0 Ma. Pollen records and plant megafossils, although not as well dated, show evidence for a warmer climate at about the same time. Increased greenhouse forcing and altered ocean heat transport are the leading candidates for the underlying cause of Pliocene global warmth. Despite being a period of global warmth, this interval encompasses considerable variability. Two new SST reconstructions are presented that are designed to provide a climatological error bar for warm peak phases of the Pliocene and to document the spatial distribution and magnitude of SST variability within the mid-Pliocene warm period. These data suggest long-term stability of low-latitude SST and document greater variability in regions of maximum warming. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Utilization of low-temperature heat sources for heat and power production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haglind, Fredrik; Elmegaard, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Low-temperature heat sources are available in many applications, ranging from waste heat from marine diesel engines, industries and refrigeration plants to biomass, geothermal and solar heat sources. There is a great potential for enhancing the utilization of these heat sources by novel thermodyn......Low-temperature heat sources are available in many applications, ranging from waste heat from marine diesel engines, industries and refrigeration plants to biomass, geothermal and solar heat sources. There is a great potential for enhancing the utilization of these heat sources by novel.......Both power production and heat pumps may benefit from the development as both technologies utilize a heat source. This makes it possible to cover the complete temperature range of low temperature sources. The development may contribute to significantly lower energy consumption in Danish industry and shipping...

  15. Attenuating the surface Urban Heat Island within the Local Thermal Zones through land surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiong; Ouyang, Wanlu

    2017-02-01

    Inefficient mitigation of excessive heat is attributed to the discrepancy between the scope of climate research and conventional planning practice. This study approaches this problem at both domains. Generally, the study, on one hand, claims that the climate research of the temperature phenomenon should be at local scale, where implementation of planning and design strategies can be more feasible. On the other hand, the study suggests that the land surface factors should be organized into zones or patches, which conforms to the urban planning and design manner. Thus in each zone, the land surface composition of those excessively hot places can be compared to the zonal standard. The comparison gives guidance to the modification of the land surface factors at the target places. Specifically, this study concerns the Land Surface Temperature (LST) in Wuhan, China. The land surface is classified into Local Thermal Zones (LTZ). The specifications of temperature sensitive land surface factors are relative homogeneous in each zone and so is the variation of the LST. By extending the city scale analysis of Urban Heat Island into local scale, the Local Surface Urban Heat Islands (LSUHIs) are extracted. Those places in each zone that constantly maintain as LSUHI and exceed the homogenous LST variation are considered as target places or hotspots with higher mitigation or adaptation priority. The operation is equivalent to attenuate the abnormal LST variation in each zone. The framework is practical in the form of prioritization and zoning, and mitigation strategies are essentially operated locally.

  16. Mathematical model of the metal mould surface temperature optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mlynek, Jaroslav, E-mail: jaroslav.mlynek@tul.cz; Knobloch, Roman, E-mail: roman.knobloch@tul.cz [Department of Mathematics, FP Technical University of Liberec, Studentska 2, 461 17 Liberec, The Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Srb, Radek, E-mail: radek.srb@tul.cz [Institute of Mechatronics and Computer Engineering Technical University of Liberec, Studentska 2, 461 17 Liberec, The Czech Republic (Czech Republic)

    2015-11-30

    The article is focused on the problem of generating a uniform temperature field on the inner surface of shell metal moulds. Such moulds are used e.g. in the automotive industry for artificial leather production. To produce artificial leather with uniform surface structure and colour shade the temperature on the inner surface of the mould has to be as homogeneous as possible. The heating of the mould is realized by infrared heaters located above the outer mould surface. The conceived mathematical model allows us to optimize the locations of infrared heaters over the mould, so that approximately uniform heat radiation intensity is generated. A version of differential evolution algorithm programmed in Matlab development environment was created by the authors for the optimization process. For temperate calculations software system ANSYS was used. A practical example of optimization of heaters locations and calculation of the temperature of the mould is included at the end of the article.

  17. Heat mass transfer model of fouling process of calcium carbonate on heat transfer surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new heat mass transfer model was developed to predict the fouling process of calcium carbonate on heat transfer surface. The model took into account not only the crystallization fouling but also the particle fouling which was formed on the heat transfer surface by the suspension particles of calcium carbonate in the su- persaturated solution. Based on experimental results of the fouling process, the deposition and removal rates of the mixing fouling were expressed. Furthermore, the coupling effect of temperature with the fouling process was considered in the physics model. As a result the fouling resistance varying with time was obtained to describe the fouling process and the prediction was compared with experimental data under same conditions. The results showed that the present model could give a good prediction of fouling process, and the deviation was less than 15% of the experimental data in most cases. The new model is credible to predict the fouling process.

  18. Selective surface functionalization of silicon nanowires via nanoscale joule heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Inkyu; Li, Zhiyong; Pisano, Albert P; Williams, R Stanley

    2007-10-01

    In this letter, we report a novel approach to selectively functionalize the surface of silicon nanowires located on silicon-based substrates. This method is based upon highly localized nanoscale Joule heating along silicon nanowires under an applied electrical bias. Numerical simulation shows that a high-temperature (>800 K) with a large thermal gradient can be achieved by applying an appropriate electrical bias across silicon nanowires. This localized heating effect can be utilized to selectively ablate a protective polymer layer from a region of the chosen silicon nanowire. The exposed surface, with proper postprocessing, becomes available for surface functionalization with chemical linker molecules, such as 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilanes, while the surrounding area is still protected by the chemically inert polymer layer. This approach is successfully demonstrated on silicon nanowire arrays fabricated on SOI wafers and visualized by selective attachment of gold nanoparticles.

  19. Theoretical Prediction and Experimental Determination of Heating Time During High-Temperature Heat Treatment of Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Xin-you

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical prediction provides basic understanding and guidance to correctly implement a certaintechnology in the production process. The present study uses a differential equation to predict the heattransfer time between the surface and core layer of wood during the heat treatment, with applicability inestimating the duration of heat treatments at high temperatures. The obtained prediction was compared withthe result of an experimental study performed on Chinese poplar wood with various thicknesses (20, 40 and60mm. During this experiment, the time necessary for the core of wood to reach a temperature of 100°C,130°C and finally 180°C was monitored and the recorded values were compared with the predicted ones.The result of this comparison proved that the experimental values matched the theoretically predicted times,validating thus the applicability of the proposed equation as prediction tool.

  20. The Pacific sea surface temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglass, David H., E-mail: douglass@pas.rochester.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States)

    2011-12-05

    The Pacific sea surface temperature data contains two components: N{sub L}, a signal that exhibits the familiar El Niño/La Niña phenomenon and N{sub H}, a signal of one-year period. Analysis reveals: (1) The existence of an annual solar forcing F{sub S}; (2) N{sub H} is phase locked directly to F{sub S} while N{sub L} is frequently phase locked to the 2nd or 3rd subharmonic of F{sub S}. At least ten distinct subharmonic time segments of N{sub L} since 1870 are found. The beginning or end dates of these segments have a near one-to-one correspondence with the abrupt climate changes previously reported. Limited predictability is possible. -- Highlights: ► El Niño/La Niña consists of 2 components phase-locked to annual solar cycle. ► The first component N{sub L} is the familiar El Niño/La Niña effect. ► The second N{sub H} component has a period of 1 cycle/year. ► N{sub L} can be phase-locked to 2nd or 3rd subharmonic of annual cycle. ► Ends of phase-locked segments correspond to abrupt previously reported climate changes.

  1. Temperature dependence of electronic heat capacity in Holstein model

    CERN Document Server

    Fialko, N S; Lakhno, V D

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of charge migration was modeled to calculate temperature dependencies of its thermodynamic equilibrium values such as energy and electronic heat capacity in homogeneous adenine fragments. The energy varies from nearly polaron one at T~0 to midpoint of the conductivity band at high temperatures. The peak on the graph of electronic heat capacity is observed at the polaron decay temperature.

  2. Nanofluid flow and forced convection heat transfer over a stretching surface considering heat source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, M.; Valipour, P.; Shambooli, M.; Ayani, M.; Mirparizi, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, magnetic field effects on the forced convection flow of a nanofluid over a stretching surface in the presence of heat generation/absorption are studied. The equations of continuity, momentum and energy are transformed into ordinary differential equations and solved numerically using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme featuring the shooting technique. Different types of nanoparticles as copper (Cu), silver (Ag), alumina (Al2O3) and titania (TiO2) with water as their base fluid has been considered. The influence of significant parameters, such as magnetic parameter, volume fraction of the nanoparticles, heat generation/absorption parameter, velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are discussed. The results show that the values of temperature profiles increase with increasing heat generation/absorption and volume fraction of the nanoparticles but they decrease with increasing velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter. Also, it can be found that selecting silver as nanoparticle leads to the highest heat transfer enhancement.

  3. Exergy Transfer Characteristics on Low Temperature Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. Y.; Yuan, X. F.; Li, Y. R.; Peng, L.

    By analyzing exergy transfer process of the low temperature heat exchangers operating below the surrounding temperature, the concept of exergy transfer coefficient is put forward and the expressions which involving relevant variables for the exergy transfer coefficient, the heat transfer units number and the ratio of cold to hot fluids heat capacity rate, etc. are derived. Taking the parallel flow, counter flow and cross flow low temperature heat exchangers as examples, the numerical results of exergy transfer coefficient are given and the comparison of exergy transfer coefficient with heat transfer coefficient is analyzed.

  4. Analysis of the sensible heat flux from the exterior surface of buildings using time sequential thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyano, Akira; Asano, Kohichi; Kanamaru, Takehisa

    In this study, the distribution of surface temperature on the surface of two buildings having different characteristics was measured using a thermal infrared camera. Measurements were made in the summer, the period in Japan during which heat flux from buildings is of major interest, and again in the winter for comparison purposes. The heat characteristics of each building were obtained throughout the day by time-sequential thermography (TST), and the surface temperature of each physical element was classified according to temperature, shape, material and position. When the temperature of a surface could not be determined by an infrared camera mounted on the top of a building or a pole, temperature measurements were made using a hand-held IR camera. In addition, the sensible heat flux from each surface was calculated using TST and the surface area of each element as calculated from blueprints of the buildings.

  5. Model-based control of district heating supply temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarinen, Linn

    2010-11-15

    A model-based control strategy for the supply temperature to a district heating network was tested during three weeks at Idbaecken's CHP plant. The aim was to increase the electricity efficiency by a lower supply temperature, without risking the delivery reliability of heat to the district heating customers. Simulations and tests showed that at high loads, the mean supply temperature could be reduced by 4 deg C and the electricity production could be increased by 2.5%

  6. 渠道热量交换与冰盖表面温度的计算分析%The Calculation of Heat Exchange and Ice-Cover Upper Surface Temperature for a Canal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘孟凯; 王长德; 冯晓波; 管光华

    2011-01-01

    In order to accurately predict the ice condition of the Middle Route of South to North Water Diversion Project in winter, to ensure the safety of the canal system and to make sure that enough water transfers from the upstream to the downstream in winter, a comprehensive analysis of the calculations of heat exchange and the temperature regime of an ice cover upper surface is made in this paper. Then a method called Forced Border Conditions is proposed to get the temperature regime of ice cover upper surface. A simulation shows that accurate weather data and right method of temperature calculation of the ice cover are important to water conveyance for a canal system in winter.%为了精确计算预测南水北调中线工程冬季输水的冰情,进而确保冬季干渠安全定时定量输水,对热量交换计算和冰盖表面温度两个方面进行了分析,提出了通过强迫边界条件法求冰盖的表面温度.通过模拟表明,准确的气象资料、准确的冰盖表面温度的计算对渠道冰盖厚度的变化过程极其重要,将对渠道冰期输水的控制运行研究有重要意义.

  7. The impact of heat waves on surface urban heat island and local economy in Cluj-Napoca city, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbel, Ioana; Croitoru, Adina-Eliza; Rus, Adina Viorica; Roşca, Cristina Florina; Harpa, Gabriela Victoria; Ciupertea, Antoniu-Flavius; Rus, Ionuţ

    2017-07-01

    The association between heat waves and the urban heat island effect can increase the impact on environment and society inducing biophysical hazards. Heat stress and their associated public health problems are among the most frequent. This paper explores the heat waves impact on surface urban heat island and on the local economy loss during three heat periods in Cluj-Napoca city in the summer of 2015. The heat wave events were identified based on daily maximum temperature, and they were divided into three classes considering the intensity threshold: moderate heat waves (daily maximum temperature exceeding the 90th percentile), severe heat waves (daily maximum temperature over the 95th percentile), and extremely severe heat waves (daily maximum temperature exceeding the 98th percentile). The minimum length of an event was of minimum three consecutive days. The surface urban heat island was detected based on land surface temperature derived from Landsat 8 thermal infrared data, while the economic impact was estimated based on data on work force structure and work productivity in Cluj-Napoca derived from the data released by Eurostat, National Bank of Romania, and National Institute of Statistics. The results indicate that the intensity and spatial extension of surface urban heat island could be governed by the magnitude of the heat wave event, but due to the low number of satellite images available, we should consider this information only as preliminary results. Thermal infrared remote sensing has proven to be a very efficient method to study surface urban heat island, due to the fact that the synoptic conditions associated with heat wave events usually favor cloud free image. The resolution of the OLI_TIRS sensor provided good results for a mid-extension city, but the low revisiting time is still a drawback. The potential economic loss was calculated for the working days during heat waves and the estimated loss reached more than 2.5 mil. EUR for each heat wave day

  8. Surface temperature measurements of diamond

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available ) and the waist position (z0) 3. TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS There are many methods to measure the temperature of a body. Here we used a thermocou- ple and a pyrometer, while future plans involve emission spectroscopy. A thermocouple is a temperature... sensor that consists of two wires con- nected together made from different metals, which produces an electrical voltage that is dependant on tem- perature. A Newport electronic thermocou- ple was used to meas- ured temperature. It can measure...

  9. Surface tension and specific heat of liquid Ni70.2Si29.8 alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Haipeng; WEI Bingbo

    2005-01-01

    The surface tension and specific heat of stable and metastable liquid Ni70.2Si29.8 eutectic alloy were measured by electromagnetic levitation oscillating drop method and drop calorimetry. The surface tension depends on temperature linearly within the experimental undercooling regime of 0-182 K (0.12 TE). Its value is 1.693 N·m-1 at the eutectic temperature of 1488 K, and the temperature coefficient is -4.23×10-4 N·m-1·K-1. For the specific heat measurement, the maximum undercooling is up to 253 K (0.17 TE). The specific heat is determined as a polynomial function of temperature in the experimental temperature regime. On the basis of the measured data of surface tension and specific heat, the temperature-dependent density, excess volume and sound speed of liquid Ni70.2Si29.8 alloy are predicted theoretically.

  10. Human local and total heat losses in different temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijuan; Yin, Hui; Di, Yuhui; Liu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jiaping

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the effects of operative temperature on the local and total heat losses, and the relationship between the heat loss and thermal sensation. 10 local parts of head, neck, chest, abdomen, upper arm, forearm, hand, thigh, leg and foot are selected. In all these parts, convection, radiation, evaporation, respiration, conduction and diffusion heat losses are analyzed when operative temperature is 23, 28, 33 and 37 °C. The local heat losses show that the radiation and convection heat losses are mainly affected by the area of local body, and the heat loss of the thigh is the most in the ten parts. The evaporation heat loss is mainly affected by the distribution of sweat gland, and the heat loss of the chest is the most. The total heat loss of the local body shows that in low temperature, the thigh, leg and chest have much heat loss, while in high temperature, the chest, abdomen, thigh and head have great heat loss, which are useful for clothing design. The heat losses of the whole body show that as the operative temperature increases, the radiation and convection heat losses decrease, the heat losses of conduction, respiration, and diffusion are almost constant, and the evaporation heat loss increases. By comparison, the heat loss ratios of the radiation, convection and sweat evaporation, are in agreement with the previous researches. At last, the formula about the heat loss ratio of convection and radiation is derived. It's useful for thermal comfort evaluation and HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) design. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Exergy and Energy Analysis of Low Temperature District Heating Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hongwei; Svendsen, Svend

    Low temperature district heating (LTDH) with reduced network supply and return temperature provides better match of the low quality building thermal demand and the low quality waste heat supply. In this paper, an exemplary LTDH network was designed for 30 low energy demand residential houses, which...... is in line with a pilot project that is carrying out in Denmark with network supply/return temperature at 55oC/25 oC. The consumer domestic hot water (DHW) demand is supplied with a special designed district heating (DH) storage tank. The space heating (SH) demand is supplied with a low temperature radiator...

  12. Heat pipes for spacecraft temperature control: Their usefulness and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollendorf, S.; Stipandic, E.

    1972-01-01

    Heat pipes are used in spacecraft to equalize the temperature of structures and maintain temperature control of electronic components. Information is provided for a designer on: (1) a typical mounting technique, (2) choices available in wick geometries and fluids, (3) tests involved in flight-qualifying the design, and (4) heat pipe limitations. An evaluation of several heat pipe designs showed that the behavior of heat pipes at room temperature does not necessarily correlate with the classic equations used to predict their performance. They are sensitive to such parameters as temperature, fluid inventory, orientation, and noncondensable gases.

  13. Pressure Controlled Heat Pipe for Precise Temperature Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research project will develop Pressure Controlled Heat Pipes (PCHPs) for precise temperature control (milli-Kelvin level). Several...

  14. 扁管翅片换热器肋侧换热系数定义用特征温度%The Characteristic Temperature in the Definition of the Heat Transfer Coefficient on the Fin Side Surface of a Flat Tube Bank Fin Heat Exchanger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚玉换; 王良璧

    2012-01-01

    为了获得换热器肋侧换热系数定义用比较普适的特征温度,采用分区求解、边界耦合方法与非耦合方法对扁管翅片式换热器三雏模型的流动与传热性能进行了数值模拟,得到了换热器在不同肋片材料和不同雷诺数下用不同特征温度定义肋侧换热系数的区别,并将数值结果与实验结果进行比较.结果表明:当特征温度不同时,肋侧换热系数数值结果不同;当Re小于1000和用非耦合计算时,与实验值吻合最好的是以流动进出口平均温度为特征温度的数值结果;而Re大于1000后,耦合计算时以流动进出口平均温度为特征温度数值结果与实验值更靠近.%To obtain an appropriate characteristic temperature in the definition of the fin side surface heat transfer coefficient, flow and heat transfer characteristics of a flat tube bank fin heat exchanger are simulated by coupled and non-coupled numerical methods. Heat transfer coefficient of the fin side surface under different materials and Reynolds numbers is obtained. The numerical results obtained by two algorithms are compared with experimental data. It shows that the fin side surface heat transfer coefficient is different if the characteristic temperature is selected differently. The numerical result using the average temperature of the fin side fluid as the characteristic temperature agrees well with the experimental results when Re is less than 1 000 and the non-coupled method is adopted. The results are the same when Re is larger than 1 000 and the coupled method is used.

  15. Influence of the convective surface transfer coefficients on the Heat, Air, and Moisture (HAM) building performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steskens, Paul Wilhelmus Maria Hermanus; Janssen, Hans; Rode, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    HAM conditions. The paper focuses on the influence of the interior surface heat and moisture transfer coefficients, and investigates its effect on the hygrothermal performance. The parameter study showed that the magnitude of the convective surface transfer coefficients have a relatively large......Current models to predict heat, air and moisture (HAM) conditions in buildings assume constant boundary conditions for the temperature and relative humidity of the neighbouring air and for the surface heat and moisture transfer coefficients. These assumptions may introduce errors in the predicted...... influence on the predicted hygrothermal conditions at the surface of a building component and on the heat and vapour exchange with the indoor environment....

  16. Role of radiogenic heat generation in surface heat flow formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khutorskoi, M. D.; Polyak, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    Heat generation due to decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes is considered in the Earth's crust of the Archean-Proterozoic and Paleozoic provinces of Eurasia and North America. The heat flow that forms in the mantle is calculated as the difference between the heat flow observed at the boundary of the solid Earth and radiogenic heat flow produced in the crust. The heat regime in regions with anomalously high radiogenic heat generation is discussed. The relationship between various heat flow components in the Precambrian and Phanerozoic provinces has been comparatively analyzed, and the role of erosion of the surfaceheat- generating layer has been estimated.

  17. Vapor bubble evolution on a heated surface containing open microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Christopher J.; Glezer, Ari; Smith, Marc K.

    2011-11-01

    Power electronics require cooling technologies capable of high heat fluxes at or below the operating temperatures of these devices. Boiling heat transfer is an effective choice for such cooling, but it is limited by the critical heat flux (CHF), which is typically near 125 W/cm2 for pool boiling of water on a flat plate at standard pressure and gravity. One method of increasing CHF is to incorporate an array of microchannels into the heated surface. Microchannels have been experimentally shown to improve CHF, and the goal of this study is to determine the primary mechanisms associated with the microchannels that allow for the increased CHF. While the use of various microstructures is not new, the emphasis of previous work has been on heat transfer aspects, as opposed to the fluid dynamics inside and in the vicinity of the microchannels. This work considers the non-isothermal fluid motion during bubble growth and departure by varying channel geometry, spacing, and heat flux input using a level-set method including vaporization and condensation. These results and the study of the underlying mechanisms will aid in the design optimization of microchannel-based cooling devices. Supported by ONR.

  18. Thermal response to the surface heat flux in a macrotidal coastal region (Nuevo Gulf, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Andrés L.; Pisoni, Juan P.; Dellatorre, Fernando G.

    2016-07-01

    At mid-latitudes, sea water temperature shows a strong seasonal cycle forced by the incident surface heat flux. As depth decreases, the heat flux incidence is damped by the horizontal flux, which prevents the indefinite growth of the seasonal temperature range. In the present work, cross-shore transport in the west coast of Nuevo Gulf (Argentina) was analyzed. Processes tending to cool the coastal waters in summer and to warm the coastal waters in winter, were identified through temperature measurements, surface heat flux and tidal height. The simplified models proposed here provide a feedback mechanism that links changes in surface heat flux with changes in the horizontal heat flux during both seasons. On shorter time scales, tide produces significant variations in the height of the water column, therefore influencing temperature fluctuations and the direction of the horizontal flow.

  19. Dry heat exposures of surface exposed and embedded Bacillus spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Wayne

    Dry heat microbial reduction (DHMR) is the primary technique used to reduce the microbial load of spacecraft and component parts. Often, manufacturing procedures require heating flight hardware to high temperatures for purposes other than planetary protection DHMR. The existing specifications, however, do not allow for additional planetary protection bioburden reduction credit if the hardware is exposed without controlled relative humidity. The intent of this study was to provide adequate data on the DHMR technique to support modification of four aspects of current requirements; expansion of acceptable time and temperature combinations used for spacecraft dry heat microbial reduction processes above 125° C, determining the effect that humidity has on spore lethality as a function of temperature, understanding the lethality for spores with exceptionally high thermal resistance and to investigate the extended exposure requirement for materials that might contain embedded microorganisms. Spores from two bacterial species were tested, B. atrophaeus ATCC 9372 and B. sp. ATCC 29669, under three conditions encompassing 5 temperature points. Embedded experiments utilized a silicone rubber polymer that is commonly used on robotic spacecraft, and surface exposed experiments were performed under both ambient and vacuum-controlled humidity conditions. The results obtained support the use of DHMR protocols that extend the maximum temperature range from 125° C to 170° C, with either controlled or ambient humidity. If implemented, this will give projects bioburden reduction credit for shorter treatments at extended temperatures, and allow spacecraft to be processed in more readily available and less expensive facilities that do not have humidity control, with significant cost and schedule benefits. The study also demonstrated that the required heating time for materials presumed to have embedded bioburden is conservative.

  20. Modelling global fresh surface water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, L.P.H. van; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, M.T.H. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature directly determines a range of water physical properties including vapour pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, and the solubility of oxygen and other gases. Indirectly water temperature acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing sediment

  1. Modelling global fresh surface water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, L.P.H. van; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, M.T.H. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature directly determines a range of water physical properties including vapour pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, and the solubility of oxygen and other gases. Indirectly water temperature acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing sediment concentrati

  2. Piston surface heat transfer during combustion in large marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    In the design process of large marine diesel engines information on the maximum heat load on the piston surface experienced during the engine cycle is an important parameter. The peak heat load occurs during combustion when hot combustion products impinge on the piston surface. Although the maximum...... with burning off piston surface material. In this work the peak heat load on the piston surface of large marine diesel engines during combustion was investigated. Measurements of the instantaneous surface temperature and surface heat flux on pistons in large marine engines are difficult due to expensive...... was calculated under different conditions in the numerical setup in order to obtain information of the actual peak heat flux experienced at the piston in large marine diesel engines during combustion. The variation of physical parameters influencing the heat transfer during combustion included a variation...

  3. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Low-temperature colossal supersaturation (LTCSS) is a novel surface hardening method for carburization of austenitic stainless steels (SS) without the precipitation of carbides. The formation of carbides is kinetically suppressed, enabling extremely high or colossal carbon supersaturation. As a result, surface carbon concentrations in excess of 12 at. % are routinely achieved. This treatment increases the surface hardness by a factor of four to five, improving resistance to wear, corrosion, and fatigue, with significant retained ductility. LTCSS is a diffusional surface hardening process that provides a uniform and conformal hardened gradient surface with no risk of delamination or peeling. The treatment retains the austenitic phase and is completely non-magnetic. In addition, because parts are treated at low temperature, they do not distort or change dimensions. During this treatment, carbon diffusion proceeds into the metal at temperatures that constrain substitutional diffusion or mobility between the metal alloy elements. Though immobilized and unable to assemble to form carbides, chromium and similar alloying elements nonetheless draw enormous amounts of carbon into their interstitial spaces. The carbon in the interstitial spaces of the alloy crystals makes the surface harder than ever achieved before by more conventional heat treating or diffusion process. The carbon solid solution manifests a Vickers hardness often exceeding 1000 HV (equivalent to 70 HRC). This project objective was to extend the LTCSS treatment to other austenitic alloys, and to quantify improvements in fatigue, corrosion, and wear resistance. Highlights from the research include the following: • Extension of the applicability of the LTCSS process to a broad range of austenitic and duplex grades of steels • Demonstration of LTCSS ability for a variety of different component shapes and sizes • Detailed microstructural characterization of LTCSS-treated samples of 316L and other alloys

  4. Enhanced convective and film boiling heat transfer by surface gas injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M.R.; Greene, G.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Irvine, T.F., Jr. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-04-01

    Heat transfer measurements were made for stable film boiling of water over a horizontal, flat stainless steel plate from the minimum film boiling point temperature, T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}500K, to T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}950K. The pressure at the plate was approximately 1 atmosphere and the temperature of the water pool was maintained at saturation. The data were compared to the Berenson film-boiling model, which was developed for minimum film-boiling-point conditions. The model accurately represented the data near the minimum film-boiling point and at the highest temperatures measured, as long it was corrected for the heat transferred by radiation. On the average, the experimental data lay within {plus minus}7% of the model. Measurements of heat transfer were made without film boiling for nitrogen jetting into an overlying pool of water from nine 1-mm- diameter holes, drilled in the heat transfer plate. The heat flux was maintained constant at approximately 26.4 kW/m{sup 2}. For water-pool heights of less than 6cm the heat transfer coefficient deceased linearly with a decrease in heights. Above 6cm the heat transfer coefficient was unaffected. For the entire range of gas velocities measured (0 to 8.5 cm/s), the magnitude of the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient only changed by approximately 20%. The heat transfer data bound the Konsetov model for turbulent pool heat transfer which was developed for vertical heat transfer surfaces. This agreement suggests that surface orientation may not be important when the gas jets do not locally affect the surface heat transfer. Finally, a database was developed for heat transfer from the plate with both film boiling and gas jetting occurring simultaneously, in a pool of water maintained at its saturation temperature. The effect of passing nitrogen through established film boiling is to increase the heat transfer from that surface. 60 refs.

  5. Enhanced convective and film boiling heat transfer by surface gas injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M.R.; Greene, G.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Irvine, T.F., Jr. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1992-04-01

    Heat transfer measurements were made for stable film boiling of water over a horizontal, flat stainless steel plate from the minimum film boiling point temperature, T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}500K, to T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}950K. The pressure at the plate was approximately 1 atmosphere and the temperature of the water pool was maintained at saturation. The data were compared to the Berenson film-boiling model, which was developed for minimum film-boiling-point conditions. The model accurately represented the data near the minimum film-boiling point and at the highest temperatures measured, as long it was corrected for the heat transferred by radiation. On the average, the experimental data lay within {plus_minus}7% of the model. Measurements of heat transfer were made without film boiling for nitrogen jetting into an overlying pool of water from nine 1-mm- diameter holes, drilled in the heat transfer plate. The heat flux was maintained constant at approximately 26.4 kW/m{sup 2}. For water-pool heights of less than 6cm the heat transfer coefficient deceased linearly with a decrease in heights. Above 6cm the heat transfer coefficient was unaffected. For the entire range of gas velocities measured [0 to 8.5 cm/s], the magnitude of the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient only changed by approximately 20%. The heat transfer data bound the Konsetov model for turbulent pool heat transfer which was developed for vertical heat transfer surfaces. This agreement suggests that surface orientation may not be important when the gas jets do not locally affect the surface heat transfer. Finally, a database was developed for heat transfer from the plate with both film boiling and gas jetting occurring simultaneously, in a pool of water maintained at its saturation temperature. The effect of passing nitrogen through established film boiling is to increase the heat transfer from that surface. 60 refs.

  6. Influence of the ambient temperature during heat pipe manufacturing on its function and heat transport ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čaja A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Heat pipe is heat transfer device working at a minimum temperature difference of evaporator and condenser. Operating temperature of the heat pipe determine by properties of the working substance and pressure achieved during production. The contribution is focused on the determining the effect of the initial surrounding temperature where the heat pipe is manufactured and on the obtaining performance characteristics produced heat pipes in dependence of manufacturing temperature. Generally hold, that the boiling point of the working liquid decrease with decreasing ambient pressure. Based on this can be suppose that producing of lower ambient temperature during heat pipe manufacturing, will create the lower pressure, the boiling point of the working fluid will lower too and the heat pipe should be better performance characteristics.

  7. Insoluble coatings for Stirling engine heat pipe condenser surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussinger, Peter M.

    1993-01-01

    The work done by Thermacore, Inc., Lancaster, Pennsylvania, for the Phase 1, 1992 SBIR National Aeronautics and Space Administration Contract, 'Insoluble Coatings for Stirling Engine Heat Pipe Condenser Surfaces' is described. The work was performed between January 1992 and July 1992. Stirling heat engines are being developed for electrical power generation use on manned and unmanned earth orbital and planetary missions. Dish Stirling solar systems and nuclear reactor Stirling systems are two of the most promising applications of the Stirling engine electrical power generation technology. The sources of thermal energy used to drive the Stirling engine typically are non-uniform in temperature and heat flux. Liquid metal heat pipe receivers are used as thermal transformers and isothermalizers to deliver the thermal energy at a uniform high temperature to the heat input section of the Stirling engine. The use of a heat pipe receiver greatly enhances system efficiency and potential life span. One issue that is raised during the design phase of heat pipe receivers is the potential solubility corrosion of the Stirling engine heat input section by the liquid metal working fluid. This Phase 1 effort initiated a program to evaluate and demonstrate coatings, applied to nickel based Stirling engine heater head materials, that are practically 'insoluble' in sodium, potassium, and NaK. This program initiated a study of nickel aluminide as a coating and developed and demonstrated a heat pipe test vehicle that can be used to test candidate materials and coatings. Nickel 200 and nickel aluminide coated Nickel 200 were tested for 1000 hours at 800 C at a condensation heat flux of 25 W/sq cm. Subsequent analyses of the samples showed no visible sign of solubility corrosion of either coated or uncoated samples. The analysis technique, photomicrographs at 200X, has a resolution of better than 2.5 microns (.0001 in). The results indicate that the heat pipe environment is not directly

  8. Insoluble coatings for Stirling engine heat pipe condenser surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussinger, Peter M.

    1993-09-01

    The work done by Thermacore, Inc., Lancaster, Pennsylvania, for the Phase 1, 1992 SBIR National Aeronautics and Space Administration Contract, 'Insoluble Coatings for Stirling Engine Heat Pipe Condenser Surfaces' is described. The work was performed between January 1992 and July 1992. Stirling heat engines are being developed for electrical power generation use on manned and unmanned earth orbital and planetary missions. Dish Stirling solar systems and nuclear reactor Stirling systems are two of the most promising applications of the Stirling engine electrical power generation technology. The sources of thermal energy used to drive the Stirling engine typically are non-uniform in temperature and heat flux. Liquid metal heat pipe receivers are used as thermal transformers and isothermalizers to deliver the thermal energy at a uniform high temperature to the heat input section of the Stirling engine. The use of a heat pipe receiver greatly enhances system efficiency and potential life span. One issue that is raised during the design phase of heat pipe receivers is the potential solubility corrosion of the Stirling engine heat input section by the liquid metal working fluid. This Phase 1 effort initiated a program to evaluate and demonstrate coatings, applied to nickel based Stirling engine heater head materials, that are practically 'insoluble' in sodium, potassium, and NaK. This program initiated a study of nickel aluminide as a coating and developed and demonstrated a heat pipe test vehicle that can be used to test candidate materials and coatings. Nickel 200 and nickel aluminide coated Nickel 200 were tested for 1000 hours at 800 C at a condensation heat flux of 25 W/sq cm. Subsequent analyses of the samples showed no visible sign of solubility corrosion of either coated or uncoated samples. The analysis technique, photomicrographs at 200X, has a resolution of better than 2.5 microns (.0001 in). The results indicate that the heat pipe environment is not directly

  9. Efficient air-water heat pumps for high temperature lift residential heating, including oil migration aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Zehnder, Michele; Favrat, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents a system approach with the aim to develop improved concepts for small capacity, high temperature lift air-water heat pumps. These are intended to replace fuel fired heating systems in the residential sector, which leads to a major reduction of the local greenhouse gas emissions. Unfavorable temperature conditions set by the existing heat distribution systems and by the use of atmospheric air, as the only accessible heat source, have to be overcome. The proposed concepts a...

  10. Investigation into flow boiling heat transfer in a minichannel with enhanced heating surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piasecka Magdalena

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of flow boiling in a minichannel of 1.0 mm depth. The heating element for the working fluid (FC-72 that flows along the minichannel is a single-sided enhanced alloy foil made from Haynes-230. Microrecesses were formed on the selected area of the heating foil by laser technology. The observations of the flow structure were carried out through a piece of glass. Simultaneously, owing to the liquid crystal layer placed on the opposite side of the enhanced foil surface, it was possible to measure temperature distribution on the heating wall through another piece of glass. The experimental research has been focused on the transition from single phase forced convection to nucleate boiling, i.e. the zone of boiling incipience and further development of boiling. The objective of the paper is determining of the void fraction for some cross-sections of selected images for increasing heat fluxes supplied to the heating surface. The flow structure photos were processed in Corel graphics software and binarized. The analysis of phase volumes was developed in Techystem Globe software.

  11. The modeling of heat affected zone (HAZ in submerged arc welding (SAW surfacing steel element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Winczek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the work the bimodal heat source model in the description of the temperature field is presented. The electric arc was treated physically as one heat source, whose heat was divided: part of the heat is transferred by the direct impact of the electric arc, but another part of the heat is transferred to the weld by the melted material of the electrode. Computations of the temperature field during SAW surfacing of S355 steel element are carried out. The macrographic and metallographic analysis of the weld confirmed the depth and shapes of the fusion line and HAZ defined by the numerical simulation.

  12. Numerical thermal analysis of water's boiling heat transfer based on a turbulent jet impingement on heated surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toghraie, D.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a numerical method for simulation of flow boiling through subcooled jet on a hot surface with 800 °C has been presented. Volume fraction (VOF) has been used to simulate boiling heat transfer and investigation of the quench phenomena through fluid jet on a hot horizontal surface. Simulation has been done in a fixed Tsub=55 °C, Re=5000 to Re=50,000 and also in different Tsub =Tsat -Tf between 10 °C and 95 °C. The effect of fluid jet velocity and subcooled temperature on the rewetting temperature, wet zone propagation, cooling rate and maximum heat flux has been investigated. The results of this study show that by increasing the velocity of fluid jet of water, convective heat transfer coefficient at stagnation point increases. More ever, by decreasing the temperature of the fluid jet, convective heat transfer coefficient increases.

  13. Very low temperature specific heat of Al 5056

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barucci, M. [INFN, Section of Florence, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Florence, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Ligi, C. [INFN -Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, I 00044 Frascati (Italy); Lolli, L. [INFN, Section of Florence, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Florence, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Marini, A. [INFN - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, I 00044 Frascati (Italy); Martelli, V., E-mail: martelliv@fi.infn.i [INFN, Section of Florence, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); LENS, University of Florence, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Risegari, L.; Ventura, G. [INFN, Section of Florence, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Florence, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    The transition temperature from normal to superconducting state and the specific heat of Al 5056 aluminium alloy in the 0.1-3.6K temperature range have been measured. This alloy is largely used in resonant detectors of gravitational waves. A comparison with specific heat data of the same material obtained by different measuring methods is given.

  14. Heat index and adjusted temperature as surrogates for wet bulb globe temperature to screen for occupational heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Thomas E; Iheanacho, Ivory

    2015-01-01

    Ambient temperature and relative humidity are readily ava-ilable and thus tempting metrics for heat stress assessment. Two methods of using air temperature and relative humidity to create an index are Heat Index and Adjusted Temperature. The purposes of this article are: (1) to examine how well Heat Index and Adjusted Temperature estimated the wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index, and (2) to suggest how Heat Index and Adjusted Temperature can be used to screen for heat stress level. Psychrometric relationships were used to estimate values of actual WBGT for conditions of air temperature, relative humidity, and radiant heat at an air speed of 0.5 m/s. A relationship between Heat Index [°F] and WBGT [°C] was described by WBGT = -0.0034 HI(2) + 0.96 HI - 34. At lower Heat Index values, the equation estimated WBGTs that were ± 2 °C-WBGT around the actual value, and to about ± 0.5 °C-WBGT for Heat Index values > 100 °F. A relationship between Adjusted Temperature [°F] and WBGT [°C] was described by WBGT = 0.45 Tadj - 16. The actual WBGT was between 1 °C-WBGT below the estimated value and 1.4 °C-WBGT above. That is, there was a slight bias toward overestimating WBGT from Adjusted Temperature. Heat stress screening tables were constructed for metabolic rates of 180, 300, and 450 W. The screening decisions were divided into four categories: (1) exposure limit at rest. The authors do not recommend using Heat Index or Adjusted Temperature instead of WBGT, but they may be used to screen for circumstances when a more detailed analysis using WBGT is appropriate. A particular weakness is accounting for radiant heat; and neither air speed nor clothing was considered.

  15. Moving-Temperature-Gradient Heat-Pipe Furnace Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.; Gernert, Nelson J.

    1993-01-01

    In improved apparatus, ampoule of material directionally solidified mounted in central hole of annular heat pipe, at suitable axial position between heated and cooled ends. Heated end held in fixed position in single-element furnace; other end left in ambient air or else actively cooled. Gradient of temperature made to move along heat pipe by changing pressure of noncondensable gas. In comparison with prior crystal-growing apparatuses, this one simpler, smaller, and more efficient.

  16. Carbon dioxide heat pump for dual-temperature drinking fountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨大章; 吕静; 何哲彬; 黄秀芝

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide trans-critical heat pump system for heating and cooling water was designed,and its thermodynamic steady-state concentration model was established. Based on the steady-state model,parameters of the carbon dioxide trans-critical heat pump were calculated by computer programming. According to these parameters,the effects and application prospect of the heat pump system were analyzed for dual-temperature drinking fountains.

  17. Differences between laminar convections through parallel plain planes with uniform wall temperature and heat flux in terms of process parameter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Using the process parameter description,we analyzed the difference between the characteristics of laminar convections through parallel plain planes with uniform temperature and heat flux.The results show the following.(1)On the wall surface of the developing region,under uniform heat flux boundary condition,the heat flux normal to the wall surface is transported through a convection process although the velocity is zero;the velocity gradient contributes to this transport,but under uniform temperature boundary condition,the heat flux normal to the wall surface is transported through a difussion process.(2)Inside the flow of the developing region,whether under uniform temperature or heat flux boundary condition,the heat flux along the main flow direction and the heat flux normal to the wall surface are transported through a convection process,and the contributions of velocity and velocity gradient are dependent on the thermal boundary condition.(3)On the wall surface of the fully developed region,under uniform heat flux boundary condition,the heat flux normal to the wall surface is transported through a convection process;the velocity gradient contributes to this transport,but under uniform temperature boundary condition,the heat flux normal to the wall surface is transported through a diffusion process.(4)Inside the flow of the fully developed region,under uniform temperature boundary condition,the heat flux along the main flow direction and the heat flux normal to the wall surface are transported through a convection process,and the velocity and velocity gradient contribute to these transports;under uniform heat flux boundary condition,the heat flux along the main flow direction and the heat flux normal to the wall surface are transported through a convection process.Furthermore,the transport of the heat flux along the main flow direction is a no-net convection process;the velocity gradient contributes to the transport of the heat flux only in the normal direction

  18. Non-invasive, transient determination of the core temperature of a heat-generating solid body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Dean; Sarkar, Daipayan; Jain, Ankur

    2016-11-01

    While temperature on the surface of a heat-generating solid body can be easily measured using a variety of methods, very few techniques exist for non-invasively measuring the temperature inside the solid body as a function of time. Measurement of internal temperature is very desirable since measurement of just the surface temperature gives no indication of temperature inside the body, and system performance and safety is governed primarily by the highest temperature, encountered usually at the core of the body. This paper presents a technique to non-invasively determine the internal temperature based on the theoretical relationship between the core temperature and surface temperature distribution on the outside of a heat-generating solid body as functions of time. Experiments using infrared thermography of the outside surface of a thermal test cell in a variety of heating and cooling conditions demonstrate good agreement of the predicted core temperature as a function of time with actual core temperature measurement using an embedded thermocouple. This paper demonstrates a capability to thermally probe inside solid bodies in a non-invasive fashion. This directly benefits the accurate performance prediction and control of a variety of engineering systems where the time-varying core temperature plays a key role.

  19. Non-invasive, transient determination of the core temperature of a heat-generating solid body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Dean; Sarkar, Daipayan; Jain, Ankur

    2016-11-02

    While temperature on the surface of a heat-generating solid body can be easily measured using a variety of methods, very few techniques exist for non-invasively measuring the temperature inside the solid body as a function of time. Measurement of internal temperature is very desirable since measurement of just the surface temperature gives no indication of temperature inside the body, and system performance and safety is governed primarily by the highest temperature, encountered usually at the core of the body. This paper presents a technique to non-invasively determine the internal temperature based on the theoretical relationship between the core temperature and surface temperature distribution on the outside of a heat-generating solid body as functions of time. Experiments using infrared thermography of the outside surface of a thermal test cell in a variety of heating and cooling conditions demonstrate good agreement of the predicted core temperature as a function of time with actual core temperature measurement using an embedded thermocouple. This paper demonstrates a capability to thermally probe inside solid bodies in a non-invasive fashion. This directly benefits the accurate performance prediction and control of a variety of engineering systems where the time-varying core temperature plays a key role.

  20. Temperature Assessment of Heating Stage for a Thermoforming Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Ghazali, F. A.; Ahmad, M. N.; Rahim, M. F. Ab; Jaafar, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Thermoforming is a well-known manufacturing process in the productions of various plastic household and industrial solutions. The heating of a plastic sheet allows the plastic to soften and within its forming window temperature the sheet can replicate a required shape when pressed against a mould. Hence, the heating process is an important thermoforming stage that determine uniformity of the material distribution. This article proposed an experimental approach to investigate the thermal characteristics of the heating section of a low cost thermoforming equipment designed for teaching and research purposes. The temperatures of air and a model of a stretched heated plastic sheet were measured and analysed. The experimental data indicates that the spatial temperatures distribution was not localised and the temperature history of the infrared heating agrees well with those given by fast response thermocouples. The findings suggest that the spatial uniformity of temperature can be reasonably evaluated by using the proposed method.

  1. Effect of radiant heat on the surface hardness of glass polyalkenoate (ionomer) cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, M J

    1994-12-01

    The use of heat to improve mechanical properties of materials is a widely accepted phenomenon. It has been studied in dentistry with a view to improving the properties of resin composite. Dental cements may benefit by the application of heat, in particular with regard to their early surface properties. This study was carried out to examine the effect of the application of radiant heat to the surface hardness of one type of glass polyalkenoate cement. It was found that raising the temperature of the surface of the cement to a maximum of 60 degrees C significantly improved the early surface hardness of the material. The application of a high level of heat also improved the surface hardness of the cement after 24 h compared to cement which had not been heat treated. The use of heat would appear to accelerate the matrix-forming reaction of the material and although further work is necessary this technique may have clinical application.

  2. High thermal power density heat transfer apparatus providing electrical isolation at high temperature using heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    This invention is directed to transferring heat from an extremely high temperature source to an electrically isolated lower temperature receiver. The invention is particularly concerned with supplying thermal power to a thermionic converter from a nuclear reactor with electric isolation. Heat from a high temperature heat pipe is transferred through a vacuum or a gap filled with electrically nonconducting gas to a cooler heat pipe. If the receiver requires gratr thermal power density, geometries are used with larger heat pipe areas for transmitting and receiving energy than the area for conducting the heat to the thermionic converter. In this way the heat pipe capability for increasing thermal power densities compensates for the comparative low thermal power densities through the electrically nonconducting gap between the two heat pipes.

  3. The invasion of non-native grasses into California grasslands has caused a shift in energy partitioning between latent and sensible heat flux, reduced albedo and higher surface temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koteen, L. E.; Harte, J.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2012-12-01

    of latent to sensible heat flux is higher where native perennial grasses are found, particularly in wet years. Annual sums of total evaporation are likewise higher in native-dominated regions, and soil moisture is lower relative to non-natives in the deep soil. We also found that PAR albedo is lower in native grasslands compared to non-natives during significant portions of the year, and corresponding to the hotter months. In all, our findings indicate that the non-native annual grasses which now dominate California grasslands, promote conditions that support higher surface temperatures relative to native perennial grasses.

  4. Heat transfer capability simulation of high-temperature heat pipe in supersonic vehicle leading edge applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghuan Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A numerical method is proposed to determine the heat transfer capability of the high-temperature heat pipe and the stagnation temperature with supersonic vehicle leading edge applications. The finite element method is employed here to perform the temperature field simulation. Without considering the heat transfer limitations of the heat pipe, such as capillary limit and sonic limit, both numerical and experimental results indicate that equivalent high thermal conductivity method is a reasonable way to simulate the heat transfer capability of the high-temperature heat pipe in preliminary design of a heat-pipe-cooled leading edge. Several important parameters’ effects on the thermal protection performance are also numerically investigated.

  5. Fiber-Optic Surface Temperature Sensor Based on Modal Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Musin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatially-integrated surface temperature sensing is highly useful when it comes to controlling processes, detecting hazardous conditions or monitoring the health and safety of equipment and people. Fiber-optic sensing based on modal interference has shown great sensitivity to temperature variation, by means of cost-effective image-processing of few-mode interference patterns. New developments in the field of sensor configuration, as described in this paper, include an innovative cooling and heating phase discrimination functionality and more precise measurements, based entirely on the image processing of interference patterns. The proposed technique was applied to the measurement of the integrated surface temperature of a hollow cylinder and compared with a conventional measurement system, consisting of an infrared camera and precision temperature probe. As a result, the optical technique is in line with the reference system. Compared with conventional surface temperature probes, the optical technique has the following advantages: low heat capacity temperature measurement errors, easier spatial deployment, and replacement of multiple angle infrared camera shooting and the continuous monitoring of surfaces that are not visually accessible.

  6. Effect of foam on temperature prediction and heat recovery potential from biological wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbala-Robles, L; Volcke, E I P; Samijn, A; Ronsse, F; Pieters, J G

    2016-05-15

    Heat is an important resource in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) which can be recovered. A prerequisite to determine the theoretical heat recovery potential is an accurate heat balance model for temperature prediction. The insulating effect of foam present on the basin surface and its influence on temperature prediction were assessed in this study. Experiments were carried out to characterize the foam layer and its insulating properties. A refined dynamic temperature prediction model, taking into account the effect of foam, was set up. Simulation studies for a WWTP treating highly concentrated (manure) wastewater revealed that the foam layer had a significant effect on temperature prediction (3.8 ± 0.7 K over the year) and thus on the theoretical heat recovery potential (30% reduction when foam is not considered). Seasonal effects on the individual heat losses and heat gains were assessed. Additionally, the effects of the critical basin temperature above which heat is recovered, foam thickness, surface evaporation rate reduction and the non-absorbed solar radiation on the theoretical heat recovery potential were evaluated.

  7. Temperature Approach Optimization in the Double Pipe Heat Exchanger with Groove

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunu Putu Wijaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer in double pipe heat exchanger with circumference-rectangular grooves has been investigated experimentally. The volume flowrate of cold and hot water were varied to determine its influence on the approach temperature of the outlet terminals. In this experimental design, the grooves were incised in annular room that is placed on the outside surface of the inner pipe. The shell diameter is 38.1 mm and tube diameter 19.4 mm with 1 m length, which is made of aluminum. The flow pattern of the two fluids in the heat exchanger is a parallel flow. The working fluid is water with volume flow rate of 27.1, 23.8 and 19.8 l/minute. The temperature of water on the inlet terminals are 50±1°C for hot stream and 30±1°C for cold stream. Temperature measurements conducted on each terminal of the inlet and outlet heat exchanger. The results showed that the grooves induced the approach temperature. The change of the approach temperature from the grooves compared to that of without grooves decreased by 37.9%. This phenomenon indicates an increase in heat transfer process and performance of the heat exchanger. Groove improves the heat surface area of the inner pipe, increasing the momentum transfer and in the other hand, reducing the weight of heat exchangers itself.

  8. A Variational Method for Estimating Near-Surface Soil Moisture and Surface Heat Fluxes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shuwen; ZHANG Weidong; QIU Chongjian

    2007-01-01

    A variational data assimilation method is proposed to estimate the near-surface soil moisture and surface sensible and latent heat fluxes. The method merges the five parts into a cost function, I.e., the differences of wind, potential temperature, and specific humidity gradient between observations and those computed by the profile method, the difference of latent heat fluxes calculated using the ECMWF land surface evaporation scheme and the profile method, and a weak constraint for surface energy balance. By using an optimal algorithm, the best solutions are found. The method is tested with the data collected at Feixi Station (31.41°N, 117.08°E) supported by the China Heavy Rain Experiment and Study (HeRES) during 7-30 June 2001. The results show that estimated near-surface soil moistures can quickly respond to rainfall, and their temporal variation is consistent with that of measurements of average soil moisture over 15-cm top depth with a maximum error less than 0.03 m3 m-3. The surface heat fluxes calculated by this method are consistent with those by the Bowen ratio method, but at the same time it can overcome the instability problem occurring in the Bowen ratio method when the latter is about -1. Meanwhile, the variational method is more accurate than the profile method in terms of satisfying the surface energy balance. The sensitivity tests also show that the variational method is the most stable one among the three methods.

  9. Localized heating on silicon field effect transistors: device fabrication and temperature measurements in fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elibol, Oguz H; Reddy, Bobby; Nair, Pradeep R; Dorvel, Brian; Butler, Felice; Ahsan, Zahab S; Bergstrom, Donald E; Alam, Muhammad A; Bashir, Rashid

    2009-10-07

    We demonstrate electrically addressable localized heating in fluid at the dielectric surface of silicon-on-insulator field-effect transistors via radio-frequency Joule heating of mobile ions in the Debye layer. Measurement of fluid temperatures in close vicinity to surfaces poses a challenge due to the localized nature of the temperature profile. To address this, we developed a localized thermometry technique based on the fluorescence decay rate of covalently attached fluorophores to extract the temperature within 2 nm of any oxide surface. We demonstrate precise spatial control of voltage dependent temperature profiles on the transistor surfaces. Our results introduce a new dimension to present sensing systems by enabling dual purpose silicon transistor-heaters that serve both as field effect sensors as well as temperature controllers that could perform localized bio-chemical reactions in Lab on Chip applications.

  10. A model of the tropical Pacific sea surface temperature climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Richard; Zebiak, Stephen E.; Cane, Mark A.

    1988-01-01

    A model for the climatological mean sea surface temperature (SST) of the tropical Pacific Ocean is developed. The upper ocean response is computed using a time dependent, linear, reduced gravity model, with the addition of a constant depth frictional surface layer. The full three-dimensional temperature equation and a surface heat flux parameterization that requires specification of only wind speed and total cloud cover are used to evaluate the SST. Specification of atmospheric parameters, such as air temperature and humidity, over which the ocean has direct influence, is avoided. The model simulates the major features of the observed tropical Pacific SST. The seasonal evolution of these features is generally captured by the model. Analysis of the results demonstrates the control the ocean has over the surface heat flux from ocean to atmosphere and the crucial role that dynamics play in determining the mean SST in the equatorial Pacific. The sensitivity of the model to perturbations in the surface heat flux, cloud cover specification, diffusivity, and mixed layer depth is discussed.

  11. Principle of uniformity of temperature difference field in heat exchanger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    过增元; 李志信; 周森泉; 熊大曦

    1996-01-01

    A principle of uniformity of temperature difference field (TDF) in heat exchangers is advanced.It states that the more uniform the temperature difference field,the higher the effectiveness of heat exchanger for a given NTU and C,.Analytical and numerical results on the uniformity of TDF and effectiveness of thirteen types of heat exchangers show the validity of the uniformity principle.Its further verification is given by the asymptotical solution of TDF in terms of a recurrence formula of heat transfer area distribution.The analyses of entropy generation caused by heat transfer indicate that the uniformity principle is based on the second law of thermodynamics.Two ways,redistributing heat transfer areas and varying the connection between tubes,are presented for the improvement of the uniformity of TDF and the consequent increase of effectiveness for crossflow heat exchangers.

  12. Effects of electrode surface roughness on motional heating of trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Kuan-Yu; Chuang, Issac L

    2016-01-01

    Electric field noise is a major source of motional heating in trapped ion quantum computation. While the influence of trap electrode geometries on electric field noise has been studied in patch potential and surface adsorbate models, only smooth surfaces are accounted for by current theory. The effects of roughness, a ubiquitous feature of surface electrodes, are poorly understood. We investigate its impact on electric field noise by deriving a rough-surface Green's function and evaluating its effects on adsorbate-surface binding energies. At cryogenic temperatures, heating rate contributions from adsorbates are predicted to exhibit an exponential sensitivity to local surface curvature, leading to either a large net enhancement or suppression over smooth surfaces. For typical experimental parameters, orders-of-magnitude variations in total heating rates can occur depending on the spatial distribution of absorbates. Through careful engineering of electrode surface profiles, our results suggests that heating ra...

  13. Evaporation of hydrocarbon compounds, including gasoline and diesel fuel, on heated metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fardad, D.; Ladommatos, N. [Brunel Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Uxbridge (United Kingdom)

    1999-11-01

    An investigation was carried out on the evaporation of various hydrocarbon liquids on heated surfaces. Single and multicomponent hydrocarbon compounds were used, including hexane, heptane, octane, a hexane-octane mixture, gasoline and diesel fuel. The heated surface included aluminium, mild steel, cast iron and copper. Tests were also carried out with different surface textures and surface coatings. The motivation for this work was a desire to improve understanding of the evaporation processes taking place in the inlet port and, to a lesser extent, within the combustion chamber of internal combustion engines. The hydrocarbon compounds were released on the heated surfaces as individual small droplets, and the subsequent evaporation was recorded using a CCD (charge coupled device) camera. These observations were then used to ascertain the effects of material, surface temperature, surface textures, surface coating and liquid composition on the heat flux and other aspects of droplet behaviour. (Author)

  14. Seasonal mean temperature changes control future heat waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüeso, Daniel; Di Luca, Alejandro; Perkins-Kirkpatrick, Sarah E.; Evans, Jason P.

    2016-07-01

    Increased temperature will result in longer, more frequent, and more intense heat waves. Changes in temperature variability have been deemed necessary to account for future heat wave characteristics. However, this has been quantified only in Europe and North America, while the rest of the globe remains unexplored. Using late century global climate projections, we show that annual mean temperature increases is the key factor defining heat wave changes in most regions. We find that commonly studied areas are an exception rather than the standard and the mean climate change signal generally outweighs any influence from variability changes. More importantly, differences in warming across seasons are responsible for most of the heat wave changes and their consideration relegates the contribution of variability to a marginal role. This reveals that accurately capturing mean seasonal changes is crucial to estimate future heat waves and reframes our interpretation of future temperature extremes.

  15. Research on low-temperature anodic bonding using induction heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Mingxiang; Yi Xinjian [Department Opto-electronic Engineering, Huazhong Uni. of Sci. and Tech., Wuhan 430074 (China); Yuan Liulin [Institute of Microsystems, Huazhong Uni. of Sci. and Tech., Wuhan 430074 (China); Institute of Microsystems, Huazhong Uni. of Sci. and Tech., Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu Sheng [Institute of Microsystems, Huazhong Uni. of Sci. and Tech., Wuhan 430074 (China); Department Mechanical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a new low temperature silicon-glass anodic bonding process using induction heating. Anodic bonding between silicon and glass (Pyrex 7740) has been achieved at temperature below 300 deg. C and almost bubble-free interfaces have been obtained. A 1KW 400KHz power supply is used to induce heat in graphite susceptors (simultaneously as the high-voltage electrodes of anodic bonding), which conduct heat to the bonding pair and permanently join the pair in 5 minutes. The results of pull tests indicate a bonding strength of above 5.0MPa for induction heating, which is greater than the strength for resistive heating at the same temperature. The fracture mainly occurs across the interface or inside the glass other than in the interface when the bonding temperature is over 200 deg. C Finally, the interfaces are examined and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the bonding mechanisms are discussed.

  16. Heat kernel measures on random surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Klevtsov, Semyon

    2015-01-01

    The heat kernel on the symmetric space of positive definite Hermitian matrices is used to endow the spaces of Bergman metrics of degree k on a Riemann surface M with a family of probability measures depending on a choice of the background metric. Under a certain matrix-metric correspondence, each positive definite Hermitian matrix corresponds to a Kahler metric on M. The one and two point functions of the random metric are calculated in a variety of limits as k and t tend to infinity. In the limit when the time t goes to infinity the fluctuations of the random metric around the background metric are the same as the fluctuations of random zeros of holomorphic sections. This is due to the fact that the random zeros form the boundary of the space of Bergman metrics.

  17. MODELING OF TEMPERATURE FIELDS IN A SOLID HEAT ACCUMULLATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Belimenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Currently, one of the priorities of energy conservation is a cost savings for heating in commercial and residential buildings by the stored thermal energy during the night and its return in the daytime. Economic effect is achieved due to the difference in tariffs for the cost of electricity in the daytime and at night. One of the most common types of devices that allow accumulating and giving the resulting heat are solid heat accumulators. The main purpose of the work: 1 software development for the calculation of the temperature field of a flat solid heat accumulator, working due to the heat energy accumulation in the volume of thermal storage material without phase transition; 2 determination the temperature distribution in its volumes at convective heat transfer. Methodology. To achieve the study objectives a heat transfer theory and Laplace integral transform were used. On its base the problems of determining the temperature fields in the channels of heat accumulators, having different cross-sectional shapes were solved. Findings. Authors have developed the method of calculation and obtained solutions for the determination of temperature fields in channels of the solid heat accumulator in conditions of convective heat transfer. Temperature fields over length and thickness of channels were investigated. Experimental studies on physical models and industrial equipment were conducted. Originality. For the first time the technique of calculating the temperature field in the channels of different cross-section for the solid heat accumulator in the charging and discharging modes was proposed. The calculation results are confirmed by experimental research. Practical value. The proposed technique is used in the design of solid heat accumulators of different power as well as full-scale production of them was organized.

  18. Exergy analysis of the performance of low-temperature district heating system with geothermal heat pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekret Robert

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Exergy analysis of low temperature geothermal heat plant with compressor and absorption heat pump was carried out. In these two concepts heat pumps are using geothermal water at 19.5 oC with spontaneous outflow 24 m3/h as a heat source. The research compares exergy efficiency and exergy destruction of considered systems and its components as well. For the purpose of analysis, the heating system was divided into five components: geothermal heat exchanger, heat pump, heat distribution, heat exchanger and electricity production and transportation. For considered systems the primary exergy consumption from renewable and non-renewable sources was estimated. The analysis was carried out for heat network temperature at 50/40 oC, and the quality regulation was assumed. The results of exergy analysis of the system with electrical and absorption heat pump show that exergy destruction during the whole heating season is lower for the system with electrical heat pump. The exergy efficiencies of total system are 12.8% and 11.2% for the system with electrical heat pump and absorption heat pump, respectively.

  19. Algorithm of heating temperature for Chongqing's winter greenhouses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Shou-yong; LI Xi-wen; YANG Shu-zi; YANG Ming-jin

    2007-01-01

    Internal temperature is crucial to plant growth in the greenhouse. We investigated the patterns of constructing and managing greenhouses in Chongqing, and developed an algorithm of heating temperature for closed winter plastic greenhouses under the conditions of no man-made illumination, no ventilation and hot wind machine as the heating equipment, which are the most adopted pattern of greenhouses in Chongqing area. The algorithm includes two functions of temperature outside the greenhouse, which calculate the values of the warming estimation coefficient (WEC) and the gap between temperatures inside and outside the greenhouse with the measured data of outside temperature, and then give the value of internal temperature; the heat rating of heating facilities required by a greenhouse can be determined by this algorithm with given values of floor area and internal temperature, measured outside temperature and calculated WEC. Verification of the algorithm demonstrates a desirable accuracy of estimation. Algorithms of computing heating temperature for greenhouses of different constructing and managing patterns and in different geographic conditions can also be derived in a similar way. This research presents a paradigm for developing a feasible method to fit out greenhouses with appropriate heating facilities, aiming at energy efficient and cost efficient production.

  20. Surface air temperature variability in global climate models

    CERN Document Server

    Davy, Richard

    2012-01-01

    New results from the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) and multiple global reanalysis datasets are used to investigate the relationship between the mean and standard deviation in the surface air temperature. A combination of a land-sea mask and orographic filter were used to investigate the geographic region with the strongest correlation and in all cases this was found to be for low-lying over-land locations. This result is consistent with the expectation that differences in the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere are an important factor in determining the surface air temperature response to forcing.

  1. Heat pipe and surface mass transfer cooling of hypersonic vehicle structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Gene T.; Modlin, James M.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of determining the feasibility of cooling hypersonic vehicle leading-edge structures exposed to severe aerodynamic surface heating using heat pipe and mass transfer cooling techniques is addressed. A description is presented of a numerical finite-difference-based hypersonic leading-edge cooling model incorporating poststartup liquid metal heat pipe cooling with surface transpiration and film cooling to predict the transient structural temperature distributions and maximum surface temperatures of hypersonic vehicle leading edge. An application of this model to the transient cooling of a typical aerospace plane wing leading-edge section. The results of this application indicated that liquid metal heat pipe cooling alone is insufficient to maintain surface temperatures below an assumed maximum level of 1800 K for about one-third of a typical aerospace plane ascent trajectory through the earth's atmosphere.

  2. High-temperature waste-heat-stream selection and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikoff, P.M.; Wiggins, D.J.; Tallman, R.L.; Forkel, C.E.

    1983-08-01

    Four types of industrial high-temperature, corrosive waste heat streams are selected that could yield significant energy savings if improved heat recovery systems were available. These waste heat streams are the flue gases from steel soaking pits, steel reheat furnaces, aluminum remelt furnaces, and glass melting furnaces. Available information on the temperature, pressure, flow, and composition of these flue gases is given. Also reviewed are analyses of corrosion products and fouling deposits resulting from the interaction of these flue gases with materials in flues and heat recovery systems.

  3. Low Temperature District Heating for Future Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Dietrich; Kallert, Anna; Blesl, Markus

    2017-01-01

    of the building stock. Low temperature district heating (LTDH) can contribute significantly to a more efficient use of energy resources as well as better integration of renewable energy (e.g. geothermal or solar heat), and surplus heat (e.g. industrial waste heat) into the heating sector. LTDH offers prospects......, such as combustible fuels, and minimising energy losses and irreversible dissipation. The paper presents the international co-operative work in the framework of the International Energy Agency (IEA), the Technology Cooperation Programme on District Heating and Cooling including Combined Heat and Power (DHC|CHP) Annex......The building sector is responsible for more than one third of the final energy consumption of societies and produces the largest amount of greenhouse gas emissions of all sectors. This is due to the utilisation of combustion processes of mainly fossil fuels to satisfy the heating demand...

  4. Low Temperature District Heating Consumer Unit with Micro Heat Pump for Domestic Hot Water Preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zvingilaite, Erika; Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Elmegaard, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present and analyse the feasibility of a district heating (DH) consumer unit with micro heat pump for domestic hot water (DHW) preparation in a low temperature (40 °C) DH network. We propose a micro booster heat pump of high efficiency (COP equal to 5,3) in a consumer DH unit...... in order to boost the temperature of the district heating water for heating the DHW. The paper presents the main designs of the suggested system and different alternative micro booster heat pump concepts. Energy efficiency and thermodynamic performance of these concepts are calculated and compared....... The results show that the proposed system has the highest efficiency. Furthermore, we compare thermodynamic and economic performance of the suggested heat pump-based concept with different solutions, using electric water heater. The micro booster heat pump system has the highest annualised investment (390 EUR...

  5. INVESTIGATION OF SURFACE TEMPERATURE IN HIGH-EFFICIENCY DEEP GRINDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Henghua; Cai Guangqi; Jin Tan

    2005-01-01

    A new thermal model with triangular heat flux distribution is given in high-efficiency deep grinding. The mathematical expressions are driven to calculate the surface temperature. The transient behavior of the maximum temperature on contact area is investigated in different grinding conditions with a J-type thermocouple. The maximum contact temperatures measured in different conditions are found to be between 1 000 ℃ and 1 500 ℃ in burn-out conditions. The experiment results show good agreement with the new thermal model.

  6. Temperature enhancement induced by ionosphere heating in low altitude region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Xu; Jian Wu; Zhensen Wu; Jun Wu; Haiqin Che; Yubo Yan; Kun Xue

    2008-01-01

    The assumption that the electron temperature is approximately equal to the ion temperature is not rational during the high frequency (HF) heating in low ionosphere region. Thus, using the theoretical formula of incoherent scatter spectra with collisional plasma, the incoherent scatter data are analyzed during ionosphere heating at 91.7 km height on August 15th 2006. The enhancements of electron temperature are obtained, and the incremental percent is up to 37% and 46% at the universal time of 10:22 and 10:30, respectively. By using the same initialization value, the ionosphere heating process is simulated by Ohmic theory and the experimental results are basically consistent with the simulation.

  7. Gravity increased by lunar surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, James

    2013-04-01

    Quantitatively large effects of lunar surface temperature on apparent gravitational force measured by lunar laser ranging (LLR) and lunar perigee may challenge widely accepted theories of gravity. LLR data grouped by days from full moon shows the moon is about 5 percent closer to earth at full moon compared to 8 days before or after full moon. In a second, related result, moon perigees were least distant in days closer to full moon. Moon phase was used as proxy independent variable for lunar surface temperature. The results support the prediction by binary mechanics that gravitational force increases with object surface temperature.

  8. Heat Transfer and Failure Mode Analyses of Ultrahigh-Temperature Ceramic Thermal Protection System of Hypersonic Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Tianbao Cheng; Weiguo Li; Wei Lu; Yushan Shi

    2014-01-01

    The transient temperature distribution of the ultrahigh-temperature ceramic (UHTC) thermal protection system (TPS) of hypersonic vehicles is calculated using finite volume method. Convective cooling enables a balance of heat increment and loss to be achieved. The temperature in the UHTC plate at the balance is approximately proportional to the surface heat flux and is approximately inversely proportional to the convective heat transfer coefficient. The failure modes of the UHTCs are presented...

  9. Vapor-modulated heat pipe for improved temperature control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D. K.; Eninger, J. E.; Ludeke, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    Dryout induced by vapor throttling makes control of equipment temperature less dependent on variations in sink environment. Mechanism controls flow of vapor in heat pipe by using valve in return path to build difference in pressure and also difference in saturation temperature of the vapor. In steady state, valve closes just enough to produce partial dryout that achieves required temperature drop.

  10. Pulmonary artery and intestinal temperatures during heat stress and cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearson, James; Ganio, Matthew S; Seifert, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    In humans, whole body heating and cooling are used to address physiological questions where core temperature is central to the investigated hypotheses. Core temperature can be measured in various locations throughout the human body. The measurement of intestinal temperature is increasingly used...

  11. A model of the ground surface temperature for micrometeorological analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Julian S.; Erell, Evyatar

    2017-07-01

    Micrometeorological models at various scales require ground surface temperature, which may not always be measured in sufficient spatial or temporal detail. There is thus a need for a model that can calculate the surface temperature using only widely available weather data, thermal properties of the ground, and surface properties. The vegetated/permeable surface energy balance (VP-SEB) model introduced here requires no a priori knowledge of soil temperature or moisture at any depth. It combines a two-layer characterization of the soil column following the heat conservation law with a sinusoidal function to estimate deep soil temperature, and a simplified procedure for calculating moisture content. A physically based solution is used for each of the energy balance components allowing VP-SEB to be highly portable. VP-SEB was tested using field data measuring bare loess desert soil in dry weather and following rain events. Modeled hourly surface temperature correlated well with the measured data (r 2 = 0.95 for a whole year), with a root-mean-square error of 2.77 K. The model was used to generate input for a pedestrian thermal comfort study using the Index of Thermal Stress (ITS). The simulation shows that the thermal stress on a pedestrian standing in the sun on a fully paved surface, which may be over 500 W on a warm summer day, may be as much as 100 W lower on a grass surface exposed to the same meteorological conditions.

  12. A modified stanton number for heat transfer through fabric surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shen-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Stanton number was originally proposed for describing heat transfer through a smooth surface. A modified one is suggested in this paper to take into account non-smooth surface or fractal surface. The emphasis is put on the heat transfer through fabrics.

  13. Novel short-duration heating balloon dilatation with uniform temperature distribution: the heating conditions to suppress neo-intimal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunio, M; Shimazaki, N; Arai, T; Sakurada, M

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the relation between the influences on smooth muscle cells and the chronic performances of our novel short-duration heating balloon dilatation to reveal the heating conditions which can suppress the neo-intimal hyperplasia after our heating dilatations. The temperature of prototype balloon catheter surface was measured during short-duration heating balloon dilatation ex vivo. There existed 2 °C temperature variations in the long direction of prototype balloon catheter at a maximum. The neo-intimal hyperplasia occupancy rate after our short-duration heating dilatations were measured in vivo porcine study. The neo-intimal hyperplasia was suppressed most at 75 °C in balloon peak temperature in vivo. The estimated dead rate of smooth muscle cells at this condition was about 13% by the Arrhenius equation. We think that the suppression of neo-intimal hyperplasia was obtained after our short-duration heating dilatation due to the proper decrease of smooth muscle cells by heating and no thermal damages to the adventitia and surrounding tissues.

  14. Mapping the body surface temperature of cattle by infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Marcia Saladini Vieira; da Silva, Suelen Corrêa; Salles, Fernando André; Roma, Luiz Carlos; El Faro, Lenira; Bustos Mac Lean, Priscilla Ayleen; Lins de Oliveira, Celso Eduardo; Martello, Luciane Silva

    2016-12-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) is an alternative non-invasive method that has been studied as a tool for identifying many physiological and pathological processes related to changes in body temperature. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the body surface temperature of Jersey dairy cattle in a thermoneutral environment in order to contribute to the determination of a body surface temperature pattern for animals of this breed in a situation of thermal comfort. Twenty-four Jersey heifers were used over a period of 35 days at APTA Brazil. Measurements were performed on all animals, starting with the physiological parameters. Body surface temperature was measured by IRT collecting images in different body regions: left and right eye area, right and left eye, caudal left foreleg, cranial left foreleg, right and left flank, and forehead. High correlations were observed between temperature and humidity index (THI) and right flank, left flank and forehead temperatures (0.85, 0.81, and 0.81, respectively). The IRT variables that exhibited the five highest correlation coefficients in principal component 1 were, in decreasing order: forehead (0.90), right flank (0.87), left flank (0.84), marker 1 caudal left foreleg (0.83), marker 2 caudal left foreleg (0.74). The THI showed a high correlation coefficient (0.88) and moderate to low correlations were observed for the physiological variables rectal temperature (0.43), and respiratory frequency (0.42). The thermal profile obtained indicates a surface temperature pattern for each region studied in a situation of thermal comfort and may contribute to studies investigating body surface temperature. Among the body regions studied, IRT forehead temperature showed the highest association with rectal temperature, and forehead and right and left flank temperatures are strongly associated with THI and may be adopted in future studies on thermoregulation and body heat production.

  15. Estimation of heat load in waste tanks using average vapor space temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, R.D.; Kummerer, M.; Postma, A.K.

    1993-12-01

    This report describes a method for estimating the total heat load in a high-level waste tank with passive ventilation. This method relates the total heat load in the tank to the vapor space temperature and the depth of waste in the tank. Q{sub total} = C{sub f} (T{sub vapor space {minus}} T{sub air}) where: C{sub f} = Conversion factor = (R{sub o}k{sub soil}{sup *}area)/(z{sub tank} {minus} z{sub surface}); R{sub o} = Ratio of total heat load to heat out the top of the tank (function of waste height); Area = cross sectional area of the tank; k{sub soil} = thermal conductivity of soil; (z{sub tank} {minus} z{sub surface}) = effective depth of soil covering the top of tank; and (T{sub vapor space} {minus} T{sub air}) = mean temperature difference between vapor space and the ambient air at the surface. Three terms -- depth, area and ratio -- can be developed from geometrical considerations. The temperature difference is measured for each individual tank. The remaining term, the thermal conductivity, is estimated from the time-dependent component of the temperature signals coming from the periodic oscillations in the vapor space temperatures. Finally, using this equation, the total heat load for each of the ferrocyanide Watch List tanks is estimated. This provides a consistent way to rank ferrocyanide tanks according to heat load.

  16. Droplet Impact on a Heated Surface under a Depressurized Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakenaka, Ryuta; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    Behavior of a water droplet of the diameter 1-3mm impacting on a heated surface under depressurized environment (100kPa -1kPa) has been studied. A syringe pump for droplet generation and a heated plate are set into a transparent acrylic vacuum chamber. The internal pressure of the chamber is automatically controlled at a target pressure with a rotary pump, a pressure transducer, and an electrical valve. A silicon wafer of the thickness 0.28 mm is mounted on the heater plate, whose temperature is directly measured by attaching a thermocouple on the backside. The droplet behavior is captured using a high-speed camera in a direction perpendicular to droplet velocity. Some unique behaviors of droplet are observed by decreasing the environmental pressure, which are considered to be due to two basic elements: Enhancement of evaporation due to the lowered saturation temperature, and shortage of pneumatic spring effect between the droplet and heated wall due to the lowered pressure of the air.

  17. Conjugated Conduction-Free Convection Heat Transfer in an Annulus Heated at Either Constant Wall Temperature or Constant Heat Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAROON IMTIAZ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate numerically the effect of thermal boundary conditions on conjugated conduction-free convection heat transfer in an annulus between two concentric cylinders using Fourier Spectral method. The inner wall of the annulus is heated and maintained at either CWT (Constant Wall Temperature or CHF (Constant Heat Flux, while the outer wall is maintained at constant temperature. CHF case is relatively more significant for high pressure industrial applications, but it has not received much attention. This study particularly focuses the latter case (CHF. The main influencing parameters on flow and thermal fields within the annulus are: Rayleigh number Ra; thickness of inner wall Rs; radius ratio Rr and inner wall-fluid thermal conductivity ratio Kr. The study has shown that the increase in Kr increases the heat transfer rate through the annulus for heating at CWT and decreases the inner wall dimensionless temperature for heating at CHF and vice versa. It has also been proved that as the Rs increases at fixed Ra and Rr, the heat transfer rate decreases for heating at CWT and the inner wall dimensionless temperature increases for heating at CHF at Kr 1 depends on Rr. It has been shown that for certain combinations of controlling parameters there will be a value of Rr at which heat transfer rate will be minimum in the annulus in case of heating at CWT, while

  18. Lauric and palmitic acids eutectic mixture as latent heat storage material for low temperature heating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncbilek, K.; Sari, A. [Gaziosmanpasa Univ., Tokat (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry; Tarhan, S.; Erguenes, G. [Gaziosmanpasa Univ., Tokat (Turkey). Dept. of Agricultural Machinery; Kaygusuz, K. [Karadeniz Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

    2005-04-01

    Palmitic acid (PA, 59.8 {sup o}C) and lauric acid (LA, 42.6 {sup o}C) are phase change materials (PCM) having quite high melting temperatures which can limit their use in low temperature solar applications such as solar space heating and greenhouse heating. However, their melting temperatures can be tailored to appropriate value by preparing a eutectic mixture of the lauric and the palmitic acids. In the present study, the thermal analysis based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique shows that the mixture of 69.0 wt% LA and 31 wt% PA forms a eutectic mixture having melting temperature of 35.2 {sup o}C and the latent heat of fusion of 166.3 J g{sup -1}. This study also considers the experimental determination of the thermal characteristics of the eutectic mixture during the heat charging and discharging processes. Radial and axial temperature distribution, heat transfer coefficient between the heat transfer fluid (HTF) pipe and the PCM, heat recovery rate and heat charging and discharging fractions were experimentally established employing a vertical concentric pipe-in-pipe energy storage system. The changes of these characteristics were evaluated with respect to the effect of inlet HTF temperature and mass flow rate. The DSC thermal analysis and the experimental results indicate that the LA-PA eutectic mixture can be a potential material for low temperature thermal energy storage applications in terms of its thermo-physical and thermal characteristics. (author)

  19. Lauric and palmitic acids eutectic mixture as latent heat storage material for low temperature heating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadir Tuncbilek; Ahmet Sari [Gaziosmanpasa University, Tokat (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry; Sefa Tarhan; Gazanfer Ergunes [Gaziosmanpasa University, Tokat (Turkey). Dept. of Agricultural Machinery; Kamil Kaygusuz [Karadeniz University, Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

    2005-04-01

    Palmitic acid (PA, 59.8{sup o}C) and lauric acid (LA, 42.6{sup o}C) are phase change materials (PCM) having quite high melting temperatures which can limit their use in low temperature solar applications such as solar space heating and greenhouse heating. However, their melting temperatures can be tailored to appropriate value by preparing a eutectic mixture of the lauric and the palmitic acids. In the present study, the thermal analysis based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique shows that the mixture of 69.0 wt% LA and 31 wt% PA forms a eutectic mixture having melting temperature of 35.2 {sup o}C and the latent heat of fusion of 166.3 J g{sup -1}. This study also considers the experimental determination of the thermal characteristics of the eutectic mixture during the heat charging and discharging processes. Radial and axial temperature distribution, heat transfer coefficient between the heat transfer fluid (HTF) pipe and the PCM, heat recovery rate and heat charging and discharging fractions were experimentally established employing a vertical concentric pipe-in-pipe energy storage system. The changes of these characteristics were evaluated with respect to the effect of inlet HTF temperature and mass flow rate. The DSC thermal analysis and the experimental results indicate that the LA-PA eutectic mixture can be a potential material for low temperature thermal energy storage applications in terms of its thermo-physical and thermal characteristics. (author)

  20. Surface urban heat island across 419 global big cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shushi; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Ottle, Catherine; Bréon, François-Marie; Nan, Huijuan; Zhou, Liming; Myneni, Ranga B

    2012-01-17

    Urban heat island is among the most evident aspects of human impacts on the earth system. Here we assess the diurnal and seasonal variation of surface urban heat island intensity (SUHII) defined as the surface temperature difference between urban area and suburban area measured from the MODIS. Differences in SUHII are analyzed across 419 global big cities, and we assess several potential biophysical and socio-economic driving factors. Across the big cities, we show that the average annual daytime SUHII (1.5 ± 1.2 °C) is higher than the annual nighttime SUHII (1.1 ± 0.5 °C) (P urban area and suburban area, while the distribution of daytime SUHII correlates negatively across cities with the difference of vegetation cover and activity between urban and suburban areas. Our results emphasize the key role of vegetation feedbacks in attenuating SUHII of big cities during the day, in particular during the growing season, further highlighting that increasing urban vegetation cover could be one effective way to mitigate the urban heat island effect.

  1. Temperatures and Heat Flows in a Soil Enclosing a Slinky Horizontal Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Neuberger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Temperature changes and heat flows in soils that host “slinky”-type horizontal heat exchangers are complex, but need to be understood if robust quantification of the thermal energy available to a ground-source heat pump is to be achieved. Of particular interest is the capacity of the thermal energy content of the soil to regenerate when the heat exchangers are not operating. Analysis of specific heat flows and the specific thermal energy regime within the soil, including that captured by the heat-exchangers, has been characterised by meticulous measurements. These reveal that high concentrations of antifreeze mix in the heat-transfer fluid of the heat exchanger have an adverse impact on heat flows discharged into the soil.

  2. High-resolution hot-film measurement of surface heat flux to an impinging jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, T. S.; Persoons, T.; Murray, D. B.

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the complex coupling between surface heat transfer and local fluid velocity in convective heat transfer, advanced techniques are required to measure the surface heat flux at high spatial and temporal resolution. Several established flow velocity techniques such as laser Doppler anemometry, particle image velocimetry and hot wire anemometry can measure fluid velocities at high spatial resolution (µm) and have a high-frequency response (up to 100 kHz) characteristic. Equivalent advanced surface heat transfer measurement techniques, however, are not available; even the latest advances in high speed thermal imaging do not offer equivalent data capture rates. The current research presents a method of measuring point surface heat flux with a hot film that is flush mounted on a heated flat surface. The film works in conjunction with a constant temperature anemometer which has a bandwidth of 100 kHz. The bandwidth of this technique therefore is likely to be in excess of more established surface heat flux measurement techniques. Although the frequency response of the sensor is not reported here, it is expected to be significantly less than 100 kHz due to its physical size and capacitance. To demonstrate the efficacy of the technique, a cooling impinging air jet is directed at the heated surface, and the power required to maintain the hot-film temperature is related to the local heat flux to the fluid air flow. The technique is validated experimentally using a more established surface heat flux measurement technique. The thermal performance of the sensor is also investigated numerically. It has been shown that, with some limitations, the measurement technique accurately measures the surface heat transfer to an impinging air jet with improved spatial resolution for a wide range of experimental parameters.

  3. Heat transfer effect of an extended surface in downward-facing subcooled flow boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Abdul R., E-mail: khan@vis.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Erkan, Nejdet, E-mail: erkan@vis.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, 319-1188 (Japan); Okamoto, Koji, E-mail: okamoto@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, 319-1188 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Compare downward-facing flow boiling results from bare and extended surfaces. • Upstream and downstream temperatures were measured on the extended surface. • Downstream temperatures exceed upstream temperatures for all flow rates. • Bubble accumulation occurs downstream on extended surface. • Extended surface heat transfer lower than bare surface as flow rate reduced. - Abstract: New BWR containment designs are considering cavity flooding as an accident management strategy. Unlike the PWR, the BWR has many Control Rod Guide Tube (CRGT) penetrations in the lower head. During a severe accident scenario with core melt in the lower plenum along with cavity flooding, the penetrations may affect the heat transfer on the ex-vessel surface and disrupt fluid flow during the boiling process. A small-scale experiment was performed to investigate the issues existing in downward-facing boiling phenomenon with an extended surface. The results were compared with a bare (flat) surface. The mass flux of 244 kg/m{sup 2} s, 215 kg/m{sup 2} s, and 177 kg/m{sup 2} s were applied in this study. CHF conditions were observed only for the 177 kg/m{sup 2} s case. The boiling curves for both types of surfaces and all flow rates were obtained. The boiling curves for the highest flow rate showed lower surface temperatures for the extended surface experiments when compared to the bare surface. The downstream location on the extended surface yielded the highest surface temperatures as the flow rate was reduced. The bubble accumulation and low velocity in the wake produced by flow around the extended surface was believed to have caused the elevated temperatures in the downstream location. Although an extended surface may enhance the overall heat transfer, a reduction in the local heat transfer was observed in the current experiments.

  4. Analysis of heat exchanger network for temperature fluctuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zunlong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Subject to temperature disturbance, exchangers in heat exchanger network will interact. It is necessary to evaluate the degree of temperature fluctuation in the network. There is inherently linear relationship between output and inlet temperatures of heat exchanger network. Based on this, the concept of temperature-change sensitivity coefficient was put forward. Quantitative influence of temperature fluctuation in the network was carried out in order to examine transmission character of temperature fluctuation in the system. And the information was obtained for improving the design quality of heat exchanger network. Favorable results were obtained by the introduced method compared with the experimental results. These results will assist engineers to distinguish primary and secondary influencing factors, which can be used in observing and controlling influencing factors accurately.

  5. MICRO- AND NANOSCALE MEASUREMENT METHODS FOR PHASE CHANGE HEAT TRANSFER ON PLANAR AND STRUCTURED SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buongiorno, J; Cahill, DG; Hidrovo, CH; Moghaddam, S; Schmidt, AJ; Shi, L

    2014-07-23

    In this opinion piece, we discuss recent advances in experimental methods for characterizing phase change heat transfer. We begin with a survey of techniques for high-resolution measurements of temperature and heat flux at the solid surface and in the working fluid. Next, we focus on diagnostic tools for boiling heat transfer and describe techniques for visualizing the temperature and velocity fields, as well as measurements at the single bubble level. Finally, we discuss techniques to probe the kinetics of vapor formation within a few molecular layers of the interface. We conclude with our outlook for future progress in experimental methods for phase change heat transfer.

  6. Sea Surface Temperature Average_SST_Master

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sea surface temperature collected via satellite imagery from http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/data/gridded/data.noaa.ersst.html and averaged for each region using ArcGIS...

  7. OW NOAA GOES Sea-Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset contains satellite-derived sea-surface temperature measurements collected by means of the Geostationary Orbiting Environmental Satellite. The data is...

  8. evaluation of land surface temperature parameterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1 DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS, ADEYEMI COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, ONDO, ... Surface temperature (Ts) is vital to the study of land-atmosphere interactions and climate variabilities. .... value = 0.167 m3m-3), and very low for dry days (mean.

  9. Monthly Near-Surface Air Temperature Averages

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global surface temperatures in 2010 tied 2005 as the warmest on record. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) was established in 1982 as part...

  10. Sea Surface Temperature (14 KM North America)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Product shows local sea surface temperatures (degrees C). It is a composite gridded-image derived from 8-km resolution SST Observations. It is generated every 48...

  11. Analysed foundation sea surface temperature, global

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The through-cloud capabilities of microwave radiometers provide a valuable picture of global sea surface temperature (SST). To utilize this, scientists at Remote...

  12. Sensitivity analysis and numerical experiments on transient test of compact heat exchanger surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hesheng REN; Lingjun LAI; Yongzheng CUI

    2008-01-01

    A single-blow transient testing technique con-sidering the effect of longitudinal heat conduction is sug-gested for determining the average convection heat transfer coefficient of compact heat exchanger surface. By matching the measured outlet fluid temperature vari-ation with similar theoretical curves, the dimensionless longitudinal conduction parameter λ1, the time constant of the inlet fluid temperature τ+, and the number of heat transfer units Ntu can be determined simultaneously using the Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear parameter estima-tion method. Both sensitivity analysis and numerical experiments with simulated measurements containing random errors show that the method in the present invest-igation provides satisfactory accuracy of the estimated parameter Ntu, which characterizes the heat transfer per-formance of compact heat exchanger surfaces.

  13. Measurement Procedure for Surface Emissivity of Heat-Shielding Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkhipov Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A procedure is suggested for the measurement of the integral emissivity coefficient of heat-shielding materials in the temperature range close to the thermal destruction temperature.

  14. Carbon nanostructured surfaces for enhanced heat transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of high performance thermal systems has stimulated interest in methods to improve heat transfer rates. Considerable efforts have been made to increase heat transfer rates by implementing passive convective heat transfer enhancement methods that require no direct consumption of extern

  15. Carbon nanostructured surfaces for enhanced heat transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, Taha Jibril

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of high performance thermal systems has stimulated interest in methods to improve heat transfer rates. Considerable efforts have been made to increase heat transfer rates by implementing passive convective heat transfer enhancement methods that require no direct consumption of extern

  16. Carbon nanostructured surfaces for enhanced heat transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of high performance thermal systems has stimulated interest in methods to improve heat transfer rates. Considerable efforts have been made to increase heat transfer rates by implementing passive convective heat transfer enhancement methods that require no direct consumption of

  17. Measured Performance of a Low Temperature Air Source Heat Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R. K. [Johnson Research LLC, Pueblo West, CO (United States)

    2013-09-01

    A 4-ton Low Temperature Heat Pump (LTHP) manufactured by Hallowell International was installed in a residence near New Haven, Connecticut and monitored over two winters of operation. After attending to some significant service issues, the heat pump operated as designed. This report should be considered a review of the dual compressor 'boosted heat pump' technology. The Low Temperature Heat Pumpsystem operates with four increasing levels of capacity (heat output) as the outdoor temperature drops. The system was shown to select capacity correctly, supplying the appropriate amount of heat to the house across the full range of outdoor temperatures. The system's Coefficient of Performance (Seasonal COP, or SCOP) over two entire winters was calculated, based on measured data, to be 3.29over the first winter and 2.68 over the second winter. A second seasonal efficiency calculation by a different method yielded a SCOP of 2.78 for the first winter and 2.83 for the second winter. This second seasonal efficiency calculation was determined by comparing measured heat pump energy use to the in situ energy use with resistance heat alone. This method is the ratio of the slopes of thedaily energy use load lines.

  18. Models of Ballistic Propagation of Heat at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, R.; Ván, P.

    2016-09-01

    Heat conduction at low temperatures shows several effects that cannot be described by the Fourier law. In this paper, the performance of various theories is compared in case of wave-like and ballistic propagation of heat pulses in NaF.

  19. Heating a chemical current source which operates at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsumata, T.; Khosikhara, N.

    1983-02-14

    A chamber for catalytic ignition of hydrogen or gasoline is installed in a chemical current source. The isolated heat heats the chemical current source with a low temperature of the environment providing its optimal operational conditions. The fuel is fed into the chamber from a tank or chamber located in the body of the chemical current source.

  20. Heat Transfer in a Forced Wall Jet on a heated Rough Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie-FrancoiseScibilia

    2000-01-01

    In this paper,an experimental investigation of a laminar wall jet in the presence of a heated wall with stationary particles on its surface,is reproted.The wall jet was submitted to external acoustic vibration amplifying the coherent structures appearing in the laminar region.A wind tunnel was used at very low Reynolds number,Mean velocity and turbulence intensity were measured by a constant temperature anemometer .Measurements were taken in the transition and turbulent regions.Embedded particles were outside the vissous sublayer and it was observed that their presence modifies significantly the flow characteristics in particular the boundary layer is thickened.This study can bring a better understanding of the structure of a flow when it is heated and forced on a rough wall.

  1. Satellite air temperature estimation for monitoring the canopy layer heat island of Milan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pichierri, Manuele; Bonafoni, Stefania; Biondi, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    2007 and 2010 were processed. Analysis of the canopy layer heat island (CLHI) maps during summer months reveals an average heat island effect of 3–4K during nighttime (with some peaks around 5K) and a weak CLHI intensity during daytime. In addition, the satellite maps reveal a well defined island shape......In this work, satellite maps of the urban heat island of Milan are produced using satellite-based infrared sensor data. For this aim, we developed suitable algorithms employing satellite brightness temperatures for the direct air temperature estimation 2 m above the surface (canopy layer), showing...

  2. Comparison of MODIS Land Surface Temperature and Air Temperature over the Continental USA Meteorological Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Bounoua, Lahouari; Imhoff, Marc L.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Thome, Kurtis

    2014-01-01

    The National Land Cover Database (NLCD) Impervious Surface Area (ISA) and MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the surface-temperature-based urban heat island's (UHIS) signature on LST amplitude over the continental USA and to make comparisons to local air temperatures. Air-temperature-based UHIs (UHIA), calculated using the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) daily air temperatures, are compared with UHIS for urban areas in different biomes during different seasons. NLCD ISA is used to define urban and rural temperatures and to stratify the sampling for LST and air temperatures. We find that the MODIS LST agrees well with observed air temperature during the nighttime, but tends to overestimate it during the daytime, especially during summer and in nonforested areas. The minimum air temperature analyses show that UHIs in forests have an average UHIA of 1 C during the summer. The UHIS, calculated from nighttime LST, has similar magnitude of 1-2 C. By contrast, the LSTs show a midday summer UHIS of 3-4 C for cities in forests, whereas the average summer UHIA calculated from maximum air temperature is close to 0 C. In addition, the LSTs and air temperatures difference between 2006 and 2011 are in agreement, albeit with different magnitude.

  3. Utilization of low temperature heat for environmentally friendly electricity production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jesper Graa; Elmegaard, Brian; Haglind, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    The focus on reduction of fossil fuelled electricity generation has increased the attention on exploitation of low grade heat as the energy source for electricity producing power plants. Low grade heat is heat, which isavailable at a low temperature, e.g. from waste heat from marine diesel engines...... and industrial processes orfrom geothermal and solar heat sources. Utilization of such heat sources makes it possible to produce electricity with no additional burning of fossil fuel, and does therefore represent an environmentally friendly alternative to fossil fuel based electricity production. Utilization...... of low grade heat is not feasible with conventional steam Rankine cycles (steam engines) due to undesirable properties of steam. Instead the organic Rankine cycle is typically used, since it enables thechoice of a working fluid, e.g. hydrocarbons or refrigerants, with desirable properties. One of the key...

  4. Mapping of low temperature heat sources in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bühler, Fabian; Holm, Fridolin Müller; Huang, Baijia

    2015-01-01

    of those heat sources feasible. In this work a mapping of those heat sources is performed to gain an overview of the potential amount of waste heat and natural heat sources in Denmark. The energy potentials are mapped together with the temperature ranges at which the heat is available and the exergy...... content of the heat. The mapping is based on data and literature primarily published by Statistics Denmark and the Danish Energy Agency, as well as interviews with specialists and engineering estimates. The results indicate that up to 13 % of the energy input to the analysed sectors is available as waste...... and deep geothermal energy. The theoretical solar thermal potential alone would be above 500 PJ per year. For the development of advanced thermodynamic cycles for the integration of heat sources in the Danish energy system, several areas of interest are determined. In the maritime transport sector a high...

  5. Urban aerosol effects on surface insolation and surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, M.; Burian, S. J.; Remer, L. A.; Shepherd, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    Urban aerosol particulates may play a fundamental role in urban microclimates and city-generated mesoscale circulations via its effects on energy balance of the surface. Key questions that need to be addressed include: (1) How do these particles affect the amount of solar energy reaching the surface and resulting surface temperature? (2) Is the effect the same in all cities? and (3) How does it vary from city to city? Using NASA AERONET in-situ observations, a radiative transfer model, and a regional climate mode (MM5), we assess aerosol effects on surface insolation and surf ace temperature for dense urban-polluted regions. Two big cities, one in a developing country (Beijing, P.R. China) and another in developed country (New York City, USA), are selected for inter-comparison. The study reveals that aerosol effects on surface temperature depends largely on aerosols' optical and chemical properties as well as atmosphere and land surface conditions, such as humidity and land cover. Therefore, the actual magnitudes of aerosol effects differ from city to city. Aerosol measurements from AERONET show both average and extreme cases for aerosol impacts on surface insolation. In general, aerosols reduce surface insolation by 30Wm-2. Nevertheless, in extreme cases, such reduction can exceed 100 Wm-2. Consequently, this reduces surface skin temperature 2-10C in an urban environment.

  6. CONJUGATE MODEL FOR HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER OF POROUS WALL IN THE HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.F. Polyakov; D.L.Reviznikov; 沈青; 魏叔如

    2001-01-01

    Heat and mass transfer of a porous permeable wall in a high temperature gas dynamical flow is considered. Numerical simulation is conducted on the ground of the conjugate mathematical model which includes filtration and heat transfer equations in a porous body and boundary layer equations on its surface. Such an approach enables one to take into account complex interaction between heat and mass transfer in the gasdynamical flow and in the structure subjected to this flow.The main attention is given to the impact of the intraporous heat transfer intensity on the transpiration cooling efficiency.

  7. Process Simulating of Heat Transfer in High-temperature Thermocouples

    OpenAIRE

    Atroshenko Yuliana K.; Bychkova Alena A.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical research of integral characteristics of process of heattransfer in sensitive elements of R, A and B types thermocouples in case of measurement of high temperatures (more than 900 K) is executed. Theoretical dependences of minimum necessary duration of heating up of the thermocouple on value of temperature on boundary of a sensitive element are received. It is shown the thermocouple of R type requires bigger time of heating for obtaining satisfactory accuracy of measurements. Tempera...

  8. Process Simulating of Heat Transfer in High-temperature Thermocouples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atroshenko Yuliana K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical research of integral characteristics of process of heattransfer in sensitive elements of R, A and B types thermocouples in case of measurement of high temperatures (more than 900 K is executed. Theoretical dependences of minimum necessary duration of heating up of the thermocouple on value of temperature on boundary of a sensitive element are received. It is shown the thermocouple of R type requires bigger time of heating for obtaining satisfactory accuracy of measurements. Temperature fields in sensitive elements of the specified thermocouples are received. It is shown that distribution of temperature on the thermocouple not linearly and has similar character for the researched thermocouples.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Heat Exchanger Tube Materials at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Sören; Zajac, Jozefa; Ekström, Hans-Erik

    Since automotive heat exchangers are operated at elevated temperatures and under varying pressures, both static and dynamic mechanical properties should be known at the relevant temperatures. We have collected elevated-temperature tensile test data, elevated-temperature stress amplitude-fatigue life data, and creep-rupture data in a systematic fashion over the past years. For thin, soft, and braze-simulated heat exchanger tube materials tested inside closed furnaces, none of the well-established methods for crack detection and observation can be applied. In our contribution, we present a simple statistical method to estimate the time required for crack initiation.

  10. Modeling of global surface air temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusakova, M. A.; Karlin, L. N.

    2012-04-01

    A model to assess a number of factors, such as total solar irradiance, albedo, greenhouse gases and water vapor, affecting climate change has been developed on the basis of Earth's radiation balance principle. To develop the model solar energy transformation in the atmosphere was investigated. It's a common knowledge, that part of the incoming radiation is reflected into space from the atmosphere, land and water surfaces, and another part is absorbed by the Earth's surface. Some part of outdoing terrestrial radiation is retained in the atmosphere by greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide) and water vapor. Making use of the regression analysis a correlation between concentration of greenhouse gases, water vapor and global surface air temperature was obtained which, it is turn, made it possible to develop the proposed model. The model showed that even smallest fluctuations of total solar irradiance intensify both positive and negative feedback which give rise to considerable changes in global surface air temperature. The model was used both to reconstruct the global surface air temperature for the 1981-2005 period and to predict global surface air temperature until 2030. The reconstructions of global surface air temperature for 1981-2005 showed the models validity. The model makes it possible to assess contribution of the factors listed above in climate change.

  11. Analysis of Contact Melting Driven by Surface Heat Flux Around a Cylinder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.S. Zhao; W.Z. Chen; F.R. Sun; Z.Y. Chen

    2008-01-01

    The contact melting of phase change material around a moving horizontal cylindrical heat source, which descended under its own weight, is investigated in this article. A melting model under constant surface heat flux is established. The analytical results for thickness and pressure distributions inside melt layer and steady melting velocity are obtained by using contact melting theory. The melting law is discussed, and compared with that of contact melting driven by temperature difference. It is found that quasi-steady melting velocity is determined by heat flux of heat source, and the variation of heat source density has less effect on melting velocity.

  12. Low-Flow Film Boiling Heat Transfer on Vertical Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe Andersen, J. G.; Dix, G. E.; Leonard, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The phenomenon of film boiling heat transfer for high wall temperatures has been investigated. Based on the assumption of laminar flow for the film, the continuity, momentum, and energy equations for the vapor film are solved and a Bromley-type analytical expression for the heat transfer...... length, an average film boiling heat transfer coefficient is obtained....

  13. Inverse heat transfer problem in digital temperature control in plate fin and tube heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taler, Dawid; Sury, Adam

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the paper is a steady-state inverse heat transfer problem for plate-fin and tube heat exchangers. The objective of the process control is to adjust the number of fan revolutions per minute so that the water temperature at the heat exchanger outlet is equal to a preset value. Two control techniques were developed. The first is based on the presented mathematical model of the heat exchanger while the second is a digital proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control. The first procedure is very stable. The digital PID controller becomes unstable if the water volumetric flow rate changes significantly. The developed techniques were implemented in digital control system of the water exit temperature in a plate fin and tube heat exchanger. The measured exit temperature of the water was very close to the set value of the temperature if the first method was used. The experiments showed that the PID controller works also well but becomes frequently unstable.

  14. A temperature-dependent surface free energy model for solid single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tianbao; Fang, Daining; Yang, Yazheng

    2017-01-01

    A temperature-dependent theoretical model for the surface free energy of the solid single crystals is established. This model relates the surface free energy at the elevated temperatures to that at the reference temperature, the temperature-dependent specific heat at constant pressure and coefficient of the linear thermal expansion, the heat of phase transition, the melting heat, and the vapor heat. As examples, the surface free energies of Fe, Cu, Al, Ni, and Pb from 0 K to melting points are calculated and are in reasonable agreement with these from Tyson's theories and the experimental results. This model has obvious advantages compared to Tyson's semi-empirical equations from the aspect of physical meaning, applicable condition, and accuracy. The study shows that the surface free energy of the solid single crystals firstly remains approximately constant and then decreases linearly as temperature increases from 0 K to melting point.

  15. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Low-temperature colossal supersaturation (LTCSS) is a novel surface hardening method for carburization of austenitic stainless steels (SS) without the precipitation of carbides. The formation of carbides is kinetically suppressed, enabling extremely high or colossal carbon supersaturation. As a result, surface carbon concentrations in excess of 12 at. % are routinely achieved. This treatment increases the surface hardness by a factor of four to five, improving resistance to wear, corrosion, and fatigue, with significant retained ductility. LTCSS is a diffusional surface hardening process that provides a uniform and conformal hardened gradient surface with no risk of delamination or peeling. The treatment retains the austenitic phase and is completely non-magnetic. In addition, because parts are treated at low temperature, they do not distort or change dimensions. During this treatment, carbon diffusion proceeds into the metal at temperatures that constrain substitutional diffusion or mobility between the metal alloy elements. Though immobilized and unable to assemble to form carbides, chromium and similar alloying elements nonetheless draw enormous amounts of carbon into their interstitial spaces. The carbon in the interstitial spaces of the alloy crystals makes the surface harder than ever achieved before by more conventional heat treating or diffusion process. The carbon solid solution manifests a Vickers hardness often exceeding 1000 HV (equivalent to 70 HRC). This project objective was to extend the LTCSS treatment to other austenitic alloys, and to quantify improvements in fatigue, corrosion, and wear resistance. Highlights from the research include the following: • Extension of the applicability of the LTCSS process to a broad range of austenitic and duplex grades of steels • Demonstration of LTCSS ability for a variety of different component shapes and sizes • Detailed microstructural characterization of LTCSS-treated samples of 316L and other alloys

  16. Sorption and agglutination phenomenon of nanofluids on a plain heating surface during pool boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhen-hua; Liao, Liang [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 200030 Shanghai (China)

    2008-05-15

    The pool nucleate boiling heat transfer experiments of water (H{sub 2}O) based and alcohol (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) based nanofluids and nanoparticles-suspensions on the plain heated copper surface were carried out. The study was focused on the sorption and agglutination phenomenon of nanofluids on a heated surface. The nanofluids consisted of the base liquid, the nanoparticles and the surfactant. The nanoparticles-suspensions consisted of the base liquid and nanoparticles. The both liquids of water and alcohol and both nanoparticles of CuO and SiO{sub 2} were used. The surfactant was sodium dodecyl benzene sulphate (SDBS). The experimental results show that for nanofluids, the agglutination phenomenon occurred on the heated surface when the wall temperature was over 112{sup o}C and steady nucleated boiling experiment could not be carried out. The reason was that an unsteady porous agglutination layer was formed on the heated surface. However, for nanoparticles-suspensions, no agglutination phenomenon occurred on the heating surface and the steady boiling could be carried out in the whole nucleate boiling region. For the both of alcohol based nanofluids and nano-suspensions, no agglutination phenomenon occurred on the heating surface and steady nucleate boiling experiment could be carried out in the whole nucleate boiling region whose wall temperature did not exceed 112{sup o}C. The boiling heat transfer characteristics of the nanofluids and nanoparticles-suspensions are somewhat poor compared with that of the base fluids, since the decrease of the active nucleate cavities on the heating surface with a very thin nanoparticles sorption layer. The very thin nanoparticles sorption layer also caused a decrease in the solid-liquid contact angle on the heating surface which leaded to an increase of the critical heat flux (CHF). (author)

  17. Contact angle and droplet heat transfer during evaporation on structured and smooth surfaces of heated wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyura, S. Y.

    2017-08-01

    Water evaporation in a wide range of droplet diameters and wall temperatures on the structured and smooth surfaces were studied experimentally. Linear dependence of evaporation rate (dV/dt) on a droplet radius varies when the volume is greater than 40-60 μl. The static contact angles on the structured surface vary with a droplet diameter for high wall superheating. Dependence of the contact angle on diameter for the corrugated surface is defined by a change in both potential energy barrier U and three-phase contact line tension τcl. This energy barrier for the structured wall changes with an increase in the initial droplet diameter and becomes constant for the large droplets. For high wall superheating, the power in the law of evaporation increases from 1 to 1.45 with an increase in the initial droplet diameter. Depending on the droplet radius, number of droplets and heater length, four different characters of evaporation are realized. Complete droplet evaporation time on structured surface is less than smooth wall. Heat transfer coefficient is greater for structured wall than smooth one. When simulating droplet evaporation and heat transfer, it is necessary to take into account free convection of air and vapor.

  18. Experimental study on condensation heat transfer of steam on vertical titanium plates with different surface energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baojin, Qi; Li, Zhang; Hong, Xu; Yan, Sun [State-Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2011-01-15

    Visual experiments were employed to investigate heat transfer characteristics of steam on vertical titanium plates with/without surface modifications for different surface energies. Stable dropwise condensation and filmwise condensation were achieved on two surface modification titanium plates, respectively. Dropwise and rivulet filmwise co-existing condensation form of steam was observed on unmodified titanium surfaces. With increase in the surface subcooling, the ratio of area ({eta}) covered by drops decreased and departure diameter of droplets increased, resulting in a decrease in condensation heat transfer coefficient. Condensation heat transfer coefficient decreased sharply with the values of {eta} decreasing when the fraction of the surface area covered by drops was greater than that covered by rivulets. Otherwise, the value of {eta} had little effect on the heat transfer performance. Based on the experimental phenomena observed, the heat flux through the surface was proposed to express as the sum of the heat flux through the dropwise region and rivulet filmwise region. The heat flux through the whole surface was the weighted mean value of the two regions mentioned above. The model presented explains the gradual change of heat transfer coefficient for transition condensation with the ratio of area covered by drops. The simulation results agreed well with the present experimental data when the subcooling temperature is lower than 10 C. (author)

  19. Selecting the induction heating for normalization of deposited surfaces of cylindrical parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олена Валеріївна Бережна

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The machine parts recovered by electric contact surfacing with metal strip are characterized by high loading of the surface layer, which has a significant impact on their performance. Therefore, the improvement of the operational stability of fast-wearing machine parts through the use of combined treatment technologies is required. Not all the work-piece but just the worn zones are subjected to recovery with electric contact surfacing; the tape thickness and depth of the heat affected zone being not more than a few millimeters. Therefore, the most optimal in this case is the use of a local surface heating method of high frequency currents. This method has economical benefits because there is no need to heat the entire work-piece. The induction heating mode at a constant power density has been proposed and analytically investigated. The ratios that make it possible to determine the main heating parameters ensuring calculation of the inductor for the normalization of the reconstructed surface of cylindrical parts have been given. These parameters are: specific power, frequency and warm-up time. The proposed induction heating mode is intermediate between the quenching and cross-cutting heating and makes it possible to simultaneously obtain the required temperatures at the surface and at the predetermined depth of the heated layer of cylindrical parts with the normalization of their surfaces restored with electric contact surfacing

  20. Temperature of the Limiter Surface Measured by IR Camera in HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Bo; LIN Hui; HUANG Juan; LUO Nanchang; GONG Xianzu; ZHANG Xiaodong; LUO Guangnan; YANG Zhongshi; LI Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Temperature measurement by IR (infrared) camera was performed on HT-7 tokamak, particularly during long pulse discharges, during which the temperature of the hot spots on the belt limiter exceeded 1000℃. The heat load on the surface of the movable limiter could be obtained through ANSYS with the temperature measured by IR-camera. This work could be important for the temperature measurement and heat load study on the first wall of EAST device.

  1. Towards convective heat transfer enhancement: surface modification, characterization and measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, T. J.; Thakur, D. B.; Van der Meer, T. H.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, heat transfer surface modification and heat transfer measurement technique is developed. Heat transfer investigation was aimed to study the effect of carbon nano fibers (extremely high thermal conductive material) on the enhancement level in heat transfer. Synthesis of these carbon nano structures is achieved using thermal catalytic chemical vapor deposition process (TCCVD) on a 50 μm pure nickel (Ni270) wire. The micro wire samples covered with CNF layers were subjected to a uniform flow from a nozzle. Heat transfer measurement was achieved by a controlled heat dissipation through the micro wire to attain a constant temperature during the flow. This measurement technique is adopted from hot wire anemometry calibration method. Synthesis of carbon nano structures, heat transfer surface characterization and measurement technique are evaluated. Preliminary results indicate that an average enhancement in Nusselt Number of 17% is achieved.

  2. Heat and mass transfer boundary conditions at the surface of a heated sessile droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Anna-Lena; Lundström, T. Staffan

    2017-07-01

    This work numerically investigates how the boundary conditions of a heated sessile water droplet should be defined in order to include effects of both ambient and internal flow. Significance of water vapor, Marangoni convection, separate simulations of the external and internal flow, and influence of contact angle throughout drying is studied. The quasi-steady simulations are carried out with Computational Fluid Dynamics and conduction, natural convection and Marangoni convection are accounted for inside the droplet. For the studied conditions, a noticeable effect of buoyancy due to evaporation is observed. Hence, the inclusion of moisture increases the maximum velocities in the external flow. Marangoni convection will, in its turn, increase the velocity within the droplet with up to three orders of magnitude. Results furthermore show that the internal and ambient flow can be simulated separately for the conditions studied, and the accuracy is improved if the internal temperature gradient is low, e.g. if Marangoni convection is present. Simultaneous simulations of the domains are however preferred at high plate temperatures if both internal and external flows are dominated by buoyancy and natural convection. The importance of a spatially resolved heat and mass transfer boundary condition is, in its turn, increased if the internal velocity is small or if there is a large variation of the transfer coefficients at the surface. Finally, the results indicate that when the internal convective heat transport is small, a rather constant evaporation rate may be obtained throughout the drying at certain conditions.

  3. Heat Transfer and Cooling Techniques at Low Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Baudouy, B

    2014-07-17

    The first part of this chapter gives an introduction to heat transfer and cooling techniques at low temperature. We review the fundamental laws of heat transfer (conduction, convection and radiation) and give useful data specific to cryogenic conditions (thermal contact resistance, total emissivity of materials and heat transfer correlation in forced or boiling flow for example) used in the design of cooling systems. In the second part, we review the main cooling techniques at low temperature, with or without cryogen, from the simplest ones (bath cooling) to the ones involving the use of cryocoolers without forgetting the cooling flow techniques.

  4. Automated Hybrid Microwave Heating for Lunar Surface Solidification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project addresses the need for a system that will provide automated lunar surface stabilization via hybrid microwave heating. Surface stabilization is...

  5. Heat mass transfer model of fouling process of calcium carbonate on heat transfer surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QUAN ZhenHua; CHEN YongChang; MA ChongFang

    2008-01-01

    A new heat mass transfer model was developed to predict the fouling process of calcium carbonate on heat transfer surface.The model took into account not only the crystallization fouling but also the particle fouling which was formed on the heat transfer surface by the suspension particles of calcium carbonate in the su-persaturated solution.Based on experimental results of the fouling process,the deposition and removal rates of the mixing fouling were expressed.Furthermore,the coupling effect of temperature with the fouling process was considered in the physics model.As a result the fouling resistance varying with time was obtained to describe the fouling process and the prediction was compared with experimental data under same conditions.The results showed that the present model could give a good prediction of fouling process,and the deviation was less than 15% of the experimental data in most cases.The new model is credible to predict the fouling process.

  6. Temperatures and Heat Flows in a Soil Enclosing a Slinky Horizontal Heat Exchanger

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Neuberger; Radomír Adamovský; Michaela Šeďová

    2014-01-01

    Temperature changes and heat flows in soils that host “slinky”-type horizontal heat exchangers are complex, but need to be understood if robust quantification of the thermal energy available to a ground-source heat pump is to be achieved. Of particular interest is the capacity of the thermal energy content of the soil to regenerate when the heat exchangers are not operating. Analysis of specific heat flows and the specific thermal energy regime within the soil, including that captured by the ...

  7. Multi-Temperature Heat Pump with Cascade Compressor Connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sit M.L.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The object of the study is a multifunctional heat pump with several evaporators and condensers designed for simultaneous provision of technological processes with heat and cold. The aim of the work is the development and study of the scheme for this type of heat pumps, which ensures minimum irreversibility in the "compressor-gas coolers" chain, without the use of adjustable ejectors installed after evaporators and used as flow mixers. The obtained technical solution ensures the stabilization of the heat pump coefficient of performance (COP and prescribed thermal regimes of heat exchangers at a variable flow rate of the refrigerant. The novelty of the elaboration is inclusion a compressor of the first stage with a serially connected intermediate heat exchanger and a control valve that are located before the compressor inlet of the second stage of the heat pump, which allows to establish a rational pressure after the first stage of the compressors. A scheme is proposed for regulating the temperature at the inlet of the first stage compressors by regulating the flow through the primary circuits of the recuperative heat exchangers. The first stage compressor control system allows providing the required modes of operation of the heat pump. It is established, because of the exergetic analysis of the sections of the hydraulic circuit of heat pump located between the evaporators and gas coolers that the reduction of irreversible losses in the heat pump is ensured due to the optimal choice of the superheat value of the gas after the evaporators.

  8. Surface wettability effects on critical heat flux of boiling heat transfer using nanoparticle coatings

    KAUST Repository

    Hsu, Chin-Chi

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of surface wettability on pool boiling heat transfer. Nano-silica particle coatings were used to vary the wettability of the copper surface from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic by modifying surface topography and chemistry. Experimental results show that critical heat flux (CHF) values are higher in the hydrophilic region. Conversely, CHF values are lower in the hydrophobic region. The experimental CHF data of the modified surface do not fit the classical models. Therefore, this study proposes a simple model to build the nexus between the surface wettability and the growth of bubbles on the heating surface. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Unsteady stagnation point flow and heat transfer over a stretching/shrinking sheet with prescribed surface heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ishak

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is carried out to study the unsteady two dimensional stagnation point flow and heat transfer over a stretching/shrinking sheet with prescribed surface heat flux. The governing partial differential equations are converted into nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity variables, and solved numerically. The effects of the unsteadiness parameter A, stretching/shrinking parameter ε and Prandtl number Pr on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are studied. It is found that the skin friction f′′(0 and the local Nusselt number 1θ(0 increase as the the unsteadiness parameter A increases. Moreover, the velocity and temperature increase as ε and Pr increase.

  10. Measurement of natural convective heat transfer coefficient along the surface of a heated wire using digital holographic interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Varun; Kumar, Manoj; Shakher, Chandra

    2014-09-20

    In this paper, the local convective heat transfer coefficient (h) is measured along the surface of an electrically heated vertical wire using digital holographic interferometry (DHI). Experiments are conducted on wires of different diameters. The experimentally measured values are within the range as given in the literature. DHI is expected to provide a more accurate local convective heat transfer coefficient (h) as the value of the temperature gradient required for the calculation of "h" can be obtained more accurately than by other existing optical interferometric techniques without the use of a phase shifting technique. This is because in digital holography phase measurement accuracy is expected to be higher.

  11. Heat Flux at the Surface of Metal Foil Heater under Evaporating Sessile Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Marchuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaporating water drops on a horizontal heated substrate were investigated experimentally. The heater was made of a constantan foil with the thickness of 25 μm and size of 42 × 35 mm2. The temperature of the bottom foil surface was measured by the infrared (IR camera. To determine the heat flux density during evaporation of liquid near the contact line, the Cauchy problem for the heat equation was solved using the temperature data. The maximum heat flux density is obtained in the contact line region and exceeds the average heat flux density from the entire foil surface by the factor of 5–7. The average heat flux density in the region wetted by the drop exceeds the average heat flux density from the entire foil surface by the factor of 3–5. This fact is explained by the heat influx from the foil periphery to the drop due to the relatively high heat conductivity coefficient of the foil material and high evaporation rate in the contact line region. Heat flux density profiles for pairs of sessile droplets are also investigated.

  12. Low Temperature Heat Capacity of a Severely Deformed Metallic Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünz, Jonas; Brink, Tobias; Tsuchiya, Koichi; Meng, Fanqiang; Wilde, Gerhard; Albe, Karsten

    2014-04-01

    The low temperature heat capacity of amorphous materials reveals a low-frequency enhancement (boson peak) of the vibrational density of states, as compared with the Debye law. By measuring the low-temperature heat capacity of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass relative to a crystalline reference state, we show that the heat capacity of the glass is strongly enhanced after severe plastic deformation by high-pressure torsion, while subsequent thermal annealing at elevated temperatures leads to a significant reduction. The detailed analysis of corresponding molecular dynamics simulations of an amorphous Zr-Cu glass shows that the change in heat capacity is primarily due to enhanced low-frequency modes within the shear band region.

  13. TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION MONITORING AND ANALYSES AT DIFFERENT HEATING CONTROL PRINCIPLES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Rode, Carsten; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2010-01-01

    control sensor which was already installed. The room was heated by means of electrical radiators, which should be able to control the indoor environment to guarantee the desired thermal conditions for the occupants and to supply heat according to desired load patterns. Five series of experiments were done......In the last decades significant efforts have been made to reduce energy use in buildings. Heating, cooling and ventilation systems are responsible for 30-40% of the energy consumption in buildings. Although they are evaluated based on the energy performance they should guarantee the desired thermal...... comfort conditions for the building occupants. During the winter and spring of 2009 a study based on analyses of the local temperatures distribution in a room was performed. The purpose was to compare the temperature distribution in the room with the temperature measured and logged by the heating system...

  14. Analytical analysis of the Pennes bioheat transfer equation with sinusoidal heat flux condition on skin surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tzu-Ching; Yuan, Ping; Lin, Win-Li; Kou, Hong-Sen

    2007-11-01

    This study focuses on the effect of the temperature response of a semi-infinite biological tissue due to a sinusoidal heat flux at the skin. The Pennes bioheat transfer equation such as rho(t)c(t)( partial differentialT/ partial differentialt)+W(b)c(b)(T-T(a))=k partial differential(2)T/ partial differentialx(2) with the oscillatory heat flux boundary condition such as q(0,t)=q(0)e(iomegat) was investigated. By using the Laplace transform, the analytical solution of the Pennes bioheat transfer equation with surface sinusoidal heating condition is found. This analytical expression is suitable for describing the transient temperature response of tissue for the whole time domain from the starting periodic oscillation to the final steady periodic oscillation. The results show that the temperature oscillation due to the sinusoidal heating on the skin surface is unstable in the initial period. Further, it is unavailable to predict the blood perfusion rate via the phase shifting between the surface heat flux and the surface temperature. Moreover, the lower frequency of sinusoidal heat flux on the skin surface induces a more sensitive phase shift response to the blood perfusion rate change, but extends the beginning time of sampling because of the avoidance of the unavailable first cyclic oscillation.

  15. Heat and Mass Transfer during Chemical Vapor Deposition on the Particle Surface Subjected to Nanosecond Laser Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Quan; He, Yaling; Mao, Yijin

    2016-01-01

    A thermal model of chemical vapor deposition of titanium nitride (TiN) on the spherical particle surface under irradiation by a nanosecond laser pulse is presented in this paper. Heat and mass transfer on a single spherical metal powder particle surface subjected to temporal Gaussian heat flux is investigated analytically. The chemical reaction on the particle surface and the mass transfer in the gas phase are also considered. The surface temperature, thermal penetration depth, and deposited film thickness under different laser fluence, pulse width, initial particle temperature, and particle radius are investigated. The effect of total pressure in the reaction chamber on deposition rate is studied as well. The particle-level model presented in this paper is an important step toward development of multiscale model of LCVI.

  16. Heat Flux and Wall Temperature Estimates for the NASA Langley HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuda, Vincent, Jr.; Hass, Neal E.

    2010-01-01

    An objective of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) Program Flight 2 is to provide validation data for high enthalpy scramjet prediction tools through a single flight test and accompanying ground tests of the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR) tested in the NASA LaRC Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF). The HDCR is a full-scale, copper heat sink structure designed to simulate the isolator entrance conditions and isolator, pilot, and combustor section of the HIFiRE flight test experiment flowpath and is fully instrumented to assess combustion performance over a range of operating conditions simulating flight from Mach 5.5 to 8.5 and for various fueling schemes. As part of the instrumentation package, temperature and heat flux sensors were provided along the flowpath surface and also imbedded in the structure. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the surface heat flux and wall temperature of the Zirconia coated copper wall can be obtained with a water-cooled heat flux gage and a sub-surface temperature measurement. An algorithm was developed which used these two measurements to reconstruct the surface conditions along the flowpath. Determinations of the surface conditions of the Zirconia coating were conducted for a variety of conditions.

  17. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 2 Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The global land surface temperature databank contains monthly timescale mean, max, and min temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was developed...

  18. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 2 Daily

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The global land surface temperature databank contains monthly timescale mean, max, and min temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was developed...

  19. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 3 Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Land Surface Temperature Databank contains monthly timescale mean, maximum, and minimum temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was...

  20. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 1 Daily

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The global land surface temperature databank contains monthly timescale mean, max, and min temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was developed...

  1. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 1 Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The global land surface temperature databank contains monthly timescale mean, max, and min temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was developed...

  2. The effect of heating rate on the surface chemistry of NiTi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undisz, Andreas; Hanke, Robert; Freiberg, Katharina E; Hoffmann, Volker; Rettenmayr, Markus

    2014-11-01

    The impact of the heating rate on the Ni content at the surface of the oxide layer of biomedical NiTi is explored. Heat treatment emulating common shape-setting procedures was performed by means of conventional and inductive heating for similar annealing time and temperature, applying various heating rates from ~0.25 K s(-1) to 250 K s(-1). A glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy method was established and employed to evaluate concentration profiles of Ni, Ti and O in the near-surface region at high resolution. The Ni content at the surface of the differently treated samples varies significantly, with maximum surface Ni concentrations of ~20 at.% at the lowest and ~1.5 at.% at the highest heating rate, i.e. the total amount of Ni contained in the surface region of the oxide layer decreases by >15 times. Consequently, the heating rate is a determinant for the biomedical characteristics of NiTi, especially since Ni available at the surface of the oxide layer may affect the hemocompatibility and be released promptly after surgical application of a respective implant. Furthermore, apparently contradictory results presented in the literature reporting surface Ni concentrations of ~3 at.% to >20 at.% after heat treatment are consistently explained considering the ascertained effect of the heating rate.

  3. Urban heat : natural and anthropogenic factors influencing urban air temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theeuwes, N.E.

    2015-01-01

    The urban heat island effect is a phenomenon observed worldwide, i.e. evening and nocturnal temperatures in cities are usually several degrees higher than in the surrounding countryside. The main goal of this thesis is to understand the processes that drive the urban air temperature and the urban he

  4. Study of the heat-transfer crisis on heat-release surfaces of annular channels with swirl and transit flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltenko, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    The results of the experimental study of the heat-transfer crisis on heat-release surfaces of annular channels with swirl and transit flow are presented. The experiments were carried out using electric heated annular channels with one and (or) two heat-release surfaces. For the organization of transit flow on a convex heat-release surface, four longitudinal ribs were installed uniformly at its perimeter. Swirl flow was realized using a capillary wound tightly (without gaps) on the ribs. The ratio between swirl and transit flows in the annular gap was varied by applying longitudinal ribs of different height. The experiments were carried out using a closed-type circulatory system. The experimental data were obtained in a wide range of regime parameters. Both water heated to the temperature less than the saturation temperature and water-steam mixture were fed at the inlet of the channels. For the measurement of the temperature of the heat-release surfaces, chromel-copel thermocouples were used. It was shown that the presence of swirl flow on a convex heatrelease surface led to a significant decrease in critical heat flows (CHF) compared to a smooth surface. To increase CHF, it was proposed to use the interaction of swirl flows of the heat carrier. The second swirl flow was transit flow, i.e., swirl flow with the step equal to infinity. It was shown that CHF values for a channel with swirl and transit flow in all the studied range of regime parameters was higher than CHF values for both a smooth annular channel and a channel with swirl. The empirical ratios describing the dependence of CHF on convex and concave heat-release surfaces of annular channels with swirl and transit flow on the geometrical characteristics of channels and the regime parameters were obtained. The experiments were carried out at the pressure p = 3.0-16.0 MPa and the mass velocity ρw = 250-3000 kg/(m2s).

  5. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and moisture transport during extreme surface heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Massman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available With increasing use of prescribed fire by land managers and increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change comes the need to improve modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This issue is addressed here by developing a one-dimensional non-equilibrium model of soil evaporation and transport of heat, soil moisture, and water vapor, for use with surface forcing ranging from daily solar cycles to extreme conditions encountered during fires. The model employs a linearized Crank–Nicolson scheme for the conservation equations of energy and mass and its performance is evaluated against dynamic soil temperature and moisture observations obtained during laboratory experiments on soil samples exposed to surface heat fluxes ranging between 10 000 and 50 000 W m−2. The Hertz–Knudsen equation is the basis for constructing the model's non-equilibrium evaporative source term. The model includes a dynamic residual soil moisture as a function of temperature and soil water potential, which allows the model to capture some of the dynamic aspects of the strongly bound soil moisture that seems to require temperatures well beyond 150 °C to fully evaporate. Furthermore, the model emulates the observed increase in soil moisture ahead of the drying front and the hiatus in the soil temperature rise during the strongly evaporative stage of drying. It also captures the observed rapid evaporation of soil moisture that occurs at relatively low temperatures (50–90 °C. Sensitivity analyses indicate that the model's success results primarily from the use of a temperature and moisture potential dependent condensation coefficient in the evaporative source term. The model's solution for water vapor density (and vapor pressure, which can exceed one standard atmosphere, cannot be experimentally verified, but they are supported by results from (earlier and very different models developed for somewhat different purposes and for different porous

  6. High-Temperature Heat Treatment Study on a Large-Grain Nb Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ciovati, P. Dhakal, R. Myneni, P. Maheshwari, F.A. Stevie

    2011-07-01

    Improvement of the cavity performance by a high-temperature heat-treatment without subsequent chemical etching have been reported for large-grain Nb cavities treated by buffered chemical polishing, as well as for a fine-grain cavity treated by vertical electropolishing. Changes in the quality factor, Q{sub 0}, and maximum peak surface magnetic field achieved in a large-grain Nb single-cell cavity have been determined as a function of the heat treatment temperature, between 600 °C and 1200 °C. The highest Q{sub 0} improvement of about 30% was obtained after heat-treatment at 800 °C-1000 °C. Measurements by secondary ion mass spectrometry on large-grain samples heat-treated with the cavity showed large reduction of hydrogen concentration after heat treatment.

  7. Calibration of surface temperature on rocky exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap Jagadeesh, Madhu

    2016-07-01

    Study of exoplanets and the search for life elsewhere has been a very fascinating area in recent years. Presently, lots of efforts have been channelled in this direction in the form of space exploration and the ultimate search for the habitable planet. One of the parametric methods to analyse the data available from the missions such as Kepler, CoRoT, etc, is the Earth Similarity Index (ESI), defined as a number between zero (no similarity) and one (identical to Earth), introduced to assess the Earth likeness of exoplanets. A multi-parameter ESI scale depends on the radius, density, escape velocity and surface temperature of exoplanets. Our objective is to establish how exactly the individual parameters, entering the interior ESI and surface ESI, are contributing to the global ESI, using the graphical analysis. Presently, the surface temperature estimates are following a correction factor of 30 K, based on the Earth's green-house effect. The main objective of this work in calculations of the global ESI using the HabCat data is to introduce a new method to better estimate the surface temperature of exoplanets, from theoretical formula with fixed albedo factor and emissivity (Earth values). From the graphical analysis of the known data for the Solar System objects, we established the calibration relation between surface and equilibrium temperatures for the Solar System objects. Using extrapolation we found that the power function is the closest description of the trend to attain surface temperature. From this we conclude that the correction term becomes very effective way to calculate the accurate value of the surface temperature, for further analysis with our graphical methodology.

  8. Pressurized Recuperator For Heat Recovery In Industrial High Temperature Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recuperators and regenerators are important devices for heat recovery systems in technological lines of industrial processes and should have high air preheating temperature, low flow resistance and a long service life. The use of heat recovery systems is particularly important in high-temperature industrial processes (especially in metallurgy where large amounts of thermal energy are lost to the environment. The article presents the process design for a high efficiency recuperator intended to work at high operating parameters: air pressure up to 1.2 MPa and temperature of heating up to 900°C. The results of thermal and gas-dynamic calculations were based on an algorithm developed for determination of the recuperation process parameters. The proposed technical solution of the recuperator and determined recuperation parameters ensure its operation under maximum temperature conditions.

  9. Mesoscopic near-field radiative heat transfer at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasilta, Ilari; Geng, Zhuoran; Chaudhuri, Saumyadip; Koppinen, Panu

    2015-03-01

    Near-field radiative heat transfer has mostly been discussed at room temperatures and/or macroscopic scale geometries. Here, we discuss our recent theoretical and experimental advances in understanding near-field transfer at ultra-low temperatures below 1K. As the thermal wavelengths increase with lowering temperature, we show that with sensitive tunnel junction bolometers it is possible to study near-field transfer up to distances ~ 10 μm currently, even though the power levels are low. In addition, these type of experiments correspond to the extreme near-field limit, as the near-field region starts at ~ mm distances at 0.1 K, and could have theoretical power enhancement factors of the order of 1010. Preliminary results on heat transfer between two parallel metallic wires are presented. We also comment on possible areas were such heat transfer might be relevant, such as densely packed arrays of low-temperature detectors.

  10. Biological control of surface temperature in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyendranath, Shubha; Gouveia, Albert D.; Shetye, Satish R.; Ravindran, P.; Platt, Trevor

    1991-01-01

    In the Arabian Sea, the southwest monsoon promotes seasonal upwelling of deep water, which supplies nutrients to the surface layer and leads to a marked increase in phytoplankton growth. Remotely sensed data on ocean color are used here to show that the resulting distribution of phytoplankton exerts a controlling influence on the seasonal evolution of sea surface temperature. This results in a corresponding modification of ocean-atmosphere heat exchange on regional and seasonal scales. It is shown that this biological mechanism may provide an important regulating influence on ocean-atmosphere interactions.

  11. Integrative inversion of land surface component temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wenjie; XU Xiru

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the row winter wheat was selected as the example to study the component temperature inversion method of land surface target in detail. The result showed that the structural pattern of row crop can affect the inversion precision of component temperature evidently. Choosing appropriate structural pattern of row crop can improve the inversion precision significantly. The iterative method combining inverse matrix was a stable method that was fit for inversing component temperature of land surface target. The result of simulation and field experiment showed that the integrative method could remarkably improve the inversion accuracy of the lighted soil surface temperature and the top layer canopy temperature, and enhance inversion stability of components temperature. Just two parameters were sufficient for accurate atmospheric correction of multi-angle and multi-spectral thermal infrared data: atmospheric transmittance and the atmospheric upwelling radiance. If the atmospheric parameters and component temperature can be inversed synchronously, the really and truly accurate atmospheric correction can be achieved. The validation using ATSRII data showed that the method was useful.

  12. Performance of ultra low temperature district heating systems with utility plant and booster heat pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Thorsen, Jan Eric; Markussen, Wiebke Brix

    2017-01-01

    and power (CHP) and central heat pumps (HPs). The analysis focussed on the characteristic heat demands of newly build multi-story buildings and the results were based on the ratio of the individual demands compared to the total. It was found that the optimal return temperature was dependent on the forward...

  13. The Heat Is On! Using Particle Models to Change Students' Conceptions of Heat and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Austin Manning; Townsend, J. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Elementary, middle-level, and high school science teachers commonly find their students have misconceptions about heat and temperature. Unfortunately, student misconceptions are difficult to modify or change and can prevent students from learning the accurate scientific explanation. In order to improve our students' understanding of heat and…

  14. Effect of heat treatment on structure, surface composition, infrared emission and surface electrical properties of tourmaline

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dengliang; Liu, Shuxin

    2017-02-01

    Crystal structure, surface composition, infrared emission properties and surface electrical properties of tourmaline from Guangxi of China, when subjected to heat treatment in air atmosphere had been studied by some methods, including X-ray fluorescence spectrum (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) meter, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Zeta potential analyzer, etc. Experimental results show that the unit cell of tourmaline would shrink during heat treatment because Fe2+ were oxidized. Moreover, the Fe3+/Fetotal inside tourmaline can be raised after treatment. Infrared normal total emissivity of tourmaline reaches 0.87, and infrared radiation energy density is 4.56 × 102W/m2. It can maintain excellent infrared emission properties at high temperature. Simultaneously, tourmaline presents negative Zeta potential in the aqueous solution, and its Zeta potential reaches ‑18.04 mV. Zeta potential of tourmaline was increased to ‑24.83 mV after heat treatment at 400∘C, and decrease to ‑11.78 mV after heat treatment at 600∘C. These findings may provide reference data for tourmaline’s application in the field of functional materials.

  15. Heat-transfer dynamics during cryogen spray cooling of substrate at different initial temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Wangcun [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, 1002 Health Sciences Road East, Irvine, CA 92612-1475 (United States); Aguilar, Guillermo [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, 1002 Health Sciences Road East, Irvine, CA 92612-1475 (United States); Wang Guoxiang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Akron, OH 44325 (United States); Nelson, J Stuart [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, 1002 Health Sciences Road East, Irvine, CA 92612-1475 (United States)

    2004-12-07

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used to minimize the risk of epidermal damage during laser dermatologic therapy. However, the dominant mechanisms of heat transfer during the transient cooling process are incompletely understood. The objective of this study is to elucidate the physics of CSC by measuring the effect of initial substrate temperature (T{sub 0}) on cooling dynamics. Cryogen was delivered by a straight-tube nozzle onto a skin phantom. A fast-response thermocouple was used to record the phantom temperature changes before, during and after the cryogen spray. Surface heat fluxes (q'') and heat-transfer coefficients (h) were computed using an inverse heat conduction algorithm. The maximum surface heat flux (q''{sub max}) was observed to increase with T{sub 0}. The surface temperature corresponding to q''{sub max} also increased with T{sub 0} but the latter has no significant effect on h. It is concluded that heat transfer between the cryogen spray and skin phantom remains in the nucleate boiling region even if T{sub 0} is 80 {sup 0}C.

  16. Surface latent heat flux as an earthquake precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dey

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of surface latent heat flux (SLHF from the epicentral regions of five recent earthquakes that occurred in close proximity to the oceans has been found to show anomalous behavior. The maximum increase of SLHF is found 2–7 days prior to the main earthquake event. This increase is likely due to an ocean-land-atmosphere interaction. The increase of SLHF prior to the main earthquake event is attributed to the increase in infrared thermal (IR temperature in the epicentral and surrounding region. The anomalous increase in SLHF shows great potential in providing early warning of a disastrous earthquake, provided that there is a better understanding of the background noise due to the tides and monsoon in surface latent heat flux. Efforts have been made to understand the level of background noise in the epicentral regions of the five earthquakes considered in the present paper. A comparison of SLHF from the epicentral regions over the coastal earthquakes and the earthquakes that occurred far away from the coast has been made and it has been found that the anomalous behavior of SLHF prior to the main earthquake event is only associated with the coastal earthquakes.

  17. Monitoring the Surface Heat Island (shi) Effects of Industrial Enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şekertekin, A.; Kutoglu, Ş. H.; Kaya, S.; Marangoz, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to present the effects of industrial enterprises on Land Surface Temperature (LST) and to retrieve Surface Heat Island (SHI) maps of these regions. SHI is one of the types of Urban Heat Island (UHI) and as the urban areas grow in a city, UHI effect becomes bigger. The city centre of Zonguldak was chosen as study area and Landsat 5 satellite data were used as materials. Zonguldak has important industrial enterprises like thermal power plants and iron and steel plant. ERDEMIR is the biggest iron and steel plant in Turkey and it is one of the biggest ones in Europe, as well. There are three operating thermal power plants in the region namely CATES, ZETES1 and ZETES2. In order to investigate these industrial regions, Landsat 5 satellite data were processed using mono-window algorithm to retrieve LST and they were acquired on 11.09.1987, 18.09.2007 and 29.09.2011, respectively. The obtained results revealed that from 1987 to 2011, spatial and temporal variability in LST in industrial enterprises became higher than the surroundings. Besides, the sizes of SHIs in 2011 are bigger than the ones in 1987. For the countries and governments, having industrial enterprises is crucial for the development and it is also important to present the community better conditions in life. Thus, decision makers should consider mitigating the effects of these regions on LST.

  18. MONITORING THE SURFACE HEAT ISLAND (SHI EFFECTS OF INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Şekertekin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present the effects of industrial enterprises on Land Surface Temperature (LST and to retrieve Surface Heat Island (SHI maps of these regions. SHI is one of the types of Urban Heat Island (UHI and as the urban areas grow in a city, UHI effect becomes bigger. The city centre of Zonguldak was chosen as study area and Landsat 5 satellite data were used as materials. Zonguldak has important industrial enterprises like thermal power plants and iron and steel plant. ERDEMIR is the biggest iron and steel plant in Turkey and it is one of the biggest ones in Europe, as well. There are three operating thermal power plants in the region namely CATES, ZETES1 and ZETES2. In order to investigate these industrial regions, Landsat 5 satellite data were processed using mono-window algorithm to retrieve LST and they were acquired on 11.09.1987, 18.09.2007 and 29.09.2011, respectively. The obtained results revealed that from 1987 to 2011, spatial and temporal variability in LST in industrial enterprises became higher than the surroundings. Besides, the sizes of SHIs in 2011 are bigger than the ones in 1987. For the countries and governments, having industrial enterprises is crucial for the development and it is also important to present the community better conditions in life. Thus, decision makers should consider mitigating the effects of these regions on LST.

  19. Top-down heating for low substrate temperature synthesis of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G Y; Stolojan, V; Silva, S R P

    2010-06-01

    A top-down heating method to allow for low-temperature large area synthesis of carbon nanotubes using plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition is introduced in this paper. The approach utilizes top-down electromagnetic heating rather than conventional heating from a substrate heater under the electrode. A temperature gradient is created between the Ni catalyst surface and the substrate using a metal thermal control barrier layer, on which carbon nanotubes are grown as a function of the bias voltage, hydrocarbon concentrations and growth conditions. The heat during growth is provided by the plasma or energy coupling to the catalyst via top-down heating, which based on the coupled power density and the cooling of the substrate, in addition to the thermal 'barrier layer' properties will dictate the temperature of the growth surface. This unique approach of top-down heating with suitable cooling schemes, coupled with thermal barriers allows for the low substrate temperature synthesis of carbon nanotubes, scalable to large areas.

  20. Entropy Generation of Desalination Powered by Variable Temperature Waste Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Warsinger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Powering desalination by waste heat is often proposed to mitigate energy consumption and environmental impact; however, thorough technology comparisons are lacking in the literature. This work numerically models the efficiency of six representative desalination technologies powered by waste heat at 50, 70, 90, and 120 °C, where applicable. Entropy generation and Second Law efficiency analysis are applied for the systems and their components. The technologies considered are thermal desalination by multistage flash (MSF, multiple effect distillation (MED, multistage vacuum membrane distillation (MSVMD, humidification-dehumidification (HDH, and organic Rankine cycles (ORCs paired with mechanical technologies of reverse osmosis (RO and mechanical vapor compression (MVC. The most efficient technology was RO, followed by MED. Performances among MSF, MSVMD, and MVC were similar but the relative performance varied with waste heat temperature or system size. Entropy generation in thermal technologies increases at lower waste heat temperatures largely in the feed or brine portions of the various heat exchangers used. This occurs largely because lower temperatures reduce recovery, increasing the relative flow rates of feed and brine. However, HDH (without extractions had the reverse trend, only being competitive at lower temperatures. For the mechanical technologies, the energy efficiency only varies with temperature because of the significant losses from the ORC.

  1. Thermal Characteristics of a Primary Surface Heat Exchanger with Corrugated Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Won Seo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of a primary surface heat exchanger (PSHE with corrugated surfaces. The PSHE was experimentally investigated for a Reynolds number range of 156–921 under various flow conditions on the hot and cold sides. The inlet temperature of the hot side was maintained at 40 °C, while that of the cold side was maintained at 20 °C. A counterflow was used as it has a higher temperature proximity in comparison with a parallel flow. The heat transfer rate and pressure drop were measured for various Reynolds numbers on both the hot and cold sides of the PSHE, with the heat transfer coefficients for both sides computed using a modified Wilson plot method. Based on the results of the experiment, both Nusselt number and friction factor correlations were suggested for a PSHE with corrugated surfaces.

  2. Convective Heat Transfer Between the Wall Surface of a Cavity and the External Main Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiwara, Masahiro; Katto, Yoshiro; Yokoyama, Masanori

    An experimental study has been made under the following conditions for convective heat transfer between the wall surface of a cavity of which both width and depth are 25 mm and the external main stream; the range of Reynolds numbers is from 104 to 105, and the ratio of tripping wire diameter to cavity width is 0.08. The oncoming boundary layer to a cavity is turbulent by the tripping wire with the existing study. Convective heat transfer between a cavity wall surface and the external main stream is treated by the following two phenomena; one is the heat transfer which is related to the temperature difference between the wall surface and the fluid in the cavity, and the other the heat transfer which is related to the temperature difference between the fluid in a cavity and the external mainstream. Experimental data obtained for the foregoing conditions is almost coincide with the existing dimensionless correlations of two of the authors.

  3. Modelling of temperature in deep boreholes and evaluation of geothermal heat flow at Forsmark and Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, Jan; Back, Paer-Erik; Laendell, Maerta; Sundberg, Anders (GEO INNOVA AB, Linkoeping (Sweden))

    2009-06-15

    This report presents modelling of temperature and temperature gradients in boreholes in Laxemar and Forsmark and fitting to measured temperature data. The modelling is performed with an analytical expression including thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, heat flow, internal heat generation and climate events in the past. As a result of the fitting procedure it is also possible to evaluate local heat flow values for the two sites. However, since there is no independent evaluation of the heat flow, uncertainties in for example thermal conductivity, diffusivity and the palaeoclimate temperature curve are transferred into uncertainties in the heat flow. Both for Forsmark and Laxemar, reasonably good fits were achieved between models and data on borehole temperatures. However, none of the general models achieved a fit within the 95% confidence intervals of the measurements. This was achieved in some cases for the additional optimised models. Several of the model parameters are uncertain. A good model fit does not automatically imply that 'correct' values have been used for these parameters. Similar model fits can be expected with different sets of parameter values. The palaeoclimatically corrected surface mean heat flow at Forsmark and Laxemar is suggested to be 61 and 56 mW/m2 respectively. If all uncertainties are combined, including data uncertainties, the total uncertainty in the heat flow determination is judged to be within +12% to -14% for both sites. The corrections for palaeoclimate are quite large and verify the need of site-specific climate descriptions. Estimations of the current ground surface temperature have been made by extrapolations from measured temperature logging. The mean extrapolated ground surface temperature in Forsmark and Laxemar is estimated to 6.5 deg and 7.3 deg C respectively. This is approximately 1.7 deg C higher for Forsmark, and 1.6 deg C higher for Laxemar compared to data in the report SKB-TR-06-23. Comparison with

  4. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadathil, Pankajakshan; Gopalakrishna, V. V.; Muraleedharan, P. M.; Reddy, G. V.; Araligidad, Nilesh; Shenoy, Shrikant

    2002-10-01

    Surface layer temperature inversion occurring in the Bay of Bengal has been addressed. Hydrographic data archived in the Indian Oceanographic Data Center are used to understand various aspects of the temperature inversion of surface layer in the Bay of Bengal, such as occurrence time, characteristics, stability, inter-annual variability and generating mechanisms. Spatially organized temperature inversion occurs in the coastal waters of the western and northeastern Bay during winter (November-February). Although the inversion in the northeastern Bay is sustained until February (with remnants seen even in March), in the western Bay it becomes less organized in January and almost disappears by February. Inversion is confined to the fresh water induced seasonal halocline of the surface layer. Inversions of large temperature difference (of the order of 1.6-2.4°C) and thin layer thickness (10-20 m) are located adjacent to major fresh water inputs from the Ganges, Brahmaputra, Irrawaddy, Krishna and Godavari rivers. The inversion is stable with a mean stability of 3600×10 -8 m -1. Inter-annual variability of the inversion is significantly high and it is caused by the inter-annual variability of fresh water flux and surface cooling in the northern Bay. Fresh water flux leads the occurrence process in association with surface heat flux and advection. The leading role of fresh water flux is understood from the observation that the two occurrence regions of inversion (the western and northeastern Bay) have proximity to the two low salinity (with values about 28-29‰) zones. In the western Bay, the East India Coastal Current brings less saline and cold water from the head of the Bay to the south-west Bay, where it advects over warm, saline water, promoting temperature inversion in this region in association with the surface heat loss. For inversion occurring in the northeastern Bay (where the surface water gains heat from atmosphere), surface advection of the less saline

  5. Performance assessment of thermal sensors during short-duration convective surface heating measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Niranjan; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-09-01

    The determination of convective surface heating is a very crucial parameter in high speed flow environment. Most of the ground based facilities in this domain have short duration experimental time scale (~milliseconds) of measurements. In these facilities, the calorimetric heat transfer sensors such as thin film gauges (TFGs) and coaxial surface junction thermocouple (CSJT) are quite effective temperature detectors. They have thickness in the range of few microns and have capability of responding in microsecond time scale. The temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) and the sensitivity are calibration parameter indicators that show the linear change in the resistance of the gauge as a function of temperature. In the present investigation, three of types of heat transfer gauges are fabricated in the laboratory namely, TFG made out of platinum, TFG made out of platinum mixed with CNT and chromel-alumel surface junction coaxial thermocouple (K-type). The calibration parameters of the gauges are determined though oil-bath experiments. The average value TCR and sensitivity of platinum TFG is found to be 0.0024 K-1 and 465 μV/K, while similar values of CSJT are obtained as, 0.064 K-1 and 40.5 μV/K, respectively. The TFG made out of platinum mixed with CNT (5 % by mass) shows the enhancement of TCR as well as sensitivity and the corresponding values are 0.0034 K-1 and 735 μV/K, respectively. The relative performances of heat transfer gauges are compared in a simple laboratory scale experiment in which the gauges are exposed to a sudden step heat load in convection mode for the time duration of 200 ms. The surface heat fluxes are predicted from the temperature history through one dimensional heat conduction modeling. While comparing the experimental results, it is seen that prediction of surface heat flux from all the heat transfer gauges are within the range of ±4 %.

  6. Synthesis of Bottom Hole Temperatures and Heat Flow Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosnold, W. D.; Crowell, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    The development of a National Geothermal Data System (http://www.geothermaldata.org/) promises to provide industry, governmental agencies and researchers with a wealth of data on United States geothermal resources. Two of the larger data sets in the NDGS effort are the bottom-hole temperature data set from oil and gas drilling and the heat flow data set. The BHT data are being compiled by state geological surveys in a Bore Hole Observation Template that can include up to 76 different attributes for each well. The heat flow data are being compiled by a consortium led by the SMU Geothermal Laboratory in a Heat Flow Template that can include up to 63 different atrributes for each heat flow site. The key data for geothermal resource development are temperature, depth and the reservoir properties that control production capacity. The UND geothermal laboratory has assembled the BHT and heat flow data sets for North Dakota, Nebraska and Minnesota and we have compared how accurately the key geothermal data may be independently determined from each data set and by synthesis of both data sets. The BHT data provide temperature at depth, but it is well-documented that BHT data were recorded at non-equilibrium conditions and generally underestimate actual formation temperatures. Heat flow data include a measured temperature gradient, although the gradient may apply to only a short segment of the borehole temperature measurement. Synthesis of these two data sets provides checks that can prevent errors in data interpretation. We compared BHT data from the Denver Basin and Williston Basin to equilibrium temperature vs. depth profiles measured in deep boreholes and developed a thermal stratigraphy approach that permits correction of the BHT data for each basin.

  7. Surface layer scintillometry for estimating the sensible heat flux component of the surface energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Savage

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The relatively recently developed scintillometry method, with a focus on the dual-beam surface layer scintillometer (SLS, allows boundary layer atmospheric turbulence, surface sensible heat and momentum flux to be estimated in real-time. Much of the previous research using the scintillometer method has involved the large aperture scintillometer method, with only a few studies using the SLS method. The SLS method has been mainly used by agrometeorologists, hydrologists and micrometeorologists for atmospheric stability and surface energy balance studies to obtain estimates of sensible heat from which evaporation estimates representing areas of one hectare or larger are possible. Other applications include the use of the SLS method in obtaining crucial input parameters for atmospheric dispersion and turbulence models. The SLS method relies upon optical scintillation of a horizontal laser beam between transmitter and receiver for a separation distance typically between 50 and 250 m caused by refractive index inhomogeneities in the atmosphere that arise from turbulence fluctuations in air temperature and to a much lesser extent the fluctuations in water vapour pressure. Measurements of SLS beam transmission allow turbulence of the atmosphere to be determined, from which sub-hourly, real-time and in situ path-weighted fluxes of sensible heat and momentum may be calculated by application of the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Unlike the eddy covariance (EC method for which corrections for flow distortion and coordinate rotation are applied, no corrections to the SLS measurements, apart from a correction for water vapour pressure, are applied. Also, path-weighted SLS estimates over the propagation path are obtained. The SLS method also offers high temporal measurement resolution and usually greater spatial coverage compared to EC, Bowen ratio energy balance, surface renewal and other sensible heat measurement methods. Applying the shortened surface

  8. Thermal Advantages for Solar Heating Systems with a Glass Cover with Antireflection Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Shah, Louise Jivan

    2003-01-01

    Investigations elucidate how a glass cover with antireflection surfaces can improve the efficiency of a solar collector and the thermal performance of solar heating systems. The transmittances for two glass covers for a flat-plate solar collector were measured for different incidence angles...... was determined for different solar heating systems. Three systems were investigated: solar domestic hot water systems, solar heating systems for combined space heating demand and domestic hot water supply, and large solar heating plants. The yearly thermal performance of the systems was calculated by detailed...... simulation models with collectors with a normal glass cover and with a glass cover with antireflection surfaces. The calculations were carried out for different solar fractions and temperature levels of the solar heating systems. These parameters influence greatly the thermal performance associated...

  9. Boiling Heat Transfer on Superhydrophilic, Superhydrophobic, and Superbiphilic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Betz, Amy Rachel; Kim, Chang-Jin 'CJ'; Attinger, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    With recent advances in micro- and nanofabrication, superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic surfaces have been developed. The statics and dynamics of fluids on these surfaces have been well characterized. However, few investigations have been made into the potential of these surfaces to control and enhance other transport phenomena. In this article, we characterize pool boiling on surfaces with wettabilities varied from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic, and provide nucleation measurements. The most interesting result of our measurements is that the largest heat transfer coefficients are reached not on surfaces with spatially uniform wettability, but on biphilic surfaces, which juxtapose hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. We develop an analytical model that describes how biphilic surfaces effectively manage the vapor and liquid transport, delaying critical heat flux and maximizing the heat transfer coefficient. Finally, we manufacture and test the first superbiphilic surfaces (juxtaposing superhydrophobic ...

  10. 地板辐射供暖系统埋管结构尺寸与地板表面温度均匀性的关系%The Relation of Pipe Structure Measurements and Temperature Evenness in the Floor Surface to Floor Panel Heating Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓彤; 郭强

    2001-01-01

    对于地板辐射供暖系统,建立数值计算的数学模型,应用有限元法得出一定表面温度均匀条件下的适宜的地板结构尺寸,可作为地板辐射供暖系统的设计依据。%To floor panel heating system, establishes the mathematic models of mumerical value calculation,and obtains appropriate pipe structure measurements in a given conditions of temperature evenness in floor surface. The results can help design floor panel heating systems.

  11. Heat Transfer to a Particle Exposed to a Rarefied Plasma with a Great Temperature Gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiChen; XinTao

    1993-01-01

    A kinetic-theory analysis is presented concerning the heat transfer from a rarefiled plasma to a spherical particle for the extreme case of free-molecule regime and thin phasma sheath.A great temperature gradient is assumed to exist in the plasma,and thus a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution function is employed for each of the gas species.Analytical results show that the existence of a temperature in employed for each of the gas species,Analytical results show that the existence of a temperature gradient in the plasma causes a nonuniform distribution of the local heat flux density on the sphere surface,while the total heat flux to the whole particle is independent of the temperature gradient.The nonuniformity of the local heat flux distributioln is small even for the case with a temperature gradient as great as 106 K/m,but it may significantly enhance the thermophoretic force on an evaporating particle,Heat transfer is mainly caused by atome at low gas temperatures with negligible ionization degree,while it can be attributed to ions and electrons at high plasma temperatures.

  12. The effects of residual temperature rise on ultrasound heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagoz, Irfan; Kartal, M Kemal

    2005-12-01

    In recent theoretical studies, the temperature rise produced by diagnostic ultrasound was estimated by solving the Bioheat Transfer Equation (BHTE) but ignoring the initial temperature rise. The temperature rise was determined in our study by the BHTE including an initial temperature rise. We discuss how the initial temperature rise occurs during an ultrasound examination, and how the initial temperature rise affects subsequent ultrasound heating. We theoretically show that the temperature rise produced by the ultrasound examination (exposure time of 500 s) in a tissue sample having an initial temperature rise was higher than that in a tissue sample with no initial temperature rise that was exposed to ultrasound (exposure time of 1200 s). The theoretical results for these two cases were 5.64 degrees C and 3.58 degrees C, respectively. In our experimental study, the highest temperature rise was measured in the presence of an initial temperature rise as in the theoretical study under the same exposure conditions. Mean temperature rises for tissue without an initial temperature rise and for tissue with an initial temperature rise were 2.42 +/- 0.13 degrees C and 3.62 +/- 0.17 degrees C, respectively. Both theoretical and experimental studies show that unless the initial temperature rise produced by the first ultrasound examination decreases to 0 degrees C, the next ultrasound examination on the same tissue sample may cause the temperature rise to be higher than expected.

  13. A comparison of heat transfer enhancement in medium temperature thermal energy storage heat exchanger using fins and multitubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agyenim, Francis [Welsh School of Architecture, Cardiff Univ., Wales (United Kingdom); Eames, Philip [School of Engineering, Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Smyth, Mervyn [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, Univ. of Ulster, Newtownabbey (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    Experimental studies using a medium temperature phase change material (PCM) Erythritol, melting point 117.7 C, in a horizontal shell and tube system have been undertaken. The experimental programme investigated the suitability of Erythritol (a sugar based material) to deliver a near constant thermal energy to be used for the hot side of LiBr/water absorption cooling system. Four experimental configurations, consisting a base model with no heat enhancement (control system), systems enhanced with circular and longitudinal fins and a multitube system were studied. Experiments were conducted at the same inlet heat transfer fluid temperature of 140 C and mass flow rate of 30 kg min{sup 1} for the different configurations. The results presented include experimentally determined isotherm plots for the final melt illustrating the heat transfer characteristics of the systems and quantitative information relating to the transient change in temperature during the charging and discharging processes. The experimental results indicate that the multitube system achieved the best charging performance with the shortest melt time due to the presence of convection but showed large subcooling during the discharge process. The presence of longitudinal fins improved the conduction heat transfer significantly during the charging process due to increased heat transfer surface area and also reduced the level of subcooling during the discharge process. The circular finned system showed no significant improvement in melt time and size and as such would not be worthy of further development. (orig.)

  14. NGNP/HTE full-power operation at reduced high-temperature heat exchanger temperatures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VIlim, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-12

    Operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) with reduced reactor outlet temperature at full power was investigated for the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen-production application. The foremost challenge for operation at design temperature is achieving an acceptably long service life for heat exchangers. In both the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) and the Process Heat Exchanger (PHX) (referred to collectively as high temperature heat exchangers) a pressure differential of several MPa exists with temperatures at or above 850 C. Thermal creep of the heat exchanger channel wall may severely limit heat exchanger life depending on the alloy selected. This report investigates plant performance with IHX temperatures reduced by lowering reactor outlet temperature. The objective is to lower the temperature in heat transfer channels to the point where existing materials can meet the 40 year lifetime needed for this component. A conservative estimate for this temperature is believed to be about 700 C. The reactor outlet temperature was reduced from 850 C to 700 C while maintaining reactor power at 600 MWt and high pressure compressor outlet at 7 MPa. We included a previously reported design option for reducing temperature at the PHX. Heat exchanger lengths were adjusted to reflect the change in performance resulting from coolant property changes and from resizing related to operating-point change. Turbomachine parameters were also optimized for the new operating condition. An integrated optimization of the complete system including heat transfer equipment was not performed. It is estimated, however, that by performing a pinch analysis the combined plant efficiency can be increased from 35.5 percent obtained in this report to a value between 38.5 and 40.1 percent. Then after normalizing for a more than three percent decrease in commodities inventory compared to the reference plant, the commodities-normalized efficiency lies between 40.0 and 41.3. This

  15. Thermal performance of a heat storage module using PCM's with different melting temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, M.M.; Kanzawa, A.

    1989-05-01

    The performance of a heat storage unit consisting of number of vertical cylindrical capsules filled with phase change materials, with air flowing across them for heat exchange has been analyzed. Earlier theoretical models did not consider temperature distribution in the radial direction within the capsules, an assumption that limits their applications for small diameter capsules. The mathematical model developed in this work is based on solving the heat conduction equation in both melt and solid phases in cylindrical coordinates, taking into account the radial temperature distribution in both phases. Heat flux was then evaluated at the surface of the first row of the capsules to determine the temperature of the air leaving that row by a simple heat balance. It was found that such computation may be carried out for every few rows rather than for a single row to minimize computer time. The simulation study showed a significant improvement in the rate of heat transfer during heat charge and discharge when phase change materials with different melting temperatures were used.

  16. Nonuniformity of Temperatures in Microwave Steam Heating of Lobster Tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, Gregory J

    2016-11-01

    The biennial Conference for Food Protection provides a formal process for all interested parties to influence food safety guidance. At a recent conference, an issue was raised culminating in a formal request to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to change its Food Code recommendation for safe cooking of seafood using microwave energy when steaming was also employed. The request was to treat microwave steam cooked seafood as a conventionally cooked raw animal product rather than a microwave cooked product, for which the safe cooking recommendation is more extensive owing to the complex temperature distributions in microwave heating. The request was motivated by a literature study that revealed a more uniform temperature distribution in microwave steam cooked whole lobster. In that study, single-point temperatures were recorded in various sections of the whole lobster, but only one temperature was recorded in the tail, although the large size of the tail could translate to multiple hot and cold points. The present study was conducted to examine lobster tail specifically, measuring temperatures at multiple points during microwave steam cooking. Large temperature differences, greater than 60°C at times, were found throughout the heating period. To compensate for such differences, the Food Code recommends a more extensive level of cooking when microwave energy, rather than conventional heat sources, is used. Therefore, a change in the Food Code regarding microwave steam heating cannot be recommended.

  17. Air-side performance of a micro-channel heat exchanger in wet surface conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srisomba Raviwat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of operating conditions on the air-side heat transfer, and pressure drop of a micro-channel heat exchanger under wet surface conditions were studied experimentally. The test section was an aluminum micro-channel heat exchanger, consisting of a multi-louvered fin and multi-port mini-channels. Experiments were conducted to study the effects of inlet relative humidity, air frontal velocity, air inlet temperature, and refrigerant temperature on air-side performance. The experimental data were analyzed using the mean enthalpy difference method. The test run was performed at relative air humidities ranging between 45% and 80%; air inlet temperature ranges of 27, 30, and 33°C; refrigerant-saturated temperatures ranging from 18 to 22°C; and Reynolds numbers between 128 and 166. The results show that the inlet relative humidity, air inlet temperature, and the refrigerant temperature had significant effects on heat transfer performance and air-side pressure drop. The heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop for the micro-channel heat exchanger under wet surface conditions are proposed in terms of the Colburn j factor and Fanning f factor.

  18. Time and Space Resolved Wall Temperature Measurements during Nucleate Boiling with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Yerramilli, Vamsee K.; Kim, Jungho

    2005-01-01

    The lack of temporally and spatially resolved measurements under nucleate bubbles has complicated efforts to fully explain pool-boiling phenomena. The objective of this current work is to acquire time and space resolved temperature distributions under nucleate bubbles on a constant heat flux surface. This was performed using a microheater array with 100 micron resolution that allowed effectively simultaneous measurements of surface temperature while supplying a constant dissipative heat flux. This data is then correlated with high speed (> 1000Hz) visual recordings of the bubble growth and departure from the heater surface acquired from below and from the side of the heater. The data indicate that a significant source of energy during bubble nucleation and initial growth is the superheated layer around the bubble. Bubble coalescence was not observed to decrease surface temperature as significantly as bubble departure from the surface. Since bubble departure is typically followed by a sharp increase in the heater surface temperature, it is surmised that the departing bubble effectively removes the superheated layer, allowing a high local heat transfer rate with the bulk fluid through transient conduction/micro-convection during rewetting.

  19. Optical fiber temperature sensors: applications in heat treatments for foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Morales, María Elena; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; López-Malo, Aurelio

    2010-10-01

    Heat treatments are important methods to provide safe foods. Conventional heat treatments involve the application of steam and recently microwave treatments have been studied and applied as they are considered as fast, clean and efficient. Optical fiber sensing is an excellent tool to measure the temperature during microwave treatments. This paper shows the application of optical fiber temperature sensing during the heat treatment of different foods such as vegetables (jalapeño pepper and cilantro), cheese and ostrich meat. Reaching the target temperature, important bacteria were inactivated: Salmonella, Listeria and Escherichia coli. Thus, the use of optical fiber sensors has resulted be a useful way to develop protocols to inactivate microorganisms and to propose new methods for food processing.

  20. Effect of heat treatment temperature on nitinol wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J. E. [Fort Wayne Metals Research Products Corporation, 9609 Ardmore Ave., Fort Wayne, Indiana 46809 (United States); Daymond, M. R. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Nicol Hall, 60 Union Street, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Yu, C. [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, 102249 Beijing (China); Ren, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, 433/D008, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-08-18

    In-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been used to study the influence of the heat treatment temperature on the subsequent micromechanical behavior of nitinol wire. It was found that increase in the heat treatment temperature rotated the austenite texture from the (332){sub B2} fiber towards the (111){sub B2} fiber, and the texture of the Stress-Induced Martensite phase changed from the (1{sup ¯}40){sub B19'} to the (1{sup ¯}20){sub B19'} fiber accordingly. Heat treatment at a low temperature reduces the internal residual strains in the austenite during super-elastic deformation and therefore improves the materials fatigue performance. The development of internal residual strains in austenite is controlled by transformation induced plasticity and the reversal martensite to austenite transformation.

  1. Effect of heat treatment temperature on nitinol wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J. E.; Daymond, M. R.; Yu, C.; Ren, Y.

    2014-08-01

    In-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been used to study the influence of the heat treatment temperature on the subsequent micromechanical behavior of nitinol wire. It was found that increase in the heat treatment temperature rotated the austenite texture from the {332}B2 fiber towards the {111}B2 fiber, and the texture of the Stress-Induced Martensite phase changed from the ( 1 ¯ 40)B19' to the ( 1 ¯ 20)B19' fiber accordingly. Heat treatment at a low temperature reduces the internal residual strains in the austenite during super-elastic deformation and therefore improves the materials fatigue performance. The development of internal residual strains in austenite is controlled by transformation induced plasticity and the reversal martensite to austenite transformation.

  2. Heat Transfer Modeling for Rigid High-Temperature Fibrous Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Cunnington, George R.; Knutson, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Combined radiation and conduction heat transfer through a high-temperature, high-porosity, rigid multiple-fiber fibrous insulation was modeled using a thermal model previously used to model heat transfer in flexible single-fiber fibrous insulation. The rigid insulation studied was alumina enhanced thermal barrier (AETB) at densities between 130 and 260 kilograms per cubic meter. The model consists of using the diffusion approximation for radiation heat transfer, a semi-empirical solid conduction model, and a standard gas conduction model. The relevant parameters needed for the heat transfer model were estimated from steady-state thermal measurements in nitrogen gas at various temperatures and environmental pressures. The heat transfer modeling methodology was evaluated by comparison with standard thermal conductivity measurements, and steady-state thermal measurements in helium and carbon dioxide gases. The heat transfer model is applicable over the temperature range of 300 to 1360 K, pressure range of 0.133 to 101.3 x 10(exp 3) Pa, and over the insulation density range of 130 to 260 kilograms per cubic meter in various gaseous environments.

  3. Improvements of high-temperature drying heat pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minea, V. [Hydro-Quebec Research Institute, Laboratoire des technologies de l' energie (LTE), 600, avenue de la Montagne, Shawinigan G9N 7N5 (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    Inadequate integration and/or inappropriate operating parameters of heat pump dryers may lead to troubles as too high/low discharge/suction pressures, low dehumidification efficiency and even mechanical damage to the compressor. This paper will help fix a number of common design errors and/or omissions, and suggests original control methods to avoid undesirable operational incidents and improve overall energy performance of high-temperature drying heat pumps. The scope is to provide normal and safe operating conditions, and thus accelerate the implementation of industrial drying heat pumps. (author)

  4. Future changes of temperature and heat waves in Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Huang, Guohe; Huang, Wendy; Lin, Qianguo; Liao, Renfei; Fan, Yurui

    2017-05-01

    Apparent changes in the temperature patterns in recent years brought many challenges to the province of Ontario, Canada. As the need for adapting to climate change challenges increases, the development of reliable climate projections becomes a crucial task. In this study, a regional climate modeling system, Providing Regional Climates for Impacts Studies (PRECIS), is used to simulate the temperature patterns in Ontario. Three PRECIS runs with a resolution of 25 km × 25 km are carried out to simulate the present (1961-1990) temperature variations. There is a good match between the simulated and observed data, which validates the performance of PRECIS in reproducing temperature changes in Ontario. Future changes of daily maximum, mean, and minimum temperatures during the period 2071-2100 are then projected under the IPCC SRES A2 and B2 emission scenarios using PRECIS. Spatial variations of annual mean temperature, mean diurnal range, and temperature seasonality are generated. Furthermore, heat waves defined based on the exceedance of local climatology and their temporal and spatial characteristics are analyzed. The results indicate that the highest temperature and the most intensive heat waves are most likely to occur at the Toronto-Windsor corridor in Southern Ontario. The Northern Ontario, in spite of the relatively low projected temperature, would be under the risk of long-lasting heat waves, and thus needs effective measures to enhance its climate resilience in the future. This study can assist the decision makers in better understanding the future temperature changes in Ontario and provide decision support for mitigating heat-related loss.

  5. Boiling Heat Transfer on Porous Surfaces with Vapor Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴伟; 杜建华; 王补宣

    2002-01-01

    Boiling heat transfer on porous coated surfaces with vapor channels was investigated experimentally to determine the effects of the size and density of the vapor channels on the boiling heat transfer. Observations showed that bubbles escaping from the channels enhanced the heat transfer. Three regimes were identified: liquid flooding, bubbles in the channel and the bottom drying out region. The maximum heat transfer occurred for an optimum vapor channel density and the boiling heat transfer performance was increased if the channels were open to the bottom of the porous coating.

  6. Influence of an insulating megaregolith on heat flow and crustal temperature structure of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea-González, Isabel; Ruiz, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Mercury is covered by a megaregolith layer, which constitutes a poor thermally conducting layer that must have an influence on the thermal state and evolution of the planet, although most thermal modeling or heat flow studies have overlooked it. In this work we have calculated surface heat flows and subsurface temperatures from the depth of thrust faults associated with several prominent lobate scarps on Mercury, valid for the time of the formation of these scarps, by solving the heat equation and taking into account the insulating effects of a megaregolith layer. We conclude that megaregolith insulation could have been an important factor limiting heat loss and therefore interior cooling and contraction of Mercury. As mercurian megaregolith properties are not very well known, we also analyze the influence of these properties on the results, and discuss the consequences of imposing the condition that the total radioactive heat production must be lower than the total surface heat loss (this is, the Urey ratio, Ur, must be lower than 1) in a cooling and thermally contracting planet such as Mercury at the time of scarp emplacement. Our results show that satisfying the condition of Ur < 1 implies that the average abundances of heat-producing elements silicate layer is 0.4 times or less the average surface value, placing an upper bound on the bulk content of heat producing elements in Mercury’s interior.

  7. Heat transfer enhancement in medium temperature thermal energy storage system using a multitube heat transfer array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agyenim, Francis; Smyth, Mervyn [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, Ulster University, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB (United Kingdom); Eames, Philip [Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    An experimental energy storage system has been designed using an horizontal shell and tube heat exchanger incorporating a medium temperature phase change material (PCM) with a melting point of 117.7 C. Two experimental configurations consisting of a control unit with one heat transfer tube and a multitube unit with four heat transfer tubes were studied. The thermal characteristics in the systems have been analysed using isothermal contour plots and temperature time curves. Temperature gradients along the three directions of the shell and tube systems; axial, radial and angular directions have been analysed and compared. The phase change in the multitube system was dominated by the effect of convective heat transfer compared to conductive heat transfer in the control system. The temperature gradient in the PCM during phase change was greatest in the radial direction for both the control and multitube systems. The temperature gradients recorded in the axial direction for the control and multitube systems during the change of phase were respectively 2.5 and 3.5% that of the radial direction, indicating essentially a two-dimensional heat transfer in the PCM. The onset of natural convection through the formation of multiple convective cells in the multitube system significantly altered the shape of the solid liquid interface fluid flow and indicates the requirement for an in-depth study of multitube arrangements. (author)

  8. Temperature limit values for gripping cold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malchaire, J.; Geng, Q.; Den Hartog, E.; Havenith, G.; Holmer, I.; Piette, A.; Powell, S.L.; Rintamäki, H.; Rissanen, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. At the request of the European Commission and in the framework of the European Machinery Directive, research was conducted jointly in five different laboratories to develop specifications for surface temperature limit values for the gripping and handling of cold items. Methods. Four

  9. Temperature limit values for gripping cold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malchaire, J.; Geng, Q.; Den Hartog, E.; Havenith, G.; Holmer, I.; Piette, A.; Powell, S.L.; Rintamäki, H.; Rissanen, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. At the request of the European Commission and in the framework of the European Machinery Directive, research was conducted jointly in five different laboratories to develop specifications for surface temperature limit values for the gripping and handling of cold items. Methods. Four hund

  10. Trend patterns in global sea surface temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, S.M.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2009-01-01

    Isolating long-term trend in sea surface temperature (SST) from El Nino southern oscillation (ENSO) variability is fundamental for climate studies. In the present study, trend-empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, a robust space-time method for extracting trend patterns, is applied...

  11. Radial and temporal variations in surface heat transfer during cryogen spray cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Walfre [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Liu Jie [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Wang Guoxiang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325 (United States); Nelson, J Stuart [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, Irvine, CA 92617 (United States); Aguilar, Guillermo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2005-01-21

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is a heat extraction process that protects the epidermis from thermal damage during dermatologic laser surgery. The objective of the present work is to investigate radial and temporal variations in the heat transferred through the surface of a skin phantom during CSC. A fast-response thermal sensor is used to measure surface temperatures every 1 mm across a 16 mm diameter of the sprayed surface of the phantom. An analytical expression based on Fourier's law and Duhamel's theorem is used to compute surface heat fluxes from temperature measurements. Results show that radial and temporal variations of the boundary conditions have a strong influence on the homogeneity of heat extraction from the skin phantom. However, there is a subregion of uniform cooling whose size is time dependent. It is also observed that the surface heat flux undergoes a marked dynamic variation, with a maximum heat flux occurring at the centre of the sprayed surface early in the spurt followed by a quick decrease. The study shows that radial and temporal variations of boundary conditions must be taken into account and ideally controlled to guarantee uniform protection during CSC of human skin.

  12. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Spectral Selectivity Surface for Both Solar Heating and Radiative Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingke Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A spectral selectivity surface for both solar heating and radiative cooling was proposed. It has a high spectral absorptivity (emissivity in the solar radiation band and atmospheric window band (i.e., 0.2~3 μm and 8~13 μm, as well as a low absorptivity (emissivity in other bands aside from the solar radiation and atmospheric window wavelengths (i.e., 3~8 μm or above 13 μm. A type of composite surface sample was trial-manufactured combining titanium-based solar selective absorbing coating with polyethylene terephthalate (TPET. Sample tests showed that the TPET composite surface has clear spectral selectivity in the spectra of solar heating and radiation cooling wavelengths. The equilibrium temperatures of the TPET surface under different sky conditions or different inclination angles of surface were tested at both day and night. Numerical analysis and comparisons among the TPET composite surface and three other typical surfaces were also performed. These comparisons indicated that the TPET composite surface had a relative heat efficiency of 76.8% of that of the conventional solar heating surface and a relative temperature difference of 75.0% of that of the conventional radiative cooling surface, with little difference in cooling power.

  13. Students’ conceptual understanding consistency of heat and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamet Budiarti, Indah; Suparmi; Sarwanto; Harjana

    2017-01-01

    The aims of the research were to explore and to describe the consistency of students’ understanding of heat and temperature concept. The sample that was taken using purposive random sampling technique consisted of 99 high school students from 3 senior high schools in Jayapura city. The descriptive qualitative method was employed in this study. The data were collected using tests and interviews regarding the subject matters of Heat and Temperature. Based on the results of data analysis, it was concluded that 3.03% of the students was the consistency of right answer, 79.80% of the students was consistency but wrong answer and 17.17% of the students was inconsistency.

  14. Rapid infrared heating of a surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Concord, TN); Ohriner, Evan Keith (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

  15. Rapid infrared heating of a surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Concord, TN); Ohriner, Evan Keith (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

  16. Rapid infrared heating of a surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Blue, Craig A.; Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2003-12-23

    High energy flux infrared heaters are used to treat an object having a surface section and a base section such that a desired characteristic of the surface section is physically, chemically, or phasically changed while the base section remains unchanged.

  17. An anatomically realistic temperature phantom for radiofrequency heating measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graedel, Nadine N; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Guerin, Bastien; Gagoski, Borjan; Wald, Lawrence L

    2015-01-01

    An anthropomorphic phantom with realistic electrical properties allows for a more accurate reproduction of tissue current patterns during excitation. A temperature map can then probe the worst-case heating expected in the unperfused case. We describe an anatomically realistic human head phantom that allows rapid three-dimensional (3D) temperature mapping at 7T. The phantom was based on hand-labeled anatomical imaging data and consists of four compartments matching the corresponding human tissues in geometry and electrical properties. The increases in temperature resulting from radiofrequency excitation were measured with MR thermometry using a temperature-sensitive contrast agent (TmDOTMA(-)) validated by direct fiber optic temperature measurements. Acquisition of 3D temperature maps of the full phantom with a temperature accuracy better than 0.1°C was achieved with an isotropic resolution of 5 mm and acquisition times of 2-4 minutes. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of constructing anatomically realistic phantoms with complex geometries incorporating the ability to measure accurate temperature maps in the phantom. The anthropomorphic temperature phantom is expected to provide a useful tool for the evaluation of the heating effects of both conventional and parallel transmit pulses and help validate electromagnetic and temperature simulations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Investigation of Enhanced Boiling Heat Transfer from Porous Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LinZhiping; MaTongze; 等

    1994-01-01

    Experimental investigations of boiling heat transfer from porous surfaces at atmospheric pressure were performne.The porous surfaces are plain tubes coverd with metal screens.V-shaped groove tubes covered with screens,plain tubes sintered with screens.and V-shaped groove tubes sintered with screens,The experimental results show that sintering metal screens around spiral V-shaped groove tubes can greatly improve the boiling heat transfer,The boiling hystesis was observed in the experiment.This paper discusses the mechanism of the boiling heat transfer from those kinds of porous surfaces stated above.

  19. Identifying (subsurface) anthropogenic heat sources that influence temperature in the drinking water distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudelo-Vera, Claudia M.; Blokker, Mirjam; de Kater, Henk; Lafort, Rob

    2017-09-01

    The water temperature in the drinking water distribution system and at customers' taps approaches the surrounding soil temperature at a depth of 1 m. Water temperature is an important determinant of water quality. In the Netherlands drinking water is distributed without additional residual disinfectant and the temperature of drinking water at customers' taps is not allowed to exceed 25 °C. In recent decades, the urban (sub)surface has been getting more occupied by various types of infrastructures, and some of these can be heat sources. Only recently have the anthropogenic sources and their influence on the underground been studied on coarse spatial scales. Little is known about the urban shallow underground heat profile on small spatial scales, of the order of 10 m × 10 m. Routine water quality samples at the tap in urban areas have shown up locations - so-called hotspots - in the city, with relatively high soil temperatures - up to 7 °C warmer - compared to the soil temperatures in the surrounding rural areas. Yet the sources and the locations of these hotspots have not been identified. It is expected that with climate change during a warm summer the soil temperature in the hotspots can be above 25 °C. The objective of this paper is to find a method to identify heat sources and urban characteristics that locally influence the soil temperature. The proposed method combines mapping of urban anthropogenic heat sources, retrospective modelling of the soil temperature, analysis of water temperature measurements at the tap, and extensive soil temperature measurements. This approach provided insight into the typical range of the variation of the urban soil temperature, and it is a first step to identifying areas with potential underground heat stress towards thermal underground management in cities.

  20. Influence of magmatism on mantle cooling, surface heat flow and Urey ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Tackley, Paul J.

    2012-05-01

    Two-dimensional thermo-chemical mantle convection simulations are used to investigate the influence of melting-inducted differentiation on the thermal evolution of Earth's mantle, focussing in particular on matching the present-day surface heat flow and the 'Urey ratio'. The influence of internal heating rate, initial mantle temperature and partitioning of heat-producing elements into basaltic crust are studied. High initial mantle temperatures, which are expected following Earth's accretion, cause major differences in early mantle thermo-chemical structures, but by the present-day surface heat flux and internal structures are indistinguishable from cases with a low initial temperature. Assuming three different values of mantle heat production that vary by more than a factor of two results in small differences in present-day heat flow, as does assuming different partitioning ratios of heat-producing elements into crust. Indeed, all of the cases presented here, regardless of exact parameters, have approximately Earth's present-day heat flow, with substantial fractions coming from the core and from mantle cooling. As a consequence of the model present-day surface heat flow varying only slightly with parameters, the Urey ratio (the ratio of total heat production to the total surface heat flow) is highly dependent on the amount of internal heat production, and due to the large uncertainty in this, the Urey ratio is considered to be a much poorer constraint on thermal evolution than the heat flow. The range of present-day Urey ratio observed in simulations here is about 0.3 to 0.5, which is consistent with observational and geochemical constraints (Jaupart et al., 2007). Magmatic heat transport contributes an upper bound of 9% to Earth's present-day heat loss but a much higher fraction at earlier times—often more than convective heat loss—so neglecting this causes an overestimation of the Urey ratio. Magmatic heat transport also plays an important role in mantle

  1. DISAGGREGATION OF GOES LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURES USING SURFACE EMISSIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate temporal and spatial estimation of land surface temperatures (LST) is important for modeling the hydrological cycle at field to global scales because LSTs can improve estimates of soil moisture and evapotranspiration. Using remote sensing satellites, accurate LSTs could be routine, but unfo...

  2. Estimation of surface heat flux for ablation and charring of thermal protection material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei-qi; He, Kai-feng; Zhou, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Ablation of the thermal protection material of the reentry hypersonic flight vehicle is a complex physical and chemical process. To estimate the surface heat flux from internal temperature measurement is much more complex than the conventional inverse heat conduction problem case. In the paper, by utilizing a two-layer pyrogeneration-plane ablation model to model the ablation and charring of the material, modifying the finite control volume method to suit for the numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation with variable-geometry, the CGM along with the associated adjoint problem is developed to estimate the surface heat flux. This estimation method is verified with a numerical example at first, the results show that the estimation method is feasible and robust. The larger is the measurement noise, the greater is the deviation of the estimated result from the exact value, and the measurement noise of ablated surface position has a significant and more direct influence on the estimated result of surface heat flux. Furthermore, the estimation method is used to analyze the experimental data of ablation of blunt Carbon-phenolic material Narmco4028 in an arc-heater. It is shown that the estimated surface heat flux agrees with the heating power value of the arc-heater, and the estimation method is basically effective and potential to treat the engineering heat conduction problem with ablation.

  3. Surface defects and temperature on atomic friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, O Y; Mazo, J J, E-mail: yovany@unizar.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-09-07

    We present a theoretical study of the effect of surface defects on atomic friction in the stick-slip dynamical regime of a minimalistic model. We focus on how the presence of defects and temperature change the average properties of the system. We have identified two main mechanisms which modify the mean friction force of the system when defects are considered. As expected, defects change the potential profile locally and thus affect the friction force. But the presence of defects also changes the probability distribution function of the tip slip length and thus the mean friction force. We corroborated both effects for different values of temperature, external load, dragging velocity and damping. We also show a comparison of the effects of surface defects and surface disorder on the dynamics of the system. (paper)

  4. Temperature Oscillation in a Loop Heat Pipe with Gravity Assist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung; Garrison, Matt; Patel, Deepak; Ottenstein, Laura; Robinson, Frank

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS Laser Thermal Control System (LTCS) thermal vacuum testing where the condenser-radiator was placed in a vertical position, it was found that the loop heat pipe (LHP) reservoir required much more control heater power than the analytical model had predicted. The required control heater power was also higher than the liquid subcooling entering the reservoir using the measured temperatures and the calculated mass flow rate based on steady state LHP operation. This presentation describes the investigation of the LHP behaviors under a gravity assist mode with a very cold radiator sink temperature and a large thermal mass attached to the evaporator. It is concluded that gravity caused the cold liquid to drop from the condenser-radiator to the reservoir, resulting in a rapid decrease of the reservoir temperature. When the reservoir temperature was increasing, a reverse flow occurred in the liquid line, carrying warm liquid to the condenser-radiator. Both events consumed the reservoir control heater power. The fall and rise of the reservoir temperature also caused the net heat input to the evaporator to vary due to the release and storage of the sensible heat of the thermal mass. The combination of these effects led to a persistent reservoir temperature oscillation and a repeated influx of cold liquid from the condenser. This was the root cause of the extraordinary high control heater power requirement in the LTCS TV test. Without gravity assist, such a persistent temperature oscillation will not be present.

  5. Process heat cogeneration using a high temperature reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Gustavo, E-mail: gustavoalonso3@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac, Edo. De Mexico 52750 (Mexico); Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Ed. 9, Lindavista, D.F. 07300 (Mexico); Ramirez, Ramon [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac, Edo. De Mexico 52750 (Mexico); Valle, Edmundo del [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Ed. 9, Lindavista, D.F. 07300 (Mexico); Castillo, Rogelio [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac, Edo. De Mexico 52750 (Mexico)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • HTR feasibility for process heat cogeneration is assessed. • A cogeneration coupling for HTR is proposed and process heat cost is evaluated. • A CCGT process heat cogeneration set up is also assessed. • Technical comparison between both sources of cogeneration is performed. • Economical competitiveness of the HTR for process heat cogeneration is analyzed. - Abstract: High temperature nuclear reactors offer the possibility to generate process heat that could be used in the oil industry, particularly in refineries for gasoline production. These technologies are still under development and none of them has shown how this can be possible and what will be the penalty in electricity generation to have this additional product and if the cost of this subproduct will be competitive with other alternatives. The current study assesses the likeliness of generating process heat from Pebble Bed Modular Reactor to be used for a refinery showing different plant balances and alternatives to produce and use that process heat. An actual practical example is presented to demonstrate the cogeneration viability using the fact that the PBMR is a modular small reactor where the cycle configuration to transport the heat of the reactor to the process plant plays an important role in the cycle efficiency and in the plant economics. The results of this study show that the PBMR would be most competitive when capital discount rates are low (5%), carbon prices are high (>30 US$/ton), and competing natural gas prices are at least 8 US$/mmBTU.

  6. Investigation of the effects of pressure gradient, temperature and wall temperature ratio on the stagnation point heat transfer for circular cylinders and gas turbine vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, H. T.; Duffy, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Low and high pressure shock tubes were designed and constructed for the purpose of obtaining heat transfer data over a temperature range of 390 to 2500 K, pressures of 0.3 to 42 atm, and Mach numbers of 0.15 to 1.5 with and without pressure gradient. A square test section with adjustable top and bottom walls was constructed to produce the favorable and adverse pressure gradient over the flat plate with heat gages. A water cooled gas turbine nozzle cascade which is attached to the high pressure shock tube was obtained to measuse the heat flux over pressure and suction surfaces. Thin-film platinum heat gages with a response time of a few microseconds were developed and used to measure the heat flux for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers. The laminar boundary heat flux on the shock tube wall agreed with Mirel's flat plate theory. Stagnation point heat transfer for circular cylinders at low temperature compared with the theoretical prediction, but for a gas temperature of 922 K the heat fluxes were higher than the predicted values. Preliminary flat plate heat transfer data were measured for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers with and without pressure gradients for free-stream temperatures of 350 to 2575 K and flow Mach numbers of 0.11 to 1.9. The experimental heat flux data were correlated with the laminar and turbulent theories and the agreement was good at low temperatures which was not the case for higher temperatures.

  7. Borehole paleoclimatology – the effect of deep lakes and "heat islands" on temperature profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Kutasov

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available It is known that changes in ground surface temperatures could be caused by many non-climatic effects. In this study we propose a method based on utilization of Laplace equation with nonuniform boundary conditions. The proposed method makes possible to estimate the maximum effect of deep lakes and "heat islands" (areas of deforestation, urbanization, farming, mining and wetland drainage on the borehole temperature profiles.

  8. Thermal Characteristics of a Primary Surface Heat Exchanger with Corrugated Channels

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of a primary surface heat exchanger (PSHE) with corrugated surfaces. The PSHE was experimentally investigated for a Reynolds number range of 156–921 under various flow conditions on the hot and cold sides. The inlet temperature of the hot side was maintained at 40 °C, while that of the cold side was maintained at 20 °C. A counterflow was used as it has a higher temperature proximity in comparison with a parallel flow. The...

  9. Revisit of Joule heating in CE: the contribution of surface conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Xiangchun

    2007-08-01

    We present in this short communication the true form of Joule heating in CE which considers the contribution of surface conductance. This increased conductivity of electrolyte solution within electrical double layer has never been discussed in previous studies. The resultant intensive heat generation near the capillary wall is demonstrated using numerical simulation to produce not a locally strong temperature rise, but an additional temperature elevation in the whole solution compared to the model neglecting surface conductance. The latter effect is, however, negligible in typical CE while it might become significant in very small channels.

  10. The Land Surface Temperature Impact to Land Cover Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I.; Abu Samah, A.; Fauzi, R.; Noor, N. M.

    2016-06-01

    Land cover type is an important signature that is usually used to understand the interaction between the ground surfaces with the local temperature. Various land cover types such as high density built up areas, vegetation, bare land and water bodies are areas where heat signature are measured using remote sensing image. The aim of this study is to analyse the impact of land surface temperature on land cover types. The objectives are 1) to analyse the mean temperature for each land cover types and 2) to analyse the relationship of temperature variation within land cover types: built up area, green area, forest, water bodies and bare land. The method used in this research was supervised classification for land cover map and mono window algorithm for land surface temperature (LST) extraction. The statistical analysis of post hoc Tukey test was used on an image captured on five available images. A pixel-based change detection was applied to the temperature and land cover images. The result of post hoc Tukey test for the images showed that these land cover types: built up-green, built up-forest, built up-water bodies have caused significant difference in the temperature variation. However, built up-bare land did not show significant impact at p<0.05. These findings show that green areas appears to have a lower temperature difference, which is between 2° to 3° Celsius compared to urban areas. The findings also show that the average temperature and the built up percentage has a moderate correlation with R2 = 0.53. The environmental implications of these interactions can provide some insights for future land use planning in the region.

  11. Heat transfer between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volokitin, A I; Lorenz, B; Persson, B N J

    2010-01-01

    We study the heat transfer between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces.We include both the heat transfer from the area of real contact, and the heat transfer between the surfaces in the non-contact regions.We apply a recently developed contact mechanics theory, which accounts for the hierarchical nature of the contact between solids with roughness on many different length scales. For elastic contact, at the highest (atomic) resolution the area of real contact typically consists of atomic (nanometer) sized regions, and we discuss the implications of this for the heat transfer. For solids with very smooth surfaces, as is typical in many modern engineering applications, the interfacial separation in the non-contact regions will be very small, and for this case we show the importance of the radiative heat transfer associated with the evanescent electromagnetic waves which exist outside of all bodies.

  12. Force Restore Technique for Ground Surface Temperature and Moisture Content in a Dry Desert System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, A.F.G.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Berkowicz, S.

    2000-01-01

    The level of the surface temperature as well as surface moisture content is important for the turbulent transports of sensible and latent heat, respectively, but this level is also crucial for the survival of shrubs, plants, insects, and small animals in a desert environment. To estimate the surface

  13. Analysis of the Impact of Decreasing District Heating Supply Temperature on Combined Heat and Power Plant Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Bolonina Alona; Bolonins Genadijs; Blumberga Dagnija

    2014-01-01

    District heating systems are widely used to supply heat to different groups of heat consumers. The district heating system offers great opportunities for combined heat and power production. In this paper decreasing district heating supply temperature is analysed in the context of combined heat and power plant operation. A mathematical model of a CHP plant is developed using both empirical and theoretical equations. The model is used for analysis of modified CHP plant operation modes with redu...

  14. Evaluation of Heat Loss and Water Temperature in a Spent Fuel Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Chihiro; Murase, Michio; Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Iwaki, Takanori; Nagae, Takashi

    Three-dimensional calculations of ventilation air flow and thermal-hydraulic behavior in a spent fuel pit (SFP) were made using the CFD software, FLUENT6.3.26 to evaluate the heat loss and water temperature in the SFP after shutdown of its cooling systems. The air and water velocities near the water surface were evaluated from the calculated results and referred to conditions of evaporation heat transfer tests, which were carried out at Shinshu University. From the test data, a correlation for evaporation heat fluxes was introduced and incorporated into the calculation of thermal-hydraulic behavior in the SFP. Then, a three-dimensional calculation of thermal-hydraulic behavior in the SFP was done. It was confirmed that the higher the water temperature was, the larger the heat loss from water was, and that the major heat loss was the evaporation heat transfer from the water surface to ventilation air, which was about ten times larger than the heat transfer to concrete walls.

  15. Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

    2013-04-01

    Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000ÀC showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

  16. Measurement of Ion Motional Heating Rates over a Range of Trap Frequencies and Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Bruzewicz, C D; Chiaverini, J

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the motional heating rate of a trapped ion at different trap frequencies and temperatures between $\\sim$0.6 and 1.5 MHz and $\\sim$4 and 295 K. Additionally, we examine the possible effect of adsorbed surface contaminants with boiling points below $\\sim$105$^{\\circ}$C by measuring the ion heating rate before and after locally baking our ion trap chip under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. We compare the heating rates presented here to those calculated from available electric-field noise models. We can tightly constrain a subset of these models based on their expected frequency and temperature scaling interdependence. Discrepancies between the measured results and predicted values point to the need for refinement of theoretical noise models in order to more fully understand the mechanisms behind motional trapped-ion heating.

  17. Simulation of temperature in office with building integrated heating and cooling system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitzmann, Peter

    2002-01-01

    by raising the temperature of the concrete to slightly above the desired room temperature. Another way of solving the problem of cooling is by using building integrated cooling in floors. This technique utilizes the thermal mass of concrete in the floors, by integrating PEX pipes in the floor. By maintaining...... and thermal comfort parameters. The model is based on a numerical Finite Control Volume (FCV) method for the heat transfer in walls, ceiling, windows and floor. The model uses both convective and radiative heat transfer to the room air and between the room surfaces. The simulation model can be used...... for calculating situations with both cooling and heating demands. Using the model it is therefore possible to assess the thermal environment, and furthermore to calculate the energy consumption required for both heating and cooling. In the paper different construction types of the floor are examined, as well...

  18. The impact of bed temperature on heat transfer characteristic between fluidized bed and vertical rifled tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaszczuk, Artur; Nowak, Wojciech

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, the heat transfer study focuses on assessment of the impact of bed temperature on the local heat transfer characteristic between a fluidized bed and vertical rifled tubes (38mm-O.D.) in a commercial circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. Heat transfer behavior in a 1296t/h supercritical CFB furnace has been analyzed for Geldart B particle with Sauter mean diameter of 0.219 and 0.246mm. The heat transfer experiments were conducted for the active heat transfer surface in the form of membrane tube with a longitudinal fin at the tube crest under the normal operating conditions of CFB boiler. A heat transfer analysis of CFB boiler with detailed consideration of the bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient and the contribution of heat transfer mechanisms inside furnace chamber were investigated using mechanistic heat transfer model based on cluster renewal approach. The predicted values of heat transfer coefficient are compared with empirical correlation for CFB units in large-scale.

  19. Geomagnetic effects on the average surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballatore, P.

    Several results have previously shown as the solar activity can be related to the cloudiness and the surface solar radiation intensity (Svensmark and Friis-Christensen, J. Atmos. Sol. Terr. Phys., 59, 1225, 1997; Veretenenkoand Pudovkin, J. Atmos. Sol. Terr. Phys., 61, 521, 1999). Here, the possible relationships between the averaged surface temperature and the solar wind parameters or geomagnetic activity indices are investigated. The temperature data used are the monthly SST maps (generated at RAL and available from the related ESRIN/ESA database) that represent the averaged surface temperature with a spatial resolution of 0.5°x0.5° and cover the entire globe. The interplanetary data and the geomagnetic data are from the USA National Space Science Data Center. The time interval considered is 1995-2000. Specifically, possible associations and/or correlations of the average temperature with the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component and with the Kp index are considered and differentiated taking into account separate geographic and geomagnetic planetary regions.

  20. Downscaling MODIS Land Surface Temperature for Urban Public Health Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, M. Z.; Crosson, W. L.; Estes, M. G., Jr.; Estes, S. M.; Quattrochi, D. A.; Johnson, D.

    2013-12-01

    This study is part of a project funded by the NASA Applied Sciences Public Health Program, which focuses on Earth science applications of remote sensing data for enhancing public health decision-making. Heat related death is currently the number one weather-related killer in the United States. Mortality from these events is expected to increase as a function of climate change. This activity sought to augment current Heat Watch/Warning Systems (HWWS) with NASA remotely sensed data, and models used in conjunction with socioeconomic and heat-related mortality data. The current HWWS do not take into account intra-urban spatial variations in risk assessment. The purpose of this effort is to evaluate a potential method to improve spatial delineation of risk from extreme heat events in urban environments by integrating sociodemographic risk factors with land surface temperature (LST) estimates derived from thermal remote sensing data. In order to further improve the assessment of intra-urban variations in risk from extreme heat, we developed and evaluated a number of spatial statistical techniques for downscaling the 1-km daily MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST data to 60 m using Landsat-derived LST data, which have finer spatial but coarser temporal resolution than MODIS. We will present these techniques, which have been demonstrated and validated for Phoenix, AZ using data from the summers of 2000-2006.

  1. DESIGN AND CALCULATION OF AERODROMECOAING WITH HEATED SURFACE LAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim G. Piskunov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available  The developed constructions with heated by surface layers for aerodromes and auto roads when developed composition of electroconductive concrete reinforced with chemical electrical conductive fibres being used was researched. The experimentally obtained characteristics of ended conductive concrete reinforced with fibers were presented. Calculation by developed heated construction of shell was made.

  2. Heat Transport in a Three-Dimensional Slab Geometry and the Temperature Profile of Ingen-Hausz Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Shiladitya; Mukherjee, Krishnendu

    2013-05-01

    We study the transport of heat in a three-dimensional, harmonic crystal of slab geometry whose boundaries and the intermediate surfaces are connected to stochastic, white noise heat baths at different temperatures. Heat baths at the intermediate surfaces are required to fix the initial state of the slab in respect of its surroundings. We allow the flow of energy fluxes between the intermediate surfaces and the attached baths and impose conditions that relate the widths of Gaussian noises of the intermediate baths. The radiated heat obeys Newton's law of cooling when intermediate baths collectively constitute the environment surrounding the slab. We show that Fourier's law holds in the continuum limit. We obtain an exponentially falling temperature profile from high to low temperature end of the slab and this very nature of the profile was already confirmed by Ingen-Hausz's experiment. Temperature profile of similar nature is also obtained in the one-dimensional version of this model.

  3. Effect of electric potential and heating on surface of KCI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ The purpose of the work is research of morphology of structural changes of a surface { 100} crystals KCl under action of heating and electric field potential enclosed to one of fasets of a crystal.

  4. Effect of electric potential and heating on surface of KCI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feodorov; Victor; A.; Sterelukhin; Andrey; A.; Karyev; Leonid; G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the work is research of morphology of structural changes of a surface { 100} crystals KCl under action of heating and electric field potential enclosed to one of fasets of a crystal.……

  5. Surface renewal method for estimating sensible heat flux

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-09-18

    Sep 18, 2008 ... Keywords: surface energy balance, sensible heat flux, latent energy flux, evaporation ... Hill et al., 1992; Thiermann and Grassl, 1992; Green et al.,. 1994; De ...... the time traces over rangeland grass near Ione (California).

  6. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT OVER THE DIMPLED SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sachin L. Borse

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past couple of years the focus on using concavities or dimples provides enhanced heat transfer has been documented by a number of researchers. Dimples are used on the surface of internal flow passages because they produce substantial heat transfer augmentation. This project work is concerned with experimentalinvestigation of the forced convection heat transfer over the dimpled surface. The objective of the experiment is to find out the heat transfer and air flow distribution on dimpled surfaces and all the results obtained are compared with those from a flat surface. The varying parameters were i Dimple arrangement on the plate i.e.staggered and inline arrangement and ii Heat input iiiDimple density on the plate. Heat transfer coefficients and Nusselt number were measured in a channel with one side dimpled surface. Thespherical type dimples were fabricated, and the diameter and the depth of dimple were 6 mm and 3 mm, respectively. Channel height is 25.4mm, two dimple configurations were tested. The Reynolds number based on the channel hydraulic diameter was varied from 5000 to 15000.Study shown that thermal performance is increasing with Reynolds number. With the inline and staggered dimple arrangement, the heat transfer coefficients, Nusselt number and the thermal performance factors were higher for the staggered arrangement.

  7. High-temperature industrial heat pump. Management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deckman, G

    1979-03-12

    The management plan for the development and demonstration of a high-temperature industrial heat pump for milk drying is presented. Section 2 describes the overall objective, technical approach, and program scope for development and demonstration of a heat pump system for use in an existing milk drying operation. The high temperature industrial heat pump program organization, its relationships to higher-level AiResearch organizations, subcontractor relationships, and personnel responsibilities are discussed in Section 3. The program management and control functions and data management techniques are described in Section 4. The activity for each work breakdown structure is described in Section 5. The program schedule is schematically shown in Section 6 and cost management reports are described in Section 7.

  8. Heat Capacities of Natural Antlerite and Brochantite at Low Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissengaliyeva, Mira R; Bekturganov, Nuraly S; Gogol, Daniil B; Taimassova, Shynar T; Koketai, Temirgaly A; Bespyatov, Michael A

    2013-11-14

    The investigation of a magnetic component of the heat capacity of natural samples of copper sulfates antlerite Cu3SO4(OH)4 in the temperature range below 40 K and brochantite Cu4SO4(OH)6 below 55 K has been carried out. A regular component of the heat capacity has been calculated from experimental data of adiabatic calorimetry. In the low-temperature area of (0 to 55) K two peaks of magnetic heat capacity for brochantite have been registered. The contributions of anomalous component ΔStr into entropy of the minerals are (11 ± 3) J·mol(-1)·K(-1) for antlerite and (5.3 ± 1.5) J·mol(-1)·K(-1) for brochantite.

  9. Temperature Histories in Ceramic-Insulated Heat-Sink Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciepluch, Carl C.

    1960-01-01

    Temperature histories were calculated for a composite nozzle wall by a simplified numerical integration calculation procedure. These calculations indicated that there is a unique ratio of insulation and metal heat-sink thickness that will minimize total wall thickness for a given operating condition and required running time. The optimum insulation and metal thickness will vary throughout the nozzle as a result of the variation in heat-transfer rate. The use of low chamber pressure results in a significant increase in the maximum running time of a given weight nozzle. Experimentally measured wall temperatures were lower than those calculated. This was due in part to the assumption of one-dimensional or slab heat flow in the calculation procedure.

  10. Crustal heat flow measurements in western Anatolia from borehole equilibrium temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Erkan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of a crustal heat flow analysis in western Anatolia based on borehole equilibrium temperatures and rock thermal conductivity data are reported. The dataset comprises 113 borehole sites that were collected in Southern Marmara and Aegean regions of Turkey in 1995–1999. The measurements are from abandoned water wells with depths of 100–150 m. Data were first classed in terms of quality, and the low quality data, including data showing effects of hydrologic disturbances on temperatures, were eliminated. For the remaining 34 sites, one meter resolution temperature-depth curves were carefully analyzed for determination of the background geothermal gradients, and any effects of terrain topography and intra-borehole fluid flow were corrected when necessary. Thermal conductivities were determined either by direct measurements on representative surface outcrop or estimated from the borehole lithologic records. The calculated heat flow values are 85–90 mW m−2 in the northern and central parts of the Menderes horst-graben system. Within the system, the highest heat flow values (> 100 mW m−2 are observed in the northeastern part of Gediz Graben, near Kula active volcanic center. The calculated heat flow values are also in agreement with the results of studies on the maximum depth of seismicity in the region. In the Menderes horst-graben system, surface heat flow is expected to show significant variations as a result of active sedimentation and thermal refraction in grabens, and active erosion on horst detachment zones. High heat flow values (90–100 mW m−2 are also observed in the peninsular (western part of Çanakkale province. The heat flow anomaly here may be an extension of the high heat flow zone previously observed in the northern Aegean Sea. Moderate heat flow values (60–70 mW m−2 are observed in eastern part of Çanakkale and central part of Balıkesir provinces.

  11. Numerical Simulation on Heat Transfer Enhancement of Phase Change Thermal Storage Devices for Low-middle Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zheng; ZHU Jiaoqun; ZHOU Weibing; CHENG Xiaomin; ZHU Jinrong

    2016-01-01

    Using Ba(OH)2·8H2O as phase change material (PCM) and water as heat transfer lfuid (HTF), we numerically simulated annular ifnned-tube heat exchangers. In order to measure and analyze the impact of parameters in the heating/cooling process, temperature changes of different monitoring points, ifn widths, and ifn pitches as key parameters were considered and applied. The experimental results show that the heat exchange process can be divided into three stages within a certain time. The faster heat transfer rate is associated with the greater temperature difference between PCM and HTF. Furthermore, ifns width and pitch affect dramatically the heat charging/discharging rate. The large ifns width or small ifns pitch is beneifcial for extending the heat exchange surface, leading to improve heat transfer efifciency.

  12. Temperature Profile Measurements During Heat Treatment of BSCCO 2212 Coils

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    The temperature profile of two different BSCCO 2212 coils has been analyzed. The profiles are obtained from thermocouples imbedded in the windings during the heat treatment that activates the 2212. The melting and freezing of the 2212 is clearly observed. A model that describes the data and can be used to guide the processing of new coils has been developed.

  13. Color, Temperature and Heat: Exploring University Students Mental Thoughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canlas, Ian Phil

    2016-01-01

    Color, temperature and heat are among the concepts in science that are interconnected. These concepts are introduced to learners even before they enter the basic education. On the other hand, in school, it is formally introduced to them not only in science but also in the humanities. The foregoing study attempted to explore the mental thoughts of…

  14. Analysis of induced temperature anomalies along borehole heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Michael; Schelenz, Sophie; Stollberg, Reiner; Gossel, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Over the last years, the thermal use of the shallow subsurface for heat generation, cooling, and thermal energy storage has increased. However, the injection or extraction of heat potentially drives changes in the subsurface temperature regime; especially in urban areas. The presented case study investigates the intensive use of borehole heat exchangers (BHE) and their potential thermal impacts on subsurface temperatures, as well as thermal interactions between individual BHE's for a residential neighborhood in Cologne, Germany. Based on on-site subsurface parameterization, a 3D subsurface model was designed, using the finite element software FEFLOW (DHI WASY). The model contains five BHE, extracting 8.2 kW, with a maximum BHE depth of 38 m, whereby the thickness of the unsaturated zone is 22 m. The simulated time span is 10 years. This study focusses on two questions: How will different BHE arrangements vary in terms of temperature plume formation and potential system interaction and what is the influence of seasonal subsurface heat storage on soil and ground water temperatures.

  15. TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION MONITORING AND ANALYSES AT DIFFERENT HEATING CONTROL PRINCIPLES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Rode, Carsten; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2010-01-01

    In the last decades significant efforts have been made to reduce energy use in buildings. Heating, cooling and ventilation systems are responsible for 30-40% of the energy consumption in buildings. Although they are evaluated based on the energy performance they should guarantee the desired thermal...... control sensor which was already installed. The room was heated by means of electrical radiators, which should be able to control the indoor environment to guarantee the desired thermal conditions for the occupants and to supply heat according to desired load patterns. Five series of experiments were done...... under different control strategies of the heating system (Pseudo Random Binary Sequence signal controlling all the heaters (PRBS) or thermostatic control of the heaters (THERM)). A comparison of the measured temperatures within the room, for the five series of experiments, shows a better correlation...

  16. Influence of Building Envelope Thermal Mass on Heating Design Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaujena, B.; Borodinecs, A.; Zemitis, J.; Prozuments, A.

    2015-11-01

    The stability of indoor air parameters is a very important factor, essential for such institutions as museums, schools and hospitals. Nowadays the use of renewable energy for space heating became one of the top priorities in modern building design. The active and passive solar energy as well as heat pumps are widely used nowadays. However, such technologies have a limitation in cold climates and often are not able to cover maximal heating loads. This paper is devoted to analysis of influence of building envelope's properties and outdoor air parameters on indoor air thermodynamic parameters stability in winter time. It presents analysis of thermal mass impact on building energy performance and indoor air parameter stability in cold climate. The results show that the thermal mass of building envelope is able to cover extreme winter temperatures as well as in case of emergency heat supply break.

  17. Wind-Speed—Surface-Heat-Flux Feedback in Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Junshi; Niino, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Strong winds associated with dust devils can induce locally large heat fluxes from the surface, and resulting enhanced buoyancy may further intensify the dust devils. This positive wind—surface-heat-flux feedback is studied using a large-eddy simulation of a convective boundary layer. A comparison of the results with and without the feedback process for the same environment demonstrates the significance of the feedback process for simulated dust devils.

  18. Analysis of the Impact of Decreasing District Heating Supply Temperature on Combined Heat and Power Plant Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolonina Alona

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available District heating systems are widely used to supply heat to different groups of heat consumers. The district heating system offers great opportunities for combined heat and power production. In this paper decreasing district heating supply temperature is analysed in the context of combined heat and power plant operation. A mathematical model of a CHP plant is developed using both empirical and theoretical equations. The model is used for analysis of modified CHP plant operation modes with reduced district heating supply temperature. Conclusions on the benefits of new operation modes are introduced.

  19. Condensation heat transfer on two-tier superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiangtao; Vandadi, Aref; Chen, Chung-Lung

    2012-09-01

    We investigated water vapor condensation on a two-tier superhydrophobic surface in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and in a customer-designed vapor chamber. We have observed continuous dropwise condensation (DWC) on the textured surface in ESEM. However, a film layer of condensate was formed on the multiscale texture in the vapor chamber. Due to the filmwise condensation, the condensation heat transfer coefficient of the superhydrophobic surface is lower than that of a flat hydrophobic surface especially under high heat flux situations. Our studies indicate that adaptive and prompt condensate droplet purging is the dominant factor for sustaining long-term DWC.

  20. Optimization of Temperatures Heating Melt and Annealing Soft Magnetic Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsepelev, Vladimir; Starodubtsev, Yuri

    2017-05-01

    Taking into account the concept of the quasi-chemical model of the liquid micro-non-uniform composition and the research made on the physical properties of the Fe-based melts being crystallized, the unique technology of the melt time-temperature treatment has been developed. Amorphous ribbons produced using this technology require optimal annealing temperatures to be specifically selected. Temperature dependences of the kinematic viscosity of a multicomponent Fe72.5Cu1Nb2Mo1.5Si14B9 melt have been studied. A critical temperature is detected above which the activation energy of viscous flow of the melt changes. Upon cooling the overheated melt, the temperature curves of the kinematic viscosity become linear within the given coordinates. In amorphous ribbon produced in the mode with overheating the melt above the critical temperature, the enthalpy of crystallization grows, the following heat treatment results in an increase in magnetic permeability.

  1. Near–surface air temperature and snow skin temperature comparison from CREST-SAFE station data with MODIS land surface temperature data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Pérez Díaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Land Surface Temperature (LST is a key variable (commonly studied to understand the hydrological cycle that helps drive the energy balance and water exchange between the Earth's surface and its atmosphere. One observable constituent of much importance in the land surface water balance model is snow. Snow cover plays a critical role in the regional to global scale hydrological cycle because rain-on-snow with warm air temperatures accelerates rapid snow-melt, which is responsible for the majority of the spring floods. Accurate information on near-surface air temperature (T-air and snow skin temperature (T-skin helps us comprehend the energy and water balances in the Earth's hydrological cycle. T-skin is critical in estimating latent and sensible heat fluxes over snow covered areas because incoming and outgoing radiation fluxes from the snow mass and the air temperature above make it different from the average snowpack temperature. This study investigates the correlation between MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS LST data and observed T-air and T-skin data from NOAA-CREST-Snow Analysis and Field Experiment (CREST-SAFE for the winters of 2013 and 2014. LST satellite validation is imperative because high-latitude regions are significantly affected by climate warming and there is a need to aid existing meteorological station networks with the spatially continuous measurements provided by satellites. Results indicate that near-surface air temperature correlates better than snow skin temperature with MODIS LST data. Additional findings show that there is a negative trend demonstrating that the air minus snow skin temperature difference is inversely proportional to cloud cover. To a lesser extent, it will be examined whether the surface properties at the site are representative for the LST properties within the instrument field of view.

  2. Near-surface air temperature and snow skin temperature comparison from CREST-SAFE station data with MODIS land surface temperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Díaz, C. L.; Lakhankar, T.; Romanov, P.; Muñoz, J.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Yu, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key variable (commonly studied to understand the hydrological cycle) that helps drive the energy balance and water exchange between the Earth's surface and its atmosphere. One observable constituent of much importance in the land surface water balance model is snow. Snow cover plays a critical role in the regional to global scale hydrological cycle because rain-on-snow with warm air temperatures accelerates rapid snow-melt, which is responsible for the majority of the spring floods. Accurate information on near-surface air temperature (T-air) and snow skin temperature (T-skin) helps us comprehend the energy and water balances in the Earth's hydrological cycle. T-skin is critical in estimating latent and sensible heat fluxes over snow covered areas because incoming and outgoing radiation fluxes from the snow mass and the air temperature above make it different from the average snowpack temperature. This study investigates the correlation between MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST data and observed T-air and T-skin data from NOAA-CREST-Snow Analysis and Field Experiment (CREST-SAFE) for the winters of 2013 and 2014. LST satellite validation is imperative because high-latitude regions are significantly affected by climate warming and there is a need to aid existing meteorological station networks with the spatially continuous measurements provided by satellites. Results indicate that near-surface air temperature correlates better than snow skin temperature with MODIS LST data. Additional findings show that there is a negative trend demonstrating that the air minus snow skin temperature difference is inversely proportional to cloud cover. To a lesser extent, it will be examined whether the surface properties at the site are representative for the LST properties within the instrument field of view.

  3. COMPARATIVE EFFICIENCY OF HEAT-PUMPS APPLICATION IN LOW TEMPERATURE HEAT SUPPLY SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Chepurnoy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The  article  considers  comparative  operation-efficiency  of  the  low-temperature  heatsupply systems with heat pumping plants (HPP and with hot-water boilers. The paper shows that for energy evaluation of the alternative heat-supply systems effectiveness one cannot employ the transformation ratio (heating coefficient and the fuel heat-utilization factor in the HPP. Nonetheless the transformation ratio enters the formulae designating the efficiency of HPP operation. The authors obtain a generalized formula for ascertainment of transformation ratio and suggest evaluating the operation efficiency of the heat-supply systems by means of indicators specifying relative gain in the exergy-efficiency factor, fuel savings and saving expenditures connected with fuel and utilities. They attain formulae and build nomographic charts for those indicators ascertainment. The operation-efficiency comparative analysis of the low-temperature heat supply systems with HPP and with hot-water boilers shows that the HPP systems increase their effectiveness with transformation ratio, fuel price increase as well as with low electric-energy prices. The article specifies that with fuel low prices, the transformation-ratios limiting values with which the HPP operation-efficacy gains, grow. Energy-efficiency increase in the HPP does not always guaranty their economic effectiveness. These findings are true only for the heating systems. The hot water-supply systems will require the HPP condenser water additional heating to the assumed temperature from another thermal source, which reduces the effectiveness of the heat pump plants utilizing.

  4. Experimental study of water droplets on over-heated nano/microstructured zirconium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seol Ha [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Ho Seon [Division of Mechanical System Engineering, Incheon National University, 406-772 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joonwon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hwan [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Heat transfer performance of a droplet on a modified zirconium surface is evaluated. • Modified (nano/micro-) surfaces enhanced heat transfer rate and Leidenfrost point. • A highly wettable condition of the modified surface contributes the enhancement. • Nano-scaled modification indicates the higher performance of droplet cooling. • Investigation via visualization of the droplet support the heat transfer experimental data. - Abstract: In this study, we observed the behavior of water droplets near the Leidenfrost point (LFP) on zirconium alloy surfaces with anodizing treatment and investigated the droplet cooling performance. The anodized zirconium surface, which consists of bundles of nanotubes (∼10–100 nm) or micro-mountain-like structures, improved the wetting characteristics of the surface. A deionized water droplet (6 μL) was dropped onto test surfaces heated to temperatures ranging from 250 °C to the LFP. The droplet dynamics were investigated through high-speed visualization, and the cooling performance was discussed in terms of the droplet evaporation time. The modified surface provided vigorous, intensive nucleate boiling in comparison with a clean, bare surface. Additionally, we observed that the structured surface had a delayed LFP due to the high wetting condition induced by strong capillary wicking forces on the structured surface.

  5. Influence of Heat Treatment on Mercury Cavitation Resistance of Surface Hardened 316LN Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Hsu, Julia [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

    2010-11-01

    The cavitation-erosion resistance of carburized 316LN stainless steel was significantly degraded but not destroyed by heat treatment in the temperature range 500-800 C. The heat treatments caused rejection of some carbon from the carburized layer into an amorphous film that formed on each specimen surface. Further, the heat treatments encouraged carbide precipitation and reduced hardness within the carburized layer, but the overall change did not reduce surface hardness fully to the level of untreated material. Heat treatments as short as 10 min at 650 C substantially reduced cavitation-erosion resistance in mercury, while heat treatments at 500 and 800 C were found to be somewhat less detrimental. Overall, the results suggest that modest thermal excursions perhaps the result of a weld made at some distance to the carburized material or a brief stress relief treatment will not render the hardened layer completely ineffective but should be avoided to the greatest extent possible.

  6. Modern State and Efficiency Analysis of Heat Recovery in Fuel Furnaces Using High Temperature Recuperators. Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Soroka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes various factors that affect upon heat transfer in high temperature recuperators, namely: heat transfer enhancement, heat exchange surface increase and rise of temperature head between primary and secondary heat transfer fluids. Comparison of experimental data with the results of mathematical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD modeling has been performed in the paper. The paper considers some new designs of high temperature heat recovery plants: tube recuperator equipped with internal inserts – secondary emitters inside tubes for metallurgical furnaces and high-efficient two-way radiative recuperators for machinery engineering furnaces.  Advantages of new recuperators in comparison with existing analogues have been estimated in the paper. These advantages are:  provision of additional fuel saving due to increase of preheating temperature of the combustion air and improvement of design stability by decrease of tube wall temperature.

  7. The balancing of existing space heating systems using temperature measurements; L'equilibrage des installations de chauffage existantes par mesure des temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didier, G.

    2004-03-01

    The balancing of space heating systems using the measurements of water temperature or of the ambient temperature is a method used since several decades. However, the results obtained with this method have been very often disappointing. Today, the improvements made in the metrology of surface temperatures allow to reconsider this approach. This technical paper describes: the progresses made in surface temperature measurements, the balancing principle using water temperature measurements, a numerical example and the study of a concrete case (relation between temperature drop and flow rate), and the choice of a balancing method. (J.S.)

  8. Using radiometric surface temperature for surface energy flux estimation in Mediterranean drylands from a two-source perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morillas, L.; Garcia Garcia, Monica; Nieto Solana, Hector;

    2013-01-01

    A two-source model (TSM) for surface energy balance, considering explicitly soil and vegetation components, was tested under water stress conditions. The TSM evaluated estimates the sensible heat flux (H) using the surface-air thermal gradient and the latent heat flux (LE) as a residual from...... and parallel; as well as the iterative algorithm included in the TSM to disaggregate the soil-surface composite temperature into its separate components. Continuous field measurements of composite soil-vegetation surface temperature (T) and bare soil temperature (T) from thermal infrared sensors were used...... T and the simplified version that uses separate inputs of T and T' were minor. This demonstrates the robustness of the iterative procedure to disaggregate a composite soil-vegetation temperature into separate soil and vegetation components in semiarid environments with good prospects for image...

  9. Effect of floor surface temperature on blood flow and skin temperature in the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, G-S

    2008-12-01

    A total of 16 healthy college students participated as subjects to elucidate the hypothesis that blood flow and skin temperature in foot are affected by the floor surface temperature. The floor surface temperature was controlled by varying the temperature of water (tw) flowing underneath the floor, and it ranged from tw 15 to 40 degrees C at 5 degrees C intervals. The blood flow rate was measured in the dorsal right toe, and skin temperatures were measured for 60 min at 8 points: the neck, right scapular, left hand, right shin, left bottom of the toe, right instep, left finger, and rectum. The blood flow rate in the foot tissue was increased until the foot skin temperature warmed up to 34 degrees C (P = 0.000). The final skin temperatures on the bottom of the toe were 19.4 +/- 2.44 degrees C for tw 15 degrees C, 22.4 +/- 2.45 degrees C for tw 20 degrees C, 24.8 +/- 2.80 degrees C for tw 25 degrees C, 27.7 +/- 2.13 degrees C for tw 30 degrees C, 30.6 +/- 2.06 degrees C for tw 35 degrees C, 33.2 +/- 1.45 degrees C for tw 40 degrees C, 34.2 +/- 1.55 degrees C for tw 45 degrees C, and 35.2 +/- 1.65 degrees C for tw 50 degrees C. Considering blood flow and comfort, the partial floor heating system is suggested and the recommended floor surface temperature range is 27-33 degrees C. A warm floor surface can serve to satisfy occupants when the ambient temperature maintained at 20 degrees C which represents an energy conscious temperature. A warm floor can induce high blood perfusion in the feet and consequently improve an occupant's health by treating many vascular-related disorders. Even in a well-insulated residential building, a partially heated floor system could prevent overheating while providing surface warmth.

  10. Dissipation Effects on MHD Nonlinear Flow and Heat Transfer Past a Porous Surface with Prescribed Heat Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P. Anjali Devi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Viscous and Joule dissipation effects are considered on MHD nonlinear flow and heat transfer past a stretching porous surface embedded in a porous medium under a transverse magnetic field. Analytical solutions of highly nonlinear momentum equation and confluent hypergeometric similarity solution of heat transfer equations in the case when the plate stretches with velocity varying linearly with distance are obtained. The effect of various parameters like suction parameter, Prandtl number, Magnetic parameter, and Eckert number entering into the velocity field, temperature distribution and skin friction co-efficient at the wall are discussed with the aid of graphs.

  11. Investigation of transient temperature's influence on damage of high-speed sliding electrical contact rail surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuyan; Sun, Shasha; Guo, Quanli; Yang, Degong; Sun, Dongtao

    2016-11-01

    In the high speed sliding electrical contact with large current, the temperature of contact area rises quickly under the coupling action of the friction heating, the Joule heating and electric arc heating. The rising temperature seriously affects the conductivity of the components and the yield strength of materials, as well affects the contact state and lead to damage, so as to shorten the service life of the contact elements. Therefore, there is vital significance to measure the temperature accurately and investigate the temperature effect on damage of rail surface. Aiming at the problem of components damage in high speed sliding electrical contact, the transient heat effect on the contact surface was explored and its influence and regularity on the sliding components damage was obtained. A kind of real-time temperature measurement method on rail surface of high speed sliding electrical contact is proposed. Under the condition of 2.5 kA current load, based on the principle of infrared radiation non-contact temperature sensor was used to measure the rail temperature. The dynamic distribution of temperature field was obtained through the simulation analysis, further, the connection between temperature changes and the rail surface damage morphology, the damage volume was analyzed and established. Finally, the method to reduce rail damage and improve the life of components by changing the temperature field was discussed.

  12. Heat transfer crisis on sintered porous surfaces – experimental investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojcik Tadeusz Michal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There were presented the results of theoretical analysis of boiling heat transfer on heating surfaces covered with thin-layered capillary porous structures. The paper discussed the results of experimental investigations into intralayer boiling crisis and accompanying phenomena. It was observed that the structural parameters of the porous covering affected the course of the process. Hysteresis phenomenon manifested itself when the heat flux initiating intralayer heat crisis was reached. The crisis mechanism hypotheses, the description of which was available in literature, were discussed.

  13. Transient Heat Diffusion with Temperature-Dependent Conductivity and Time-Dependent Heat Transfer Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raseelo J. Moitsheki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lie point symmetry analysis is performed for an unsteady nonlinear heat diffusion problem modeling thermal energy storage in a medium with a temperature-dependent power law thermal conductivity and subjected to a convective heat transfer to the surrounding environment at the boundary through a variable heat transfer coefficient. Large symmetry groups are admitted even for special choices of the constants appearing in the governing equation. We construct one-dimensional optimal systems for the admitted Lie algebras. Following symmetry reductions, we construct invariant solutions.

  14. High temperature polymer fuel cells. Heat utilization and co tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jens, Oluf Jensen; Qingfeng, Li; Ronghuan, He; Gang, Xiao; Ji-An, Gao; Bjerrum, N.J. [Denmark Technical Univ., Department of Chemistry, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-09-01

    This paper will report recent results from our group on polymer fuel cells (PEMFC) based on the temperature resistant polymer poly-benzimidazole (PBI), which allow working temperatures up to 200 C. The membrane has a water drag number near zero and need no water management at all. The high working temperature allows for utilization of the excess heat for fuel processing. Moreover, it provides an excellent CO tolerance of several percent, and the system needs no purification of hydrogen from a reformer. Continuous service for over 6 months at 150 C has been demonstrated. (authors)

  15. METHODS TO DETECT ATMOSPHERIC AND SURFACE HEAT ISLANDS IN URBAN AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. HERBEL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Intensification of the urbanization process and its associated climatic effects is nowadays a major problem of large cities worldwide. One of these climatic effects is the urban heat island (UHI, that implies increased air and surface temperature values in the city when compared to the nearby rural areas. This phenomenon threatens the health of the population, especially during heat waves, affects the quality of the environment and the quality of life, and also generates significant costs to ensure the inhabitants' thermal comfort. In this study we present a review of the UHI concept and three of the main methods used to detect the atmospheric and surface urban heat islands. Satellite image data analysis seems an easier and time-saving solution, but due to its limitations, we consider that a combination of both surfaces and lower atmospheric layer temperature data analysis is the best choice in order to get accurate results of the intensity and spatial extension of the UHI.

  16. Urban heat mitigation by roof surface materials during the East Asian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungjoon; Ryu, Youngryel; Jiang, Chongya

    2015-12-01

    Roof surface materials, such as green and white roofs, have attracted attention in their role in urban heat mitigation, and various studies have assessed the cooling performance of roof surface materials during hot and sunny summer seasons. However, summers in the East Asian monsoon climate region are characterized by significant fluctuations in weather events, such as dry periods, heatwaves, and rainy and cloudy days. This study investigated the efficacy of different roof surface materials for heat mitigation, considering the temperatures both at and beneath the surface of the roof covering materials during a summer monsoon in Seoul, Korea. We performed continuous observations of temperature at and beneath the surface of the roof covering materials, and manual observation of albedo and the normalized difference vegetation index for a white roof, two green roofs (grass (Poa pratensis) and sedum (Sedum sarmentosum)), and a reference surface. Overall, the surface temperature of the white roof was significantly lower than that of the grass and sedum roofs (1.1 °C and 1.3 °C), whereas the temperature beneath the surface of the white roof did not differ significantly from that of the grass and sedum roofs during the summer. The degree of cloudiness significantly modified the surface temperature of the white roof compared with that of the grass and sedum roofs, which depended on plant metabolisms. It was difficult for the grass to maintain its cooling ability without adequate watering management. After considering the cooling performance and maintenance efforts for different environmental conditions, we concluded that white roof performed better in urban heat mitigation than grass and sedum during the East Asian summer monsoon. Our findings will be useful in urban heat mitigation in the region.

  17. Tracking ocean heat uptake during the surface warming hiatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Xie, Shang-Ping; Lu, Jian

    2016-03-30

    Ocean heat uptake is observed to penetrate deep into the Atlantic and Southern Oceans during the recent hiatus of global warming. Here we show that the deep heat penetration in these two basins is not unique to the hiatus but is characteristic of anthropogenic warming and merely reflects the depth of the mean meridional overturning circulation in the basin. We find, however, that heat redistribution in the upper 350 m between the Pacific and Indian Oceans is closely tied to the surface warming hiatus. The Indian Ocean shows an anomalous warming below 50 m during hiatus events due to an enhanced heat transport by the Indonesian throughflow in response to the intensified trade winds in the equatorial Pacific. Thus, the Pacific and Indian Oceans are the key regions to track ocean heat uptake during the surface warming hiatus.

  18. The Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS for estimation of turbulent heat fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Su

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS is proposed for the estimation of atmospheric turbulent fluxes and evaporative fraction using satellite earth observation data, in combination with meteorological information at proper scales. SEBS consists of: a set of tools for the determination of the land surface physical parameters, such as albedo, emissivity, temperature, vegetation coverage etc., from spectral reflectance and radiance measurements; a model for the determination of the roughness length for heat transfer; and a new formulation for the determination of the evaporative fraction on the basis of energy balance at limiting cases. Four experimental data sets are used to assess the reliabilities of SEBS. Based on these case studies, SEBS has proven to be capable to estimate turbulent heat fluxes and evaporative fraction at various scales with acceptable accuracy. The uncertainties in the estimated heat fluxes are comparable to in-situ measurement uncertainties. Keywords: Surface energy balance, turbulent heat flux, evaporation, remote sensing

  19. Effect of surface etching on condensing heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok, Sung Chul; Park, Jae Won; Jung, Jiyeon; Choi, Chonggun; Choi, Gyu Hong; Hwang, Seung Sik; Chung, Tae Yong; Shin, Donghoon [Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Jun [Hoseo University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    This study conducted experiments on humid air condensation during heat transfer in an air preheating exchanger attached to a home condensing boiler to improve thermal efficiency. An etchant composed of sulfuric acid and sodium nitrate was used to create roughness on the heat exchanger surface made from STS430J1L. A counter flow heat exchanger was fabricated to test the performance of heat transfer. Results showed that the overall heat transfer coefficients of all specimens treated with etchant improved with respect to the original specimens (not treated with etchant), and the overall heat transfer coefficient of the 60 s etching specimen increased by up to 15%. However, the increasing rate of the heat transfer coefficient was disproportional to the etching time. When the etching time specifically increased above 60 s, the heat transfer coefficient decreased. This effect was assumed to be caused by surface characteristics such as contact angle. Furthermore, a smaller contact angle or higher hydrophilicity leads to higher heat transfer coefficient.

  20. MODIS Surface Temperatures for Cryosphere Studies (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D. K.; Comiso, J. C.; DiGirolamo, N. E.; Shuman, C. A.; Riggs, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have used Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land-surface temperature (LST) and ice-surface temperature (IST) products for several applications in studies of the cryosphere. A climate-quality climate data record (CDR) of the IST of the Greenland ice sheet has been developed and was one of the data sources used to monitor the extreme melt event covering nearly the entire Greenland ice sheet on 11 - 12 July 2012. The IST CDR is available online for users to employ in models, and to study temperature distributions and melt trends on the ice sheet. We continue to assess accuracy of the IST product through comparative analysis with air temperature data from the NOAA Logan temperature sensor at Summit Station, Greenland. We find a small offset between the air temperature and the IST with the IST being slightly lower which is consistent with findings of other studies. The LST data product has been applied in studies of snow melt in regions where snow is a significant water resource. We have used LST data in seasonally snow-covered areas such as the Wind River Range, Wyoming, to monitor the relationship between LST and seasonal streamflow. A close association between a sudden and sustained increase in LST and complete snowmelt, and between melt-season maximum LST and maximum daily streamflow has been documented. Use of LST and MODIS snow-cover and products in hydrological models increases the accuracy of the modeled prediction of runoff. The IST and LST products have also been applied to study of sea ice, e.g. extent and concentration, and lake ice, such as determining ice-out dates, and these efforts will also be described.

  1. A statistical method to get surface level air-temperature from satellite observations of precipitable water

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Shikauchi, A.; Sugimori, Y.; Kubota, M.

    Vol. 49, pp. 551 to 558. 1993 A Statistical Method to Get Surface Level Air-Temperature from Satellite Observations of Precipitable Water PANKAJAKSHAN THADATHIL*, AKIRA SHIKAUCHI, YASUHIRO SUGIMORI and MASAHISA KUBOTA School of Marine Science... observations for getting the estimates of heat flux across the air-sea boundary (Miller, 1981; Liu, 1988). Bulk method has widely been used for this purpose and the parameters required are: sea surface temperature, and wind speed, air-temperature and specific...

  2. Modeling heat efficiency, flow and scale-up in the corotating disc scraped surface heat exchanger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Alan; Szabo, Peter; Karlson, Torben

    2002-01-01

    A comparison of two different scale corotating disc scraped surface heat exchangers (CDHE) was performed experimentally. The findings were compared to predictions from a finite element model. We find that the model predicts well the flow pattern of the two CDHE's investigated. The heat transfer...

  3. Temperature and heat wave trends in northwest Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Austria, Polioptro F.; Bandala, Erick R.; Patiño-Gómez, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    Increase in temperature extremes is one of the main expected impacts of climate change, as well as one of the first signs of its occurrence. Nevertheless, results emerging from General Circulation Models, while sufficient for large scales, are not enough for forecasting local trends and, hence, the IPCC has called for local studies based on on-site data. Indeed, it is expected that climate extremes will be detected much earlier than changes in climate averages. Heat waves are among the most important and least studied climate extremes, however its occurrence has been only barely studied and even its very definition remains controversial. This paper discusses the observed changes in temperature trends and heat waves in Northwestern Mexico, one of the most vulnerable regions of the country. The climate records in two locations of the region are analyzed, including one of the cities with extreme climate in Mexico, Mexicali City in the state of Baja California and the Yaqui River basin at Sonora State using three different methodologies. Results showed clear trends on temperature increase and occurrence of heat waves in both of the study zones using the three methodologies proposed. As result, some policy making suggestion are included in order to increase the adaptability of the studied regions to climate change, particularly related with heat wave occurrence.

  4. Evolution of surface sensible heat over the Tibetan Plateau under the recent global warming hiatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lihua; Huang, Gang; Fan, Guangzhou; Qu, Xia; Zhao, Guijie; Hua, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Based on regular surface meteorological observations and NCEP/DOE reanalysis data, this study investigates the evolution of surface sensible heat (SH) over the central and eastern Tibetan Plateau (CE-TP) under the recent global warming hiatus. The results reveal that the SH over the CE-TP presents a recovery since the slowdown of the global warming. The restored surface wind speed together with increased difference in ground-air temperature contribute to the recovery in SH. During the global warming hiatus, the persistent weakening wind speed is alleviated due to the variation of the meridional temperature gradient. Meanwhile, the ground surface temperature and the difference in ground-air temperature show a significant increasing trend in that period caused by the increased total cloud amount, especially at night. At nighttime, the increased total cloud cover reduces the surface effective radiation via a strengthening of atmospheric counter radiation and subsequently brings about a clear upward trend in ground surface temperature and the difference in ground-air temperature. Cloud-radiation feedback plays a significant role in the evolution of the surface temperature and even SH during the global warming hiatus. Consequently, besides the surface wind speed, the difference in ground-air temperature becomes another significant factor for the variation in SH since the slowdown of global warming, particularly at night.

  5. Temperature and heat flux scalings for isoviscous thermal convection in spherical geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Frédéric; Tackley, Paul J.; Nakagawa, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    Parametrized convection, which has long been used to reconstruct the thermal history of planetary mantles, is based on scaling relationships between observables (including heat flux) and controlling parameters (the most important being the Rayleigh number, Ra). To explore the influence of spherical geometry on heat transfer, we have conducted two series of numerical experiments of thermal convection (one with bottom heating and the other with mixed heating) in an isoviscous spherical shell with various curvatures. Using these calculations and a generalized non-linear inversion, we then derive scaling laws for the average temperature and for the surface heat flux. In the case of bottom heating, we found that the non-dimensional average temperature is given by θm = f2/(1 + f2), where f is the ratio between the core and total radii. The non-dimensional surface heat flux is fitted well by Nutop = 0.36f0.32 Ra(0.273+0.05f) θ0.6m. This scaling indicates that the available heating power decreases with increasing curvature (decreasing f). There exist strong trade-offs between the inverted parameters, that is, different sets of parameters explain our calculations well within error bars. For mixed heating, the non-dimensional average temperature and surface heat flux are well explained by θH = θm + (1.68 - 0.8f)[(1 + f + f2)/3]0.79 h0.79/Ra0.234, where h is the non-dimensional rate of internal heating, and Nutop = 0.59f0.05 Ra(0.300-0.003f) θ1.23H. Due to a competition between the radiogenic and convective powers, and for given values of h and Ra, there is a curvature for which the Urey ratio reaches a minimum. Applied to the Earth's mantle, the mixed heating scaling predicts a Urey ratio between 0.4 and 0.6, depending on the Rayleigh number. Additional parameters, including the thermal viscosity ratio, phase transitions, the presence of dense material in the deep mantle, and variability of the flow pattern in time, may enter an appropriate modelling of the Earth

  6. Maximum Efficiency of Thermoelectric Heat Conversion in High-Temperature Power Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Khvesyuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern trends in development of aircraft engineering go with development of vehicles of the fifth generation. The features of aircrafts of the fifth generation are motivation to use new high-performance systems of onboard power supply. The operating temperature of the outer walls of engines is of 800–1000 K. This corresponds to radiation heat flux of 10 kW/m2 . The thermal energy including radiation of the engine wall may potentially be converted into electricity. The main objective of this paper is to analyze if it is possible to use a high efficiency thermoelectric conversion of heat into electricity. The paper considers issues such as working processes, choice of materials, and optimization of thermoelectric conversion. It presents the analysis results of operating conditions of thermoelectric generator (TEG used in advanced hightemperature power devices. A high-temperature heat source is a favorable factor for the thermoelectric conversion of heat. It is shown that for existing thermoelectric materials a theoretical conversion efficiency can reach the level of 15–20% at temperatures up to 1500 K and available values of Ioffe parameter being ZT = 2–3 (Z is figure of merit, T is temperature. To ensure temperature regime and high efficiency thermoelectric conversion simultaneously it is necessary to have a certain match between TEG power, temperature of hot and cold surfaces, and heat transfer coefficient of the cooling system. The paper discusses a concept of radiation absorber on the TEG hot surface. The analysis has demonstrated a number of potentialities for highly efficient conversion through using the TEG in high-temperature power devices. This work has been implemented under support of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation; project No. 1145 (the programme “Organization of Research Engineering Activities”.

  7. Regionalization of surface heat fluxes and evapotranspiration over heterogeneous landscape of the Third Pole region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yaoming

    2016-04-01

    Like Antarctica and the Arctic, the Third Pole region is drawing increased attention among the international academic community. It is centered on the Tibetan Plateau, stretching from the Pamir Plateau and Hindu-Kush on the west to the Hengduan Mountains on the east, and from the Kunlun and Qilian Mts on the north to the Himalayas on the south. Covering over 5,000,000 km2 in total and with an average elevation surpassing 4000 m. The exchange of energy and evapotranspiration (ET) between land surface and atmosphere over the Third Pole region play an important role in the Asian monsoon system, which in turn is a major component of both the energy and water cycles of the global climate system. The parameterization methods based on satellite data and Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) observations have been proposed and tested for deriving regional distribution of surface reflectance, surface temperature, net radiation flux, soil heat flux, sensible heat flux, latent heat flux and ET over heterogeneous landscape. As cases study, the methods were applied to the whole Tibetan Plateau area and Nepal area. To validate the proposed methods, the ground-measured surface reflectance, surface temperature, net radiation flux, soil heat flux, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux in the Third Pole Environment Programme (TPE) Research Platform (TPEP) TPEP are compared to the derived values. The results show that the derived surface variables, land surface heat fluxes and ET over the study area are in good accordance with the land surface status. These parameters show a wide range due to the strong contrast of surface features. And the estimated land surface variables and land surface heat fluxes are in good agreement with ground measurements, and all the absolute percent difference is less than 10% in the validation sites. It is therefore concluded that the proposed methods are successful for the retrieval of land surface variables and land surface heat fluxes over heterogeneous

  8. Laser ablation of metals: Analysis of surface-heating and plume-expansion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, A.; Giardini Guidoni, A.; Kelly, R.; Flamini, C.; Orlando, S.

    1997-02-01

    The thermal effects produced by laser pulses (6 or 18 ns) absorbed by a solid target have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The energy which is absorbed serves to raise the temperature of the surface. The regimes to be considered are described by the heat-diffusion equation under conditions of what we term `normal vaporization'. Numerical solutions of the heat-diffusion equation lead to the temperature profiles produced within the target. The aim of this work is to present the results on heat flow in terms of the surface temperature and the velocity at which the surface recedes. Experimental data on the recession velocity and of the crater depth in relation to the thermophysical parameters of the metals Al, Cu, Nb, W, and Zn, are reported. The effect of the surface heating has also been examined in terms of the velocities of the plumes emitted from the targets. It is concluded that vaporization from the laser-heated targets is not the only relevant process but that one or both of laser-plume interaction and phase explosion may play a role in determining particle energies.

  9. Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Shea Rose, Leanna

    2007-06-14

    Data on materials and surface types that comprise a city, i.e. urban fabric, are needed in order to estimate the effects of light-colored surfaces (roofs and pavements) and urban vegetation (trees, grass, shrubs) on the meteorology and air quality of a city. We discuss the results of a semi-automatic statistical approach used to develop data on surface-type distribution and urban-fabric makeup using aerial color orthophotography, for four metropolitan areas of Chicago, IL, Houston, TX, Sacramento, CA, and Salt Lake City, UT. The digital high resolution (0.3 to 0.5-m) aerial photographs for each of these metropolitan areas covers representative urban areas ranging from 30 km{sup 2} to 52 km{sup 2}. Major land-use types examined included: commercial, residential, industrial, educational, and transportation. On average, for the metropolitan areas studied, vegetation covers about 29-41% of the area, roofs 19-25%, and paved surfaces 29-39%. For the most part, trees shade streets, parking lots, grass, and sidewalks. At ground level, i.e., view from below the tree canopies, vegetation covers about 20-37% of the area, roofs 20-25%, and paved surfaces 29-36%.

  10. One Hundred Years of New York City's "Urban Heat Island": Temperature Trends and Public Health Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, J. E.; Knowlton, K. M.; Rosenzweig, C.; Goldberg, R.; Kinney, P. L.

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, we examine the relationship between the historical development of New York City and its effect on the urban climate. Urban "heat islands" (UHI) are created principally by man-made surfaces, including concrete, dark roofs, asphalt lots and roads, which absorb most of the sunlight falling on them and reradiate that energy as heat. Many urban streets have fewer trees and other vegetation to shade buildings, block solar radiation and cool the air by evapotranspiration. The historical development of the NYC heat island effect was assessed in terms of average temperature differences of the city center relative to its surrounding 31-county metropolitan region, comprised of parts of New York State, New Jersey, and Connecticut. Monthly maximum and minimum temperatures for 1900-1997 were obtained from NOAA's National Climatic Data Center, the NASA-Goddard Institute for Space Studies, and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University for 24 weather stations within the region that are part of the U.S. Historical Climatology Network. Analysis of annual mean temperatures shows an increasing difference between NYC (Central Park weather station) and its surrounding region over the twentieth century. Analysis of the temperature differences over time between NY Central Park (NYCP) station and 23 regional weather stations classified according to distance and level of urbanization show a heat island effect existing in NYC, with mean temperatures in the NYCP Station generally higher than the surrounding stations, ranging from 1.20\\deg C to 3.02\\deg C. A difference of at least 1\\deg C already existed at the beginning of the 20th century between the mean temperature in NYC and its surrounding rural areas, and this difference increased over the twentieth century. There was a significant decrease in the monthly and seasonal variability of the UHI effect over the century. Temperature extremes and summertime heat can create heat stress and other health

  11. On the heat capacity of liquids at high temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Stishov, S M

    2016-01-01

    Making use of a simple approximation for the evolution of the radial distribution function, we calculate the temperature dependence of the heat capacity $C_v$ of Ar at constant density. $C_v$ decreases with temperature roughly according to the law $\\sim T^{-1/4}$, slowly approaching the hard sphere asymptotic value $C_v=\\frac{3}{2}R$. However, the asymptotic value of $C_v$ is not reachable at reasonable temperatures , but stays close to 1.7--1.8 $R$ over a wide range of temperatures after passing a " magic " $2R$ value at about 2000 K. Nevertheless these values has nothing to do with loss of vibrational degrees of freedom, but arises as a result of a temperature variation of the collision diameter $\\sigma$. \\end{abstract}

  12. Heat propagation models for superconducting nanobridges at millikelvin temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, A.; Rozhko, S.; Hao, L.; Gallop, J. C.; Romans, E. J.

    2017-01-01

    Nanoscale superconducting quantum interference devices (nanoSQUIDs) most commonly use Dayem bridges as Josephson elements to reduce the loop size and achieve high spin sensitivity. Except at temperatures close to the critical temperature T c, the electrical characteristics of these bridges exhibit undesirable thermal hysteresis which complicates device operation. This makes proper thermal analysis an essential design consideration for optimising nanoSQUID performance at ultralow temperatures. However the existing theoretical models for this hysteresis were developed for micron-scale devices operating close to liquid helium temperatures, and are not fully applicable to a new generation of much smaller devices operating at significantly lower temperatures. We have therefore developed a new analytic heat model which enables a more accurate prediction of the thermal behaviour in such circumstances. We demonstrate that this model is in good agreement with experimental results measured down to 100 mK and discuss its validity for different nanoSQUID geometries.

  13. Time-resolved, local temperature measurements during pulsed laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappes, Ralf S; Li Chen; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Gutmann, Jochen S, E-mail: kappes@mpip-mainz.mpg.d [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    To analyse processes during laser heating, one needs to be able to measure temperatures of about 1000 K within one microsecond and with micrometre resolution. To achieve this accuracy, we set up a high-performance optical detection system with a microsecond gated camera in combination with selected interference filters to detect the thermal emission spectrum in the visible range. By fitting the emission spectrum to Planck's law, we are able to collect an area temperature profile for time intervals as short as one microsecond. Thus we can show that a polymer film, which is doped with an organic dye for energy conversion, can reach temperatures of at least 900 K, which is high above its 'normal' decomposition temperature. It is, furthermore, possible to relate the temperature to the effect of the laser beam on the polymer film.

  14. Hot-forging Die Cavity Surface Layer Temperature Gradient Distribution and Determinant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huachang; WANG Guan; XIAO Han; WANG Hongfu

    2011-01-01

    Based on the car front-wheel-hub forging forming process of numerical simulation,the temperature gradient expression of forging model cavity near the surface layer was got ten,which illustrates that the forging temperature gradient is related to forging die materials thermal conductivity,specific heat and impact speed,and the correlation coefficient is 0.97.Under the different thermal conductivity,heat capacity and forging speed,the temperature gradient was compared with each other.The paper obtained the relevant laws,which illustrates the temperature gradient relates to these three parameters in a sequence of thermal conductivity > impact speed> specific heat capacity.To reduce thermal stress in the near-surface layer of hot forging cavity,the material with greater thermal conductivity coefficient and specific heat capacity should be used.

  15. Temperature and phase transformations fields during surfacing by welding of CCS machine roll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Winczek

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In work have been presented models of temperature fields and kinetics of phase transformations in continuous casting steel machine roll surfacing spiral welding sequence with swinging motion of welding head. The temperature field was determined by analytical solution for massive body heated by moving voluminal heat source. The progress of diffusional phase transformations was described basing on equation of kinetics JMA-K and Koistinen-Marburger’s for martensitic transfomation. Deliberations were illustrated by computational example of surfaced roll made from steel 13CrMo4. The temperature field and structural components fraction was calcualated in section of regenerated area of material decline (along the roll axis. Considering critical temperatures, heat-affected zones have been determined: A1 and A3 – austenitic transformation, and solidus - fusion line. Accepted technological parameters of rebuilding gave results that reproduce geometry of padding weld heat-affected zones confirmed experimentally.

  16. Analytical investigation of the one dimensional heat transfer in logarithmic various surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vahabzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate of the effect of temperature variation on the logarithmic surface. By using the appropriate similarity transformation for the generation components and temperature, the basic equations governing flow and heat transfer are reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations. These equations have been solved approximately subject to the relevant boundary conditions with numerical and analytical techniques. The reliability and performance of the present method have been compared with the numerical method (Runge–Kutta fourth-rate to solve this problem. Then, LSM is used to solve nonlinear equation in heat transfer. This method is useful and practical for solving the nonlinear equation in heat transfer. It is observed that the obtained results by present analytical method are very close to result of the numerical method. Furthermore, the results show that the temperature profiles decreased by increasing the α number, and, temperature profiles increased by increasing the β number.

  17. Field Measurement of Fracture/Matrix Heat Exchange using Fiber Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, A.; Becker, M. W.; Tsoflias, G. P.

    2012-12-01

    Highly channelized flow in fractured geologic systems has been blamed for early thermal breakthrough and poor performance of geothermal circulation systems. An experiment is presented in which the effect of channelized flow on fluid/rock heat transfer is measured. Hot water was circulated between two wells (7-14 m separation) completed in a single bedding plane fracture. The elevation of rock matrix temperature was measured using Fiber Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS). Between wells with good hydraulic connection, heat transfer followed a classic dipole sweep pattern. Between wells with poor hydraulic connection, heat transfer was skewed toward apparent regions of higher transmissivity (or larger aperture). Heat transfer between fracture and matrix was compared with saline tracer circulated between the same wells. Saline distribution was imaged using surface Ground Penetrating Radar. The results suggest that flow channeling can have a significant impact on heat transfer efficiency even in single bedding plane fractures. Temperature rise in the rock matrix above a fracture as a function of time Map view comparison of heat exchange to ground penetrating radar reflection amplitude (a function of fracture aperture). Red is warmer rock, yellow is cooler.

  18. Heat Flux Apportionment to Heterogeneous Surfaces Using Flux Footprint Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Heat flux data collected from the Baiyangdian Heterogeneous Field Experiment were analyzed using the footprint method. High resolution (25 m) Landsat-5 satellite imaging was used to determine the land cover as one of four surface types: farmland, lake, wetland, or village. Data from two observation sites in September 2005 were used. One site (Wangjiazhai) was characterized by highly heterogeneous surfaces in the central area of the Baiyangdian: lake/wetland. The other site (Xiongxian) was on land with more uniform surface cover. An improved Eulerian analytical flux footprint model was used to determine "source areas" of the heat fluxes measured at towers located at each site from surrounding landscapes of mixed surface types.In relative terms results show that wetland and lake areas generally contributed most to the observed heat flux at Wangjiazhai, while farmland contributed most at Xiongxian. Given the areal distribution of surface type contributions, calculations were made to obtain the magnitudes of the heat flux from lake, wetland and farmland to the total observed flux and apportioned contributions of each surface type to the sensible and latent heat fluxes. Results show that on average the sensible heat flux from wetland and farmland were comparable over the diurnal cycle, while the latent heat flux from farmland was somewhat larger by about 30-50 W m-2 during daytime. The latent and sensible fluxes from the lake source in daytime were about 50 W m-2 and 100 W m-2 less, respectively, than from wetland and farmland. The results are judged reasonable and serve to demonstrate the potential for flux apportionment over heterogeneous surfaces.

  19. Limitations of Heat Conductivity in Cryogenic Sensors Due to Surface Roughness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moktadir, Z.; Bruijn, M.P.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Ridder, M.; Mels, W.A.

    2002-01-01

    The limitation of heat conductivity in cryogenic sensors due to surface roughness was discussed. It was found that at macroscopic scale and high temperatures, the transport coefficients were characteristic properties of the material and were independent of the shape and size of specimen. An

  20. Aerodynamic heat transfer to RSI tile surfaces and gap intersections. [Reusable Surface Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunavant, J. C.; Throckmorton, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Review of the results of aerothermal heating tests of a simulated reusable surface insulation (RSI) tile array, performed on the sidewall of a Mach-10 hypersonic tunnel. In particular, the heating characteristics of the tile array, such as they result from heating inside the tile-expansion-space providing gaps between individual tiles, are investigated. The results include the finding that heating on the upstream face of a tile is strongly affected by the interacting longitudinal gap flow.