WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface temperature electronic

  1. Electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges over liquid water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeni Simeni, M.; Roettgen, A.; Petrishchev, V.; Frederickson, K.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    Time-resolved electron density, electron temperature, and gas temperature in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium and O2-He mixtures near liquid water surface are measured using Thomson/pure rotational Raman scattering, in two different geometries, (a) ‘diffuse filament’ discharge between a spherical high-voltage electrode and a grounded pin electrode placed in a reservoir filled with distilled water, with the tip exposed, and (b) dielectric barrier discharge between the high-voltage electrode and the liquid water surface. A diffuse plasma filament generated between the electrodes in helium during the primary discharge pulse exhibits noticeable constriction during the secondary discharge pulse several hundred ns later. Adding oxygen to the mixture reduces the plasma filament diameter and enhances constriction during the secondary pulse. In the dielectric barrier discharge, diffuse volumetric plasma occupies nearly the entire space between the high voltage electrode and the liquid surface, and extends radially along the surface. In the filament discharge in helium, adding water to the container results in considerable reduction of plasma lifetime compared to the discharge in dry helium, by about an order of magnitude, indicating rapid electron recombination with water cluster ions. Peak electron density during the pulse is also reduced, by about a factor of two, likely due to dissociative attachment to water vapor during the discharge pulse. These trends become more pronounced as oxygen is added to the mixture, which increases net rate of dissociative attachment. Gas temperature during the primary discharge pulse remains near room temperature, after which it increases up to T ~ 500 K over 5 µs and decays back to near room temperature before the next discharge pulse several tens of ms later. As expected, electron density and electron temperature in diffuse DBD plasmas are considerably lower compared to peak values in the filament discharge. Use of Thomson

  2. An AES Study of the Room Temperature Surface Conditioning of Technological Metal Surfaces by Electron Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Taborelli, M; Brown, A; Baker, M A

    2002-01-01

    The modifications to technological copper and niobium surfaces induced by 2.5 keV electron irradiation have been investigated in the context of the conditioning process occurring in particle accelerator ultra high vacuum systems. Changes in the elemental surface composition have been found using Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) by monitoring the carbon, oxygen and metal Auger peak intensities as a function of electron irradiation in the dose range 10-6 to 10-2 C mm-2. The surface analysis results are compared with electron dose dependent secondary electron and electron stimulated desorption yield measurements. Initially the electron irradiation causes a surface cleaning through electron stimulated desorption, in particular of hydrogen. During this period both the electron stimulated desorption and secondary electron yield decrease as a function of electron dose. When the electron dose exceeds 10-4 C mm-2 electron stimulated desorption yields are reduced by several orders of magnitude and the electron beam indu...

  3. SiGe Based Low Temperature Electronics for Lunar Surface Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Blalock, Benjamin; Cressler, John

    2012-01-01

    The temperature at the permanently shadowed regions of the moon's surface is approximately -240 C. Other areas of the lunar surface experience temperatures that vary between 120 C and -180 C during the day and night respectively. To protect against the large temperature variations of the moon surface, traditional electronics used in lunar robotics systems are placed inside a thermally controlled housing which is bulky, consumes power and adds complexity to the integration and test. SiGe Based electronics have the capability to operate over wide temperature range like that of the lunar surface. Deploying low temperature SiGe electronics in a lander platform can minimize the need for the central thermal protection system and enable the development of a new generation of landers and mobility platforms with highly efficient distributed architecture. For the past five years a team consisting of NASA, university and industry researchers has been examining the low temperature and wide temperature characteristic of SiGe based transistors for developing electronics for wide temperature needs of NASA environments such as the Moon, Titan, Mars and Europa. This presentation reports on the status of the development of wide temperature SiGe based electronics for the landers and lunar surface mobility systems.

  4. Core-shell nanowire based electrical surface fastener used for room-temperature electronic packaging bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Ju, Yang; Hosoi, Atsushi

    2014-03-01

    With the ongoing miniaturization in electronic packaging, the traditional solders suffer from severe performance degradation. In addition, the high temperature required in the traditional solder reflow process may damage electronic elements. Therefore, there is an increasing urgent need for a new kind of nontoxic solder that can afford good mechanical stress and electrical contact at low temperature. This paper presents a method of fabricating nanowire surface fastener for the application of microelectronic packaging bonding at room temperature. This surface fastener consists of copper core and polystyrene shell nanowire arrays. It showed an adhesive strength of ˜24 N/cm2 and an electrical resistance of ˜0.41 × 10-2 Ω·cm2. This kind of nanowire surface fastener may enable the exploration of wide range applications, involving assembly of components in the electronic packaging.

  5. Investigations on electronic, Fermi surface, Curie temperature and optical properties of Zr2CoAl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Ping; Sun, Weiwei; Zhang, Ya-Ling; Sun, Xiao-Wei; Song, Ting; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Jia-Liang; Su, Hao; Deng, Jian-Bo; Zhu, Xing-Feng

    2017-03-01

    Using full-potential local-orbital minimum-basis along with spin-polarized relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker methods, we study the electronic, Fermi surface, Curie temperature and optical properties of Zr2CoAl alloy. The alloy with Li2AgSb and Cu2MnAl structures are compared in terms of magnetic properties, and the electronic structures in two structures are also discussed. According to the calculated electronic states, it finds that the Zr2CoAl with Li2AgSb structure is half-metallic ferromagnet with an integral magnetic moment of 2.00μB , meanwhile we also notice the d-d and p-d hybridizations are responsible for the formation of minority-spin gap, furthermore, the fat-bands are applied to discuss the mixture between d and p electrons in the vicinity of the Fermi level. The Fermi surfaces related to the valence bands are constructed, and it is found that the spin-up valence bands 26, 27 and 28 across the Fermi energy dominate the nature of electrons. By mapping the system onto a Heisenberg Hamiltonian, we obtain the exchange coupling parameters, and observe that the Zr(A)-Co(C) and Zr(A)-Zr(B) interactions provide a major contribution for exchange interactions. Based on the calculated exchange coupling parameters, the Curie temperature is estimated to be 287.86 K at equilibrium, and also the dependence of Curie temperature on lattice constant related to the tunable Curie temperature in Zr2CoAl alloy is studied. Finally, we report the optical properties of Zr2CoAl alloy, and present the photon energy dependence of the absorption, the optical conductivity and the loss function.

  6. Room-temperature bonding method for polymer substrate of flexible electronics by surface activation using nano-adhesion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumae, Takashi; Fujino, Masahisa; Suga, Tadatomo

    2015-10-01

    A sealing method for polymer substrates to be used in flexible electronics is studied. For this application, a low-temperature sealing method that achieves flexible bonding of inorganic bonding material is required, but no conventional technique satisfies these requirements simultaneously. In this study, a new polymer bonding method using thin Si and Fe layers and the surface activated bonding (SAB) method are applied to bond poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN) films to each other. PEN films can be bonded via the proposed method without voids at room temperature, and the bonded samples are bendable. The adhesion strength of the bonded samples is so strong that fracture occurs in the polymer bulk rather than at the bond interface. Investigations of the bonded samples by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) reveal that bonding is achieved by chemical interactions between the polymer surface and deposited atoms.

  7. Low temperature dynamics of surface and bulk electronic structure of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy Grandhi, G.; Tomar, Renu; Viswanatha, Ranjani

    2017-09-01

    Absolute energies of band edges have proven to be very important for various applications like hydrogen generation, solar water splitting and solar cell optimization. Energy differences as small as 50–100 meV have been shown to largely affect device efficiencies. Device operational temperature can vary largely and temperature dependence of band gap is well known in bulk semiconductor literature. However, there are only a few studies on variation of band gap in quantum dots and none of them characterize the relative energy variation of band edges in spite of their importance in various applications. This is mainly due to the absence of an internal standard that can be used to study the variation of band edges. Here, in this paper, we introduce a technique wherein we utilize Cu dopant emission as an internal probe. Using this technique, we report the variation of band gap, conduction band and valence band edges of CdS and CdSe quantum dots as a function of temperature and size. We found that band gap variation is similar to that of bulk but with a higher average phonon energy. The band edge variation is characterized by a dominant conduction band shift for larger sizes with decreasing temperature while the smaller size QDs show the variation in both conduction band and valence band. Further, we have also utilized this method to study the binding energy of the trap states as a function of temperature using Cu photoluminescence quantum yield and average lifetime of Cu photoluminescence.

  8. Conversion electron surface imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, G M; Wehner, A

    1999-01-01

    A method of imaging the Moessbauer absorption over the surface of a sample based on counting conversion electrons emitted from the surface following resonant absorption of gamma radiation is described. This Conversion Electron Surface Imaging (CESI) method is somewhat analogous to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), particularly chemical shift imaging, and similar tomographic reconstruction techniques are involved in extracting the image. The theory behind the technique and a prototype device is described, as well as the results of proof-of-principle experiments which demonstrate the function of the device. Eventually this same prototype device will be part of a system to determine the spatial variation of the Moessbauer spectrum over the surface of a sample. Applications include imaging of variations of surface properties of steels and other iron containing alloys, as well as other surfaces over which sup 5 sup 7 Fe has been deposited.

  9. Surface Temperature Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Ruedy, Reto

    2012-01-01

    Small global mean temperature changes may have significant to disastrous consequences for the Earth's climate if they persist for an extended period. Obtaining global means from local weather reports is hampered by the uneven spatial distribution of the reliably reporting weather stations. Methods had to be developed that minimize as far as possible the impact of that situation. This software is a method of combining temperature data of individual stations to obtain a global mean trend, overcoming/estimating the uncertainty introduced by the spatial and temporal gaps in the available data. Useful estimates were obtained by the introduction of a special grid, subdividing the Earth's surface into 8,000 equal-area boxes, using the existing data to create virtual stations at the center of each of these boxes, and combining temperature anomalies (after assessing the radius of high correlation) rather than temperatures.

  10. ECE imaging of electron temperature and electron temperature fluctuations (invited)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, B.H.; Domier, C.W.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Brower, D.L.; Cima, G.; Donne, A. J. H.; Oyevaar, T.; van de Pol, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECE imaging or ECEI) is a novel plasma diagnostic technique for the study of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations in magnetic fusion plasma devices. Instead of a single receiver located in the tokamak midplane as in conventional ECE radiometers, ECEI sy

  11. GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations: Ship, fixed/drifting buoy, and CMAN in-situ surface temperature. Global Telecommunication System (GTS) Data. The...

  12. Optical and electronic properties of sub-surface conducting layers in diamond created by MeV B-implantation at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems van Beveren, L. H.; Liu, R.; Bowers, H.; Ganesan, K.; Johnson, B. C.; McCallum, J. C.; Prawer, S.

    2016-06-01

    Boron implantation with in-situ dynamic annealing is used to produce highly conductive sub-surface layers in type IIa (100) diamond plates for the search of a superconducting phase transition. Here, we demonstrate that high-fluence MeV ion-implantation, at elevated temperatures avoids graphitization and can be used to achieve doping densities of 6 at. %. In order to quantify the diamond crystal damage associated with implantation Raman spectroscopy was performed, demonstrating high temperature annealing recovers the lattice. Additionally, low-temperature electronic transport measurements show evidence of charge carrier densities close to the metal-insulator-transition. After electronic characterization, secondary ion mass spectrometry was performed to map out the ion profile of the implanted plates. The analysis shows close agreement with the simulated ion-profile assuming scaling factors that take into account an average change in diamond density due to device fabrication. Finally, the data show that boron diffusion is negligible during the high temperature annealing process.

  13. GISS Surface Temperature Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The GISTEMP dataset is a global 2x2 gridded temperature anomaly dataset. Temperature data is updated around the middle of every month using current data files from...

  14. Surface temperature measurements of diamond

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available ) and the waist position (z0) 3. TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS There are many methods to measure the temperature of a body. Here we used a thermocou- ple and a pyrometer, while future plans involve emission spectroscopy. A thermocouple is a temperature... sensor that consists of two wires con- nected together made from different metals, which produces an electrical voltage that is dependant on tem- perature. A Newport electronic thermocou- ple was used to meas- ured temperature. It can measure...

  15. Electron-phonon coupling and surface Debye temperature of Bi2Te3(111) from helium atom scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamtogl, Anton; Kraus, Patrick; Avidor, Nadav

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the topological insulator Bi2Te3(111) by means of helium atom scattering. The average electron-phonon coupling lambda of Bi2Te3(111) is determined by adapting a recently developed quantum-theoretical derivation of the helium scattering probabilities to the case of degenerate...

  16. Electronic Ambient-Temperature Recorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Larry; Barrows, William

    1995-01-01

    Electronic temperature-recording unit stores data in internal memory for later readout. Records temperatures from minus 40 degrees to plus 60 degrees C at intervals ranging from 1.875 to 15 minutes. With all four data channels operating at 1.875-minute intervals, recorder stores at least 10 days' data. For only one channel at 15-minute intervals, capacity extends to up to 342 days' data. Developed for recording temperatures of instruments and life-science experiments on satellites, space shuttle, and high-altitude aircraft. Adaptable to such terrestrial uses as recording temperatures of perishable goods during transportation and of other systems or processes over long times. Can be placed directly in environment to monitor.

  17. Temperature dependence of surface nanobubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkelaar, R.P.; Seddon, James Richard Thorley; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    The temperature dependence of nanobubbles was investigated experimentally using atomic force microscopy. By scanning the same area of the surface at temperatures from 51 °C to 25 °C it was possible to track geometrical changes of individual nanobubbles as the temperature was decreased.

  18. Electron beam induced oxidation of Al–Mg alloy surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.; Agterveld, D.T.L. van; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2002-01-01

    Electron beam currents of a few nanoamperes, currently used in nanometer scale scanning Auger/electron microscopy, induces severe oxidation of Al–Mg alloy surfaces at room temperature. Auger peak-to-peak oxygen curves for Al–Mg surfaces support the hypothesis that the electron beam creates

  19. Electron beam induced oxidation of Al–Mg alloy surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.; Agterveld, D.T.L. van; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2002-01-01

    Electron beam currents of a few nanoamperes, currently used in nanometer scale scanning Auger/electron microscopy, induces severe oxidation of Al–Mg alloy surfaces at room temperature. Auger peak-to-peak oxygen curves for Al–Mg surfaces support the hypothesis that the electron beam creates additiona

  20. Surface structure and electronic properties of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Somorjai, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    A surface potential model is developed to explain dopant effects on chemical vapor deposition. Auger analysis of the interaction between allotropic forms of carbon and silicon films has shown Si-C formation for all forms by glassy carbon. LEED intensity measurements have been used to determine the mean square displacement of surface atoms of silicon single crystals, and electron loss spectroscopy has shown the effect of structure and impurities on surface states located within the band gap. A thin film of Al has been used to enhance film crystallinity at low temperature.

  1. The surface temperature of Europa

    CERN Document Server

    Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    Previous estimates of the surface temperature of Jupiter's moon, Europa, neglected the effect of the eccentricity of Jupiter's orbit around the Sun, the effect of the eclipse of Europa (i.e., the relative time that Europa is within the shadow of Jupiter), and the effect of Europa's internal heating. Here we estimate the surface temperature of Europa, when Europa's obliquity, eclipse and internal heating, as well as the eccentricity of Jupiter, are all taken into account. For a typical internal heating rate of 0.05 W/m$^2$ (corresponding to an ice thickness of about 10 kms), the equator, pole, and global mean surface temperatures are 101.7 K, 45.26 K, and 94.75 K, respectively. We found that the temperature at the high latitudes is significantly affected by the internal heating. We also studied the effect of the internal heating on the mean thickness of Europa's icy shell and conclude that the polar region temperature can be used to constrain the internal heating and the depth of the ice. Our approach and form...

  2. Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST) dataset is a global monthly sea surface temperature analysis derived from the International Comprehensive...

  3. NOAA Global Surface Temperature (NOAAGlobalTemp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Global Surface Temperature Dataset (NOAAGlobalTemp) is a merged land–ocean surface temperature analysis (formerly known as MLOST) (link is external). It is...

  4. Electron temperature fluctuations in NGC 346

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, V A; Krabbe, A C

    2008-01-01

    The existence and origin of large spatial temperature fluctuations in HII regions and planetary nebulae are assumed to explain the differences between the heavy element abundances inferred from collisionally excited and recombination lines, although this interpretation remains significantly controversial. We investigate the spatial variation in electron temperature inside NGC 346, the brightest HII region in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Long slit spectrophotometric data of high signal-to-noise were employed to derive the electron temperature from measurements derived from localized observations of the [OIII]($\\lambda4959 + \\lambda5007)/\\lambda4363$ ratio in three directions across the nebula. The electron temperature was estimated in 179 areas of 5$^{\\prime\\prime}\\times1.5^{\\prime\\prime}$ of size distributed along three different declinations. A largely homogeneous temperature distribution was found with a mean temperature of 12 269 K and a dispersion of 6.1%. After correcting for pure measurements errors, a t...

  5. High temperature power electronics for space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Baumann, Eric D.; Myers, Ira T.; Overton, Eric

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature electronics program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating materials research, development and testing of high temperature power components, and integration of the developed components and devices into a demonstrable 200 C power system, such as inverter. An overview of the program and a description of the in-house high temperature facilities along with experimental data obtained on high temperature materials are presented.

  6. Appendage mountable electronic devices conformable to surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John; Ying, Ming; Bonifas, Andrew; Lu, Nanshu

    2017-01-24

    Disclosed are appendage mountable electronic systems and related methods for covering and conforming to an appendage surface. A flexible or stretchable substrate has an inner surface for receiving an appendage, including an appendage having a curved surface, and an opposed outer surface that is accessible to external surfaces. A stretchable or flexible electronic device is supported by the substrate inner and/or outer surface, depending on the application of interest. The electronic device in combination with the substrate provides a net bending stiffness to facilitate conformal contact between the inner surface and a surface of the appendage provided within the enclosure. In an aspect, the system is capable of surface flipping without adversely impacting electronic device functionality, such as electronic devices comprising arrays of sensors, actuators, or both sensors and actuators.

  7. Appendage mountable electronic devices conformable to surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, John; Ying, Ming; Bonifas, Andrew; Lu, Nanshu

    2017-01-24

    Disclosed are appendage mountable electronic systems and related methods for covering and conforming to an appendage surface. A flexible or stretchable substrate has an inner surface for receiving an appendage, including an appendage having a curved surface, and an opposed outer surface that is accessible to external surfaces. A stretchable or flexible electronic device is supported by the substrate inner and/or outer surface, depending on the application of interest. The electronic device in combination with the substrate provides a net bending stiffness to facilitate conformal contact between the inner surface and a surface of the appendage provided within the enclosure. In an aspect, the system is capable of surface flipping without adversely impacting electronic device functionality, such as electronic devices comprising arrays of sensors, actuators, or both sensors and actuators.

  8. Substrate temperature and electron fluence effects on metallic films created by electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberg, S.G.; Landheer, K.; Hagen, C.W.; Fairbrother, D.H.

    2012-01-01

    Using three different precursors [MeCpPtMe3, Pt(PF3)4, and W(CO)6], an ultra-high vacuum surface science approach has been used to identify and rationalize the effects of substrate temperature and electron fluence on the chemical composition and bonding in films created by electron beam induced

  9. Passive electronic identification with temperature monitoring. [Temperature monitor for cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, D.M.; Bobbett, R.E.; Koelle, A.R.; Landt, J.A.; Sanders, W.M.; Depp, S.W.; Seawright, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) have been supporting an electronic identification and temperature monitoring project at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) since early 1973. The development, so far, indicates that a subdermally-implanted, electronic transponder (having no batteries) can be remotely activated and transmit temperature and identification information back to a receiver in a few tenths of a second. If this electronic identification and temperature monitoring system is developed into a commercially available product line, and is widely accepted by the cattle industry, it will enable them to carry out more extensive management practices. Better management can result in greater efficiency and productivity. The system will also enable regulatory agencies to trace the movements of diseased animals through commerce, and thus assist in disease control measures. Work so far has been concentrated primarily on determining the technical feasibility of the electronic concepts. (auth)

  10. Parametric dependencies of JET electron temperature profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunke, B. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Imre, K.; Riedel, K. [New York Univ., NY (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The JET Ohmic, L-Mode and H-Mode electron temperature profiles obtained from the LIDAR Thomson Scattering Diagnostic are parameterized in terms of the normalized flux parameter and a set of the engineering parameters like plasma current, toroidal field, line averages electron density... It is shown that the electron temperature profiles fit a log-additive model well. It is intended to use the same model to predict the profile shape for D-T discharges in JET and in ITER. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Deep Trek High Temperature Electronics Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce Ohme

    2007-07-31

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative research agreement between Honeywell and U.S. Department of Energy to develop high-temperature electronics. Objects of this development included Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) wafer process development for high temperature, supporting design tools and libraries, and high temperature integrated circuit component development including FPGA, EEPROM, high-resolution A-to-D converter, and a precision amplifier.

  12. The Pacific sea surface temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglass, David H., E-mail: douglass@pas.rochester.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States)

    2011-12-05

    The Pacific sea surface temperature data contains two components: N{sub L}, a signal that exhibits the familiar El Niño/La Niña phenomenon and N{sub H}, a signal of one-year period. Analysis reveals: (1) The existence of an annual solar forcing F{sub S}; (2) N{sub H} is phase locked directly to F{sub S} while N{sub L} is frequently phase locked to the 2nd or 3rd subharmonic of F{sub S}. At least ten distinct subharmonic time segments of N{sub L} since 1870 are found. The beginning or end dates of these segments have a near one-to-one correspondence with the abrupt climate changes previously reported. Limited predictability is possible. -- Highlights: ► El Niño/La Niña consists of 2 components phase-locked to annual solar cycle. ► The first component N{sub L} is the familiar El Niño/La Niña effect. ► The second N{sub H} component has a period of 1 cycle/year. ► N{sub L} can be phase-locked to 2nd or 3rd subharmonic of annual cycle. ► Ends of phase-locked segments correspond to abrupt previously reported climate changes.

  13. Electronics Demonstrated for Low- Temperature Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammond, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott S.

    2000-01-01

    The operation of electronic systems at cryogenic temperatures is anticipated for many NASA spacecraft, such as planetary explorers and deep space probes. For example, an unheated interplanetary probe launched to explore the rings of Saturn would experience an average temperature near Saturn of about 183 C. Electronics capable of low-temperature operation in the harsh deep space environment also would help improve circuit performance, increase system efficiency, and reduce payload development and launch costs. An ongoing research and development program on low-temperature electronics at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field is focusing on the design of efficient power systems that can survive and exploit the advantages of low-temperature environments. The targeted systems, which are mission driven, include converters, inverters, controls, digital circuits, and special-purpose circuits. Initial development efforts successfully demonstrated the low-temperature operation and cold-restart of several direct-current/direct-current (dc/dc) converters based on different types of circuit design, some with superconducting inductors. The table lists some of these dc/dc converters with their properties, and the photograph shows a high-voltage, high-power dc/dc converter designed for an ion propulsion system for low-temperature operation. The development efforts of advanced electronic systems and the supporting technologies for low-temperature operation are being carried out in-house and through collaboration with other Government agencies, industry, and academia. The Low Temperature Electronics Program supports missions and development programs at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Goddard Space Flight Center. The developed technologies will be transferred to commercial end users for applications such as satellite infrared sensors and medical diagnostic equipment.

  14. High-Temperature Passive Power Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    In many future NASA missions - such as deep-space exploration, the National AeroSpace Plane, minisatellites, integrated engine electronics, and ion or arcjet thrusters - high-power electrical components and systems must operate reliably and efficiently in high-temperature environments. The high-temperature power electronics program at the NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating material research, the development and characterization of high-temperature components, and the integration of the developed components into a demonstrable 200 C power system - such as an inverter. NASA Lewis has developed high-temperature power components through collaborative efforts with the Air Force Wright Laboratory, Northrop Grumman, and the University of Wisconsin. Ceramic and film capacitors, molypermalloy powder inductors, and a coaxially wound transformer were designed, developed, and evaluated for high-temperature operation.

  15. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Thermodynamic modeling to explain the high degree of carbon solubility possible in austenitic grades under the LTCSS process and experimental validation of model results • Corrosion testing to determine the corrosion resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Erosion testing to determine the erosion resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Wear testing to quantify the wear resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Fatigue testing for quantifying the extent of improvement from the LTCSS process • Component treating and testing under simulated and in-line commercial operations XRD verified expanded austenite lattice, with no evidence of carbide precipitation. Carbon concentration profiles via Auger and electron dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) showed carbon levels in excess of 12 at. % in treated, type 316 SS. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of pulled-to-failure treated tensile specimens showed slip bands and no de-cohesion of the treated layer, verifying that the layer remains ductile. Compressive stresses in excess of 2 GPa (300 ksi) have been calculated at the surface of the case. Phase diagram (CALPHAD) (ThermoCalc) and Wagner dilute solution thermodynamic models were developed that calculate the solubility of carbon in austenite as a function of alloying content for the process time and temperature. Several commercial alloys have been modeled, and the model has been used to design experimental alloys with enhanced affinity for carbon solubility at treatment temperatures. Four experimental alloys were melted, rolled, and manufactured into test specimens, and the LTCSS treatment indicated successfully enhanced results and validated the predictions based on thermodynamic modeling. Electrochemical polarization curves show a 600 to 800 mV increase in pitting potential in treated (900-1000 mV) versus non-treated (200-300 mV) type 316 in chloride solutions. Treated 316L showed crevice-corrosion behavior similar to that of Ti-6

  16. Modelling global fresh surface water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, L.P.H. van; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, M.T.H. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature directly determines a range of water physical properties including vapour pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, and the solubility of oxygen and other gases. Indirectly water temperature acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing sediment

  17. Modelling global fresh surface water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, L.P.H. van; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, M.T.H. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature directly determines a range of water physical properties including vapour pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, and the solubility of oxygen and other gases. Indirectly water temperature acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing sediment concentrati

  18. Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Dickman, John E.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Many space and some terrestrial applications would benefit from the availability of low-temperature electronics. Exploration missions to the outer planets, Earth-orbiting and deep-space probes, and communications satellites are examples of space applications which operate in low-temperature environments. Space probes deployed near Pluto must operate in temperatures as low as -229 C. Figure 1 depicts the average temperature of a space probe warmed by the sun for various locations throughout the solar system. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low-temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. The development of electrical power systems capable of extremely low-temperature operation represents a key element of some advanced space power systems. The Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on the design, fabrication, and characterization of low-temperature power systems and the development of supporting technologies for low-temperature operations such as dielectric and insulating materials, power components, optoelectronic components, and packaging and integration of devices, components, and systems.

  19. Surfaces and interfaces of electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Brillson, Leonard J

    2012-01-01

    An advanced level textbook covering geometric, chemical, and electronic structure of electronic materials, and their applications to devices based on semiconductor surfaces, metal-semiconductor interfaces, and semiconductor heterojunctions. Starting with the fundamentals of electrical measurements on semiconductor interfaces, it then describes the importance of controlling macroscopic electrical properties by atomic-scale techniques. Subsequent chapters present the wide range of surface and interface techniques available to characterize electronic, optical, chemical, and structural propertie

  20. Electron bombardment of water adsorbed on Zr(0001) surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ankrah, S; Ramsier, R D

    2003-01-01

    A study of the effects of electron bombardment on water adsorbed on Zr(0001) is reported. Zirconium surfaces are dosed with isotopic water mixtures at 160 K followed by electron bombardment (485 eV). The system is then probed by low energy electron diffraction, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). No evidence is found that would indicate preferential mixing of hydrogen from the bulk with isotopic water dissociation products during TPD. However, electron bombardment results in the sharpening of a hydrogen/deuterium desorption peak near 320 K and the production of water near 730 K at low water exposures. In addition, although water does not oxidize Zr(0001) thermally, electron bombardment of adsorbed water induces a shift of about 2 eV in the Zr AES features indicating that the surface is partially oxidized by electron bombardment.

  1. Time-resolved electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roettgen, A.; Shkurenkov, I.; Simeni Simeni, M.; Petrishchev, V.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2016-10-01

    Thomson scattering is used to study temporal evolution of electron density and electron temperature in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium sustained in two different configurations, (i) diffuse filament discharge between two spherical electrodes, and (ii) surface discharge over plane quartz surface. In the diffuse filament discharge, the experimental results are compared with the predictions of a 2D plasma fluid model. Electron densities are put on an absolute scale using pure rotational Raman spectra in nitrogen, taken without the plasma, for calibration. In the diffuse filament discharge, electron density and electron temperature increase rapidly after breakdown, peaking at n e  ≈  3.5 · 1015 cm-3 and T e  ≈  4.0 eV. After the primary discharge pulse, both electron density and electron temperature decrease (to n e ~ 1014 cm-3 over ~1 µs and to T e ~ 0.5 eV over ~200 ns), with a brief transient rise produced by the secondary discharge pulse. At the present conditions, the dominant recombination mechanism is dissociative recombination of electrons with molecular ions, \\text{He}2+ . In the afterglow, the electron temperature does not relax to gas temperature, due to superelastic collisions. Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) inferred from the Thomson scattering spectra are nearly Maxwellian, which is expected at high ionization fractions, when the shape of EEDF is controlled primarily by electron-electron collisions. The kinetic model predictions agree well with the temporal trends detected in the experiment, although peak electron temperature and electron density are overpredicted. Heavy species temperature predicted during the discharge and the early afterglow remains low and does not exceed T  =  400 K, due to relatively slow quenching of metastable He* atoms in two-body and three-body processes. In the surface discharge, peak electron density and electron temperature are n e  ≈  3 · 1014 cm3 and T e

  2. Role of surface temperature in fluorocarbon plasma-surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Caleb T.; Overzet, Lawrence J.; Goeckner, Matthew J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, PO Box 830688, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    This article examines plasma-surface reaction channels and the effect of surface temperature on the magnitude of those channels. Neutral species CF{sub 4}, C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, and C{sub 3}F{sub 8} are produced on surfaces. The magnitude of the production channel increases with surface temperature for all species, but favors higher mass species as the temperature is elevated. Additionally, the production rate of CF{sub 2} increases by a factor of 5 as the surface temperature is raised from 25 Degree-Sign C to 200 Degree-Sign C. Fluorine density, on the other hand, does not change as a function of either surface temperature or position outside of the plasma glow. This indicates that fluorine addition in the gas-phase is not a dominant reaction. Heating reactors can result in higher densities of depositing radical species, resulting in increased deposition rates on cooled substrates. Finally, the sticking probability of the depositing free radical species does not change as a function of surface temperature. Instead, the surface temperature acts together with an etchant species (possibly fluorine) to elevate desorption rates on that surface at temperatures lower than those required for unassisted thermal desorption.

  3. Thermal management of low temperature electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Louis C.; Sehmbey, Maninder S.; Mahefkey, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Operation of electronics at liquid nitrogen temperature is a very attractive possibility. High temperature superconducting circuits operating at liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have great potential in supercomputers and in the medical field. The limitations of superconducting switches in handling high power levels can be overcome by employing hybrid circuits where MOSFET switches are used in conjunction with superconducting elements. These hybrid circuits can be employed advantageously in many applications; for example, high-voltage power conversion, and superconducting-brushless-ac motors for locomotives. However, the thermal management of LNT electronics is an issue that has to be addressed. In this paper, two thermal management techniques, direct immersion cooling, and high-heat-flux spray cooling are discussed. Immersion cooling can handle relatively low heat flux levels (100 kW/m2) while spray cooling is capable of very high heat flux removal (over 1000 kW/m2).

  4. Surface-electronic-state effects in electron emission from the Be(0001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archubi, C. D. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, casilla de correo 67, sucursal 28, C1428EGA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gravielle, M. S. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, casilla de correo 67, sucursal 28, C1428EGA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Silkin, V. M. [Donostia International Physics Center, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 1072, E-20080 San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, E-48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    We study the electron emission produced by swift protons impinging grazingly on a Be(0001) surface. The process is described within a collisional formalism using the band-structure-based (BSB) approximation to represent the electron-surface interaction. The BSB model provides an accurate description of the electronic band structure of the solid and the surface-induced potential. Within this approach we derive both bulk and surface electronic states, with these latter characterized by a strong localization at the crystal surface. We found that such surface electronic states play an important role in double-differential energy- and angle-resolved electron emission probabilities, producing noticeable structures in the electron emission spectra.

  5. Electron Traps at the Ice Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockstedte, Michel; Auburger, Philipp; Michl, Anja

    Water, water clusters and ice possess the fascinating ability to solvate electrons. On the surface of water cluster1 and thin crystalline ice structures on a metal substrate2 long-living solvated electron states were observed that evolve from pre-existing surface traps. The identification of such traps provides important insight into the electronic structure of the water or ice surface, and the dissociative interaction of electrons with adsorbates. Models2,3 based on the bilayer terminated Ih-(0001) surface related such traps to orientational defects or vacancies. So far, the understanding of the electronic structure of the ice surface with the electron traps is incomplete. Here we address this issue including also water ad-structures4 within hybrid density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory (G0W0). We identify a hierachy of traps with increasing vertical electron affinity, ranging from hexagon adrows to clusters of orientational defects and vacancies with dangling OH-groups. Siefermann and Abel, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 50, 5264 (2011). Bovensiepen et al., J. Chem. Phys. C 113, 979 (2013). Hermann et al., J. Phys.: cond. matter 20, 225003 (2008). Mehlhorn and Morgenstern, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 246101 (2007)

  6. Gravity increased by lunar surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, James

    2013-04-01

    Quantitatively large effects of lunar surface temperature on apparent gravitational force measured by lunar laser ranging (LLR) and lunar perigee may challenge widely accepted theories of gravity. LLR data grouped by days from full moon shows the moon is about 5 percent closer to earth at full moon compared to 8 days before or after full moon. In a second, related result, moon perigees were least distant in days closer to full moon. Moon phase was used as proxy independent variable for lunar surface temperature. The results support the prediction by binary mechanics that gravitational force increases with object surface temperature.

  7. Measuring the Electron Temperature in the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Joseph; SaintCyr, Orville C.; Reginald, Nelson

    2008-01-01

    We report on an experiment to demonstrate the feasibility of a new method to obtain the electron temperature and flow speed in the solar corona by observing the visible Kcoronal spectrum during the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Libya. Results show that this new method is indeed feasible, giving electron temperatures and speeds of 1.10 $\\pm$ 0.05 MK, 103.0 $\\pm$ 92.0 $kmsA{-l}$; 0.98 $\\pm$ 0.12 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-1)s; 0.70 $\\pm$ 0.08 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-l)$ at l.l{\\it R)$ {\\odot}$ in the solar north, east and west, respectively, and 0.93 $\\pm$ 0.12 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-l}$ at 1.2{\\it R}$ {\\odot}$ in the solar east. This new technique could be easily used from a space-based platform in a coronagraph to produce two dimensional maps of the electron temperature and bulk flow speed at the base of the solar wind useful for the study of heliospheric structure and space weather.

  8. Nonlocal bacterial electron transfer to hematite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Smith, Steven C.

    2003-03-01

    Mechanisms by which dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria utilize iron and manganese oxide minerals as terminal electron acceptors for respiration are poorly understood. In the absence of exogenous electron shuttle compounds, extracellular electron transfer is generally thought to occur through the interfacial contact area between mineral surfaces and attached cells. Possible alternative reduction pathways have been proposed based on the discovery of a link between an excreted quinone and dissimilatory reduction. In this study, we utilize a novel experimental approach to demonstrate that Shewanella putrefaciens reduces the surface of crystalline iron oxides at spatial locations that are distinct from points of attachment.

  9. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, K.-I. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Space and Plasma Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); International Center for Space Weather Study and education, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Liu, W. T. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Space and Plasma Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2015-08-15

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T{sub e} in low frequency mode and N{sub e} in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f{sub UHR}). The instrument which is named “TeNeP” can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  10. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, K.-I.; Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K.; Liu, W. T.

    2015-08-01

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both Te in low frequency mode and Ne in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (fUHR). The instrument which is named "TeNeP" can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  11. Sea Surface Temperature Average_SST_Master

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sea surface temperature collected via satellite imagery from http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/data/gridded/data.noaa.ersst.html and averaged for each region using ArcGIS...

  12. OW NOAA GOES Sea-Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset contains satellite-derived sea-surface temperature measurements collected by means of the Geostationary Orbiting Environmental Satellite. The data is...

  13. evaluation of land surface temperature parameterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1 DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS, ADEYEMI COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, ONDO, ... Surface temperature (Ts) is vital to the study of land-atmosphere interactions and climate variabilities. .... value = 0.167 m3m-3), and very low for dry days (mean.

  14. Monthly Near-Surface Air Temperature Averages

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global surface temperatures in 2010 tied 2005 as the warmest on record. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) was established in 1982 as part...

  15. Sea Surface Temperature (14 KM North America)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Product shows local sea surface temperatures (degrees C). It is a composite gridded-image derived from 8-km resolution SST Observations. It is generated every 48...

  16. Analysed foundation sea surface temperature, global

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The through-cloud capabilities of microwave radiometers provide a valuable picture of global sea surface temperature (SST). To utilize this, scientists at Remote...

  17. Electron beam damage in high temperature polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. (Dayton Univ., OH (USA). Research Inst.); Adams, W.W. (Air Force Materials Lab., Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Electron microscopic studies of polymers are limited due to beam damage. Two concerns are the damage mechanism in a particular material, and the maximum dose for a material before damage effects are observed. From the knowledge of the dose required for damage to the polymer structure, optimum parameters for electron microscopy imaging can be determined. In the present study, electron beam damage of polymers has been quantified by monitoring changes in the diffraction intensity as a function of electron dose. The beam damage characteristics of the following polymers were studied: poly(p-phenylene benzobisthiazole) (PBZT); poly(p-phenylene benzobisoxazole) (PBO); poly(benzoxazole) (ABPBO); poly(benzimidazole) (ABPBI); poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA); and poly(aryl ether ether ketone) (PEEK). Previously published literature results on polyethylene (PE), polyoxymethylene (POM), nylon-6, poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), PBZT, PPTA, PPX, iPS, poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT), and poly(phenylene sulphide) (PPS) were reviewed. This study demonstrates the strong dependence of the electron beam resistivity of a polymer on its thermal stability/melt temperature. (author).

  18. Urban aerosol effects on surface insolation and surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, M.; Burian, S. J.; Remer, L. A.; Shepherd, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    Urban aerosol particulates may play a fundamental role in urban microclimates and city-generated mesoscale circulations via its effects on energy balance of the surface. Key questions that need to be addressed include: (1) How do these particles affect the amount of solar energy reaching the surface and resulting surface temperature? (2) Is the effect the same in all cities? and (3) How does it vary from city to city? Using NASA AERONET in-situ observations, a radiative transfer model, and a regional climate mode (MM5), we assess aerosol effects on surface insolation and surf ace temperature for dense urban-polluted regions. Two big cities, one in a developing country (Beijing, P.R. China) and another in developed country (New York City, USA), are selected for inter-comparison. The study reveals that aerosol effects on surface temperature depends largely on aerosols' optical and chemical properties as well as atmosphere and land surface conditions, such as humidity and land cover. Therefore, the actual magnitudes of aerosol effects differ from city to city. Aerosol measurements from AERONET show both average and extreme cases for aerosol impacts on surface insolation. In general, aerosols reduce surface insolation by 30Wm-2. Nevertheless, in extreme cases, such reduction can exceed 100 Wm-2. Consequently, this reduces surface skin temperature 2-10C in an urban environment.

  19. Plasmonics—the interaction of light with metal surface electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroó, Norbert; Rácz, Péter

    2016-08-01

    The realization of light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation opened up an enormous wealth of potential new research and technologies in a broad wavelength range of electromagnetic waves. One of the new fields is plasmonics, based on the special properties of some materials with negative refractive index. In this case surface electromagnetic waves, coupled to surface electrons, the so-called surface plasmons can be generated. These waves among others represent a large enhancement of the EM field near the surface of the materials. The present paper illustrates some of the consequences of this phenomenon for a broad range of phenomena from ‘lasing’ to electron pairing. The latter is the basic condition for superconductivity, in our case found at room temperature. Measurements with a scanning tunneling microscope, furthermore electron and photon emission studies are the source of the presented experimental data.

  20. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Thermodynamic modeling to explain the high degree of carbon solubility possible in austenitic grades under the LTCSS process and experimental validation of model results • Corrosion testing to determine the corrosion resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Erosion testing to determine the erosion resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Wear testing to quantify the wear resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Fatigue testing for quantifying the extent of improvement from the LTCSS process • Component treating and testing under simulated and in-line commercial operations XRD verified expanded austenite lattice, with no evidence of carbide precipitation. Carbon concentration profiles via Auger and electron dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) showed carbon levels in excess of 12 at. % in treated, type 316 SS. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of pulled-to-failure treated tensile specimens showed slip bands and no de-cohesion of the treated layer, verifying that the layer remains ductile. Compressive stresses in excess of 2 GPa (300 ksi) have been calculated at the surface of the case. Phase diagram (CALPHAD) (ThermoCalc) and Wagner dilute solution thermodynamic models were developed that calculate the solubility of carbon in austenite as a function of alloying content for the process time and temperature. Several commercial alloys have been modeled, and the model has been used to design experimental alloys with enhanced affinity for carbon solubility at treatment temperatures. Four experimental alloys were melted, rolled, and manufactured into test specimens, and the LTCSS treatment indicated successfully enhanced results and validated the predictions based on thermodynamic modeling. Electrochemical polarization curves show a 600 to 800 mV increase in pitting potential in treated (900-1000 mV) versus non-treated (200-300 mV) type 316 in chloride solutions. Treated 316L showed crevice-corrosion behavior similar to that of Ti-6

  1. Modeling of global surface air temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusakova, M. A.; Karlin, L. N.

    2012-04-01

    A model to assess a number of factors, such as total solar irradiance, albedo, greenhouse gases and water vapor, affecting climate change has been developed on the basis of Earth's radiation balance principle. To develop the model solar energy transformation in the atmosphere was investigated. It's a common knowledge, that part of the incoming radiation is reflected into space from the atmosphere, land and water surfaces, and another part is absorbed by the Earth's surface. Some part of outdoing terrestrial radiation is retained in the atmosphere by greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide) and water vapor. Making use of the regression analysis a correlation between concentration of greenhouse gases, water vapor and global surface air temperature was obtained which, it is turn, made it possible to develop the proposed model. The model showed that even smallest fluctuations of total solar irradiance intensify both positive and negative feedback which give rise to considerable changes in global surface air temperature. The model was used both to reconstruct the global surface air temperature for the 1981-2005 period and to predict global surface air temperature until 2030. The reconstructions of global surface air temperature for 1981-2005 showed the models validity. The model makes it possible to assess contribution of the factors listed above in climate change.

  2. Electromagnetic Instabilities Excited by Electron Temperature Anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆全明; 王连启; 周艳; 王水

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are performed to investigate the nonlinear evolution of electromagnetic instabilities excited by the electron temperature anisotropy in homogeneous plasmas with different parameters. The results show that the electron temperature anisotropy can excite the two right-hand electromagnetic instabilities, one has the frequency higher than Ωe, the other is the whistler instability with larger amplitude,and its frequency is below Ωe. Their dispersion relations are consistent with the prediction from the cold plasma theory. In the initial growth stage (prediction from linear theory), the frequency of the dominant mode (the mode whose amplitude is large enough) of the whistler wave almost does not change, but in the saturation stage the situation is different. In the case that the ratio of electron plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency is larger than 1, the frequency of the dominant mode of the whistler wave drifts from high to low continuously. However, for the case of the ratio smaller than 1, besides the original dominant mode of the whistler wave whose frequency is about 2.6ωe, another dominant mode whose frequency is about 1.55ωe also begins to be excited at definite time,and its amplitude increases with time until it exceeds the original dominant mode.

  3. Electron anions and the glass transition temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Lewis E.; Sushko, Peter V.; Tomota, Yudai; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-08-24

    Properties of glasses are typically controlled by judicious selection of the glass-forming and glass-modifying constituents. Through an experimental and computational study of the crystalline, molten, and amorphous [Ca12Al14O32]2+ ∙ (e)2, we demonstrate that electron anions in this system behave as glass-modifiers that strongly affect solidification dynamics, the glass transition temperature, and spectroscopic properties of the resultant amorphous material. Concentration of such electron anions is a consequential control parameter: it invokes materials evolution pathways and properties not available in conventional glasses, which opens a new avenue in rational materials design.

  4. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 2 Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The global land surface temperature databank contains monthly timescale mean, max, and min temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was developed...

  5. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 2 Daily

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The global land surface temperature databank contains monthly timescale mean, max, and min temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was developed...

  6. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 3 Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Land Surface Temperature Databank contains monthly timescale mean, maximum, and minimum temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was...

  7. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 1 Daily

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The global land surface temperature databank contains monthly timescale mean, max, and min temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was developed...

  8. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 1 Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The global land surface temperature databank contains monthly timescale mean, max, and min temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was developed...

  9. Wide Temperature Cycling Tolerant Electronic Packaging Substrates Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Planetary exploration missions require electronics packaging that can withstand extreme temperatures and numerous temperature cycles (-230C to +350C). The present...

  10. Calibration of surface temperature on rocky exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap Jagadeesh, Madhu

    2016-07-01

    Study of exoplanets and the search for life elsewhere has been a very fascinating area in recent years. Presently, lots of efforts have been channelled in this direction in the form of space exploration and the ultimate search for the habitable planet. One of the parametric methods to analyse the data available from the missions such as Kepler, CoRoT, etc, is the Earth Similarity Index (ESI), defined as a number between zero (no similarity) and one (identical to Earth), introduced to assess the Earth likeness of exoplanets. A multi-parameter ESI scale depends on the radius, density, escape velocity and surface temperature of exoplanets. Our objective is to establish how exactly the individual parameters, entering the interior ESI and surface ESI, are contributing to the global ESI, using the graphical analysis. Presently, the surface temperature estimates are following a correction factor of 30 K, based on the Earth's green-house effect. The main objective of this work in calculations of the global ESI using the HabCat data is to introduce a new method to better estimate the surface temperature of exoplanets, from theoretical formula with fixed albedo factor and emissivity (Earth values). From the graphical analysis of the known data for the Solar System objects, we established the calibration relation between surface and equilibrium temperatures for the Solar System objects. Using extrapolation we found that the power function is the closest description of the trend to attain surface temperature. From this we conclude that the correction term becomes very effective way to calculate the accurate value of the surface temperature, for further analysis with our graphical methodology.

  11. Observation of Hot Electrons in Surface-Wave Plasmas Excited by Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Ye-Lin; CHEN Zhao-Quan; LIU Ming-Hai; HONG Ling-Li; LI Ping; ZHENG Xiao-Liang; XIA Guang-Qing; HU Xi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) are studied in the planar-type surface-wave plasma (SWP)caused by resonant excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using a single cylindrical probe.Sustained plasma characteristics can be considered as a bi-Maxwellian EEDF,which correspond to a superposition of the bulk low-temperature electron and the high-energy electron beam-like part.The beam component energy is pronounced at about 10eV but the bulk part is lower than 3.5eV.The hot electrons included in the proposed plasmas play a significant role in plasma heating and further affect the discharge chemistry.During the past several years,in the fabrication ofamorphous or crystalline silicon films,diamond film synthesis and carbon nanotube growth,the large-area overdense plasma source has been useful.In electronic device fabrication techniques such as etching,ashing or plasma chemical vapor deposition,overdense electrons and radicals are required,especially hot electrons.Among the various plasma devices,the planar-type surface-wave plasma (SWP) source is an advanced plasma source,which is a type of promising plasma source satisfying the above rigorous requirements for large-area plasma processing.%The electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) are studied in the planar-type surface-wave plasma (SWP) caused by resonant excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using a single cylindrical probe. Sustained plasma characteristics can be considered as a bi-Maxwellian EEDF, which correspond to a superposition of the bulk low-temperature electron and the high-energy electron beam-like part. The beam component energy is pronounced at about 10 eV but the bulk part is lower than 3.5 eV. The hot electrons included in the proposed plasmas play a significant role in plasma heating and further affect the discharge chemistry.

  12. Integrative inversion of land surface component temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wenjie; XU Xiru

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the row winter wheat was selected as the example to study the component temperature inversion method of land surface target in detail. The result showed that the structural pattern of row crop can affect the inversion precision of component temperature evidently. Choosing appropriate structural pattern of row crop can improve the inversion precision significantly. The iterative method combining inverse matrix was a stable method that was fit for inversing component temperature of land surface target. The result of simulation and field experiment showed that the integrative method could remarkably improve the inversion accuracy of the lighted soil surface temperature and the top layer canopy temperature, and enhance inversion stability of components temperature. Just two parameters were sufficient for accurate atmospheric correction of multi-angle and multi-spectral thermal infrared data: atmospheric transmittance and the atmospheric upwelling radiance. If the atmospheric parameters and component temperature can be inversed synchronously, the really and truly accurate atmospheric correction can be achieved. The validation using ATSRII data showed that the method was useful.

  13. Relaxation between electrons and surface phonons of a homogeneously photoexcited metal film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navinder Singh

    2004-11-01

    The energy relaxation between the hot degenerate electrons of a homogeneously photoexcited metal film and the surface phonons (phonon wave vectors in two dimensions) is considered under Debye approximation. The state of electrons and phonons is described by equilibrium Fermi and Bose functions with different temperatures. Two cases for electron scattering by the metal surface, namely specular and diffuse scattering, are considered.

  14. Electric field distribution of electron emitter surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, M.; Takenobu, S.; Ohmae, N.; Umeno, M.

    1987-03-01

    The electric field distribution of a tungsten field emitter surface and a LaB6 thermionic emitter surface has been studied. The computer simulation of electric field distribution on the emitter surface was carried out with a charge simulation method. The electric field distribution of the LaB6 thermionic emitter was experimentally evaluated by the Schottky plot. Two independent equations are necessary for obtaining local electric field and work function; the Fowler-Nordheim equation and the equation of total energy distribution of emitted electron being used to evaluate the electric field distribution of the tungsten field emitter. The experimental results agreed with the computer simulation.

  15. Low Temperature Photoluminescence (PL) from High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT RDMR-WD-14-55 LOW TEMPERATURE PHOTOLUMINESCENCE (PL) FROM HIGH ELECTRON MOBILITY TRANSISTORS (HEMTS...DATE March 2015 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Low Temperature Photoluminescence (PL) From High Electron...temperature Photoluminescence (PL) from High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) structures that have been modified by proton irradiation. The samples are

  16. Temperature limit values for gripping cold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malchaire, J.; Geng, Q.; Den Hartog, E.; Havenith, G.; Holmer, I.; Piette, A.; Powell, S.L.; Rintamäki, H.; Rissanen, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. At the request of the European Commission and in the framework of the European Machinery Directive, research was conducted jointly in five different laboratories to develop specifications for surface temperature limit values for the gripping and handling of cold items. Methods. Four

  17. Temperature limit values for gripping cold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malchaire, J.; Geng, Q.; Den Hartog, E.; Havenith, G.; Holmer, I.; Piette, A.; Powell, S.L.; Rintamäki, H.; Rissanen, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. At the request of the European Commission and in the framework of the European Machinery Directive, research was conducted jointly in five different laboratories to develop specifications for surface temperature limit values for the gripping and handling of cold items. Methods. Four hund

  18. Surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, L.

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation we study the surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis. For heterogeneous reactions, such as gas-solid catalytic reactions, the reactions take place at the interfaces between the two phases: the gas and the solid catalyst. Large amount of reaction heats are released

  19. Surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, L.

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation we study the surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis. For heterogeneous reactions, such as gas-solid catalytic reactions, the reactions take place at the interfaces between the two phases: the gas and the solid catalyst. Large amount of reaction heats are released

  20. Trend patterns in global sea surface temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, S.M.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2009-01-01

    Isolating long-term trend in sea surface temperature (SST) from El Nino southern oscillation (ENSO) variability is fundamental for climate studies. In the present study, trend-empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, a robust space-time method for extracting trend patterns, is applied...

  1. Influence of Annealing Temperature on CZTS Thin Film Surface Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenmei; Han, Junfeng; Ge, Jun; Peng, Xianglin; Liu, Yunong; Jian, Yu; Yuan, Lin; Xiong, Xiaolu; Cha, Limei; Liao, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    In this work, copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS) films were deposited by direct current sputtering and the samples were annealed in different oven-set temperatures and atmosphere (Ar and H2S). The surface evolution was investigated carefully by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The surface of the as-sputtered precursor contained little Cu and large amounts of Zn and Sn. The metallic precursor was continuous and compact without pinholes or cracks. With the increase of the temperature from room temperature to 250°C, Cu atoms diffused to the film surface to form Cu1- x S and covered other compounds. Some small platelets were smaller than 500 nm spreading randomly in the holes of the film surfaces. When the temperature reached 350°C, Zn and Sn atoms began to diffuse to the surface and react with S or Cu1- x S. At 400°C, SEM showed the melting of large particles and small particles with a size from 100 nm to 200 nm in the background of the film surface. Excess Zn segregated towards the surface regions and formed ZnS phase on the surface. In addition, the signal of sodium in the CZTS surface was observed above 400°C. At 600°C, a large amount of regular structures with clear edges and corners were observed in the film surface in SEM images. A clear recrystallized process on the surface was assumed from those observations.

  2. DISAGGREGATION OF GOES LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURES USING SURFACE EMISSIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate temporal and spatial estimation of land surface temperatures (LST) is important for modeling the hydrological cycle at field to global scales because LSTs can improve estimates of soil moisture and evapotranspiration. Using remote sensing satellites, accurate LSTs could be routine, but unfo...

  3. Electron beam induced surface activation of oxide surfaces for nanofabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollnhals, Florian; Seiler, Steffen; Walz, Marie-Madeleine; Steinrueck, Hans-Peter; Marbach, Hubertus [Lehrstuhl fuer Physikalische Chemie II and Interdisciplinary Center for Molecular Materials (ICMM), Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Woolcot, Tom; Thornton, Geoff [London Centre for Nanotechnology and Department of Chemistry, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The controlled fabrication of structures on the nanoscale is a major challenge in science and engineering. Direct-write techniques like Electron Beam Induced Deposition (EBID) were shown to be suitable tools in this context. Recently, Electron Beam Induced Surface Activation (EBISA) has been introduced as a new focused electron beam technique. In EBISA, a surface, e.g. SiO{sub 2}, is irradiated by a focused electron beam, resulting in an activation of the exposed area. The activated area can then react and decompose precursor gases like iron pentacarbonyl, Fe(CO){sub 5}. This leads to a primary deposit, which continues to grow autocatalytically as long as Fe(CO){sub 5} is supplied, resulting in pure (> 90 % at.), crystalline iron nanostructures. We expand the use of this concept by exploring EBISA to produce metallic nanostructures on TiO{sub 2}(110) in UHV; atomistic insight into the process is obtained via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and chemical insight via Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES).

  4. Surface defects and temperature on atomic friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, O Y; Mazo, J J, E-mail: yovany@unizar.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-09-07

    We present a theoretical study of the effect of surface defects on atomic friction in the stick-slip dynamical regime of a minimalistic model. We focus on how the presence of defects and temperature change the average properties of the system. We have identified two main mechanisms which modify the mean friction force of the system when defects are considered. As expected, defects change the potential profile locally and thus affect the friction force. But the presence of defects also changes the probability distribution function of the tip slip length and thus the mean friction force. We corroborated both effects for different values of temperature, external load, dragging velocity and damping. We also show a comparison of the effects of surface defects and surface disorder on the dynamics of the system. (paper)

  5. Surface temperature distribution in broiler houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MS Baracho

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Brazilian meat production scenario broiler production is the most dynamic segment. Despite of the knowledge generated in the poultry production chain, there are still important gaps on Brazilian rearing conditions as housing is different from other countries. This research study aimed at analyzing the variation in bird skin surface as function of heat distribution inside broiler houses. A broiler house was virtually divided into nine sectors and measurements were made during the first four weeks of the grow-out in a commercial broiler farm in the region of Rio Claro, São Paulo, Brazil. Rearing ambient temperature and relative humidity, as well as light intensity and air velocity, were recorded in the geometric center of each virtual sector to evaluate the homogeneity of these parameters. Broiler surface temperatures were recorded using infrared thermography. Differences both in surface temperature (Ts and dry bulb temperature (DBT were significant (p<0.05 as a function of week of rearing. Ts was different between the first and fourth weeks (p<0.05 in both flocks. Results showed important variations in rearing environment parameters (temperature and relative humidity and in skin surface temperature as a function of week and house sector. Air velocity data were outside the limits in the first and third weeks in several sectors. Average light intensity values presented low variation relative to week and house sector. The obtained values were outside the recommended ranges, indicating that broilers suffered thermal distress. This study points out the need to record rearing environment data in order to provide better environmental control during broiler grow-out.

  6. Electron Stimulated Desorption of Condensed Gases on Cryogenic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tratnik, H; Hilleret, Noël

    2005-01-01

    In ultra-high vacuum systems outgassing from vacuum chamber walls and desorption from surface adsorbates are usually the factors which in°uence pressure and residual gas composition. In particular in beam vacuum systems of accelerators like the LHC, where surfaces are exposed to intense synchro- tron radiation and bombardment by energetic ions and electrons, properties like the molecular desorption yield or secondary electron yield can strongly in°uence the performance of the accelerator. In high-energy particle accelerators operating at liquid helium temperature, cold surfaces are exposed to the bombardment of energetic photons, electrons and ions. The gases released by the subsequent desorption are re-condensed on the cold surfaces and can be re-desorbed by the impinging electrons and ions. The equilibrium coverage reached on the surfaces exposed to the impact of energetic particles depends on the desorption yield of the condensed gases and can a®ect the operation of the accelerator by modifying th...

  7. Etching with atomic precision by using low electron temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorf, L.; Wang, J.-C.; Rauf, S.; Monroy, G. A.; Zhang, Y.; Agarwal, A.; Kenney, J.; Ramaswamy, K.; Collins, K.

    2017-07-01

    There has been a steady increase in sub-nm precision requirement for many critical plasma etching processes in the semiconductor industry. In addition to high selectivity and low controllable etch rate, an important requirement of atomic precision etch processes is no (or minimal) damage to the remaining material surface. It has traditionally not been possible to avoid damage in conventional radio-frequency (RF) plasma processing systems, even during layer-by-layer or ‘atomic layer’ etch. To meet these increasingly stringent requirements, it is necessary to have an accurate control over ion energy and ion/radical composition during plasma processing. In this work, a new plasma etch system designed to facilitate atomic precision plasma processing is presented. An electron sheet beam parallel to the substrate surface is used to produce a plasma in this system. This plasma has a significantly lower electron temperature T e ~ 0.3 eV and ion energy E i  plasmas. Electron beam plasmas also have a higher ion-to-radical ratio compared to RF plasmas, so this plasma etch system employs an independent radical source for accurate control over relative ion and radical concentrations. A low frequency RF bias capability that allows control of ion energy in the 2-50 eV range is another important component of this plasma etch system. The results of etching of a variety of materials and structures in this low-electron temperature plasma system are presented in this study: (1) layer-by-layer etching of p-Si at E i ~ 25-50 eV using electrical and gas cycling is demonstrated; (2) continuous etching of epi-grown µ-Si in Cl2-based plasmas is performed, showing that surface damage can be minimized by keeping E i  etching at low E i.

  8. Geomagnetic effects on the average surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballatore, P.

    Several results have previously shown as the solar activity can be related to the cloudiness and the surface solar radiation intensity (Svensmark and Friis-Christensen, J. Atmos. Sol. Terr. Phys., 59, 1225, 1997; Veretenenkoand Pudovkin, J. Atmos. Sol. Terr. Phys., 61, 521, 1999). Here, the possible relationships between the averaged surface temperature and the solar wind parameters or geomagnetic activity indices are investigated. The temperature data used are the monthly SST maps (generated at RAL and available from the related ESRIN/ESA database) that represent the averaged surface temperature with a spatial resolution of 0.5°x0.5° and cover the entire globe. The interplanetary data and the geomagnetic data are from the USA National Space Science Data Center. The time interval considered is 1995-2000. Specifically, possible associations and/or correlations of the average temperature with the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component and with the Kp index are considered and differentiated taking into account separate geographic and geomagnetic planetary regions.

  9. Packaging Technology for SiC High Temperature Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Meredith, Roger D.; Nakley, Leah M.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2017-01-01

    High-temperature environment operable sensors and electronics are required for long-term exploration of Venus and distributed control of next generation aeronautical engines. Various silicon carbide (SiC) high temperature sensors, actuators, and electronics have been demonstrated at and above 500 C. A compatible packaging system is essential for long-term testing and application of high temperature electronics and sensors in relevant environments. This talk will discuss a ceramic packaging system developed for high temperature electronics, and related testing results of SiC integrated circuits at 500 C facilitated by this high temperature packaging system, including the most recent progress.

  10. The dependence of surface temperature on IGBTs load and ambient temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Čaja; Marek, Patsch

    2015-05-01

    Currently, older power electronics and electrotechnics are improvement and at the same time developing new and more efficient devices. These devices produce in their activities a significant part of the heat which, if not effectively drained, causing damage to these elements. In this case, it is important to develop new and more efficient cooling system. The most widespread of modern methods of cooling is the cooling by heat pipe. This contribution is aimed at cooling the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) elements by loop heat pipe (LHP). IGBTs are very prone to damage due to high temperatures, and therefore is the important that the surface temperature was below 100°C. It was therefore created a model that examined what impact of surface temperature on the IGBT element and heat removal at different load and constant ambient temperature.

  11. The dependence of surface temperature on IGBTs load and ambient temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Čaja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, older power electronics and electrotechnics are improvement and at the same time developing new and more efficient devices. These devices produce in their activities a significant part of the heat which, if not effectively drained, causing damage to these elements. In this case, it is important to develop new and more efficient cooling system. The most widespread of modern methods of cooling is the cooling by heat pipe. This contribution is aimed at cooling the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT elements by loop heat pipe (LHP. IGBTs are very prone to damage due to high temperatures, and therefore is the important that the surface temperature was below 100°C. It was therefore created a model that examined what impact of surface temperature on the IGBT element and heat removal at different load and constant ambient temperature.

  12. Electronic phase separation and high temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivelson, S.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-01-11

    The authors review the extensive evidence from model calculations that neutral holes in an antiferromagnet separate into hole-rich and hole-poor phases. All known solvable limits of models of holes in a Heisenberg antiferromagnet exhibit this behavior. The authors show that when the phase separation is frustrated by the introduction of long-range Coulomb interactions, the typical consequence is either a modulated (charge density wave) state or a superconducting phase. The authors then review some of the strong experimental evidence supporting an electronically-driven phase separation of the holes in the cuprate superconductors and the related Ni oxides. Finally, the authors argue that frustrated phase separation in these materials can account for many of the anomalous normal state properties of the high temperature superconductors and provide the mechanism of superconductivity. In particular, it is shown that the T-linear resistivity of the normal state is a paraconductivity associated with a novel composite pairing, although the ordered superconducting state is more conventional.

  13. Temperature dependence of electronic heat capacity in Holstein model

    CERN Document Server

    Fialko, N S; Lakhno, V D

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of charge migration was modeled to calculate temperature dependencies of its thermodynamic equilibrium values such as energy and electronic heat capacity in homogeneous adenine fragments. The energy varies from nearly polaron one at T~0 to midpoint of the conductivity band at high temperatures. The peak on the graph of electronic heat capacity is observed at the polaron decay temperature.

  14. MODIS Surface Temperatures for Cryosphere Studies (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D. K.; Comiso, J. C.; DiGirolamo, N. E.; Shuman, C. A.; Riggs, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have used Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land-surface temperature (LST) and ice-surface temperature (IST) products for several applications in studies of the cryosphere. A climate-quality climate data record (CDR) of the IST of the Greenland ice sheet has been developed and was one of the data sources used to monitor the extreme melt event covering nearly the entire Greenland ice sheet on 11 - 12 July 2012. The IST CDR is available online for users to employ in models, and to study temperature distributions and melt trends on the ice sheet. We continue to assess accuracy of the IST product through comparative analysis with air temperature data from the NOAA Logan temperature sensor at Summit Station, Greenland. We find a small offset between the air temperature and the IST with the IST being slightly lower which is consistent with findings of other studies. The LST data product has been applied in studies of snow melt in regions where snow is a significant water resource. We have used LST data in seasonally snow-covered areas such as the Wind River Range, Wyoming, to monitor the relationship between LST and seasonal streamflow. A close association between a sudden and sustained increase in LST and complete snowmelt, and between melt-season maximum LST and maximum daily streamflow has been documented. Use of LST and MODIS snow-cover and products in hydrological models increases the accuracy of the modeled prediction of runoff. The IST and LST products have also been applied to study of sea ice, e.g. extent and concentration, and lake ice, such as determining ice-out dates, and these efforts will also be described.

  15. The Electron Temperature Gradient in the Galactic Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Quireza, C; Bania, T M; Balser, D S; Maciel, W J

    2006-01-01

    We derive the electron temperature gradient in the Galactic disk using a sample of HII regions that spans Galactocentric distances 0--17 kpc. The electron temperature was calculated using high precision radio recombination line and continuum observations for more than 100 HII regions. Nebular Galactocentric distances were calculated in a consistent manner using the radial velocities measured by our radio recombination line survey. The large number of nebulae widely distributed over the Galactic disk together with the uniformity of our data provide a secure estimate of the present electron temperature gradient in the Milky Way. Because metals are the main coolants in the photoionized gas, the electron temperature along the Galactic disk should be directly related to the distribution of heavy elements in the Milky Way. Our best estimate of the electron temperature gradient is derived from a sample of 76 sources for which we have the highest quality data. The present gradient in electron temperature has a minimu...

  16. Surface morphology and deuterium retention in tungsten exposed to high flux D plasma at high temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jia, Y. Z.; De Temmerman, G.; Luo, G. N.; Xu, H.Y.; Li, C.; Fu, B. Q.; Liu, W.

    2015-01-01

    Surface modifications and deuterium retention induced in tungsten by high fluxes (1024 m−2 s−1) low energy (38 eV) deuterium ions were studied as a function of surface temperature. Blister formation was studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction, while deuterium ret

  17. Electronic Structure and Catalysis on Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Jeff; Norskov, Jens K.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2002-10-01

    The powerful computational resources available to scientists today, together with recent improvements in electronic structure calculation algorithms, are providing important new tools for researchers in the fields of surface science and catalysis. In this review, we discuss first principles calculations that are now capable of providing qualitative and, in many cases, quantitative insights into surface chemistry. The calculations can aid in the establishment of chemisorption trends across the transition metals, in the characterization of reaction pathways on individual metals, and in the design of novel catalysts. First principles studies provide an excellent fundamental complement to experimental investigations of the above phenomena and can often allow the elucidation of important mechanistic details that would be difficult, if not impossible, to determine from experiments alone.

  18. Characteristics of surface sterilization using electron cyclotron resonance plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonesu, Akira; Hara, Kazufumi; Nishikawa, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of surface sterilization using electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma were investigated. High-energy electrons and oxygen radicals were observed in the ECR zone using electric probe and optical emission spectroscopic methods. A biological indicator (BI), Geobacillus stearothermophilus, containing 1 × 106 spores was sterilized in 120 s by exposure to oxygen discharges while maintaining a temperature of approximately 55 °C at the BI installation position. Oxygen radicals and high-energy electrons were found to be the sterilizing species in the ECR region. It was demonstrated that the ECR plasma could be produced in narrow tubes with an inner diameter of 5 mm. Moreover, sterilization tests confirmed that the spores present inside the narrow tube were successfully inactivated by ECR plasma irradiation.

  19. The international surface temperature initiative's global land surface databank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrimore, J. H.; Rennie, J.; Gambi de Almeida, W.; Christy, J.; Flannery, M.; Gleason, B.; Klein-Tank, A.; Mhanda, A.; Ishihara, K.; Lister, D.; Menne, M. J.; Razuvaev, V.; Renom, M.; Rusticucci, M.; Tandy, J.; Thorne, P. W.; Worley, S.

    2013-09-01

    The International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) consists of an end-to-end process for land surface air temperature analyses. The foundation is the establishment of a global land surface Databank. This builds upon the groundbreaking efforts of scientists in the 1980s and 1990s. While using many of their principles, a primary aim is to improve aspects including data provenance, version control, openness and transparency, temporal and spatial coverage, and improved methods for merging disparate sources. The initial focus is on daily and monthly timescales. A Databank Working Group is focused on establishing Stage-0 (original observation forms) through Stage-3 data (merged dataset without quality control). More than 35 sources of data have already been added and efforts have now turned to development of the initial version of the merged dataset. Methods have been established for ensuring to the extent possible the provenance of all data from the point of observation through all intermediate steps to final archive and access. Databank submission procedures were designed to make the process of contributing data as easy as possible. All data are provided openly and without charge. We encourage the use of these data and feedback from interested users.

  20. Effects of electron temperature anisotropy on proton mirror instability evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Narges; Germaschewski, Kai; Raeder, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron-free energy so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.

  1. Effects of electron temperature anisotropy on proton mirror instability evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadi, Narges; Raeder, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here, we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron free energy, so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.

  2. The surface temperature of free evaporating drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodulin, V. Y.; Letushko, V. N.; Nizovtsev, M. I.; Sterlyagov, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    Complex experimental and theoretical investigation of heat and mass transfer processes was performed at evaporation of free liquid drops. For theoretical calculation the emission-diffusion model was proposed. This allowed taking into account the characteristics of evaporation of small droplets, for which heat and mass transfer processes are not described in the conventional diffusion model. The calculation results of evaporation of droplets of different sizes were compared using two models: the conventional diffusion and emission-diffusion models. To verify the proposed physical model, the evaporation of droplets suspended on a polypropylene fiber was experimentally investigated. The form of droplets in the evaporation process was determined using microphotographing. The temperature was measured on the surfaces of evaporating drops using infrared thermography. The experimental results have showed good agreement with the numerical data for the time of evaporation and the temperature of evaporating drops.

  3. Low temperature surface conductivity of hydrogenated diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauerer, C.; Ertl, F.; Nebel, C.E.; Stutzmann, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Walter-Schottky-Inst. fuer Physikalische Grundlagen der Halbleiterelektronik; Bergonzo, P. [LIST(CEA-Recherche Technology)/DIMIR/SIAR/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Williams, O.A.; Jackman, R.A. [University Coll., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

    2001-07-23

    Conductivity and Hall experiments are performed on hydrogenated poly-CVD, atomically flat homoepitaxially grown Ib and natural type IIa diamond layers in the regime 0.34 to 400 K. For all experiments hole transport is detected with sheet resistivities at room temperature in the range 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 5} {omega}/{radical}. We introduce a transport model where a disorder induced tail of localized states traps holes at very low temperatures (T < 70 K). The characteristic energy of the tail is in the range of 6 meV. Towards higher temperatures (T > 70 K) the hole density is approximately constant and the hole mobility {mu} is increasing two orders of magnitude. In the regime 70 K < T < 200 K, {mu} is exponentially activated with 22 meV, above it follows a {proportional_to}T{sup 3/2} law. The activation energy of the hole density at T < 70 K is governed by the energy gap between holes trapped in the tail and the mobility edge which they can propagate. In the temperature regime T < 25 K an increasing hole mobility is detected which is attributed to transport in delocalized states at the surface. (orig.)

  4. Photoelectron spectroscopy bulk and surface electronic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Suga, Shigemasa

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is now becoming more and more required to investigate electronic structures of various solid materials in the bulk, on surfaces as well as at buried interfaces. The energy resolution was much improved in the last decade down to 1 meV in the low photon energy region. Now this technique is available from a few eV up to 10 keV by use of lasers, electron cyclotron resonance lamps in addition to synchrotron radiation and X-ray tubes. High resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) is now widely applied to band mapping of materials. It attracts a wide attention from both fundamental science and material engineering. Studies of the dynamics of excited states are feasible by time of flight spectroscopy with fully utilizing the pulse structures of synchrotron radiation as well as lasers including the free electron lasers (FEL). Spin resolved studies also made dramatic progress by using higher efficiency spin detectors and two dimensional spin detectors. Polarization depend...

  5. Temperature dependence of electron attachment to methylene chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnaduwage, L. A.; Tav, C.; McCorkle, D. L.; Ding, W. X.

    1999-05-01

    Temperature dependence of dissociative electron attachment to methylene chloride in the electron energy range of 0-10 eV was studied in a high-temperature electron swarm apparatus. The measurements were made using N2 and Ar as buffer gases. From the measured electron attachment rate constants, the electron attachment cross sections at 300, 400, and 500 K were determined using an unfolding technique. The maximum electron attachment cross sections at 300, 400, and 500 K were ≈3.1×10-18, ≈8.2×10-18, and ≈1.7×10-17 cm2, and occurred at electron energies of ≈0.8, ≈0.65, and ≈0.55 eV, respectively. The increase in electron attachment to methylene chloride with temperature is attributed to the increase in the vibrational energy of the molecule.

  6. Ferromagnetism and temperature-dependent electronic structure in metallic films

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, T

    1999-01-01

    reduced at the surface compared to the inner layers. This observation clearly contradicts the well-known Stoner picture of band magnetism and can be explained in terms of general arguments which are based on exact results in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction. The magnetic behavior of the Hubbard films can be analyzed in detail by inspecting the local quasi particle density of states as well as the wave vector dependent spectral density. The electronic structure is found to be strongly spin-, layer-, and temperature-dependent. The last part of this work is concerned about the temperature-driven reorientation transition in thin metallic films. For the description of the magnetic anisotropy in thin films the dipole interaction as well as the spin-orbit interaction have to be included in the model. By calculating the temperature-dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy it is found that both types of temperature-driven reorientation transitions, from out-of-plane to in-plane (''Fe-type'') and from in-pla...

  7. Some unusual electronic patterns on graphite surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shyam K Choudhury; Anjan K Gupta

    2008-02-01

    We report on the observation of some unusual electronic patterns on a graphite surface using scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STM). We attribute these patterns to different types of strain near the surface. One such pattern seen on a particular layer comprises of two-dimensional spatially varying super-lattice and one-dimensional fringes. This pattern is present in a finite region of a layer on the surface confined between two carbon fibers. We attribute this spatially varying super-lattice structure to the shear strain generated in the top layer due to the restraining fibers. We have also developed a model with the Moirµe rotation hypothesis that gives us a better insight into such large-scale spatially varying patterns. We have been able to model the above-observed pattern. We also report another pattern near a defect, which we attribute to the change in density of states due to the physical buckling of the top graphite layer. Part of this buckled layer is found to be buried under another layer and this region shows a reversed contrast and thus supporting our idea of buckling. We also performed tunneling spectroscopy measurements on various regions of these patterns which show significant variations in the density of states.

  8. High temperature surface degradation of III-V nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartuli, C.B.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; MacKenzie, J.D.; Lambers, E.S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Zolper, J.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The surface stoichiometry, surface morphology and electrical conductivity of AlN, GaN, InN, InGaN and InAlN was examined at rapid thermal annealing temperatures up to 1,150 C. The sheet resistance of the AlN dropped steadily with annealing, but the surface showed signs of roughening only above 1,000 C. Auger Electronic Spectroscopy (AES) analysis showed little change in the surface stoichiometry even at 1,150 C. GaN root mean square (RMS) surface roughness showed an overall improvement with annealing, but the surface became pitted at 1,000 C, at which point the sheet resistance also dropped by several orders of magnitude, and AES confirmed a loss of N from the surface. The InN surface had roughened considerably even at 650 C, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed significant degradation. In contrast to the binary nitrides the sheet resistance of InAlN was found to increase by {approximately} 10{sup 2} from the as grown value after annealing at 800 C and then remain constant up to 1,000 C, while that of InGaN increased rapidly above 700 C. The RMS roughness increased above 800 C and 700 C respectively for InAlN and InGaN samples. In droplets began to form on the surface at 900 C for InAlN and at 800 C for InGaN, and then evaporate at 1,000 C leaving pits. AES analysis showed a decrease in the N concentration in the top 500 {angstrom} of the sample for annealing {ge} 800 C in both materials.

  9. Low-temperature electron microscopy: techniques and protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Roland A

    2015-01-01

    Low-temperature electron microscopy endeavors to provide "solidification of a biological specimen by cooling with the aim of minimal displacement of its components through the use of low temperature as a physical fixation strategy" (Steinbrecht and Zierold, Cryotechniques in biological electron microscopy. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, p 293, 1987). The intention is to maintain confidence that the tissue observed retains the morphology and dimensions of the living material while also ensuring soluble cellular components are not displaced. As applied to both scanning and transmission electron microscopy, cryo-electron microscopy is a strategy whereby the application of low-temperature techniques are used to reduce or remove processing artifacts which are commonly encountered in more conventional room temperature electron microscopy techniques which rely heavily on chemical fixation and heavy metal staining. Often, cryo-electron microscopy allows direct observation of specimens, which have not been stained or chemically fixed.

  10. Observation of isotropic electron temperature in the turbulent E region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saito

    Full Text Available Using EISCAT radar data, we find that electrons are strongly heated in the magnetic field-line direction during high electric field events. The remote site data show that the electron temperature increases in almost the same way in the field-perpendicular direction; electron heating by E region plasma turbulence is isotropic. We discuss the implications of our observation for the "plasmon"-electron as well as the wave Joule heating models of the anomalous electron heating in the E region.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; plasma temperature and density; plasma waves and instabilities

  11. Room-Temperature Growth of Al Films on Si(111)-7×7 Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong; ZHANG Yan-Feng; WANG De-Yong; JIA Jin-Feng; XUE Qi-Kun

    2004-01-01

    @@ Reflection high energy electron diffraction and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) are used to investigate the structure and morphology of Al films deposited on Si(111)-7 × 7 surface at room temperature. The films are polycrystalline, made up of (100) and (111) oriented islands, which primarily result from the interface elastic effect and free surface energies of the Al (100) and (111) surfaces.

  12. First high-temperature electronics products survey 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy Allen

    2006-04-01

    On April 4-5, 2005, a High-Temperature Electronics Products Workshop was held. This workshop engaged a number of governmental and private industry organizations sharing a common interest in the development of commercially available, high-temperature electronics. One of the outcomes of this meeting was an agreement to conduct an industry survey of high-temperature applications. This report covers the basic results of this survey.

  13. Development of Surface Acoustic Wave Electronic Nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Jha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes an effective method to design and develop surface acoustic wave (SAW sensor array-based electronic nose systems for specific target applications. The paper suggests that before undertaking full hardware development empirically through hit and trial for sensor selection, it is prudent to develop accurate sensor array simulator for generating synthetic data and optimising sensor array design and pattern recognition system. The latter aspects are most time-consuming and cost-intensive parts in the development of an electronic nose system. This is because most of the electronic sensor platforms, circuit components, and electromechanical parts are available commercially-off-the-shelve (COTS, whereas knowledge about specific polymers and data analysis software are often guarded due to commercial or strategic interests. In this study, an 11-element SAW sensor array is modelled to detect and identify trinitrotoluene (TNT and dinitrotoluene (DNT explosive vapours in the presence of toluene, benzene, di-methyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP and humidity as interferents. Additive noise sources and outliers were included in the model for data generation. The pattern recognition system consists of: (i a preprocessor based on logarithmic data scaling, dimensional autoscaling, and singular value decomposition-based denoising, (ii principal component analysis (PCA-based feature extractor, and (iii an artificial neural network (ANN classifier. The efficacy of this approach is illustrated by presenting detailed PCA analysis and classification results under varied conditions of noise and outlier, and by analysing comparative performance of four classifiers (neural network, k-nearest neighbour, naïve Bayes, and support vector machine.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(4, pp.364-376, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.493

  14. Satellite Sensed Skin Sea Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlon, Craig

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of spatial and temporal changes the global climate rely heavily on the use of computer models. Unfortunately, such models cannot provide the basis for climate prediction because key physical processes are inadequately treated. Consequently, fine tuning procedures are often used to optimize the fit between model output and observational data and the validation of climate models using observations is essential if model based predictions of climate change are to be treated with any degree of confidence. Satellite Sea Surface Temperature (SST) observations provide high spatial and temporal resolution data which is extremely well suited to the initialization, definition of boundary conditions and, validation of climate models. In the case of coupled ocean-atmosphere models, the SST (or more correctly the 'Skin' SST (SSST)) is a fundamental diagnostic variable to consider in the validation process. Daily global SST maps derived from satellite sensors also provide adequate data for the detection of global patterns of change which, unlike any other SST data set, repeatedly extend into the southern hemisphere extra-tropical regions. Such data are essential to the success of the spatial 'fingerprint' technique, which seeks to establish a north-south asymmetry where warming is suppressed in the high latitude Southern Ocean. Some estimates suggest that there is a greater than 80% chance of directly detecting significant change (97.5 % confidence level) after 10-12 years of consistent global observations of mean sea surface temperature. However, these latter statements should be qualified with the assumption that a negligible drift in the observing system exists and that biases between individual instruments required to derive a long term data set are small. Given that current estimates for the magnitude of global warming of 0.015 K yr(sup -1) - 0.025 K yr(sup -1), satellite SST data sets need to be both accurate and stable if such a warming trend is to

  15. Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST), Version 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST) dataset is a global monthly sea surface temperature analysis on a 2x2 degree grid derived from the...

  16. NOAA Global Surface Temperature Dataset, Version 4.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Global Surface Temperature Dataset (NOAAGlobalTemp) is derived from two independent analyses: the Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST)...

  17. HTPro: Low-temperature Surface Hardening of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Low-temperature surface hardening of stainless steel provides the required performance properties without affecting corrosion resistance.......Low-temperature surface hardening of stainless steel provides the required performance properties without affecting corrosion resistance....

  18. Merged Land and Ocean Surface Temperature, Version 3.5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The historical Merged Land-Ocean Surface Temperature Analysis (MLOST) is derived from two independent analyses, an Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature...

  19. Rocket-borne measurements of electron temperature and density with the Electron Retarding Potential Analyzer instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I. J.; Widholm, M.; Lessard, M. R.; Riley, P.; Heavisides, J.; Moen, J. I.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Bekkeng, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Determining electron temperature in the ionosphere is a fundamentally important measurement for space science. Obtaining measurements of electron temperatures at high altitudes (>700 km) is difficult because of limitations on ground-based radar and classic spacecraft instrumentation. In light of these limitations, the rocket-borne Electron Retarding Potential Analyzer (ERPA) was developed to allow for accurate in situ measurement of ionospheric electron temperature with a simple and low-resource instrument. The compact ERPA, a traditional retarding potential analyzer with multiple baffle collimators, allows for a straightforward calculation of electron temperature. Since its first mission in 2004, it has amassed significant flight heritage and obtained data used in multiple studies investigating a myriad of phenomena related to magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. In addition to highlighting the scientific contributions of the ERPA instrument, this paper outlines its theory and operation, the methodology used to obtain electron temperature measurements, and a comparative study suggesting that the ERPA can also provide electron density measurements.

  20. Generation of surface electrons in femtosecond laser-solid interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Miaohua; LI; Yutong; YUAN; Xiaohui; ZHENG; Zhiyuan; LIANG; Wenxi; YU; Quanzhi; ZHANG; Yi; WANG; Zhaohua; WEI; Zhiyi; ZHANG; Jie

    2006-01-01

    The characteristics of hot electrons produced by p-polarized femtosecond laser-solid interactions are studied. The experimental results show that the outgoing electrons are mainly emitted in three directions: along the target surface, the normal direction and the laser backward direction. The electrons flowing along the target surface are due to the confinement of the electrostatic field and the surface magnetic field, while the electrons in the normal direction due to the resonant absorption.

  1. Surface topology and electronic structure of layered strontium ruthenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienert, Robert; Klinke, Melanie; Waelsch, Michael; Mietke, Sebastian; Matzdorf, Rene [Experimentalphysik II, Universitaet Kassel (Germany); Peng, Jin; Mao, Zhiqiang [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans (United States)

    2012-07-01

    In complex materials the interplay of properties like crystal structure, electronic structure and magnetism results in very interesting physical phenomena. The Ruddlesden-Popper series of layered Strontium Ruthenates Sr{sub n+1}Ru{sub n}O{sub 3n+1} describes one class of these materials. The double and triple layer systems behave like a Fermi liquid up to the transition temperature of 15 K and 24 K, respectively. In both compounds the local density of states (LDOS) shows a peak within the dip-like feature around the Fermi energy E{sub F}. Using low-temperature (LT) STM and STS we studied the temperature dependence of the LDOS in the range from 4.7 to 35 K. By increasing the temperature the peak within the dip in the LDOS at E{sub F} is only affected by thermal broadening. The surface unit cell of the Strontium Ruthenates exhibits a c(2 x 2) super structure, which is stable from 4.7 K up to room temperature as shown by our atomically resolved LT STM images and room temperature LEED experiments.

  2. The hydrated electron and its reactions at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hilbert; Sehested, Knud

    1986-01-01

    The spectrum of the hydrated electron was determined in the temperature range 5-300 "C by using strongly alkaline solutions and high hydrogen pressure. At temperatures up to about 150 "C the temperature coefficients of E, and AE1/2 are -2.8 X and 2 X lo4 eV K-', respectively. E,, is the energy ma...

  3. Middle Pliocene sea surface temperature variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, H.J.; Chandler, M.A.; Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    Estimates of sea surface temperature (SST) based upon foraminifer, diatom, and ostracod assemblages from ocean cores reveal a warm phase of the Pliocene between about 3.3 and 3.0 Ma. Pollen records and plant megafossils, although not as well dated, show evidence for a warmer climate at about the same time. Increased greenhouse forcing and altered ocean heat transport are the leading candidates for the underlying cause of Pliocene global warmth. Despite being a period of global warmth, this interval encompasses considerable variability. Two new SST reconstructions are presented that are designed to provide a climatological error bar for warm peak phases of the Pliocene and to document the spatial distribution and magnitude of SST variability within the mid-Pliocene warm period. These data suggest long-term stability of low-latitude SST and document greater variability in regions of maximum warming. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Impact of Atlantic sea surface temperatures on the warmest global surface air temperature of 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Riyu

    2005-03-01

    The year 1998 is the warmest year in the record of instrumental measurements. In this study, an atmospheric general circulation model is used to investigate the role of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in this warmth, with a focus on the role of the Atlantic Ocean. The model forced with the observed global SSTs captures the main features of land surface air temperature anomalies in 1998. A sensitivity experiment shows that in comparison with the global SST anomalies, the Atlantic SST anomalies can explain 35% of the global mean surface air temperature (GMAT) anomaly, and 57% of the land surface air temperature anomaly in 1998. The mechanisms through which the Atlantic Ocean influences the GMAT are likely different from season to season. Possible detailed mechanisms involve the impact of SST anomalies on local convection in the tropical Atlantic region, the consequent excitation of a Rossby wave response that propagates into the North Atlantic and the Eurasian continent in winter and spring, and the consequent changes in tropical Walker circulation in summer and autumn that induce changes in convection over the tropical Pacific. This in turn affects climate in Asia and Australia. The important role of the Atlantic Ocean suggests that attention should be paid not only to the tropical Pacific Ocean, but also to the tropical Atlantic Ocean in understanding the GMAT variability and its predictability.

  5. Turbulent Flow past High Temperature Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Thangam, Siva; Carlucci, Pasquale; Buckley, Liam; Carlucci, Donald

    2014-11-01

    Flow over high-temperature surfaces subject to wall heating is analyzed with applications to projectile design. In this study, computations are performed using an anisotropic Reynolds-stress model to study flow past surfaces that are subject to radiative flux. The model utilizes a phenomenological treatment of the energy spectrum and diffusivities of momentum and heat to include the effects of wall heat transfer and radiative exchange. The radiative transport is modeled using Eddington approximation including the weighted effect of nongrayness of the fluid. The time-averaged equations of motion and energy are solved using the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation with an efficient finite-volume algorithm. The model is applied for available test cases to validate its predictive capabilities for capturing the effects of wall heat transfer. Computational results are compared with experimental data available in the literature. Applications involving the design of projectiles are summarized. Funded in part by U.S. Army, ARDEC.

  6. Use of satellite land surface temperatures in the EUSTACE global surface air temperature analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, D.; Good, E.; Rayner, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    EUSTACE (EU Surface Temperatures for All Corners of Earth) is a Horizon2020 project that will produce a spatially complete, near-surface air temperature (NSAT) analysis for the globe for every day since 1850. The analysis will be based on both satellite and in situ surface temperature observations over land, sea, ice and lakes, which will be combined using state-of-the-art statistical methods. The use of satellite data will enable the EUSTACE analysis to offer improved estimates of NSAT in regions that are poorly observed in situ, compared with existing in-situ based analyses. This presentation illustrates how satellite land surface temperature (LST) data - sourced from the European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) GlobTemperature project - will be used in EUSTACE. Satellite LSTs represent the temperature of the Earth's skin, which can differ from the corresponding NSAT by several degrees or more, particularly during the hottest part of the day. Therefore the first challenge is to develop an approach to estimate global NSAT from satellite observations. Two methods will be trialled in EUSTACE, both of which are summarised here: an established empirical regression-based approach for predicting NSAT from satellite data, and a new method whereby NSAT is calculated from LST and other parameters using a physics-based model. The second challenge is in estimating the uncertainties for the satellite NSAT estimates, which will determine how these data are used in the final blended satellite-in situ analysis. This is also important as a key component of EUSTACE is in delivering accurate uncertainty information to users. An overview of the methods to estimate the satellite NSATs is also included in this presentation.

  7. High temperature electronics and instrumentation seminar proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veneruso, A.F.; Arnold, C.; Simpson, R.S. (eds.)

    1980-05-01

    This seminar was tailored to address the needs of the borehole logging industry and to stimulate the development and application of this technology, for logging geothermal, hot oil and gas, and steam injection wells. The technical sessions covered the following topics: hybrid circuits, electronic devices, transducers, cables and connectors, materials, mechanical tools and thermal protection. Thirty-eight papers are included. Separate entries were prepared for each one. (MHR)

  8. High temperature electronics and instrumentation seminar proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veneruso, A.F.; Arnold, C.; Simpson, R.S. (eds.)

    1980-05-01

    This seminar was tailored to address the needs of the borehole logging industry and to stimulate the development and application of this technology, for logging geothermal, hot oil and gas, and steam injection wells. The technical sessions covered the following topics: hybrid circuits, electronic devices, transducers, cables and connectors, materials, mechanical tools and thermal protection. Thirty-eight papers are included. Separate entries were prepared for each one. (MHR)

  9. Determination of coronal temperatures from electron density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaire, J F

    2011-01-01

    The most popular method for determining coronal temperatures is the scale-height-method (shm). It is based on electron density profiles inferred from White Light (WL) brightness measurements of the corona during solar eclipses. This method has been applied to several published coronal electron density models. The calculated temperature distributions reach a maximum at r > 1.3 RS, and therefore do not satisfy one of the conditions for applying the shm method. Another method is the hydrostatic equilibrium method (hst), which enables coronal temperature distributions to be determined, providing solutions to the hydrostatic equilibrium equation. The temperature maximas using the hst method are almost equal to those obtained using the shm method, but the temperature peak is always at significantly lower altitude when the hst-method is used than when the shm-method is used. A third and more recently developed method, dyn, can be used for the same published electron density profiles. The temperature distributions ob...

  10. Electron temperature fluctuation in the HT-7 tokamak plasma observed by electron cyclotron emission imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xiao-Yuan; Wang Jun; Yu Yi; Wen Yi-Zhi; Yu Chang-Xuan; Liu Wan-Dong; Wan Bao-Nian; Gao Xiang; N. C. Luhmann; C. W. Domier; Jian Wang; Z. G. Xia; Zuowei Shen

    2009-01-01

    The fluctuation of the electron temperature has been measured by using the electron cyclotron emission imaging in the Hefei Tokamak-7 (HT-7) plasma. The electron temperature fluctuation with a broadband spectrum shows that it propagates in the electron diamagnetic drift direction, and the mean poloidal wave-number kg is calculated to be about 1.58 cm-1, or keps ≈0.34. It indicates that the fluctuation should come from the electron drift wave turbulence. The linear global scaling of the electron temperature fluctuation with the gradient of electron temperature is consistent with the mixing length scale qualitatively. Evolution of spectrum of the fluctuation during the sawtooth oscillation phases is investigated, and the fluctuation is found to increase with the gradient of electron temperature increasing during most phases of the sawtooth oscillation. The results indicate that the electron temperature gradient is probably the driver of the fluctuation enhancement. The steady heat flux driven by electron temperature fluctuation is estimated and compared with the results from power balance estimation.

  11. Theoretical study of cathode surfaces and high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Wolfgang

    1995-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the work functions of BaO on W, Os, Pt, and alloys of Re-W, Os-W, and Ir-W that are in excellent agreement with experiment. The observed emission enhancement for alloy relative to tungsten dispenser cathodes is attributed to properties of the substrate crystal structure and explained by the smaller depolarization of the surface dipole on hexagonal as compared to cubic substrates. For Ba and BaO on W(100), the geometry of the adsorbates has been determined by a comparison of inverse photoemission spectra with calculated densities of unoccupied states based on the fully relativistic embedded cluster approach. Results are also discussed for models of scandate cathodes and the electronic structure of oxygen on W(100) at room and elevated temperatures. A detailed comparison is made for the surface electronic structure of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7 as obtained with non-, quasi-, and fully relativistic cluster calculations.

  12. Secondary Electron Yield on Cryogenic Surfaces as a Function of Physisorbed Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzucan, Asena; Taborelli, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    In LHC the electron cloud induced by photoelectrons, gas ionization and secondary electrons emitted from the beam pipe walls could be a limitation of the performance. The electron cloud induce heat load on the cryogenic system, cause pressure rise, emittance growth and beam instabilities, which in the end will limit the beam’s lifetime. Beam- induced multipacting, which can arise through oscillatory motion of photoelectrons and low-energy secondary electrons bouncing back and forth between opposite walls of the vacuum chamber during successive passage of proton bunches, represent therefore a potential problem for the machine. The secondary electron yield (SEY) is one of the key parameters for the electron cloud build up and multipacting phenomenon. An electron cloud occurs if the metal surface secondary electron yield is high enough for electron multiplication. This parameter has been extensively studied on room temperature samples but uncertainties remain for samples at cryogenic temperature. Indeed, at l...

  13. Blocking layer modeling for temperature analysis of electron transfer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blocking layer modeling for temperature analysis of electron transfer rate in quantum dot sensitized solar cells. ... Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences ... of the quantum dots and free energy of system and finally the Marcus equation.

  14. Electronic Modeling and Design for Extreme Temperatures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are developing CAD tools, models and methodologies for electronics design for circuit operation in extreme environments with focus on very low temperatures...

  15. High Temperature Electron Localization in dense He Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Borghesani, A F

    2002-01-01

    We report new accurate mesasurements of the mobility of excess electrons in high density Helium gas in extended ranges of temperature $[(26\\leq T\\leq 77) K ]$ and density $[ (0.05\\leq N\\leq 12.0) {atoms} \\cdot {nm}^{-3}]$ to ascertain the effect of temperature on the formation and dynamics of localized electron states. The main result of the experiment is that the formation of localized states essentially depends on the relative balance of fluid dilation energy, repulsive electron-atom interaction energy, and thermal energy. As a consequence, the onset of localization depends on the medium disorder through gas temperature and density. It appears that the transition from delocalized to localized states shifts to larger densities as the temperature is increased. This behavior can be understood in terms of a simple model of electron self-trapping in a spherically symmetric square well.

  16. Electronic Modeling and Design for Extreme Temperatures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop electronics for operation at temperatures that range from -230oC to +130oC. This new technology will minimize the requirements for external...

  17. A Nonlinear Model for Relativistic Electrons at Positive Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Hainzl, Christian; Lewin, Mathieu; Seiringer, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We study the relativistic electron-positron field at positive temperature in the Hartree-Fock-approximation. We consider both the case with and without exchange term, and investigate the existence and properties of minimizers. Our approach is non-perturbative in the sense that the relevant electron subspace is determined in a self-consistent way. The present work is an extension of previous work by Hainzl, Lewin, S\\'er\\'e, and Solovej where the case of zero temperature was considered.

  18. Electron Conditioning of Technical Aluminium Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pimpec, F

    2004-09-02

    The effect of electron conditioning on commercially aluminium alloys 1100 and 6063 were investigated. Contrary to the assumption that electron conditioning, if performed long enough, can reduce and stabilize the SEY to low values (= 1.3, value of many pure elements [1]), the SEY of aluminium did not go lower than 1.8. In fact, it reincreases with continued electron exposure dose.

  19. Monitoring temperature and pressure over surfaces using sensitive paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Viramontes, J. Ascención; Moreno Hernández, David; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Morán Loza, José Miguel; García Arreola, Alicia

    2007-03-01

    Two techniques for monitoring temperature and pressure variations over surfaces using sensitive paints are presented. The analysis is done by the acquisition of a set of images of the surface under analysis. The surface is painted by a paint called Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) for pressure measurements and Temperature Sensitive Paints (TSP) for temperature measurements. These kinds of paints are deposited over the surface under analysis. The recent experimental advances in calibration process are presented in this paper.

  20. Evaluation of the benefits of high temperature electronics for lunar power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Edgar H.

    A comparative evaluation is conducted of several approaches to the cooling of a lunar power system's power electronics, in view of the 400 K temperature of the 354-hour lunar day and lunar dust accumulation, which can contaminate power components and radiator surfaces. It is noted that, by raising the power electronics' baseplate temperature to 480 K, no thermal control system is required; the surface of the baseplate acts as its own, waste-heat-rejecting radiator, but the baseplate must be kept clean of lunar dust contamination.

  1. Evaluation of the Benefits of High Temperature Electronics for Lunar Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Edgar H.

    1992-01-01

    A comparative evaluation is conducted of several approaches to the cooling of a lunar power system's power electronics, in view of the 400 K temperature of the 354-hour lunar day and lunar dust accumulation, which can contaminate power components and radiator surfaces. It is noted that, by raising the power electronics' baseplate temperature to 480 K, no thermal control system is required; the surface of the baseplate acts as its own, waste-heat-rejecting radiator, but the baseplate must be kept clean of lunar dust contamination.

  2. Electronic properties of semiconductor surfaces and metal/semiconductor interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallarida, M.

    2005-05-15

    This thesis reports investigations of the electronic properties of a semiconductor surface (silicon carbide), a reactive metal/semiconductor interface (manganese/silicon) and a non-reactive metal/semiconductor interface (aluminum-magnesium alloy/silicon). The (2 x 1) reconstruction of the 6H-SiC(0001) surface has been obtained by cleaving the sample along the (0001) direction. This reconstruction has not been observed up to now for this compound, and has been compared with those of similar elemental semiconductors of the fourth group of the periodic table. This comparison has been carried out by making use of photoemission spectroscopy, analyzing the core level shifts of both Si 2p and C 1s core levels in terms of charge transfer between atoms of both elements and in different chemical environments. From this comparison, a difference between the reconstruction on the Si-terminated and the C-terminated surface was established, due to the ionic nature of the Si-C bond. The growth of manganese films on Si(111) in the 1-5 ML thickness range has been studied by means of LEED, STM and photoemission spectroscopy. By the complementary use of these surface science techniques, two different phases have been observed for two thickness regimes (<1 ML and >1 ML), which exhibit a different electronic character. The two reconstructions, the (1 x 1)-phase and the ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30 -phase, are due to silicide formation, as observed in core level spectroscopy. The growth proceeds via island formation in the monolayer regime, while the thicker films show flat layers interrupted by deep holes. On the basis of STM investigations, this growth mode has been attributed to strain due to lattice mismatch between the substrate and the silicide. Co-deposition of Al and Mg onto a Si(111) substrate at low temperature (100K) resulted in the formation of thin alloy films. By varying the relative content of both elements, the thin films exhibited different electronic properties

  3. Experimental study of water absorption of electronic components and internal local temperature and humidity into electronic enclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conseil, Helene; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion reliability of electronic products is a key factor for electronics industry, and today there is a large demand for performance reliability in large spans of temperature and humidity during day and night shifts. Corrosion failures are still seen due to the effects of temperature, humidity...... and corrosion accelerating species in the atmosphere, and moreover the surface region of printed circuit board assemblies is often contaminated by various contaminating species. In order to evaluate the level of humidity at which failures such as electrochemical migration start to appear on printed circuit......–75 % RH was reached, corresponding to the deliquescence relative humidity level of NaCl. The overall effect of climate (humidity and temperature) has been studied on the internal climate of typical electronic enclosures. The varied parameters included material used for casing, s ize of opening...

  4. Electronic Components and Circuits for Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dickman, John E.; Gerber, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Planetary exploration missions and deep space probes require electrical power management and control systems that are capable of efficient and reliable operation in very low temperature environments. Presently, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of deep space carry a large number of radioisotope heating units in order to maintain the surrounding temperature of the on-board electronics at approximately 20 C. Electronics capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures will not only tolerate the hostile environment of deep space but also reduce system size and weight by eliminating or reducing the radioisotope heating units and their associate structures; thereby reducing system development as well as launch costs. In addition, power electronic circuits designed for operation at low temperatures are expected to result in more efficient systems than those at room temperature. This improvement results from better behavior and tolerance in the electrical and thermal properties of semiconductor and dielectric materials at low temperatures. The Low Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on research and development of electrical components, circuits, and systems suitable for applications in the aerospace environment and deep space exploration missions. Research is being conducted on devices and systems for reliable use down to cryogenic temperatures. Some of the commercial-off-the-shelf as well as developed components that are being characterized include switching devices, resistors, magnetics, and capacitors. Semiconductor devices and integrated circuits including digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters, DC/DC converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators are also being investigated for potential use in low temperature applications. An overview of the NASA Glenn Research Center Low Temperature Electronic Program will be presented in this paper. A description of the low temperature test facilities along with

  5. Temperature Effects on the Dissociative Electron Attachment to Dichlorobenzene Isomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi-Darian, M.; Mauracher, A.; Aleem, A.; Denifl, S.; Rittenschober, B.; Bacher, A.; Probst, M.; Märk, T. D.; Scheier, P.

    2009-10-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to all three isomers of dichlorobenzene has been investigated in the electron energy range from 0 to 2 eV and in the gas temperature range from 391 to 696 K using a crossed electron-molecular beam apparatus with a new temperature-regulated effusive molecular beam source. In the case of the dissociative electron attachment channel Cl-/1,2-dichlorobenzene and Cl-/1,4-dichlorobenzene, strong enhancement of the negative ion production with the gas temperature at low electron energies has been observed. The low-energy peak increases dramatically when the gas temperature is raised from 391 to 696 K. Activation energies for dissociative electron attachment of (482 ± 20) meV for 1,2-dichlorobenzene and (59 ± 20) meV for 1,4-dichlorobenzene have been determined. For the resonance at (0.49 ± 0.03) eV in 1,2-dichlorobenzene and (0.32 ± 0.03) eV in 1,4-dichlorobenzene, no dependence of the cross sections on the gas temperature has been observed. In the case of the dissociative electron attachment to Cl-/1,3-dichlorobenzene, the cross section does not depend on the temperature in the electron energy range from 0 to 2 eV. Quantum chemical calculations of the reaction energies and of the potential energy curves involved in the dissociation of Cl- have been performed, together with an analysis of the thermo dynamical accessibility of the relevant vibrational modes. Possible reasons for the different temperature dependences of the isomers are discussed.

  6. Non-contact temperature measurement requirements for electronic materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for non-contact temperature measurement capabilities for electronic materials processing in space are assessed. Non-contact methods are probably incapable of sufficient accuracy for the actual absolute measurement of temperatures in most such applications but would be useful for imaging in some applications.

  7. Surface and volume photoemission of hot electrons from plasmonic nanoantennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander V.; Protsenko, Igor E.; Ikhsanov, Renat S.;

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically compare surface- and volume-based photoelectron emission from spherical nanoparticles, obtaining analytical expressions for the emission rate in both mechanisms. We show that the surface mechanism prevails, being unaffected by detrimental hot electron collisions....

  8. Chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of LaFeCoSi alloy: Surface and bulk properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lollobrigida, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Basso, V.; Kuepferling, M.; Coïsson, M.; Olivetti, E. S.; Celegato, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), I-10135 Torino (Italy); Borgatti, F. [CNR, Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Torelli, P.; Panaccione, G. [CNR, Istituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM), Lab. TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Tortora, L. [Laboratorio di Analisi di Superficie, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Università Tor Vergata, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Stefani, G.; Offi, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy)

    2014-05-28

    We investigate the chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of the magnetocaloric LaFeCoSi compound with bulk and surface sensitive techniques. We put in evidence that the surface retains a soft ferromagnetic behavior at temperatures higher than the Curie temperature of the bulk due to the presence of Fe clusters at the surface only. This peculiar magnetic surface effect is attributed to the exchange interaction between the ferromagnetic Fe clusters located at the surface and the bulk magnetocaloric alloy, and it is used here to monitor the magnetic properties of the alloy itself.

  9. Estimation of sea surface temperature (SST) using marine seismic data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sinha, S.K.; Dewangan, P.; Sain, K.

    .g. Wu et al. [1999]). However, due to the skin effect, sea surface temperatures as measured by satellites can be very different from temperatures a few centimeters below the sea surface (i.e. in-situ temperatures) [Emery et al., 1994]. Therefore...

  10. Noncontact Monitoring of Surface Temperature Distribution by Laser Ultrasound Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Akira; Ihara, Ikuo

    2011-07-01

    A laser ultrasound scanning method for measuring a surface temperature distribution of a heated material is presented. An experiment using an aluminum plate heated up to 120 °C is carried out to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. A series of one-dimensional surface acoustic wave (SAW) measurements within an area of a square on the aluminum surface are performed by scanning a pulsed laser for generating SAW using a galvanometer system, where the SAWs are detected at a fixed location on the surface. An inverse analysis is then applied to SAW data to determine the surface temperature distribution in a certain direction. The two-dimensional distribution of the surface temperature in the square is constructed by combining the one-dimensional surface temperature distributions obtained within the square. The surface temperature distributions obtained by the proposed method almost agrees with those obtained using an infrared radiation camera.

  11. Surface and volume photoemission of hot electrons from plasmonic nanoantennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander V.; Protsenko, Igor E.; Ikhsanov, Renat S.

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically compare surface- and volume-based photoelectron emission from spherical nanoparticles, obtaining analytical expressions for the emission rate in both mechanisms. We show that the surface mechanism prevails, being unaffected by detrimental hot electron collisions.......We theoretically compare surface- and volume-based photoelectron emission from spherical nanoparticles, obtaining analytical expressions for the emission rate in both mechanisms. We show that the surface mechanism prevails, being unaffected by detrimental hot electron collisions....

  12. Complex temperature evolution of the electronic structure of CaFe2As2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ganesh; Biswas, Deepnarayan; Sahadev, Nishaina; Bindu, R.; Kumar, Neeraj; Dhar, S. K.; Thamizhavel, A.; Maiti, Kalobaran

    2014-03-01

    Employing high resolution photoemission spectroscopy, we investigate the temperature evolution of the electronic structure of CaFe2As2, which is a parent compound of high temperature superconductors—CaFe2As2 exhibits superconductivity under pressure as well as doping of charge carriers. Photoemission results of CaFe2As2 in this study reveal a gradual shift of an energy band, α away from the chemical potential with decreasing temperature in addition to the spin density wave (SDW) transition induced Fermi surface reconstruction across SDW transition temperature. The corresponding hole pocket eventually disappears at lower temperatures, while the hole Fermi surface of the β band possessing finite p orbital character survives till the lowest temperature studied. These results, thus, reveal signature of complex charge redistribution among various energy bands as a function of temperature.

  13. Study of surface leakage current of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, YongHe; Zhang, Kai; Cao, MengYi; Zhao, ShengLei; Zhang, JinCheng; Hao, Yue, E-mail: yhao@xidian.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Wide Band Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Ma, XiaoHua, E-mail: xhma@xidian.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Wide Band Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); School of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2014-04-14

    Temperature-dependent surface current measurements were performed to analyze the mechanism of surface conductance of AlGaN/GaN channel high-electron-mobility transistors by utilizing process-optimized double gate structures. Different temperatures and electric field dependence have been found in surface current measurements. At low electric field, the mechanism of surface conductance is considered to be two-dimensional variable range hopping. At elevated electric field, the Frenkel–Poole trap assisted emission governs the main surface electrons transportation. The extracted energy barrier height of electrons emitting from trapped state near Fermi energy level into a threading dislocations-related continuum state is 0.38 eV. SiN passivation reduces the surface leakage current by two order of magnitude and nearly 4 orders of magnitude at low and high electric fields, respectively. SiN also suppresses the Frenkel–Poole conductance at high temperature by improving the surface states of AlGaN/GaN. A surface treatment process has been introduced to further suppress the surface leakage current at high temperature and high field, which results in a decrease in surface current of almost 3 orders of magnitude at 476 K.

  14. Electron-beam-assisted Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Of Insulating Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bullock, E T

    2000-01-01

    Insulating materials are widely used in electronic devices. Bulk insulators and insulating films pose unique challenges for high resolution study since most commonly used charged particle surface analysis techniques are incompatible with insulating surfaces and materials. A, method of performing scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) on insulating surfaces has been investigated. The method is referred to as electron-beam assisted scanning tunneling microscopy (e-BASTM). It is proposed that by coupling the STM and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as one integrated device, that insulating materials may be studied, obtaining both high spatial resolution, and topographic and electronic resolution. The premise of the technique is based on two physical consequences of the interaction of an energetic electron beam (PE) with a material. First, when an electron beam is incident upon a material, low level material electrons are excited into conduction band states. For insulators, with very high secondary electron yi...

  15. Stopping power of an electron gas with anisotropic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khelemelia, O. V.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2016-04-01

    A general theory of motion of a heavy charged particle in the electron gas with an anisotropic velocity distribution is developed within the quantum-field method. The analytical expressions for the dielectric susceptibility and the stopping power of the electron gas differs in no way from well-known classic formulas in the approximation of large and small velocities. Stopping power of the electron gas with anisotropic temperature in the framework of the quantum-field method is numerically calculated for an arbitrary angle between directions of the motion of the projectile particle and the electron beam. The results of the numerical calculations are compared with the dielectric model approach.

  16. Technique for the estimation of surface temperatures from embedded temperature sensing for rapid, high energy surface deposition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Tyson R.; Schunk, Peter Randall; Roberts, Scott Alan

    2014-07-01

    Temperature histories on the surface of a body that has been subjected to a rapid, highenergy surface deposition process can be di cult to determine, especially if it is impossible to directly observe the surface or attach a temperature sensor to it. In this report, we explore two methods for estimating the temperature history of the surface through the use of a sensor embedded within the body very near to the surface. First, the maximum sensor temperature is directly correlated with the peak surface temperature. However, it is observed that the sensor data is both delayed in time and greatly attenuated in magnitude, making this approach unfeasible. Secondly, we propose an algorithm that involves tting the solution to a one-dimensional instantaneous energy solution problem to both the sensor data and to the results of a one-dimensional CVFEM code. This algorithm is shown to be able to estimate the surface temperature 20 C.

  17. Finite element analysis on electron beam brazing temperature and stresses of stainless steel radiator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Furong; Liu Jun; Xie Ruijun; Liu Fangjun; Hu Gang

    2006-01-01

    Based on thermal-elasto-plastic finite element theory, a two-dimensional finite element model for calculating electron beam brazing temperature and residual stress fields of stainless steel radiator are presented.The distributions of temperature and residual stress are studied.The results showed that temperature distribution on brazing surface is rather uniform, ranging from 1026 ℃ to 1090 ℃.The residual stresses are varied from initial compressive to tensile , and the variation of residual stress is very little in total zone of brazing surface.

  18. High-Temperature Gas Sensor Array (Electronic Nose) Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to measure emissions from aeronautic engines and in commercial applications such as automotive emission control and chemical process monitoring is a necessary first step if one is going to actively control those emissions. One single sensor will not give all the information necessary to determine the chemical composition of a high-temperature, harsh environment. Rather, an array of gas sensor arrays--in effect, a high-temperature electronic "nose"--is necessary to characterize the chemical constituents of a diverse, high-temperature environment, such as an emissions stream. The signals produced by this nose could be analyzed to determine the constituents of the emission stream. Although commercial electronic noses for near-room temperature applications exist, they often depend significantly on lower temperature materials or only one sensor type. A separate development effort necessary for a high-temperature electronic nose is being undertaken by the NASA Glenn Research Center, Case Western Reserve University, Ohio State University, and Makel Engineering, Inc. The sensors are specially designed for hightemperature environments. A first-generation high-temperature electronic nose has been demonstrated on a modified automotive engine. This nose sensor array was composed of sensors designed for hightemperature environments fabricated using microelectromechanical-systems- (MEMS-) based technology. The array included a tin-oxide-based sensor doped for nitrogen oxide (NOx) sensitivity, a SiC-based hydrocarbon (CxHy) sensor, and an oxygen sensor (O2). These sensors operate on different principles--resistor, diode, and electrochemical cell, respectively--and each sensor has very different responses to the individual gases in the environment. A picture showing the sensor head for the array is shown in the photograph on the left and the sensors installed in the engine are shown in the photograph on the right. Electronics are interfaced with the sensors for

  19. Determination of Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Potential Urban Heat Island Effect in Parts of Lagos State using Satellite ... Changes in temperature appear to be closely related to concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  20. Electron–electron interactions and the electrical resistivity of lithium at low temperatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O N Awasthi; V K Pundhir

    2007-01-01

    The electron–electron interactions in lithium metal have been examined keeping in view the recent developments. The contribution of the electron–electron Umklapp scattering processes in the electrical resistivity of lithium at low temperatures has been evaluated using a simplified spherical Fermi surface model with isotropic transition probability. Our values of the electrical resistivity so obtained compare fairly well with the experimental results for lithium.

  1. Temperature dependent droplet impact dynamics on flat and textured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azar Alizadeh; Vaibhav Bahadur; Sheng Zhong; Wen Shang; Ri Li; James Ruud; Masako Yamada; Liehi Ge; Ali Dhinojwala; Manohar S Sohal (047160)

    2012-03-01

    Droplet impact dynamics determines the performance of surfaces used in many applications such as anti-icing, condensation, boiling and heat transfer. We study impact dynamics of water droplets on surfaces with chemistry/texture ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and across a temperature range spanning below freezing to near boiling conditions. Droplet retraction shows very strong temperature dependence especially for hydrophilic surfaces; it is seen that lower substrate temperatures lead to lesser retraction. Physics-based analyses show that the increased viscosity associated with lower temperatures can explain the decreased retraction. The present findings serve to guide further studies of dynamic fluid-structure interaction at various temperatures.

  2. Electron-Hole Counting Approach to Surface Atomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadi, D. J.

    The observed reconstructions of III-V semiconductor surfaces are shown to be consistent with constraints imposed by a simple "electron-hole" counting rule proposed by Pashley. The rule ensures that the predicted surfaces are nonmetallic, nonpolar, and at least, metastable since the compensation of the "donor" electrons leaves no occupied states in the upper part of the band gap which can easily induce other reconstructions. Applications of the method to the problem of surface structure and passivation are examined.

  3. Charge, density and electron temperature in a molecular ultracold plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Rennick, C J; Ortega-Arroyo, J; Godin, P J; Grant, E R

    2009-01-01

    A Rydberg gas of NO entrained in a supersonic molecular beam releases electrons as it evolves to form an ultracold plasma. The size of this signal, compared with that extracted by the subsequent application of a pulsed electric field, determines the absolute magnitude of the plasma charge. This information, combined with the number density of ions, supports a simple thermochemical model that explains the evolution of the plasma to an ultracold electron temperature.

  4. Some Estimations for Correlation Between the RF Cavity Surface Temperature and Electrical Breakdown Possibility

    CERN Document Server

    Paramonov, V V

    2004-01-01

    The electrical breakdown in accelerating cavities is the complicated phenomenon and depends on many parameters. Some reasons for breakdown can be avoided by appropriate vacuum system design and the cavity surface cleaning. This case, for normal conducting accelerating cavities free electrons - the dark currents due to Fowler-Nordheim emission can be considered as the main reason of possible electrical breakdown. It is known from the practice - the combination of the high electric field at the cavity surface with high surface temperature is the subject for risk in the cavity operation. In this paper the dependence on the surface temperature is considered and 'effective' electric field enhancement is discussed.

  5. Hydrophobicity of electron beam modified surface of hydroxyapatite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregor, M., E-mail: gregor@fmph.uniba.sk [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Plecenik, T. [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Tofail, S.A.M. [Materials & Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Zahoran, M.; Truchly, M. [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Vargova, M. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, 84215 Bratislava (Slovakia); Laffir, F. [Materials & Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Plesch, G. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, 84215 Bratislava (Slovakia); Kus, P.; Plecenik, A. [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Surface potential of hydroxyapatite films were modified by focused electron beam. • Micron-sized domains of modified surface potential were created. • Wettability and surface free energy of the irradiated areas was studied. • Possible mechanisms of increased surface hydrophobicity are discussed. - Abstract: Arrays of micron-sized domains of modified surface potential were created on hydroxyapatite films by mid-energy (20 keV) electron beam irradiation available in a laboratory scanning electron microscope. The dosage of electron beam was varied between 10{sup −3} and 10{sup 3} μC/cm{sup 2} to inject charge into the film surface. Contrary to the conventional electrowetting theory, the dosage of injected charge used in creating such microdomains caused a gradual increase of the water contact angle from 57° to 93° due to the elimination of the polar component of the surface free energy. Surface contamination by carbonaceous species can be held only partially responsible for such behavior at lower dosage of electron beam. A transfer of free surface charge to water and an electron beam induced disruption of polar orientation of OH ions have been attributed to be influencial factors in the overall dewetting behavior.

  6. Room-temperature single-electron transistors using alkanedithiols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Kang; Chae, D-H; Yao Zhen [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Center for Nano- and Molecular Science and Technology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2007-11-21

    We have fabricated single-electron transistors by alkanedithiol molecular self-assembly. The devices consist of spontaneously formed ultrasmall Au nanoparticles linked by alkanedithiols to nanometer-spaced Au electrodes created by electromigration. The devices reproducibly exhibit addition energies of a few hundred meV, which enables the observation of single-electron tunneling at room temperature. At low temperatures, tunneling through discrete energy levels in the Au nanoparticles is observed, which is accompanied by the excitations of molecular vibrations at large bias voltage.

  7. Electron-phonon interaction in high temperature superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Khosroabadi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available   We explore the important role of the strong electron-phonon interaction in high temperature superconductivity through the study of the results of some important experiments, such as inelastic neutron and X-ray scattering, angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and isotope effects. We also present our computational results of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Ag Raman modes, and the ionic displacement dependence of the electronic band structure by density functional theory. It is clearly evident that the role of phonons in the mechanism behind the high-temperature superconducting state should be seriously considered.

  8. Signature of electron-phonon interaction in high temperature superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Ashokan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The theory of thermal conductivity of high temperature superconductors (HTS based on electron and phonon line width (life times formulation is developed with Quantum dynamical approach of Green's function. The frequency line width is observed as an extremely sensitive quantity in the transport phenomena of HTS as a collection of large number of scattering processes. The role of resonance scattering and electron-phonon interaction processes is found to be most prominent near critical temperature. The theory successfully explains the spectacular behaviour of high Tc superconductors in the vicinity of transition temperature. A successful agreement between theory and experiment has been obtained by analyzing the thermal conductivity data for the sample La1.8Sr0.2CuO4 in the temperature range 0 − 200K. The theory is equally and successfully applicable to all other high Tc superconductors.

  9. Temperature variation of a thermionic cathode during electron emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is necessary to know the actual temperature of a thermionic cathode that works as the electron source in a microwave tube. It has been found that the temperature of the cathode drops markedly during the thermionic emission. For example, the temperature could fall by about 30oC under a current density of 2.92 A/cm2. Using the molecular thermodynamics, the dependence of the cathode temperature on the emission current density has been obtained. It has been theoretically pointed out that several factors, such as heating model and temperature coefficient of resis-tance of heater, can influence the cathode temperature. These theoretical conclu-sions were supported by the experimental results.

  10. Temperature variation of a thermionic cathode during electron emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YanWen; TIAN Hong; HAN Yong; XU ZhenYing; MENG MingFeng; ZHANG HongLai

    2008-01-01

    It is necessary to know the actual temperature of a thermionic cathode that works as the electron source in a microwave tube. It has been found that the temperature of the cathode drops markedly during the thermionic emission. For example, the temperature could fall by about 30℃ under a current density of 2.92 A/cm2. Using the molecular thermodynamics, the dependence of the cathode temperature on the emission current density has been obtained. It has been theoretically pointed out that several factors, such as heating model and temperature coefficient of resis- tance of heater, can influence the cathode temperature. These theoretical conclu- sions were supported by the experimental results.

  11. Estimation of Surface Heat Flux and Surface Temperature during Inverse Heat Conduction under Varying Spray Parameters and Sample Initial Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aamir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck’s sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m2 was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa.

  12. Estimation of surface heat flux and surface temperature during inverse heat conduction under varying spray parameters and sample initial temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Aqeel-ur-Rehman; Wang, Hong; Zubair, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm) 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck's sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF) within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m(2) was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa.

  13. Electron dynamics at surfaces induced by highly charged ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morgenstern, R

    1998-01-01

    Energy spectra of electrons resulting from hydrogen-like multiply charged N6+ and Q(7+) ions on various surfaces are presented and discussed. Por metal target surfaces thr formation and decay of hollow atoms during the approach towards the surface is rather well understood in terms of the classical

  14. Electron dynamics at surfaces induced by highly charged ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morgenstern, R

    Energy spectra of electrons resulting from hydrogen-like multiply charged N6+ and Q(7+) ions on various surfaces are presented and discussed. Por metal target surfaces thr formation and decay of hollow atoms during the approach towards the surface is rather well understood in terms of the classical

  15. Positronium formation at low temperatures: The role of trapped electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirade, T.; Maurer, F.H.J.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    2000-01-01

    Measurements have been carried out of electron spin densities (by electron spin resonance technique) and positronium (Ps) formation probability as functions of Co-60 gamma-irradiation dose in poly(methyl methacrylate) and linear poly(ethylene) at 77 K. We observe a linear relationship between...... the enhancement of the Ps formation and the density of trapped electrons in both polymers. This clear correlation strongly supports the previous suggestion by the authors that the increase in Ps formation with time (that has been observed at low temperatures for a number of polymers) can be explained...

  16. Phosphogypsum surface characterisation using scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of application of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to examinations of the samples of natural gypsum and phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum has a well developed crystalline structure, and appear in two polymorphous forms, of rombic and hexagonal shape crystals. Natural gypsum has a poorly crystalline structure. The differences in crystalline structure influence the chemical behavior of these row materials.

  17. Predicting monsoon rainfall and pressure indices from sea surface temperature

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.

    The relationship between the sea surface temperature (SST) in the Indian Ocean and monsoon rainfall has been examined by using 21 years data set (1967-87) of MOHSST.6 (Met. Office Historical Sea Surface Temperature data set, obtained from U.K. Met...

  18. Metal surface temperature induced by moving laser beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, G.R.B.E.; Meijer, J.

    1995-01-01

    Whenever a metal is irradiated with a laser beam, electromagnetic energy is transformed into heat in a thin surface layer. The maximum surface temperature is the most important quantity which determines the processing result. Expressions for this maximum temperature are provided by the literature fo

  19. Recent trends in sea surface temperature off Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lluch-Cota, S.E.; Tripp-Valdéz, M.; Lluch-Cota, D.B.; Lluch-Belda, D.; Verbesselt, J.; Herrera-Cervantes, H.; Bautista-Romero, J.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in global mean sea surface temperature may have potential negative implications for natural and socioeconomic systems; however, measurements to predict trends in different regions have been limited and sometimes contradictory. In this study, an assessment of sea surface temperature change si

  20. Recent trends in sea surface temperature off Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lluch-Cota, S.E.; Tripp-Valdéz, M.; Lluch-Cota, D.B.; Lluch-Belda, D.; Verbesselt, J.; Herrera-Cervantes, H.; Bautista-Romero, J.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in global mean sea surface temperature may have potential negative implications for natural and socioeconomic systems; however, measurements to predict trends in different regions have been limited and sometimes contradictory. In this study, an assessment of sea surface temperature change

  1. Reintroducing radiometric surface temperature into the Penman-Monteith formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mallick, Kaniska; Bøgh, Eva; Trebs, Ivonne;

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate a novel method to physically integrate radiometric surface temperature (TR) into the Penman-Monteith (PM) formulation for estimating the terrestrial sensible and latent heat fluxes (H and λE) in the framework of a modified Surface Temperature Initiated Closure (STIC). It combi...

  2. Interferometric measurements of sea surface temperature and emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Lars; Bakan, Stephan

    1997-09-01

    A new multispectral method to derive sea surface emissivity and temperature by using interferometer measurements of the near surface upwelling radiation in the infrared window region is presented. As reflected sky radiation adds substantial spectral variability to the otherwise spectrally smooth surface radiation, an appropriate estimate of surface emissivity allows the measured upwelling radiation to be corrected for the reflected sky component. The remaining radiation, together with the estimated surface emissivity, yields an estimate of the sea surface temperature. Measurements from an ocean pier in the Baltic Sea in October 1995 indicate an accuracy of about 0.1 K for the sea surface temperature thus derived. A strong sea surface skin effect of about 0.6 K is found in that particular case.

  3. Surface morphology and deuterium retention in tungsten exposed to high flux D plasma at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Y.Z. [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); De Temmerman, G. [FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands); ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon-CS90046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Xu, H.Y. [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, Mianyang, Sichuan 621907 (China); Li, C.; Fu, B.Q. [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, W., E-mail: liuw@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Surface modifications and deuterium retention induced in tungsten by high fluxes (10{sup 24} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}) low energy (38 eV) deuterium ions were studied as a function of surface temperature. Blister formation was studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction, while deuterium retention was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy. Blisters are observed on the surface exposed at different temperatures, ranging from 493 K to 1273 K. The blister density and D retention decrease with the increasing exposure temperature. The formation of blisters at high temperatures is attributed to the high flux of D plasma. At 943 K, with the increasing fluence, there is trend to the saturation of D retention and blister density. The defects caused by plasma exposure have an important effect on the D trapping and blistering behavior. The formation of blisters has a strong relationship with slipping system of tungsten.

  4. Age-surface temperature estimation model: When will oil palm plantation reach the same surface temperature as natural forest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushayati, S. B.; Hermawan, R.; Meilani, R.

    2017-01-01

    Oil palm plantation has often been accused as the cause of global warming. However, along with its growth, it would be able to decrease surface temperature. The question is ‘when will the plantation be able to reach the same surface temperature as natural forest’. This research aimed to estimate the age of oil palm plantation that create similar surface temperature to those in natural forest (land cover before the opening and planting of oil palm). The method used in this research was spatial analysis of land cover and surface temperature distribution. Based on the spatial analysis of surface temperature, five points was randomly taken from each planting age (age 1 15 years). Linear regression was then employed in the analysis. The linear regression formula between surface temperature and age of oil palm plantation was Y = 26.002 – 0.1237X. Surface temperature will decrease as much as 0.1237 ° C with one year age growth oil palm. Surface temperature that was similar to the initial temperature, when the land cover was natural forest (23.04 °C), was estimated to occur when the oil palm plantation reach the age 24 year.

  5. Spectroscopic measurements of electron temperature on VX-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma, Ella; Lee, Charles; Bengtson, Roger; Jacobson, Verlin; Lavagni-Bolanos, Frank; McCaskill, Greg

    2004-11-01

    We have made spectroscopic measurements at several locations in the VX-10 experiment in the near UV, visible, and near IR spectral region. We estimate electron temperatures using a collisional radiative model. Residual gas analysis is also performed with plasma discharges. Quantitative estimates of plasma composition are also discussed.

  6. Electronic structure of heavy fermions: narrow temperature-independent bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Andrews, A.B.; Thompson, J.D.; Smith, J.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Moshopoulou, E.; Fisk, Z. [NHMFL, Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Menovsky, A.A. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Natuurkundig Lab.; Canfield, P.C.; Olson, C.G. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Ames Lab.

    1997-02-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow temperature independent bands. There is no evidence from ARPES data reported here for a collective phenomenon normally referred to as the Kondo resonance. In uranium compounds a small dispersion of the bands is easily measurable. (orig.).

  7. The electronic structure of heavy fermions: Narrow temperature independent bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Smith, J.L.; Andrews, A.B. [and others

    1996-08-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow temperature independent bands. There is no evidence from photoemission for a collective phenomenon normally referred to as the Kondo resonance. In uranium compounds a small dispersion of the bands is easily measurable.

  8. Approximation of Engine Casing Temperature Constraints for Casing Mounted Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Jonathan L.; Culley, Dennis E.; Chapman, Jeffryes W.

    2017-01-01

    The performance of propulsion engine systems is sensitive to weight and volume considerations. This can severely constrain the configuration and complexity of the control system hardware. Distributed Engine Control technology is a response to these concerns by providing more flexibility in designing the control system, and by extension, more functionality leading to higher performing engine systems. Consequently, there can be a weight benefit to mounting modular electronic hardware on the engine core casing in a high temperature environment. This paper attempts to quantify the in-flight temperature constraints for engine casing mounted electronics. In addition, an attempt is made at studying heat soak back effects. The Commercial Modular Aero Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k) software is leveraged with real flight data as the inputs to the simulation. A two-dimensional (2-D) heat transfer model is integrated with the engine simulation to approximate the temperature along the length of the engine casing. This modification to the existing C-MAPSS40k software will provide tools and methodologies to develop a better understanding of the requirements for the embedded electronics hardware in future engine systems. Results of the simulations are presented and their implications on temperature constraints for engine casing mounted electronics is discussed.

  9. Characterization of electron temperature by simulating a multicusp ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Yeong Heum; Ghergherehchi, Mitra; Kim, Sang Bum; Jun, Woo Jung; Lee, Jong Chul; Mohamed Gad, Khaled Mohamed; Namgoong, Ho; Chai, Jong Seo

    2016-12-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used in cyclotrons and linear accelerators to produce high beam currents. The structure of a multicusp ion source consists of permanent magnets, filaments, and an anode body. The configuration of the array of permanent magnets, discharge voltage of the plasma, extraction bias voltage, and structure of the multicusp ion source body decide the quality of the beam. The electrons are emitted from the filament by thermionic emission. The emission current can be calculated from thermal information pertaining to the filament, and from the applied voltage and current. The electron trajectories were calculated using CST Particle Studio to optimize the plasma. The array configuration of the permanent magnets decides the magnetic field inside the ion source. The extraction bias voltage and the structure of the multicusp ion source body decide the electric field. Optimization of the electromagnetic field was performed with these factors. CST Particle Studio was used to calculate the electron temperature with a varying permanent magnet array. Four types of permanent magnet array were simulated to optimize the electron temperature. It was found that a 2-layer full line cusp field (with inverse field) produced the best electron temperature control behavior.

  10. Separation of finite electron temperature effect on plasma polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imazawa, Ryota; Kawano, Yasunori; Kusama, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    This study demonstrates the separation of the finite electron temperature on the plasma polarimetry in the magnetic confined fusion plasma for the first time. Approximate solutions of the transformed Stokes equation, including the relativistic effect, suggest that the orientation angle, {theta}, and ellipticity angle, {epsilon}, of polarization state have different dependency on the electron density, n{sub e}, and the electron temperature, T{sub e}, and that the separation of n{sub e} and T{sub e} from {theta} and {epsilon} is possible in principle. We carry out the equilibrium and kinetic reconstruction of tokamak plasma when the central electron density was 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}, and the central electron temperatures were 5, 10, 20, and 30 keV. For both cases when a total plasma current, I{sub p}, is known and when I{sub p} is unknown, the profiles of plasma current density, j{sub {phi}}, n{sub e}, and T{sub e} are successfully reconstructed. The reconstruction of j{sub {phi}} without the information of I{sub p} indicates the new method of I{sub p} measurement applicable to steady state operation of tokamak.

  11. Separation of finite electron temperature effect on plasma polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazawa, Ryota; Kawano, Yasunori; Kusama, Yoshinori

    2012-12-01

    This study demonstrates the separation of the finite electron temperature on the plasma polarimetry in the magnetic confined fusion plasma for the first time. Approximate solutions of the transformed Stokes equation, including the relativistic effect, suggest that the orientation angle, θ, and ellipticity angle, ε, of polarization state have different dependency on the electron density, n(e), and the electron temperature, T(e), and that the separation of n(e) and T(e) from θ and ε is possible in principle. We carry out the equilibrium and kinetic reconstruction of tokamak plasma when the central electron density was 10(20) m(-3), and the central electron temperatures were 5, 10, 20, and 30 keV. For both cases when a total plasma current, I(p), is known and when I(p) is unknown, the profiles of plasma current density, j(φ), n(e), and T(e) are successfully reconstructed. The reconstruction of j(φ) without the information of I(p) indicates the new method of I(p) measurement applicable to steady state operation of tokamak.

  12. Optical manipulation of ultrafast electron and nuclear motion on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petek, Hrvoje

    2009-12-02

    We study the unoccupied electronic structure and dynamics of chemisorbed atoms and molecules on metal surfaces by time resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PP). spectroscopy, low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM), and theory. Our research concerns simple atomic adsorbates such as alkali and alkaline earth atoms, which provide fundamentally important models for adsorbate-surface interactions, and more complex adsorbates such as fullerenes on noble metals, which illustrate emergent interfacial properties that derive from intrinsic molecular attributes, and moleculemolecule and molecule-surface interactions. Our goal is to understand how these interactions contribute to formation of the interfacial electronic structure, and how thus formed electronic properties affect interfacial phenomena of importance to energy transduction and storage. Moreover, we explore how the interfacial electronic excitation drives dynamical phenomena such as charge transfer and surface femtochemistry.

  13. Surface dose with grids in electron beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, K.-H.; Huang, C.-Y.; Lin, J.-P.; Chu, T.-C. E-mail: tcchu@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2002-03-01

    This investigation attempts to solve the problem of the lack of skin-sparing effect in electron radiation therapy and to increase the tolerance of skin to radiation using the grid technique. Electron grid therapy involves the mounting of a Cerrobend grid in the electron cone. Film dosimetry was employed to measure the relative surface dose and the percentage depth dose profile of electron grid portals. Various grid hole diameters (d=0.45, 1.0, 1.5 cm) and grid hole spacings (s=0.4, 0.2 cm) were considered for electron beams from 6 to 14 MeV. Experimental results indicate that the electron grid technique can reduce the relative surface dose in electron radiation therapy. Degradations of the relative surface dose depend on the percentage of open area in the grid portal. A proper grid design allows the surface dose to be reduced and the range of nonhomogeneous doses to be limited to a depth at which the target volume can receive a homogeneous dose. The grid technique can lower the surface dose in electron radiation therapy.

  14. Glass for parenteral products: a surface view using the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseman, T J; Brown, J A; Scothorn, W W

    1976-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope was utilized to explore the internal surface of glass ampuls and vials used in parenteral products. The surface topography of USP Type I borosilicate glass containers was viewed after exposure to "sulfur," ammonium bifluoride, and sulfuric acid treatments. The scanning electron micrographs showed startling differences in the appearance of the surface regions. "Sulfur treatment" of ampuls was associated with a pitting of the surface and the presence of sodium sulfate crystals. The sulfur treatment of vials altered the glass surface in a characteristically different manner. The dissimilarity between the surface appearances was attributed to the method of sulfur treatment. Ampuls exposed to sulfuric acid solutions at room temperature did not show the pitting associated with the sulfur treatment. Scanning electron micrographs of ammonium bifluoride-treated ampuls showed a relief effect, suggesting that the glass was affected by the bifluoride solution but that sufficient stripping of the surface layer did not occur to remove the pits associated with the sulfur treatment. Flakes emanating from the glass were identified with the aid of the electron microprobe. Scanning electron micrographs showed that these vitreous flakes resulted from a delamination of a thin layer of the glass surface. It is concluded that the scanning electron microscope, in conjunction with other analytical techniques, is a valuable tool in assessing the quality of glass used for parenteral products. The techniques studied should be of particular importance to the pharmaceutical industry where efforts are being made to reduce the levels of particulate matter in parenteral dosage forms.

  15. Evolution of electron Fermi surface with doping in cobaltates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xixiao; Lan, Yu; Qin, Ling; Kuang, Lülin; Feng, Shiping

    2016-08-24

    The notion of the electron Fermi surface is one of the characteristic concepts in the field of condensed matter physics, and it plays a crucial role in the understanding of the physical properties of doped Mott insulators. Based on the t-J model, we study the nature of the electron Fermi surface in the cobaltates, and qualitatively reproduce the essential feature of the evolution of the electron Fermi surface with doping. It is shown that the underlying hexagonal electron Fermi surface obeys Luttinger's theorem. The theory also predicts a Fermi-arc phenomenon at the low-doped regime, where the region of the hexagonal electron Fermi surface along the [Formula: see text]-K direction is suppressed by the electron self-energy, and then six disconnected Fermi arcs located at the region of the hexagonal electron Fermi surface along the [Formula: see text]-M direction emerge. However, this Fermi-arc phenomenon at the low-doped regime weakens with the increase of doping.

  16. Electron Cyclotron Current Drive at High Electron Temperature on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, C. C.; Austin, M. E.; Harvey, R. W.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T. C.; Makowski, M. A.; Prater, R.

    2007-09-01

    Experiments on DIII-D have measured the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency for co- and counter-injection in low density plasmas with radiation temperatures from electron cyclotron emission (ECE) above 20 keV. The radiation temperature is generally higher than the Thomson scattering temperature, indicating that there is a significant population of non-thermal electrons. The experimental ECCD profile measured with motional Stark effect (MSE) polarimetry is found to agree with quasi-linear theory except for the highest power density cases (QEC/ne2≫1). Radial transport of the energetic electrons with diffusion coefficients of ˜0.4 m2/s is needed to model the broadened ECCD profile at high power density.

  17. Structural and electronic properties of hydrosilylated silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumer, A.

    2005-11-15

    The structural and electronic properties of alkyl-terminated Si surfaces prepared by thermallyinduced hydrosilylation have been studied in detail in the preceding chapters. Various surfaces have been used for the functionalization ranging from crystalline Si over amorphous hydrogenated Si to nanoscaled materials such as Si nanowires and nanoparticles. In each case, the alkyl-terminated surfaces have been compared to the native oxidized and H-terminated surfaces. (orig.)

  18. Hot-electron nanoscopy using adiabatic compression of surface plasmons

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2013-10-20

    Surface plasmon polaritons are a central concept in nanoplasmonics and have been exploited to develop ultrasensitive chemical detection platforms, as well as imaging and spectroscopic techniques at the nanoscale. Surface plasmons can decay to form highly energetic (or hot) electrons in a process that is usually thought to be parasitic for applications, because it limits the lifetime and propagation length of surface plasmons and therefore has an adverse influence on the functionality of nanoplasmonic devices. Recently, however, it has been shown that hot electrons produced by surface plasmon decay can be harnessed to produce useful work in photodetection, catalysis and solar energy conversion. Nevertheless, the surface-plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency has been below 1% in all cases. Here we show that adiabatic focusing of surface plasmons on a Schottky diode-terminated tapered tip of nanoscale dimensions allows for a plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency of ∼30%. We further demonstrate that, with such high efficiency, hot electrons can be used for a new nanoscopy technique based on an atomic force microscopy set-up. We show that this hot-electron nanoscopy preserves the chemical sensitivity of the scanned surface and has a spatial resolution below 50 nm, with margins for improvement.

  19. Electronic Excitation Temperature in DC Positive Streamer Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaochen; WANG Ninghui; DING Zhenfeng

    2007-01-01

    The electronic excitation temperature in a direct current positive streamer discharge based on ultra-thin sheet electrodes was measured by optical emission spectrometry in order to deposit materials for potential future applications. It was remarkable that the electronic excitation temperature (Texc) did not vary monotonically with the discharge current, but demonstrated a peak at a certain position. In a mixture of oxygen and argon (80% oxygen), the maximum Texc reached about 6300 K at an average current of 600 μA. Both the positive ions accumulation in the discharge region and the increase of the local temperature around the streamer channel caused by Joule heating are considered to be the main reasons for the variations of Texc.

  20. Evaluation of MODIS Land Surface Temperature with In Situ Snow Surface Temperature from CREST-SAFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Diaz, C. L.; Lakhankar, T.; Romanov, P.; Munoz, J.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Yu, Y.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the procedure and results of a temperature-based validation approach for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Land Surface Temperature (LST) product provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Terra and Aqua Earth Observing System satellites using in situ LST observations recorded at the Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology Center - Snow Analysis and Field Experiment (CREST-SAFE) during the years of 2013 (January-April) and 2014 (February-April). A total of 314 day and night clear-sky thermal images, acquired by the Terra and Aqua satellites, were processed and compared to ground-truth data from CREST-SAFE with a frequency of one measurement every 3 min. Additionally, this investigation incorporated supplementary analyses using meteorological CREST-SAFE in situ variables (i.e. wind speed, cloud cover, incoming solar radiation) to study their effects on in situ snow surface temperature (T-skin) and T-air. Furthermore, a single pixel (1km2) and several spatially averaged pixels were used for satellite LST validation by increasing the MODIS window size to 5x5, 9x9, and 25x25 windows for comparison. Several trends in the MODIS LST data were observed, including the underestimation of daytime values and nighttime values. Results indicate that, although all the data sets (Terra and Aqua, diurnal and nocturnal) showed high correlation with ground measurements, day values yielded slightly higher accuracy ( 1°C), both suggesting that MODIS LST retrievals are reliable for similar land cover classes and atmospheric conditions. Results from the CREST-SAFE in situ variables' analyses indicate that T-air is commonly higher than T-skin, and that a lack of cloud cover results in: lower T-skin and higher T-air minus T-skin difference (T-diff). Additionally, the study revealed that T-diff is inversely proportional to cloud cover, wind speed, and incoming solar radiation. Increasing the MODIS window size

  1. Estimation of minimum surface temperature at stage ll (Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Dimri

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting minimum surface temperature at a station, Stage II, located in mountainous region requires information on the meteorological fields. An attempt has been made to develop a statistical model for forecasting minimum temperature at ground level using previous years' data. Surface data were collected at StageII (longitude 73 oB, latitude 34 oN, and altitude 2650 m. Atmospheric variables are influenced by complex orography and surface features to a great extent. In the present study, statistical relationship between atmosphere parameters and minimum temperature at the site has been established. Multivariate linear regression analysis has been used to establish the relationship to predict the minimum surface temperature for the following day. A comparison between the observed and the calculated forecast minimum temperature has been made. Most of the cases are well predicted (multiple correlation coefficient of 0.94.

  2. Two-Temperature Model of Nonequilibrium Electron Relaxation:. a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Navinder

    The present paper is a review of the phenomena related to nonequilibrium electron relaxation in bulk and nano-scale metallic samples. The workable Two-Temperature Model (TTM) based on Boltzmann-Bloch-Peierls kinetic equation has been applied to study the ultra-fast (femto-second) electronic relaxation in various metallic systems. The advent of new ultra-fast (femto-second) laser technology and pump-probe spectroscopy has produced wealth of new results for micro- and nano-scale electronic technology. The aim of this paper is to clarify the TTM, conditions of its validity and nonvalidity, its modifications for nano-systems, to sum-up the progress, and to point out open problems in this field. We also give a phenomenological integro-differential equation for the kinetics of nondegenerate electrons that goes beyond the TTM.

  3. Hydrogen effect on zirconium alloy surface treated by pulsed electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pushilina, N.S.; Lider, A.M. [Department of General Physics, Institute of Physics and Technology, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Kudiiarov, V.N., E-mail: viktor.kudiiarov@gmail.com [Department of General Physics, Institute of Physics and Technology, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Chernov, I.P. [Department of General Physics, Institute of Physics and Technology, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Ivanova, S.V. [National Research Nuclear University “MIFI”, Kashirskoye shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-15

    Influence of modification by pulsed electron beam (PEB) and hydrogen adsorption in zirconium alloys have been investigated. Treatment of Zr–1Nb alloy by high-current PEB allows for a decrease in the amount of hydrogen absorbed by the samples during the hydrogenation process from gas atmosphere in the temperature range of (350–550 °S). The effect of the PEB surface treatment on the hydrogen adsorption connected with the formation of a protective oxide film after PEB irradiation and also by the formation of a specific hardening structure under the action of irradiation at temperatures exceeding the melting temperature from the subsequent high-speed surface cooling.

  4. North American regional climate reconstruction from ground surface temperature histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaume-Santero, Fernando; Pickler, Carolyne; Beltrami, Hugo; Mareschal, Jean-Claude

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of the PAGES NAm2k project, 510 North American borehole temperature-depth profiles were analyzed to infer recent climate changes. To facilitate comparisons and to study the same time period, the profiles were truncated at 300 m. Ground surface temperature histories for the last 500 years were obtained for a model describing temperature changes at the surface for several climate-differentiated regions in North America. The evaluation of the model is done by inversion of temperature perturbations using singular value decomposition and its solutions are assessed using a Monte Carlo approach. The results within 95 % confidence interval suggest a warming between 1.0 and 2.5 K during the last two centuries. A regional analysis, composed of mean temperature changes over the last 500 years and geographical maps of ground surface temperatures, show that all regions experienced warming, but this warming is not spatially uniform and is more marked in northern regions.

  5. EVOLUTION OF IONS AFTER MULTIPLE ELECTRON-CAPTURE FROM SURFACES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MORGENSTERN, R; DAS, J

    1993-01-01

    A comparison is made of the electronic processes which occur when a multiply charged ion is approaching an atomic target on the one hand or a metal surface on the other hand. In both caws three collision phases can be identified: those of attraction, of electron capture and of decay in the vacuum; i

  6. Sourcebook on high-temperature electronics and instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veneruso, A.F. (ed.)

    1981-10-01

    This sourcebook summarizes the high-temperature characteristics of a number of commercially available electronic components and materials required in geothermal well-logging instruments that must operate to 275/sup 0/C. The sourcebook is written to provide a starting place for instrument designers, who need to know the high-temperature electronic products that are available and the design and performance limitations of these products. The electronic component information given includes the standard repertoire of passive devices such as resistors, capacitors, and magnetics; the active devices and integrated circuits sections emphasize silicon semiconductor JFETs and CMOS circuits; and, to complete the electronics, interconnections and packaging of hybrid microelectronics are described. Thermal insulation and refrigeration alternatives are also presented in the sourcebook. Finally, instrument housing materials and high-temperature cables and cablehead connectors are listed. This information was compiled as part of the Geothermal Logging Instrumentation Development Program that Sandia National Laboratories conducted for the US Department of Energy's Divison of Geothermal Energy from 1976 to 1981.

  7. Extracting superconducting parameters from surface resistivity by using inside temperatures of SRF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, M; Padamsee, H; Shemelin, V

    2014-01-01

    The surface resistance of an RF superconductor depends on the surface temperature, the residual resistance and various superconductor parameters, e.g. the energy gap, and the electron mean free path. These parameters can be determined by measuring the quality factor Q0 of a SRF cavity in helium-baths of different temperatures. The surface resistance can be computed from Q0 for any cavity geometry, but it is not trivial to determine the temperature of the surface when only the temperature of the helium bath is known. Traditionally, it was approximated that the surface temperature on the inner surface of the cavity was the same as the temperature of the helium bath. This is a good approximation at small RF-fields on the surface, but to determine the field dependence of Rs, one cannot be restricted to small field losses. Here we show the following: (1) How computer simulations can be used to determine the inside temperature Tin so that Rs(Tin) can then be used to extract the superconducting parameters. The compu...

  8. Ground-based measurement of surface temperature and thermal emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owe, M.; Van De Griend, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    Motorized cable systems for transporting infrared thermometers have been used successfully during several international field campaigns. Systems may be configured with as many as four thermal sensors up to 9 m above the surface, and traverse a 30 m transect. Ground and canopy temperatures are important for solving the surface energy balance. The spatial variability of surface temperature is often great, so that averaged point measurements result in highly inaccurate areal estimates. The cable systems are ideal for quantifying both temporal and spatial variabilities. Thermal emissivity is also necessary for deriving the absolute physical temperature, and measurements may be made with a portable measuring box.

  9. SPECTROSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS IN ELECTRONIC TEMPERATURE OF PHOTOIONISE PLASMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Ferouani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we are interested in the diagnostics in electronic temperature of a plasma purely photoionized, based on the intensity ration of lines emitted by ions helium-like, which have an atomic number Z relatively small. We considered the three lines corresponding to the transitions starting from the excited levels 1s2l towards the fundamental level 1s2 1S0, like appropriate lines. More precisely, the line of resonance w due to the transition 1s2p 1P1 --- 1s2 1 S0, the line of intercombinaison (x,y 1s2p 3 P2,1 --- 1s2 1 S0  as well as prohibited line z due to the transition 1s2 3 S1 --- 1s2 1 S0. These lines appear clearly in the spectra of astrophysical plasmas. As helium-like ion, we chose two, the oxygen O6+ (Z=8 and neon Ne8+ (Z=10. We carried out calculations of the ration of lines intensity G=(z+x+y/w of O6+ and Ne8+  according to the electronic temperature in the range going from 105 to 107 K. We will see that, like it was shown by Gabriel and Jordan in 1969 [1], this intensity ration can be very sensitive to the temperature electronic and practically independent of the electronic density. Consequently, the ration G can be used to determine in a reliable way the electronic temperature of plasma observed [2].

  10. Effect of milling temperatures on surface area, surface energy and cohesion of pharmaceutical powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Umang V; Wang, Zihua; Olusanmi, Dolapo; Narang, Ajit S; Hussain, Munir A; Tobyn, Michael J; Heng, Jerry Y Y

    2015-11-10

    Particle bulk and surface properties are influenced by the powder processing routes. This study demonstrates the effect of milling temperatures on the particle surface properties, particularly surface energy and surface area, and ultimately on powder cohesion. An active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of industrial relevance (brivanib alaninate, BA) was used to demonstrate the effect of two different, but most commonly used milling temperatures (cryogenic vs. ambient). The surface energy of powders milled at both cryogenic and room temperatures increased with increasing milling cycles. The increase in surface energy could be related to the generation of surface amorphous regions. Cohesion for both cryogenic and room temperature milled powders was measured and found to increase with increasing milling cycles. For cryogenic milling, BA had a surface area ∼ 5× higher than the one obtained at room temperature. This was due to the brittle nature of this compound at cryogenic temperature. By decoupling average contributions of surface area and surface energy on cohesion by salinization post-milling, the average contribution of surface energy on cohesion for powders milled at room temperature was 83% and 55% at cryogenic temperature.

  11. Dynamics of electron in a surface quantum well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Li-Fei; Yang Guang-Can

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the quantum dynamics of electrons in a surface quantum well in the time domain with autocorrelation of wave packet. The evolution of the wave packet for different manifold eigenstates with finite and infinite lifetimes is investigated analytically. It is found that the quantum coherence and evolution of the surface electronic wave packet can be controlled by the laser central energy and electric field. The results show that the finite lifetime of excited states expedites the dephasing of the coherent electronic wave packet significantly. The correspondence between classical and quantum mechanics is shown explicitly in the system.

  12. Electronic stimulators for surface neural prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broderick Barry J.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the technological advancements in neural prosthesis devices using Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES. FES refers to the restoration of motor functions lost due to spinal cord injury (SCI, stroke, head injury, or diseases such as Cerebral Palsy or Multiple Sclerosis by eliciting muscular contractions through the use of a neuromuscular electrical stimulator device. The field has developed considerably since its inception, with the miniaturisation of circuity, the development of programmable and adaptable stimulators and the enhancement of sensors used to trigger the application of stimulation to suit a variety of FES applications. This paper discusses general FES system design requirements in the context of existing commercial and research FES devices, focusing on surface stimulators for the upper and lower limbs. These devices have demonstrated feasible standing and stepping in a clinical setting with paraplegic patients, improvements in dropped foot syndrome with hemiplegic patients and aided in the restoration of grasping function in patients with upper limb motor dysfunction.

  13. TEMPERATURE CONTROL CIRCUIT FOR SURFACE ACOUSTIC WAVE (SAW RESONATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Mohamad Ashari

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW resonators are key components in oscillators, frequency synthesizers and transceivers. One of the drawbacks of SAW resonators are that its piezoelectric substrates are highly sensitive to ambient temperature resulting in performance degradation. This work propose a simple circuit design which stabalizes the temperature of the SAW resonator, making it independet of temperature change. This circuit is based on the oven control method which elevates the temperature of the resonator to a high temperature, making it tolerant to minor changes in ambient temperature.This circuit consist of a temperature sensor, heaters and a comparator which turn the heater on or off depending on the ambient temperature. Several SAW resonator were tested using this circuit. Experimental results indicate the temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF decreases from maximum of 130.44/°C to a minimum of -1.11/°C. 

  14. Cleaning of SiC surfaces by low temperature ECR microwave hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Lingqin; Zhu Qiaozhi; Gao Mingchao [School of Electronic Science and Technology, Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, 116024 (China); Qin Fuwen [State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), Dalian University of Technology, 116024 (China); Wang Dejun, E-mail: dwang121@dlut.edu.cn [School of Electronic Science and Technology, Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, 116024 (China)

    2011-09-15

    N-type 4H-SiC (0 0 0 1) surfaces were cleaned by low temperature hydrogen plasma in electronic cyclotron resonance (ECR) microware plasma system. The effects of the hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) on the structure, chemical and electronic properties of surfaces were characterized by in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The RHEED results indicate that the structures of the films are strongly dependent on the treatment temperature and time. Significant improvements in quality of 4H-SiC films can be obtained with the temperature ranging from 200 deg. C to 700 deg. C for an appropriate treatment period. The XPS results show that the surface oxygen is greatly reduced and the carbon contamination is completely removed from the 4H-SiC surfaces. The hydrogenated SiC surfaces exhibit an unprecedented stability against oxidation in the air. The surface Fermi level moves toward the conduction band in 4H-SiC after the treatment indicating an unpinning Fermi level with the density of surfaces states as low as 8.09 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}.

  15. Equatorial plasma bubbles with enhanced ion and electron temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeheung; Min, Kyoung Wook; Kim, Vitaly P.; Kil, Hyosub; Su, Shin-Yi; Chao, Chi Kuang; Lee, Jae-Jin

    2008-09-01

    While the ion and electron temperatures inside equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) are normally lower than those in an ambient plasma, bubbles with enhanced temperatures (BETs) are found occasionally in the topside ionosphere. Here we report the characteristics of BETs identified from observations of the first Republic of China Satellite (ROCSAT-1), the first Korea Multi-purpose Satellite (KOMPSAT-1), and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F15 during the solar maximum period between 2000 and 2001. The oxygen ion fraction inside the BETs, which was no lower than that of the ambient ionosphere, was similar to the case of ordinary low-temperature EPBs. These observations indicate that the BETs and low-temperature EPBs detected on the topside were produced by the upward drift of low-density plasma from lower altitudes. The feature that distinguishes BETs from normal EPBs is the occurrence of an unusually fast poleward field-aligned plasma flow relative to the ambient plasma. The BETs occurred preferentially around geomagnetic latitudes of 10° in the summer hemisphere, where the ambient ion and electron temperatures are lower than those in the conjugate winter hemisphere. The occurrence of BETs did not show any notable dependence on geomagnetic activities. The characteristics of the BETs suggest that the BETs were produced by adiabatic plasma heating associated with a fast poleward oxygen ion transport along magnetic flux tubes.

  16. Two loop low temperature corrections to electron self energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahnaz Q. Haseeb; Samina S. Masood

    2011-01-01

    We xecalculate the two loop corrections in the background heat bath using real time formalism.The procedure of the integrations of loop momenta with dependence on finite temperature before the moments without it has been followed. We determine the mass and wavefunction renormalization constants in the low temperature limit of QED, for the first time with this preferred order of integrations. The correction to electron mass and spinors in this limit is important in the early universe at the time of primordial nucleosynthesis as well as in astrophysics.

  17. A surface-electrode quadrupole guide for electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffrogge, Johannes Philipp

    2012-12-19

    This thesis reports on the design and first experimental realization of a surface-electrode quadrupole guide for free electrons. The guide is based on a miniaturized, planar electrode layout and is driven at microwave frequencies. It confines electrons in the near-field of the microwave excitation, where strong electric field gradients can be generated without resorting to resonating structures or exceptionally high drive powers. The use of chip-based electrode geometries allows the realization of versatile, microstructured potentials with the perspective of novel quantum experiments with guided electrons. I present the design, construction and operation of an experiment that demonstrates electron confinement in a planar quadrupole guide for the first time. To this end, electrons with kinetic energies from one to ten electron-volts are guided along a curved electrode geometry. The stability of electron guiding as a function of drive parameters and electron energy has been studied. A comparison with numerical particle tracking simulations yields good qualitative agreement and provides a deeper understanding of the electron dynamics in the guiding potential. Furthermore, this thesis gives a detailed description of the design of the surface-electrode layout. This includes the development of an optimized coupling structure to inject electrons into the guide with minimum transverse excitation. I also discuss the extension of the current setup to longitudinal guide dimensions that are comparable to or larger than the wavelength of the drive signal. This is possible with a modified electrode layout featuring elevated signal conductors. Electron guiding in the field of a planar, microfabricated electrode layout allows the generation of versatile and finely structured guiding potentials. One example would be the realization of junctions that split and recombine a guided electron beam. Furthermore, it should be possible to prepare electrons in low-lying quantum mechanical

  18. Mapping the body surface temperature of cattle by infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Marcia Saladini Vieira; da Silva, Suelen Corrêa; Salles, Fernando André; Roma, Luiz Carlos; El Faro, Lenira; Bustos Mac Lean, Priscilla Ayleen; Lins de Oliveira, Celso Eduardo; Martello, Luciane Silva

    2016-12-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) is an alternative non-invasive method that has been studied as a tool for identifying many physiological and pathological processes related to changes in body temperature. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the body surface temperature of Jersey dairy cattle in a thermoneutral environment in order to contribute to the determination of a body surface temperature pattern for animals of this breed in a situation of thermal comfort. Twenty-four Jersey heifers were used over a period of 35 days at APTA Brazil. Measurements were performed on all animals, starting with the physiological parameters. Body surface temperature was measured by IRT collecting images in different body regions: left and right eye area, right and left eye, caudal left foreleg, cranial left foreleg, right and left flank, and forehead. High correlations were observed between temperature and humidity index (THI) and right flank, left flank and forehead temperatures (0.85, 0.81, and 0.81, respectively). The IRT variables that exhibited the five highest correlation coefficients in principal component 1 were, in decreasing order: forehead (0.90), right flank (0.87), left flank (0.84), marker 1 caudal left foreleg (0.83), marker 2 caudal left foreleg (0.74). The THI showed a high correlation coefficient (0.88) and moderate to low correlations were observed for the physiological variables rectal temperature (0.43), and respiratory frequency (0.42). The thermal profile obtained indicates a surface temperature pattern for each region studied in a situation of thermal comfort and may contribute to studies investigating body surface temperature. Among the body regions studied, IRT forehead temperature showed the highest association with rectal temperature, and forehead and right and left flank temperatures are strongly associated with THI and may be adopted in future studies on thermoregulation and body heat production.

  19. Atomic arrangements and electronic properties of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadi, D. J.; Martin, R. M.

    1982-05-01

    The areas of research during the past 12 months have included: step-formation energies and domain orientation at Si(111) surfaces; the electronic structure of the Al-GaAs(110) surface chemisorption system; density-functional calculations of bulk properties of GaAs and of (100)GaAs-Ge interfaces; demonstration of the importance of correlation effects on the atomic and electronic structure of Si(111) surfaces; and derivation of an exact scaling law for the resistance of a thin wire for the one dimensional Anderson model containing Loth diagonal and off-diagonal disorder.

  20. eMODIS Global Land Surface Temperature Version 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The EROS Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (eMODIS) Aqua Land Surface Temperature (LST) product is similar to the Land Processes Distributed Active...

  1. 2002 Average Monthly Sea Surface Temperature for California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA/ NASA AVHRR Oceans Pathfinder sea surface temperature data are derived from the 5-channel Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) on board the...

  2. 2003 Average Monthly Sea Surface Temperature for California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA/ NASA AVHRR Oceans Pathfinder sea surface temperature data are derived from the 5-channel Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) on board the...

  3. Sea surface temperature anomalies in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.

    . Further analysis has shown that the sea surface anomalies are well correlated to the anomalies of air temperature and latent heat flux values; whereas they are least correlated to the anomalies of wind stress and net radiation values, except over...

  4. An Estimation of Land Surface Temperatures from Landsat ETM+ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr-Adeline

    2 National Authority for Remote Sensing and Space Sciences, Cairo, Egypt. 3University of ... Keywords: Urban growth, urban heat Island, land surface temperatures, satellite remote sensing .... observed target includes green vegetation or not.

  5. Global 1-km Sea Surface Temperature (G1SST)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — JPL OurOcean Portal: A daily, global Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data set is produced at 1-km (also known as ultra-high resolution) by the JPL ROMS (Regional Ocean...

  6. COBE-SST2 Sea Surface Temperature and Ice

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A new sea surface temperature (SST) analysis on a centennial time scale is presented. The dataset starts in 1850 with monthly 1x1 means and is periodically updated....

  7. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Arabian Sea during winter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Ghosh, A.K.

    Surface layer temperature inversion in the south eastern Arabian Sea, during winter has been studied using Bathythermograph data collected from 1132 stations. It is found that the inversion in this area is a stable seasonal feature...

  8. Seasonal Sea Surface Temperature Averages, 1985-2001 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of four images showing seasonal sea surface temperature (SST) averages for the entire earth. Data for the years 1985-2001 are averaged to...

  9. 1996 Average Monthly Sea Surface Temperature for California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA/ NASA AVHRR Oceans Pathfinder sea surface temperature data are derived from the 5-channel Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) on board the...

  10. 2000 Average Monthly Sea Surface Temperature for California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA/ NASA AVHRR Oceans Pathfinder sea surface temperature data are derived from the 5-channel Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) on board the...

  11. OW NOAA Pathfinder/GAC Sea-Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset contains satellite-derived sea-surface temperature measurements collected by means of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer - Global Area Coverage...

  12. OW NOAA AVHRR-GAC Sea-Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset contains satellite-derived sea-surface temperature measurements collected by means of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer - Global Area Coverage...

  13. NOAA High-Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Analysis Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archive covers two high resolution sea surface temperature (SST) analysis products developed using an optimum interpolation (OI) technique. The analyses have a...

  14. Tropical sea surface temperatures and the earth's orbital eccentricity cycles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, S.M.; Fernandes, A.A.; Mohan, R.

    The tropical oceanic warm pools are climatologically important regions because their sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are positively related to atmospheric greenhouse effect and the cumulonimbus-cirrus cloud anvil. Such a warm pool is also present...

  15. Structure of a bacterial cell surface decaheme electron conduit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Thomas A; Edwards, Marcus J; Gates, Andrew J; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye F; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alexander S; Marshall, Matthew J; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas J; Fredrickson, James K; Zachara, John M; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J

    2011-06-07

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves decaheme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outer-membrane electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular intercytochrome electron exchange along "nanowire" appendages. We present a 3.2-Å crystal structure of one of these decaheme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the 10 hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65-Å octaheme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45-Å tetraheme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g., minerals), soluble substrates (e.g., flavins), and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  16. Temperature Distribution Measurement of The Wing Surface under Icing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isokawa, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Takeshi; Kimura, Shigeo; Sakaue, Hirotaka; Morita, Katsuaki; Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Collaboration; Univ of Notre Dame Collaboration; Kanagawa Institute of Technology Collaboration; Univ of Electro-(UEC) Team, Comm

    2016-11-01

    De- or anti-icing system of an aircraft is necessary for a safe flight operation. Icing is a phenomenon which is caused by a collision of supercooled water frozen to an object. For the in-flight icing, it may cause a change in the wing cross section that causes stall, and in the worst case, the aircraft would fall. Therefore it is important to know the surface temperature of the wing for de- or anti-icing system. In aerospace field, temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) has been widely used for obtaining the surface temperature distribution on a testing article. The luminescent image from the TSP can be related to the temperature distribution. (TSP measurement system) In icing wind tunnel, we measured the surface temperature distribution of the wing model using the TSP measurement system. The effect of icing conditions on the TSP measurement system is discussed.

  17. High temperature photoelectron emission and surface photovoltage in semiconducting diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G. T.; Cooil, S. P.; Roberts, O. R.; Evans, S.; Langstaff, D. P.; Evans, D. A.

    2014-08-01

    A non-equilibrium photovoltage is generated in semiconducting diamond at above-ambient temperatures during x-ray and UV illumination that is sensitive to surface conductivity. The H-termination of a moderately doped p-type diamond (111) surface sustains a surface photovoltage up to 700 K, while the clean (2 × 1) reconstructed surface is not as severely affected. The flat-band C 1s binding energy is determined from 300 K measurement to be 283.87 eV. The true value for the H-terminated surface, determined from high temperature measurement, is (285.2 ± 0.1) eV, corresponding to a valence band maximum lying 1.6 eV below the Fermi level. This is similar to that of the reconstructed (2 × 1) surface, although this surface shows a wider spread of binding energy between 285.2 and 285.4 eV. Photovoltage quantification and correction are enabled by real-time photoelectron spectroscopy applied during annealing cycles between 300 K and 1200 K. A model is presented that accounts for the measured surface photovoltage in terms of a temperature-dependent resistance. A large, high-temperature photovoltage that is sensitive to surface conductivity and photon flux suggests a new way to use moderately B-doped diamond in voltage-based sensing devices.

  18. Temperature Compensation of Surface Acoustic Waves on Berlinite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, David Michael Marshall

    The surface acoustic wave properties of Berlinite (a-AlPO4) have been investigated theoretically and experimentally, for a variety of crystallographic orientations, to evaluate its possible use as a substrate material for temperature compensated surface acoustic wave devices. A computer program has been developed to calculate the surface wave properties of a material from its elastic, piezoelectric, dielectric and lattice constants and their temperature derivatives. The program calculates the temperature coefficient of delay, the velocity of the surface wave, the direction of power flow and a measure of the electro-mechanical coupling. These calculations have been performed for a large number of orientations using a modified form of the data given by Chang and Barsch for Berlinite and predict several new temperature compensated directions. Experimental measurements have been made of the frequency-temperature response of a surface acoustic wave oscillator on an 80° X axis boule cut which show it to be temperature compensated in qualitative agreement with the theoretical predictions. This orientation shows a cubic frequency-temperature dependence instead of the expected parabolic response. Measurements of the electro-mechanical coupling coefficient k gave a value lower than predicted. Similar measurements on a Y cut plate gave a value which is approximately twice that of ST cut quartz, but again lower than predicted. The surface wave velocity on both these cuts was measured to be slightly higher than predicted by the computer program. Experimental measurements of the lattice parameters a and c are also presented for a range of temperatures from 25°C to just above the alpha-beta transition at 584°C. These results are compared with the values obtained by Chang and Barsch. The results of this work indicate that Berlinite should become a useful substrate material for the construction of temperature compensated surface acoustic wave devices.

  19. Electronic Structure of the Bismuth Family of High Temperature Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Lisa

    2002-03-07

    High temperature superconductivity remains the central intellectual problem in condensed matter physics fifteen years after its discovery. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) directly probes the electronic structure, and has played an important role in the field of high temperature superconductors. With the recent advances in sample growth and the photoemission technique, we are able to study the electronic structure in great detail, and address regimes that were previously inaccessible. This thesis work contains systematic photoemission studies of the electronic structure of the Bi-family of high temperature superconductors, which include the single-layer system (Bi2201), the bi-layer system (Bi2212), and the tri-layer system (Bi2223). We show that, unlike conventional BCS superconductors, phase coherence information emerges in the single particle excitation spectrum of high temperature superconductors as the superconducting peak in Bi2212. The universality and various properties of this superconducting peak are studied in various systems. We argue that the origin of the superconducting peak may provide the key to understanding the mechanism of High-Tc superconductors. In addition, we identified a new experimental energy scale in the bilayer material, the anisotropic intra-bilayer coupling energy. For a long time, it was predicted that this energy scale would cause bilayer band splitting. We observe this phenomenon, for the first time, in heavily overdoped Bi2212. This new observation requires the revision of the previous picture of the electronic excitation in the Brillouin zone boundary. As the first ARPES study of a trilayer system, various detailed electronic proper- ties of Bi2223 are examined. We show that, comparing with Bi2212, both superconducting gap and relative superconducting peak intensity become larger in Bi2223, however, the strength of the interlayer coupling within each unit cell is possibly weaker. These results suggest that the

  20. SURFACE TEMPERATURES ON TITAN DURING NORTHERN WINTER AND SPRING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Romani, P. N.; Samuelson, R. E. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mamoutkine, A. [ADNET Systems, Inc., Bethesda, MD 20817 (United States); Gorius, N. J. P. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Coustenis, A. [Laboratoire d’Etudes Spatiales et d’Instrumentation en Astrophysique (LESIA), Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris-Diderot, 5, place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Tokano, T., E-mail: donald.e.jennings@nasa.gov [Universität zu Köln, Albertus-Magnus-Platz, D-50923 Köln (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    Meridional brightness temperatures were measured on the surface of Titan during the 2004–2014 portion of the Cassini mission by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer. Temperatures mapped from pole to pole during five two-year periods show a marked seasonal dependence. The surface temperature near the south pole over this time decreased by 2 K from 91.7 ± 0.3 to 89.7 ± 0.5 K while at the north pole the temperature increased by 1 K from 90.7 ± 0.5 to 91.5 ± 0.2 K. The latitude of maximum temperature moved from 19 S to 16 N, tracking the sub-solar latitude. As the latitude changed, the maximum temperature remained constant at 93.65 ± 0.15 K. In 2010 our temperatures repeated the north–south symmetry seen by Voyager one Titan year earlier in 1980. Early in the mission, temperatures at all latitudes had agreed with GCM predictions, but by 2014 temperatures in the north were lower than modeled by 1 K. The temperature rise in the north may be delayed by cooling of sea surfaces and moist ground brought on by seasonal methane precipitation and evaporation.

  1. Temperature dependence of surface enhanced Raman scattering on C70

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ying; Zhang Zhenlong; DU Yinxiao; DONG Hua; MO Yujun

    2005-01-01

    The temperature dependence of surface enhanced Raman scattering of the C70 molecule is reported.The Raman scattering of C70 molecules adsorbed on the surface of a silver mirror was measured at different temperatures. The experimental results indicate that the relative intensities of the Raman features vary with the temperature of the sample. When the temperature decreases from room temperature to 0℃, the relative intensities of certain Raman bands decrease abruptly. If we take the strongest band 1565cm-1 as a standard value 100, the greatest decrease approaches to 43%. However, with the further decrease in the temperature these relative intensities increase and resume the value at room temperature. And such a temperature dependence is reversible. Our results show that the adsorption state of the C70 molecules on the silver surface around 0℃changes greatly with the temperature, resulting in a decrease in relative intensities for some main Raman features of C70molecule. When the temperature is lower than 0℃, the adsorption state changes continually and more slowly. Synchronously, eight new Raman featu res, which have not ever been reported in literature, are observed in our experiment and this enriches the basic information of the vibrational modes for C70 molecule.

  2. Temperature dependent electronic correlation effects in GdN

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, A; Nolting, W.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate temperature dependent electronic correlation effects in the conduction bands of Gadolinium Nitride (GdN) based on the combination of many body analysis of the multi-band Kondo lattice model and the first principles TB-LMTO bandstructure calculations. The physical properties like the quasi-particle density of states (Q-DOS), spectral density (SD) and quasi-particle bandstructure (Q-BS) are calculated and discussed. The results can be compared with spin and angle resolved inverse...

  3. Sea Surface Temperature from EUMETSAT Including Sentinel-3 SLSTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, Anne; Bonekamp, Hans; Montagner, Francois; Santacesaria, Vincenzo; Tomazic, Igor

    2015-12-01

    The paper gives an overview of sea surface temperature (SST) activities at EUMETSAT including information on SST planned from the Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR). Operational oceanography activities within the Marine Applications group at EUMETSAT continue with a focus on SST, sea surface winds, sea-ice products, radiative fluxes, significant wave height and sea surface topography. These are achieved through the mandatory, optional and third-party programmes, and for some products with the EUMETSAT Ocean and Sea-Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF). Progress towards products from sea-ice surface temperature, ocean colour products, turbidity and aerosol optical depth over water continue. Information on oceanography products from EUMETSAT can be found through the product navigator (http://navigator.eumetsat.int). EUMETSAT have been collaborating with ESA for a number of years on the development of SST for SLSTR.

  4. Applications of Silicon Carbide for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Virgil B.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide bandgap material that shows great promise in high-power and high temperature electronics applications because of its high thermal conductivity and high breakdown electrical field. The excellent physical and electronic properties of SiC allows the fabrication of devices that can operate at higher temperatures and power levels than devices produced from either silicon or GaAs. Although modern electronics depends primarily upon silicon based devices, this material is not capable of handling may special requirements. Devices which operate at high speeds, at high power levels and are to be used in extreme environments at high temperatures and high radiation levels need other materials with wider bandgaps than that of silicon. Many space and terrestrial applications also have a requirement for wide bandgap materials. SiC also has great potential for high power and frequency operation due to a high saturated drift velocity. The wide bandgap allows for unique optoelectronic applications, that include blue light emitting diodes and ultraviolet photodetectors. New areas involving gas sensing and telecommunications offer significant promise. Overall, the properties of SiC make it one of the best prospects for extending the capabilities and operational regimes of the current semiconductor device technology.

  5. Copper plasmonics and catalysis: role of electron-phonon interactions in dephasing localized surface plasmons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi-C; Ding, Yuchen; Goodman, Samuel M; Funke, Hans H; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-11-07

    Copper metal can provide an important alternative for the development of efficient, low-cost and low-loss plasmonic nanoparticles, and selective nanocatalysts. However, poor chemical stability and lack of insight into photophysics and plasmon decay mechanisms has impeded study. Here, we use smooth conformal ALD coating on copper nanoparticles to prevent surface oxidation, and study dephasing time for localized surface plasmons on different sized copper nanoparticles. Using dephasing time as a figure of merit, we elucidate the role of electron-electron, electron-phonon, impurity, surface and grain boundary scattering on the decay of localized surface plasmon waves. Using our quantitative analysis and different temperature dependent measurements, we show that electron-phonon interactions dominate over other scattering mechanisms in dephasing plasmon waves. While interband transitions in copper metal contributes substantially to plasmon losses, tuning surface plasmon modes to infrared frequencies leads to a five-fold enhancement in the quality factor. These findings demonstrate that conformal ALD coatings can improve the chemical stability for copper nanoparticles, even at high temperatures (>300 °C) in ambient atmosphere, and nanoscaled copper is a good alternative material for many potential applications in nanophotonics, plasmonics, catalysis and nanoscale electronics.

  6. A model of the ground surface temperature for micrometeorological analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Julian S.; Erell, Evyatar

    2017-07-01

    Micrometeorological models at various scales require ground surface temperature, which may not always be measured in sufficient spatial or temporal detail. There is thus a need for a model that can calculate the surface temperature using only widely available weather data, thermal properties of the ground, and surface properties. The vegetated/permeable surface energy balance (VP-SEB) model introduced here requires no a priori knowledge of soil temperature or moisture at any depth. It combines a two-layer characterization of the soil column following the heat conservation law with a sinusoidal function to estimate deep soil temperature, and a simplified procedure for calculating moisture content. A physically based solution is used for each of the energy balance components allowing VP-SEB to be highly portable. VP-SEB was tested using field data measuring bare loess desert soil in dry weather and following rain events. Modeled hourly surface temperature correlated well with the measured data (r 2 = 0.95 for a whole year), with a root-mean-square error of 2.77 K. The model was used to generate input for a pedestrian thermal comfort study using the Index of Thermal Stress (ITS). The simulation shows that the thermal stress on a pedestrian standing in the sun on a fully paved surface, which may be over 500 W on a warm summer day, may be as much as 100 W lower on a grass surface exposed to the same meteorological conditions.

  7. Determination of temperature of moving surface by sensitivity analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Farhanieh, B

    2002-01-01

    In this paper sensitivity analysis in inverse problem solutions is employed to estimate the temperature of a moving surface. Moving finite element method is used for spatial discretization. Time derivatives are approximated using Crank-Nicklson method. The accuracy of the solution is assessed by simulation method. The convergence domain is investigated for the determination of the temperature of a solid fuel.

  8. A new interpolation method for Antarctic surface temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yetang Wang; Shugui Hou

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new methodology for the spatial interpolation of annual mean temperature into a regular grid with a geographic resolution of 0.01° for Antarctica by applying a recent compilation of the Antarctic temperature data.A multiple linear regression model of the dependence of temperature on some geographic parameters (i.e.,latitude,longitude,and elevation) is proposed empirically,and the kriging method is used to determine the spatial distribution of regional and local deviations from the temperature calculated from the multiple linear regression model.The modeled value and residual grids are combined to derive a high-resolution map of surface air temperature.The performance of our new methodology is superior to a variety of benchmark methods (e.g.,inverse distance weighting,kriging,and spline methods) via cross-validation techniques.Our simulation resembles well with those distinct spatial features of surface temperature,such as the decrease in annual mean surface temperature with increasing latitude and the distance away from the coast line;and it also reveals the complex topographic effects on the spatial distribution of surface temperature.

  9. Analysis of Anomaly in Land Surface Temperature Using MODIS Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorozu, K.; Kodama, T.; Kim, S.; Tachikawa, Y.; Shiiba, M.

    2011-12-01

    Atmosphere-land surface interaction plays a dominant role on the hydrologic cycle. Atmospheric phenomena cause variation of land surface state and land surface state can affect on atmosphereic conditions. Widely-known article related in atmospheric-land interaction was published by Koster et al. in 2004. The context of this article is that seasonal anomaly in soil moisture or soil surface temperature can affect summer precipitation generation and other atmospheric processes especially in middle North America, Sahel and south Asia. From not only above example but other previous research works, it is assumed that anomaly of surface state has a key factor. To investigate atmospheric-land surface interaction, it is necessary to analyze anomaly field in land surface state. In this study, soil surface temperature should be focused because it can be globally and continuously observed by satellite launched sensor. To land surface temperature product, MOD11C1 and MYD11C1 products which are kinds of MODIS products are applied. Both of them have 0.05 degree spatial resolution and daily temporal resolution. The difference of them is launched satellite, MOD11C1 is Terra and MYD11C1 is Aqua. MOD11C1 covers the latter of 2000 to present and MYD11C1 covers the early 2002 to present. There are unrealistic values on provided products even if daily product was already calibrated or corrected. For pre-analyzing, daily data is aggregated into 8-days data to remove irregular values for stable analysis. It was found that there are spatial and temporal distribution of 10-years average and standard deviation for each 8-days term. In order to point out extreme anomaly in land surface temperature, standard score for each 8-days term is applied. From the analysis of standard score, it is found there are large anomaly in land surface temperature around north China plain in early April 2005 and around Bangladesh in early May 2009.

  10. MODIFICATION OF SURFACE LAYERS FOR SILICATE GLASSES BY ELECTRON IRRADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Brunov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research results of silicate glass surface layers modification by the influence of electron beams with 5-50 keV energies and 20-50 mC/cm2 doses are presented. It is shown that during the glasses exposure to an electron beam with 20-50 keV electron energies, a gradient optical waveguide with increased refractive index on waveguide axis Δn = 0.01-0.04 is formed in the surface layer. Сhemical etching rate is increased in the exposed area by up to two times which is related to glass grid destruction. Depending on irradiation dose thin film or silver nanoparticles with the size less than 20nm are formed on the surface of the silver containing glasses for electron energies less than 10 keV. Silver films drawn on the surface of the glass are dissolved into the glass bulk for electron energies 20-50 keV and 20-50 mC/cm2 dose. Basic mechanisms causing these effects are: chemical bonds breaking of spatial glass grid by high energy electrons, formation of negative volume charge inside the glass and field migration of positive metal ions into the volume charge region. Achieved results can be used in photonics, integral optics and nanoplasmonics device fabrication.

  11. Radar Backscatter Across the Gulf Stream Sea Surface Temperature Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Li, F. K.; Walsh, E. J.; Lou, S. H.

    1998-01-01

    Ocean backscatter signatures were measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne NUSCAT K(sub u)-band scatterometer across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front. The measurements were made during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) off the coast of Virginia and Maryland in the winter of 1991.

  12. estimation of land surface temperature of kaduna metropolis, nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zaharaddeen et. al

    Understanding the spatial variation of Land Surface Temperature. (LST), will be ... positive correlation between mean of surface emissivity with date and ... deviation of 1.92 of LST and coefficient determinant R2 (0.46) show a ... (LST), as the prime and basic physical parameter of the earth's ..... thorough review of the paper.

  13. Printed circuit board metal powder filters for low electron temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Filipp; Schouten, Raymond N; Brauns, Matthias; Gang, Tian; Lim, Wee Han; Lai, Nai Shyan; Dzurak, Andrew S; van der Wiel, Wilfred G; Zwanenburg, Floris A

    2013-04-01

    We report the characterisation of printed circuit boards (PCB) metal powder filters and their influence on the effective electron temperature which is as low as 22 mK for a quantum dot in a silicon MOSFET structure in a dilution refrigerator. We investigate the attenuation behaviour (10 MHz-20 GHz) of filter made of four metal powders with a grain size below 50 μm. The room-temperature attenuation of a stainless steel powder filter is more than 80 dB at frequencies above 1.5 GHz. In all metal powder filters, the attenuation increases with temperature. Compared to classical powder filters, the design presented here is much less laborious to fabricate and specifically the copper powder PCB-filters deliver an equal or even better performance than their classical counterparts.

  14. Treatment of surfaces with low-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, L.; Mikmeková, E.; Lejeune, M.

    2017-06-01

    Electron-beam-induced deposition of various materials from suitable precursors has represented an established branch of nanotechnology for more than a decade. A specific alternative is carbon deposition on the basis of hydrocarbons as precursors that has been applied to grow various nanostructures including masks for subsequent technological steps. Our area of study was unintentional electron-beam-induced carbon deposition from spontaneously adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. This process traditionally constitutes a challenge for scanning electron microscopy practice preventing one from performing any true surface studies outside an ultrahigh vacuum and without in-situ cleaning of samples, and also jeopardising other electron-optical devices such as electron beam lithographs. Here we show that when reducing the energy of irradiating electrons sufficiently, the e-beam-induced deposition can be converted to e-beam-induced release causing desorption of hydrocarbons and ultimate cleaning of surfaces in both an ultrahigh and a standard high vacuum. Using series of experiments with graphene samples, we demonstrate fundamental features of e-beam-induced desorption and present results of checks for possible radiation damage using Raman spectroscopy that led to optimisation of the electron energy for damage-free cleaning. The method of preventing carbon contamination described here paves the way for greatly enhanced surface sensitivity of imaging and substantially reduced demands on vacuum systems for nanotechnological applications.

  15. Souring in low-temperature surface facilities of two high-temperature Argentinian oil fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Akhil; An, Dongshan; Cavallaro, Adriana; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2014-09-01

    Produced waters from the Barrancas and Chihuido de la Salina (CHLS) fields in Argentina had higher concentrations of sulfate than were found in the injection waters, suggesting that the formation waters in these reservoirs had a high sulfate concentration and that sulfate-reducing bacteria were inactive downhole. Incubation of produced waters with produced oil gave rapid reduction of sulfate to sulfide (souring) at 37 °C, some at 60 °C, but none at 80 °C. Alkylbenzenes and alkanes served as electron donor, especially in incubations with CHLS oil. Dilution with water to decrease the ionic strength or addition of inorganic phosphate did not increase souring at 37 or 60 °C. These results indicate that souring in these reservoirs is limited by the reservoir temperature (80 °C for the Barrancas and 65-70 °C for the CHLS field) and that souring may accelerate in surface facilities where the oil-water mixture cools. As a result, significant sulfide concentrations are present in these surface facilities. The activity and presence of chemolithotrophic Gammaproteobacteria of the genus Thiomicrospira, which represented 85% of the microbial community in a water plant in the Barrancas field, indicated reoxidation of sulfide and sulfur to sulfate. The presence of these bacteria offers potential for souring control by microbial oxidation in aboveground facilities, provided that formation of corrosive sulfur can be avoided.

  16. The low-temperature method for study of coniferous tissues in the environmental scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neděla, Vilém; Tihlaříková, Eva; Hřib, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The use of non-standard low-temperature conditions in environmental scanning electron microscopy might be promising for the observation of coniferous tissues in their native state. This study is aimed to analyse and evaluate the method based on the principle of low-temperature sample stabilization. We demonstrate that the upper mucous layer is sublimed and a microstructure of the sample surface can be observed with higher resolution at lower gas pressure conditions, thanks to a low-temperature method. An influence of the low-temperature method on sample stability was also studied. The results indicate that high-moisture conditions are not suitable for this method and often cause the collapse of samples. The potential improvement of stability to beam damage has been demonstrated by long-time observation at different operation parameters. We finally show high applicability of the low-temperature method on different types of conifers and Oxalis acetosella. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Determination of gas temperature in the plasmatron channel according to the known distribution of electronic temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimov Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical method to calculate the temperature distribution of heavy particles in the channel of the plasma torch on the known distribution of the electronic temperature has been proposed. The results can be useful for a number of model calculations in determining the most effective conditions of gas blowing through the plasma torch with the purpose of heating the heavy component. This approach allows us to understand full details about the heating of cold gas, inpouring the plasma, and to estimate correctly the distribution of the gas temperature inside the channel.

  18. Surface and Core Electronic Structure of Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor A. Nama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio restricted Hartree-Fock method within the framework of large unit cell formalism is used to simulate silicon nanocrystals between 216 and 1000 atoms (1.6–2.65 nm in diameter that include Bravais and primitive cell multiples. The investigated properties include core and oxidized surface properties. Results revealed that electronic properties converge to some limit as the size of the nanocrystal increases. Increasing the size of the core of a nanocrystal resulted in an increase of the energy gap, valence band width, and cohesive energy. The lattice constant of the core and oxidized surface parts shows a decreasing trend as the nanocrystal increases in a size that converges to 5.28 Ǻ in a good agreement with the experiment. Surface and core convergence to the same lattice constant reflects good adherence of oxide layer at the surface. The core density of states shows highly degenerate states that split at the oxygenated (001-(1×1 surface due to symmetry breaking. The nanocrystal surface shows smaller gap and higher valence and conduction bands when compared to the core part, due to oxygen surface atoms and reduced structural symmetry. The smaller surface energy gap shows that energy gap of the nanocrystal is controlled by the surface part. Unlike the core part, the surface part shows a descending energy gap that proves its obedience to quantum confinement effects. Nanocrystal geometry proved to have some influence on all electronic properties including the energy gap.

  19. Fractal Dimension of Fracture Surface in Rock Material after High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Z. Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments on granite specimens after different high temperature under uniaxial compression were conducted and the fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM. The fractal dimensions of the fracture surfaces with increasing temperature were calculated, respectively. The fractal dimension of fracture surface is between 1.44 and 1.63. Its value approximately goes up exponentially with the increase of temperature. There is a quadratic polynomial relationship between the rockburst tendency and fractal dimension of fracture surface; namely, a fractal dimension threshold can be obtained. Below the threshold value, a positive correlativity shows between rockburst tendency and fractal dimension; when the fractal dimension is greater than the threshold value, it shows an inverse correlativity.

  20. Mechanisms of femtosecond LIPSS formation induced by periodic surface temperature modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Evgeny L.

    2016-06-01

    Here we analyze the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on metal surfaces upon single femtosecond laser pulses. Most of the existing models of the femtosecond LIPSS formation discuss only the appearance of a periodic modulation of the electron and ion temperatures. However the mechanism how the inhomogeneous surface temperature distribution induces the periodically-modulated surface profile under the conditions corresponding to ultrashort-pulse laser ablation is still not clear. Estimations made on the basis of different hydrodynamic instabilities allow to sort out mechanisms, which can bridge the gap between the temperature modulation and the LIPSS. The proposed theory shows that the periodic structures can be generated by single ultrashort laser pulses due to ablative instabilities. The Marangoni and Rayleigh-Bénard convection on the contrary cannot cause the LIPSS formation.

  1. ESTIMATION OF PV MODULE SURFACE TEMPERATURE USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Coskun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to use the artificial neural network (ANN method to estimate the surface temperature of a photovoltaic (PV panel. Using the experimentally obtained PV data, the accuracy of the ANN model was evaluated. To train the artificial neural network (ANN, outer temperature solar radiation and wind speed values were inputs and surface temperature was an output. The ANN was used to estimate PV panel surface temperature. Using the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM algorithm the feed forward artificial neural network was trained. Two back propagation type ANN algorithms were used and their performance was compared with the estimate from the LM algorithm. To train the artificial neural network, experimental data were used for two thirds with the remaining third used for testing. Additionally scaled conjugate gradient (SCG back propagation and resilient back propagation (RB type ANN algorithms were used for comparison with the LM algorithm. The performances of these three types of artificial neural network were compared and mean error rates of between 0.005962 and 0.012177% were obtained. The best estimate was produced by the LM algorithm. Estimation of PV surface temperature with artificial neural networks provides better results than conventional correlation methods. This study showed that artificial neural networks may be effectively used to estimate PV surface temperature.

  2. Packaging Technologies for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liangyu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Spry, David J.; Meredith, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews ceramic substrates and thick-film metallization based packaging technologies in development for 500degC silicon carbide (SiC) electronics and sensors. Prototype high temperature ceramic chip-level packages and printed circuit boards (PCBs) based on ceramic substrates of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum nitride (AlN) have been designed and fabricated. These ceramic substrate-based chiplevel packages with gold (Au) thick-film metallization have been electrically characterized at temperatures up to 550degC. A 96% alumina based edge connector for a PCB level subsystem interconnection has also been demonstrated recently. The 96% alumina packaging system composed of chip-level packages and PCBs has been tested with high temperature SiC devices at 500degC for over 10,000 hours. In addition to tests in a laboratory environment, a SiC JFET with a packaging system composed of a 96% alumina chip-level package and an alumina printed circuit board mounted on a data acquisition circuit board was launched as a part of the MISSE-7 suite to the International Space Station via a Shuttle mission. This packaged SiC transistor was successfully tested in orbit for eighteen months. A spark-plug type sensor package designed for high temperature SiC capacitive pressure sensors was developed. This sensor package combines the high temperature interconnection system with a commercial high temperature high pressure stainless steel seal gland (electrical feed-through). Test results of a packaged high temperature capacitive pressure sensor at 500degC are also discussed. In addition to the pressure sensor package, efforts for packaging high temperature SiC diode-based gas chemical sensors are in process.

  3. Effect of Temperature on Nucleation of Nanocrystalline Indium Tin Oxide Synthesized by Electron-Beam Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Zhao, Yujun; Shen, Jianxing; Xu, Xiangang

    2017-07-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) has been widely applied as a transparent conductive layer and optical window in light-emitting diodes, solar cells, and touch screens. In this paper, crystalline nano-sized ITO dendrites are obtained using an electron-beam evaporation technique. The surface morphology of the obtained ITO was studied for substrate temperatures of 25°C, 130°C, 180°C, and 300°C. Nano-sized crystalline dendrites were synthesized only at a substrate temperature of 300°C. The dendrites had a cubic structure, confirmed by the results of x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The growth mechanism of the nano-crystalline dendrites could be explained by a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth model. The catalysts of the VLS process were indium and tin droplets, confirmed by varying the substrate temperature, which further influenced the nucleation of the ITO dendrites.

  4. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poncé, S., E-mail: samuel.pon@gmail.com; Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Chemin des étoiles 8, bte L07.03.01, B-1348 Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Marini, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Via Salaria Km 29.3, CP 10, 00016 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Verstraete, M. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Physique des matériaux et nanostructures, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 17, B-4000 Liège (Belgium)

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  5. Mathematical model of the metal mould surface temperature optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mlynek, Jaroslav, E-mail: jaroslav.mlynek@tul.cz; Knobloch, Roman, E-mail: roman.knobloch@tul.cz [Department of Mathematics, FP Technical University of Liberec, Studentska 2, 461 17 Liberec, The Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Srb, Radek, E-mail: radek.srb@tul.cz [Institute of Mechatronics and Computer Engineering Technical University of Liberec, Studentska 2, 461 17 Liberec, The Czech Republic (Czech Republic)

    2015-11-30

    The article is focused on the problem of generating a uniform temperature field on the inner surface of shell metal moulds. Such moulds are used e.g. in the automotive industry for artificial leather production. To produce artificial leather with uniform surface structure and colour shade the temperature on the inner surface of the mould has to be as homogeneous as possible. The heating of the mould is realized by infrared heaters located above the outer mould surface. The conceived mathematical model allows us to optimize the locations of infrared heaters over the mould, so that approximately uniform heat radiation intensity is generated. A version of differential evolution algorithm programmed in Matlab development environment was created by the authors for the optimization process. For temperate calculations software system ANSYS was used. A practical example of optimization of heaters locations and calculation of the temperature of the mould is included at the end of the article.

  6. Resolving the electron temperature discrepancies in HII Regions and Planetary Nebulae: kappa-distributed electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholls, David C; Sutherland, Ralph S

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of electron temperatures and metallicities in H ii regions and Planetary Nebulae (PNe) has-for several decades-presented a problem: results obtained using different techniques disagree. What it worse, they disagree consistently. There have been numerous attempts to explain these discrepancies, but none has provided a satisfactory solution to the problem. In this paper, we explore the possibility that electrons in H ii regions and PNe depart from a Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium energy distribution. We adopt a "kappa-distribution" for the electron energies. Such distributions are widely found in Solar System plasmas, where they can be directly measured. This simple assumption is able to explain the temperature and metallicity discrepancies in H ii regions and PNe arising from the different measurement techniques. We find that the energy distribution does not need to depart dramatically from an equilibrium distribution. From an examination of data from Hii regions and PNe it appears that kappa ~ ...

  7. Direct Measurements of the Electron Energy Flux versus Electron Temperature Gradient in Tokamak Discharges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.W. Gentle; M.E. Austin; P.E. Phillips

    2004-01-01

    Electron thermal transport is one of the most complex processes in fusion plasmas. It is generally described by a simple thermal diffusivity in transport analyses of discharges, but there is evidence of critical gradient effects with moderate stiffness. By analyzing periodic perturbations to an equilibrium, one can measure the variations in electron energy flux and electron temperature gradient over the perturbation cycle, obtaining the flux as a function of gradient over the range of parameters generated by the perturbation. Although time-dependent transport analysis is very sensitive to noise in the input data, averaging over many cycles of a periodic perturbation can provide data of sufficient quality. The analyses presented here are based on the ECE temperature data with high spatial and temporal resolution and full profile coverage on DIII-D for sawteeth and modulated ECH heating.

  8. Electronic and electrochemical doping of graphene by surface adsorbates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Pinto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Many potential applications of graphene require its precise and controllable doping with charge carriers. Being a two-dimensional material graphene is extremely sensitive to surface adsorbates, so its electronic properties can be effectively modified by deposition of different atoms and molecules. In this paper, we review two mechanisms of graphene doping by surface adsorbates, namely electronic and electrochemical doping. Although, electronic doping has been extensively studied and discussed in the literature, much less attention has been paid to electrochemical doping. This mechanism can, however, explain the doping of graphene by adsorbates for which no charge transfer is expected within the electronic doping model. In addition, electrochemical doping is in the origin of the hysteresis effects often observed in graphene-based field effect transistors when operating in the atmospheric environment.

  9. Low temperature diffusion of Li atoms into Si nanoparticles and surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhaus, Hermann; Karacuban, Hatice; Krix, David; Becker, Felix; Hagemann, Ulrich; Steeger, Doris; Bywalez, Robert; Schulz, Christof; Wiggers, Hartmut

    2013-07-01

    The diffusion of Li atoms deposited on hydrogen-passivated Si(001) surfaces, chemically oxidized Si(001) surfaces, Si nanoparticle films, and thick SiO2 layers is investigated with electron-beam induced Auger electron spectroscopy. The nanoparticles exhibit an average diameter of 24 nm. The Li metal film is evaporated at a sample temperature below 120 K. The reappearance of the Si substrate Auger signal as a function of time and temperature can be measured to study the Li diffusion into the bulk material. Values for the diffusion barrier of 0.5 eV for H:Si(001) and 0.3 eV for the ox-Si(001) and Si nanoparticle films are obtained. The diffusion of the Li atoms results in the disruption of the crystalline Si surfaces observed with atomic force microscopy. Contrasting to that, the Si nanoparticle films show less disruption by Li diffusion due to filling of the porous films detected with cross section electron microscopy. Silicon dioxide acts as a diffusion barrier for temperatures up to 300 K. However, the electron beam induces a reaction between Li and SiO2, leading to LiOx and elemental Si floating on the surface.

  10. Thermal Balloon Endometrial Ablation: Safety Aspects Evaluated by Serosal Temperature, Light Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L F; Meinert, L; Junge, Jette

    1998-01-01

    subsequent hysterectomy the extent of thermal damage into the myometrium was assessed by light and electron microscopy. RESULTS: The highest temperature measured on the uterine serosa was 39.1 degrees C. Coagulation of the myometrium adjacent to the endometrium could be demonstrated by light microscopy...... in all patients, with a maximum depth of 11.5 mm. By electron microscopy no influence of heat could be demonstrated beyond 15 mm from the endometrial surface. CONCLUSION: Up to 16 min of thermal balloon endometrial ablation therapy can destroy the endometrium and the submucosal layers. The myometrium...

  11. Thermal Balloon Endometrial Ablation: Safety Aspects Evaluated by Serosal Temperature, Light Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L F; Meinert, L; Junge, Jette

    1998-01-01

    subsequent hysterectomy the extent of thermal damage into the myometrium was assessed by light and electron microscopy. RESULTS: The highest temperature measured on the uterine serosa was 39.1 degrees C. Coagulation of the myometrium adjacent to the endometrium could be demonstrated by light microscopy...... in all patients, with a maximum depth of 11.5 mm. By electron microscopy no influence of heat could be demonstrated beyond 15 mm from the endometrial surface. CONCLUSION: Up to 16 min of thermal balloon endometrial ablation therapy can destroy the endometrium and the submucosal layers. The myometrium...

  12. Thermal balloon endometrial ablation: safety aspects evaluated by serosal temperature, light microscopy and electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L F; Meinert, L; Rygaard, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    subsequent hysterectomy the extent of thermal damage into the myometrium was assessed by light and electron microscopy. RESULTS: The highest temperature measured on the uterine serosa was 39.1 degrees C. Coagulation of the myometrium adjacent to the endometrium could be demonstrated by light microscopy...... in all patients, with a maximum depth of 11.5 mm. By electron microscopy no influence of heat could be demonstrated beyond 15 mm from the endometrial surface. CONCLUSION: Up to 16 min of thermal balloon endometrial ablation therapy can destroy the endometrium and the submucosal layers. The myometrium...

  13. Mechanism for orientation dependence of blisters on W surface exposed to D plasma at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, W.; Xu, B.; Luo, G.-N.; Qu, S. L.; Morgan, T. W.; De Temmerman, G.

    2016-08-01

    The orientation dependence of blister formation induced by D plasma exposure at low temperature (about 523 K) on rolled tungsten and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) W samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Severe blistering was observed on grains with surface normal directions close to [111], while the [001] surfaces are the most resistant to blister formation. Cavities induced by D2 gas were observed beneath [111], [110] and [001] surfaces, independently on whether blisters were observed on the surface or not. The [111] surface is more prone to blister formation, because it is easily plastically deformed by the D2 gas pressure. Some blister edges and steps were perpendicular to [110] directions, which may be induced by the slipping of dislocations on {110} planes. The blister morphology induced by D plasma can be well explained by the blister model based on plastic deformation mechanism.

  14. Climate Change Signal Analysis for Northeast Asian Surface Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeong-Hyeong LEE; Byungsoo KIM; Keon-Tae SOHN; Won-Tae KOWN; Seung-Ki MIN

    2005-01-01

    Climate change detection, attribution, and prediction were studied for the surface temperature in the Northeast Asian region using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data and three coupled-model simulations from ECHAM4/OPYC3, HadCM3, and CCCma GCMs (Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis general circulation model). The Bayesian fingerprint approach was used to perform the detection and attribution test for the anthropogenic climate change signal associated with changes in anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) and sulfate aerosol (SO42-) concentrations for the Northeast Asian temperature. It was shown that there was a weak anthropogenic climate change signal in the Northeast Asian temperature change. The relative contribution of CO2 and SOl- effects to total temperature change in Northeast Asia was quantified from ECHAM4/OPYC3 and CCCma GCM simulations using analysis of variance. For the observed temperature change for the period of 1959-1998, the CO2 effect contributed 10%-21% of the total variance and the direct cooling effect of SO42- played a less important role (0% 7%) than the CO2effect. The prediction of surface temperature change was estimated from the second CO2+SO24- scenario run of ECHAM4/OPYC3 which has the least error in the simulation of the present-day temperature field near the Korean Peninsula. The result shows that the area-mean surface temperature near the Korean Peninsula will increase by about 1.1° by the 2040s relative to the 1990s.

  15. Electronic origin of high-temperature superconductivity in single-layer FeSe superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Defa; Zhang, Wenhao; Mou, Daixiang; He, Junfeng; Ou, Yun-Bo; Wang, Qing-Yan; Li, Zhi; Wang, Lili; Zhao, Lin; He, Shaolong; Peng, Yingying; Liu, Xu; Chen, Chaoyu; Yu, Li; Liu, Guodong; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Hu, Jiangping; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qikun; Zhou, X J

    2012-07-03

    The recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in iron-based compounds has attracted much attention. How to further increase the superconducting transition temperature (T(c)) and how to understand the superconductivity mechanism are two prominent issues facing the current study of iron-based superconductors. The latest report of high-T(c) superconductivity in a single-layer FeSe is therefore both surprising and significant. Here we present investigations of the electronic structure and superconducting gap of the single-layer FeSe superconductor. Its Fermi surface is distinct from other iron-based superconductors, consisting only of electron-like pockets near the zone corner without indication of any Fermi surface around the zone centre. Nearly isotropic superconducting gap is observed in this strictly two-dimensional system. The temperature dependence of the superconducting gap gives a transition temperature T(c)~ 55 K. These results have established a clear case that such a simple electronic structure is compatible with high-T(c) superconductivity in iron-based superconductors.

  16. Probing environmentally significant surface radicals: Crystallographic and temperature dependent adsorption of phenol on ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeaux, Chad A.; Poliakoff, E.D.; Kizilkaya, Orhan; Patterson, Matthew C.; DiTusa, Mark F.; Kurtz, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) are toxic organic/metal oxide composite particles that have been discovered to form from substituted benzenes chemisorbed to metal oxides. Here, we perform photoelectron spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and low energy electron diffraction of phenol chemisorbed to ZnO(1 0 1̱ 0) and (0 0 0 1̱)-Zn to observe electronic structure changes and charge transfer as a function adsorption temperature. We show direct evidence of charge transfer from the ZnO surfaces to the phenol. This evidence can help gain a better understanding of EPFRs and be used to develop possible future remediation strategies. PMID:26388650

  17. High-fluence hyperthermal ion irradiation of gallium nitride surfaces at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finzel, A.; Gerlach, J.W., E-mail: juergen.gerlach@iom-leipzig.de; Lorbeer, J.; Frost, F.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Irradiation of gallium nitride films with hyperthermal nitrogen ions. • Surface roughening at elevated sample temperatures was observed. • No thermal decomposition of gallium nitride films during irradiation. • Asymmetric surface diffusion processes cause local roughening. - Abstract: Wurtzitic GaN films deposited on 6H-SiC(0001) substrates by ion-beam assisted molecular-beam epitaxy were irradiated with hyperthermal nitrogen ions with different fluences at different substrate temperatures. In situ observations with reflection high energy electron diffraction showed that during the irradiation process the surface structure of the GaN films changed from two dimensional to three dimensional at elevated temperatures, but not at room temperature. Atomic force microscopy revealed an enhancement of nanometric holes and canyons upon the ion irradiation at higher temperatures. The roughness of the irradiated and heated GaN films was clearly increased by the ion irradiation in accordance with x-ray reflectivity measurements. A sole thermal decomposition of the films at the chosen temperatures could be excluded. The results are discussed taking into account temperature dependent sputtering and surface uphill adatom diffusion as a function of temperature.

  18. Enhanced Electron-Phonon Coupling at Metal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, Ward E.

    2010-08-04

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA) decouples electronic from nuclear motion, providing a focal point for most quantum mechanics textbooks. However, a multitude of important chemical, physical and biological phenomena are driven by violations of this approximation. Vibronic interactions are a necessary ingredient in any process that makes or breaks a covalent bond, for example, conventional catalysis or enzymatically delivered biological reactions. Metastable phenomena associated with defects and dopants in semiconductors, oxides, and glasses entail violation of the BOA. Charge exchange in inorganic polymers, organic slats and biological systems involves charge- induced distortions of the local structure. A classic example is conventional superconductivity, which is driven by the electron-lattice interaction. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments are yielding new insight into the microscopic origin of electron-phonon coupling (EPC) in anisotropic two-dimensional systems. Our recent surface phonon measurement on the surface of a high-Tc material clearly indicates an important momentum dependent EPC in these materials. In the last few years we have shifted our research focus from solely looking at electron phonon coupling to examining the structure/functionality relationship at the surface of complex transition metal compounds. The investigation on electron phonon coupling has allowed us to move to systems where there is coupling between the lattice, the electrons and the spin.

  19. Surface band-gap narrowing in quantized electron accumulation layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, P D C; Veal, T D; McConville, C F; Zúñiga-Pérez, J; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V; Hopkinson, M; Rienks, E D L; Jensen, M Fuglsang; Hofmann, Ph

    2010-06-25

    An energy gap between the valence and the conduction band is the defining property of a semiconductor, and the gap size plays a crucial role in the design of semiconductor devices. We show that the presence of a two-dimensional electron gas near to the surface of a semiconductor can significantly alter the size of its band gap through many-body effects caused by its high electron density, resulting in a surface band gap that is much smaller than that in the bulk. Apart from reconciling a number of disparate previous experimental findings, the results suggest an entirely new route to spatially inhomogeneous band-gap engineering.

  20. Weissenberg reflection high-energy electron diffraction for surface crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abukawa, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Tomoyuki; Yajima, Kentaro; Yoshimura, Koji

    2006-12-15

    The principle of a Weissenberg camera is applied to surface crystallographic analysis by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. By removing inelastic electrons and measuring hundreds of patterns as a function of sample rotation angle phi, kinematical analysis can be performed over a large volume of reciprocal space. The data set is equivalent to a three-dimensional stack of Weissenberg photographs. The method is applied to analysis of an Si(111)-square root of 3 x square root of 3-Ag surface, and the structural data obtained are in excellent agreement with the known atomic structure.

  1. Comparison of MODIS Land Surface Temperature and Air Temperature over the Continental USA Meteorological Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Bounoua, Lahouari; Imhoff, Marc L.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Thome, Kurtis

    2014-01-01

    The National Land Cover Database (NLCD) Impervious Surface Area (ISA) and MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the surface-temperature-based urban heat island's (UHIS) signature on LST amplitude over the continental USA and to make comparisons to local air temperatures. Air-temperature-based UHIs (UHIA), calculated using the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) daily air temperatures, are compared with UHIS for urban areas in different biomes during different seasons. NLCD ISA is used to define urban and rural temperatures and to stratify the sampling for LST and air temperatures. We find that the MODIS LST agrees well with observed air temperature during the nighttime, but tends to overestimate it during the daytime, especially during summer and in nonforested areas. The minimum air temperature analyses show that UHIs in forests have an average UHIA of 1 C during the summer. The UHIS, calculated from nighttime LST, has similar magnitude of 1-2 C. By contrast, the LSTs show a midday summer UHIS of 3-4 C for cities in forests, whereas the average summer UHIA calculated from maximum air temperature is close to 0 C. In addition, the LSTs and air temperatures difference between 2006 and 2011 are in agreement, albeit with different magnitude.

  2. Regulation of electron temperature gradient turbulence by zonal flows driven by trapped electron modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asahi, Y., E-mail: y.asahi@nr.titech.ac.jp; Tsutsui, H.; Tsuji-Iio, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    Turbulent transport caused by electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes was investigated by means of gyrokinetic simulations. It was found that the ETG turbulence can be regulated by meso-scale zonal flows driven by trapped electron modes (TEMs), which are excited with much smaller growth rates than those of ETG modes. The zonal flows of which radial wavelengths are in between the ion and the electron banana widths are not shielded by trapped ions nor electrons, and hence they are effectively driven by the TEMs. It was also shown that an E × B shearing rate of the TEM-driven zonal flows is larger than or comparable to the growth rates of long-wavelength ETG modes and TEMs, which make a main contribution to the turbulent transport before excitation of the zonal flows.

  3. Electronic structure of disordered alloys, surfaces and interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Turek, Ilja; Kudrnovský, Josef; Šob, Mojmír; Weinberger, Peter

    1997-01-01

    At present, there is an increasing interest in the prediction of properties of classical and new materials such as substitutional alloys, their surfaces, and metallic or semiconductor multilayers. A detailed understanding based on a thus of the utmost importance for fu­ microscopic, parameter-free approach is ture developments in solid state physics and materials science. The interrela­ tion between electronic and structural properties at surfaces plays a key role for a microscopic understanding of phenomena as diverse as catalysis, corrosion, chemisorption and crystal growth. Remarkable progress has been made in the past 10-15 years in the understand­ ing of behavior of ideal crystals and their surfaces by relating their properties to the underlying electronic structure as determined from the first principles. Similar studies of complex systems like imperfect surfaces, interfaces, and mul­ tilayered structures seem to be accessible by now. Conventional band-structure methods, however, are of limited use ...

  4. Features of Ion-Electronic Emission from Surface of Semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kurochka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of the research value of the current of the secondary electrons in the ion-beam etching of various semiconductors. Shows the setup and electrical circuit of the experiment. An experimental study to determine the dependence of the current of the secondary electrons from the band gap Eg and the height of the potential barrier (electron affinity eχ. It is shown that in the conditions of ion-beam etching of the semiconductor is the penetration of the electric field, which leads to a shift of the energy levels of electrons in the surface layer. Found that the ion-electronic signal emission silicon n-type is higher than the p-type silicon.

  5. Fiber-Optic Surface Temperature Sensor Based on Modal Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Musin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatially-integrated surface temperature sensing is highly useful when it comes to controlling processes, detecting hazardous conditions or monitoring the health and safety of equipment and people. Fiber-optic sensing based on modal interference has shown great sensitivity to temperature variation, by means of cost-effective image-processing of few-mode interference patterns. New developments in the field of sensor configuration, as described in this paper, include an innovative cooling and heating phase discrimination functionality and more precise measurements, based entirely on the image processing of interference patterns. The proposed technique was applied to the measurement of the integrated surface temperature of a hollow cylinder and compared with a conventional measurement system, consisting of an infrared camera and precision temperature probe. As a result, the optical technique is in line with the reference system. Compared with conventional surface temperature probes, the optical technique has the following advantages: low heat capacity temperature measurement errors, easier spatial deployment, and replacement of multiple angle infrared camera shooting and the continuous monitoring of surfaces that are not visually accessible.

  6. Electron Scattering at Surfaces and Interfaces of Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Pengyuan

    The effect of surfaces on the electron transport at reduced scales is attracting continuous interest due to its broad impact on both the understanding of materials properties and their application for nanoelectronics. The size dependence of for conductor's electrical resistivity rho due to electron surface scattering is most commonly described within the framework of Fuchs and Sondheimer (FS) and their various extensions, which uses a phenomenological scattering parameter p to define the probability of electrons being elastically (i.e. specularly) scattered by the surface without causing an increase of rho at reduced size. However, a basic understanding of what surface chemistry and structure parameters determine the specularity p is still lacking. In addition, the assumption of a spherical Fermi surface in the FS model is too simple for transition metals to give accurate account of the actual surface scattering effect. The goal of this study is to develop an understanding of the physics governing electron surface/interface scattering in transition metals and to study the significance of their Fermi surface shape on surface scattering. The advancement of the scientific knowledge in electron surface and interface scattering of transition metals can provide insights into how to design high-conductivity nanowires that will facilitate the viable development of advanced integrated circuits, thermoelectric power generation and spintronics. Sequential in situ and ex situ transport measurements as a function of surface chemistry demonstrate that electron surface/interface scattering can be engineered by surface doping, causing a decrease in the rho. For instance, the rho of 9.3-nm-thick epitaxial and polycrystalline Cu is reduced by 11--13% when coated with 0.75 nm Ni. This is due to electron surface scattering which exhibits a specularity p = 0.7 for the Cu-vacuum interface that transitions to completely diffuse (p = 0) when exposed to air. In contrast, Ni-coated surfaces

  7. Surface modification of pure titanium by pulsed electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.D. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Laboratoired' Etude des Microstructures et de Mecanique des Materiaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Universite Paul Verlaine - Metz, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France); Hao, S.Z., E-mail: ebeam@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, X.N. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Dong, C., E-mail: dong@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Grosdidier, T., E-mail: Thierry.grosdidier@univ-metz.fr [Laboratoired' Etude des Microstructures et de Mecanique des Materiaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Universite Paul Verlaine - Metz, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France)

    2011-04-15

    The microstructure, hardness and corrosion resistance of commercially pure Ti treated by low energy high current pulsed electron beam (LEHCPEB) have been investigated. The thin near-surface melted layer rapidly solidified into {beta} and subsequently transformed into ultrafine {alpha}' martensite. This has led to a drastic improvement of the corrosion properties and a significant increase (more than 60%) in hardness of the top surface.

  8. Positron studies of surfaces, structure and electronic properties of nanocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    Eijt, S. W. H.; Barbiellini, B.; Houtepen, A.J.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Bansil, A.

    2007-01-01

    A brief review is given of recent positron studies of metal and semiconductor nanocrystals. The prospects offered by positron annihilation as a sensitive method to access nanocrystal (NC) properties are described and compared with other experimental methods. The tunability of the electronic structure of nanocrystals underlies their great potential for application in many areas. Owing to their large surface-to-volume ratio, the surfaces and interfaces of NCs play a crucial role in determining ...

  9. Assessment of broiler surface temperature variation when exposed to different air temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GR Nascimento

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effect of the air temperature variation on the mean surface temperature (MST of 7- to 35-day-old broiler chickens using infrared thermometry to estimate MST, and to study surface temperature variation of the wings, head, legs, back and comb as affected by air temperature and broiler age. One hundred Cobb® broilers were used in the experiment. Starting on day 7, 10 birds were weekly selected at random, housed in an environmental chamber and reared under three distinct temperatures (18, 25 and 32 ºC to record their thermal profile using an infrared thermal camera. The recorded images were processed to estimate MST by selecting the whole area of the bird within the picture and comparing it with the values obtained using selected equations in literature, and to record the surface temperatures of the body parts. The MST estimated by infrared images were not statistically different (p > 0.05 from the values obtained by the equations. MST values significantly increased (p < 0.05 when the air temperature increased, but were not affected by bird age. However, age influenced the difference between MST and air temperature, which was highest on day 14. The technique of infrared thermal image analysis was useful to estimate the mean surface temperature of broiler chickens.

  10. Investigating the effect of surface water - groundwater interactions on stream temperature using Distributed temperature sensing and instream temperature model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karthikeyan, Matheswaran; Blemmer, Morten; Mortensen, Julie Flor;

    2011-01-01

    Surface water–groundwater interactions at the stream interface influences, and at times controls the stream temperature, a critical water property driving biogeochemical processes. This study investigates the effects of these interactions on temperature of Stream Elverdamsåen in Denmark using...... the Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system and instream temperature modelling. Locations of surface water–groundwater interactions were identified from the temperature data collected over a 2-km stream reach using a DTS system with 1-m spatial and 5-min temporal resolution. The stream under consideration...... exhibits three distinct thermal regimes within a 2 km reach length due to two major interactions. An energy balance model is used to simulate the instream temperature and to quantify the effect of these interactions on the stream temperature. This research demonstrates the effect of reach level small scale...

  11. Electron scattering at surfaces and grain boundaries in thin Au films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriquez, Ricardo [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Casilla 110-V, Valparaíso (Chile); Flores, Marcos; Moraga, Luis [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Blanco Encalada 2008, Casilla 487-3, Santiago 8370449 (Chile); Kremer, German [Bachillerato, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Santiago 7800024 (Chile); González-Fuentes, Claudio [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Casilla 110-V, Valparaíso (Chile); Munoz, Raul C., E-mail: ramunoz@ing.uchile.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Blanco Encalada 2008, Casilla 487-3, Santiago 8370449 (Chile)

    2013-05-15

    The electron scattering at surfaces and grain boundaries is investigated using polycrystalline Au films deposited onto mica substrates. We vary the three length scales associated with: (i) electron scattering in the bulk, that at temperature T is characterized by the electronic mean free path in the bulk ℓ{sub 0}(T); (ii) electron-surface scattering, that is characterized by the film thickness t; (iii) electron-grain boundary scattering, that is characterized by the mean grain diameter D. We varied independently the film thickness from approximately 50 nm to about 100 nm, and the typical grain size making up the samples from 12 nm to 160 nm. We also varied the scale of length associated with electron scattering in the bulk by measuring the resistivity of each specimen at temperatures T, 4 K < T < 300 K. Cooling the samples to 4 K increases ℓ{sub 0}(T) by approximately 2 orders of magnitude. Detailed measurements of the grain size distribution as well as surface roughness of each sample were performed with a Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM). We compare, for the first time, theoretical predictions with resistivity data employing the two theories available that incorporate the effect of both electron-surface as well as electron-grain boundary scattering acting simultaneously: the theory of A.F. Mayadas and M. Shatzkes, Phys. Rev. 1 1382 (1970) (MS), and that of G. Palasantzas, Phys. Rev. B 58 9685 (1998). We eliminate adjustable parameters from the resistivity data analysis, by using as input the grain size distribution as well as the surface roughness measured with the STM on each sample. The outcome is that both theories provide a fair representation of both the temperature as well as the thickness dependence of the resistivity data, but yet there are marked differences between the resistivity predicted by these theories. In the case of the MS theory, when the average grain diameter D is significantly smaller than ℓ{sub 0}(300) = 37 nm, the electron mean

  12. Electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET: Michelson interferometer, new absolute calibration, and determination of electron temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmuck, S; Fessey, J; Gerbaud, T; Alper, B; Beurskens, M N A; de la Luna, E; Sirinelli, A; Zerbini, M

    2012-12-01

    At the fusion experiment JET, a Michelson interferometer is used to measure the spectrum of the electron cyclotron emission in the spectral range 70-500 GHz. The interferometer is absolutely calibrated using the hot/cold technique and, in consequence, the spatial profile of the plasma electron temperature is determined from the measurements. The current state of the interferometer hardware, the calibration setup, and the analysis technique for calibration and plasma operation are described. A new, full-system, absolute calibration employing continuous data acquisition has been performed recently and the calibration method and results are presented. The noise level in the measurement is very low and as a result the electron cyclotron emission spectrum and thus the spatial profile of the electron temperature are determined to within ±5% and in the most relevant region to within ±2%. The new calibration shows that the absolute response of the system has decreased by about 15% compared to that measured previously and possible reasons for this change are presented. Temperature profiles measured with the Michelson interferometer are compared with profiles measured independently using Thomson scattering diagnostics, which have also been recently refurbished and recalibrated, and agreement within experimental uncertainties is obtained.

  13. Two-temperature radiative shocks with electron thermal conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Shull, J. Michael; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of electron thermal conduction on radiative shock structure is studied for both one- and two-temperature plasmas. The dimensionless ratio of the conductive length to the cooling length determines whether or not conduction is important, and shock jump conditions with conduction are established for a collisionless shock front. Approximate solutions are obtained, with the assumptions that the ionization state of the gas is constant and the cooling rate is a function of temperature alone. In the absence of magnetic fields, these solutions indicate that conduction noticeably influences normal-abundance interstellar shocks with velocities 50-100 km/s and dramatically affects metal-dominated shocks over a wide range of shock velocities.

  14. Surface compositional variations of Mo-47Re alloy as a function of temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekje, S.J.; Outlaw, R.A.; Sankaran, S.N.

    1993-12-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium alloys are candidate materials for the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) as well as for other applications in generic hypersonics. These materials are expected to be subjected to high-temperature (above 1200 C) casual hydrogen (below 50 torr), which could potentially degrade the material strength. Since the uptake of hydrogen may be controlled by the contaminant surface barriers, a study of Mo-47Re was conducted to examine the variations in surface composition as a function of temperature from 25 C to 1000 C. Pure molybdenum and rhenium were also examined and the results compared with those for the alloy. The analytical techniques employed were Auger electron spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, ion scattering spectroscopy, and x ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The native surface was rich in metallic oxides that disappeared at elevated temperatures. As the temperature increased, the carbon and oxygen disappeared by 800 C and the surface was subsequently populated by the segregation of silicon, presumably from the grain boundaries. The alloy readily chemisorbed oxygen, which disappeared with heating. The disappearance temperature progressively increased for successive dosings. When the alloy was exposed to 800 torr of hydrogen at 900 C for 1 hour, no hydrogen interaction was observed.

  15. Boiling Heat Transfer Measurements on Highly Conductive Surfaces Using Microscale Heater and Temperature Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Bae, S. W.; Whitten, M. W.; Mullen, J. D.; Quine, R. W.; Kalkur, T. S.

    1999-01-01

    Two systems have been developed to study boiling heat transfer on the microscale. The first system utilizes a 32 x 32 array of diodes to measure the local temperature fluctuations during boiling on a silicon wafer heated from below. The second system utilizes an array of 96 microscale heaters each maintained at constant surface temperature using electronic feedback loops. The power required to keep each heater at constant temperature is measured, enabling the local heat transfer coefficient to be determined. Both of these systems as well as some preliminary results are discussed.

  16. Uncertainties and shortcomings of ground surface temperature histories derived from inversion of temperature logs

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, Andreas; Rath, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Analysing borehole temperature data in terms of ground surface history can add useful information to reconstructions of past climates. Therefore, a rigorous assessment of uncertainties and error sources is a necessary prerequisite for the meaningful interpretation of such ground surface temperature histories. This study analyses the most prominent sources of uncertainty. The diffusive nature of the process makes the inversion relatively robust against incomplete knowledge of the thermal diffu...

  17. Very low electron temperature in warm dense matter formed by focused picosecond soft x-ray laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishino, Masahiko, E-mail: ishino.masahiko@jaea.go.jp; Hasegawa, Noboru; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Yamagiwa, Mitsuru [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7, Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Pikuz, Tatiana [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 13-2, Izhorskaya Street, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 1-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Skobelev, Igor [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 13-2, Izhorskaya Street, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, 31, Kashirskoe Shosse, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Faenov, Anatoly [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 13-2, Izhorskaya Street, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Institute for Academic Initiatives, Osaka University, 1-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Inogamov, Nail [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 1-A, Akademika Semenova av., Chernogolovka, Moscow Region 142432 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    We investigated the optical emission from the ablating surfaces induced by the irradiations of soft x-ray laser (SXRL) pulses with the aim of estimation of the maximum electron temperature. No emission signal in the spectral range of 400–800 nm could be observed despite the formation of damage structures on the target surfaces. Hence, we estimated an upper limit for the electron temperature of 0.4–0.7 eV for the process duration of 100–1000 ps. Our results imply that the ablation and/or surface modification by the SXRL is not accompanied by plasma formation but is induced by thermo-mechanical pressure, which is so called a spallative ablation. This spallative ablation process occurs in the low electron temperature region of a non-equilibrium state of warm dense matter.

  18. Be(1010): A test ground for surface electron-phonon coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shu-Jung; Sprunger, Philip; Plummer, Ward; Yang, Wanli; Brouet, Veronique; Zhou, Xingjiang; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2003-03-01

    The electron-phonon coupling on the Be(10bar10) surface has been investigated with high-resolution photoemission examining temperature dependence and dispersion distortion near the Fermi energy of the two zone boundary surface states. Two surface states (S1 and S2) coexist in a large gap in the bulk projection at the surface zone boundary barA. S1 is localized near the surface in the middle of the gap while S2 is near the bottom band edge and penetrates into the bulk. Using both a Debye and Einstein model to fit the temperature-dependent surface state line width produces an electron-phonon coupling strength with parameters, λ _S1 = 0.647 and λ _S2 = 0.491, more than two times larger than the bulk value, λ _bulk = 0.24. S2 data was measured with a 3D Debye model but the S1 data required an Einstein model with an optical phonon at energy 64 meV. Direct 2D images of the dispersion of the S1 state show dramatic distortion of the electron band dispersion within 64 meV of the Fermi energy. This data is used to extract the real and imaginary parts of the self-energy. Founded by NSF DMR-0105232 and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725

  19. Peptide-functionalized semiconductor surfaces: strong surface electronic effects from minor alterations to backbone composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matmor, Maayan; Lengyel, George A; Horne, W Seth; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2017-02-22

    The use of non-canonical amino acids is a powerful way to control protein structure. Here, we show that subtle changes to backbone composition affect the ability of a dipeptide to modify solid surface electronic properties. The extreme sensitivity of the interactions to the peptide structure suggests potential applications in improving the performance of electronic devices.

  20. Extremely confined gap surface-plasmon modes excited by electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Stenger, Nicolas; Pors, Anders Lambertus

    2014-01-01

    High-spatial and energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) can be used for detailed characterization of localized and propagating surface-plasmon excitations in metal nanostructures, giving insight into fundamental physical phenomena and various plasmonic effects. Here, applying...

  1. A micromachined surface stress sensor with electronic readout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlen, E.T.; Weinberg, M.S.; Zapata, A.M.; Borenstein, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    A micromachined surface stress sensor has been fabricated and integrated off chip with a low-noise, differential capacitance, electronic readout circuit. The differential capacitance signal is modulated with a high frequency carrier signal, and the output signal is synchronously demodulated and filt

  2. Electron capture by highly charged ions from surfaces and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, F.

    2008-01-11

    In this study highly charged ions produced in Electron Beam Ion Traps are used to investigate electron capture from surfaces and gases. The experiments with gas targets focus on spectroscopic measurements of the K-shell x-rays emitted at the end of radiative cascades following electron capture into Rydberg states of Ar{sup 17+} and Ar{sup 18+} ions as a function of collision energy. The ions are extracted from an Electron Beam Ion Trap at an energy of 2 keVu{sup -1}, charge-selected and then decelerated down to 5 eVu{sup -1} for interaction with an argon gas target. For decreasing collision energies a shift to electron capture into low orbital angular momentum capture states is observed. Comparative measurements of the K-shell x-ray emission following electron capture by Ar{sup 17+} and Ar{sup 18+} ions from background gas in the trap are made and a discrepancy in the results compared with those from the extraction experiments is found. Possible explanations are discussed. For the investigation of electron capture from surfaces, highly charged ions are extracted from an Electron Beam Ion Trap at energies of 2 to 3 keVu{sup -1}, charge-selected and directed onto targets comprising arrays of nanoscale apertures in silicon nitride membranes. The highly charged ions implemented are Ar{sup 16+} and Xe{sup 44+} and the aperture targets are formed by focused ion beam drilling in combination with ion beam assisted thin film deposition, achieving hole diameters of 50 to 300 nm and aspect ratios of 1:5 to 3:2. After transport through the nanoscale apertures the ions pass through an electrostatic charge state analyzer and are detected. The percentage of electron capture from the aperture walls is found to be much lower than model predictions and the results are discussed in terms of a capillary guiding mechanism. (orig.)

  3. High-Temperature Surface-Acoustic-Wave Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoliang; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft-engine rotating equipment usually operates at high temperature and stress. Non-invasive inspection of microcracks in those components poses a challenge for the non-destructive evaluation community. A low-profile ultrasonic guided wave sensor can detect cracks in situ. The key feature of the sensor is that it should withstand high temperatures and excite strong surface wave energy to inspect surface/subsurface cracks. As far as the innovators know at the time of this reporting, there is no existing sensor that is mounted to the rotor disks for crack inspection; the most often used technology includes fluorescent penetrant inspection or eddy-current probes for disassembled part inspection. An efficient, high-temperature, low-profile surface acoustic wave transducer design has been identified and tested for nondestructive evaluation of structures or materials. The development is a Sol-Gel bismuth titanate-based surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor that can generate efficient surface acoustic waves for crack inspection. The produced sensor is very thin (submillimeter), and can generate surface waves up to 540 C. Finite element analysis of the SAW transducer design was performed to predict the sensor behavior, and experimental studies confirmed the results. One major uniqueness of the Sol-Gel bismuth titanate SAW sensor is that it is easy to implement to structures of various shapes. With a spray coating process, the sensor can be applied to surfaces of large curvatures. Second, the sensor is very thin (as a coating) and has very minimal effect on airflow or rotating equipment imbalance. Third, it can withstand temperatures up to 530 C, which is very useful for engine applications where high temperature is an issue.

  4. Microscopic theory of electron absorption by plasma-facing surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronold, F. X.; Fehske, H.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a method for calculating the probability with which the wall of a plasma absorbs an electron at low energy. The method, based on an invariant embedding principle, expresses the electron absorption probability as the probability for transmission through the wall’s long-range surface potential times the probability to stay inside the wall despite of internal backscattering. To illustrate the approach we apply it to a SiO2 surface. Besides emission of optical phonons inside the wall we take elastic scattering at imperfections of the plasma-wall interface into account and obtain absorption probabilities significantly less than unity in accordance with available electron-beam scattering data but in disagreement with the widely used perfect absorber model.

  5. Studies on electronic structure of GaN(0001) surface

    CERN Document Server

    Xie Chang Kun; Xu Fa Qiang; Deng Rui; Liu Feng; Yibulaxin, K

    2002-01-01

    An electronic structure investigation on GaN(0001) is reported. The authors employ a full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FPLAPW) approach to calculate the partial density of state, which is in agreement with previous experimental results. The effects of the Ga3d semi-core levels on the electronic structure of GaN are discussed. The valence-electronic structure of the wurtzite GaN(0001) surface is investigated using synchrotron radiation excited angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The bulk bands dispersion along GAMMA A direction in the Brillouin zones is measured using normal-emission spectra by changing photon-energy. The band structure derived from authors' experimental data is compared well with the results of authors' FPLAPW calculation. Furthermore, off-normal emission spectra are also measured along the GAMMA K and GAMMA M directions. Two surface states are identified, and their dispersions are characterized

  6. Microscopic theory of electron absorption by plasma-facing surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bronold, Franz X

    2016-01-01

    We describe a method for calculating the probability with which the wall of a plasma absorbs an electron at low energy. The method, based on an invariant embedding principle, expresses the electron absorption probability as the probability for transmission through the wall's long-range surface potential times the probability to stay inside the wall despite of internal backscattering. To illustrate the approach we apply it to a \\SiOTwo\\ surface. Besides emission of optical phonons inside the wall we take elastic scattering at imperfections of the plasma-wall interface into account and obtain absorption probabilities significantly less than unity in accordance with available electron-beam scattering data but in disagreement with the widely used perfect absorber model.

  7. Investigation of surface properties of high temperature nitrided titanium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Koyuncu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of paper is to investigate surface properties of high temperature nitrided titanium alloys.Design/methodology/approach: In this study, surface modification of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy was made at various temperatures by plasma nitriding process. Plasma nitriding treatment was performed in 80% N2-20% H2 gas mixture, for treatment times of 2-15 h at the temperatures of 700-1000°C. Surface properties of plasma nitrided Ti6Al4V alloy were examined by metallographic inspection, X-Ray diffraction and Vickers hardness.Findings: Two layers were determined by optic inspection on the samples that were called the compound and diffusion layers. Compound layer contain TiN and Ti2N nitrides, XRD results support in this formations. Maximum hardness was obtained at 10h treatment time and 1000°C treatment temperature. Micro hardness tests showed that hardness properties of the nitrided samples depend on treatment time and temperature.Practical implications: Titanium and its alloys have very attractive properties for many industries. But using of titanium and its alloys is of very low in mechanical engineering applications because of poor tribological properties.Originality/value: The nitriding of titanium alloy surfaces using plasma processes has already reached the industrial application stage in the biomedical field.

  8. Surface Intermediates on Metal Electrodes at High Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Jacobsen, Torben; Bay, Lasse

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms widely suggested for the O2-reduc-tion or H2-oxidation SOFC reactions involve inter-mediate O/H species adsorbed on the electrode surface. The presence of these intermediates is investigated by linear sweep voltammetry. In airat moderate temperatures (500øC) Pt in contact with YSZ ...... is covered with adsorbed oxygen which vanishes at high temperature (1000øC). On Ni (YSZ) a specific layer of NiO is observed abovethe equilibrium potential while no surface species can identified at SOFC anode conditions....

  9. Determination of sea surface temperatures from microwave and IR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaswamy, S.; Grover, J.

    1982-01-01

    Microwave measurements from the Nimbus 7 SMMR were used to derive the atmospheric precipitable water, which was then used to obtain the atmospheric correction for use with AVHRR thermal IR measurements to obtain sea surface temperature (SST). The resulting SST's were compared with the NOAA operational sea surface temperature measurements, and the two sets of measurements were found to be in reasonable agreement. The average residuals between the two sets of measurements was 0.15 K with the NOAA operational SST's being slightly greater.

  10. Surface intermediates on metal electrodes at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Jacobsen, Torben; Bay, Lasse;

    1998-01-01

    in contact with YSZ is covered with adsorbed oxygen which vanishes at high temperature (1000 degrees C). On Ni (YSZ) a specific layer of NiO is observed above the equilibrium potential while no surface species involving hydrogen can be identified at SOFC anode conditions. (C) 1998 Published by Elsevier......The mechanisms widely conceived for the O(2)-reduction or H(2)-oxidation reactions in SOFC's involve intermediate O/H species adsorbed on the electrode surface. The presence of these intermediates is investigated by linear sweep voltammetry. In air at moderate temperatures (500 degrees C) Pt...

  11. Surface air temperature variability in global climate models

    CERN Document Server

    Davy, Richard

    2012-01-01

    New results from the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) and multiple global reanalysis datasets are used to investigate the relationship between the mean and standard deviation in the surface air temperature. A combination of a land-sea mask and orographic filter were used to investigate the geographic region with the strongest correlation and in all cases this was found to be for low-lying over-land locations. This result is consistent with the expectation that differences in the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere are an important factor in determining the surface air temperature response to forcing.

  12. Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen at nonpolar GaN (1 1 ¯ 00 ) surfaces: Kinetics and impact on surface vibrational and electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperakis, L.; Neugebauer, J.; Himmerlich, M.; Krischok, S.; Rink, M.; Kröger, J.; Polyakov, V. M.

    2017-05-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen at nonpolar GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surfaces and its impact on the electronic and vibrational properties is investigated using surface electron spectroscopy in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For the surface mediated dissociation of H2 and the subsequent adsorption of H, an energy barrier of 0.55 eV has to be overcome. The calculated kinetic surface phase diagram indicates that the reaction is kinetically hindered at low pressures and low temperatures. At higher temperatures ab initio thermodynamics show, that the H-free surface is energetically favored. To validate these theoretical predictions experiments at room temperature and under ultrahigh vacuum conditions were performed. They reveal that molecular hydrogen does not dissociatively adsorb at the GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surface. Only activated atomic hydrogen atoms attach to the surface. At temperatures above 820 K, the attached hydrogen gets desorbed. The adsorbed hydrogen atoms saturate the dangling bonds of the gallium and nitrogen surface atoms and result in an inversion of the Ga-N surface dimer buckling. The signatures of the Ga-H and N-H vibrational modes on the H-covered surface have experimentally been identified and are in good agreement with the DFT calculations of the surface phonon modes. Both theory and experiment show that H adsorption results in a removal of occupied and unoccupied intragap electron states of the clean GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surface and a reduction of the surface upward band bending by 0.4 eV. The latter mechanism largely reduces surface electron depletion.

  13. Observing the Agulhas Current with sea surface temperature and altimetry data: challenges and perspectives

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Krug, Marjolaine, J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available -Red Sea Surface Temperature datasets still suffer from inadequate cloud masking algorithms, particularly in regions of strong temperature gradient. Despite both Sea Surface Height and Sea Surface Temperature observations being severely compromised...

  14. The Land Surface Temperature Impact to Land Cover Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I.; Abu Samah, A.; Fauzi, R.; Noor, N. M.

    2016-06-01

    Land cover type is an important signature that is usually used to understand the interaction between the ground surfaces with the local temperature. Various land cover types such as high density built up areas, vegetation, bare land and water bodies are areas where heat signature are measured using remote sensing image. The aim of this study is to analyse the impact of land surface temperature on land cover types. The objectives are 1) to analyse the mean temperature for each land cover types and 2) to analyse the relationship of temperature variation within land cover types: built up area, green area, forest, water bodies and bare land. The method used in this research was supervised classification for land cover map and mono window algorithm for land surface temperature (LST) extraction. The statistical analysis of post hoc Tukey test was used on an image captured on five available images. A pixel-based change detection was applied to the temperature and land cover images. The result of post hoc Tukey test for the images showed that these land cover types: built up-green, built up-forest, built up-water bodies have caused significant difference in the temperature variation. However, built up-bare land did not show significant impact at p<0.05. These findings show that green areas appears to have a lower temperature difference, which is between 2° to 3° Celsius compared to urban areas. The findings also show that the average temperature and the built up percentage has a moderate correlation with R2 = 0.53. The environmental implications of these interactions can provide some insights for future land use planning in the region.

  15. Calculation of surface dose in rotational total skin electron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla, C.; Heese, R.; Pla, M.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    1984-07-01

    A single-field rotational total skin electron irradiation technique has recently been developed at the McGill University for treatment of skin malignancies. The dose received by a given surface point during rotation in a uniform large electron field depends on the radius of rotation of the surface point, on the local radius of curvature of the contour in the vicinity of the point of interest, and on the shadows cast by limbs (arms upon trunk or head and neck, and legs upon each other). A method for calculating the surface dose distribution on a patient is presented accounting for the various parameters affecting the dose. A series of measurements were performed with polystyrene and a humanoid phantom, and an excellent agreement between measured and calculated dose distributions was obtained.

  16. Experimental evidence of excited electron number density and temperature effects on electron-phonon coupling in gold films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Gaskins, John T.; Foley, Brian M.; Cheaito, Ramez; Hopkins, Patrick E., E-mail: phopkins@virginia.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2015-01-28

    The electronic transport properties of metals with weak electron-phonon coupling can be influenced by non-thermal electrons. Relaxation processes involving non-thermal electrons competing with the thermalized electron system have led to inconsistencies in the understanding of how electrons scatter and relax with the less energetic lattice. Recent theoretical and computational works have shown that the rate of energy relaxation with the metallic lattice will change depending on the thermalization state of the electrons. Even though 20 years of experimental works have focused on understanding and isolating these electronic relaxation mechanisms with short pulsed irradiation, discrepancies between these existing works have not clearly answered the fundamental question of the competing effects between non-thermal and thermal electrons losing energy to the lattice. In this work, we demonstrate the ability to measure the electron relaxation for varying degrees of both electron-electron and electron-phonon thermalization. This series of measurements of electronic relaxation over a predicted effective electron temperature range up to ∼3500 K and minimum lattice temperatures of 77 K validate recent computational and theoretical works that theorize how a nonequilibrium distribution of electrons transfers energy to the lattice. Utilizing this wide temperature range during pump-probe measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, we explain discrepancies in the past two decades of literature of electronic relaxation rates. We experimentally demonstrate that the electron-phonon coupling factor in gold increases with increasing lattice temperature and laser fluences. Specifically, we show that at low laser fluences corresponding to small electron perturbations, energy relaxation between electrons and phonons is mainly governed by non-thermal electrons, while at higher laser fluences, non-thermal electron scattering with the lattice is less influential on the energy relaxation

  17. Secondary electron yield of Cu technical surfaces: Dependence on electron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larciprete, R.; Grosso, D. R.; Commisso, M.; Flammini, R.; Cimino, R.

    2013-01-01

    The secondary emission yield (SEY) properties of colaminated Cu samples for LHC beam screens are correlated to the surface chemical composition determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The surface of the as-received samples is characterized by the presence of significant quantities of contaminating adsorbates and by the maximum of the SEY curve (δmax⁡) being as high as 2.1. After extended electron scrubbing at kinetic energy of 10 and 500 eV, the δmax⁡ value drops to the ultimate values of 1.35 and 1.1, respectively. In both cases the surface oxidized phases are significantly reduced, whereas only in the sample scrubbed at 500 eV the formation of a graphitic-like C layer is observed. We find that the electron scrubbing of technical Cu surfaces can be described as occurring in two steps: the first step consists in the electron-induced desorption of weakly bound contaminants that occurs indifferently at 10 and at 500 eV and corresponds to a partial decrease of δmax⁡; the second step, activated by more energetic electrons and becoming evident at high doses, increases the number of graphitic-like C-C bonds via the dissociation of adsorbates already contaminating the as-received surface or accumulating on this surface during irradiation. Our results demonstrate how the kinetic energy of impinging electrons is a crucial parameter when conditioning the surfaces of Cu and other metals by means of electron-induced chemical processing.

  18. Daytime sensible heat flux estimation over heterogeneous surfaces using multitemporal land-surface temperature observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellví, F.; Cammalleri, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Maltese, A.; Rossi, F.

    2016-05-01

    Equations based on surface renewal (SR) analysis to estimate the sensible heat flux (H) require as input the mean ramp amplitude and period observed in the ramp-like pattern of the air temperature measured at high frequency. A SR-based method to estimate sensible heat flux (HSR-LST) requiring only low-frequency measurements of the air temperature, horizontal mean wind speed, and land-surface temperature as input was derived and tested under unstable conditions over a heterogeneous canopy (olive grove). HSR-LST assumes that the mean ramp amplitude can be inferred from the difference between land-surface temperature and mean air temperature through a linear relationship and that the ramp frequency is related to a wind shear scale characteristic of the canopy flow. The land-surface temperature was retrieved by integrating in situ sensing measures of thermal infrared energy emitted by the surface. The performance of HSR-LST was analyzed against flux tower measurements collected at two heights (close to and well above the canopy top). Crucial parameters involved in HSR-LST, which define the above mentioned linear relationship, were explained using the canopy height and the land surface temperature observed at sunrise and sunset. Although the olive grove can behave as either an isothermal or anisothermal surface, HSR-LST performed close to H measured using the eddy covariance and the Bowen ratio energy balance methods. Root mean square differences between HSR-LST and measured H were of about 55 W m-2. Thus, by using multitemporal thermal acquisitions, HSR-LST appears to bypass inconsistency between land surface temperature and the mean aerodynamic temperature. The one-source bulk transfer formulation for estimating H performed reliable after calibration against the eddy covariance method. After calibration, the latter performed similar to the proposed SR-LST method.

  19. New indexing and surface temperature analysis of exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Kashyap, J M; Safonova, M

    2016-01-01

    Study of exoplanets is the holy grail of present research in planetary sciences and astrobiology. Analysis of huge planetary data from space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler is directed ultimately at finding a planet similar to Earth\\-the Earth's twin, and answering the question of potential exo-habitability. The Earth Similarity Index (ESI) is a first step in this quest, ranging from 1 (Earth) to 0 (totally dissimilar to Earth). It was defined for the four physical parameters of a planet: radius, density, escape velocity and surface temperature. The ESI is further sub-divided into interior ESI (geometrical mean of radius and density) and surface ESI (geometrical mean of escape velocity and surface temperature). The challenge here is to determine which exoplanet parameter(s) is important in finding this similarity; how exactly the individual parameters entering the interior ESI and surface ESI are contributing to the global ESI. Since the surface temperature entering surface ESI is a non-observable quantity,...

  20. INVESTIGATION OF SURFACE TEMPERATURE IN HIGH-EFFICIENCY DEEP GRINDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Henghua; Cai Guangqi; Jin Tan

    2005-01-01

    A new thermal model with triangular heat flux distribution is given in high-efficiency deep grinding. The mathematical expressions are driven to calculate the surface temperature. The transient behavior of the maximum temperature on contact area is investigated in different grinding conditions with a J-type thermocouple. The maximum contact temperatures measured in different conditions are found to be between 1 000 ℃ and 1 500 ℃ in burn-out conditions. The experiment results show good agreement with the new thermal model.

  1. Chemistry of SOFC Cathode Surfaces: Fundamental Investigation and Tailoring of Electronic Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildiz, Bilge; Heski, Clemens

    2013-08-31

    1) Electron tunneling characteristics on La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSM) thin-film surfaces were studied up to 580oC in 10-3mbar oxygen pressure, using scanning tunneling microscopy/ spectroscopy (STM/STS). A threshold-like drop in the tunneling current was observed at positive bias in STS, which is interpreted as a unique indicator for the activation polarization in cation oxygen bonding on LSM cathodes. Sr-enrichment was found on the surface at high temperature using Auger electron spectroscopy, and was accompanied by a decrease in tunneling conductance in STS. This suggests that Sr-terminated surfaces are less active for electron transfer in oxygen reduction compared to Mn-terminated surfaces on LSM. 2) Effects of strain on the surface cation chemistry and the electronic structure are important to understand and control for attaining fast oxygen reduction kinetics on transition metal oxides. Here, we demonstrate and mechanistically interpret the strain coupling to Sr segregation, oxygen vacancy formation, and electronic structure on the surface of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSM) thin films as a model system. Our experimental results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy are discussed in light of our first principles-based calculations. A stronger Sr enrichment tendency and a more facile oxygen vacancy formation prevail for the tensile strained LSM surface. The electronic structure of the tensile strained LSM surface exhibits a larger band gap at room temperature, however, a higher tunneling conductance near the Fermi level than the compressively strained LSM at elevated temperatures in oxygen. Our findings suggest lattice strain as a key parameter to tune the reactivity of perovskite transition metal oxides with oxygen in solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. 3) Cation segregation on perovskite oxide surfaces affects vastly the oxygen reduction activity and stability of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes. A unified theory that explains the physical

  2. Chemistry of SOFC Cathode Surfaces: Fundamental Investigation and Tailoring of Electronic Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildiz, Bilge; Heski, Clemens

    2013-08-31

    1) Electron tunneling characteristics on La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSM) thin-film surfaces were studied up to 580oC in 10-3mbar oxygen pressure, using scanning tunneling microscopy/ spectroscopy (STM/STS). A threshold-like drop in the tunneling current was observed at positive bias in STS, which is interpreted as a unique indicator for the activation polarization in cation oxygen bonding on LSM cathodes. Sr-enrichment was found on the surface at high temperature using Auger electron spectroscopy, and was accompanied by a decrease in tunneling conductance in STS. This suggests that Sr-terminated surfaces are less active for electron transfer in oxygen reduction compared to Mn-terminated surfaces on LSM. 2) Effects of strain on the surface cation chemistry and the electronic structure are important to understand and control for attaining fast oxygen reduction kinetics on transition metal oxides. Here, we demonstrate and mechanistically interpret the strain coupling to Sr segregation, oxygen vacancy formation, and electronic structure on the surface of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSM) thin films as a model system. Our experimental results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy are discussed in light of our first principles-based calculations. A stronger Sr enrichment tendency and a more facile oxygen vacancy formation prevail for the tensile strained LSM surface. The electronic structure of the tensile strained LSM surface exhibits a larger band gap at room temperature, however, a higher tunneling conductance near the Fermi level than the compressively strained LSM at elevated temperatures in oxygen. Our findings suggest lattice strain as a key parameter to tune the reactivity of perovskite transition metal oxides with oxygen in solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. 3) Cation segregation on perovskite oxide surfaces affects vastly the oxygen reduction activity and stability of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes. A unified theory that explains the physical

  3. Temperature effect on the electron emission and charging of BN–SiO{sub 2} under low energy electron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belhaj, M., E-mail: Mohamed.Belhaj@onera.fr [The French Aerospace Lab, FR-31055 (France); Guerch, K.; Sarrailh, P. [The French Aerospace Lab, FR-31055 (France); Arcis, N. [CNES, 18 Avenue Édouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France)

    2015-11-01

    The BN–SiO{sub 2} is widely used as canal material in Hall Effect Thrusters. The electron emission yield under electron impact is considered as a key material parameter that affects the thrust efficiency. The effect of the temperature on the electron emission yield of BN–SiO{sub 2} was investigated. It is found that, the electron emission drop significantly when the temperature is increased from 22 °C to 800 °C. The aim here is to report our experimental results and to discuss the representativeness of electron emission data measured on ceramics at room temperature.

  4. The Remote Sensing of Surface Radiative Temperature over Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    remote sensing of surface radiative temperature over Barbados was undertaken using a PRT-5 attached to a light aircraft. Traverses across the centre of the island, over the rugged east coast area, and the urban area of Bridgetown were undertaken at different times of day and night in the last week of June and the first week of December, 1969. These traverses show that surface variations in long-wave radiation emission lie within plus or minus 5% of the observations over grass at a representative site. The quick response of the surface to sunset and sunrise was

  5. Native gallium adatoms discovered on atomically-smooth gallium nitride surfaces at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Khan; Foley, Andrew; Smith, Arthur R

    2015-03-11

    In advanced compound semiconductor devices, such as in quantum dot and quantum well systems, detailed atomic configurations at the growth surfaces are vital in determining the structural and electronic properties. Therefore, it is important to investigate the surface reconstructions in order to make further technological advancements. Usually, conventional semiconductor surfaces (e.g., arsenides, phosphides, and antimonides) are highly reactive due to the existence of a high density of group V (anion) surface dangling bonds. However, in the case of nitrides, group III rich growth conditions in molecular beam epitaxy are usually preferred leading to group III (Ga)-rich surfaces. Here, we use low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to reveal a uniform distribution of native gallium adatoms with a density of 0.3%-0.5% of a monolayer on the clean, as-grown surface of nitrogen polar GaN(0001̅) having the centered 6 × 12 reconstruction. Unseen at room temperature, these Ga adatoms are strongly bound to the surface but move with an extremely low surface diffusion barrier and a high density saturation coverage in thermodynamic equilibrium with Ga droplets. Furthermore, the Ga adatoms reveal an intrinsic surface chirality and an asymmetric site occupation. These observations can have important impacts in the understanding of gallium nitride surfaces.

  6. A comparison of all-weather land surface temperature products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Joao; Trigo, Isabel F.; Ghilain, Nicolas; Goettche, Frank-M.; Ermida, Sofia; Olesen, Folke-S.; Gellens-Meulenberghs, Françoise; Arboleda, Alirio

    2017-04-01

    The Satellite Application Facility on Land Surface Analysis (LSA-SAF, http://landsaf.ipma.pt) has been providing land surface temperature (LST) estimates using SEVIRI/MSG on an operational basis since 2006. The LSA-SAF service has since been extended to provide a wide range of satellite-based quantities over land surfaces, such as emissivity, albedo, radiative fluxes, vegetation state, evapotranspiration, and fire-related variables. Being based on infra-red measurements, the SEVIRI/MSG LST product is limited to clear-sky pixels only. Several all-weather LST products have been proposed by the scientific community either based on microwave observations or using Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer models to fill the gaps caused by clouds. The goal of this work is to provide a nearly gap-free operational all-weather LST product and compare these approaches. In order to estimate evapotranspiration and turbulent energy fluxes, the LSA-SAF solves the surface energy budget for each SEVIRI pixel, taking into account the physical and physiological processes occurring in vegetation canopies. This task is accomplished with an adapted SVAT model, which adopts some formulations and parameters of the Tiled ECMWF Scheme for Surface Exchanges over Land (TESSEL) model operated at the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), and using: 1) radiative inputs also derived by LSA-SAF, which includes surface albedo, down-welling fluxes and fire radiative power; 2) a land-surface characterization obtained by combining the ECOCLIMAP database with both LSA-SAF vegetation products and the H(ydrology)-SAF snow mask; 3) meteorological fields from ECMWF forecasts interpolated to SEVIRI pixels, and 4) soil moisture derived by the H-SAF and LST from LSA-SAF. A byproduct of the SVAT model is surface skin temperature, which is needed to close the surface energy balance. The model skin temperature corresponds to the radiative temperature of the interface between soil and atmosphere

  7. Visualizing Surface Plasmons with Photons, Photoelectrons, and Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Gong, Yu; Hage, F. S.; Cottom, J.; Joly, Alan G.; Brydson, R.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2016-06-21

    Both photons and electrons may be used to excite surface plasmon polaritons, the collective charge density fluctuations at the surface of metal nanostructures. By virtue of their nanoscopic and dissipative nature, a detailed characterization of surface plasmon (SP) eigenmodes in real space-time ultimately requires joint sub-nanometer spatial and sub-femtosecond temporal resolution. The latter realization has driven significant developments in the past few years, aimed at interrogating both localized and propagating SP modes over the relevant length and time scales. In this mini-review, we briefly highlight different techniques we employ to visualize the enhanced electric fields associated with SPs. Specifically, we discuss recent hyperspectral optical microscopy, tip-enhanced Raman nano-spectroscopy, nonlinear photoemission electron microscopy, as well as correlated scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements targeting prototypical plasmonic nanostructures and constructs. Through selected practical examples, we examine the information content in multidimensional images recorded by taking advantage of each of the aforementioned techniques. In effect, we illustrate how SPs can be visualized at the ultimate limits of space and time.

  8. Structure and stability of pyrophyllite edge surfaces: Effect of temperature and water chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kideok D.; Newton, Aric G.

    2016-10-01

    The surfaces of clay minerals, which are abundant in atmospheric mineral dust, serve as an important medium to catalyze ice nucleation. The lateral edge surface of 2:1 clay minerals is postulated to be a potential site for ice nucleation. However, experimental investigations of the edge surface structure itself have been limited compared to the basal planes of clay minerals. Density functional theory (DFT) computational studies have provided insights into the pyrophyllite edge surface. Pyrophyllite is an ideal surrogate mineral for the edge surfaces of 2:1 clay minerals as it possesses no or little structural charge. Of the two most-common hydrated edge surfaces, the AC edge, (1 1 0) surface in the monoclinic polytype notation, is predicted to be more stable than the B edge, (0 1 0) surface. These stabilities, however, were determined based on the total energies calculated at 0 K and did not consider environmental effects such as temperature and humidity. In this study, atomistic thermodynamics based on periodic DFT electronic calculations was applied to examine the effects of environmental variables on the structure and thermodynamic stability of the common edge surfaces in equilibrium with bulk pyrophyllite and water vapor. We demonstrate that the temperature-dependent vibrational energy of sorbed water molecules at the edge surface is a significant component of the surface free energy and cannot be neglected when determining the surface stability of pyrophyllite. The surface free energies were calculated as a function of temperature from 240 to 600 K and water chemical potential corresponding to conditions from ultrahigh vacuum to the saturation vapor pressure of water. We show that at lower water chemical potentials (dry conditions), the AC and B edge surfaces possessed similar stabilities; at higher chemical potentials (humid conditions) the AC edge surface was more stable than the B edge surface. At high temperatures, both surfaces showed similar stabilities

  9. Enzyme surface rigidity tunes the temperature dependence of catalytic rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-07-12

    The structural origin of enzyme adaptation to low temperature, allowing efficient catalysis of chemical reactions even near the freezing point of water, remains a fundamental puzzle in biocatalysis. A remarkable universal fingerprint shared by all cold-active enzymes is a reduction of the activation enthalpy accompanied by a more negative entropy, which alleviates the exponential decrease in chemical reaction rates caused by lowering of the temperature. Herein, we explore the role of protein surface mobility in determining this enthalpy-entropy balance. The effects of modifying surface rigidity in cold- and warm-active trypsins are demonstrated here by calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots and thermodynamic activation parameters for the peptide hydrolysis reaction, using extensive computer simulations. The protein surface flexibility is systematically varied by applying positional restraints, causing the remarkable effect of turning the cold-active trypsin into a variant with mesophilic characteristics without changing the amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we show that just restraining a key surface loop causes the same effect as a point mutation in that loop between the cold- and warm-active trypsin. Importantly, changes in the activation enthalpy-entropy balance of up to 10 kcal/mol are almost perfectly balanced at room temperature, whereas they yield significantly higher rates at low temperatures for the cold-adapted enzyme.

  10. Temperature limit values for touching cold surfaces with the fingertip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geng, Q.; Holme, I.; Hartog, E.A. den; Havenith, G.; Jay, O.; Malchaires, J.; Piette, A.; Rintama, H.; Rissanen, S.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: At the request of the European Commission and in the framework of the European Machinery Directive, research was performed in five different laboratories to develop specifications for surface temperature limit values for the short-term accidental touching of the fingertip with cold

  11. Temperature limit values for touching cold surfaces with the fingertip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geng, Q.; Holme, I.; Hartog, E.A. den; Havenith, G.; Jay, O.; Malchaires, J.; Piette, A.; Rintama, H.; Rissanen, S.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: At the request of the European Commission and in the framework of the European Machinery Directive, research was performed in five different laboratories to develop specifications for surface temperature limit values for the short-term accidental touching of the fingertip with cold surfa

  12. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Global Land Surface Air Temperature Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A station observation-based global land monthly mean surface air temperature dataset at 0.5 x 0.5 latitude-longitude resolution for the period from 1948 to the...

  13. Quantifying and specifying the solar influence on terrestrial surface temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, C.; Duhau, S.; van Geel, B.

    2010-01-01

    This investigation is a follow-up of a paper in which we showed that both major magnetic components of the solar dynamo, viz. the toroidal and the poloidal ones, are correlated with average terrestrial surface temperatures. Here, we quantify, improve and specify that result and search for their caus

  14. A physically based model of global freshwater surface temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van L.P.H.; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, van M.T.H.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature determines a range of physical properties of water and exerts a strong control on surface water biogeochemistry. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime directly affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism and indirectly through

  15. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Global Land Surface Air Temperature Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A station observation-based global land monthly mean surface air temperature dataset at 0.5 0.5 latitude-longitude resolution for the period from 1948 to the present...

  16. Processes of India's offshore summer intraseasonal sea surface temperature variability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kurian, N.; Lengaigne, M.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Vialard, J.; Pous, S.; Peter, A-C.; Durand; Naik, Shweta

    ., vol.63; 2013; 329-346 Processes of India’s offshore summer intraseasonal sea surface temperature variability K. Nisha1, M. Lengaigne1,2, V.V. Gopalakrishna,1 J. Vialard2, S. Pous2, A.-C. Peter2, F. Durand3, S.Naik1 1. NIO, CSIR, Goa, India 2...

  17. A physically based model of global freshwater surface temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van L.P.H.; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, van M.T.H.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature determines a range of physical properties of water and exerts a strong control on surface water biogeochemistry. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime directly affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism and indirectly through

  18. Surface temperature maps for II Peg during 1999-2002

    CERN Document Server

    Lindborg, M; Tuominen, I; Hackman, T; Ilyin, I; Piskunov, N

    2009-01-01

    The active RS CVn star II Peg has been spectroscopically monitored for almost 18 years with the SOFIN spectrograph at NOT, La Palma, Spain. In this paper we present five new surface temperature maps of the object for the years 1999 (two maps), 2001 (one map) and 2002 (two maps).

  19. Surface chemistry of alanine on Cu{111}: Adsorption geometry and temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldanza, Silvia; Cornish, Alix; Nicklin, Richard E. J.; Zheleva, Zhasmina V.; Held, Georg

    2014-11-01

    Adsorption of L-alanine on the Cu{111} single crystal surface was investigated as a model system for interactions between small chiral modifier molecules and close-packed metal surfaces. Synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy are used to determine the chemical state, bond coordination and out-of-plane orientation of the molecule on the surface. Alanine adsorbs in its anionic form at room temperature, whilst at low temperature the overlayer consists of anionic and zwitterionic molecules. NEXAFS spectra exhibit a strong angular dependence of the π* resonance associated with the carboxylate group, which allows determining the tilt angle of this group with respect to the surface plane (48° ± 2°) at room temperature. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) shows a p(2√{ 13} × 2√{ 13}) R 13 ° superstructure with only one domain, which breaks the mirror symmetry of the substrate and, thus, induces global chirality to the surface. Temperature-programmed XPS (TP-XPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments indicate that the zwitterionic form converts into the anionic species (alaninate) at 293 K. The latter desorbs/decomposes between 435 K and 445 K.

  20. A Microring Temperature Sensor Based on the Surface Plasmon Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchao Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A structure of microring sensor suitable for temperature measurement based on the surface plasmon wave is put forward in this paper. The sensor uses surface plasmon multilayer waveguiding structure in the vertical direction and U-shaped microring structure in the horizontal direction and utilizes SOI as the thermal material. The transfer function derivation of the structure of surface plasmon microring sensor is according to the transfer matrix method. While the change of refractive index of Si is caused by the change of ambient temperature, the effective refractive index of the multilayer waveguiding structure is changed, resulting in the drifting of the sensor output spectrum. This paper focuses on the transmission characteristics of multilayer waveguide structure and the impact on the output spectrum caused by refractive index changes in temperature parts. According to the calculation and simulation, the transmission performance of the structure is stable and the sensitivity is good. The resonance wavelength shift can reach 0.007 μm when the temperature is increased by 100 k and FSR can reach about 60 nm. This structure achieves a high sensitivity in the temperature sense taking into account a wide range of filter frequency selections, providing a theoretical basis for the preparation of microoptics.

  1. Electron beam heating effects during environmental scanning electron microscopy imaging of water condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykaczewski, K.; Scott, J. H. J.; Fedorov, A. G.

    2011-02-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) show promise as promoters of dropwise condensation. Droplets with diameters below ˜10 μm account for the majority of the heat transferred during dropwise condensation but their growth dynamics on SHS have not been systematically studied. Due to the complex topography of the surface environmental scanning electron microscopy is the preferred method for observing the growth dynamics of droplets in this size regime. By studying electron beam heating effects on condensed water droplets we establish a magnification limit below which the heating effects are negligible and use this insight to study the mechanism of individual drop growth.

  2. Modeling the surface temperature of Earth-like planets

    CERN Document Server

    Vladilo, G; Murante, G; Filippi, L; Provenzale, A

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a novel Earth-like planet surface temperature model (ESTM) for habitability studies based on the spatial-temporal distribution of planetary surface temperatures. The ESTM adopts a surface Energy Balance Model complemented by: radiative-convective atmospheric column calculations, a set of physically-based parameterizations of meridional transport, and descriptions of surface and cloud properties more refined than in standard EBMs. The parameterization is valid for rotating terrestrial planets with shallow atmospheres and moderate values of axis obliquity (epsilon >= 45^o). Comparison with a 3D model of atmospheric dynamics from the literature shows that the equator-to-pole temperature differences predicted by the two models agree within ~5K when the rotation rate, insolation, surface pressure and planet radius are varied in the intervals 0.5 <= Omega/Omega_o <= 2, 0.75 <= S/S_o <= 1.25, 0.3 <= p/(1 bar) <= 10, and 0.5 <= R/R_o <= 2, respectively. The ESTM has an extremely l...

  3. Modeling Apple Surface Temperature Dynamics Based on Weather Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The exposure of fruit surfaces to direct sunlight during the summer months can result in sunburn damage. Losses due to sunburn damage are a major economic problem when marketing fresh apples. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a model for simulating fruit surface temperature (FST dynamics based on energy balance and measured weather data. A series of weather data (air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed was recorded for seven hours between 11:00–18:00 for two months at fifteen minute intervals. To validate the model, the FSTs of “Fuji” apples were monitored using an infrared camera in a natural orchard environment. The FST dynamics were measured using a series of thermal images. For the apples that were completely exposed to the sun, the RMSE of the model for estimating FST was less than 2.0 °C. A sensitivity analysis of the emissivity of the apple surface and the conductance of the fruit surface to water vapour showed that accurate estimations of the apple surface emissivity were important for the model. The validation results showed that the model was capable of accurately describing the thermal performances of apples under different solar radiation intensities. Thus, this model could be used to more accurately estimate the FST relative to estimates that only consider the air temperature. In addition, this model provides useful information for sunburn protection management.

  4. A model of the tropical Pacific sea surface temperature climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Richard; Zebiak, Stephen E.; Cane, Mark A.

    1988-01-01

    A model for the climatological mean sea surface temperature (SST) of the tropical Pacific Ocean is developed. The upper ocean response is computed using a time dependent, linear, reduced gravity model, with the addition of a constant depth frictional surface layer. The full three-dimensional temperature equation and a surface heat flux parameterization that requires specification of only wind speed and total cloud cover are used to evaluate the SST. Specification of atmospheric parameters, such as air temperature and humidity, over which the ocean has direct influence, is avoided. The model simulates the major features of the observed tropical Pacific SST. The seasonal evolution of these features is generally captured by the model. Analysis of the results demonstrates the control the ocean has over the surface heat flux from ocean to atmosphere and the crucial role that dynamics play in determining the mean SST in the equatorial Pacific. The sensitivity of the model to perturbations in the surface heat flux, cloud cover specification, diffusivity, and mixed layer depth is discussed.

  5. Temperature maps measurements on 3D surfaces with infrared thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardone, Gennaro; Ianiro, Andrea [University of Naples Federico II, Department of Aerospace Engineering (DIAS), Naples (Italy); Ioio, Gennaro dello [University of Cambridge, BP Institute for Multiphase Flow, Cambridge, England (United Kingdom); Passaro, Andrea [Alta SpA, Ospedaletto, PI (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    The use of the infrared camera as a temperature transducer in wind tunnel applications is convenient and widespread. Nevertheless, the infrared data are available in the form of 2D images while the observed surfaces are often not planar and the reconstruction of temperature maps over them is a critical task. In this work, after recalling the principles of IR thermography, a methodology to rebuild temperature maps on the surfaces of 3D object is proposed. In particular, an optical calibration is applied to the IR camera by means of a novel target plate with control points. The proposed procedure takes also into account the directional emissivity by estimating the viewing angle. All the needed steps are described and analyzed. The advantages given by the proposed method are shown with an experiment in a hypersonic wind tunnel. (orig.)

  6. Harvesting the loss: surface plasmon-based hot electron photodetection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the nonradiative decay of surface plasmons was once thought to be only a parasitic process within the plasmonic and metamaterial communities, hot carriers generated from nonradiative plasmon decay offer new opportunities for harnessing absorption loss. Hot carriers can be harnessed for applications ranging from chemical catalysis, photothermal heating, photovoltaics, and photodetection. Here, we present a review on the recent developments concerning photodetection based on hot electrons. The basic principles and recent progress on hot electron photodetectors are summarized. The challenges and potential future directions are also discussed.

  7. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  8. A Surface Temperature Initiated Closure (STIC) for surface energy balance fluxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mallick, Kaniska; Jarvis, Andrew J.; Boegh, Eva;

    2014-01-01

    of four state equations. Taking advantage of the psychrometric relationship between temperature and vapor pressure, the present method also estimates the near surface moisture availability (M) from TS, air temperature (TA) and relative humidity (RH), thereby being capable of decomposing λ...

  9. Surface structures from low energy electron diffraction: Atoms, small molecules and an ordered ice film on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Materer, N.F.

    1995-09-01

    We investigated the surface bonding of various adsorbates (0, S, C{sub 2}H{sub 3} and NO) along with the resulting relaxation of the Pt(111) surface using low energy electron diffiraction (LEED). LEED experiments have been performed on these ordered overlayers along with theoretical structural analysis using automated tensor LEED (ATLEED). The resulting surface structures of these ordered overlayers exhibit similar adsorbate-induced relaxations. In all cases the adsorbate occupies the fcc hollow site and induces an approximately 0.1 A buckling of the metal surface. The three metal atoms directly bonded to the adsorbate are ``pulled`` out of the surface and the metal atom that is not bound to the adsorbate is `pushed`` inward. In order to understand the reliability of such details, we have carried out a comprehensive study of various non-structural parameters used in a LEED computation. We also studied the adsorption of water on the Pt(lll) surface. We ordered an ultra thin ice film on this surface. The film`s surface is found to be the (0001) face of hexagonal ice. This surface is apparently terminated by a full-bilayer, in which the uppermost water molecules have large vibrational amplitudes even at temperatures as low as 90 K. We examined two other metal surfaces besides Pt(111): Ni(111) and Fe(lll). On Ni(111), we have studied the surface under a high coverage of NO. On both Ni(111) and Pt(111) NO molecules occupy the hollow sites and the N-0 bond distances are practically identical. The challenging sample preparation of an Fe(111) surface has been investigated and a successful procedure has been obtained. The small interlayer spacing found on Fe(111) required special treatment in the LEED calculations. A new ATLEED program has been developed to handle this surface.

  10. Dynamical Decoupling of a single electron spin at room temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Naydenov, Boris; Hall, Liam T; Shin, Chang; Fedder, Helmut; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the increase of the coherence time T$_2$ of a single electron spin at room temperature by using dynamical decoupling. We show that the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence can prolong the T$_2$ of a single Nitrogen-Vacancy center in diamond up to 2.44 ms compared to the Hahn echo measurement where T$_2 = 390~\\mu$s. Moreover, by performing spin locking experiments we demonstrate that with CPMG the maximum possible $T_2$ is reached. On the other hand, we do not observe strong increase of the coherence time in nanodiamonds, possibly due to the short spin lattice relaxation time $T_1=100~\\mu$s (compared to T$_1$ = 5.93 ms in bulk). An application for detecting low magnetic field is demonstrated, where we show that the sensitivity using the CPMG method is improved by about a factor of two compared to the Hahn echo method.

  11. Designing high-temperature steels via surface science and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Cameron T.; Jiang, Zilin; Mathai, Allan; Chung, Yip-Wah

    2016-06-01

    Electricity in many countries such as the US and China is produced by burning fossil fuels in steam-turbine-driven power plants. The efficiency of these power plants can be improved by increasing the operating temperature of the steam generator. In this work, we adopted a combined surface science and computational thermodynamics approach to the design of high-temperature, corrosion-resistant steels for this application. The result is a low-carbon ferritic steel with nanosized transition metal monocarbide precipitates that are thermally stable, as verified by atom probe tomography. High-temperature Vickers hardness measurements demonstrated that these steels maintain their strength for extended periods at 700 °C. We hypothesize that the improved strength of these steels is derived from the semi-coherent interfaces of these thermally stable, nanosized precipitates exerting drag forces on impinging dislocations, thus maintaining strength at elevated temperatures.

  12. Electronic structure of graphene on Ni surfaces with different orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudikov, D.A., E-mail: gelbry@gmail.com; Zhizhin, E.V.; Rybkin, A.G.; Rybkina, A.A.; Zhukov, Y.M.; Vilkov, O. Yu.; Shikin, A.M.

    2016-08-15

    An experimental study of the graphene, synthesized by propylene cracking on Ni surfaces with different orientation: (100) and (111), using angle-resolved photoemission, has been performed. It has been shown that graphene on Ni(111) had a perfect lateral structure due to consistency of their lattices, whereas graphene/Ni(100) consisted of a lot of domains. For both systems electronic structure was quite similar and demonstrated a strong bonding of graphene to the underlying Ni surface. After Au intercalation the electronic structure of graphene in both systems was shifted to the Fermi level and became linear in the vicinity of the K point of the Brillouin zone. - Highlights: • Graphene on Ni(111) is well-ordered, whereas on Ni(100) – multi-domain. • Graphene on Ni(111) and Ni(100) is strongly bonded with substrate. • Intercalation of Au atoms restores the linearity in dispersion and makes graphene quasi-free on both Ni(100) and Ni(111).

  13. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadathil, Pankajakshan; Gopalakrishna, V. V.; Muraleedharan, P. M.; Reddy, G. V.; Araligidad, Nilesh; Shenoy, Shrikant

    2002-10-01

    Surface layer temperature inversion occurring in the Bay of Bengal has been addressed. Hydrographic data archived in the Indian Oceanographic Data Center are used to understand various aspects of the temperature inversion of surface layer in the Bay of Bengal, such as occurrence time, characteristics, stability, inter-annual variability and generating mechanisms. Spatially organized temperature inversion occurs in the coastal waters of the western and northeastern Bay during winter (November-February). Although the inversion in the northeastern Bay is sustained until February (with remnants seen even in March), in the western Bay it becomes less organized in January and almost disappears by February. Inversion is confined to the fresh water induced seasonal halocline of the surface layer. Inversions of large temperature difference (of the order of 1.6-2.4°C) and thin layer thickness (10-20 m) are located adjacent to major fresh water inputs from the Ganges, Brahmaputra, Irrawaddy, Krishna and Godavari rivers. The inversion is stable with a mean stability of 3600×10 -8 m -1. Inter-annual variability of the inversion is significantly high and it is caused by the inter-annual variability of fresh water flux and surface cooling in the northern Bay. Fresh water flux leads the occurrence process in association with surface heat flux and advection. The leading role of fresh water flux is understood from the observation that the two occurrence regions of inversion (the western and northeastern Bay) have proximity to the two low salinity (with values about 28-29‰) zones. In the western Bay, the East India Coastal Current brings less saline and cold water from the head of the Bay to the south-west Bay, where it advects over warm, saline water, promoting temperature inversion in this region in association with the surface heat loss. For inversion occurring in the northeastern Bay (where the surface water gains heat from atmosphere), surface advection of the less saline

  14. New Measurements from Old Boreholes: A Look at Interaction Between Surface Air Temperature and Ground Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinle, S. M.; Gosnold, W. D.

    2007-12-01

    We recently logged new field measurements of several boreholes throughout the Midwest, including North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska. We then compared these new measurements against measurements previously obtained. Our comparisons included inverse modeling of past and recent measurements as well as climate modeling based on past surface air temperatures obtained from the weather stations. The data show a good correlation between climate warming in the last century and ground surface warming. Of particular importance is that cooling of air temperatures beginning in the mid 1990s reflects in the ground surface temperatures. The boreholes included in the study consist of three boreholes located in north central North Dakota, including two deeper than 200 meters. Two boreholes in the southwestern part of South Dakota, and two from southeastern South Dakota, all approximately 180 meters deep. Also included, were two boreholes (135 meters and over 200 meters deep) located in southwestern Nebraska, and two boreholes in the panhandle of Nebraska, each over 100 meters deep. We obtained historical surface air temperature from climate stations located near the boreholes, both from the United States Historical Climatology Network and from the Western Regional Climate Center.

  15. Temperature dependent surface modification of molybdenum due to low energy He{sup +} ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, J.K., E-mail: jtripat@purdue.edu [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Novakowski, T.J.; Joseph, G. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, EURATOM Association, Jülich D-52425 (Germany); Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we report on the temperature dependent surface modifications in molybdenum (Mo) samples due to 100 eV He{sup +} ion irradiation in extreme conditions as a potential candidate to plasma-facing components in fusion devices alternative to tungsten. The Mo samples were irradiated at normal incidence, using an ion fluence of 2.6 × 10{sup 24} ions m{sup −2} (with a flux of 7.2 × 10{sup 20} ions m{sup −2} s{sup −1}). Surface modifications have been studied using high-resolution field emission scanning electron-(SEM) and atomic force (AFM) microscopy. At 773 K target temperature homogeneous evolution of molybdenum nanograins on the entire Mo surface were observed. However, at 823 K target temperature appearance of nano-pores and pin-holes nearby the grain boundaries, and Mo fuzz in patches were observed. The fuzz density increases significantly with target temperatures and continued until 973 K. However, at target temperatures beyond 973 K, counterintuitively, a sequential reduction in the fuzz density has been seen till 1073 K temperatures. At 1173 K and above temperatures, only molybdenum nano structures were observed. Our temperature dependent studies confirm a clear temperature widow, 823–1073 K, for Mo fuzz formation. Ex-situ high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on Mo fuzzy samples show the evidence of MoO{sub 3} 3d doublets. This elucidates that almost all the Mo fuzz were oxidized during open air exposure and are thick enough as well. Likewise the microscopy studies, the optical reflectivity measurements also show a sequential reduction in the reflectivity values (i.e., enhancement in the fuzz density) up to 973 K and after then a sequential enhancement in the reflectivity values (i.e., reduction in the fuzz density) with target temperatures. This is in well agreement with microscopy studies where we observed clear temperature window for Mo fuzz growth.

  16. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-06-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society.

  17. Operation of a novel hot-electron vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkan, Naci; O'Brien-Davies, Angela; Thoms, A. B.; Potter, Richard J.; Poolton, Nigel; Adams, Michael J.; Masum, J.; Bek, Alpan; Serpenguzel, Ali; Aydinli, Atilla; Roberts, John S.

    1998-07-01

    The hot Electron Light Emission and Lasing in Semiconductor Heterostructures devices (HELLISH-1) is novel surface emitter consisting of a GaAs quantum well, within the depletion region, on the n side of Ga1-xAlxAs p- n junction. It utilizes hot electron transport parallel to the layers and injection of hot electron hole pairs into the quantum well through a combination of mechanisms including tunnelling, thermionic emission and diffusion of `lucky' carriers. Super Radiant HELLISH-1 is an advanced structure incorporating a lower distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). Combined with the finite reflectivity of the upper semiconductor-air interface reflectivity it defines a quasi- resonant cavity enabling emission output from the top surface with a higher spectral purity. The output power has increased by two orders of magnitude and reduced the full width at half maximum (FWHM) to 20 nm. An upper DBR added to the structure defines HELLISH-VCSEL which is currently the first operational hot electron surface emitting laser and lases at room temperature with a 1.5 nm FWHM. In this work we demonstrate and compare the operation of UB-HELLISH-1 and HELLISH-VCSEL using experimental and theoretical reflectivity spectra over an extensive temperature range.

  18. Surface emissivity and temperature retrieval for a hyperspectral sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borel, C.C.

    1998-12-01

    With the growing use of hyper-spectral imagers, e.g., AVIRIS in the visible and short-wave infrared there is hope of using such instruments in the mid-wave and thermal IR (TIR) some day. The author believes that this will enable him to get around using the present temperature-emissivity separation algorithms using methods which take advantage of the many channels available in hyper-spectral imagers. A simple fact used in coming up with a novel algorithm is that a typical surface emissivity spectrum are rather smooth compared to spectral features introduced by the atmosphere. Thus, a iterative solution technique can be devised which retrieves emissivity spectra based on spectral smoothness. To make the emissivities realistic, atmospheric parameters are varied using approximations, look-up tables derived from a radiative transfer code and spectral libraries. One such iterative algorithm solves the radiative transfer equation for the radiance at the sensor for the unknown emissivity and uses the blackbody temperature computed in an atmospheric window to get a guess for the unknown surface temperature. By varying the surface temperature over a small range a series of emissivity spectra are calculated. The one with the smoothest characteristic is chosen. The algorithm was tested on synthetic data using MODTRAN and the Salisbury emissivity database.

  19. Sea-surface temperature and salinity mapping from remote microwave radiometric measurements of brightness temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans-Juergen, C. B.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique to measure remotely sea surface temperature and salinity was demonstrated with a dual frequency microwave radiometer system. Accuracies in temperature of 1 C and in salinity of part thousand for salinity greater than 5 parts per thousand were attained after correcting for the influence of extraterrestrial background radiation, atmospheric radiation and attenuation, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers, operating at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz, comprise a third-generation system using null balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from an aircraft at an altitude of 1.4 km over the lower Chesapeake Bay and coastal areas of the Atlantic Ocean resulted in contour maps of sea-surface temperature and salinity with a spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  20. Ultraviolet surface plasmon-mediated low temperature hydrazine decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Siying; Sheldon, Matthew T.; Atwater, Harry A. [Thomas J. Watson Laboratories of Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Liu, Wei-Guang; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William Andrew [Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-01-12

    Conventional methods require elevated temperatures in order to dissociate high-energy nitrogen bonds in precursor molecules such as ammonia or hydrazine used for nitride film growth. We report enhanced photodissociation of surface-absorbed hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) molecules at low temperature by using ultraviolet surface plasmons to concentrate the exciting radiation. Plasmonic nanostructured aluminum substrates were designed to provide resonant near field concentration at λ = 248 nm (5 eV), corresponding to the maximum optical cross section for hydrogen abstraction from N{sub 2}H{sub 4}. We employed nanoimprint lithography to fabricate 1 mm × 1 mm arrays of the resonant plasmonic structures, and ultraviolet reflectance spectroscopy confirmed resonant extinction at 248 nm. Hydrazine was cryogenically adsorbed to the plasmonic substrate in a low-pressure ambient, and 5 eV surface plasmons were resonantly excited using a pulsed KrF laser. Mass spectrometry was used to characterize the photodissociation products and indicated a 6.2× overall enhancement in photodissociation yield for hydrazine adsorbed on plasmonic substrates compared with control substrates. The ultraviolet surface plasmon enhanced photodissociation demonstrated here may provide a valuable method to generate reactive precursors for deposition of nitride thin film materials at low temperatures.

  1. Microscopic theory of the residual surface resistivity of Rashba electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaziz, Juba; Lounis, Samir; Blügel, Stefan; Ishida, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    A microscopic expression of the residual electrical resistivity tensor is derived in linear response theory for Rashba electrons scattering at a magnetic impurity with cylindrical or noncylindrical potential. The behavior of the longitudinal and transversal residual resistivity is obtained analytically and computed for an Fe impurity at the Au(111) surface. We studied the evolution of the resistivity tensor elements as a function of the Rashba spin-orbit strength and the magnetization direction of the impurity. We found that the absolute values of longitudinal resistivity reduce with increasing spin-orbit strength of the substrate and that the scattering of the conduction electrons at magnetic impurities with magnetic moments pointing in directions not perpendicular to the surface plane produce a planar Hall effect and an anisotropic magnetoresistance even if the impurity carries no spin-orbit interaction. Functional forms are provided describing the anisotropy of the planar Hall effect and the anisotropic magnetoresistance with respect to the direction of the impurity moment. In the limit of no spin-orbit interaction and a nonmagnetic impurity of cylindrical symmetry, the expression of the residual resistivity of a two-dimensional electron gas has the same simplicity and form as for the three-dimensional electron gas [J. Friedel, J. Nuovo. Cim. 7, 287 (1958), 10.1007/BF02751483] and can also be expressed in terms of scattering phase shifts.

  2. Electron acceleration and high harmonic generation by relativistic surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantono, Giada; Luca Fedeli Team; Andrea Sgattoni Team; Andrea Macchi Team; Tiberio Ceccotti Team

    2016-10-01

    Intense, short laser pulses with ultra-high contrast allow resonant surface plasmons (SPs) excitation on solid wavelength-scale grating targets, opening the way to the extension of Plasmonics in the relativistic regime and the manipulation of intense electromagnetic fields to develop new short, energetic, laser-synchronized radiation sources. Recent theoretical and experimental studies have explored the role of SP excitation in increasing the laser-target coupling and enhancing ion acceleration, high-order harmonic generation and surface electron acceleration. Here we present our results on SP driven electron acceleration from grating targets at ultra-high laser intensities (I = 5 ×1019 W/cm2, τ = 25 fs). When the resonant condition for SP excitation is fulfilled, electrons are emitted in a narrow cone along the target surface, with a total charge of about 100 pC and energy spectra peaked around 5 MeV. Distinguishing features of the resonant process were investigated by varying the incidence angle, grating type and with the support of 3D PIC simulations, which closely reproduced the experimental data. Open challenges and further measurements on high-order harmonic generation in presence of a relativistic SP will also be discussed.

  3. Electronic structure tuning via surface modification in semimetallic nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Soares, Alfonso; O'Donnell, Conor; Greer, James C.

    2016-12-01

    Electronic structure properties of nanowires (NWs) with diameters of 1.5 and 3 nm based on semimetallic α -Sn are investigated by employing density functional theory and perturbative GW methods. We explore the dependence of electron affinity, band structure, and band-gap values with crystallographic orientation, NW cross-sectional size, and surface passivants of varying electronegativity. We consider four chemical terminations in our study: methyl (CH3), hydrogen (H ), hydroxyl (OH ), and fluorine (F ). Results suggest a high degree of elasticity of Sn-Sn bonds within the Sn NWs' cores with no significant structural variations for nanowires with different surface passivants. Direct band gaps at Brillouin-zone centers are found for most studied structures with quasiparticle corrected band-gap magnitudes ranging from 0.25 to 3.54 eV in 1.5-nm-diameter structures, indicating an exceptional range of properties for semimetal NWs below the semimetal-to-semiconductor transition. Band-gap variations induced by changes in surface passivants indicate the possibility of realizing semimetal-semiconductor interfaces in NWs with constant cross-section and crystallographic orientation, allowing the design of novel dopant-free NW-based electronic devices.

  4. Reconstruction of MODIS daily land surface temperature under clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L.; Gao, F.; Chen, Z.; Song, L.; Xie, D.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST), generally defined as the skin temperature of the Earth's surface, controls the process of evapotranspiration, surface energy balance, soil moisture change and climate change. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) is equipped with 1km resolution thermal sensor andcapable of observing the earth surface at least once per day.Thermal infrared bands cannot penetrate cloud, which means we cannot get consistency drought monitoring condition at one area. However, the cloudy-sky conditions represent more than half of the actual day-to-day weather around the global. In this study, we developed an LST filled model based on the assumption that under good weather condition, LST difference between two nearby pixels are similar among the closest 8 days. We used all the valid pixels covered by a 9*9 window to reconstruct the gap LST. Each valid pixel is assigned a weight which is determined by the spatial distance and the spectral similarity. This model is applied in the Middle-East of China including Gansu, Ningxia, Shaanxi province. The terrain is complicated in this area including plain and hill. The MODIS daily LST product (MOD11A3) from 2000 to 2004 is tested. Almost all the gap pixels are filled, and the terrain information is reconstructed well and smoothly. We masked two areas in order to validate the model, one located in the plain, another located in the hill. The correlation coefficient is greater than 0.8, even up to 0.92 in a few days. We also used ground measured day maximum and mean surface temperature to valid our model. Although both the temporal and spatial scale are different between ground measured temperature and MODIS LST, they agreed well in all the stations. This LST filled model is operational because it only needs LST and reflectance, and does not need other auxiliary information such as climate factors. We will apply this model to more regions in the future.

  5. Electron emission from MOS electron emitters with clean and cesium covered gold surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunver; Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar; Johansson, Martin;

    2009-01-01

    MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor) electron emitters consisting of a Si substrate, a SiO2 tunnel barrier and a Ti (1 nm)/Au(7 nm) top-electrode, with an active area of 1 cm(2) have been produced and studied with surface science techniques under UHV (ultra high vacuum) conditions and their emission c...

  6. Wet-electron Enhanced Surface Dissociative Electron Attachment Chemistry of Halocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    photocatalysis , TiO2, decontamination, electron spectroscopy Hrvoje Petek, Xuefeng Cui, Chungwei Lin, and Jin Zhao University of Pittsburgh 123 University...reduction processes on TiO2 surfaces. Therefore it is relevant to the mechanism of photocatalytic decontamination with TiO2 photocatalysis . (a... photocatalysis  with H2O and CH3OH  overlayers.    For a clean TiO2 surface at 90 K O2 molecules do not adsorb on  stoichiometric TiO2 surfaces; they

  7. Piglets’ Surface Temperature Change at Different Weights at Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldara, Fabiana Ribeiro; dos Santos, Luan Sousa; Machado, Sivanilza Teixeira; Moi, Marta; de Alencar Nääs, Irenilza; Foppa, Luciana; Garcia, Rodrigo Garófallo; de Kássia Silva dos Santos, Rita

    2014-01-01

    The study was carried out in order to verify the effects of piglets’ weight at birth on their surface temperature change (ST) after birth, and its relationship with ingestion time of colostrum. Piglets from four different sows were weighed at birth and divided into a totally randomized design with three treatments according to birth weight (PBW): T1 - less than 1.00 kg, T2 - 1.00 to 1.39 kg, and T3 - higher than or equal to 1.40 kg. The time spent for the first colostrum ingestion was recorded (TFS). Images of piglets’ surface by thermal imaging camera were recorded at birth (STB) and 15, 30, 45, 60, and 120 min after birth. The air temperature and relative humidity were recorded every 30 min and the indexes of temperature and humidity (THI) were calculated. A ST drop after 15 min from birth was observed, increasing again after sixty minutes. Positive correlations were found between the PBW and the ST at 30 and 45 min after birth. The PBW was negatively correlated with the TFS. The THI showed high negative correlations (−0.824 and −0.815) with STB and after 15 min from birth. The piglet’s surface temperature at birth was positively correlated with temperature thereof to 15 min, influencing therefore the temperatures in the interval of 45 to 120 min. The birth weight contributes significantly to postnatal hypothermia and consequently to the time it takes for piglets ingest colostrum, requiring special attention to those of low birth weight. PMID:25049971

  8. Piglets' surface temperature change at different weights at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldara, Fabiana Ribeiro; Dos Santos, Luan Sousa; Machado, Sivanilza Teixeira; Moi, Marta; de Alencar Nääs, Irenilza; Foppa, Luciana; Garcia, Rodrigo Garófallo; de Kássia Silva Dos Santos, Rita

    2014-03-01

    The study was carried out in order to verify the effects of piglets' weight at birth on their surface temperature change (ST) after birth, and its relationship with ingestion time of colostrum. Piglets from four different sows were weighed at birth and divided into a totally randomized design with three treatments according to birth weight (PBW): T1 - less than 1.00 kg, T2 - 1.00 to 1.39 kg, and T3 - higher than or equal to 1.40 kg. The time spent for the first colostrum ingestion was recorded (TFS). Images of piglets' surface by thermal imaging camera were recorded at birth (STB) and 15, 30, 45, 60, and 120 min after birth. The air temperature and relative humidity were recorded every 30 min and the indexes of temperature and humidity (THI) were calculated. A ST drop after 15 min from birth was observed, increasing again after sixty minutes. Positive correlations were found between the PBW and the ST at 30 and 45 min after birth. The PBW was negatively correlated with the TFS. The THI showed high negative correlations (-0.824 and -0.815) with STB and after 15 min from birth. The piglet's surface temperature at birth was positively correlated with temperature thereof to 15 min, influencing therefore the temperatures in the interval of 45 to 120 min. The birth weight contributes significantly to postnatal hypothermia and consequently to the time it takes for piglets ingest colostrum, requiring special attention to those of low birth weight.

  9. Piglets’ Surface Temperature Change at Different Weights at Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Ribeiro Caldara

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out in order to verify the effects of piglets’ weight at birth on their surface temperature change (ST after birth, and its relationship with ingestion time of colostrum. Piglets from four different sows were weighed at birth and divided into a totally randomized design with three treatments according to birth weight (PBW: T1 - less than 1.00 kg, T2 - 1.00 to 1.39 kg, and T3 - higher than or equal to 1.40 kg. The time spent for the first colostrum ingestion was recorded (TFS. Images of piglets’ surface by thermal imaging camera were recorded at birth (STB and 15, 30, 45, 60, and 120 min after birth. The air temperature and relative humidity were recorded every 30 min and the indexes of temperature and humidity (THI were calculated. A ST drop after 15 min from birth was observed, increasing again after sixty minutes. Positive correlations were found between the PBW and the ST at 30 and 45 min after birth. The PBW was negatively correlated with the TFS. The THI showed high negative correlations (−0.824 and −0.815 with STB and after 15 min from birth. The piglet’s surface temperature at birth was positively correlated with temperature thereof to 15 min, influencing therefore the temperatures in the interval of 45 to 120 min. The birth weight contributes significantly to postnatal hypothermia and consequently to the time it takes for piglets ingest colostrum, requiring special attention to those of low birth weight.

  10. The characteristics of carbon nanotubes grown at low temperature for electronic device application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Seob [Department of Photoelectronics Information, Chosun College of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Junsin [School of Information and Communications Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, 440–746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaehyeong, E-mail: jaehyeong@skku.edu [School of Information and Communications Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, 440–746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    For the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in flexible electronic devices, the CNTs were grown on Corning 1737 glass substrate by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) method. To deposit the catalyst layer, TiN buffer layer of 200 nm thickness and Ni catalyst layer of 60 nm were first deposited on the glass by r.f. magnetron sputtering method. The CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2} gases are used as the synthesis gas of CNTs and the working pressure was about 2.13 kPa, and the substrate bias was about − 200 V. The growth time was from 2 min to 5 min and the microwave power was about 800 W. The substrate temperature as the main parameter was changed from 400 °C to 550 °C. The structural properties of CNTs synthesized with the substrate temperature were investigated using Raman, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy methods. The surface and electrical properties of CNTs grown by MPECVD method were studied by scanning probe microscopy and four-point probe methods. We obtained the multi-walled CNTs (MW-CNTs). Multi-walled CNTs were vertically grown on Ni/TiN/glass substrates below 500 °C without any glass deformations. As the substrate temperature was increased, the crystallinity of CNTs was improved. Ni catalyst was found at the tip of CNT by the TEM observation and the grown CNTs were found to have a multi-walled with bamboo like structure. - Highlights: • Synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Effects of substrate temperature on carbon nanotubes properties. • Improvement of the crystallinity with increasing substrate temperature. • Reduction of sheet resistance with increasing substrate temperature.

  11. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostic systems for electron temperature perturbation measurement in JT-60U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isayama, Akihiko; Isei, Nobuaki; Ishida, Shinichi; Sato, Minoru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    Three systems are now operational in JT-60U tokamak for the measurement of electron cyclotron emissions. They are the Fourier transform spectrometer, 20 channels grating polychrometer, and 24 channels heterodyne radiometer. The first system has been absolutely calibrated, and used in the relative calibration of remaining two systems. The paper describes major specifications and recent upgrading of each system. In JT-60U experiments, the heterodyne radiometer system is mainly used for electron temperature perturbations with high signal-to-noise ratio. One of the disadvantage of this system is that the measurement points uniquely determined by the toroidal field, and thus cannot be chosen freely. In the experiment the third system, grating polychrometer, which allows free choice of measurement points, is used to cover the wide cross-section of the JT-60U plasma. (author)

  12. Suppressing high-frequency temperature oscillations in microchannels with surface structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yangying; Antao, Dion S.; Bian, David W.; Rao, Sameer R.; Sircar, Jay D.; Zhang, Tiejun; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2017-01-01

    Two-phase microchannel heat sinks are attractive for thermal management of high heat flux electronic devices, yet flow instability which can lead to thermal and mechanical fatigue remains a significant challenge. Much work has focused on long-timescale (˜seconds) flow oscillations which are usually related to the compressible volume in the loop. The rapid growth of vapor bubbles which can also cause flow reversal, however, occurs on a much shorter timescale (˜tens of milliseconds). While this high-frequency oscillation has often been visualized with high-speed imaging, its effect on the instantaneous temperature has not been fully investigated due to the typical low sampling rates of the sensors. Here, we investigate the temperature response as a result of the high-frequency flow oscillation in microchannels and the effect of surface microstructures on this temperature oscillation with a measurement data acquisition rate of 1000 Hz. For smooth surface microchannels, fluid flow oscillated between complete dry-out and rewetting annular flow due to the short-timescale flow instability, which caused high-frequency and large amplitude temperature oscillations (10 °C in 25 ms). In comparison, hydrophilic surface structures on the microchannel promoted capillary flow which delayed and suppressed dry-out in each oscillation cycle, and thus significantly reduced the temperature oscillation at high heat fluxes. This work suggests that promoting capillary wicking via surface structures is a promising technique to reduce thermal fatigue in high heat flux two-phase microchannel thermal management devices.

  13. Single electron charging at temperatures above 4 K in ultrasmall lateral quantum dots patterned on shallow GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsosfoldi, Z.; Rahman, M.; Larkin, I. A.; Long, A. R.; Davies, J. H.; Weaver, J. M. R.; Holland, M. C.; Williamson, J. G.

    1995-06-01

    We demonstrate single electron charging in fully controllable nanoscale quantum devices at temperatures above 4 K. Hitherto, single electron devices operating at ``high'' temperatures have been two-terminal, having no control electrode, whereas fully tunable structures such as quantum dots have only shown charging effects at temperatures of 4 K or less. We have fabricated ultrasmall quantum dots on modulation doped heterostructures where the two-dimensional electron gas is less than 30 nm from the surface. Dots with lithographic diameter 150 nm show Coulomb oscillations up to temperatures of 7 K. Higher temperature operation allows potential applications to be considered without the need, for example, of a dilution fridge.

  14. Near–surface air temperature and snow skin temperature comparison from CREST-SAFE station data with MODIS land surface temperature data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Pérez Díaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Land Surface Temperature (LST is a key variable (commonly studied to understand the hydrological cycle that helps drive the energy balance and water exchange between the Earth's surface and its atmosphere. One observable constituent of much importance in the land surface water balance model is snow. Snow cover plays a critical role in the regional to global scale hydrological cycle because rain-on-snow with warm air temperatures accelerates rapid snow-melt, which is responsible for the majority of the spring floods. Accurate information on near-surface air temperature (T-air and snow skin temperature (T-skin helps us comprehend the energy and water balances in the Earth's hydrological cycle. T-skin is critical in estimating latent and sensible heat fluxes over snow covered areas because incoming and outgoing radiation fluxes from the snow mass and the air temperature above make it different from the average snowpack temperature. This study investigates the correlation between MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS LST data and observed T-air and T-skin data from NOAA-CREST-Snow Analysis and Field Experiment (CREST-SAFE for the winters of 2013 and 2014. LST satellite validation is imperative because high-latitude regions are significantly affected by climate warming and there is a need to aid existing meteorological station networks with the spatially continuous measurements provided by satellites. Results indicate that near-surface air temperature correlates better than snow skin temperature with MODIS LST data. Additional findings show that there is a negative trend demonstrating that the air minus snow skin temperature difference is inversely proportional to cloud cover. To a lesser extent, it will be examined whether the surface properties at the site are representative for the LST properties within the instrument field of view.

  15. Near-surface air temperature and snow skin temperature comparison from CREST-SAFE station data with MODIS land surface temperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Díaz, C. L.; Lakhankar, T.; Romanov, P.; Muñoz, J.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Yu, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key variable (commonly studied to understand the hydrological cycle) that helps drive the energy balance and water exchange between the Earth's surface and its atmosphere. One observable constituent of much importance in the land surface water balance model is snow. Snow cover plays a critical role in the regional to global scale hydrological cycle because rain-on-snow with warm air temperatures accelerates rapid snow-melt, which is responsible for the majority of the spring floods. Accurate information on near-surface air temperature (T-air) and snow skin temperature (T-skin) helps us comprehend the energy and water balances in the Earth's hydrological cycle. T-skin is critical in estimating latent and sensible heat fluxes over snow covered areas because incoming and outgoing radiation fluxes from the snow mass and the air temperature above make it different from the average snowpack temperature. This study investigates the correlation between MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST data and observed T-air and T-skin data from NOAA-CREST-Snow Analysis and Field Experiment (CREST-SAFE) for the winters of 2013 and 2014. LST satellite validation is imperative because high-latitude regions are significantly affected by climate warming and there is a need to aid existing meteorological station networks with the spatially continuous measurements provided by satellites. Results indicate that near-surface air temperature correlates better than snow skin temperature with MODIS LST data. Additional findings show that there is a negative trend demonstrating that the air minus snow skin temperature difference is inversely proportional to cloud cover. To a lesser extent, it will be examined whether the surface properties at the site are representative for the LST properties within the instrument field of view.

  16. Snell's law for surface electrons: Refraction of an electron gas imaged in real space

    OpenAIRE

    Repp, Jascha; Meyer, Gerhard; Rieder, Karl-Heinz

    2003-01-01

    On NaCl(100)/Cu(111) an interface state band is observed that descends from the surface-state band of the clean copper surface. This band exhibits a Moire-pattern-induced one-dimensional band gap, which is accompanied by strong standing-wave patterns, as revealed in low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy images. At NaCl island step edges, one can directly see the refraction of these standing waves, which obey Snell's refraction law.

  17. Snell's law for surface electrons: refraction of an electron gas imaged in real space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repp, Jascha; Meyer, Gerhard; Rieder, Karl-Heinz

    2004-01-23

    On NaCl(100)/Cu(111) an interface state band is observed that descends from the surface-state band of the clean copper surface. This band exhibits a Moiré-pattern-induced one-dimensional band gap, which is accompanied by strong standing-wave patterns, as revealed in low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy images. At NaCl island step edges, one can directly see the refraction of these standing waves, which obey Snell's refraction law.

  18. Surface morphology and physicochemical properties of ordered mesoporous silica SBA-15 synthesized at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, M. H.; Haji Azaman, S. A.; Hameed, B. H.; Din, A. T. Mohd

    2017-06-01

    The effects of process parameters on the surface morphology and physicochemical characteristics of ordered mesoporous silica SBA-15 synthesized at low temperature have been investigated in this study. SBA-15 particles were synthesized through sol-gel method using non-ionic surfactant Pluronic P123 and TEOS as a silica source with aqueous hydrochloric acid (HCl) as a catalyst under the following conditions: HCl concentration (1.0-2.5 M), ageing temperature (40-70ºC) and ageing time (12-48 hours). A series of physicochemical characterizations and material analyses were performed on SBA-15 particles including Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), BET surface area analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. From the experimental observation, the conditions of HCl concentration, ageing temperature and ageing time were able to influence the surface morphology of SBA-15 particles. The presence of the ordered structures in SBA-15 particles was observed through the formation of 1-D cylindrical channels and 2-D hexagonal pores, inspected by using TEM. The detected XRD peak at (100) reflection signified the presence of ordered meso structures within the SBA-15 particles. Therefore, synthesis of SBA-15 particles through sol-gel method at low temperature is feasible and more sustainable if compared to the energy intensive hydrothermal method.

  19. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of surface-engineered silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Somak; Švrček, Vladimir; Macias-Montero, Manual; Velusamy, Tamilselvan; Mariotti, Davide

    2016-01-01

    In this work we report on temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements (15–300 K), which have allowed probing radiative transitions and understanding of the appearance of various transitions. We further demonstrate that transitions associated with oxide in SiNCs show characteristic vibronic peaks that vary with surface characteristics. In particular we study differences and similarities between silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) derived from porous silicon and SiNCs that were surface-treated using a radio-frequency (RF) microplasma system. PMID:27296771

  20. Biological control of surface temperature in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyendranath, Shubha; Gouveia, Albert D.; Shetye, Satish R.; Ravindran, P.; Platt, Trevor

    1991-01-01

    In the Arabian Sea, the southwest monsoon promotes seasonal upwelling of deep water, which supplies nutrients to the surface layer and leads to a marked increase in phytoplankton growth. Remotely sensed data on ocean color are used here to show that the resulting distribution of phytoplankton exerts a controlling influence on the seasonal evolution of sea surface temperature. This results in a corresponding modification of ocean-atmosphere heat exchange on regional and seasonal scales. It is shown that this biological mechanism may provide an important regulating influence on ocean-atmosphere interactions.

  1. Surface spin-electron acoustic waves in magnetically ordered metals

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Pavel A

    2015-01-01

    Degenerate plasmas with motionless ions show existence of three surface waves: the Langmuir wave, the electromagnetic wave, and the zeroth sound. Applying the separated spin evolution quantum hydrodynamics to half-space plasma we demonstrate the existence of the surface spin-electron acoustic wave (SSEAW). We study dispersion of the SSEAW. We show that there is hybridization between the surface Langmuir wave and the SSEAW at rather small spin polarization. In the hybridization area the dispersion branches are located close to each other. In this area there is a strong interaction between these waves leading to the energy exchange. Consequently, generating the Langmuir waves with the frequencies close to hybridization area we can generate the SSEAWs. Thus, we report a method of creation of the SEAWs.

  2. Atomic and electronic structure of surfaces theoretical foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Lannoo, Michel

    1991-01-01

    Surfaces and interfaces play an increasingly important role in today's solid state devices. In this book the reader is introduced, in a didactic manner, to the essential theoretical aspects of the atomic and electronic structure of surfaces and interfaces. The book does not pretend to give a complete overview of contemporary problems and methods. Instead, the authors strive to provide simple but qualitatively useful arguments that apply to a wide variety of cases. The emphasis of the book is on semiconductor surfaces and interfaces but it also includes a thorough treatment of transition metals, a general discussion of phonon dispersion curves, and examples of large computational calculations. The exercises accompanying every chapter will be of great benefit to the student.

  3. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of laser-induced periodic surface structures on nickel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedao, Xxx, E-mail: sedao.xxx@gmail.com [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France); Maurice, Claire [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 St-Etienne (France); Garrelie, Florence; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France); Quey, Romain; Blanc, Gilles [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 St-Etienne (France); Pigeon, Florent [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlight: •Lattice rotation and its distribution in laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the subsurface region on a nickel substrate are revealed using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). -- Abstract: We report on the structural investigation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) generated in polycrystalline nickel target after multi-shot irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is used to reveal lattice rotation caused by dislocation storage during LIPSS formation. Localized crystallographic damages in the LIPSS are detected from both surface and cross-sectional EBSD studies. A surface region (up to 200 nm) with 1–3° grain disorientation is observed in localized areas from the cross-section of the LIPSS. The distribution of the local disorientation is inhomogeneous across the LIPSS and the subsurface region.

  4. Estimating Temperature Fields from MODIS Land Surface Temperature and Air Temperature Observations in a Sub-Arctic Alpine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott N. Williamson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatially continuous satellite infrared temperature measurements are essential for understanding the consequences and drivers of change, at local and regional scales, especially in northern and alpine environments dominated by a complex cryosphere where in situ observations are scarce. We describe two methods for producing daily temperature fields using MODIS “clear-sky” day-time Land Surface Temperatures (LST. The Interpolated Curve Mean Daily Surface Temperature (ICM method, interpolates single daytime Terra LST values to daily means using the coincident diurnal air temperature curves. The second method calculates daily mean LST from daily maximum and minimum LST (MMM values from MODIS Aqua and Terra. These ICM and MMM models were compared to daily mean air temperatures recorded between April and October at seven locations in southwest Yukon, Canada, covering characteristic alpine land cover types (tundra, barren, glacier at elevations between 1,408 m and 2,319 m. Both methods for producing mean daily surface temperatures have advantages and disadvantages. ICM signals are strongly correlated with air temperature (R2 = 0.72 to 0.86, but have relatively large variability (RMSE = 4.09 to 4.90 K, while MMM values had a stronger correlation to air temperature (R2 = 0.90 and smaller variability (RMSE = 2.67 K. Finally, when comparing 8-day LST averages, aggregated from the MMM method, to air temperature, we found a high correlation (R2 = 0.84 with less variability (RMSE = 1.54 K. Where the trend was less steep and the y-intercept increased by 1.6 °C compared to the daily correlations. This effect is likely a consequence of LST temperature averages being differentially affected by cloud cover over warm and cold surfaces. We conclude that satellite infrared skin temperature (e.g., MODIS LST, which is often aggregated into multi-day composites to mitigate data reductions caused by cloud cover, changes in its relationship to air temperature

  5. Alloying influences on low melt temperature SnZn and SnBi solder alloys for electronic interconnections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Guang [Stokes Laboratories, Bernal Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland); Department of Civil Engineering and Materials Science, University of Limerick (Ireland); Wilding, Ian J. [Henkel Ltd, Hemel Hempstead (United Kingdom); Collins, Maurice N., E-mail: Maurice.collins@ul.ie [Stokes Laboratories, Bernal Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland)

    2016-04-25

    Due to its commercial potential and the technological challenges associated with processing, low temperature soldering is a topic gaining widespread interest in both industry and academia in the application space of consumer and “throw away” electronics. This review focuses on the latest metallurgical alloys, tin zinc (Sn–Zn) and tin bismuth (Sn–Bi), for lower temperature processed electronic interconnections. The fundamentals of solder paste production and flux development for these highly surface active metallic powders are introduced. Intermetallic compounds that underpin low temperature solder joint production and reliability are discussed. The influence of alloying on these alloys is described in terms of critical microstructural changes, mechanical properties and reliability. The review concludes with an outlook for next generation electronic interconnect materials. - Highlights: • Review of the latest advances in Sn–Zn and Sn–Bi solder alloys. • Technological developments underpinning low temperature soldering. • Micro alloying influences on next generation interconnect materials.

  6. Low temperature removal of surface oxides and hydrocarbons from Ge(100) using atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, M., E-mail: m.walker@warwick.ac.uk; Tedder, M.S.; Palmer, J.D.; Mudd, J.J.; McConville, C.F.

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Preparation of a clean, well-ordered Ge(100) surface with atomic hydrogen. • Surface oxide layers removed by AHC at room temperature, but not hydrocarbons. • Increasing surface temperature during AHC dramatically improves efficiency. • AHC with the surface heated to 250 °C led to a near complete removal of contaminants. • (2 × 1) LEED pattern from IBA and AHC indicates asymmetric dimer reconstruction. - Abstract: Germanium is a group IV semiconductor with many current and potential applications in the modern semiconductor industry. Key to expanding the use of Ge is a reliable method for the removal of surface contamination, including oxides which are naturally formed during the exposure of Ge thin films to atmospheric conditions. A process for achieving this task at lower temperatures would be highly advantageous, where the underlying device architecture will not diffuse through the Ge film while also avoiding electronic damage induced by ion irradiation. Atomic hydrogen cleaning (AHC) offers a low-temperature, damage-free alternative to the common ion bombardment and annealing (IBA) technique which is widely employed. In this work, we demonstrate with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) that the AHC method is effective in removing surface oxides and hydrocarbons, yielding an almost completely clean surface when the AHC is conducted at a temperature of 250 °C. We compare the post-AHC cleanliness and (2 × 1) low energy electron diffraction (LEED) pattern to that obtained via IBA, where the sample is annealed at 600 °C. We also demonstrate that the combination of a sample temperature of 250 °C and atomic H dosing is required to clean the surface. Lower temperatures prove less effective in removal of the oxide layer and hydrocarbons, whilst annealing in ultra-high vacuum conditions only removes weakly bound hydrocarbons. Finally, we examine the subsequent H-termination of an IBA-cleaned sample using XPS, LEED and ultraviolet

  7. Calibration plan for the sea and land surface temperature radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David L.; Nightingale, Tim J.; Mortimer, Hugh; Middleton, Kevin; Edeson, Ruben; Cox, Caroline V.; Mutlow, Chris T.; Maddison, Brian J.

    2013-10-01

    The Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) to be flown on ESA's Sentinel-3 mission is a multichannel scanning radiometer that will continue the 21-year datasets of the Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) series. As its name implies, measurements from SLSTR will be used to retrieve global sea surface temperatures to an uncertainty of SLSTR instrument, infrared calibration sources and alignment equipment. The calibration rig has been commissioned and results of these tests will be presented. Finally the authors will present the planning for the on-orbit monitoring and calibration activities to ensure that calibration is maintained. These activities include vicarious calibration techniques that have been developed through previous missions, and the deployment of ship-borne radiometers.

  8. Hot electron dynamics at semiconductor surfaces: Implications for quantum dot photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdale, William A., III

    . A TR-SHG study of these electronically-coupled quantum-dot films reveals temperature-activated cooling of hot charge carriers and coherent excitation of a previously-unidentified surface optical phonon. Finally, I report the first experimental observation of ultrafast electron transfer from the higher excited states of a colloidal quantum dot (PbSe) to delocalized conduction band states of a widely-used electron acceptor (TiO2). The electric field resulting from ultrafast (<50fs) separation of charge carriers across the PbSe/TiO2(110) interface excites coherent vibration of the TiO2 surface atoms, whose collective motions can be followed in real time.

  9. A surface acoustic wave ICP sensor with good temperature stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Hu, Hong; Ye, Aipeng; Zhang, Peng

    2017-07-20

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is very important for assessing and monitoring hydrocephalus, head trauma and hypertension patients, which could lead to elevated ICP or even devastating neurological damage. The mortality rate due to these diseases could be reduced through ICP monitoring, because precautions can be taken against the brain damage. This paper presents a surface acoustic wave (SAW) pressure sensor to realize ICP monitoring, which is capable of wireless and passive transmission with antenna attached. In order to improve the temperature stability of the sensor, two methods were adopted. First, the ST cut quartz was chosen as the sensor substrate due to its good temperature stability. Then, a differential temperature compensation method was proposed to reduce the effects of temperature. Two resonators were designed based on coupling of mode (COM) theory and the prototype was fabricated and verified using a system established for testing pressure and temperature. The experiment result shows that the sensor has a linearity of 2.63% and hysteresis of 1.77%. The temperature stability of the sensor has been greatly improved by using the differential compensation method, which validates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. A New Estimate of the Earth's Land Surface Temperature History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, R. A.; Curry, J. A.; Groom, D.; Jacobsen, B.; Perlmutter, S.; Rohde, R. A.; Rosenfeld, A.; Wickham, C.; Wurtele, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature team has re-evaluated the world's atmospheric land surface temperature record using a linear least-squares method that allow the use of all the digitized records back to 1800, including short records that had been excluded by prior groups. We use the Kriging method to estimate an optimal weighting of stations to give a world average based on uniform weighting of the land surface. We have assembled a record of the available data by merging 1.6 billion temperature reports from 16 pre-existing data archives; this data base will be made available for public use. The former Global Historic Climatology Network (GHCN) monthly data base shows a sudden drop in the number of stations reporting monthly records from 1980 to the present; we avoid this drop by calculating monthly averages from the daily records. By using all the data, we reduce the effects of potential data selection bias. We make an independent estimate of the urban heat island effect by calculating the world land temperature trends based on stations chosen to be far from urban sites. We calculate the effect of poor station quality, as documented in the US by the team led by Anthony Watts by estimating the temperature trends based solely on the stations ranked good (1,2 or 1,2,3 in the NOAA ranking scheme). We avoid issues of homogenization bias by using raw data; at times when the records are discontinuous (e.g. due to station moves) we break the record into smaller segments and analyze those, rather than attempt to correct the discontinuity. We estimate the uncertainties in the final results using the jackknife procedure developed by J. Tukey. We calculate spatial uncertainties by measuring the effects of geographical exclusion on recent data that have good world coverage. The results we obtain are compared to those published by the groups at NOAA, NASA-GISS, and Hadley-CRU in the UK.

  11. Effect of floor surface temperature on blood flow and skin temperature in the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, G-S

    2008-12-01

    A total of 16 healthy college students participated as subjects to elucidate the hypothesis that blood flow and skin temperature in foot are affected by the floor surface temperature. The floor surface temperature was controlled by varying the temperature of water (tw) flowing underneath the floor, and it ranged from tw 15 to 40 degrees C at 5 degrees C intervals. The blood flow rate was measured in the dorsal right toe, and skin temperatures were measured for 60 min at 8 points: the neck, right scapular, left hand, right shin, left bottom of the toe, right instep, left finger, and rectum. The blood flow rate in the foot tissue was increased until the foot skin temperature warmed up to 34 degrees C (P = 0.000). The final skin temperatures on the bottom of the toe were 19.4 +/- 2.44 degrees C for tw 15 degrees C, 22.4 +/- 2.45 degrees C for tw 20 degrees C, 24.8 +/- 2.80 degrees C for tw 25 degrees C, 27.7 +/- 2.13 degrees C for tw 30 degrees C, 30.6 +/- 2.06 degrees C for tw 35 degrees C, 33.2 +/- 1.45 degrees C for tw 40 degrees C, 34.2 +/- 1.55 degrees C for tw 45 degrees C, and 35.2 +/- 1.65 degrees C for tw 50 degrees C. Considering blood flow and comfort, the partial floor heating system is suggested and the recommended floor surface temperature range is 27-33 degrees C. A warm floor surface can serve to satisfy occupants when the ambient temperature maintained at 20 degrees C which represents an energy conscious temperature. A warm floor can induce high blood perfusion in the feet and consequently improve an occupant's health by treating many vascular-related disorders. Even in a well-insulated residential building, a partially heated floor system could prevent overheating while providing surface warmth.

  12. Actual evaporation estimation from infrared measurement of soil surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Pognant

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the hydrological cycle, actual evaporation represents the second most important process in terms of volumes of water transported, second only to the precipitation phenomena. Several methods for the estimation of the Ea were proposed by researchers in scientific literature, but the estimation of the Ea from potential evapotranspiration often requires the knowledge of hard-to-find parameters (e.g.: vegetation morphology, vegetation cover, interception of rainfall by the canopy, evaporation from the canopy surface and uptake of water by plant roots and many existing database are characterized by missing or incomplete information that leads to a rough estimation of the actual evaporation amount. Starting from the above considerations, the aim of this study is to develop and validate a method for the estimation of the Ea based on two steps: i the potential evaporation estimation by using the meteorological data (i.e. Penman-Monteith; ii application of a correction factor based on the infrared soil surface temperature measurements. The dataset used in this study were collected during two measurement campaigns conducted both in a plain testing site (Grugliasco, Italy, and in a mountain South-East facing slope (Cogne, Italy. During those periods, hourly measurement of air temperature, wind speed, infrared surface temperature, soil heat flux, and soil water content were collected. Results from the dataset collected in the two testing sites show a good agreement between the proposed method and reference methods used for the Ea estimation.

  13. Land surface temperature shaped by urban fractions in megacity region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxuan; Hu, Yonghong; Jia, Gensuo; Hou, Meiting; Fan, Yanguo; Sun, Zhongchang; Zhu, Yuxiang

    2017-02-01

    Large areas of cropland and natural vegetation have been replaced by impervious surfaces during the recent rapid urbanization in China, which has resulted in intensified urban heat island effects and modified local or regional warming trends. However, it is unclear how urban expansion contributes to local temperature change. In this study, we investigated the relationship between land surface temperature (LST) change and the increase of urban land signals. The megacity of Tianjin was chosen for the case study because it is representative of the urbanization process in northern China. A combined analysis of LST and urban land information was conducted based on an urban-rural transect derived from Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), and QuickBird images. The results indicated that the density of urban land signals has intensified within a 1-km2 grid in the urban center with an impervious land fraction >60 %. However, the construction on urban land is quite different with low-/mid-rise buildings outnumbering high-rise buildings in the urban-rural transect. Based on a statistical moving window analysis, positive correlation ( R 2 > 0.9) is found between LST and urban land signals. Surface temperature change (ΔLST) increases by 0.062 °C, which was probably caused by the 1 % increase of urbanized land (ΔIF) in this case region.

  14. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniuchi, T.; Motoyui, Y.; Morozumi, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Fortuna, F.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Shin, S.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ~40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides.

  15. Giant band bending induced by Ag on InAs(110) surfaces at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristov, V. Yu.; Le Lay, G.; Vinh, Le Thanh; Hricovini, K.; Bonnet, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    We show by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy [G. Le Lay, V. Yu Aristov, J. Kanski, P. O. Nilsson, U. O. Karlsson, K. Hricovini, and J. E. Bonnet (unpublished)] (core levels and valence band) as well as by Kelvin probe measurements, both under illumination and in the dark, at low temperature (LT) T~=20 K and room temperature (RT) T~=300 K, that upon deposition of minute amounts of silver (about 0.01-0.1 monolayer) onto in situ well-cleaved, highly doped, n- and p-type InAs(110) surfaces, one induces a giant movement of the Fermi level EF into the conduction band. We thus create a two-dimensional (2D) electron gas at the surface (strong downwards band bending): as a matter of fact, we do observe emission of electrons from filled states up to the EF placed far above the conduction-band minimum (CBM). It is also shown that the growth is laminar at LT, while it follows a Volmer-Weber mode at RT, with indications of chemical interactions between the Ag and In atoms at both temperatures. At LT the deposited atoms interact with the dangling bonds of the In atoms and saturate them for θ~=1 monolayer (ML). At low coverages and LT, the individual Ag atoms create donorlike surface states (SS) (adsorption-induced states) and EF can be pinned by these SS in the conduction band. This leads to the formation of a 2D electron channel at the InAs surface already at θ~=0.01-0.1 ML for both types of semiconductors. At higher coverages one observes the onset of metallization for both temperatures and Ag clusters can produce another type of SS, typically metal-induced gap states near the CBM. These proposals, as well as the experimental facts, are discussed in the light of the current theoretical models of Schottky-barrier formation.

  16. Magnetospheric Whistler Mode Ray Tracing with the Inclusion of Finite Electron and Ion Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxworth, A. S.; Golkowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    Ray tracing is an important technique for the study of whistler mode wave propagation in the Earth's magnetosphere. In numerical ray tracing the trajectory of a wave packet is calculated at each point in space by solving the Haselgrove equations, assuming a smooth, loss-less medium with no mode coupling. Previous work on ray tracing has assumed a cold plasma environment with negligible electron and ion temperatures. In this work we present magnetospheric whistler mode wave ray tracing results with the inclusion of finite ion and electron temperature. The inclusion of finite temperature effects makes the fourth order dispersion relation become sixth order. We compare our results with the work done by previous researchers for cold plasma environments, using two near earth space models (NGO and GCPM). Inclusion of finite temperature closes the otherwise open refractive index surface near the lower hybrid resonance frequency and affects the magnetospheric reflection of whistler waves. We also asses the main changes in the ray trajectory and implications for cyclotron resonance wave particle interactions including energetic particle precipitation.

  17. Zeeman shift of an electron trapped near a surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Robert; Eberlein, Claudia

    2014-04-01

    Boundary-dependent corrections to the spin energy eigenvalues of an electron in a weak magnetic field and confined by a harmonic trapping potential are investigated. The electromagnetic field is quantized through a normal-mode expansion obeying the Maxwell boundary conditions at the material surface. We couple the electron to this photon field and a classical magnetic field in the Dirac equation, to which we apply the unitary Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation in order to generate a nonrelativistic approximation of the Hamiltonian to the desired order. We obtain the Schrödinger eigenstates of an electron subject to double confinement by a harmonic potential and a classical magnetic field, and then use these within second-order perturbation theory to calculate the spin energy shift that is attributable to the surface-modified quantized field. We find that a pole at the eigenfrequency of a set of generalized Landau transitions gives dominant oscillatory contributions to the energy shift in the limit of tight harmonic confinement in a weak magnetic field, which also make the energy shift preferable to the magnetic moment for a physically meaningful interpretation.

  18. Multiscale approach to the electronic structure of doped semiconductor surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinai, Ofer; Hofmann, Oliver T.; Rinke, Patrick; Scheffler, Matthias; Heimel, Georg; Kronik, Leeor

    2015-02-01

    The inclusion of the global effects of semiconductor doping poses a unique challenge for first-principles simulations, because the typically low concentration of dopants renders an explicit treatment intractable. Furthermore, the width of the space-charge region (SCR) at charged surfaces often exceeds realistic supercell dimensions. Here, we present a multiscale technique that fully addresses these difficulties. It is based on the introduction of a charged sheet, mimicking the SCR-related field, along with free charge which mimics the bulk charge reservoir, such that the system is neutral overall. These augment a slab comprising "pseudoatoms" possessing a fractional nuclear charge matching the bulk doping concentration. Self-consistency is reached by imposing charge conservation and Fermi level equilibration between the bulk, treated semiclassically, and the electronic states of the slab, which are treated quantum-mechanically. The method, called CREST—the charge-reservoir electrostatic sheet technique—can be used with standard electronic structure codes. We validate CREST using a simple tight-binding model, which allows for comparison of its results with calculations encompassing the full SCR explicitly. Specifically, we show that CREST successfully predicts scenarios spanning the range from no to full Fermi level pinning. We then employ it with density functional theory, obtaining insight into the doping dependence of the electronic structures of the metallic "clean-cleaved" Si(111) surface and its semiconducting (2 ×1 ) reconstructions.

  19. Surface Tensions and Their Variations with Temperature and Impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, S. C.; Fine, J.

    1985-01-01

    The surface tensions in this work were determined using the sessile drop technique. This method is based on a comparison of the profile of a liquid drop with the profile calculated by solving the Young-Laplace equation. The comparison can be made in several ways; the traditional Bashforth-Adams procedure was used in conjunction with recently calculated drop shape tables which virtually eliminate interpolation errors. Although previous study has found little difference in measurements with pure and oxygen doped silicon, there is other evidence suggesting that oxygen in dilute concentrations severely depresses the surface tension of silicon. The surface tension of liquid silicon in purified argon atmospheres was measured. A temperature coefficient near -0.28 mJ/square meters K was found. The experiments show a high sensitivity of the surface tension to what is believed are low concentrations of oxygen. Thus one cannot rule out some effect of low levels of oxygen in the results. However, the highest surface tension values obtained in conditions which minimized the residual oxygen pressure are in good agreement with a previous measurement in pure hydrogen. Therefore, depression of the surface tension by oxygen is insignificant in these measurements.

  20. Negative plasma potential relative to electron-emitting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanell, M D

    2013-09-01

    Most works on plasma-wall interaction predict that with strong electron emission, a nonmonotonic "space-charge-limited" (SCL) sheath forms where the plasma potential is positive relative to the wall. We show that a fundamentally different sheath structure is possible where the potential monotonically increases toward a positively charged wall that is shielded by a single layer of negative charge. No ion-accelerating presheath exists in the plasma and the ion wall flux is zero. An analytical solution of the "inverse sheath" regime is demonstrated for a general plasma-wall system where the plasma electrons and emitted electrons are Maxwellian with different temperatures. Implications of the inverse sheath effect are that (a) the plasma potential is negative, (b) ion sputtering vanishes, (c) no charge is lost at the wall, and (d) the electron energy flux is thermal. To test empirically what type of sheath structure forms under strong emission, a full plasma bounded by strongly emitting walls is simulated. It is found that inverse sheaths form at the walls and ions are confined in the plasma. This result differs from past particle-in-cell simulation studies of emission which contain an artificial "source sheath" that accelerates ions to the wall, leading to a SCL sheath at high emission intensity.

  1. Application of Electron Beam Surface Technologies in the Automotive Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rolf Zenker; Anja Buchwalder

    2004-01-01

    Progress in the beam deflection technique opens up new possibilities for the application of electron beam (EB)surface and welding technologies in the automotive industry. This development is based on three-dimensional high-speed beam deflection and fully automatic online process control. So, in the EB surface treatment three-dimensional energy transfer fields can be realised which take into account the contour of a component, the conditions of heat conduction and the load conditions. High flexibility, precision and reproducibility are typical characteristics. High productivity is achieved by the simultaneous interaction of the EB in several processing areas or by carrying out several processes simultaneously. EB surface treatment is becoming more and more attractive and important especially in the automotive industry, and also in comparison to laser technologies. This paper deals with different EB surface technologies, for example hardening,remelting, surface alloying, dispersing or cladding of different materials such as steel, cast iron and different alloys of Al,Mg and Ti. Examples of applications in the automotive industry, especially engine components, will be discussed.

  2. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of laser-induced periodic surface structures on nickel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedao, Xxx; Maurice, Claire; Garrelie, Florence; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Quey, Romain; Blanc, Gilles; Pigeon, Florent

    2014-05-01

    We report on the structural investigation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) generated in polycrystalline nickel target after multi-shot irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is used to reveal lattice rotation caused by dislocation storage during LIPSS formation. Localized crystallographic damages in the LIPSS are detected from both surface and cross-sectional EBSD studies. A surface region (up to 200 nm) with 1-3° grain disorientation is observed in localized areas from the cross-section of the LIPSS. The distribution of the local disorientation is inhomogeneous across the LIPSS and the subsurface region.

  3. Electronic ventilator temperature sensors as a potential source of respiratory tract colonization with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogues, A M; Maugein, J; Allery, A; Fleureau, C; Boulestreau, H; Surcin, S; Bebear, C; Janvier, G; Gachie, J P

    2001-12-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) is an important cause of nosocomial infection among ventilated and immunocompromised patients, and among patients receiving broad-spectrum antimicrobials. We report a cluster of patients in a surgical intensive care unit who were colonized or infected with S. maltophilia. An epidemiological investigation was initiated after surveillance data revealed that eight patients were culture-positive from sputum for S. maltophilia in the preceding month. Review of respiratory care procedures revealed that when mechanical ventilators were serviced between patients, the electronic temperature probes used with servo-controlled humidifiers were wiped with inadequate disinfection. We collected cultures of case-patient room surfaces, sinks and ventilator equipment. S. maltophilia was recovered from room surfaces, ventilator expiratory circuits and a temperature sensor which had been kept in ambient air after disinfection. Patients and environmental isolates were examined by RAPD-PCR. Three clinical isolates and one environmental isolate had the same profile, which suggests cross-contamination or common source exposure. The outbreak was controlled by adequate disinfection of the temperature sensors. No single epidemic strain was identified but several observations support the conclusion that the temperature probes contributed to the outbreak.

  4. DFPT approach to the temperature dependence of electronic band energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Paul; Cote, Michel; Gonze, Xavier

    2010-03-01

    The energy bands of semiconductors exhibit significant shifts and broadening with temperature at constant volume. This is an effect of the direct renormalization of band energies due to electron-phonon interactions. In search of an efficient linear response DFT approach to this effect, beyond semi-empirical approximation or frozen- phonon DFT, we have implemented formulas derived by Allen and Heine [J. Phys. C 9, 2305 (1976)] inside the ABINIT package. We have found that such formulas need a great number of bands, O(1000), to properly converge the thermal corrections of deep potential well atoms, i.e. elements of the first row. This leads to heavy computational costs even for simple systems like diamond. The DFPT formalism can be used to circumvent entirely the need for conduction bands by computing the first-order wave-functions using the self-consistent Sternheimer equation. We will compare the results of both formalism demonstrating that the DFPT approach reproduces the correct converged results of the formulas of Allen and Heine.

  5. Peltier Effect and Electron Temperature Distribution in Quantum Hall Systems with Potential Discontinuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Takahiro; Akera, Hiroshi; Suzuura, Hidekatsu

    2005-06-01

    Spatial variations of the electron temperature are calculated in the linear-response regime in a quantum Hall system with a potential discontinuity in the current direction. It is shown that the sign of the induced deviation of the electron temperature from the lattice temperature exhibits quantum oscillations.

  6. Nanoscale electron transport at the surface of a topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Bobisch, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional topological insulators for disruptive technologies critically depends on the dissipationless transport of electrons at the surface, because of the suppression of backscattering at defects. However, in real devices, defects are unavoidable and scattering at angles other than 180° is allowed for such materials. Until now, this has been studied indirectly by bulk measurements and by the analysis of the local density of states in close vicinity to defect sites. Here, we directly measure the nanoscale voltage drop caused by the scattering at step edges, which occurs if a lateral current flows along a three-dimensional topological insulator. The experiments were performed using scanning tunnelling potentiometry for thin Bi2Se3 films. So far, the observed voltage drops are small because of large contributions of the bulk to the electronic transport. However, for the use of ideal topological insulating thin films in devices, these contributions would play a significant role. PMID:27098939

  7. Nanoscale electron transport at the surface of a topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Bobisch, Christian A.

    2016-04-01

    The use of three-dimensional topological insulators for disruptive technologies critically depends on the dissipationless transport of electrons at the surface, because of the suppression of backscattering at defects. However, in real devices, defects are unavoidable and scattering at angles other than 180° is allowed for such materials. Until now, this has been studied indirectly by bulk measurements and by the analysis of the local density of states in close vicinity to defect sites. Here, we directly measure the nanoscale voltage drop caused by the scattering at step edges, which occurs if a lateral current flows along a three-dimensional topological insulator. The experiments were performed using scanning tunnelling potentiometry for thin Bi2Se3 films. So far, the observed voltage drops are small because of large contributions of the bulk to the electronic transport. However, for the use of ideal topological insulating thin films in devices, these contributions would play a significant role.

  8. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  9. Probing the Structure of Ionic Liquid Surfaces by Rotationally and Electronically Inelastic Scattering of no

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemkiewicz, M. P.; Zutz, A.; Nesbitt, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL’s) are a highly diverse class of materials with many potential technological applications. They are candidates for use in advanced electrolytes, green solvents, and supported liquid membranes for CO_2 sequestration. We present studies where inelastic scattering of high or low velocity nitric oxide provides insight into the microscopic structure of these complex surfaces. As an open shell diatomic, jet-cooled NO [^2π1/2(J = 0.5)] features both molecular and electronic collision dynamics as seen by probing scattered rotational and spin-orbit distributions respectively. These studies show substantial variation in degree of rotational and electronic excitation as ionic liquid identity is varied. Also, surface heating is found to have a strong effect on scattered spin-orbit branching, possibly due to the dependence of surface structure on temperature. This is discussed in terms of a picture where the electronic degree of freedom may serve as a sensitive measure of the cationic versus anionic nature of the top few layers of this material.

  10. Low temperature removal of surface oxides and hydrocarbons from Ge(100) using atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, M.; Tedder, M. S.; Palmer, J. D.; Mudd, J. J.; McConville, C. F.

    2016-08-01

    Germanium is a group IV semiconductor with many current and potential applications in the modern semiconductor industry. Key to expanding the use of Ge is a reliable method for the removal of surface contamination, including oxides which are naturally formed during the exposure of Ge thin films to atmospheric conditions. A process for achieving this task at lower temperatures would be highly advantageous, where the underlying device architecture will not diffuse through the Ge film while also avoiding electronic damage induced by ion irradiation. Atomic hydrogen cleaning (AHC) offers a low-temperature, damage-free alternative to the common ion bombardment and annealing (IBA) technique which is widely employed. In this work, we demonstrate with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) that the AHC method is effective in removing surface oxides and hydrocarbons, yielding an almost completely clean surface when the AHC is conducted at a temperature of 250 °C. We compare the post-AHC cleanliness and (2 × 1) low energy electron diffraction (LEED) pattern to that obtained via IBA, where the sample is annealed at 600 °C. We also demonstrate that the combination of a sample temperature of 250 °C and atomic H dosing is required to clean the surface. Lower temperatures prove less effective in removal of the oxide layer and hydrocarbons, whilst annealing in ultra-high vacuum conditions only removes weakly bound hydrocarbons. Finally, we examine the subsequent H-termination of an IBA-cleaned sample using XPS, LEED and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) in order to examine changes in the work function of Ge(100) upon hydrogenation.

  11. Mechanism for orientation dependence of blisters on W surface exposed to D plasma at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Y.Z. [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, W., E-mail: liuw@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu, B. [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Qu, S.L. [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Morgan, T.W. [FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, 5612AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); De Temmerman, G. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon-CS90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2016-08-15

    The orientation dependence of blister formation induced by D plasma exposure at low temperature (about 523 K) on rolled tungsten and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) W samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Severe blistering was observed on grains with surface normal directions close to [111], while the [001] surfaces are the most resistant to blister formation. Cavities induced by D{sub 2} gas were observed beneath [111], [110] and [001] surfaces, independently on whether blisters were observed on the surface or not. The [111] surface is more prone to blister formation, because it is easily plastically deformed by the D{sub 2} gas pressure. Some blister edges and steps were perpendicular to [110] directions, which may be induced by the slipping of dislocations on {110} planes. The blister morphology induced by D plasma can be well explained by the blister model based on plastic deformation mechanism. - Highlights: • The blistering behavior was severe on the [111] surface, while the [001] surfaces are the most resistant to blister formation. The CVD samples with [001] texture showed good resistance to blister formation, so it is suggested that it may be effective to alleviate blisters by texturing of W. • The blister formation model based on the plastic deformation of W can well explain the heterogeneity of blister formation and the different shapes of blisters on surfaces with different normal directions. The [111] surface is more prone to blister formation, because the surface layer is easily deformed by the D{sub 2} gas pressure beneath the surface. The blister edges and steps were speculated to be induced by the slipping of dislocations.

  12. Scanning electron microscopy of the surfaces of ion implanted SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malherbe, Johan B., E-mail: johan.malherbe@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Berg, N.G. van der; Kuhudzai, R.J.; Hlatshwayo, T.T.; Thabethe, T.T.; Odutemowo, O.S.; Theron, C.C.; Friedland, E. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Botha, A.J. [Laboratory for Microscopy & Microanalysis, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Wendler, E. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    This paper gives a brief review of radiation damage caused by particle (ions and neutrons) bombardment in SiC at different temperatures, and its annealing, with an expanded discussion on the effects occurring on the surface. The surface effects were observed using SEM (scanning electron microscopy) with an in-lens detector and EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction). Two substrates were used, viz. single crystalline 6H-SiC wafers and polycrystalline SiC, where the majority of the crystallites were 3C-SiC. The surface modification of the SiC samples by 360 keV ion bombardment was studied at temperatures below (i.e. room temperature), just at (i.e. 350 °C), or above (i.e. 600 °C) the critical temperature for amorphization of SiC. For bombardment at a temperature at about the critical temperature an extra step, viz. post-bombardment annealing, was needed to ascertain the microstructure of bombarded layer. Another aspect investigated was the effect of annealing of samples with an ion bombardment-induced amorphous layer on a 6H-SiC substrate. SEM could detect that this layer started to crystalize at 900 °C. The resulting topography exhibited a dependence on the ion species. EBSD showed that the crystallites forming in the amorphized layer were 3C-SiC and not 6H-SiC as the substrate. The investigations also pointed out the behaviour of the epitaxial regrowth of the amorphous layer from the 6H-SiC interface.

  13. Trapping Surface Electrons on Graphene Layers and Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Niesner, D.; Fauster, Th.; Dadap, J. I.; Zaki, N.; Knox, K. R.; Yeh, P. -C.; Bhandari, R.; Osgood, R. M.; Petrović, M; Kralj, M.

    2011-01-01

    We report the use of time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission to map the bound, unoccupied electronic structure of the weakly coupled graphene/Ir(111) system. The energy, dispersion, and lifetime of the lowest three image-potential states are measured. In addition, the weak interaction between Ir and graphene permits observation of resonant transitions from an unquenched Shockley-type surface state of the Ir substrate to graphene/Ir image-potential states. The image-potential-state l...

  14. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin; Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-01

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (∼2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic "poly-tropic law" is more appropriate than the isothermal "barometric law" to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the "poly-tropic law" are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3.

  15. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin; Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-01

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (˜2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic "poly-tropic law" is more appropriate than the isothermal "barometric law" to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the "poly-tropic law" are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3.

  16. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin, E-mail: thb@buaa.edu.cn; Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue [School of Astronautics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (∼2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic “poly-tropic law” is more appropriate than the isothermal “barometric law” to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the “poly-tropic law” are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3.

  17. Improvement of carbon fiber surface properties using electron beam irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced advance composites have been used for struetural applications, mainly on account of their mechanical properties. The main factor for a good mechanical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced composite is the interfacial interaction between its components, which are carbon fiber and polymeric matrix. The aim of this study is to improve the surface properties of the carbon fiber using ionizing radiation from an electron beam to obtain better adhesion properties in the resultant composite. EB radiation was applied on the carbon fiber itself before preparing test specimens for the mechanical tests. Experimental results showed that EB irradiation improved the tensile strength of carbon fiber samples. The maximum value in tensile strength was reached using doses of about 250kGy. After breakage, the morphology aspect of the tensile specimens prepared with irradiated and non-irradiated carbon fibers were evaluated. SEM micrographs showed modifications on the carbon fiber surface.

  18. Localized electronic states at grain boundaries on the surface of graphene and graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luican-Mayer, Adina; Barrios-Vargas, Jose E.; Toft Falkenberg, Jesper; Autès, Gabriel; Cummings, Aron W.; Soriano, David; Li, Guohong; Brandbyge, Mads; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Roche, Stephan; Andrei, Eva Y.

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in large-scale synthesis of graphene and other 2D materials have underscored the importance of local defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries (GBs), and especially their tendency to alter the electronic properties of the material. Understanding how the polycrystalline morphology affects the electronic properties is crucial for the development of applications such as flexible electronics, energy harvesting devices or sensors. We here report on atomic scale characterization of several GBs and on the structural-dependence of the localized electronic states in their vicinity. Using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, together with tight binding and ab initio numerical simulations we explore GBs on the surface of graphite and elucidate the interconnection between the local density of states and their atomic structure. We show that the electronic fingerprints of these GBs consist of pronounced resonances which, depending on the relative orientation of the adjacent crystallites, appear either on the electron side of the spectrum or as an electron-hole symmetric doublet close to the charge neutrality point. These two types of spectral features will impact very differently the transport properties allowing, in the asymmetric case to introduce transport anisotropy which could be utilized to design novel growth and fabrication strategies to control device performance.

  19. Oblique propagation of electrons in crystals of germanium and silicon at sub-Kelvin temperature in low electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera, B; Moffatt, R; Sundqvist, K; Sadoulet, B

    2010-01-01

    We show that oblique propagation of electrons in crystals of Ge and Si, where the electron velocity does not follow the electric field even on average, can be explained using standard anisotropic theory for indirect gap semiconductors. These effects are pronounced at temperatures below ~1K and for electric fields below ~5V/cm because inter-valley transitions are energetically suppressed forcing electrons to remain in the same band valley throughout their motion and the valleys to separate in position space. To model, we start with an isotropic approximation which incorporates the average properties of the crystals with one phonon mode, and include the ellipsoidal electron valleys by transforming into a momentum space where constant energy surfaces are spheres. We include comparisons of simulated versus measured drift velocities for holes and electrons, and explain the large discrepancy between electrons and holes for shared events in adjacent electrodes.

  20. Auger electron spectroscopic study of CO{sub 2} adsorption on Zircaloy-4 surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojilovic, N.; Farkas, N. [Institute for Teaching and Learning and Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-6236 (United States); Ramsier, R.D. [Institute for Teaching and Learning and Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-6236 (United States)], E-mail: rex@uakron.edu

    2008-02-28

    We investigate the adsorption of CO{sub 2} onto Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) surfaces at 150, 300 and 600 K using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Following CO{sub 2} adsorption at 150 K the graphitic form of carbon is detected, whereas upon chemisorption at 300 and 600 K we detect the carbidic phase. As the adsorption temperature is increased, the carbon Auger signal increases, whereas the oxygen signal decreases. Adsorption at all three temperatures results in a shift of the Zr Auger features, indicating surface oxidation. The effect of adsorbed CO{sub 2} on the Zr(MVV) and Zr(MNV) transitions depends on adsorption temperature and is less pronounced at higher temperatures. On the other hand, changes in the Zr(MNN) feature are similar for all three adsorption temperatures. The changes in the Zr Auger peak shapes and positions are attributed to oxygen from dissociated CO{sub 2}, with the differences observed at various temperatures indicative of the diffusion of oxygen into the subsurface region.

  1. Decadal trends in Red Sea maximum surface temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Chaidez, Veronica

    2017-08-09

    Ocean warming is a major consequence of climate change, with the surface of the ocean having warmed by 0.11 °C decade-1 over the last 50 years and is estimated to continue to warm by an additional 0.6 - 2.0 °C before the end of the century1. However, there is considerable variability in the rates experienced by different ocean regions, so understanding regional trends is important to inform on possible stresses for marine organisms, particularly in warm seas where organisms may be already operating in the high end of their thermal tolerance. Although the Red Sea is one of the warmest ecosystems on earth, its historical warming trends and thermal evolution remain largely understudied. We characterized the Red Sea\\'s thermal regimes at the basin scale, with a focus on the spatial distribution and changes over time of sea surface temperature maxima, using remotely sensed sea surface temperature data from 1982 - 2015. The overall rate of warming for the Red Sea is 0.17 ± 0.07 °C decade-1, while the northern Red Sea is warming between 0.40 and 0.45 °C decade-1, all exceeding the global rate. Our findings show that the Red Sea is fast warming, which may in the future challenge its organisms and communities.

  2. Polarization induced water molecule dissociation below the first-order electronic-phase transition temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Arulsamy, Andrew; Kregar, Zlatko; Eleršič, Kristina; Modic, Martina; Subramani, Uma Shankar

    2011-09-01

    Hydrogen produced from the photocatalytic splitting of water is one of the reliable alternatives to replace the polluting fossil and the radioactive nuclear fuels. Here, we provide unequivocal evidence for the existence of blue- and red-shifting O-H covalent bonds within a single water molecule adsorbed on the MgO surface as a result of asymmetric displacement polarizabilities. The adsorbed H-O-H on MgO gives rise to one weaker H-O bond, while the other O-H covalent bond from the same adsorbed water molecule compensates this effect with a stronger bond. The weaker bond (nearest to the surface), the interlayer tunneling electrons and the silver substrate are shown to be the causes for the smallest dissociative activation energy on the MgO monolayer. The origin that is responsible to initiate the splitting mechanism is proven to be due to the changes in the polarizability of an adsorbed water molecule, which are further supported by the temperature-dependent static dielectric constant measurements for water below the first-order electronic-phase transition temperature.

  3. Temperature-mediated transition from Dyakonov-Tamm surface waves to surface-plasmon-polariton waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiadini, Francesco; Fiumara, Vincenzo; Mackay, Tom G.; Scaglione, Antonio; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2017-08-01

    The effect of changing the temperature on the propagation of electromagnetic surface waves (ESWs), guided by the planar interface of a homogeneous isotropic temperature-sensitive material (namely, InSb) and a temperature-insensitive structurally chiral material (SCM) was numerically investigated in the terahertz frequency regime. As the temperature rises, InSb transforms from a dissipative dielectric material to a dissipative plasmonic material. Correspondingly, the ESWs transmute from Dyakonov-Tamm surface waves into surface-plasmon-polariton waves. The effects of the temperature change are clearly observed in the phase speeds, propagation distances, angular existence domains, multiplicity, and spatial profiles of energy flow of the ESWs. Remarkably large propagation distances can be achieved; in such instances the energy of an ESW is confined almost entirely within the SCM. For certain propagation directions, simultaneous excitation of two ESWs with (i) the same phase speeds but different propagation distances or (ii) the same propagation distances but different phase speeds are also indicated by our results.

  4. Gaia FGK Benchmark Stars: Effective temperatures and surface gravities

    CERN Document Server

    Heiter, U; Gustafsson, B; Korn, A J; Soubiran, C; Thévenin, F

    2015-01-01

    Large Galactic stellar surveys and new generations of stellar atmosphere models and spectral line formation computations need to be subjected to careful calibration and validation and to benchmark tests. We focus on cool stars and aim at establishing a sample of 34 Gaia FGK Benchmark Stars with a range of different metallicities. The goal was to determine the effective temperature and the surface gravity independently from spectroscopy and atmospheric models as far as possible. Fundamental determinations of Teff and logg were obtained in a systematic way from a compilation of angular diameter measurements and bolometric fluxes, and from a homogeneous mass determination based on stellar evolution models. The derived parameters were compared to recent spectroscopic and photometric determinations and to gravity estimates based on seismic data. Most of the adopted diameter measurements have formal uncertainties around 1%, which translate into uncertainties in effective temperature of 0.5%. The measurements of bol...

  5. Global Surface Temperature Response Explained by Multibox Energy Balance Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksen, H. B.; Rypdal, M.

    2016-12-01

    We formulate a multibox energy balance model, from which global temperature evolution can be described by convolving a linear response function and a forcing record. We estimate parameters in the response function from instrumental data and historic forcing, such that our model can produce a response to both deterministic forcing and stochastic weather forcing consistent with observations. Furthermore, if we make separate boxes for upper ocean layer and atmosphere over land, we can also make separate response functions for global land and sea surface temperature. By describing internal variability as a linear response to white noise, we demonstrate that the power-law form of the observed temperature spectra can be described by linear dynamics, contrary to a common belief that these power-law spectra must arise from nonlinear processes. In our multibox model, the power-law form can arise due to the multiple response times. While one of our main points is that the climate system responds over a wide range of time scales, we cannot find one set of time scales that can be preferred compared to other choices. Hence we think the temperature response can best be characterized as something that is scale-free, but still possible to approximate by a set of well separated time scales.

  6. Electronic system for floor surface type detection in robotics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarapata, Grzegorz; Paczesny, Daniel; Tarasiuk, Łukasz

    2016-11-01

    The paper reports a recognizing method base on ultrasonic transducers utilized for the surface types detection. Ultra-sonic signal is transmitted toward the examined substrate, then reflected and scattered signal goes back to another ultra-sonic receiver. Thee measuring signal is generated by a piezo-electric transducer located at specified distance from the tested substrate. The detector is a second piezo-electric transducer located next to the transmitter. Depending on thee type of substrate which is exposed by an ultrasonic wave, the signal is partially absorbed inn the material, diffused and reflected towards the receiver. To measure the level of received signal, the dedicated electronic circuit was design and implemented in the presented systems. Such system was designed too recognize two types of floor surface: solid (like concrete, ceramic stiles, wood) and soft (carpets, floor coverings). The method will be applied in electronic detection system dedicated to autonomous cleaning robots due to selection of appropriate cleaning method. This work presents the concept of ultrasonic signals utilization, the design of both the measurement system and the measuring stand and as well number of wide tests results which validates correctness of applied ultrasonic method.

  7. The dust-acoustic mode in two-temperature electron plasmas with charging effects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhong Xijuan; Chen Hui; Liu Nianhua; Liu Sanqiu

    2016-04-01

    Dust charging in an unmagnetized collisionless dusty plasma with two-temperature electrons was investigated based on the orbital motion limited theory, where the two-temperature electrons and ions are modelled by the Maxwellian distributions. Then by taking into account the effects of two-temperature electron and the associated charging fluctuations, the dispersion peculiarities of dust-acoustic waves are studied based on dust fluid dynamics. The present results show that the effect will introduce a dissipation on the mode, and the dispersion and the dissipation depend on the temperature ratio and number density ratio of hot and cold electrons.

  8. Growth behavior and properties of nano Pb quantum islands on Si(111) surfaces at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsong, Tien T.

    2004-03-01

    Quantum effects can affect the dynamic properties of surface atoms and the growth behavior of nanometer size islands. Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we have studied: 1) Dynamics of atoms and silicon magic clusters on clean Si(111)-7x7 surfaces. 2) How the electronic property affects the growth behavior of Pb ultra-thin quantum-islands on the Si(111) surface. We find the low temperature growth of Pb quantum-islands on the Si(111)-7x7 surface is affected by the electronic standing wave states formed in the normal direction of these islands. The scaling behavior in the growth of these multilayer flat-top quantum islands can be described by a scaling theory of growth of single layer 2D islands with a minor modification. 3) Observed the vertical Friedel oscillation of the electronic Morie patterns formed at the Pb-Si interface and found the decay of the amplitude to follow the inverse square of the distance to the interface. 4) Observed the dynamics of a structure phase transition of monolayer quasi two dimensional Pb islands and its size effect. These and other recent interesting observations of ours will be presented. Coworkers: C-S Chang, I-S Hwang, W-B Su, M-S Ho, W-B Jian, and S-H Chang etc. Work supported by NSC of Taiwan and Academia Sinica (Taiwan).

  9. Geostatistical Solutions for Downscaling Remotely Sensed Land Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Rodriguez-Galiano, V.; Atkinson, P. M.

    2017-09-01

    Remotely sensed land surface temperature (LST) downscaling is an important issue in remote sensing. Geostatistical methods have shown their applicability in downscaling multi/hyperspectral images. In this paper, four geostatistical solutions, including regression kriging (RK), downscaling cokriging (DSCK), kriging with external drift (KED) and area-to-point regression kriging (ATPRK), are applied for downscaling remotely sensed LST. Their differences are analyzed theoretically and the performances are compared experimentally using a Landsat 7 ETM+ dataset. They are also compared to the classical TsHARP method.

  10. Temperature effects on the behavior of PET submitted to electron beam irradiation in a SEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsafi, B., E-mail: bassem.elsafi@yahoo.fr [LaMaCop, Faculte des Sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra Km. 3, BP 1171, C.P 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Fakhfakh, S.; Fakhfakh, Z. [LaMaCop, Faculte des Sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra Km. 3, BP 1171, C.P 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Jbara, O. [GRESPI/Materiaux Fonctionnels, UFR Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France)

    2011-12-01

    The electron-beam irradiation behavior of a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) has been investigated at different temperatures by the electrostatic influence method employing a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The experimental procedure is based on the measurement of displacement and leakage currents using a modified arrangement adapted to SEM able to heat the sample at controllable temperatures. The charging and flashover phenomena caused by continuous irradiation have been observed. The experimental results reveal a similar tendency for the charging process where the increase of temperature leads to an increase of the amount of accumulated charge, expect at high temperature where a different behavior is observed. For the discharging process, the increase of temperature is always followed by an increase of the released accumulated charge. The effects of the temperature on electron emission yield (EEY) where also studied. The results showed clearly a decrease in this yield with temperature for PET. The higher is the temperature and the lower is the electron emission yield.

  11. Self-consistent many-electron theory of electron work functions and surface potential characteristics for selected metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. R.

    1969-01-01

    Electron work functions, surface potentials, and electron number density distributions and electric fields in the surface region of 26 metals were calculated from first principles within the free electron model. Calculation proceeded from an expression of the total energy as a functional of the electron number density, including exchange and correlation energies, as well as a first inhomogeneity term. The self-consistent solution was obtained via a variational procedure. Surface barriers were due principally to many-body effects; dipole barriers were small only for some alkali metals, becoming quite large for the transition metals. Surface energies were inadequately described by this model, which neglects atomistic effects. Reasonable results were obtained for electron work functions and surface potential characteristics, maximum electron densities varying by a factor of over 60.

  12. Effect of surface nanostructure on temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Michael; Rogal, Jutta; Reuter, Karsten

    2008-03-01

    Using the catalytic CO oxidation at RuO2(110) as a showcase, we employ first-principles kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to illustrate the intricate effects on temperature programmed reaction (TPR) spectroscopy data brought about by the mere correlations between the locations of the active sites at a nanostructured surface. Even in the absence of lateral interactions, this nanostructure alone can cause inhomogeneities that cannot be grasped by prevalent mean-field data analysis procedures, which thus lead to wrong conclusions on the reactivity of the different surface species. The RuO2(110) surface studied here exhibits only two prominent active sites, arranged in simple alternating rows. Yet, the mere neglection of this still quite trivial nanostructure leads mean-field TPR data analysis [1] to extract kinetic parameters that are in error by several orders of magnitude and that do not even reflect the relative reactivity of the different surface species correctly [2].[1] S. Wendt, M. Knapp, and H. Over, JACS 126, 1537 (2004).[2] M. Rieger, J. Rogal, and K. Reuter, Phys. Rev. Lett (in press).

  13. Electronic chemical response indexes at finite temperature in the canonical ensemble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco, E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Gázquez, José L., E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México, D. F. 09340, México (Mexico); Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México, D. F. 07360, México (Mexico); Vela, Alberto, E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México, D. F. 07360, México (Mexico)

    2015-07-14

    Assuming that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons and within the extension of density functional theory to finite temperature, the first and second order chemical reactivity response functions of the Helmholtz free energy with respect to the temperature, the number of electrons, and the external potential are derived. It is found that in all cases related to the first or second derivatives with respect to the number of electrons or the external potential, there is a term given by the average of the corresponding derivative of the electronic energy of each state (ground and excited). For the second derivatives, including those related with the temperature, there is a thermal fluctuation contribution that is zero at zero temperature. Thus, all expressions reduce correctly to their corresponding chemical reactivity expressions at zero temperature and show that, at room temperature, the corrections are very small. When the assumption that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons is replaced by the straight lines behavior connecting integer values, as required by the ensemble theorem, one needs to introduce directional derivatives in most cases, so that the temperature dependent expressions reduce correctly to their zero temperature counterparts. However, the main result holds, namely, at finite temperature the thermal corrections to the chemical reactivity response functions are very small. Consequently, the present work validates the usage of reactivity indexes calculated at zero temperature to infer chemical behavior at room and even higher temperatures.

  14. Detection and attribution of near surface temperature changes over homogenous temperature zones in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achutarao, K. M.; R, D.

    2015-12-01

    The IPCC Fifth Assessment Report concluded, "More than half of the observed increase in global mean surface temperature (GMST) from 1951 to 2010 is very likely due to the observed anthropogenic increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations." Detecting and attributing the changes over regional scales can provide more relevant information to policymakers at the national level but the low signal-to-noise ratios at smaller spatial scales make this a harder problem. In this study, we analyze changes in temperature (annual and seasonal means of mean, minimum, and maximum temperatures) over 7 homogeneous temperature zones of India from 1901 -2005 using models from the CMIP5 database and multiple observational datasets (CRU-3.22, and IITM). We perform Detection and Attribution (D&A) analysis using fingerprint methods by defining a signal that concisely express both spatial and temporal changes found in the model runs with the CMIP5 individual forcing runs; greenhouse (historicalGHG), natural (historicalNat), anthropogenic (historicalAnthro), and anthropogenic aerosols (historicalAA). We are able to detect changes in annual mean temperature over many of the homogenous temperature zones as well as seasonal means in some of the homogenous zones. We quantify the contributions resulting from individual forcings in these cases. Preliminary results indicate large contributions from anthropogenic, forcings with a negligible contribution from natural forcings.

  15. Formation and local electronic structure of Ge clusters on Si(111)-7×7 surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hai-Feng; Xu Ming-Chun; Yang Bing; Shi Dong-Xia; Guo Hai-Ming; Pang Shi-Jin; Gao Hong-Jun

    2007-01-01

    We report the formation and local electronic structure of Ge clusters on the Si(111)-7×7 surface studied by using variable temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy (VT-STM) and low-temperature scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS). Atom-resolved STM images reveal that the Ge atoms are prone to forming clusters with 1.0 nm in diameter for coverage up to 0.12 ML. Such Ge clusters preferentially nucleate at the centre of the faulted-half unit cells, leading to the 'dark sites' of Si centre adatoms from the surrounding three unfaulted-half unit cells in filled-state images. Biasdependent STM images show the charge transfer from the neighbouring Si adatoms to Ge clusters. Low-temperature STS of the Ge clusters reveals that there is a band gap on the Ge cluster and the large voltage threshold is about 0.9 V.

  16. Emission of correlated electron pairs from Au(111) and Cu(111) surfaces under low-energy electron impact: Contribution of surface states, d-states and spin effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samarin, S., E-mail: samar@physics.uwa.edu.au [Centre for Atomic, Molecular and Surface Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Research Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Artamonov, O.M. [Research Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Guagliardo, P. [Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis, UWA, Perth (Australia); Pravica, L. [Centre for Atomic, Molecular and Surface Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Baraban, A. [Research Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Schumann, F.O. [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Williams, J.F. [Centre for Atomic, Molecular and Surface Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Spin-polarized two-electron spectroscopy (e,2e) was applied for studying surface states on Cu(111) and Au(111). • Relative (to d-states) contribution of surface states in the (e,2e) spectrum decreases exponentially when primary electron energy increases from 14 to 30 eV. • Spin asymmetry is readily observed in the spectra of Au(111) whereas in the spectra of Cu(111) the spin effect is negligible. - Abstract: The emission of correlated electron pairs excited from surfaces of Au(111) and Cu(111) by low-energy electrons is measured and analyzed. Energy and momentum conservation allows identification of electron pairs involving excitation of electrons from Shockley surface states and from valence d-states. The relative contributions of surface and d-states to the measured spectra of correlated electron pairs is shown to depend on the primary electron energy and is larger from surface states at relatively small primary energies. The use of a spin-polarized incident electron beam highlights the spin effects in producing an electron pair. Measurements show that spin effects are larger for the pair excitation from the valence d-states than for pairs excited from the surface states.

  17. Graphene surface plasmon polaritons with opposite in-plane electron oscillations along its two surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Huawei; Ruan, Shuangchen, E-mail: scruan@szu.edu.cn; Zhang, Min; Su, Hong; Li, Irene Ling [Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Laser Engineering, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2015-08-31

    We predict the existence of a surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode that can be guided by a graphene monolayer, regardless of the sign of the imaginary part of its conductivity. In this mode, in-plane electron oscillations along two surfaces of graphene are of opposite directions, which is very different from conventional SPPs on graphene. Significantly, coating graphene with dielectric films yields a way to guide the SPPs with both sub-wavelength mode widths and ultra-long propagation distances. In particular, the mode characteristics are very sensitive to the chemical potential of graphene, so the graphene-based waveguide can find applications in many optoelectronic devices.

  18. Temperature dependence of Hall electron density of GaN-based heterostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jin-Feng; Zhang Jin-Cheng; Hao Yue

    2004-01-01

    The theoretic calculation and analysis of the temperature dependence of Hall electron density of a sample AlGaN/GaN heterostructure has been carried out in the temperature range from 77 to 300K. The densities of the twodimensional electron gas and the bulk electrons are solved by self-consistent calculation of one-dimensional Schrodinger and Poisson equations at different temperatures, which allow for the variation of energy gap and structure strain, and are used for evaluation of the temperature dependence of Hall electron density. The calculated Hall electron density agrees with the measured one quite well with the appropriate bulk mobility data. Analysis revealed that for the temper ature range considered, even in the heterostructures with a small bulk conductance the factors that determine the Hall mobility and electron density could be of different sources, and not just the two-dimensional electron gas as generally supposed.

  19. Resistive Memory for Harsh Electronics: Immunity to Surface Effect and High Corrosion Resistance via Surface Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Teng-Han; Yang, Po-Kang; Lien, Der-Hsien; Kang, Chen-Fang; Tsai, Meng-Lin; Chueh, Yu-Lun; He-Hau, Jr.

    2014-03-01

    The tolerance/resistance of the electronic devices to extremely harsh environments is of supreme interest. Surface effects and chemical corrosion adversely affect stability and operation uniformity of metal oxide resistive memories. To achieve the surrounding-independent behavior, the surface modification is introduced into the ZnO memristors via incorporating fluorine to replace the oxygen sites. F-Zn bonds is formed to prevent oxygen chemisorption and ZnO dissolution upon corrosive atmospheric exposure, which effectively improves switching characteristics against harmful surroundings. In addition, the fluorine doping stabilizes the cycling endurance and narrows the distribution of switching parameters. The outcomes provide valuable insights for future nonvolatile memory developments in harsh electronics.

  20. Afforestation in China cools local land surface temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shu-Shi; Piao, Shilong; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Ciais, Philippe; Zhou, Liming; Li, Laurent Z X; Myneni, Ranga B; Yin, Yi; Zeng, Hui

    2014-02-25

    China has the largest afforested area in the world (∼62 million hectares in 2008), and these forests are carbon sinks. The climatic effect of these new forests depends on how radiant and turbulent energy fluxes over these plantations modify surface temperature. For instance, a lower albedo may cause warming, which negates the climatic benefits of carbon sequestration. Here, we used satellite measurements of land surface temperature (LST) from planted forests and adjacent grasslands or croplands in China to understand how afforestation affects LST. Afforestation is found to decrease daytime LST by about 1.1 ± 0.5 °C (mean ± 1 SD) and to increase nighttime LST by about 0.2 ± 0.5 °C, on average. The observed daytime cooling is a result of increased evapotranspiration. The nighttime warming is found to increase with latitude and decrease with average rainfall. Afforestation in dry regions therefore leads to net warming, as daytime cooling is offset by nighttime warming. Thus, it is necessary to carefully consider where to plant trees to realize potential climatic benefits in future afforestation projects.

  1. A New Global Climatology of Annual Land Surface Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Bechtel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature (LST is an important parameter in various fields including hydrology, climatology, and geophysics. Its derivation by thermal infrared remote sensing has long tradition but despite substantial progress there remain limited data availability and challenges like emissivity estimation, atmospheric correction, and cloud contamination. The annual temperature cycle (ATC is a promising approach to ease some of them. The basic idea to fit a model to the ATC and derive annual cycle parameters (ACP has been proposed before but so far not been tested on larger scale. In this study, a new global climatology of annual LST based on daily 1 km MODIS/Terra observations was processed and evaluated. The derived global parameters were robust and free of missing data due to clouds. They allow estimating LST patterns under largely cloud-free conditions at different scales for every day of year and further deliver a measure for its accuracy respectively variability. The parameters generally showed low redundancy and mostly reflected real surface conditions. Important influencing factors included climate, land cover, vegetation phenology, anthropogenic effects, and geology which enable numerous potential applications. The datasets will be available at the CliSAP Integrated Climate Data Center pending additional processing.

  2. MEaSUREs Land Surface Temperature from GOES Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, Rachel T.; Chen, Wen; Ma, Yingtao; Islam, Tanvir; Borbas, Eva; Hain, Chris; Hulley, Glynn; Hook, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Information on Land Surface Temperature (LST) can be generated from observations made from satellites in low Earth orbit (LEO) such as MODIS and ASTER and by sensors in geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) such as GOES. Under a project titled: "A Unified and Coherent Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity Earth System Data Record for Earth Science" led by Jet Propulsion Laboratory, an effort is underway to develop long term consistent information from both such systems. In this presentation we will describe an effort to derive LST information from GOES satellites. Results will be presented from two approaches: 1) based on regression developed from a wide range of simulations using MODTRAN, SeeBor Version 5.0 global atmospheric profiles and the CAMEL (Combined ASTER and MODIS Emissivity for Land) product based on the standard University of Wisconsin 5 km emissivity values (UWIREMIS) and the ASTER Global Emissivity Database (GED) product; 2) RTTOV radiative transfer model driven with MERRA-2 reanalysis fields. We will present results of evaluation of these two methods against various products, such as MOD11, and ground observations for the five year period of (2004-2008).

  3. Final Technical Report - 300°C Capable Electronics Platform and Temperature Sensor System For Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cheng-Po; Shaddock, David; Sandvik, Peter; Saia, Rich; Amita Patil, Alexey Vert; Zhang, Tan

    2012-11-30

    A silicon carbide (SiC) based electronic temperature sensor prototype has been demonstrated to operate at 300°C. We showed continuous operation of 1,000 hours with SiC operational amplifier and surface mounted discreet resistors and capacitors on a ceramic circuit board. This feasibility demonstration is a major milestone in the development of high temperature electronics in general and high temperature geothermal exploration and well management tools in particular. SiC technology offers technical advantages that are not found in competing technologies such as silicon-on-insulator (SOI) at high temperatures of 200°C to 300°C and beyond. The SiC integrated circuits and packaging methods can be used in new product introduction by GE Oil and Gas for high temperature down-hole tools. The existing SiC fabrication facility at GE is sufficient to support the quantities currently demanded by the marketplace, and there are other entities in the United States and other countries capable of ramping up SiC technology manufacturing. The ceramic circuit boards are different from traditional organic-based electronics circuit boards, but the fabrication process is compatible with existing ceramic substrate manufacturing. This project has brought high temperature electronics forward, and brings us closer to commercializing tools that will enable and reduce the cost of enhanced geothermal technology to benefit the public in terms of providing clean renewable energy at lower costs.

  4. Final Technical Report - 300°C Capable Electronics Platform and Temperature Sensor System For Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cheng-Po; Shaddock, David; Sandvik, Peter; Saia, Rich; Amita Patil, Alexey Vert; Zhang, Tan

    2012-11-30

    A silicon carbide (SiC) based electronic temperature sensor prototype has been demonstrated to operate at 300°C. We showed continuous operation of 1,000 hours with SiC operational amplifier and surface mounted discreet resistors and capacitors on a ceramic circuit board. This feasibility demonstration is a major milestone in the development of high temperature electronics in general and high temperature geothermal exploration and well management tools in particular. SiC technology offers technical advantages that are not found in competing technologies such as silicon-on-insulator (SOI) at high temperatures of 200°C to 300°C and beyond. The SiC integrated circuits and packaging methods can be used in new product introduction by GE Oil and Gas for high temperature down-hole tools. The existing SiC fabrication facility at GE is sufficient to support the quantities currently demanded by the marketplace, and there are other entities in the United States and other countries capable of ramping up SiC technology manufacturing. The ceramic circuit boards are different from traditional organic-based electronics circuit boards, but the fabrication process is compatible with existing ceramic substrate manufacturing. This project has brought high temperature electronics forward, and brings us closer to commercializing tools that will enable and reduce the cost of enhanced geothermal technology to benefit the public in terms of providing clean renewable energy at lower costs.

  5. Al2O3 Passivation on c-si Surfaces for Low Temperature Solar Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saynova, D.S.; Janssen, G.J.M.; Burgers, A.R.; Mewe, A.A. [ECN Solar Energy, Westerduinweg 3, NL-1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Cianci, E.; Seguini, G.; Perego, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2,I-20864 Agrate Brianza MB (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    Functional passivation of high resistivity p-type c-Si wafer surfaces was achieved using 10 nm Al2O3 layers and low temperatures for both the thermal ALD process and post-deposition anneal. Effective lifetime values higher than 1 ms were measured at excess carrier density {delta}n=1015 cm{sup -3}. This result was reached in combination with temperatures of 100C and 200C for the Al2O3 layer deposition and anneal, respectively. The Al2O3/c-Si interface was characterized using conductance-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements. In particular, significantly reduced interface density of the electrically active defects Dit {approx} 2x1010 eV{sup -1}cm{sup -2} was detected, which enabled excellent chemical passivation. The measured density of fixed charges at the interface, Qf, after anneal were in the range +1x10{sup 12} to -1x10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} indicating that both inversion and accumulation conditions result in relevant field-effect passivation using Al2O3 layers and low temperature processes. Numerical simulations on representative test structures show that the uniform Qf effect can be understood in terms of a surface damage region (SDR) present near the interface in combination with asymmetry in the lifetime of holes and electrons in the SDR. The combination of low processing temperatures, thin layers and good passivation properties facilitate a technology for future low temperature solar cell applications.

  6. Photo-stimulated low electron temperature high current diamond film field emission cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurter,; Roger Philips, Devlin [Los Alamos, NM; David James, Moody [Santa Fe, NM; Nathan Andrew, Taccetti [Los Alamos, NM; Jose Martin, Russell [Santa Fe, NM; John, Steven [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-07-24

    An electron source includes a back contact surface having a means for attaching a power source to the back contact surface. The electron source also includes a layer comprising platinum in direct contact with the back contact surface, a composite layer of single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in platinum in direct contact with the layer comprising platinum. The electron source also includes a nanocrystalline diamond layer in direct contact with the composite layer. The nanocrystalline diamond layer is doped with boron. A portion of the back contact surface is removed to reveal the underlying platinum. The electron source is contained in an evacuable container.

  7. Photo-stimulated low electron temperature high current diamond film field emission cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurter; Roger Philips , Devlin; David James , Moody; Nathan Andrew , Taccetti; Jose Martin , Russell; Steven John

    2012-07-24

    An electron source includes a back contact surface having a means for attaching a power source to the back contact surface. The electron source also includes a layer comprising platinum in direct contact with the back contact surface, a composite layer of single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in platinum in direct contact with the layer comprising platinum. The electron source also includes a nanocrystalline diamond layer in direct contact with the composite layer. The nanocrystalline diamond layer is doped with boron. A portion of the back contact surface is removed to reveal the underlying platinum. The electron source is contained in an evacuable container.

  8. A protocol for validating Land Surface Temperature from Sentinel-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, D.

    2015-12-01

    One of the main objectives of the Sentinel-3 mission is to measure sea- and land-surface temperature with high-end accuracy and reliability in support of environmental and climate monitoring in an operational context. Calibration and validation are thus key criteria for operationalization within the framework of the Sentinel-3 Mission Performance Centre (S3MPC).Land surface temperature (LST) has a long heritage of satellite observations which have facilitated our understanding of land surface and climate change processes, such as desertification, urbanization, deforestation and land/atmosphere coupling. These observations have been acquired from a variety of satellite instruments on platforms in both low-earth orbit and in geostationary orbit. Retrieval accuracy can be a challenge though; surface emissivities can be highly variable owing to the heterogeneity of the land, and atmospheric effects caused by the presence of aerosols and by water vapour absorption can give a bias to the underlying LST. As such, a rigorous validation is critical in order to assess the quality of the data and the associated uncertainties. The Sentinel-3 Cal-Val Plan for evaluating the level-2 SL_2_LST product builds on an established validation protocol for satellite-based LST. This set of guidelines provides a standardized framework for structuring LST validation activities, and is rapidly gaining international recognition. The protocol introduces a four-pronged approach which can be summarised thus: i) in situ validation where ground-based observations are available; ii) radiance-based validation over sites that are homogeneous in emissivity; iii) intercomparison with retrievals from other satellite sensors; iv) time-series analysis to identify artefacts on an interannual time-scale. This multi-dimensional approach is a necessary requirement for assessing the performance of the LST algorithm for SLSTR which is designed around biome-based coefficients, thus emphasizing the importance of

  9. Space Charge Saturated Sheath Regime and Electron Temperature Saturation in Hall Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; A. Smirnov; N.J. Fisch

    2005-03-16

    Secondary electron emission in Hall thrusters is predicted to lead to space charge saturated wall sheaths resulting in enhanced power losses in the thruster channel. Analysis of experimentally obtained electron-wall collision frequency suggests that the electron temperature saturation, which occurs at high discharge voltages, appears to be caused by a decrease of the Joule heating rather than by the enhancement of the electron energy loss at the walls due to a strong secondary electron emission.

  10. A Preliminary Study of Surface Temperature Cold Bias in COAMPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, H-N S; Leach, M J; Sugiyama, G A; Aluzzi, F J

    2001-04-27

    It is well recognized that the model predictability is more or less hampered by the imperfect representations of atmospheric state and model physics. Therefore, it is a common problem for any numerical models to exhibit some sorts of biases in the prediction. In this study, the emphasis is focused on the cold bias of surface temperature forecast in Naval Research Laboratory's three-dimensional mesoscale model, COAMPS (Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System). Based on the comparison with the ground station data, there were two types of ground temperature cold biases identified in LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) operational forecasts of COAMPS over the California and Nevada regions during the 1999 winter and the 2000 spring. The first type of cold bias appears at high elevation regions covered by snow, and its magnitude can be as large as 30 F - 40 F lower than observed. The second type of cold bias mainly exists in the snow-free clear-sky regions, where the surface temperature is above the freezing point, and its magnitude can be up to 5 F - 10 F lower than observed. These cold biases can affect the low-level stratification, and even the diurnal variation of winds in the mountain regions, and therefore impact the atmospheric dispersion forecast. The main objective of this study is to explore the causes of such cold bias, and to further the improvement of the forecast performance in COAMPS. A series of experiments are performed to gauge the sensitivity of the model forecast due to the physics changes and large-scale data with various horizontal and vertical resolutions.

  11. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco, E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México D. F. 09340 (Mexico); Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Gázquez, José L., E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México D. F. 09340 (Mexico); Ayers, Paul W. [Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Vela, Alberto [Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México D. F. 07360 (Mexico)

    2015-10-21

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μ{sub e}) and chemical hardness (η{sub e}) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μ{sub e}. Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (−I), positive (−A), and zero values of the fractional charge (−(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness.

  12. Reevaluation of mid-Pliocene North Atlantic sea surface temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Marci M.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Dwyer, Gary S.; Lawrence, Kira T.

    2008-01-01

    Multiproxy temperature estimation requires careful attention to biological, chemical, physical, temporal, and calibration differences of each proxy and paleothermometry method. We evaluated mid-Pliocene sea surface temperature (SST) estimates from multiple proxies at Deep Sea Drilling Project Holes 552A, 609B, 607, and 606, transecting the North Atlantic Drift. SST estimates derived from faunal assemblages, foraminifer Mg/Ca, and alkenone unsaturation indices showed strong agreement at Holes 552A, 607, and 606 once differences in calibration, depth, and seasonality were addressed. Abundant extinct species and/or an unrecognized productivity signal in the faunal assemblage at Hole 609B resulted in exaggerated faunal-based SST estimates but did not affect alkenone-derived or Mg/Ca–derived estimates. Multiproxy mid-Pliocene North Atlantic SST estimates corroborate previous studies documenting high-latitude mid-Pliocene warmth and refine previous faunal-based estimates affected by environmental factors other than temperature. Multiproxy investigations will aid SST estimation in high-latitude areas sensitive to climate change and currently underrepresented in SST reconstructions.

  13. Study of temperature effects on the conduction and trapping of charges in the alkali-silicate glass under electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhfakh, S., E-mail: slimfakhfakh@yahoo.fr [LaMaCop, Faculte des sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra Km 3, BP 1171, C.P. 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Elsafi, B., E-mail: bassem.elsafi@yahoo.fr [LaMaCop, Faculte des sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra Km 3, BP 1171, C.P. 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Fakhfakh, Z. [LaMaCop, Faculte des sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra Km 3, BP 1171, C.P. 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Jbara, O. [GRESPI/Materiaux Fonctionnels, UFR Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France)

    2012-01-15

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is employed to investigate the temperature effect on the charging behaviour of alkali-silicate glasses under electron beam irradiation using electrostatic influence method (EIM). A modified special arrangement adapted to the SEM allows to study charging mechanisms and charge transport characteristics of these glasses using the simultaneous measurement of displacement and leakage currents. The trapping process during continuous electron irradiation can be directly determined by the EIM. The experimental results reveal that the charging ability of glasses decreases with increasing temperature. The variation of charge process has been confirmed by measuring the surface potential in response to the sample temperature. In this report, we introduce also the secondary electron emission (SEE) yield. It was found the strong dependence of the SEE yield on the temperature variation. The higher is the temperature and the lower is the SEE yield. The trapping ability is analyzed taking into account the regulation mechanisms involved under electron irradiation.

  14. Simulations and Measurement of Electron Energy and Effective Electron Temperature of Nanosecond Pulsed Argon Plasma%Simulations and Measurement of Electron Energy and Effective Electron Temperature of Nanosecond Pulsed Argon Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闻雪晴; 信裕; 冯春雷; 丁洪斌

    2012-01-01

    The behavior of argon plasma driven by nanosecond pulsed plasma in a low-pressure plasma reactor is investigated using a global model, and the results are compared with the experimental measurements. The time evolution of plasma density and the electron energy probability function are calculated by solving the energy balance and Boltzmann equations. During and shortly after the discharge pulse, the electron energy probability function can be represented by a bi-Maxwellian distribution, indicating two energy groups of electrons. According to the effective electron temperature calculation, we find that there are more high-energy electrons that play an important role in the excitation and ionization processes than low-energy electrons. The effective electron temperature is also measured via optical emission spectroscopy to evaluate the simulation model. In the comparison, the simulation results are found to be in agreement with the measure- ments. Furthermore, variations of the effective electron temperature are presented versus other discharge parameters, such as pulse width time, pulse rise time and gas pressure.

  15. Method of temperature rising velocity and threshold control of electron beam brazing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuedong Wang; Shun Yao

    2005-01-01

    In order to accommodate electron beam to the brazing of the joints with various curve shapes and the brazing of thermo sensitive materials, the method of electron beam scanning and brazing temperature control was developed, in which electron beam was controlled to scan according to predefined scanning track, and the actual temperature rising velocity of the brazed seam was limited in an allowed scope by detecting the brazed seam temperature, calculating the temperature rising velocity and adjusting the beam current during the brazing process; in addition, through the setting of the highest allowed temperature, the actual temperature of the brazed seam could be controlled not exceeding the threshold set value, and these two methods could be employed alone or jointly. It is shown that high precision temperature control in electron beam brazing could be realized and the productivity be increased by the proposed method.

  16. Martian Surface Temperature and Spectral Response from the MSL REMS Ground Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Torres, Javier; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Zorzano, María-Paz; Serrano, María; Mendaza, Teresa; Hamilton, Vicky; Sebastián, Eduardo; Armiens, Carlos; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; REMS Team

    2013-04-01

    The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) offers the opportunity to explore the near surface atmospheric conditions and, in particular will shed new light into the heat budget of the Martian surface. This is important for studies of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), as the ground and air temperatures measured directly by REMS control the coupling of the atmosphere with the surface [Zurek et al., 1992]. This coupling is driven by solar insolation. The ABL plays an important role in the general circulation and the local atmospheric dynamics of Mars. One of the REMS sensors, the ground temperature sensor (GTS), provides the data needed to study the thermal inertia properties of the regolith and rocks beneath the MSL rover. The GTS includes thermopile detectors, with infrared bands of 8-14 µm and 16-20 µm [Gómez-Elvira et al., 2012]. These sensors are clustered in a single location on the MSL mast and the 8-14 µm thermopile sounds the surface temperature. The infrared radiation reaching the thermopile is proportional to the emissivity of the surface minerals across these thermal wavelengths. We have developed a radiative transfer retrieval method for the REMS GTS using a database of thermal infrared laboratory spectra of analogue minerals and their mixtures. [Martín Redondo et al. 2009, Martínez-Frías et al. 2012 - FRISER-IRMIX database]. This method will be used to assess the perfomance of the REMS GTS as well as determine, through the error analysis, the surface temperature and emissivity values where MSL is operating. Comparisons with orbiter data will be performed. References Gómez-Elvira et al. [2012], REMS: The Environmental Sensor Suite for the Mars Science Laboratory Rover, Space Science Reviews, Volume 170, Issue 1-4, pp. 583-640. Martín-Redondo et al. [2009] Journal of Environmental Monitoring 11:, pp. 1428-1432. Martínez-Frías et al. [2012] FRISER-IRMIX database http

  17. Investigations of the Electronic Properties and Surface Structures of Aluminium-Rich Quasicrystalline Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason A. Barrow

    2003-08-05

    equations. Transport behavior is described in terms of charge carriers and the mean-free time between carrier collisions. It is concluded that the mean-free time is much longer in the periodic direction than in the aperiodic direction. This difference produces the observed anisotropy in thermal transport. The third study presented a detailed analysis of the reversible, sputter-induced phase transformation which occurs on the 5-fold surface of an icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and ultra-violet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) data were collected as a function of annealing temperature and were used to probe surface structure, surface composition, and electronic structure, respectively. The composition and structure of the sputtered surface are consistent with a transformation to the {beta}-Al-Cu-Fe cubic structure, and shows a sharp metallic cut-off in the spectral intensity of the electronic structure at the Fermi edge. Upon annealing the surface reverts to a quasicrystalline composition and structure. This transformation has been correlated with a reduction in the spectral intensity of the electronic structure at the Fermi level. This data clearly demonstrates that the observed reduction is intrinsic to a quasicrystalline surface. It is concluded that this is due to the opening of a pseudo-gap in the electronic density of states as the surface reverts from {beta}-Al-Cu-Fe to quasicrystalline.

  18. Post calibration of the two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument with electron temperature characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M J; Park, H K; Yun, G S; Nam, Y B; Choe, G H; Lee, W; Jardin, S

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) instrument is widely used to study the local electron temperature (Te) fluctuations by measuring the ECE intensity IECE ∝ Te in tokamak plasmas. The ECEI measurement is often processed in a normalized fluctuation quantity against the time averaged value due to complication in absolute calibration. In this paper, the ECEI channels are relatively calibrated using the flat Te assumption of the sawtooth crash or the tearing mode island and a proper extrapolation. The 2-D relatively calibrated electron temperature (Te,rel) images are reconstructed and the displacement amplitude of the magnetohydrodynamic modes can be measured for the accurate quantitative growth analysis.

  19. Scanning electron microscopy of human cortical bone failure surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braidotti, P; Branca, F P; Stagni, L

    1997-02-01

    Undecalcified samples extracted from human femoral shafts are fractured by bending and the fracture surfaces are examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The investigation is performed on both dry and wet (hydrated with a saline solution) specimens. SEM micrographs show patterns in many respects similar to those observed in fractography studies of laminated fiber-reinforced synthetic composites. In particular, dry and wet samples behave like brittle and ductile matrix laminates, respectively. An analysis carried out on the basis of the mechanisms that dominate the fracture process of laminates shows that a reasonable cortical bone model is that of a laminated composite material whose matrix is composed of extracellular noncollagenous calcified proteins, and the reinforcement is constituted by the calcified collagen fiber system.

  20. Electronic stopping of keV nitrogen ions interacting with a Pt(110) (1 x 2) surface - a tool to characterize electronic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robin, A; Postnikov, AV; Heiland, W

    2005-01-01

    Ion channeling is used to investigate the electronic density corrugation at surfaces by analysing the electronic stopping behaviour of ions scattering grazingly off a clean single crystalline Pt(110)(1 x 2) surface. We use the fact that under these conditions the elastic contribution can be separate

  1. Eddy-Induced Ekman Pumping from Sea-Surface Temperature and Surface Current Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaube, P.; Chelton, D. B.; O'Neill, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    Numerous past studies have discussed the biological importance of upwelling of nutrients into the interiors of nonlinear eddies. Such upwelling can occur during the transient stages of formation of cyclones from shoaling of the thermocline. In their mature stages, upwelling can occur from Ekman pumping driven by eddy-induced wind stress curl. Previous investigations of ocean-atmosphere interaction in regions of persistent sea-surface temperature (SST) frontal features have shown that the wind field is locally stronger over warm water and weaker over cold water. Spatial variability of the SST field thus results in a wind stress curl and an associated Ekman pumping in regions of crosswind temperature gradients. It can therefore be anticipated that any SST anomalies associated with eddies can generate Ekman pumping in the eddy interiors. Another mechanism for eddy-induced Ekman pumping is the curl of the stress on the sea surface that arises from the difference between the surface wind velocity and the surface ocean velocity. While SST-induced Ekman upwelling can occur over eddies of either polarity surface current effects on Ekman upwelling occur only over anticyclonic eddies The objective of this study is to determine the spatial structures and relative magnitudes of the two mechanisms for eddy-induced Ekman pumping within the interiors of mesoscale eddies. This is achieved by collocating satellite-based measurements of SST, surface winds and wind stress curl to the interiors of eddies identified and tracked with an automated procedure applied to the sea-surface height (SSH) fields in the Reference Series constructed by AVISO from the combined measurements by two simultaneously operating altimeters. It is shown that, on average, the wind stress curl from eddy-induced surface currents is largest at the eddy center, resulting in Ekman pumping velocities of order 10 cm day-1. While this surface current-induced Ekman pumping depends only weakly on the wind direction

  2. Surface trap mediated electronic transport in biofunctionalized silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puppo, F.; Traversa, F. L.; Di Ventra, M.; De Micheli, G.; Carrara, S.

    2016-08-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs), fabricated via a top-down approach and then functionalized with biological probes, are used for electrically-based sensing of breast tumor markers. The SiNWs, featuring memristive-like behavior in bare conditions, show, in the presence of biomarkers, modified hysteresis and, more importantly, a voltage memory component, namely a voltage gap. The voltage gap is demonstrated to be a novel and powerful parameter of detection thanks to its high-resolution dependence on charges in proximity of the wire. This unique approach of sensing has never been studied and adopted before. Here, we propose a physical model of the surface electronic transport in Schottky barrier SiNW biosensors, aiming at reproducing and understanding the voltage gap based behavior. The implemented model describes well the experimental I-V characteristics of the device. It also links the modification of the voltage gap to the changing concentration of antigens by showing the decrease of this parameter in response to increasing concentrations of the molecules that are detected with femtomolar resolution in real human samples. Both experiments and simulations highlight the predominant role of the dynamic recombination of the nanowire surface states, with the incoming external charges from bio-species, in the appearance and modification of the voltage gap. Finally, thanks to its compactness, and strict correlation with the physics of the nanodevice, this model can be used to describe and predict the I-V characteristics in other nanostructured devices, for different than antibody-based sensing as well as electronic applications.

  3. Development of the mechanical cryocooler system for the Sea Land Surface Temperature Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilletti, Adam; Burgess, Christopher; Donchev, Anton; Watson, Stuart; Weatherstone Akbar, Shane; Gamo-Albero, Victoria; Romero-Largacha, Victor; Caballero-Olmo, Gema

    2014-11-01

    The Sea Land Surface Temperature Radiometer is a dual view Earth observing instrument developed as part of the European Global Monitoring for Environment and Security programme. It is scheduled for launch on two satellites, Sentinel 3A and 3B in 2014. The instrument detectors are cooled to below 85 K by two split Stirling Cryocoolers running in hot redundancy. These coolers form part of a cryocooler system that includes a support structure and drive electronics. Aspects of the system design, including control and reduction of exported vibration are discussed; and results, including thermal performance and exported vibration from the Engineering Model Cryooler System test campaign are presented.

  4. Measuring surface temperature of isolated neutron stars and related problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, Marcus Alton

    New and exciting results for measuring neutron star surface temperatures began with the successful launch of the Chandra X-ray observatory. Among these results are new detections of neutron star surface temperatures which have made it possible to seriously test neutron star thermal evolution theories. The important new temperature determination of the Vela pulsar (Pavlov, et al., 2001a) requires a non-standard cooling scenario to explain it. Apart from this result, we have measured PSR B1055-52's surface temperature in this thesis, determining that it can be explained by standard cooling with heating. Our spectral fit of the combined data from ROSAT and Chandra have shown that a three component model, two thermal blackbodies and an non-thermal power-law, is required to explain the data. Furthermore, our phase resolved spectroscopy has begun to shed light on the geometry of the hot spot on PSR B1055-52's surface as well as the structure of the magnetospheric radiation. Also, there is strong evidence for a thermal distribution over its surface. Most importantly, the fact that PSR B1055-52 does not have a hydrogen atmosphere has been firmly established. To reconcile these two key observations, on the Vela pulsar and PSR B1055-52, we tested neutron star cooling with neutrino processes including the Cooper pair neutrino emission process. Overall, it has been found that a phase change associated with pions being present in the cores of more massive neutron stars explains all current of the data. A transition from neutron matter to pion condensates in the central stellar core explains the difference between standard and non-standard cooling scenarios, because the superfluid suppression of pion cooling will reduce the emissivity of the pion direct URCA process substantially. A neutron star with a mass of [Special characters omitted.] with a medium stiffness equation of state and a T72 type neutron superfluid models the standard cooling case well. A neutron star of [Special

  5. Structural and surface modifications of carbon nanotubes when submitted to high temperature annealing treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillejos, E. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, ICP-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Bachiller-Baeza, B. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, ICP-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada UNED/ICP-CSIC Group for Molecular Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts, Madrid (Spain); Perez-Cadenas, M.; Gallegos-Suarez, E. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica y Tecnica, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez-Ramos, I. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, ICP-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada UNED/ICP-CSIC Group for Molecular Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts, Madrid (Spain); Guerrero-Ruiz, A. [Unidad Asociada UNED/ICP-CSIC Group for Molecular Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts, Madrid (Spain); Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica y Tecnica, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Tamargo-Martinez, K., E-mail: katia@incar.csic.es [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, INCAR-CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain); Martinez-Alonso, A.; Tascon, J.M.D. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, INCAR-CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), pristine and heat-treated at 2873 K, were comparatively characterized using HRTEM, SEM, nitrogen adsorption, Raman spectroscopy and immersion calorimetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Annealing at 2873 K produced removal of amorphous phases, ordering of graphene layers and structural changes inside the cylindrical mesopores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immersion enthalpies in organic liquids indicated the existence of specific {pi}-{pi} electronic interactions between aromatic molecules and the surface of heat-treated MWCNTs. - Abstract: Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized using a chemical vapour deposition procedure using acetylene as source of carbon, iron pentacarbonyl as catalyst and an inert carrier gas. An aliquot of these MWCNTs was heat-treated at 2873 K under inert atmosphere (Ar). The two carbon nanotube samples where characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, Raman spectroscopy, and immersion calorimetry in toluene, methanol and methylcyclohexane. HRTEM images confirmed that high-temperature treatment removed amorphous carbon, the graphene layers being better graphitized, and also some structural changes inside the cylindrical mesopores took place. Immersion enthalpies in toluene, in which molecules are present as aromatic functions, indicated the existence of specific {pi}-{pi} electronic interactions between such molecules and the surface of heat-treated MWCNTs.

  6. Space charge saturated sheath regime and electron temperature saturation in Hall thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitses, Y.; Staack, D.; Smirnov, A.; Fisch, N. J.

    2005-07-01

    Existing electron-wall interaction models predict that secondary electron emission in Hall thrusters is significant and that the near-wall sheaths are space charge saturated. The experimental electron-wall collision frequency is computed using plasma parameters measured in a laboratory Hall thruster. In spite of qualitative similarities between the measured and predicted dependencies of the maximum electron temperature on the discharge voltage, the deduced electron-wall collision frequency for high discharge voltages is much lower than the theoretical value obtained for space charge saturated sheath regime, but larger than the wall recombination frequency. The observed electron temperature saturation appears to be directly associated with a decrease of the Joule heating rather than with the enhancement of the electron energy loss at the walls due to a strong secondary electron emission. Another interesting experimental result is related to the near-field plasma plume, where electron energy balance appears to be independent on the magnetic field.

  7. Detecting climate rationality and homogeneities of sea surface temperature data in Longkou marine station using surface air temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Li, Huan; Wang, Qingyuan; Wang, Guosong; Fan, Wenjing

    2017-08-01

    This study presents a systematic evaluation of the climate rationality and homogeneity of monthly sea surface temperature (SST) in Longkou marine station from 1960 to 2011. The reference series are developed using adjacent surface air temperature (SAT) on a monthly timescale. The results suggest SAT as a viable option for use in evaluating climate rationality and homogeneity in the SST data on the coastal China Seas. According to the large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns and SAT of the adjacent meteorological stations, we confirm that there is no climate shift in 1972/1973 and then the climate shift in 1972/1973 is corrected. Besides, the SST time series has serious problems of inhomogeneity. Three documented break points have been checked using penalized maximum T (PMT) test and metadata. The changes in observation instruments and observation system are the main causes of the break points. For the monthly SST time series, the negative adjustments may be greatly due to the SST decreasing after automation. It is found that the increasing trend of annual mean SST after adjustment is higher than before, about 0.24 °C/10 yr.

  8. GHRSST Level 4 ODYSSEA Mediterranean Sea Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at Ifremer/CERSAT...

  9. Comparison of MTI and Ground Truth Sea Surface Temperatures at Nauru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurzeja, R.

    2002-09-05

    This report evaluates MTI-derived surface water temperature near the tropical Pacific island of Nauru. The MTI sea-surface temperatures were determined by the Los Alamos National Laboratory based on the robust retrieval.

  10. GHRSST Level 4 GAMSSA Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Australian Bureau...

  11. GHRSST Level 4 RAMSSA Australian Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Australian Bureau...

  12. GHRSST Level 4 EUR Mediterranean Sea Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily by Ifremer/CERSAT (France) using optimal...

  13. GHRSST Level 4 ODYSSEA Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at Ifremer/CERSAT...

  14. GHRSST Level 4 ODYSSEA Eastern Central Pacific Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at Ifremer/CERSAT...

  15. GHRSST Level 4 G1SST Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis by the JPL OurOcean...

  16. GHRSST Level 4 DMI_OI Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis by the Danish...

  17. GHRSST Level 4 OSTIA Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS versions 1 and 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the UK Met Office...

  18. GHRSST Level 4 MW_OI Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) global Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on a 0.25 degree grid at Remote Sensing...

  19. GHRSST Level 4 MUR North America Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced as a retrospective dataset at the JPL Physical...

  20. Assessment of surface temperatures of buffalo bulls (Bubalus bubalis) raised under tropical conditions using infrared thermography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barros, D.V; Silva, L.K.X; Kahwage, P.R; Lourenço Júnior, J.B; Sousa, J.S; Silva, A.G.M; Franco, I.M; Martorano, L.G; Garcia, A.R

    2016-01-01

    This paper aimed to evaluate the surface temperatures of buffalo bulls using infrared thermography, considering four distinct anatomical parts over time, and to correlate surface temperatures and thermal comfort indexes...

  1. GHRSST Level 4 OSPO Global Nighttime Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Office of...

  2. GHRSST Level 4 OSPO Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Office of...

  3. GHRSST Level 4 AVHRR_AMSR_OI Global Blended Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) global Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on a 0.25 degree grid at the NOAA...

  4. GHRSST Level 4 K10_SST Global 1 meter Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Naval...

  5. Surface recombination of oxygen atoms in O2 plasma at increased pressure: II. Vibrational temperature and surface production of ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopaev, D. V.; Malykhin, E. M.; Zyryanov, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Ozone production in an oxygen glow discharge in a quartz tube was studied in the pressure range of 10-50 Torr. The O3 density distribution along the tube diameter was measured by UV absorption spectroscopy, and ozone vibrational temperature TV was found comparing the calculated ab initio absorption spectra with the experimental ones. It has been shown that the O3 production mainly occurs on a tube surface whereas ozone is lost in the tube centre where in contrast the electron and oxygen atom densities are maximal. Two models were used to analyse the obtained results. The first one is a kinetic 1D model for the processes occurring near the tube walls with the participation of the main particles: O(3P), O2, O2(1Δg) and O3 molecules in different vibrational states. The agreement of O3 and O(3P) density profiles and TV calculated in the model with observed ones was reached by varying the single model parameter—ozone production probability (\\gamma_{O_{3}}) on the quartz tube surface on the assumption that O3 production occurs mainly in the surface recombination of physisorbed O(3P) and O2. The phenomenological model of the surface processes with the participation of oxygen atoms and molecules including singlet oxygen molecules was also considered to analyse \\gamma_{O_{3}} data obtained in the kinetic model. A good agreement between the experimental data and the data of both models—the kinetic 1D model and the phenomenological surface model—was obtained in the full range of the studied conditions that allowed consideration of the ozone surface production mechanism in more detail. The important role of singlet oxygen in ozone surface production was shown. The O3 surface production rate directly depends on the density of physisorbed oxygen atoms and molecules and can be high with increasing pressure and energy inputted into plasma while simultaneously keeping the surface temperature low enough. Using the special discharge cell design, such an approach opens up the

  6. Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 100 Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA) (PC database for purchase)   This database has been designed to facilitate quantitative interpretation of Auger-electron and X-ray photoelectron spectra and to improve the accuracy of quantitation in routine analysis. The database contains all physical data needed to perform quantitative interpretation of an electron spectrum for a thin-film specimen of given composition. A simulation module provides an estimate of peak intensities as well as the energy and angular distributions of the emitted electron flux.

  7. Electronic Noses for Composites Surface Contamination Detection in Aerospace Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vito, Saverio De; Miglietta, Maria Lucia; Massera, Ettore; Fattoruso, Grazia; Formisano, Fabrizio; Polichetti, Tiziana; Salvato, Maria; Alfano, Brigida; Esposito, Elena; Francia, Girolamo Di

    2017-04-02

    The full exploitation of Composite Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) in so-called green aircrafts design is still limited by the lack of adequate quality assurance procedures for checking the adhesive bonding assembly, especially in load-critical primary structures. In this respect, contamination of the CFRP panel surface is of significant concern since it may severely affect the bonding and the mechanical properties of the joint. During the last years, the authors have developed and tested an electronic nose as a non-destructive tool for pre-bonding surface inspection for contaminants detection, identification and quantification. Several sensors and sampling architectures have been screened in view of the high Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scenarios requirements. Ad-hoc pattern recognition systems have also been devised to ensure a fast and reliable assessment of the contamination status, by combining real time classifiers and the implementation of a suitable rejection option. Results show that e-noses could be used as first line low cost Non Destructive Test (NDT) tool in aerospace CFRP assembly and maintenance scenarios.

  8. SSVD Extreme Temperature Electronics for Planned Venus Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this project is to demonstrate, based on a new class of electronic devices called solid state vacuum devices (SSVD?s), a highly promising enabling...

  9. SSVD Extreme Temperature Electronics for Planned Venus Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of a new class of electronic devices called solid state vacuum devices (SSVDTMs), a highly enabling...

  10. An Open and Transparent Databank of Global Land Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, J.; Thorne, P.; Lawrimore, J. H.; Gleason, B.; Menne, M. J.; Williams, C.

    2013-12-01

    The International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) consists of an effort to create an end-to-end process for land surface air temperature analyses. The foundation of this process is the establishment of a global land surface databank. The databank builds upon the groundbreaking efforts of scientists who led efforts to construct global land surface datasets in the 1980's and 1990's. A primary aim of the databank is to improve aspects including data provenance, version control, temporal and spatial coverage, and improved methods for bringing dozens of source data together into an integrated dataset. The databank consists of multiple stages, with each successive stage providing a higher level of processing, quality and integration. Currently more than 50 sources of data have been added to the databank. An automated algorithm has been developed that merges these sources into one complete dataset by removing duplicate station records, identifying two or more station records that can be merged into a single record, and incorporating new and unique stations. The program runs iteratively through all the sources which are ordered based upon criteria established by the ISTI. The highest preferred source, known as the target, runs through all the candidate sources, calculating station comparisons that are acceptable for merging. The process is probabilistic in approach, and the final fate of a candidate station is based upon metadata matching and data equivalence criteria. If there is not enough information, the station is withheld for further investigation. The algorithm has been validated using a pseudo-source of stations with a known time of observation bias, and correct matches have been made nearly 95% of the time. The final product, endorsed and recommended by ISTI, contains over 30,000 stations, however slight changes in the algorithm can perturb results. Subjective decisions, such as the ordering of the sources, or changing metadata and data matching thresholds

  11. Estimation of Land Surface Temperature under Cloudy Skies Using Combined Diurnal Solar Radiation and Surface Temperature Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature (LST is a key parameter in the interaction of the land-atmosphere system. However, clouds affect the retrieval of LST data from thermal-infrared remote sensing data. Thus, it is important to determine a method for estimating LSTs at times when the sky is overcast. Based on a one-dimensional heat transfer equation and on the evolution of daily temperatures and net shortwave solar radiation (NSSR, a new method for estimating LSTs under cloudy skies (Tcloud from diurnal NSSR and surface temperatures is proposed. Validation is performed against in situ measurements that were obtained at the ChangWu ecosystem experimental station in China. The results show that the root-mean-square error (RMSE between the actual and estimated LSTs is as large as 1.23 K for cloudy data. A sensitivity analysis to the errors in the estimated LST under clear skies (Tclear and in the estimated NSSR reveals that the RMSE of the obtained Tcloud is less than 1.5 K after adding a 0.5 K bias to the actual Tclear and 10 percent NSSR errors to the actual NSSR. Tcloud is estimated by the proposed method using Tclear and NSSR products of MSG-SEVIRI for southern Europe. The results indicate that the new algorithm is practical for retrieving the LST under cloudy sky conditions, although some uncertainty exists. Notably, the approach can only be used during the daytime due to the assumption of the variation in LST caused by variations in insolation. Further, if there are less than six Tclear observations on any given day, the method cannot be used.

  12. Temperature dependence of the electronic gaps of semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardona, M.; Kremer, R.K.

    2014-11-28

    Understanding the temperature dependence of the direct and indirect gaps is indispensable for optimizing the applications of semiconductors. Experimentally, this temperature dependence can be very precisely determined by ellipsometry, by absorption or by luminescence spectroscopy. We have re-analyzed the temperature dependence of the direct and indirect gaps of some prominent tetrahedral semiconductors and improved available fits by applying a simple modified approach which uses statistical factors and the knowledge of prominent transverse-acoustic and transverse-optical bands in the measured or calculated phonon density of states of the semiconductors under consideration. - Highlights: • Re-analysis of the temperature dependence of the gaps of tetrahedral semiconductors • Modeling of the temperature dependence of the gaps of tetrahedral semiconductors • Simplified modeling using statistical factors and prominent phonon bands.

  13. Temperature dependent dual hydrogen sensor response of Pd nanoparticle decorated Al doped ZnO surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, D.; Barman, P. B.; Hazra, S. K., E-mail: surajithazra@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Jaypee University of Information Technology, Waknaghat, Solan, Himachal Pradesh-173234 (India); Dutta, D. [IC Design and Fabrication Centre, Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032 (India); Kumar, M.; Som, T. [SUNAG Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India)

    2015-10-28

    Sputter deposited Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin films exhibit a dual hydrogen sensing response in the temperature range 40 °C–150 °C after surface modifications with palladium nanoparticles. The unmodified AZO films showed no response in hydrogen in the temperature range 40 °C–150 °C. The operational temperature windows on the low and high temperature sides have been estimated by isolating the semiconductor-to-metal transition temperature zone of the sensor device. The gas response pattern was modeled by considering various adsorption isotherms, which revealed the dominance of heterogeneous adsorption characteristics. The Arrhenius adsorption barrier showed dual variation with change in hydrogen gas concentration on either side of the semiconductor-to-metal transition. A detailed analysis of the hydrogen gas response pattern by considering the changes in nano palladium due to hydrogen adsorption, and semiconductor-to-metal transition of nanocrystalline Al doped ZnO layer due to temperature, along with material characterization studies by glancing incidence X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, are presented.

  14. Efficient planar Sb2S3 solar cells using a low-temperature solution-processed tin oxide electron conductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hongwei; Yang, Guang; Guo, Yaxiong; Xiong, Liangbin; Qin, Pingli; Dai, Xin; Zheng, Xiaolu; Ke, Weijun; Tao, Hong; Chen, Zhao; Li, Borui; Fang, Guojia

    2016-06-28

    Efficient planar antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) heterojunction solar cells have been made using chemical bath deposited (CBD) Sb2S3 as the absorber, low-temperature solution-processed tin oxide (SnO2) as the electron conductor and poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as the hole conductor. A solar conversion efficiency of 2.8% was obtained at 1 sun illumination using a planar device consisting of F-doped SnO2 substrate/SnO2/CBD-Sb2S3/P3HT/Au, whereas the solar cells based on a titanium dioxide (TiO2) electron conductor exhibited a power conversion efficiency of 1.9%. Compared with conventional Sb2S3 sensitized solar cells, the high-temperature processed mesoscopic TiO2 scaffold is no longer needed. More importantly, a low-temperature solution-processed SnO2 layer was introduced for electron transportation to substitute the high-temperature sintered dense blocking TiO2 layer. Our planar solar cells not only have simple geometry with fewer steps to fabricate but also show enhanced performance. The higher efficiency of planar Sb2S3 solar cell devices based on a SnO2 electron conductor is attributed to their high transparency, uniform surface, efficient electron transport properties of SnO2, suitable energy band alignment, and reduced recombination at the interface of SnO2/Sb2S3.

  15. Diverse Electron-Induced Optical Emissions from Space Observatory Materials at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, J.R.; Jensen, Amberly Evans; Wilson, Gregory; Dekany, Justin; Bowers, Charles W.; Meloy, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Electron irradiation experiments have investigated the diverse electron-induced optical and electrical signatures observed in ground-based tests of various space observatory materials at low temperature. Three types of light emission were observed: (i); long-duration cathodoluminescence which persisted as long as the electron beam was on (ii) short-duration (affect the performance of space-based observatories.

  16. High temperature, radiation hardened electronics for application to nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gover, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Electronic circuits were developed and built at Sandia for many aerospace and energy systems applications. Among recent developments were high temperature electronics for geothermal well logging and radiation hardened electronics for a variety of aerospace applications. Sandia has also been active in technology transfer to commercial industry in both of these areas.

  17. Impacts of wind farms on surface air temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidya Roy, Somnath; Traiteur, Justin J.

    2010-01-01

    Utility-scale large wind farms are rapidly growing in size and numbers all over the world. Data from a meteorological field campaign show that such wind farms can significantly affect near-surface air temperatures. These effects result from enhanced vertical mixing due to turbulence generated by wind turbine rotors. The impacts of wind farms on local weather can be minimized by changing rotor design or by siting wind farms in regions with high natural turbulence. Using a 25-y-long climate dataset, we identified such regions in the world. Many of these regions, such as the Midwest and Great Plains in the United States, are also rich in wind resources, making them ideal candidates for low-impact wind farms. PMID:20921371

  18. Change point detection of the Persian Gulf sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirvani, A.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the Student's t parametric and Mann-Whitney nonparametric change point models (CPMs) were applied to detect change point in the annual Persian Gulf sea surface temperature anomalies (PGSSTA) time series for the period 1951-2013. The PGSSTA time series, which were serially correlated, were transformed to produce an uncorrelated pre-whitened time series. The pre-whitened PGSSTA time series were utilized as the input file of change point models. Both the applied parametric and nonparametric CPMs estimated the change point in the PGSSTA in 1992. The PGSSTA follow the normal distribution up to 1992 and thereafter, but with a different mean value after year 1992. The estimated slope of linear trend in PGSSTA time series for the period 1951-1992 was negative; however, that was positive after the detected change point. Unlike the PGSSTA, the applied CPMs suggested no change point in the Niño3.4SSTA time series.

  19. Investigation of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies over Cyprus area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Andreas; Akçit, Nuhcan

    2016-08-01

    The temperature of the sea surface has been identified as an important parameter of the natural environment, governing processes that occur in the upper ocean. This paper focuses on the analysis of the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies at the greater area of Cyprus. For that, SST data derived from MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on board both Aqua and Terra sun synchronous satellites were used. A four year period was chosen as a first approach to address and describe this phenomenon. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) has been used as an integrated platform of analysis and presentation in addition of the support of MATLAB®. The methodology consists of five steps: (i) Collection of MODIS SST imagery, (ii) Development of the digital geo-database; (iii) Model and run the methodology in GIS as a script; (iv) Calculation of SST anomalies; and (v) Visualization of the results. The SST anomaly values have presented a symmetric distribution over the study area with an increase trend through the years of analysis. The calculated monthly and annual average SST anomalies (ASST) make more obvious this trend, with negative and positive SST changes to be distributed over the study area. In terms of seasons, the same increase trend presented during spring, summer, autumn and winter with 2013 to be the year with maximum ASST observed values. Innovative aspects comprise of straightforward integration and modeling of available tools, providing a versatile platform of analysis and semi-automation of the operation. In addition, the fine resolution maps that extracted from the analysis with a wide spatial coverage, allows the detail representation of SST and ASST respectively in the region.

  20. Effects of Gas and Surface Temperatures during Cryogenic Etching of silicon with SF6/O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinck, Stefan; Neyts, Erik; Tillocher, Thomas; Dussart, Remi; Bogaerts, Annemie; Plasmant Team; Gremi Team

    2016-09-01

    Cryogenic deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of silicon and SiO2 used for creating vias is investigated. The wafer is cooled to about -100 °C and a SF6/O2 mixture is applied. During cryogenic DRIE, a SiFxOy passivation layer is formed which prevents isotropic etching and the diffusion of F atoms into the Si or SiO2 material. When the wafer is brought back to room temperature, this passivation layer desorbs naturally, leaving a clean trench with no scalloping. The primary issue with cryogenic DRIE is the high sensitivity to oxygen content and substrate or gas temperature. Both effects are investigated here. We believe that understanding the temperature dependent surface behavior of the O and F atoms to etch silicon is a primary step in obtaining full insight in the mechanisms of the SiFxOy passivation layer formation and automatic desorption. For this purpose, we apply a self-consistent model that covers both the bulk plasma characteristics as well as the surface processes during etching. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are also performed to obtain insight in the surface reaction mechanisms. For validation of the modeling results, the etch rates are also experimentally obtained with reflectometry and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) pictures.