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Sample records for surface substantially slows

  1. The TTI slowness surface approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Stovas, A.

    2011-01-01

    The relation between the vertical and horizontal slownesses, better known as the dispersion relation, for a transversely isotropic media with titled symmetry axis {left parenthesis, less than bracket}TTI{right parenthesis, greater than bracket} requires solving a quartic polynomial, which does not admit a practical explicit solution to be used, for example, in downward continuation. Using a combination of perturbation theory with respect to the anelliptic parameter and Shanks transform to improve the accuracy of the expansion, we develop an explicit formula for the dispersion relation that is highly accurate for all practical purposes. It also reveals some insights into the anisotropy parameter dependency of the dispersion relation including the low impact that the anelliptic parameter has on the vertical placement of reflectors for small tilt in the symmetry angle. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  2. Slowing Down Surface Plasmons on a Moiré Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Askin; Senlik, S. Seckin; Aydinli, Atilla

    2009-02-01

    We have demonstrated slow propagation of surface plasmons on metallic Moiré surfaces. The phase shift at the node of the Moiré surface localizes the propagating surface plasmons and adjacent nodes form weakly coupled plasmonic cavities. Group velocities around vg=0.44c at the center of the coupled cavity band and almost a zero group velocity at the band edges are observed. A tight binding model is used to understand the coupling behavior. Furthermore, the sinusoidally modified amplitude about the node suppresses the radiation losses and reveals a relatively high quality factor (Q=103).

  3. A tilted transversely isotropic slowness surface approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Stovas, A.

    2012-05-09

    The relation between vertical and horizontal slownesses, better known as the dispersion relation, for transversely isotropic media with a tilted symmetry axis (TTI) requires solving a quartic polynomial equation, which does not admit a practical explicit solution to be used, for example, in downward continuation. Using a combination of the perturbation theory with respect to the anelliptic parameter and Shanks transform to improve the accuracy of the expansion, we develop an explicit formula for the vertical slowness that is highly accurate for all practical purposes. It also reveals some insights into the anisotropy parameter dependency of the dispersion relation including the low impact that the anelliptic parameter has on the vertical placement of reflectors for a small tilt in the symmetry angle. © 2012 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  4. Fast and Slow Wetting Dynamics on nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandyala, Dhiraj; Rahmani, Amir; Cubaud, Thomas; Colosqui, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This talk will present force-displacement and spontaneous drop spreading measurements on diverse nanostructured surfaces (e.g., mesoporous titania thin films, nanoscale pillared structures, on silica or glass substrates). Experimental measurements are performed for water-air and water-oil systems. The dynamics of wetting observed in these experiments can present remarkable crossovers from fast to slow or arrested dynamics. The emergence of a slow wetting regime is attributed to a multiplicity of metastable equilibrium states induced by nanoscale surface features. The crossover point can be dramatically advanced or delayed by adjusting specific physical parameters (e.g., viscosity of the wetting phases) and geometric properties of the surface nanostructure (e.g., nanopore/pillar radius and separation). Controlling the crossover point to arrested dynamics can effectively modify the degree of contact angle hysteresis and magnitude of liquid adhesion forces observed on surfaces of different materials. This work is supported by a SEED Award from The Office of Brookhaven National Laboratory Affairs at Stony Brook University.

  5. Excitation of surface plasma waves over corrugated slow-wave structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashim P Jain; Jetendra Parashar

    2005-08-01

    A microwave propagating along vacuum–dielectric–plasma interface excites surface plasma wave (SPW). A periodic slow-wave structure placed over dielectric slows down the SPW. The phase velocity of slow SPW is sensitive to height, periodicity, number of periods, thickness and the separation between dielectric and slow-wave structure. These slow SPW can couple the microwave energy to the plasma and can sustain the discharge. The efficiency of the power coupling is few per cent and is sensitive to separation between dielectric and slow-wave structure.

  6. Curvature properties of the slowness surface of the system of crystal acoustics for cubic crystals

    OpenAIRE

    LIESS, Otto

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we study geometric properties of the slowness surface of the system of crystal acoustics for cubic crystals. In particular we shall study curvature properties of the surface and the behaviour of the surface near singular points. The main result is that in the generic nearly isotropic case there are no planes which are tangent to the surface along entire curves. This is in contrast with what happens for the slowness surface of the system of crystal optics for...

  7. Modelling surface restructuring by slow highly charged ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, G.; Tőkési, K.; Betz, G.; Lemell, C.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2013-12-01

    We theoretically investigate surface modifications on alkaline earth halides due to highly charged ion impact, focusing on recent experimental evidence for both etch pit and nano-hillock formation on CaF2 (A.S. El-Said et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, (2012) 117602 [1]). We discuss mechanisms for converting the projectile potential and kinetic energies into thermal energy capable of changing the surface structure. A proof-of-principle classical molecular dynamics simulation suggests the existence of two thresholds which we associate with etch pit and nano-hillock formation in qualitative agreement with experiment.

  8. Modelling surface restructuring by slow highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, G., E-mail: georg.wachter@tuwien.ac.at [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstraße 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Tőkési, K. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Science (ATOMKI), H-4001 Debrecen, P.O. Box 51 (Hungary); Betz, G. [Institute for Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstraße 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Lemell, C.; Burgdörfer, J. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstraße 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-12-15

    We theoretically investigate surface modifications on alkaline earth halides due to highly charged ion impact, focusing on recent experimental evidence for both etch pit and nano-hillock formation on CaF{sub 2} (A.S. El-Said et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, (2012) 117602 [1]). We discuss mechanisms for converting the projectile potential and kinetic energies into thermal energy capable of changing the surface structure. A proof-of-principle classical molecular dynamics simulation suggests the existence of two thresholds which we associate with etch pit and nano-hillock formation in qualitative agreement with experiment.

  9. Collisions of Slow Highly Charged Ions with Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Burgdoerfer, J.; Lemell, C.; Schiessl, K.; Solleder, B.; Reinhold, C; Tokesi, K.; Wirtz, Ludger

    2006-01-01

    Progress in the study of collisions of multiply charged ions with surfaces is reviewed with the help of a few recent examples. They range from fundamental quasi-one electron processes to highly complex ablation and material modification processes. Open questions and possible future directions will be discussed.

  10. SLOWNESS SURFACE CALCULATION FOR DIFFERENT MEDIA USING THE SYMBOLIC MATHEMATICS LANGUAGE MAPLE®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piedrahita Carlos

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the equation in different media, we obtain the different type of waves that can exists in such media. The evaluation of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors let us construct the slowness surfaces. In general complex calculations case have to be made. In this work, routines were implemented in the symbolic language MAPLE® and the slowness surfaces were plotted. This work is relevant for the modelling of equivalent media that simulates natural fractured reservoirs, like those common in the Colombian foothills. It is important to understand the seismic response of this reservoirs for exploration of this areas.

  11. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-05

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms.

  12. Direct observation of surface mode excitation and slow light coupling in photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volkov, V.S.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn;

    2007-01-01

    are obtained for light at telecom wavelengths propagating in the PhCW, demonstrating directly, for the first time to our knowledge, drastic widening of the PhCW guided mode in the slow-light regime and excitation of surface waves at the PhCW interface along with their feeding into the guided mode......A scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) is used to systematically study the properties of guided modes in linear and slow-light regimes of silicon-on-insulator (SOI)-based photonic crystal waveguides (PhCWs) with different terminations of the photonic lattice. High quality SNOM images...

  13. Acceleration of curing of resin composite at the bottom surface using slow-start curing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Takako; Morigami, Makoto; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two slow-start curing methods on acceleration of the curing of resin composite specimens at the bottom surface. The light-cured resin composite was polymerized using one of three curing techniques: (1) 600 mW/cm(2) for 60 s, (2) 270 mW/cm(2) for 10 s+0-s interval+600 mW/cm(2) for 50 s, and (3) 270 mW/cm(2) for 10 s+5-s interval+600 mW/cm(2) for 50 s. After light curing, Knoop hardness number was measured at the top and bottom surfaces of the resin specimens. The slow-start curing method with the 5-s interval caused greater acceleration of curing of the resin composite at the bottom surface of the specimens than the slow-start curing method with the 0-s interval. The light-cured resin composite, which had increased contrast ratios during polymerization, showed acceleration of curing at the bottom surface.

  14. Phase diagram for nanostructuring CaF(2) surfaces by slow highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Said, A S; Wilhelm, R A; Heller, R; Facsko, S; Lemell, C; Wachter, G; Burgdörfer, J; Ritter, R; Aumayr, F

    2012-09-14

    The impact of individual slow highly charged ions (HCI) on alkaline earth halide and alkali halide surfaces creates nano-scale surface modifications. For different materials and impact energies a wide variety of topographic alterations have been observed, ranging from regularly shaped pits to nanohillocks. We present experimental evidence for the creation of thermodynamically stable defect agglomerations initially hidden after irradiation but becoming visible as pits upon subsequent etching. A well defined threshold separating regions with and without etch-pit formation is found as a function of potential and kinetic energies of the projectile. Combining this novel type of surface defects with the previously identified hillock formation, a phase diagram for HCI induced surface restructuring emerges. The simulation of the energy deposition by the HCI in the crystal provides insight into the early stages of the dynamics of the surface modification and its dependence on the kinetic and potential energies.

  15. High quality broadband spatial reflections of slow Rayleigh surface acoustic waves modulated by a graded grooved surface

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-01-21

    We report high quality broadband spatial reflections of Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (SAWs) through a graded grooved surface. High quality means that no wave is allowed to transmit and the incident wave is nearly all reflected to the input side. The graded grooved surface is structured by drilling one dimensional array of graded grooves with increased depths on a flat surface. We investigate SAW dispersion relations, wave field distribution at several typical SAW wavelengths, and time evolution of a Gaussian pulse through the graded grooved surface. Results show that the input broadband Rayleigh SAWs can be slowed, spatially enhanced and stopped, and finally reflected to the input side. The study suggests that engraving the flat surface can be used as an efficient and economical way to manipulate Rayleigh SAWs, which has potential application in novel SAW devices such as filters, reflectors, sensors, energy harvesters, and diodes.

  16. Slowing surface plasmon polaritons on plasmonic coupled cavities by tuning grating grooves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Askin; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2010-09-01

    We investigate slow surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in plasmonic waveguiding bands formed by coupled plasmonic cavities on Moiré surfaces. We demonstrate controlling the group velocity and dispersion of the SPPs by varying the depth of the plasmonic Bragg grating groove. Changing the grating depth results in modification of coupling coefficients between the cavities and hence the SPPs group velocity is altered. Variation in the group velocity and dispersion of SPPs can be measured with polarization dependent spectroscopic reflection measurements. Dispersion of SPPs has been calculated by finite-difference time-domain method in agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Creation of nanohillocks on CaF2 surfaces by single slow highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Said, A S; Heller, R; Meissl, W; Ritter, R; Facsko, S; Lemell, C; Solleder, B; Gebeshuber, I C; Betz, G; Toulemonde, M; Möller, W; Burgdörfer, J; Aumayr, F

    2008-06-13

    Upon impact on a solid surface, the potential energy stored in slow highly charged ions is primarily deposited into the electronic system of the target. By decelerating the projectile ions to kinetic energies as low as 150 x q eV, we find first unambiguous experimental evidence that potential energy alone is sufficient to cause permanent nanosized hillocks on the (111) surface of a CaF(2) single crystal. Our investigations reveal a surprisingly sharp and well-defined threshold of potential energy for hillock formation which can be linked to a solid-liquid phase transition.

  18. Novel aspects on the irradiation of HOPG surfaces with slow highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, R. [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Shen, Q. [Institute of Physics, Montanuniversität Leoben, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Wilhelm, R.A. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Heller, R. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Ginzel, R.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J.R. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Facsko, S. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Teichert, C. [Institute of Physics, Montanuniversität Leoben, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Aumayr, F., E-mail: aumayr@iap.tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-11-15

    As a continuation of our previous work, we present new results regarding the interaction of slow highly charged ions with HOPG. Lateral atomic force microscopy measurements with calibrated cantilevers were performed to investigate in more detail the locally enhanced friction at ion impact sites, which has been reported earlier. For very high charge states, apart from ever-present changes in frictional and electronic properties, we find evidence for true topographic surface modifications (hillocks). In complementary studies, we have investigated these structures regarding their conductivity by employing high-resolution conductive atomic force microscopy. In addition, we demonstrate the possibility to etch ion-induced surface structures by thermal annealing.

  19. Coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator: Model and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Melke A. [Institute of Chemistry of São Carlos, University of São Paulo, PO Box 780, 13560-970, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Nagao, Raphael [Institute of Chemistry of São Carlos, University of São Paulo, PO Box 780, 13560-970, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Eiswirth, Markus [Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Ertl Center for Electrochemistry and Catalysis, GIST, Cheomdan-gwagiro 261, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Varela, Hamilton, E-mail: varela@iqsc.usp.br [Institute of Chemistry of São Carlos, University of São Paulo, PO Box 780, 13560-970, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Ertl Center for Electrochemistry and Catalysis, GIST, Cheomdan-gwagiro 261, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-21

    The co-existence of disparate time scales is pervasive in many systems. In particular for surface reactions, it has been shown that the long-term evolution of the core oscillator is decisively influenced by slow surface changes, such as progressing deactivation. Here we present an in-depth numerical investigation of the coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator. The model consists of four nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, investigated over a wide parameter range. Besides the conventional bifurcation analysis, the system was studied by means of high-resolution period and Lyapunov diagrams. It was observed that the bifurcation diagram changes considerably as the irreversible surface poisoning evolves, and the oscillatory region shrinks. The qualitative dynamics changes accordingly and the chaotic oscillations are dramatically suppressed. Nevertheless, periodic cascades are preserved in a confined region of the resistance vs. voltage diagram. Numerical results are compared to experiments published earlier and the latter reinterpreted. Finally, the comprehensive description of the time-evolution in the period and Lyapunov diagrams suggests further experimental studies correlating the evolution of the system's dynamics with changes of the catalyst structure.

  20. Erosion of Ag surface by continuous irradiation with slow, large Ar clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rzeznik, Lukasz, E-mail: lukasz.rzeznik@uj.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Krakow (Poland); Paruch, Robert [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Krakow (Poland); Garrison, Barbara J. [Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Postawa, Zbigniew, E-mail: zbigniew.postawa@uj.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Krakow (Poland)

    2011-07-15

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations are employed to probe processes taking place during continuous irradiation of Ag(1 1 1) surface by keV Ar{sub 872} projectiles. Surface modification, the total sputtering yield, and the angular distributions of ejected species are calculated at fluences ranging from 0 up to {approx}6 x 10{sup 13} impacts/cm{sup 2}. It has been shown that two trends can be identified in the development of surface roughness. At the beginning surface roughness increases fast. This fast increase terminates around 1 x 10{sup 13} impacts/cm{sup 2} and is followed by a slow increase that finally saturates. The effect of the surface roughness on the sputtering yield depends on the impact angle. At normal incidence the sputtering yield is rather insensitive to the development of the surface topography. Modification of the surface morphology has, however, a significant influence on the total sputtering yield at large impact angles. Both the shape of the sputtering yield dependence on the impact angle and the angular spectra of ejected particles are sensitive to the surface roughness.

  1. Curvature properties of the slowness surface of the system of crystal acoustics for cubic crystals II

    OpenAIRE

    LIESS, Otto; Sonobe, Tetsuya

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study geometric properties of the slowness surface of the system of crystal acoustics for cubic crystals in the special case when the stiffness constants satisfy the condition $a = -2b$. The paper is a natural continuation of the paper [9] in which related properties were studied for general constants $a$ and $b$, but assuming that we were in the nearly isotropic case, in which case $a - b$ has to be small. We also take this opportunity to correct a state...

  2. Laser Generation of Surface Waves on Cylinder with a Slow Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shi-Gong; HU Wen-Xiang

    2008-01-01

    @@ An analytical model of acoustic field excited by a pulsed-laser line source on a coated cylinder is presented.Surface wave dispersive behaviours for a cylinder with a slow coating are analysed and compared with that of a bare cylinder.Based on this analysis, the laser-generated transient response of the perturbed Rayleigh wave and the higher modes of steel cylinder with a zinc coating are calculated from the model using residue theory and FFT technique.The theoretical result from the superposed waveform of the perturbed Rayleigh wave and higher modes agree well with the waveform obtained in experiment.The results show that the model and numerical method provide a useful technique for quantitatively characterizing coating parameters of coated cylinder by the laser generated surface waves.

  3. Statistical contact angle analyses; "slow moving" drops on a horizontal silicon-oxide surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, M; Grub, J; Heib, F

    2015-06-01

    Sessile drop experiments on horizontal surfaces are commonly used to characterise surface properties in science and in industry. The advancing angle and the receding angle are measurable on every solid. Specially on horizontal surfaces even the notions themselves are critically questioned by some authors. Building a standard, reproducible and valid method of measuring and defining specific (advancing/receding) contact angles is an important challenge of surface science. Recently we have developed two/three approaches, by sigmoid fitting, by independent and by dependent statistical analyses, which are practicable for the determination of specific angles/slopes if inclining the sample surface. These approaches lead to contact angle data which are independent on "user-skills" and subjectivity of the operator which is also of urgent need to evaluate dynamic measurements of contact angles. We will show in this contribution that the slightly modified procedures are also applicable to find specific angles for experiments on horizontal surfaces. As an example droplets on a flat freshly cleaned silicon-oxide surface (wafer) are dynamically measured by sessile drop technique while the volume of the liquid is increased/decreased. The triple points, the time, the contact angles during the advancing and the receding of the drop obtained by high-precision drop shape analysis are statistically analysed. As stated in the previous contribution the procedure is called "slow movement" analysis due to the small covered distance and the dominance of data points with low velocity. Even smallest variations in velocity such as the minimal advancing motion during the withdrawing of the liquid are identifiable which confirms the flatness and the chemical homogeneity of the sample surface and the high sensitivity of the presented approaches.

  4. Simulating a slow bar in the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chequers, Matthew H.; Spekkens, Kristine; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Gilhuly, Colleen

    2016-12-01

    We present a disc-halo N-body model of the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628, one of the few systems that harbours a `slow' bar with a ratio of corotation radius to bar length of R ≡ R_c/a_b ˜ 2. We select our initial conditions using SDSS DR10 photometry, a physically motivated radially variable mass-to-light ratio profile, and rotation curve data from the literature. A global bar instability grows in our submaximal disc model, and the disc morphology and dynamics agree broadly with the photometry and kinematics of UGC 628 at times between peak bar strength and the onset of buckling. Prior to bar formation, the disc and halo contribute roughly equally to the potential in the galaxy's inner region, giving the disc enough self-gravity for bar modes to grow. After bar formation, there is significant mass redistribution, creating a baryon-dominated inner and dark matter-dominated outer disc. This implies that, unlike most other low surface brightness galaxies, UGC 628 is not dark matter dominated everywhere. Our model nonetheless implies that UGC 628 falls on the same relationship between dark matter fraction and rotation velocity found for high surface brightness galaxies, and lends credence to the argument that the disc mass fraction measured at the location where its contribution to the potential peaks is not a reliable indicator of its dynamical importance at all radii.

  5. Detailed statistical contact angle analyses; "slow moving" drops on inclining silicon-oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, M; Groß, K; Grub, J; Heib, F

    2015-06-01

    Contact angle determination by sessile drop technique is essential to characterise surface properties in science and in industry. Different specific angles can be observed on every solid which are correlated with the advancing or the receding of the triple line. Different procedures and definitions for the determination of specific angles exist which are often not comprehensible or reproducible. Therefore one of the most important things in this area is to build standard, reproducible and valid methods for determining advancing/receding contact angles. This contribution introduces novel techniques to analyse dynamic contact angle measurements (sessile drop) in detail which are applicable for axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric drops. Not only the recently presented fit solution by sigmoid function and the independent analysis of the different parameters (inclination, contact angle, velocity of the triple point) but also the dependent analysis will be firstly explained in detail. These approaches lead to contact angle data and different access on specific contact angles which are independent from "user-skills" and subjectivity of the operator. As example the motion behaviour of droplets on flat silicon-oxide surfaces after different surface treatments is dynamically measured by sessile drop technique when inclining the sample plate. The triple points, the inclination angles, the downhill (advancing motion) and the uphill angles (receding motion) obtained by high-precision drop shape analysis are independently and dependently statistically analysed. Due to the small covered distance for the dependent analysis (static to the "slow moving" dynamic contact angle determination. They are characterised by small deviations of the computed values. Additional to the detailed introduction of this novel analytical approaches plus fit solution special motion relations for the drop on inclined surfaces and detailed relations about the reactivity of the freshly cleaned silicon wafer

  6. Surface deformation due to slow slip source considering a non-elastic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, N. K.; Malservisi, R.; Dixon, T. H.; Protti, M.

    2016-12-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) are now recognized as a feature common in many subduction zones. They have been recognized in both the shallow part of subduction interface as well as deeper, beneath the seismogenic zone. While shallow events are difficult to image due to lack of resolution with onshore instrumentation, deep events appear to correlate well with seismic phenomena including tremor and low frequency events. However, uncertainty regarding source properties of the events and their surrounding medium remains high at these depths. Deep slow slip appears to be located between 60 and 25 km depth at many locations worldwide (Schwartz and Rokosky , 2007). This places the events at depths at or near the mantle wedge corner. Serpentinization of the mantle wedge is thought to be one source of fluids commonly attributed as the source of SSEs and tremor (Wada et al., 2008) but also leads to drastic changes in rheology of the down going slab and near by mantle. Traditionally, measured geodetic transients are inverted for slip distributions using a simple elastic "Okada" type models. Often the shape of these transients is attributed to variance in slip rate on the fault. Here we explore the response of the surrounding lithosphere to the transient stress propagation induced by SSE and the effects on observed surface deformation using varying rheologies within a finite element model. Understanding these effects allows a better estimation of the uncertainty in the geodetically derived slip distributions thus is important to consider when evaluating SSEs role in earthquake hazard as well as deciphering the relationship between tremor and slip.

  7. Simulating a slow bar in the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628

    CERN Document Server

    Chequers, Matthew H; Widrow, Lawrence M; Gilhuly, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    We present a disc-halo N-body model of the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628, one of the few systems that harbours a "slow" bar with a ratio of corotation radius to bar length of $\\mathcal{R} \\equiv R_c/a_b \\sim 2$. We select our initial conditions using SDSS DR10 photometry, a physically motivated radially variable mass-to-light ratio profile, and rotation curve data from the literature. A global bar instability grows in our submaximal disc model, and the disc morphology and dynamics agree broadly with the photometry and kinematics of UGC 628 at times between peak bar strength and the onset of buckling. Prior to bar formation, the disc and halo contribute roughly equally to the potential in the galaxy's inner region, giving the disc enough self gravity for bar modes to grow. After bar formation there is significant mass redistribution, creating a baryon dominated inner and dark matter dominated outer disc. This implies that, unlike most other low surface brightness galaxies, UGC 628 is not dark matter do...

  8. Fast and slow responses of Southern Ocean sea surface temperature to SAM in coupled climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, Yavor; Marshall, John; Hausmann, Ute; Armour, Kyle C.; Ferreira, David; Holland, Marika M.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate how sea surface temperatures (SSTs) around Antarctica respond to the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) on multiple timescales. To that end we examine the relationship between SAM and SST within unperturbed preindustrial control simulations of coupled general circulation models (GCMs) included in the Climate Modeling Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). We develop a technique to extract the response of the Southern Ocean SST (55°S-70°S) to a hypothetical step increase in the SAM index. We demonstrate that in many GCMs, the expected SST step response function is nonmonotonic in time. Following a shift to a positive SAM anomaly, an initial cooling regime can transition into surface warming around Antarctica. However, there are large differences across the CMIP5 ensemble. In some models the step response function never changes sign and cooling persists, while in other GCMs the SST anomaly crosses over from negative to positive values only 3 years after a step increase in the SAM. This intermodel diversity can be related to differences in the models' climatological thermal ocean stratification in the region of seasonal sea ice around Antarctica. Exploiting this relationship, we use observational data for the time-mean meridional and vertical temperature gradients to constrain the real Southern Ocean response to SAM on fast and slow timescales.

  9. Analysis of surface modifications on graphite induced by slow highly charged ion impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hida, A. E-mail: hida@postman.riken.go.jp; Meguro, T.; Maeda, K.; Aoyagi, Y

    2003-05-01

    Modifications of the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surfaces induced by the single impacts of slow Ar{sup +} and Ar{sup 8+} were investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The difference in the irradiation-induced disorder between Ar{sup +} and Ar{sup 8+} was clearly revealed by comparing two kinds of changes in Raman features against ion fluences: one is the peak intensity ratio of the disorder-induced peak with respect to the E{sub 2g}-mode peak in the first-order Raman spectra, and the other is the full width at half maximum of the E{sub 2g}-mode peak. Judging from the peculiar dependence of them on the fluence of Ar{sup 8+}, it was assumed that the defects introduced by Ar{sup 8+} impacts is not simple vacancies as is the case of Ar{sup +} impacts but vacancy clusters. The formation mechanism of vacancy clusters under Ar{sup 8+} irradiation was also discussed from the change in the second-order Raman spectra.

  10. Detailed topology mapping reveals substantial exposure of the "cytoplasmic" C-terminal tail (CTT sequences in HIV-1 Env proteins at the cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Steckbeck

    Full Text Available Substantial controversy surrounds the membrane topology of the HIV-1 gp41 C-terminal tail (CTT. While few studies have been designed to directly address the topology of the CTT, results from envelope (Env protein trafficking studies suggest that the CTT sequence is cytoplasmically localized, as interactions with intracellular binding partners are required for proper Env targeting. However, previous studies from our lab demonstrate the exposure of a short CTT sequence, the Kennedy epitope, at the plasma membrane of intact Env-expressing cells, the exposure of which is not observed on viral particles. To address the topology of the entire CTT sequence, we serially replaced CTT sequences with a VSV-G epitope tag sequence and examined reactivity of cell- and virion-surface Env to an anti-VSV-G monoclonal antibody. Our results demonstrate that the majority of the CTT sequence is accessible to antibody binding on the surface of Env expressing cells, and that the CTT-exposed Env constitutes 20-50% of the cell-surface Env. Cell surface CTT exposure was also apparent in virus-infected cells. Passive transfer of Env through cell culture media to Env negative (non-transfected cells was not responsible for the apparent cell surface CTT exposure. In contrast to the cell surface results, CTT-exposed Env was not detected on infectious pseudoviral particles containing VSV-G-substituted Env. Finally, a monoclonal antibody directed to the Kennedy epitope neutralized virus in a temperature-dependent manner in a post-attachment neutralization assay. Collectively, these results suggest that the membrane topology of the HIV gp41 CTT is more complex than the widely accepted intracytoplasmic model.

  11. Nanostructuring CaF2 surfaces with slow highly charged ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Said, A. S.; Wilhelm, R. A.; Heller, R.; Ritter, R.; Wachter, G.; Facsko, S.; Lemell, C.; Burgdörfer, J.; Aumayr, F.

    2014-04-01

    In recent years the potential of slow highly charged ions (HCI) as tools for nanostructuring purposes has received considerable attention and a wide range of material classes, from insulating ionic crystals, polymers and ultrathin films, to semiconducting and conducting substrates have been investigated regarding their response to individual HCI impact. For the majority of investigated materials, however, consistent theoretical modeling to supplement with experimental evidence and to satisfactorily explain the complete physical process from ion approach and impact to the formation of an individual nanostructure is still lacking. CaF2, from both an experimental and theoretical point of view, might be considered the most thoroughly investigated material. Combining results from numerous studies has allowed for the generation of a "phase diagram" for nanostructuring of CaF2 in dependence of ion beam parameters. This paves the way for a first unified picture, as implications from this phase diagram should be applicable to similar materials as well.

  12. Theoretical and experimental substantiation of a thermogravimetric method for assessing the water-retention capacity and specific surface area of disperse systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagin, A. V.; Sadovnikova, N. B.; Bashina, A. S.; Kirichenko, A. V.; Vityazev, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    A conceptually new instrumental method has been proposed for the determination of the sorption fragment of the soil water retention curve and the specific surface area of soils and sediments by drying samples at different temperatures, which is based on fundamental models for relative air humidity and thermodynamic water potential ( Ψ) as functions of temperature ( T). The basic equation for the calculation of water potential in the first (linear) approximation is as follows: Ψ = Q- aT, where Q is the specific heat of evaporation, and a is the physically substantiated parameter related to the initial relative air humidity in the laboratory. The setting of model parameters necessary for quantitative calculations has been performed from tabulated data for the saturated water vapor pressure as a function of temperature and results of an independent experiment with gradual air heating and synchronous automated control of air humidity and temperature with DS 1923 hydrochrons. The potentialities of the method have been demonstrated using literature data on the dehydration of soil colloids and our own results on the drying of a silty sandy soil (Arenosol) from Dubai, a light loamy soddy-podzolic soil (Albic Retisol) and a low-moor peat soil (Histosol) from Moscow oblast, and a loamy ordinary chernozem (Haplic Chernozem) from Krasnodar region.

  13. Surface wave inversion for a p-wave velocity profile: Estimation of the squared slowness gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarenko, A.V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Surface waves can be used to obtain a near-surface shear wave profile. The inverse problem is usually solved for the locally 1-D problem of a set of homogeneous horizontal elastic layers. The output is a set of shear velocity values for each layer in the profile. P-wave velocity profile can be estim

  14. Slow and Steady: Ocean Circulation. The Influence of Sea Surface Height on Ocean Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haekkinen, Sirpa

    2000-01-01

    The study of ocean circulation is vital to understanding how our climate works. The movement of the ocean is closely linked to the progression of atmospheric motion. Winds close to sea level add momentum to ocean surface currents. At the same time, heat that is stored and transported by the ocean warms the atmosphere above and alters air pressure distribution. Therefore, any attempt to model climate variation accurately must include reliable calculations of ocean circulation. Unlike movement of the atmosphere, movement of the ocean's waters takes place mostly near the surface. The major patterns of surface circulation form gigantic circular cells known as gyres. They are categorized according to their general location-equatorial, subtropical, subpolar, and polar-and may run across an entire ocean. The smaller-scale cell of ocean circulation is known' as an eddy. Eddies are much more common than gyres and much more difficult to track in computer simulations of ocean currents.

  15. Unsteady fluid and heat flow induced by a submerged stretching surface while its steady motion is slowed down gradually

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, M.E. [King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Mechanical Engineering Department; Magyari, E. [Institute of Building Technology, ETH Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2007-01-15

    The title problem arises in the terminal stage of a large class of industrial manufacturing processes as polymer extrusion, wire drawing, drawing of plastic sheets, etc. It concerns the transient crossover to the state of rest of the fluid and heat flow which accompanies the steady fabrication process, when the devices are switched off gradually (i.e. when the motion is slowed down and the surface temperature approaches the ambient temperature continuously). The mechanical and thermal characteristics of such an unsteady process are investigated in the boundary layer approximation, assuming a linear variation of the steady stretching velocity with the longitudinal coordinate x and an inverse linear law for its decrease with time during the gradual switch-off process. For the corresponding surface temperature a general power-law variation is admitted. The paper presents the similarity analysis of several specific cases. The cases of basic interest of a constant surface temperature T{sub w} and of a constant surface heat flux q{sub w} are discussed in some detail. In the case T{sub w}=const. an exact solution is reported and the Prandtl number dependence of the corresponding surface heat flux is given for all 0

  16. Interaction of slow and highly charged ions with surfaces: formation of hollow atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolterfoht, N.; Grether, M.; Spieler, A.; Niemann, D. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Berlin (Germany). Bereich Festkoerperphysik; Arnau, A.

    1997-03-01

    The method of Auger spectroscopy was used to study the interaction of highly charged ions with Al and C surfaces. The formation of hollow Ne atoms in the first surface layers was evaluated by means of a Density Functional theory including non-linear screening effects. The time-dependent filling of the hollow atom was determined from a cascade model yielding information about the structure of the K-Auger spectra. Variation of total intensities of the L- and K-Auger peaks were interpreted by the cascade model in terms of attenuation effects on the electrons in the solid. (author)

  17. Surface modification of an Mg-1Ca alloy to slow down its biocorrosion by chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, X N; Zheng, Y F; Lan, Q X; Cheng, Y; Zhang, Z X; Xi, T F; Zhang, D Y

    2009-08-01

    The surface morphologies before and after immersion corrosion test of various chitosan-coated Mg-1Ca alloy samples were studied to investigate the effect of chitosan dip coating on the slowdown of biocorrosion. It showed that the corrosion resistance of the Mg-Ca alloy increased after coating with chitosan, and depended on both the chitosan molecular weight and layer numbers of coating. The Mg-Ca alloy coated by chitosan with a molecular weight of 2.7 x 10(5) for six layers has smooth and intact surface morphology, and exhibits the highest corrosion resistance in a simulated body fluid.

  18. Surface modification of an Mg-1Ca alloy to slow down its biocorrosion by chitosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, X N; Zheng, Y F; Lan, Q X [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System and College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Cheng, Y; Xi, T F [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Z X [Biomedical Engineering Research Center, Research Institute of Peking University in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Zhang, D Y, E-mail: gxn139888@pku.edu.c, E-mail: yfzheng@pku.edu.c, E-mail: 8lanqiuxiang@163.co, E-mail: chengyan@pku.edu.c, E-mail: top5460@163.co, E-mail: xitingfei@tom.co, E-mail: zhangdeyuan@lifetechmed.co [Lifetech Scientific (Shenzhen) Co. Ltd, Hi-Tech Park, Shenzhen 518000 (China)

    2009-08-15

    The surface morphologies before and after immersion corrosion test of various chitosan-coated Mg-1Ca alloy samples were studied to investigate the effect of chitosan dip coating on the slowdown of biocorrosion. It showed that the corrosion resistance of the Mg-Ca alloy increased after coating with chitosan, and depended on both the chitosan molecular weight and layer numbers of coating. The Mg-Ca alloy coated by chitosan with a molecular weight of 2.7 x 10{sup 5} for six layers has smooth and intact surface morphology, and exhibits the highest corrosion resistance in a simulated body fluid.

  19. X-ray spectra induced by slow highly charged Arq+ ions in collision with Nb surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of Nb surface induced by Arq+ (q =16,17) ions with the energy range from 10 to 20 keV/q were studied by the optical spectrum technology. The experimental results indicate that the multi-electron excitation occurred as a highly charged Ar16+ ion was neutralized below the metal surface. The K shell electron of Ar16+ was excited and then de-excited cascadly to emit K X-ray. The intensity of the X-ray emitted from K shell of the hollow Ar atom decreased with the increase of projectile kinetic energy. The intensity of the X-ray emitted from L shell of the target atom Nb increased with the increase of projectile kinetic energy. The X-ray yield of Ar17+ is three magnitude orders larger than that of Ar16+.

  20. X-ray spectra induced by slow highly charged Arq+ ions in collision with Nb surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG ZhiHu; GAO ZhiMing; ZHANG XiaoAn; ZHU KeXin; YU DeYang; CAI XiaoHong; CUI Ying; CHEN XiMeng; SONG ZhangYong; SHAO JianXiong; RUAN FangFang; ZHANG HongQiang; DU Juan; LIU YuWen

    2008-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of Nb surface induced by Arq+ (q = 16,17) ions with the energy range from 10 to 20 keV/q were studied by the optical spectrum technology. The experimental results indicate that the multi-electron excitation occurred as a highly charged Ar16+ ion was neutralized below the metal surface. The K shell electron of Ar16+ was excited and then de-excited cascadly to emit K X-ray. The intensity of the X-ray emitted from K shell of the hollow Ar atom decreased with the increase of projectile kinetic energy. The intensity of the X-ray emitted from L shell of the target atom Nb increased with the increase of projectile kinetic energy. The X-ray yield of Ar17+ is three magnitude orders larger than that of Ar16+.

  1. Dynamics of the Rydberg state population of slow highly charged ions impinging a solid surface at arbitrary collision geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeljković, N. N.; Majkić, M. D.; Božanić, D. K.; Dojčilović, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the population dynamics of the intermediate Rydberg states of highly charged ions (core charge Z\\gg 1, principal quantum number {n}{{A}}\\gg 1) interacting with solid surfaces at arbitrary collision geometry. The recently developed resonant two-state vector model for the grazing incidence (2012 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 45 215202) is extended to the quasi-resonant case and arbitrary angle of incidence. According to the model, the population probabilities depend both on the projectile parallel and perpendicular velocity components, in a complementary way. A cascade neutralization process for {{{Xe}}}Z+ ions, for Z=15{--}45, interacting with a conductive-surface is considered by taking into account the population dynamics. For an arbitrary collision geometry and given range of ionic velocities, a micro-staircase model for the simultaneous calculation of the kinetic energy gain and the charge state of the ion in front of the surface is proposed. The relevance of the obtained results for the explanation of the formation of nanostructures on solid surfaces by slow highly charged ions for normal incidence geometry is briefly discussed.

  2. A notational analysis of elite tennis serve and serve-return strategies on slow surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Eric; Leroy, David; Thouvarecq, Régis; Stein, Jean-François

    2009-03-01

    A notational analysis of singles events at the French Open Grand Slam tournament was undertaken in 2005 and 2006 to characterize the game patterns and strategies of serve and serve-return and to determine their influence on the point issue on a clay court surface. One hundred sixteen men's singles matches were video analyzed. The flat serve (57.6%), particularly down the "T" location (50.3%), allowed servers to win significantly more points than the topspin (24.1%) and slice serves (18.3%). When the topspin was the first serve strategy, servers kept a high percentage of points won from the serve (52.4%). This strategy was essentially used on the second serve (91.6%) by playing the "T" location in the deuce court and the wide zone in the advantage court. Returns to the central zone allowed receivers to win more points (73.3% on first serve and 65.9% on second serve) than plays to external locations. The results highlight the high impact of the first shots of all opponents on the rally. Even on clay, the slowest court surface, serves and serve-returns remain the strokes that most influence the match results in modern tennis games.

  3. Asteroseismic measurement of slow, nearly uniform surface-to-core rotation in the main-sequence F star KIC 9244992

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saio, Hideyuki; Kurtz, Donald W.; Takata, Masao;

    2015-01-01

    We have found a rotationally split series of core g-mode triplets and surface p-mode multiplets in a main-sequence F star, KIC 9244992. Comparison with models shows that the star has a mass of about 1.45 M-circle dot, and is at an advanced stage of main-sequence evolution in which the central......, obtained from p-mode splittings, is 66 d, slightly slower than the rotation of 64 d in the core, measured by g-mode splittings. KIC 9244992 is similar to KIC 11145123 in that both are near the end of main-sequence stage with very slow and nearly uniform rotation. This indicates the angular momentum...

  4. Observation of electron excitation into silicon conduction band by slow-ion surface neutralization

    CERN Document Server

    Shchemelinin, S

    2016-01-01

    Bare reverse biased silicon photodiodes were exposed to 3eV He+, Ne+, Ar+, N2+, N+ and H2O+ ions. In all cases an increase of the reverse current through the diode was observed. This effect and its dependence on the ionization energy of the incident ions and on other factors are qualitatively explained in the framework of Auger-type surface neutralization theory. Amplification of the ion-induced charge was observed with an avalanche photodiode under high applied bias. The observed effect can be considered as ion-induced internal potential electron emission into the conduction band of silicon. To the best of our knowledge, no experimental evidence of such effect was previously reported. Possible applications are discussed.

  5. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Alison; Salt, Louise; Shewry, Peter R.

    Wheat is a major crop in world agriculture and is consumed after processing into a range of food products. It is therefore of great importance to determine the consequences (intended and unintended) of transgenesis in wheat and whether genetically modified lines are substantially equivalent to those produced by conventional plant breeding. Proteomic analysis is one of several approaches which can be used to address these questions. Two-dimensional PAGE (2D PAGE) remains the most widely available method for proteomic analysis, but is notoriously difficult to reproduce between laboratories. We therefore describe methods which have been developed as standard operating procedures in our laboratory to ensure the reproducibility of proteomic analyses of wheat using 2D PAGE analysis of grain proteins.

  6. Communication: Rigorous quantum dynamics of O + O2 exchange reactions on an ab initio potential energy surface substantiate the negative temperature dependence of rate coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqin; Sun, Zhigang; Jiang, Bin; Xie, Daiqian; Dawes, Richard; Guo, Hua

    2014-08-28

    The kinetics and dynamics of several O + O2 isotope exchange reactions have been investigated on a recently determined accurate global O3 potential energy surface using a time-dependent wave packet method. The agreement between calculated and measured rate coefficients is significantly improved over previous work. More importantly, the experimentally observed negative temperature dependence of the rate coefficients is for the first time rigorously reproduced theoretically. This negative temperature dependence can be attributed to the absence in the new potential energy surface of a submerged "reef" structure, which was present in all previous potential energy surfaces. In addition, contributions of rotational excited states of the diatomic reactant further accentuate the negative temperature dependence.

  7. Slow Heartbeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... per minute. The heartbeat is controlled by an electrical system that signals the heart muscle to contract, or “squeeze,” pumping blood to the rest of the body. Bradycardia happens when the system slows or blocks ...

  8. Large scale spatio-temporal behaviour in surface growth. Scaling and dynamics of slow height variations in generalized two-dimensional Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juknevičius, Vaidas; Ruseckas, Julius; Armaitis, Jogundas

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents new findings concerning the dynamics of the slow height variations in surfaces produced by the two-dimensional isotropic Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with an additional nonlinear term. In addition to the disordered cellular patterns of specific size evident at small scales, slow height variations of scale-free character become increasingly evident when the system size is increased. This paper focuses on the parameter range in which the kinetic roughening with eventual saturation in surface roughness and coarseness is obtained, and the statistical and dynamical properties of surfaces in the long-time stationary regime are investigated. The resulting long-range scaling properties of the saturated surface roughness consistent with the power-law shape of the surface spectrum at small wave numbers are obtained in a wider parameter range than previously reported. The temporal properties of these long-range height variations are investigated by analysing the time series of surface roughness fluctuations. The resulting power-spectral densities can be expressed as a generalized Lorentzian whose cut-off frequency varies with system size. The dependence of this lower cut-off frequency on the smallest wave number connects spatial and temporal properties and gives new insight into the surface evolution on large scales.

  9. Effects of Incorporation of Nano-carbon into Slow-released Fertilizer on Rice Yield and Nitrogen Loss in Surface Water of Paddy Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Mei-yan Wu

    2013-01-01

    The use of slow-released fertilizer has become a new trend to save fertilizer consumption and to minimize environmental pollution. Duo to its high surface energy and chemical activity, the application domain of nano-materials has significantly expanded with the development of nanotechnology in conjunction with biotechnology in various fields, such as water purification, wastewater treatment, environmental remediation and food processing and packaging, industrial and household purposes, medici...

  10. Effects of Incorporation of Nano-carbon into Slow-released Fertilizer on Rice Yield and Nitrogen Loss in Surface Water of Paddy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-yan Wu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of slow-released fertilizer has become a new trend to save fertilizer consumption and to minimize environmental pollution. Duo to its high surface energy and chemical activity, the application domain of nano-materials has significantly expanded with the development of nanotechnology in conjunction with biotechnology in various fields, such as water purification, wastewater treatment, environmental remediation and food processing and packaging, industrial and household purposes, medicine and in smart sensor development. However, use in agriculture, especially for plant production, is an under-explored area in the research community. In this study, nano-carbon was incorporated into slow-released fertilizer and the influence on rice yield and nitrogen loss in surface water of paddy soil was conducted by field experiment. The experiment was a randomized block design with five treatments and three replications, the Control (CK, Jingzhengda Slow-released fertilizer (JSCU, N 42%, Jingzhengda Slow-released fertilizer and nano-Carbon (JSCU+C, Stanley slow-released compound fertilizer (SSRF, N-P2O5-K2O = 20:9:11, Stanley Slow-Released compound Fertilizer and nano-carbon (SSRF+C, respectively. The results indicated that the total nitrogen concentration in surface water of paddy soil increased rapidly at the 2nd day after fertilization and decreased gradually after that in all treatments. Compare to JSCU, sampling at different times after fertilization, the total nitrogen concentration in surface water of paddy soil under JSCU+C treatment was declined in the range of 19.1-46.8%, the average was 31.0% and the time of nitrogen runoff loss due to rainfall was shorten 2.2 day. For SSCU+C treatment, the average total nitrogen concentration was decreased by 29.8% and the time of nitrogen runoff loss was shortening 1.8 day. The rice grain yield and nitrogen use efficiency were increased significantly after applying slow-released fertilizer added nano

  11. Slow Motion of a Sphere Away from a Wall: Effect of Surface Roughness on the Viscous Force

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunil Datta; Manju Shukla

    2002-11-01

    An asymptotic analysis is given for the effect of roughness exhibited through the slip parameter on the motion of the sphere, moving away from a plane surface with velocity . The method replaces the no-slip condition at the rough surface by slip condition and employs the method of inner and outer regions on the sphere surface. For > 0, we have the classical slip boundary condition and the results of the paper are then of interest in the microprocessor industry.

  12. Surface brightness correction for compact extended sources observed by the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor in the slow-scan mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Toshiya; Tomasino, Rachael L.; Takita, Satoshi; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Shirahata, Mai; Fullard, Andrew; Yamamura, Issei; Matsuura, Shuji

    2017-02-01

    We present a general surface brightness correction method for compact extended sources imaged in the slow-scan pointed observation mode of the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) aboard the AKARI infrared astronomical satellite. Our method recovers correct surface brightness distribution maps by rescaling archived raw FIS maps using the surface-brightness-dependent inverse FIS response function. The flux of a target source is then automatically corrected for as the simple sum of surface brightnesses within the adopted contour encircling the perimeter of the target (i.e., contour photometry). This correction method is contrasted with the previous aperture photometry method for point sources, which directly corrects for the target flux with a flux-dependent scaling law. The new surface brightness correction scheme is applicable to objects of any shape from unresolved point sources to resolved extended objects, as long as the target is not deemed diffuse, i.e., the total extent of the target source does not exceed too much more than a single FIS scan width of 10'. The new correction method takes advantage of the well-defined shape (i.e., the scale invariance) of the point spread function, which enables us to adopt a power-law FIS response function. We analyze the point source photometric calibrator data using the FIS AKARI Slow-scan Tool and constrain the parameters of the adopted power-law FIS response function. We conclude that the photometric accuracy of the new correction method is better than 10% error based on comparisons with the expected fluxes of the photometric calibrators, and that resulting fluxes without the present correction method can lead to up to 230% overestimates or down to 50% underestimates.

  13. Determination of the Dissolution Slowness Surface by Study of Etched Shapes: II. Comparison of 2D Experimental and Theoretical Etching Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblois, T.; Tellier, C. R.; Messaoudi, T.

    1997-03-01

    The anisotropic etching behavior of quartz crystal in concentrated ammonium bifluoride solution is studied and analyzed in the framework of a tensorial model. This model allows to simulate bi- or three-dimensional etching shapes from the equation for the representative surface of the dissolution slowness. In this paper, we present experimental results such as surface profile and initially circular cross-sectional profiles of differently singly- or doubly-rotated cuts. The polar diagrams of the dissolution slowness vector in several planes are deduced from experimental data. The comparison between predicted surface and cross-sectional profiles and experimental results is detailed and shows a good agreement. In particular, several examples give evidence that the final etched shapes are correlated to the extrema of the dissolution slowness. However, in several cases, experimental shapes cannot be simply correlated to the presence of extrema. Simulation gives effectively evidence for an important role played by more progressive changes in the curvature of the slowness surface. Consequently, analysis of data merits to be treated carefully. Nous nous proposons d'étudier et d'analyser à l'aide du modèle tensoriel de la dissolution l'attaque chimique anisotrope du cristal de quartz dans une solution concentrée de bifluorure d'ammonium. Ce modèle permet de simuler des formes usinées à deux ou trois dimensions à partir de l'équation de la surface représentative de la lenteur de dissolution du cristal de quartz. Dans cet article, nous présentons des résultats expérimentaux concernant des profils de surface et des sections initialement cylindriques de coupes à simple et double rotation. Les diagrammes polaires du vecteur lenteur de dissolution dans différents plans sont déduits de données expérimentales. La comparaison entre les profils de surface et de section théoriques et les résultats expérimentaux est détaillée et montre un bon accord. En

  14. Surface Brightness Correction for Compact Extended Sources Observed by the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) in the Slow-Scan Mode

    CERN Document Server

    Ueta, Toshiya; Takita, Satoshi; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Shirahata, Mai; Fullard, Andrew; Yamamura, Issei; Matsuura, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    We present a general surface brightness correction method for compact extended sources imaged in the slow-scan pointed observation mode of the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) aboard the AKARI Infrared Astronomical Satellite. Our method recovers correct surface brightness distribution maps by re-scaling archived raw FIS maps using the surface-brightness-dependent inverse FIS response function. The flux of a target source is then automatically corrected for as the simple sum of surface brightnesses within the adopted contour encircling the perimeter of the target (i.e., contour photometry). This correction method is contrasted to the previous aperture photometry method for point sources, which directly corrects for the target flux with a flux-dependent scaling law. The new surface brightness correction scheme is applicable to objects of any shape from unresolved point sources to resolved extended objects, as long as the target is not deemed diffuse, i.e., the total extent of the target source does not exceed too mu...

  15. Slow plasma dynamo driven by electric current helicity in non-compact Riemann surfaces of negative curvature

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Boozer addressed the role of magnetic helicity in dynamos [Phys Fluids \\textbf{B},(1993)]. He pointed out that the magnetic helicity conservation implies that the dynamo action is more easily attainable if the electric potential varies over the surface of the dynamo. This provided us with motivation to investigate dynamos in Riemannian curved surfaces [Phys Plasmas \\textbf{14}, (2007);\\textbf{15} (2008)]. Thiffeault and Boozer [Phys Plasmas (2003)] discussed the onset of dissipation in kinematic dynamos. When curvature is constant and negative, a simple simple laminar dynamo solution is obtained on the flow topology of a Poincare disk, whose Gauss curvature is $K=-1$. By considering a laminar plasma dynamo [Wang et al, Phys Plasmas (2002)] the electric current helicity ${\\lambda}\\approx{2.34m^{-1}}$ for a Reynolds magnetic number of $Rm\\approx{210}$ and a growth rate of magnetic field $|{\\gamma}|\\approx{0.022}$. Negative constant curvature non-compact $\\textbf{H}^{2}$, has also been used in one-component elec...

  16. Dynamics of 2+1 dimensional SOS surfaces above a wall: slow mixing induced by entropic repulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Caputo, Pietro; Martinelli, Fabio; Sly, Allan; Toninelli, Fabio Lucio

    2012-01-01

    We study the Glauber dynamics for the (2+1)D Solid-On-Solid model above a hard wall and below a far away ceiling, on an $L \\times L$ box of $Z^2$ with zero boundary conditions, at large inverse-temperature $\\beta$. It was shown by Bricmont, El-Mellouki and Fr\\"ohlich (1986) that the floor constraint induces an entropic repulsion effect which lifts the surface to an average height $H \\asymp (1/\\beta)\\log L$. As an essential step in understanding the effect of entropic repulsion on the Glauber dynamics we determine the equilibrium height $H$ to within an additive constant: $H=(1/4\\beta)\\log L+O(1)$. We then show that starting from zero initial conditions the surface rises to its final height $H$ through a sequence of metastable transitions between consecutive levels. The time for a transition from height $h=aH $, $a\\in (0,1)$, to height $h+1$ is roughly $\\exp(c L^a)$ for some constant $c>0$. In particular, the mixing time of the dynamics is exponentially large in $L$, i.e., $T_{mix} \\geq e^{c L}$. We also provi...

  17. Study of the slow batch pyrolysis of mixtures of pine, plastics and tires. Application of response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paradela, Filipe; Pinto, Filomena; Ramos, Ana M.; Gulyurtlu, Ibrahim

    2010-07-01

    Full text: The aim of this work was to optimise pyrolysis experimental conditions of three types of waste in a batch reactor, particularly the influence of the reaction time, temperature, initial pressure and waste mixture composition in the yield and composition of liquid products. The wastes studied were. biomass (pine), used tyres and recycled plastic, whose main components were polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and polystyrene (PS). Experimental tests were made in a 1L stainless steel autoclave, in which the experimental conditions like: initial pressure, waste mixture composition, temperature and time of reaction were varied and optimized. The three product fractions obtained (liquids, solids and gases) were collected and analyzed. Two immiscible liquid phases were formed whenever pine was pyrolysed, one being mainly water with traces of compounds commonly produced by fast biomass pyrolysis, and the other being a less dense organic phase. Liquids were distilled into three fractions. The lighter one distilled between 35 and 150 deg. C, the next fraction distilled between 150 and 270 deg. C, whilst the other presented a distillation range higher than 270 deg. C. Each fraction was analyzed by Gas Chromatography (GC) and GC/MS (Mass Spectrometry) to identify their main compounds. Gases were also analyzed by GC and its density was also measured. The remaining liquid in the solid phase was extracted with solvents and analyzed by GC. Liquid products yield and composition were affected by experimental conditions. Previous studies (1) showed that the rise of reaction temperature decreased liquid yields, by increasing solids and gases yields. The increase of initial pressure did not lead to significant variations in products yields and composition. The increase or pyrolysis reaction time led to a small decrease in liquids formation, favouring the production of lighter liquid compounds. The optimisation of experimental parameters was done by response surface

  18. Slow Pseudotachylites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pec, M.; Stunitz, H.; Heilbronner, R.

    2011-12-01

    Tectonic pseudotachylites as solidified, friction induced melts are believed to be the only unequivocal evidence for paleo-earthquakes. Earthquakes occur when fast slip (1 - 3 m/s) propagates on a localized failure plane and are always related with stress drops. The mechanical work expended, together with the rock composition and the efficiency of thermal dissipation, controls whether the temperature increase on a localized slip plane will be sufficient to induce fusion. We report the formation of pseudotachylites during steady-state plastic flow at slow bulk shear strain rates (~10^-3 to ~10^-5 /s corresponding to slip rates of ~10^-6 to ~10^-8 m/s) in experiments performed at high confining pressures (500 MPa) and temperatures (300°C) corresponding to a depth of ~15 km. Crushed granitioid rock (Verzasca gneiss), grain size ≤ 200 μm, with 0.2 wt% water added was placed between alumina forcing blocks pre-cut at 45°, weld-sealed in platinum jackets and deformed with a constant displacement rate in a solid medium deformation apparatus (modified Griggs rig). Microstructural observations show the development of a S-C-C' fabric with C' slip zones being the dominant feature. Strain hardening in the beginning of the experiment is accompanied with compaction which is achieved by closely spaced R1 shears pervasively cutting the whole gouge zone and containing fine-grained material (d 10) are localized in less densely spaced, ~10 μm thick C'-C slip zones which develop predominantly in feldspars and often contain micas. In TEM, they appear to have no porosity consisting of partly amorphous material and small crystalline fragments with the average grain size of 20 nm. After the peak strength, the samples weaken by ~20 MPa and continue deforming up to γ ~ 4 without any stress drops. Strain localization progresses in the C'-C slip zones and leads to the formation of pseudotachylites. Rough estimates of slip rates in the deforming slip zones are 2 to 4 orders of magnitude

  19. Monte Carlo simulations on atropisomerism of thienotriazolodiazepines applicable to slow transition phenomena using potential energy surfaces by ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikami, Kenji; Itezono, Yoshiko; Nishimoto, Masahiro; Ohta, Masateru

    2014-01-01

    Compounds with a medium-sized flexible ring often show atropisomerism that is caused by the high-energy barriers between long-lived conformers that can be isolated and often have different biological properties to each other. In this study, the frequency of the transition between the two stable conformers, aS and aR, of thienotriazolodiazepine compounds with flexible 7-membered rings was estimated computationally by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and validated experimentally by NMR experiments. To estimate the energy barriers for transitions as precisely as possible, the potential energy (PE) surfaces used in the MC simulations were calculated by molecular orbital (MO) methods. To accomplish the MC simulations with the MO-based PE surfaces in a practical central processing unit (CPU) time, the MO-based PE of each conformer was pre-calculated and stored before the MC simulations, and then only referred to during the MC simulations. The activation energies for transitions calculated by the MC simulations agreed well with the experimental ΔG determined by the NMR experiments. The analysis of the transition trajectories of the MC simulations revealed that the transition occurred not only through the transition states, but also through many different transition paths. Our computational methods gave us quantitative estimates of atropisomerism of the thienotriazolodiazepine compounds in a practical period of time, and the method could be applicable for other slow-dynamics phenomena that cannot be investigated by other atomistic simulations.

  20. Interaction of slow, highly charged ions with the surface of ionic crystals; Wechselwirkung langsamer hochgeladener Ionen mit der Oberflaeche von Ionenkristallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, Rene

    2009-08-15

    In this thesis the creation of permanent nanostructures induced by the impact of very slow (v{<=}5 x 10{sup 5} m/s) highly charged (q{<=}40) ions on the ionic crystal surfaces of CaF{sub 2} and KBr is investigated. The systematic analysis of the samples surfaces by means of atomic force microscopy supplies information on the influence of the potential as well as the kinetic projectile energy on the process of structure creation. The individual impact of highly charged ions on the KBr(001) surface can initiate the creation of mono-atomic deep pit-like structures -nanopits- with a lateral size of a few 10 nm. The volume of these pits and the corresponding number of sputtered secondary particles show a linear dependence on the projectiles potential energy. For the onset of pit formation a kinetic energy dependent threshold in the potential energy E{sup grenz}{sub pot}(E{sub kin}) could be identified. Based on the defect-mediated desorption by electrons and by including effects of defect agglomeration a consistent model for the process of pit formation was drawn. In this work the recently discovered creation of hillock-like structures by impact of highly charged ions on CaF{sub 2}(111) surfaces could be verified for lowest kinetic energies (E{sub kin}{<=}150 eV x q). For the first time the potential energy of impinging projectiles could be identified to be exclusively responsible for the creation of nanostructures. Furthermore, a shift of potential energy threshold for hillock formation was observed for very small projectile velocities. Within the framework of cooperation with the Vienna University of Technology simulations based on the inelastic thermal spike model were performed, which allowed to interlink the individual hillock formation with a local melting of the ionic lattice. The essential influence of electron emission during the interaction of the highly charged ions with the surface on the process of nanostructuring was taken into consideration by

  1. FROM SLOW FOOD TO SLOW TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bac Dorin Paul

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the effects of globalization is the faster pace of our lives. This rhythm can be noticed in all aspects of life: travel, work, shopping, etc. and it has serious negative effects. It has become common knowledge that stress and speed generate serious medical issues. Food and eating habits in the modern world have taken their toll on our health. However, some people took a stand and argued for a new kind of lifestyle. It all started in the field of gastronomy, where a new movement emerged – Slow Food, based on the ideas and philosophy of Carlo Petrini. Slow Food represents an important adversary to the concept of fast food, and is promoting local products, enjoyable meals and healthy food. The philosophy of the Slow Food movement developed in several directions: Cittaslow, slow travel and tourism, slow religion and slow money etc. The present paper will account the evolution of the concept and its development during the most recent years. We will present how the philosophy of slow food was applied in all the other fields it reached and some critical points of view. Also we will focus on the presence of the slow movement in Romania, although it is in a very early stage of development. The main objectives of the present paper are: to present the chronological and ideological evolution of the slow movement; to establish a clear separation of slow travel and slow tourism, as many mistake on for the other; to review the presence of the slow movement in Romania. Regarding the research methodology, information was gathered from relevant academic papers and books and also from interviews and discussions with local entrepreneurs. The research is mostly theoretical and empirical, as slow food and slow tourism are emerging research themes in academic circles.

  2. 6.5 Years of Slow Slip Events in Cascadia: A Catalogue of SSE Surface Expressions, Interface Slip Distributions, Event Magnitudes and Relationship to Tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, L. L.; Wallace, L. M.; Haines, A. J.; Bartlow, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) in Cascadia occur at ~30-50 km depth, every 10-19 months, and typically involve slip of a few cm, producing surface displacements on the order of a few mm up to ~1cm. Are there smaller SSE signals that are currently not recognized geodetically? What is the spatial, temporal and size distribution of SSEs, and how are SSE related to tremor? We address these questions with a catalogue of all detectable SSEs spanning the last 6.5 years using a new methodology based on Vertical Derivatives of Horizontal Stress (VDoHS) rates obtained from cGPS times series. VDoHS rates, calculated by solving the force balance equations at the Earth's surface, represent the most inclusive and spatially compact surface expressions of subsurface deformation sources: VDoHS rate vectors are tightly localized above the sources and point in the direction of push or pull. We compare our results with those from the Network Inversion Filter (NIF) for selected events. We identify and characterize a spectrum of SSEs, including events with moment release at least two orders of magnitudes smaller than has been previously identified with GPS data. We catalogue events timing, interface slip distribution and moment release, and compare our results with existing tremor catalogues. VDoHS rates also reveal the boundaries between the locked and unlocked portions of the megathrust, and we can track how this varies throughout the SSE cycle. Above the locked interface, the pull of the subducted plate generates shear tractions in the overlying plate in the direction of subduction, while above the creeping section shear tractions are in the opposite direction, which is reflected in the VDoHS rates. We show that sections of the Cascadia megathrust unlock prior to some SSEs and lock thereafter, with the locked zone propagating downdip and eastward after the SSEs over weeks to months. The catalogue and movies of events will be available at http://www.ig.utexas.edu/people/staff/lada/SSEs.

  3. Slow Movements of Bio-Inspired Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babikian, Sarine; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.; Kanso, Eva

    2016-10-01

    Slow and accurate finger and limb movements are essential to daily activities, but the underlying mechanics is relatively unexplored. Here, we develop a mathematical framework to examine slow movements of tendon-driven limbs that are produced by modulating the tendons' stiffness parameters. Slow limb movements are driftless in the sense that movement stops when actuations stop. We demonstrate, in the context of a planar tendon-driven system representing a finger, that the control of stiffness suffices to produce stable and accurate limb postures and quasi-static (slow) transitions among them. We prove, however, that stable postures are achievable only when tendons are pretensioned, i.e., they cannot become slack. Our results further indicate that a non-smoothness in slow movements arises because the precision with which individual stiffnesses need to be altered changes substantially throughout the limb's motion.

  4. 77 FR 34887 - Substantial Business Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BK85 Substantial Business Activities AGENCY: Internal... substantial business activities in a foreign country. These regulations affect certain domestic corporations... whether a foreign corporation has substantial business activities in a foreign country for purposes...

  5. Slow frictional waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  6. Slow-plasmon resonant nano-strip antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Thomas; Beermann, Jonas; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Resonant scattering by gold nanostrip antennas due to constructive interference of counterpropagating slow surface plasmon polaritons SPPs is analyzed, including the quasistatic limit of ultrasmall antennas, and experimentally demonstrated. The phase of slow SPP reflection by strip ends is found...

  7. Slow-plasmon resonant-nanostrip antennas: Analysis and demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Thomas; Beermann, J.; Boltasseva, Alexandra;

    2008-01-01

    Resonant scattering by gold nanostrip antennas due to constructive interference of counterpropagating slow surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is analyzed, including the quasistatic limit of ultrasmall antennas, and experimentally demonstrated. The phase of slow SPP reflection by strip ends is found...

  8. Too slow, for Milton

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, N.

    2011-01-01

    Too slow, for Milton was written in 2011, as part of a memorial project for Milton Babbitt. The piece borrows harmonies from Babbitt's Composition for 12 Instruments (harmonies which Babbitt had in turn borrowed from Schoenberg's Ode to Napoleon), but unfolds them as part of a musical texture characterised by repetition, resonance, and a slow rate of change. As Babbitt once told me that my music was 'too slow', this seemed an appropriately obstinate form of homage.

  9. Error-corrected AFM: a simple and broadly applicable approach for substantially improving AFM image accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, James L; Huey, Bryan D

    2014-04-18

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become an indispensable tool for imaging the topography and properties of surfaces at the nanoscale. A ubiquitous problem, however, is that optimal accuracy demands smooth surfaces, slow scanning, and expert users, contrary to many AFM applications and practical use patterns. Accordingly, a simple correction to AFM topographic images is implemented, incorporating error signals such as deflection and/or amplitude data that have long been available but quantitatively underexploited. This is demonstrated to substantially improve both height and lateral accuracy for expert users, with a corresponding 3-5 fold decrease in image error. Common image artifacts due to inexperienced AFM use, generally poorly scanned surfaces, or high speed images acquired in as fast as 7 s, are also shown to be effectively rectified, returning results equivalent to standard 'expert-user' images. This concept is proven for contact mode AFM, AC-mode, and high speed imaging, as well as property mapping such as phase contrast, with obvious extensions to many specialized AFM variations as well. Conveniently, as this correction procedure is based on either real time or post-processing, it is easily employed for future as well as legacy AFM systems and data. Such error-corrected AFM therefore offers a simple, broadly applicable approach for more accurate, more efficient, and more user-friendly implementation of AFM for nanoscale topography and property mapping.

  10. Transformer Industry Productivity Slows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Phyllis Flohr

    1981-01-01

    Annual productivity increases averaged 2.4 percent during 1963-79, slowing since 1972 to 1.5 percent; computer-assisted design and product standardization aided growth in output per employee-hour. (Author)

  11. Substantial Life Extension and Meanings of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derkx, P.H.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Substantial extension of the human lifespan has become a subject of lively debate. One reason for this is the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2001 and the experimental avenues for biogerontological research the project enables. Another is recent theoretical progress in biogerontology (Aust

  12. Substantial Life Extension and Meanings of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derkx, P.H.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Substantial extension of the human lifespan has become a subject of lively debate. One reason for this is the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2001 and the experimental avenues for biogerontological research the project enables. Another is recent theoretical progress in biogerontology

  13. 40 CFR 725.94 - Substantiation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...? How substantial would the harmful effects of disclosure be? What is the causal relationship between... data sheets or other similar materials for the microorganism or the resulting end product? (iii... information? What is the causal connection between the disclosure and harm? (7) If EPA disclosed to the...

  14. Toward More Substantial Theories of Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson, Cinnamon Ann

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive linguists argue that certain sets of knowledge of language are innate. However, critics have argued that the theoretical concept of "innateness" should be eliminated since it is ambiguous and insubstantial. In response, I aim to strengthen theories of language acquisition and identify ways to make them more substantial. I…

  15. Estimation of surface heat and moisture fluxes over a prairie grassland. IV - Impact of satellite remote sensing of slow canopy variables on performance of a hybrid biosphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosson, William L.; Smith, Eric A.; Cooper, Harry J.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical experiments are conducted using the Ex-BATS model of Crosson and Weng (1993), which is an adaptation the Dickinson (1983, 1984) and Dickinson et al. (1986) biosphere model BATS. The purpose of these experiments is the assessment of the Ex-BATS performance when using remotely sensed data for the estimation of three key canopy variables retrieved from NOAA-AVHRR measurements: the total surface albedo, the leaf area index (LAI), and the nondiurnally varying component of stomatal resistance, r(s). The results of the simulations, which cover the entire FIFE 1987 time period, show that the satellite retrievals of r(s) are only 20 to 30 percent less accurate than the idealized results of the control experiment. The performance of the model which used satellite retrieval of the surface albedo and LAI was essentially equivalent to the hypothetical version.

  16. Slow-release fluoride devices: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Pelim Pessan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the prevalence of caries has decreased dramatically over the past decades, it has become a polarised disease, with most of subjects presenting low caries levels and few individuals accounting for most of the caries affected surfaces. Thus it become evident for the need of clinical approaches directed at these high-risk patients, in order to overcome problems related to compliance and low attendance at dental care centres. Slow-release fluoride devices were developed based on the inverse relationship existing between intra-oral fluoride levels and dental caries experience. The two main types of slow-release devices - copolymer membrane type and glass bead - are addressed in the present review. A substantial number of studies have demonstrated that these devices are effective in raising intra-oral F concentrations at levels able to reduce enamel solubility, resulting in a caries-protective effect. Studies in animals and humans demonstrated that the use of these devices was able to also protect the occlusal surfaces, not normally protected by conventional fluoride regimens. However, retention rates have been shown to be the main problem related to these devices and still requires further improvements. Although the results of these studies are very promising, further randomised clinical trials are needed in order to validate the use of these devices in clinical practice. The concept of continuously providing low levels of intra-oral fluoride has great potential for caries prevention in high caries-risk groups.

  17. Slow light beam splitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanhong; Klein, Mason; Hohensee, Michael; Jiang, Liang; Phillips, David F; Lukin, Mikhail D; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2008-07-25

    We demonstrate a slow light beam splitter using rapid coherence transport in a wall-coated atomic vapor cell. We show that particles undergoing random and undirected classical motion can mediate coherent interactions between two or more optical modes. Coherence, written into atoms via electromagnetically induced transparency using an input optical signal at one transverse position, spreads out via ballistic atomic motion, is preserved by an antirelaxation wall coating, and is then retrieved in outgoing slow light signals in both the input channel and a spatially-separated second channel. The splitting ratio between the two output channels can be tuned by adjusting the laser power. The slow light beam splitter may improve quantum repeater performance and be useful as an all-optical dynamically reconfigurable router.

  18. Phonon magnification and the Gaussian curvature of the slowness surface in anisotropic media: Detector shape effects with application to GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax, M.; Narayanamurti, V.

    1980-11-01

    A new short derivation is given for the magnification of photons, phonons, and other wave phenomena in anisotropic media. The results, when specialized to the phonon case, agree with those of Maris and of Philip and Viswanathan. At nondegenerate points the magnification is shown, regardless of the nature of the wave phenomenon, to be expressible in terms of the Gaussian curvature K at the wave vector q--> of the surface ω(q-->)=ω. A representation of K, free of surface coordinates, is given as the cofactor of a 3×3 curvature tensor. The curvature tensor contains information beyond the Jacobian, such as the two principal magnifications for a given mode. Along degenerate directions (such as the [100] direction in cubic crystals) the results, even in the infinitesimal limit, are sensitive to the shape of the detector. Explicit expressions for circular, rectangular and square detectors are given and applied to the case of ballistic phonons in GaAs. Numerical calculation of finite aperture effects indicates significant qualitative as well as quantitative differences with infinitesimal aperture results.

  19. Slowing Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... takes years of daily use for NSAIDs to cause CKD. But, once CKD is present, NSAIDs can make ... in the wrong places can “oxidize” and cause damage, a lot like rust. Antioxidants ... Fish oil can help slow CKD that is caused by a disease called IgA ...

  20. Slow crack growth in spinel in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwantes, S.; Elber, W.

    1983-01-01

    Magnesium aluminate spinel was tested in a water environment at room temperature to establish its slow crack-growth behavior. Ring specimens with artificial flaws on the outside surface were loaded hydraulically on the inside surface. The time to failure was measured. Various precracking techniques were evaluated and multiple precracks were used to minimize the scatter in the static fatigue tests. Statistical analysis techniques were developed to determine the strength and crack velocities for a single flaw. Slow crack-growth rupture was observed at stress intensities as low as 70 percent of K sub c. A strengthening effect was observed in specimens that had survived long-time static fatigue tests.

  1. Substantiating the Incurred but not Reported Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Vintilã

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to handle past and future liability taken by insurance contracts concluded, any insurance company must constitute and maintain technical reserves. Substantiating technical reserves is done through actuarial methods and its over-evaluation or under-evaluation influence solvency and financial performance of the insurance companies, in the sense of reducing solvency through over-evaluating reserves and, respectively, influencing profit (hence of outstanding tax through under-evaluating reserves. An important reserve for insurance companies is represented by the incurred but not reported reserve, as it allows the estimation of the liability the company may confront in the future, generated by events occurred in the past, which are not currently known in the present but will be reported in the future.

  2. Slow wave propagation in soft adhesive interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan K; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-11-16

    Stick-slip in sliding of soft adhesive surfaces has long been associated with the propagation of Schallamach waves, a type of slow surface wave. Recently it was demonstrated using in situ experiments that two other kinds of slow waves-separation pulses and slip pulses-also mediate stick-slip (Viswanathan et al., Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 5265-5275). While separation pulses, like Schallamach waves, involve local interface detachment, slip pulses are moving stress fronts with no detachment. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of the propagation of these three waves in a linear elastodynamics framework. Different boundary conditions apply depending on whether or not local interface detachment occurs. It is shown that the interface dynamics accompanying slow waves is governed by a system of integral equations. Closed-form analytical expressions are obtained for the interfacial pressure, shear stress, displacements and velocities. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves emerge naturally as wave solutions of the integral equations, with oppositely oriented directions of propagation. Wave propagation is found to be stable in the stress regime where linearized elasticity is a physically valid approximation. Interestingly, the analysis reveals that slow traveling wave solutions are not possible in a Coulomb friction framework for slip pulses. The theory provides a unified picture of stick-slip dynamics and slow wave propagation in adhesive contacts, consistent with experimental observations.

  3. Slowed Exports Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The first half of 2010 is showing that the impacts of the financial crisis are still lingering.Zhao Jinping,a researcher at the Development Research Center of the State Council,says that the possible implementation of exit strategies in developed countries may deal a heavy blow to a global rally,and it will certainly result in slowed exports growth for China.Zhao published his opinion in the China Economic Times.The first part was published in issue No.33.Edited excerpts of the second part follow:

  4. Substantial nitrogen pollution embedded in international trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oita, Azusa; Malik, Arunima; Kanemoto, Keiichiro; Geschke, Arne; Nishijima, Shota; Lenzen, Manfred

    2016-02-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of reactive nitrogen to the atmosphere and water bodies can damage human health and ecosystems. As a measure of a nation’s contribution to this potential damage, a country’s nitrogen footprint has been defined as the quantity of reactive nitrogen emitted during the production, consumption and transportation of commodities consumed within that country, whether those commodities are produced domestically or internationally. Here we use global emissions databases, a global nitrogen cycle model, and a global input-output database of domestic and international trade to calculate the nitrogen footprints for 188 countries as the sum of emissions of ammonia, nitrogen oxides and nitrous oxide to the atmosphere, and of nitrogen potentially exportable to water bodies. Per-capita footprints range from under 7 kg N yr-1 in some developing countries to over 100 kg N yr-1 in some wealthy nations. Consumption in China, India, the United States and Brazil is responsible for 46% of global emissions. Roughly a quarter of the global nitrogen footprint is from commodities that were traded across country borders. The main net exporters have significant agricultural, food and textile exports, and are often developing countries, whereas important net importers are almost exclusively developed economies. We conclude that substantial local nitrogen pollution is driven by demand from consumers in other countries.

  5. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn; Galan, Isabel; Andrade, Carmen; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 2013. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production, but the natural reversal of the process--carbonation--has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondary use of concrete waste to estimate regional and global CO2 uptake between 1930 and 2013 using an analytical model describing carbonation chemistry. We find that carbonation of cement materials over their life cycle represents a large and growing net sink of CO2, increasing from 0.10 GtC yr-1 in 1998 to 0.25 GtC yr-1 in 2013. In total, we estimate that a cumulative amount of 4.5 GtC has been sequestered in carbonating cement materials from 1930 to 2013, offsetting 43% of the CO2 emissions from production of cement over the same period, not including emissions associated with fossil use during cement production. We conclude that carbonation of cement products represents a substantial carbon sink that is not currently considered in emissions inventories.

  6. Substantial bulk photovoltaic effect enhancement via nanolayering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fenggong; Young, Steve M; Zheng, Fan; Grinberg, Ilya; Rappe, Andrew M

    2016-01-21

    Spontaneous polarization and inversion symmetry breaking in ferroelectric materials lead to their use as photovoltaic devices. However, further advancement of their applications are hindered by the paucity of ways of reducing bandgaps and enhancing photocurrent. By unravelling the correlation between ferroelectric materials' responses to solar irradiation and their local structure and electric polarization landscapes, here we show from first principles that substantial bulk photovoltaic effect enhancement can be achieved by nanolayering PbTiO3 with nickel ions and oxygen vacancies ((PbNiO2)x(PbTiO3)(1-x)). The enhancement of the total photocurrent for different spacings between the Ni-containing layers can be as high as 43 times due to a smaller bandgap and photocurrent direction alignment for all absorption energies. This is due to the electrostatic effect that arises from nanolayering. This opens up the possibility for control of the bulk photovoltaic effect in ferroelectric materials by nanoscale engineering of their structure and composition.

  7. Substantial Research Secures the Blue Future for our Blue Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa Abdel Maksoud

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Earth, the blue planet, is our home, and seas and oceans cover more than 70% of its surface. As the earth’s population rapidly increases and available resources decrease, seas and oceans can play a key role in assuring the long-term survival of humankind. Renewable maritime energy has huge potential to provide a considerable part of the earth’s population with decarbonised electricity generation systems. Renewable maritime energy is very flexible and can be harvested above the water’s free surface by using offshore wind turbines, on the water’s surface by using wave energy converters or below the water’s surface by using current or tidal turbines. The supposed conflict between environmental protection measures and economic interests is neither viable nor reasonable. Renewable maritime energy can be the motor for considerable substantial economic growth for many maritime regions and therefore for society at large. The fastest growing sector of renewable maritime energy is offshore wind. The annual report of the European Wind Energy Association from the year 2015 confirms the growing relevance of the offshore wind industry. In 2015, the total installed and grid-connected capacity of wind power was 12,800 MW in the EU and 6,013.4 MW in Germany. 38% of the 2015 annual installation in Germany was offshore, accounting for a capacity of 2,282.4 MW. However, there are a limited number of available installation sites in shallow water, meaning that there is an urgent need to develop new offshore structures for water depths greater than 50m. The persistent trend towards deeper waters has encouraged the offshore wind industry to look for floating wind turbine structures and larger turbines. Floating wind turbine technologies are at an early stage of development and many technical and economic challenges will still need to be faced. Nonetheless, intensive research activities and the employment of advanced technologies are the key factors in

  8. Universality of slow decorrelation in KPZ growth

    CERN Document Server

    Corwin, I; Peche, S

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that, under minimal hypothesis, a wide class of growth models diplays a phenomenon known as slow decorrelation, where along certain characteristic directions the range of correlation for fluctuations of the growth surface height is much longer than other directions. We apply this result to certain models known to be in the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class in 1+1 dimension for which the necessary hypothesis holds. These models are the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), last passage percolation (LPP), and the polynuclear growth (PNG) model. Utilizing the slow decorrelation of fluctuations in these models we are able to extend known fluctuation limit process results away from the fixed curves on which they were proved, to general space-time curves. Using the monotonicity of the basic coupling we additionally prove that the partially asymmetric simple exclusion process (PASEP) displays slow decorrelation.

  9. Substantial Union or Substantial Distinction of Mind and Body in Descartes' Metaphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahime Jamei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available According to Descartes’ metaphysics there are two different kinds of substances in the world of creatures: “thinking substance” and “extended substance” or soul and matter. In Descartes’ philosophy the soul is equal to the mind and considered as a “thinking substance”. This immaterial substance is the essence of the human being. Body, being considered as a “matter“, is an “extended substance” and entirely distinct from the soul. The soul, therefore, exists and may be known prior to body and, not being corporeal, can exist after human death. Hence, Descartes can prove the immortality of human soul in the framework of the principle of substantial distinction. On the other hand, as a physiologist and psychologist, Descartes indeed believes in mind-body union, so that some causal interactions between mind and body show their substantial union. In this essay, the authors show that Descartes faces a serious problem in combining substantial union of mind and body with their substantial distinction; despite of his efforts in introducing the idea of pineal gland, the problem remains unsolved. Therefore it seems that as he cannot dispense with his only reason for proving the immortality of human soul, he has to hold the mind-body distinction theory in his metaphysics. Indeed, Descartes prefers to support the distinction theory rather than union theory in confronting a thesis and an antithesis stating one of two theories

  10. Substantial :union: or Substantial Distinction of Mind and Body in Descartes\\' Metaphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    f Jamei

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available According to Descartes’ metaphysics there are two different kinds of substances in the world of creatures: “thinking substance” and “extended substance” or soul and matter. In Descartes’ philosophy the soul is equal to the mind and considered as a “thinking substance”. This immaterial substance is the essence of the human being. Body, being considered as a “matter“, is an “extended substance” and entirely distinct from the soul. The soul, therefore, exists and may be known prior to body and, not being corporeal, can exist after human death. Hence, Descartes can prove the immortality of human soul in the framework of the principle of substantial distinction. On the other hand, as a physiologist and psychologist, Descartes indeed believes in mind-body :union:, so that some causal interactions between mind and body show their substantial :union:. In this essay, the authors show that Descartes faces a serious problem in combining substantial :union: of mind and body with their substantial distinction despite of his efforts in introducing the idea of pineal gland, the problem remains unsolved. Therefore it seems that as he cannot dispense with his only reason for proving the immortality of human soul, he has to hold the mind-body distinction theory in his metaphysics. Indeed, Descartes prefers to support the distinction theory rather than :union: theory in confronting a thesis and an antithesis stating one of two theories.

  11. Slow change deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhoff, John G; Wayand, Joseph; Ndiaye, Mamoudou C; Berkow, Ann B; Bertacchi, Breanna R; Benton, Catherine A

    2015-05-01

    In four experiments, we demonstrated a new phenomenon called "slow-change deafness." In Experiment 1 we presented listeners with continuous speech that changed three semitones in pitch over time, and we found that nearly 50 % failed to notice the change. Experiments 2 and 3 replicated the finding, demonstrated that the changes in the stimuli were well above threshold, and showed that when listeners were alerted to the possibility of a change, detection rates improved dramatically. Experiment 4 showed that increasing the magnitude of the change that occurred in the stimulus decreased the rate of change deafness. Our results are consistent with previous work that had shown that cueing listeners to potential auditory changes can significantly reduce change deafness. These findings support an account of change deafness that is dependent on both the magnitude of a stimulus change and listener expectations.

  12. Slowed Exports Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Ⅲ. Slowed export recovery in the second half Since the beginning of this year, global trade has maintained a recovery growth thanks to the worldwide economic rally.From January to April, the imports of three major Economics--the United States, the euro zone and Japan--rose 17.5 percent on average from a year ago. Import growths for the United States, the euro zone and Japan were 20.9 percent, 4.8 percent and 29 percent, respectively, which spurred China's exports to those regions. From January to June this year, China's exports totaled $705.09 billion, up 35.2 percent from the same period in 2009 and were 5.8 percent higher than the first half of 2008 when the crisis had yet to begin. Those figures indicated China's exports had rebounded to precrisis levels.

  13. Slow Scan Telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Originally developed under contract for NASA by Ball Bros. Research Corporation for acquiring visual information from lunar and planetary spacecraft, system uses standard closed circuit camera connected to a device called a scan converter, which slows the stream of images to match an audio circuit, such as a telephone line. Transmitted to its destination, the image is reconverted by another scan converter and displayed on a monitor. In addition to assist scans, technique allows transmission of x-rays, nuclear scans, ultrasonic imagery, thermograms, electrocardiograms or live views of patient. Also allows conferencing and consultation among medical centers, general practitioners, specialists and disease control centers. Commercialized by Colorado Video, Inc., major employment is in business and industry for teleconferencing, cable TV news, transmission of scientific/engineering data, security, information retrieval, insurance claim adjustment, instructional programs, and remote viewing of advertising layouts, real estate, construction sites or products.

  14. A Case for Slow Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Ostercamp

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This essay makes a case for the value of slow or deep reading.  Inspired by the Slow Food movement it seeks to apply their principles to reading.  It begins by exploring the meaning of information and how like food, information has come to be regarded as a commodity.  Drawing upon the philosophy of Albert Borgmann, it counters the prevalent commodity view of information by offering an alternative paradigm that connects careful reading to human flourishing.  It argues that by connecting information to pleasure and community, slow reading advocates can have comparable success to that enjoyed by the slow food movement.

  15. Ultra Slow Muon Project at J-PARC MUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yasuhiro; Ikedo, Yutaka; Shimomura, Koichiro; Strasser, Patrick; Takashi, Nagatomo; Nakamura, Jumpei; Makimura, Shunsuke; Kawamura, Naritoshi; Fujimori, Hiroshi; Koda, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Nishiyama, Kusuo; Kadono, Ryosuke; Higemoto, Wataru; Ito, Takashi; Ogitsu, Toru; Makida, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Kenichi; Adachi, Taihei; Torikai, Eiko

    We have been proceeding the Ultra Slow Muon project at J-PARC MUSE(MUon Science Establishment). As a first mission, we constructed the U-Line and succeeded in extracting the world highest intensity pulsed surface muons, 2,500,000 muons per pulse (6.4 × 107/s at 212 kW proton beam intensity, corresponding to 3 × 108/s at 1 MW) to the U1 experimental area. As the second mission, we have installed a Mu chamber to stop such intense pulsed surface muons towards a hot tungsten target for generating an intense ultra slow muon beam, as well as a slow ion optics to accelerate and transport ultra slow muons to the U1A and U1B areas where μ+ SR spectrometers are located. We are standing on the stage we are ready to generate ultra slow muons, if J-PARC operation is approved.

  16. Film thickness in grease lubricated slow rotating rolling bearings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales-Espejel, G.E.; Lugt, Pieter Martin; Pasaribu, H.R.; Cen, H.

    2014-01-01

    Film thickness measurements in grease lubricated contacts are presented for different greases. The conditions used in the experiments are similar to the ones expected in fully-flooded slow rotating bearings. The results show that at very low speeds grease produces film thicknesses substantially thic

  17. Slow light and slow acoustic phonons in optophononic resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, V.; Soubelet, P.; Bruchhausen, A. E.; Lanzillotti-Kimura, N. D.; Jusserand, B.; Lemaître, A.; Fainstein, A.

    2016-11-01

    Slow and confined light have been exploited in optoelectronics to enhance light-matter interactions. Here we describe the GaAs/AlAs semiconductor microcavity as a device that, depending on the excitation conditions, either confines or slows down both light and optically generated acoustic phonons. The localization of photons and phonons in the same place of space amplifies optomechanical processes. Picosecond laser pulses are used to study through time-resolved reflectivity experiments the coupling between photons and both confined and slow acoustic phonons when the laser is tuned either with the cavity (confined) optical mode or with the stop-band edge (slow) optical modes. A model that fully takes into account the modified propagation of the acoustic phonons and light in these resonant structures is used to describe the laser detuning dependence of the coherently generated phonon spectra and amplitude under these different modes of laser excitation. We observe that confined light couples only to confined mechanical vibrations, while slow light can generate both confined and slow coherent vibrations. A strong enhancement of the optomechanical coupling using confined photons and vibrations, and also with properly designed slow photon and phonon modes, is demonstrated. The prospects for the use of these optoelectronic devices in confined and slow optomechanics are addressed.

  18. 10 CFR 840.4 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... or substantial radiation levels offsite. 840.4 Section 840.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY... substantial radiation levels offsite. DOE will determine that there has been a substantial discharge or dispersal of radioactive material offsite, or that there have been substantial levels of radiation...

  19. 10 CFR 140.84 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... or substantial radiation levels offsite. 140.84 Section 140.84 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... § 140.84 Criterion I—Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels... radioactive material offsite, or that there have been substantial levels of radiation offsite, when, as...

  20. Slow Tourism: Exploring the discourses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guiver

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ‘Slow travel’ and ‘slow tourism’ are relatively new, but contested, concepts. This paper examines the meanings ascribed to them in the academic literature and websites targeted at potential tourists. It finds concurrence on aspects of savouring time at the destination and investing time to appreciate the locality, its people, history, culture and products, but detects different emphases. The academic literature stresses the benefits to the destination and global sustainability, while the websites focus on the personal benefits and ways of becoming a ‘slow tourist’. Food and drink epitomise the immersion in and absorption of the destination and the multi-dimensional tourism experience, contrasted with the superficiality of mainstream tourism. The paper discusses whether tourists practising slow tourism without using the label are slow tourists or not.

  1. Slow Muons and Muonium

    CERN Document Server

    Kirch, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland operates the high intensity proton accelerator facility HIPA. A 590 MeV kinetic energy proton beam of presently up to 2.4 mA is sent to target stations producing pions, muons and neutrons for fundamental and applied physics. The beam power of 1.4 MW provides the world's highest intensities of low momentum muons which can be stopped in low mass targets. Rates of surface muons of up to about $10^8$/s are being provided to various unique precision particle physics experiments. Two feasibility studies are ongoing to considerably improve the available muon beams. The high intensity muon beamline, HiMB, could deliver on the order of $10^{10}$/s surface muons and the stopped muon cooler, muCool, aims at a gain factor of $10^{10}$ in phase space quality while sacrificing only less than 3 orders of magnitude in intensity for low energy $\\mu^+$. These beams will allow a new generation of precision physics experiments with stopped muons and muonium atoms.

  2. Escape for the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    Plasma from the Sun known as the slow solar wind has been observed far away from where scientists thought it was produced. Now new simulations may have resolved the puzzle of where the slow solar wind comes from and how it escapes the Sun to travel through our solar system.An Origin PuzzleA full view of a coronal hole (dark portion) from SDO. The edges of the coronal hole mark the boundary between open and closed magnetic field lines. [SDO; adapted from Higginson et al. 2017]The Suns atmosphere, known as the corona, is divided into two types of regions based on the behavior of magnetic field lines. In closed-field regions, the magnetic field is firmly anchored in the photosphere at both ends of field lines, so traveling plasma is confined to coronal loops and must return to the Suns surface. In open-field regions, only one end of each magnetic field line is anchored in the photosphere, so plasma is able to stream from the Suns surface out into the solar system.This second type of region known as a coronal hole is thought to be the origin of fast-moving plasma measured in our solar system and known as the fast solar wind. But we also observe a slow solar wind: plasma that moves at speeds of less than 500 km/s.The slow solar wind presents a conundrum. Its observational properties strongly suggest it originates in the hot, closed corona rather than the cooler, open regions. But if the slow solar wind plasma originates in closed-field regions of the Suns atmosphere, then how does it escape from the Sun?Slow Wind from Closed FieldsA team of scientists led by Aleida Higginson (University of Michigan) has now used high-resolution, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to show how the slow solar wind can be generated from plasma that starts outin closed-field parts of the Sun.A simulated heliospheric arc, composed of open magnetic field lines. [Higginson et al. 2017]Motions on the Suns surface near the boundary between open and closed-field regions the boundary

  3. 19 CFR 10.7 - Substantial containers or holders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Substantial containers or holders. 10.7 Section 10... Exported and Returned § 10.7 Substantial containers or holders. (a) Substantial containers or holders... domestic products exported and returned. When such containers or holders are imported not containing...

  4. Birth control - slow release methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007555.htm Birth control - slow release methods To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Certain birth control methods contain man-made forms of hormones. These ...

  5. Slow light in flight imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Kali; Gariepy, Genevieve; Henderson, Robert; Howell, John; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Slow-light media are of interest in the context of quantum computing and enhanced measurement of quantum effects, with particular emphasis on using slow-light with single photons. We use light-in-flight imaging with a single photon avalanche diode camera-array to image in situ pulse propagation through a slow light medium consisting of heated rubidium vapour. Light-in-flight imaging of slow light propagation enables direct visualisation of a series of physical effects including simultaneous observation of spatial pulse compression and temporal pulse dispersion. Additionally, the single-photon nature of the camera allows for observation of the group velocity of single photons with measured single-photon fractional delays greater than 1 over 1 cm of propagation.

  6. Perovskite photovoltaics: Slow recombination unveiled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Jacques-E.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most salient features of hybrid lead halide perovskites is the extended lifetime of their photogenerated charge carriers. This property has now been shown experimentally to originate from a slow, thermally activated recombination process.

  7. Implications of the Deep Minimum for Slow Solar Wind Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R.; Titov, V. S.; Linker, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    The origin of the slow solar wind has long been one of the most important problems in solar/heliospheric physics. Two observational constraints make this problem especially challenging. First, the slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, unlike the fast wind that originates on open field lines. Second, the slow wind has substantial angular extent, of order 30 degrees, which is much larger than the widths observed for streamer stalks or the widths expected theoretically for a dynamic heliospheric current sheet. We propose that the slow wind originates from an intricate network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that emanate from the polar coronal hole regions. Using topological arguments, we show that these corridors must be ubiquitous in the solar corona. The total solar eclipse in August 2008, near the lowest point of the Deep Minimum, affords an ideal opportunity to test this theory by using the ultra-high resolution Predictive Science's (PSI) eclipse model for the corona and wind. Analysis of the PSI eclipse model demonstrates that the extent and scales of the open-field corridors can account for both the angular width of the slow wind and its closed-field composition. We discuss the implications of our slow wind theory for the structure of the corona and heliosphere at the Deep Minimum and describe further observational and theoretical tests. This work has been supported by the NASA HTP, SR&T, and LWS programs.

  8. The Potential of/for 'Slow': Slow Tourists and Slow Destinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guiver

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Slow tourism practices are nothing new; in fact, they were once the norm and still are for millions of people whose annual holiday is spent camping, staying in caravans, rented accommodation, with friends and relations or perhaps in a second home, who immerse themselves in their holiday environment, eat local food, drink local wine and walk or cycle around the area. So why a special edition about slow tourism? Like many aspects of life once considered normal (such as organic farming or free-range eggs, the emergence of new practices has highlighted differences and prompted a re-evaluation of once accepted practices and values. In this way, the concept of ‘slow tourism’ has recently appeared as a type of tourism that contrasts with many contemporary mainstream tourism practices. It has also been associated with similar trends already ‘branded’ slow: slow food and cittaslow (slow towns and concepts such as mindfulness, savouring and well-being.

  9. SLOW-RELEASE UREA APPLIED TO SURFACE AND REGULAR UREA INCORPORATED TO SOIL ON MAIZE YIELD UREIA DE LIBERAÇÃO LENTA APLICADA SUPERFICIALMENTE E UREIA COMUM INCORPORADA AO SOLO NO RENDIMENTO DO MILHO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloene Rodriges Godoy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Urea applied to the soil surface results in high losses of nitrogen (N by volatilization of NH3. The use of polymers covering urea granules is an alternative management to reduce such losses. The experiment was carried out in Entisols (Quartzipsament, with 6% of clay, in the 2007/2008 harvest, in Jataí, Goiás State, Brazil, in order to assess the efficiency of the following management systems: urea incorporated to the soil and polymer coated urea applied to the surface, concerning the agronomic and economic aspects of maize cultivation. It was implemented an experimental design in randomized blocks, with eight replications, totaling 24 plots. The covering nitrogen fertilization was performed in a single application, at the V5 stage. The urea incorporated to the soil resulted in higher values related to ear length and diameter, number of grains per ear, mass of one hundred grains, and relation between earned revenue and invested capital. The highest grain yield and profitability were obtained with the application of urea incorporated to the soil. For each Real (R$ 1.00 invested in the cultivation, the urea incorporated to the soil produced R$ 1.37 as profit.

    KEY-WORDS: Zea mays L.; slow-release fertilizer; nitrogen; polymers; no-tillage system.

  10. Dose from slow negative muons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siiskonen, T

    2008-01-01

    Conversion coefficients from fluence to ambient dose equivalent, from fluence to maximum dose equivalent and quality factors for slow negative muons are examined in detail. Negative muons, when stopped, produce energetic photons, electrons and a variety of high-LET particles. Contribution from each particle type to the dose equivalent is calculated. The results show that for the high-LET particles the details of energy spectra and decay yields are important for accurate dose estimates. For slow negative muons the ambient dose equivalent does not always yield a conservative estimate for the protection quantities. Especially, the skin equivalent dose is strongly underestimated if the radiation-weighting factor of unity for slow muons is used. Comparisons to earlier studies are presented.

  11. Diffusion theory of slow responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李景德; 陈敏; 郑凤; 周镇宏

    1997-01-01

    When an action is applied to a macroscopic substance, there is a particular sort of slow response he sides the well-known fast response. Using diffusion theory, the characteristics of slow response in dielectric, elastic, piezoelectric, and pyroelectric relaxation may he explained A time domain spectroscopy method suitable for slow and fast responses in linear and nonlinear effects is given. Every relaxation mechanism contributes a peak in differential spectroscopy, and its position, height, and line shape show the dynamical properties of the mechanism The method of frequency domain spectroscopy is suitable only for linear fast response. Time domain spectroscopy is another nonequiv-alent powerful method. The theory is confirmed by a lot of experimental data

  12. Obsessional slowness: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wendy; Wong, Karen W; Fulks, Mary-Ann; Holsti, Liisa

    2008-10-01

    Obsessional slowness is a rare psychiatric disorder with few treatment options and limited research to date. Some suggest that targeted behavioural interventions may reduce the time taken for functional daily activities. To examine whether a behavioural intervention would reduce the amount of time taken for an adolescent with obsessional slowness to walk to class. A single-subject A-B-A withdrawal design was incorporated into this case study. The treatment involved one-to-one pacing and prompting during the subject's walk to gym class. Walking times to gym class were measured during a baseline phase, during a one-month treatment phase, and during a post-treatment follow-up phase. The subject's walking times decreased during the treatment phase. Post-treatment walking times suggested a carry-over effect. This study adds to the sparse evidence on treatments for obsessional slowness and suggests occupation-based treatment options.

  13. Laser radiation pressure slowing of a molecular beam

    CERN Document Server

    Barry, J F; Norrgard, E B; DeMille, D

    2011-01-01

    There is substantial interest in producing samples of ultracold molecules for possible applications in quantum computation, quantum simulation of condensed matter systems, precision measurements, controlled chemistry, and high precision spectroscopy. A crucial step to obtaining large samples of ultracold, trapped molecules is developing a means to bridge the gap between typical molecular source velocities (~150-600 m/s) and velocities for which trap loading or confinement is possible (~5-20 m/s). Here we show deceleration of a beam of neutral strontium monofluoride (SrF) molecules using radiative force. Under certain conditions, the deceleration results in a substantial flux of molecules with velocities <50 m/s. The observed slowing, from ~140 m/s, corresponds to scattering ~10000 photons. We also observe longitudinal velocity compression under different conditions. Combined with molecular laser cooling techniques, this lays the groundwork to create slow and cold molecular beams suitable for trap loading.

  14. Semiclassical approximations for adiabatic slow-fast systems

    CERN Document Server

    Teufel, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    In this letter we give a systematic derivation and justification of the semiclassical model for the slow degrees of freedom in adiabatic slow-fast systems first found by Littlejohn and Flynn [5]. The classical Hamiltonian obtains a correction due to the variation of the adiabatic subspaces and the symplectic form is modified by the curvature of the Berry connection. We show that this classical system can be used to approximate quantum mechanical expectations and the time-evolution of operators also in sub-leading order in the combined adiabatic and semiclassical limit. In solid state physics the corresponding semiclassical description of Bloch electrons has led to substantial progress during the recent years, see [1]. Here, as an illustration, we show how to compute the Piezo-current arising from a slow deformation of a crystal in the presence of a constant magnetic field.

  15. 20 CFR 604.6 - Conformity and substantial compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conformity and substantial compliance. 604.6... FOR ELIGIBILITY FOR UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION § 604.6 Conformity and substantial compliance. (a) In... for the administration of its UC program. (b) Resolving Issues of Conformity and...

  16. Substantial reduction in caries from regular fluoride varnish application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Derek

    2013-09-01

    The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, CINAHL, LILACS and BBO, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, Web of Science Conference Proceedings and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched. Reference lists of identified articles were also scanned for relevant papers. Study authors were contacted for additional information. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials using or indicating blind outcome assessment that compared fluoride varnish to placebo or no treatment for at least one year were included. Risk of bias assessment was undertaken. Study assessment and data extraction was carried out independently by at least two reviewers. The primary measure of effect was the prevented fraction, that is the difference in mean caries increments between the treatment and control groups expressed as a percentage of the mean increment in the control group. The caries increments nearest to three years were used from each included study. Random-effects meta-analyses were performed where data could be pooled. Potential sources of heterogeneity were examined in random-effects meta-regression analyses. Adverse effects information was collected from the included trials. Twenty-two trials (12,455 participants) were included. Thirteen trials were included in the permanent tooth surfaces meta-analysis, the pooled D(M)FS prevented fraction estimate comparing fluoride varnish with placebo or no treatment was 43% (95% confidence interval (CI) 30% to 57%; P fluorides, application features such as prior prophylaxis, concentration of fluoride or frequency of application. There was little information concerning possible adverse effects or acceptability of treatment. The conclusions of this updated review remain the same as when it was first published. The review suggests a substantial caries inhibiting effect of fluoride varnish in both permanent and primary teeth; however the quality of the evidence

  17. Periodic solutions and slow manifolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, F.

    2006-01-01

    After reviewing a number of results from geometric singular perturbation theory, we give an example of a theorem for periodic solutions in a slow manifold. This is illustrated by examples involving the van der Pol-equation and a modified logistic equation. Regarding nonhyperbolic transitions we disc

  18. 76 FR 38961 - Tobacco Products, Exemptions From Substantial Equivalence Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... comment noted that a dictionary definition of ``modification'' supported excluding these ``adjustments... select regulatory approaches that maximize net benefits (including potential economic, environmental... significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. Section 202(a) of the Unfunded Mandates...

  19. Cold and Slow Molecular Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Hsin-I; Wright, Matthew J; Patterson, Dave; Doyle, John M

    2011-01-01

    Employing a two-stage cryogenic buffer gas cell, we produce a cold, hydrodynamically extracted beam of calcium monohydride molecules with a near effusive velocity distribution. Beam dynamics, thermalization and slowing are studied using laser spectroscopy. The key to this hybrid, effusive-like beam source is a "slowing cell" placed immediately after a hydrodynamic, cryogenic source [Patterson et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2007, 126, 154307]. The resulting CaH beams are created in two regimes. One modestly boosted beam has a forward velocity of vf = 65 m/s, a narrow velocity spread, and a flux of 10^9 molecules per pulse. The other has the slowest forward velocity of vf = 40 m/s, a longitudinal temperature of 3.6 K, and a flux of 5x10^8 molecules per pulse.

  20. Research Development and Perspective on Slow Slip, Tremors, and Slow Earthquakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yanzhao; Shen Zhengkang

    2007-01-01

    Seismological and geodetic observations indicate that slow slip sometimes occurs in active fault zones beneath the seismogenic depth, and large slow slip can result in transient ground motion.Slow earthquakes, on the other hand, emit tremor-like signals within a narrow frequency band, and usually produce no catastrophic consequences. In general, slow slip and slow earthquakes probably correspond to deformation processes associated with releasing elastic energy in fault zones, and understanding their mechanisms may help improve our understanding of fault zone dynamic processes. This article reviews the research progress on slow slip and slow earthquakes over the last decade. Crustal motion and tremor activities associated with slow slip and slow earthquakes have been investigated extensively, mainly involving locating sources of slow slip and slow earthquakes and numerical modeling of their processes. In the meantime, debates have continued about slow slip and slow earthquakes,such as their origins, relationship, and mechanisms.

  1. TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC SUBSTANTIATION OF PROJECTS OF THE AFFORDABLE HOUSING CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KRAVCHUNOVSKA T. S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Problem statement. The development of inhabitant locality of Ukraine is characterized by significant differences in levels of socio and economic development. An excessive concentration of population and industry in large cities, inefficient, slow development of most medium and small cities, towns and villages, considerable territorial disproportions of economic development of the country, considerable shortcomings in the territorial organization of society are observed. At the same time the tendency of the total area of increasing of inhabitant locality. The lands are used inefficiently. Among the most common problems of inhabitant locality is the housing problem. When making a decision on the design of affordable housing construction is one of the most important stages in the development of the technique and economic substantiation of the project is determination of the advisability and effectiveness of construction. The substantiation of advisability and effectiveness of affordable housing based on the definition of technical and economic indicators of projects, one of the most important among them is the cost, in its calculation is necessary to take into account the influence of organizational and technological factors, reflecting the features of construction in condition of compacted construction. Purpose. Development of methodical recommendations on substantiation of cost construction of affordable housing in the conditions of compacted construction. Conclusion. To provide a processing and the analysis of data is necessary development of the applied software on the basis of the developed block scheme of justification of cost construction of affordable housing.

  2. 基于二维特异材料波导的表面电磁波的慢波实验研究%Experimental studies of slow wave based on the surface waves in a two-dimensional metamaterials waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王五松; 张利伟; 张冶文; 方恺

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study the slow propagation characteristics of surface electromagnetic waves according to theoretical analysis in the MNG (μ-negative)-DPS (double-positive)-MNG waveguide, which is composed of two-dimensional (2D) metamaterials. The dispersion curves of this waveguide vary with circuit parameter (unit capacitors) of MNG metamaterial. At the cutoff frequency of the dispersion curve the group velocity of electromagnetic wave is equal to zero in theory. So we can obtain slow propagation of the surface waves at different cutoff frequencies just by changing the unit capacitor of the MNG metamaterial. Theoretical analysis also shows that the step changes in slow waves are obtained at some fixed frequencies through changing the unit circuit parameters. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulation results.%本文在理论分析的基础上,实验研究了二维MNG/DPS/MNG(磁单负材料/双正材料/磁单负材料)表面波波导中的慢波效应.该波导的色散曲线随着电路参数(单元电容)的改变而改变,而且在色散曲线的截止频率点,电磁波的群速度理论上等于零.因此可以通过改变MNG区域的电路参数,得到在不同截止频率的慢波特性.另外,本文还通过改变MNG区域的电路参数实现在某一固定频率下波速度渐变的慢波效应.实验结果与仿真结果相一致.

  3. Synthesis, growth, structural, optical, luminescence, surface and HOMO LUMO analysis of 2-[2-(4-cholro-phenyl)-vinyl]-1-methylquinolinium naphthalene-2-sulfonate organic single crystals grown by a slow evaporation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthigha, S.; Kalainathan, S.; Maheswara Rao, Kunda Uma; Hamada, Fumio; Yamada, Manabu; Kondo, Yoshihiko

    2016-02-01

    Single crystals of 2-[2-(4-cholro-phenyl)-vinyl]-1-methylquinolinium naphthalene-2-sulfonate (4CLNS) were grown by a slow evaporation technique. The formation of molecule was confirmed from 1H NMR and FTIR analysis. The confirmation of crystal structure was done by single crystal XRD and atomic packing of grown crystal was identified. The grown single crystal crystallized in triclinic structure with centrosymmetric space group P-1. The crystalline nature of the synthesised material was recorded by powder XRD. The optical absorption properties of the grown crystals were analyzed by UV-vis spectral studies. The thermal behaviour of the title material has been studied by TG/DTA analysis which revealed the stability of the compound till its melting point 276.7 °C. The third order nonlinear optical property of 4CLNS was investigated in detail by Z scan technique and it confirms that the title crystal is suitable for photonic devices and NLO optical applications. Emissions at 519 nm in green region of the EM spectrum were found by photoluminescence studies. The charge transfer occurring within the molecule is explained by the calculated HOMO and LUMO energies.

  4. Inherited ataxia with slow saccades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R T Chakor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia is a symptom of cerebellar dysfunction. Slowly progressive ataxia, dysarthria in an adult with a positive family history suggests an inherited cerebellar ataxia. We present an adult with gradually progressive ataxia and slow saccades. There was history of similar illness in his son. Genetic testing for spinocerebellar ataxia 2 was positive. We discuss the various inherited ataxias, causes of acute, progressive ataxia syndromes, episodic ataxias and ataxia associated with other neurological signs like peripheral neuropathy, pyramidal features, movement disorders and cognitive decline.

  5. Can Occupational Therapy Slow Alzheimer's Decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_162135.html Can Occupational Therapy Slow Alzheimer's Decline? Patients, caregivers may reap some benefits, but ... slow down the physical decline that comes with Alzheimer's disease, a new clinical trial suggests. The study ...

  6. 26 CFR 7.105-2 - Substantial gainful activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....105-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1976 § 7.105-2 Substantial gainful... minimum wage prescribed by section 6(a)(1) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as amended, 29 U.S.C...

  7. 29 CFR 4043.27 - Distribution to a substantial owner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the substantial owner's death; and (4) Immediately after the distribution, the plan has nonforfeitable... the form of a straight life annuity to a participant beginning at Social Security retirement age ($120...) Form 1 extension. The notice date is extended until 30 days after the plan's variable rate...

  8. 26 CFR 1.274-5A - Substantiation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... substantiated a particular element of an expenditure, but the taxpayer establishes to the satisfaction of the.... If a taxpayer fails to establish to the satisfaction of the district director that he has... food and beverages for employees, section 274(e)(3) relating to expenses treated as...

  9. 19 CFR 134.35 - Articles substantially changed by manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... processor in the United States who converts or combines the imported article into the different article will... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Articles substantially changed by manufacture. 134...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN MARKING Exceptions to Marking Requirements § 134.35...

  10. Engineering Substantially Prolonged Human Lifespans: Biotechnological Enhancement and Ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derkx, P.H.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Substantial extension of the human lifespan has recently become a subject of lively debate. One reason for this is the completion in 2001 of the Human Genome Project and the experimental avenues for biogerontological research it has opened. Another is recent theoretical progress in biogerontology.

  11. SUBSTANTIATION OF SOLUTIONS PERTAINING TO COMPLEX PRODUCTION RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Y. Gurinovich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While taking an example of reconstruction and modernization of OJSC «Construction and Mounting Trust No.16, Novopolotsk» the paper substantiates solutions for complex production reconstruction. The production reconstruction is divided in three start-up facilities ensuring continuous finished-product output.

  12. Integrated Photonics Enabled by Slow Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Chen, Yuntian; Ek, Sara;

    2012-01-01

    In this talk we will discuss the physics of slow light in semiconductor materials and in particular the possibilities offered for integrated photonics. This includes ultra-compact slow light enabled optical amplifiers, lasers and pulse sources.......In this talk we will discuss the physics of slow light in semiconductor materials and in particular the possibilities offered for integrated photonics. This includes ultra-compact slow light enabled optical amplifiers, lasers and pulse sources....

  13. Slowing Down in Chemical Tristability Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN,Ye-Hong(詹业宏); ZHANG,Chun-Hua(张春华); WU,Fu-Gen(吴福根); HU,Yi-Hua(胡义华)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper two kinds of slowing down in the chamical tristability systems are studied. One is the critical slowing down at the edges of tristable reion, and the other is the slowing down far from the critical point, which has much to do with the unstable steady-points. The results possess some universal propererties.

  14. Slow Monitoring Systems for CUORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Suryabrata; Cuore Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is a ton-scale neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment under construction at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS). The experiment is comprised of 988 TeO2 bolometric crystals arranged into 19 towers and operated at a temperature of 10 mK. We have developed slow monitoring systems to monitor the cryostat during detector installation, commissioning, data taking, and other crucial phases of the experiment. Our systems use responsive LabVIEW virtual instruments and video streams of the cryostat. We built a website using the Angular, Bootstrap, and MongoDB frameworks to display this data in real-time. The website can also display archival data and send alarms. I will present how we constructed these slow monitoring systems to be robust, accurate, and secure, while maintaining reliable access for the entire collaboration from any platform in order to ensure efficient communications and fast diagnoses of all CUORE systems.

  15. Substantial Life Extension and the Fair Distribution of Healthspans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareham, Christopher S

    2016-10-01

    One of the strongest objections to the development and use of substantially life-extending interventions is that they would exacerbate existing unjust disparities of healthy lifespans between rich and poor members of society. In both popular opinion and ethical theory, this consequence is sometimes thought to justify a ban on life-prolonging technologies. However, the practical and ethical drawbacks of banning receive little attention, and the viability of alternative policies is seldom considered. Moreover, where ethicists do propose alternatives, there is scant effort to consider their merits in light of developing world priorities. In response to these shortcomings, I distinguish four policy options and, on the basis of a plausible intuition about fairness, evaluate their implications for a fair distribution of healthy lifespans. I claim that even in developing nations it would be fairest to favor policies that promote equal access to at least one promising category of substantially life-extending intervention: calorie restriction mimetics.

  16. Pathophysiological Substantiation of Epidural Administration of Tenoxicam in Dorsalgia Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Yastrebov D.N.; Shpagin М.V.; Artifexov S.B.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the investigation is to assess the efficiency of Tenoxicam epidural administration, and represent pathophysiological substantiation of new techniques of dorsalgias treatment. Materials and Methods. There have been examined 75 patients with intense lumbar pain syndrome who underwent epidural pharmacotherapy of pain syndrome. The 1st group (n=50) had epidural Tenoxicam introduction, by 20 mg in 10–20 ml of saline solution, the control group (n=25) was given the combination of cor...

  17. Plant domestication slows pest evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Martin M; Lochab, Amaneet K; Turley, Nash E; Johnson, Marc T J

    2015-09-01

    Agricultural practices such as breeding resistant varieties and pesticide use can cause rapid evolution of pest species, but it remains unknown how plant domestication itself impacts pest contemporary evolution. Using experimental evolution on a comparative phylogenetic scale, we compared the evolutionary dynamics of a globally important economic pest - the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) - growing on 34 plant taxa, represented by 17 crop species and their wild relatives. Domestication slowed aphid evolution by 13.5%, maintained 10.4% greater aphid genotypic diversity and 5.6% higher genotypic richness. The direction of evolution (i.e. which genotypes increased in frequency) differed among independent domestication events but was correlated with specific plant traits. Individual-based simulation models suggested that domestication affects aphid evolution directly by reducing the strength of selection and indirectly by increasing aphid density and thus weakening genetic drift. Our results suggest that phenotypic changes during domestication can alter pest evolutionary dynamics.

  18. Highly Alfvenic Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly thought that fast solar wind tends to be highly Alfvenic, with strong correlations between velocity and magnetic fluctuations, but examples have been known for over 20 years in which slow wind is both Alfvenic and has many other properties more typically expected of fast solar wind. This paper will present a search for examples of such flows from more recent data, and will begin to characterize the general characteristics of them. A very preliminary search suggests that such intervals are more common in the rising phase of the solar cycle. These intervals are important for providing constraints on models of solar wind acceleration, and in particular the role waves might or might not play in that process.

  19. Traditional Procurement is too Slow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Kong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an exploratory interview survey of construction project participants aimed at identifying the reasons for the decrease in use of the traditional, lump-sum, procurement system in Malaysia. The results show that most people believe it is too slow. This appears to be in part due to the contiguous nature of the various phase and stages of the process and especially the separation of the design and construction phases. The delays caused by disputes between the various parties are also seen as a contributory factor - the most prominent cause being the frequency of variations, with design and scope changes being a particular source of discontent. It is concluded that an up scaling of the whole of the time related reward/penalty system may be the most appropriate measure for the practice in future.

  20. Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Superalloys to Resist Environment-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720, ATI 718Plus alloy, Haynes 282, and Inconel 740. Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  1. Slow dynamics in proteins and polymer chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2013-02-01

    How a biological system can maintain in a non-equilibrium state for a very long time and why proteins aggregate are still not well understood. In this paper, we first review critical slow down of the Ising model and slow relaxation of a spin-glass model at low temperatures. The data indicate that relaxation of the spin glass model at low temperatures can be slower than the critical slowing down of the Ising model. We then review recent molecular dynamics results for the slow relaxation of polymer chains and experimental data for the glassy behavior of collagen fibrils. The slow dynamics in polymer chains and collagen fibrils can provide clues for understanding why a biological system can maintain in a non-equilibrium state for a very long time, and how to slow down protein aggregation related to neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. COMPOSITIONAL AND SUBSTANTIAL STRUCTURE OF THE MEDICAL DOCUMENT: FORMATION STAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romashova Olga Vladimirovna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the compositional and substantial structure of the ambulatory medical record, or "case history", which has being formed for a long time. The author allocates the three main periods in the formation of this medical document: the first period (the beginning of the 19th century – 1920s is connected with the origin and formation; the second period (1920-1980s is marked by emergence of the normative legal acts regulating registration and maintaining; the third period (1980s – up to the present is associated with the cancellation of regulations and the introduction of the new order of the Ministry of Health of the USSR that changed the document's form and name. It is determined that the composition of the case history consists of the title page and the main part. The following processes take place in the course of ambulatory medical record's formation: strengthening formalization, increase in the number of pattern text fragments, increase in the text's volume, and the implementation of bigger number of functions. The author reveals the main (informative and cumulative, accounting and additional (scientific, controlling, legal, financial functions of the document. The implementation of these functions is reflected in the compositional and substantial structure of the document text and is conditioned by a number of extralinguistic factors.

  3. Slow Tourism Now and in the Future

    OpenAIRE

    Soininen, Tiia

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of a research to a new tourism trend; slow tourism. Tourism industry alters continuously and new forms of tourism are created all the time. The focus was given to slow tourism and travel because it has begun during the last decade in Italy from Slow Movement and it is an encounter to speed travelling and mass tourism. Slow tourism was identified with travelling slowly, living in the local culture and valuing sustainability. The main goal in the research was to find o...

  4. Slow slip hidden in the noise: the intermittence of tectonic release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, W.

    2016-12-01

    Referred to as slow slip events, the transient aseismic slip that occurs along plate boundaries can be indirectly characterized through colocated seismicity, such as tectonic tremor and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs). Using the timing of cataloged LFE and tremor activity in Guerrero, Mexico and northern Cascadia, I decompose the inter-aseismic GPS displacement, defined as the surface deformation between previously detected slow slip events, into separate regimes of tectonic loading and release. In such a way, previously undetected slow slip events that produce on average less than a millimeter of surface deformation are extracted from the geodetic noise. These new observations demonstrate that the inter-aseismic period is not quiescent and that slow slip occurs much more often than previously thought. This suggests that the plate interface where slow slip and tremor occur is in fact strongly coupled and undergoes rapid cycles of stress accumulation and release.

  5. Invasive mammal eradication on islands results in substantial conservation gains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Holly P; Holmes, Nick D; Butchart, Stuart H M; Tershy, Bernie R; Kappes, Peter J; Corkery, Ilse; Aguirre-Muñoz, Alfonso; Armstrong, Doug P; Bonnaud, Elsa; Burbidge, Andrew A; Campbell, Karl; Courchamp, Franck; Cowan, Philip E; Cuthbert, Richard J; Ebbert, Steve; Genovesi, Piero; Howald, Gregg R; Keitt, Bradford S; Kress, Stephen W; Miskelly, Colin M; Oppel, Steffen; Poncet, Sally; Rauzon, Mark J; Rocamora, Gérard; Russell, James C; Samaniego-Herrera, Araceli; Seddon, Philip J; Spatz, Dena R; Towns, David R; Croll, Donald A

    2016-04-12

    More than US$21 billion is spent annually on biodiversity conservation. Despite their importance for preventing or slowing extinctions and preserving biodiversity, conservation interventions are rarely assessed systematically for their global impact. Islands house a disproportionately higher amount of biodiversity compared with mainlands, much of which is highly threatened with extinction. Indeed, island species make up nearly two-thirds of recent extinctions. Islands therefore are critical targets of conservation. We used an extensive literature and database review paired with expert interviews to estimate the global benefits of an increasingly used conservation action to stem biodiversity loss: eradication of invasive mammals on islands. We found 236 native terrestrial insular faunal species (596 populations) that benefitted through positive demographic and/or distributional responses from 251 eradications of invasive mammals on 181 islands. Seven native species (eight populations) were negatively impacted by invasive mammal eradication. Four threatened species had their International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List extinction-risk categories reduced as a direct result of invasive mammal eradication, and no species moved to a higher extinction-risk category. We predict that 107 highly threatened birds, mammals, and reptiles on the IUCN Red List-6% of all these highly threatened species-likely have benefitted from invasive mammal eradications on islands. Because monitoring of eradication outcomes is sporadic and limited, the impacts of global eradications are likely greater than we report here. Our results highlight the importance of invasive mammal eradication on islands for protecting the world's most imperiled fauna.

  6. Slow plasmons in grating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinli, Atilla; Karademir, Ertugrul; Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun

    2016-03-01

    Recent research on surface plasmon polaritons and their applications have brought forward a wealth of information and continues to be of interest to many. In this report, we concentrate on propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and their interaction with matter. Using grating based metallic structures, it is possible to control the electrodynamics of propagating SPPs. Biharmonic gratings loaded with periodic Si stripes allow excitation of SPPs that are localized inside the band gap with grating coupling. The cavity state is formed due to periodic effective index modulation obtained by one harmonic of the grating and loaded Si stripes. More complicated grating structures such as metallic Moiré surfaces have also been shown to form a localized state inside the band gap when excited with Kretschmann configuration.

  7. Pathogenetic substantiation of surgical treatment of recurrent inguinal hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilіanskyі L.S.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Research purpose was to investigate tissue reactions on implantation of polypropylene mesh, processed with collagen, after plastic surgery of experimental defect in rats in preperitoneal prosthesis localization. Research was performed in two experimental groups. Group 1 – in 17 rats an experimental defect of anterior abdominal wall with 3 cm of size with further preperitoneal fixation of the polypropylene mesh of 0,5×1,0 cm size was performed. Group 2 – in 20 rats under analogous conditions preperitoneal fixation of polypropylene mesh, processed with collagen was performed. Morphological analysis of stages of scar tissue formation in the implantation region in the preperitoneal cavity of rats by stereological characteristics of cellular and fiber structures of connective tissue considering hemodynamic characteristics shows substantial benefits of polypropylene mesh, processed with collagen, during 2 montha after experimental hernioplasty.

  8. RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Frank R.; Shanks, Howard R.

    1982-10-12

    A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  9. Contraception. Slow train gathers speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, N; Kubba, A

    The otherwise slow pace of contraceptive research developments has recently quickened, with new products developed, more on the way, and encouraging new data emerging about existing methods. While the 1995 UK pill scare called attention to a differential in the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) between pills containing levonorgestrel or norethisterone and those containing desogestrel or gestodene, there is only an extremely small level of excess mortality attributable to third-generation progestogens, less than 2 per million women per year. Tentative evidence suggests that pills with less anti-estrogenic progestogens are neutral with regard to coronary artery disease. The pill remains extremely safe for healthy young women, although additional research with larger numbers of participants is warranted. Salient research findings are that the combined oral contraceptive pill may protect against colon cancer, the pill appears to offer no protection against bone fractures, new products contain less estrogen and have a shortened pill-free interval, a WHO paper showed no significant association between cardiovascular disease and the use of oral or injectable progestogens, a UK study showed no correlation between bone density and plasma estrogen concentrations among long-term users of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, and a WHO controlled trial found a progestogen-only method of emergency contraception to be considerably more effective in preventing expected pregnancies than the Yuzpe regimen. The T 380 copper IUD provides very high protection against intrauterine and extrauterine pregnancies for 10 years and is now available in an improved inserting mechanism, the Mirena levonorgestrel-releasing IUD system is now licensed for 5 years, and the GyneFIX IUD implant is a frameless device fixed during insertion to the fundal myometrium.

  10. A substantial and unexpected enhancement of motion perception in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss-Feig, Jennifer H; Tadin, Duje; Schauder, Kimberly B; Cascio, Carissa J

    2013-05-08

    Atypical perceptual processing in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is well documented. In addition, growing evidence supports the hypothesis that an excitatory/inhibitory neurochemical imbalance might underlie ASD. Here we investigated putative behavioral consequences of the excitatory/inhibitory imbalance in the context of visual motion perception. As stimulus size increases, typical observers exhibit marked impairments in perceiving motion of high-contrast stimuli. This result, termed "spatial suppression," is believed to reflect inhibitory motion-processing mechanisms. Motion processing is also affected by gain control, an inhibitory mechanism that underlies saturation of neural responses at high contrast. Motivated by these behavioral correlates of inhibitory function, we investigated motion perception in human children with ASD (n = 20) and typical development (n = 26). At high contrast, both groups exhibited similar impairments in motion perception with increasing stimulus size, revealing no apparent differences in spatial suppression. However, there was a substantial enhancement of motion perception in ASD: children with ASD exhibited a consistent twofold improvement in perceiving motion. Hypothesizing that this enhancement might indicate abnormal weakening of response gain control, we repeated our measurements at low contrast, where the effects of gain control should be negligible. At low contrast, we indeed found no group differences in motion discrimination thresholds. These low-contrast results, however, revealed weaker spatial suppression in ASD, suggesting the possibility that gain control abnormalities in ASD might have masked spatial suppression differences at high contrast. Overall, we report a pattern of motion perception abnormalities in ASD that includes substantial enhancements at high contrast and is consistent with an underlying excitatory/inhibitory imbalance.

  11. 20 CFR 416.972 - What we mean by substantial gainful activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Substantial Gainful Activity § 416.972 What we mean by substantial gainful activity. Substantial gainful activity is work activity that is both substantial and gainful: (a) Substantial work activity. Substantial work activity...

  12. Slow Movement/Slow University: Critical Engagements. Introduction to the Thematic Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie O'Neill

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This thematic section emerged from two seminars that took place at Durham University in England in November 2013 and March 2014 on the possibilities for thinking through what a change movement towards slow might mean for the University. Slow movements have emerged in relation to a number of topics: Slow food, Citta slow and more recently, slow science. What motivated us in the seminars was to explore how far these movements could help us address the acceleration and intensification of work within our own and other universities, and indeed, what new learning, research, philosophies, practices, structures and governance might emerge. This editorial introduction presents the concept of the "slow university" and introduces our critical engagements with slow. The articles presented here interrogate the potentialities, challenges, problems and pitfalls of the slow university in an era of corporate culture and management rationality. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1403166

  13. Can Fast and Slow Intelligence Be Differentiated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partchev, Ivailo; De Boeck, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Responses to items from an intelligence test may be fast or slow. The research issue dealt with in this paper is whether the intelligence involved in fast correct responses differs in nature from the intelligence involved in slow correct responses. There are two questions related to this issue: 1. Are the processes involved different? 2. Are the…

  14. 49 CFR 236.813 - Speed, slow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Speed, slow. 236.813 Section 236.813 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, slow. A speed not exceeding 20 miles per hour....

  15. Tandem queue with server slow-down

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.I. Miretskiy; W.R.W. Scheinhardt; M.R.H. Mandjes

    2007-01-01

    We study how rare events happen in the standard two-node tandem Jackson queue and in a generalization, the socalled slow-down network, see [2]. In the latter model the service rate of the first server depends on the number of jobs in the second queue: the first server slows down if the amount of job

  16. Slow-light pulses in moving media

    OpenAIRE

    Fiurasek, J.; Leonhardt, U.; Parentani, R.

    2000-01-01

    Slow light in moving media reaches a paradoxical regime when the flow speed of the medium approaches the group velocity of light. Pulses can penetrate a region where a counter-propagating flow exceeds the group velocity. When the counter-flow slows down pulses are reflected.

  17. Can fast and slow intelligence be differentiated?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Partchev, I.; de Boeck, P.

    2012-01-01

    Responses to items from an intelligence test may be fast or slow. The research issue dealt with in this paper is whether the intelligence involved in fast correct responses differs in nature from the intelligence involved in slow correct responses. There are two questions related to this issue: 1.

  18. Slow Light in Metamaterial Waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Lavoie, Benjamin R

    2013-01-01

    Metamaterials, which are materials engineered to possess novel optical properties, have been increasingly studied. The ability to fabricate metamaterials has sparked an interest in determining possible applications. We investigate using a metamaterial for boundary engineering in waveguides. A metamaterial-clad cylindrical waveguide is used to provide confinement for an optical signal, thereby increasing the local electromagnetic energy density. We show that metamaterial-clad waveguides have unique optical properties, including new modes, which we call hybrid modes. These modes have properties of both ordinary guided modes and surface plasmon-polariton modes. We show that for certain metamaterial parameters, the surface plasmon-polariton modes of a metamaterial-clad waveguide have less propagation loss than those of a metal-clad guide with the same permittivity. This low-loss mode is exploited for all-optical control of weak fields. Embedding three-level {\\Lambda} atoms in the dielectric core of a metamaterial...

  19. Connecting slow earthquakes to huge earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Kazushige; Kato, Aitaro

    2016-07-15

    Slow earthquakes are characterized by a wide spectrum of fault slip behaviors and seismic radiation patterns that differ from those of traditional earthquakes. However, slow earthquakes and huge megathrust earthquakes can have common slip mechanisms and are located in neighboring regions of the seismogenic zone. The frequent occurrence of slow earthquakes may help to reveal the physics underlying megathrust events as useful analogs. Slow earthquakes may function as stress meters because of their high sensitivity to stress changes in the seismogenic zone. Episodic stress transfer to megathrust source faults leads to an increased probability of triggering huge earthquakes if the adjacent locked region is critically loaded. Careful and precise monitoring of slow earthquakes may provide new information on the likelihood of impending huge earthquakes.

  20. Connecting slow earthquakes to huge earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Kazushige; Kato, Aitaro

    2016-07-01

    Slow earthquakes are characterized by a wide spectrum of fault slip behaviors and seismic radiation patterns that differ from those of traditional earthquakes. However, slow earthquakes and huge megathrust earthquakes can have common slip mechanisms and are located in neighboring regions of the seismogenic zone. The frequent occurrence of slow earthquakes may help to reveal the physics underlying megathrust events as useful analogs. Slow earthquakes may function as stress meters because of their high sensitivity to stress changes in the seismogenic zone. Episodic stress transfer to megathrust source faults leads to an increased probability of triggering huge earthquakes if the adjacent locked region is critically loaded. Careful and precise monitoring of slow earthquakes may provide new information on the likelihood of impending huge earthquakes.

  1. Scientific substantiation of functional food health claims in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuexin

    2008-06-01

    This article provides an overview of the procedures involved in scientific substantiation of functional food health claims in China. The definition of a functional food is discussed, in addition to the factors that led to its modification in 2005. The framework of administration includes the regulation of functional foods, steps involved in submission of dossiers, the safety control system for raw materials and products, and technical procedures for testing and evaluation. Scientific evidence required for a claim includes evidence from product tests in addition to evidence resulting from complete scientific literature searches relative to the food material or component in question. Currently, the 4 main rules for functional food assessment in China include 1) functional assessment procedures; 2) standard toxicological assessment; 3) regulations on nutrient supplements; and 4) standard analytical methods for functional components. The current situation for functional foods in China is analyzed, including a discussion of the distribution of the 27 currently allowed functional food health claims. The effectiveness of functional foods and health claims for improving health relies largely on the motivation and education of the public to be able to make good choices.

  2. Substantial soil organic carbon retention along floodplains of mountain streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutfin, Nicholas A.; Wohl, Ellen

    2017-07-01

    Small, snowmelt-dominated mountain streams have the potential to store substantial organic carbon in floodplain sediment because of high inputs of particulate organic matter, relatively lower temperatures compared with lowland regions, and potential for increased moisture conditions. This work (i) quantifies mean soil organic carbon (OC) content along 24 study reaches in the Colorado Rocky Mountains using 660 soil samples, (ii) identifies potential controls of OC content based on soil properties and spatial position with respect to the channel, and (iii) and examines soil properties and OC across various floodplain geomorphic features in the study area. Stepwise multiple linear regression (adjusted r2 = 0.48, p capture the variability of OC across floodplains in the study area. Mean floodplain OC (6.3 ± 0.3%) is more variable but on average greater than values in uplands (1.5 ± 0.08% to 2.2 ± 0.14%) of the Colorado Front Range and higher than published values from floodplains in other regions, particularly those of larger rivers.

  3. Will surface winds weaken in response to global warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Foltz, Gregory R.; Soden, Brian J.; Huang, Gang; He, Jie; Dong, Changming

    2016-12-01

    The surface Walker and tropical tropospheric circulations have been inferred to slow down from historical observations and model projections, yet analysis of large-scale surface wind predictions is lacking. Satellite measurements of surface wind speed indicate strengthening trends averaged over the global and tropical oceans that are supported by precipitation and evaporation changes. Here we use corrected anemometer-based observations to show that the surface wind speed has not decreased in the averaged tropical oceans, despite its reduction in the region of the Walker circulation. Historical simulations and future projections for climate change also suggest a near-zero wind speed trend averaged in space, regardless of the Walker cell change. In the tropics, the sea surface temperature pattern effect acts against the large-scale circulation slow-down. For higher latitudes, the surface winds shift poleward along with the eddy-driven mid-latitude westerlies, resulting in a very small contribution to the global change in surface wind speed. Despite its importance for surface wind speed change, the influence of the SST pattern change on global-mean rainfall is insignificant since it cannot substantially alter the global energy balance. As a result, the precipitation response to global warming remains ‘muted’ relative to atmospheric moisture increase. Our results therefore show consistency between projections and observations of surface winds and precipitation.

  4. Slow light Mach-Zehnder fiber interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yundong Zhang; Jinfang Wang; Xuenan Zhang; Hao Wu; Yuanxue Cai; Jing Zhang; Ping Yuan

    2012-01-01

    A slow light structure Mach-Zehnder fiber interferometer is theoretically demonstrated.The sensitivity of the interferometer is significantly enhanced by the dispersion of the slow light structure.The numerical results show that the sensitivity enhancement factor varies with the coupling coefficient and reaches its maximum under critical coupling conditions.Interferometers have been investigated in relation to their applications in fields such as metrology[1],optical sensing[2],optical communication[3,4],quantum information processing[5],and biomedical engineering[6].A number of schemes have been proposed to improve the performance of interferometers[7],such as using photonic crystal structures to minimize the size of on-chip devices[8],utilizing the dispersive property of semiconductor to enhance the spectral sensitivity of interferometers[9,10],utilizing slow light medium to enhance the resolution of Fourier transform interferometer[11],exploiting fast light medium or slow light structure to increase the rotation sensitivity of a Sagnac interferometer[12,13],enhancing the transmittance of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) in the slow light region by gratings[14],and using liquid crystal light valve to derive high sensitivity interferometers[15].%A slow light structure Mach-Zehnder fiber interferometer is theoretically demonstrated. The sensitivity of the interferometer is significantly enhanced by the dispersion of the slow light structure. The numerical results show that the sensitivity enhancement factor varies with the coupling coefficient and reaches its maximum under critical coupling conditions.

  5. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyodo, T; Wada, K; Yagishita, A; Kosuge, T; Saito, Y; Kurihara, T; Kikuchi, T; Shirakawa, A; Sanami, T; Ikeda, M; Ohsawa, S; Kakihara, K; Shidara, T, E-mail: toshio.hyodo@kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps{sup -}). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a {sup 22}Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  6. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, T.; Wada, K.; Yagishita, A.; Kosuge, T.; Saito, Y.; Kurihara, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Shirakawa, A.; Sanami, T.; Ikeda, M.; Ohsawa, S.; Kakihara, K.; Shidara, T.

    2011-12-01

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps-). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a 22Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  7. New theory of arrhythmia. Conceptual substantiation of arrhythmia mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir I. Ermoshkin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims A new attempt is made to substantiate the concept of the mechanism of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. Methods The paper is based on a theoretical analysis of special literature, personal experience of participation in conferences and discussions with leading Russian cardiologists. Results We have succeeded in demonstrating the fact that researchers ignore the fact that cardiomyocytes can be excited by mechanical pulses, when considering the arrhythmia mechanisms. We have conducted trials using the Cardiocode device. Under stress in a human, opened may be large and small arteriovenous anastomoses, via which blood under high pressure is ejected into veins. It leads to pressure surges in arteries and veins. The vena cava dilates, its tonus increases. In some cases, the pulse waves travel via anastomoses along the vena cava walls to the atria and the ventricles. An above-threshold concentration of tensions from mechanical pulses may excite cardiomyocytes from different points of the myocardium, disturbing the sinus rhythm. As a result, extrasystoles, tachycardia attacks, blocking of blood circulation in the peripheral segments of the venous arterial networks, edemata, thrombosis and metabolism disorders appear. Arrhythmia, tachycardia attacks and concomitant myocardial ischemia lead to progression of heart fibrosis. Such changes increase the probability of fibrillations and sudden cardiac death. Conclusion Unhealthy lifestyle, the presence of opening and not properly closing anastomoses may provoke a number of diseases. To avoid the cardiac arrhythmia attacks and prevent SCD, it is necessary to suppress travel of the mechanical waves within the following circuitry: aorta – artery – anastomosis – vein – vena cava – atria – ventricles. The travel of the mechanical waves within the same vessel circuitry explains the fact that the fixed couplings under extrasystoles are observed, and the beat-to-beat RR intervals under tachycardia

  8. Forest soils in France are sequestering substantial amounts of carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonard, Mathieu; Nicolas, Manuel; Coomes, David A; Caignet, Isabelle; Saenger, Anaïs; Ponette, Quentin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether French forest soils are sources or sinks of carbon and to quantify changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks over time by resampling soil in long-term forest monitoring plots. Within each plot, and for each survey, soils were sampled at five points selected in five subplots and divided into layers. Composite samples were produced for each layer and subplot, then analysed for mass, bulk density and SOC. Linear mixed models were used to estimate SOC changes over 15years between two soil surveys carried out in 102 plots in France. A factor analysis and a budget approach were also used to identify which factors and processes were primarily responsible for SOC dynamics. Forest soils throughout France substantially accumulated SOC (+0.35MgCha(-1)yr(-1)) between 1993 and 2012. The SOC sequestration rate declined with stand age and was affected by stand structure. Uneven-aged stands sequestered more SOC than did even-aged stands (paffecting litter decomposition (climate and litter quality). For the mineral soil, the budget approach was unable to replicate the observed SOC sequestration rate, probably because SOC stocks were not yet at equilibrium with litter inputs at the beginning of the monitoring period (contrary to our steady-state assumption). This explanation is also supported by the fact that the SOC sequestration rate decreased with stand age. As the SOC sequestration rate declines with stand age and is higher in uneven-aged stands, forest management has the potential to influence this carbon sink. Copyright © 2016 Office national des forêts. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Generation and evolution of interplanetary slow shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Wu

    Full Text Available It is well known that most MHD shocks observed within 1 AU are MHD fast shocks. Only a very limited number of MHD slow shocks are observed within 1 AU. In order to understand why there are only a few MHD slow shocks observed within 1 AU, we use a one-dimensional, time-dependent MHD code with an adaptive grid to study the generation and evolution of interplanetary slow shocks (ISS in the solar wind. Results show that a negative, nearly square-wave perturbation will generate a pair of slow shocks (a forward and a reverse slow shock. In addition, the forward and the reverse slow shocks can pass through each other without destroying their characteristics, but the propagating speeds for both shocks are decreased. A positive, square-wave perturbation will generate both slow and fast shocks. When a forward slow shock (FSS propagates behind a forward fast shock (FFS, the former experiences a decreasing Mach number. In addition, the FSS always disappears within a distance of 150R (where R is one solar radius from the Sun when there is a forward fast shock (with Mach number ≥1.7 propagating in front of the FSS. In all tests that we have performed, we have not discovered that the FSS (or reverse slow shock evolves into a FFS (or reverse fast shock. Thus, we do not confirm the FSS-FFS evolution as suggested by Whang (1987.

  10. Slow light vortices in periodic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Ha, Sangwoo; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2009-01-01

    We reveal that the reduction of the group velocity of light in periodic waveguides is generically associated with the presence of vortex energy flows. We show that the energy flows are gradually frozen for slow-light at the Brillouin zone edge, whereas vortices persist for slow-light states havin...... non-vanishing phase velocity inside the Brillouin zone. We also demonstrate that presence of vortices can be linked to the absence of slow-light at the zone edge, and present calculations illustrating these general results....

  11. Slow-light vortices in periodic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Ha, Sangwoo; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2009-01-01

    We reveal that the reduction of the group velocity of light in periodic waveguides is generically associated with the presence of vortex energy flows. We show that the energy flows are gradually frozen for slow-light at the Brillouin zone edge, whereas vortices persist for slow-light states havin...... non-vanishing phase velocity inside the Brillouin zone. We also demonstrate that presence of vortices can be linked to the absence of slow-light at the zone edge, and present calculations illustrating these general results....

  12. Slow gamma rhythms in CA3 are entrained by slow gamma activity in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yi-Tse; Zheng, Chenguang; Colgin, Laura Lee

    2016-12-01

    In hippocampal area CA1, slow (∼25-55 Hz) and fast (∼60-100 Hz) gamma rhythms are coupled with different CA1 afferents. CA1 slow gamma is coupled to inputs from CA3, and CA1 fast gamma is coupled to inputs from the medial entorhinal cortex (Colgin LL, Denninger T, Fyhn M, Hafting T, Bonnevie T, Jensen O, Moser MB, Moser EI. Nature 462: 353-357, 2009). CA3 gives rise to highly divergent associational projections, and it is possible that reverberating activity in these connections generates slow gamma rhythms in the hippocampus. However, hippocampal gamma is maximal upstream of CA3, in the dentate gyrus (DG) region (Bragin A, Jando G, Nadasdy Z, Hetke J, Wise K, Buzsaki G. J Neurosci 15: 47-60, 1995). Thus it is possible that slow gamma in CA3 is driven by inputs from DG, yet few studies have examined slow and fast gamma rhythms in DG recordings. Here we investigated slow and fast gamma rhythms in paired recordings from DG and CA3 in freely moving rats to determine whether slow and fast gamma rhythms in CA3 are entrained by DG. We found that slow gamma rhythms, as opposed to fast gamma rhythms, were particularly prominent in DG. We investigated directional causal influences between DG and CA3 by Granger causality analysis and found that DG slow gamma influences CA3 slow gamma. Moreover, DG place cell spikes were strongly phase-locked to CA3 slow gamma rhythms, suggesting that DG excitatory projections to CA3 may underlie this directional influence. These results indicate that slow gamma rhythms do not originate in CA3 but rather slow gamma activity upstream in DG entrains slow gamma rhythms in CA3. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Surface plasmon polariton amplification in semiconductor-graphene-dielectric structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadoenkova, Yuliya S. [Ulyanovsk State University, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Novgorod State University, Veliky Novgorod (Russian Federation); Donetsk Institute for Physics and Technology, Donetsk (Ukraine); Moiseev, Sergey G. [Ulyanovsk State University, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Kotelnikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Abramov, Aleksei S. [Ulyanovsk State University, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Kadochkin, Aleksei S.; Zolotovskii, Igor O. [Ulyanovsk State University, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Nanotechnologies of Microelectronics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 32A Leninskiy Prosp., 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fotiadi, Andrei A. [Ulyanovsk State University, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Universite de Mons (Belgium)

    2017-05-15

    A mechanism of amplification of surface plasmon polaritons due to the transfer of electromagnetic energy from a drift current wave into a far-infrared surface wave propagating along a semiconductor-dielectric boundary in waveguide geometry is proposed. A necessary condition of the interaction of these waves is phase matching condition, i. e., when the phase velocity of the surface wave approaches the drift velocity of charge carriers. It is shown that in the spectral region of the surface plasmon polariton slowing-down its amplification coefficient can reach values substantially exceeding the ohmic loss coefficient of the surface wave in the structure. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Investigators unable to substantiate suspected link between sponge, TSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    Federal investigators have failed to substantiate a suspected link between the contraceptive sponge and toxic shock syndrome (TSS). In September the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reported the case of a woman who inserted the contraceptive sponge last July 17 and removed itthe following day. About 6 hours later she noted the sudden onset of a fever of 104 degrees Farenheit, nausea, redness, shaking chills, and an inflamed vagina. Cultures from the sponge revealed S. aureus and S. epidemis. There was initial concern that the case may have represented early TSS. A toxin produced by certain strains of S. aureus is thought to cause TSS. The syndrome includes a fever greater than 102 degrees, rash, blood pressure less than 90mmHG, peelin g skin on the palms and soles 1-2 weeks after onset, and involvement of 3 or more of the following organ systems: gastrointestinal, muscular, mucous membrane, renal, hepatic, hematologic,or central nervous system. FDA medical Officers Dr. William J. McCann told "Contraceptive Technology Update" (CTU) that the reported case failed to fill the Centers for Disease Control criteriaof the diagnosis of TSS. Because the woman has been treated with antibiotics early in the course of her disease, McCann said he could not entirely exclude the possibility that she might have developed TSS if she had gone untreated. He added that the possibility was "remote". Dr. Gail Bolan, CDC epidemiologist, told CTU that "antibiotics do not seem to affect the outcome of the original episode" of TSS cases. She commented that milder forms of TSS might exist that may not meet CDC's strict case definition. Without a specific test, there is no way to separate milder TSS cases from viral or other diseases that may appear similar. According to Deborah Gaynor, the sponge's package insert states that clinical trials were not large enough to assess the risk of TSS. The sponge is not recommended for use during menstration. Gaynor cites a variety of reasons why the

  15. Experimental demonstration of spinor slow light

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Meng-Jung; Lee, Chin-Yuan; Kudriasov, Viaceslav; Chang, Kao-Fang; Cho, Hung-Wen; Juzeliunas, Gediminas; Yu, Ite A

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the developments of slow, stored and stationary light based on the electromagnetically induced transparency effect have attracted a great deal of attention, stimulated by potential applications such as low-light-level nonlinear optics and quantum information manipulation. The previous experiments all dealt with the single-component slow light. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of two-component or spinor slow light using a double tripod (DT) atom-light coupling scheme which involves two atomic ground state coherences. We observe the neutrino-type oscillations between the two slow light components controlled by the two-photon detuning. We show that the DT scheme for the light storage behaves like the two outcomes of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer enabling high precision measurements of the frequency detuning. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate a possible application of the DT scheme as quantum memory/rotator for the two-color qubits.

  16. Depression Can Slow Hospital Patients' Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166427.html Depression Can Slow Hospital Patients' Recovery: Study Screening for ... 9, 2017 FRIDAY, June 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression affects about one-third of hospital patients and ...

  17. Systematic Design of Slow Light Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fengwen

    Light can propagate much slower in photonic crystal waveguides and plasmonic waveguides than in vacuum. Slow light propagation in waveguides shows broad prospects in the terabit communication systems. However, it causes severe signal distortions and displays large propagation loss. Moreover...... two different parameterizations. Detailed comparisons show that the bandwidth of slow light propagation can be significantly enhanced by allowing irregular geometries in the waveguides. To mitigate the propagation loss due to scattering in the photonic crystal waveg- uides, an optimization problem...... is formulated to minimize the average propagation loss of the designed modes. The presented approach is employed to design a free-topology slow light waveguide. Numerical result illustrates that slow light propagation in the optimized waveguide displays significantly suppressed propagation loss while keeping...

  18. Slow living and the green economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana-Eugenia Ioncică

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current paper explores the relationship between some relatively new concepts in the field of economics – slow living, slow food, slow writing and the green economy. The goal of the paper is twofold – discussing the possibilities opened by these exciting new concepts, in terms of an increase in the quality of life combined with an environmentally sustainable lifestyle, as well as ascertaining what the concepts may entail in the context in which the effects of the recent economic crisis may make green and slow living seem like a distant dream. It is this holistic view that we shall attempt to enlarge upon in the paper, with the avowed purpose of weighing out the possibilities presented in the complicated, crisis-fraught global context.

  19. Effects of slow recovery rates on water column geochemistry in aquitard wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, K.E.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring wells are often installed in aquitards to verify effectiveness for preventing migration of surface contaminants to underlying aquifers. However, water sampling of aquitard wells presents a challenge due to the slow recovery times for water recharging the wells, which can take as long as weeks, months or years to recharge depending on the sample volume needed. In this study, downhole profiling and sampling of aquitard wells was used to assess geochemical changes that occur in aquitard wells during water level recovery. Wells were sampled on three occasions spanning 11years, 1year and 1week after they were purged and casing water showed substantial water chemistry variations. Temperature decreased with depth, whereas pH and specific conductance increased with depth in the water column after 11years of water level recovery. Less stable parameters such as dissolved O2 (DO) and Eh showed strong zonation in the well column, with DO stratification occurring as the groundwater slowly entered the well. Oxidation of reduced till groundwater along with degassing of CO2 from till pore water affects mineral solubility and dissolved solid concentrations. Recommendations for sampling slowly recovering aquitard wells include identifying the zone of DO and Eh stratification in the well column and collecting water samples from below the boundary to better measure unstable geochemical parameters. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Mud Flow - Slow and Fast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, C. C.; Liu, K.-F.; Yuhi, M.

    Heavy and persistent rainfalls in mountainous areas can loosen the hillslope and induce mud flows which can move stones, boulders and even trees, with destructive power on their path. In China where 70% of the land surface is covered by mountains, debris flows due to landslides or rainfalls affect over 18.6% of the nation. Over 10,000 debris flow ravines have been identified; hundreds of lives are lost every year [1]. While accurate assessment is still pending, mud flows caused by Hurr icane Mitch in 1998 have incurred devastating floods in Central America. In Honduras alone more than 6000 people perished. Half of the nation's infrastructures were damaged. Mud flows can also be the result of volcanic eruption. Near the volcano, lava and pyroclastic flows dominate. Further downstream solid particles become smaller and can mix with river or lake water, rainfall, melting snow or ice, or eroded soil, resulting in hyperconcentrated mud mixed with rocks. The muddy debris can travel at high speeds over tens of miles down the hill slopes and devastate entire communities. In 1985 the catastrophic eruption of Nevado del Ruiz in Colombia resulted in mud flows which took the life of 23,000 inhabitants in the town of Amero [2]. During the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in Phillipnes in 1991, one cubic mile of volcanic ash and rock fragments fell on the mountain slopes. Seasonal rain in the following months washed down much of the loose deposits, causing damage to 100,000 villages. These catastrophes have been vividly recorded in the film documentary by Lyons [3].

  1. Substantial local variation of the Seebeck coefficient in gold nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotavin, Pavlo; Evans, Charlotte I; Natelson, Douglas

    2017-07-06

    Nanoscale structuring holds promise to improve the thermoelectric properties of materials for energy conversion and photodetection. We report a study of the spatial distribution of the photothermoelectric voltage in thin-film nanowire devices fabricated from a single metal. A focused laser beam is used to locally heat the metal nanostructure via a combination of direct absorption and excitation of a plasmon resonance in Au devices. As seen previously, in nanowires shorter than the spot size of the laser, we observe a thermoelectric voltage distribution that is consistent with the local Seebeck coefficient being spatially dependent on the width of the nanostructure. In longer structures, we observe extreme variability of the net thermoelectric voltage as the laser spot is scanned along the length of the nanowire. The sign and magnitude of the thermoelectric voltage is sensitive to the structural defects, metal grain structure, and surface passivation of the nanowire. This finding opens the possibility of improved local control of the thermoelectric properties at the nanoscale.

  2. KIC011764567: An evolved object showing substantial flare-activity

    CERN Document Server

    Kitze, M; Hambaryan, V; Torres, G; Neuhäuser, R

    2016-01-01

    We intensively studied the flare activity on the stellar object KIC011764567. The star was thought to be solar type, with a temperature of $T_{eff} = (5640 \\pm 200)\\,$K, $\\log(g) = (4.3 \\pm 0.3)\\,$dex and a rotational period of Prot 22 d (Brown et al. 2011). High resolution spectra turn the target to an evolved object with Teff = (5300 \\pm 150) K, a metalicity of $[m/H] = (-0.5 \\pm 0.2)$, a surface gravity of $log(g) = (3.3 \\pm 0.4)\\,$dex, and a projected rotational velocity of $v sin i = (22 \\pm 1)\\,kms^{-1}$. Within an observing time span of 4 years we detected 150 flares in Kepler data in an energy range of $10^{36} - 10^{37}$ erg. From a dynamical Lomb-Scargle periodogram we have evidence for differential rotation as well as for stellar spot evolution and migration. Analysing the occurrence times of the flares we found hints for a periodic flare frequency cycle of $430 - 460 $d, the significance increases with an increasing threshold of the flares equivalent duration. One explanation is a very short activ...

  3. Slow freezing, but not vitrification supports complete spermatogenesis in cryopreserved, neonatal sheep testicular xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budhan S Pukazhenthi

    Full Text Available The ability to spur growth of early stage gametic cells recovered from neonates could lead to significant advances in rescuing the genomes of rare genotypes or endangered species that die unexpectedly. The purpose of this study was to determine, for the first time, the ability of two substantially different cryopreservation approaches, slow freezing versus vitrification, to preserve testicular tissue of the neonatal sheep and subsequently allow initiation of spermatogenesis post-xenografting. Testis tissue from four lambs (3-5 wk old was processed and then untreated or subjected to slow freezing or vitrification. Tissue pieces (fresh, n = 214; slow freezing, then thawing, n = 196; vitrification, then warming, n = 139 were placed subcutaneously under the dorsal skin of SCID mice and then grafts recovered and evaluated 17 wk later. Grafts from fresh and slow frozen tissue contained the most advanced stages of spermatogenesis, including normal tubule architecture with elongating spermatids in ~1% (fresh and ~10% (slow frozen of tubules. Fewer than 2% of seminiferous tubules advanced to the primary spermatocyte stage in xenografts derived from vitrified tissue. Results demonstrate that slow freezing of neonatal lamb testes was far superior to vitrification in preserving cellular integrity and function after xenografting, including allowing ~10% of tubules to retain the capacity to resume spermatogenesis and yield mature spermatozoa. Although a first for any ruminant species, findings also illustrate the importance of preemptive studies that examine cryo-sensitivity of testicular tissue before attempting this type of male fertility preservation on a large scale.

  4. The slow oscillation in cortical and thalamic networks: mechanisms and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett T. Neske

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During even the most quiescent behavioral periods, the cortex and thalamus express rich spontaneous activity in the form of slow (<1 Hz, synchronous network state transitions. Throughout this so-called slow oscillation, cortical and thalamic neurons fluctuate between periods of intense synaptic activity (Up states and almost complete silence (Down states. The two decades since the original characterization of the slow oscillation in the cortex and thalamus have seen considerable advances in deciphering the cellular and network mechanisms associated with this pervasive phenomenon. There are, nevertheless, many questions regarding the slow oscillation that await more thorough illumination, particularly the mechanisms by which Up states initiate and terminate, the functional role of the rhythmic activity cycles in unconscious or minimally conscious states, and the precise relation between Up states and the activated states associated with waking behavior. Given the substantial advances in multineuronal recording and imaging methods in both in vivo and in vitro preparations, the time is ripe to take stock of our current understanding of the slow oscillation and pave the way for future investigations of its mechanisms and functions. My aim in this Review is to provide a comprehensive account of the mechanisms and functions of the slow oscillation, and to suggest avenues for further exploration.

  5. Current Sheets in the Corona and the Complexity of Slow Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro

    2010-01-01

    The origin of the slow solar wind has long been one of the most important problems in solar/heliospheric physics. Two observational constraints make this problem especially challenging. First, the slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, unlike the fast wind that originates on open field lines. Second, the slow wind has substantial angular extent, of order 30 degrees, which is much larger than the widths observed for streamer stalks or the widths expected theoretically for a dynamic heliospheric current sheet. We propose that the slow wind originates from an intricate network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that emanate from the polar coronal hole regions. Using topological arguments, we show that these corridors must be ubiquitous in the solar corona. The total solar eclipse in August 2008, near the lowest point of cycle 23 affords an ideal opportunity to test this theory by using the ultra-high resolution Predictive Science's (PSI) eclipse model for the corona and wind. Analysis of the PSI eclipse model demonstrates that the extent and scales of the open-field corridors can account for both the angular width of the slow wind and its closed-field composition. We discuss the implications of our slow wind theory for the structure of the corona and heliosphere at solar minimum and describe further observational and theoretical tests.

  6. Experimental substantiation of planetary quarantine in orbital flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, Nataliya; Polikarpov, Nikolay; Deshevaya, Elena; Svistunova, Yulia

    Planetary quarantine is one of the outstanding issues faced by planners of future exploration missions. Evaluation of risks associated with the hypothesized transfer of biological material through the interplanetary space has been listed among the high-priority goals of space research. To address this issue, the Institute for Biomedical Problems of the Russian Academy of Sciences has developed a program of and equipment for space experiment BIORISK with the idea of extended exposure of various microorganisms on the outer surface of the International Space Station {ISS}. The experiment is to provide new data about patterns and limits of phenotypic adaptation and genotype modifications, if any, in bacterial-fungal associations that form typical microbiota found on the structural materials used in space vehicles. The first extended {18 months} exposure of microorganisms-artificial substrates systems in open space comparable with the length of voyage on the Earth-Mars-Earth itinerary demonstrated preservation of the viability of spore forms of bacteria and microscopic fungi. Also, after exposure to the extremities of open space most of the survived strains were shown to have mobilized a protection-adaptation mechanism consisting of intensification of the enzyme and biochemical activities. The present, second stage of BIORISK is being conducted with a broader variety of biological objects. The conditions of near-Earth orbits are entirely different from the conditions the exploration crew and their microbial companions will have to live in during the voyage, mainly in terms of values and spectra of radiation doses. For this reason, indication of space exploration trajectories with the help of different taxonomic groups of microorganisms will be essential to defining approaches to planetary quarantine and astrobiology.

  7. Obtaining slow beam spills at the SSC collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritson, D.

    1993-08-01

    There is substantial interest in providing slow-spill external proton beams in parallel with ``interaction running`` at the 20 TeV SSC collider. The proposal is to cause a flux of particles to impinge on a target consisting of a bent crystal extraction channel. Additionally, a slow spill onto a conventional internal target could be used as a source of secondary beams for physics or test purposes and might also be used for B-physics as proposed for HERA. The ``natural`` beam loss rates from elastic and diffractive beam gas scattering and IP collisions are not sufficient to provide suitably intense external proton beams. To prevent loss of luminosity, the rf excitation is non-linear and preferentially blows up the halo of the beam. The ``target`` is to be located at a region of high dispersion forcing particles at the edge of the momentum space onto the target. T. Lohse in this workshop has described a proposed internal target to be used at HERA that will not employ rf excitation but will use the finite loss rates observed at the HERA machine. The Hera losses are caused by a variety of sources in addition to beam gas scattering or IP interactions. Initially, the beam lifetime at HERA was too short to obtain satisfactory integrated luminosities. Subsequently, through careful attention to detail, the beam lifetime was increased to > 20 hours. Even with these changes, present loss rates provide the required intensity onto an internal target. The Tevatron and SPS proton anti-proton colliders have had similar experiences with their investigations of loss rates and also find that beam lifetimes may be substantially shorter than expected solely from beam gas and IP interactions. This paper proposes deliberately introducing controlled errors li

  8. On novel mechanisms of slow ion induced electron emission

    CERN Document Server

    Eder, H

    2000-01-01

    impact of singly and doubly charged ions on poly- and monocrystalline aluminum surfaces were performed. From the results we conclude that direct plasmon excitation by slow ions occurs due to the potential energy of the projectile in a quasi-resonant fashion. The highest relative plasmon intensities were found for impact of 5 keV Ne+ on Al(111) with 5 % of the total yield. For impact of H + and H sub 2 + characteristical differences were observed for Al(111) and polycrystalline aluminum. We show that structures in the spectrum for monocrystalline aluminum arise from diffraction of ejected electrons instead of plasmon excitation as previously assumed. The present work has contributed in new ways to the field of slow ion induced electron emission. First, measurements of the total electron yield gamma for impact of slow singly and multiply charged ions on atomically clean polycrystalline gold and graphite have been made. The respective yields were determined by current measurements and measurements of the electro...

  9. Fast-slow climate dynamics and peak global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Ashwin K.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of a linear two-box energy balance climate model is analyzed as a fast-slow system, where the atmosphere, land, and near-surface ocean taken together respond within few years to external forcing whereas the deep-ocean responds much more slowly. Solutions to this system are approximated by estimating the system's time-constants using a first-order expansion of the system's eigenvalue problem in a perturbation parameter, which is the ratio of heat capacities of upper and lower boxes. The solution naturally admits an interpretation in terms of a fast response that depends approximately on radiative forcing and a slow response depending on integrals of radiative forcing with respect to time. The slow response is inversely proportional to the "damping-timescale", the timescale with which deep-ocean warming influences global warming. Applications of approximate solutions are discussed: conditions for a warming peak, effects of an individual pulse emission of carbon dioxide (CO2 ), and metrics for estimating and comparing contributions of different climate forcers to maximum global warming.

  10. Biodegradation of MIB and geosmin with slow sand filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Shu-Ting; Lin, Tsair-Fuh; Wang, Gen-Shuh

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the biodegradation of MIB (2-methylisoborneol) and geosmin (trans-1,10-dimethyl-trans- 9-decalol) in simulated slow sand filtration (SSF) columns and in batch reactors. The results showed that both MIB and geosmin were biodegradable in the two systems. In batch experiments, the overall removals for MIB and geosmin were 50% and 78%, respectively, after 7 days of contact time. Volatilization loss plays an important role for geosmin in batch systems. Simulated SSF column studies also showed that more than 50% of geosmin and MIB were degraded by the microbial on the sand surface of a slow sand filter. With a filtration rate of 5 m/day, the simulated SSF degraded MIB from 48% to 69% and geosmin from 87% to 96%. The rapid biodegradation of MIB and geosmin in SSF column tests was attributed to the use of filter sands from the SSF unit in the Kinmen water treatment plant, where the microbial had been acclimated to both MIB and geosmin. The results also showed that more than 70% of the geosmin was removed in the top portion of the filter ( approximately 10 cm); while the removal of MIB occurred throughout the entire column depth. The results of this study demonstrated that slow flow through preacclimated sand was effective for control of MIB and geosmin in drinking water.

  11. Fast-slow climate dynamics and peak global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Ashwin K.

    2017-04-01

    The dynamics of a linear two-box energy balance climate model is analyzed as a fast-slow system, where the atmosphere, land, and near-surface ocean taken together respond within few years to external forcing whereas the deep-ocean responds much more slowly. Solutions to this system are approximated by estimating the system's time-constants using a first-order expansion of the system's eigenvalue problem in a perturbation parameter, which is the ratio of heat capacities of upper and lower boxes. The solution naturally admits an interpretation in terms of a fast response that depends approximately on radiative forcing and a slow response depending on integrals of radiative forcing with respect to time. The slow response is inversely proportional to the "damping-timescale", the timescale with which deep-ocean warming influences global warming. Applications of approximate solutions are discussed: conditions for a warming peak, effects of an individual pulse emission of carbon dioxide (CO2), and metrics for estimating and comparing contributions of different climate forcers to maximum global warming.

  12. Topological Origins of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, S.

    2008-12-01

    Although the slow solar wind has been studied for decades with both in situ and remote sensing observations, its origin is still a matter of intense debate. In the standard quasi-steady model, the slow wind is postulated to originate near coronal hole boundaries that define topologically well-behaved separatrices between open and closed field regions. In the interchange model, on the other hand, the slow wind is postulated to originate on open flux that is dynamically diffusing throughout the seemingly closed-field corona. We argue in favor of the quasi-steady scenario and propose that the slow wind is due to two effects: First, the open-closed boundary is highly complex due to the complexity of the photospheric flux distribution. Second, this boundary is continuously driven by the transport of magnetic helicity from the closed field region into the open. The implications of this model for the structure and dynamics of the corona and slow wind are discussed, and observational tests of the model are presented. This work has been supported, in part, by the NASA LWS, HTP, and SR&T programs.

  13. Global Network of Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooker, N. U.; Antiochos, S. K.; Zhao, X.; Neugebauer, M.

    2012-01-01

    The streamer belt region surrounding the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) is generally treated as the primary or sole source of the slow solar wind. Synoptic maps of solar wind speed predicted by the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model during selected periods of solar cycle 23, however, show many areas of slow wind displaced from the streamer belt. These areas commonly have the form of an arc that is connected to the streamer belt at both ends. The arcs mark the boundaries between fields emanating from different coronal holes of the same polarity and thus trace the paths of belts of pseudostreamers, i.e., unipolar streamers that form over double arcades and lack current sheets. The arc pattern is consistent with the predicted topological mapping of the narrow open corridor or singular separator line that must connect the holes and, thus, consistent with the separatrix-web model of the slow solar wind. Near solar maximum, pseudostreamer belts stray far from the HCS-associated streamer belt and, together with it, form a global-wide web of slow wind. Recognition of pseudostreamer belts as prominent sources of slow wind provides a new template for understanding solar wind stream structure, especially near solar maximum.

  14. Human gamma oscillations during slow wave sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Valderrama

    Full Text Available Neocortical local field potentials have shown that gamma oscillations occur spontaneously during slow-wave sleep (SWS. At the macroscopic EEG level in the human brain, no evidences were reported so far. In this study, by using simultaneous scalp and intracranial EEG recordings in 20 epileptic subjects, we examined gamma oscillations in cerebral cortex during SWS. We report that gamma oscillations in low (30-50 Hz and high (60-120 Hz frequency bands recurrently emerged in all investigated regions and their amplitudes coincided with specific phases of the cortical slow wave. In most of the cases, multiple oscillatory bursts in different frequency bands from 30 to 120 Hz were correlated with positive peaks of scalp slow waves ("IN-phase" pattern, confirming previous animal findings. In addition, we report another gamma pattern that appears preferentially during the negative phase of the slow wave ("ANTI-phase" pattern. This new pattern presented dominant peaks in the high gamma range and was preferentially expressed in the temporal cortex. Finally, we found that the spatial coherence between cortical sites exhibiting gamma activities was local and fell off quickly when computed between distant sites. Overall, these results provide the first human evidences that gamma oscillations can be observed in macroscopic EEG recordings during sleep. They support the concept that these high-frequency activities might be associated with phasic increases of neural activity during slow oscillations. Such patterned activity in the sleeping brain could play a role in off-line processing of cortical networks.

  15. Magnon Inflation: Slow Roll with Steep Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Adshead, Peter; Burgess, C P; Hayman, Peter; Patil, Subodh P

    2016-01-01

    We find multi-scalar effective field theories (EFTs) that can achieve a slow inflationary roll despite having a scalar potential that does not satisfy the usual slow-roll condition (d V)^2 << V^2/Mp^2. They evade the usual slow-roll conditions on $V$ because their kinetic energies are dominated by single-derivative terms rather than the usual two-derivative terms. Single derivatives dominate during slow roll and so do not require a breakdown of the usual derivative expansion that underpins calculational control in much of cosmology. The presence of such terms requires some sort of UV Lorentz-symmetry breaking during inflation (besides the usual cosmological breaking). Chromo-natural inflation provides an example of a UV theory that can generate the multi-field single-derivative terms we consider, and we argue that the EFT we find indeed captures the slow-roll conditions for the background evolution for Chromo-natural inflation. We also show that our EFT can be understood as a multi-field generalization ...

  16. Magnon inflation: slow roll with steep potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adshead, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Blas, Diego [Theoretical Physics Department, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Burgess, C.P.; Hayman, Peter [Physics & Astronomy, McMaster University,Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Patil, Subodh P. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Geneva,24 Quai Ansermet, Geneva, CH-1211 (Switzerland)

    2016-11-04

    We find multi-scalar effective field theories (EFTs) that can achieve a slow inflationary roll despite having a scalar potential that does not satisfy G{sup ab}∂{sub a}V∂{sub b}V≪V{sup 2}/M{sub p}{sup 2} (where G{sub ab} is the target-space metric). They evade the usual slow-roll conditions on V because their kinetic energies are dominated by single-derivative terms rather than the usual two-derivative terms. Single derivatives dominate during slow roll and so do not require a breakdown of the usual derivative expansion that underpins calculational control in much of cosmology. The presence of such terms requires some sort of UV Lorentz-symmetry breaking during inflation (besides the usual cosmological breaking). Chromo-natural inflation provides one particular example of a UV theory that can generate the multi-field single-derivative terms we consider, and we argue that the EFT we find indeed captures the slow-roll conditions for its background evolution. We also show that our EFT can be understood as a multi-field generalization of the single-field Cuscuton models. The multi-field case introduces a new feature, however: the scalar kinetic terms define a target-space 2-form, F{sub ab}, whose antisymmetry gives new ways for slow roll to be achieved.

  17. Improving the Material Response for Slow Heat of Energetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, A L

    2010-03-08

    The goal of modern high explosive slow heat cookoff modeling is to understand the level of mechanical violence. This requires understanding the coupled thermal-mechanical-chemical system that such an environment creates. Recent advances have improved our ability to predict the time to event, and we have been making progress on predicting the mechanical response. By adding surface tension to the product gas pores in the high explosive, we have been able to reduce the current model's tendency to overpressurize confinement vessels. We describe the model and demonstrate how it affects a LX-10 STEX experiment. Issues associated with current product gas equations of state are described and examined.

  18. Use of Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Several Superalloys to Resist Environmentally-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720(TradeMark) ATI 718Plus(Registered TradeMark) alloy, Haynes 282(Trademark), and Inconel 740(TradeMark) Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  19. Optical slowing of calcium monofluoride molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Aakash; Chae, Eunmi; Hemmerling, Boerge; Anderegg, Loic; Augenbraun, Benjamin; Drayna, Garrett; Hutzler, Nicholas; Collopy, Alejandra; Wu, Yewei; Ding, Shiqian; Ye, Jun; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Doyle, John

    2016-05-01

    We report white-light slowing of calcium monofluoride molecules. A single main laser (606 nm) plus two additional vibrational repump lasers (628 nm) are employed. The slowing lasers are spectrally broadened to address the molecules' velocity spread and hyperfine splittings. We use a background-free two-photon fluorescence detection scheme to make high signal-to-noise measurements of our molecular beam's longitudinal velocity distribution. This method is applied to slow CaF produced by a two-stage cryogenic buffer gas beam source by > 30 m/s to near the capture velocity of a molecular magneto-optical trap (MOT). Due to the presence of magnetic dark states which inhibit optical cycling, we will use an AC-MOT. We characterize the performance of this AC-MOT used in the trapping of Li and Yb.

  20. Synchronized ion acceleration by ultraintense slow light

    CERN Document Server

    Brantov, A V; Kovalev, V F; Bychenkov, V Yu

    2015-01-01

    An effective scheme of synchronized laser-triggered ion acceleration and the corresponding theoretical model are proposed for a slow light pulse of relativistic intensity, which penetrates into a near-critical-density plasma, strongly slows, and then increases its group velocity during propagation within a target. The 3D PIC simulations confirm this concept for proton acceleration by a femtosecond petawatt-class laser pulse experiencing relativistic self-focusing, quantify the characteristics of the generated protons, and demonstrate a significant increase of their energy compared with the proton energy generated from optimized ultrathin solid dense foils.

  1. Ultrafast Faraday Rotation of Slow Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musorin, A. I.; Sharipova, M. I.; Dolgova, T. V.; Inoue, M.; Fedyanin, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The active control of optical signals in the time domain is what science and technology demand in fast all-optical information processing. Nanostructured materials can modify the group velocity and slow the light down, as the artificial light dispersion emerges. We observe the ultrafast temporal behavior of the Faraday rotation within a single femtosecond laser pulse under conditions of slow light in a one-dimensional magnetophotonic crystal. The Faraday effect changes by 20% over the time of 150 fs. This might be applicable to the fast control of light in high-capacity photonic devices.

  2. Geodynamic environments of ultra-slow spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokhan, Andrey; Dubinin, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-slow spreading is clearly distinguished as an outstanding type of crustal accretion by recent studies. Spreading ridges with ultra-slow velocities of extension are studied rather well. But ultra-slow spreading is characteristic feature of not only spreading ridges, it can be observed also on convergent and transform plate boundaries. Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on divergent plate boundaries: 1. On spreading ridges with ultra-slow spreading, both modern (f.e. Gakkel, South-West Indian, Aden spreading center) and ceased (Labrador spreading center, Aegir ridge); 2. During transition from continental rifting to early stages of oceanic spreading (all spreading ridges during incipient stages of their formation); 3. During incipient stages of formation of spreading ridges on oceanic crust as a result of ridge jumps and reorganization of plate boundaries (f.e. Mathematicians rise and East Pacific rise); 4. During propagation of spreading ridge into the continental crust under influence of hotspot (Aden spreading center and Afar triple junction), under presence of strike-slip faults preceding propagation (possibly, rift zone of California Bay). Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on transform plate boundaries: 1. In transit zones between two "typical" spreading ridges (f.e. Knipovich ridge); 2. In semi strike-slip/extension zones on the oceanic crust (f.e. American-Antarctic ridge); 3. In the zones of local extension in regional strike-slip areas in pull-apart basins along transform boundaries (Cayman trough, pull-apart basins of the southern border of Scotia plate). Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on convergent plate boundaries: 1. During back-arc rifting on the stage of transition into back-arc spreading (central

  3. The GPRC6A Receptor displays Constitutive Internalization and Sorting to the Slow Recycling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Stine Engesgaard; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Jansen, Anna Mai; Gether, Ulrik; Madsen, Kenneth Lindegaard; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2017-03-09

    The class C G protein-coupled receptor GPRC6A is a putative nutrient sensing receptor and represents a possible new drug target in metabolic disorders. However, the specific physiological role of this receptor has yet to be identified, and the mechanisms regulating its activity and cell surface availability also remain enigmatic. In the present study, we investigated the trafficking properties of GPRC6A by use of both a classical antibody feeding internalization assay in which cells were visualized using confocal microscopy and a novel internalization assay that is based on real-time measurements of fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Both assays revealed that GPRC6A predominantly undergoes constitutive internalization while the agonist-induced effects were imperceptible. Moreover, post-endocytic sorting was investigated by assessing the co-localization of internalized GPRC6A with selected Rab protein markers. Internalized GPRC6A was mainly co-localized with the early endosome marker Rab5 and the long loop recycling endosome marker Rab11 and to a much lesser extent with the late endosome marker Rab7. This suggests that upon agonist-independent internalization, GPRC6A is recycled via the Rab11-positive slow recycling pathway, which may be responsible for ensuring a persistent pool of GPRC6A receptors at the cell surface despite chronic agonist exposure. Distinct trafficking pathways have been reported for several of the class C receptors, and our results thus substantiate that non-canonical trafficking mechanisms are a common feature for the nutrient sensing class C family that ensure functional receptors in the cell membrane despite prolonged agonist exposure.

  4. Theory of slow light enhanced four-wave mixing in photonic crystal waveguides

    OpenAIRE

    Santagiustina M.; Someda C.G.; Vadala G.; Combrie S.; Rossi A.

    2010-01-01

    The equations for Four-Wave-Mixing in a Photonic Crystal waveguide are derived accurately. The dispersive nature of slow-light enhancement, the impact of Bloch mode reshaping in the nonlinear overlap integrals and the tensor nature of the third order polarization are therefore taken into account. Numerical calculations reveal substantial differences with simpler models, which increase with decreasing group velocity. We predict that the gain for a 1.3 mm long, unoptimized GaInP waveguide will ...

  5. Where does slow axonal transport go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Sumio

    2003-12-01

    Axonal transport is the specialized and well-developed intracellular transport system for regulated and/or long-distance transport based on generalized cellular machineries. Among them, slow axonal transport conveys cytoplasmic proteins. The motor molecule, the nature of transporting complex and the transport regulation mechanism for slow transport are still unclarified. There has been a dispute regarding the nature of transporting complex of cytoskeletal proteins, polymer-sliding hypothesis versus subunit-transport theory. Recent data supporting the hypothesis of polymer sliding in cultured neurons only reconfirm the previously reported structure and this inference suffers from the lack of ultrastructural evidence and the direct relevance to the physiological slow transport phenomenon in vivo. Observation of the moving cytoskeletal proteins in vivo using transgenic mice or squid giant axons revealed that subunits do move in a microtubule-dependent manner, strongly indicating the involvement of microtubule-based motor kinesin. If the slow transport rate reflects the intermittent fast transport dependent on kinesin motor, we have to investigate the molecular constituents of the transporting complex in more detail and evaluate why the motor and cargo interaction is so unstable. This kind of weak and fluctuating interaction between various molecular pairs could not be detected by conventional techniques, thus necessitating the establishment of a new experimental system before approaching the molecular regulation problem.

  6. Proton energy dependence of slow neutron intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshigawara, Makoto; Harada, Masahide; Watanabe, Noboru; Kai, Tetsuya; Sakata, Hideaki; Ikeda, Yujiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ooi, Motoki [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    The choice of the proton energy is an important issue for the design of an intense-pulsed-spallation source. The optimal proton beam energy is rather unique from a viewpoint of the leakage neutron intensity but no yet clear from the slow-neutron intensity view point. It also depends on an accelerator type. Since it is also important to know the proton energy dependence of slow-neutrons from the moderators in a realistic target-moderator-reflector assembly (TMRA). We studied on the TMRA proposed for Japan Spallation Neutron Source. The slow-neutron intensities from the moderators per unit proton beam power (MW) exhibit the maximum at about 1-2 GeV. At higher proton energies the intensity per MW goes down; at 3 and 50 GeV about 0.91 and 0.47 times as low as that at 1 GeV. The proton energy dependence of slow-neutron intensities was found to be almost the same as that of total neutron yield (leakage neutrons) from the same bare target. It was also found that proton energy dependence was almost the same for the coupled and decoupled moderators, regardless the different moderator type, geometry and coupling scheme. (author)

  7. Moving Crystal Slow-Neutron Wavelength Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buras, B.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1973-01-01

    Experimental proof that a moving single crystal can serve as a slow-neutron wavelength analyser of special features is presented. When the crystal moves with a velocity h/(2 md) (h-Planck constant, m-neutron mass, d-interplanar spacing) perpendicular to the diffracting plane and the analysed...

  8. Moving Crystal Slow-Neutron Wavelength Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buras, B.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1973-01-01

    Experimental proof that a moving single crystal can serve as a slow-neutron wavelength analyser of special features is presented. When the crystal moves with a velocity h/(2 md) (h-Planck constant, m-neutron mass, d-interplanar spacing) perpendicular to the diffracting plane and the analysed...

  9. Slowed ageing, welfare, and population problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareham, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Biological studies have demonstrated that it is possible to slow the ageing process and extend lifespan in a wide variety of organisms, perhaps including humans. Making use of the findings of these studies, this article examines two problems concerning the effect of life extension on population size and welfare. The first--the problem of overpopulation--is that as a result of life extension too many people will co-exist at the same time, resulting in decreases in average welfare. The second--the problem of underpopulation--is that life extension will result in too few people existing across time, resulting in decreases in total welfare. I argue that overpopulation is highly unlikely to result from technologies that slow ageing. Moreover, I claim that the problem of underpopulation relies on claims about life extension that are false in the case of life extension by slowed ageing. The upshot of these arguments is that the population problems discussed provide scant reason to oppose life extension by slowed ageing.

  10. Exponential estimates of symplectic slow manifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall; Wulff, C.

    2016-01-01

    is motivated by a paper of MacKay from 2004. The method does not notice resonances, and therefore we do not pose any restrictions on the motion normal to the slow manifold other than it being fast and analytic. We also present a stability result and obtain a generalization of a result of Gelfreich and Lerman...

  11. The slow death of most galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cattaneo, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    For most galaxies, the shutdown of star formation was a slow process that took four billion years. An analysis of thousands of galaxies suggests that 'strangulation' by their environment was the most likely cause. See Letter on page 192 of Peng, Maiolino and Cochrane (2015), Nature, vol. 521.

  12. Slow light on a printed circuit board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanin, Aleksandr A; Voronin, Aleksandr A; Sokolov, Viktor I; Fedotov, Ilya V; Fedotov, Andrei B; Akhmanov, Aleksandr S; Panchenko, Vladislav Ya; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2011-05-15

    Slow-light effects induced by stimulated Raman scattering in polymer waveguides on a printed circuit board are shown to enable a widely tunable delay of broadband optical signals, suggesting an advantageous platform for optical information processing and ultrafast optical waveform transformation. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  13. Origin of pseudotachylites during slow creep experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peč, M.; Stünitz, H.; Heilbronner, R.; Drury, M.; De Capitani, C.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a series of experiments on granitoid cataclasites under mid-crustal conditions (Pc∼500 MPa, T=300 °C) and slow displacement rates (10−8 ms−1

  14. Exploring the Hedonic Quality of Slow Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Orehovački, Tihomir; Al Sokkar, Abdullah A.M.; Derboven, Jan; Khan, Azam

    2013-01-01

    Pace is an inseparable part of all technologies and consequently represents an interaction design element. Various technology aspects can support hedonic qualities brought about from reflection transformed into unlimited unique experiences, mental rest, and inner peace. This paper argues different approaches to technology pace evaluation. Attributes that contribute to the hedonic quality of slow technology are presented and discussed.

  15. Generation and application of slow positrons based on a electron LINAC

    CERN Document Server

    Kurihara, T

    2002-01-01

    History of slow positron in Institute of Materials Structure Science High Energy Accelerator Research Organization is explained. The principle of generation and application of intense positron beam is mentioned. Two sources of intense positron are radioactive decay of radioactive isotopes emitting positron and electron-positron pair creation. The radioactive decay method uses sup 5 sup 8 Co, sup 6 sup 4 Cu, sup 1 sup 1 C, sup 1 sup 3 N, sup 1 sup 5 O and sup 1 sup 8 F. The electron-positron pair creation method uses nuclear reactor or electron linear accelerator (LINAC). The positron experimental facility in this organization consists of electron LINAC, slow positron beam source, positron transport and experimental station. The outline of this facility is started. The intense slow positron beam is applied to research positronium work function, electron structure of surface. New method such as combination of positron lifetime measurement and slow positron beam or Auger electron spectroscopy by positron annihil...

  16. Fractal THz slow light metamaterial devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shoichi

    Scope and Method of Study: The goal of this study is to investigate the time delay of the fractal H metamaterials in the terahertz regime. This metamaterial contains resonators with two different sizes of H structures which mimic Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and create a transmission window and the corresponding phase dispersion, thus producing slow light. The Al structures were fabricated on silicon wafer and Mylar by using microelectronic lithography and thermal evaporation technique. By using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the phase change caused by the slow light system and the actual time delay were obtained. Numerical simulations were carried out to systematize the effect of permittivity and structure dimensions on the optical properties. Findings and Conclusions: We experimentally demonstrated the numerical time delay of the fractal H metamaterial as a slow light device. When permittivity of the substrates increases, the peak position of the transmission window shifts to lower frequency and the bandwidth becomes broader. As a result, silicon performed larger time delay than that of Mylar. By changing the length of the resonator, the bandwidth and the peak position of the transmission window is controllable. At the edges of the transmission window, the negative time delays (fast light) were also observed. Mylar acts as a quaci-free standing structure and allows higher spectral measurement. Moreover, metamaterials fabricated on multiple Mylar films can potentially act as a more effective slow light device. As applications, slow light metamaterials are expected to be used for high-capacity terahertz communication networks, all-optical information processing and sensing devices.

  17. Properties of slow oscillation during slow-wave sleep and anesthesia in cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Crochet, Sylvain; Volgushev, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Deep anesthesia is commonly used as a model of slow-wave sleep (SWS). Ketamine-xylazine anesthesia reproduces the main features of sleep slow oscillation: slow, large amplitude waves in field potential, which are generated by the alternation of hyperpolarized and depolarized states of cortical neurons. However, direct quantitative comparison of field potential and membrane potential fluctuations during natural sleep and anesthesia is lacking, so it remains unclear how well the properties of sleep slow oscillation are reproduced by the ketamine-xylazine anesthesia model. Here, we used field potential and intracellular recordings in different cortical areas in the cat, to directly compare properties of slow oscillation during natural sleep and ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. During SWS cortical activity showed higher power in the slow/delta (0.1-4 Hz) and spindle (8-14 Hz) frequency range, while under anesthesia the power in the gamma band (30-100 Hz) was higher. During anesthesia, slow waves were more rhythmic and more synchronous across the cortex. Intracellular recordings revealed that silent states were longer and the amplitude of membrane potential around transition between active and silent states was bigger under anesthesia. Slow waves were largely uniform across cortical areas under anesthesia, but in SWS they were most pronounced in associative and visual areas, but smaller and less regular in somatosensory and motor cortices. We conclude that although the main features of the slow oscillation in sleep and anesthesia appear similar, multiple cellular and network features are differently expressed during natural SWS as compared to ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. PMID:22016533

  18. Properties of slow oscillation during slow-wave sleep and anesthesia in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Crochet, Sylvain; Volgushev, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2011-10-19

    Deep anesthesia is commonly used as a model of slow-wave sleep (SWS). Ketamine-xylazine anesthesia reproduces the main features of sleep slow oscillation: slow, large-amplitude waves in field potential, which are generated by the alternation of hyperpolarized and depolarized states of cortical neurons. However, direct quantitative comparison of field potential and membrane potential fluctuations during natural sleep and anesthesia is lacking, so it remains unclear how well the properties of sleep slow oscillation are reproduced by the ketamine-xylazine anesthesia model. Here, we used field potential and intracellular recordings in different cortical areas in the cat to directly compare properties of slow oscillation during natural sleep and ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. During SWS cortical activity showed higher power in the slow/delta (0.1-4 Hz) and spindle (8-14 Hz) frequency range, whereas under anesthesia the power in the gamma band (30-100 Hz) was higher. During anesthesia, slow waves were more rhythmic and more synchronous across the cortex. Intracellular recordings revealed that silent states were longer and the amplitude of membrane potential around transition between active and silent states was bigger under anesthesia. Slow waves were mostly uniform across cortical areas under anesthesia, but in SWS, they were most pronounced in associative and visual areas but smaller and less regular in somatosensory and motor cortices. We conclude that, although the main features of the slow oscillation in sleep and anesthesia appear similar, multiple cellular and network features are differently expressed during natural SWS compared with ketamine-xylazine anesthesia.

  19. Stability and oscillations in a slow-fast flexible joint system with transformation delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan-Ying; Xu, Jian; Yan, Yao

    2014-10-01

    Flexible joints are usually used to transfer velocities in robot systems and may lead to delays in motion transformation due to joint flexibility. In this paper, a link-rotor structure connected by a flexible joint or shaft is firstly modeled to be a slow-fast delayed system when moment of inertia of the lightweight link is far less than that of the heavy rotor. To analyze the stability and oscillations of the slow-fast system, the geometric singular perturbation method is extended, with both slow and fast manifolds expressed analytically. The stability of the slow manifold is investigated and critical boundaries are obtained to divide the stable and the unstable regions. To study effects of the transformation delay on the stability and oscillations of the link, two quantitatively different driving forces derived from the negative feedback of the link are considered. The results show that one of these two typical driving forces may drive the link to exhibit a stable state and the other kind of driving force may induce a relaxation oscillation for a very small delay. However, the link loses stability and undergoes regular periodic and bursting oscillation when the transformation delay is large. Basically, a very small delay does not affect the stability of the slow manifold but a large delay affects substantially.

  20. An Active Area Model of Rapid Infiltration Response at Substantial Depth in the Unsaturated Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, L.; Nimmo, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    In a porous medium subject to preferential flow, response to surface water infiltration can occur rapidly even at substantial depth in the unsaturated zone. In a ponding experiment at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) the profile of undisturbed natural soil, seasonally dry at the start, was observed to approach field saturation throughout a 2 meter depth within 6 hours (Nimmo and Perkins, 2007). Traditional use of Richards' equation would require an unrealistically large unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of 40 m/day to capture the observed non-classic wetting behavior. Here we present a model for rapid flow using an active area concept similar to the active fracture model (Liu and others, 1998, WRR 34:2633-2646). The active area concept is incorporated within the preferential flow domain (which allows rapid downward movement) of a dual-domain model that also contains a diffuse-flow domain in which flow can be described by Richards' equation. Development of the active area model is motivated by observation of rapid wetting at substantial depth, as well as a phenomenon in which deep flow is observed before shallow flow. In this model water movement in the preferential domain can be physically conceptualized as laminar flow in free-surface films of constant average thickness. For a given medium, the preferential domain is characterized by an effective areal density (area per unit bulk volume) that describes the free-surface film capacity of the domain as a function of depth. The active area is defined as a portion of the effective areal density that dictates the depth and temporal distribution of domain-exchange and new infiltration within the preferential domain. With the addition of the active area concept, the model is capable of simulating non-diffusive vertical transport patterns. Advantages of the model include simulating rapid response for a variety of infiltration types, including ponding and rain events, as well as modeling relatively rapid aquifer

  1. 20 CFR 404.446 - Definition of “substantial services” and “services.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Definition of “substantial services” and “services.” (a) General. In general, the substantial services test... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of âsubstantial servicesâ and...)(1). It is a test of whether, in view of all the services rendered by the individual and...

  2. 20 CFR 654.13 - Determination of areas of substantial unemployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of areas of substantial unemployment. 654.13 Section 654.13 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... 10582 § 654.13 Determination of areas of substantial unemployment. An area of substantial unemployment...

  3. 76 FR 32215 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Substantiation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-03

    ... nutritional deficiency, structure/function, or general well-being claim have substantiation that the statement... supplement manufacturers will only need to collect information to substantiate their product's nutritional...'s label. The standard discussed in the guidance for substantiation of a claim on the labeling of...

  4. 24 CFR 115.201 - The two phases of substantial equivalency certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false The two phases of substantial... ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES Certification of Substantially Equivalent Agencies § 115.201 The two phases of.... The Department has developed a two-phase process of substantial equivalency certification....

  5. Slow and fast light in semiconductor waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Hansen, Per Lunnemann; Xue, Weiqi

    2010-01-01

    Investigations of slow and fast light effects in semiconductor waveguides entail interesting physics and point to a number of promising applications. In this review we give an overview of recent progress in the field, in particular focusing on the physical mechanisms of electromagnetically induced...... transparency and coherent population oscillations. While electromagnetically induced transparency has been the most important effect in realizing slowdown effects in atomic gasses, progress has been comparatively slow in semiconductors due to inherent problems of fast dephasing times and inhomogeneous...... broadening in quantum dots. The physics of electromagnetically induced transparency in semiconductors is discussed, emphasizing these limitations and recent suggestions for overcoming them. On the other hand, the mechanism of coherent population oscillations relies on wave mixing effects and is well suited...

  6. Slow scrambling in disordered quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Swingle, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has studied the growth of commutators as a probe of chaos and information scrambling in quantum many-body systems. In this work we study the effect of static disorder on the growth of commutators in a variety of contexts. We find generically that disorder slows the onset of scrambling, and, in the case of a many-body localized state, partially halts it. We access the many-body localized state using a standard fixed point Hamiltonian, and we show that operators exhibit slow logarithmic growth under time evolution. We compare the result with the expected growth of commutators in both localized and delocalized non-interacting disordered models. Finally, based on a scaling argument, we state a conjecture about the effect of weak interactions on the growth of commutators in an interacting diffusive metal.

  7. Polymeric membrane studied using slow positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, W.-S.; Lo, C.-H. [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Cheng, M.-L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 32003, Taiwan (China); Chen Hongmin; Liu Guang; Chakka, Lakshmi [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Nanda, D.; Tung, K.-L.; Huang, S.-H.; Lee, Kueir-Rarn; Lai, J.-Y. [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Sun Yiming [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 32003, Taiwan (China); Yu Changcheng [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Zhang Renwu [Physical Science Department, Southern Utah University, Cedar City, UT 84720 (United States); Jean, Y.C. [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)], E-mail: jeany@umkc.edu

    2008-10-31

    A radioisotope slow positron beam has been built at the Chung Yuan Christian University in Taiwan for the research and development in membrane science and technology. Doppler broadening energy spectra and positron annihilation lifetime have been measured as a function of positron energy up to 30 keV in a polyamide membrane prepared by the interfacial polymerization between triethylenetetraamine (TETA) and trimesoyl chloride (TMC) on modified porous polyacrylonitrile (PAN) asymmetric membrane. The multilayer structures and free-volume depth profile for this asymmetric membrane system are obtained. Positron annihilation spectroscopy coupled with a slow beam could provide new information about size selectivity of transporting molecules and guidance for molecular designs in polymeric membranes.

  8. Quake clamps down on slow slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Laura M.; Bartlow, Noel; Hamling, Ian; Fry, Bill

    2014-12-01

    Using continuous GPS (cGPS) data from the Hikurangi subduction zone in New Zealand, we show for the first time that stress changes induced by a local earthquake can arrest an ongoing slow slip event (SSE). The cGPS data show that the slip rate in the northern portion of the 2013/2014 Kapiti SSE decreased abruptly following a nearby intraslab earthquake. We suggest that deceleration of the Kapiti SSE in early 2014 occurred due to a tenfold increase in the normal stress relative to shear stress in the SSE source, induced by the nearby Mw 6.3 earthquake, consistent with expectations of rate and state friction. Our observation of an abrupt halting/slowing of the SSE in response to stress changes imposed by a local earthquake has implications for the strength of fault zones hosting SSEs and supports the premise that static stress changes are an important ingredient in triggering (or delaying) fault slip.

  9. Critical slowing down in a dynamic duopoly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobido, M. G. O.; Hatano, N.

    2015-01-01

    Anticipating critical transitions is very important in economic systems as it can mean survival or demise of firms under stressful competition. As such identifying indicators that can provide early warning to these transitions are very crucial. In other complex systems, critical slowing down has been shown to anticipate critical transitions. In this paper, we investigate the applicability of the concept in the heterogeneous quantity competition between two firms. We develop a dynamic model where the duopoly can adjust their production in a logistic process. We show that the resulting dynamics is formally equivalent to a competitive Lotka-Volterra system. We investigate the behavior of the dominant eigenvalues and identify conditions that critical slowing down can provide early warning to the critical transitions in the dynamic duopoly.

  10. MIND diet slows cognitive decline with aging

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Martha Clare; Tangney, Christy C.; Wang, Yamin; Sacks, Frank Martin; Barnes, Lisa L.; Bennett, David William; Aggarwal, Neelum T

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Mediterranean and dash diets have been shown to slow cognitive decline; however, neither diet is specific to the nutrition literature on dementia prevention. METHODS: We devised the Mediterranean-Dietary Approach to Systolic Hypertension (DASH) diet intervention for neurodegenerative delay (MIND) diet score that specifically captures dietary components shown to be neuroprotective and related it to change in cognition over an average 4.7 years among 960 participants ...

  11. Eldor spin echoes and slow motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornak, Joseph P.; Freed, Jack H.

    1983-10-01

    It is shown how an ELDOR technique based upon spin echoes and rapid stepping of the magnetic field may be employed to measure rotational correlation times, τ R for very slow motions. Experiments on PD-Tempone in 85% glycerol/ D 2O at low temperatures led to τ R values of 10 -4 to 10 -5 s obtained with a simple analysis of the data.

  12. Pilot Study of Propofol-induced Slow Waves as a Pharmacologic Test for Brain Dysfunction after Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortelainen, Jukka; Väyrynen, Eero; Huuskonen, Usko; Laurila, Jouko; Koskenkari, Juha; Backman, Janne T; Alahuhta, Seppo; Seppänen, Tapio; Ala-Kokko, Tero

    2017-01-01

    Slow waves (less than 1 Hz) are the most important electroencephalogram signatures of nonrapid eye movement sleep. While considered to have a substantial importance in, for example, providing conditions for single-cell rest and preventing long-term neural damage, a disturbance in this neurophysiologic phenomenon is a potential indicator of brain dysfunction. Since, in healthy individuals, slow waves can be induced with anesthetics, the authors tested the possible association between hypoxic brain injury and slow-wave activity in comatose postcardiac arrest patients (n = 10) using controlled propofol exposure. The slow-wave activity was determined by calculating the low-frequency (less than 1 Hz) power of the electroencephalograms recorded approximately 48 h after cardiac arrest. To define the association between the slow waves and the potential brain injury, the patients' neurologic recovery was then followed up for 6 months. In the patients with good neurologic outcome (n = 6), the low-frequency power of electroencephalogram representing the slow-wave activity was found to substantially increase (mean ± SD, 190 ± 83%) due to the administration of propofol. By contrast, the patients with poor neurologic outcome (n = 4) were unable to generate propofol-induced slow waves. In this experimental pilot study, the comatose postcardiac arrest patients with poor neurologic outcome were unable to generate normal propofol-induced electroencephalographic slow-wave activity 48 h after cardiac arrest. The finding might offer potential for developing a pharmacologic test for prognostication of brain injury by measuring the electroencephalographic response to propofol.

  13. [Pathogenesis and treatment of slow transit constipation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongxu; Zhu, Anlong

    2016-12-25

    Slow transit constipation (STC) is generally considered as a complex idiopathic disease affected by multiple factors synergistically. Primarily caused by the condition of gut dysmotility, the transit of intestinal contents turned so slow that the moisture absorption increases, defecation frequency decreases, bowel movement is weakened or even disappeared with or without abdominal distension, dry and hard stool. Its etiology and pathogenesis remains unclear.Recently some researches reported the pathogenesis may be associated with the changes of the enteric nervous system (ENS), such as the change or degeneration of intestinal nerve cells, gut glial cell damage and neurotransmitter changes. Besides, intestinal myopathy, ICC reduction, immune factors, endocrine factors, laxative, mental psychological factors, diet and exercise habits may also be associated with the occurrence and aggravation of STC. The current understanding of STC mechanism can not meet the needs of clinical diagnosis and treatment. Conservative treatment is the main treatment of STC nowadays. For those receiving normative medical treatment but with little effect, surgery is necessary. "Jingling procedure" and "antiperistaltic anastomosis" can both get good efficacy. Treatment aiming at causes of disease will be uncovered as the development of the researches on the pathogenesis and treatment of slow transit constipation.

  14. Method for monitoring slow dynamics recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Kristian C. E.; Hedberg, Claes M.

    2012-11-01

    Slow Dynamics is a specific material property, which for example is connected to the degree of damage. It is therefore of importance to be able to attain proper measurements of it. Usually it has been monitored by acoustic resonance methods which have very high sensitivity as such. However, because the acoustic wave is acting both as conditioner and as probe, the measurement is affecting the result which leads to a mixing of the fast nonlinear response to the excitation and the slow dynamics material recovery. In this article a method is introduced which, for the first time, removes the fast dynamics from the process and allows the behavior of the slow dynamics to be monitored by itself. The new method has the ability to measure at the shortest possible recovery times, and at very small conditioning strains. For the lowest strains the sound speed increases with strain, while at higher strains a linear decreasing dependence is observed. This is the first method and test that has been able to monitor the true material state recovery process.

  15. Synthesis and Performance of Polyurethane Coated Urea as Slow/controlled Release Fertilizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qingshan; WU Shu; RU Tiejun; WANG Limin; XING Guangzhong; WANG Jinming

    2012-01-01

    Polyurethane coated urea slow/controlled release fertilizer was prepared based on urea granules,isocyanate,polyols and paraffin.Isocyanate reacted with polyols to synthesize the polyurethane skin layer on urea granules surface.Paraffin serves as a lubricant during syntheses of polyurethane skin layers.The structure and nutrient release characteristics of the polyurethane skin layers were investigated by FTIR,SEM and TG.Urea nitrogen slow-release behavior of the polyurethane coated urea was tested.The experimental results indicated that compact and dense polyurethane skin layers with a thickness of 10-15 μm were formed on urea surface,the urea nitrogen slow-release time can reach 40-50 days.Paraffin proves to play a key role in inhibiting water to penetrate into urea,but excessive addition would decrease the polyurethane crosslinking density.

  16. Did growth of high Andes slow down Nazca plate subduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteros, J.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2010-12-01

    The convergence velocity rate of the Nazca and South-American plate and its variations during the last 100 My are quite well-known from the global plate reconstructions. The key observation is that the rate of Nazca plate subduction has decreased by about 2 times during last 20 Myr and particularly since 10 Ma. During the same time the Central Andes have grown to its present 3-4 km height. Based on the thin-shell model, coupled with mantle convection, it was suggested that slowing down of Nazca plate resulted from the additional load exerted by the Andes. However, the thin-shell model, that integrates stresses and velocities vertically and therefore has no vertical resolution, is not an optimal tool to model a subduction zone. More appropriate would be modeling it with full thermomechanical formulation and self-consistent subduction. We performed a set of experiments to estimate the influence that an orogen like the Andes could have on an ongoing subduction. We used an enhanced 2D version of the SLIM-3D code suitable to simulate the evolution of a subducting slab in a self-consistent manner (gravity driven) at vertical crossections through upper mantle, transition zone and shallower lower mantle. The model utilizes non-linear temperature- and stress-dependant visco-elasto-plastic rheology and phase transitions at 410 and 660 km depth. We started from a reference case with a similar configuration as both Nazca and South-America plates. After some Mys of slow kinematicaly imposed subduction, to develop a coherent thermo-mechanical state, subduction was totally dynamic. On the other cases, the crust was slowly thickened artificially during 10 My to generate the Andean topography. Although our first results show no substantial changes on the velocity pattern of the subduction, we, however, consider this result as preliminary. At the meeting we plan to report completed and verified modeling results and discuss other possible cases of the late Cenozoic slowing down of

  17. Nonlinear dynamical triggering of slow slip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knuth, Matthew W [WISCONSIN; Kaproth, Bryan M [PENN STATE; Carpenter, Brett [PENN STATE; Guyer, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daub, Eric G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marone, Chris [PENN STATE

    2010-12-10

    Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads ({approx}1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred

  18. Global and regional ocean carbon uptake and climate change: sensitivity to a substantial mitigation scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vichi, Marcello; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), Bologna (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Bologna (Italy); Manzini, Elisa [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), Bologna (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Bologna (Italy); Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); Fogli, Pier Giuseppe [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), Bologna (Italy); Alessandri, Andrea [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), Bologna (Italy); ENEA, Rome (Italy); Patara, Lavinia [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), Bologna (Italy); Leibniz Institute of Marine Sciences (IFM-GEOMAR), Kiel (Germany); Scoccimarro, Enrico [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Bologna (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Under future scenarios of business-as-usual emissions, the ocean storage of anthropogenic carbon is anticipated to decrease because of ocean chemistry constraints and positive feedbacks in the carbon-climate dynamics, whereas it is still unknown how the oceanic carbon cycle will respond to more substantial mitigation scenarios. To evaluate the natural system response to prescribed atmospheric ''target'' concentrations and assess the response of the ocean carbon pool to these values, 2 centennial projection simulations have been performed with an Earth System Model that includes a fully coupled carbon cycle, forced in one case with a mitigation scenario and the other with the SRES A1B scenario. End of century ocean uptake with the mitigation scenario is projected to return to the same magnitude of carbon fluxes as simulated in 1960 in the Pacific Ocean and to lower values in the Atlantic. With A1B, the major ocean basins are instead projected to decrease the capacity for carbon uptake globally as found with simpler carbon cycle models, while at the regional level the response is contrasting. The model indicates that the equatorial Pacific may increase the carbon uptake rates in both scenarios, owing to enhancement of the biological carbon pump evidenced by an increase in Net Community Production (NCP) following changes in the subsurface equatorial circulation and enhanced iron availability from extratropical regions. NCP is a proxy of the bulk organic carbon made available to the higher trophic levels and potentially exportable from the surface layers. The model results indicate that, besides the localized increase in the equatorial Pacific, the NCP of lower trophic levels in the northern Pacific and Atlantic oceans is projected to be halved with respect to the current climate under a substantial mitigation scenario at the end of the twenty-first century. It is thus suggested that changes due to cumulative carbon emissions up to present and the

  19. Warming in the Yukon River Basin is Likely to Release Substantial Amounts of Soil Organic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juday, G. P.; Huntington, T. G.

    2005-12-01

    In recent decades the Yukon River Basin (YRB) in northwestern Canada and central Alaska has experienced a substantial warming trend resulting in a variety of geophysical and biological responses. Climatologic measurements consistent with rapid warming in the YRB during the last several decades of the 20th century include surface air temperature (especially daily minima), number of frost-free days, and the number of very warm days. During the 20th century daily maxima in the warm season in the YRB have increased only weakly, and modest autumn cooling occurred. Indirect indicators of warming include shrinkage in lake area, decreases in glacier mass, increased fire frequency and annual area burned, and changes in permafrost thickness and permafrost temperature. Changes in tree growth rates and susceptibility to pests have been related to warming and drying in interior Alaska. Oral histories of Alaska Natives have also revealed many other warming related changes in the YRB. If ongoing warming trends continue there is a concern that large stores of soil organic carbon (SOC) will be at risk for release to the atmosphere through heterotrophic decomposition. Warming tends to accelerate microbial decomposition at a faster rate than net primary productivity. One of the most important effects of warming in the YRB is likely to be its influence on the hydrologic and cryospheric regimes. Warming may be accompanied by soil drying and lowering of the water table in wetlands and lakes exposing more SOC to aerobic decomposition. A substantial portion of the YRB is underlain by permafrost that thaws to a variable depth (active layer) each summer. Increasing the thickness of the active layer exposes more SOC to microbial decomposition. Increasing the burned area results in direct SOC losses by oxidation during the fire and decreases albedo that warms surface soils and increases the thickness of the active layer. Warming and increasing length of the growing season increases seasonal

  20. Global and regional ocean carbon uptake and climate change: sensitivity to a substantial mitigation scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichi, Marcello; Manzini, Elisa; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Alessandri, Andrea; Patara, Lavinia; Scoccimarro, Enrico; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio

    2011-11-01

    Under future scenarios of business-as-usual emissions, the ocean storage of anthropogenic carbon is anticipated to decrease because of ocean chemistry constraints and positive feedbacks in the carbon-climate dynamics, whereas it is still unknown how the oceanic carbon cycle will respond to more substantial mitigation scenarios. To evaluate the natural system response to prescribed atmospheric "target" concentrations and assess the response of the ocean carbon pool to these values, 2 centennial projection simulations have been performed with an Earth System Model that includes a fully coupled carbon cycle, forced in one case with a mitigation scenario and the other with the SRES A1B scenario. End of century ocean uptake with the mitigation scenario is projected to return to the same magnitude of carbon fluxes as simulated in 1960 in the Pacific Ocean and to lower values in the Atlantic. With A1B, the major ocean basins are instead projected to decrease the capacity for carbon uptake globally as found with simpler carbon cycle models, while at the regional level the response is contrasting. The model indicates that the equatorial Pacific may increase the carbon uptake rates in both scenarios, owing to enhancement of the biological carbon pump evidenced by an increase in Net Community Production (NCP) following changes in the subsurface equatorial circulation and enhanced iron availability from extratropical regions. NCP is a proxy of the bulk organic carbon made available to the higher trophic levels and potentially exportable from the surface layers. The model results indicate that, besides the localized increase in the equatorial Pacific, the NCP of lower trophic levels in the northern Pacific and Atlantic oceans is projected to be halved with respect to the current climate under a substantial mitigation scenario at the end of the twenty-first century. It is thus suggested that changes due to cumulative carbon emissions up to present and the projected concentration

  1. Wettability-independent bouncing on flat surfaces mediated by thin air films

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Jolet; Lagraauw, Rudy; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-01-01

    The impingement of drops onto solid surfaces plays a crucial role in a variety of processes, including inkjet printing, fog harvesting, anti-icing, dropwise condensation and spray coating. Recent efforts in understanding and controlling drop impact behaviour focused on superhydrophobic surfaces with specific surface structures enabling drop bouncing with reduced contact time. Here, we report a different universal bouncing mechanism that occurs on both wetting and non-wetting flat surfaces for both high and low surface tension liquids. Using high-speed multiple-wavelength interferometry, we show that this bouncing mechanism is based on the continuous presence of an air film for moderate drop impact velocities. This submicrometre `air cushion' slows down the incoming drop and reverses its momentum. Viscous forces in the air film play a key role in this process: they provide transient stability of the air cushion against squeeze-out, mediate momentum transfer, and contribute a substantial part of the energy dissipation during bouncing.

  2. GEANT4 simulation of slow positron beam implantation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryzek, Jerzy; Horodek, Paweł

    2008-09-01

    The paper presents the positron implantation profiles, which are important for proper interpretation of data produced in slow-positron depth defect spectroscopy (VEPAS). In the paper, we compared the profiles reported in other publications and those obtained using the GEANT4 codes, which are used for the simulation of interaction of energetic particles with matter. The comparison shows that the GEANT4 codes produce profiles which match fairly well with those generated by other codes, which take into account more accurately processes at low energies when positrons interact with core electrons, valence electrons, plasmons etc. The profiles in different materials simulated for different implant energies were parameterized using two analytical formulas: the Makhovian profile and the profile proposed by Ghosh et al. [V.J. Ghosh, D.O. Welch, K.G. Lynn, in: E. Ottewite, A.H. WeissSlow (Eds.), Positron Beam Techniques for Solids and Surfaces, Jackson Hole, Wyoming, AIP Conference Proceedings, Vol. 303, New York, 1994, p. 37]. The adjustable parameters obtained are presented in Tables 1 and 2. The total backscattering probability obtained from the GEANT4 simulations is in agreement with experimental data reported.

  3. Imaging slow slip events and their relationship to seismic slow earthquakes in southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Moore, A. W.; Owen, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    Past geodetic and seismic studies have revealed a diverse spectrum of fault slip behaviors including slow slip events (SSEs), tremor, low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) and very-low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs). Thanks to its dense GPS and seismic network, Japan has been one of the prime places to study slow slip transients and their relationship to seismic slow earthquakes such as tremor, LFEs and VLFEs. Recent studies show there are complex interactions between slow slip transients, large seismic event, downdip LFEs and up-dip VLFEs in southwest Japan [e.g., Liu et al., 2015]. In this study, we extend our Japan GEONET GPS position time series reanalysis from 1996 to 2016/07/02 using JPL GIPSY/OASIS-II based GPS Network Processor and raw data provided by Geospatial Information Authority of Japan and Caltech. Our analysis uses re-estimated JPL precise orbits, GMF troposphere model, and single receiver ambiguity resolution strategy. The resultant decades long position time series show good consistency and reduced scattering over the entire time period. We apply an in-house developed time series analysis framework to systemically identify and correct the offsets caused by earthquakes, instrument and other unknown sources, and estimate and correct common mode error. We employ a time dependent slip inversion approach to image the spatiotemporal variations of transient slip and investigate their relationship to seismic slow earthquakes. Our application to some recent events such as the one in Bungo Channel region in 2014-2015 shows different spatiotemporal slip pattern as compared to previous recurrent SSEs at the same region. The change in slip pattern, along with a shortened interval, indicates a possible change in recurrent behaviors. Within the same transient event, we find slow slip can occur with and without accompanying tremor/LFEs, suggesting different underlying mechanisms of the two. We are in the process of modeling other slip transients and investigating

  4. A high-performance carbon derived from corn stover via microwave and slow pyrolysis for supercapacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Hong; wang, Xiaomin; Shen, Yanbin

    2014-01-01

    Microwave and slow pyrolysis were conducted for converting corn stover to biochar. Chemical agents of sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide were used to progressively produce activated carbon. The pore structures and surface area of the samples were characterized by nitrogen adsorption...

  5. A high-performance carbon derived from corn stover via microwave and slow pyrolysis for supercapacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Hong; wang, Xiaomin; Shen, Yanbin

    2014-01-01

    Microwave and slow pyrolysis were conducted for converting corn stover to biochar. Chemical agents of sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide were used to progressively produce activated carbon. The pore structures and surface area of the samples were characterized by nitrogen adsorption...

  6. Slow Wave Sleep and Long Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Alexandra; Orr, Martin; Arias, Diana; Rueger, Melanie; Johnston, Smith; Leveton, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    While ground research has clearly shown that preserving adequate quantities of sleep is essential for optimal health and performance, changes in the progression, order and /or duration of specific stages of sleep is also associated with deleterious outcomes. As seen in Figure 1, in healthy individuals, REM and Non-REM sleep alternate cyclically, with stages of Non-REM sleep structured chronologically. In the early parts of the night, for instance, Non-REM stages 3 and 4 (Slow Wave Sleep, or SWS) last longer while REM sleep spans shorter; as night progresses, the length of SWS is reduced as REM sleep lengthens. This process allows for SWS to establish precedence , with increases in SWS seen when recovering from sleep deprivation. SWS is indeed regarded as the most restorative portion of sleep. During SWS, physiological activities such as hormone secretion, muscle recovery, and immune responses are underway, while neurological processes required for long term learning and memory consolidation, also occur. The structure and duration of specific sleep stages may vary independent of total sleep duration, and changes in the structure and duration have been shown to be associated with deleterious outcomes. Individuals with narcolepsy enter sleep through REM as opposed to stage 1 of NREM. Disrupting slow wave sleep for several consecutive nights without reducing total sleep duration or sleep efficiency is associated with decreased pain threshold, increased discomfort, fatigue, and the inflammatory flare response in skin. Depression has been shown to be associated with a reduction of slow wave sleep and increased REM sleep. Given research that shows deleterious outcomes are associated with changes in sleep structure, it is essential to characterize and mitigate not only total sleep duration, but also changes in sleep stages.

  7. Fast-slow and slow-slow form of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia sustained by the same reentrant circuit: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantù, Francesco; De Filippo, Paolo; Rordorf, Roberto; De Ferrari, Gaetano M; Frattini, Folco; Petracci, Barbara; Russo, Giovanni; Cerrone, Marina; Landolina, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    It has been suggested that a reentrant circuit confined to the posterior extensions of the atrioventricular node underlies both fast-slow and slow-slow types of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT). According to this hypothesis the fast-slow reentrant circuit would be formed by two slow pathways, located in the rightward and leftward posterior extension of the atrioventricular node. Thus, the fast pathway would act as a bystander with respect to the reentrant circuit. We describe the case of a 40-year-old woman with several episodes of palpitations unresponsive to antiarrhythmic drugs. The ECG during symptoms showed a narrow QRS tachycardia with a long ventriculo-atrial interval and a negative P wave in the inferior leads. Electrophysiological study showed the inducibility of a slow-slow AVNRT which rapidly shifted to a fast-slow AVNRT without any change in the duration of the tachycardia cycle. Our observation is in agreement with the hypothesis that the fast-slow reentrant circuit consists of two slow pathways with the fast pathway acting as a bystander.

  8. Counting graphene layers with very slow electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Ludĕk; Mikmeková, Eliška; Müllerová, Ilona [Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); Lejeune, Michaël [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Faculté des Sciences d' Amiens, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-01-05

    The study aimed at collection of data regarding the transmissivity of freestanding graphene for electrons across their full energy scale down to the lowest energies. Here, we show that the electron transmissivity of graphene drops with the decreasing energy of the electrons and remains below 10% for energies below 30 eV, and that the slow electron transmissivity value is suitable for reliable determination of the number of graphene layers. Moreover, electrons incident below 50 eV release adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules and effectively clean graphene in contrast to faster electrons that decompose these molecules and create carbonaceous contamination.

  9. Improvement of pedestrian flow by slow rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Daichi; Tomoeda, Akiyasu; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a simple model for pedestrians by dividing walking velocity into two parts, which are step size and pace of walking (number of steps per unit time). Theoretical analysis on pace indicates that rhythm that is slower than normal-walking pace in a low-density regime increases flow if the flow-density diagram is convex downward in a high-density regime. In order to verify this result, we have performed an experiment with real pedestrians and observed the improvement of flow in a congested situation using slow rhythm.

  10. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bonebrake, Eric; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, Victor A.; Haight, R. C.; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O' Donnell, J. M.; Weltz, Adam

    2012-06-07

    This report documents the progress that has been completed in the first half of FY2012 in the MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer project. Significant progress has been made on the algorithm development. We have an improve understanding of the experimental responses in LSDS for fuel-related material. The calibration of the ultra-depleted uranium foils was completed, but the results are inconsistent from measurement to measurement. Future work includes developing a conceptual model of an LSDS system to assay plutonium in used fuel, improving agreement between simulations and measurement, design of a thorium fission chamber, and evaluation of additional detector techniques.

  11. Slow slip event at Kilauea Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Miklius, Asta; Wilson, J. David; Okubo, Paul G.; Montgomery-Brown, Emily; Segall, Paul; Brooks, Benjamin; Foster, James; Wolfe, Cecily; Syracuse, Ellen; Thurbe, Clifford

    2010-01-01

    Early in the morning of 1 February 2010 (UTC; early afternoon 31 January 2010 local time), continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) and tilt instruments detected a slow slip event (SSE) on the south flank of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. The SSE lasted at least 36 hours and resulted in a maximum of about 3 centimeters of seaward displacement. About 10 hours after the start of the slip, a flurry of small earthquakes began (Figure 1) in an area of the south flank recognized as having been seismically active during past SSEs [Wolfe et al., 2007], suggesting that the February earthquakes were triggered by stress associated with slip [Segall et al., 2006].

  12. Posterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation: how slow should we go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Gregory C

    2008-02-01

    Outcomes after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstructive surgery have historically been inferior to outcomes after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). As such, some surgeons may be reluctant to recommend reconstruction of the PCL. However, recent technologic advances have substantially improved PCL reconstructive surgical outcomes. These advances include better understanding of PCL diagnosis and surgical indications; recognition of the need for repair or reconstruction of associated injuries, especially injuries to the posterolateral and posteromedial corners of the knee; PCL-specific surgical instruments including mechanical tensioning devices to restore anatomic tibial step-off; improved graft fixation techniques including primary and backup methods of fixation; use of strong graft material including advances in the procurement, processing, and usage of allograft tissue; improved surgical techniques; and advances in the understanding of knee ligament structure and biomechanics, resulting in more accurate surgical tunnel placement, achieving anatomic graft insertion sites while minimizing graft bending. Today, PCL reconstructive surgery often results in excellent function with a return to the patient's preinjury level of activity. In contrast to accelerated rehabilitation after ACL reconstructive surgery, slow and deliberate postoperative rehabilitation is recommended to allow early healing to occur after PCL reconstructive surgery.

  13. Masculine sexual activity affects slow wave sleep in Golden hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Anguiano, A; Arteaga-Silva, M; Velázquez-Moctezuma, J

    2003-02-15

    The sleep pattern is modified by events occurring during wakefulness. In rats, it has been shown that male sexual behavior has a direct influence on sleeping patterns, increasing slow wave sleep (SWS) duration. On the other hand, the sexual behavior pattern of the male Golden hamster differs from the copulatory pattern of male rats. Male hamsters copulate faster and they do not display the motor inhibition observed in rats after each ejaculation. Moreover, close to exhaustion, hamsters display a behavioral pattern known as Long Intromission, which has been linked to an sexual inhibitory process. The present study was performed to determine the effects of male sexual activity on the sleep pattern in hamsters. Subjects were allowed to copulate for 30 and 60 min. In addition, the effect of locomotor activity was also assessed. The results show that male sexual behavior induced a significant increase of SWS II, with a reduction of wakefulness. No effect was observed on REM sleep. Locomotor activity produced only a slight effect on sleep. The results are discussed in terms of the similarities between the effects observed after sexual behavior on sleep in rats and hamsters, despite the substantial differences in the behavioral pattern.

  14. Liquid crystal light valves for slow light and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Residori, S; Bortolozzo, U [INLN, CNRS, University de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, 1361 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France); Huignard, J P, E-mail: jean-pierre.huignard@thalesgroup.co [Thales Research and Technology, RD 128 91767, Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2010-02-01

    The large dispersive properties of wave mixing in liquid crystal light-valves allow obtaining fast and slow light with tunable group velocities. A slow light interferometer is shown by using this interaction.

  15. Sustainable Development of Slow Fashion Businesses: Customer Value Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sojin Jung

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As an alternative to the prevalent fast fashion model, slow fashion has emerged as a way of enhancing sustainability in the fashion industry, yet how slow fashion can enhance profitability is still largely unknown. Based on a customer value creation framework, this study empirically tested a structural model that specified the slow fashion attributes that contribute to creating perceived customer value, which subsequently increases a consumer’s intention to buy and pay a price premium for slow fashion products. An analysis of 221 U.S. consumer data revealed that delivering exclusive product value is significantly critical in creating customer value for slow fashion, and customer value, in turn, positively affects consumers’ purchase intentions. Further analysis also revealed that different slow fashion attributes distinctively affect customer value. This provides potential strategies on which slow fashion businesses can focus to secure an economically sustainable business model, thereby continuously improving environmental and social sustainability with the slow fashion ideal.

  16. Slow-light effects in photonic crystal membrane lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Yu, Yi; Ottaviano, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a systematic investigation of photonic crystal cavity laser operating in the slow-light regime. The dependence of lasing threshold on the effect of slow-light will be particularly highlighted.......In this paper, we present a systematic investigation of photonic crystal cavity laser operating in the slow-light regime. The dependence of lasing threshold on the effect of slow-light will be particularly highlighted....

  17. Principles of Slow Fashion Application in Clothing Collection Creation

    OpenAIRE

    Agnė Antanavičiūtė; Vaida Dobilaitė

    2015-01-01

    Today we can clearly see the damage which is caused by fast fashion production and mass consumption. Therefore, a relevant issue is how to reduce consumption, waste, and threat to the environment and human health. Research into the slow fashion designers approach towards eco-friendly and slow fashion products shows that it is necessary to spread ideas of slow fashion widely and teach users about ecologically friendly clothing. Therefore, this paper analyses theoretical and practical slow fash...

  18. Nonlinear Gain Saturation in Active Slow Light Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Mørk, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    We present a quantitative three-dimensional analysis of slow-light enhanced traveling wave amplification in an active semiconductor photonic crystal waveguides. The impact of slow-light propagation on the nonlinear gain saturation of the device is investigated.......We present a quantitative three-dimensional analysis of slow-light enhanced traveling wave amplification in an active semiconductor photonic crystal waveguides. The impact of slow-light propagation on the nonlinear gain saturation of the device is investigated....

  19. Automated classification of spatiotemporal characteristics of gastric slow wave propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Gao, Jerry; Du, Peng; O'Grady, Gregory; Cheng, Leo K

    2013-01-01

    Gastric contractions are underpinned by an electrical event called slow wave activity. High-resolution electrical mapping has recently been adapted to study gastric slow waves at a high spatiotemporal detail. As more slow wave data becomes available, it is becoming evident that the spatial organization of slow wave plays a key role in the initiation and maintenance of gastric dsyrhythmias in major gastric motility disorders. All of the existing slow wave signal processing techniques deal with the identification and partitioning of recorded wave events, but not the analysis of the slow wave spatial organization, which is currently performed visually. This manual analysis is time consuming and is prone to observer bias and error. We present an automated approach to classify spatial slow wave propagation patterns via the use of Pearson cross correlations. Slow wave propagations were grouped into classes based on their similarity to each other. The method was applied to high-resolution gastric slow wave recordings from four pigs. There were significant changes in the velocity of the gastric slow wave wavefront and the amplitude of the slow wave event when there was a change in direction to the slow wave wavefront during dsyrhythmias, which could be detected with the automated approach.

  20. The Persistence of a Slow Manifold with Bifurcation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall; Palmer, P.; Robert, M.

    2012-01-01

    his paper considers the persistence of a slow manifold with bifurcation in a slow-fast two degree of freedom Hamiltonian system. In particular, we consider a system with a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation in the fast space which is unfolded by the slow coordinate. The model system is motivated...

  1. Slow features nonnegative matrix factorization for temporal data decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zafeiriou, Lazaros; Nikitidis, Symeon; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Pantic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we combine the principles of temporal slowness and nonnegative parts-based learning into a single framework that aims to learn slow varying parts-based representations of time varying sequences. We demonstrate that the proposed algorithm arises naturally by embedding the Slow Features

  2. Good, Clean, Fair: The Rhetoric of the Slow Food Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines the origins of the Slow Food movement before examining the ways in which Slow Food rhetoric seeks to redefine gastronomy and combat the more deleterious effects of globalization. In articulating a new gastronomy, Slow Food founder Carlo Petrini attempts to reconstruct the gastronomy of Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, at once…

  3. Slow Photons for Photocatalysis and Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Zhao, Heng; Wu, Min; Van der Schueren, Benoit; Li, Yu; Deparis, Olivier; Ye, Jinhua; Ozin, Geoffrey A; Hasan, Tawfique; Su, Bao-Lian

    2017-02-06

    Solar light is widely recognized as one of the most valuable renewable energy sources for the future. However, the development of solar-energy technologies is severely hindered by poor energy-conversion efficiencies due to low optical-absorption coefficients and low quantum-conversion yield of current-generation materials. Huge efforts have been devoted to investigating new strategies to improve the utilization of solar energy. Different chemical and physical strategies have been used to extend the spectral range or increase the conversion efficiency of materials, leading to very promising results. However, these methods have now begun to reach their limits. What is therefore the next big concept that could efficiently be used to enhance light harvesting? Despite its discovery many years ago, with the potential for becoming a powerful tool for enhanced light harvesting, the slow-photon effect, a manifestation of light-propagation control due to photonic structures, has largely been overlooked. This review presents theoretical as well as experimental progress on this effect, revealing that the photoreactivity of materials can be dramatically enhanced by exploiting slow photons. It is predicted that successful implementation of this strategy may open a very promising avenue for a broad spectrum of light-energy-conversion technologies.

  4. Slow internal protein dynamics in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, R.; Richter, D.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale domain dynamics in proteins are found when flexible linkers or hinges connect domains. The related conformational changes are often related to the function of the protein, for example by arranging the active center after substrate binding or allowing transport and release of products. The adaptation of a specific active structure is referred to as ‘induced fit’ and is challenged by models such as ‘conformational sampling’. Newer models about protein function include some flexibility within the protein structure or even internal dynamics of the protein. As larger domains contribute to the configurational changes, the timescale of the involved motions is slowed down. The role of slow domain dynamics is being increasingly recognized as essential to understanding the function of proteins. Neutron spin echo spectroscopy (NSE) is a technique that is able to access the related timescales from 0.1 up to several hundred nanoseconds and simultaneously covers the length scale relevant for protein domain movements of several nanometers distance between domains. Here we focus on these large-scale domain fluctuations and show how the structure and dynamics of proteins can be assessed by small-angle neutron scattering and NSE.

  5. Maxwell Equations for Slow-Moving Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozov, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, the Minkowski equations obtained on the basis of theory of relativity are used to describe electromagnetic fields in moving media. But important electromagnetic processes run under non-relativistic conditions of slow-moving media. Therefore, one should carry out its description in terms of classical mechanics. Hertz derived electrodynamic equations for moving media within the frame of classical mechanics on the basis of the Maxwell theory. His equations disagree with the experimental data concerned with the moving dielectrics. In the paper, a way of description of electromagnetic fields in slow-moving media on the basis of the Maxwell theory within the frame of classical mechanics is offered by combining the Hertz approach and the experimental data concerned with the movement of dielectrics in electromagnetic fields. Received Maxwell equations lack asymmetry in the description of the reciprocal electrodynamic action of a magnet and a conductor and conform to known experimental data. Comparative analysis of the Minkowski and Maxwell models is carried out.

  6. Colectomy for idiopathic slow transit constipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童卫东; 刘宝华; 张胜本; 张连阳; 黄显凯

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the intervention of colectomy on a group of patients with idiopathic slow transit constipation (STC).Methods: Thirty-four patients with STC, underwent colectomy during recent 10 years in our department, were subjected and followed for a mean length of 34 months, and their colon transits, defecograms, colonoscopic examination, sex hormone detection, and immunohistochemical studies were retrospectively reviewed.Results: The colonic transit time ranged from 96 to 240 h, with a mean time of 136 h.Eighty-five percent of patients (29/34) accompanied with outlet obstructed constipation, and 50% (17/34) showed abnormal sex hormone levels.Colectomy obtained satisfactory results in most patients, except one case of recurrence.Moreover, more neurons positive to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and lesser to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) were seen in the colonic myenteric plexus.Conclusion: Colectomy produces a satisfactory functional outcome in the majority of patients undergoing surgery for slow transit constipation, but accompanied pelvic dysfunction must be corrected simultaneously.

  7. Using of slow positrons in various investigations - state of the art and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, V N

    2000-01-01

    Slow positrons have become a unique probe in research of electronic structure of matter, in data acquisition on Fermi surface in metals and alloys, in studying of formation processes of structural and radiation defects in metals, semiconductors, polymers and nanocrystalline structures. First positron microscopes, PAES-spectrometers, positron ionization mass spectrometers and positron tomographs have been already created. In this paper results obtained by positron annihilation method in different research fields and possibilities of future progress in obtaining of high-intensity, high-brightness slow positron beams of variable energy are briefly discussed.

  8. Slow dynamics and high variability in balanced cortical networks with clustered connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin-Kumar, Ashok; Doiron, Brent

    2012-11-01

    Anatomical studies demonstrate that excitatory connections in cortex are not uniformly distributed across a network but instead exhibit clustering into groups of highly connected neurons. The implications of clustering for cortical activity are unclear. We studied the effect of clustered excitatory connections on the dynamics of neuronal networks that exhibited high spike time variability owing to a balance between excitation and inhibition. Even modest clustering substantially changed the behavior of these networks, introducing slow dynamics during which clusters of neurons transiently increased or decreased their firing rate. Consequently, neurons exhibited both fast spiking variability and slow firing rate fluctuations. A simplified model shows how stimuli bias networks toward particular activity states, thereby reducing firing rate variability as observed experimentally in many cortical areas. Our model thus relates cortical architecture to the reported variability in spontaneous and evoked spiking activity.

  9. Alloy substantially free of dendrites and method of forming the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Figueredo, Anacleto M.; Apelian, Diran; Findon, Matt M.; Saddock, Nicholas

    2009-04-07

    Described herein are alloys substantially free of dendrites. A method includes forming an alloy substantially free of dendrites. A superheated alloy is cooled to form a nucleated alloy. The temperature of the nucleated alloy is controlled to prevent the nuclei from melting. The nucleated alloy is mixed to distribute the nuclei throughout the alloy. The nucleated alloy is cooled with nuclei distributed throughout.

  10. Detection of Dew-Point by substantial Raman Band Frequency Jumps (A new Method)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    Detection of Dew-Point by substantial Raman Band Frequency Jumps (A new Method). See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/jumps.pdf......Detection of Dew-Point by substantial Raman Band Frequency Jumps (A new Method). See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/jumps.pdf...

  11. 46 CFR 252.22 - Substantiality and extent of foreign-flag competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Substantiality and extent of foreign-flag competition... WORLDWIDE SERVICES Operation § 252.22 Substantiality and extent of foreign-flag competition. (a) Type and tonnage groupings. Foreign-flag competition shall be determined, as of January 1 of the year...

  12. 20 CFR 229.85 - Substantial gainful activity by blind employee or child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... in any type of substantial gainful activity which requires skills or abilities comparable to those of... THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE Miscellaneous Deductions and... substantial gainful activity that does not require skills or ability used in his or her previous work. However...

  13. 76 FR 76905 - Extension of Comment Period for Proposed Rulemaking on Substantially Underserved Trust Areas (SUTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... improvements to rural electric, water and waste, and telecom and broadband infrastructure, RUS also plays a big... of infrastructure projects in Substantially Underserved Trust Areas (SUTA). DATES: Comments must be... improvement of infrastructure projects in Substantially Underserved Trust Areas (SUTA). The RUS loan,...

  14. 26 CFR 1.6043-3T - Returns regarding liquidation, dissolution, termination, or substantial contraction of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Returns regarding liquidation, dissolution, termination, or substantial contraction of organizations exempt from taxation under section 501(a) (temporary..., dissolution, termination, or substantial contraction of organizations exempt from taxation under section 501(a...

  15. Computer analysis of slow vital capacity spirograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primiano, F P; Bacevice, A E; Lough, M D; Doershuk, C F

    1982-01-01

    We have developed a digital computer program which evaluates the vital capacity and its subdivisions, expiratory reserve volume and inspiratory capacity. The algorithm examines the multibreath spirogram, a continuous record of quiet breathing interspersed among repeated slow, large volume maneuvers. Quiet breaths are recognized by comparing features of each breath to the respective average and variation of these features for all breaths. A self-scaling, iterative procedure is used to identify those end-tidal points that most likely represent the subject's functional residual capacity. A least-squared error baseline is then fit through these points to partition the vital capacity. Twenty-three spirograms from patients with documented pulmonary disease were independently analyzed by the computer, a pulmonary function technician, and the laboratory supervisor. No practical differences were found among the results. However, the computer's values, in contrast to those of the technician, were reproducible on repeated trials and free of computational and transcriptional errors.

  16. Slow spin relaxation in dipolar spin ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orendac, Martin; Sedlakova, Lucia; Orendacova, Alzbeta; Vrabel, Peter; Feher, Alexander; Pajerowski, Daniel M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Meisel, Mark W.; Shirai, Masae; Bramwell, Steven T.

    2009-03-01

    Spin relaxation in dipolar spin ice Dy2Ti2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7 was investigated using the magnetocaloric effect and susceptibility. The magnetocaloric behavior of Dy2Ti2O7 at temperatures where the orientation of spins is governed by ``ice rules`` (T Tice) revealed thermally activated relaxation; however, the resulting temperature dependence of the relaxation time is more complicated than anticipated by a mere extrapolation of the corresponding high temperature data [1]. A susceptibility study of Ho2Ti2O7 was performed at T > Tice and in high magnetic fields, and the results suggest a slow relaxation of spins analogous to the behavior reported in a highly polarized cooperative paramagnet [2]. [1] J. Snyder et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 107201. [2] B. G. Ueland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (2006) 027216.

  17. Slow light based optical frequency shifter

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Qian; Thuresson, Axel; Nilsson, Adam N; Rippe, Lars; Kröll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically a controllable way of shifting the frequency of an optical pulse by using a combination of spectral hole burning, slow light effect, and linear Stark effect in a rare-earth-ion doped crystal. We claim that the solid angle of acceptance of a frequency shift structure can be close to $2\\pi$, which means that the frequency shifter could work not only for optical pulses propagating in a specific spatial mode but also for randomly scattered light. As the frequency shift is controlled solely by an external electric field, it works also for weak coherent light fields, and can e.g. be used as a frequency shifter for quantum memory devices in quantum communication.

  18. Environmentally friendly slow-release nitrogen fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Boli; Liu, Mingzhu; Lü, Shaoyu; Xie, Lihua; Wang, Yanfang

    2011-09-28

    To sustain the further world population, more fertilizers are required, which may become an environmental hazard, unless adequate technical and socioeconomic impacts are addressed. In the current study, slow-release formulations of nitrogen fertilizer were developed on the basis of natural attapulgite (APT) clay, ethylcellulose (EC) film, and sodium carboxymethylcellulose/hydroxyethylcellulose (CMC/HEC) hydrogel. The structural and chemical characteristics of the product were examined. The release profiles of urea, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium chloride as nitrogen fertilizer substrates were determined in soil. To further compare the release profiles of nitrogen from different fertilizer substrates, a mathematical model for nutrient release from the coated fertilizer was applied to calculate the diffusion coefficient D. The influence of the product on water-holding and water-retention capacities of soil was determined. The experimental data indicated that the product can effectively reduce nutrient loss, improve use efficiency of water, and prolong irrigation cycles in drought-prone environments.

  19. Thermal slow evolution of compact objects

    CERN Document Server

    Becerra, L; Nunez, L A

    2013-01-01

    We present a comparative study on the gravitational dissipative collapse for local and nonlocal anisotropic spherical matter configurations in the slow contraction approximation. The matter contents are radiant, anisotropic (unequal stresses) spherical local and nonlocal fluids, where the heat flux is described by causal thermodynamics, leading to a consistent determination of the temperature. It is found that both, local and nonlocal, matter configurations exhibit thermal peeling when most of the radiated energy comes from the outer layers of the distribution. This peeling occurs when different signs in the velocity of fluid elements appears, giving rise to the splitting of the matter configuration. This effect emerges as a combination of convection mass transfer and radiation flux, but is the intense radiation field at the outer layers of the object that causes of the peeling. This effect seems to be more violent for nonlocal configurations and it is very sensible to the initial mass of the energy flux prof...

  20. Limits of slow light in photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2008-01-01

    in the group velocity acquiring a finite value above zero at the band-gap edges while attaining uperluminal values within the band gap. Simple scalings of the minimum and maximum group velocities with the imaginary part of the dielectric function or, equivalently, the linewidth of the broadened states......While ideal photonic crystals would support modes with a vanishing group velocity, state-of-the-art structures have still only provided a slow down by roughly two orders of magnitude. We find that the induced density of states caused by lifetime broadening of the electromagnetic modes results...... are presented. The results obtained are entirely general and may be applied to any effect which results in a broadening of the electromagnetic states, such as loss, disorder, and finite-size effects. This significantly limits the reduction in group velocity attainable via photonic crystals....

  1. Slow flow in channels with porous walls

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Kaare H

    2012-01-01

    We consider the slow flow of a viscous incompressible liquid in a channel of constant but arbitrary cross section shape, driven by non-uniform suction or injection through the porous channel walls. A similarity transformation reduces the Navier-Stokes equations to a set of coupled equations for the velocity potential in two dimensions. When the channel aspect ratio and Reynolds number are both small, the problem reduces to solving the biharmonic equation with constant forcing in two dimensions. With the relevant boundary conditions, determining the velocity field in a porous channels is thus equivalent to solving for the vertical displacement of a simply suspended thin plate under uniform load. This allows us to provide analytic solutions for flow in porous channels whose cross-section is e.g. a rectangle or an equilateral triangle, and provides a general framework for the extension of Berman flow (Journal of Applied Physics 24(9), p. 1232, 1953) to three dimensions.

  2. Slow light pulse propagation in dispersive media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    -difference-time-domain Maxwell-Bloch simulations and compared to analytic results. For long pulses the group index (transmission) for the combined system is significantly enhanced (reduced) relative to slow light based on purely material or waveguide dispersion. Shorter pulses are strongly distorted and depending on parameters......We present a theoretical and numerical analysis of pulse propagation in a semiconductor photonic crystal waveguide with embedded quantum dots in a regime where the pulse is subjected to both waveguide and material dispersion. The group index and the transmission are investigated by finite...... broadening or break-up of the pulse may be observed. The transition from linear to nonlinear pulse propagation is quantified in terms of the spectral width of the pulse. To cite this article: T.R. Nielsen et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009). (C) 2009 Academie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All...

  3. Slow photon delay and the neutrino velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Martin, Gustavo R

    2011-01-01

    Starting from the coordinate system used by Einstein to find the bending of light rays by gravitational fields we calculate the effect of the Earth gravitational energy along a hypothetical photon null path on the geoid non inertial system. There is an energy term, relative to an inertial system, which may be interpreted as a small time-relative "dressed" physical rest mass correction to the photon null mass. This relative gravitational potential energy determines a proper time delay proportional to the laboratory non inertial flying time interval along the trajectory with a small factor 5.276x10-5. Applying this delay to a hypothetical photon trajectory from the CERN SPS/CNGS target to the LNGS OPERA detector we may interpret the reported neutrino time anomaly, which is of the same order of magnitude, by saying that the OPERA neutrino is faster than our slow photon but its speed is smaller than the fundamental constant c.

  4. Lethal and pre-lethal effects of a fungal biopesticide contribute to substantial and rapid control of malaria vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Blanford

    Full Text Available Rapidly emerging insecticide resistance is creating an urgent need for new active ingredients to control the adult mosquitoes that vector malaria. Biopesticides based on the spores of entomopathogenic fungi have shown considerable promise by causing very substantial mortality within 7-14 days of exposure. This mortality will generate excellent malaria control if there is a high likelihood that mosquitoes contact fungi early in their adult lives. However, where contact rates are lower, as might result from poor pesticide coverage, some mosquitoes will contact fungi one or more feeding cycles after they acquire malaria, and so risk transmitting malaria before the fungus kills them. Critics have argued that 'slow acting' fungal biopesticides are, therefore, incapable of delivering malaria control in real-world contexts. Here, utilizing standard WHO laboratory protocols, we demonstrate effective action of a biopesticide much faster than previously reported. Specifically, we show that transient exposure to clay tiles sprayed with a candidate biopesticide comprising spores of a natural isolate of Beauveria bassiana, could reduce malaria transmission potential to zero within a feeding cycle. The effect resulted from a combination of high mortality and rapid fungal-induced reduction in feeding and flight capacity. Additionally, multiple insecticide-resistant lines from three key African malaria vector species were completely susceptible to fungus. Thus, fungal biopesticides can block transmission on a par with chemical insecticides, and can achieve this where chemical insecticides have little impact. These results support broadening the current vector control paradigm beyond fast-acting chemical toxins.

  5. Theory of slow light enhanced four-wave mixing in photonic crystal waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagiustina, M; Someda, C G; Vadalà, G; Combrié, S; De Rossi, A

    2010-09-27

    The equations for Four-Wave-Mixing in a Photonic Crystal waveguide are derived accurately. The dispersive nature of slow-light enhancement, the impact of Bloch mode reshaping in the nonlinear overlap integrals and the tensor nature of the third order polarization are therefore taken into account. Numerical calculations reveal substantial differences with simpler models, which increase with decreasing group velocity. We predict that the gain for a 1.3 mm long, unoptimized GaInP waveguide will exceed 10 dB if the pump power exceeds 1 W.

  6. Theory of Slow Light Enhanced Four-Wave Mixing in Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Santagiustina, M; Vadalà, G; Combrié, S; De Rossi, A

    2010-01-01

    The equations for Four-Wave-Mixing in a Photonic Crystal waveguide are derived accurately. The dispersive nature of slow-light enhancement, the impact of Bloch mode reshaping in the nonlinear overlap integrals and the tensor nature of the third order polarization are therefore taken into account. Numerical calculations reveal substantial differences with simpler models, which increase with decreasing group velocity. We predict that the gain for a 1.3 mm long, unoptimized GaInP waveguide will exceed 10 dB if the pump power exceeds 1 W.

  7. Third Interger Resonance Slow Extraction Using RFKO at High Space Charge

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaslaev, V; Johnstone, J; Park, C S; Werkema, S

    2012-01-01

    A proposal to search for direct {\\mu}-->e conversion at Fermilab requires slow, resonant extraction of an intense proton beam. Large space charge forces will present challenges, partly due to the substantial betatron tune spread. The main challenges will be maintaining a uniform spill profile and moderate losses at the septum. We propose to use "radio frequency knockout" (RFKO) for fine tuning the extraction. Strategies for the use of the RFKO method will be discussed here in the context of the Mu2e experiment. The feasibility of this method has been demonstrated in simulations.

  8. Are ammonia emissions from field-applied slurry substantially over-estimated in European emission inventories?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sintermann

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The EMEP/EEA guidebook 2009 for agricultural emission inventories reports an average ammonia (NH3 emission factor (EF by volatilisation of 55% of the applied total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN content for cattle slurry, and 35% losses for pig slurry, irrespective of the type of surface or slurry characteristics such as dry matter content and pH. In this review article, we compiled over 350 measurements of EFs published between 1991 and 2011. The standard slurry application technique during the early years of this period, when a large number of measurements were made, was spreading by splash plate, and as a result reference EFs given in many European inventories are predominantly based on this technique. However, slurry application practices have evolved since then, while there has also been a shift in measurement techniques and investigated plot sizes. We therefore classified the available measurements according to the flux measurement technique or measurement plot size and year of measurement. Medium size plots (usually circles between 20 to 50 m radius generally yielded the highest EFs. The most commonly used measurement setups at this scale were based on the Integrated Horizontal Flux method (IHF or the ZINST method (a simplified IHF method. Several empirical models were published in the years 1993 to 2003 predicting NH3 EFs as a function of meteorology and slurry characteristics (Menzi et al., 1998; Søgaard et al., 2002. More recent measurements show substantially lower EFs which calls for new measurement series in order to validate the various measurement approaches against each other and to derive revised inputs for inclusion into emission inventories.

  9. Modeling of Slow Slip Events at the Hikurangi Subduction Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C. A.; Wallace, L. M.; Beavan, R. J.; Lohman, R. B.; Ellis, S. M.; Marson-Pidgeon, K.; Eberhart-Phillips, D. M.; Reyners, M.; Henrys, S. A.; Bell, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) occur along nearly the entire Hikurangi subduction margin adjacent to the North Island, New Zealand. Long duration (1-2 years), deep (40- 60 km depth), large events (equivalent to Mw ~7.0) occur at the southern Hikurangi margin, while shallow (10-15 km depth), short (1-2 weeks), smaller events (equivalent to Mw ~6.5) occur at the northern and central Hikurangi margin. A recently-initiated shallow event (Castle Point) lies further to the south than previous shallow events and appears to be rupturing a portion of the plate interface that was previously thought to be locked. Since 2000, three major slow slip events have been identified at the southern Hikurangi margin; the 2003 Kapiti SSE, the 2004/2005 Manawatu SSE, and the 2007/2008 Kapiti SSE (which ended in early 2009). A repeat of the 2004/2005 Manawatu event is presently underway. In some cases, these SSEs may have triggered moderate seismicity within the subducting Pacific plate (e.g., Reyners and Bannister, 2007). To date, all of the inferred slip distributions for the SSEs have been obtained using elastic half-space dislocation models. Numerous recent studies of coseismic displacement fields have shown that variations in elastic properties and surface topography can influence the predicted deformation. In our initial work, we used a finite element model to evaluate the influence of material property variations on the predicted surface deformation field. Elastic properties were assigned based on a seismic velocity model, and slip distributions inferred from an elastic half-space model were applied. When compared to the elastic half- space model, we found that the heterogeneous models generally predict larger amounts of surface deformation, indicating that the half-space models may be overestimating the amount of slip. As the next phase in our study, we are using finite element models that include material property variations and topography to generate Green's functions for use in an

  10. Slowing DNA Translocation in a Nanofluidic Field-Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifan; Yobas, Levent

    2016-04-26

    Here, we present an experimental demonstration of slowing DNA translocation across a nanochannel by modulating the channel surface charge through an externally applied gate bias. The experiments were performed on a nanofluidic field-effect transistor, which is a monolithic integrated platform featuring a 50 nm-diameter in-plane alumina nanocapillary whose entire length is surrounded by a gate electrode. The field-effect transistor behavior was validated on the gating of ionic conductance and protein transport. The gating of DNA translocation was subsequently studied by measuring discrete current dips associated with single λ-DNA translocation events under a source-to-drain bias of 1 V. The translocation speeds under various gate bias conditions were extracted by fitting event histograms of the measured translocation time to the first passage time distributions obtained from a simple 1D biased diffusion model. A positive gate bias was observed to slow the translocation of single λ-DNA chains markedly; the translocation speed was reduced by an order of magnitude from 18.4 mm/s obtained under a floating gate down to 1.33 mm/s under a positive gate bias of 9 V. Therefore, a dynamic and flexible regulation of the DNA translocation speed, which is vital for single-molecule sequencing, can be achieved on this device by simply tuning the gate bias. The device is realized in a conventional semiconductor microfabrication process without the requirement of advanced lithography, and can be potentially further developed into a compact electronic single-molecule sequencer.

  11. Child protection decisions to substantiate hospital child protection teams' reports of suspected maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedwab, Merav; Benbenishty, Rami; Chen, Wendy; Glasser, Saralee; Siegal, Gil; Lerner-Geva, Liat

    2015-02-01

    The present study focuses on the way child protection officers (CPOs) in Israel assess suspected abuse and neglect (SCAN) reports made by hospital child protection teams (CPTs), to determine whether the alleged maltreatment is substantiated. The study was conducted in six medical centers and included 358 reports investigated by CPOs for SCAN. A structured questionnaire was completed by hospital CPTs to capture all relevant information on each child referred to the CPTs. Structured phone interviews were conducted with each of the CPOs who received a CPT report. Bivariate associations and multivariate logistic regressions were conducted to estimate the substantiation rate of cases reported by CPTs and the types of maltreatment substantiated, as well as to identify case characteristics of the child and the family that were associated with the CPOs' substantiation decision. CPO follow-up investigations revealed a substantiation rate of 53.5%. The maltreatment type most commonly substantiated was neglect. The case characteristics associated with substantiation included socio-demographic background, parents' health and functioning, previous contact with social services, characteristics of the hospital referral, medical findings and an assessment of the parents' behaviors. The findings of the study highlighted the importance of cooperation between the health and welfare services and the policy makers. This cooperation is essential for identifying early signs of maltreatment. Enhanced cooperation and effective information transfer between various professionals would help prevent or at least reduce the recurrence of maltreatment and would ensure that the children and their families are treated appropriately.

  12. Fast-slow analysis for parametrically and externally excited systems with two slow rationally related excitation frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiujing; Bi, Qinsheng; Ji, Peng; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    We present a general method for analyzing mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) in parametrically and externally excited systems with two low excitation frequencies (PEESTLEFs) for the case of arbitrary m:n relation between the slow frequencies of excitations. The validity of the approach has been demonstrated using the equations of Duffing and van der Pol, separately. Our study shows that, by introducing a slow variable and finding the relation between the slow variable and the slow excitations, PEESTLEFs can be transformed into a fast-slow form with a single slow variable and therefore MMOs observed in PEESTLEFs can be understood by the classical machinery of fast subsystem analysis of the transformed fast-slow system.

  13. Controlled-release fertilizer composition substantially coated with an impermeable layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankeny, Mark

    2016-03-29

    A controlled-release fertilizer composition is provided that is substantially coated with an impermeable layer. The fertilizer composition may further include one or more hollow sections to allow for root penetration and efficient delivery of nutrients.

  14. Transcriptome, genetic editing, and microRNA divergence substantiate sympatric speciation of blind mole rat, Spalax

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Kexin; Wang, Liuyang; Knisbacher, Binyamin A; Xu, Qinqin; Levanon, Erez Y; Wang, Huihua; Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Tagore, Satabdi; Fang, Xiaodong; Bazak, Lily; Buchumenski, Ilana; Zhao, Yang; Lövy, Matěj; Li, Xiangfeng; Han, Lijuan; Frenkel, Zeev; Beiles, Avigdor; Cao, Yi Bin; Wang, Zhen Long; Nevo, Eviatar

    2016-01-01

    ... on mitochondrial and whole-genome nuclear DNA. Here, we present new evidence, including transcriptome, DNA editing, microRNA, and codon usage, substantiating earlier evidence for adaptive divergence in the abutting chalk and basalt populations...

  15. Extremely short duration high intensity interval training substantially improves insulin action in young healthy males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babraj, John A; Vollaard, Niels B J; Keast, Cameron

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traditional high volume aerobic exercise training reduces cardiovascular and metabolic disease risk but involves a substantial time commitment. Extremely low volume high-intensity interval training (HIT) has recently been demonstrated to produce improvements to aerobic function, but i...

  16. 75 FR 27504 - Substantial Product Hazard List: Hand-Held Hair Dryers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... substantial product hazard.'' B. The Product A hand-held hair dryer is a portable electrical appliance with a..., electrically energized wires across which a fan blows air. These dryers are typically used in bathrooms...

  17. Slow-roll approximation in loop quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Luc, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The slow-roll approximation is an analytical approach to study dynamical properties of the inflationary universe. In this article, systematic construction of the slow-roll expansion for effective loop quantum cosmology is presented. The analysis is performed up to the fourth order in both slow-roll parameters and the parameter controlling the strength of deviation from the classical case. The expansion is performed for three types of the slow-roll parameters: Hubble slow-roll parameters, Hubble flow parameters and potential slow-roll parameters. An accuracy of the approximation is verified by comparison with the numerical phase space trajectories for the case with a massive potential term. The results obtained in this article may be helpful in the search for the subtle quantum gravitational effects with use of the cosmological data.

  18. Slow-roll approximation in loop quantum cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, Joanna; Mielczarek, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    The slow-roll approximation is an analytical approach to study dynamical properties of the inflationary universe. In this article, systematic construction of the slow-roll expansion for effective loop quantum cosmology is presented. The analysis is performed up to the fourth order in both slow-roll parameters and the parameter controlling the strength of deviation from the classical case. The expansion is performed for three types of the slow-roll parameters: Hubble slow-roll parameters, Hubble flow parameters and potential slow-roll parameters. An accuracy of the approximation is verified by comparison with the numerical phase space trajectories for the case with a massive potential term. The results obtained in this article may be helpful in the search for the subtle quantum gravitational effects with use of the cosmological data.

  19. Slow light in tapered slot photonic crystal waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jun; LI YanPing; YANG ChuanChuan; PENG Chao; WANG ZiYu

    2009-01-01

    A slotted single-mode photonic crystal waveguide with a linear tapered slot is presented to realize slow light, whose dispersion curve is shifted by changing the slot width. When the slot width is reduced, the band curve shifts in the tapered structure, and the group velocity of light approach zero at the cut-off frequency. Therefore, different frequency components of the guided light are slowed down even loca-lized along the propagation direction inside a tapered slot photonic crystal waveguide. Furthermore, this structure can confine slow light-wave in a narrow slot waveguide, which may effectively enhance the interaction between slow light and the low-index wave-guiding materials filled in the slot. In addition, this tapered slot structure can be used to compensate group velocity dispersion of slow light by mod-ifying the structure, thus opening the opportunity for ultra-wide bandwidth slow light.

  20. A slow gravity compensated atom laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleine Büning, G.; Will, J.; Ertmer, W.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a slow guided atom laser beam outcoupled from a Bose–Einstein condensate of 87Rb atoms in a hybrid trap. The acceleration of the atom laser beam can be controlled by compensating the gravitational acceleration and we reach residual accelerations as low as 0.0027 g. The outcoupling...... mechanism allows for the production of a constant flux of 4.5×106 atoms per second and due to transverse guiding we obtain an upper limit for the mean beam width of 4.6 μm. The transverse velocity spread is only 0.2 mm/s and thus an upper limit for the beam quality parameter is M 2=2.5. We demonstrate...... the potential of the long interrogation times available with this atom laser beam by measuring the trap frequency in a single measurement. The small beam width together with the long evolution and interrogation time makes this atom laser beam a promising tool for continuous interferometric measurements....

  1. Slow positron beam at the JINR, Dubna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horodek Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Low Energy Positron Toroidal Accumulator (LEPTA at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR proposed for generation of positronium in flight has been adopted for positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS. The positron injector generates continuous slow positron beam with positron energy range between 50 eV and 35 keV. The radioactive 22Na isotope is used. In distinction to popular tungsten foil, here the solid neon is used as moderator. It allows to obtain the beam intensity of about 105 e+/s width energy spectrum characterized by full width at half maximum (FWHM of 3.4 eV and a tail to lower energies of about 30 eV. The paper covers the characteristic of variable energy positron beam at the LEPTA facility: parameters, the rule of moderation, scheme of injector, and transportation of positrons into the sample chamber. Recent status of the project and its development in the field of PAS is discussed. As an example, the measurement of the positron diffusion length in pure iron is demonstrated.

  2. Wall mode stabilization at slow plasma rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Betti, Riccardo; Reimerdes, Holger; Garofalo, Andrea; Manickam, Janardhan

    2007-11-01

    Unstable pressure-driven external kink modes, which become slowly growing resistive wall modes (RWMs) in the presence of a resistive wall, can lead to tokamak plasma disruptions at high beta. It has been shown that RWMs are stabilized by fast plasma rotation (about 1-2% of the Alfv'en frequency) in experiments. Conventional theories attribute the RWM suppression to the dissipation induced by the resonances between plasma rotation and ion bounce/transit or shear Alfv'en frequencies [1]. In those theories, the kinetic effects associated with the plasma diamagnetic frequencies and trapped-particle precession drift frequencies are neglected. It has been observed in recent experiments [2,3] that the RWM suppression also occurs at very slow plasma rotation (about 0.3% of the Alfv'en frequency), where the conventional dissipation is too small to fully suppress the RWMs. Here it is shown, that the trapped-particle kinetic contribution associated with the precession motion [4] is large enough to stabilize the RWM in DIII-D at low rotation. Work supported by the US-DoE OFES. [1] A. Bondeson and M. S. Chu, Physics of Plasmas, 3,3013 (1996). [2] H. Reimerdes et al., Physical Review Letters, 98,055001 (2007). [3] M. Takechi et al., Physical Review Letters, 98,055002 (2007). [4] B. Hu and R. Betti, Physical Review Letters, 93,105002 (2004).

  3. Mixing, ergodicity and slow relaxation phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, I. V. L.; Vainstein, M. H.; Lapas, L. C.; Batista, A. A.; Oliveira, F. A.

    2006-11-01

    Investigations on diffusion in systems with memory [I.V.L. Costa, R. Morgado, M.V.B.T. Lima, F.A. Oliveira, Europhys. Lett. 63 (2003) 173] have established a hierarchical connection between mixing, ergodicity, and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT). This hierarchy means that ergodicity is a necessary condition for the validity of the FDT, and mixing is a necessary condition for ergodicity. In this work, we compare those results with recent investigations using the Lee recurrence relations method [M.H. Lee, Phys. Rev. B 26 (1982) 2547; M.H. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 250601; M.H. Lee, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 (2006) 4651]. Lee shows that ergodicity is violated in the dynamics of the electron gas [M.H. Lee, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 (2006) 4651]. This reinforces both works and implies that the results of [I.V.L. Costa, R. Morgado, M.V.B.T. Lima, F.A. Oliveira, Europhys. Lett. 63 (2003) 173] are more general than the framework in which they were obtained. Some applications to slow relaxation phenomena are discussed.

  4. Impregnated netting slows infestation by Triatoma infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michael Z; Quíspe-Machaca, Victor R; Ylla-Velasquez, Jose L; Waller, Lance A; Richards, Jean M; Rath, Bruno; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; del Carpio, Juan G Cornejo; Cordova-Benzaquen, Eleazar; McKenzie, F Ellis; Wirtz, Robert A; Maguire, James H; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2008-10-01

    We used sentinel animal enclosures to measure the rate of infestation by the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, in an urban community of Arequipa, Peru, and to evaluate the effect of deltamethrin-impregnated netting on that rate. Impregnated netting decreased the rate of infestation of sentinel enclosures (rate ratio, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-0.38; P < 0.001), controlling for the density of surrounding vector populations and the distance of these to the sentinel enclosures. Most migrant insects were early-stage nymphs, which are less likely to carry the parasitic agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. Spread of the vector in the city therefore likely precedes spread of the parasite. Netting was particularly effective against adult insects and late-stage nymphs; taking into account population structure, netting decreased the reproductive value of migrant populations from 443.6 to 40.5. Impregnated netting can slow the spread of T. infestans and is a potentially valuable tool in the control of Chagas disease.

  5. Slow Diffusive Gravitational Instability Before Decoupling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Todd A

    2009-01-01

    Radiative diffusion damps acoustic modes at large comoving wavenumber (k) before decoupling (``Silk damping''). In a simple WKB analysis, neglecting moments of the temperature distribution beyond the quadrupole, damping appears in the acoustic mode as a term of order ik^2/(taudot) where taudot is the scattering rate per unit conformal time. Although the Jeans instability is stabilized on scales smaller than the adiabatic Jeans length, I show that the medium is linearly unstable to first order in (1/taudot) to a slow diffusive mode. At large comoving wavenumber, the characteristic growth rate becomes independent of spatial scale and constant: (t_{KH}a)^-1 ~ (128 pi G/9 kappa_T c)(rho_m/rho_b), where "a" is the scale factor, rho_m and rho_b are the matter and baryon energy density, respectively, and kappa_T is the Thomson opacity. This is the characteristic timescale for a fluid parcel to radiate away its thermal energy content at the Eddington limit, analogous to the Kelvin-Helmholz (KH) time for a massive sta...

  6. Deciding about fast and slow decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croskerry, Pat; Petrie, David A; Reilly, James B; Tait, Gordon

    2014-02-01

    Two reports in this issue address the important topic of clinical decision making. Dual process theory has emerged as the dominant model for understanding the complex processes that underlie human decision making. This theory distinguishes between the reflexive, autonomous processes that characterize intuitive decision making and the deliberate reasoning of an analytical approach. In this commentary, the authors address the polarization of viewpoints that has developed around the relative merits of the two systems. Although intuitive processes are typically fast and analytical processes slow, speed alone does not distinguish them. In any event, the majority of decisions in clinical medicine are not dependent on very short response times. What does appear relevant to diagnostic ease and accuracy is the degree to which the symptoms of the disease being diagnosed are characteristic ones. There are also concerns around some methodological issues related to research design in this area of enquiry. Reductionist approaches that attempt to isolate dependent variables may create such artificial experimental conditions that both external and ecological validity are sacrificed. Clinical decision making is a complex process with many independent (and interdependent) variables that need to be separated out in a discrete fashion and then reflected on in real time to preserve the fidelity of clinical practice. With these caveats in mind, the authors believe that research in this area should promote a better understanding of clinical practice and teaching by focusing less on the deficiencies of intuitive and analytical systems and more on their adaptive strengths.

  7. Towards Modelling slow Earthquakes with Geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Yuen, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    We explore a new, properly scaled, thermal-mechanical geodynamic model{^1} that can generate timescales now very close to those of earthquakes and of the same order as slow earthquakes. In our simulations we encounter two basically different bifurcation phenomena. One in which the shear zone nucleates in the ductile field, and the second which is fully associated with elasto-plastic (brittle, pressure- dependent) displacements. A quartz/feldspar composite slab has all two modes operating simultaneously in three different depth levels. The bottom of the crust is predominantly controlled by the elasto-visco-plastic mode while the top is controlled by the elasto-plastic mode. The exchange of the two modes appears to communicate on a sub-horizontal layer in a flip-flop fashion, which may yield a fractal-like signature in time and collapses into a critical temperature which for crustal rocks is around 500-580 K; in the middle of the brittle-ductile transition-zone. Near the critical temperature, stresses close to the ideal strength can be reached at local, meter-scale. Investigations of the thermal-mechanical properties under such extreme conditions are pivotal for understanding the physics of earthquakes. 1. Regenauer-Lieb, K., Weinberg, R. & Rosenbaum, G. The effect of energy feedbacks on continental strength. Nature 442, 67-70 (2006).

  8. Enhancement of sleep slow waves: underlying mechanisms and practical consequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Michele eBellesi; Brady A Riedner; Garcia-Molina, Gary N.; Chiara eCirelli; Giulio eTononi

    2014-01-01

    Even modest sleep restriction, especially the loss of sleep slow wave activity, is invariably associated with slower EEG activity during wake, the occurrence of local sleep in an otherwise awake brain, and impaired performance due to cognitive and memory deficits. Recent studies not only confirm the beneficial role of sleep in memory consolidation, but also point to a specific role for sleep slow waves. Thus, the implementation of methods to enhance sleep slow waves without unwanted arousals ...

  9. Slow mode shocks propagating in open and closed magnetic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕建永; 魏奉思

    1999-01-01

    A 2-D MHD model is used to investigate the propagation of slow mode shocks in the open and closed magnetic fields of the meridional plane near the sun. The solutions demonstrate that a forward slow shock could retain its slow shock characteristics into interplanetary space in the magnetically open region; however, it can evolve into an intermediate shock through the helmet-type current sheet to the open magnetic field.

  10. Elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepko, L.; Viall, N. M.; Lepri, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    While the source of the fast solar wind is well understood to be linked to coronal holes, the source of the slow solar wind has remained elusive. A distinguishing characteristic of the slow solar wind is the high variability of the plasma parameters, such as magnetic field, velocity, density, composition, and charge state. Many previous studies of the slow solar wind have examined trends in the composition and charge states over long time scales and using data with comparatively low temporal resolution. In this study, we take advantage of high time resolution (12 min) measurements of the charge-state abundances recently reprocessed by the ACE SWICS science team to probe the timescales of solar wind variability of coherent structures at relatively small scales (<2000 Mm, or ~ 90 minutes at slow wind speeds). We use an interval of slow solar wind containing quasi pressure-balanced, periodic number density structures previously studied by Kepko et al and shown to be important in solar wind-magnetospheric coupling. The combination of high temporal resolution composition measurements and the clearly identified boundaries of the periodic structures allows us to probe the elemental slow solar wind flux tubes/structures. We use this train of 2000Mm periodic density structures as tracers of solar wind origin and/or acceleration. We find that each 2000 Mm parcel of slow solar wind, though its speed is steady, exhibits the complete range of charge state and composition variations expected for the entire range of slow solar wind, in a repeated sequence. Each parcel cycles through three states: 1) 'normal' slow wind, 2) compositionally slow wind with very high density, and 3) compositionally fast but typical slow solar wind density. We conclude by suggesting these structures form elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind, and discuss whether it is necessary to decouple separately the process(es) responsible for the release and acceleration.

  11. Sustainable Development of Slow Fashion Businesses: Customer Value Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Sojin Jung; Byoungho Jin

    2016-01-01

    As an alternative to the prevalent fast fashion model, slow fashion has emerged as a way of enhancing sustainability in the fashion industry, yet how slow fashion can enhance profitability is still largely unknown. Based on a customer value creation framework, this study empirically tested a structural model that specified the slow fashion attributes that contribute to creating perceived customer value, which subsequently increases a consumer’s intention to buy and pay a price premium for slo...

  12. Slowing the Tide of Alcohol Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan; Chamsi-Pasha, Majed; Albar, Mohammed Ali

    2016-09-28

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs)-a spectrum including at-risk drinking, alcohol abuse, dependence, and addiction-is a highly prevalent problem worldwide with a substantial economic impact. The toll of alcohol on individual health and healthcare systems is devastating. Alcohol is estimated to be the fifth leading risk factor for global disability-adjusted life years. Tackling the problem of AUD requires a comprehensive strategy that includes solid action on price, availability, and marketing of alcohol. Restricting or banning alcohol advertising may reduce exposure to the risk posed by alcohol at the individual and general population level. Warning labels about the cancer risks associated with drinking have a high degree of public support and may be an inexpensive and acceptable way to educate the public. Religiosity may reduce risk behaviors and contribute to health decision making related to alcohol use.

  13. Threshold Characteristics of Slow-Light Photonic Crystal Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Yu, Yi; Ottaviano, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The threshold properties of photonic crystal quantum dot lasers operating in the slow-light regime are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Measurements show that, in contrast to conventional lasers, the threshold gain attains a minimum value for a specific cavity length. The experimental...... results are explained by an analytical theory for the laser threshold that takes into account the effects of slow light and random disorder due to unavoidable fabrication imperfections. Longer lasers are found to operate deeper into the slow-light region, leading to a trade-off between slow-light induced...

  14. Regional Slow Waves and Spindles in Human Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Yuval; Staba, Richard J.; Andrillon, Thomas; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V.; Cirelli, Chiara; Fried, Itzhak; Tononi, Giulio

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The most prominent EEG events in sleep are slow waves, reflecting a slow (waves and the underlying active and inactive neuronal states occur locally. Thus, especially in late sleep, some regions can be active while others are silent. We also find that slow waves can propagate, usually from medial prefrontal cortex to the medial temporal lobe and hippocampus. Sleep spindles, the other hallmark of NREM sleep EEG, are likewise predominantly local. Thus, intracerebral communication during sleep is constrained because slow and spindle oscillations often occur out-of-phase in different brain regions. PMID:21482364

  15. On Promoting the Slow Learners' Learning in English Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞雅

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays,the actualities of slow learners in English class are not satisfying in China.Confronted with such kind of situation,as language teachers,how to promote the slow students' learning,is one of the biggest problems in our teaching.The paper focuses on the features of slow learners,e.g.,lit'de or improper motivation,debilitative anxiety,introversion,inhibition,etc.and the roles the slow learners play in English class,and some of the writer's personal suggestions for promoting their learning in English class as well.

  16. Sustainable Development of Slow Fashion Businesses: Customer Value Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jung, Sojin; Jin, Byoungho

    2016-01-01

    ... fashion can enhance protability is still largely unknown. Based on a customer value creation framework, this study empirically tested a structural model that specied the slow fashion attributes ...

  17. Tyrosine Residues from the S4-S5 Linker of Kv11.1 Channels Are Critical for Slow Deactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chai-Ann; Gravel, Andrée E; Perry, Matthew D; Arnold, Alexandre A; Marcotte, Isabelle; Vandenberg, Jamie I

    2016-08-12

    Slow deactivation of Kv11.1 channels is critical for its function in the heart. The S4-S5 linker, which joins the voltage sensor and pore domains, plays a critical role in this slow deactivation gating. Here, we use NMR spectroscopy to identify the membrane-bound surface of the S4S5 linker, and we show that two highly conserved tyrosine residues within the KCNH subfamily of channels are membrane-associated. Site-directed mutagenesis and electrophysiological analysis indicates that Tyr-542 interacts with both the pore domain and voltage sensor residues to stabilize activated conformations of the channel, whereas Tyr-545 contributes to the slow kinetics of deactivation by primarily stabilizing the transition state between the activated and closed states. Thus, the two tyrosine residues in the Kv11.1 S4S5 linker play critical but distinct roles in the slow deactivation phenotype, which is a hallmark of Kv11.1 channels.

  18. Ultra slow muon microscopy by laser resonant ionization at J-PARC, MUSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Y., E-mail: yasuhiro.miyake@kek.jp; Ikedo, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Strasser, P.; Kawamura, N.; Nishiyama, K.; Koda, A.; Fujimori, H.; Makimura, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nagatomo, T.; Kadono, R. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Muon Science Laboratory (Japan); Torikai, E. [Yamanashi University, Faculty of Engineering (Japan); Iwasaki, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Advanced Meson Science Laboratory (Japan); Wada, S.; Saito, N. [RIKEN, Advanced Science Institute (Japan); Okamura, K. [RIKEN-WAKO Incubation Plaza 301, Megaopto Co., Ltd. (Japan); Yokoyama, K. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Advanced Meson Science Laboratory (Japan); Ito, T.; Higemoto, W. [J-PARC Center, Muon Section, Materials and Life Science Division (Japan)

    2013-04-15

    As one of the principal muon beam line at the J-PARC muon facility (MUSE), we are now constructing a Muon beam line (U-Line), which consists of a large acceptance solenoid made of mineral insulation cables (MIC), a superconducting curved transport solenoid and superconducting axial focusing magnets. There, we can extract 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8}/s surface muons towards a hot tungsten target. At the U-Line, we are now establishing a new type of muon microscopy; a new technique with use of the intense ultra-slow muon source generated by resonant ionization of thermal Muonium (designated as Mu; consisting of a {mu}{sup + } and an e{sup - }) atoms generated from the surface of the tungsten target. In this contribution, the latest status of the Ultra Slow Muon Microscopy project, fully funded, is reported.

  19. Ultra slow muon microscopy by laser resonant ionization at J-PARC, MUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Y.; Ikedo, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Strasser, P.; Kawamura, N.; Nishiyama, K.; Koda, A.; Fujimori, H.; Makimura, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nagatomo, T.; Kadono, R.; Torikai, E.; Iwasaki, M.; Wada, S.; Saito, N.; Okamura, K.; Yokoyama, K.; Ito, T.; Higemoto, W.

    2013-04-01

    As one of the principal muon beam line at the J-PARC muon facility (MUSE), we are now constructing a Muon beam line (U-Line), which consists of a large acceptance solenoid made of mineral insulation cables (MIC), a superconducting curved transport solenoid and superconducting axial focusing magnets. There, we can extract 2 × 108/s surface muons towards a hot tungsten target. At the U-Line, we are now establishing a new type of muon microscopy; a new technique with use of the intense ultra-slow muon source generated by resonant ionization of thermal Muonium (designated as Mu; consisting of a μ + and an e - ) atoms generated from the surface of the tungsten target. In this contribution, the latest status of the Ultra Slow Muon Microscopy project, fully funded, is reported.

  20. Imatinib treatment causes substantial transcriptional changes in adult Schistosoma mansoni in vitro exhibiting pleiotropic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin Buro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosome parasites cause schistosomiasis, one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. For decades Praziquantel (PZQ is the only drug widely used for controlling schistosomiasis. The absence of a vaccine and fear of PZQ resistance have motivated the search for alternatives. Studies on protein kinases (PKs demonstrated their importance for diverse physiological processes in schistosomes. Among others two Abl tyrosine kinases, SmAbl1 and SmAbl2, were identified in Schistosoma mansoni and shown to be transcribed in the gonads and the gastrodermis. SmAbl1 activity was blocked by Imatinib, a known Abl-TK inhibitor used in human cancer therapy (Gleevec/Glivec. Imatinib exhibited dramatic effects on the morphology and physiology of adult schistosomes in vitro causing the death of the parasites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show modeling data supporting the targeting of SmAbl1/2 by Imatinib. A biochemical assay confirmed that SmAbl2 activity is also inhibited by Imatinib. Microarray analyses and qRT-PCR experiments were done to unravel transcriptional processes influenced by Imatinib in adult schistosomes in vitro demonstrating a wide influence on worm physiology. Surface-, muscle-, gut and gonad-associated processes were affected as evidenced by the differential transcription of e.g. the gynecophoral canal protein gene GCP, paramyosin, titin, hemoglobinase, and cathepsins. Furthermore, transcript levels of VAL-7 and egg formation-associated genes such as tyrosinase 1, p14, and fs800-like were affected as well as those of signaling genes including a ribosomal protein S6 kinase and a glutamate receptor. Finally, a comparative in silico analysis of the obtained microarray data sets and previous data analyzing the effect of a TGFβR1 inhibitor on transcription provided first evidence for an association of TGFβ and Abl kinase signaling. Among others GCP and egg formation-associated genes were identified as common

  1. Resting-state slow wave power, healthy aging and cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahou, Eleni L; Thurm, Franka; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Schlee, Winfried

    2014-05-29

    Cognitive functions and spontaneous neural activity show significant changes over the life-span, but the interrelations between age, cognition and resting-state brain oscillations are not well understood. Here, we assessed performance on the Trail Making Test and resting-state magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings from 53 healthy adults (18-89 years old) to investigate associations between age-dependent changes in spontaneous oscillatory activity and cognitive performance. Results show that healthy aging is accompanied by a marked and linear decrease of resting-state activity in the slow frequency range (0.5-6.5 Hz). The effects of slow wave power on cognitive performance were expressed as interactions with age: For older (>54 years), but not younger participants, enhanced delta and theta power in temporal and central regions was positively associated with perceptual speed and executive functioning. Consistent with previous work, these findings substantiate further the important role of slow wave oscillations in neurocognitive function during healthy aging.

  2. Effect of the calcium antagonists bepridil (CERM-1978) and verapamil on Ca++-dependent slow action potentials in frog skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, L M; Sperelakis, N

    1982-07-01

    The calcium slow channels found in cardiac and smooth muscle are blocked by calcium-antagonistic agents. In the present study, the effects of the Ca++-antagonistic drugs bepridil and verapamil on the slow action potentials (APs) found in the frog skeletal muscle were examined. Slow APs were induced in Cl-- free (acetate substituted), Na+-free (sucrose substituted), high K+ (25 mM)media. A conventional two-microelectrode recording technique was used. Amplitude of the slow APs increases linearly with log [Ca]o with a slope of 28.2 mV/decade, suggesting that Ca++ is the major inward current carrier because this value approaches the theoretical slope of 29 mV/decade (at 21 degrees C) predicted by the Nernst equation for a divalent cation. Duration also increases with increases in [Ca]o. The slow APs were abolished by glycerol shock treatment, which disconnects the T-tubules from the surface membrane, suggesting that the slow APs originate in the T-tubules. Verapamil and bepridil depress the amplitude of the slow APs in a use-dependent manner at concentrations of 5 X 10-9 to 1 X 10-6 M and abolish the slow APs at 5 X 10-6 M. These drugs also decrease the rates of rise of the slow APs. Bepridil decreases the duration of the slow APs, whereas verapamil has little effect, suggesting that bepridil, in addition to blocking the slow channels, might also increase gk. Thus, the slow channels found in the T-tubular system of frog skeletal muscle have some of the same properties of slow channels in vascular smooth muscle and cardiac muscle.

  3. Compounding slow-release capsules: a comprehensive review and an Excel spreadsheet for faster calculations of excipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    Compounding pharmacists throughout the world are compounding a special type of capsule called "slow-release." This type of capsule is a compounding pharmacy application of the commercial hydrophilic matrix tablets. It is a relatively simple system that allows formulating a robust, reliable, and consistent drug system based on 30% w/w to 40% w/w of specific types of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose. The main purpose of these capsules is to attenuate the drug release when there is a clinical need and no commercial medication exists. Five in vitro trials verified and proved this kind of preparation can be compounded by specialized pharmacists achieving substantial attenuation of drug release that resembles the pharmacokinetic profiles of commercial slow-release medications. An in-depth explanation of the mechanism of action of the slow-release capsules is provided. Since the pharmaceutical calculations needed to compound this preparation are time consuming, a suggestion of a faster way to perform these calculations by using a special Excel spreadsheet is provided. The article demonstrates a special table with a comparison between the specifications, results, and conclusions of the five in vitro trials that evaluated the pharmacokinetic rates of compounded slow-release capsules. The regulatory aspect of compounding slow-release capsules is also discussed.

  4. New data on programmed aging - slow phenoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skulachev, M V; Skulachev, V P

    2014-10-01

    indicating that aging can be regulated by an organism provide another argument in favor of optionality of aging. Cases have been described when aging as a program useful for the evolution of offspring but counterproductive for the parental individual slows under conditions that threaten the very existence of the individual. These conditions include food restriction (the threat of death from starvation), heavy muscular work, decrease or increase in the environmental temperature, small amounts of poisons (including ROS; here we speak about the paradoxical geroprotective effect of the low doses of prooxidants that inhibit apoptosis). On the other hand, aging can be inhibited (and maybe even cancelled) artificially. This can be done by turning off the genes encoding the proteins participating in the aging program, such as FAT10, p66shc, and some others. In addition, the gene of the antioxidant enzyme catalase can be addressed into mitochondria, where it will split mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide, the level of which increases with age. However, today the simplest way to slow down the aging program is the use of mitochondria-targeted low molecular weight antioxidant compounds of plastoquinonyl decyltriphenylphosphonium-type (SkQ1), which prolong the life of animals, plants, and fungi and inhibit the development of many age-related diseases and symptoms.

  5. Propagation of Long-Wavelength Nonlinear Slow Sausage Waves in Stratified Magnetic Flux Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbulescu, M.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-05-01

    The propagation of nonlinear, long-wavelength, slow sausage waves in an expanding magnetic flux tube, embedded in a non-magnetic stratified environment, is discussed. The governing equation for surface waves, which is akin to the Leibovich-Roberts equation, is derived using the method of multiple scales. The solitary wave solution of the equation is obtained numerically. The results obtained are illustrative of a solitary wave whose properties are highly dependent on the degree of stratification.

  6. Slow light in metal-insulator-metal waveguide by negative Goos-Hänchen shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Geum-Yoon; Chheang, Vuthy; Kim, Doo-Gun; Kim, Tae-Ryong; Jun, Li; Kim, Hong-Seung; Choi, Young-Wan

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrated group velocity delay using a metal-insulator-metal structure for slow light that would be very simple to fabricate. A negative Goos-Hänchen shift of the surface plasmon resonance can be caused by incident radiation while reflecting, resulting in a general group delay. Using this phenomenon, we induced a group delay of 70 fs using a very simple 20-μm-long waveguide.

  7. Mutual recombination in slow Si+ + H- collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jian-Guo; Liu Chun-Lei; Janev R. K.; Yan Jun; Shi Jian-Rong

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the process of mutual neutralization of Si+ and H- ions in slow collisions within the multichannel Landau-Zener model. All important ionic-covalent couplings in this collision system are included in the collision dynamics. The cross sections for population of specific final states of product Si atom are calculated in the CM energy range 0.05 eV/u-5 keV/u. Both singlet and triplet states are considered. At collision energies below ~10 eV/u, the most populated singlet state is Si(3p4p, 1S0), while for energies above ~150eV/u it is the Si(3p, 4p, 1P1) state. In the case of triplet states, the mixed 3p4p(3 S1 +3P0) states are the most populated in the entire collision energy range investigated. The total cross section exhibits a broad maximum around 200-300 eV/u and for ECM ≤ 10eV/u it monotonically increases with decreasing the collision energy, reaching a value of 8 × 10-13 cm2 at ECM = 0.05 eV/u. The ion-pair formation process in Si(3p2 3PJ)+H(1s) collisions has also been considered and its cross section in the considered energy range is very small (smaller than 10-20 cm2 in the energy region below 1 keV/u).

  8. Rapid identification of slow healing wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kenneth; Covington, Scott; Sen, Chandan K; Januszyk, Michael; Kirsner, Robert S; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Shah, Nigam H

    2016-01-01

    Chronic nonhealing wounds have a prevalence of 2% in the United States, and cost an estimated $50 billion annually. Accurate stratification of wounds for risk of slow healing may help guide treatment and referral decisions. We have applied modern machine learning methods and feature engineering to develop a predictive model for delayed wound healing that uses information collected during routine care in outpatient wound care centers. Patient and wound data was collected at 68 outpatient wound care centers operated by Healogics Inc. in 26 states between 2009 and 2013. The dataset included basic demographic information on 59,953 patients, as well as both quantitative and categorical information on 180,696 wounds. Wounds were split into training and test sets by randomly assigning patients to training and test sets. Wounds were considered delayed with respect to healing time if they took more than 15 weeks to heal after presentation at a wound care center. Eleven percent of wounds in this dataset met this criterion. Prognostic models were developed on training data available in the first week of care to predict delayed healing wounds. A held out subset of the training set was used for model selection, and the final model was evaluated on the test set to evaluate discriminative power and calibration. The model achieved an area under the curve of 0.842 (95% confidence interval 0.834-0.847) for the delayed healing outcome and a Brier reliability score of 0.00018. Early, accurate prediction of delayed healing wounds can improve patient care by allowing clinicians to increase the aggressiveness of intervention in patients most at risk. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  9. Design optimization of radiation shielding structure for lead slowing-down spectrometer system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Dong Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS system is a promising nondestructive assay technique that enables a quantitative measurement of the isotopic contents of major fissile isotopes in spent nuclear fuel and its pyroprocessing counterparts, such as 235U, 239Pu, 241Pu, and, potentially, minor actinides. The LSDS system currently under development at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Daejeon, Korea is planned to utilize a high-flux (>1012 n/cm2·s neutron source comprised of a high-energy (30 MeV/high-current (∼2 A electron beam and a heavy metal target, which results in a very intense and complex radiation field for the facility, thus demanding structural shielding to guarantee the safety. Optimization of the structural shielding design was conducted using MCNPX for neutron dose rate evaluation of several representative hypothetical designs. In order to satisfy the construction cost and neutron attenuation capability of the facility, while simultaneously achieving the aimed dose rate limit (<0.06 μSv/h, a few shielding materials [high-density polyethylene (HDPE–Borax, B4C, and Li2CO3] were considered for the main neutron absorber layer, which is encapsulated within the double-sided concrete wall. The MCNP simulation indicated that HDPE-Borax is the most efficient among the aforementioned candidate materials, and the combined thickness of the shielding layers should exceed 100 cm to satisfy the dose limit on the outside surface of the shielding wall of the facility when limiting the thickness of the HDPE-Borax intermediate layer to below 5 cm. However, the shielding wall must include the instrumentation and installation holes for the LSDS system. The radiation leakage through the holes was substantially mitigated by adopting a zigzag-shape with concrete covers on both sides. The suggested optimized design of the shielding structure satisfies the dose rate limit and can be used for the construction of a facility in the near

  10. Design optimization of radiation shielding structure for lead slowing-down spectrometer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Dong; Ahn, Sang Joon; Lee, Yong Deok [Nonproliferation System Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Je [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    A lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS) system is a promising nondestructive assay technique that enables a quantitative measurement of the isotopic contents of major fissile isotopes in spent nuclear fuel and its pyroprocessing counterparts, such as 235U, 239Pu, 241Pu, and, potentially, minor actinides. The LSDS system currently under development at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Daejeon, Korea) is planned to utilize a high-flux (>101{sup 2n}/cm{sup 2}·s) neutron source comprised of a high-energy (30 MeV)/high-current (∼2 A) electron beam and a heavy metal target, which results in a very intense and complex radiation field for the facility, thus demanding structural shielding to guarantee the safety. Optimization of the structural shielding design was conducted using MCNPX for neutron dose rate evaluation of several representative hypothetical designs. In order to satisfy the construction cost and neutron attenuation capability of the facility, while simultaneously achieving the aimed dose rate limit (<0.06 μSv/h), a few shielding materials [high-density polyethylene (HDPE)–Borax, B{sub 4}C, and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}] were considered for the main neutron absorber layer, which is encapsulated within the double-sided concrete wall. The MCNP simulation indicated that HDPE-Borax is the most efficient among the aforementioned candidate materials, and the combined thickness of the shielding layers should exceed 100 cm to satisfy the dose limit on the outside surface of the shielding wall of the facility when limiting the thickness of the HDPE-Borax intermediate layer to below 5 cm. However, the shielding wall must include the instrumentation and installation holes for the LSDS system. The radiation leakage through the holes was substantially mitigated by adopting a zigzag-shape with concrete covers on both sides. The suggested optimized design of the shielding structure satisfies the dose rate limit and can be used for the construction of a facility in

  11. Persistent photoconductivity in poly(p-phenylenevinylene): Spectral response and slow relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. H.; Yu, G.; Heeger, A. J.

    1993-06-01

    We report the spectral response and slow decay of the steady-state photoconductivity in poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV) films. The spectral response of the photoconductivity is in good agreement with that calculated from the absorption data with the assumption of rapid recombination at the surface of the film; the results indicate direct photogeneration of free charge carriers via an interband transition. The photoconductivity is, therefore, consistent with a description of the electronic structure of PPV in terms of a semiconductor band model (rather than an exciton model). The very slow stretched-exponential relaxation of the photoinduced conductivity is reminiscent of the persistent photoconductivity observed in inorganic semiconductors. By assuming that the photocurrent is carried predominantly by mobile polarons near the surface, one can construct a model for the persistent photoconductivity in which the recombination of long-lived bipolarons is inhibited in the bulk where bipolarons have a lower free energy than polarons. The persistent photoconductivity, therefore, is caused by the slow dispersive diffusion of photogenerated bipolarons to the surface where they dissociate into polarons and where both polaron transport and recombination occur.

  12. Evaluation of the depth of surface deterioration for concrete structure using dispersion characteristics of surface wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Keng-Tsang; Cheng, Chia-Chi; Tao, Hung-Yu; Chiang, Chih-Hung

    2017-02-01

    Surface waves generated by an impact are used to assess depth of deterioration for concrete plate. The proposed method uses one receiver positioned away from the impacting source. The spectrogram of the group velocity obtained from the signal recorded from the receiver is calculated by Short-Time Fourier Transform and the reassignment technique. Experiments were conduct on the concrete plate with top mortar layer to simulate concrete with serious aggregate segregation and bleeding. In the experiment, the responses corresponding to different source-receiver distance were explored. The results were shown by both slowness spectrogram and velocity profile. In the slowness spectrogram, substantial increase of velocity at low frequency domain is found. The velocity profile shows the change of wave speed is at the wave length about 1.2 times the mortar thickness. The results also show the lower velocity corresponding to the weak layer may be identified for source-receiver distance as short as 0.5 m but the wave speed may be underestimated.

  13. Experimental determination of the slow-neutron wavelength distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, Bente; Mikke, K.; Sledziewska-Blocka, D.

    1970-01-01

    Different experiments for determining the slow-neutron wavelength distribution in the region 227-3 meV have been carried out, and the results compared. It is concluded that the slow-neutron wave-length distribution can be determined accurately by elastic scattering on a pure incoherent or a pure...

  14. Slow Light at High Frequencies in an Amplifying Semiconductor Waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Yvind, Kresten; Mørk, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate slow-down of a modulated light signal in a semiconductor waveguide. Concatenated amplifying and absorbing sections simultaneously achieve both amplification and a controllable time delay at 15 GHz.......We demonstrate slow-down of a modulated light signal in a semiconductor waveguide. Concatenated amplifying and absorbing sections simultaneously achieve both amplification and a controllable time delay at 15 GHz....

  15. Helping the Slow-Reader in the Primary School Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Edmund V.

    1988-01-01

    A strategy is proposed for primary teachers to use with children who have reading difficulties. It includes developing a profile of each slow reader, testing each slow reader to determine reading level and specific weaknesses, and using certain practical methods to help solve the problem. (two references) (LB)

  16. The impact of cortical deafferentation on the neocortical slow oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Maxime; Chen, Jen-Yung; Lonjers, Peter; Bazhenov, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2014-04-16

    Slow oscillation is the main brain rhythm observed during deep sleep in mammals. Although several studies have demonstrated its neocortical origin, the extent of the thalamic contribution is still a matter of discussion. Using electrophysiological recordings in vivo on cats and computational modeling, we found that the local thalamic inactivation or the complete isolation of the neocortical slabs maintained within the brain dramatically reduced the expression of slow and fast oscillations in affected cortical areas. The slow oscillation began to recover 12 h after thalamic inactivation. The slow oscillation, but not faster activities, nearly recovered after 30 h and persisted for weeks in the isolated slabs. We also observed an increase of the membrane potential fluctuations recorded in vivo several hours after thalamic inactivation. Mimicking this enhancement in a network computational model with an increased postsynaptic activity of long-range intracortical afferents or scaling K(+) leak current, but not several other Na(+) and K(+) intrinsic currents was sufficient for recovering the slow oscillation. We conclude that, in the intact brain, the thalamus contributes to the generation of cortical active states of the slow oscillation and mediates its large-scale synchronization. Our study also suggests that the deafferentation-induced alterations of the sleep slow oscillation can be counteracted by compensatory intracortical mechanisms and that the sleep slow oscillation is a fundamental and intrinsic state of the neocortex.

  17. Beyond Equal: From Same but Different to the Doctrine of Substantial Equivalence

    OpenAIRE

    Paull, John

    2008-01-01

    A same-but-different dichotomy has recently been encapsulated within the ill-defined concept of “substantial equivalence”. By invoking this concept the genetically modified organism (GMO) industry has escaped the rigors of safety testing that might otherwise apply. The curious concept of “substantial equivalence” grants a presumption of safety to GMO food. This presumption has yet to be earned, and has been used to constrain labelling of both GMO and non-GMO food. It is an idea that w...

  18. Beyond Equal: From Same but Different to the Doctrine of Substantial Equivalence

    OpenAIRE

    Paull, John

    2008-01-01

    A same-but-different dichotomy has recently been encapsulated within the ill-defined concept of “substantial equivalence”. By invoking this concept the genetically modified organism (GMO) industry has escaped the rigors of safety testing that might otherwise apply. The curious concept of “substantial equivalence” grants a presumption of safety to GMO food. This presumption has yet to be earned, and has been used to constrain labelling of both GMO and non-GMO food. It is an idea that w...

  19. Kinetic investigation for slow combustion of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    The renewed interest in biomass as a renewable, clean, and inexpensive fuel was discussed. Many different mechanisms take place simultaneously during biomass combustion and also during other thermal processes such as gasification, pyrolysis or carbonization. These mechanisms have a pronounced influence on the design and operation of thermal conversion processes. In addition, product yields and product distributions from the thermal processes are sensitive to the kinetic properties of biomass. In order to evaluate the combustion mechanisms and the combustion kinetics of biomass, the behavior of these constituents under combustion conditions were properly evaluated. In this study, combustion of biomass samples was carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer by heating them from ambient to 1173 K with heating rates of 5 K/min and 10 K/min under dynamic dry air atmosphere of 40 mL/min. The biomass samples included olive refuse, sunflower seed shell, rapeseed, grape seed, and hybrid poplar. The purpose of the study was to examine the kinetic properties of biomass during slow combustion for the overall combustion process as well as for some definite temperature intervals at which different combustion mechanisms are present according to the type and complexity of biomass used. Derivative thermogravimetric analysis (DTG) curves were derived, and data obtained from these curves were used to compute the kinetic parameters such as activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and governing mechanisms for the combustion processes. The governing mechanisms for individual temperature intervals were examined along with the overall combustion process. The study showed that at lower temperature intervals, the combustion process was controlled primarily by the chemical reaction. At least 3 sequential mechanisms may occur at different temperature intervals during combustion of biomass. Activation energy and pre-exponential factors were determined for each temperature interval

  20. Hippocampal gamma-slow oscillation coupling in macaques during sedation and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Andrew G; Liu, Xilin; Weigand, Pauline K; Hudgins, Eric D; Stein, Joel M; Das, Sandhitsu R; Proekt, Alexander; Kelz, Max B; Zhang, Milin; Van der Spiegel, Jan; Lucas, Timothy H

    2017-07-01

    Behavioral and neurophysiological evidence suggests that the slow (≤1 Hz) oscillation (SO) during sleep plays a role in consolidating hippocampal (HIPP)-dependent memories. The effects of the SO on HIPP activity have been studied in rodents and cats both during natural sleep and during anesthetic administration titrated to mimic sleep-like slow rhythms. In this study, we sought to document these effects in primates. First, HIPP field potentials were recorded during ketamine-dexmedetomidine sedation and during natural sleep in three rhesus macaques. Sedation produced regionally-specific slow and gamma (∼40 Hz) oscillations with strong coupling between the SO phase and gamma amplitude. These same features were seen in slow-wave sleep (SWS), but the coupling was weaker and the coupled gamma oscillation had a higher frequency (∼70 Hz) during SWS. Second, electrical stimuli were delivered to HIPP afferents in the parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) during sedation to assess the effects of sleep-like SO on excitability. Gamma bursts after the peak of SO cycles corresponded to periods of increased gain of monosynaptic connections between the PHG and HIPP. However, the two PHG-HIPP connectivity gains during sedation were both substantially lower than when the animal was awake. We conclude that the SO is correlated with rhythmic excitation and inhibition of the PHG-HIPP network, modulating connectivity and gamma generators intrinsic to this network. Ketamine-dexmedetomidine sedation produces a similar effect, but with a decreased contribution of the PHG to HIPP activity and gamma generation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Slow dynamics of supercooled water confined in nanoporous silica materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L [Department of Nuclear Engineering, 24-209 MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Faraone, A [Department of Nuclear Engineering, 24-209 MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Mou, C-Y [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Yen, C-W [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, S-H [Department of Nuclear Engineering, 24-209 MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2004-11-17

    We review our incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) studies of the dynamics of supercooled water confined in nanoporous silica materials. QENS data were analysed by using the relaxing cage model (RCM) previously developed by us. We first use molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the extended simple point charge model (SPC/E) for bulk supercooled water to establish the validity of the RCM, which applies to both the translational and rotational motion of water molecules. We then assume that the dynamics of water molecules in the vicinity of a hydrophilic surface is similar to a bulk water at an equivalent lower supercooled temperature. This analogy was experimentally demonstrated in previous investigations of water in Vycor glasses and near hydrophilic protein surfaces. Studies were made of supercooled water in MCM-41-S (pore sizes 25, 18, and 14 A) and MCM-48-S (pore size 22 A) using three QENS spectrometers of respective energy resolutions 1, 30, and 60 {mu}eV, covering the temperature range from 325 to 200 K. Five quantities are extracted from the analysis: they are {beta}, the stretch exponent characterizing the {alpha}-relaxation; {beta}{gamma}, the exponent determining the power-law dependence of the relaxation time on Q; <{tau}{sub 0}>, the Q-independent pre-factor for the average translational relaxation time; <{tau}{sub R{sub 1}}>, the relaxation time for the first-order rotational correlation function; and <{tau}{sub R{sub 3}}>, the relaxation time for the second-order rotational correlation function. We discuss the temperature dependence of these parameters and note that, in particular, the dynamics is rapidly slowing down at temperature around 220 K, signalling the onset of a structural arrest transition of liquid water into an amorphous solid water.

  2. Stick-slip at soft adhesive interfaces mediated by slow frictional waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan K; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-06-28

    Stick-slip is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from squealing automobile brakes to earthquakes. At soft adhesive interfaces, this instability has long been attributed to Schallamach waves, which are a type of slow frictional wave. We use a contact configuration capable of isolating single wave events, coupled with high speed in situ imaging, to demonstrate the existence of two new stick-slip modes. It is shown that these modes also correspond to the passage of slow waves-separation pulse and slip pulse-with distinct nucleation and propagation characteristics. The slip pulse, characterized by a sharp stress front, propagates in the same direction as the Schallamach wave. In contrast, the separation pulse, involving local interface detachment and resembling a tensile neck, travels in exactly the opposite direction. A change in the stick-slip mode from the separation to the slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Taken together, the three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in low-velocity sliding. The detailed observations enable us to present a phase diagram delineating the domains of occurrence of these waves. We suggest a direct analogy between the observed slow frictional waves and well known muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied organisms. Our work answers basic questions about adhesive mechanisms of frictional instabilities in natural and engineered systems, with broader implications for slow surface wave phenomena.

  3. Rate-weakening friction characterizes both slow sliding and catastrophic failure of landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handwerger, Alexander L.; Rempel, Alan W.; Skarbek, Rob M.; Roering, Joshua J.; Hilley, George E.

    2016-09-01

    Catastrophic landslides cause billions of dollars in damages and claim thousands of lives annually, whereas slow-moving landslides with negligible inertia dominate sediment transport on many weathered hillslopes. Surprisingly, both failure modes are displayed by nearby landslides (and individual landslides in different years) subjected to almost identical environmental conditions. Such observations have motivated the search for mechanisms that can cause slow-moving landslides to transition via runaway acceleration to catastrophic failure. A similarly diverse range of sliding behavior, including earthquakes and slow-slip events, occurs along tectonic faults. Our understanding of these phenomena has benefitted from mechanical treatments that rely upon key ingredients that are notably absent from previous landslide descriptions. Here, we describe landslide motion using a rate- and state-dependent frictional model that incorporates a nonlocal stress balance to account for the elastic response to gradients in slip. Our idealized, one-dimensional model reproduces both the displacement patterns observed in slow-moving landslides and the acceleration toward failure exhibited by catastrophic events. Catastrophic failure occurs only when the slip surface is characterized by rate-weakening friction and its lateral dimensions exceed a critical nucleation length h*h* that is shorter for higher effective stresses. However, landslides that are extensive enough to fall within this regime can nevertheless slide slowly for months or years before catastrophic failure. Our results suggest that the diversity of slip behavior observed during landslides can be described with a single model adapted from standard fault mechanics treatments.

  4. Rate-weakening friction characterizes both slow sliding and catastrophic failure of landslides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handwerger, Alexander L; Rempel, Alan W; Skarbek, Rob M; Roering, Joshua J; Hilley, George E

    2016-09-13

    Catastrophic landslides cause billions of dollars in damages and claim thousands of lives annually, whereas slow-moving landslides with negligible inertia dominate sediment transport on many weathered hillslopes. Surprisingly, both failure modes are displayed by nearby landslides (and individual landslides in different years) subjected to almost identical environmental conditions. Such observations have motivated the search for mechanisms that can cause slow-moving landslides to transition via runaway acceleration to catastrophic failure. A similarly diverse range of sliding behavior, including earthquakes and slow-slip events, occurs along tectonic faults. Our understanding of these phenomena has benefitted from mechanical treatments that rely upon key ingredients that are notably absent from previous landslide descriptions. Here, we describe landslide motion using a rate- and state-dependent frictional model that incorporates a nonlocal stress balance to account for the elastic response to gradients in slip. Our idealized, one-dimensional model reproduces both the displacement patterns observed in slow-moving landslides and the acceleration toward failure exhibited by catastrophic events. Catastrophic failure occurs only when the slip surface is characterized by rate-weakening friction and its lateral dimensions exceed a critical nucleation length [Formula: see text] that is shorter for higher effective stresses. However, landslides that are extensive enough to fall within this regime can nevertheless slide slowly for months or years before catastrophic failure. Our results suggest that the diversity of slip behavior observed during landslides can be described with a single model adapted from standard fault mechanics treatments.

  5. Identification of slow molecular order parameters for Markov model construction

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Hernandez, Guillermo; Giorgino, Toni; de Fabritiis, Gianni; Noé, Frank

    2013-01-01

    A goal in the kinetic characterization of a macromolecular system is the description of its slow relaxation processes, involving (i) identification of the structural changes involved in these processes, and (ii) estimation of the rates or timescales at which these slow processes occur. Most of the approaches to this task, including Markov models, Master-equation models, and kinetic network models, start by discretizing the high-dimensional state space and then characterize relaxation processes in terms of the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of a discrete transition matrix. The practical success of such an approach depends very much on the ability to finely discretize the slow order parameters. How can this task be achieved in a high-dimensional configuration space without relying on subjective guesses of the slow order parameters? In this paper, we use the variational principle of conformation dynamics to derive an optimal way of identifying the "slow subspace" of a large set of prior order parameters - either g...

  6. Damping of Slow Magnetoacoustic Waves in an Inhomogeneous Coronal Plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nagendra Kumar; Pradeep Kumar; Shiv Singh; Anil Kumar

    2008-03-01

    We study the propagation and dissipation of slow magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous viscous coronal loop plasma permeated by uniform magnetic field. Only viscosity and thermal conductivity are taken into account as dissipative processes in the coronal loop. The damping length of slow-mode waves exhibit varying behaviour depending upon the physical parameters of the loop in an active region AR8270 observed by TRACE. The wave energy flux associated with slow magnetoacoustic waves turns out to be of the order of 106 erg cm-2 s-1 which is high enough to replace the energy lost through optically thin coronal emission and the thermal conduction belowto the transition region. It is also found that only those slow-mode waves which have periods more than 240 s provide the required heating rate to balance the energy losses in the solar corona. Our calculated wave periods for slow-mode waves nearly match with the oscillation periods of loop observed by TRACE.

  7. Slow-light enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Ek, Sara; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Slow light is a fascinating physical effect, raising fundamental questions related to our understanding of light-matter interactions as well as offering new possibilities for photonic devices. From the first demonstrations of slow light propagation in ultra-cold atomic gasses, solid-state Ruby and photonic crystal structures, focus has shifted to applications, with slow light offering the ability to enhance and control light-matter interactions. The demonstration of tuneable delay lines, enhanced nonlinearities and spontaneous emission, enlarged spectral sensitivity and increased phase shifts illustrate the possibilities enabled by slow light propagation, with microwave photonics emerging as one of the promising applications. Here, we demonstrate that slow light can be used to control and increase the gain coefficient of an active semiconductor waveguide. The effect was theoretically predicted but not yet experimentally demonstrated. These results show a route towards realizing ultra-compact optical amplifier...

  8. Enhancement of sleep slow waves: underlying mechanisms and practical consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eBellesi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Even modest sleep restriction, especially the loss of sleep slow wave activity, is invariably associated with slower EEG activity during wake, the occurrence of local sleep in an otherwise awake brain, and impaired performance due to cognitive and memory deficits. Recent studies not only confirm the beneficial role of sleep in memory consolidation, but also point to a specific role for sleep slow waves. Thus, the implementation of methods to enhance sleep slow waves without unwanted arousals or lightening of sleep could have significant practical implications. Here we first review the evidence that it is possible to enhance sleep slow waves in humans using transcranial direct-current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Since these methods are currently impractical and their safety is questionable, especially for chronic long-term exposure, we then discuss novel data suggesting that it is possible to enhance slow waves using sensory stimuli. We consider the physiology of the K-complex, a peripheral evoked slow wave, and show that, among different sensory modalities, acoustic stimulation is the most effective in increasing the magnitude of slow waves, likely through the activation of non-lemniscal ascending pathways to the thalamo-cortical system. In addition, we discuss how intensity and frequency of the acoustic stimuli, as well as exact timing and pattern of stimulation, affect sleep enhancement. Finally, we discuss automated algorithms that read the EEG and, in real-time, adjust the stimulation parameters in a closed-loop manner to obtain an increase in sleep slow waves and avoid undesirable arousals. In conclusion, while discussing the mechanisms that underlie the generation of sleep slow waves, we review the converging evidence showing that acoustic stimulation is safe and represents an ideal tool for slow wave sleep enhancement.

  9. Enhancement of sleep slow waves: underlying mechanisms and practical consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellesi, Michele; Riedner, Brady A; Garcia-Molina, Gary N; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Even modest sleep restriction, especially the loss of sleep slow wave activity (SWA), is invariably associated with slower electroencephalogram (EEG) activity during wake, the occurrence of local sleep in an otherwise awake brain, and impaired performance due to cognitive and memory deficits. Recent studies not only confirm the beneficial role of sleep in memory consolidation, but also point to a specific role for sleep slow waves. Thus, the implementation of methods to enhance sleep slow waves without unwanted arousals or lightening of sleep could have significant practical implications. Here we first review the evidence that it is possible to enhance sleep slow waves in humans using transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Since these methods are currently impractical and their safety is questionable, especially for chronic long-term exposure, we then discuss novel data suggesting that it is possible to enhance slow waves using sensory stimuli. We consider the physiology of the K-complex (KC), a peripheral evoked slow wave, and show that, among different sensory modalities, acoustic stimulation is the most effective in increasing the magnitude of slow waves, likely through the activation of non-lemniscal ascending pathways to the thalamo-cortical system. In addition, we discuss how intensity and frequency of the acoustic stimuli, as well as exact timing and pattern of stimulation, affect sleep enhancement. Finally, we discuss automated algorithms that read the EEG and, in real-time, adjust the stimulation parameters in a closed-loop manner to obtain an increase in sleep slow waves and avoid undesirable arousals. In conclusion, while discussing the mechanisms that underlie the generation of sleep slow waves, we review the converging evidence showing that acoustic stimulation is safe and represents an ideal tool for slow wave sleep (SWS) enhancement.

  10. Slow Money for Soft Energy: Lessons for Energy Finance from the Slow Money Movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kock, Beaudry E. [Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)], e-mail: beaudry.kock@ouce.ox.ac.uk

    2012-12-15

    Energy infrastructure is decarbonizing, shifting from dirty coal to cleaner gas- and emissions-free renewables. This is an important and necessary change that unfortunately risks preserving many problematic technical and institutional properties of the old energy system: in particular, the large scales, high aggregation, and excessive centralization of renewable energy infrastructure and, importantly, its financing. Large-scale renewables carry environmental, social and political risks that cannot be ignored, and more importantly they may not alone accomplish the necessary decarbonization of the power sector. We need to revive a different approach to clean energy infrastructure: a 'softer' (Lovins 1978), more distributed, decentralized, local-scale strategy. To achieve this, we need a fundamentally different approach to the financing of clean energy infrastructure. I propose we learn from the 'Slow Money' approach being pioneered in sustainable agriculture (Tasch 2010), emphasizing a better connection to place, smaller scales, and a focus on quality over quantity. This 'slow money, soft energy' vision is not a repudiation of big-scale renewables, since there are some societal needs, which can only be met by big, centralized power. But we do not need the level of concentration in control and finance epitomized by the current trends in the global renewables sector: this can and must change.

  11. Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sideras-Haddad, E.; Schenkel, T.; Shrivastava, S.; Makgato, T.; Batra, A.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A.; Erasmus, R.; Mwakikunga, B.

    2009-01-06

    The interaction between slow highly-charged ions (SHCI) of different charge states from an electron-beam ion trap and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces is studied in terms of modification of electronic states at single-ion impact nanosizeareas. Results are presented from AFM/STM analysis of the induced-surface topological features combined with Raman spectroscopy. I-V characteristics for a number of different impact regions were measured with STM and the results argue for possible formation of diamond-like nanoscale structures at the impact sites.

  12. Surface phonons

    CERN Document Server

    Wette, Frederik

    1991-01-01

    In recent years substantial progress has been made in the detection of surface phonons owing to considerable improvements in inelastic rare gas scattering tech­ niques and electron energy loss spectroscopy. With these methods it has become possible to measure surface vibrations in a wide energy range for all wave vectors in the two-dimensional Brillouin zone and thus to deduce the complete surface phonon dispersion curves. Inelastic atomic beam scattering and electron energy loss spectroscopy have started to play a role in the study of surface phonons similar to the one played by inelastic neutron scattering in the investigation of bulk phonons in the last thirty years. Detailed comparison between experimen­ tal results and theoretical studies of inelastic surface scattering and of surface phonons has now become feasible. It is therefore possible to test and to improve the details of interaction models which have been worked out theoretically in the last few decades. At this point we felt that a concise, co...

  13. 26 CFR 1.6662-4 - Substantial understatement of income tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... adjustments on audit for 1989 increase taxable income to $51,500 and tax liability to $12,339. There was... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Substantial understatement of income tax. 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Additions to the Tax, Additional Amounts, and...

  14. 45 CFR 305.63 - Standards for determining substantial compliance with IV-D requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... State income tax refund offset, which results in a collection received during the audit period, the... in substantial compliance with one or more of the IV-D requirements as a result of an audit conducted... this chapter to State and Federal income tax refund offset; and wage withholding under § 303.100...

  15. 5 CFR 5502.107 - Supplemental disclosure of financial interests in substantially affected organizations applicable...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supplemental disclosure of financial... SUPPLEMENTAL FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS FOR EMPLOYEES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES § 5502.107 Supplemental disclosure of financial interests in substantially affected...

  16. 77 FR 65169 - Extension of Certain Timber Sale Contracts; Finding of Substantial Overriding Public Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-25

    ... increases competition for National Forest System timber sales, results in higher prices paid for such timber... hazardous fuels. On June 1, 2012, there were 98 National Forest System timber sales under contract in... Forest Service Extension of Certain Timber Sale Contracts; Finding of Substantial Overriding Public...

  17. Have Cognitive Diagnostic Models Delivered Their Goods? Some Substantial and Methodological Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Oliver; Robitzsch, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The paper by Rupp and Templin (2008) is an excellent work on the characteristics and features of cognitive diagnostic models (CDM). In this article, the authors comment on some substantial and methodological aspects of this focus paper. They organize their comments by going through issues associated with the terms "cognitive," "diagnostic" and…

  18. Automated Analysis of Vital Signs Identified Patients with Substantial Bleeding Prior to Hospital Arrival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    threatening bleeding may be effectively treated when surgery and blood resuscitation are provided sufficiently quickly after injury [1, 2]. Standard...survive. Protocols for substantial bleeding , typically activated after the patient’s arrival in a hospital, are known to improve trauma outcomes. Early...

  19. 16 CFR 1115.12 - Information which should be reported; evaluating substantial product hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... in accordance with § 1115.11, about product use, experience, performance, design, or manufacture... of the product, and the population group exposed to the product (e.g., children, elderly, handicapped...; evaluating substantial product hazard. 1115.12 Section 1115.12 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT...

  20. EXPERIMENTAL SUBSTANTIATION OF HERB MATERIAL SELECTION IN THE MAKING OF COMPLEX TINCTURE FOR PERIODONTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piminov O.F.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available During this work, possibility of using of licorice roots, sedge cane rootstocks as well as burnet rootstocks with its roots as components of a complex tincture for periodontitis treatment was experimentally substantiated, and an optimal raw material-extractant ratio, based on results of microbiological studings, was proved.

  1. Theoretical-and-Methodological Substantiation of Multilingual Model Activity in Kazakhstan Higher School Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospanova, Bikesh Revovna; Azimbayeva, Zhanat Amantayevna; Timokhina, Tatyana Vladimirovna; Seydakhmetova, Zergul Koblandiyevna

    2016-01-01

    The need of implementing the model of professional development in training an expert in the conditions of multilingualism is considered. The possibility of using the multilingual approach in the context of present day education with the use of innovative technologies of training is substantiated, the definition of "multilingual…

  2. 76 FR 41424 - Finding of Substantial Inadequacy of Implementation Plan; Call for Iowa State Implementation Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    ... experience high incidences of lung disease, cardiac problems, renal and other serious life threatening...) is substantially inadequate to maintain the 2006 24-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS... this rule on February 2, 2011 (76 FR 9706). EPA received comments from the State of Iowa Department...

  3. 19 CFR 10.41b - Clearance of serially numbered substantial holders or outer containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clearance of serially numbered substantial holders or outer containers. 10.41b Section 10.41b Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... holders or outer containers. (a) The holders and containers described in this section may be...

  4. Substantial Molecular Evolution In Prolonged Latent Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infections In Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillebaek, Troels; Norman, Anders; Rasmussen, Erik Michael;

    2015-01-01

    , as well as evidence for distinct processes such as oxidative damage or natural selection having contributed to mutation accumulation. Conclusions: Our study shows that distinct processes can shape Mtb genomes during latent infection. Most importantly, we document substantial molecular evolution of Mtb...

  5. 26 CFR 1.6043-3 - Return regarding liquidation, dissolution, termination, or substantial contraction of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Return regarding liquidation, dissolution... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Information Returns § 1.6043-3 Return regarding liquidation, dissolution... years preceding any liquidation, dissolution, termination, or substantial contraction of the...

  6. Intergenerational transmission of child abuse and neglect: Do maltreatment type, perpetrator, and substantiation status matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jessica Dym; Kotake, Chie; Fauth, Rebecca; Easterbrooks, M Ann

    2017-01-01

    A maternal history of childhood maltreatment is thought to be a potent risk factor for child abuse and neglect, yet the extent of continuity across generations is unclear, with studies reporting vastly different rates of intergenerational transmission. Disparate findings may be due to lack of attention to the nature of maltreatment experiences in each generation. We sought to expand the current literature by examining the role of maltreatment type, perpetrator identity, and substantiation status of reports to child protective services (CPS) on intergenerational maltreatment among adolescent mothers (n=417) and their children. We found that when mothers had at least one report of childhood maltreatment (substantiated or not), the odds that they maltreated their children increased by 72% (OR=2.52), compared to mothers who are not maltreated, but the odds were considerably lower when we limited analysis to substantiated reports. Both a maternal history of substantiated neglect and multiple type maltreatment (neglect and physical or sexual abuse) were associated with increased risk of child maltreatment, yet the likelihood of children experiencing multiple maltreatment perpetrated with their mothers identified as perpetrators increased over 300% when mothers had a childhood history of multiple maltreatment.

  7. Stimulating forebrain communications: Slow sinusoidal electric fields over frontal cortices dynamically modulate hippocampal activity and cortico-hippocampal interplay during slow-wave states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Anastasia; Whitten, Tara A; Dickson, Clayton T

    2016-06-01

    Slow-wave states are characterized by the most global physiological phenomenon in the mammalian brain, the large-amplitude slow oscillation (SO; ~1Hz) composed of alternating states of activity (ON/UP states) and silence (OFF/DOWN states) at the network and single cell levels. The SO is cortically generated and appears as a traveling wave that can propagate across the cortical surface and can invade the hippocampus. This cortical rhythm is thought to be imperative for sleep-dependent memory consolidation, potentially through increased interactions with the hippocampus. The SO is correlated with learning and its presumed enhancement via slow rhythmic electrical field stimulation improves subsequent mnemonic performance. However, the mechanism by which such field stimulation influences the dynamics of ongoing cortico-hippocampal communication is unknown. Here we show - using multi-site recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats - that sinusoidal electrical field stimulation applied to the frontal region of the cerebral cortex creates a platform for improved cortico-hippocampal communication. Moderate-intensity field stimulation entrained hippocampal slow activity (likely by way of the temporoammonic pathway) and also increased sharp-wave ripples, the signature memory replay events of the hippocampus, and further increased cortical spindles. Following cessation of high-intensity stimulation, SO interactions in the cortical-to-hippocampal direction were reduced, while the reversed hippocampal-to-cortical communication at both SO and gamma bandwidths was enhanced. Taken together, these findings suggest that cortical field stimulation may function to boost memory consolidation by strengthening cortico-hippocampal and hippocampo-cortical interplay at multiple nested frequencies in an intensity-dependent fashion.

  8. Origin of Pseudotachylites during slow creep experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peč, M.; Stünitz, H.; Heilbronner, R.; Drury, M.; De Capitani, C.

    2012-04-01

    structures, bubbles, and bubble trains following the local flow pattern, corroded clasts and amorphous glass identified by TEM. The chemical composition of the pseudotachylites varies depending on the precursor material and is in general more ferromagnesian and basic compared to the bulk rock indicating preferred melting of biotite. The calculated temperature increase due to shear heating is at the most 5°C. High stresses cause pervasive comminution: the smallest crystalline fragments within the bubbly melt have a grain diameter of 10 nm. Nanomaterials exhibit a 'melting point depression' (dependence of melting point on grain size) which allows melting well below bulk melting temperatures. Thus, it seems that melting is a continuation of the comminution once the rock has reached small enough grain size. We therefore suggest that pseudotachylites may also form as 'mechanical melts' at slow displacement rates without the necessity of reaching high temperatures.

  9. Peptoids successfully inhibit the growth of gram negative E-coli causing substantial membrane damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojsoska, Biljana; Carretero, Gustavo; Larsen, Sylvester

    2017-01-01

    demonstrate that both peptoids are able to cause loss of viability in E. coli susceptible cells at their MIC (16-32 mu g/ml) concentrations. Dye leakage assays demonstrate slow and low membrane permeabilization for peptoid 1, that is still higher for lipid compositions mimicking bacterial membranes than lipid...... compositions containing Cholesterol. At concentrations of 4 x MIC (64-128 mu g/ml), pore formation, leakage of cytoplasmic content and filamentation were the most commonly observed morphological changes seen by SEM in E. coli treated with both peptoids. Flow cytometry data supports the increase of cell size...

  10. Regeneration of frog twitch and slow muscle fibers after mincing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, H; Emser, W

    1985-10-01

    Iliofibularis muscles of Rana temporaria were minced and allowed to regenerate in the iliofibularis or the sartorius bed of the same frog. Regenerated muscles were examined for the presence of slow muscle fibers using electrophysiologic, histochemical, and contractile parameters. Muscle regeneration from sartorius mince was also studied. Regeneration was more successful from iliofibularis than from sartorius mince, and the iliofibularis bed was more favorable for regeneration than the sartorius bed for both types of muscle. Twitch fibers regenerated within a few months, but slow fibers could not be identified earlier than 14 months after muscle destruction. Slow muscle fibers regenerated only from iliofibularis mince, both orthotopically and heterotopically. All regenerates capable of maintaining a K-contracture contained histochemically identified slow fibers; the membrane properties of electrophysiologically identified slow fibers were normal. It is concluded that slow muscle fibers regenerate only from the remnants of a muscle that contains slow fibers. The results are discussed with respect to the role of innervating nerve fibers.

  11. Hedgehog can drive terminal differentiation of amniote slow skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bildsoe Heidi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secreted Hedgehog (Hh signalling molecules have profound influences on many developing and regenerating tissues. Yet in most vertebrate tissues it is unclear which Hh-responses are the direct result of Hh action on a particular cell type because Hhs frequently elicit secondary signals. In developing skeletal muscle, Hhs promote slow myogenesis in zebrafish and are involved in specification of medial muscle cells in amniote somites. However, the extent to which non-myogenic cells, myoblasts or differentiating myocytes are direct or indirect targets of Hh signalling is not known. Results We show that Sonic hedgehog (Shh can act directly on cultured C2 myoblasts, driving Gli1 expression, myogenin up-regulation and terminal differentiation, even in the presence of growth factors that normally prevent differentiation. Distinct myoblasts respond differently to Shh: in some slow myosin expression is increased, whereas in others Shh simply enhances terminal differentiation. Exposure of chick wing bud cells to Shh in culture increases numbers of both muscle and non-muscle cells, yet simultaneously enhances differentiation of myoblasts. The small proportion of differentiated muscle cells expressing definitive slow myosin can be doubled by Shh. Shh over-expression in chick limb bud reduces muscle mass at early developmental stages while inducing ectopic slow muscle fibre formation. Abundant later-differentiating fibres, however, do not express extra slow myosin. Conversely, Hh loss of function in the limb bud, caused by implanting hybridoma cells expressing a functionally blocking anti-Hh antibody, reduces early slow muscle formation and differentiation, but does not prevent later slow myogenesis. Analysis of Hh knockout mice indicates that Shh promotes early somitic slow myogenesis. Conclusions Taken together, the data show that Hh can have direct pro-differentiative effects on myoblasts and that early-developing muscle requires Hh for

  12. On Slow Light as a Black Hole Analogue

    CERN Document Server

    Unruh, W G

    2003-01-01

    Although slow light (electromagnetically induced transparency) would seem an ideal medium in which to institute a ``dumb hole'' (black hole analog), it suffers from a number of problems. We show that the high phase velocity in the slow light regime ensures that the system cannot be used as an analog displaying Hawking radiation. Even though an appropriately designed slow-light set-up may simulate classical features of black holes -- such as horizon, mode mixing, Bogoliubov coefficients, etc. -- it does not reproduce the related quantum effects. PACS: 04.70.Dy, 04.80.-y, 42.50.Gy, 04.60.-m.

  13. Theory of neutron slowing down in nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Ferziger, Joel H; Dunworth, J V

    2013-01-01

    The Theory of Neutron Slowing Down in Nuclear Reactors focuses on one facet of nuclear reactor design: the slowing down (or moderation) of neutrons from the high energies with which they are born in fission to the energies at which they are ultimately absorbed. In conjunction with the study of neutron moderation, calculations of reactor criticality are presented. A mathematical description of the slowing-down process is given, with particular emphasis on the problems encountered in the design of thermal reactors. This volume is comprised of four chapters and begins by considering the problems

  14. Enhanced parametric amplification in slow-light photonic crystal waveguides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yang; JIANG Chun

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate both theoretically and numerically that slow light can enhance the parametric process of silicon in photonic crystal line-defect waveguides.Specifically,to get the desired gain,the pump power for a given gain medium length or the gain medium length for given pump power can be reduced by (c/vgn)2 when slow light waveguides are used,where n is the material index of conventional waveguide,vg is the group velocity of the slow light waveguide and c is the light velocity in vacuum.

  15. Magnetic Trapping of Molecules via Optical Loading and Magnetic Slowing

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Hsin-I; Hemmerling, Boerge; Piskorski, Julia; Doyle, John M

    2013-01-01

    Calcium monofluoride (CaF) is magnetically slowed and trapped using optical pumping. Starting from a collisionally cooled slow beam, CaF with an initial velocity of ~ 30 m/s is slowed via magnetic forces as it enters a 800 mK deep magnetic trap. Employing two-stage optical pumping, CaF is irreversibly loaded into the trap via two scattered photons. We observe a trap lifetime exceeding 500 ms, limited by background collisions. This method paves the way for cooling and magnetic trapping of chemically diverse molecules without closed cycling transitions.

  16. Slow light invisibility, teleportation, and other mysteries of light

    CERN Document Server

    Perkowitz, Sidney

    2011-01-01

    Slow Light is a popular treatment of today's astonishing breakthroughs in the science of light. Even though we don't understand light's quantum mysteries, we can slow it to a stop and speed it up beyond its Einsteinian speed limit, 186,000 miles/sec; use it for quantum telecommunications; teleport it; manipulate it to create invisibility; and perhaps generate hydrogen fusion power with it. All this is lucidly presented for non-scientists who wonder about teleportation, Harry Potter invisibility cloaks, and other fantastic outcomes. Slow Light shows how the real science and the fantasy inspire

  17. Slow Food: por um alimento bom, limpo e justo

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiele Porazzi

    2012-01-01

    REVIEW:PETRINI, Carlo. Slow Food: princípios da nova gastronomia. Trad. de Renata Lúcia Botina. São Paulo: Editora Senac, 2009. 245 p. RESEÑA:PETRINI, Carlo. Slow Food: princípios da nova gastronomia. Trad. de Renata Lúcia Botina. São Paulo: Editora Senac, 2009. 245 p. http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-1384.2012v9n1p384 RESENHA:PETRINI, Carlo. Slow Food: princípios da nova gastronomia. Trad. de Renata Lúcia Botina. São Paulo: Editora Senac, 2009. 245 p.

  18. Origin of the slow afterhyperpolarization and slow rhythmic bursting in striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Charles J; Goldberg, Joshua A

    2006-01-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons recorded in slices exhibit three different firing patterns: rhythmic single spiking, irregular bursting, and rhythmic bursting. The rhythmic single-spiking pattern is governed mainly by a prominent brief afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) that follows single spikes. The mAHP arises from an apamin-sensitive calcium-dependent potassium current. A slower AHP (sAHP), also present in these neurons, becomes prominent during rhythmic bursting or driven firing. Although not apamin sensitive, the sAHP is caused by a calcium-dependent potassium conductance. It is not present after blockade of calcium current with cadmium or after calcium is removed from the media or when intracellular calcium is buffered with bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid. It reverses at the potassium equilibrium potential. It can be generated by subthreshold depolarizations and persists after blockade of sodium currents by tetrodotoxin. It is slow, being maximal approximately 1 s after depolarization onset, and takes several seconds to decay. It requires >300-ms depolarizations to become maximally activated. Its voltage sensitivity is sigmoidal, with a half activation voltage of -40 mV. We conclude the sAHP is a high-affinity apamin-insensitive calcium-dependent potassium conductance, triggered by calcium currents partly activated at subthreshold levels. In combination with those calcium currents, it accounts for the slow oscillations seen in a subset of cholinergic interneurons exhibiting rhythmic bursting. In all cholinergic interneurons, it contributes to the slowdown or pause in firing that follows driven activity or prolonged subthreshold depolarizations and is therefore a candidate mechanism for the pause response observed in cholinergic neurons in vivo.

  19. Modifications of gallium phosphide single crystals using slow highly charged ions and swift heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Said, A. S.; Wilhelm, R. A.; Heller, R.; Akhmadaliev, Sh.; Schumann, E.; Sorokin, M.; Facsko, S.; Trautmann, C.

    2016-09-01

    GaP single crystals were irradiated with slow highly charged ions (HCI) using 114 keV 129Xe(33-40)+ and with various swift heavy ions (SHI) of 30 MeV I9+ and 374 MeV-2.2 GeV 197Au25+. The irradiated surfaces were investigated by scanning force microscopy (SFM). The irradiations with SHI lead to nanohillocks protruding from the GaP surfaces, whereas no changes of the surface topography were observed after the irradiation with HCI. This result indicates that a potential energy above 38.5 keV is required for surface nanostructuring of GaP. In addition, strong coloration of the GaP crystals was observed after irradiation with SHI. The effect was stronger for higher energies. This was confirmed by measuring an increased extinction coefficient in the visible light region.

  20. Quantifying NVT in southern Mexico and its apparent lack of correlation with slow slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, S. M.; Brudzinski, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    One of the most exciting recent discoveries in seismology has been the episodic correlation of slow slip and non-volcanic tremor (NVT) in space and time. This observation was first made in Cascadia, but has now been observed in a variety of other subduction zones. Recent studies in Oaxaca reveal both slow slip and NVT, but analysis of the most prominent NVT finds it recurs as often as every 2-3 months in a given region while slow slip occurs much less frequently on the order of 12-24 months. This result was surprising considering that tremor and slip are so well correlated in Cascadia that a linear relationship exists between the number of tremor hours recorded and the moment of concurrent slow slip. In contrast, the first study of NVT in Oaxaca found prominent tremor episodes were only slightly more common during the 2 month slow slip event than the 6 months before or after. However, NVT is more difficult to detect in Oaxaca than Cascadia considering the frequent microseismicity, seasonal storms, and limited seismic network. In this study, we investigate whether there were smaller periods of NVT that went undetected during the slow slip in the initial study, which was based on scanning average absolute amplitudes in the tremor passband. As an alternative, we will utilize a recently developed technique for detecting NVT that takes advantage of the narrow frequency content by calculating the ratio of amplitudes in the tremor passband relative to amplitudes in higher and lower passbands where microseismicity and surface waves are more common, respectively. In Cascadia, this frequency ratio method has been successful in the detection of low amplitude, short duration inter-ETS tremor and may assist in the detection of less prominent tremor. Moreover, it will provide a more thorough estimate of tremor prevalence over time to test whether tremor is at all correlated with GPS-detected slow slip and if it provides any proxy to the degree of strain release on the deeper

  1. Slow axis collimation lens with variable curvature radius for semiconductor laser bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ling-Ling; Cai, Lei; Zheng, Yan-Fang; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Pu; Nie, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Xing-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Based on Snell's law and the constant phase in the front of optical field, a design method of the slow axis collimation lens with variable curvature radius is proposed for semiconductor laser bars. Variable radius of the collimator is designed by the transmission angle, and it is demonstrated that the collimator has good beam collimation ability by material with low refractive index. Resorting to the design thought of finite element method, the surface of the collimator has been divided, and it is feasible to be fabricated. This method is applied as an example in collimation of a 976 nm semiconductor laser bar. 6 mrad divergence angle of collimated beam at slow axis is realized by the designed collimation lens with refraction index of 1.51.

  2. Preparation and Testing of Cementing and Coating Nano-Subnanocomposites of Slow/Controlled-Release Fertilizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiu-mei; FENG Zhao-bin; ZHANG Fu-dao; ZHANG Shu-qing; HE Xu-sheng

    2006-01-01

    To select the cementing and coating materials of slow/controlled-release fertilizer, the natural kaoline and abandoned foam plastics were used to prepare nano-subnanocomposites through the methods of organic material intercalation, semiemulsification, and cut at high velocity techniques. Besides, two kinds of nano-subnanocomposites were tested in this study using several instruments, including the scanning electron microscope (SEM), the X-ray diffraction (XRD), the infrared ray spectrum (IR), and the laser granularity. The main results were as follows: 1) The organic material was intercalated in the layers of kaoline clays, and the natural kaoline exfoliated into nanometer-sized layers. The organic agent and clays formed nanocomposites through hydrogen bond combination. 2) The SEM pictures of polystyrenestarch nano-subnanocomposites showed that many pores and rugas were present on the surface of film at sizes ranging from 10 to 20 nm. These nano-subnanocomposites were used as the cementing and coating materials of slow/controlledrelease fertilizer.

  3. Fast and Slow Precipitation Responses to Individual Climate Forcers: A PDRMIP Multimodel Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Forster, P.M.; Hodnebrog, O.; Andrews, T.; Faluvegi, G.; Flaschner, D.; Kasoar, M.; Kharin, V.; Kirkevag, A.; Shindell, D.; Voulgarakis, A.

    2016-01-01

    Precipitation is expected to respond differently to various drivers of anthropogenic climate change. We present the first results from the Precipitation Driver and Response Model Intercomparison Project (PDRMIP), where nine global climate models have perturbed CO2, CH4, black carbon, sulfate, and solar insolation. We divide the resulting changes to global mean and regional precipitation into fast responses that scale with changes in atmospheric absorption and slow responses scaling with surface temperature change. While the overall features are broadly similar between models, we find significant regional intermodel variability, especially over land. Black carbon stands out as a component that may cause significant model diversity in predicted precipitation change. Processes linked to atmospheric absorption are less consistently modeled than those linked to top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing. We identify a number of land regions where the model ensemble consistently predicts that fast precipitation responses to climate perturbations dominate over the slow, temperature-driven responses.

  4. Validation and substantiation of 25 kGy as sterilization dose for lyophilized human amnion membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djefal, A; Tahtat, D; Khodja, A Nacer; Bouzid, S Saad; Remane, N

    2007-01-01

    The validation and substantiation of sterilization dose for lyophilized human amnion membrane by gamma irradiation delivered by Co60 source were investigated. The validation experiments were conducted according to ISO 13409 method B. A total of 120 human amnion membranes were collected. Of these, 10 membranes were used for estimation of bioburden and 20 membranes were used for the individual sterility test at verification dose. The average bioburden per product unit with sample item portion (SIP = 1) for lyophilized human amnion membrane was 572 cfu. The verification dose experiments were done at dose of 8.1 kGy and the results of sterility tests showed that human amnion membrane got one positive. Consequently, the sterilization dose of 25 kGy was confirmed and substantiated.

  5. Leaky domino-modes in regular arrays of substantially thick metal nanostrips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voroshilov, Pavel M.; Simovski, Constantin R.

    2016-07-01

    In previous works, an efficient light trapping performed by arrays of metal nanoantennas whose building block was a slightly tapered (trapezoidal) substantially thick nanostrip was revealed. This light trapping implied a broad spectrum of solar light concentrated in a subwavelength depth of the semiconductor substrate. This is a very advantageous feature allowing our structure to enhance thin-film solar cells. However, the physics of the broadband resonant absorption in the substrate was not investigated. In the present paper, we show that our arrays support so-called leaky domino-modes, responsible for such the light trapping. These modes are multipole oscillations of the array of substantially thick nanostrips. In this work we have thoroughly studied these leaky modes relating them to resonances of high-order multipole moments and to broadband light-trapping effect.

  6. Expanding Student International Awareness Through Short-Term Study Abroad Courses With Substantial Engineering Technical Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobitz, Frank; Schubert, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    The efficacy of Compact International Experience (CIE) courses is assessed in this study. These courses were developed with the aim to raise student international awareness while retaining substantial engineering technical content. The courses were motivated by a strong student desire for engineering international studies as well as a drive by the home institution for internationalization of the curriculum. The experiences gained from delivering two distinct three-semester-unit engineering elective courses in three-week time frames in France and Australia are discussed. While the two courses, Topics in Fluid Mechanics and Advanced Electronic Circuit Design, focused on their technical content, the desire for student understanding of the cultural environment and the impact of engineering solutions from a global and societal viewpoint were strong driving factors for each. Assessment validates the hypothesis that CIE courses can successfully deliver substantial engineering technical content while providing an enriching international experience to students.

  7. The Geodetic Matched Filter: Searching for Low Amplitude Slow Slip Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, B.; Campillo, M.; Lasserre, C.; Frank, W.; Socquet, A.; Cotte, N.; Walpersdorf, A.; Kostoglodov, V.

    2016-12-01

    Since the discovery of Slow Slip Events (SSEs), many methods have successfully been applied to model obvious transient events in geodetic time series, such as the widely used network strain filter. Independent seismological observations of tremors or low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) are evidences of low amplitude slow deformation but do not always coincide with clear occurrences of transient signals in geodetic time series. One way to discriminate if the slow deformation information is present or not in geodetic data is to use the seismological catalog as a tracker. For example, Frank et. al 2015 used the LFEs bursts timings on the Mexican subduction zone to stack potential slow events included in GPS time series in order to increase the signal to noise ratio. It successfully produced a slow slip like signal corresponding to the average surface motion of all the stacked events. The aim of the present study is to find a way to extract the signal corresponding to slow slips, hidden in the noise of GPS time series, without using information from independent datasets. We take advantage of the Mexican continuous GPS network (40 stations) within Guerrero and Oaxaca regions. We first build templates of transient events by assembling a source function with green functions that link slip on the subduction interface to surface displacement. We then correlate the templates built on the whole interface with the GPS time-series cleaned of co-seismic, post-seismic signals and large SSEs. We apply a weighted stacking, that takes into account the location of GPS stations compared to the sliding patch, on all correlation functions across the GPS network. We perform an analysis on synthetic time series, where we add transients signals to noise enable to set a detection treshold. Applied on the same period of time as the one analyzed by Frank et al. 2015, this technique enables us to (i) detect in time the events corresponding to bursts of LFEs and (ii) locate and characterize the

  8. PM2.5 pollution is substantially affected by ammonia emissions in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiyun; Gu, Baojing; Erisman, Jan Willem; Reis, Stefan; Fang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Xuehe; Zhang, Xiuming

    2016-11-01

    Urban air quality in China has been declining substantially in recent years due to severe haze episodes. The reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions since 2013 does not yet appear to yield substantial benefits for haze mitigation. As the reductions of those key precursors to secondary aerosol formation appears not to sufficient, other crucial factors need to be considered for the design of effective air pollution control strategies. Here we argue that ammonia (NH3) plays a - so far - underestimated role in the formation of secondary inorganic aerosols, a main component of urban fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations in China. By analyzing in situ concentration data observed in major cities alongside gridded emission data obtained from remote sensing and inventories, we find that emissions of NH3 have a more robust association with the spatiotemporal variation of PM2.5 levels than emissions of SO2 and NOx. As a consequence, we argue that urban PM2.5 pollution in China in many locations is substantially affected by NH3 emissions. We highlight that more efforts should be directed to the reduction of NH3 emissions that help mitigate PM2.5 pollution more efficiently than other PM2.5 precursors. Such efforts will yield substantial co-benefits by improving nitrogen use efficiency in farming systems. As a consequence, such integrated strategies would not only improve urban air quality, but also contribute to China's food-security goals, prevent further biodiversity loss, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lead to economic savings.

  9. Trans- Substantial Motion and Man’s Evolution in Mulla Sadra’s Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qodratullah Qorbani

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The above subject is considered in Islam and Islamic thought, especially in Islamicphilosophy and wisdom. We can find theories of it in Transcendent wisdom of Islam by Mulla SadraShirazi. He himself has a theory called Trans-substantial motion, which we try to provide and explainit here. First, we give a short account of the properties and principles of Mulla Sadra‟s philosophy.

  10. Do convective schemes substantially alter simulated global climate and cloud feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, S. C.; Webb, M.; Lock, A.; Bretherton, C. S.; Bony, S.; Cole, J. N.; Idelkadi, A.; Kang, S. M.; Koshiro, T.; Kawai, H.; Ogura, T.; Roehrig, R.; Shin, Y.; Mauritsen, T.; Vial, J.; Watanabe, M.; Woelfle, M.; Zhao, M.; Cairns, C. W.; Vallis, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate CFMIP-2 AMIP and AMIP+4K experiments with ten climate models which have had their convective parametrizations turned off. Previous studies have suggested that parameterized convection may be a leading source of inter-model spread in cloud feedbacks and other aspects. We find that model biases in 'ConvOff' runs (those with the convective schemes switched off), for example in tropical lapse rate and relative humidity, are generally smaller than intermodel differences in these fields, in spite of the fact that these fields are widely thought to be controlled by convective processes. This suggests that, to a considerable extent, explicitly resolved convection is able to do most of the overall job of convection in modern climate models at least with respect to phenomena at large scales. We find moreover that 'ConvOff' models have a similar overall range of cloud feedbacks compared to the standard configurations. Furthermore, applying a simple bias correction method to allow for differences in present day global cloud radiative effects substantially reduces the differences between the cloud feedbacks with and without parametrized convection in the individual models. We conclude that, while parametrized convection influences the strength of the cloud feedbacks substantially in some models, other processes must also contribute substantially to the overall inter-model spread. The positive shortwave cloud feedbacks seen in the models in subtropical regimes associated with shallow clouds are still present in the ConvOff experiments. Inter-model spread in shortwave cloud feedback increases slightly in regimes associated with trade cumulus in the ConvOff experiments but is quite similar in the most stable sub-tropical regimes associated with stratocumulus clouds. Inter-model spread in longwave cloud feedbacks in strongly precipitating regions of the tropics is substantially reduced in the ConvOff experiments however, indicating a considerable local contribution

  11. Patient health causes substantial portion of geographic variation in Medicare costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Megan

    2013-10-01

    Key findings. (1) Substantial geographic variation exists in Medicare costs, but to determine the source and extent of this variation requires proper accounting for population health differences. (2) While physician practice patterns likely affect Medicare geographic cost variations, population health explains at least 75 to 85 percent of the variations—more than previously estimated. (3) Policy strategies should consider the magnitude of the impact of beneficiary health status on Medicare costs in order to address geographic variation.

  12. Confidence Intervals: From tests of statistical significance to confidence intervals, range hypotheses and substantial effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Beaulieu-Prévost

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available For the last 50 years of research in quantitative social sciences, the empirical evaluation of scientific hypotheses has been based on the rejection or not of the null hypothesis. However, more than 300 articles demonstrated that this method was problematic. In summary, null hypothesis testing (NHT is unfalsifiable, its results depend directly on sample size and the null hypothesis is both improbable and not plausible. Consequently, alternatives to NHT such as confidence intervals (CI and measures of effect size are starting to be used in scientific publications. The purpose of this article is, first, to provide the conceptual tools necessary to implement an approach based on confidence intervals, and second, to briefly demonstrate why such an approach is an interesting alternative to an approach based on NHT. As demonstrated in the article, the proposed CI approach avoids most problems related to a NHT approach and can often improve the scientific and contextual relevance of the statistical interpretations by testing range hypotheses instead of a point hypothesis and by defining the minimal value of a substantial effect. The main advantage of such a CI approach is that it replaces the notion of statistical power by an easily interpretable three-value logic (probable presence of a substantial effect, probable absence of a substantial effect and probabilistic undetermination. The demonstration includes a complete example.

  13. Optimum Multiuser Detector for Multipath Slow Fading Asynchronous CDMA Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangZhaocheng; YangZhixing; 等

    1995-01-01

    A structure of optimum multiuser detector for asynchronous CDMA in multipath slow fading channels is derived and the significant performance gain over the conventional RAKE receiv-er is shown by simulation.

  14. Compounding of slow-release niacinamide capsules: feasibility and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radojkovic, Branko; Milić, Jela; Calija, Bojan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of extemporaneous compounding of slow-release oral dosage form of niacinamide and to evaluate its release kinetics. The model formulation (preparation) was developed in the form of powder-filled hard gelatin capsules. Two slow-release preparations with different ratios of hypromellose have been prepared and evaluated in comparison with an immediate-release preparation. The dissolution tests were performed as per United States Pharmacopoeia requirements: Type I Apparatus, over 7 hours. Both slow-release preparations, containing 40% and 60% v/v hypromellose, respectively, have showed slow release kinetics. The dissolution profiles were significantly different, with similarity factor f2niacinamide capsules can be successfully compounded using hypromellose as a sole release rate modifier, and that the release mechanism is comparable to hydrophilic polymer matrix-based systems.

  15. Effects of cervical self-stretching on slow vital capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongwook; Yoon, Nayoon; Jeong, Yeongran; Ha, Misook; Nam, Kunwoo

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of self-stretching of cervical muscles, because the accessory inspiratory muscle is considered to improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy university students 19-21 years old who did not have any lung disease, respiratory dysfunction, cervical injury, or any problems upon cervical stretching. [Methods] Spirometry was used as a pulmonary function test to measure the slow vital capacity before and after stretching. The slow vital capacity of the experimental group was measured before and after cervical self-stretching. Meanwhile, the slow vital capacity of the control group, which did not perform stretching, was also measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The expiratory vital capacity, inspiratory reserve volume, and expiratory reserve volume of the experimental group increased significantly after the cervical self-stretching. [Conclusion] Self-stretching of the cervical muscle (i.e., the inspiratory accessory muscle) improves slow vital capacity.

  16. Obesity Slows Recovery for Heart Surgery Patients: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167721.html Obesity Slows Recovery for Heart Surgery Patients: Study They' ... Aug. 10 in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery . "Obesity is a growing problem for society that has ...

  17. Preparation and characterization of slow release formulations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    *

    characterize the resulting slow release formulations (SRFs) using scanning electron microscopy. (SEM), and Fourier ... used for controlled release of N-P-K compound fertilizer9 and of ..... fertilizer with controlled release and water retention,.

  18. Slow light enhancement and limitations in periodic media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grgic, Jure

    to longer interaction time in the periodic media. Due to this reason, weak light-matter interaction is enhanced. The enhancement due to slow light has been studied for loss and gain. By introducing gain/loss, dispersive properties, in the slow light region, are severely influenced. The minimum attainable......Properties of periodic dielectric media have attracted a big interest in the last two decades due to numerous exciting physical phenomena that cannot occur in homogeneous media. Due to their strong dispersive properties, the speed of light can be significantly slowed down in periodic structures...... and significant structures with numerical and analytical methods. By analyzing different structures, we show very general properties for limitation and enhancement in the slow light regime. Inherent imperfections of fabricated structures such as a material loss and structural disorder have a strong influence...

  19. Exploring carrier dynamics in semiconductors for slow light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Xue, Weiqi; Chen, Yaohui

    2009-01-01

    We give an overview of recent results on slow and fast light in active semiconductor waveguides. The cases of coherent population oscillations as well as electromagnetically induced transparency are covered, emphasizing the physics and fundamental limitations.......We give an overview of recent results on slow and fast light in active semiconductor waveguides. The cases of coherent population oscillations as well as electromagnetically induced transparency are covered, emphasizing the physics and fundamental limitations....

  20. Slow Fashion : Tailoring a Strategic Approach towards Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Cataldi, Carlotta; Dickson, Maureen; Grover, Crystal

    2010-01-01

    This research explores one avenue for achieving sustainability within the fashion industry; which as it exists today is unsustainable. The Slow Fashion movement has an existing foundation in the larger fashion industry and is already making strides towards sustainability. The authors used this opportunity to examine a strategic approach, as its current approach is ad hoc. First, the authors assessed the Slow Fashion movement using the 5 level Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development. T...

  1. Slow and fast light in semiconductor structures: physics and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Xue, Weiqi;

    We discuss the physics and applications of slow light in semiconductor waveguides. In particular we introduce methods for enhancing the degree of light speed control considering both electromagnetically induced transparency as well as coherent population oscillations.......We discuss the physics and applications of slow light in semiconductor waveguides. In particular we introduce methods for enhancing the degree of light speed control considering both electromagnetically induced transparency as well as coherent population oscillations....

  2. Essential Thalamic Contribution to Slow Waves of Natural Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, François; Schmiedt, Joscha T.; Taylor, Hannah L.; Orban, Gergely; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Uebele, Victor N.; Renger, John J.; Lambert, Régis C.; Leresche, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Slow waves represent one of the prominent EEG signatures of non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep and are thought to play an important role in the cellular and network plasticity that occurs during this behavioral state. These slow waves of natural sleep are currently considered to be exclusively generated by intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms within neocortical territories, although a role for the thalamus in this key physiological rhythm has been suggested but never demonstrated. Combining neuronal ensemble recordings, microdialysis, and optogenetics, here we show that the block of the thalamic output to the neocortex markedly (up to 50%) decreases the frequency of slow waves recorded during non-REM sleep in freely moving, naturally sleeping-waking rats. A smaller volume of thalamic inactivation than during sleep is required for observing similar effects on EEG slow waves recorded during anesthesia, a condition in which both bursts and single action potentials of thalamocortical neurons are almost exclusively dependent on T-type calcium channels. Thalamic inactivation more strongly reduces spindles than slow waves during both anesthesia and natural sleep. Moreover, selective excitation of thalamocortical neurons strongly entrains EEG slow waves in a narrow frequency band (0.75–1.5 Hz) only when thalamic T-type calcium channels are functionally active. These results demonstrate that the thalamus finely tunes the frequency of slow waves during non-REM sleep and anesthesia, and thus provide the first conclusive evidence that a dynamic interplay of the neocortical and thalamic oscillators of slow waves is required for the full expression of this key physiological EEG rhythm. PMID:24336724

  3. Slow light in semiconductor waveguides: Theory and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Öhman, Filip; Poel, Mike van der;

    2007-01-01

    Slow light in multi-section quantum well waveguide structure is realized using either coherent population oscillations (CPO) and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is studied. The properties of the two schemes are compared and discussed.......Slow light in multi-section quantum well waveguide structure is realized using either coherent population oscillations (CPO) and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is studied. The properties of the two schemes are compared and discussed....

  4. Slow-light enhancement of Beer-Lambert-Bouguer absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Xiao, Sanshui

    2007-01-01

    We theoretically show how slow light in an optofluidic environment facilitates enhanced light-matter interactions, by orders of magnitude. The proposed concept provides strong opportunities for improving existing miniaturized chemical absorbance cells for Beer-Lambert-Bouguer absorption measureme......We theoretically show how slow light in an optofluidic environment facilitates enhanced light-matter interactions, by orders of magnitude. The proposed concept provides strong opportunities for improving existing miniaturized chemical absorbance cells for Beer-Lambert-Bouguer absorption...

  5. Slow Tech: The Bridge between Computer Ethics and Business Ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Patrignani, Norberto; Whitehouse, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Part 1: Society, Social Responsibility, Ethics and ICT; International audience; This paper addresses the difficult task of implementing the concept of Slow Tech, that is, information and communication technology (ICT) that is good, clean and fair, in a business environment. It investigates the democratic, environmental, and social challenges currently facing ICT vendors. More specifically, it examines the opportunities available for these companies to use Slow Tech as a bridging mechanism bet...

  6. On the use of slow light for enhancing waveguide properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Nielsen, Torben Roland

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of a general analysis of waveguides containing a dispersive material, we identify conditions under which slow-light propagation may enhance the gain, absorption, or phase change. The enhancement is shown to depend on the slow-light mechanism and the translational symmetry...... of the waveguide. A combination of material and waveguide dispersion may strongly enhance the control of light speed, e.g., using electromagnetically induced transparency in quantum dots embedded in a photonic crystal waveguide....

  7. On the stability of slow neutron combustion in astrophysical objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, J.E.; Benvenuto, O.G.

    1988-11-03

    The problem of slow neutron combustion in astrophysical objects is studied from the hydrodynamical point of view, showing that unless the existence of unknown stabilizing effects, the process seems to be absolutely unstable. It is shown that the slow combustion is likely to become a fast combustion mode called detonation. Some possible consequences of this instability for neutron stars and type II supernovae are presented and discussed.

  8. Perceptions of the Slow Food Cultural Trend among the Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Lelia Voinea; Anca Atanase; Ion Schileru

    2016-01-01

    As they become increasingly aware of the importance of healthy eating and of the serious food imbalance caused by the overconsumption of industrial, ultra-processed and superorganoleptic food, consumers are now beginning to turn their attention to food choices guaranteeing both individual health and also of the environment . Thus, in recent years we are witnessing the rise of a cultural trend ‒ Slow Food. Slow Food has become an international movement that advocates for satisfying culinary pl...

  9. Apparatus for laser slowing and cooling of molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-09

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This is the final report for our DURIP grant entitled "Apparatus for Laser Slowing and cooling of Molecules". We have... cooling of a new molecular species, TlF. We have also successfully acquired and assembled the parts for a custom laser system, which produces long...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 09-10-2016 1-Sep-2012 31-Aug-2014 Final Report: Apparatus for laser slowing and cooling of molecules The views

  10. A 'slow pace of life' in Australian old-endemic passerine birds is not accompanied by low basal metabolic rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Claus; Chappell, Mark A; Astheimer, Lee B; Londoño, Gustavo A; Buttemer, William A

    2016-05-01

    Life history theory suggests that species experiencing high extrinsic mortality rates allocate more resources toward reproduction relative to self-maintenance and reach maturity earlier ('fast pace of life') than those having greater life expectancy and reproducing at a lower rate ('slow pace of life'). Among birds, many studies have shown that tropical species have a slower pace of life than temperate-breeding species. The pace of life has been hypothesized to affect metabolism and, as predicted, tropical birds have lower basal metabolic rates (BMR) than temperate-breeding birds. However, many temperate-breeding Australian passerines belong to lineages that evolved in Australia and share 'slow' life-history traits that are typical of tropical birds. We obtained BMR from 30 of these 'old-endemics' and ten sympatric species of more recently arrived passerine lineages (derived from Afro-Asian origins or introduced by Europeans) with 'faster' life histories. The BMR of 'slow' temperate-breeding old-endemics was indistinguishable from that of new-arrivals and was not lower than the BMR of 'fast' temperate-breeding non-Australian passerines. Old-endemics had substantially smaller clutches and longer maximal life spans in the wild than new arrivals, but neither clutch size nor maximum life span was correlated with BMR. Our results suggest that low BMR in tropical birds is not functionally linked to their 'slow pace of life' and instead may be a consequence of differences in annual thermal conditions experienced by tropical versus temperate species.

  11. Effects of rapid or slow body weight reduction on intramuscular protein degradation pathways during equivalent weight loss on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Y; Urashima, S; Inai, M; Nishimura, S; Higashida, K; Terada, S

    2017-07-18

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of short-term fasting-induced rapid weight loss with those of slower but equivalent body weight loss induced by daily calorie restriction on muscle protein degradation pathways and muscle protein content. Male Fischer rats were subjected to either 30 % calorie restriction for 2 weeks to slowly decrease body weight (Slow) or 3-day fasting to rapidly decrease body weight by a comparable level of that of the Slow group (Rapid). The final body weights were about 15 % lower in both the Slow and Rapid groups than in the Con group (pweight of fast-twitch plantaris muscle, but not slow-twitch soleus muscle, were significantly lower in the Rapid group compared with the control rats fed ad libitum. Substantial increases in the expression ratio of autophagosomal membrane proteins (LC3-II/-I ratio) and polyubiquitinated protein concentration, used as biomarkers of autophagy-lysosome and ubiquitin-proteasome activities, respectively, were observed in the plantaris muscle of the Rapid group. Moreover, the LC3-II/-I ratio and polyubiquitinated protein concentration were negatively correlated with the total protein content and wet weight of plantaris muscle. These results suggest that short-term fasting-induced rapid body weight loss activates autophagy-lysosome and ubiquitin-proteasome systems more strongly than calorie restriction-induced slower weight reduction, resulting in muscular atrophy in fast-twitch muscle.

  12. Slow temporal filtering may largely explain the transformation of stick insect (Carausius morosus) extensor motor neuron activity into muscle movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Scott L; Guschlbauer, Christoph; von Uckermann, Géraldine; Büschges, Ansgar

    2007-09-01

    Understanding how nervous systems generate behavior requires understanding how muscles transform neural input into movement. The stick insect extensor tibiae muscle is an excellent system in which to study this issue because extensor motor neuron activity is highly variable during single leg walking and extensor muscles driven with this activity produce highly variable movements. We showed earlier that spike number, not frequency, codes for extensor amplitude during contraction rises, which implies the muscle acts as a slow filter on the time scale of burst interspike intervals (5-10 ms). We examine here muscle response to spiking variation over entire bursts, a time scale of hundreds of milliseconds, and directly measure muscle time constants. Muscle time constants differ during contraction and relaxation, and contraction time constants, although variable, are always extremely slow (200-700 ms). Models using these data show that extremely slow temporal filtering alone can explain much of the observed transform properties. This work also revealed an unexpected (to us) ability of slow filtering to transform steadily declining inputs into constant amplitude outputs. Examination of the effects of time constant variability on model output showed that variation within an SD primarily altered output amplitude, but variation across the entire range also altered contraction shape. These substantial changes suggest that understanding the basis of this variation is central to predicting extensor activity and that the animal could theoretically vary muscle time constant to match extensor response to changing behavioral need.

  13. Slow Solar Wind from S-Web Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Aleida K.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; DeVore, C. Richard; Wyper, Peter; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2017-08-01

    A long-standing mystery posed by in-situ heliospheric observations is the large angular extent of slow solar wind about the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). Measurements of plasma composition strongly imply that much of the slow wind consists of plasma from the closed corona that escapes onto open field lines, presumably by field-line opening or by interchange reconnection. Both of these processes are expected to release closed-field plasma into the solar wind within and immediately adjacent to the HCS. The recently proposed Separatrix-Web (S-Web) Theory postulates that the observations of slow wind far from the HCS can be explained by the dynamical interaction of open and closed flux in regions of complex coronal-hole topology. We present the first high-resolution, three-dimensional numerical simulations of the dynamic S-Web. These simulations suggest that photospheric motions at coronal-hole boundaries are responsible for the release of slow solar wind plasma from the magnetically closed solar corona, specifically through prolific interchange magnetic reconnection. The location of this plasma once it is released into the solar wind depends strongly on the geometry of the coronal-hole flux. We demonstrate how the dynamics at the boundaries of narrow corridors of open flux (coronal hole corridors) can create giant S-Web arcs of slow solar wind at high latitudes in the heliosphere, far from the HCS, accounting for the long-puzzling slow-wind observations.

  14. Global intracellular slow-wave dynamics of the thalamocortical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheroziya, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2014-06-25

    It is widely accepted that corticothalamic neurons recruit the thalamus in slow oscillation, but global slow-wave thalamocortical dynamics have never been experimentally shown. We analyzed intracellular activities of neurons either from different cortical areas or from a variety of specific and nonspecific thalamic nuclei in relation to the phase of global EEG signal in ketamine-xylazine anesthetized mice. We found that, on average, slow-wave active states started off within frontal cortical areas as well as higher-order and intralaminar thalamus (posterior and parafascicular nuclei) simultaneously. Then, the leading edge of active states propagated in the anteroposterior/lateral direction over the cortex at ∼40 mm/s. The latest structure we recorded within the slow-wave cycle was the anterior thalamus, which followed active states of the retrosplenial cortex. Active states from different cortical areas tended to terminate simultaneously. Sensory thalamic ventral posterior medial and lateral geniculate nuclei followed cortical active states with major inhibitory and weak tonic-like "modulator" EPSPs. In these nuclei, sharp-rising, large-amplitude EPSPs ("drivers") were not modulated by cortical slow waves, suggesting their origin in ascending pathways. The thalamic active states in other investigated nuclei were composed of depolarization: some revealing "driver"- and "modulator"-like EPSPs, others showing "modulator"-like EPSPs only. We conclude that sensory thalamic nuclei follow the propagating cortical waves, whereas neurons from higher-order thalamic nuclei display "hub dynamics" and thus may contribute to the generation of cortical slow waves.

  15. Water supply of Zaporizhzhya Priazovye: nascent, stages of development, problems of nowadays and hygienic substantiation of ways of their solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagorodniuk K.Yu.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available At the modern stage of development humanity is on the verge of the pandemic of non-communicable diseases. It is not an exception for the population of the Ukraine, among which more than 2/3 of the total morbidity incidences is non-communicable diseases: desieses of cardiovascular system, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, diabetes. To the mind of experts in the field of public health and environment protection, the first place among factors affecting the level of population’s health in Ukraine is given to the water that is ahead of air and food products in this aspect. Taking into consideration the fact that after annexation of the Crimea by the Russian Federation in March of 2014 and uncertainty in the military-political situation on the East of the Ukraine, Zaporizhzhya Priazovye is becoming a recreational zone, and with each year it will be used by more and more Ukrainian citizens. The objective of our research was to investigate nascent, stages of development and nowadays problems of region’s water supply as well as hygienic substantiation of complex ways of nowadays problem of Zaporizhzhya Priazovye water supply. As a result of conducted researches it was found that single economically feasible way of providing population of Zaporizhzhya Priazovye with water with normative total hardness and general mineralization is supply of the Dnipro water carried out by operation of Western group water conduit. To reduce the formation of chlorination by-products in the process of water purification it is necessary to use iron-containing chlorine-sulfate coagulant "Aula" of brand A according to the technical requirements TR U 24.1-33075701-002: 2011. For utilization of flush water of contact clarifiers, it is necessary to retool water purification facilities by clarifiers-recirculators with sediment recirculation in “inner contour”. It was proved that corrosive aggressiveness is an indicator of water quality which will determine further

  16. Coupled Flow and Geomechanics Modeling of Slow Earthquakes: Application to Slow Slip Events (SSE) in the Guerrero Gap, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves da Silva Junior, J.; Frank, W.; Castineira, D.; Jha, B.; Juanes, R.

    2016-12-01

    Three major cycles of slow slip events (SSE) have been reported since the early 2000s in the Guerrero gap, Mexico, on the boundary between the Cocos and North American plates. Analysis of teleseismic waveforms recorded on a dense temporary seismic network in the Guerrero gap have found low S-wave velocity and high Vp/Vs ratios at the depths corresponding to the sources of SSE, implying the possible presence of fluids and thus an active dewatering process that may result in near-lithostatic pore pressure at the plate interface. Here we use coupled flow and geomechanics analysis of the Guerrero gap to model transient changes in the stress field in the subduction zone as a result of pore pressure fluctuations and potential fluid flow along the subduction interface. Our computational modeling approach couples a multiphase flow simulator with a mechanical simulator using the unconditionally stable fixed stress scheme for the sequential solution of the two-way coupling between flow and geomechanics (Jha and Juanes, 2014). We assume quasi-static mechanical deformation and neglect the inertial term in the solid momentum balance equation—an approximation that is valid to model SSE assuming aseismic slip. We represent the subducting Cocos fault as a surface embedded in a three-dimensional medium, and use zero thickness interface elements to accurately model stick-slip behavior under dynamically evolving fluid pressure and fault strength. We employ the rate- and state-dependent friction model in the evolution of the coefficient of friction. We calibrate our model using two distinct datasets—GPS data and tremor catalogs in the area of Guerrero gap—and by separately constraining the rate of water production from a model of mineral hydration with depth. Our quantitative modeling approach furnishes a mechanistic understanding of the relationship between pore pressure evolution, stress transfer and tremor migration, and helps elucidate the origin of SSE in this area.

  17. Plasma depletion layer: the role of the slow mode waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Wang

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The plasma depletion layer (PDL is a layer on the sunward side of the magnetopause with lower plasma density and higher magnetic field compared to their corresponding values in the upstream magnetosheath. The depletion layer usually occurs during northward (IMF conditions with low magnetic shear across the magnetopause. We have previously validated the Raeder global model by comparing the computed formation of a magnetosheath density depletion with in-situ observations. We also have performed a detailed force analysis and found the varying roles that different MHD forces play along the path of a plasma parcel flowing around the magnetopause. That study resulted in a new description of the behavior of magnetosheath magnetic flux tubes which better explains the plasma depletion along a flux tube. The slow mode waves have been observed in the magnetosheath and have been used to explain the formation of the PDL in some of the important PDL models. In this study, we extend our former work by investigating the possible role of the slow mode waves for the formation of the PDL, using global MHD model simulations. We propose a new technique to test where a possible slow mode front may occur in the magnetosheath by comparing the slow mode group velocity with the local flow velocity. We find that the slow mode fronts can exist in certain regions in the magnetosheath under certain solar wind conditions. The existence and location of such fronts clearly depend on the IMF. We do not see from our global simulation results either the sharpening of the slow mode front into a slow mode shock or noticeable changes of the flow and field in the magnetosheath across the slow mode front, which implies that the slow mode front is not likely responsible for the formation of the PDL, at least for the stable solar wind conditions used in these simulations. Also, we do not see the two-layered slow mode structures shown in some observations and proposed in certain PDL

  18. Demonstration of “substantial research activity” to acquire consultative status under the Antarctic Treaty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Gray

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic Treaty Consultative Parties are entitled to participate in consensus-based governance of the continent through the annual Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meetings. To acquire consultative status, an interested Party must demonstrate “substantial research activity,” but no agreed mechanism exists to determine whether a Party has fulfilled this criterion. Parties have generally demonstrated substantial research activity with the construction of a research station, as suggested within the Treaty itself. However, this largely demonstrates logistical capacity, rather than research activity, and often results in major and persistent impacts on Antarctic terrestrial environments. Our study found that national investment in Antarctic infrastructure, estimated by the number of bed spaces at stations, was not a reliable indicator of scientific output. Therefore, we investigated metrics to evaluate research activity directly, and identified both the overall number of Antarctic papers and the proportion of national scientific output these represented as meaningful metrics. Such metrics could (1 demonstrate a nation's level of research activity in Antarctica or (2 help Consultative Parties assess the level of research activity undertaken by a Party seeking to acquire consultative status. Our data showed that, even without land-based Antarctic infrastructure, Canada, Denmark and Switzerland may have reasonable grounds to demonstrate “substantial research activity” on a level comparable with existing Consultative Parties. The use of these metrics may help dispel any perceived requirement for the establishment of a research station to reach consultative status, by putting a greater emphasis on generation of scientific research outputs rather than construction of Antarctic infrastructure.

  19. Metabolic Slowing with Massive Weight Loss despite Preservation of Fat-Free Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, Darcy L.; Knuth, Nicolas D.; Huizenga, Robert; Rood, Jennifer C.; Ravussin, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Context: An important goal during weight loss is to maximize fat loss while preserving metabolically active fat-free mass (FFM). Massive weight loss typically results in substantial loss of FFM potentially slowing metabolic rate. Objective: Our objective was to determine whether a weight loss program consisting of diet restriction and vigorous exercise helped to preserve FFM and maintain resting metabolic rate (RMR). Participants and Intervention: We measured body composition by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, RMR by indirect calorimetry, and total energy expenditure by doubly labeled water at baseline (n = 16), wk 6 (n = 11), and wk 30 (n = 16). Results: At baseline, participants were severely obese (×± sd; body mass index 49.4 ± 9.4 kg/m2) with 49 ± 5% body fat. At wk 30, more than one third of initial body weight was lost (−38 ± 9%) and consisted of 17 ± 8% from FFM and 83 ± 8% from fat. RMR declined out of proportion to the decrease in body mass, demonstrating a substantial metabolic adaptation (−244 ± 231 and −504 ± 171 kcal/d at wk 6 and 30, respectively, P < 0.01). Energy expenditure attributed to physical activity increased by 10.2 ± 5.1 kcal/kg·d at wk 6 and 6.0 ± 4.1 kcal/kg·d at wk 30 (P < 0.001 vs. zero). Conclusions: Despite relative preservation of FFM, exercise did not prevent dramatic slowing of resting metabolism out of proportion to weight loss. This metabolic adaptation may persist during weight maintenance and predispose to weight regain unless high levels of physical activity or caloric restriction are maintained. PMID:22535969

  20. The correlation between reading and mathematics ability at age twelve has a substantial genetic component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Oliver S P; Band, Gavin; Pirinen, Matti; Haworth, Claire M A; Meaburn, Emma L; Kovas, Yulia; Harlaar, Nicole; Docherty, Sophia J; Hanscombe, Ken B; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Curtis, Charles J C; Strange, Amy; Freeman, Colin; Bellenguez, Céline; Su, Zhan; Pearson, Richard; Vukcevic, Damjan; Langford, Cordelia; Deloukas, Panos; Hunt, Sarah; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Potter, Simon C; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Edkins, Sarah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A; Casas, Juan P; Corvin, Aiden; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz A Z; Markus, Hugh S; Mathew, Christopher G; Palmer, Colin N A; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J; Trembath, Richard C; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Wood, Nicholas W; Barroso, Ines; Peltonen, Leena; Dale, Philip S; Petrill, Stephen A; Schalkwyk, Leonard S; Craig, Ian W; Lewis, Cathryn M; Price, Thomas S; Donnelly, Peter; Plomin, Robert; Spencer, Chris C A

    2014-07-08

    Dissecting how genetic and environmental influences impact on learning is helpful for maximizing numeracy and literacy. Here we show, using twin and genome-wide analysis, that there is a substantial genetic component to children's ability in reading and mathematics, and estimate that around one half of the observed correlation in these traits is due to shared genetic effects (so-called Generalist Genes). Thus, our results highlight the potential role of the learning environment in contributing to differences in a child's cognitive abilities at age twelve.

  1. IMMUNE DISTURBANCES AND SUBSTANTIATION OF THEIR CORRECTION IN THE CHILDREN WITH CHRONIC GASTRODUODENITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Shcherbak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. 72 patients and 30 healthy children of the age of 7-17 years were examined, aiming for substantiation of thymaline, vilon and ventramine application in treatment of chronic gastroduodenitis in children. Disbalance of cellular and humoral immunity and reduction of intensity of lymphocyte-platelet adhesions were established. An increase of IL-1β, IL-2, TNFα and IFNα concentration was registered in absence of IL-4 changes. Application of thymaline, vilon and ventramine essentially improves clinical course of disease, results in normalization of immune profile, reduced levels of proimflammatory cytokines, restoration of lymphocyte-platelet adhesions.

  2. Substantial Result Achieved for China-Russia-ROK Gas Cooperation Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Jiqiang

    2003-01-01

    @@ China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC), Rusia Petroleum of Russia and KOGAS, a natural gas company in Rpbulic of Korea, jointly announced in Moscow on November 14 that the feasibility study report of "Project for Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline to People's Republic of China and Republic of Korea from Kovykta Condensate Field in Russia's Irkutsk and Development of Kovykta Condensate Field" has been approved at the six meeting of the Coordination Committee thanks to the common efforts by the governments in the three countries. This marks a substantial result achieved in natural gas cooperation among China, Russia and ROK.

  3. Principles of Slow Fashion Application in Clothing Collection Creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnė Antanavičiūtė

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Today we can clearly see the damage which is caused by fast fashion production and mass consumption. Therefore, a relevant issue is how to reduce consumption, waste, and threat to the environment and human health. Research into the slow fashion designers approach towards eco-friendly and slow fashion products shows that it is necessary to spread ideas of slow fashion widely and teach users about ecologically friendly clothing. Therefore, this paper analyses theoretical and practical slow fashion principles applied by slow fashion designers; according to this, the collection ‘Just Share’ was created. The aim of the collection is to spread ideas of slow fashion and adapt them in specific technical projects dealing with the problems of use and production waste minimisation and creating sustainable, easily recyclable, environmentally friendly garments. Products for reducing consumption are developed based on the idea of sharing clothing. Therefore, garments are one size and suitable for different types of figures of men and women.  Clothing design is inspired by folding, so models have various pleats, unfolds allowing minimal transformation of the garment, which gives the product its individuality and extends time of wearing. Models are designed with a minimal amount of accessories and minimum division lines, maintaining the uniformity of materials and uncomplicated sewing technology. In this way, out of wear garments can be easily remade. Original constructions of models are based on the ‘zero waste’ principle. This method reduces waste generation. So this research was prepared using the principles of slow fashion, which has a potential to reduce excessive consumption and stop growth of textile waste.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.71.2.12392

  4. Detection of slow atoms confined in a Cesium vapor cell by spatially separated pump and probe laser beams

    CERN Document Server

    Todorov, Petko; Maurin, Isabelle; Saltiel, Solomon; Bloch, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The velocity distribution of atoms in a thermal gas is usually described through a Maxwell-Boltzman distribution of energy, and assumes isotropy. As a consequence, the probability for an atom to leave the surface under an azimuth angle {\\theta} should evolve as cos {\\theta}, in spite of the fact that there is no microscopic basis to justify such a law. The contribution of atoms moving at a grazing incidence towards or from the surface, i.e. atoms with a small normal velocity, here called "slow" atoms, reveals essential in the development of spectroscopic methods probing a dilute atomic vapor in the vicinity of a surface, enabling a sub-Doppler resolution under a normal incidence irradiation. The probability for such "slow" atoms may be reduced by surface roughness and atom-surface interaction. Here, we describe a method to observe and to count these slow atoms relying on a mechanical discrimination, through spatially separated pump and probe beams. We also report on our experimental progresses toward such a g...

  5. Theoretical study of ultra-wideband slow light in dual-stub-coupled plasmonic waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunlei; Su, Runzhou; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xueru

    2016-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide side coupled double stubs to realize broadband slow surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) around the telecom frequency 193.5 THz. When the depth of single stub is approximately equal to integral multiple of half plasmon wavelength, owing to the constructive interferences between the electromagnetic wave propagating through the MIM waveguide and that reflected from the stubs, wideband slow light effect appears. The improved transmission line theory calculation indicates that the group velocity of SPPs in the plasmonic waveguide system for stub depth 1111 nm is 0.1c (c is light speed in vacuum.) over a broad bandwidth of 69 THz. Exploiting the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulation, the group velocity of pulse for width 20 fs (Full width at half high) is calculated. The result agrees well with that predicted by the transmission line theory. This plasmonic waveguide for slow light effect has important potential application in optical delay lines.

  6. Alginate based bilayer hydrocolloid films as potential slow-release modern wound dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu, Hnin-Ei; Zulfakar, Mohd Hanif; Ng, Shiow-Fern

    2012-09-15

    The aims of this research were to develop a novel bilayer hydrocolloid film based on alginate and to investigate its potential as slow-release wound healing vehicle. The bilayer is composed of an upper layer impregnated with model drug (ibuprofen) and a drug-free lower layer, which acted as a rate-controlling membrane. The thickness uniformity, solvent loss, moisture vapour transmission rate (MVTR), hydration rate, morphology, rheology, mechanical properties, in vitro drug release and in vivo wound healing profiles were investigated. A smooth bilayer film with two homogenous distinct layers was produced. The characterisation results showed that bilayer has superior mechanical and rheological properties than the single layer films. The bilayers also showed low MVTR, slower hydration rate and lower drug flux in vitro compared to single layer inferring that bilayer may be useful for treating low suppurating wounds and suitable for slow release application on wound surfaces. The bilayers also provided a significant higher healing rate in vivo, with well-formed epidermis with faster granulation tissue formation when compared to the controls. In conclusions, a novel alginate-based bilayer hydrocolloid film was developed and results suggested that they can be exploited as slow-release wound dressings.

  7. Solar geoengineering could substantially reduce climate risks—A research hypothesis for the next decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, David W.; Irvine, Peter J.

    2016-11-01

    We offer a hypothesis that if solar geoengineering (SG) were deployed to offset half of the increase in global-mean temperature from the date of deployment using a technology and deployment method chosen to approximate a reduction in the solar constant then, over the 21st century, it would (a) substantially reduce the global aggregate risks of climate change, (b) without making any country worse off, and (c) with the aggregate risks from side-effects being small in comparison to the reduction in climate risks. We do not set out to demonstrate this hypothesis; rather we propose it with the goal of stimulating a strategic engagement of the SG research community with policy-relevant questions. We elaborate seven sub-hypotheses on the effects of our scenario for key risks of climate change that could be assessed in future modeling work. As an example, we provide a defence of one of our sub-hypotheses, that our scenario of SG would reduce the risk of drought in dry regions, but also identify issues that may undermine this sub-hypothesis and how future work could resolve this question. SG cannot substitute for emissions mitigation but it may be a useful supplement. It is our hope that scientific and technical research over the next decade focuses more closely on well-articulated variants of the key policy-relevant question: could SG be designed and deployed in such a way that it could substantially and equitably reduce climate risks?

  8. Multimodal exercise training in multiple sclerosis: A randomized controlled trial in persons with substantial mobility disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandroff, Brian M; Bollaert, Rachel E; Pilutti, Lara A; Peterson, Melissa L; Baynard, Tracy; Fernhall, Bo; McAuley, Edward; Motl, Robert W

    2017-10-01

    Mobility disability is a common, debilitating feature of multiple sclerosis (MS). Exercise training has been identified as an approach to improve MS-related mobility disability. However, exercise randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on mobility in MS have generally not selectively targeted those with the onset of irreversible mobility disability. The current multi-site RCT compared the efficacy of 6-months of supervised, multimodal exercise training with an active control condition for improving mobility, gait, physical fitness, and cognitive outcomes in persons with substantial MS-related mobility disability. 83 participants with substantial MS-related mobility disability underwent initial mobility, gait, fitness, and cognitive processing speed assessments and were randomly assigned to 6-months of supervised multimodal (progressive aerobic, resistance, and balance) exercise training (intervention condition) or stretching-and-toning activities (control condition). Participants completed the same outcome assessments halfway through and immediately following the 6-month study period. There were statistically significant improvements in six-minute walk performance (F(2158)=3.12, p=0.05, ηp(2)=0.04), peak power output (F(2150)=8.16, pdisability. This is critical for informing the development of multi-site exercise rehabilitation programs in larger samples of persons with MS-related mobility disability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lateral CO2 diffusion inside dicotyledonous leaves can be substantial: quantification in different light intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morison, James I L; Lawson, Tracy; Cornic, Gabriel

    2007-11-01

    Substantial lateral CO(2) diffusion rates into leaf areas where stomata were blocked by grease patches were quantified by gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence imaging in different species across the full range of photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFD). The lateral CO(2) flux rate over short distances was substantial and very similar in five dicotyledonous species with different vascular anatomies (two species with bundle sheath extensions, sunflower [Helianthus annuus] and dwarf bean [Phaseolus vulgaris]; and three species without bundle sheath extensions, faba bean [Vicia faba], petunia [Petunia hybrida], and tobacco [Nicotiana tabacum]). Only in the monocot maize (Zea mays) was there little or no evident lateral CO(2) flux. Lateral diffusion rates were low when PPFD saturation in moderate PPFD (300 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) when lateral CO(2) diffusion represented 15% to 24% of the normal CO(2) assimilation rate. Smaller patches and higher ambient CO(2) concentration increased lateral CO(2) diffusion rates. Calculations with a two-dimensional diffusion model supported these observations that lateral CO(2) diffusion over short distances inside dicotyledonous leaves can be important to photosynthesis. The results emphasize that supply of CO(2) from nearby stomata usually dominates assimilation, but that lateral supply over distances up to approximately 1 mm can be important if stomata are blocked, particularly when assimilation rate is low.

  10. Neighborhood-level social processes and substantiated cases of child maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Beth E; Goerge, Robert M; Gilsanz, Paola; Hill, Andrea; Subramanian, S V; Holton, John K; Duncan, Dustin T; Beatriz, Elizabeth D; Beardslee, William R

    2016-01-01

    Child maltreatment is a preventable public health problem. Research has demonstrated that neighborhood structural factors (e.g. poverty, crime) can influence the proportion of a neighborhood's children who are victims of maltreatment. A newer strategy is the identification of potentially modifiable social processes at the neighborhood level that can also influence maltreatment. Toward this end, this study examines neighborhood-level data (maltreatment cases substantiated by Illinois' child protection agency, 1995-2005, social processes measured by the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods, U.S. Census data, proportions of neighborhoods on public assistance, and crime data) that were linked across clusters of contiguous, relatively homogenous Chicago, IL census tracts with respect to racial/ethnic and socioeconomic composition. Our analysis-an ecological-level, repeated cross-sectional design utilizing random-intercept logit models-with a sensitivity analysis using spatial models to control for spatial autocorrelation-revealed consistent associations between neighborhood social processes and maltreatment. Neighborhoods higher in collective efficacy, intergenerational closure, and social networks, and lower in disorder had lower proportions of neglect, physical abuse, and sexual abuse substantiated cases, controlling for differences in structural factors. Higher collective efficacy and social network size also predicted a lower proportion of substance-exposed infants. This research indicates that strategies to mobilize neighborhood-level protective factors may decrease child maltreatment more effectively than individual and family-focused efforts alone.

  11. Pedigree error due to extra-pair reproduction substantially biases estimates of inbreeding depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jane M; Keller, Lukas F; Marr, Amy B; Nietlisbach, Pirmin; Sardell, Rebecca J; Arcese, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the evolutionary dynamics of inbreeding and inbreeding depression requires unbiased estimation of inbreeding depression across diverse mating systems. However, studies estimating inbreeding depression often measure inbreeding with error, for example, based on pedigree data derived from observed parental behavior that ignore paternity error stemming from multiple mating. Such paternity error causes error in estimated coefficients of inbreeding (f) and reproductive success and could bias estimates of inbreeding depression. We used complete "apparent" pedigree data compiled from observed parental behavior and analogous "actual" pedigree data comprising genetic parentage to quantify effects of paternity error stemming from extra-pair reproduction on estimates of f, reproductive success, and inbreeding depression in free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). Paternity error caused widespread error in estimates of f and male reproductive success, causing inbreeding depression in male and female annual and lifetime reproductive success and juvenile male survival to be substantially underestimated. Conversely, inbreeding depression in adult male survival tended to be overestimated when paternity error was ignored. Pedigree error stemming from extra-pair reproduction therefore caused substantial and divergent bias in estimates of inbreeding depression that could bias tests of evolutionary theories regarding inbreeding and inbreeding depression and their links to variation in mating system. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Mechanical and Acoustic Signature of Slow Earthquakes on Laboratory Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuderi, Marco Maria; Marone, Chris; Tinti, Elisa; Scognamiglio, Laura; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Collettini, Cristiano

    2015-04-01

    Recent seismic and geodetic observations show that fault slip occurs via a spectrum of behaviors that range from seismic (fast dynamic) to aseismic (creep). Indeed faults can slip via a variety of quasi-dynamic processes such as Slow-Slip, Low Frequency Earthquakes (LFE), and Tremor. These transient modes of slip represent slow, but self-propagating acceleration of slip along fault zones. These phenomena have been observed worldwide in a variety of active tectonic environments, however the physics of quasi-dynamic rupture and the underlying fault zone processes are still poorly understood. Rate- and State- frictional constitutive equations predict that fast dynamic slip will occur when the stiffness of the loading system (k) is less than a critical stiffness (kc) characterizing the fault gouge. In order to investigate quasi-dynamic transients, we performed laboratory experiments on simulated fault gouge (silica powders) in the double direct shear configuration with a compliant central block allowing boundary conditions where k≈kc. In addition, PZTs were used to measure acoustical properties of the gouge layers during shear. We document an evolution of the fault mechanical properties as the σn is increased. For σn state frictional type of shear. When σn ≥ 15 MPa we observe emergent slow-slip events from steady state shear with accumulated shear displacement of about 10 mm. The typical values of stress drop (Δτ) vary between 0.2 and 0.8 MPa, and have typical duration from 0.5 up to 3 seconds giving the characteristics of slow stick-slip. As σn is varied we observe different characteristics of slow slip. For σn = 15MPa a repetitive double period oscillation is observed with slow slip growing until a maximum stress drop and then self attenuating. When σn is increased to 20 and 25 MPa slow slip are characterized by larger Δτ with constant τmax and τmin, however still showing a co-seismic duration of ~2 seconds. Our results suggest that strain

  13. Perceptions of the Slow Food Cultural Trend among the Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lelia Voinea

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As they become increasingly aware of the importance of healthy eating and of the serious food imbalance caused by the overconsumption of industrial, ultra-processed and superorganoleptic food, consumers are now beginning to turn their attention to food choices guaranteeing both individual health and also of the environment . Thus, in recent years we are witnessing the rise of a cultural trend ‒ Slow Food. Slow Food has become an international movement that advocates for satisfying culinary pleasure, protects biological and cultural diversity, spread taste education, links "green" producers to consumers and believes that gastronomy intersects with politics, agriculture and ecology. Slow Food proposes a holistic approach to food problem, where the economic, sociocultural and environmental aspects are interlinked, being pursued as part of an overall strategy. In order to highlight the manner in which the principles of this cultural trend are perceived by the representatives of the new generation of consumers in Romania, exploratory research marketing was conducted among the students in the second year of the master’s program Quality Management, Expertise and Consumer Protection, from the Faculty of Business and Tourism from the Buchares t University of Economic Studies . The results of this research have shown an insufficient knowledge of Slow Food phenomenon and, especially, the Slow Food network activity in Romania. To show that the Slow Food type of food is a healthier option towards which the future consumer demand should be guided, especially those belonging to the younger generation, an antithetical comparative analysis of the nutritional value of two menus was performed: a suggestive one for the Slow Food feeding style and other one, specific to the fast food style. Slow Food style was considered antithetical to the fast food because many previous studies have shown a preference of the young for the fast-food type products, despite the

  14. The function of male sperm whale slow clicks in a high latitude habitat: communication, echolocation, or prey debilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cláudia; Wahlberg, Magnus; Johnson, Mark; Miller, Patrick J O; Madsen, Peter T

    2013-05-01

    Sperm whales produce different click types for echolocation and communication. Usual clicks and buzzes appear to be used primarily in foraging while codas are thought to function in social communication. The function of slow clicks is less clear, but they appear to be produced by males at higher latitudes, where they primarily forage solitarily, and on the breeding grounds, where they roam between groups of females. Here the behavioral context in which these vocalizations are produced and the function they may serve was investigated. Ninety-nine hours of acoustic and diving data were analyzed from sound recording tags on six male sperm whales in Northern Norway. The 755 slow clicks detected were produced by tagged animals at the surface (52%), ascending from a dive (37%), and during the bottom phase (11%), but never during the descent. Slow clicks were not associated with the production of buzzes, other echolocation clicks, or fast maneuvering that would indicate foraging. Some slow clicks were emitted in seemingly repetitive temporal patterns supporting the hypothesis that the function for slow clicks on the feeding grounds is long range communication between males, possibly relaying information about individual identity or behavioral states.

  15. A taste of ethical consumption at a slow food festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lauren T; Germov, John; Fuller, Sascha; Freij, Maria

    2015-08-01

    This paper examines the motives and experiences of attendees at a Slow Food festival to gain an understanding of how people engage with ethical consumer projects. Slow Food is a global social movement aimed at promoting food that is regionally, ethically, and sustainably produced, and convivially consumed. The movement uses culinary tourist events, such as food festivals and farmers' markets, to promote its philosophy and attract new members. There have been no empirical studies of ethical consumption using a Slow Food event as a case study. This study uses an ethnographic approach and a framework of virtue ethics to explore the views of people attending a major Slow Food festival in the city of Melbourne, Australia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in situ with 33 participants (19 consumers and 14 stallholders) to discover their rationales for attending the festival, and their perspectives on ethical consumption. Transcripts were coded and thematically analysed, resulting in three themes reflecting varying degrees of public virtues (altruistic motivations) and private virtues (personal wellbeing): the quest for virtuous lifestyles through ethical consumption, the importance of co-production, and the challenges of putting ethical consumer projects like Slow Food into daily practice. The findings reveal the manner in which virtue ethics affects foodways and highlights the contingent and challenging nature of practising ethical eating. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimizing detection and analysis of slow waves in sleep EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensen, Armand; Riedner, Brady; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of individual slow waves in EEG recording during sleep provides both greater sensitivity and specificity compared to spectral power measures. However, parameters for detection and analysis have not been widely explored and validated. We present a new, open-source, Matlab based, toolbox for the automatic detection and analysis of slow waves; with adjustable parameter settings, as well as manual correction and exploration of the results using a multi-faceted visualization tool. We explore a large search space of parameter settings for slow wave detection and measure their effects on a selection of outcome parameters. Every choice of parameter setting had some effect on at least one outcome parameter. In general, the largest effect sizes were found when choosing the EEG reference, type of canonical waveform, and amplitude thresholding. Previously published methods accurately detect large, global waves but are conservative and miss the detection of smaller amplitude, local slow waves. The toolbox has additional benefits in terms of speed, user-interface, and visualization options to compare and contrast slow waves. The exploration of parameter settings in the toolbox highlights the importance of careful selection of detection METHODS: The sensitivity and specificity of the automated detection can be improved by manually adding or deleting entire waves and or specific channels using the toolbox visualization functions. The toolbox standardizes the detection procedure, sets the stage for reliable results and comparisons and is easy to use without previous programming experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Slow and fast development in ladybirds: occurrence, effects and significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mishra

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Developmental and growth rates are known to vary in response to genetic, developmental, physiological and environmental factors. However, developmental variations that exist within a cohort under any constant rearing condition are not so well investigated. A few such prominent polymorphisms have been studied, but not the subtle ones. The current study investigates the presence of such varying rates of development, slow and fast, in a cohort reared under constant conditions in two ladybirds, Cheilomenes sexmaculata and Propylea dissecta. Our results reveal slow and fast developers in the cohorts of each species and the ratio of slow and fast developers was similar. Slow developers showed a female biased sex ratio. The two developmental variants differed significantly in juvenile duration only in the first instar and the pupal stage, though variations in developmental time were observed in all stages. Fecundity was higher in slow developers, but developmental rates did not affect egg viability. The similar ratio in both ladybirds indicates it to be a result of either presence of a constant ratio across species or an effect of the similar rearing environment.

  18. Optimal Curiosity-Driven Modular Incremental Slow Feature Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompella, Varun Raj; Luciw, Matthew; Stollenga, Marijn Frederik; Schmidhuber, Juergen

    2016-08-01

    Consider a self-motivated artificial agent who is exploring a complex environment. Part of the complexity is due to the raw high-dimensional sensory input streams, which the agent needs to make sense of. Such inputs can be compactly encoded through a variety of means; one of these is slow feature analysis (SFA). Slow features encode spatiotemporal regularities, which are information-rich explanatory factors (latent variables) underlying the high-dimensional input streams. In our previous work, we have shown how slow features can be learned incrementally, while the agent explores its world, and modularly, such that different sets of features are learned for different parts of the environment (since a single set of regularities does not explain everything). In what order should the agent explore the different parts of the environment? Following Schmidhuber's theory of artificial curiosity, the agent should always concentrate on the area where it can learn the easiest-to-learn set of features that it has not already learned. We formalize this learning problem and theoretically show that, using our model, called curiosity-driven modular incremental slow feature analysis, the agent on average will learn slow feature representations in order of increasing learning difficulty, under certain mild conditions. We provide experimental results to support the theoretical analysis.

  19. Interneuron-mediated inhibition synchronizes neuronal activity during slow oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jen-Yung; Chauvette, Sylvain; Skorheim, Steven; Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    The signature of slow-wave sleep in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is large-amplitude fluctuation of the field potential, which reflects synchronous alternation of activity and silence across cortical neurons. While initiation of the active cortical states during sleep slow oscillation has been intensively studied, the biological mechanisms which drive the network transition from an active state to silence remain poorly understood. In the current study, using a combination of in vivo electrophysiology and thalamocortical network simulation, we explored the impact of intrinsic and synaptic inhibition on state transition during sleep slow oscillation. We found that in normal physiological conditions, synaptic inhibition controls the duration and the synchrony of active state termination. The decline of interneuron-mediated inhibition led to asynchronous downward transition across the cortical network and broke the regular slow oscillation pattern. Furthermore, in both in vivo experiment and computational modelling, we revealed that when the level of synaptic inhibition was reduced significantly, it led to a recovery of synchronized oscillations in the form of seizure-like bursting activity. In this condition, the fast active state termination was mediated by intrinsic hyperpolarizing conductances. Our study highlights the significance of both intrinsic and synaptic inhibition in manipulating sleep slow rhythms. PMID:22641778

  20. Advances in Bichromatic Force Slowing of Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieda, M. A.; Eyler, E. E.

    2012-06-01

    The optical bichromatic force (BCF) holds promise as an efficient, simple, and compact means to slow atoms and molecules to MOT capture velocities.ootnotetextM. Cashen and H. Metcalf, JOSA B 20, 915 (2003).^,ootnotetextM. A. Chieda and E. E. Eyler, PRA 84, 063401 (2011). Metastable helium beams, with v˜1000 m/s, are especially worthwhile atomic candidates since they presently require Zeeman slowers with lengths of 2--3 m. We present a novel BCF decelerator in which the Doppler shifts are chirped to keep the force centered on the atoms as they slow. This is made possible by recent advances in high-power diode lasers and electronics, and avoids many of the problems of alternative designs using large detunings. Initial tests on He* atoms show encouraging results. Unlike atoms, direct laser slowing of molecules remains exceedingly difficult, although success with SrF has very recently been reported.ootnotetextJ. F. Barry, E. S. Shuman, E. B. Norrgard, and D. DeMille, to be published. We calculate that for molecules with near-cycling transitions, rapid laser BCF slowing should be possible.ootnotetextChieda, op. sit. For the CaF molecule, we predict slowing by δv = 150 m/s, enough to bring a buffer-gas cooled beam to rest. An experimental demonstration is in progress.

  1. The slow component of {V}O2 in professional cyclists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, A.; Hoyos, J.; Chicharro, J.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—To analyse the slow component of oxygen uptake (O2) in professional cyclists and to determine whether this phenomenon is due to altered neuromuscular activity, as assessed by surface electromyography (EMG). Methods—The following variables were measured during 20 minute cycle ergometer tests performed at about 80% of O2MAX in nine professional road cyclists (mean (SD) age 26 (2) years; O2max 72.6 (2.2) ml/kg/min): heart rate (HR), gas exchange variables (O2, ventilation (E), tidal volume (VT), breathing frequency (fb), ventilatory equivalents for oxygen and carbon dioxide (E/O2 and E/CO2 respectively), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), and end tidal PO2 and PCO2 (PETO2 and PETCO2 respectively)), blood variables (lactate, pH, and [HCO3-]) and EMG data (root mean from square voltage (rms-EMG) and mean power frequency (MPF)) from the vastus lateralis muscle. Results—The mean magnitude of the slow component (from the end of the third minute to the end of exercise) was 130 (0.04) ml in 17 minutes or 7.6 ml/min. Significant increases from three minute to end of exercise values were found for the following variables: O2 (p0.05) throughout the exercise tests. Conclusions—A significant but small O2 slow component was shown in professional cyclists during constant load heavy exercise. The results suggest that the primary origin of the slow component is not neuromuscular factors in these subjects, at least for exercise intensities up to 80% of O2MAX. Key Words: pulmonary; gas exchange; electromyography; neuromuscular; fatigue; cyclists PMID:11049147

  2. Substantial health and economic returns from delayed aging may warrant a new focus for medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Dana P; Cutler, David; Rowe, John W; Michaud, Pierre-Carl; Sullivan, Jeffrey; Peneva, Desi; Olshansky, S Jay

    2013-10-01

    Recent scientific advances suggest that slowing the aging process (senescence) is now a realistic goal. Yet most medical research remains focused on combating individual diseases. Using the Future Elderly Model--a microsimulation of the future health and spending of older Americans--we compared optimistic "disease specific" scenarios with a hypothetical "delayed aging" scenario in terms of the scenarios' impact on longevity, disability, and major entitlement program costs. Delayed aging could increase life expectancy by an additional 2.2 years, most of which would be spent in good health. The economic value of delayed aging is estimated to be $7.1 trillion over fifty years. In contrast, addressing heart disease and cancer separately would yield diminishing improvements in health and longevity by 2060--mainly due to competing risks. Delayed aging would greatly increase entitlement outlays, especially for Social Security. However, these changes could be offset by increasing the Medicare eligibility age and the normal retirement age for Social Security. Overall, greater investment in research to delay aging appears to be a highly efficient way to forestall disease, extend healthy life, and improve public health.

  3. Rotigaptide (ZP123) reverts established atrial conduction velocity slowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Ketil; Kjølbye, Anne Louise; Hennan, James K; Petersen, Jørgen Søberg

    2005-01-01

    Rotigaptide (ZP123) increases gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and prevents stress-induced cardiac conduction velocity (CV) slowing. However, the effect of rotigaptide on established cardiac conduction slowing and the duration of effect on rotigaptide during washout is unknown. Metabolic stress (induced by superfusion with nonoxygenated glucose-free Tyrodes buffer) was associated with a 30% decrease in atrial CV in vehicle-treated rat atria. Rotigaptide treatment initiated after a period of 30 minutes of metabolic stress produced a rapid and significant increase in CV compared to vehicle-treated time controls. During washout of rotigaptide for 30 min (while subjected to metabolic stress), there was a minor decrease in atrial CV; however, this was not significantly different from atrial CV in a rotigaptide-treated time control group. Rotigaptide treatment rapidly normalizes established conduction slowing in atria subjected to metabolic stress. However, the cessation of effect was considerably slower than the onset of action.

  4. Modeling fast and slow earthquakes at various scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake sources represent dynamic rupture within rocky materials at depth and often can be modeled as propagating shear slip controlled by friction laws. These laws provide boundary conditions on fault planes embedded in elastic media. Recent developments in observation networks, laboratory experiments, and methods of data analysis have expanded our knowledge of the physics of earthquakes. Newly discovered slow earthquakes are qualitatively different phenomena from ordinary fast earthquakes and provide independent information on slow deformation at depth. Many numerical simulations have been carried out to model both fast and slow earthquakes, but problems remain, especially with scaling laws. Some mechanisms are required to explain the power-law nature of earthquake rupture and the lack of characteristic length. Conceptual models that include a hierarchical structure over a wide range of scales would be helpful for characterizing diverse behavior in different seismic regions and for improving probabilistic forecasts of earthquakes.

  5. A comprehensive investigation on the slowing down of cosmic acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Yazhou; Li, Nan; Wang, Shuang

    2015-01-01

    In~\\citep{Shafieloo2009}, Shafieloo, Sanhi and Starobinsky firstly proposed the possibility that the current cosmic acceleration (CA) is slowing down. This is rather counterintuitive, because a slowing down CA cannot be accommodated in almost all the mainstream cosmological models. In this work, by exploring the evolutionary trajectories of dark energy equation of state $w(z)$ and deceleration parameter $q(z)$, we present a comprehensive investigation on the slowing down of CA from both the theoretical and the observational sides. For the theoretical side, we study the impacts of different $w(z)$ by using six parametrization models, and then discuss the effects of spatial curvature. For the observational side, we investigate the effects of different type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), different baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO), and different cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, respectively. We find that the evolution of CA are insensitive to the specific form of $w(z)$; in contrast, a non-flat Universe more fav...

  6. Transmural myocardial ischemia due to slow coronary flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Slow coronary flow phenomenon(SCFP) is an angiographic observation characterized by delayed distal vessel opacification in the absence of significant epicardial coronary disease. Only limited studies have been focused on the etiologies, clinical manifestations and treatment of this unique angiographic phenomenon. In our case report, we described an 85-year-old man who came with significant ST segment elevation in leads V1-V4 and V3R-V5R without increase in myocardial enzyme. The patient also developed respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Coronary angiography revealed only mild atherosclerosis without spasm or thromboembolic occlusion. Slow flow was seen in all coronary arteries, especially in the left anterior descending and right coronary arteries. This case speculated that transmural myocardial ischemia with ST segment elevation might be resulted from slow coronary flow. Transmural myocardial ischemia can occur owing to abnormalities of the coronary microcirculation.

  7. Slow-roll corrections to inflaton fluctuations on a brane

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, K; Wands, D; Koyama, Kazuya; Mizuno, Shuntaro; Wands, David

    2005-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations of an inflaton field, slow-rolling during inflation are coupled to metric fluctuations. In conventional four dimensional cosmology one can calculate the effect of scalar metric perturbations as slow-roll corrections to the evolution of a massless free field in de Sitter spacetime. This gives the well-known first-order corrections to the field perturbations after horizon-exit. If inflaton fluctuations on a four dimensional brane embedded in a five dimensional bulk spacetime are studied to first-order in slow-roll then we recover the usual conserved curvature perturbation on super-horizon scales. But on small scales, at high energies, we find that the coupling to the bulk metric perturbations cannot be neglected, leading to a modified amplitude of vacuum oscillations on small scales. This is a large effect which casts doubt on the reliability of the usual calculation of inflaton fluctuations on the brane neglecting their gravitational coupling.

  8. Slow light with electromagnetically induced transparency in cylindrical waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Hatta, Agus Muhamad; Al-Hagan, Ola A; Moiseev, Sergey A

    2014-01-01

    Slow light with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the core of cylindrical waveguide (CW) for an optical fiber system containing three-level atoms is investigated. The CW modes are treated in the weakly guiding approximation which renders the analysis into manageable form. The transparency window and permittivity profile of the waveguide due to the strong pump field in the EIT scheme is calculated. For a specific permittivity profile of the waveguide due to EIT, the propagation constant of the weak signal field and spatial shape of fundamental guided mode are calculated by solving the vector wave equation using the finite difference method. It is found that the transparency window and slow light field can be controlled via the CW parameters. The reduced group velocity of slow light in this configuration is useful for many technological applications such as optical memories, effective control of single photon fields, optical buffer and delay line.

  9. A REVIEW OF SLOW SPEED BEARING DIAGNOSTICS AND PROGNOSTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SYLVESTER A. AYE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the literature in diagnostics and prognostics of slow rotating bearings. Diagnostics and prognostics involve data acquisition and processing. The diagnostics and prognostics of rotating machinery is a subject of much on-going research. There are three approaches to diagnostics and prognostics which include data driven techniques, model based techniques and experience based approach. The review looks at current diagnostics and prognostics approaches to bearings in general and slow rotating bearings in particular and future trends. Bayesian techniques are currently gaining widespread application in diagnostics and prognostics of slow rotating bearings and mechanical systems as a result of their ability to handle the stochastic nature of the data well at varying operating conditions.

  10. Study of Dynamic Characteristics of Slow-Changing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinong Li

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A vibration system with slow-changing parameters is a typical nonlinear system. Such systems often occur in the working and controlled process of some intelligent structures when vibration and deformation exist synchronously. In this paper, a system with slow-changing stiffness, damping and mass is analyzed in an intelligent structure. The relationship between the amplitude and the frequency of the system is studied, and its dynamic characteristic is also discussed. Finally, a piecewise linear method is developed on the basis of the asymptotic method. The simulation and the experiment show that a suitable slow-changing stiffness can restrain the amplitude of the system when the system passes through the resonant region.

  11. Slow fragmentation of hydrocarbons after ultrafast laser interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Larimian, Seyedreza; Lötstedt, Erik; Szidarovszky, Tamás; Maurer, Raffael; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus; Kartashov, Daniil; Baltuška, Andrius; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Kitzler, Markus; Xie, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigated the deprotonation process on nanosecond to microsecond timescale in ethylene and acetylene molecules, following their double ionization by a strong femtosecond laser field. In our experiments we utilized coincidence detection with the reaction microscope technique, and found that both the mean lifetime of the ethylene dication leading to the "slow" deprotonation and the relative channel strength of the slow deprotonation compared to the fast one have no evident dependence on the laser pulse duration and the laser peak intensity. Furthermore, quantum chemical simulations suggest that such slow fragmentation originates from the tunneling of near-dissociation-threshold vibrational states through a dissociation barrier on an electronic dication state. Such vibrational states can be populated through strong field double ionization induced vibrational excitation on an electronically excited state in the case of ethylene, and through intersystem processes from electro...

  12. Moderate Cortical Cooling Eliminates Thalamocortical Silent States during Slow Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheroziya, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2015-09-23

    Reduction in temperature depolarizes neurons by a partial closure of potassium channels but decreases the vesicle release probability within synapses. Compared with cooling, neuromodulators produce qualitatively similar effects on intrinsic neuronal properties and synapses in the cortex. We used this similarity of neuronal action in ketamine-xylazine-anesthetized mice and non-anesthetized mice to manipulate the thalamocortical activity. We recorded cortical electroencephalogram/local field potential (LFP) activity and intracellular activities from the somatosensory thalamus in control conditions, during cortical cooling and on rewarming. In the deeply anesthetized mice, moderate cortical cooling was characterized by reversible disruption of the thalamocortical slow-wave pattern rhythmicity and the appearance of fast LFP spikes, with frequencies ranging from 6 to 9 Hz. These LFP spikes were correlated with the rhythmic IPSP activities recorded within the thalamic ventral posterior medial neurons and with depolarizing events in the posterior nucleus neurons. Similar cooling of the cortex during light anesthesia rapidly and reversibly eliminated thalamocortical silent states and evoked thalamocortical persistent activity; conversely, mild heating increased thalamocortical slow-wave rhythmicity. In the non-anesthetized head-restrained mice, cooling also prevented the generation of thalamocortical silent states. We conclude that moderate cortical cooling might be used to manipulate slow-wave network activity and induce neuromodulator-independent transition to activated states. Significance statement: In this study, we demonstrate that moderate local cortical cooling of lightly anesthetized or naturally sleeping mice disrupts thalamocortical slow oscillation and induces the activated local field potential pattern. Mild heating has the opposite effect; it increases the rhythmicity of thalamocortical slow oscillation. Our results demonstrate that slow oscillation can be

  13. Surface nanostructures by single highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facsko, S; Heller, R; El-Said, A S; Meissl, W; Aumayr, F

    2009-06-03

    It has recently been demonstrated that the impact of individual, slow but highly charged ions on various surfaces can induce surface modifications with nanometer dimensions. Generally, the size of these surface modifications (blisters, hillocks, craters or pits) increases dramatically with the potential energy of the highly charged ion, while the kinetic energy of the projectile ions seems to be of little importance. This paper presents the currently available experimental evidence and theoretical models and discusses the circumstances and conditions under which nanosized features on different surfaces due to the impact of slow highly charged ions can be produced.

  14. Third Interger Resonance Slow Extraction Using RFKO at High Space Charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaslaev, V.; Amundson, J.; Johnstone, J.; Park, C.S.; Werkema, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-15

    A proposal to search for direct {mu} {yields} e conversion at Fermilab requires slow, resonant extraction of an intense proton beam. Large space charge forces will present challenges, partly due to the substantial betatron tune spread. The main challenges will be maintaining a uniform spill profile and moderate losses at the septum. We propose to use 'radio frequency knockout' (RFKO) for fine tuning the extraction. Strategies for the use of the RFKO method will be discussed here in the context of the Mu2e experiment. The feasibility of this method has been demonstrated in simulations. Tracking simulations show that optimal RFKO frequency modulation in case of the SC beam tune spread is substantially different from that of chromatic tune spread. FM should be centred at the bare betatron frequency rather than in the middle of the tune spread, and additional chromaticity must be added in order to facilitate rapid dilution of the dipole oscillations. Heating efficiency slowly decreases with the SC growing. Colored noise modulation (random signal within a given bandwidth) appears to be the most effective way of modulation, however its advantage over linear modulation is not very large, so practical reasons may prevail in the final choice between the two.

  15. Substantial early, but nonprogressive neuronal loss in multiple sclerosis (MS) spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Lucas; Albert, Monika; Buss, Armin; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Antel, Jack P; Brück, Wolfgang; Stadelmann, Christine

    2009-11-01

    Research in multiple sclerosis (MS) has recently been focusing on the extent of neuroaxonal damage and its contribution to disease outcome. In the present study, we examined spinal cord tissue from 30 clinically well-characterized MS patients. MS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and control spinal cord tissue were subjected to morphometric analysis and immunohistochemistry for markers of cell damage and regeneration. Data were related to disease duration and age at death. Here, we present evidence for substantial, nonprogressive neuronal loss on the cervical and lumbar levels early in the disease course of MS. Chromatolytic neurons and immunoreactivity for c-Jun and GAP43 were observed in the ventral gray matter in and adjacent to actively demyelinating lesions, pointing toward neuronal damage and regeneration as an early response to lesion formation.

  16. Challenges in Archiving and Sharing Video Data: Considering Moral, Pragmatic, and Substantial Arguments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terhi Kirsi Korkiakangas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Social science researchers are facing new challenges in data archiving and sharing. The challenges encountered for video data are different from those encountered for other types of qualitative data. I will consider these challenges with respect to the moral, pragmatic, and substantial arguments with which funding bodies justify data archiving and sharing. Throughout the article, I will draw on a recent Economic and Social Research Council funded project, “Transient Teams in the Operating Theatre,” in which our research team video recorded work activities in the operating theatre of a UK hospital, thereby dealing with highly sensitive footage. I will consider how video data, on most occasions, cannot be archived for re-use by the wider research community, but how new avenues could be developed so as to benefit from further research on such “unarchivable” datasets.

  17. Substantial and sustained seizure reduction with ketogenic diet in a patient with Ohtahara syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adithya Sivaraju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ketogenic diet has been shown to be efficacious in some epileptic encephalopathies but rarely reported as being useful in children with Ohtahara syndrome. This could possibly be attributed to the rarity of the disease and associated short survival period. We report on a 5-year-old child with Ohtahara syndrome, whose seizures failed to improve with all known medications, continued to show persistent suppression-burst pattern on the electroencephalography (EEG and had substantial reduction in seizure frequency for one year post-initiation of ketogenic diet. He has not had a single visit to the emergency room because of seizures in the last one year, and more importantly, there has been a clear improvement noted in his level of interaction and temperament. Patients with Ohtahara syndrome invariably have medically intractable seizures and catastrophic neurodevelopmental outcome. Ketogenic diet is a treatment modality that might be worth considering even in this group of patients.

  18. Pachytene asynapsis drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and leads to substantial postmeiotic repression in spermatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, James M A; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Ellis, Peter J I; Mitchell, Michael J; Burgoyne, Paul S

    2006-04-01

    Transcriptional silencing of the sex chromosomes during male meiosis (MSCI) is conserved among organisms with limited sex chromosome synapsis, including mammals. Since the 1990s the prevailing view has been that MSCI in mammals is transient, with sex chromosome reactivation occurring as cells exit meiosis. Recently, we found that any chromosome region unsynapsed during pachytene of male and female mouse meiosis is subject to transcriptional silencing (MSUC), and we hypothesized that MSCI is an inevitable consequence of this more general meiotic silencing mechanism. Here, we provide direct evidence that asynapsis does indeed drive MSCI. We also show that a substantial degree of transcriptional repression of the sex chromosomes is retained postmeiotically, and we provide evidence that this postmeiotic repression is a downstream consequence of MSCI/MSUC. While this postmeiotic repression occurs after the loss of MSUC-related proteins at the end of prophase, other histone modifications associated with transcriptional repression have by then become established.

  19. Exact alpha-error determination for two-stage sampling strategies to substantiate freedom from disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacka, I; Hofrichter, J; Fuchs, K

    2013-05-01

    Sampling strategies to substantiate freedom from disease are important when it comes to the trade of animals and animal products. When considering imperfect tests and finite populations, sample size calculation can, however, be a challenging task. The generalized hypergeometric formula developed by Cameron and Baldock (1998a) offers a framework that can elegantly be extended to multi-stage sampling strategies, which are widely used to account for disease clustering at herd-level. The achieved alpha-error of such surveys, however, typically depends on the realization of the sample and can differ from the pre-calculated value. In this paper, we introduce a new formula to evaluate the exact alpha-error induced by a specific sample. We further give a numerically viable approximation formula and analyze its properties using a data example of Brucella melitensis in the Austrian sheep population.

  20. Substantiation of Reference Method For Determining Concrete’s Freeze-Thaw Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolskiy, S.; Pertseva, O.

    2017-01-01

    It has been analytically proved that using concrete’s rate of set ε as a measure of damage, instead of decreasing of tensile strength R, increases freeze-thaw resistance’s accuracy of estimation a lot under otherwise equal conditions by the time of freeze-thaw cycling. Also it has been experimentally shown that ratio of relative decreasing R to ε in direction, perpendicular to compression, is assumed to be independent on values R and ε for a given concrete and on the ways of achieving them during mechanical or freeze-thaw cycling. Taking this into account patented methods for estimation of concrete’s freeze-thaw resistance as per values R and ε received after freezing and thawing cycles of some specimens and their postliminary failure by linear compression was substantiated.

  1. Experimental substantiation of methodic of 11-13 years old boxers’ coordination development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yong Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: experimental substantiation of methodic of junior boxers’ coordination training. Material: in the research 18 boxers of 11-13 year old age participated. In total, during 4 months 42 trainings were conducted. Total time of coordination load’s fulfillment at each training was 15-45 minutes. Results: dynamic of results in control tests was statistically confident in the tested parameters of movements. It proves effectiveness of usage the tasks with complex-coordination orientation, accented on impact on sensor-informational and motor systems of movements in junior boxers’ trainings. Conclusions: coordination training in boxing at initial stage shall include specialized varied means and methods, which would facilitate formation of motor condition and skills’ basis. Motor condition and skills are a reserve for further rising of coordination abilities’ level of junior sportsmen.

  2. Quantitative Evaluation of the Substantially Variable Morphology and Function of the Left Atrial Appendage and Its Relation with Adjacent Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cai-Ying; Gao, Bu-Lang; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Fan, Qiong-Ying; Zhang, Xue-Jing; Liu, Guo-Chao; Yang, Hai-Qing; Feng, Ping-Yong; Wang, Yong; Song, Peng

    2015-01-01

    To investigate quantitatively the morphology, anatomy and function of the left atrial appendage (LAA) and its relation with adjacent structures. A total of 860 patients (533 men, 62.0%, age 55.9±10.4 year) who had cardiac multidetector computed tomography angiography from May to October 2012 were enrolled for analysis. Seven types and 6 subtypes of LAA morphology were found with Type 2 being the most prevalent. Type 5 was more significantly (Pwater drop-like in 3.2%, round in 2.4% and foot-like in 1.6%. The LAA orifice had a significantly greater (Pvolume, aortic cross area long axis or LSPV long axis but poor correlation with the height, weight, surface area and vertebral body height of the patients. Four types of LAA ridge were identified: AI, AII, B and C with the distribution of 17.6%, 69.9%, 5.9% and 6.6%, respectively. The LAA had a significantly (Pvolume at 45% phase but the least volume at 5% phase. The LAA maximal, minimal and emptying volumes were all significantly (Pvolume but no correlation with the maximal volume. The LAA has substantially variable morphologies and relation with the adjacent structures, which may be helpful in guiding the LAA trans-catheter occlusion or catheter ablation procedures.

  3. On Slow-roll Glueball Inflation from Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Anguelova, Lilia

    2016-01-01

    We investigate glueball inflation model-building via the methods of the gauge/gravity duality. For that purpose, we consider a certain 5d consistent truncation of type IIB supergravity. This theory admits a solution, whose metric is of the form of a $dS_4$ fibration over a fifth dimension. We find a new time-dependent deformation around this solution, which allows for a small $\\eta$ parameter of the corresponding inflationary model. This resolves a problem with a previous solution that allowed only $\\eta$ of order one and thus gave only an ultra-slow roll regime, but not regular slow roll.

  4. Past, Present and Future of Ultra-Slow Muons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Kanetada

    Experimental works towards a realization of the ultra-slow positive muon by laser resonant ionization of thermal muonium (USM) in 1995 are reviewed with reference to the other methods. Then a short description is given for the present USM project at J-PARC MUSE. Finally, possible future projects at J-PARC MUSE are presented, with a particular emphasis on the fundamental atomic physics of extreme muonic atomic states, µ+µ- atoms which would only be produced, along with the UCM, by a possible development of a slow and narrow µ- beam for which some ideas are given.

  5. Possible detection of super massive very slow GUTS monopole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, A. E.

    A conceptual design idea for a detector of super massive very slow grand unified theories (GUTS) monopoles is discussed. The idea is based on the total stopping power due to the field energy generated by the supercurrents when a slowly moving monopole β ≍ 10-4 passes through a superconductor. The detector incorporates a superconducting Al disc with dimensions chosen for maximum phonon thermalization energy, surrounded by an array of plastic scintillators to provide a monopole trigger and cosmic ray veto. The integrated system acts as a velocity filter for very slow Dirac galactic monopoles.

  6. Optical signal processing using slow and fast light technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capmany, J.; Sales, Salvador; Xue, Weiqi;

    2009-01-01

    microwave or millimeter-wave frequency bands, we present one scheme to increase the achievable RF phase shift by enhancing light slow-down or speed-up. As a real application in microwave photonics, a widely tunable microwave photonic notch filter with 100% fractional tuning range is also proposed......We review the theory of slow and fat light effects due to coherent population oscillations in semiconductor waveguides, which can be potentially applied in microwave photonic systems as a RF phase shifters. In order to satisfy the application requirement of 360 degrees RF phase shift at different...

  7. Computation of saddle-type slow manifolds using iterative methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative approach for the computation of trajectory segments on slow manifolds of saddle type. This approach is based on iterative methods rather than collocation-type methods. Compared to collocation methods, which require mesh refinements to ensure uniform convergence...... with respect to , appropriate estimates are directly attainable using the method of this paper. The method is applied to several examples, including a model for a pair of neurons coupled by reciprocal inhibition with two slow and two fast variables, and the computation of homoclinic connections in the Fitz...

  8. Entangled photons from on-chip slow light

    CERN Document Server

    Takesue, Hiroki; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Notomi, Masaya

    2014-01-01

    We report the first entanglement generation experiment using an on-chip slow light device. With highly efficient spontaneous four-wave mixing enhanced by the slow light effect in a coupled resonator optical waveguide based on a silicon photonic crystal, we generated 1.5-$\\mu$m-band high-dimensional time-bin entangled photon pairs. We undertook two-photon interference experiments and observed the coincidence fringes with visibilities $>74\\%$. The present result enables us to realize an on-chip entanglement source with a very small footprint, which is an essential function for quantum information processing based on integrated quantum photonics.

  9. Ultrasonic slow dynamics to probe concrete aging and damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larose, E.; Tremblay, N.; Payan, C.; Garnier, V.; Rossetto, V.

    2013-01-01

    The stiffness of concrete experiences a drop immediately after a moderate mechanical solicitation. Then the stiffness rises back logarithmically toward its initial value. This Slow Dynamics behavior has been probed by macroscopic quantities averaged over the sample volume, including resonant frequency. This article presents a different approach based on diffuse acoustic wave spectroscopy, a technique that is directly sensitive to the details of the sample structure. The parameters of the dynamics are found to depend on mechanical and thermal damage of the medium. Results confirm that slow dynamics can be used onsite to assess the level of damage of a given structure.

  10. Slow effects of fast harmonic excitation for elastic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tcherniak, Dmitri; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    1998-01-01

    High-frequency excitation may affect the 'slow' behavior of a dynamical system. For example, equilibria may move, disappear, or gain or loose stability. We consider such slow effects of fast excitation for a simple mechanical system that incorporates features of many engineering structures. The s....... The study is intended to contribute to the general understanding of periodically excited linear and nonlinear systems, as well as to the current attempts to utilize high-frequency excitation for altering the low-frequency properties of structures....

  11. Closed-loop transcranial alternating current stimulation of slow oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilde Christian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS is an emerging non-invasive tool for modulating brain oscillations. There is evidence that weak oscillatory electrical stimulation during sleep can entrain cortical slow oscillations to improve the memory consolidation in rodents and humans. Using a novel method and a custom built stimulation device, automatic stimulation of slow oscillations in-phase with the endogenous activity in a real-time closed-loop setup is possible. Preliminary data from neuroplasticity experiments show a high detection performance of the proposed method, electrical measurements demonstrate the outstanding quality of the presented stimulation device.

  12. Wide-band slow-wave systems simulation and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Staras, Stanislovas

    2012-01-01

    The field of electromagnetics has seen considerable advances in recent years, based on the wide applications of numerical methods for investigating electromagnetic fields, microwaves, and other devices. Wide-Band Slow-Wave Systems: Simulation and Applications presents new technical solutions and research results for the analysis, synthesis, and design of slow-wave structures for modern electronic devices with super-wide pass-bands. It makes available, for the first time in English, significant research from the past 20 years that was previously published only in Russian and Lithuanian. The aut

  13. Slow Unfolding of Monomeric Proteins from Hyperthermophiles with Reversible Unfolding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Mukaiyama

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the differences in their optimal growth temperatures microorganisms can be classified into psychrophiles, mesophiles, thermophiles, and hyperthermophiles. Proteins from hyperthermophiles generally exhibit greater stability than those from other organisms. In this review, we collect data about the stability and folding of monomeric proteins from hyperthermophilies with reversible unfolding, from the equilibrium and kinetic aspects. The results indicate that slow unfolding is a general strategy by which proteins from hyperthermophiles adapt to higher temperatures. Hydrophobic interaction is one of the factors in the molecular mechanism of the slow unfolding of proteins from hyperthermophiles.

  14. Transcriptome, genetic editing, and microRNA divergence substantiate sympatric speciation of blind mole rat, Spalax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kexin; Wang, Liuyang; Knisbacher, Binyamin A; Xu, Qinqin; Levanon, Erez Y; Wang, Huihua; Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Tagore, Satabdi; Fang, Xiaodong; Bazak, Lily; Buchumenski, Ilana; Zhao, Yang; Lövy, Matěj; Li, Xiangfeng; Han, Lijuan; Frenkel, Zeev; Beiles, Avigdor; Cao, Yi Bin; Wang, Zhen Long; Nevo, Eviatar

    2016-07-05

    Incipient sympatric speciation in blind mole rat, Spalax galili, in Israel, caused by sharp ecological divergence of abutting chalk-basalt ecologies, has been proposed previously based on mitochondrial and whole-genome nuclear DNA. Here, we present new evidence, including transcriptome, DNA editing, microRNA, and codon usage, substantiating earlier evidence for adaptive divergence in the abutting chalk and basalt populations. Genetic divergence, based on the previous and new evidence, is ongoing despite restricted gene flow between the two populations. The principal component analysis, neighbor-joining tree, and genetic structure analysis of the transcriptome clearly show the clustered divergent two mole rat populations. Gene-expression level analysis indicates that the population transcriptome divergence is displayed not only by soil divergence but also by sex. Gene ontology enrichment of the differentially expressed genes from the two abutting soil populations highlights reproductive isolation. Alternative splicing variation of the two abutting soil populations displays two distinct splicing patterns. L-shaped FST distribution indicates that the two populations have undergone divergence with gene flow. Transcriptome divergent genes highlight neurogenetics and nutrition characterizing the chalk population, and energetics, metabolism, musculature, and sensory perception characterizing the abutting basalt population. Remarkably, microRNAs also display divergence between the two populations. The GC content is significantly higher in chalk than in basalt, and stress-response genes mostly prefer nonoptimal codons. The multiple lines of evidence of ecological-genomic and genetic divergence highlight that natural selection overrules the gene flow between the two abutting populations, substantiating the sharp ecological chalk-basalt divergence driving sympatric speciation.

  15. Extremely short duration high intensity interval training substantially improves insulin action in young healthy males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cottrell Greg

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional high volume aerobic exercise training reduces cardiovascular and metabolic disease risk but involves a substantial time commitment. Extremely low volume high-intensity interval training (HIT has recently been demonstrated to produce improvements to aerobic function, but it is unknown whether HIT has the capacity to improve insulin action and hence glycemic control. Methods Sixteen young men (age: 21 ± 2 y; BMI: 23.7 ± 3.1 kg·m-2; VO2peak: 48 ± 9 ml·kg-1·min-1 performed 2 weeks of supervised HIT comprising of a total of 15 min of exercise (6 sessions; 4–6 × 30-s cycle sprints per session. Aerobic performance (250-kJ self-paced cycling time trial, and glucose, insulin and NEFA responses to a 75-g oral glucose load (oral glucose tolerance test; OGTT were determined before and after training. Results Following 2 weeks of HIT, the area under the plasma glucose, insulin and NEFA concentration-time curves were all reduced (12%, 37%, 26% respectively, all P -1, P = 0.058. Insulin sensitivity, as measured by the Cederholm index, was improved by 23% (P Conclusion The efficacy of a high intensity exercise protocol, involving only ~250 kcal of work each week, to substantially improve insulin action in young sedentary subjects is remarkable. This novel time-efficient training paradigm can be used as a strategy to reduce metabolic risk factors in young and middle aged sedentary populations who otherwise would not adhere to time consuming traditional aerobic exercise regimes.

  16. Substantial nitrogen acquisition by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from organic material has implications for N cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Angela; Fitter, Alastair H

    2010-08-03

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are obligate biotrophs that acquire carbon (C) solely from host plants. AM fungi can proliferate hyphae in, and acquire nitrogen (N) from, organic matter. Although they can transfer some of that N to plants, we tested the hypothesis that organic matter is an important N source for the AM fungi themselves. We grew pairs of plants with and without the AM fungus Glomus hoi in microcosms that allowed only the fungus access to a 15N/13C-labeled organic patch; in some cases, one plant was shaded to reduce C supply to the fungus. The fungal hyphae proliferated vigorously in the patch, irrespective of shading, and increased plant growth and N content; approximately 3% of plant N came from the patch. The extraradical mycelium of the fungus was N-rich (3-5% N) and up to 31% of fungal N came from the patch, confirming the hypothesis. The fungus acquired N as decomposition products, because hyphae were not 13C-enriched. In a second experiment, hyphae of both G. hoi and Glomus mosseae that exploited an organic material patch were also better able to colonize a new host plant, demonstrating a fungal growth response. These findings show that AM fungi can obtain substantial amounts of N from decomposing organic materials and can enhance their fitness as a result. The large biomass and high N demand of AM fungi means that they represent a global N pool equivalent in magnitude to fine roots and play a substantial and hitherto overlooked role in the nitrogen cycle.

  17. Technique of Substantiating Requirements for the Vision Systems of Industrial Robotic Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ya. Kolyuchkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In references, there is a lack of approaches to describe the justified technical requirements for the vision systems (VS of industrial robotics complexes (IRC. Therefore, an objective of the work is to develop a technique that allows substantiating requirements for the main quality indicators of VS, functioning as a part of the IRC.The proposed technique uses a model representation of VS, which, as a part of the IRC information system, sorts the objects in the work area, as well as measures their linear and angular coordinates. To solve the problem of statement there is a proposal to define the target function of a designed IRC as a dependence of the IRC indicator efficiency on the VS quality indicators. The paper proposes to use, as an indicator of the IRC efficiency, the probability of a lack of fault products when manufacturing. Based on the functions the VS perform as a part of the IRC information system, the accepted indicators of VS quality are as follows: a probability of the proper recognition of objects in the working IRC area, and confidential probabilities of measuring linear and angular orientation coordinates of objects with the specified values of permissible error. Specific values of these errors depend on the orientation errors of working bodies of manipulators that are a part of the IRC. The paper presents mathematical expressions that determine the functional dependence of the probability of a lack of fault products when manufacturing on the VS quality indicators and the probability of failures of IRC technological equipment.The offered technique for substantiating engineering requirements for the VS of IRC has novelty. The results obtained in this work can be useful for professionals involved in IRC VS development, and, in particular, in development of VS algorithms and software.

  18. Prolonging the hydration and active metabolism from light periods into nights substantially enhances lichen growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidussi, Massimo; Gauslaa, Yngvar; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates how hydration during light and dark periods influences growth in two epiphytic old forest lichens, the green algal Lobaria pulmonaria and the cyanobacterial L. scrobiculata. The lichens were cultivated in growth chambers for 14 days (200 μmol m(-1) s(-2); 12 h photoperiod) at four temperature regimes (25/20 °C, 21/16 °C, 13/8 °C, and 6/1 °C; day/night temperatures) and two hydration regimes (12 h day-time hydration; 12 h day-time + 12 h night-time hydration). Growth was highly dynamic, showing that short-term growth experiments in growth cabinets have a high, but largely unexplored potential in functional lichen studies. The highest measured growth rates were not far from the maximal dry matter gain estimated from published net photosynthetic CO2 uptake data. For the entire data set, photobiont type, temperature, hydration regime and specific thallus mass accounted for 46.6 % of the variation in relative growth rate (RGR). Both species showed substantially higher relative growth rates based on both biomass (RGR) and thallus area (RTAGR) when they were hydrated day and night compared to hydration in light only. Chronic photoinhibition was substantial in thalli hydrated only during the day time and kept at the highest and lowest temperature regimes, resulting in exponential increases in RGR with increasing maximal PSII efficiency (F v/F m) in both species. However, the depression in F v/F m was stronger for the cyanolichen than for the cephalolichen at extreme temperatures. The growth-stimulating effect of night-time hydration suggests that nocturnal metabolic activity improves recovery of photoinhibition and/or enhances the conversion rate of photosynthates into thallus extension.

  19. Comparative genomics of Gardnerella vaginalis strains reveals substantial differences in metabolic and virulence potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl J Yeoman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gardnerella vaginalis is described as a common vaginal bacterial species whose presence correlates strongly with bacterial vaginosis (BV. Here we report the genome sequencing and comparative analyses of three strains of G. vaginalis. Strains 317 (ATCC 14019 and 594 (ATCC 14018 were isolated from the vaginal tracts of women with symptomatic BV, while Strain 409-05 was isolated from a healthy, asymptomatic individual with a Nugent score of 9. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Substantial genomic rearrangement and heterogeneity were observed that appeared to have resulted from both mobile elements and substantial lateral gene transfer. These genomic differences translated to differences in metabolic potential. All strains are equipped with significant virulence potential, including genes encoding the previously described vaginolysin, pili for cytoadhesion, EPS biosynthetic genes for biofilm formation, and antimicrobial resistance systems, We also observed systems promoting multi-drug and lantibiotic extrusion. All G. vaginalis strains possess a large number of genes that may enhance their ability to compete with and exclude other vaginal colonists. These include up to six toxin-antitoxin systems and up to nine additional antitoxins lacking cognate toxins, several of which are clustered within each genome. All strains encode bacteriocidal toxins, including two lysozyme-like toxins produced uniquely by strain 409-05. Interestingly, the BV isolates encode numerous proteins not found in strain 409-05 that likely increase their pathogenic potential. These include enzymes enabling mucin degradation, a trait previously described to strongly correlate with BV, although commonly attributed to non-G. vaginalis species. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our results indicate that all three strains are able to thrive in vaginal environments, and therein the BV isolates are capable of occupying a niche that is unique from 409-05. Each strain has significant virulence

  20. Surface nanoscale axial photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Sumetsky, M

    2011-01-01

    Dense photonic integration promises to revolutionize optical computing and communications. However, efforts towards this goal face unacceptable attenuation of light caused by surface roughness in microscopic devices. Here we address this problem by introducing Surface Nanoscale Axial Photonics (SNAP). The SNAP platform is based on whispering gallery modes circulating around the optical fiber surface and undergoing slow axial propagation readily described by the one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger equation. These modes can be steered with dramatically small nanoscale variation of the fiber radius, which is quite simple to introduce in practice. The extremely low loss of SNAP devices is achieved due to the fantastically low surface roughness inherent in a drawn fiber surface. In excellent agreement with the developed theory, we experimentally demonstrate localization of light in quantum wells, halting light by a point source, tunneling through potential barriers, dark states, etc. This demonstration, prototyping basi...

  1. Surface finish measurement studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, E. C.

    1983-01-01

    The performance of stylus instruments for measuring the topography of National Transonic Facility (NTF) model surfaces both for monitoring during fabrication and as an absolute measurement of topography was evaluated. It was found that the shop-grade instruments can damage the surface of models and that their use for monitoring fabrication procedures can lead to surface finishes that are substantially out of range in critical areas of the leading edges. The development of a prototype light-scattering instrument which would allow for rapid assessment of the surface finish of a model is also discussed.

  2. Characterization of RyR1-slow, a ryanodine receptor specific to slow-twitch skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissette, J; Xu, L; Nelson, A; Meissner, G; Block, B A

    2000-11-01

    Two distinct skeletal muscle ryanodine receptors (RyR1s) are expressed in a fiber type-specific manner in fish skeletal muscle (11). In this study, we compare [(3)H]ryanodine binding and single channel activity of RyR1-slow from fish slow-twitch skeletal muscle with RyR1-fast and RyR3 isolated from fast-twitch skeletal muscle. Scatchard plots indicate that RyR1-slow has a lower affinity for [(3)H]ryanodine when compared with RyR1-fast. In single channel recordings, RyR1-slow and RyR1-fast had similar slope conductances. However, the maximum open probability (P(o)) of RyR1-slow was threefold less than the maximum P(o) of RyR1-fast. Single channel studies also revealed the presence of two populations of RyRs in tuna fast-twitch muscle (RyR1-fast and RyR3). RyR3 had the highest P(o) of all the RyR channels and displayed less inhibition at millimolar Ca(2+). The addition of 5 mM Mg-ATP or 2.5 mM beta, gamma-methyleneadenosine 5'-triphosphate (AMP-PCP) to the channels increased the P(o) and [(3)H]ryanodine binding of both RyR1s but also caused a shift in the Ca(2+) dependency curve of RyR1-slow such that Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation was attenuated. [(3)H]ryanodine binding data also showed that Mg(2+)-dependent inhibition of RyR1-slow was reduced in the presence of AMP-PCP. These results indicate differences in the physiological properties of RyRs in fish slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle, which may contribute to differences in the way intracellular Ca(2+) is regulated in these muscle types.

  3. PREFACE 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckman, Stephen; Sullivan, James; White, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Preface These proceedings arose from the 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques (SLOPOS12), which was held on Magnetic Island, North Queensland, Australia, between 1-6th August 2010. Meetings in the SLOPOS series are held (roughly) every three years and have now been held on (almost) all continents, indicating the truly international nature of the field. SLOPOS12 marked the second time that the Workshop had been held in the southern hemisphere, and the first time in Australia. SLOPOS12 attracted 122 delegates from 16 countries. Most encouraging was the attendance of 28 student delegates, and that about half of the overall delegates were early career researchers - a good sign for the future of our field. We also enjoyed the company of more than a dozen partners and families of delegates. In a slight departure from previous SLOPOS meetings, the International Advisory Committee approved a broader scope of scientific topics for inclusion in the program for the 2010 Workshop. This broader scope was intended to capture the applications of positrons in atomic, molecular and biomedical areas and was encapsulated in the byeline for SLOPOS-12: The 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques for Solids, Surfaces, Atoms and Molecules. The scientific and social program for the meeting ran over 6 days with delegates gathering on Sunday August 1st and departing on August 6th. The scientific program included plenary, invited, contributed and student lectures, the latter being the subject of a student prize. In all there were 53 oral presentations during the week. There were also two poster sessions, with 63 posters exhibited, and a prize was awarded for the best poster by a student delegate. The standard of the student presentations, both oral and posters, was outstanding, so much so that the judging panel recommended an additional number of prizes be awarded. Topics that were the focus of invited presentations and contributed papers at

  4. Theoretical preconditions and technical substantiation for mechanical compressed air drying method application on the railway transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana RIPOL’-SARAGOSI

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is related to the compressed air purification for the rolling stock problems. The mechanical method is described as a potential way of the compressed air cooling and purificating. The temperature field at the heat conducting surface engineer function equation is given in the article as well.

  5. Laser cooling and slowing of CaF molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truppe, Stefan; Williams, Hannah; Hambach, Moritz; Sauer, Ben; Hinds, Ed; Tarbutt, Mike

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a cold and bright source for CaF molecules and use laser radiation pressure to slow the molecules to within the capture velocity of a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Using laser ablation of Ca into a continuous flow of cryogenic Helium buffer gas mixed with SF6 we produce up to 1011 molecules per steradian per pulse in a single rotational state. The molecules move with a mean forward velocity of 160m/s and have a velocity spread of 80m/s. We then apply laser radiation pressure to the molecular beam to slow and cool the molecules. We form a quasi-closed laser-cooling cycle by using a main cooling laser to drive the B2Σ+ (v' = 0) - X2Σ+ (v'' = 0) transition and a single repump laser to address the A2Π1 / 2 (v' = 0) -X2Σ+ (v'' = 1) transition. Radio-frequency sidebands applied to both lasers address the hyperfine structure. By chirping the frequencies of both lasers to keep the decelerating molecules resonant with the light, we scatter more than 10000 photons and reduce the speed to below 50 m/s. We achieve a similar effect by broadening the linewidth of the laser to several hundred MHz. This ``white-light'' slowing is compared to the chirped slowing technique. We also present progress towards a MOT of CaF molecules.

  6. Structural looseness investigation in slow rotating permanent magnet generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrimpas, Georgios Alexandros; Mijatovic, Nenad; Sweeney, Christian Walsted;

    2016-01-01

    Structural looseness in electric machines is a condition influencing the alignment of the machine and thus the overall bearing health. In this work, assessment of the above mentioned failure mode is tested on a slow rotating (running speed equal to 0.7Hz) permanent magnet generator (PMG), while...

  7. One Size Fits All? Slow Cortical Potentials Neurofeedback: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Kerstin; Wyckoff, Sarah N.; Strehl, Ute

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The intent of this manuscript was to review all published studies on slow cortical potentials (SCP) neurofeedback for the treatment of ADHD, with emphasis on neurophysiological rationale, study design, protocol, outcomes, and limitations. Method: For review, PubMed, MEDLINE, ERIC, and Google Scholar searches identified six studies and…

  8. The multilayer Fe/Hf studied with slow positron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashige, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Nakajyo, T.; Koizumi, T.; Kanazawa, I.; Komori, F.; Ito, Y.

    1997-04-01

    The positron annihilation parameter versus the incident positron energy is measured in the thin Fe films and the Fe/Hf bilayer on silica substrate, by means of the variable energetic slow-positron beam technique. We have analyzed the change in open-volume spaces and vacancy-type defects among the Fe microcrystals in these thin films with the deposition temperature.

  9. Formation of Heliospheric Arcs of Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, A. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; Devore, C. R.; Wyper, P. F.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2017-01-01

    A major challenge in solar and heliospheric physics is understanding the origin and nature of the so-called slow solar wind. The Sun's atmosphere is divided into magnetically open regions, known as coronal holes, where the plasma streams out freely and fills the solar system, and closed regions, where the plasma is confined to coronal loops. The boundary between these regions extends outward as the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). Measurements of plasma composition strongly imply that much of the slow wind consists of plasma from the closed corona that escapes onto open field lines, presumably by field-line opening or by interchange reconnection. Both of these processes are expected to release closed-field plasma into the solar wind within and immediately adjacent to the HCS. Mysteriously, however, slow wind with closed-field plasma composition is often observed in situ far from the HCS. We use high-resolution, three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations to calculate the dynamics of a coronal hole with a geometry that includes a narrow corridor flanked by closed field and is driven by supergranule-like flows at the coronal-hole boundary. These dynamics produce giant arcs of closed-field plasma that originate at the open-closed boundary in the corona, but extend far from the HCS and span tens of degrees in latitude and longitude at Earth. We conclude that such structures can account for the long-puzzling slow-wind observations.

  10. Reduction in slow intercompartmental clearance of urea during dialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowsher, D.J.; Krejcie, T.C.; Avram, M.J.; Chow, M.J.; Del Greco, F.; Atkinson, A.J. Jr.

    1985-04-01

    The kinetics of urea and inulin were analyzed in five anesthetized dogs during sequential 2-hour periods before, during, and after hemodialysis. The distribution of both compounds after simultaneous intravenous injection was characterized by three-compartment models, and the total volumes of urea (0.66 +/- 0.05 L/kg) and inulin (0.19 +/- 0.01 L/kg) distribution were similar to expected values for total body water and extravascular space, respectively. Intercompartmental clearances calculated before dialysis were used to estimate blood flows to the fast and slow equilibrating compartments. In agreement with previous results, the sum of these flows was similar to cardiac output, averaging 101% of cardiac output measured before dialysis (range 72% to 135%). Dialysis was accompanied by reductions in the slow intercompartmental clearances of urea (81%) and inulin (47%), which reflected a 90% attenuation in blood flow supplying the slow equilibrating compartments. This was estimated to result in a 10% average reduction in the efficiency with which urea was removed by dialysis (range 2.0% to 16.4%). Mean arterial pressure fell by less than 5% during dialysis, but total peripheral resistance increased by 47% and cardiac output fell by 35%. In the postdialysis period, total peripheral resistance and cardiac output returned toward predialysis values, but blood flow to the slow equilibrating peripheral compartment was still reduced by 80%. These changes parallel activation of the renin-angiotensin system, but further studies are required to establish causality.

  11. A Model for the Sources of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R.; Titov, V.; Linker, J.

    2010-05-01

    Models for the origin of the slow solar wind must account for two seemingly contradictory observations: The slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, implying that it originates at the open-closed field boundary layer, but it also has large angular width, up to 40 degrees. We propose a model that can explain both observations. The key idea is that the source of the slow wind at the Sun is a network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that map to a web of separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers in the heliosphere. We calculate with high numerical resolution, the quasi-steady solar wind and magnetic field for a Carrington rotation centered about the August 1, 2008 total solar eclipse. Our numerical results demonstrate that, at least for this time period, a web of separatrices (S-web) forms with sufficient density and extent in the heliosphere to account for the observed properties of the slow wind. We discuss the implications of our S-web model for the structure and dynamics of the corona and heliosphere, and propose further tests of the model. This work was supported, in part, by the NASA HTP, TR&T and SR&T programs.

  12. Standing Shocks in the Inner Slow Solar Wind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bo; CHEN Yan-Jun; LI Xing

    2011-01-01

    @@ We examine whether the flow tube along the edge of a coronal streamer supports standing shocks in the inner slow wind by solving an isothermal wind model in terms of the Lambert W function.It is shown that solutions with standing shocks do exist and they exist in a broad area in the parameter space characterizing the wind temperature and flow tube.In particular,streamers with cusps located at a heliocentric distance(>~)3.2R⊙ can readily support discontinuous slow winds with temperatures barely higher than 1 MK.%We examine whether the flow tube along the edge of a coronal streamer supports standing shocks in the inner slow wind by solving an isothermal wind model in terms of the Lambert W function. It is shown that solutions with standing shocks do exist and they exist in a broad area in the parameter space characterizing the wind temperature and flow tube. In particular, streamers with cusps located at a heliocentric distance (>) 3.2P⊙ can readily support discontinuous slow winds with temperatures barely higher than 1 MK.

  13. Slow motions in systems with fast modulated excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, E.

    2016-11-01

    It is well known that high-frequency excitation can modify the behavior of systems with respect to slow motions. The goal of this study is consideration of these effects in a rather general case of analytical systems with modulated sinusoidal excitation. The method of direct separation of motions proposed by I.I. Blekhman was applied in a modified form with the explicit introduction of a small parameter. Equations for the slow motions are obtained and an analysis of how they depend on the structure of the original equations is performed. Five basic effects corresponding to different possible dependencies of the modulation amplitude on position, velocity, and slow time are selected (some of them for the first time). These effects offer a possibility for designing a high-frequency control of the slow motions with specified properties. For example, high-frequency excitation in a system with a nonlinear friction can essentially increase the effective damping. The results are also of significance for system identification and diagnostics. Analysis of a hydraulic valve is given as an example of application.

  14. Temporal Heterogeneity and the Value of Slowness in Robotic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    persistent monitoring is precision farming , where robots are deployed on farms for long periods of time. In this case, we consider these SlowBots as...33]. The mating system is also unknown at this time. Specific nocturnal social interactions include allogroom (repeated licking), alternate click

  15. A Model for the Sources of the Slow Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Antiochos, S K; Titov, V S; Lionello, R; Linker, J A

    2011-01-01

    Models for the origin of the slow solar wind must account for two seemingly contradictory observations: The slow wind has the composition of the closed field corona, implying that it originates from the continuous opening and closing of flux at the boundary between open and closed field. On the other hand, the slow wind also has large angular width, up to ~ 60{\\circ}, suggesting that its source extends far from the open-closed boundary. We propose a model that can explain both observations. The key idea is that the source of the slow wind at the Sun is a network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that map to a web of separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers in the heliosphere. We compute analytically the topology of an open-field corridor and show that it produces a quasi-separatrix layer in the heliosphere that extends to angles far from the heliospheric current sheet. We then use an MHD code and MDI/SOHO observations of the photospheric magnetic field to calculate numerically, with high spat...

  16. Efficient coupling to slow light photonic crystal waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md Shofiqul Islam; Devarapu, Ganga Chinna Rao; O'Faolain, Liam

    2016-04-01

    Slow light photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) have been the subject of intensive study due to their potential for on-chip applications such as optical buffers and the enhancement of nonlinear phenomenon. However, due to high group velocity mismatch between the strip waveguide and the slow light waveguide efficient coupling of light is challenging. The coupling efficiency is also very sensitive to the truncation at the interface between the two waveguides. This sensitivity can be removed and light can efficiently be coupled from the strip waveguide to the slow light waveguide by adding an intermediate photonic crystal waveguide (or coupler) that operates at a group index of ˜ 5. Several designs have been proposed for couplers to obtain higher coupling efficiency within the desired group index range. We have studied uniaxial stretched couplers in which the lattice constant is stretched in the direction of propagation by 10-50 nm in the coupler region. Using a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Simulation Method that allows the extraction of the group index, we have observed 8.5 dB improvement in the coupling efficiency at the group index of 30. Efficient coupling is dominantly determined by the band edge position of the coupler region and maximum transmission efficiency is limited by the maximum transmission of the coupler PCW. If the band edge of coupler PCW is sufficiently red shifted relative to the band edge of the slow light PCW then higher coupling efficiency can be achieved.

  17. Slow Manifold and Hannay Angle in the Spinning Top

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M. V.; Shukla, P.

    2011-01-01

    The spin of a top can be regarded as a fast variable, coupled to the motion of the axis which is slow. In pure precession, the rotation of the axis round a cone (without nutation), can be considered as the result of a reaction from the fast spin. The resulting restriction of the total state space of the top is an illustrative example, at…

  18. Delineating psychomotor slowing from reduced processing speed in schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrens, M.; Hulstijn, W.; Matton, C.; Madani, Y.; Bouwel, L. van; Peuskens, J.; Sabbe, B.G.C.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Psychomotor slowing is an intrinsic feature of schizophrenia that is poorly delineated from generally reduced processing speed. Although the Symbol Digit Substitution Test (SDST) is widely used to assess psychomotor speed, the task also taps several higher-order cognitive processes. Re

  19. Good cash flow = come in fast, go out slow!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Sherill

    2002-07-01

    The formula for successful cash management in home care is a simple one: The agency must bring cash in as quickly as possible, while keeping expenditures at as low and slow a pace as possible. However, while the formula may be simple, success may be elusive unless agency administrators have a well-thought-out plan to handle cash management.

  20. Understanding bifurcation of slow versus fast cyber-attackers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieren, van Maarten; Doerr, Christian; Jacobs, Vivian; Pieters, Wolter; Livraga, Giovanni; Torra, Vicenç; Aldini, Alessandro; Martinelli, Fabio; Suri, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotally, the distinction between fast “Smash-and-Grab” cyber-attacks on the one hand and slow attacks or “Advanced Persistent Threats” on the other hand is well known. In this article, we provide an explanation for this phenomenon as the outcome of an optimization from the perspective of the att