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Sample records for surface subsidence induced

  1. Genetic Programming Approach for Predicting Surface Subsidence Induced by Mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The surface subsidence induced by mining is a complex problem, which is related with many complex and uncertain factors.Genetic programming (GP) has a good ability to deal with complex and nonlinear problems, therefore genetic programming approach is proposed to predict mining induced surface subsidence in this article.First genetic programming technique is introduced, second, surface subsidence genetic programming model is set up by selecting its main affective factors and training relating to practical engineering data, and finally, predictions are made by the testing of data, whose results show that the relative error is approximately less than 10%, which can meet the engineering needs, and therefore, this proposed approach is valid and applicable in predicting mining induced surface subsidence.The model offers a novel method to predict surface subsidence in mining.

  2. Anelastic modeling of surface subsidence induced by the Crandall Mine (Utah) collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Christina; Wdowinski, Shimon; Dixon, Tim

    2010-05-01

    The Crandall Mine collapsed in August 2007 and resulted in the death of 6 miners. The collapse induced surface subsidence visible by satellite geodesy. We processed data from ALOS satellite acquired before and after the collapse to quantify the subsidence and infer the deformation at depth. Our InSAR results show a localized oval shaped (1000 x 500 m2) pattern of subsidence with a maximum vertical displacement of 29 cm. Profiles across the subsided area show a steep V-shaped pattern. We first model the collapse using an elastic halfspace model. However, we find poor agreement between the elastic model solution and the InSAR observations, mainly because the elastic solution is characterized by a broad subsidence pattern. To improve this fit, we apply a model predicting surface settlement from tunneling (Loganathan and Poulos, 1998), where the internal friction angle is considered in the solution. To account for the flat shape of the collapse strata, we modify the model by changing its geometry from circular shape to elliptical (500 x 2.4 m). Our results show a very good fit in terms of the subsidence pattern, in particular the localization of the subsidence. We found that the surface subsidence was caused by a 7.7% collapse of the mine elliptical shaped mine. Although our simple model does not explain all the observed features, we find it more suitable than elastic halfspace models to explain the localized deformation pattern.

  3. Modeling Surface Subsidence from Hydrocarbon Production and Induced Fault Slip in the Louisiana Coastal Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallman, E. P.; Zoback, M. D.

    2005-12-01

    Coastal wetland loss in southern Louisiana poses a great threat to the ecological and economic stability of the region. In the region of interest, wetland loss is a combination of land subsidence along with eustatic sea level rise, sediment accumulation, erosion, filling and drainage. More than half of the land loss in coastal Louisiana between 1932 and 1990 was related to subsidence due to the complicated interaction of multiple natural and anthropogenic processes, including compaction of Holocene sediments in the Mississippi River delta, lithospheric flexure as a response to sediment loading, and natural episodic movement along regional growth faults. In addition to these mechanisms, it has recently been suggested that subsurface oil and gas production may be a large contributing factor to surface subsidence in the Louisiana Coastal Zone. We model the effect of fluid withdrawal from oil and gas fields in the Barataria Bay region of the Louisiana Coastal Zone on surface subsidence and its potential role in inducing fault slip on the region's growth faults. Along the western edge of Barataria Basin is a first-order leveling line to constrain our model of land subsidence. The rates for this leveling line show numerous locations of increased subsidence rate over the surrounding area, which tend to be located over the large oil and gas fields in the region. However, also located in the regions of high subsidence rate and oil and gas fields are the regional normal faults. Slip on these growth faults is important in two contexts: Regional subsidence would be expected along these faults as a natural consequence of naturally-occurring slip over time. In addition, slip along the faults can be exacerbated by production such that surface subsidence would be localized near the oil and gas fields. Using pressure data from wells in the Valentine, Golden Meadow, and Leeville oil and gas fields we estimate the amount of compaction of the various reservoirs, the resulting surface

  4. Surface subsidence induced by the Crandall Mine (Utah) collapse: InSAR observations and anelastic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, C.; Wdowinski, S.; Dixon, T. H.; Govers, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Crandall Mine collapsed in August 2007 and resulted in the death of 6 miners. The collapse induced surface subsidence visible by satellite geodesy. We processed data from ALOS satellite acquired before and after the collapse to quantify the subsidence and infer the deformation at depth. Our InSAR results show a localized oval shaped (1000 x 500 m2) pattern of subsidence with a maximum vertical displacement of 29 cm. Profiles across the subsided area show a steep V-shaped pattern. We first model the collapse using an elastic halfspace model. However, we find poor agreement between the elastic model solution and the InSAR observations, mainly because the elastic solution is characterized by a broad subsidence pattern, as elasticity does not explain localized strain. To overcome this limitation, we investigated analytical models that consider strain localization due to material failure. Here, we apply a model predicting surface settlement from tunneling (Loganathan and Poulos, 1998). This model uses the internal friction angle to define the maximum width of the subsidence area. To account for the flat shape of the collapse strata, we modify the model by changing its geometry from circular shape to elliptical (500 x 2.4 m). Our results show a very good fit in terms of the subsidence pattern, in particular the localization of the subsidence. We found that the surface subsidence was caused by a 7.7% collapse of the mine elliptical shaped mine. Although our simple model does not explain all the observed features, we find it more suitable than elastic halfspace models to explain the localized deformation pattern.

  5. Surface subsidence induced by the Crandall Canyon Mine (Utah) collapse: InSAR observations and elasto-plastic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, C.; Wdowinski, S.; Dixon, T. H.; Biggs, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Crandall Canyon Mine, Utah, collapse in 2007 August resulted in a total of nine fatalities. We processed data from the ALOS satellite acquired before and after the collapse to quantify surface subsidence associated with the collapse to better understand the collapse process. The deformation shows a steep V-shaped pattern of subsidence with slight asymmetry. We compare the fit of four different models that simulate the subsidence pattern. The first two models use elastic half-space rheology. We find that collapse alone cannot explain the observations, and a component of normal faulting is required to fit the data. The second set of models simulates collapse in elasto-plastic media. Only a small component of normal faulting is required in these models. We suggest that considering elasto-plastic material behaviour is particularly important for shallow deformation modelling, where microfractures and other non-elastic rheology are common. Disregarding this material behaviour can lead to biased model parameter estimates.

  6. Stem surface roughness alters creep induced subsidence and 'taper-lock' in a cemented femoral hip prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, T L; Thyagarajan, G; Saligrama, V C; Gruen, T A; Blaha, J D

    2001-10-01

    The clinical success of polished tapered stems has been widely reported in numerous long term studies. The mechanical environment that exists for polished tapered stems, however, is not fully understood. In this investigation, a collarless, tapered femoral total hip stem with an unsupported distal tip was evaluated using a 'physiological' three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis. It was hypothesized that stem-cement interface friction, which alters the magnitude and orientation of the cement mantle stress, would subsequently influence stem 'taper-lock' and viscoelastic relaxation of bone cement stresses. The hypothesis that creep-induced subsidence would result in increases to stem-cement normal (radial) interface stresses was also examined. Utilizing a viscoelastic material model for the bone cement in the analysis, three different stem-cement interface conditions were considered: debonded stem with zero friction coefficient (mu=0) (frictionless), debonded stem with stem-cement interface friction (mu=0.22) ('smooth' or polished) and a completely bonded stem ('rough'). Stem roughness had a profound influence on cement mantle stress, stem subsidence and cement mantle stress relaxation over the 24-h test period. The frictionless and smooth tapered stems generated compressive normal stress at the stem-cement interface creating a mechanical environment indicative of 'taper-lock'. The normal stress increased with decreasing stem-cement interface friction but decreased proximally with time and stem subsidence. Stem subsidence also increased with decreasing stem-cement interface friction. We conclude that polished stems have a greater potential to develop 'taper-lock' fixation than do rough stems. However, subsidence is not an important determinant of the maintenance of 'taper-lock'. Rather subsidence is a function of stem-cement interface friction and bone cement creep.

  7. The help of Advanced Satellite Interferometry in assessing the effect of human-induced surface deformation in naturally subsiding areas. Methodological approach and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Andrea; Giannico, Chiara; Del Conte, Sara; Teatini, Pietro

    2014-05-01

    Underground water extraction, natural gas storage either in depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs or in aquifers, and excavations for civil works (e.g. underground passageways, car parks, etc.) in flat areas are responsible for surface deformation that can damage pre-existing structures and modify drainage pathways. Deformation patterns associated to different underground show in many cases typical patterns. Their recognition can help in disentangling different processes when occurring in areas already affected by natural subsidence, such as coastal areas and inner sedimentary plains. Moreover, assessing the extent of human-induced deformation can help in identifying causes, modelling phenomena, predicting their evolution and adopting proper remedial measures. Advanced Satellite Interferometry provides a synoptic view of surface displacements over large areas and long time-spans and has become a standard in several Italian regions where underground fluid injection and withdrawal is going on. The integration of interferometric measurements with ground (leveling, GPS) and underground (borehole extensometers, piezometers, micro-seismic) monitoring networks can provide an exhaustive framework of the effect induced at surface level by underground human activities at local and regional scale. Documented case studies demonstrating the effectiveness of the above approach will be presented.

  8. Seismic reflection characteristics of naturally-induced subsidence affecting transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflections have been used effectively to investigate sinkholes formed from the dissolution of a bedded salt unit found throughout most of Central Kansas. Surface subsidence can have devastating effects on transportation structures. Roads, rails, bridges, and pipelines can even be dramatically affected by minor ground instability. Areas susceptible to surface subsidence can put public safety at risk. Subsurface expressions significantly larger than surface depressions are consistently observed on seismic images recorded over sinkholes in Kansas. Until subsidence reaches the ground surface, failure appears to be controlled by compressional forces evidenced by faults with reverse orientation. Once a surface depression forms or dissolution of the salt slows or stops, subsidence structures are consistent with a tensional stress environment with prevalent normal faults. Detecting areas of rapid subsidence potential, prior to surface failure, is the ultimate goal of any geotechnical survey where the ground surface is susceptible to settling. Seismic reflection images have helped correlate active subsidence to dormant paleofeatures, project horizontal growth of active sinkholes based on subsurface structures, and appraise the risk of catastrophic failure. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  9. Seismic Reflection Characteristics of Naturally-Induced Subsidence Affecting Transportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard D Miller; Jianghai Xia; Don W Steeples

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflections have been used effectively to investigate sinkholes formed from the dissolution of a bedded salt unit found throughout most of Central Kansas. Surface subsidence can have devastating effects on transportation structures. Roads, rails, bridges, and pipeliues can even be dramatically affected by minor ground instability. Areas susceptible to surface subsidence can put public safety at risk. Subsurface expressions significantly larger than surface depressions are consistently observed on seismic images recorded over sinkholes in Kansas. Until subsidence reaches the ground surface, failure appears to be controlled by compressional forces evidenced by faults with reverse orientation. Once a surface depression forms or dissolution of the salt slows or stops, subsidence structures are consistent with a tensional stress environment with prevalent normal faults. Detecting areas of rapid subsidence potential, prior to surface failure, is the ultimate goal of any geotechnical survey where the ground surface is susceptible to settling. Seismic reflection images have helped correlate active subsidence to dormant paleofeatures, project horizontal growth of active sinkholes based on subsurface structures, and appraise the risk of catastrophic failure.

  10. Linking oil production to surface subsidence from satellite radar interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haibin; Dvorkin, Jack; Nur, Amos

    Land subsidence over the Belridge and Lost Hills oil fields, Southern California, was measured using spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). During the 105-day period between 11/5/95 and 2/17/96, the subsidence in the center of the Lost Hills field reached 15 cm. We assume that this surface subsidence resulted from the vertical shrinkage of the reservoir, which in turn was due to oil production and the resulting pore pressure drop. We model this mechanical effect using an elastic deformation theoretical solution with input constants taken from relevant experiments. The modeled surface deformation matches the InSAR measured values. This result indicates that it is possible, in principle, to monitor hydrocarbon production using satellite-based measurements of earth deformation.

  11. Numerical analysis of surface subsidence in asymmetric parallel highway tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratan Das

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tunnelling related hazards are very common in the Himalayan terrain and a number of such instances have been reported. Several twin tunnels are being planned for transportation purposes which will require good understanding for prediction of tunnel deformation and surface settlement during the engineering life of the structure. The deformational behaviour, design of sequential excavation and support of any jointed rock mass are challenging during underground construction. We have raised several commonly assumed issues while performing stability analysis of underground opening at shallow depth. For this purpose, Kainchi-mod Nerchowck twin tunnels (Himachal Pradesh, India are taken for in-depth analysis of the stability of two asymmetric tunnels to address the influence of topography, twin tunnel dimension and geometry. The host rock encountered during excavation is composed mainly of moderately to highly jointed grey sandstone, maroon sandstone and siltstones. In contrast to equidimensional tunnels where the maximum subsidence is observed vertically above the centreline of the tunnel, the result from the present study shows shifting of the maximum subsidence away from the tunnel centreline. The maximum subsidence of 0.99 mm is observed at 4.54 m left to the escape tunnel centreline whereas the maximum subsidence of 3.14 mm is observed at 8.89 m right to the main tunnel centreline. This shifting clearly indicates the influence of undulating topography and in-equidimensional noncircular tunnel.

  12. Assessment, management rehabilitation of surface water losses due to longwall coal mining subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawkins, A.P. [Coffey Geosciences Pty. Ltd., Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    1999-07-01

    Subsidence due to longwall coal mining has generated notable effects on surface water and groundwater above numerous longwall coal mines in Queensland and NSW. This paper deals with the methods which can be used to assess, predict and rehabilitate the effects of longwall surface subsidence on surface water bodies. Aspects discussed cover the subsidence model, hydrological and hydrogeological assessment, hydrogeochemical changes and subsidence rehabilitation issues. The paper concludes that longwall surface subsidence can significantly affect the mine's local environment. However, with sufficient baseline data and a thorough assessment of site specific issues, longwalls can be planned to account for subsidence effects on surface water, and possible deleterious effects can be mitigated. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Evidence of regional subsidence and associated interior wetland loss induced by hydrocarbon production, Gulf Coast region, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Robert A.; Bernier, Julie C.; Barras, John A.

    2006-05-01

    Analysis of remote images, elevation surveys, stratigraphic cross-sections, and hydrocarbon production data demonstrates that extensive areas of wetland loss in the northern Gulf Coast region of the United States were associated with large-volume fluid production from mature petroleum fields. Interior wetland losses at many sites in coastal Louisiana and Texas are attributed largely to accelerated land subsidence and fault reactivation induced by decreased reservoir pressures as a result of rapid or prolonged extraction of gas, oil, and associated brines. Evidence that moderately-deep hydrocarbon production has induced land-surface subsidence and reactivated faults that intersect the surface include: (1) close temporal and spatial correlation of fluid production with surficial changes including rapid subsidence of wetland sediments near producing fields, (2) measurable offsets of shallow strata across the zones of wetland loss, (3) large reductions in subsurface pressures where subsidence rates are high, (4) coincidence of orientation and direction of displacement between surface fault traces and faults that bound the reservoirs, and (5) accelerated subsidence rates near producing fields compared to subsidence rates in surrounding areas or compared to geological rates of subsidence. Based on historical trends, subsidence rates in the Gulf Coast region near producing fields most likely will decrease in the future because most petroleum fields are nearly depleted. Alternatively, continued extraction of conventional energy resources as well as potential production of alternative energy resources (geopressured-geothermal fluids) in the Gulf Coast region could increase subsidence and land losses and also contribute to inundation of areas of higher elevation.

  14. Research on the surface subsidence monitoring technology based on fiber Bragg grating sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinyu; Jiang, Long; Sun, Zengrong; Hu, Binxin; Zhang, Faxiang; Song, Guangdong; Liu, Tongyu; Qi, Junfeng; Zhang, Longping

    2017-03-01

    In order to monitor the process of surface subsidence caused by mining in real time, we reported two types of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based sensors. The principles of the FBG-based displacement sensor and the FBG-based micro-seismic sensor were described. The surface subsidence monitoring system based on the FBG sensing technology was designed. Some factual application of using these FBG-based sensors for subsidence monitoring in iron mines was presented.

  15. Time-dependent inversion of surface subsidence due to dynamic reservoir compaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntendam-Bos, A.G.; Kroon, I.C.; Fokker, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a novel, time-dependent inversion scheme for resolving temporal reservoir pressure drop from surface subsidence observations (from leveling or GPS data, InSAR, tiltmeter monitoring) in a single procedure. The theory is able to accommodate both the absence of surface subsidence estimates

  16. Subsidence Induced Faulting Hazard Zonation Using Persistent Scatterer Interferometry and Horizontal Gradient Mapping in Mexican Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Cigna, F.; Osmanoglu, B.; Dixon, T.; Wdowinski, S.

    2011-12-01

    Subsidence and faulting have affected Mexico city for more than a century and the process is becoming widespread throughout larger urban areas in central Mexico. This process causes substantial damages to the urban infrastructure and housing structures and will certainly become a major factor to be considered when planning urban development, land use zoning and hazard mitigation strategies in the next decades. Subsidence is usually associated with aggressive groundwater extraction rates and a general decrease of aquifer static level that promotes soil consolidation, deformation and ultimately, surface faulting. However, local stratigraphic and structural conditions also play an important role in the development and extension of faults. In all studied cases stratigraphy of the uppermost sediment strata and the structure of the underlying volcanic rocks impose a much different subsidence pattern which is most suitable for imaging through satellite geodetic techniques. We present examples from several cities in central Mexico: a) Mexico-Chalco. Very high rates of subsidence, up to 370 mm/yr are observed within this lacustrine environment surrounded by Pliocene-Quaternary volcanic structures. b) Aguascalientes where rates up to 90 mm/yr in the past decade are observed, is controlled by a stair stepped N-S trending graben that induces nucleation of faults along the edges of contrasting sediment package thicknesses. c) Morelia presents subsidence rates as high as 80 mm/yr. Differential deformation is observed across major basin-bounding E-W trending faults and with higher subsidence rates on their hanging walls, where the thickest sequences of compressible Quaternary sediments crop out. Our subsidence and faulting study in urban areas of central Mexico is based on a horizontal gradient analysis using displacement maps from Persistent Scatterer InSAR that allows definition of areas with high vulnerability to surface faulting. Correlation of the surface subsidence pattern

  17. STUDY OF THE PIEZOMETRIC SURFACE AND HYDROCOMPACTION AT CONFINED AQUIFER CAUSED THE LAND SUBSIDENCE IN SEMARANG

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    Fahrudin Fahrudin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Semarang city has experienced of the land subsidence that be caused by intake groundwater in confined aquiferabundant. The land subsidence happened during range of time 20 years, it’s critical boundary so that result theenvironmental damage. Hence needed a study of cause of the land subsidence. This study aim to know theposition of piezometric surface and also explain the mechanism hydrogeology when happened the landsubsidence. The study of spreading aquifer has been done by the analysis of secondary data which is in the formof drilling log data, piezometric surface and soil mechanics test obtained from PLG (Environmental Center ofGeology Bandung. Later then, between the land subsidence and piezometric surface be overlay becamezonation. From the data made a analysis of cause of the land subsidence. This aquifer has the land subsidence.The land subsidence explainable with the experienced phenomenon fact for example degradation of piezometricsurface at confined aquifer and process of hydrocompaction. That process influenced by two factors that areassess the pore number (e and specific gravity (Gs. The degradation of piezometric surface formed the trapezeof water table until 20 m from sea level with the mean 0.7 - 1.1 m/year. Hydrocompaction cause the degradationof number of mean pore 0.145 - 0.5 and specific gravity 0.009 - 0.073 . The degradation of piezometric surfaceand process the hydrocompaction cause the fast of land subsidence around 0.5 - 1.75 cm/year.

  18. Time function of surface subsidence based on Harris model in mined-out area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xinrong; Wang Junbao; Guo Jianqiang; Yuan Hong; Li Peng

    2013-01-01

    The surface subsidence is a common environmental hazard in mined-out area.Based on careful analysis of the regularity of surface subsidence in mined-out area,we proposed a new time function based on Harris curve model in consideration of the shortage of current surface subsidence time functions.By analyzing the characteristics of the new time function,we found that it could meet the dynamic process,the velocity change process and the acceleration change process during surface subsidence.Then its rationality had been verified through project cases.The results show that the proposed time function model can give a good reflection of the regularity of surface subsidence in mined-out area and can accurately predict surface subsidence.And the prediction data of the model are a little greater than measured data on condition of proper measured data quantity,which is safety in the engineering.This model provides a new method for the analysis of surface subsidence in mined-out area and reference for future prediction,and it is valuable to engineering application.

  19. Prevention partition for land subsidence induced by engineering dewatering in Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. X.; Liu, X. T.; Yang, T. L.

    2015-11-01

    Land subsidence in shanghai has been found for more than 70 years. In the early years, it was mainly caused by groundwater exploitation. In recent years, engineering dewatering in shallow ground (within 90 m) has become a major source for land subsidence in the rapid urbanization course. A management partition of land subsidence induced by foundation pit dewatering for the first confined aquifer was suggested.

  20. Monitoring coal mine induced residual land subsidence using SBAS and PSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzovic, M.; Ghulam, A.

    2013-12-01

    Underground coal mining can cause damage to both property and the environment as a result of mining-induced land subsidence. Illinois, a major coal producer in the United States, is particularly susceptible to mining-induced land subsidence because it has large reserves of underground coal. Identifying and monitoring mining-induced land subsidence is important in order to assist in subsidence planning, minimizing damage to the environment, and prevent damage to structures. Since 1983, coal mining companies are responsible for preventing or correcting damage caused by mining-induced land subsidence. During active mining, land subsidence is monitored using traditional surveying methods, but this monitoring ends after active mining has stopped. In addition, mining-induced land subsidence can continue for decades after the completion of active mining. Traditional surveying methods are time consuming and expensive; therefore, a low-cost method of monitoring land subsidence is of great interest. Satellite based synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) provides a way to remotely measure land subsidence at low-cost, and with multitemporal methods of processing satellite data it reduces problems with standard InSAR and becomes a valuable tool to monitor mining-induced land subsidence. Permanent scatterer interferometry (PSI; Ferretti, et al., 2000, 2001) is a proven method that uses temporally coherent objects, such as buildings and rock outcrops, to improve the accuracy of land displacement measurements. PSI works well in urban areas because of the abundance of buildings, but it is less useful in rural areas. Small baseline subset (SBAS; Berardino, et al., 2002) interferometry uses multiple differential interferograms with small satellite baselines to improve spatial correlation. Both of these methods were used to measure land subsidence from 1992 to 2009 in Springfield, Illinois. Springfield presents a challenge because of the large surrounding rural areas. By

  1. CHARACTERISTICS OF MOVEMENT OF SURFACE POINT IN DYNAMIC SUBSIDENCE BASIN AND ITS DEFORMATION CALCULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGShidao; HUANGPeizhu

    1995-01-01

    Along with underground mining, movement and deformation of overburden gradually extends in all directions and up to the ground surface and finally forms a surface subsidence basin. The surface movement progressively stabilizes until coal mining is completed and forms a stable movement basin. Two types of basins, i.e. static and dynamic subsidence basins are distinguished in the paper, a classification of the basins and a description of their characteristics are presented. Based on the analysis of measured data by Yanzhou Coal Mining Bureau, during mining operation, the movement characteristics of surface point, subsidence equation, subsidence rate equation and the law of distribution of movement parameters of surface point relative to principal section of movement basin are addressed in this paper. Moreover the calculating formula of the movement parameters for an arbitrary surface point and the expression for calculating the maximum subsidence rate are also proposed. On the basis of the findings, the movement deformation formula for an arbitrary surface point in any directions during mining operation is highlighted.

  2. Wave-planation surfaces in the East Sea back-arc basin: an indicator of back-arc subsidence history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, G.; Yoon, S.; Kwon, Y.; Chough, S.

    2011-12-01

    This study focuses on delineating seismic characteristics and geomorphic features of wave-planation surfaces recognized in the southwestern East Sea, an extended back-arc area, based on the multi-channel seismic reflection data. The wave-planation surfaces are regarded to have originated from the co-occurrence of shallow-marine wave-induced abrasion on the bed rock and constructive sedimentation in forms of prograding clinoform and infilling of topographic depressions. The restricted shallow-marine wave-induced erosional and depositional processes are necessarily associated with regional-scale crustal subsidence caused by tectonic extension, thermal contraction, or sedimentary loading, in order to form such extensive and continuous wave-planation surfaces. The surfaces are classified into three types based on their present depths, possible initiation timings of subsidence, and the origins of underlain substrates, and each type of which reflects specific tectonic, volcanic, and sedimentary evolution histories. The WPS-1 occurs on the top of acoustic basement of rifted continental fragments in the SKP and continental margin terraces along the EKCM, which might have formed on the rifted continental crust undergoing subsequent thermal subsidence. The WPS-2 occurs on the top of flat-topped volcanic seamounts such as Kiminu Seamount (KS), Dok Is. (DI), Shimheungtaek Tablemount (ST), and Isabu Tablemount (IT), which most likely originated from initial subaerial volcanic eruption and following subsidence by loading effect of the volcanic edifices and minor thermal subsidence. The WPS-3 occurs on the top of the shelf-margin bank comprising the uplifted Tertiary sedimentary units. These surfaces might have originated from the subaerial exposure of existing syn-rift sedimentary units by tectonic inversion of the East Sea. In the Early Miocene (ca. 23 Ma) initial continental rifting occurred in subaerial environment, which resulted in rapid tectonic subsidence of SKP and EKCM

  3. Geomechanical modeling of reservoir compaction, surface subsidence, and casing damage at the Belridge diatomite field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FREDRICH,JOANNE T.; DEITRICK,G.L.; ARGUELLO JR.,JOSE G.; DEROUFFIGNAC,E.P.

    2000-05-01

    Geologic, and historical well failure, production, and injection data were analyzed to guide development of three-dimensional geomechanical models of the Belridge diatomite field, California. The central premise of the numerical simulations is that spatial gradients in pore pressure induced by production and injection in a low permeability reservoir may perturb the local stresses and cause subsurface deformation sufficient to result in well failure. Time-dependent reservoir pressure fields that were calculated from three-dimensional black oil reservoir simulations were coupled uni-directionally to three-dimensional non-linear finite element geomechanical simulations. The reservoir models included nearly 100,000 gridblocks (100--200 wells), and covered nearly 20 years of production and injection. The geomechanical models were meshed from structure maps and contained more than 300,000 nodal points. Shear strain localization along weak bedding planes that causes casing dog-legs in the field was accommodated in the model by contact surfaces located immediately above the reservoir and at two locations in the overburden. The geomechanical simulations are validated by comparison of the predicted surface subsidence with field measurements, and by comparison of predicted deformation with observed casing damage. Additionally, simulations performed for two independently developed areas at South Belridge, Sections 33 and 29, corroborate their different well failure histories. The simulations suggest the three types of casing damage observed, and show that although water injection has mitigated surface subsidence, it can, under some circumstances, increase the lateral gradients in effective stress, that in turn can accelerate subsurface horizontal motions. Geomechanical simulation is an important reservoir management tool that can be used to identify optimal operating policies to mitigate casing damage for existing field developments, and applied to incorporate the effect of

  4. Surface Subsidence Analysis by Multi-Temporal InSAR and GRACE: A Case Study in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiming Guo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between surface subsidence and groundwater changes. To investigate this relationship, we first analyzed surface subsidence. This paper presents the results of a case study of surface subsidence in Beijing from 1 August 2007 to 29 September 2010. The Multi-temporal Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (multi-temporal InSAR technique, which can simultaneously detect point-like stable reflectors (PSs and distributed scatterers (DSs, was used to retrieve the subsidence magnitude and distribution in Beijing using 18 ENVISAT ASAR images. The multi-temporal InSAR-derived subsidence was verified by leveling at an accuracy better than 5 mm/year. Based on the verified multi-temporal InSAR results, a prominent uneven subsidence was identified in Beijing. Specifically, most of the subsidence velocities in the downtown area were within 10 mm/year, and the largest subsidence was detected in Tongzhou, with velocities exceeding 140 mm/year. Furthermore, Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE data were used to derive the groundwater change series and trend. By comparison with the multi-temporal InSAR-derived subsidence results, the long-term decreasing trend between groundwater changes and surface subsidence showed a relatively high consistency, and a significant impact of groundwater changes on the surface subsidence was identified. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the subsidence funnel was partially consistent with that of groundwater depression, i.e., the former possessed a wider range than the latter. Finally, the relationship between surface subsidence and groundwater changes was determined.

  5. Systematic approach to assess and mitigate longwall subsidence influences on surface structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yi

    2008-01-01

    The surface subsidence process associated with Iongwall mining operations isoften capable of causing disturbances to various surface structures. Inadequate consid-erations of the subsidence influences could result in poor public relation with local resi-dents and regulatory agencies, uneconomic operations, hazardous conditions, etc. A sys-tematic approach to assess and mitigate influences caused by Iongwall subsidence hadbeen developed and adopted to minimize the severity of these potential problems. Theapproach included accurate prediction of final and dynamic surface movements and de-formations, assessment of the severities and locations of the potential disturbances, anddesign and implementation of proper mitigation measures. The approach had been suc-cessfully applied at many Iongwall mining companies on numerous and various residential,farming, public and industrial structures. As a matter of fact, the state of Pennsylvania, thestate with largest number of Iongwall mines and highest Iongwall production in U.S., wouldlike to use such approach as the standards in dealing with Iongwall subsidence cases.

  6. Computer program for predicting surface subsidence resulting from pressure depletion in geopressured wells: subsidence prediction for the DOW test well No. 1, Parcperdue, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, J.C.; Carver, D.R.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L. (eds.)

    1981-01-01

    The nucleus-of-strain concept is used to construct a computer program for predicting surface subsidence due to pressure reduction in geopressured reservoirs. Numerical integration allows one to compute the vertical displacement of the ground surface directly above and beyond the aquifer boundaries which results from the pressure reduction in each of the small finite volumes into which the aquifer is partitioned. The program treats depth (measured from the surface to the mean thickness of the aquifer) as a constant. Variation in aquifer thickness is accounted for by linear interpolation from one boundary to its opposite. In this simple model, subsidence is proportional to the pressure reduction (considered constant in this presentation) and to but one physical parameter, Cm(1-..nu..), in which Cm is its coefficient of uniaxial compaction, and ..nu.. is Poisson's ratio.

  7. Groundwater-Mining-Induced Subsidence and Earth Fissures in Cedar Valley, Southwestern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, T. R.; Inkenbrandt, P.; Lund, W. R.; Lowe, M.; Bowman, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater pumping in excess of recharge (groundwater mining) has lowered the potentiometric surface in Cedar Valley, southwestern Utah, by as much as 114 feet since 1939. Lowering the potentiometric surface (head decline) has caused permanent compaction of fine-grained sediments of the Cedar Valley aquifer. Recently acquired interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imagery shows that land subsidence is occurring over an ~100 square-mile area, including two pronounced subsidence bowls in the northeastern (Enoch graben) and southwestern (Quichapa Lake area) parts of the valley. A lack of accurate historical benchmark elevation data over much of the valley prevents detailed long-term quantification of subsidence. In response to the land subsidence, earth fissures have formed along the margins of the Enoch graben and north and west of Quichapa Lake. Our initial inventory of Cedar Valley fissures, which relied on aerial-photography analysis, identified 3.9 miles of fissures in 2009. With newly acquired light detection and ranging (LiDAR) coverage in 2011, we more than doubled the total length of mapped fissures to 8.3 miles. Fissures on the west side of the Enoch graben exhibit ongoing vertical surface displacement with rates as high as 1.7 inches/year. The largest Enoch-graben-west fissure has displaced street surfaces, curb and gutter, and sidewalks, and has reversed the flow direction of a sewer line in a partially developed subdivision. Several Cedar Valley fissures are closely associated with, and in some places coincident with, mapped Quaternary faults. While the majority of Cedar Valley fissures are mapped in agricultural areas, continued groundwater mining and resultant subsidence will likely cause existing fissures to lengthen and new fissures to form that may eventually impact other developed areas of the valley.

  8. Groundwater-abstraction induced land subsidence and groundwater regulation in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H.; Wang, L.; Cheng, G.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-11-01

    Land subsidence can be induced when various factors such as geological, and hydrogeological conditions and intensive groundwater abstraction combine. The development and utilization of groundwater in the North China Plain (NCP) bring great benefits, and at the same time have led to a series of environmental and geological problems accompanying groundwater-level declines and land subsidence. Subsidence occurs commonly in the NCP and analyses show that multi-layer aquifer systems with deep confined aquifers and thick compressible clay layers are the key geological and hydrogeological conditions responsible for its development in this region. Groundwater overdraft results in aquifer-system compaction, resulting in subsidence. A calibrated, transient groundwater-flow numerical model of the Beijing plain portion of the NCP was developed using MODFLOW. According to available water supply and demand in Beijing plain, several groundwater regulation scenarios were designed. These different regulation scenarios were simulated with the groundwater model, and assessed using a multi-criteria fuzzy pattern recognition model. This approach is proven to be very useful for scientific analysis of sustainable development and utilization of groundwater resources. The evaluation results show that sustainable development of groundwater resources may be achieved in Beijing plain when various measures such as control of groundwater abstraction and increase of artificial recharge combine favourably.

  9. Method of forecasting seismic energy induced by longwall exploitation based on changes in ground subsidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Violetta Sokoola Szewiola

    2011-01-01

    A method of forecasting total seismic energy induced by longwall exploitation,based on changes in ground subsidence,is presented in the form of a linear regression model with one with one independent variable.In the method,ground subsidence is described with a cross-section area of a subsidence trough Pw along a line of observations in the direction of an advancing longwall front,approximately along the axis of the Iongwall area.Total seismic energy is determined on the basis of seismic energy data of tremors induced by exploitation.The presentation consists of a detailed method and evaluation of its predictive ability for the area of longwall exploitation within the region of one of the coal mines in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin.This method can be used for forecasting the total seismic energy released by tremors within the area directly connected with the exploitation,in which the seismic activity induced by this exploitation occurs.The estimation of the parameters of the determined model should each time be carried out with investigations of the correctness of the model.The method cannot be applied when the number of recorded phenomena is small and when there is insufficient data to make it possible to calculate the index Pw.

  10. Experimental Study on the Microstructure Evolution of Mixed Disposal Paste in Surface Subsidence Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The integrated disposal of surface subsidence pits and surface solid waste can be realized by backfilling a surface subsidence area with a paste made from the solid wastes of mines, such as tailings and waste rock. The microstructures of these wastes determine the macroscopic properties of a paste backfill. This paper presents an experimental study on the internal structure evolution of pasty fluid mixed with different waste rock concentrations (10%, 30%, and 50% and cement dosages (1% and 2% under damage. To this end, a real-time computed tomography (CT scan is conducted using medical CT and a small loading device. Results show that UCS (uniaxial compressive strength increases when the amount of cement increases. Given a constant amount of cement, UCS increases first and then decreases as waste rock content increases. UCS is maximized at 551 kPa when the waste rock content is 30%. The paste body is a typical medium used to investigate initial damage, which mainly consists of microholes, pores, and microcracks. The initial damages also exhibit a high degree of random inhomogeneity. After loading, cracks are initiated and expand gradually from the original damage location until the overall damages are generated. The mesostructure evolution model of the paste body is divided into six categories, and this mesostructure is reasonable when the waste rock content is 30%.

  11. Dynamic subsidence prediction of ground surface above salt cavern gas storage considering the creep of rock salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A new model is proposed to predict the dynamic subsidence of ground surface above salt cavern gas storage during the leaching and storage, which takes into account the creep of rock salt. In the model, the extended form of Gaussian curve is adopted to figure out the shape of subsidence areas. The corresponding theoretical formulas are derived. In addition, parameters are studied to investigate the surface subsidence as a function of the salt ejection rate, internal pressure, buried depth, diameter, height, running time, etc. Through an example, the subsidence of the salt cavern gas storage located at Jiangsu of China obtained by the new model was compared with those by Peter A F formula, Schober & Sroka formula and FLAC3D through simulation. The results showed the proposed model is precise and correct, and can meet the actual engineering demands. The surface subsidence is equidirectional with the increase of salt ejection rate, depth, diameter, height, and running time, but reverse to the increase of internal pressure. The depth, diameter, running time and internal pressure have great effects on the subsidence, whereas the salt ejection rate and height have little influences on it.

  12. STRATA AND SURFACE SUBSIDENCE CONTROL IN STRIP-PARTIAL MINING UNDER BUILDINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴立新; 王金庄; 赵学胜; 李邦三

    1994-01-01

    This paper systematically expounds the history and present situation of the research & application of strip-partial mining at home and abroad. The prospect of using strip-partial mining mcthod to mine under buildings (structures) at the present situation of market economy is also expounded here. Strata & surface subsldcnce mechanism of strip-partiai mining, the optimization of the width of unit goal & coal pillar as weal as the calculation method of surface subsidenoc pridiction based on Holding-Plate Control Theory and Coal Pillar Long-term Stability, which are our research achivements in recent years about strata & surface subsidence control in strip-partial mining, are the main points introduced here.

  13. Liquefaction-fluidization induced land subsidence: impact of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake on reclaimed land around Tokyo bay area, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    A. Kagawa; Furuno, K; Kusuda, T.; Sakai, Y.; Yoshida, T.; Kazaoka, O.

    2015-01-01

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake caused major liquefaction-induced, ground deformation of the reclaimed land surrounding Tokyo Bay. In this area, liquefaction was visibly manifest by sand boils, ejection of sandy water, land subsidence and floating underground tanks. The level measurements show a correspondence between the degree of liquefaction-fluidization and the amount of subsidence. The strata most susceptible to liquefaction are hydraulically emplaced dredged fill and artifi...

  14. Regional subsidence modelling in Murcia city (SE Spain using 1-D vertical finite element analysis and 2-D interpolation of ground surface displacements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tessitore

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subsidence is a hazard that may have natural or anthropogenic origin causing important economic losses. The area of Murcia city (SE Spain has been affected by subsidence due to groundwater overexploitation since the year 1992. The main observed historical piezometric level declines occurred in the periods 1982–1984, 1992–1995 and 2004–2008 and showed a close correlation with the temporal evolution of ground displacements. Since 2008, the pressure recovery in the aquifer has led to an uplift of the ground surface that has been detected by the extensometers. In the present work an elastic hydro-mechanical finite element code has been used to compute the subsidence time series for 24 geotechnical boreholes, prescribing the measured groundwater table evolution. The achieved results have been compared with the displacements estimated through an advanced DInSAR technique and measured by the extensometers. These spatio-temporal comparisons have showed that, in spite of the limited geomechanical data available, the model has turned out to satisfactorily reproduce the subsidence phenomenon affecting Murcia City. The model will allow the prediction of future induced deformations and the consequences of any piezometric level variation in the study area.

  15. Mangrove forest against dyke-break-induced tsunami on rapidly subsiding coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Mikami, Takahito; Fujii, Daisuke; Esteban, Miguel; Kurobe, Shota

    2016-07-01

    Thin coastal dykes typically found in developing countries may suddenly collapse due to rapid land subsidence, material ageing, sea-level rise, high wave attack, earthquakes, landslides, or a collision with vessels. Such a failure could trigger dam-break tsunami-type flooding, or "dyke-break-induced tsunami", a possibility which has so far been overlooked in the field of coastal disaster science and management. To analyse the potential consequences of one such flooding event caused by a dyke failure, a hydrodynamic model was constructed based on the authors' field surveys of a vulnerable coastal location in Jakarta, Indonesia. In a 2 m land subsidence scenario - which is expected to take place in the study area after only about 10-20 years - the model results show that the floodwaters rapidly rise to a height of nearly 3 m, resembling the flooding pattern of earthquake-induced tsunamis. The depth-velocity product criterion suggests that many of the narrow pedestrian paths behind the dyke could experience strong flows, which are far greater than the safe limits that would allow pedestrian evacuation. A couple of alternative scenarios were also considered to investigate how such flood impacts could be mitigated by creating a mangrove belt in front of the dyke as an additional safety measure. The dyke-break-induced tsunamis, which in many areas are far more likely than regular earthquake tsunamis, cannot be overlooked and thus should be considered in disaster management and urban planning along the coasts of many developing countries.

  16. Application of remote-sensing-image fusion to the monitoring of mining induced subsidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Liang-jun; WU Yan-bin

    2008-01-01

    We discuss remote-sensing-image fusion based on a multi-band wavelet and RGB feature fusion method. The fused data can be used to monitor the dynamic evolution of mining induced subsidence. High resolution panchromatic image data and multi-spectral image data were first decomposed with a multi-ary wavelet method. Then the high frequency components of the high resolution image were fused with the features from the R, G, B bands of the multi-spectral image to form a new high frequency component. Then the newly formed high frequency component and the low frequency component were inversely transformed using a multi-ary wavelet method. Finally, color images were formed from the newly formed R, G, B bands. In our experiment we used images with a resolution of 10 m (SPOT), and TM30 images, of the Huainan mining area. These images were fused with a trinary wavelet method. In addition, we used four indexes-entropy, average gradient, wavelet energy and spectral distortion-to assess the new method. The result indicates that this new method can improve the clarity and resolution of the images and also preserves the information from the original images. Using the fused images for monitoring mining induced subsidence achieves a good effect.

  17. Hydrogeology and simulation of groundwater flow and land-surface subsidence in the northern part of the Gulf Coast aquifer system, Texas, 1891-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmarek, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    In cooperation with the Harris–Galveston Subsidence District, Fort Bend Subsidence District, and Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, the U.S. Geological Survey developed and calibrated the Houston Area Groundwater Model (HAGM), which simulates groundwater flow and land-surface subsidence in the northern part of the Gulf Coast aquifer system in Texas from predevelopment (before 1891) through 2009. Withdrawal of groundwater since development of the aquifer system has resulted in potentiometric surface (hydraulic head, or head) declines in the Gulf Coast aquifer system and land-surface subsidence (primarily in the Houston area) from depressurization and compaction of clay layers interbedded in the aquifer sediments.

  18. Characterization of land subsidence induced by groundwater withdrawals in Wenyu River alluvial fan, Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Luo, Y.; Yang, Y.; Tian, F.; Zhou, Y.; Tian, M.-Z.

    2015-11-01

    The Beijing plain area has suffered from severe land subsidence owing to groundwater overdraft. A major example is the Wenyu River alluvial fan in the Beijing plain area. This area has experienced as much as 10 m of land subsidence through 2000s. An integrated subsidence-monitoring program, including borehole extensometer and multilayer monitoring of groundwater, has been designed to meet the needs of monitoring land subsidence in this region. This work has allowed us to characterize land subsidence and understand the mechanical properties of the strata. The analysis results show the development of the land subsidence in this area is consistent with water-level change. The major strata contributing to compression deformation are Mid-Pleistocene stratum which contributed around 70 % of total subsidence. The shallow stratum and deep stratum show elastic mechanical behavior the intermediate stratum exhibit elastic-plastic mechanical behavior.

  19. Imaging Land Subsidence Induced by Groundwater Extraction in Beijing (China Using Satellite Radar Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Beijing is one of the most water-stressed cities in the world. Due to over-exploitation of groundwater, the Beijing region has been suffering from land subsidence since 1935. In this study, the Small Baseline InSAR technique has been employed to process Envisat ASAR images acquired between 2003 and 2010 and TerraSAR-X stripmap images collected from 2010 to 2011 to investigate land subsidence in the Beijing region. The maximum subsidence is seen in the eastern part of Beijing with a rate greater than 100 mm/year. Comparisons between InSAR and GPS derived subsidence rates show an RMS difference of 2.94 mm/year with a mean of 2.41 ± 1.84 mm/year. In addition, a high correlation was observed between InSAR subsidence rate maps derived from two different datasets (i.e., Envisat and TerraSAR-X. These demonstrate once again that InSAR is a powerful tool for monitoring land subsidence. InSAR derived subsidence rate maps have allowed for a comprehensive spatio-temporal analysis to identify the main triggering factors of land subsidence. Some interesting relationships in terms of land subsidence were found with groundwater level, active faults, accumulated soft soil thickness and different aquifer types. Furthermore, a relationship with the distances to pumping wells was also recognized in this work.

  20. Land subsidence induced by groundwater extraction and building damage level assessment-a case study of Datun,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Qi-yan; LIU Gang-jun; MENG Lei; FU Er-jiang; ZHANG Hai-rong; ZHANG Ke-fei

    2008-01-01

    As in many parts of the world, long-term excessive extraction of groundwater has caused significant land-surface subsidence in the residential areas of Datun coal mining district in East China. The recorded maximum level of subsidence in the area since 1976 to 2006 is 863 mm, and the area with an accumulative subsidence more than 200 mm has reached 33.1 km2 by the end of 2006. Over ten cases of building crack due to ground subsidence have already been observed. Spatial variation in ground subsidence often leads to a corresponding pattern of ground deformation. Buildings and underground infrastructures have been under a higher risk of damage in locations with greater differential ground deformation. Governmental guideline in China classifies building damages into four different levels, based on the observable measures such as the width of wall crack, the degree of door and window deformation, the degree of wall inclination and the degree of structural destruction. Building damage level (BDL) is estimated by means of ground deformation analysis in terms of variations in slope gradient and curvature. Ground deformation analysis in terms of variations in slope gradient has shown that the areas of BDL Ⅲ and BDL Ⅱ sites account for about 0.013 km2 and 0.284km2 respectively in 2006, and the predicted areas of BDL (define this first) Ⅲ and Ⅱ sites will be about 0.029 km2 and 0.423 km2respectively by 2010. The situation is getting worse as subsidence continues. That calls for effective strategies for subsidence mitigation and damage reduction, in terms of sustainable groundwater extraction, enhanced monitoring and the establishment of early warning systems.

  1. Liquefaction-fluidization induced land subsidence: impact of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake on reclaimed land around Tokyo bay area, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, A.; Furuno, K.; Kusuda, T.; Sakai, Y.; Yoshida, T.; Kazaoka, O.

    2015-11-01

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake caused major liquefaction-induced, ground deformation of the reclaimed land surrounding Tokyo Bay. In this area, liquefaction was visibly manifest by sand boils, ejection of sandy water, land subsidence and floating underground tanks. The level measurements show a correspondence between the degree of liquefaction-fluidization and the amount of subsidence. The strata most susceptible to liquefaction are hydraulically emplaced dredged fill and artificial strata on thick uncompacted Holocene deposits. On the other hand, the phenomena of seismic isolation coursed by liquefaction had saved the single-family houses from collapse.

  2. Prediction of delayed subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, K.

    A predictive model of delayed subsidence is discussed. A numerical implementation is tested on one of the best-described study areas, Allegheny County in Pennsylvania. In planning insurance of restitution measures, a predictive model is of value in estimating the magnitude of the problem and the size of long-term budgetary commitments. Contrary to active subsidence, which occurs concurrently with mining operations, or is completed within a few days following coal extraction, delayed subsidence may take many years to appear at the surface after coal mines are abandoned. There are two principal morphological types of delayed subsidence: troughs, which are shallow depressions, and sinks, which are steep-sided crown pits. Both types are damaging to surface structures, and a variety of methods were introduced to deal with the problem, ranging from subsidence insurance to site restitution.

  3. Properties of L-band differential InSAR for monitoring mining-induced subsidence in coalfield of Jining, Northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶秋香; 刘国林

    2014-01-01

    The properties and feasibility of L-band differential InSAR for detecting and monitoring mining-induced subsidence were systematically analyzed and demonstrated. The largest monitored subsidence gradient of 7.9×10-3 and magnitude of 91 cm were firstly derived by theoretical derivation. Then, the stronger phase maintaining capacity and weaker sensitivity to minor land subsidence compared with C-band DInSAR were illustrated by phase simulation of the actual mine subsidence. Finally, the data processing procedure of two-pass DInSAR was further refined to accurately observe subsidence of a coalfield of Jining in Northern China using 7 ALOS PALSAR images. The largest monitored subsidence magnitude of 39.22 cm and other properties were better investigated by testing results interpretation and subsidence analysis, and the absolute difference varying from 0.5 mm to 17.9 mm was obtained by comparison with leveling-measured subsidence. All of results show that L-band DInSAR technique can investigate the location, amount, area and other detailed subsidence information with relatively higher accuracy.

  4. Failure of man-made cavities in salt and surface subsidence due to sulfur mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, G.K.; Lee, C.A.; McClain, W.C.; Senseny, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    An engineering data base relevant to subsidence due to sulfur mining and to structural failure of cavities in salt is established, evaluated and documented. Nineteen failure events are discussed. Based on these documented failure events, capabilities of and inputs to a mathematical model of cavity failure are determined. Two failure events are adequately documented for use in model verification studies. A conclusion of this study that is pertinent to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve is that cavity failures in dome salt are fairly rare, but that as the number of large cavities (especially those having large roof spans) increases, failures will probably be more common unless stability and failure mechanisms of cavities are better understood.

  5. Application of InSAR and gravimetric surveys for developing construction codes in zones of land subsidence induced by groundwater extraction: case study of Aguascalientes, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Martínez, J.; Wdowinski, S.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Hernández-Marín, M.; Ortiz-Lozano, J. A.; Oliver-Cabrera, T.; Solano-Rojas, D.; Havazli, E.

    2015-11-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has become a valuable tool for surface deformation monitoring, including land subsidence associated with groundwater extraction. Another useful tools for studying Earth's surface processes are geophysical methods such as Gravimetry. In this work we present the application of InSAR analysis and gravimetric surveying to generate valuable information for risk management related to land subsidence and surface faulting. Subsidence of the city of Aguascalientes, Mexico is presented as study case. Aguascalientes local governments have addressed land subsidence issues by including new requirements for new constructions projects in the State Urban Construction Code. Nevertheless, the resulting zoning proposed in the code is still subjective and not clearly defined. Our work based on gravimetric and InSAR surveys is aimed for improving the subsidence hazard zoning proposed in the State Urban Code in a more comprehensive way. The study includes a 2007-2011 ALOS InSAR time-series analysis of the Aguascalientes valley, an interpretation of the compete Bouguer gravimetric anomaly of the Aguascalientes urban area, and the application of time series and gravimetric anomaly maps for improve the subsidence hazard zoning of Aguascalientes City.

  6. Experiences of the measurement of the extent of surface subsidence in the area of the Thorez Opencast mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdelyi, L.

    1987-01-01

    Experiences gained in the course of subsidence measurement in the environs of the Thorez opencast mine (North Hungary) and the results of recent subsidence measurements are summarized. The direction, size, extension and temporal variation of surficial movements caused by draining of formation water are dealt with. Two cases are dealt with in detail which were not caused by surficial movements and the real causes were revealed just by the subsidence measurements.

  7. Inverting subsidence data to detect possible compartmentalization in a gas reservoir in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, K.; Muntendam-Bos, A.G.; Kunakbayeva, G.; Leeuwenburgh, O.; Peters, E.; Fokker, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Subsidence can be induced by hydrocarbon production, due to the decrease in pore pressure in the reservoir which causes the reservoir to compact. The subsidence at any point on the surface is a result of the compaction over a large area of the reservoir. The properties of the reservoir and thus the

  8. The deep Earth origin of the Iceland plume and its effects on regional surface uplift and subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett-Moore, Nicholas; Hassan, Rakib; Flament, Nicolas; Müller, Dietmar

    2017-02-01

    The present-day seismic structure of the mantle under the North Atlantic Ocean indicates that the Iceland hotspot represents the surface expression of a deep mantle plume, which is thought to have erupted in the North Atlantic domain during the Palaeocene. The spatial and temporal evolution of the plume since its eruption is still highly debated, and little is known about its deep mantle history. Here, we use palaeogeographically constrained global mantle flow models to investigate the evolution of deep Earth flow beneath the North Atlantic since the Jurassic. The models show that over the last ˜ 100 Myr a remarkably stable pattern of convergent flow has prevailed in the lowermost mantle near the tip of the African Large Low-Shear Velocity Province (LLSVP), making it an ideal plume nucleation site. We extract model dynamic topography representative of a plume beneath the North Atlantic region since eruption at ˜ 60 Ma to present day and compare its evolution to available offshore geological and geophysical observations across the region. This comparison confirms that a widespread episode of Palaeocene transient uplift followed by early Eocene anomalous subsidence can be explained by the mantle-driven effects of a plume head ˜ 2500 km in diameter, arriving beneath central eastern Greenland during the Palaeocene. The location of the model plume eruption beneath eastern Greenland is compatible with several previous models. The predicted dynamic topography is within a few hundred metres of Palaeocene anomalous subsidence derived from well data. This is to be expected given the current limitations involved in modelling the evolution of Earth's mantle flow in 3-D, particularly its interactions with the base of a heterogeneous lithosphere as well as short-wavelength advective upper mantle flow, not captured in the presented global models.

  9. A modeling study of coastal inundation induced by storm surge, sea-level rise, and subsidence in the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kraucunas, Ian P.; Rice, Jennie S.; Preston, Benjamin; Wilbanks, Thomas

    2013-12-10

    The northern coasts of the Gulf of Mexico are highly vulnerable to the direct threats of climate change, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, and such risks can be potentially exacerbated by land subsidence and global sea level rise. This paper presents an application of a coastal storm surge model to study the coastal inundation process induced by tide and storm surge, and its response to the effects of land subsidence and sea level rise in the northern Gulf coast. An unstructured-grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model was used to simulate tides and hurricane-induced storm surges in the Gulf of Mexico. Simulated distributions of co-amplitude and co-phase of semi-diurnal and diurnal tides are in good agreement with previous modeling studies. The storm surges induced by four historical hurricanes (Rita, Katrina, Ivan and Dolly) were simulated and compared to observed water levels at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tide stations. Effects of coastal subsidence and future global sea level rise on coastal inundation in the Louisiana coast were evaluated using a parameter “change of inundation depth” through sensitivity simulations that were based on a projected future subsidence scenario and 1-m global sea level rise by the end of the century. Model results suggested that hurricane-induced storm surge height and coastal inundation could be exacerbated by future global sea level rise and subsidence, and that responses of storm surge and coastal inundation to the effects of sea level rise and subsidence are highly nonlinear and vary on temporal and spatial scales.

  10. Land subsidence of coastal areas of Jiangsu Province, China: historical review and present situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Q. Zhu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface faults related to land subsidence have been observed in coastal cities, such as Nantong, Yancheng, and Lian Yungang, in Jiangsu Province (CAJS since the early 1970s. Nowadays, increases flooding and rising sea levels are attributed to subsidence caused by groundwater pumping. In this work we present a brief description of land subsidence in CAJS, we examine the mechanisms of land subsidence induced mainly by groundwater pumping and its evolution and economic implications as well as the implemented measures by the local government to prevent new damage.

  11. How to deal with subsidence in the Dutch delta?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouthamer, Esther; Erkens, Gilles

    2017-04-01

    In many deltas worldwide subsidence still is an underestimated problem, while the threat posed by land subsidence to low-lying urbanizing and urbanized deltas exceeds the threat of sea-level rise induced by climate change. Human-induced subsidence is driven by the extraction of hydrocarbons and groundwater, drainage of phreatic groundwater, and loading by buildings and infrastructure. The consequences of subsidence are increased flood risk and flood water depth, rising groundwater levels relative to the land surface, land loss, damage to buildings and infrastructure, and salinization of ground and surface water.. The Netherlands has a long history of subsidence. Large-scale drainage of the extensive peatlands in the western and northern parts of the Netherlands started approximately 1000 years ago as a result of rapid population growth. Subsidence is still ongoing due to (1) continuous drainage of the former peatland, which is now mainly in use as agricultural land and built-up area, (2) expansion of the built-up area and the infrastructural network, (3) salt mining and the extraction of gas in the northern Netherlands. Mitigating subsidence and its negative impacts requires understanding of the relative contribution of the drivers contributing to total subsidence, accurate predictions of land subsidence under different management scenarios, and its impacts. Such understanding enables the development of effective and sustainable management strategies. In the Netherlands, a lot of effort is put into water management aiming at amongst others the protection against floods and the ensuring agricultural activities, but a specific policy focusing on subsidence is lacking. The development of strategies to cope with subsidence is very challenging, because (1) the exact contribution of different drivers of subsidence to total subsidence is spatially different within the Netherlands, (2) there is no single problem owner, which makes it difficult to recognize this a common

  12. TerraSAR-X time-series interferometry detects human-induce subsidence in the Historical Centre of Hanoi, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tuan; Chang, Chung-Pai; Nguyen, Xuan

    2016-04-01

    Hanoi was the capital of 12 Vietnamese dynasties, where the most historical relics, archaeological ruins and ancient monuments are located over Vietnam. However, those heritage assets are threatened by the land subsidence process occurred in recent decades, which mainly triggered by massive groundwater exploitation and construction activities. In this work, we use a set of high resolution TerraSAR-X images to map small-scale land subsidence patterns in the Historical Centre of Hanoi from April 2012 to November 2013. Images oversampling is integrated into the Small Baseline InSAR processing chain in order to enlarge the monitoring coverage by increasing the point-wise measurements, maintaining the monitoring scale of single building and monument. We analyzed over 2.4 million radar targets on 13.9 km2 area of interest based on 2 main sites: The Citadel, the Old Quarter and French Quarter. The highest subsidence rate recorded is -14.2 mm/year. Most of the heritage assets are considered as stable except the Roman Catholic Archdiocese and the Ceramic Mosaic Mural with the subsidence rates are -14.2 and -13.7 mm/year, respectively. Eventually, optical image and soil properties map are used to determine the causes of subsidence patterns. The result shows the strong relationships between the existing construction sites, the component of sediments and land subsidence processes that occurred in the study site.

  13. Using radar interferometry and SBAS technique to detect surface subsidence relating to coal mining in Upper Silesia from 1993-2000 and 2003-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádudvari Ádám

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the presented research ERS1-2 and Envisat ASAR archive data were used for the periods 1993 – 2000 and 2003 – 2010. The radar images were acquired over Upper Silesia in southern Poland. DinSAR (Differential InSAR and SBAS (Small Baseline Subset methods were applied for the detection of the most subsided areas. The DinSAR images were layer stacked for an image using 26 interferometry pairs of ERS1-2 SAR and 16 pairs from Envisat ASAR images in an ascending-descending orbit combination. The stacking of these images showed the most subsided parts of these cities even under low coherent areas, but the results are less precise. In the Upper Silesian Coal Basin, intensive underground coal exploitation has resulted in several surface deformations under Bytom (~8-17 km2, Piekary Śląskie (~9-15 km2, Ruda Śląska (~32-42 km2 and Katowice (~20-23 km2 with 25-40 cm of subsidence (in general in the studied time periods. The SBAS technique has also shown that coal mining caused subsidence in the cities of Bytom, Katowice, and Piekary Śląskie of 5-7 cm/yr. The presented SBAS method did not work for low coherent areas, e.g. dense forested areas. DInSAR data also pointed to several decreasingly less active mining areas, which relate to the mine closures in Bytom and Ruda Śląska, which is also verified by the time series analysis.

  14. Surface movement induced by geothermal operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokker, P.A.; Wees, J.D. van

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the impact of the exploitation of a geothermal well doublet on surface movement. We found that the largest effect should be expected from the progressive cooling of the reservoir, through the thermo-elastic coupling. The absolute value of the expected subsidence is low, but possibly

  15. DInSAR technique: basis and applications to terrain subsidence monitoring in construction works

    OpenAIRE

    Sillerico, E.; Marchamalo, M.; Rejas, J. G.; MARTíNEZ, R

    2010-01-01

    Subsidences are defined as slow and gradual movements of the terrain or built surface. These may affect all types of terrains, and are caused by tension-induced changes for many reasons, such as lowering water tables (groundwater extraction), underground mining (minerals, coal, salt), excavation of tunnels, extraction of oil or gas, slow processes of dissolution and lixiviation of materials, consolidation of soft soils, organic soils,... The measurement and monitoring of land subsidences are ...

  16. D-InSAR技术地表沉降监测概述%The Principle of D-InSAR Technology Used in the Monitoring of Surface Subsidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周荣; 顾爱辉; 钱小娟

    2012-01-01

      传统的地表沉降监测技术,如全球定位系统、精密水准测量和土工测量等,存在空间分辨率低、监测范围小和费用高的局限性。本文介绍了近几年迅速发展的监测地表沉降的合成孔径雷达差分干涉测量(D-InSAR)技术,主要对合成孔径雷达干涉测量(InSAR)技术的原理、D-InSAR 技术的原理和处理流程做了详细的阐述,并对 D-InSAR 技术中的不足作了说明。%  Traditional surface subsidence monitoring technologies, for example, Global Positioning System, Precise Leveling and Geotechnical Measurements, have the limitation of low spatial resolution, small coverage and high cost. D-InSAR, which was developed in recent years, is introduced to monitor the surface subsidence in this paper. The principle of InSAR and process of D-InSAR were described in detail. Moreover, the deficiencies of D-InSAR were described too.

  17. Geometry and subsidence history of the Dead Sea basin: A case for fluid-induced mid-crustal shear zone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brink, U.S.; Flores, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    Pull-apart basins are narrow zones of crustal extension bounded by strike-slip faults that can serve as analogs to the early stages of crustal rifting. We use seismic tomography, 2-D ray tracing, gravity modeling, and subsidence analysis to study crustal extension of the Dead Sea basin (DSB), a large and long-lived pull-apart basin along the Dead Sea transform (DST). The basin gradually shallows southward for 50 km from the only significant transverse normal fault. Stratigraphic relationships there indicate basin elongation with time. The basin is deepest (8-8.5 km) and widest (???15 km) under the Lisan about 40 km north of the transverse fault. Farther north, basin depth is ambiguous, but is 3 km deep immediately north of the lake. The underlying pre-basin sedimentary layer thickens gradually from 2 to 3 km under the southern edge of the DSB to 3-4 km under the northern end of the lake and 5-6 km farther north. Crystalline basement is ???11 km deep under the deepest part of the basin. The upper crust under the basin has lower P wave velocity than in the surrounding regions, which is interpreted to reflect elevated pore fluids there. Within data resolution, the lower crust below ???18 km and the Moho are not affected by basin development. The subsidence rate was several hundreds of m/m.y. since the development of the DST ???17 Ma, similar to other basins along the DST, but subsidence rate has accelerated by an order of magnitude during the Pleistocene, which allowed the accumulation of 4 km of sediment. We propose that the rapid subsidence and perhaps elongation of the DSB are due to the development of inter-connected mid-crustal ductile shear zones caused by alteration of feldspar to muscovite in the presence of pore fluids. This alteration resulted in a significant strength decrease and viscous creep. We propose a similar cause to the enigmatic rapid subsidence of the North Sea at the onset the North Atlantic mantle plume. Thus, we propose that aqueous fluid flux

  18. Surface-induced evaporative cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Min; Yan Bo; Cheng Feng; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2009-01-01

    The effects of surface-induced evaporative cooling on an atom chip are investigated. The evolutions of temperature, number and phase-space density of the atom cloud are measured when the atom cloud is brought close to the surface. Rapid decrease of the temperature and number of the atoms is found when the atom-surface distance is < 100 μm. A gain of about a factor of five on the phase-space density is obtained. It is found that the efficiency of the surface-induced evaporative cooling depends on the atom-surface distance and the shape of the evaporative trap. When the atoms are moved very close to the surface, severe heating is observed, which dominates when the holding time is > 8 ms. It is important that the surface-induced evaporative cooling offers novel possibilities for the realization of a continuous condensation, where a spatially varying evaporative cooling is required.

  19. Coastal subsidence and relative sea level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Galloway, Devin L.

    2014-01-01

    Subsurface fluid-pressure declines caused by pumping of groundwater or hydrocarbons can lead to aquifer-system compaction and consequent land subsidence. This subsidence can be rapid, as much as 30 cm per year in some instances, and large, totaling more than 13 m in extreme examples. Thus anthropogenic subsidence may be the dominant contributor to relative sea-level rise in coastal environments where subsurface fluids are heavily exploited. Maximum observed rates of human-induced subsidence greatly exceed the rates of natural subsidence of unconsolidated sediments (~0.1–1 cm yr−1) and the estimated rates of ongoing global sea-level rise (~0.3 cm yr−1).

  20. Volcanic subsidence triggered by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake in Japan: Hot and weak material hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Youichiro; Fukushima, Yo

    2014-05-01

    With spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) analysis, we found that the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake in Japan (March 11, 2011) has triggered unprecedented subsidence of multiple volcanoes. Similar phenomenon has been reported for the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake (Pritchard et al., 2013). We used SAR data acquired before and after the mainshock by ALOS (PALSAR). By removing long wave-length phase trend from InSAR images, we obtained the localized subsidence signals at five active volcanoes: Mt. Akitakoma, Mt. Kurikoma, Mt. Zao, Mt. Azuma, and Mt. Nasu. All of them belong to the volcanic front of Northeast Japan. The subsidence areas exhibit elliptic shape elongated in the North-South direction - perpendicular to the principal axis of the extensional stress change due to the Tohoku earthquake. Major axis of the ellipse reaches 15 - 20 km, and the amount of subsidence is up to 15 cm (Mt. Azuma). GPS data from two volcanoes also indicate surface subsidence consistent with the satellite radar observations. Furthermore, the GPS data show that the subsidence occurred immediately after the earthquake. A common feature of the five volcanoes is their high geothermal activity. The areas of high geothermal gradient and high thermal water temperature are in good agreement with the area of subsidence detected by InSAR. Also, the Late Cenozoic calderas cluster around the subsidence regions, which implies that hot plutonic bodies once intruded are still hot and highly deformable even now. According to numerical modelling, the observed subsidence can be explained by the co-seismic response of fluid-filled ellipsoid beneath each volcano. We confirmed that the surface subsidence is also caused by the ellipsoid filled with elastic body of low shear strength. We further checked that an ellipsoid is more effective to cause the subsidence than a sphere when the ellipsoid is elongated perpendicular to the tension axis of the imposed stress. References: Takada, Y. and

  1. Impact of rock salt creep law choice on subsidence calculations for hydrocarbon reservoirs overlain by evaporite caprocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marketos, G.; Spiers, C. J.; Govers, R.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate forward modeling of surface subsidence above producing hydrocarbons reservoirs requires an understanding of the mechanisms determining how ground deformation and subsidence evolve. Here we focus entirely on rock salt, which overlies a large number of reservoirs worldwide, and specifically on the role of creep of rock salt caprocks in response to production-induced differential stresses. We start by discussing available rock salt creep flow laws. We then present the subsidence evolution above an axisymmetric finite element representation of a generic reservoir that extends over a few kilometers and explore the effects of rock salt flow law choice on the subsidence response. We find that if rock salt creep is linear, as appropriate for steady state flow by pressure solution, the subsidence response to any pressure reduction history contains two distinct components, one that leads to the subsidence bowl becoming narrower and deeper and one that leads to subsidence rebound and becomes dominant at later stages. This subsidence rebound becomes inhibited if rock salt deforms purely through steady state power law creep at low stresses. We also show that an approximate representation of transient creep leads to relatively small differences in subsidence predictions. Most importantly, the results confirm that rock salt flow must be modeled accurately if good subsidence predictions are required. However, in practice, large uncertainties exist in the creep behavior of rock salt, especially at low stresses. These are a consequence of the spatial variability of rock salt physical properties, which is practically impossible to constrain. A conclusion therefore is that modelers can only resort to calculating bounds for the subsidence evolution above producing rock salt-capped reservoirs.

  2. Integration of InSAR and GIS in the Study of Surface Faults Caused by Subsidence-Creep-Fault Processes in Celaya, Guanajuato, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Olivera, Jorge A.; Farina, Paolo; Garduño-Monroy, Victor H.

    2008-05-01

    In Celaya city, Subsidence-Creep-Fault Processes (SCFP) began to become visible at the beginning of the 1980s with the sprouting of the crackings that gave rise to the surface faults "Oriente" and "Poniente". At the present time, the city is being affected by five surface faults that display a preferential NNW-SSE direction, parallel to the regional faulting system "Taxco-San Miguel de Allende". In order to study the SCFP in the city, the first step was to obtain a map of surface faults, by integrating in a GIS field survey and an urban city plan. The following step was to create a map of the current phreatic level decline in city with the information of deep wells and using the "kriging" method in order to obtain a continuous surface. Finally the interferograms maps resulted of an InSAR analysis of 9 SAR images covering the time interval between July 12 of 2003 and May 27 of 2006 were integrated to a GIS. All the maps generated, show how the surface faults divide the city from North to South, in two zones that behave in a different way. The difference of the phreatic level decline between these two zones is 60 m; and the InSAR study revealed that the Western zone practically remains stable, while sinkings between the surface faults "Oriente" and "Universidad Pedagógica" are present, as well as in portions NE and SE of the city, all of these sinkings between 7 and 10 cm/year.

  3. AN ESTIMATION OF FUZZY RELIABILITY OF DISTINCT ELEMENT METHOD IN PREDICTION OF SURFACE SUBSIDENCE DUE TO COAL MINING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉卓

    1998-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of errors involved in a particular numerical modelling is of prime importance for the effectiveness and reliability of the method. Errors in Distinct Element Modelling are generated mainly through three resources as simplification of physical model, determination of parameters and boundary conditions. A measure of errors which represent the degree of numerical solution 'close to true value' is proposed through fuzzy probability in this paper. The main objective of this paper is to estimate the reliability of Distinct Element Method in rock engineering practice by varying the parameters and boundary conditions. The accumulation laws of standard errors induced by improper determination of parameters and boundary conditions are discussed in delails. Furthermore, numerical experiments are given to illustrate the estimation of fuzzy reliability. Example shows that fuzzy reliability falls between 75%-98% when the relative standard errors of input data is under 10 %.

  4. Characteristics of spatio-temporal evolution in Beijing land subsidence, 2003-2009, using PS-InSAR technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Z.; Gong, H.; Lu, X.; Zhang, Y.; Chen, B.; Liu, H.; Wang, S.

    2013-12-01

    Two thirds of water supply in Beijing city has come from groundwater, surveyed by Beijing Institute of Hydrogeology and Engineering Geology. During the past several years, Beijing city has suffers severe groundwater decline and land subsidence, induced by continuous over-exploitation of groundwater for nearly 60 years. The maximum of subsidence has reached up to 1096mm since 60 decades, and the rates in these subsidence bowls is between 10 mm/yr to 20 mm/yr, and The cumulative subsidence greater than 300mm is up to 1300km2, which pose a great challenge to public infrastructure and mitigate hazard in Beijing municipal. Permanent Scatterers Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (PS-InSAR) can quickly obtain surface deformation details with high resolution, compared to traditional leveling and extensometer techniques. In this paper we use PS-InSAR technique and 29 acquisitions by Envisat between 2003 and 2009 to monitor recent land subsidence in Beijing plain area. we studied the characteristics of spatio-temporal evolution of Beijing subsidence. The results suggests subsidence bowls have been bounded together in Beijing plain area, which covers Chaoyang, Changping, Shunyi, Tongzhou area, and the range of subsidence has a eastward trend. With conventional of emergency water resource in Changping, Huairou, Pinggu, the rates have increased from more than 10-20mm/yr to about 20-30mm/yr, 50 percent increase in subsidence bowls. What's more, the spatial and temporal distribution of deformation is not only controlled by tectonic but influenced by stress-strain behavior (elastic - plastic - viscoelastic) of aquifer systems. Keywords: Land Subsidence; PS-InSAR; Beijing; Ground fissure; Stress-strain analysis

  5. Simulating pumping-induced regional land subsidence with the use of InSAR and field data in the Toluca Valley, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderhead, A. I.; Therrien, R.; Rivera, A.; Martel, R.; Garfias, J.

    2011-01-01

    A multidisciplinary approach is presented here for quantifying land subsidence in a heavily pumped aquifer system with complex stratigraphy. The methodology consists in incorporating Terzaghi's 1D instantaneous compaction principle into a 3D groundwater flow model that is then applied and calibrated to reproduce observed hydraulic heads and compaction for the Toluca Valley, Mexico. Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (D-InSAR), a generated 3D-geological model, extensometers, monitoring wells, and available literature are used to constrain the model. The D-InSAR measured subsidence, extensometers, and numerical simulations of subsidence agree relatively well. Simulations show that since regional subsidence began in the mid 1960s there has been up to 2 m of subsidence in the industrial corridor, where heavy pumping and thick clay layers are found. This study shows that an approach using various sources of data is useful in estimating and constraining the vertical component of the inelastic skeletal specific storage.

  6. Effectiveness of submerged drains in reducing subsidence of peat soils in agricultural use, and their effects on water management and nutrient loading of surface water: modelling of a case study in the western peat soil area of The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Rob F. A.; van den Akker, Jan J. A.

    2017-04-01

    Effectiveness of submerged drains in reducing subsidence of peat soils in agricultural use, and their effects on water management and nutrient loading of surface water: modelling of a case study in the western peat soil area of The Netherlands In the Netherlands, about 8% of the area is covered by peat soils. Most of these soils are in use for dairy farming and, consequently, are drained. Drainage causes decomposition of peat by oxidation and accordingly leads to surface subsidence and greenhouse gas emission. Submerged drains that enhance submerged infiltration of water from ditches during the dry and warm summer half year were, and are still, studied in The Netherlands as a promising tool for reducing peat decomposition by raising groundwater levels. For this purpose, several pilot field studies in the Western part of the Dutch peat area were conducted. Besides the effectiveness of submerged drains in reducing peat decomposition and subsidence by raising groundwater tables, some other relevant or expected effects of these drains were studied. Most important of these are water management and loading of surface water with nutrients nitrogen, phosphorus and sulphate. Because most of these parameters are not easy to assess and all of them are strongly depending on the meteorological conditions during the field studies some of these studies were modelled. The SWAP model was used for evaluating the hydrological results on groundwater table and water discharge and recharge. Effects of submerged drains were assessed by comparing the results of fields with and without drains. An empirical relation between deepest groundwater table and subsidence was used to convert effects on groundwater table to effects on subsidence. With the SWAP-ANIMO model nutrient loading of surface water was modelled on the basis of field results on nutrient concentrations . Calibrated models were used to assess effects in the present situation, as thirty-year averages, under extreme weather

  7. Subsidence in the holocene delta of The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonhögen, L.M.; Doornenbal, P.J.; Lange, G. de; Fokker, P.A.; Gunnink, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    The low-lying part of The Netherlands is very vulnerable in terms of surface subsidence due to peat oxidation and peat/clay compaction. To gain knowledge about this kind of subsidence and the factors driving it, a study was performed in which as many surface elevation data were collected as possible

  8. Detecting, mapping and monitoring of land subsidence in Jharia Coalfield, Jharkhand, India by spaceborne differential interferometric SAR, GPS and precision levelling techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Chatterjee; Shailaja Thapa; K B Singh; G Varunakumar; E V R Raju

    2015-08-01

    The study aims at detection, mapping and monitoring of land subsidence in Jharia Coalfield, Jharkhand, India by spaceborne DInSAR, GPS and precision levelling techniques. Using multi-frequency C- and L-band DInSAR, both slowly and rapidly subsiding areas were identified and DInSAR-based subsidence maps were prepared. C-band DInSAR was found useful for detection of slowly subsiding areas whereas L-band DInSAR for rapidly subsiding and/or adverse land cover areas. Due to dynamic nature of mining and adverse land cover, temporal decorrelation poses a serious problem particularly in C-band DInSAR. Specially designed InSAR coherence guided adaptive filtering was found useful to highlight the deformation fringes. Collateral GPS and levelling observations were conducted in three test sites to validate DInSAR measurements and to determine the net displacement vectors. We observed an appreciable horizontal displacement component of land subsidence in all the test sites. For comparison of results, we calculated InSAR coherence weighted LOS displacement rates from the unwrapped differential interferograms of smaller spatial subsets and LOS projected ground-based displacement rates in three test sites. We found good agreement between DInSAR and ground-based measurements except for C-band observation in Dobari test site primarily due to large difference in observation periods and temporally inconsistent land subsidence. Collateral spaceborne and ground-based observations were also found useful for characterization of subsidence phenomena to determine net displacement vector and horizontal displacement component. In coal mining areas with spatially scattered and temporally irregular land subsidence phenomena, the adopted methodology can be used successfully for detection, mapping and monitoring of the subsiding areas vulnerable to future collapse. This will facilitate efficient planning and designing of surface infrastructures and other developmental structures in the mining

  9. Application of Kalman filtering in monitoring of surface subsidence by the observation station%Kalman滤波在地表移动观测站沉降监测中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕伟才; 秦永洋; 孙兴平; 郭红星

    2011-01-01

    According to Kalman filtering theory and the needs of mining subsidence monitoring, the standard Kalman filtering model and predicting model of the surface subsidence are advanced which is monitored by the surface displacement observation station. These models are tested by the data from the 1117(1) First Exploiting Face Observation Station in Guqiao Mine, and meet the requirement for mining subsidence management engineering.%文章根据Kalman滤波理论,结合矿区开采沉陷监测的需要,建立了对地表移动观测站沉降监测进行动态处理的标准Kalman滤波模型和预测预报模型;利用顾桥矿1117(1)首采面观测站的实测资料,对所建立的滤波模型和预测预报模型进行了检核,结果表明所建模型基本能满足开采沉陷工程治理的要求.

  10. Plate boundary deformation and man-made subsidence around geothermal fields on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland

    KAUST Repository

    Keiding, Marie

    2010-07-01

    We present Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data from 1992-1999 and 2003-2008 as well as GPS data from 2000-2009 for the active plate boundary on the Reykjanes Peninsula, southwest Iceland. The geodetic data reveal deformation mainly due to plate spreading, anthropogenic subsidence caused by geothermal fluid extraction and, possibly, increasing pressure in a geothermal system. Subsidence of around 10. cm is observed during the first 2. years of production at the Reykjanes geothermal power plant, which started operating in May 2006. We model the surface subsidence around the new power plant using point and ellipsoidal pressure sources in an elastic halfspace. Short-lived swarms of micro-earthquakes as well as aseismic fault movement are observed near the geothermal field following the start of production, possibly triggered by the stresses induced by geothermal fluid extraction. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  11. 基于短基线集技术的矿区开采沉陷监测研究%Monitoring the Surface Subsidence of Mining Areas Based on SBAS Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国华; 薛继群

    2013-01-01

    The surface subsidence monitoring of mining areas becomes increasingly important because of the large - scale exploitation of coal resources. As an important branch of Differential Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (D - InSAR) , Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) method has been presented as an effective way to monitor the urban surface deformation theoretically, which is based on the use of a large number of SAR acquisitions distributed in small baseline subsets and singular value decomposition ( SVD) method, but has not been used to monitor mine subsidence. In this paper, an experiment based on the SBAS method was performed to monitor mine subsidence using 12 ERS - 1/2 SAR images of mining area in Jiangsu. Experimental results show that this method can effectively monitor the mine surface subsidence to a certain extent, but at present stage, the result of SBAS method can not achieve the desired application standard. According to the experimental result, we summarized two factors which restrict SBAS technique applied to monitor mining subsidence.%随着矿产资源的开采规模、范围不断增加,监测矿区开采沉陷显得越来越重要.作为差分干涉测量技术(D-InSAR)的重要分支,短基线技术(Small Baseline Subset,SBAS)理论上能有效地监测城市沉降,但未应用于监测矿区的开采沉陷.它是将多幅SAR影像组合成若干个基线距较短的干涉对并利用奇异值分解(SVD)方法获取形变.本文利用12幅ERS-1/2 SAR影像(1995.4-1998.8)组成20组干涉对,采用短基线技术对江苏某矿区的开采沉陷进行监测.实验表明,短基线技术能较为有效地监测矿区的开采沉陷,但在现阶段尚不能应用于生产工作中.根据本次实验结果,总结出限制短基线技术应用于监测矿区开采沉陷的两大因素.

  12. Assessment of pot-hole subsidence risk for Indian coal mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lokhande D. Ritesh; Murthy Vemavarapu M.S.R.; Vellanky Venkateswarlu; Singh B. Kalendra

    2015-01-01

    Ground subsidence induced by extraction of coal seam belowground brings about changes in surface environment leading to trough and pot-hole subsidence. Pot-hole subsidence is extremely hazardous and does not give any prior indication before its occurrence. In India, several pot-holes have occurred in the coal mines of South Eastern Coalfields Limited triggering the need for in-depth studies. In line with the requirement, literature review and field investigations were conducted to develop an in-depth under-standing of various parameters influencing the occurrence of pot-holes. The critical parameters identified were rock to soil ratio, depth to height of extraction ratio, brittleness index of rock and rock density. Risk assessment of pot-hole subsidence has been done by developing an empirical rating approach named as pot-hole subsidence rating (PHSR), involving the critical parameters with suitable corrections for certain structural and mining conditions to obtain corrected PHSR (CPHSR). CPHSR was then applied for all the 34 pot-holes studied and it was found that all the pot-holes fall under Class I and Class II category of risk representing a very high to high risk class. An effort was made for the estimation of pot-hole depth uti-lizing the developed CPHSR in both the development and depillaring cases. The developed approach was found to yield consistent results in pot-hole depth prediction.

  13. Planetary plains: subsidence and warping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G.

    A common feature of all celestial bodies is their tectonic dichotomy best studied, naturally, at Earth [1]. Here there is an opposition of the eastern continental hemisphere and the western oceanic one. The first one is uplifted and cracked, the second one subsided, squeezed and warped. The next excellent example of dichotomy is at Mars where the subsided northern hemisphere is opposed by the highly uplifted southern one. The enigmatic two-face Iapetus now with help of Cassini SC presents a more clear picture: the leading dark hemisphere is opposed by the trailing light one. The light hemisphere is built mainly of water ice, the dark one of some more dense material. Bean-shaped asteroids with one convex and another concave hemispheres are best exemplified by Ida. Examples of dichotomic asteroids, satellites, planets and stars could be extended. Ubiquity of this phenomenon was expressed as the 1st theorem of the planetary wave tectonics [2 & others]: "Celestial bodies are dichotomic". A reason of this phenomenon is in action of inertia-gravity waves occurring in any celestial body because of its movement in non-round but elliptical (parabolic) orbit with periodically changing accelerations. The inertia-gravity standing waves warp rotating bodies (but all bodies rotate !) in 4 ortho- and diagonal interfering directions and in several harmonic wave-lengths. The fundamental wave1 produces ubiquitous tectonic dichotomy (2πR-structure): an opposition of two hemispheres with different planetary radii. To keep angular momenta of two hemispheres equal (otherwise a body will fall apart) the lower subsiding one is constructed of denser material than the higher one. Normally in terrestrial planets lowlands are filled with dense basalts, highlands are built by lighter lithologies. A subsidence means diminishing radius, otherwise, the larger surface must be fit into a smaller space. It is possible only if an original infilling is warped. At Earth cosmic altimetry shows complex

  14. Feedback of land subsidence on the movement and conjunctive use of water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R. T.; Schmid, W.; Hughes, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The dependency of surface- or groundwater flows and aquifer hydraulic properties on dewatering-induced layer deformation is not available in the USGS's groundwater model MODFLOW. A new integrated hydrologic model, MODFLOW-OWHM, formulates this dependency by coupling mesh deformation with aquifer transmissivity and storage and by linking land subsidence/uplift with deformation-dependent flows that also depend on aquifer head and other flow terms. In a test example, flows most affected were stream seepage and evapotranspiration from groundwater (ETgw). Deformation feedback also had an indirect effect on conjunctive surface- and groundwater use components: Changed stream seepage and streamflows influenced surface-water deliveries and returnflows. Changed ETgw impacted on irrigation demand, which jointly with altered surface-water supplies resulted in changed supplemental groundwater requirements and pumping and changed return runoff. This modeling feature will improve the impact assessment of dewatering-induced land subsidence/uplift (following irrigation pumping or coal-seam gas extraction) on surface receptors, inter-basin transfers, and surface-infrastructure integrity. A hypothetical example and the Central Valley are used to demonstrate the utility and importance of the new subsidence model linkages for conjunctive use.

  15. Subsidence due to Excessive Groundwater Withdrawal in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, F.; Harter, T.; Sneed, M.

    2011-12-01

    Francis Corbett1, Thomas Harter1 and Michelle Sneed2 1Department of Land Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis. 2U.S. Geological Survey Western Remote Sensing and Visualization Center, Sacramento. Abstract: Groundwater development within the Central Valley of California began approximately a century ago. Water was needed to supplement limited surface water supplies for the burgeoning population and agricultural industries, especially within the arid but fertile San Joaquin Valley. Groundwater levels have recovered only partially during wet years from drought-induced lows creating long-term groundwater storage overdraft. Surface water deliveries from Federal and State sources led to a partial alleviation of these pressure head declines from the late 1960s. However, in recent decades, surface water deliveries have declined owing to increasing environmental pressures, whilst water demands have remained steady. Today, a large portion of the San Joaquin Valley population, and especially agriculture, rely upon groundwater. Groundwater levels are again rapidly declining except in wet years. There is significant concern that subsidence due to groundwater withdrawal, first observed at a large scale in the middle 20th century, will resume as groundwater resources continue to be depleted. Previous subsidence has led to problems such as infrastructure damage and flooding. To provide a support tool for groundwater management on a naval air station in the southern San Joaquin Valley (Tulare Lake Basin), a one-dimensional MODFLOW subsidence model covering the period 1925 to 2010 was developed incorporating extensive reconstruction of historical subsidence and water level data from various sources. The stratigraphy used for model input was interpreted from geophysical logs and well completion reports. Gaining good quality data proved problematic, and often values needed to be estimated. In part, this was due to the historical lack of awareness/understanding of

  16. Application of synthetic aperture radar interferometry for mine subsidence monitoring in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wempen, Jessica Michelle

    Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR), a satellite-based remote sensing technique, is a practical method for measuring deformation of the earth's surface. In this investigation, the application of DInSAR for monitoring mine subsidence was evaluated for active underground mining regions in the Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and the Wasatch Plateau in central Utah. Interferograms were generated using X-band (3-cm wavelength) Synthetic Aperture Radar data from the TerraSAR-X mission and L-band (24-cm wavelength) Synthetic Aperture Radar data from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite. In general, the DInSAR data have high spatial and temporal resolutions and show gradual, progressive subsidence. In the Green River Basin, displacements were estimated using both L-band and X-band data. In the Wasatch Plateau, displacements were only estimated using L-band data; areas affected by subsidence are identifiable in the X-band data, but precisely quantifying subsidence magnitudes is difficult as a result of significant phase noise. In the Green River Basin, the maximum subsidence magnitude was 150 cm over 690 days, estimated using L-band DInSAR. In the Wasatch Plateau, the maximum subsidence magnitude was 180 cm over 414 days. In both regions, as a result of low coherence in the areas with large displacements, the maximum displacements may be underestimated by tens of centimeters. Additionally, relationships between surface deformations measured by DInSAR and mining-induced seismicity (MIS) in the Green River Basin and the Wasatch Plateau were explored. Both regions exhibit large magnitude, relatively rapid subsidence, but the characteristics (rates and magnitudes) of MIS in the Wasatch Plateau study region and the Green River Basin are significantly different. In the Wasatch Plateau study region, surface displacements tend to precede seismicity, event rates tend to be high, and event magnitudes tend to be relatively low. In the Green River

  17. Safety appraisement on building natural gas pipeline over coal mining subsidence area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Wei-jia; LIU Jin-xiao; WEN Xing-lin

    2007-01-01

    The target of the text is to scientifically appraise dynamic development of surface deformation in subsidence area and its influence on groundwork stability of natural pipe and then adopt some technological measures to ensure safe circulation of natural pipeline. Analysed the influence on natural pipeline from coal mining subsidence in the way of pipeline grade variation, vertical curve variation, transverse deformation, horizontal pull and compression deformation and pipe stress variation etc., and described detailed surface subsidence product and its used time among initial phase, active phase and decline phase in the course of surface movement deformation time. In the context of considering surface subsidence that doesn't reach basic latter end and residual subsidence quantity, the text confirmed the calculation method of residual deformation in surface subsidence area, and gave the technological measures about building natural gas pipeline in subsidence area finally.

  18. Modeling of laser induced periodic surface structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skolski, J.Z.P.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.; Mitko, V.S.; Obona, J.V.; Ocelik, V.; Hosson, J.T.M. de

    2010-01-01

    In surfaces irradiated by short laser pulses, Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) have been observed on all kind of materials for over forty years. These LIPSS, also referred to as ripples, consist of wavy surfaces with periodicity equal or smaller than the wavelength of the laser radi

  19. Detecting and monitoring UCG subsidence with InSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellors, R J; Foxall, W; Yang, X

    2012-03-23

    The use of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to measure surface subsidence caused by Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is tested. InSAR is a remote sensing technique that uses Synthetic Aperture Radar images to make spatial images of surface deformation and may be deployed from satellite or an airplane. With current commercial satellite data, the technique works best in areas with little vegetation or farming activity. UCG subsidence is generally caused by roof collapse, which adversely affects UCG operations due to gas loss and is therefore important to monitor. Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of InSAR in measuring surface subsidence related to coal mining and surface deformation caused by a coal mining roof collapse in Crandall Canyon, Utah is imaged as a proof-of-concept. InSAR data is collected and processed over three known UCG operations including two pilot plants (Majuba, South Africa and Wulanchabu, China) and an operational plant (Angren, Uzbekistan). A clear f eature showing approximately 7 cm of subsidence is observed in the UCG field in Angren. Subsidence is not observed in the other two areas, which produce from deeper coal seams and processed a smaller volume. The results show that in some cases, InSAR is a useful tool to image UCG related subsidence. Data from newer satellites and improved algorithms will improve effectiveness.

  20. Impact of rock salt creep law choice on subsidence calculations for hydrocarbon reservoirs overlain by evaporite caprocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marketos, G.; Spiers, C.J.; Govers, R.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate forward modeling of surface subsidence above producing hydrocarbons reservoirs requires an understanding of the mechanisms determining how ground deformation and subsidence evolve. Here we focus entirely on rock salt, which overlies a large number of reservoirs worldwide, and specifically

  1. Radiation induced erosion of autoelectron emitter surface

    CERN Document Server

    Mazilova, T I; Ksenofontov, V A

    2001-01-01

    The peculiarities of erosion of the needle-shaped autoemitter surface under the effect of the helium ions bombardment are studied. The analysis of the radiation-induced formation of the surface atomic roughness testifies to the nondynamic character of shifting the surface atoms by the ions energies below the threshold of the Frenkel stable pairs formation and cathode sputtering. The quasistatic mechanism of the surface erosion due to the atoms shift into the low-coordination positions by releasing the energy of the helium internodal atoms formation is discussed

  2. Development mechanism of cavity damage under urban roads and its influence on road surface subsidence%城市道路地下空洞病害发展机理及对路面塌陷的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶连金; 袁松; 安军海

    2015-01-01

    外界因素作用易引起城市道路地下空洞破坏,甚至向上发展至地面形成地层塌陷。基于离散元软件对城市道路路基下空洞的发展破坏进行数值模拟,分析空洞规模、埋深、施工振动、空洞周围土性对空洞稳定性的影响。结果表明:道路路面沉降随着空洞埋深的减小和尺寸的增大,均出现先急剧增加后趋于平缓的过程。该曲线的拐点为道路安全性预测的关键点。当空洞与扰动土层相距3 m以内时,必须考虑施工扰动的影响。沉降值随空洞所在土层的黏聚力和摩擦角均近似呈线性变化。该研究从颗粒细观角度揭示了地下空洞发展至路面塌陷的破坏机制,为地下病害研究提供了新方法。%This paper is concerned specifically with a deeper study addressing cavity disease—cavity damage more likely to occur under urban roads due to the external factors and even cause road surface subsidence. The study involves simulating the development and damage of cavity under urban road using distinct element software and analyzing the impact of the cavity size, buried depth, the vibration during construction, the property of soil around the cavity on the stability of the cavity. The study demonstrates that, as a result of the decrease of the cavity depth and the increase of size, the road surface is subjected to the typical subsidence tending to sharply increase, followed by a flat increase, suggesting that the point of inflexion holds the key to the road safety prediction; the occurrence of a 3-m-distance between cavity and disturbed soil necessitates the consideration of the influence of vibration during construction;and sur-face has subsidence value approximate to linear variation due to the cohesive force and the friction angle of soil to which the cavity is exposed. The study offers a new insight into failure mechanism behind the underground cavity and the resulting road surface subsidence thanks to

  3. Monitoring Land Subsidence over Mining Areas with Sentinel-1 Differential SAR Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirek, Katarzna

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents possibilities for monitoring man- made surface deformation on example of two areas (Fig. 1): Upper Silesian Coal Basin and Lubelskie Coal Basin (Poland). Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images acquired by Sentinel-1A satellite are utilized in subsidence studies. Satellite radar interferometry technique (InSAR) was used to detecting and monitoring subsidence. There are clearly visible on obtained interferograms subsidence troughs as a distinctive concentric fringes. This study is a part of initiated the SSUMMO project (Surface Subsidence Multidisciplinary Monitoring). The project will provide multidisciplinary monitoring of mining areas and it will prepare the methodology and research software for continuous observation of the impact of exploitation on surface.

  4. Detecting and Measuring Land Subsidence in Houston-Galveston, Texas using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Global Positioning System Data, 2012-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, A.; Baker, S.

    2016-12-01

    Several cities in the Houston-Galveston (HG) region in Texas have subsided up to 13 feet over several decades due to natural and anthropogenic processes [Yu et al. 2014]. Land subsidence, a gradual sinking of the Earth's surface, is an often human-induced hazard and a major environmental problem expedited by activities such as mining, oil and gas extraction, urbanization and excessive groundwater pumping. We are able to detect and measure subsidence in HG using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and global positioning systems (GPS). Qu et al. [2015] used ERS, Envisat, and ALOS-1 to characterize subsidence in HG from 1995 to 2011, but a five-year gap in InSAR measurements exists due to a lack of freely available SAR data. We build upon the previous study by comparing subsidence patterns detected by Sentinel-1 data starting in July 2015. We used GMT5SAR to generate a stack of interferograms with perpendicular baselines less than 100 meters and temporal baselines less than 100 days to minimize temporal and spatial decorrelation. We applied the short baseline subset (SBAS) time series processing using GIAnT and compared our results with GPS measurements. The implications of this work will strengthen land subsidence monitoring systems in HG and broadly aid in the development of effective water resource management policies and strategies.

  5. Subsidence crack closure: rate, magnitude and sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Graff, J.V.; Romesburg, H.C.

    1981-06-01

    Tension cracks are a major surface disturbance resulting from subsidence and differential settlement above underground coal mines. Recent engineering studies of subsidence indicate that cracks may close where tensile stresses causing the cracks are reduced or relaxed. This stress reduction occurs as mining in the area is completed. Crack closure was confirmed by a study in the Wasatch Plateau coal field of central Utah. Cracks occurred in both exposed bedrock and regolith in an area with maximum subsidence of 3 m. Mean closure rate was 0.3 cm per week with individual crack closure rates between 0.2 cm and 1.0 cm per week. The mean crack closure magnitude was 80% with closure magnitudes varying between 31% and 100%. Actual magnitude values ranged from 0.6 cm to 6.5 cm with a mean value of 3.8 cm. Statistical analysis compared width change status among cracks over time. It was found that: 1) a 41% probability existed that a crack would exhibit decreasing width per weekly measurement, 2) closure state sequences seem random over time, and 3) real differences in closure state sequence existed among different cracks. (6 refs.) (In English)

  6. How a Curvilinear Continental Margin Influences Its Subsidence History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacek, V.; Ussami, N.

    2012-12-01

    Current one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) thermo-mechanical models successfully explain the first-order vertical motions of sedimentary basins created by lithospheric extension. However, the modeling of second-order effects such as extra-subsidence, non-monotonic-subsidence or protracted-subsidence still remains controversial. One aspect that has not been fully considered in the current models is that the rifting direction leading to the continental break-up does not always follow a straight line, which demands a three-dimensional (3D) approach. The aim of this work is to demonstrate the importance of using a 3D model that takes into account the curvature of rifting along the margin and theoretically predicts some of the second-order subsidence observations. Our results indicate that concave oceanward margins tend to subside faster than convex ones. This differential subsidence of the margin is a result of the combined effect of lateral thermal conduction, small-scale mantle (or edge driven) convection and the curvature of the rifting. We have used the finite element code CITCOM (Moresi & Gurnis, 1996; Zhong et al., 2000) to construct 3D numerical models of the mantle convection and its effect on the surface evolution. We observed that the differential subsidence along a curved margin is dependent on the viscosity structure of the mantle: for an asthenospheric viscosity of 5×1020 Pa.s the differential subsidence can reach more than 700 m assuming a sediment filled basin; however, for low asthenospheric viscosity (geometry. As an application of this 3D conceptual model for curved margin, we analysed the stratigraphic evolution of the Santos Basin, offshore Southeastern Brazil, and we propose that the variations in the subsidence history along the margin can be explained by its 3D geometry and the dynamical evolution of the mantle. We conclude that the incorporation of the third dimension in the study of the subsidence history of divergent margins may

  7. Feedback of land subsidence on the movement and conjunctive use of water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Wolfgang; Hanson, Randall T; Leake, Stanley A; Hughes, Joseph D; Niswonger, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    The dependency of surface- or groundwater flows and aquifer hydraulic properties on dewatering-induced layer deformation is not available in the USGS's groundwater model MODFLOW. A new integrated hydrologic model, MODFLOW-OWHM, formulates this dependency by coupling mesh deformation with aquifer transmissivity and storage and by linking land subsidence/uplift with deformation-dependent flows that also depend on aquifer head and other flow terms. In a test example, flows most affected were stream seepage and evapotranspiration from groundwater (ETgw). Deformation feedback also had an indirect effect on conjunctive surface- and groundwater use components: Changed stream seepage and streamflows influenced surface-water deliveries and returnflows. Changed ETgw affected irrigation demand, which jointly with altered surface-water supplies resulted in changed supplemental groundwater requirements and pumping and changed return runoff. This modeling feature will improve the impact assessment of dewatering-induced land subsidence/uplift (following irrigation pumping or coal-seam gas extraction) on surface receptors, inter-basin transfers, and surface-infrastructure integrity.

  8. Cone Penetration Testing, a new approach to quantify coastal-deltaic land subsidence by peat consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Kay; Erkens, Gilles; Zwanenburg, Cor

    2016-04-01

    It is undisputed that land subsidence threatens coastal-deltaic lowlands all over the world. Any loss of elevation (on top of sea level rise) increases flood risk in these lowlands, and differential subsidence may cause damage to infrastructure and constructions. Many of these settings embed substantial amounts of peat, which is, due to its mechanically weak organic composition, one of the main drivers of subsidence. Peat is very susceptible to volume reduction by loading and drainage induced consolidation, which dissipates pore water, resulting in a tighter packing of the organic components. Often, the current state of consolidation of peat embedded within coastal-deltaic subsidence hotspots (e.g. Venice lagoon, Mississippi delta, San Joaquin delta, Kalimantan peatlands), is somewhere between its initial (natural) and maximum compressed stage. Quantifying the current state regarding peat volume loss, is of utmost importance to predict potential (near) future subsidence when draining or loading an area. The processes of subsidence often afflict large areas (>103 km2), thus demanding large datasets to assess the current state of the subsurface. In contrast to data describing the vertical motions of the actual surface (geodesy, satellite imagery), subsurface information applicable for subsidence analysis are often lacking in subsiding deltas. This calls for new initiatives to bridge that gap. Here we introduce Cone Penetration Testing (CPT) to quantify the amount of volume loss peat layers embedded within the Holland coastal plain (the Netherlands) experienced. CPT measures soil mechanical strength, and hundreds of thousands of CPTs are conducted each year on all continents. We analyzed 28 coupled CPT-borehole observations, and found strong empirical relations between volume loss and increased peat mechanical strength. The peat lost between ~20 - 95% of its initial thickness by dissipation of excess pore water. An increase in 0.1 - 0.4 MPa of peat strength is

  9. Modeling of time dependent subsidence for coal and ore deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryszard Hejmanowski

    2015-01-01

    Coal and ore underground mining generates subsidence and deformation of the land surface. Those defor-mations may cause damage to buildings and infrastructures. The environmental impact of subsidence will not be accepted in the future by the society in many countries. Especially there, where the mining regions are densely urbanized, the acceptance of the ground deformations decreases every year. The only solution is to limit the subsidence or its impact on the infrastructure. The first is not rentable for the mining industry, the second depends on the precise subsidence prediction and good preventing management involved in the mining areas. The precision of the subsidence prediction depends strictly on the mathematical model of the deformation phenomenon and on the uncertainty of the input data. The subsidence prediction in the geological conditions of the raw materials used to be made on the basis of numerical modeling or the stochastic models. A modified solution of the stochastic model by Knothe will be presented in the paper. The author focuses on the precise description of the deposit shape and on the time dependent displacements of the rock mass. A two parameters’ time function has been introduced in the algorithm.

  10. Subsidence prediction in Estonia's oil shale mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastarus, J.R. [Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia); Toomik, A. [Institute of Ecology, Johvi (Estonia)

    2000-07-01

    This paper analysis the stability of the mining blocks in Estonian oil shale mines, where the room-and-pillar mining system is used. The pillars are arranged in a singular grid. The oil shale bed is embedded at the depth of 40-75 m. The processes in overburden rocks and pillars have caused the subsidence of the ground surface. The conditional thickness and sliding rectangle methods performed calculations. The results are presented by conditional thickness contours. Error does not exceed 4%. Model allows determining the parameters of spontaneous collapse of the pillars and surface subsidence. The surface subsidence parameters will be determined by conventional calculation scheme. Proposed method suits for stability analysis, failure prognosis and monitoring. 8 refs.

  11. An analysis on the relationship between land subsidence and floods at the Kujukuri Plain in Chiba Prefecture, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Y.; Chen, H.; Sawamukai, M.; Su, T.; Tokunaga, T.

    2015-11-01

    Surface environments at the Kujukuri Plain in Chiba Prefecture, Japan, in 1970, 2004, and 2013, were analyzed and compared to discuss the possible impact of land subsidence on the occurrence of floods. The study area has been suffered from land subsidence due to ground deformation from paleo-earthquakes, tectonic activities, and human-induced subsidence by groundwater exploitation. Meteorological data, geomorphological data including DEM obtained from the airborne laser scanning (1-m spatial resolution), leveling data, and the result of our assessment map (Chen et al., 2015) were used in this study. Clear relationship between floods and land subsidence was not recognized, while geomorphological setting, urbanization, and change of precipitation pattern were found to contribute to the floods. The flood prone-area is distributed on the characteristic geomorphological setting such as floodplain and back swamp. It was revealed that the urban area has been expanded on these geomorphological setting in recent years. The frequency of hourly precipitation was also shown to be increased in the past ca. 40 years, and this could induce rapid freshet and overflow of small- and medium-sized rivers and sewerage lines. The distribution of depression areas was increased from 2004 to 2013. This change could be associated with the ground deformation after the Tohoku earthquake (Mw = 9.0) in 2011.

  12. Land subsidence and problems affecting land use at Edwards Air Force Base and vicinity, California, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, James C.; Williams, J. S.

    Land subsidence in Antelope Valley, which includes Edwards Air Force Base, was first reported in the 1950's; by 1967, about 200 square miles of Antelope Valley were affected by as much as 2 feet of subsidence. The purpose of the report is to present the results to date of recent studies done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Air Force, to determine the cause and areal extent of land subsidence and surface deformation on Rogers Lakebed and vicinity, and the effects of surface deformation on runways used for aircraft landings at Edwards AFB in southern California. Because of the time-related effects of land subsidence, several years of data collection will be needed to establish subsidence trends and evaluate those factors causing land subsidence.

  13. Application of InSAR and Gravimetry for Land Subsidence Hazard Zoning in Aguascalientes, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Pacheco-Martínez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present an application of InSAR and gravimetric surveys for risk management related to land subsidence and surface ground faulting generation. A subsidence velocity map derived from the 2007–2011 ALOS SAR imagery and a sediment thicknesses map obtained from the inversion of gravimetric data were integrated with a surface fault map to produce a subsidence hazard zoning in the city of Aguascalientes, Mexico. The resulting zoning is presented together with specific recommendations about geotechnical studies needed for further evaluation of surface faulting in these hazard zones. The derived zoning map consists in four zones including null hazard (stable terrain without subsidence, low hazard (areas prone to subsidence, medium hazard (zones with subsidence and high hazard (zones with surface faulting. InSAR results displayed subsidence LOS velocities up to 10 cm/year and two subsidence areas unknown before this study. Gravimetric results revealed that the thicker sediment sequence is located toward north of Aguascalientes City reaching up to 600 m in thickness, which correspond to a high subsidence LOS velocity zone (up to 6 cm/year.

  14. Gyromagnetically Induced Transparency of Meta-Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Mousavi, S Hossein; Allen, Jeffery; Allen, Monica; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that the violation of the time-reversal (TR) symmetry in the presence of a gyromagnetic substrate can produce an analog of electromagnetically induced transparency in metallic meta-molecules. The simplest implementation of such gyromagnetically induced transparency (GIT) in a meta-surface comprised of an array of resonant antenna pairs placed on a gyromagnetic substrate and illuminated by a normally incident electromagnetic wave is analyzed. TR symmetry breaking introduced by the magnetic field makes meta-molecules bi-anisotropic and causes spectrally-sharp Fano interference between the otherwise uncoupled electric and magnetic dipolar resonances of the meta-molecules. The applied magnetic field results in a sharp transmission peak through the otherwise reflective meta-surface. We show that, for oblique wave incidence, one-way GIT can be achieved by the combination of spatial dispersion and TR symmetry breaking. These theoretically predicted phenomena pave the way to non-reciprocal switches and...

  15. DMSO Induces Dehydration near Lipid Membrane Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Song, Jinsuk; Pas, Jolien; Meijer, Lenny H.H.; Han, Songi

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been broadly used in biology as a cosolvent, a cryoprotectant, and an enhancer of membrane permeability, leading to the general assumption that DMSO-induced structural changes in cell membranes and their hydration water play important functional roles. Although the effects of DMSO on the membrane structure and the headgroup dehydration have been extensively studied, the mechanism by which DMSO invokes its effect on lipid membranes and the direct role of water in this process are unresolved. By directly probing the translational water diffusivity near unconfined lipid vesicle surfaces, the lipid headgroup mobility, and the repeat distances in multilamellar vesicles, we found that DMSO exclusively weakens the surface water network near the lipid membrane at a bulk DMSO mole fraction (XDMSO) of DMSO was found to effectively destabilize the hydration water structure at the lipid membrane surface at XDMSO 0.1, DMSO enters the lipid interface and restricts the lipid headgroup motion. We postulate that DMSO acts as an efficient cryoprotectant even at low concentrations by exclusively disrupting the water network near the lipid membrane surface, weakening the cohesion between water and adhesion of water to the lipid headgroups, and so mitigating the stress induced by the volume change of water during freeze-thaw. PMID:26200868

  16. Traces of warping subsided tectonic blocks on Miranda, Enceladus, Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G.

    2007-08-01

    Icy satellites of the outer Solar system have very large range of sizes - from kilometers to thousands of kilometers. Bodies less than 400-500 km across have normally irregular shapes , often presenting simple Plato's polyhedrons woven by standing inertiagravity waves (see an accompanying abstract of Kochemasov). Larger bodies with enhanced gravity normally are rounded off and have globular shapes but far from ideal spheres. This is due to warping action of inertia-gravity waves of various wavelengths origin of which is related to body movements in elliptical keplerian orbits with periodically changing accelerations (alternating accelerations cause periodically changing forces acting upon a body what means oscillations of its spheres in form of standing warping waves). The fundamental wave 1 and its first overtone wave 2 produce ubiquitous tectonic dichotomy - two segmental structure and tectonic sectoring superimposed on this dichotomy. Two kinds of tectonic blocks (segments and sectors) are formed: uplifted (+) and subsided (-). Uplifting means increasing planetary radius of blocks, subsiding - decreasing radius (as a sequence subsiding blocks diminishing their surfaces must be warped, folded, wrinkled; uplifting blocks increasing their surfaces tend to be deeply cracked, fallen apart). To level changing angular momenta of blocks subsided areas are filled with denser material than uplifted ones (one of the best examples is Earth with its oceanic basins filled with dense basalts and uplifted continents built of less dense on average andesitic material). Icy satellites follow the same rule. Their warped surfaces show differing chemistries or structures of constructive materials. Uplifted blocks are normally built with light (by color and density) water ice. Subsided blocks - depressions, "seas', "lakes", coronas - by somewhat denser material differing in color from water ice (very sharply - Iapetus, moderately - Europa, slightly - many saturnian satellites). A very

  17. Electron beam induced surface activation of oxide surfaces for nanofabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollnhals, Florian; Seiler, Steffen; Walz, Marie-Madeleine; Steinrueck, Hans-Peter; Marbach, Hubertus [Lehrstuhl fuer Physikalische Chemie II and Interdisciplinary Center for Molecular Materials (ICMM), Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Woolcot, Tom; Thornton, Geoff [London Centre for Nanotechnology and Department of Chemistry, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The controlled fabrication of structures on the nanoscale is a major challenge in science and engineering. Direct-write techniques like Electron Beam Induced Deposition (EBID) were shown to be suitable tools in this context. Recently, Electron Beam Induced Surface Activation (EBISA) has been introduced as a new focused electron beam technique. In EBISA, a surface, e.g. SiO{sub 2}, is irradiated by a focused electron beam, resulting in an activation of the exposed area. The activated area can then react and decompose precursor gases like iron pentacarbonyl, Fe(CO){sub 5}. This leads to a primary deposit, which continues to grow autocatalytically as long as Fe(CO){sub 5} is supplied, resulting in pure (> 90 % at.), crystalline iron nanostructures. We expand the use of this concept by exploring EBISA to produce metallic nanostructures on TiO{sub 2}(110) in UHV; atomistic insight into the process is obtained via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and chemical insight via Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES).

  18. A Picture of Subsidized Households 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Picture of Subsidized Households describes the nearly 5 million households living in HUD-subsidized housing in the United States for the year 2009. Picture 2009...

  19. A Picture of Subsidized Housholds 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Picture of Subsidized Households describes the nearly 5 million households living in HUD-subsidized housing in the United States for the year 2008. Picture 2008...

  20. Review: Advances in delta-subsidence research using satellite methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Stephanie A.

    2016-05-01

    Most of the world's major river deltas are sinking relative to local sea level. The effects of subsidence can include aquifer salinization, infrastructure damage, increased vulnerability to flooding and storm surges, and permanent inundation of low-lying land. Consequently, determining the relative importance of natural vs. anthropogenic pressures in driving delta subsidence is a topic of ongoing research. This article presents a review of knowledge with respect to delta surface-elevation loss. The field is rapidly advancing due to applications of space-based techniques: InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar), GPS (global positioning system), and satellite ocean altimetry. These techniques have shed new light on a variety of subsidence processes, including tectonics, isostatic adjustment, and the spatial and temporal variability of sediment compaction. They also confirm that subsidence associated with fluid extraction can outpace sea-level rise by up to two orders of magnitude, resulting in effective sea-level rise that is one-hundred times faster than the global average rate. In coming years, space-based and airborne instruments will be critical in providing near-real-time monitoring to facilitate management decisions in sinking deltas. However, ground-based observations continue to be necessary for generating complete measurements of surface-elevation change. Numerical modeling should seek to simulate couplings between subsidence processes for greater predictive power.

  1. Contrasts between deformation accommodated by induced seismic and aseismic processes revealed by combined monitoring of seismicity and surface deformations: Brady Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatzes, N. C.; Ali, S. T.; Mellors, R. J.; Foxall, W.; Wang, H. F.; Feigl, K. L.; Drakos, P. S.; Zemach, E.

    2013-12-01

    Fluid pressure change accompanying pumping in the Brady Geothermal Field is associated with two easily measureable deformation responses: (1) surface deformations and 2) seismic slip. Surface deformation can be imaged by InSAR and appears to correspond to volume change at depth. Seismic slip on fractures is likely induced by either changes in effective normal stress or solid stress with minimal impact to volume. Both responses have potential impact on permeability structure due to dilation or compaction along natural fractures. We present an integrated data set that compares pumping records with these deformation responses to investigate their coupling and to constrain the geometry and rheology of the reservoir and surrounding crust. We also seek to clarify the relationship between induced seismicity and pumping. Currently, the dominant pumping signal is pressure reduction resulting from on-going production since 1992. Surface subsidence extends over a region of approximately 5 km by 2 km with the long axis along the strike of the major normal faults associated with the reservoir. Smaller approximately 1 km length-scale regions of intense subsidence are associated bends or intersections among individual normal fault segments. Modeling of the deformation source indicates that the broader subsidence pattern is consistent with the majority of fluid extraction from a reservoir at a depth of approximately 1 km and extending along the entire length of the mapped Brady normal fault. The more intense subsidence is consistent with fluid extraction along steep conduits from shallower depths that extend to the main reservoir. These results indicate a reservoir much larger than would be expected from the footprint of the production wells. In contrast, seismicity is primarily concentrated along a narrow path between injecting and producing wells, but outside the regions of most intense subsidence. Overall, seismicity represents only a small fraction of the strain energy

  2. Shallow Faulting in Morelia, Mexico, Based on Seismic Tomography and Geodetically Detected Land Subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Vergara-Huerta, F.; Chaussard, E.; Wdowinski, S.; DeMets, C.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.

    2013-12-01

    Subsidence has been a common occurrence in several cities in central Mexico for the past three decades. This process causes substantial damage to the urban infrastructure and housing in several cities and it is a major factor to be considered when planning urban development, land-use zoning and hazard mitigation strategies. Since the early 1980's the city of Morelia in Central Mexico has experienced subsidence associated with groundwater extraction in excess of natural recharge from rainfall. Previous works have focused on the detection and temporal evolution of the subsidence spatial distribution. The most recent InSAR analysis confirms the permanence of previously detected rapidly subsiding areas such as the Rio Grande Meander area and also defines 2 subsidence patches previously undetected in the newly developed suburban sectors west of Morelia at the Fraccionamiento Del Bosque along, south of Hwy. 15 and another patch located north of Morelia along Gabino Castañeda del Rio Ave. Because subsidence-induced, shallow faulting develops at high horizontal strain localization, newly developed a subsidence areas are particularly prone to faulting and fissuring. Shallow faulting increases groundwater vulnerability because it disrupts discharge hydraulic infrastructure and creates a direct path for transport of surface pollutants into the underlying aquifer. Other sectors in Morelia that have been experiencing subsidence for longer time have already developed well defined faults such as La Colina, Central Camionera, Torremolinos and La Paloma faults. Local construction codes in the vicinity of these faults define a very narrow swath along which housing construction is not allowed. In order to better characterize these fault systems and provide better criteria for future municipal construction codes we have surveyed the La Colina and Torremolinos fault systems in the western sector of Morelia using seismic tomographic techniques. Our results indicate that La Colina Fault

  3. Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures induced by surface plasmons coupled via roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, E. L.; Gurevich, S. V.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper the formation mechanisms of the femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are discussed. One of the most frequently used theories explains the structures by interference between the incident laser beam and surface plasmon-polariton waves. The latter is most commonly attributed to the coupling of the incident laser light to the surface roughness. We demonstrate that this excitation of surface plasmons contradicts the results of laser-ablation experiments. As an alternative approach to the excitation of LIPSS we analyse development of hydrodynamic instabilities in the melt layer.

  4. Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures induced by surface plasmons coupled via roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurevich, E.L., E-mail: gurevich@lat.rub.de [Chair of Applied Laser Technology, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstraße 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Gurevich, S.V., E-mail: gurevics@uni-muenster.de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Straße 9, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    In this paper the formation mechanisms of the femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are discussed. One of the most frequently used theories explains the structures by interference between the incident laser beam and surface plasmon-polariton waves. The latter is most commonly attributed to the coupling of the incident laser light to the surface roughness. We demonstrate that this excitation of surface plasmons contradicts the results of laser-ablation experiments. As an alternative approach to the excitation of LIPSS we analyse development of hydrodynamic instabilities in the melt layer.

  5. Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) induced surface chemistry on Ru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Feng; Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    EUV photon induced surface chemistry can damage multilayer mirrors causing reflectivity loss and faster degradation. EUV photo chemistry involves complex processes including direct photon induced surface chemistry and secondary electron radiation chemistry. Current cleaning techniques include dry an

  6. Research of the refilling use in order to reduce the subsidence effects in the surface; Investigacion del Empleo de Relleno Consolidado para Reducir los Efectos de la Subsidencia en Superficie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The development of the research has been performed with a practical immediate purpose in the works of the Company Coto Minero de Narcea, S. A., a producer of anthracite in Asturias West Bassin. This is due to the fact that the work mining of the 2, 3 and 6 seams, essential to continue the production activities, is at present almost in vertical coincidence with surface installations of the mine making it necessary to use a filling material specially selected and layed in the works to minimize the subsidence effects. The prediction of these effects in order to reduce them to admissible bounds has been made through the application of the computer program SUBSIMCO, developed on the basis of the empirical calculation methods and the experience collected by the VNIMI Institute of Leningrad. The results controlled up to now, through accurate measuring, show a satisfactory coincidence with the predictions of theoretical calculations, proving at the same time the effectiveness of the filling process designed and the correct adaptation of the calculus method.

  7. Land subsidence due to groundwater withdrawal detected by InSAR time-series in Tazerbo well field, Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufekci, Nesrin; Schoups, Gerrit; Mahapatra, Pooja; van de Giesen, Nick; Hanssen, Ramon F.

    2014-05-01

    The Tazerbo well field is one of the well fields designed within the Great Man-Made River Project (GMMRP), which aims to deliver water to the eastern coast of Libya through an underground pipe network. It consists of 108 wells in three rows, where the wells are separated 1.3 km in longitude and 10 km in latitude. The planned total groundwater withdrawal from all wells is 1 million m3/day. The water is pumped from the deep sandstone aquifer (Nubian sandstone), which is overlaid by a thick mudstone-siltstone aquitard. Being heavily pumped, the aquifer and fine-grained sediments of the aquitard are expected to compact in time resulting in land subsidence. In order to investigate the surface deformation caused by groundwater pumping in the Tazerbo well field, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique was utilized. InSAR is widely used for monitoring land subsidence and can provide sub-cm scale deformation information over large areas. Using the Persistent Scatterer method, SAR time series of 20 Envisat images, spanning from 2004 to 2010, are employed to analyze spatial and temporal distribution of land subsidence induced by groundwater withdrawal. The results are in a good agreement with simulated subsidence. In addition, the spatial distribution of InSAR observations seems to be promising in terms of detecting spatial heterogeneity of aquifer material.

  8. 浅埋暗挖地铁隧道施工地表沉降规律分析%Analysis of surface subsidence rule of shallow subway tunnel construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金奎; 王飞飞; 白会人

    2012-01-01

    为了研究大连地铁202标段促进路站—春光街站暗挖区间人工素填土地段单双线隧道施工地表沉降规律,通过现场实测和数据分析整理的方法,在地铁隧道开挖期间建立了地表沉降监控量测测站,运用精密水准仪进行3个月的监测,监测结果表明浅埋暗挖隧道在开挖期间地表沉降最大位置处于隧道中心线的正上方,沉降量约为25.66~31.82 mm.提出了距跨比β的概念,距跨比β的有效工程取值范围-4<β<4,地表沉降与距跨比β密切相关,其中-2<β<2地表沉降剧烈阶段,约占整体变形的67.5~77.6%,沉降速率约达0.84~0.93 mm/d.建议应加强监测频率,增加现场巡视.现场测试结果与文克尔地表沉降计算模型相吻合,监测成果对大连地铁及类似的浅埋暗挖隧道建设有借鉴作用.%To study the Dalian Metro section 202 ' s (Cujin Road station-Chunguang Street station, which is shallowly buried and covered with plain fill ) ground surface settlement, the monitoring measuring station was built during the construction. After 3 months' measuring by precision level, the data shows that the maximum point is in the center line of the tunnel of the upper part, the settlement is about 25. 66 — 31.82 mm. We put forward the concept of the distance span ratio β, β effective value range was - 4 <β< 4, surface subsidence was closely related with β, severe surface subsidence stage was —2 <(3< 2, which accounted for 67. 5 — 77. 6% of the whole deformation ,and settlement rate was about 0. 84 — 0. 93 mm/d. So the monitoring frequency and site tour should be strengthened. The result of field test is consistent with that of the ground surface settlement calculation model . The monitoring results have reference for Dalian subway and the similar shallow depth excavation tunnel construction.

  9. Do hospitals cross-subsidize?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Guy; Lindrooth, Richard C; Helmchen, Lorens A; Burns, Lawton R

    2014-09-01

    Despite its salience as a regulatory tool to ensure the delivery of unprofitable medical services, cross-subsidization of services within hospital systems has been notoriously difficult to detect and quantify. We use repeated shocks to a profitable service in the market for hospital-based medical care to test for cross-subsidization of unprofitable services. Using patient-level data from general short-term hospitals in Arizona and Colorado before and after entry by cardiac specialty hospitals, we study how incumbent hospitals adjusted their provision of three uncontested services that are widely considered to be unprofitable. We estimate that the hospitals most exposed to entry reduced their provision of psychiatric, substance-abuse, and trauma care services at a rate of about one uncontested-service admission for every four cardiac admissions they stood to lose. Although entry by single-specialty hospitals may adversely affect the provision of unprofitable uncontested services, these findings warrant further evaluation of service-line cross-subsidization as a means to finance them.

  10. Dynamic subsidence basins in coal mines based on rock mass theological theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yu; Gong Zhiqiang; Liang Bing

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the surface deformation caused by coal mining and to reduce environmental damage,more accurate information of dynamic subsidence basins,caused by coal mining,is needed.Based on rheological theory,we discuss surface deformation mechanism of dynamic subsidence on the assumption that both the roof and the coal seam are visco-elastic media,put forward the idea that the principle of surface deformation is similar to that of roofs,except for their parameters.Therefore,a surface deformation equation can be obtained,given the equation of the roof deformation derived.from using a HM rheological model.In the end,we apply the equation of surface deformation as a practical subsidence prediction in a coal mine.Given the rheologic properties of a rock mass,the results of our research of a dynamic subsidence basin can predict the development of surface deformation as a function of time.which is more important than the ultimate subsidence itself.The results indicate that using rheological theory to calculate the deformation of a dynamic subsidence basin is suitable and provides some reference for surface deformation of dynamic subsidence basins.

  11. Quantitative evaluation of soil erosion of land subsided by coal mining using RUSLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Lei; Feng Qiyan; Wu Kan; Meng Qingjun

    2012-01-01

    Based on a RUSLE model,we identified the key factors of the impact on soil erosion induced by coal mining subsidence.We designed a method for predicting LS factors of a mining subsidence basin,using analytical GIS spatial technology.Using the Huainan mining area as an example,we calculated the modulus of erosion,its volume and classified the grade of soil erosion for both the original area and the subsidence basin.The results show that the maximum modulus of erosion and the volume of erosion of the subsidence basin without water logging would increase by 78% and 23% respectively compared with the original situation.The edge of the subsidence basin,where the land subsidence was uneven,is subject to the greatest acceleration in soil erosion.In the situation of water logging after subsidence,the maximum modulus of erosion would decrease if the accumulated slope length were reduced.This maximum modulus around the water logged area within the subsidence basin is equal to that without water logging,while the total volume of erosion decreases.Therefore,mining subsidence aggravates soil erosion especially at the edge of basins where water and soil conservation measures should be taken.

  12. Impact of halite dissolution subsidence on Quaternary fluvial terrace development: Case study of the Huerva River, Ebro Basin, NE Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Jesús; Gutiérrez, Francisco; Lucha, Pedro

    2008-08-01

    This paper analyses the control of evaporite dissolution subsidence on the evolution of the lower 30 km-long reach of the Huerva River up to its confluence with the Ebro River. In the study area the Huerva River flows across different interfingered lithofacies of the subhorizontally lying Ebro Basin fill: (1) shales and sandstones upstream of Cadrete; (2) evaporites dominated by gypsum between Cadrete and Cuarte; (3) gypsum with glauberite and halite units in the subsurface downstream of Cuarte. The halite shows a marked downvalley increase in thickness. Twelve terrace levels and seven pediment levels correlative to some of the terraces have been mapped in the studied area. Upstream of Cadrete, the terrace deposits, with a relatively constant thickness less than 4 m and overlying unsoluble bedrock, remain undeformed. Between Cadrete and Cuarte the deposits of some terraces show local thickening ( 60 m-thick terrace alluvium that fills a 5 km-long trough generated by synsedimentary subsidence phenomena caused primarily by the interstratal dissolution of halite. The older terraces (T1 to T4) show slight thickening (> 18 m) and locally truncate paleocollapse structures ascribed to the interstratal karstification of halite beds. The intermediate terraces (T5 to T7) correspond to degradation surfaces that grade downstream of Cuarte into aggradation flights underlain by the abruptly thickened deposits that fill this 5 km-long dissolution trough. Subsidence migrated episodically downstream during the generation of these terraces and the subsidence/aggradation rate was probably large enough to induce a base-level drop and knickpoint migration upstream generating strath terraces with convergent longitudinal profiles. The sedimentological changes that show the thickened terrace deposits in the subsidence area (high proportion of overbank fines (> 60%) including palustrine facies, gravel channels with lower width/depth ratio, multiple fining-upward cycles, decrease in the

  13. Tectonic subsidence of the Sirte Basin, Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumati, Y.D.; Nairn, A.E.M. (South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (US). Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.)

    1991-01-01

    The Sirte Basin of Libya has a history of faulting and differential subsidence brought about by lithospheric extension during a 25 MM (million) year period beginning in the Late Cretaceous. The first phase of extension and initial subsidence, with faulting and graben formation, occurred from Cenomanian to Campanian times. Following extension, there occurred widespread thermally-driven subsidence from Maastrichtian through Eocene and Oligocene times, accounting for about half of the total subsidence. Details of basin subsidence, sediment accumulation rates and facies variations have been reconstructed for the northern Sirte Basin from a suite of approximately 100 completion well logs and numerous seismic lines. These show that at various times in the late Cretaceous and Paleocene-Eocene, renewed differential subsidence followed fault reactivation. Tectonic subsidence maps show a systematic SE to NW shift in the loci of maximum and minimum subsidence, which parallels the structural trend of the basin. The greatest subsidence observed in the Sirte Trough is 2,085 meters, whereas subsidence of the horsts is generally less than 1,000 meters. The stretching factor ({beta}: in the range of 1.1 to 1.75), corresponds to an extension of 10-75%, with an average of less than 50%. The greatest stretching is associated with the central graben. (Author).

  14. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  15. Subsidence hazard and risk assessments for Mexico City: An interdisciplinary analysis of satellite-derived subsidence map (PSInSAR) and census data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Rojas, D. E.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Wdowinski, S.; Hernaández Espriú, A.; Falorni, G.; Bohane, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Mexico City Metropolitan Area is the largest urban center in the American continent, with 20.4 millions of inhabitants, representing 17.8% of the total population of the country. Over the past several decades Mexico City has been experienced rapid subsidence, up to ~370 mm/yr, caused by groundwater extraction. The subsidence rate is inhomogeneous, as it controlled by the local geology. Unconsolidated sediments tend to compact and induce rapid subsidence, whereas subsurface volcanic rocks are less prone to subsidence. Intensive faulting in the city has been observed in areas of differential deformation; in these areas buildings and infrastructure are highly damaged. Quantification of subsidence-induce damage is needed for establishing the magnitude of the phenomenon. Our study uses three data sources: a satellite-derived subsidence map, census information of population distribution for 2010, and information on buildings and infrastructure. The subsidence map was calculated from 29 SAR scene acquired by the Envisat satellite during the years 2003-2010 using the Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PSI) method with the SqueeSAR algorithm. The information of the census of population comes from the National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI), which also provides the information about infrastructure. We intersected the information from the three maps using a geographic information system (GIS), which cover an area of 1, 640 km2. As subsidence-induced damage occurs mainly in areas of differential subsidence, we based the GIS analysis on the subsidence gradients, rather than subsidence rates. In order to evaluate subsidence-induced faulting risk, we generated a risk matrix that worked as the main parameter to create a risk map. We then reclassified the urban area into 5 zones according to the related risk, with R0 for the lowest risk and R4 for the highest. Our counting showed that 350 km2 of the city is located in an urban area of high to very high risk

  16. September 2016 Bayou Choctaw Subsidence Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, Dylan Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lord, Anna C. Snider [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Subsidence monitoring is a crucial component to understanding cavern integrity of salt storage caverns. This report looks at historical and current data at the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site. Data from the most recent land-based annual surveys, GPS, and tiltmeter indicate the subsidence rates across the site are approximately 0.0 ft./yr. Because of this, there is no evidence from the subsidence survey to suggest any of the DOE caverns have been structurally compromised.

  17. Femtosecond laser-induced surface wettability modification of polystyrene surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Wang, XinCai; Zheng, HongYu; Lam, YeeCheong

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we demonstrated a simple method to create either a hydrophilic or hydrophobic surface. With femtosecond laser irradiation at different laser parameters, the water contact angle (WCA) on polystyrene's surface can be modified to either 12.7° or 156.2° from its original WCA of 88.2°. With properly spaced micro-pits created, the surface became hydrophilic probably due to the spread of the water droplets into the micro-pits. While with properly spaced micro-grooves created, the surface became rough and more hydrophobic. We investigated the effect of laser parameters on WCAs and analyzed the laser-treated surface roughness, profiles and chemical bonds by surface profilometer, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the laser-treated surface with low roughness, the polar (such as C—O, C=O, and O—C=O bonds) and non-polar (such as C—C or C—H bonds) groups were found to be responsible for the wettability changes. While for a rough surface, the surface roughness or the surface topography structure played a more significant role in the changes of the surface WCA. The mechanisms involved in the laser surface wettability modification process were discussed.

  18. Prediction of land subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation in Hanoi, Vietnam, using multifactorial correlation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thinh Hong Phi; Ludmila Aleksandrovna Strokova

    2013-01-01

    Multifactorial correlation analysis is a new method used to predict the land subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation. This article introduces and applies the method to establish the function of the surface settlement rate (Vs) and the function of the time-dependent surface settlement (St) caused by groundwater exploitation, based on data acquired at three land subsidence monitoring stations in the Hanoi area of Vietnam. Comparison with actual monitoring data indicates that the prediction results are relatively close to the monitoring data. From this, we conclude that multifactorial correlation analysis is a reliable method and can be used to predict future land subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation in Hanoi.

  19. Laser induced surface emission of neutral species and its relationship to optical surface damage processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.; Smith, L. K.

    1988-03-01

    The laser-induced emission of neutral constituents and impurities from surfaces of several optical materials is shown to be correlated with optical surface damage thresholds. The characteristics of the emission can be utilized to investigate physical processes involved in the absorption of laser energy at the surface. Examples are given of neutral emission correlated with catastrophic surface heating, changes in surface stoichiometry, and thermally-induced cracking.

  20. Land subsidence in major cities of Central Mexico: Interpreting InSAR-derived land subsidence mapping with hydrogeological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellazzi, Pascal; Arroyo-Domínguez, Norma; Martel, Richard; Calderhead, Angus I.; Normand, Jonathan C. L.; Gárfias, Jaime; Rivera, Alfonso

    2016-05-01

    Significant structural damages to urban infrastructures caused by compaction of over-exploited aquifers are an important problem in Central Mexico. While the case of Mexico City has been well-documented, insight into land subsidence problems in other cities of Central Mexico is still limited. Among the cities concerned, we present and discuss the cases of five of them, located within the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB): Toluca, Celaya, Aguascalientes, Morelia, and Queretaro. Applying the SBAS-InSAR method to C-Band RADARSAT-2 data, five high resolution ground motion time-series were produced to monitor the spatio-temporal variations of displacements and fracturing from 2012 to 2014. The study presents recent changes of land subsidence rates along with concordant geological and water data. It aims to provide suggestions to mitigate future damages to infrastructure and to assist in groundwater resources management. Aguascalientes, Celaya, Morelia and Queretaro (respectively in order of decreasing subsidence rates) are typical cases of fault-limited land subsidence of Central Mexico. It occurs as a result of groundwater over-exploitation in lacustrine and alluvial deposits covering highly variable bedrock topography, typical of horst-graben geological settings. Aguascalientes and Toluca show high rates of land subsidence (up to 10 cm/yr), while Celaya and Morelia show lower rates (from 2 to 5 cm/yr). Comparing these results with previous studies, it is inferred that the spatial patterns of land subsidence have changed in the city of Toluca. This change appears to be mainly controlled by the spatial heterogeneity of compressible sediments since no noticeable change occurred in groundwater extraction and related drawdown rates. While land subsidence of up to 8 cm/yr has been reported in the Queretaro Valley before 2011, rates inferior to 1 cm/yr are measured in 2013-2014. The subsidence has been almost entirely mitigated by major changes in the water management

  1. Time-varying land subsidence detected by radar altimetry: California, Taiwan and north China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Cheinway; Yang, Yuande; Kao, Ricky; Han, Jiancheng; Shum, C K; Galloway, Devin L; Sneed, Michelle; Hung, Wei-Chia; Cheng, Yung-Sheng; Li, Fei

    2016-06-21

    Contemporary applications of radar altimetry include sea-level rise, ocean circulation, marine gravity, and icesheet elevation change. Unlike InSAR and GNSS, which are widely used to map surface deformation, altimetry is neither reliant on highly temporally-correlated ground features nor as limited by the available spatial coverage, and can provide long-term temporal subsidence monitoring capability. Here we use multi-mission radar altimetry with an approximately 23 year data-span to quantify land subsidence in cropland areas. Subsidence rates from TOPEX/POSEIDON, JASON-1, ENVISAT, and JASON-2 during 1992-2015 show time-varying trends with respect to displacement over time in California's San Joaquin Valley and central Taiwan, possibly related to changes in land use, climatic conditions (drought) and regulatory measures affecting groundwater use. Near Hanford, California, subsidence rates reach 18 cm yr(-1) with a cumulative subsidence of 206 cm, which potentially could adversely affect operations of the planned California High-Speed Rail. The maximum subsidence rate in central Taiwan is 8 cm yr(-1). Radar altimetry also reveals time-varying subsidence in the North China Plain consistent with the declines of groundwater storage and existing water infrastructure detected by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, with rates reaching 20 cm yr(-1) and cumulative subsidence as much as 155 cm.

  2. Time-varying land subsidence detected by radar altimetry: California, Taiwan and north China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Cheinway; Yang, Yuande; Kao, Ricky; Han, Jiancheng; Shum, C.K.; Galloway, Devin L.; Sneed, Michelle; Hung, Wei-Chia; Cheng, Yung-Sheng; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary applications of radar altimetry include sea-level rise, ocean circulation, marine gravity, and ice sheet elevation change. Unlike InSAR and GNSS, which are widely used to map surface deformation, altimetry is neither reliant on highly temporally-correlated ground features nor as limited by the available spatial coverage, and can provide long-term temporal subsidence monitoring capability. Here we use multi-mission radar altimetry with an approximately 23 year data-span to quantify land subsidence in cropland areas. Subsidence rates from TOPEX/POSEIDON, JASON-1, ENVISAT, and JASON-2 during 1992–2015 show time-varying trends with respect to displacement over time in California’s San Joaquin Valley and central Taiwan, possibly related to changes in land use, climatic conditions (drought) and regulatory measures affecting groundwater use. Near Hanford, California, subsidence rates reach 18 cm/yr with a cumulative subsidence of 206 cm, which potentially could adversely affect operations of the planned California High-Speed Rail. The maximum subsidence rate in central Taiwan is 8 cm/yr. Radar altimetry also reveals time-varying subsidence in the North China Plain consistent with the declines of groundwater storage and existing water infrastructure detected by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, with rates reaching 20 cm/yr and cumulative subsidence as much as 155 cm.

  3. Time-varying land subsidence detected by radar altimetry: California, Taiwan and north China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Cheinway; Yang, Yuande; Kao, Ricky; Han, Jiancheng; Shum, C. K.; Galloway, Devin L.; Sneed, Michelle; Hung, Wei-Chia; Cheng, Yung-Sheng; Li, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Contemporary applications of radar altimetry include sea-level rise, ocean circulation, marine gravity, and icesheet elevation change. Unlike InSAR and GNSS, which are widely used to map surface deformation, altimetry is neither reliant on highly temporally-correlated ground features nor as limited by the available spatial coverage, and can provide long-term temporal subsidence monitoring capability. Here we use multi-mission radar altimetry with an approximately 23 year data-span to quantify land subsidence in cropland areas. Subsidence rates from TOPEX/POSEIDON, JASON-1, ENVISAT, and JASON-2 during 1992–2015 show time-varying trends with respect to displacement over time in California’s San Joaquin Valley and central Taiwan, possibly related to changes in land use, climatic conditions (drought) and regulatory measures affecting groundwater use. Near Hanford, California, subsidence rates reach 18 cm yr‑1 with a cumulative subsidence of 206 cm, which potentially could adversely affect operations of the planned California High-Speed Rail. The maximum subsidence rate in central Taiwan is 8 cm yr‑1. Radar altimetry also reveals time-varying subsidence in the North China Plain consistent with the declines of groundwater storage and existing water infrastructure detected by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, with rates reaching 20 cm yr‑1 and cumulative subsidence as much as 155 cm.

  4. Subsidence characterization and modeling for engineered facilities in Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, M. L.; Fergason, K. C.; Panda, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    Several engineered facilities located on deep alluvial basins in southern Arizona, including flood retention structures (FRS) and a coal ash disposal facility, have been impacted by up to as much as 1.8 m of differential land subsidence and associated earth fissuring. Compressible basin alluvium depths are as deep as about 300 m, and historic groundwater level declines due to pumping range from 60 to more than 100 m at these facilities. Addressing earth fissure-inducing ground strain has required alluvium modulus characterization to support finite element modeling. The authors have developed Percolation Theory-based methodologies to use effective stress and generalized geo-material types to estimate alluvium modulus as a function of alluvium lithology, depth and groundwater level. Alluvial material modulus behavior may be characterized as high modulus gravel-dominated, low modulus sand-dominated, or very low modulus fines-dominated (silts and clays) alluvium. Applied at specific aquifer stress points, such as significant pumping wells, this parameter characterization and quantification facilitates subsidence magnitude modeling at its' sources. Modeled subsidence is then propagated over time across the basin from the source(s) using a time delay exponential decay function similar to the soil mechanics consolidation coefficient, only applied laterally. This approach has expanded subsidence modeling capabilities on scales of engineered facilities of less than 2 to more than 15 km.

  5. Measurements of the Balance of Subsidence and Sedimentation in the Coastal Zone of Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckler, M. S.; Mondal, D. R.; Akhter, S. H.; Davis, J. L.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Wilson, C.; Bulbul, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In the face of rising sea levels, the balance of land subsidence, sea level rise and sedimentation is critical for low-lying deltaic regions. Deltas commonly experience subsidence due to compaction of their thick sediment accumulations and other processes. Many are susceptible to growth faulting and seaward collapse of the sediment pile on detachment layers (salt and/or shales) leading to even greater subsidence. We present evidence for moderate subsidence rates and continuing active sedimentation at the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta in Bangladesh. Subsidence rates are based on continuous GPS, including three new coastal stations established in 2012, hourly tide gauge data for 1977-2012 at 16 sites, two historical sites with ages of 300 years (salt-making kilns) and 400 years (Hindu temple), and sedimentation accumulation rates of near-sea-level deposits from hand-drilled tube wells. Results so far suggest that most sites are subsiding at 3-4 mm/y, although some higher rates are recorded. Updated estimates for subsidence will be presented. Two sets of vertical optical strainmeters record sediment compaction and inform its variation with depth. Sedimentation estimates based on sedimentation plots, marker horizons, and surface elevation tables (SETs) suggest that accumulation rates in natural areas near the coast currently compensate for relative subsidence, whereas human-modified areas farther inland receive insufficient sediment and are at risk. We hypothesize that the moderate subsidence rate of the delta is due to buttressing of the margin by the continental rise. The slope-rise break is shallow at 1 km water depth due to the high sediment supply feeding the Bengal Fan. Thus the thick wedge of continental rise sediments rise higher than the top of the weak overpressured sediments in the delta that could act as a décollement surface. This prevents the seaward collapse of the delta and associated higher rates of subsidence.

  6. 30 CFR 817.121 - Subsidence control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Subsidence control. 817.121 Section 817.121... ACTIVITIES § 817.121 Subsidence control. (a) Measures to prevent or minimize damage. (1) The permittee must... control plan prepared pursuant to § 784.20 of this chapter. (c) Repair of damage—(1) Repair of damage...

  7. Induced factors and controlled methods of oil subsidence in citrus peel%柑橘果皮油胞下陷诱发因素及控制方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽丹; 曾凯芳

    2012-01-01

    The physiological disorder of citrus peel had been generally concerned by consumers.In particular,oil subsidence was the main problem which affected the appearance quality of citrus.Oil subsidence of citrus peel made physiological disorder of citrus peel performing oil spotting and brown spot,resulting in the commodity and storability of citrus declined.Therefore,how to reduce the citrus peel diseases was a investigative hot spot.This article summarized factors of citrus peel oil subsidence and methods of reducing citrus peel oil subsidence in order to support technical for further study in oil subsidence and the fundamental mechanism of citrus peel oil subsidence.%目前柑橘的生理病变受到普遍关注,尤其柑橘果皮的生理病变—油胞下陷是影响柑橘品质的主要问题。柑橘果皮油胞下陷使柑橘果皮病变主要表现为油胞病和褐斑病,导致柑橘的商品性和耐贮性降低,因此如何减少柑橘果皮的病变是目前研究的热点。本文总结了减少柑橘果皮油胞下陷的因素和多种控制方法,希望能为进一步研究柑橘果皮油胞下陷的方法和根本机制提供技术支持。

  8. InSAR derived horizontal subsidence gradient as a tool for hazard assessment in urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Dixon, T.; Diaz-Molina, O.

    2007-05-01

    Mexico City's subsidence has been recognized for over a century, after the first well battery was drilled to supply water to the rapidly growing city at the end of the XIX century. Consequences of the subsidence process are costly but the economic consequences of subsidence in urban areas is hard to assess due to the fact that their costs are generally factored into yearly maintenance budgets rather than accounting for them as a unique natural disaster. It has thus become increasingly important to assess the extent and magnitude of damage due to ground subsidence in the Mexico City metropolitan area. Periodic InSAR and GPS measurements including data from an 8 site permanent GPS network in Mexico City has enabled us to derive an integrated composite displacement map for Mexico City. This image was used to calculate the horizontal subsidence gradient for areas smaller than 100x100m throughout the city by computing the observed displacement difference divided by the respective pixel to pixel horizontal distance and comparing similarly calculated values from all adjacent pixels in order to select the maximum gradient. Both empiric and analytical approaches can been used to correlate the potential for surface faulting in high horizontal subsidence gradient zones and show that the principal factor for constraining these areas can be successfully determined using a combined Differential InSAR and GPS approach. We present surface faulting risk maps for several cities in central Mexico derived from the horizontal subsidence gradient approach as an example of this technique.

  9. Catastrophic subsidence: An environmental hazard, shelby county, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoreaux, Philip E.; Newton, J. G.

    1986-03-01

    Induced sinkholes (catastrophic subsidence) are those caused or accelerated by human activities These sinkholes commonly result from a water level decline due to pumpage Construction activities in a cone of depression greatly increases the likelihood of sinkhole occurrence Almost all occur where cavities develop in unconsolidated deposits overlying solution openings in carbonate rocks. Triggering mechanisms resulting from water level declines are (1) loss of buoyant support of the water, (2) increased gradient and water velocity, (3) water-level fluctuations, and (4) induced recharge Construction activities triggering sinkhole development include ditching, removing overburden, drilling, movement of heavy equipment, blasting and the diversion and impoundment of drainage Triggering mechanisms include piping, saturation, and loading Induced sinkholes resulting from human water development/management activities are most predictable in a youthful karst area impacted by groundwater withdrawals Shape, depth, and timing of catastrophic subsidence can be predicted in general terms Remote sensing techniques are used in prediction of locations of catastrophic subsidence. This provides a basis for design and relocation of structures such as a gas pipeline, dam, or building Utilization of techniques and a case history of the relocation of a pipeline are described

  10. Land Subsidence Monitoring Using PS-InSAR Technique for L-Band SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, S.; Chatterjee, R. S.; Singh, K. B.; Kumar, D.

    2016-10-01

    Differential SAR-Interferometry (D-InSAR) is one of the potential source to measure land surface motion induced due to underground coal mining. However, this technique has many limitation such as atmospheric in homogeneities, spatial de-correlation, and temporal decorrelation. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry synthetic aperture radar (PS-InSAR) belongs to a family of time series InSAR technique, which utilizes the properties of some of the stable natural and anthropogenic targets which remain coherent over long time period. In this study PS-InSAR technique has been used to monitor land subsidence over selected location of Jharia Coal field which has been correlated with the ground levelling measurement. This time series deformation observed using PS InSAR helped us to understand the nature of the ground surface deformation due to underground mining activity.

  11. Subsidence Serves as an Indicator of Groundwater Arsenic Risk in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.; Knight, R. J.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater arsenic concentrations dominantly result from anaerobic conditions. Within aquifers, clays are typically the major hosts of solid-phase arsenic, and clay layers often have restricted oxygen supply, resulting in anaerobic conditions and the concomitant relase of arsenic to groundwater. But it is not until water is drawn from the clay layers, through over-pumping of aquifers, that arsenic enters the water supply. Due to the mechanical properties of clays, the volume of groundwater withdrawn is effectively approximated by their vertical deformation, the sum of which is expressed at the surface as subsidence. As a result, subsidence can serve as an indicator, or "early warning system", of the presence of arsenic in the pumped groundwater. In the San Joaquin Valley of California, there has been significant subsidence due to groundwater extraction from clays for nearly a century. Historical subsidence in this area has been measured with leveling surveys, GPS and extensometers, and has been reproduced in groundwater models. More recent subsidence can be measured directly using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). We use recent (post-2007) arsenic level data from the southern portion of the San Joaquin Valley to train a random forest model. Predictors in the model include historical (pre-2002) estimates of subsidence, more recent (2007-2011) InSAR estimates of subsidence, and other predictors representing additional mechanisms that could affect arsenic levels in groundwater, such as groundwater flow, redox potential and position in the basin. We find that recent subsidence is a strong predictor of arsenic levels; historical subsidence could have some impact but is less significant. These results indicate that avoiding over-pumping of the aquifer may improve water quality over a time period on the order of 10 years. Incorporating subsidence into arsenic prediction maps can improve our ability to identify and manage areas that have a higher risk of

  12. Satellite signal shows storage-unloading subsidence in North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiwo, J. P.; Tao, F.

    2015-06-01

    Worsening water storage depletion (WSD) contributes to environmental degradation, land subsidence and earthquake and could disrupt food production/security and social stability. There is need for efficient water use strategies in North China, a pivotal agrarian, industrial and political base in China with a widespread WSD. This study integrates satellite, model and field data products to investigate WSD and land subsidence in North China. In the first step, GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) mass rates are used to show WSD in the region. Next, GRACE total water storage (TWS) is corrected for soil water storage (SWS) to derive groundwater storage (GWS) using GLDAS (Global Land Data Assimilation System) data products. The derived GWS is compared with GWS obtained from field-measured groundwater level to show land subsidence in the study area. Then GPS (Global Positioning System) data of relative land surface change (LSC) are used to confirm the subsidence due to WSD. A total of ~ 96 near-consecutive months (January 2002 through December 2009) of datasets are used in the study. Based on GRACE mass rates, TWS depletion is 23.76 ± 1.74 mm yr-1 or 13.73 ± 1.01 km3 yr-1 in the 578 000 km2 study area. This is ~ 31 % of the slated 45 km3 yr-1 water delivery in 2050 via the South-North Water Diversion Project. Analysis of relative LSC shows subsidence of 7.29 ± 0.35 mm yr-1 in Beijing and 2.74 ± 0.16 mm yr-1 in North China. About 11.53 % (2.74 ± 0.18 mm or 1.58 ± 0.12 km3) of the TWS and 8.37 % (1.52 ± 0.70 mm or 0.88 ± 0.03 km3) of the GWS are attributed to storage reductions accompanying subsidence in the region. Although interpretations of the findings require caution due to the short temporal and large spatial coverage, the concurrence of WSD and land subsidence could have adverse implications for the study area. It is critical that the relevant stakeholders embark on resource-efficient measures to ensure water availability, food security, ecological

  13. The Land Subsidence and Relative Sea Level Rise in Chinese Delta Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YeYincan; LiuDujuan

    2004-01-01

    Based on some experts' research effort, the problems of land subsidence and relative sea level rise in three Chinese delta areas(Huanghe, Changjiang and Zhujiang Delta) are analyzed and discussed in this paper. The authors' opinion is that the land subsidence is mainly induced by human activity and has made the greater contributions to the relative sea level rise and become one of the geological hazards in these areas. In Tianjin and Shanghai areas where had ever existed serious land subsidence problem, due to the positive and effective control methods, the ratio of man-induced land subsidence to relative sea level rise decreased from 80% - 90% in 1960s - 1970s to less than 60% at present. But it is estimated that in the next tens of years this ratio will still be considerable. So human being must keep its eyes on this phenomenon and take more positive countermeasures to control the land subsidenee.

  14. Land Subsidence International Symposium held in Venice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Third International Symposium on Land Subsidence was held March 18-25, 1984, in Venice, Italy. Sponsors were the Ground-Water Commission of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS), the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Italian National Research Council (CNR), the Italian Regions of Veneto and Emilia-Romagna, the Italian Municipalities of Venice, Ravenna, and Modena, the Venice Province, and the European Research Office. Cosponsors included the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH), the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering (ISSMFE), and the Association of Geoscientists for International Development (AGID).Organized within the framework of UNESCO's International Hydrological Program, the symposium brought together over 200 international interdisciplinary specialists in the problems of land subsidence due to fluid and mineral withdrawal. Because man's continuing heavy development of groundwater, gas, oil, and minerals is changing the natural regime and thus causing more and more subsiding areas in the world, there had been sufficient new land subsidence occurrence, problems, research, and remedial measures since the 1976 Second International Symposium held in Anaheim, California, to develop a most interesting program of nearly 100 papers from about 30 countries. The program consisted of papers covering case histories of fluid and mineral withdrawal, engineering theory and analysis, karst “sink-hole”-type subsidence, subsidence due to dewatering of organic deposits or due to application of water (hydrocompaction), instrumentation, legal, socioeconomic, and environmental effects of land subsidence, and remedial works.

  15. Subsidence due to gas production in the Wadden Sea: How to ensure no harm will be done to nature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thienen-Visser, K. van; Breunese, J.N.; Muntendam-Bos, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    The Wadden Sea is a shallow tidal sea in the north of the Netherlands where gas production is ongoing since 1986. Due to the sensitive nature of this area, gas extraction induced subsidence must remain within the "effective subsidence capacity" for the two tidal basins (Pinkegat and Zoutkamperlaag)

  16. Offshore gravimetric and subsidence monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenvold, Torkjell

    2008-06-15

    The introduction (Chapter 1) is complemented by the introductions given in Chapters 2 to 8. I am the first author of the articles in chapter 2 and 8. For the 5 articles in between I am a coauthor, and the sum of my contributions to those articles (as quantified by the respective first authors) represents about one article. Chapter 2 contains the article 'High-precision relative depth and subsidence mapping from seafloor water-pressure measurements' by Stenvold et al. (2006), published in the SPE Journal. It was submitted in March 2005, and a revised version that also contained results from the Troll 2005 survey (August) was submitted in February 2006. The method of obtaining high-precision relative depth measurements by the use of mobile pressure gauges is presented. Intra-survey and inter-survey depth repeatabilities from six surveys are presented, and the individual contributing errors are discussed and estimated. Average reservoir compressibility for the Troll field between 2002 and 2005 is obtained by matching measured subsidence with modeled subsidence. Chapter 3 contains the article 'A new seafloor gravimeter' by Sasagawa et al. (2003), published in Geophysics. It was submitted in September 2001, and a revised version was submitted in August 2002. This article describes the ROVDOG (Remotely operated Vehicledeployed Deep-Ocean Gravimeter) in detail. Gravity and pressure repeatability results from the two first Troll surveys in 1998 and 2000 are presented. Data reduction, instrumental and environmental corrections are also presented. Chapter 4 contains the article 'Precision of seafloor gravity and pressure measurements for reservoir monitoring' by Zumberge et al., and was submitted 29 February 2008 to Geophysics. This builds on the article by Sasagawa et al. (Chapter 3). Improvements and upto date intra- and inter survey repeatability results are presented. The emphasis is on gravity results since the relative depth measurements

  17. DMSO induces dehydration near lipid membrane surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Song, Jinsuk; Pas, Jolien; Meijer, Lenny H H; Han, Songi

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been broadly used in biology as a cosolvent, a cryoprotectant, and an enhancer of membrane permeability, leading to the general assumption that DMSO-induced structural changes in cell membranes...

  18. Electric Field Induced Surface Modification of Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erchak, A.A.; Franklin, G.F.; Houston, J.E.; Mayer, T.M.; Michalske, T.A.

    1999-02-15

    We discuss the role of localized high electric fields in the modification of Au surfaces with a W probe using the Interfacial Force Microscope. Upon bringing a probe close to a Au surface, we measure both the interfacial force and the field emission current as a function of separation with a constant potential of 100 V between tip and sample. The current initially increases exponentially as the separation decreases. However, at a distance of less than {approximately} 500{angstrom} the current rises sharply as the surface begins to distort and rapidly close the gap. Retraction of the tip before contact is made reveals the formation of a mound on the surface. We propose a simple model, in which the localized high electric field under the tip assists the production of mobile Au adatoms by detachment from surface steps, and a radial field gradient causes a net flux of atoms toward the tip by surface diffusion. These processes give rise to an unstable surface deformation which, if left unchecked, results in a destructive mechanical contact. We discuss our findings with respect to earlier work using voltage pulses in the STM as a means of nanofabrication.

  19. Rapid groundwater-related land subsidence in Yemen observed by multi-temporal InSAR

    KAUST Repository

    Abdullin, Ayrat

    2015-04-01

    Several basins in Yemen are suffering from a rapid drawdown of groundwater, which is the most important water source for agricultural irrigation, industry and domestic use. However, detailed geodetic measurements in the region have been lacking and the extent and magnitude of groundwater-related land subsidence has been poorly known. We used 13 ascending ALOS and 15 descending Envisat images to study land subsidence of several basins in Yemen, with a special focus on the Sana\\'a and Mabar basins. From multitemporal synthetic aperture radar interferometric analysis (persistent scatterers (PS) and small baseline subsets (SBAS)) we examined the spatio-temporal behavior of the subsidence induced by depletion of groundwater aquifer systems from November 2003 to February 2011. In the interferometric data processing, we carefully chose interferogram pairs to minimize spatial and temporal decorrelation, because of high subsidence rates and the type of land cover. Our results show that the spatial pattern of subsidence remained quite stable during the observation period in both the Sana\\'a and Mabar basins. In the Sana\\'a basin, the maximum subsidence rate exceeded 14 cm/year in the radar line-of-sight (LOS) direction between 2003 and 2008 in an agricultural area just north of Sana\\'a city, where water wells have been drying up according to the well data. The subsidence rate was lower in the urban areas, or approximately 1 cm/year, exhibiting annual variations. The main subsidence was found in the center and southern parts of the city, while deformation in the northern part is less obvious. For the Mabar basin, the subsidence rate exceeded 30 cm/year in the agricultural area north of the town of Mabar during 2007 - 2011. The southern part of the Mabar basin also experienced high subsidence rates, although somewhat lower than to the north. Excessive water pumping is the main cause of the ground subsidence and it has already led to extensive ground fracturing at the edge

  20. Unconventional superconductivity induced by interfaces and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschrig, Matthias [Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik and DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Ordered many-body states in solids are often characterized by an order parameter that breaks one or more of the symmetries of the crystal. Such unconventional states lead to interesting new physics associated with the spontaneously broken symmetries. However, in order that such a symmetry breaking can occur it has to be energetically favored. Some of the most interesting symmetry broken states have never been found experimentally in bulk materials for that reason. However, symmetries can be broken also by introducing interfaces with other materials. In this case, the evasive unconventional states might be induced locally near the interface, and can then penetrate as correlations into bulk materials. The properties of the induced states depend on the scattering characteristics of the interfaces and on the proximity induced states produced by the adjacent materials. We discuss in particular interface-induced unconventional superconductivity in heterostructures with magnetically active materials, that may exhibit e.g. odd-frequency pairing or equal-spin triplet pairing states. We study the conditions under which such unconventional pairing amplitudes are induced and demonstrate how they can be tested in experiment and used for quantum devices.

  1. Study of "3-Step Mining" Subsidence Control in Coal Mining Under Buildings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Guang-li; ZHA Jian-feng; WU Bin; JIA Xin-guo

    2007-01-01

    Mining subsidence damage is the main factor of restricting coal mining under buildings. To control or ease effectively the degree of mining subsidence and deformation is essential to resolve this problem. Through analyzing both advantages and disadvantages of some technologies such as mining with stowing, partial extraction and grouting in separated beds of overburden, we used the principle of load replacement and propose a "3-step mining" method, a new pattern of controlling mining subsidence, which consists of: strip mining, i.e. grouting to fill and consolidate the caving zone and retained strip pillar mining. The mechanism of controlling mining subsidence by using the "3-step mining" pattern is analyzed. The effect of the control is numerically simulated. The preliminary analysis shows that the "3-step mining" can effectively control ground subsidence and deformation. By using this method, the ground subsidence factor can be controlled to a value of about 0.25. Coal recovery can reach 80%-90%. Coal mining without removing surface buildings can be realized and the economic loss resulting from ground subsidence can be greatly reduced.

  2. Study on Land Subsidence Incangzhou Area Basedon SENTINEL-1A/B Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H.; Wang, Y.; Yan, S.

    2017-09-01

    This paper, obtaining 39scenesof images of the Sentinel-1 A/B, monitored the Cangzhou area subsidence from Mar. 2015 to Dec. 2016 basing on using PS-InSAR technique. The annual average subsidence rate and accumulative subsidence were obtained. The results showed that the ground surface of Xian County,Cang County, Cangzhou urban area had a rebound trend; Qing County, the east of Cang County ,the west of Nanpi County and Dongguang County appeared obvious subsidence, and the accumulated subsidence in Hezhuang village of Dongguang County reached 47 mm. And from that the main reason leading to these obvious subsidence was over-exploitation of ground-water. At last, it analyzed the settlement of the High-Speed Railway (HR) which was north from the Machang town of QingCounty and south to the Lian town of Dongguang County in Cangzhou.The relative deformation of the HR between the two sections which was Lierzhuang village of Cang County and Chenxin village of Nanpi County arrived at 30 mm. Moreover, this paper discussed the application of Sentinel-1 A/B SAR images in monitoring urban land subsidence and the results provided important basic data for the relevant departments.

  3. STUDY ON LAND SUBSIDENCE INCANGZHOU AREA BASEDON SENTINEL-1A/B DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zhou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper, obtaining 39scenesof images of the Sentinel-1 A/B, monitored the Cangzhou area subsidence from Mar. 2015 to Dec. 2016 basing on using PS-InSAR technique. The annual average subsidence rate and accumulative subsidence were obtained. The results showed that the ground surface of Xian County,Cang County, Cangzhou urban area had a rebound trend; Qing County, the east of Cang County ,the west of Nanpi County and Dongguang County appeared obvious subsidence, and the accumulated subsidence in Hezhuang village of Dongguang County reached 47 mm. And from that the main reason leading to these obvious subsidence was over-exploitation of ground-water. At last, it analyzed the settlement of the High-Speed Railway (HR which was north from the Machang town of QingCounty and south to the Lian town of Dongguang County in Cangzhou.The relative deformation of the HR between the two sections which was Lierzhuang village of Cang County and Chenxin village of Nanpi County arrived at 30 mm. Moreover, this paper discussed the application of Sentinel-1 A/B SAR images in monitoring urban land subsidence and the results provided important basic data for the relevant departments.

  4. Subsidence in the Parícutin lava field: Causes and implications for interpretation of deformation fields at volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussard, Estelle

    2016-06-01

    Assessment of volcanic hazards includes interpretation of ground deformation signal, which, at polygenetic volcanoes often results from the superposition of deformation due to pressure changes in the magmatic system and due to surficial processes such as cooling of emplaced lava. The deformation signal associated with emplaced lava is sometimes considered negligible if fields are decades old, but if the lava thickness is great, deformation may still be occurring, possibly leading to misinterpretation of the observed deformation. Here I evaluate the 2007-2011 ground motion of the 1943-1952 lava field of the Parícutin monogenetic cinder cone, Mexico. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) time series reveal patchy subsidence restricted to the lava field and following linear rates up to 5.5 cm/year. There is a clear correlation between subsidence rates and topography suggesting a causal relationship with deposits or lava thickness. I estimate these thicknesses in the subsiding areas using pre- and post-eruption topographic maps and show that they reach up to 200 m. A numerical model for lava flow cooling was developed considering radiation and convection from the surface, conductive transfer inside the flow and to the ground, and vesiculation and latent heat generation at the top and bottom of the flow. The model shows that compaction induced by cooling of the thick deposits emplaced ~ 60 years ago explains the observed subsidence when conductive transfer to the ground is considered. These results demonstrate that thick deposits can keep deforming significantly even decades after their emplacement, emphasizing the importance of considering cooling processes when interpreting deformation fields at polygenetic volcanoes producing massive lava fields.

  5. Offshore gravimetric and subsidence monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenvold, Torkjell

    2008-06-15

    The introduction (Chapter 1) is complemented by the introductions given in Chapters 2 to 8. I am the first author of the articles in chapter 2 and 8. For the 5 articles in between I am a coauthor, and the sum of my contributions to those articles (as quantified by the respective first authors) represents about one article. Chapter 2 contains the article 'High-precision relative depth and subsidence mapping from seafloor water-pressure measurements' by Stenvold et al. (2006), published in the SPE Journal. It was submitted in March 2005, and a revised version that also contained results from the Troll 2005 survey (August) was submitted in February 2006. The method of obtaining high-precision relative depth measurements by the use of mobile pressure gauges is presented. Intra-survey and inter-survey depth repeatabilities from six surveys are presented, and the individual contributing errors are discussed and estimated. Average reservoir compressibility for the Troll field between 2002 and 2005 is obtained by matching measured subsidence with modeled subsidence. Chapter 3 contains the article 'A new seafloor gravimeter' by Sasagawa et al. (2003), published in Geophysics. It was submitted in September 2001, and a revised version was submitted in August 2002. This article describes the ROVDOG (Remotely operated Vehicledeployed Deep-Ocean Gravimeter) in detail. Gravity and pressure repeatability results from the two first Troll surveys in 1998 and 2000 are presented. Data reduction, instrumental and environmental corrections are also presented. Chapter 4 contains the article 'Precision of seafloor gravity and pressure measurements for reservoir monitoring' by Zumberge et al., and was submitted 29 February 2008 to Geophysics. This builds on the article by Sasagawa et al. (Chapter 3). Improvements and upto date intra- and inter survey repeatability results are presented. The emphasis is on gravity results since the relative depth measurements

  6. Shearing along faults and stratigraphic joints controlled by land subsidence in the Valley of Queretaro, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreón-Freyre, D.; Cerca, M.; Ochoa-González, G.; Teatini, P.; Zuñiga, F. R.

    2016-05-01

    Slip of nearly vertical faults or horizontal stratigraphic joints has provoked the shearing of at least 16 well casings in a period of over 10 years in the Valley of Queretaro aquifer, Mexico. Evidence integrated from field observations, remote surface-deformation monitoring, in-situ monitoring, stratigraphic correlation, and numerical modeling indicate that groundwater depletion and land subsidence induce shearing. Two main factors conditioning the stress distribution and the location of sheared well casings have been identified: (1) slip on fault planes, and (2) slip on stratigraphic joints. Additionally, the distribution of piezometric gradients may be a factor that enhances shearing. Slip on faults can be generated either by the compaction of sedimentary units (passive faulting) or by slip of blocks delimited by pre-existing faults (reactivation). Major piezometric-level declines and the distribution of hydraulic gradients can also be associated with slip at stratigraphic joints. Faults and hydraulic contrasts in the heterogeneous rock sequence, along with groundwater extraction, influence the distribution of the gradients and delimit the compartments of groundwater in the aquifer. Analogue modeling allowed assessment of the distribution of stress-strain and displacements associated with the increase of the vertical stress. Fault-bounded aquifers in grabens are common in the central part of Mexico and the results obtained can be applied to other subsiding, structurally controlled aquifer systems elsewhere.

  7. Man in Louisiana's coastal zone - From reclamation to subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, D.W. (Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge (USA))

    1990-09-01

    For more than 300 years the US marsh lands were thought to be of no economic value. They were considered useless wastelands. Today, they are recognized as valuable and highly productive environments. As a renewable resource that operates with minimum capital expenditures, the wetlands are epitomized in Louisiana. Even so, south Louisiana's first settlers were unaware of the wetlands value. These coastal lowlands were considered a nuisance. They bred yellow fever-carrying mosquitos and contributed directly and indirectly to flooding. Consequently, to overcome the hardships of being sea-level citizens, for more than 250 years the inhabitants have systematically reclaimed the marshes and swamps. As a result of the intense utilization of levees and pumps, normally wet property began to dry out, losing some of its natural buoyancy, increasing regional subsidence. Man-induced negative land surfaces are producing an urbanized population that must face the realities of subsidence caused by unregulated reclamation. New Orleans has, in fact, become North America's premier sinking city. The population has been forced to learn how to live with the problem. Nevertheless, these people are at risk, particularly if the current predicted sea-level rise of 1.2 mm/yr is correct. In the main, Louisiana's coastal issues will become those of the nation and represent the precursor of things to come. Louisiana's reaction and solutions to these issues will establish a precedent for the remainder of the country to follow.

  8. Sinkhole formation and subsidence along the Dead Sea coast, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yechieli, Yoseph; Abelson, Meir; Baer, Gideon

    2016-05-01

    More than 4,000 sinkholes have formed since the 1980s within a 60-km-long and 1-km-wide strip along the western coast of the Dead Sea (DS) in Israel. Their formation rate accelerated in recent years to >400 sinkholes per year. They cluster mostly in specific sites up to 1,000 m long and 200 m wide, which align parallel to the general direction of the fault systems associated with the DS Rift. The abrupt appearance of the sinkholes reflects changes to the groundwater regime around the shrinking DS. The eastward retreat of the shoreline and the lake-level drop (1 m/year in recent years) cause an eastward and downward migration of the fresh/saline groundwater interface. Consequently, a subsurface salt layer, which was previously enveloped by saline groundwater, is gradually being invaded and submerged by relatively fresh groundwater, and cavities form due to the rapid dissolution of the salt. Collapse of the overlying sediments into these cavities results in sinkholes at the surface. An association between sinkhole sites and land subsidence is revealed by interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements. On a broad scale (hundreds of meters), subsidence occurs due to compaction of fine-grained sediments as groundwater levels decline along the retreating DS shoreline. At smaller scales (tens of meters), subsidence appears above subsurface cavities in association with the sinkholes, serving in many cases as sinkhole precursors, a few weeks to more than a year before their actual appearance at the surface. This paper overviews the processes of sinkhole formation and their relation to land subsidence.

  9. Study of Subsidence and Earthquake Swarms in the Western Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqiu Huang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the Quetta Valley and surrounding areas have experienced unprecedented levels of subsidence, which has been attributed mainly to groundwater withdrawal. However, this region is also tectonically active and is home to several regional strike-slip faults, including the north–south striking left-lateral Chaman Fault System. Several large earthquakes have occurred recently in this area, including one deadly Mw 6.4 earthquake that struck on 28 October 2008. This study integrated Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR results with GPS, gravity, seismic reflection profiles, and earthquake centroid-moment-tensor (CMT data to identify the impact of tectonic and anthropogenic processes on subsidence and earthquake patterns in this region. To detect and map the spatial-temporal features of the processes that led to the surface deformation, this study used two Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR time series, i.e., 15 Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR images acquired by an Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS from 2006–2011 and 40 Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR images spanning 2003–2010. A Small Baseline Subset (SBAS technique was used to investigate surface deformation. Five seismic lines totaling ~60 km, acquired in 2003, were used to map the blind thrust faults beneath a Quaternary alluvium layer. The median filtered SBAS-InSAR average velocity profile supports groundwater withdrawal as the dominant source of subsidence, with some contribution from tectonic subsidence in the Quetta Valley. Results of SBAS-InSAR multi-temporal analysis provide a better explanation for the pre-, co-, and post-seismic displacement pattern caused by the 2008 earthquake swarms across two strike-slip faults.

  10. Neogene residual subsidence and its response to a sinking slab in the deep mantle of eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiang; Liu, ShaoFeng; Bai, Yu; Ji, HuiLi

    2017-08-01

    Mantle convection could have a significant effect on basin evolution; however, research quantifying this relationship is controversial. To understand the formation mechanism and evolution of the Cenozoic rift basins in eastern China, we applied the back-stripping technique and strain rate inversion modeling to 119 wells from Sangjiang Basin, Bohai Bay Basin, North Yellow Sea Basin, South Yellow Sea Basin, East China Sea Shelf Basin, and four basins within the northern South China Sea margin. The modeled results can be used to reconstruct the tectonic subsidence history and further assess the potential subsidence mechanisms of eastern China. Residual subsidence is defined as the difference between the theoretical and observed tectonic subsidences. Our results show that the residual subsidence since 20 Ma in eastern China generally increases from ∼100 to 300 m in terrestrial areas to ∼1.2-1.8 km on the continental shelf. Our observed residual subsidence is generally consistent with the present-day dynamic topography that is predicted from mantle flow models, and it is associated with a stagnant slab within the mantle that has been observed by seismic tomography. The migration pathway of the residual subsidence since 20 Ma is consistent with the movement direction of the Pacific and Philippine plates. Therefore, we suggest that the residual subsidence might be a dynamic subsidence induced by a negative buoyancy of the sinking slab in the deep mantle beneath eastern China.

  11. Review: Regional land subsidence accompanying groundwater extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Devin L.; Burbey, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The extraction of groundwater can generate land subsidence by causing the compaction of susceptible aquifer systems, typically unconsolidated alluvial or basin-fill aquifer systems comprising aquifers and aquitards. Various ground-based and remotely sensed methods are used to measure and map subsidence. Many areas of subsidence caused by groundwater pumping have been identified and monitored, and corrective measures to slow or halt subsidence have been devised. Two principal means are used to mitigate subsidence caused by groundwater withdrawal—reduction of groundwater withdrawal, and artificial recharge. Analysis and simulation of aquifer-system compaction follow from the basic relations between head, stress, compressibility, and groundwater flow and are addressed primarily using two approaches—one based on conventional groundwater flow theory and one based on linear poroelasticity theory. Research and development to improve the assessment and analysis of aquifer-system compaction, the accompanying subsidence and potential ground ruptures are needed in the topic areas of the hydromechanical behavior of aquitards, the role of horizontal deformation, the application of differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry, and the regional-scale simulation of coupled groundwater flow and aquifer-system deformation to support resource management and hazard mitigation measures.

  12. Surface-induced charge at the Ge (001) surface and its interaction with self-interstitials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiyama, Eiji; Sueoka, Koji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan); Vanhellemont, Jan [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2014-02-21

    The Ge (001) surface with dimer structure, is negatively charged while into the bulk, positive charges are observed even deeper than the fifteenth layer from the surface. This is different from the Si case. This charge distribution can lead to the repulsion of positively charged self-interstitials by the positively charged near surface layer in an implantation or irradiation process. Self-interstitial reflection by Ge surfaces had been proposed to explain the results of diffusion experiments during irradiation whereby positively charged self-interstitials are generated by collisions of highly energetic particles with Ge atoms. We investigated different Ge (001) surface comparing an as-cleaved surface with dangling bonds to a surface with dimer structure, and to a surface terminated by hydrogen atoms. The effect of these different surface terminations on the surface-induced charges in the near surface bulk were calculated by ab initio techniques.

  13. Surface Hydrophobicity and Surface Rigidity Induce Spore Germination in Colletotrichum graminicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaky, J; Anderson, K; Moss, M; Vaillancourt, L

    2001-06-01

    ABSTRACT We investigated the relationship between physical characteristics of artificial surfaces, spore attachment, and spore germination in Colletotrichum graminicola. Surface hydrophobicity and surface rigidity were both signals for breaking dormancy and initiating spore germination, but spore attachment alone was not an important inducing signal. The presence of a carbon source overrode the necessity for a rigid, hydrophobic substrate for spore germination. Spore attachment was typically stronger to more hydrophobic surfaces, but certain hydrophilic surfaces also proved to be good substrates for spore attachment. In contrast to spore germination, appressorial induction was more dependent on attachment to a rigid substrate than it was on surface hydrophobicity. Appressoria were induced efficiently on hydrophilic surfaces, as long as there was significant conidial attachment to those surfaces.

  14. Electron beam induced oxidation of Al–Mg alloy surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.; Agterveld, D.T.L. van; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2002-01-01

    Electron beam currents of a few nanoamperes, currently used in nanometer scale scanning Auger/electron microscopy, induces severe oxidation of Al–Mg alloy surfaces at room temperature. Auger peak-to-peak oxygen curves for Al–Mg surfaces support the hypothesis that the electron beam creates

  15. Electron beam induced oxidation of Al–Mg alloy surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.; Agterveld, D.T.L. van; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2002-01-01

    Electron beam currents of a few nanoamperes, currently used in nanometer scale scanning Auger/electron microscopy, induces severe oxidation of Al–Mg alloy surfaces at room temperature. Auger peak-to-peak oxygen curves for Al–Mg surfaces support the hypothesis that the electron beam creates additiona

  16. Characterization of the multi-component driving land subsidence using Persistent Scatterer Interferometry technique: the Ravenna case of study (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonì, Roberta; Fiaschi, Simone; Calcaterra, Domenico; Di Martire, Diego; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Meisina, Claudia; Perini, Luisa; Ramondini, Massimo; Tessitore, Serena; Floris, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Land subsidence represents a kind of hazard, which affects an increasing number of worldwide regions, densely populated, causing damage to the environment and infrastructures. Settlements can be related to multiple processes both natural and anthropic (i.e. vadose zone processes, soil consolidation, aquifer compaction, solid and fluid extraction and load-induced compaction) which take place at different spatio-temporal scale. Over the last decades, advanced subsidence studies exploited Synthetic-Aperture Radar (SAR) data, a recent remote sensing tool, to investigate land subsidence phenomena around the world. In particular, Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) technique, allowing a quantitative estimation at high resolution of the surface deformations, has already been successfully applied to monitor the phenomenon evolution; PSI measurements represent the cumulative displacement, deriving from the contribution of natural and anthropic components, both superficial and deep. The overlapping of several causative factors makes more difficult to accurately interpret the resulting deformations; therefore, it is essential to implement a suitable methodology to distinguish the shallow and deep components of motion. The aim of our research is to introduce a PSI-based approach not only to monitoring but also to understand the land subsidence mechanism, in order to disentangle the natural and anthropic components of motion. The methodology consists of three main phases: 1) Post-processing elaborations (i.e. interpolation of the cumulated displacements and isokinetics map implementation); 2) Characterization of the subsidence areas (i.e. subsidence pattern recognition by means of automatic time series classification); 3) Mechanisms recognition (i.e. identification of the predisposing and triggering factors and comparison with lito-technical model of subsoil, and with earth measurements). In this work, the methodology has been applied to the Ravenna area, Italy, using

  17. Regional subsidence history and 3D visualization with MATLAB of the Vienna Basin, central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E.; Novotny, J.; Wagreich, M.

    2013-12-01

    This study reconstructed the subsidence history by the backstripping and 3D visualization techniques, to understand tectonic evolution of the Neogene Vienna Basin. The backstripping removes the compaction effect of sediment loading and quantifies the tectonic subsidence. The amount of decompaction was calculated by porosity-depth relationships evaluated from seismic velocity data acquired from two boreholes. About 100 wells have been investigated to quantify the subsidence history of the Vienna Basin. The wells have been sorted into 10 groups; N1-4 in the northern part, C1-4 in the central part and L1-2 in the northernmost and easternmost parts, based on their position within the same block bordered by major faults. To visualize 3D subsidence maps, the wells were arranged to a set of 3D points based on their map location (x, y) and depths (z1, z2, z3 ...). The division of the stratigraphic column and age range was arranged based on the Central Paratethys regional Stages. In this study, MATLAB, a numerical computing environment, was used to calculate the TPS interpolation function. The Thin-Plate Spline (TPS) can be employed to reconstruct a smooth surface from a set of 3D points. The basic physical model of the TPS is based on the bending behavior of a thin metal sheet that is constrained only by a sparse set of fixed points. In the Lower Miocene, 3D subsidence maps show strong evidence that the pre-Neogene basement of the Vienna Basin was subsiding along borders of the Alpine-Carpathian nappes. This subsidence event is represented by a piggy-back basin developed on top of the NW-ward moving thrust sheets. In the late Lower Miocene, Group C and N display a typical subsidence pattern for the pull-apart basin with a very high subsidence event (0.2 - 1.0 km/Ma). After the event, Group N shows remarkably decreasing subsidence, following the thin-skinned extension which was regarded as the extension model of the Vienna Basin in the literature. But the subsidence in

  18. Eddy-Induced Ekman Pumping from Sea-Surface Temperature and Surface Current Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaube, P.; Chelton, D. B.; O'Neill, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    Numerous past studies have discussed the biological importance of upwelling of nutrients into the interiors of nonlinear eddies. Such upwelling can occur during the transient stages of formation of cyclones from shoaling of the thermocline. In their mature stages, upwelling can occur from Ekman pumping driven by eddy-induced wind stress curl. Previous investigations of ocean-atmosphere interaction in regions of persistent sea-surface temperature (SST) frontal features have shown that the wind field is locally stronger over warm water and weaker over cold water. Spatial variability of the SST field thus results in a wind stress curl and an associated Ekman pumping in regions of crosswind temperature gradients. It can therefore be anticipated that any SST anomalies associated with eddies can generate Ekman pumping in the eddy interiors. Another mechanism for eddy-induced Ekman pumping is the curl of the stress on the sea surface that arises from the difference between the surface wind velocity and the surface ocean velocity. While SST-induced Ekman upwelling can occur over eddies of either polarity surface current effects on Ekman upwelling occur only over anticyclonic eddies The objective of this study is to determine the spatial structures and relative magnitudes of the two mechanisms for eddy-induced Ekman pumping within the interiors of mesoscale eddies. This is achieved by collocating satellite-based measurements of SST, surface winds and wind stress curl to the interiors of eddies identified and tracked with an automated procedure applied to the sea-surface height (SSH) fields in the Reference Series constructed by AVISO from the combined measurements by two simultaneously operating altimeters. It is shown that, on average, the wind stress curl from eddy-induced surface currents is largest at the eddy center, resulting in Ekman pumping velocities of order 10 cm day-1. While this surface current-induced Ekman pumping depends only weakly on the wind direction

  19. Long Wall Mining Subsidence and Fluvial Stream Changes: an Ecological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, R.; Proch, T.

    2005-05-01

    Long wall mining is a high efficiency underground coal extraction technique that removes large panels of coal and causes immediate subsidence of the overburden. Surface subsidence may vary between 0.3 meters and 2 meters depending on the depth of the coal seam. Fractures in the overburden allow perched water tables to drain to greater depths and dries up their associated springs. Base flow in headwater streams is often eliminated. Subsidence also changes the physical characteristics of streams. Typical riffle pool sequences are replaced with long pools and glides. Benthic invertebrate and fish community assemblages reflect the physical habitat changes. EPT invertebrate taxa are replaced with Odonates and Diptera larvae associated with glide/pool habitat. Fish community diversity is negatively impacted. Diverse riffle dwelling assemblages are replaced and dominated by increasingly homogenous pool dwelling fish communities. Stream subsidence effectively increases the stream order without increasing its size or flow regime.

  20. Application of GPS technology to build a mine-subsidence observation station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Wei-cai; CHENG Shi-guang; YANG Hai-sheng; LIU Da-peng

    2008-01-01

    We propose the design of an observation station to establish a reliable datum for displacement and deformation analysis at the first working-face subsidence observation station of Liuzhuang Mine. The design considers various geologic and mining con-ditions. Having analyzed the aims of the joint survey and the comprehensive survey, we propose design principles, and work modes,for adopting GPS technology as the position measuring technique to be used in these two stages. Baseline vectors and spatial ad-justments of the GPS network were calculated after study of data processing and quality estimation methods. A coordinate system transformation and error estimates of the transformed GPS network data are discussed. The error estimates in all stages show that the GPS control network of the observation station has sufficient accuracy and is highly efficient. The network thus provides a reli-able datum for analyzing the laws of surface displacement and deformation induced by mining.

  1. Monitoring Mining Subsidence Using A Combination of Phase-Stacking and Offset-Tracking Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongdong Fan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An approach to study the mechanism of mining-induced subsidence, using a combination of phase-stacking and sub-pixel offset-tracking methods, is reported. In this method, land subsidence with a small deformation gradient was calculated using time-series differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (D-InSAR data, whereas areas with greater subsidence were calculated by a sub-pixel offset-tracking method. With this approach, time-series data for mining subsidence were derived in Yulin area using 11 TerraSAR-X (TSX scenes from 13 December 2012 to 2 April 2013. The maximum mining subsidence and velocity values were 4.478 m and 40 mm/day, respectively, which were beyond the monitoring capabilities of D-InSAR and advanced InSAR. The results were compared with the GPS field survey data, and the root mean square errors (RMSE of the results in the strike and dip directions were 0.16 m and 0.11 m, respectively. Four important results were obtained from the time-series subsidence in this mining area: (1 the mining-induced subsidence entered the residual deformation stage within about 44 days; (2 the advance angle of influence changed from 75.6° to 80.7°; (3 the prediction parameters of mining subsidence; (4 three-dimensional deformation. This method could be used to predict the occurrence of mining accidents and to help in the restoration of the ecological environment after mining activities have ended.

  2. Surface Curvature-Induced Directional Movement of Water Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Lv, Cunjing; Yin, Yajun; Zheng, Quanshui

    2010-01-01

    Here we report a surface curvature-induced directional movement phenomenon, based on molecular dynamics simulations, that a nanoscale water droplet at the outer surface of a graphene cone always spontaneously moves toward the larger end of the cone, and at the inner surface toward the smaller end. The analysis on the van der Waals interaction potential between a single water molecule and a curved graphene surface reveals that the curvature with its gradient does generate the driving force resulting in the above directional motion. Furthermore, we found that the direction of the above movement is independent of the wettability, namely is regardless of either hydrophobic or hydrophilic of the surface. However, the latter surface is in general leading to higher motion speed than the former. The above results provide a basis for a better understanding of many reported observations, and helping design of curved surfaces with desired directional surface water transportation.

  3. Threat of land subsidence in and around Kolkata City and East Kolkata Wetlands, West Bengal, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Sahu; P K Sikdar

    2011-06-01

    This paper attempts to estimate the possible rate of land subsidence of Kolkata City including Salt Lake City and the adjoining East Kolkata Wetlands located at the lower part of the deltaic alluvial plain of South Bengal basin. Demand of groundwater for drinking, agricultural and industrial purposes has increased due to rapid urbanization. The subsurface geology consists of Quaternary sediments comprising a succession of clay, silty clay and sand of various grades. Groundwater occurs mostly under confined condition except in those places where the top aquitard has been obliterated due to the scouring action of past channels. Currently, the piezometric head shows a falling trend and it may be accelerated due to further over-withdrawal of groundwater resulting in land subsidence. The estimated mean land subsidence rate is 13.53 mm/year and for 1 m drop in the piezometric head, the mean subsidence is 3.28 cm. The surface expression of the estimated land subsidence is however, cryptic because of a time lag between the settlement of the thick low-permeable aquitard at the top and its surface expression. Therefore, groundwater of the cities and wetland areas should be developed cautiously based on the groundwater potential to minimize the threat of land subsidence.

  4. Electrochemically induced annealing of stainless-steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, G. T.; Hutchings, I. M.; Sasaki, K.

    2000-10-01

    Modification of the surface properties of metals without affecting their bulk properties is of technological interest in demanding applications where surface stability and hardness are important. When austenitic stainless steel is heavily plastically deformed by grinding or rolling, a martensitic phase transformation occurs that causes significant changes in the bulk and surface mechanical properties of the alloy. This martensitic phase can also be generated in stainless-steel surfaces by cathodic charging, as a consequence of lattice strain generated by absorbed hydrogen. Heat treatment of the steel to temperatures of several hundred degrees can result in loss of the martensitic structure, but this alters the bulk properties of the alloy. Here we show that martensitic structures in stainless steel can be removed by appropriate electrochemical treatment in aqueous solutions at much lower temperature than conventional annealing treatments. This electrochemically induced annealing process allows the hardness of cold-worked stainless steels to be maintained, while eliminating the brittle martensitic phase from the surface. Using this approach, we are able to anneal the surface and near-surface regions of specimens that contain rolling-induced martensite throughout their bulk, as well as those containing surface martensite induced by grinding. Although the origin of the electrochemical annealing process still needs further clarification, we expect that this treatment will lead to further development in enhancing the surface properties of metals.

  5. Present-day oxidative subsidence of organic soils and mitigation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deverel, Steven J.; Ingrum, Timothy; Leighton, David

    2016-05-01

    Subsidence of organic soils in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta threatens sustainability of the California (USA) water supply system and agriculture. Land-surface elevation data were collected to assess present-day subsidence rates and evaluate rice as a land use for subsidence mitigation. To depict Delta-wide present-day rates of subsidence, the previously developed SUBCALC model was refined and calibrated using recent data for CO2 emissions and land-surface elevation changes measured at extensometers. Land-surface elevation change data were evaluated relative to indirect estimates of subsidence and accretion using carbon and nitrogen flux data for rice cultivation. Extensometer and leveling data demonstrate seasonal variations in land-surface elevations associated with groundwater-level fluctuations and inelastic subsidence rates of 0.5-0.8 cm yr-1. Calibration of the SUBCALC model indicated accuracy of ±0.10 cm yr-1 where depth to groundwater, soil organic matter content and temperature are known. Regional estimates of subsidence range from 1.8 cm yr-1. The primary uncertainty is the distribution of soil organic matter content which results in spatial averaging in the mapping of subsidence rates. Analysis of leveling and extensometer data in rice fields resulted in an estimated accretion rate of 0.02-0.8 cm yr-1. These values generally agreed with indirect estimates based on carbon fluxes and nitrogen mineralization, thus preliminarily demonstrating that rice will stop or greatly reduce subsidence. Areas below elevations of -2 m are candidate areas for implementation of mitigation measures such as rice because there is active subsidence occurring at rates greater than 0.4 cm yr-1.

  6. Surface-Induced Melting of Metal Nanoclusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Quan-Wen; ZHU Ru-Zeng; WEI Jiu-An; WEN Yu-Hua

    2004-01-01

    @@ We investigate the size effect on melting of metal nanoclusters by molecular dynamics simulation and thermodynamic theory based on Kofman's melt model. By the minimization of the free energy of metal nanoclusters with respect to the thickness of the surface liquid layer, it has been found that the nanoclusters of the same metal have the same premelting temperature Tpre = T0 - T0(γsv -γlv -γst)/(ρLξ) (T0 is the melting point of bulk metal, γsv the solid-vapour interfacial free energy, γlv the liquid-vapour interfacial free energy, γsl the solid-liquid interfacial free energy, ρ the density of metal, L the latent heat of bulk metal, and ξ the characteristic length of surface-interface interaction) to be independent of the size of nanoclusters, so that the characteristic length ξ ofa metal can be obtained easily by Tpre, which can be obtained by experiments or molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The premelting temperature Tpre of Cu is obtained by MD simulations, then ξ is obtained.The melting point Tcm is further predicted by free energy analysis and is in good agreement with the result of our MD simulations. We also predict the maximum premelting-liquid width of Cu nanoclusters with various sizes and the critical size, below which there is no premelting.

  7. Time series prediction of mining subsidence based on a SVM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peixian; Tan Zhixiang; Yah Lili; Deng Kazhong

    2011-01-01

    In order to study dynamic laws of surface movements over coal mines due to mining activities,a dynamic prediction model of surface movements was established,based on the theory of support vector machines (SVM) and times-series analysis.An engineering application was used to verify the correctness of the model.Measurements from observation stations were analyzed and processed to obtain equal-time interval surface movement data and subjected to tests of stationary,zero means and normality.Then the data were used to train the SVM model.A time series model was established to predict mining subsidence by rational choices of embedding dimensions and SVM parameters.MAPE and WIA were used asindicators to evaluate the accuracy of the model and for generalization performance.In the end,the model was used to predict future surface movements.Data from observation stations in Huaibei coal mining area were used as an example.The results show that the maximum absolute error of subsidence is 9 mm,the maximum relative error 1.5%.the maximum absolute error of displacement 7 mm and the maximum relative error 1.8%.The accuracy and reliability of the model meet the requirements of on-site engineering.The results of the study provide a new approach to investigate the dynamics of surface movements.

  8. Superconductivity of metal-induced surface reconstructions on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchihashi, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    Recent progress in superconducting metal-induced surface reconstructions on silicon is reviewed, mainly focusing on the results of the author’s group. After a brief introduction of an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV)-low-temperature (LT)-compatible electron transport measurement system, direct observation of the zero resistance state for the Si(111)-(\\sqrt{7} × \\sqrt{3} )-In surface is described, which demonstrates the existence of a superconducting transition in this class of two-dimensional (2D) materials. The measurement and analysis of the temperature dependence of the critical current density indicate that a surface atomic step works as a Josephson junction. This identification is further confirmed by LT-scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observation of Josephson vortices trapped at atomic steps on the Si(111)-(\\sqrt{7} × \\sqrt{3} )-In surface. These experiments reveal unique features of metal-induced surface reconstructions on silicon that may be utilized to explore novel superconductivity.

  9. Integrating wireless sensor network for monitoring subsidence phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marturià, Jordi; Lopez, Ferran; Gigli, Giovanni; Intrieri, Emanuele; Mucchi, Lorenzo; Fornaciai, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    An innovative wireless sensor network (WSN) for the 3D superficial monitoring of deformations (such as landslides and subsidence) is being developed in the frame of the Wi-GIM project (Wireless sensor network for Ground Instability Monitoring - LIFE12 ENV/IT/001033). The surface movement is detected acquiring the position (x, y and z) by integrating large bandwidth technology able to detect the 3D coordinates of the sensor with a sub-meter error, with continuous wave radar, which allows decreasing the error down to sub-cm. The Estació neighborhood in Sallent is located over the old potassium mine Enrique. This zone has been affected by a subsidence process over more than twenty years. The implementation of a wide network for ground auscultation has allowed monitoring the process of subsidence since 1997. This network consists of: i) a high-precision topographic leveling network to control the subsidence in surface; ii) a rod extensometers network to monitor subsurface deformation; iii) an automatic Leica TCA Total Station to monitor building movements; iv) an inclinometers network to measure the horizontal displacements on subsurface and v) a piezometer to measure the water level. Those networks were implemented within an alert system for an organized an efficient response of the civil protection authorities in case of an emergency. On 23rd December 2008, an acceleration of subsoil movements (of approx. 12-18 cm/year) provoked the activation of the emergency plan by the Catalan Civil Protection. This implied the preventive and scheduled evacuation of the neighbours (January 2009) located in the area with a higher risk of collapse: around 120 residents of 43 homes. As a consequence, the administration implemented a compensation plan for the evacuation of the whole neighbourhood residents and the demolition of 405 properties. In this work, the adaptation and integration process of Wi-GIM system with those conventional monitoring network are presented for its testing

  10. Subsidence due to geothermal fluid withdrawal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasimhan, T. N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Goyal, K. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1984-12-01

    Single-phase and two-phase geothermal reservoirs are currently being exploited for power production in Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, the United States, and elsewhere. Vertical ground displacements of up to 4.5 m and horizontal ground displacements of up to 0.5 m have been observed at Wairakei, New Zealand, that are clearly attributable to the resource exploitation. Similarly, vertical displacements of about 0.13 m have been recorded at The Geysers, California. No significant ground displacements that are attributable to large-scale fluid production have been observed at Larderello, Italy, and Cerro Prieto, Mexico. In this paper, observations show that subsidence due to geothermal fluid production is characterized by such features as an offset of the subsidence bowl from the main area of production, time-lag between production and subsidence, and nonlinear stress-strain relationships. Several plausible conceptual models, of varying degrees of sophistication, have been proposed to explain the observed features. At present, relatively more is known about the physical mechanisms that govern subsidence than the relevant thermal mechanisms. Finally, although attempts have been made to simulate observed geothermal subsidence, the modeling efforts have been seriously limited by a lack of relevant field data needed to sufficiently characterize the complex field system.

  11. Subsidence due to geothermal fluid withdrawal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Goyal, K.P.

    1982-10-01

    Single-phase and two-phase geothermal reservoirs are currently being exploited for power production in Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, the U.S. and elsewhere. Vertical ground displacements of upto 4.5 m and horizontal ground displacements of up t o 0.5 m have been observed at Wairakei, New Zealand that are clearly attributable to the resource exploitation. Similarly, vertical displacements of about 0.13 m have been recorded at The Geysers, California. No significant ground displacements that are attributable to large-scale fluid production have been observed at Larderello, Italy and Cerro Prieto, Mexico. Observations show that subsidence due to geothermal fluid production is characterized by such features as an offset of the subsidence bowl from the main area of production, time-lag between production and subsidence and nonlinear stress-strain relationships. Several plausible conceptual models, of varying degrees of sophistication, have been proposed to explain the observed features. At present, relatively more is known about the physical mechanisms that govern subsidence than the relevant therma mechanisms. Although attempts have been made to simulate observed geothermal subsidence, the modeling efforts have been seriously limited by a lack of relevant field data needed to sufficiently characterize the complex field system.

  12. Water availability and land subsidence in the Central Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunt, Claudia; Sneed, Michelle; Traum, Jonathan A.; Brandt, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The Central Valley in California (USA) covers about 52,000 km2 and is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. This agriculture relies heavily on surface-water diversions and groundwater pumpage to meet irrigation water demand. Because the valley is semi-arid and surface-water availability varies substantially, agriculture relies heavily on local groundwater. In the southern two thirds of the valley, the San Joaquin Valley, historic and recent groundwater pumpage has caused significant and extensive drawdowns, aquifer-system compaction and subsidence. During recent drought periods (2007–2009 and 2012-present), groundwater pumping has increased owing to a combination of decreased surface-water availability and land-use changes. Declining groundwater levels, approaching or surpassing historical low levels, have caused accelerated and renewed compaction and subsidence that likely is mostly permanent. The subsidence has caused operational, maintenance, and construction-design problems for water-delivery and flood-control canals in the San Joaquin Valley. Planning for the effects of continued subsidence in the area is important for water agencies. As land use, managed aquifer recharge, and surface-water availability continue to vary, long-term groundwater-level and subsidence monitoring and modelling are critical to understanding the dynamics of historical and continued groundwater use resulting in additional water-level and groundwater storage declines, and associated subsidence. Modeling tools such as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model, can be used in the evaluation of management strategies to mitigate adverse impacts due to subsidence while also optimizing water availability. This knowledge will be critical for successful implementation of recent legislation aimed toward sustainable groundwater use.

  13. Water availability and land subsidence in the Central Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunt, Claudia C.; Sneed, Michelle; Traum, Jon; Brandt, Justin T.

    2016-05-01

    The Central Valley in California (USA) covers about 52,000 km2 and is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. This agriculture relies heavily on surface-water diversions and groundwater pumpage to meet irrigation water demand. Because the valley is semi-arid and surface-water availability varies substantially, agriculture relies heavily on local groundwater. In the southern two thirds of the valley, the San Joaquin Valley, historic and recent groundwater pumpage has caused significant and extensive drawdowns, aquifer-system compaction and subsidence. During recent drought periods (2007-2009 and 2012-present), groundwater pumping has increased owing to a combination of decreased surface-water availability and land-use changes. Declining groundwater levels, approaching or surpassing historical low levels, have caused accelerated and renewed compaction and subsidence that likely is mostly permanent. The subsidence has caused operational, maintenance, and construction-design problems for water-delivery and flood-control canals in the San Joaquin Valley. Planning for the effects of continued subsidence in the area is important for water agencies. As land use, managed aquifer recharge, and surface-water availability continue to vary, long-term groundwater-level and subsidence monitoring and modelling are critical to understanding the dynamics of historical and continued groundwater use resulting in additional water-level and groundwater storage declines, and associated subsidence. Modeling tools such as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model, can be used in the evaluation of management strategies to mitigate adverse impacts due to subsidence while also optimizing water availability. This knowledge will be critical for successful implementation of recent legislation aimed toward sustainable groundwater use.

  14. Light-Induced Surface Patterning of Silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hong Suk; Lee, Seungwoo; Choi, Jaeho; Lee, Hongkyung; Park, Jung-Ki; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2015-10-27

    Manipulating the size and shape of silica precursor patterns using simple far-field light irradiation and transforming such reconfigured structures into inorganic silica patterns by pyrolytic conversion are demonstrated. The key concept of our work is the use of an azobenzene incorporated silica precursor (herein, we refer to this material as azo-silane composite) as ink in a micromolding process. The moving direction of azo-silane composite is parallel to light polarization direction; in addition, the amount of azo-silane composite movement can be precisely determined by controlling light irradiation time. By exploiting this peculiar phenomenon, azo-silane composite patterns produced using the micromolding technique are arbitrarily manipulated to obtain various structural features including high-resolution size or sophisticated shape. The photoreconfigured patterns formed with azo-silane composites are then converted into pure silica patterns through pyrolytic conversion. The pyrolytic converted silica patterns are uniformly formed over a large area, ensuring crack-free formation and providing high structural fidelity. Therefore, this optical manipulation technique, in conjunction with the pyrolytic conversion process, opens a promising route to the design of silica patterns with finely tuned structural features in terms of size and shape. This platform for designing silica structures has significant value in various nanotechnology fields including micro/nanofluidic channel for lab-on-a-chip devices, transparent superhydrophobic surfaces, and optoelectronic devices.

  15. Light induced modulation instability of surfaces under intense illumination

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.

    2013-12-17

    We show that a flat surface of a polymer in rubber state illuminated with intense electromagnetic radiation is unstable with respect to periodic modulation. Initial periodic perturbation is amplified due to periodic thermal expansion of the material heated by radiation. Periodic heating is due to focusing-defocusing effects caused by the initial surface modulation. The surface modulation has a period longer than the excitation wavelength and does not require coherent light source. Therefore, it is not related to the well-known laser induced periodic structures on polymer surfaces but may contribute to their formation and to other phenomena of light-matter interaction.

  16. November 2016 West Hackberry Subsidence Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, Dylan Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lord, Anna C. Snider [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Subsidence monitoring is a critical component to understanding the cavern integrity of salt storage caverns. This report looks at historical and recent data from two of the three West Hackberry dome cavern operators. DOE SPR and LA Storage are coordinating subsidence surveys to create a comprehensive understanding of ground movement above the dome. Data from annual level and rod surveys, GPS, and tiltmeter data show the sites are experiencing typical ground movement. The highest subsidence rate is seen in the middle of the DOE SPR site at just under one inch per year with less ground movement around the edge of the site. A GPS and tiltmeter instrument in the northeast areas of the DOE SPR site has not seen any trend change since the devices were installed in 2013. Comparison between recent ground movement data and historical trends suggest that there is no reason to believe that any DOE SPR or LA Storage caverns have been structurally compromised.

  17. Robust processing of mining subsidence monitoring data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Mingzhong; Huang Guogang [Pingdingshan Mining Bureau (China); Wang Yunjia; Guogangli [China Univ. of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou (China)

    1996-12-31

    Since China began to do research on mining subsidence in 1950s, more than one thousand lines have been observed. Yet, monitoring data sometimes contain quite a lot of outliers because of the limit of observation and geological mining conditions. In China, nowdays, the method of processing mining subsidence monitoring data is based on the principle of the least square method. It is possible to produce lower accuracy, less reliability, or even errors. For reason given above, the authors, according to Chinese actual situation, have done some research work on the robust processing of mining subsidence monitoring data in respect of how to get prediction parameters. The authors have derived related formulas, designed some computational programmes, done a great quantity of actual calculation and simulation, and achieved good results. (orig.)

  18. Subsidence and collapse sinkholes in soluble rock: a numerical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Romanov, Douchko; Hiller, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Soluble rocks such as limestone, gypsum, anhydrite, and salt are prone to subsidence and the sudden creation of collapse sinkholes. The reason for this behaviour stems from the solubility of the rock: Water percolating through fissures and bedding partings can remove material from the rock walls and thus increase the permeability of the host rock by orders of magnitudes. This process occurs on time scales of 1,000-100,000 years, resulting in enlarged fractures, voids and cavities, which then carry flow efficiently through the rock. The enlargement of sub-surface voids to the meter-size within such short times creates mechanical conditions prone to collapse. The collapse initiates at depth, but then propagates to the surface. By means of numerical modelling, we discuss the long-term evolution of secondary porosity in gypsum rocks, resulting in zones of sub-surface voids, which then become mechanically unstable and collapse. We study two real-world case scenarios, in which we can relate field observations to our numerical model: (i) A dam-site scenario, where flow around the dam caused widespread dissolution of gypsum and subsequent subsidence of the dam and a nearby highway. (ii) A natural collapse sinkhole forming as a result of freshwater inflow into a shallow anhydrite formation with rapid evolution of voids in the sub-surface.

  19. Anatomy of Subsidence in Tianjin from Time Series InSAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater is a major source of fresh water in Tianjin Municipality, China. The average rate of groundwater extraction in this area for the last 20 years fluctuates between 0.6 and 0.8 billion cubic meters per year. As a result, significant subsidence has been observed in Tianjin. In this study, C-band Envisat (Environmental Satellite ASAR (Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar images and L-band ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite PALSAR (Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar data were employed to recover the Earth’s surface evolution during the period between 2007 and 2009 using InSAR time series techniques. Similar subsidence patterns can be observed in the overlapping area of the ASAR and PALSAR mean velocity maps with a maximum radar line of sight rate of ~170 mm·year−1. The west subsidence is modeled for ground water volume change using Mogi source array. Geological control by major faults on the east subsidence is analyzed. Storage coefficient of the east subsidence is estimated by InSAR displacements and temporal pattern of water level changes. InSAR has proven a useful tool for subsidence monitoring and displacement interpretation associated with underground water usage.

  20. Evaluating Land Subsidence Rates and Their Implications for Land Loss in the Lower Mississippi River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available High subsidence rates, along with eustatic sea-level change, sediment accumulation and shoreline erosion have led to widespread land loss and the deterioration of ecosystem health around the Lower Mississippi River Basin (LMRB. A proper evaluation of the spatial pattern of subsidence rates in the LMRB is the key to understanding the mechanisms of the submergence, estimating its potential impacts on land loss and the long-term sustainability of the region. Based on the subsidence rate data derived from benchmark surveys from 1922 to 1995, this paper constructed a subsidence rate surface for the region through the empirical Bayesian kriging (EBK interpolation method. The results show that the subsidence rates in the region ranged from 1.7 to 29 mm/year, with an average rate of 9.4 mm/year. Subsidence rates increased from north to south as the outcome of both regional geophysical conditions and anthropogenic activities. Four areas of high subsidence rates were found, and they are located in Orleans, Jefferson, Terrebonne and Plaquemines parishes. A projection of future landscape loss using the interpolated subsidence rates reveals that areas below zero elevation in the LMRB will increase from 3.86% in 2004 to 19.79% in 2030 and 30.88% in 2050. This translates to a growing increase of areas that are vulnerable to land loss from 44.3 km2/year to 240.7 km2/year from 2011 to 2050. Under the same scenario, Lafourche, Plaquemines and Terrebonne parishes will experience serious loss of wetlands, whereas Orleans and Jefferson parishes will lose significant developed land, and Lafourche parish will endure severe loss of agriculture land.

  1. Subsidence and capillary effects in chalks

    CERN Document Server

    Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu Jun

    2008-01-01

    Based on the concepts of the mechanics of unsaturated soils where capillary phenomena arise between the wetting fluid (water) and the non-wetting one (air), the subsidence of chalks containing oil (non-wetting fluid) during water injection (wetting fluid) is analysed. It is shown that the collapse phenomenon of unsaturated soils under wetting provides a physical explanation and a satisfactory prediction of the order of magnitude of the subsidence of the chalk. The use of a well established constitutive model for unsaturated soils allows a description of the hydro-mechanical history of the chalk, from its deposition to the oil exploitation.

  2. Cenozoic residual subsidence and its response to sinking slab in deep mantle in eastern part of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiang; Liu, Shaofeng; Ma, Pengfei; Lin, Chengfa

    2016-04-01

    Mantle convection could have a significant effect on basin evolution. However, the research on quantifying this relationship is controversial. To understand the formating mechanisms and evolution of the Cenozoic rift basin in eastern part of China, we applied backstripping and strain rate inversion modeling to 119 wells from the Sangjiang Basin, Bohai Bay Basin, North Yellow Sea Basin, South Yellow Sea Basin, East China Sea Shelf Basin and South China Sea Basin. The modeled results help us reconstruct the tectonic subsidence history and further assess the potential subsidence mechanisms of the eastern China. Post-rift residual subsidence is defined as the discrepancy between observed and predicted post-rift subsidence based on the uniform stretching model, following lithospheric thinning events. Our results show that the residual subsidence since 20Ma in eastern part of China generally increases from ˜100-300 m in terrestrial area to ˜1.2-1.8 km in continental shelf. Our observed residual subsidence is generally in agree with present-day dynamic topography predicted from mantle flow models, and is coupled with stagnant slab within the mantle recorded by seismic tomography. Therefore, we suggest that the residual subsidence might be a dynamic subsidence induced by a negative buoyancy of the sinking slab in the deep mantle beneath the eastern China.

  3. Land subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA, 2007-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, M.; Brandt, J. T.

    2015-11-01

    Rapid land subsidence was recently measured using multiple methods in two areas of the San Joaquin Valley (SJV): between Merced and Fresno (El Nido), and between Fresno and Bakersfield (Pixley). Recent land-use changes and diminished surface-water availability have led to increased groundwater pumping, groundwater-level declines, and land subsidence. Differential land subsidence has reduced the flow capacity of water-conveyance systems in these areas, exacerbating flood hazards and affecting the delivery of irrigation water. Vertical land-surface changes during 2007-2014 were determined by using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS), and extensometer data. Results of the InSAR analysis indicate that about 7600 km2 subsided 50-540 mm during 2008-2010; CGPS and extensometer data indicate that these rates continued or accelerated through December 2014. The maximum InSAR-measured rate of 270 mm yr-1 occurred in the El Nido area, and is among the largest rates ever measured in the SJV. In the Pixley area, the maximum InSAR-measured rate during 2008-2010 was 90 mm yr-1. Groundwater was an important part of the water supply in both areas, and pumping increased when land use changed or when surface water was less available. This increased pumping caused groundwater-level declines to near or below historical lows during the drought periods 2007-2009 and 2012-present. Long-term groundwater-level and land-subsidence monitoring in the SJV is critical for understanding the interconnection of land use, groundwater levels, and subsidence, and evaluating management strategies that help mitigate subsidence hazards to infrastructure while optimizing water supplies.

  4. Positron annihilation induced Auger and gamma spectroscopies of surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, A.H. [Physics Department, Box 19059, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)]. E-mail: weiss@uta.edu; Fazleev, N.G. [Physics Department, Box 19059, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Nadesalingam, M.P. [Physics Department, Box 19059, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Mukherjee, S. [Physics Department, Box 19059, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Xie, S. [Physics Department, Box 19059, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Zhu, J. [Physics Department, Box 19059, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Davis, B.R. [Physics Department, Box 19059, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)

    2007-02-15

    The annihilation of positrons with core electrons results in an element specific signature in the spectra of Auger-electron and annihilation gamma rays. Because a large fraction of positrons implanted at low energies become trapped just outside the surface, annihilation induced Auger and Gamma signals probe the surfaces of solids with single atomic layer depth resolution. Recent applications of positron annihilation-induced Auger electron spectroscopy (PAES) and Auger-gamma coincidence spectroscopy (AGCS) and future applications of Auger-gamma and gamma-gamma coincidence spectroscopy are discussed.

  5. Positron annihilation induced Auger and gamma spectroscopies of surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, A. H.; Fazleev, N. G.; Nadesalingam, M. P.; Mukherjee, S.; Xie, S.; Zhu, J.; Davis, B. R.

    2007-02-01

    The annihilation of positrons with core electrons results in an element specific signature in the spectra of Auger-electron and annihilation gamma rays. Because a large fraction of positrons implanted at low energies become trapped just outside the surface, annihilation induced Auger and Gamma signals probe the surfaces of solids with single atomic layer depth resolution. Recent applications of positron annihilation-induced Auger electron spectroscopy (PAES) and Auger-gamma coincidence spectroscopy (AGCS) and future applications of Auger-gamma and gamma-gamma coincidence spectroscopy are discussed.

  6. Geometrically induced surface polaritons in planar nanostructured metallic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, P. S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Intravia, F [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalvit, Diego A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-14

    We examine the modal structure and dispersion of periodically nanostructured planar metallic cavities within the scattering matrix formulation. By nanostructuring a metallic grating in a planar cavity, artificial surface excitations or spoof plasmon modes are induced with dispersion determined by the periodicity and geometric characteristics of the grating. These spoof surface plasmon modes are shown to give rise to new cavity polaritonic modes at short mirror separations that modify the density of modes in nanostructured cavities. The increased modal density of states form cavity polarirons have a large impact on the fluctuation induced electromagnetic forces and enhanced hear transfer at short separations.

  7. Subsidence history and forming mechanism of anomalous tectonic subsidence in the Bozhong depression, Bohaiwan basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Bozhong depression of the Bohaiwan basin belongs to a family of extensional basins in East China, but is quite different from other parts of the basin. The Cenozoic subsidence of the depression is controlled by a combination of lithospheric thinning and polycyclic strike-slip movements. Three episodic rifts have been identified, i.e. Paleocence-early Eocene, middle-late Eocene and Oligocene age. The depression underwent syn-rift and post-rift stages, but two episodic dextral movement events of the strike-slip faults modify the subsidence of the Bozhong depression since the Oligocene. The early dextral movement of the Tan-Lu fault associated with crustal extension resulted in accelerated subsidence during the time of deposition of the Dongying Formation with a maximum thickness of 4000 m. A late reactivation of dextral movement of the Tan-Lu fault began in late Miocene (about 12 Ma), which resulted in the intense subsidence of Minghuazhen Formation and Quaternary. In addition, dynamic mantle convection-driven topography also accelerated the post-rift anomalous subsidence since the Miocene (24.6 Ma). Our results indicate that the primary control on rapid subsidence both during the rift and post-rift stages in the Bozhong depression originates from a combination of multiple episodic crustal extension and polycyclic dextral movements of strike-slip faults, and dynamic topography. tectonic subsidence, strike-slip, dynamic topography, Bozhong depression, Bohaiwan basin

  8. Enhanced surface plasmon polariton propagation induced by active dielectrics

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasopoulos, C.; Mattheakis, M.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2013-01-01

    We present numerical simulations for the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons in a dielectric-metal-dielectric waveguide using COMSOL multiphysics software. We show that the use of an active dielectric with gain that compensates metal absorption losses enhances substantially plasmon propagation. Furthermore, the introduction of the active material induces, for a specific gain value, a root in the imaginary part of the propagation constant leading to infinite propagation of the surface pl...

  9. Ion-Induced Surface Modification of Magnetically Operated Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Arushanov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A study has been made of permalloy (iron-nickel contacts of reed switches before and after ion-induced surface modification using atomic force and optical microscopy, Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It has been found that the formation of surface nitride layers enhances corrosion and erosion resistance of contacts. We proposed to produce such layers directly into sealed reed switches by means of pulsing glow-discharge nitrogen plasma.

  10. Mechanism of Hydrophilicity by Radiation-Induced Surface Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honjo, Yoshio; Furuya, Masahiro; Takamasa, Tomoji; Okamoto, Koji

    When a metal oxide is irradiated by gamma rays, the irradiated surface becomes hydrophilic. This surface phenomenon is called as radiation-induced surface activation (RISA) hydrophilicity. In order to investigate gamma ray-induced and photoinduced hydrophilicity, the contact angles of water droplets on a titanium dioxide surface were measured in terms of irradiation intensity and time for gamma rays of cobalt-60 and for ultraviolet rays. Reciprocals of the contact angles increased in proportion to the irradiation time before the contact angles reached its super-hydrophilic state. The irradiation time dependency is equal to each other qualitatively. In addition, an effect of ambient gas was investigated. In pure argon gas, the contact angle remains the same against the irradiation time. This clearly indicates that certain humidity is required in ambient gas to take place of RISA hydrophilicity. A single crystal titanium dioxide (100) surface was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). After irradiation with gamma rays, a peak was found in the O1s spectrum, which indicates the adsorption of dissociative water to a surface 5-fold coordinate titanium site, and the formation of a surface hydroxyl group. We conclude that the RISA hydrophilicity is caused by chemisorption of the hydroxyl group on the surface.

  11. Preliminary results of land subsidence monitoring project in Konya Closed Basin between 2006–2009 by means of GNSS observations

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    One of the potential dangers that might arise as a result of bringing excessive amounts of groundwater to the surface of the Earth is land subsidence. Such surface deformations – these velocities may vary from a few millimetres to a few metres per year – do the greatest damage to infrastructure facilities and buildings in residential units. Agricultural lands, in which excessive irrigation is performed, and densely populated cities are more likely to suffer from land subsidence. Konya Closed ...

  12. Geomechanics of subsidence above single and multi-seam coal mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.M. Suchowerska Iwanec; J.P. Carter; J.P. Hambleton

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of surface subsidence due to the extraction of underground coal seams is a significant challenge in geotechnical engineering. This task is further compounded by the growing trend for coal to be extracted from seams either above or below previously extracted coal seams, a practice known as multi-seam mining. In order to accurately predict the subsidence above single and multi-seam longwall panels using numerical methods, constitutive laws need to appropriately represent the mechanical behaviour of coal measure strata. The choice of the most appropriate model is not always straightforward. This paper compares predictions of surface subsidence obtained using the finite element method, considering a range of well-known constitutive models. The results show that more sophisticated and numerically taxing constitutive laws do not necessarily lead to more accurate predictions of subsidence when compared to field measurements. The advantages and limitations of using each particular constitutive law are discussed. A comparison of the numerical predictions and field measurements of surface subsidence is also provided.

  13. Geomechanics of subsidence above single and multi-seam coal mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Suchowerska Iwanec

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate prediction of surface subsidence due to the extraction of underground coal seams is a significant challenge in geotechnical engineering. This task is further compounded by the growing trend for coal to be extracted from seams either above or below previously extracted coal seams, a practice known as multi-seam mining. In order to accurately predict the subsidence above single and multi-seam longwall panels using numerical methods, constitutive laws need to appropriately represent the mechanical behaviour of coal measure strata. The choice of the most appropriate model is not always straightforward. This paper compares predictions of surface subsidence obtained using the finite element method, considering a range of well-known constitutive models. The results show that more sophisticated and numerically taxing constitutive laws do not necessarily lead to more accurate predictions of subsidence when compared to field measurements. The advantages and limitations of using each particular constitutive law are discussed. A comparison of the numerical predictions and field measurements of surface subsidence is also provided.

  14. Growth and subsidence of carbonate platforms: numerical modelling and application to the Dolomites, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bosellini

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of subsidence induced by the growth of carbonate platforms has been investigated with the aid of numerical modelling. The research aimed to quantify the relative contribution of this process in the creation of the accommodation space required to pile up thick neritic bodies. We analysed two end-member deformation styles, namely the elastic behaviour of the lithosphere when locally loaded and the plastic-like reaction of a sedimentary succession underlying a growing carbonate buildup. The former process, analysed using a modified flexural model, generates a regional subsidence. In contrast, the latter process, simulated by considering the compaction occurring in soft sediments, generates a local subsidence. We attempted to quantify the amount and distribution of subsidence occurring below and surrounding an isolated platform and in the adjacent basin. The major parameters playing a role in the process are discussed in detail. The model is then applied to the Late Anisian-Early Ladinian generation of carbonate platforms of the Dolomites, Northern Italy, where they are spectacularly exposed. Taking also into account the Tertiary shortening that occurred in the area, both local and regional subsidence contributions of major platform bodies have been calculated aimed at a reconstruction of the map of the induced subsidence. A major outcome of this study is that the accommodation space, that allowed the accumulation of very thick shallow-water carbonate successions in the Dolomites, was only partially due to lithospheric stretching while the contribution given by the 'local' overload is as high as 20-40% of the total subsidence. Our results also shed some light on the water-depth problem of the Triassic basins as well as on the basin-depth to platform-thickness relationships.

  15. Measurement of Subsidence in the Yangbajain Geothermal Fields from TerraSAR-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongsheng; Zhang, Jingfa; Li, Zhenhong

    2016-08-01

    Yangbajain contains the largest geothermal energy power station in China. Geothermal explorations in Yangbajain first started in 1976, and two plants were subsequently built in 1981 and 1986. A large amount of geothermal fluids have been extracted since then, leading to considerable surface subsidence around the geothermal fields. In this paper, InSAR time series analysis is applied to map the subsidence of the Yangbajain geothermal fields during the period from December 2011 to November 2012 using 16 senses of TerraSAR-X stripmap SAR images. Due to its high resolution and short repeat cycle, TerraSAR-X provides detailed surface deformation information at the Yangbajain geothermal fields.

  16. Analysis of long-term land subsidence near Mexico City: Field investigations and predictive modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Guerrero, Adrian; Rudolph, David L.; Cherry, John A.

    1999-11-01

    The Mexico City region has several flat plains formed on exceptionally porous (60-90%) lacustrine deposits overlying a highly productive regional aquifer. Severe land subsidence due to consolidation of the lacustrine aquitard caused by aquifer exploitation has resulted in restrictions on pumping in the core of Mexico City. This has led to large increases in aquifer pumping in the outlying lacustrine plains where satellite communities are rapidly expanding. The Chalco Basin is one of these lacustrine areas where pumping began in the 1950s and greatly increased in the 1980s. The lacustrine sequence in the Chalco area is significantly thicker than anywhere else in the Basin of Mexico averaging 100 m and reaching a maximum thickness of 300 m. Consequently, this area is susceptible to the highest potential land subsidence effects as a result of groundwater extraction of anywhere in the basin. Land subsidence in the central part of the Chalco Basin has increased to 0.4 m/yr since 1984 and by 1991 total subsidence had reached 8 m. The rapid land subsidence in this area is causing the accumulation of meteoric waters during the rainy season resulting in extensive flooding of farmland. This study first demonstrates a methodology for combining hydraulic data from a network of monitoring wells, geotechnical data from core samples, and a compilation of historical information on land surface elevation to quantify groundwater flow and land subsidence phenomena within the rapidly subsiding Chalco Basin. Then a one-dimensional mathematical model is employed to develop predictions of future land subsidence under a range of pumping conditions. The model permits the hydraulic properties of the aquitard to vary as transient functions of hydraulic head and porosity. Simulations suggest that under current pumping rates, total land subsidence in the area of thickest lacustrine sediment will reach 15 m by the year 2010. If pumping is reduced to the extent that further decline in the

  17. Semi-analytic modelling of subsidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokker, P.A.; Orlic, B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a forward model for subsidence prediction caused by extraction of hydrocarbons. The model uses combinations of analytic solutions to the visco-elastic equations, which approximate the boundary conditions. There are only a few unknown parameters to be estimated, and, consequently,

  18. Robust authentication through stochastic femtosecond laser filament induced scattering surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haisu; Tzortzakis, Stelios

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a reliable authentication method by femtosecond laser filament induced scattering surfaces. The stochastic nonlinear laser fabrication nature results in unique authentication robust properties. This work provides a simple and viable solution for practical applications in product authentication, while also opens the way for incorporating such elements in transparent media and coupling those in integrated optical circuits.

  19. Towards Friction Control using laser-induced periodic Surface Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichstädt, J.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at contributing to the study of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the description of their tribological properties in order to facilitate the knowledge for contact mechanical applications. To obtain laser parameters for LIPSS formation, we propose to execute two D

  20. Using surface deformation to infer reservoir dilation induced by injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Asanga Sanjeewee

    Reservoir dilations occur due to variety of subsurface injection operations including waste disposal, waterflooding, steam injection, CO 2 sequestration and aquifer storage recovery. These reservoir dilations propagate to the surrounding formations and extend up to the ground surface resulting in surface deformations. The surface deformations can be measured by using various technologies such as tiltmeters and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and they can be inverted to infer reservoir dilations by solving an ill-posed inverse problem. This concept forms the basis of the research work presented in this thesis. Initially, the characteristics of the surface and subsurface deformations (induced by the injection operations) and correlations between them were investigated in detail by applying both analytical (based on center of dilatation approach) and numerical methods (fully coupled finite element method). Then, a simple set of guidelines to obtain quick estimates for the surface heave characteristics were proposed. The guidelines are in the form of simple analytical equations or charts and thereby they could be very useful in obtaining preliminary assessment for the surface deformation characteristics induced by the subsurface injection operations. Next, the mathematical aspects of the inverse problem were discussed in detail and the factors affecting the accuracy of the inverse solution were investigated through an extensive parametric study including both two-dimensional and three-dimensional problems. Then, a method was developed to infer reservoir dilation (with high accuracy and high spatial resolution) using a limited number of surface deformation measurements. The proposed method was applied to infer the reservoir dilation induced by a waste disposal operation conducted at Frog Lake, Alberta and the practical issues pertaining to the proposed method were discussed. Finally, guidelines for tiltmeter array design were proposed and

  1. Laser-induced periodic surface structuring of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Susana; Rebollar, Esther; Oujja, Mohamed; Martín, Margarita; Castillejo, Marta

    2013-03-01

    We report here on a systematic study about the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on biopolymers. Self-standing films of the biopolymers chitosan, starch and the blend of chitosan with the synthetic polymer poly (vinyl pyrrolidone), PVP, were irradiated in air with linearly polarized laser beams at 193, 213 and 266 nm, with pulse durations in the range of 6-17 ns. The laser-induced periodic surface structures were topographically characterized by atomic force microscopy and the chemical modifications induced by laser irradiation were inspected via Raman spectroscopy. Formation of LIPSS parallel to the laser polarization direction, with periods similar to the laser wavelength, was observed at efficiently absorbed wavelengths in the case of the amorphous biopolymer chitosan and its blend with PVP, while formation of LIPSS is prevented in the crystalline starch biopolymer.

  2. Coral reef evolution on rapidly subsiding margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, J.M.; Braga, J.C.; Clague, D.A.; Gallup, C.; Hein, J.R.; Potts, D.C.; Renema, W.; Riding, R.; Riker-Coleman, K.; Silver, E.; Wallace, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    A series of well-developed submerged coral reefs are preserved in the Huon Gulf (Papua New Guinea) and around Hawaii. Despite different tectonics settings, both regions have experienced rapid subsidence (2-6??m/ka) over the last 500??ka. Rapid subsidence, combined with eustatic sea-level changes, is responsible for repeated drowning and backstepping of coral reefs over this period. Because we can place quantitative constraints on these systems (i.e., reef drowning age, eustatic sea-level changes, subsidence rates, accretion rates, basement substrates, and paleobathymetry), these areas represent unique natural laboratories for exploring the roles of tectonics, reef accretion, and eustatic sea-level changes in controlling the evolution of individual reefs, as well as backstepping of the entire system. A review of new and existing bathymetric, radiometric, sedimentary facies and numerical modeling data indicate that these reefs have had long, complex growth histories and that they are highly sensitive, recording drowning not only during major deglaciations, but also during high-frequency, small-amplitude interstadial and deglacial meltwater pulse events. Analysis of five generalized sedimentary facies shows that reef drowning is characterized by a distinct biological and sedimentary sequence. Observational and numerical modeling data indicate that on precessional (20??ka) and sub-orbital timescales, the rate and amplitude of eustatic sea-level changes are critical in controlling initiation, growth, drowning or sub-aerial exposure, subsequent re-initiation, and final drowning. However, over longer timescales (> 100-500??ka) continued tectonic subsidence and basement substrate morphology influence broad scale reef morphology and backstepping geometries. Drilling of these reefs will yield greatly expanded stratigraphic sections compared with similar reefs on slowly subsiding, stable and uplifting margins, and thus they represent a unique archive of sea-level and climate

  3. Subsidence Contours for South Louisiana; UTM 15N NAD83; LRA (2005); [subsidence_contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The GIS data shapefile represents average subsidence contour intervals (0.02 cm/year over 10,000 years) for Coastal LA derived from the following: Kulp, M.A., 2000,...

  4. Disturbance induced by surface preparation on instrumented indentation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yugang, E-mail: yugang.li@utt.fr [Université de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), ICD-LASMIS, UMR CNRS 6281, 12, rue Marie Curie-CS 42060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France); Kanouté, Pascale, E-mail: pascale.kanoute@onera.fr [Université de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), ICD-LASMIS, UMR CNRS 6281, 12, rue Marie Curie-CS 42060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France); The French Aerospace Lab (ONERA), DMSM/MCE, 29 avenue de la Division Leclerc-BP 72, F-92322 Chatillon Cedex (France); François, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.francois@utt.fr [Université de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), ICD-LASMIS, UMR CNRS 6281, 12, rue Marie Curie-CS 42060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France)

    2015-08-26

    Surface preparation, which may induce considerable sample disturbance, plays an important role in instrumented indentation test (IIT). In this study, the sample disturbance (mainly divided into residual stresses and plastic strain) induced by the surface preparation process of instrumented indentation test specimens were investigated with both experimental tests and numerical simulations. Grazing incidence X-ray diffractions (GIXRD) and uniaxial tensile tests were conducted for characterizing the residual stresses and high plastic strain in the top surface layers of a carefully mechanically polished indentation sample, which, in the present work, is made of commercially pure titanium. Instrumented indentation tests and the corresponding finite element simulations were performed as well. For comparison, a reference sample (carefully mechanically polished & electrolytically polished) which represents the raw material was prepared and tested. Results showed that a careful mechanical polishing procedure can effectively reduce the level of residual stresses induced by this process. However, the high plastic strain in the surface region imposed by the polishing process is significant. The induced plastic strain can affect a depth up to 5 µm, which is deeper than the maximum penetration depth h{sub max} (3 µm) used for the instrumented indentation tests. In the near surface layer (in the range of depth about 350 nm), the plastic strain levels are fairly high. In the very top layer, the plastic strain was even estimated to reach more than 60%. The simultaneous use of indentation tests and numerical simulations showed that the existence of high plastic strain in the surface region will make the load vs depth (P–h) curve shift upwards, the contact hardness (H) increase and the contact stiffness (S) decrease.

  5. Integrated geophysical survey in defining subsidence features on a golf course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jianghai; Miller, Richard D.

    2007-12-01

    Subsidence was observed at several places on the Salina Municipal Golf Course in areas known to be built over a landfill in Salina, Kansas. High-resolution magnetic survey (~5400 m2), multi-channel electrical resistivity profiling (three 154 m lines) and microgravity profiling (23 gravity-station values) were performed on a subsidence site (Green 16) to aid in determining boundaries and density deficiency of the landfill in the vicinity of the subsidence. Horizontal boundaries of the landfill were confidently defined by both magnetic anomalies and the pseudo-vertical gradient of total field magnetic anomalies. Furthermore, the pseudo-vertical gradient of magnetic anomalies presented a unique anomaly at Green 16, which provided a criterion for predicting other spots with subsidence potential using the same gradient property. Results of multi-channel electrical resistivity profiling (ERP) suggested the bottom limit of the landfill at Green 16 was around 21 m below the ground surface based on the vertical gradient of electric resistivity and a priori information on the depth of the landfill. ERP results also outlined several possible landfill bodies based on their low resistivity values. Microgravity results suggested a -0.14 g cm-3 density deficiency at Green 16 that could equate to future surface subsidence of as much as 1.5 m due to gradual compaction.

  6. Land subsidence in the southwestern Mojave Desert, California, 1992–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Justin; Sneed, Michelle

    2017-07-19

    Groundwater has been the primary source of domestic, agricultural, and municipal water supplies in the southwestern Mojave Desert, California, since the early 1900s. Increased demands on water supplies have caused groundwater-level declines of more than 100 feet (ft) in some areas of this desert between the 1950s and the 1990s (Stamos and others, 2001; Sneed and others, 2003). These water-level declines have caused the aquifer system to compact, resulting in land subsidence. Differential land subsidence (subsidence occurring at different rates across the landscape) can alter surface drainage routes and damage surface and subsurface infrastructure. For example, fissuring across State Route 247 at Lucerne Lake has required repairs as has pipeline infrastructure near Troy Lake.Land subsidence within the Mojave River and Morongo Groundwater Basins of the southwestern Mojave Desert has been evaluated using InSAR, ground-based measurements, geology, and analyses of water levels between 1992 and 2009 (years in which InSAR data were collected). The results of the analyses were published in three USGS reports— Sneed and others (2003), Stamos and others (2007), and Solt and Sneed (2014). Results from the latter two reports were integrated with results from other USGS/ MWA cooperative groundwater studies into the broader scoped USGS Mojave Groundwater Resources Web site (http://ca.water.usgs.gov/ mojave/). This fact sheet combines the detailed analyses from the three subsidence reports, distills them into a longer-term context, and provides an assessment of options for future monitoring.

  7. Integrated geophysical survey in defining subsidence features on a golf course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    Subsidence was observed at several places on the Salina Municipal Golf Course in areas known to be built over a landfill in Salina, Kansas. High-resolution magnetic survey (???5400 m2), multi-channel electrical resistivity profiling (three 154 m lines) and microgravity profiling (23 gravity-station values) were performed on a subsidence site (Green 16) to aid in determining boundaries and density deficiency of the landfill in the vicinity of the subsidence. Horizontal boundaries of the landfill were confidently defined by both magnetic anomalies and the pseudo-vertical gradient of total field magnetic anomalies. Furthermore, the pseudo-vertical gradient of magnetic anomalies presented a unique anomaly at Green 16, which provided a criterion for predicting other spots with subsidence potential using the same gradient property. Results of multi-channel electrical resistivity profiling (ERP) suggested the bottom limit of the landfill at Green 16 was around 21 m below the ground surface based on the vertical gradient of electric resistivity and a priori information on the depth of the landfill. ERP results also outlined several possible landfill bodies based on their low resistivity values. Microgravity results suggested a -0.14 g cm-3 density deficiency at Green 16 that could equate to future surface subsidence of as much as 1.5 m due to gradual compaction. ?? 2007 Nanjing Institute of Geophysical Prospecting.

  8. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of laser-induced periodic surface structures on nickel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedao, Xxx, E-mail: sedao.xxx@gmail.com [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France); Maurice, Claire [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 St-Etienne (France); Garrelie, Florence; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France); Quey, Romain; Blanc, Gilles [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 St-Etienne (France); Pigeon, Florent [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlight: •Lattice rotation and its distribution in laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the subsurface region on a nickel substrate are revealed using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). -- Abstract: We report on the structural investigation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) generated in polycrystalline nickel target after multi-shot irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is used to reveal lattice rotation caused by dislocation storage during LIPSS formation. Localized crystallographic damages in the LIPSS are detected from both surface and cross-sectional EBSD studies. A surface region (up to 200 nm) with 1–3° grain disorientation is observed in localized areas from the cross-section of the LIPSS. The distribution of the local disorientation is inhomogeneous across the LIPSS and the subsurface region.

  9. Femoral prosthesis subsidence in asymptomatic patients. A stereophotogrammetric assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafetz, N; Baumrind, S; Murray, W R; Genant, H K

    1984-01-01

    A radiographic stereophotogrammetric technique (SPG) was used to evaluate quantitatively the presence of early femoral prosthesis subsidence after total hip arthroplasty (THA). This paper focuses on the measurement of subsidence in 12 patients who remained asymptomatic during the first two years after surgery. Only one of these had SPG estimated subsidence in excess of one millimeter at any timepoint. These findings are consistent with the conclusion that early postoperative subsidence is not a common finding among asymptomatic THA patients.

  10. Superoleophobic behavior induced by nanofeatures on oleophilic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Stella M M; Benyagoub, Abdenacer; Canut, Bruno; Jamois, Cécile

    2010-04-06

    The control of surface wetting properties to produce robust and strong hydrophobic and oleophobic effects on intrinsically oleophilic surfaces is at the heart of many technological applications. In this paper, we explore the conditions to observe such effects when the roughness of the substrate is of fractal nature and consists of nanofeatures obtained by the ion track etching technique. The wetting properties were investigated using eight different liquids with surface tensions gamma varying from 18 to 72 mN m(-1). While it is observed that all the tested oils readily wet the flat substrates, it is found that the contact angles are systematically exalted on the rough surfaces even for the liquids with very low surface tension. For liquids with gamma > or = 25 mN m(-1) an oleophobic behavior is clearly induced by the nanostructuration. For liquids with gamma < 25 mN m(-1), although the contact angle is enhanced on the nanorough surfaces, it conserves its oleophilic character (theta* lower than 90 degrees). Moreover, our experiments show that even in the case of hexane, liquid having the lowest surface tension, the homogeneous wetting (Wenzel state) is never reached. This high resistance to liquid impregnation is discussed within the framework of recent approaches explaining the wetting properties of superoleophobic surfaces.

  11. Bio-Inspired Functional Surfaces Based on Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Frank A.; Clemens Kunz; Stephan Gräf

    2016-01-01

    Nature developed numerous solutions to solve various technical problems related to material surfaces by combining the physico-chemical properties of a material with periodically aligned micro/nanostructures in a sophisticated manner. The utilization of ultra-short pulsed lasers allows mimicking numerous of these features by generating laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS). In this review paper, we describe the physical background of LIPSS generation as well as the physical princip...

  12. Sulfur-induced structural motifs on copper and gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walen, Holly [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of sulfur with copper and gold surfaces plays a fundamental role in important phenomena that include coarsening of surface nanostructures, and self-assembly of alkanethiols. Here, we identify and analyze unique sulfur-induced structural motifs observed on the low-index surfaces of these two metals. We seek out these structures in an effort to better understand the fundamental interactions between these metals and sulfur that lends to the stability and favorability of metal-sulfur complexes vs. chemisorbed atomic sulfur. The experimental observations presented here—made under identical conditions—together with extensive DFT analyses, allow comparisons and insights into factors that favor the existence of metal-sulfur complexes, vs. chemisorbed atomic sulfur, on metal terraces. We believe this data will be instrumental in better understanding the complex phenomena occurring between the surfaces of coinage metals and sulfur.

  13. THE THREE DIMENSIONAL MODELS AND THEIR IDENTIFICATION MINING SUBSIDENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUGe; SHENGuanghan; JIXiaoming; WANGQuanke

    1995-01-01

    The theory and method for selecting the three dimensional prediction models of mining subsidence are studied in this paper. Namely, based on system identification and statistics theory, an optimum mining subsidence prediction model can be selected. The method proved by a typical case has a good prospect for determining the physical model of rock mass for mining subsidence prediction.

  14. Subsidence monitoring with geotechnical instruments in the Mexicali Valley, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacka, E.; Sarychikhina, O.; Márquez Ramírez, V. H.; Robles, B.; Nava, F. A.; Farfán, F.; García Arthur, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    The Mexicali Valley (northwestern Mexico), situated in the southern part of the San Andreas fault system, is an area with high tectonic deformation, recent volcanism, and active seismicity. Since 1973, fluid extraction, from the 1500-3000 m depth range, at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field (CPGF), has influenced deformation in the Mexicali Valley area, accelerating the subsidence and causing slip along the traces of tectonic faults that limit the subsidence area. Detailed field mapping done since 1989 (González et al., 1998; Glowacka et al., 2005; Suárez-Vidal et al., 2008) in the vicinity of the CPGF shows that many subsidence induced fractures, fissures, collapse features, small grabens, and fresh scarps are related to the known tectonic faults. Subsidence and fault rupture are causing damage to infrastructure, such as roads, railroad tracks, irrigation channels, and agricultural fields. Since 1996, geotechnical instruments installed by CICESE (Centro de Investigación Ciéntifica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada, B.C.) have operated in the Mexicali Valley, for continuous recording of deformation phenomena. Instruments are installed over or very close to the affected faults. To date, the network includes four crackmeters and eight tiltmeters; all instruments have sampling intervals in the 1 to 20 min range. Instrumental records typically show continuous creep, episodic slip events related mainly to the subsidence process, and coseismic slip discontinuities (Glowacka et al., 1999, 2005, 2010; Sarychikhina et al., 2015). The area has also been monitored by levelling surveys every few years and, since the 1990's by studies based on DInSAR data (Carnec and Fabriol, 1999; Hansen, 2001; Sarychikhina et al., 2011). In this work we use data from levelling, DInSAR, and geotechnical instruments records to compare the subsidence caused by anthropogenic activity and/or seismicity with slip recorded by geotechnical instruments, in an attempt to obtain more information

  15. Current Land Subsidence in Tianjin, China Recorded by Three Continuous GPS stations (2010-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, X.; Jing, Q.; Yan, B.; Yu, J.; Gan, W.; Wang, G.

    2014-12-01

    In the past two decades, Global Positioning System (GPS) technologies have been frequently applied to urban subsidence studies, both as a complement, and an alternative to conventional surveying methods. These studies have demonstrated that high-accuracy GPS techniques are an efficient tool in tracking long-term land subsidence. A great number of Continuously Operating Reference GPS Stations (CORS) have been installed in China during the past five years. Considerable land subsidence has been observed from CORS stations installed in several large cities. This study investigated GPS time series observed at three CORS in Tianjin: TJBD (2010-2014), TJBH (2010-2014), and TJWQ (2010-2014). Tianjin is one of the largest cities that is experiencing severe land subsidence problems in China. The observations at the three GPS sites indicate different subsidence rates. The average subsidence rate over four years are 0.2 cm/year at TJBD, 2 cm/year at TJBH, and 4.4 cm/year at TJWQ. The GPS station TJBD is located at Baodi, Tianjin. This area is the least economically developed and have the smallest population compared to the other two areas. Over 80% of water usage in Baodi is for agriculture and only less than 15% is from groundwater. The rapid subsidence at TJBH and TJWQ were caused by huge groundwater withdrawals associate with rapid urban and industrial developments in Binhai and Wuqing. Wuqing district, with a unique location advantage called "Corridor of Beijing and Tianjin", has been experiencing major urbanization. The population has reached 1,053,300 and the water usage has reached 350 million cubic meters in 2012. Over 25% of water usage is from groundwater. Significant annual and half-annual seasonal ground surface fluctuation has been observed from all three GPS stations. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the annual signal is 1.5 cm.

  16. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of laser-induced periodic surface structures on nickel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedao, Xxx; Maurice, Claire; Garrelie, Florence; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Quey, Romain; Blanc, Gilles; Pigeon, Florent

    2014-05-01

    We report on the structural investigation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) generated in polycrystalline nickel target after multi-shot irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is used to reveal lattice rotation caused by dislocation storage during LIPSS formation. Localized crystallographic damages in the LIPSS are detected from both surface and cross-sectional EBSD studies. A surface region (up to 200 nm) with 1-3° grain disorientation is observed in localized areas from the cross-section of the LIPSS. The distribution of the local disorientation is inhomogeneous across the LIPSS and the subsurface region.

  17. Genesis of femtosecond-induced nanostructures on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlamova, Olga; Martens, Christian; Ratzke, Markus; Reif, Juergen

    2014-11-01

    The start and evolution of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS, ripples) are investigated. The important role of irradiation dose (fluence×number of pulses) for the properties of the generated structures is demonstrated. It is shown how, with an increasing dose, the structures evolve from random surface modification to regular sub-wavelength ripples, then coalesce to broader LIPSS and finally form more complex shapes when ablation produces deep craters. First experiments are presented following this evolution in one single irradiated spot.

  18. Bio-Inspired Functional Surfaces Based on Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A. Müller

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nature developed numerous solutions to solve various technical problems related to material surfaces by combining the physico-chemical properties of a material with periodically aligned micro/nanostructures in a sophisticated manner. The utilization of ultra-short pulsed lasers allows mimicking numerous of these features by generating laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS. In this review paper, we describe the physical background of LIPSS generation as well as the physical principles of surface related phenomena like wettability, reflectivity, and friction. Then we introduce several biological examples including e.g., lotus leafs, springtails, dessert beetles, moth eyes, butterfly wings, weevils, sharks, pangolins, and snakes to illustrate how nature solves technical problems, and we give a comprehensive overview of recent achievements related to the utilization of LIPSS to generate superhydrophobic, anti-reflective, colored, and drag resistant surfaces. Finally, we conclude with some future developments and perspectives related to forthcoming applications of LIPSS-based surfaces.

  19. Effects of Induced Surface Tension in Nuclear and Hadron Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Sagun, V V; Ivanytskyi, A I; Oliinychenko, D R; Mishustin, I N

    2016-01-01

    Short range particle repulsion is rather important property of the hadronic and nuclear matter equations of state. We present a novel equation of state which is based on the virial expansion for the multicomponent mixtures with hard-core repulsion. In addition to the hard-core repulsion taken into account by the proper volumes of particles, this equation of state explicitly contains the surface tension which is induced by another part of the hard-core repulsion between particles. At high densities the induced surface tension vanishes and the excluded volume treatment of hard-core repulsion is switched to its proper volume treatment. Possible applications of this equation of state to a description of hadronic multiplicities measured in A+A collisions, to an investigation of the nuclear matter phase diagram properties and to the neutron star interior modeling are discussed.

  20. Effects of Induced Surface Tension in Nuclear and Hadron Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagun V.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Short range particle repulsion is rather important property of the hadronic and nuclear matter equations of state. We present a novel equation of state which is based on the virial expansion for the multicomponent mixtures with hard-core repulsion. In addition to the hard-core repulsion taken into account by the proper volumes of particles, this equation of state explicitly contains the surface tension which is induced by another part of the hard-core repulsion between particles. At high densities the induced surface tension vanishes and the excluded volume treatment of hard-core repulsion is switched to its proper volume treatment. Possible applications of this equation of state to a description of hadronic multiplicities measured in A+A collisions, to an investigation of the nuclear matter phase diagram properties and to the neutron star interior modeling are discussed.

  1. Spatial Analysis of Soil Subsidence in Peat Meadow Areas in Friesland in Relation to Land and Water Management, Climate Change, and Adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, Karlijn; Eikelboom, Tessa; Jansen, Peter C; Janssen, Ron; Kwakernaak, Cees; van den Akker, Jan J H; Verhoeven, Jos T A

    2015-01-01

    Dutch peatlands have been subsiding due to peat decomposition, shrinkage and compression, since their reclamation in the 11th century. Currently, subsidence amounts to 1-2 cm/year. Water management in these areas is complex and costly, greenhouse gases are being emitted, and surface water quality is

  2. Subsidizing purchase of apartments and residential construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baturan Luka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During last few years, Republic of Serbia has been allowing significant resources for subsidizing purchase of apartments and residential construction. Explanation for this is desire to help construction sector to overcome consequences of economic crisis, as well as social categories to solve housing issue. The paper analyzes economic consequences, benefits and costs of conducting this economic policy, as well as reasons leading to its establishment.

  3. Towards Friction Control using laser-induced periodic Surface Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Eichstädt, J.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at contributing to the study of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the description of their tribological properties in order to facilitate the knowledge for contact mechanical applications. To obtain laser parameters for LIPSS formation, we propose to execute two D2-Experiments. For the transfer of results from static experiments to areas of LIPSS we propose the discrete accumulation of fluences. Areas covered by homogeneously distributed LIPSS were machined...

  4. Contribution of Sediment Compaction/Loading to the Ganges-Bangladesh Delta Subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpytchev, Mikhail; Krien, Yann; Ballu, Valerie; Becker, Melanie; Calmant, Stephane; Spada, Giorgio; Guo, Junyi; Khan, Zahirul; Shum, Ck

    2016-04-01

    A pronounced spatial variability characterizes the subsidence/uplift rates in the Ganges-Bangladesh delta estimated from both sediment cores and modern geodetic techniques. The large variability of the subsidence rates suggests an interplay of different natural and anthropogenic processes including tectonics, sediment loading and sediment compaction, groundwater extaction among many others drivers of the delta vertical land movements.In this study, we focus on estimating the subsidence rates due to the sediments transported by the Ganges-Brahmaputra since the last 18 000 years. The delta subsidence induced by the sediment loading and the resulting sea level changes are modelled by the TABOO and SELEN software (Spada, 2003; Stocchi and Spada, 2007) in the framework of a gravitationally self-consistent Earth model. The loading history was obtained from available sediment cores and from the isopach map of Goodbread and Kuehl (2000). The results demonstrate that the delta loading enhanced by the Holocene sedimention can be responsable for a regular subsidence across the Ganges-Brahmaputra delta with an amplitude of 1-5 mm/yr along the Bengal coast. These estimates demonstrate that the contribution of the Holocene as well as modern sediment loading should be taken into account in climate change mitigation politicy for Bangladesh.

  5. Regional Sea Level Variation: California Coastal Subsidence (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewitt, G.; Hammond, W. C.; Nerem, R.

    2013-12-01

    Satellite altimetry over the last two decades has measured variations in geocentric sea level (GSL), relative to the Earth system center of mass, providing valuable data to test models of physical oceanography and the effects of global climate change. The societal impacts of sea level change however relate to variations in local sea level (LSL), relative to the land at the coast. Therefore, assessing the impacts of sea level change requires coastal measurements of vertical land motion (VLM). Indeed, ΔLSL = ΔGSL - ΔVLM, with subsidence mapping 1:1 into LSL. Measurements of secular coastal VLM also allow tide-gauge data to test models of GSL over the last century in some locations, which cannot be provided by satellite data. Here we use GPS geodetic data within 15 km of the US west coast to infer regional, secular VLM. A total of 89 GPS stations met the criteria that time series span >4.5 yr, and do not have obvious non-linear variation, as may be caused by local instability. VLM rates for the GPS stations are derived in the secular reference frame ITRF2008, which aligns with the Earth system center of mass to ×0.5 mm/yr. We find that regional VLM has different behavior north and south of the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ). The California coast has a coherent regional pattern of subsidence averaging 0.5 mm/yr, with an increasing trend to the north. This trend generally matches GIA model predictions. Around San Francisco Bay, the observed coastal subsidence of 1.0 mm/yr coherently decreases moving away from the Pacific Ocean to very small subsidence on the east shores of the bay. This gradient is likely caused by San Andreas-Hayward Fault tectonics, and possibly by differential surface loading across the bay and Sacramento-San Joachim River Delta. Thus in addition to the trend in subsidence from GIA going northward along the California coast, tectonics may also play a role where the plate boundary fault system approaches the coast. In contrast, we find that VLM

  6. Oral Morbidity in the Subsidized Population of Manizales Served through the TeachingService Model at a University Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    de la Rosa-Marrugo, Eola; Avilés-Franco, Paula; Rodríguez-Lezama, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: the purpose of this research was to determine oral morbidity in the subsidized population of Manizales served through the teaching-service model at a university clinic. Materials and methods: the descriptive study looked at a study population of 122 patients of all ages affiliated with the subsidized system. Sociodemographic, systemic precedents and oral alterations were analyzed, such as changes in the dental, gingival and periodontal surfaces, occlusion, pulp, periapical bones...

  7. Neotectonic of subsiding basins : case of studies from Marañon and Beni basins, Peru and Bolivia

    OpenAIRE

    Dumont, Jean-Francois

    1994-01-01

    Climatic conditions make the fluvial processes very sensitive in the extended flood plain of subandean basins, giving typical morphostructures. Because of high subsidence rate, these basins are case for the understanding of neotectonics in subsiding basins. Recent anciente fluvial traces are used in combination with sub surface structures, neotectonic and seismotectonic data to study the neotectonic evolution of the Peruvian and Bolivian active foreland basins. These basins, the Marañon Basin...

  8. Instruments for subsurface monitoring of geothermal subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Rourke, J.E.; Ranson, B.B.

    1979-07-01

    The requirements for a subsurface geothermal subsidence instrument were reviewed. Available instruments for monitoring subsurface displacements, both vertical and horizontal, were studied and the most capable instruments identified. Techniques and materials for improving existing or developing new instruments were evaluated. Elements of sensor and signal technology with potential for high temperature monitoring of subsidence were identified. Drawing from these studies, methods to adapt production wells for monitoring were proposed and several new instrumentation systems were conceptually designed. Finally, four instrumentation systems were selected for future development. These systems are: triple sensor induction sensor probe (with casing collar markers); triple sensor gamma ray detector probe (with radioactive markers); triple sensor reed switch probe (with magnet markers); and triple sensor oscillator-type magnet detector probe (with magnet markers). All are designed for use in well casing incorporating slip couplings or bellows sections, although the gamma ray detector probe may also be used in unlined holes. These systems all measure vertical moement. Instruments to measure horizontal displacement due to geothermal subsidence were studied and the required instrument performance was judged to be beyond the state-of-the-art. Thus, no conceptual designs for instruments to monitor horizontal movement are included.

  9. Monitoring land subsidence process in the urban area of Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam using multi-temporal SAR Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Xuan; Chang, Chung-Pai; Le, Tuan

    2016-04-01

    Land subsidence has become the most common hazard in urban area that could led to cracking buildings and infrastructures, extending the flooding area or even change the river path. Despite deriving precise information, conventional subsidence monitoring techniques are considered as costly, man-power consuming and lack of comprehensive information. Recently, SAR Interferometry (InSAR) has become a widely used geodetic technique for monitoring the deformation of the Earth's surface, especially methods based on the use of a multi-temporal dataset. In this study, we use a stack of 18 SAR images acquired from L-band PALSAR sensor onboard the ALOS satellite to derive the subsidence information of Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam over the period of December 2006 to December 2010. The Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers (StaMPS) Multi-Temporal Interferometry (MTI) approach is chosen to take advantages of both the persistent scatterers and the distributed scatterers, which could be used as monitoring points to measure the subsidence process. Assume the subsidence in this area mostly corresponds to vertical components, we found subsidence patterns along Saigon river and in the South of the city. Maximum subsidence rate reaches up to -66 mm/year in vertical direction. Finally, InSAR derived result and previous levelling data are taken into comparison to find the correlation between the two results.

  10. BasinVis 1.0: A MATLAB®-based program for sedimentary basin subsidence analysis and visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Young; Novotny, Johannes; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Stratigraphic and structural mapping is important to understand the internal structure of sedimentary basins. Subsidence analysis provides significant insights for basin evolution. We designed a new software package to process and visualize stratigraphic setting and subsidence evolution of sedimentary basins from well data. BasinVis 1.0 is implemented in MATLAB®, a multi-paradigm numerical computing environment, and employs two numerical methods: interpolation and subsidence analysis. Five different interpolation methods (linear, natural, cubic spline, Kriging, and thin-plate spline) are provided in this program for surface modeling. The subsidence analysis consists of decompaction and backstripping techniques. BasinVis 1.0 incorporates five main processing steps; (1) setup (study area and stratigraphic units), (2) loading well data, (3) stratigraphic setting visualization, (4) subsidence parameter input, and (5) subsidence analysis and visualization. For in-depth analysis, our software provides cross-section and dip-slip fault backstripping tools. The graphical user interface guides users through the workflow and provides tools to analyze and export the results. Interpolation and subsidence results are cached to minimize redundant computations and improve the interactivity of the program. All 2D and 3D visualizations are created by using MATLAB plotting functions, which enables users to fine-tune the results using the full range of available plot options in MATLAB. We demonstrate all functions in a case study of Miocene sediment in the central Vienna Basin.

  11. Magnitude and extent of land subsidence in central Mexico revealed by regional InSAR ALOS time-series survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussard, E.; Wdowinski, S.; Amelung, F.; Cabral-Cano, E.

    2013-05-01

    Massive groundwater extraction is very common in Mexico and is well known to result in land subsidence. However, most surveys dedicated to land subsidence focus on one single city, mainly Mexico City, and thus fail to provide a comprehensive picture of the problem. Here we use a space-based radar remote sensing technique, known as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) to detect land subsidence in the entire central Mexico area. We used data from the Japanese satellite ALOS, processed over 600 SAR images acquired between 2007-2011 and produced over 3000 interferograms to cover and area of 200,000 km2 in central Mexico. We identify land subsidence in twenty-one areas, including seventeen cities, namely from east to west, Puebla, Mexico city, Toluca de Lerdo, Queretaro, San Luis de la Paz, south of San Luis de la Paz, Celaya, south of Villa de Reyes, San Luis Potosi, west of Villa de Arista, Morelia, Salamanca, Irapuato, Silao, Leon, Aguascalientes, north of Aguascalientes, Zamora de Hidalgo, Guadalajara, Ahuacatlan, and Tepic. Subsidence rates of 30 cm/yr are observed in Mexico City, while in the other locations typical rates of 5-10 cm/yr are noticed. Regional surveys of this type are necessary for the development of hazard mitigation plans and efficient use of ground-based monitoring. We additionally correlate subsidence with land use, surface geology, and faults distribution and suggest that groundwater extraction for agricultural, urban, and industrial uses are the main causes of land subsidence. We also reveal that the limits of the subsiding areas often correlate with existing faults, motion on these faults being driven by water extraction rather than by tectonic activity. In all the subsiding locations we observe high ground velocity gradients emphasizing the significant risks associated with land subsidence in central Mexico. Averaged 2007-2011 ground velocity map from ALOS InSAR time-series in central Mexico, revealing land subsidence in 21

  12. Instrumentation plan for characterization of subsidence over longwall mining panels at Allen Mine, Weston, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Rourke, J.

    1980-01-01

    The program includes surface, subsurface, and mine-level instrumentation to monitor subsidence characteristics over two adjacent longwall mining panels, situated in mountainous topography in southern Colorado. An installation plan has been detailed to show numbers and arrangements of instruments in and over the panels, and includes pertinent installation details. The appendix contains technical descriptions of standard features of some of the instrument systems, though in certain cases standard instruments will be modified by Woodward-Clyde Consultants (WCC) or the manufacturer to suit site specific installation requirements detailed on attached drawings. Technical discussions on the application of the instrument arrangements and data monitored to subsidence modeling are given in the report.

  13. New information on regional subsidence and soil fracturing in Mexico City Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvinet, G.; Méndez-Sánchez, E.; Juárez-Camarena, M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, updated information about regional subsidence in Mexico City downtown area is presented. Data obtained by R. Gayol in 1891, are compared with information obtained recently from surveys using the reference points of Sistema de Aguas de la Ciudad de México (2008) and on the elevation of a cloud of points on the ground surface determined using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology. In addition, this paper provides an overview of recent data obtained from systematic studies focused on understanding soil fracturing associated with regional land subsidence and mapping of areas susceptible to cracking in Mexico City Valley.

  14. Integrating interferometric SAR data with levelling measurements of land subsidence using geostatistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Y.; Stein, A.; Molenaar, M.

    2003-01-01

    Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferometric (D-InSAR) data of ground surface deformation are affected by several error sources associated with image acquisitions and data processing. In this paper, we study the use of D-InSAR for quantifying land subsidence due to groundwater extract

  15. Thermal desorption from surfaces with laser-induced defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabelski, Pawel; Panczyk, Tomasz; Rudzinski, Wladyslaw

    2002-12-30

    Monte Carlo simulation method was used to mimic surface damage development caused by short laser pulses. The influence of pulsed laser irradiation on the creation of defect concentration was examined in the case of a model surface. In particular, the dependence of the intact surface area on a number of laser scans was studied and compared with the experimental results obtained for Rh(1 1 1) crystal face. Changes in the adsorptivoperties of the surface produced by laser irradiation are explained with the help of a simple geometric model connecting the laser intensity and the disordered area generated by a single laser shot. It was demonstrated that exponential decay of the Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) signal with the number of laser scans, which is observed experimentally, may result directly from the overlapping of the laser spots created on the surface. This effect becomes enhanced when the laser intensity, hence the spot size, increases. The importance of laser-induced defects in the kinetics of catalytic/separation processes was examined in the case of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectra from surfaces subjected to a different number of laser shots. The spectra were simulated by employing the Monte Carlo method as well as by application of the absolute rate theory (ART) coupled with the mean field approximation. The results obtained with both methods were in a good agreement even when weak lateral interactions in the adsorbed phase were allowed.

  16. Protein-induced surface structuring in myelin membrane monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosetti, Carla M; Maggio, Bruno

    2007-12-15

    Monolayers prepared from myelin conserve all the compositional complexity of the natural membrane when spread at the air-water interface. They show a complex pressure-dependent surface pattern that, on compression, changes from the coexistence of two liquid phases to a viscous fractal phase embedded in a liquid phase. We dissected the role of major myelin protein components, myelin basic protein (MBP), and Folch-Lees proteolipid protein (PLP) as crucial factors determining the structural dynamics of the interface. By analyzing mixtures of a single protein with the myelin lipids we found that MBP and PLP have different surface pressure-dependent behaviors. MBP stabilizes the segregation of two liquid phases at low pressures and becomes excluded from the film under compression, remaining adjacent to the interface. PLP, on the contrary, organizes a fractal-like pattern at all surface pressures when included in a monolayer of the protein-free myelin lipids but it remains mixed in the MBP-induced liquid phase. The resultant surface topography and dynamics is regulated by combined near to equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium effects. PLP appears to act as a surface skeleton for the whole components whereas MBP couples the structuring to surface pressure-dependent extrusion and adsorption processes.

  17. Laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voumard, Pierre; Zenobi, Renato

    1995-10-01

    A complete study on the energy partitioning upon laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces was undertaken. The measurements include characterization of the aniline-quartz adsorption system using temperature-programmed desorption, the extrapolation of quasiequilibrium desorption temperatures to the regime of laser heating rates on the order of 109-1010 K/s by computational means, measurement of the kinetic energy distributions of desorbing aniline using a pump-probe method, and the determination of internal energies with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. The measurements are compared to calculations of the surface temperature rise and the resulting desorption rates, based on a finite-difference mathematical description of pulsed laser heating. While the surface temperature of laser-heated silica reaches about 600-700 K at the time of desorption, the translational temperature of laser-desorbed aniline was measured to be Tkin=420±60 K, Tvib was 360±60 K, and Trot was 350±100 K. These results are discussed using different models for laser-induced thermal desorption from surfaces.

  18. Ion beam induced optical and surface modification in plasmonic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Udai B., E-mail: udaibhansingh123@gmail.com; Gautam, Subodh K.; Kumar, Sunil; Hooda, Sonu; Ojha, Sunil; Singh, Fouran

    2016-07-15

    In present work, ion irradiation induced nanostructuring has been exploited as an efficient and effective tool for synthesis of coupled plasmonics nanostructures by using 1.2 MeV Xe ions on Au/ZnO/Au system deposited on glass substrate. The results are correlated on the basis of their optical absorption, surface morphologies and enhanced sensitivity of evolved phonon modes by using UV Visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Raman spectroscopy (RS), respectively. Optical absorbance spectra of plasmonic nanostructures (NSs) show a decrease in band gap, which may be ascribed to the formation of defects with ion irradiation. The surface morphology reveals the formation of percolated NSs upon ion irradiation and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) study clearly shows the formation of multilayer system. Furthermore, RS measurements on samples are studied to understand the enhanced sensitivity of ion irradiation induced phonon mode at 573 cm{sup −1} along with other modes. As compared to pristine sample, a stronger and pronounced evolution of these phonon modes is observed with further ion irradiation, which indicates localized surface plasmon results with enhanced intensity of phonon modes of Zinc oxide (ZnO) material. Thus, such plasmonic NSs can be used as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates.

  19. The study of UHMWPEF surface modification with plasma- induced polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Fang; Jia, Qing-Xiu; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Pei-Ran

    2015-07-01

    In order to improve the surface activity levels of the ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene fiber (UHMWPEF), as well as enhancing the interface strength of the UHMWPEF based composite materials, the method of plasma-induced polymerization was applied to modify the UHMWPEF surface. In this study, the plasma's power, time, pressure and the grafting monomer concentration were introduced. Also, through a well-conducted comparison and analysis of the grafting rate, fabric surface functional groups and the microcosmic morphology, the most suitable plasma modification process was discovered and determined. The mechanics performance of hybrid composites with the modified UHMWPEF and unidirectional carbon fiber cloth (CF) was tested to reveal that, compared with the unmodified composites, the tensile strength and the laminar shear strength could be improved.

  20. Surface modification of ceramic matrix composites induced by laser treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costil, S.; Lukat, S.; Langlade, C.; Coddet, C.

    2008-12-01

    Ceramics or ceramic composites present many advantages (hardness, chemical resistance, low density, etc.) which induce some more and more important applications particularly from the industrial point of view. The evolution of technology can also be beneficial to enlarge their global application areas. This is particularly the aim of this work which consists in applying a laser beam on the ceramic in order to clean its surface. A Nd:YAG laser has been used to study the basic mechanism roughening the surface of silicon carbide composite (ceramic matrix composite (CMC)). Investigations on different surfaces (two chemical compositions) show a strong influence of the nature of the material on the development of a characteristic conic structure. Microscopic studies (SEM) and elementary analyses (EDS and RMS) demonstrated the formation of a regular cone-like structure with a kinetic and a chemical modification specific to each material.

  1. Femtosecond laser-induced surface structures on carbon fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajzew, Roman; Schröder, Jan; Kunz, Clemens; Engel, Sebastian; Müller, Frank A; Gräf, Stephan

    2015-12-15

    The influence of different polarization states during the generation of periodic nanostructures on the surface of carbon fibers was investigated using a femtosecond laser with a pulse duration τ=300  fs, a wavelength λ=1025  nm, and a peak fluence F=4  J/cm². It was shown that linear polarization results in a well-aligned periodic pattern with different orders of magnitude concerning their period and an alignment parallel and perpendicular to fiber direction, respectively. For circular polarization, both types of uniform laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) patterns appear simultaneously with different dominance in dependence on the position at the fiber surface. Their orientation was explained by the polarization-dependent absorptivity and the geometrical anisotropy of the carbon fibers.

  2. Subsidence Detection Using InSAR and Geodetic Measurements in the North-West of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Morteza

    2010-05-01

    The subsidence of the Earth surface is a phenomenon that occurs in some places in the world which overuse underground sources of water. As Iran has semi-arid and arid climate and the rate of rainfall is lower than the mean rate in the world then nowadays we are encountered by over-exploitation of groundwater in agricultural areas and also for extending the cities and industrial areas. Geodetic measurements i.e., repeated leveling measurements of first order leveling network of Iran and continuous GPS measurements of Iranian Permanent GPS Network of Iran (IPGN), showed that there are subsidence areas in the north-west of Iran. In this paper we try to find the area and rate of subsidence in the north-west of Iran using InSAR and geodetic techniques. The result of InSAR technique shows a better understanding on this phenomenon in these areas and has a good consistency with accurate geodetic measurements.

  3. In-induced stable ordering of stepped Si(553) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL) , Dr. K.S. KrishnanRoad, New Delhi -110012 (India); Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Niazi, Asad; Nair, Lekha [Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Gupta, Govind, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL) , Dr. K.S. KrishnanRoad, New Delhi -110012 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Control growth of In on step Si(553) & thermal stability of novel superstructure. • Influence of temperature on growth modes (SK,VB) under different growth conditions. • In-induced superstructure: (8 × 2), (8 × 4), mixed (553)-7 × 1 + (111)√3 × √3R30° phases. - Abstract: The growth mechanism and adsorbate-induced surface morphology of metal atoms on semiconducting surfaces crucially determines the electronic and physicochemical properties of these metal/semiconductor systems. In this study, we investigate the kinetically controlled growth of indium (In) atoms on the high index stepped Si(553)-7 × 7 surface and the thermal stability of various novel In-induced superstructural phases formed during adsorption/desorption process. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that In adsorption at room temperature (RT) and at 350 °C, with a controlled incident flux of 0.0016 ML/s, proceeds in the Stranski–Krastanov growth mode where two dimensional (2D)/three dimensional (3D) islands are formed on top of two complete monolayers. At higher substrate temperature up to 450 °C, the growth of In atoms occurs in the form of islands on the bare Si(553) surface, and In coverage is limited to the sub-monolayer regime. During the thermal desorption of the RT grown In/Si(553) system, the In clusters rearrange themselves and an unusual “cluster to layer” transformation occurs on top of the stable monolayer. In situ low energy electron diffraction analysis during adsorption and desorption shows the development of various coverage and temperature dependent In-induced superstructural phases on Si(553) surface, such as: (8 × 2) after annealing at 520 °C with coverage 0.5 ML, (8 × 4) after annealing at 580 °C (∼1 ML coverage) and (553)-7 × 1 + (111)-√3 × √3-R30° at 0.3 ML (630 °C). These adsorbate-induced superstructural phases could potentially be utilized as templates for pattern assisted growth of various exotic 1D/2D structures for

  4. Unmasking Sinkings Zones Caused by Subsidence-Creep Processes in Morelia, MICHOACÁN, Using Insar and GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandro, Avila-Olivera Jorge; Paolo, Farina; Hugo, Garduño-Monroy Victor

    2008-05-01

    In Morelia City since the beginning of the 1980s, problems of differential sinkings, crackings and superficial faults affecting natural and anthropogenic structures have been observed. At the present time the city is being affected by nine faults, eight of which are related to Subsidence-Creep-Fault Processes (SCFP) and display a preferential direction ENE-WSW, identical to the Tula-Chapala regional faulting system. As part of the SCFP studies, GDPS and InSAR monitoring have been carried out; both showed that the maximum sinkings (3. 5 cm/year, summer 2003-summer 2007) are located in the NW part of the city, considered stable (in the past) due to the coverage of Pleistocene-Holocene basaltic-andesitic materials of Quinceo volcano. In order to resolve the enigma, all the available information related to the SCFP in the city have been integrated in a GIS; as well as two analysis of lithology columns were carried out to obtain a surface of the spatial distribution of the thickness of compressible materials in the city. The first analysis just increased the doubts, but the second one showed that the subsoil in the NW portion of Morelia consists of an interleave between basaltic-andesitic products of Quinceo volcano and lacustrine and/or fluviolacustrine sediments able to suffer deformations induced by groundwater withdrawal, which have been masked by the superficial volcanic products, that in addition are responsible of accelerating the process of land subsidence (sinkings) in function of weight these represent.

  5. Application and Evaluation of ALOS PALSAR Data for Monitoring of Mining Induced Surface Deformations Using Interferometric Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Diana; Wegmuller, Urs; Spreckels, Volker; Busch, Wolfgang

    2008-11-01

    The main objective of the projects "Determination of ground motions in mining areas by interferometric analyses of ALOS data" (ALOS ADEN 3576, ESA) and "Monitoring of mining induced surface deformation" (ALOS-RA-094, JAXA) is to evaluate PALSAR data for surface deformation monitoring, using interferometric techniques. We present monitoring results of surface movements for an active hard coal colliery of the German hard coal mining company RAG Deutsche Steinkohle (RAG). Underground mining activities lead to ground movements at the surface with maximum subsidence rates of about 10cm per month for the test site. In these projects the L-band sensor clearly demonstrates the good potential for deformation monitoring in active mining areas, especially in rural areas. In comparison to C-band sensors we clearly observe advantages in resolving the high deformation gradients that are present in this area and we achieve a more complete spatial coverage than with C-band. Extensive validation data based on levelling data and GPS measurements are available within RAǴs GIS based database "GeoMon" and thus enable an adequate analysis of the quality of the interferometric results. Previous analyses confirm the good accuracy of PALSAR data for deformation monitoring in mining areas. Furthermore, we present results of special investigations like precision geocoding of PALSAR data and corner reflector analysis. At present only DInSAR results are obtained due to the currently available number of PALSAR scenes. For the future we plan to also apply Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) using longer series of PALSAR data.

  6. Detecting land subsidence near metro lines in the Baoshan district of Shanghai with multi-temporal interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Li; Guoxiang Liu; Hui Lin; Rui Zhang; Hongguo Jia; Bing Yu

    2014-01-01

    Land subsidence is a major factor that affects metro line (ML) stability. In this study, an improved multi-temporal interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) (MTI) method to detect land subsidence near MLs is pre-sented. In particular, our multi-temporal InSAR method provides surface subsidence measurements with high observation density. The MTI method tracks both point-like targets and distributed targets with temporal radar back-scattering steadiness. First, subsidence rates at the point targets with low-amplitude dispersion index (ADI) values are extracted by applying a least-squared estimator on an optimized freely connected network. Second, to reduce error propagation, the pixels with high-ADI values are classified into several groups according to ADI intervals and processed using a Pearson correlation coefficient and hierarchical analysis strategy to obtain the distributed targets. Then, nonlinear subsidence components at all point-like and dis-tributed targets are estimated using phase unwrapping and spatiotemporal filtering on the phase residuals. The proposed MTI method was applied to detect land subsidence near MLs of No. 1 and 3 in the Baoshan district of Shanghai using 18 TerraSAR-X images acquired between April 21, 2008 and October 30, 2010. The results show that the mean subsidence rates of the stations distributed along the two MLs are -12.9 and -14.0 mm/year. Furthermore, three subsidence funnels near the MLs are discovered through the hierarchical analysis. The testing results demonstrate the satisfactory capacity of the proposed MTI method in pro-viding detailed subsidence information near MLs.

  7. Consideration on the restoring plan in the subsidence prone areas through the development of ground stability assessment techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, K.S.; Kim, I.H.; Cho, W.J.; Song, W.K.; Synn, J.H.; Choi, S.O.; Yoon, C.H.; Hong, K.P.; Park, C. [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    The ground stability assessment technique of the subsidence prone area and its restoring plan need to be developed to obtain the ground stability around the mines at rest or closed since 1980's. Up to the present, the assessment of the subsidence risk has been conducted only after the statements of residents or the observation of symptom on the subsidence. Generally, the assessment process at first stage is carried on through the analysis of surface and mining map, the geological survey and the interviews to the residents. Drilling survey, rock property test, geotechnical rock and ground survey, and numerical analyses belong to the second stage. After the completion of the procedure the stability of buildings and the strength of subsidence are determined. The acquisition of the accurate in-situ data, the estimation of mechanical property of rock mass, and the analysis of basic mechanism may affect in the great extent on the assessment of the subsidence risk. In this study, the development of the subsidence risk assessment method was incorporated with the GIS technique which will be used to make the risk information map on the subsidence. The numerical analysis in 2D and 3D using PFC and FLAC has been conducted to estimate the ground stability of Moo-Geuk Mine area. The displacement behavior of the ground and the development of the failed zone due to the cavity were studied from the numerical modelling. The result of the ground stability assessment for the area in question shows that the risk to the subsidence is relatively small. It is, however, necessary to fill the cavity with some suitable materials when considering the new construction of buildings or roads in plan. Finally, the measures to prevent the subsidence and some case studies were presented, in particular the case study on the measurement of the ground movement in a mine were described in detail. (author). 27 refs., 27 tabs., 62 figs.

  8. Groundwater Resources and Land Subsidence investigations in the Toluca Valley, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderhead, A. I.; Martel, R.; Rivera, A.; Garfias, J.; Therrien, R.

    2007-05-01

    The sustained growth in population in the Toluca Valley and neighboring Mexico City has primarily depended on the continuous development of both local and regional water resources for industrial, agricultural and domestic uses. The Toluca Valley Basin, covering an area of approximately 2000 Km2, is the focus of this study. Currently, there is a significant net loss of water within the basin primarily due to groundwater pumping, and the loss is increasing with time. These stresses on the aquifer have caused significant changes on the water flow patterns, a reversal in the direction of hydraulic gradients, the disappearance of artesian springs and wetlands and noticeable land subsidence within the basin. Neighboring Mexico City's land subsidence problems have been well documented, however, no comprehensive studies exist for the Toluca Basin. This study is divided into two parts: 1) investigation of groundwater depletion in the Toluca Valley; and 2) assessment of land subsidence in the Toluca Valley. We examine various changes in regional flow patterns, and groundwater levels decline throughout the valley and 3D numerical flow simulations are run to predict the ever decreasing level of the piezometric surface. Currently there is a net loss (recharge - extraction) of 142 Mm3 per year of groundwater within the Toluca Basin aquifers. We have documented a decrease in groundwater levels with a rate of up to 1.4 m/year between 1970 and 2006 in the central part of the valley. At the current rate of consumption, groundwater resources will not be sustainable for the population of the valley. Directly related to the drawdown in groundwater levels is the occurrence of land subsidence throughout the valley. Neighboring Mexico City, where total subsidence of up to 9 meters has been observed, has a similar geology as the one in the Toluca valley. We have documented several sites in the Toluca Valley where land subsidence is occurring. Ongoing work includes the mapping of regional

  9. Polyphase tectonic subsidence evolution of the Vienna Basin inferred from quantitative subsidence analysis of the northern and central parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Young; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Vienna Basin is a tectonically complex Neogene basin situated at the Alpine-Carpathian transition. This study analyzes a detailed quantification of subsidence in the northern and central parts of the Vienna Basin to understand its tectonic subsidence evolution. About 200 wells were used to arrange stratigraphic setting, and wells reaching the pre-Neogene basement were analyzed for subsidence. To enhance the understanding of the regional subsidences, the wells were sorted into ten groups based on their position on major fault blocks. In the Early Miocene, subsidence was slow and along E-W to NE-SW trending axis, indicating the development of thrust-controlled piggyback basins. During the late Early Miocene data show abruptly increasing subsidence, making the initiation of the Vienna pull-apart basin system. From the Middle Miocene, the tectonic subsidence curves show regionally different patterns. The tectonic subsidence during the Middle Miocene varies laterally across the Vienna Basin, and the differential subsidence can be related to the changing tensional regime of weakening transtension and strengthening extension toward the late Middle Miocene. From the late Middle Miocene to the Late Miocene, the tectonic subsidence occurred dominantly along the regional active faults, and corresponds to the axis of E-W trending extension of the western parts of the Pannonian Basin system. In the Quaternary the Vienna Basin has been reactivated, and resulted in subsidence along the NE-SW trending Vienna Basin transfer fault system.

  10. The stress-induced surface wave velocity variations in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvier, Agustin; Bittner, James; Evani, Sai Kalyan; Popovics, John S.

    2017-02-01

    This investigation studies the behavior of surface wave velocity in concrete specimens subjected to low levels of compressive and tensile stress in beams from applied flexural loads. Beam specimen is loaded in a 4-point-load bending configuration, generating uniaxial compression and tension stress fields at the top and bottom surfaces of the beam, respectively. Surface waves are generated through contactless air-coupled transducers and received through contact accelerometers. Results show a clear distinction in responses from compression and tension zones, where velocity increases in the former and decreases in the latter, with increasing load levels. These trends agree with existing acoustoelastic literature. Surface wave velocity tends to decrease more under tension than it tends to increase under compression, for equal load levels. It is observed that even at low stress levels, surface wave velocity is affected by acoustoelastic effects, coupled with plastic effects (stress-induced damage). The acoustoelastic effect is isolated by means of considering the Kaiser effect and by experimentally mitigating the viscoelastic effects of concrete. Results of this ongoing investigation contribute to the overall knowledge of the acoustoelastic behavior of concrete. Applications of this knowledge may include structural health monitoring of members under flexural loads, improved high order modelling of materials, and validation of results seen in dynamic acoustoelasticity testing.

  11. Refining femtosecond laser induced periodical surface structures with liquid assist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, L.S. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Ng, E.Y.K., E-mail: mykng@ntu.edu.sg [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Zheng, H.Y. [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, 638075 Singapore (Singapore)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LIPSS on silicon wafer was made in air and in ethanol environment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ethanol environment produce cleaner surface ripples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ethanol environment decrease spatial wavelength of the LIPSS by 30%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More number of pulses produce smaller spatial wavelength in air. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Number of pulses do not influence spatial wavelength in ethanol environment. - Abstract: Laser induced periodic surface structures were generated on silicon wafer using femtosecond laser. The medium used in this study is both air and ethanol. The laser process parameters such as wavelength, number of pulse, laser fluence were kept constant for both the mediums. The focus of the study is to analyze spatial wavelength. When generating surface structures with air as a medium and same process parameter of the laser, spatial wavelength results showed a 30% increase compared to ethanol. The cleanliness of the surface generated using ethanol showed considerably less debris than in air. The results observed from the above investigation showed that the medium plays a predominant role in the generation of surface structures.

  12. Picosecond laser induced periodic surface structure on copper thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, Thi Trang Dai; Petit, Agnès; Semmar, Nadjib, E-mail: nadjib.semmar@univ-orleans.fr

    2014-05-01

    LIPSS (Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structure) formation on copper thin films induced by a picosecond laser beam (Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm, 42 ps and 10 Hz) was studied experimentally. Copper thin films were deposited on glass and silicon substrates by magnetron sputtering. The surface modifications of irradiated zones were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Two distinct types of LIPSS were identified with respect to the laser fluence (F), number of laser shots (N) and substrate material. Namely, with a number of laser shots (1000 < N < 10,000) and a fluence of (200 mJ/cm{sup 2} < F < 500 mJ/cm{sup 2}), Low Spatial Frequency LIPSS (LSFL with a spatial period of Λ ∼ 260 nm and an orientation perpendicular to polarization) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS (HSFL with a spatial period of Λ ∼ 130 nm and an orientation parallel to the polarization) were observed. The regime of regular spikes formation was determined for N ≥ 1000. Moreover, the 2D-map of the relationship among LIPSS formation, laser fluence and number of laser shots on copper thin film with two different substrates was established. A physics interpretation of regular spikes and LIPSS formation on copper thin film induced by ps laser with overlapping multi-shots is proposed based on experimental data and the theory of Plateau-Rayleigh instability.

  13. Picosecond laser induced periodic surface structure on copper thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Thi Trang Dai; Petit, Agnès; Semmar, Nadjib

    2014-05-01

    LIPSS (Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structure) formation on copper thin films induced by a picosecond laser beam (Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm, 42 ps and 10 Hz) was studied experimentally. Copper thin films were deposited on glass and silicon substrates by magnetron sputtering. The surface modifications of irradiated zones were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Two distinct types of LIPSS were identified with respect to the laser fluence (F), number of laser shots (N) and substrate material. Namely, with a number of laser shots (1000 LIPSS (LSFL with a spatial period of Λ ∼ 260 nm and an orientation perpendicular to polarization) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS (HSFL with a spatial period of Λ ∼ 130 nm and an orientation parallel to the polarization) were observed. The regime of regular spikes formation was determined for N ≥ 1000. Moreover, the 2D-map of the relationship among LIPSS formation, laser fluence and number of laser shots on copper thin film with two different substrates was established. A physics interpretation of regular spikes and LIPSS formation on copper thin film induced by ps laser with overlapping multi-shots is proposed based on experimental data and the theory of Plateau-Rayleigh instability.

  14. Fabrication of laser induced periodic surface structure for geometrical engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutsumi, Naoto [Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)], E-mail: tsutsumi@kit.jp; Fujihara, Arata; Nagata, Kazuya [Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2008-12-31

    The paper presents the highly ordered geometrical structures of laser induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) in azobenzene urethane polymer (DR19 polymer) from 4-(N,N-dihydroxyethylamino)-4'-nitroazobenzene (Disperse red 19) with tolylene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI). One or two regulated striped LIPSS was formed in confined spaces between surface relief gratings (SRG) induced by the s-polarized interfered beams. The pitch of LIPSS was one-half or one-third of SRG pitch. Standing wave with some selected mode between SRG in the surface waveguide is responsible for the formation of the regulated striped LIPSS. The crossed illumination of the interfered beams showed the waffle-like structure for s-polarization beam and the egg crate-like (ECL) structure for p-polarized beam. Photoinduced microscopic molecular ordering was also investigated. The linear polarized beam gave the large optical anisotropy in the polymer and the circularly polarized beam produced the chiral structure. The circular dichroism spectra showed the sharp peak due to the circular Bragg reflection from which the chiral pitch was evaluated.

  15. Preliminary results of land subsidence monitoring project in Konya Closed Basin between 2006–2009 by means of GNSS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ustun

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the potential dangers that might arise as a result of bringing excessive amounts of groundwater to the surface of the Earth is land subsidence. Such surface deformations – these velocities may vary from a few millimetres to a few metres per year – do the greatest damage to infrastructure facilities and buildings in residential units. Agricultural lands, in which excessive irrigation is performed, and densely populated cities are more likely to suffer from land subsidence. Konya Closed Basin (KCB, where a rapid groundwater withdrawal has been observed during the last 30–40 years, is faced with such a threat. In this study, the possibility of the occurrence of land subsidence, related to groundwater withdrawal for the KCB, is assessed and the geodetic studies conducted up to now, with the intention of identifying land subsidence, are introduced. The vertical displacements of between -12 and -52 mm/year have been detected through GNSS observations collected on the 6-point test network. The land subsidence phenomenon has been developing in the areas where the groundwater is extensively used for irrigation and daily life. The results support the findings derived from the historical leveling records and point out the need of an extended study based on both GNSS and InSAR techniques for spatial and temporal mapping of land subsidence in the KCB.

  16. Preliminary results of land subsidence monitoring project in Konya Closed Basin between 2006-2009 by means of GNSS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustun, A.; Tusat, E.; Yalvac, S.

    2010-06-01

    One of the potential dangers that might arise as a result of bringing excessive amounts of groundwater to the surface of the Earth is land subsidence. Such surface deformations - these velocities may vary from a few millimetres to a few metres per year - do the greatest damage to infrastructure facilities and buildings in residential units. Agricultural lands, in which excessive irrigation is performed, and densely populated cities are more likely to suffer from land subsidence. Konya Closed Basin (KCB), where a rapid groundwater withdrawal has been observed during the last 30-40 years, is faced with such a threat. In this study, the possibility of the occurrence of land subsidence, related to groundwater withdrawal for the KCB, is assessed and the geodetic studies conducted up to now, with the intention of identifying land subsidence, are introduced. The vertical displacements of between -12 and -52 mm/year have been detected through GNSS observations collected on the 6-point test network. The land subsidence phenomenon has been developing in the areas where the groundwater is extensively used for irrigation and daily life. The results support the findings derived from the historical leveling records and point out the need of an extended study based on both GNSS and InSAR techniques for spatial and temporal mapping of land subsidence in the KCB.

  17. Using temporarily coherent point interferometric synthetic aperture radar for land subsidence monitoring in a mining region of western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongdong; Xu, Qiang; Hu, Zhongbo; Du, Sen

    2017-04-01

    Yuyang mine is located in the semiarid western region of China where, due to serious land subsidence caused by underground coal exploitation, the local ecological environment has become more fragile. An advanced interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) technique, temporarily coherent point InSAR, is applied to measure surface movements caused by different mining conditions. Fifteen high-resolution TerraSAR-X images acquired between October 2, 2012, and March 27, 2013, were processed to generate time-series data for ground deformation. The results show that the maximum accumulated values of subsidence and velocity were 86 mm and 162 mm/year, respectively; these measurements were taken above the fully mechanized longwall caving faces. Based on the dynamic land subsidence caused by the exploitation of one working face, the land subsidence range was deduced to have increased 38 m in the mining direction with 11 days' coal extraction. Although some mining faces were ceased in 2009, they could also have contributed to a small residual deformation of overlying strata. Surface subsidence of the backfill mining region was quite small, the maximum only 21 mm, so backfill exploitation is an effective method for reducing the land subsidence while coal is mined.

  18. Surface plasmon polariton-induced hot carrier generation for photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Wonmi; Ratchford, Daniel C; Pehrsson, Pehr E; Simpkins, Blake S

    2017-03-02

    Non-radiative plasmon decay in noble metals generates highly energetic carriers under visible light irradiation, which opens new prospects in the fields of photocatalysis, photovoltaics, and photodetection. While localized surface plasmon-induced hot carrier generation occurs in diverse metal nanostructures, inhomogeneities typical of many metal-semiconductor plasmonic nanostructures hinder predictable control of photocarrier generation and therefore reproducible carrier-mediated photochemistry. Here, we generate traveling surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at the interface between a noble metal/titanium dioxide (TiO2) heterostructure film and aqueous solution, enabling simultaneous optical and electrochemical interrogation of plasmon-mediated chemistry in a system whose resonance may be continuously tuned via the incident optical excitation angle. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental demonstration of SPP-induced hot carrier generation for photocatalysis. We found electrochemical photovoltage and photocurrent responses as SPP-induced hot carriers drive both solution-based oxidation of methanol and the anodic half-reaction of photoelectrochemical water-splitting in sodium hydroxide solution. A strong excitation angle dependence and linear power dependence in the electrochemical photocurrent confirm that the photoelectrochemical reactions are SPP-driven. SPP-generated hot carrier chemistry was recorded on gold and silver and with two different excitation wavelengths, demonstrating potential for mapping resonant charge transfer processes with this technique. These results will provide the design criteria for a metal-semiconductor hybrid system with enhanced hot carrier generation and transport, which is important for the understanding and application of plasmon-induced photocatalysis.

  19. Inexpensive laser-induced surface modification in bismuth thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, A. Reyes [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca, Ixtlahuaca Kilómetro 15.5, C.P. 50200 Edo. de México (Mexico); Hautefeuille, M., E-mail: mathieu_h@ciencias.unam.mx [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Universidad 3000, Circuito Exterior S/N, Coyoacán, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510 D.F. Mexico (Mexico); García, A. Esparza [Fotofísica y Películas Delgadas, Departamento de Tecnociencias, CCADET-UNAM, Circuito exterior s/n C.P. 04510 Cd. Universitaria, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Mejia, O. Olea [Centro Conjunto de Investigación en Química Sustentable UAEM-UNAM, Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, Km 14.5, Unidad El Rosedal, 50200 San Cayetano, Estado de México (Mexico); López, M.A. Camacho [Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Tollocan s/n, esq. Paseo Colón, Toluca, Estado de México 50110 (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Laser-induced microbumps were formed on bismuth films using a simple, low-cost, laser setup. • The patterns, similar to those typically obtained with high-power lasers, were characterized. • Control of laser ablation conditions is critical in the fabrication of surface microbumps. - Abstract: In this work, we present results on texturing a 500 nm thick bismuth film, deposited by sputtering onto a glass slide using a low-cost homemade, near-infrared pulsed laser platform. A 785 nm laser diode of a CD–DVD pickup head was precisely focused on the sample mounted on a motorized two-axis translation stage to generate localized surface microbumps on the bismuth films. This simple method successfully transferred desired micropatterns on the films in a computer-numerical control fashion. Irradiated zones were characterized by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that final results are strongly dependent on irradiation parameters.

  20. RUPTURING OF POLYMER FILMS WITH RUBBING-INDUCED SURFACE DEFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Du; F.C.Xie; Y.J.Wang; O.K.C.Tsui

    2003-01-01

    It has been a long-standing question whether dewetting of polymer film from non-wettable substrate surfaces wherein the bicontinuous morphology never forms in the dewetting film is due to spinodal instability or heterogeneous nucleation. In this experiment, we use a simple method to make the distinction through introduction of topographical defects of the films by rubbing the sample surface with a rayon cloth. Spinodal dewetting is identified for those films that dewet by a characteristic wavevector, q*, independent of the density of rubbing-induced defects. Heterogeneous nucleation, on the other hand, is identified for those with q* increasing with increasing density of defects. Our result shows that PS films on oxide coated silicon with thickness less than ≈ 13 nm are dominated by spinodal dewetting, but the thicker films are dominated by nucleation dewetting. We also confirm that spinodal dewetting does not necessarily lead to a bicontinuous morphology in the dewetting film, contrary to the classic theory of Cahn.

  1. Light-induced crawling of crystals on a glass surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Emi; Azumi, Reiko; Norikane, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    Motion is an essential process for many living organisms and for artificial robots and machines. To date, creating self-propelled motion in nano-to-macroscopic-sized objects has been a challenging issue for scientists. Herein, we report the directional and continuous motion of crystals on a glass surface when irradiated simultaneously with two different wavelengths, using simple azobenzenes as a photoresponsive organic compound. The direction of the motion can be controlled by the position of the light sources, and the crystals can even climb vertical surfaces. The motion is driven by crystallization and melting at the front and rear edges of the crystal, respectively, via photochemical conversion between the crystal and liquid phases induced by the trans-cis isomerization of azobenzenes. This finding could lead to remote-controlled micrometre-sized vehicles and valves on solid substrates.

  2. Giant Surface-Plasmon-Induced Drag Effect in Metal Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durach, Maxim; Rusina, Anastasia; Stockman, Mark I.

    2009-10-01

    Here, for the first time we predict a giant surface-plasmon-induced drag-effect rectification (SPIDER), which exists under conditions of the extreme nanoplasmonic confinement. In nanowires, this giant SPIDER generates rectified THz potential differences up to 10 V and extremely strong electric fields up to ˜105-106V/cm. The giant SPIDER is an ultrafast effect whose bandwidth for nanometric wires is ˜20THz. It opens up a new field of ultraintense THz nanooptics with wide potential applications in nanotechnology and nanoscience, including microelectronics, nanoplasmonics, and biomedicine.

  3. Giant surface plasmon induced drag effect (SPIDEr) in metal nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durach, Maxim; Rusina, Anastasia; Stockman, Mark I.

    2009-08-01

    Here, for the first time we predict a giant surface plasmon-induced drag effect (SPIDEr), which exists under conditions of the extreme nanoplasmonic confinement. Under realistic conditions, in nanowires, this giant SPIDEr generates rectified THz potential differences up to 10 V and extremely strong electric fields up to ~ 105 ~ 106 V/cm. The SPIDEr is an ultrafast effect whose bandwidth for nanometric wires is ~ 20 THz. The giant SPIDEr opens up a new field of ultraintense THz nanooptics with wide potential applications in nanotechnology and nanoscience, including microelectronics, nanoplasmonics, and biomedicine.

  4. Deriving Dynamic Subsidence of Coal Mining Areas Using InSAR and Logistic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zefa Yang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal variation of land cover and the large deformation gradients in coal mining areas often give rise to severe temporal and geometrical decorrelation in interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR interferograms. Consequently, it is common that the available InSAR pairs do not cover the entire time period of SAR acquisitions, i.e., temporal gaps exist in the multi-temporal InSAR observations. In this case, it is very difficult to accurately estimate mining-induced dynamic subsidence using the traditional time-series InSAR techniques. In this investigation, we employ a logistic model which has been widely applied to describe mining-related dynamic subsidence, to bridge the temporal gaps in multi-temporal InSAR observations. More specifically, we first construct a functional relationship between the InSAR observations and the logistic model, and we then develop a method to estimate the model parameters of the logistic model from the InSAR observations with temporal gaps. Having obtained these model parameters, the dynamic subsidence can be estimated with the logistic model. Simulated and real data experiments in the Datong coal mining area, China, were carried out in this study, in order to test the proposed method. The results show that the maximum subsidence in the Datong coal mining area reached about 1.26 m between 1 July 2007 and 28 February 2009, and the accuracy of the estimated dynamic subsidence is about 0.017 m. Compared with the linear and cubic polynomial models of the traditional time-series InSAR techniques, the accuracy of dynamic subsidence derived by the logistic model is increased by about 50.0% and 45.2%, respectively.

  5. Investigation on Mining Subsidence Based on Multi-Temporal InSAR and Time-Series Analysis of the Small Baseline Subset—Case Study of Working Faces 22201-1/2 in Bu’ertai Mine, Shendong Coalfield, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ma

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High-intensity coal mining (large mining height, shallow mining depth, and rapid advancing frequently causes large-scale ground damage within a short period of time. Understanding mining subsidence under high-intensity mining can provide a basis for mining-induced damage assessment, land remediation in a subsidence area, and ecological reconstruction in vulnerable ecological regions in Western China. In this study, the mining subsidence status of Shendong Coalfield was investigated and analyzed using two-pass differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR technology based on high-resolution synthetic aperture radar data (RADARSAT-2 precise orbit, multilook fine, 5 m collected from 20 January 2012 to June 2013. Surface damages in Shendong Coalfield over a period of 504 days under open-pit mining and underground mining were observed. Ground deformation of the high-intensity mining working faces 22201-1/2 in Bu’ertai Mine, Shendong Coalfield was monitored using small baseline subset (SBAS InSAR technology. (1 DInSAR detected and located 85 ground deformation areas (including ground deformations associated with past-mining activity. The extent of subsidence in Shendong Coalfield presented a progressive increase at an average monthly rate of 13.09 km2 from the initial 54.98 km2 to 225.20 km2, approximately, which accounted for 7% of the total area of Shendong Coalfield; (2 SBAS-InSAR reported that the maximum cumulative subsidence area reached 5.58 km2 above the working faces 22201-1/2. The advance speed of ground destruction (7.9 m/day was nearly equal to that of underground mining (8.1 m/day.

  6. Reduction-induced surface modification of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Yash K; Ruetsch, Sigrid B

    2010-01-01

    A microfluorometric method has been developed to characterize lipid removal or "delipidation" of the human hair cuticula during light exposure and chemical grooming processes such as oxidation (bleaching) and reduction. In the case of photochemical and chemical oxidation, lipid removal ("delipidation" of the F-layer or lipid-layer) from the outer beta-layer of the exposed scale faces and generation of cysteic acid groups occurs. This "delipidation," which ultimately results in "acidification" of the scale faces, leading to a change in surface chemistry from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, can be detected and quantified by microfluorometry by tagging, e.g., with the cationic fluorochrome Rhodamine B. In the case of reduction, similar tagging of the acid sites on the scale faces is possible, but this time, Rhodamine B reacts with the mixed disulfide containing a carboxyl group that will be ionized above a pH of about 4. In addition to this, we have shown by microfluorometric scanning that the negative charges generated in the cuticle surface can be used to bind low-molecular-weight quaternary conditioners. This process can be considered as "relipidation" or "refatting" of the scale faces. We have shown in earlier studies (1) that this entire process of oxidation-induced "delipidation" and subsequent "relipidation" of the acidic scale faces with a cationic conditioning molecule can also be reliably quantified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Furthermore, single-fiber wettability scanning using the Wilhelmy technique, which is highly sensitive to any changes in surface chemistry, is well-suited to detect and characterize treatment-induced changes in the chemical nature of the hair surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic.

  7. Recrystallization of InSb Surfaces Induced by Pulsed Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Černý

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed laser processing of InSb wafers for the application in designing high speed infrared detectors is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The recrystallization of InSb surfaces resulting in restoration of the implanted region to a single crystal state is presented as a reasonable alternative to the conventional thermal heating. In the theoretical part, thermal equilibrium and nonequilibrium models of melting, recrystallization and evaporation are formulated to describe transport phenomena in the material induced by laser irradiation. In the experimental part, InSb samples irradiated by the ruby (694 nm, 80ns FWHM, and ArF (193 nm, 10 ns FWHM lasers are studied using time resolved reflectivity, Auger electron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction methods to analyze surface modifications. A comparison of the experimental data with the numerical predictions shows that while for the ruby laser a reasonable agreement in surface melt duration is achieved, the results for the ArF laser differ quite a lot. As a main reason for these differences, the amorphization of the surface is identified.

  8. Coherence in ultrafast laser-induced periodic surface structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Li, Chen; Faure, Nicolas; Cheng, Guanghua; Stoian, Razvan

    2015-11-01

    Ultrafast laser irradiation can trigger anisotropically structured nanoscaled gratinglike arrangements of matter, the laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs). We demonstrate here that the formation of LIPSS is intrinsically related to the coherence of the laser field. Employing several test materials that allow large optical excursions, we observe the effect of randomizing spatial phase in generating finite domains of ripples. Using three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain methods, we evaluate energy deposition patterns below a material's rough surface and show that modulated pattern, i.e., a spatially ordered electromagnetic solution, results from the coherent superposition of waves. By separating the field scattered from a surface rough topography from the total field, the inhomogeneous energy absorption problem is reduced to a simple interference equation. We further distinguish the contribution of the scattered near field and scattered far field on various types of inhomogeneous energy absorption features. It is found that the inhomogeneous energy absorption which could trigger the low-spatial-frequency LIPSSs (LSFLs) and high-spatial-frequency LIPSSs (HSFLs) of periodicity Λ >λ /Re(n ˜) are due to coherent superposition between the scattered far field (propagation) and the refracted field, while HSFLs of Λ λ ) related to a feedback-driven topography evolution. Those results strongly suggest the electromagnetic interpretation of LIPSSs in interplay with an evolving surface topography.

  9. Regular subwavelength surface structures induced by femtosecond laser pulses on stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Litao; Nishii, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu

    2009-06-15

    In this research, we studied the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on the stainless steel surface using femtosecond laser pulses. A 780 nm wavelength femtosecond laser, through a 0.2 mm pinhole aperture for truncating fluence distribution, was focused onto the stainless steel surface. Under different experimental condition, low-spatial-frequency laser-induced periodic surface structures with a period of 526 nm and high-spatial-frequency laser-induced periodic surface structures with a period of 310 nm were obtained. The mechanism of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on the stainless steel surface is discussed.

  10. Large networks of artificial radar reflectors to monitor land subsidence in natural lowlying coastal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Luigi; Strozzi, Tazio; Teatini, Pietro

    2014-05-01

    intensity of the surrounding area; (ii) the network must be established resembling a sort of levelling benchmark network, i.e. with the TCRs placed keeping to a value of about 1.0-1.5 km the maximum distance between the TCRs or between an 'artificial' and the adjacent 'natural' reflectors to reliably resolve the radar phase ambiguities in the presence of atmospheric artifacts. Moreover, our experiment provided new information in order to improve the knowledge of the regional and local processes acting in the Venice Lagoon. We found that the northern basin of the lagoon is subsiding at a rate of about 3-4 mm/yr, while the central and the southern lagoon regions are more stable. At the local scale, i.e., the scale of the single salt marshes, significant differences have been detected depending, for example, on the nature and the architecture of Holocene deposits (Tosi et al., 2009). Acknowledgments. This work was supported by Magistrato alle Acque di Venezia-Venice Water Authority (VWA) and Consorzio Venezia Nuova (CVN) through the INLET Project and partially developed within the RITMARE Flagship Project (CNR-MIUR), Action 2 (SP3-WP1). TERRASAR-X data courtesy COA0612, © DLR. References. Teatini, P., Tosi, L., Strozzi, T., Carbognin, L., Cecconi, G., Rosselli, R., & Libardo, S. (2012). Resolving land subsidence within the venice lagoon by persistent scatterer SAR interferometry. Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 40-41, 72-79, doi: 10.1016/j.pce.2010.01.002. Strozzi, T., Teatini, P., Tosi, L., Wegmüller, U., & Werner, C. (2013). Land subsidence of natural transitional environments by satellite radar interferometry on artificial reflectors. Journal of Geophysical Research F: Earth Surface, 118(2), 1177-1191, doi: 10.1002/jgrf.2008. Tosi, L., Rizzetto, F., Zecchin, M., Brancolini, G., & Baradello, L. (2009). Morphostratigraphic framework of the venice lagoon (italy) by very shallow water VHRS surveys: Evidence of radical changes triggered by human-induced river diversions

  11. Subsidence Modeling of the Over-exploited Granular Aquifer System in Aguascalientes, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Rojas, D. E.; Wdowinski, S.; Minderhoud, P. P. S.; Pacheco, J.; Cabral, E.

    2016-12-01

    The valley of Aguascalientes in central Mexico experiences subsidence rates of up to 100 [mm/yr] due to overexploitation of its aquifer system, as revealed from satellite-based geodetic observations. The spatial pattern of the subsidence over the valley is inhomogeneous and affected by shallow faulting. The understanding of the subsoil mechanics is still limited. A better understanding of the subsidence process in Aguascalientes is needed to provide insights for future subsidence in the valley. We present here a displacement-constrained finite-element subsidence model using Deltares iMOD (interactive MODeling), based on the USGS MODFLOW software. The construction of our model relies on 3 main inputs: (1) groundwater level time series obtained from extraction wells' hydrographs, (2) subsurface lithostratigraphy interpreted from well drilling logs, and (3) hydrogeological parameters obtained from field pumping tests. The groundwater level measurements were converted to pore pressure in our model's layers, and used in Terzaghi's equation for calculating effective stress. We then used the effective stresse along with the displacement obtained from geodetic observations to constrain and optimize five geo-mechanical parameters: compression ratio, reloading ratio, secondary compression index, over consolidation ratio, and consolidation coefficient. Finally, we use the NEN-Bjerrum linear stress model formulation for settlements to determine elastic and visco-plastic strain, accounting for the aquifer system units' aging effect. Preliminary results show higher compaction response in clay-saturated intervals (i.e. aquitards) of the aquifer system, as reflected in the spatial pattern of the surface deformation. The forecasted subsidence for our proposed scenarios show a much more pronounced deformation when we consider higher groundwater extraction regimes.

  12. Subsidence and associated shallow faulting hazard assessment in central Mexico using InSAR and GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Solano Rojas, D. E.; Oliver-Cabrera, T.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.; Wdowinski, S.; DeMets, C.; Pacheco, J.

    2014-12-01

    While subsidence has affected Mexico City for over a century, other cities in central Mexico have been subjected to subsidence since the '80, as a result of their large urban expansion, population increase and aggressive groundwater extraction rates. The continuous subsidence results in severe damage to urban infrastructure and civil structures. Unfortunately the damage cost assessment and vulnerability are difficult to evaluate, because of the variable geographic extent and the continuous nature of the process, which have different characteristics than localized, short duration hazards, as earthquakes or flood events.We have monitored land subsidence in 17 cities in central Mexico using both InSAR and GPS observations. InSAR provides an unsurpassed synoptic view of the earth's dynamic surface. However, different satellite sensors and sometimes widely spaced data availability make it difficult to derive long-term time series, rapid changes or nonlinear variations of subsidence velocities. To alleviate this situation, higher temporal resolution subsidence observations of associated fault motion has been pursued using continuously operating GPS stations. We have developed a GPS network that covers 6 urban centers to detect short duration variations using different processing schemes that include both real-time solutions using RTNet as well as daily solution using Gipsy-Oasis.Cartographic products based on these techniques have been merged with other population, hydrology and meteorology data sets. This approach allows a better hazard assessment and provides information for other purposes, such as vulnerability for shallow faulting, land use zonations, and other decision elements for water resource management agencies. We will provide examples of these hazard assessments for several cities, including Mexico City, Aguascalientes, Morelia, Irapuato and Celaya and the challenges encountered to integrate these results with other data sets from federal and state

  13. Land subsidence in the Santa Clara Valley, California as of 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, J.F.; Ireland, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    From 1916 to 1966 in the San Jose area of Santa Clara Valley, California, deficient rainfall and runoff was accompanied by a fourfold increase in groundwater withdrawals. In response the artesian head declined 180-240 ft. The land surface subsided 12.7 ft in San Jose, due to compaction of the fine-grained compressible beds. The subsidence resulted in flooding of lands, and the compaction of the sediments caused compressional failure of many well casings. From 1967 to 1975, the artesian head recovered 70 to 100 feet due to a fivefold increase in surface water imports, favorable local water supply, decreased withdrawal, and increased recharge. In 1960, the Geological Survey installed extensometers in core holes 1,000 ft deep in San Jose and Sunnyvale. Measurements of compaction of the confined aquifer system obtained from these extensometers demonstrate the marked decrease in rate of compaction in response to the major head recovery since 1967. In San Jose the rate decreased from about 1 ft/yr in 1961 to 0.1 ft/yr in 1973. The subsidence has been stopped by raising the artesian head in the aquifers until it equaled or exceeded the maximum pore pressures in the fine-grained beds. However, the subsidence will recommence if the artesian head is drawn down appreciably below the levels of 1971-73. (USGS)

  14. Evolution of long-term land subsidence near Mexico City: Review, field investigations, and predictive simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Zamora, Dalia; Ortega-Guerrero, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Aquitard consolidation in the Chalco Plain is the most recent of a series of major land subsidence problems near Mexico City caused by leaky-aquifer pumping and involving a complex distribution of basalt flows within a lacustrine sequence. This study first conducted a ground magnetic survey combined with lithologic logs to map the extension of basalts. Then it assessed the evolution of ground surface elevations and updated hydraulic heads in the aquifer and aquitard in order to verify the accuracy of previous simulations and develop new predictions on land subsidence employing a one-dimensional, nonlinear, groundwater flow-consolidation model. Results show the presence of shallow basalts that extend from Sierra Santa Catarina into the Chalco Plain, causing a differential consolidation that controls both the distribution of large-scale fractures in the aquitard and the shape of a new lake. Cumulative land subsidence in the center of the Chalco Plain reached 13 m in 2006, thus closely matching previous numerical estimations. Since 1985, the ground surface decline has continued at a rate of ˜0.40 m/yr, while the potentiometric surface decline in the aquifer proceeds at an average rate of ˜1.5 m/yr, indicating that the flow system has not yet reached steady-state conditions. Numerical predictions show that under current pumping rates, where the aquitard is 300 m, total land subsidence will reach ˜19 m by the year 2020; while where the aquitard is 140 m thick, total land subsidence will reach ˜12 m, and increase the risk of flooding and aquitard fracturing for nearby urban centers.

  15. Analysis of Subsidence Data for the Big Hill Site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Stephen J.

    1999-06-01

    The elevation change data measured at the Big Hill SPR site over the last 10 years has been studied and a model utilized to project elevation changes into the future. The subsidence rate at Big Hill is low in comparison with other Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites and has decreased with time due to the maintenance of higher operating pressures and the normal decrease in creep closure rate of caverns with time. However, the subsidence at the site is projected to continue. A model was developed to project subsidence values 20 years into the future; no subsidence related issues are apparent from these projections.

  16. Surface-Induced Hybridization between Graphene and Titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Allen L. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States).; Koch, Roland J. [Technische Universitat, Chemnitz (Germany); Ong, Mitchell T. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Fang, Wenjing [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hofmann, Mario [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kim, Ki Kang [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States).; Seyller, Thomas [Technische Universitat, Chemnitz (Germany); Dresselhaus, Mildred S. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Reed, Evan J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Kong, Jing [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Palacios, Tomás [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-08-26

    Carbon-based materials such as graphene sheets and carbon nanotubes have inspired a broad range of applications ranging from high-speed flexible electronics all the way to ultrastrong membranes. However, many of these applications are limited by the complex interactions between carbon-based materials and metals. In this work, we experimentally investigate the structural interactions between graphene and transition metals such as palladium (Pd) and titanium (Ti), which have been confirmed by density functional simulations. We find that the adsorption of titanium on graphene is more energetically favorable than in the case of most metals, and density functional theory shows that a surface induced p-d hybridization occurs between atomic carbon and titanium orbitals. This strong affinity between the two materials results in a short-range ordered crystalline deposition on top of graphene as well as chemical modifications to graphene as seen by Raman and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). This induced hybridization is interface-specific and has major consequences for contacting graphene nanoelectronic devices as well as applications toward metal-induced chemical functionalization of graphene.

  17. Surface-induced hybridization between graphene and titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Allen L; Koch, Roland J; Ong, Mitchell T; Fang, Wenjing; Hofmann, Mario; Kim, Ki Kang; Seyller, Thomas; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Reed, Evan J; Kong, Jing; Palacios, Tomás

    2014-08-26

    Carbon-based materials such as graphene sheets and carbon nanotubes have inspired a broad range of applications ranging from high-speed flexible electronics all the way to ultrastrong membranes. However, many of these applications are limited by the complex interactions between carbon-based materials and metals. In this work, we experimentally investigate the structural interactions between graphene and transition metals such as palladium (Pd) and titanium (Ti), which have been confirmed by density functional simulations. We find that the adsorption of titanium on graphene is more energetically favorable than in the case of most metals, and density functional theory shows that a surface induced p-d hybridization occurs between atomic carbon and titanium orbitals. This strong affinity between the two materials results in a short-range ordered crystalline deposition on top of graphene as well as chemical modifications to graphene as seen by Raman and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). This induced hybridization is interface-specific and has major consequences for contacting graphene-nanoelectronic devices as well as applications toward metal-induced chemical functionalization of graphene.

  18. Starvation-induced effects on bacterial surface characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjelleberg, S; Hermansson, M

    1984-09-01

    Changes in bacterial surface hydrophobicity, charge, and degree of irreversible binding to glass surfaces of seven marine isolates were followed during starvation. The degree of hydrophobicity was measured by hydrophobic interaction chromatography and by two-phase separation in a hexadecane-water system, whereas changes in charge were measured by electrostatic interaction chromatography. All isolates underwent the starvation-induced responses of fragmentation, which is defined as division without growth, and continuous size reduction, which results in populations with increased numbers of smaller cells. The latter process was also responsible for a significant proportion of the total drop in cell volume; this was observed by noting the biovolume (the average cell multiplied by the number of bacteria) of a population after various times of starvation. Four strains exhibited increases in both hydrophobicity and irreversible binding, initiated after different starvation times. The most hydrophilic and most hydrophobic isolates both showed a small increase in the degree of irreversible binding after only 5 h, followed by a small decrease after 22 h. Their hydrophobicity remained constant, however, throughout the entire starvation period. On the other hand, one strain, EF190, increased its hydrophobicity after 5 h of starvation, although the degree of irreversible binding remained constant. Charge effects could not be generally related to the increase in irreversible binding. Scanning electron micrographs showed a large increase in surface roughness throughout the starvation period for all strains that showed marked changes in physicochemical characteristics.

  19. Electrostatically induced superconductivity at the surface of WS₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sanghyun; Costanzo, Davide; Berger, Helmuth; Morpurgo, Alberto F

    2015-02-11

    We investigate transport through ionic liquid gated field effect transistors (FETs) based on exfoliated crystals of semiconducting WS2. Upon electron accumulation, at surface densities close to, or just larger than, 10(14) cm(-2), transport exhibits metallic behavior with the surface resistivity decreasing pronouncedly upon cooling. A detailed characterization as a function of temperature and magnetic field clearly shows the occurrence of a gate-induced superconducting transition below a critical temperature Tc ≈ 4 K, a finding that represents the first demonstration of superconductivity in tungsten-based semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides. We investigate the nature of superconductivity and find significant inhomogeneity, originating from the local detaching of the frozen ionic liquid from the WS2 surface. Despite the inhomogeneity, we find that in all cases where a fully developed zero resistance state is observed, different properties of the devices exhibit a behavior characteristic of a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition, as it could be expected in view of the two-dimensional nature of the electrostatically accumulated electron system.

  20. Integration of MODIS data and Short Baseline Subset (SBAS) technique for land subsidence monitoring in Datong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chao-ying; Zhang, Qin; Yang, Chengsheng; Zou, Weibao

    2011-07-01

    Datong is located in the north of Shanxi Province, which is famous for its old-fashioned coal-mining preservation in China. Some serious issues such as land subsidence, ground fissures, mining collapse, and earthquake hazards have occurred over this area for a long time resulting in significant damages to buildings and roads. In order to monitor and mitigate these natural man-made hazards, Short Baseline Subsets (SBAS) InSAR technique with ten Envisat ASAR data is applied to detect the surface deformation over an area of thousands of square kilometers. Then, five MODIS data are used to check the atmospheric effects on InSAR interferograms. Finally, nine nonlinear land subsidence cumulative results during September 2004 and February 2008 are obtained. Based on the deformation data, three kinds of land subsidence are clearly detected, caused by mine extraction, underground water withdrawal and construction of new economic zones, respectively. The annual mean velocity of subsidence can reach 1 to 4 cm/year in different subsidence areas. A newly designed high-speed railway (HSR) with speeds of 350 km/h will cross through the Datong hi-tech zone. Special measures should be taken for the long run of this project. In addition, another two subsidence regions need further investigation to mitigate such hazards.

  1. Integration of MODIS data and short baseline subset (SBAS) technique for land subsidence monitoring in Datong, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, C.Y.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, C.S.; Zou, W.B. [Changan University, Xian (China)

    2011-07-15

    Datong is located in the north of Shanxi Province, which is famous for its old-fashioned coal-mining preservation in China. Some serious issues such as land subsidence, ground fissures, mining collapse, and earthquake hazards have occurred over this area for a long time resulting in significant damages to buildings and roads. In order to monitor and mitigate these natural man-made hazards, Short Baseline Subsets (SBAS) InSAR technique with ten Envisat ASAR data is applied to detect the surface deformation over an area of thousands of square kilometers. Then, five MODIS data are used to check the atmospheric effects on InSAR interferograms. Finally, nine nonlinear land subsidence cumulative results during September 2004 and February 2008 are obtained. Based on the deformation data, three kinds of land subsidence are clearly detected, caused by mine extraction, underground water withdrawal and construction of new economic zones, respectively. The annual mean velocity of subsidence can reach 1 to 4 cm/year in different subsidence areas. A newly designed high-speed railway (HSR) with speeds of 350 km/h will cross through the Datong hi-tech zone. Special measures should be taken for the long run of this project. In addition, another two subsidence regions need further investigation to mitigate such hazards.

  2. Effects of groundwater regulation on aquifer-system compaction and subsidence in the Houston-Galveston Region, Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, M. J.; Petrov, A.

    2015-11-01

    Subsidence has been a primary concern in the Houston area for many years. Since 1906, about 4 m of subsidence has occurred in the coastal areas, with a broad area of about 2 m of subsidence existing today throughout most of the Houston Area. In 1975, as a result of area residents and local governments becoming increasingly alarmed by the continued impact of subsidence on economic growth and quality of life in the region, the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District was created by the 64th Texas Legislature as an underground water conservation district with the mission to provide for the regulation of the withdrawal of groundwater to control subsidence. Over its nearly 40 years of existence, the District has developed substantial data sets providing the foundation for its regulatory plan. The District's regulatory plan allows groundwater users an amount of annual groundwater based on a percentage of an individual permitee's total water demand. The management of the groundwater resources within the District has involved significant coordination with regional ground and surface water suppliers; ongoing interaction with other state and local regulatory bodies; analysis of accurate and up to date predictions on water usage; the enforcement of disincentives to those who rely too heavily on groundwater and a commitment to practicing and promoting water conservation. Areas nearest the Gulf of Mexico coast have completed the conversion to alternative (other than groundwater) water sources, consequently the effective stress on the aquifer has decreased and subsidence rates have been reduced. Areas within the District further inland are currently proceeding through the conversion process, and subsidence has continued in those areas as development of the groundwater resources has continued.

  3. Induced polarization of volcanic rocks. 1Surface versus quadrature conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil, A.; Breton, M. Le; Niu, Q.; Wallin, E.; Haskins, E.; Thomas, D. M.

    2016-11-01

    We performed complex conductivity measurements on 28 core samples from the hole drilled for the Humu´ula Groundwater Research Project (Hawai´i Island, HI, USA). The complex conductivity measurements were performed at 4 different pore water conductivities (0.07, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0, and 10 S m-1 prepared with NaCl) over the frequency range 1 mHz to 45 kHz at 22 ± 1°C. The in-phase conductivity data are plotted against the pore water conductivity to determine, sample by sample, the intrinsic formation factor and the surface conductivity. The intrinsic formation factor is related to porosity by Archie's law with an average value of the cementation exponent m of 2.45, indicating that only a small fraction of the connected pore space controls the transport properties. Both the surface and quadrature conductivities are found to be linearly related to the cation exchange capacity of the material, which was measured with the cobalt hexamine chloride method. Surface and quadrature conductivities are found to be proportional to each other like for sedimentary siliclastic rocks. A Stern layer polarization model is used to explain these experimental results. Despite the fact that the samples contain some magnetite (up to 5% wt.), we were not able to identify the effect of this mineral on the complex conductivity spectra. These results are very encouraging in showing that galvanometric induced polarization measurements can be used in volcanic areas to separate the bulk from the surface conductivity and therefore to define some alteration attributes. Such a goal cannot be achieved with resistivity alone.

  4. Induced polarization of volcanic rocks - 1. Surface versus quadrature conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil, A.; Le Breton, M.; Niu, Q.; Wallin, E.; Haskins, E.; Thomas, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    We performed complex conductivity measurements on 28 core samples from the hole drilled for the Humu'ula Groundwater Research Project (Hawai'i Island, HI, USA). The complex conductivity measurements were performed at 4 different pore water conductivities (0.07, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0, and 10 S m-1 prepared with NaCl) over the frequency range 1 mHz to 45 kHz at 22 ± 1 °C. The in-phase conductivity data are plotted against the pore water conductivity to determine, sample by sample, the intrinsic formation factor and the surface conductivity. The intrinsic formation factor is related to porosity by Archie's law with an average value of the cementation exponent m of 2.45, indicating that only a small fraction of the connected pore space controls the transport properties. Both the surface and quadrature conductivities are found to be linearly related to the cation exchange capacity of the material, which was measured with the cobalt hexamine chloride method. Surface and quadrature conductivities are found to be proportional to each other like for sedimentary siliclastic rocks. A Stern layer polarization model is used to explain these experimental results. Despite the fact that the samples contain some magnetite (up to 5 per cent wt.), we were not able to identify the effect of this mineral on the complex conductivity spectra. These results are very encouraging in showing that galvanometric induced polarization measurements can be used in volcanic areas to separate the bulk from the surface conductivity and therefore to define some alteration attributes. Such a goal cannot be achieved with resistivity alone.

  5. Electrochemically Inducible Surfaces for Patterning Two Distinct Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Inseong; Yeo, Woon-Seok [Konkuk University,Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Herein, we report on a new multicomponent patterning method based on electrochemically inducible self-assembled monolayers on gold. Two different masked functional groups on monolayers are activated to give amine and acetylene moieties through electrochemical activations at negative potential and positive potential, respectively. The resulting amine and acetylene groups are further used as chemical handles for incorporation of ligand molecules via well-known chemoselective conjugation reactions such as amine-specific conjugation chemistry and click reaction. The chemical conversions of masked functional groups to amine and acetylene groups were characterized by cyclic voltammetry. We demonstrated the orthogonal immobilization of two fluorescent dyes on the patterned surface along the patterned features. Our strategy can provide a useful platform technology for the preparation of multicomponent ligand-patterned substrates with various advantages such as chemical flexibility, mild reaction conditions, and high yields of two orthogonal chemical reactions of amine-specific conjugation and click reaction.

  6. Flooding hazards from sea extremes and subsidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo; Vognsen, Karsten; Broge, Niels

    2015-01-01

    If we do not understand the effects of climate change and sea level rise (SLR) we cannot live in low-lying coastal areas in the future. Permanent inundation may become a prevalent issue but more often floods related to extreme events have the largest damage potential, and the management of flooding...... hazards needs to integrate the water loading from various sources. Furthermore, local subsidence must be accounted for in order to evaluate current and future flooding hazards and management options. We present the methodology (Figure) and preliminary results from the research project “Coastal Flooding...... Hazards due to Storm Surges and Subsidence” (2014-2017) with the objective to develop and test a practice oriented methodology for combining extreme water level statistics and land movement in coastal flooding hazard mapping and in climate change adaptation schemes in Denmark. From extreme value analysis...

  7. Development of a complex groundwater model to assess the relation among groundwater resource exploitation, seawater intrusion and land subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi Ting, Fang; Yih Chi, Tan; Chen, Jhong Bing

    2016-04-01

    The land subsidence, which is usually irreversible, in Taiwan Pintung Plain occurred due to groundwater overexploitation. Many of the land subsidence areas in Taiwan are located in coastal area. It could not only result in homeland loss, but also vulnerability to flooding because the function of drainage system and sea wall are weakened for the lowered ground surface. Groundwater salinization and seawater intrusion could happen more easily as well. This research focuses on grasping the trend of environmental change due to the damage and impact from inappropriate development of aquaculture in the last decades. The main task is developing the artificial neural networks (ANNs) and complex numerical model for conjunctive use of surface and groundwater which is composed of a few modules such as land use, land subsidence, contamination transportation and etc. An approach based on self-organizing map (SOM) is proposed to delineate groundwater recharge zones. Several topics will be studied such as coupling of surface water and groundwater modeling, assessing the benefit of improving groundwater resources by recharge, identifying the improper usage of groundwater resources, and investigating the effect of over-pumping on land subsidence in different depth. In addition, a complete plan for managing both the flooding and water resources will be instituted by scheming non-engineering adaptation strategies for homeland planning, ex. controlling pumping behavior in area vulnerable to land subsidence and increasing groundwater recharge.

  8. Differential substrate subsidence of the EnviHUT project pitched extensive green roof

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nečadová Klára

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In primary phase of testing building physical characteristics of the EnviHUT project extensive and semi-intensive roofs with 30° inclination occurred exceptional substrate subsidence. An extensive testing field with retaining geocell-system evinced differential subsidence of individual sectors after six months. Measured subsidence of installed substrate reached 40 % subsidence compared to originally designed height (intended layer thickness. Subsequent deformation of geocell-system additionally caused partial slide of substrate to drip edge area. These slides also influenced initial development of stonecrop plants on its surface. Except functional shortages the aesthetical function of the whole construction is influenced by the mentioned problem. The stated paper solves mentioned issues in view of installation method optimization, selection and modification of used roof substrate and in view of modification of geometric and building installed elements retaining system arrangement. Careful adjustment of roof system geometry and enrichment of original substrate fraction allow full functionality from pitched extensive green roof setting up. The modification scheme and its substantiation is a part of this technical study output.

  9. Satellite SAR interferometric observations of displacements associated with urban subsidence in Suzhou, Eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    SAR interferometry (InSAR) has a high potential for surface displacement mapping in the range from millimeter to meter. In this paper the potential of ERS-1/2 SAR interferometry for mapping subtle land subsidence has been investigated. A time series of ERS-1/2 SAR data from February 1993 to February 2000 is collected from measurements taken in Suzhou city, Jiangsu Province, China, eight ERS-1/2 SAR images are used to create seven interferograms, and three differential interferograms are produced using the three-pass method, which clearly show the spatial extent of land subsidence. The deformation maps are validated by leveling surveys, the correlation coefficient and standard deviation between them are 0.943 and 0.1706 respectively. Based on seven benchmarks, the subsidence rates are estimated, the overall trends are in close agreement with InSAR results. The results of study show that for the mapping of land subsidence in urban environments InSAR has a strong potential due to its cost-saving, high resolution and accuracy.

  10. Is There a Tectonic Component On The Subsidence Process In Morelia, Mexico?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Diaz-Molina, O.; Garduno-Monroy, V.; Avila-Olivera, J.; Hernández-Madrigal, V.; Hernández-Quintero, E.

    2009-12-01

    Subsidence and faulting have affected cities in central Mexico for decades. This process causes substantial damages to the urban infrastructure, housing and large buildings, and is an important factor to be consider when planning urban development, land use zoning and hazard mitigation strategies. In Mexico, studies using InSAR and GPS based observations have shown that high subsidence areas are usually associated with the presence of thick lacustrine and fluvial deposits. In most cases the subsidence is closely associated with intense groundwater extraction that results in sediment consolidation. However, recent studies in the colonial city of Morelia in central Mexico show a different scenario, where groundwater extraction cannot solely explain the observed surface deformation. Our results indicate that a more complex interplay between sediment consolidation and tectonic forces is responsible for the subsidence and fault distribution within the city. The city of Morelia has experienced fault development recognized since the 80’s. This situation has led to the recognition of 9 NE-SW trending faults that cover most of its urbanized area. Displacement maps derived from differential InSAR analysis show that the La Colina fault is the highest subsiding area in Morelia with maximum annual rates over -35 mm/yr. However, lithological mapping and field reconnaissance clearly show basalts outcropping this area of high surface deformation. The subsurface characterization of the La Colina fault was carried out along 27 Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) sections and 6 seismic tomography profiles. Assuming a constant, linear past behavior of the subsidence as observed by InSAR techniques, and based on the interpretation of the fault dislocation imaged by the shallow GPR and seismic tomography, it is suggested that the La Colina fault may have been active for the past 220-340 years and clearly pre-dates the intense water well extraction from the past century. These conditions

  11. 薄冲积层下开采地表动态移动规律与特征%Dynamic laws and characteristics of surface movement induced by mining under thin alluvium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐君; 王金安; 王磊

    2014-01-01

    High-voltage transit lines, gas and petroleum pipelines, riverbeds and other facilities located in mining disturbed zones are extremely sensitive to surface dynamic movement. Based on the case of coal mining under Jinsha river in Gansu province, in-site surface movement monitoring is carried out;and the dynamic law of surface subsidence of fully mechanized top coal caving mining under the thin alluvium is obtained. The study shows that the surface subsidence experiences a very short initial period and a longer active period of movement. The active period of surface movement appears in the range from 110 m in front of the working face to 400 m back of working face, which lasts 185 days and results in 90.7%of the total surface subsidence. The severe period of surface subsidence occurs at 50 m to 150 m in the rear of working face;but the severer movement time is relatively short about 60 days. Based on the sinking curves of the measuring point displaying S-shaped distribution, and the sinking rate curves that are similar to normal distribution, the dynamic model of surface subsidence and sinking rate are established with respect to the mining time and advancing rate. The trajectories of ground measuring points are captured showing the back and forth moving characteristics. The fractures on the surface induced by mining under thin alluvium intend to develop parallel to the mining direction. With the working face advancing, the time and space features demonstrate that the surface fractures move forward and the concentration areas expand to the outside of the mining area.%位于采煤影响区的高压线、输气输油管道、河道等设施对地表动态移动极为敏感。以甘肃某煤矿在金沙河下开采为背景,通过现场地表移动监测,获得薄冲积层条件下综放开采地表动态移动变形规律。研究表明:薄冲积层下综放开采地表具有下沉移动起始期很短、活跃期较长等特点。地表移动

  12. RUPTURING OF POLYMER FILMS WITH RUBBING—INDUCED SURFACE DEFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Du; F.C.Xie; Y.J.Wang; O.K.C.Tsui; O.K.C.Tsui

    2003-01-01

    It has been a long-standing question whether dewetting of polymer film from non-wettable substrate surfaces wherein the bicontinuous morphology never forms in the dewetting film is due to spinodal instability or heterogeneous nucleation.In this experiment,we use a simple method to make the distinction through introduction of topographical defects of the films by rubbing the sample surface with a rayon cloth.Spinodal dewetting is identified for those films that dewet by a characteristic wavevector,q,independent of the density of rubbing-induced defects.Heterogeneous nucleation,on the other hand,is identified for those with q increasing with increasing density of defects.Our result shows that PS films on oxide coated silicon with thickness less than≈13nm are dominated by spinodal dewetting,but the thicker films are dominated by nucleation dewetting.We also confirm that spinodal dewetting does not necessarily lead to a bicontinuous morphology in the dewetting film,contrary to the classic theory of Cahn.

  13. An Integrated Assessment Framework for land subsidence in Delta cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucx, T.; van Ruiten, K.; Erkens, G.

    2013-12-01

    In many delta cities land subsidence exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. Without change, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other delta (and coastal) cities will sink below sea level. Increased flooding and also other wide¬spread impacts of land subsidence result already in damage of billions of dollars per year to roads, embankments, subsurface infrastructure and housing. Moreover the potential damage caused by increased flood risk is around the same amount of money. A major cause for severe land subsidence is excessive groundwater extraction related to rapid urbanization and population growth. A major rethink is needed to resolve the ';hidden' but urgent threat of subsidence in a multi-sectoral perspective. A comprehensive approach is presented to address land subsidence for more sustainable and resilient urban development. Land subsidence is an issue that involves many policy fields, complex technical aspects and governance. There is a need for an integrated approach in order to manage subsidence and to develop appropriate strategies and measures that are effective and efficient on both the short and long term. Urban (ground)water management, adaptive flood risk management and related spatial planning strategies should be taken into account. This presentation will introduce and illustrate an Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF) for land subsidence that has been developed in the European FP7 project Subcoast. This framework is based on an integrated (multi-sectoral) approach and can be used to gain insight in the complex aspects of subsidence, to raise awareness and to support decision making on appropriate adaptation strategies and measures. The IAF is addressing all aspects of subsidence: from primary causes, vulnerability, impacts and risks towards responses and solutions. It will also take into account the three spatial layers (Occupation, Network and Base layer), governance aspects and several scenarios (economic

  14. Multi-scale modelling for the assessment of water quality and land subsidence due to salt layers dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourdier, Sébastien; Bazargan-Sabet, Behrooz; Quang Vong, Chan

    2016-04-01

    Long term evolution of salt mine depends on mechanical behavior of the material but also on specific conditions like the intrusion of water into working areas. Such phenomenon has been observed in the Nancy Basin (East of France) where brine percolates through access shafts accompanied by significant subsidence at the surface level, bringing about growing societal concerns. In order to understand the mechanisms and kinetics of dissolution of salt inducing the phenom-enon of subsidence, a numerical model is implemented. The circulation of water between the salt layer and the impervious layer induces the creation of dissolution channels. In active disso-lution zones, the channel network constantly evolves: new channels appear with new dissolution zones while others collapse because of their too important dimensions. The model simulates the phenomenon of dissolution at the channel scale first, then at the basin scale. Dissolution channels modeling has been realized using COMSOL Multiphysics® with Darcy's Law and Solute Transport interfaces. At the channel scale, realistic parameters used as input data gave raise to output results con-sistent with the expected range of values for numerical assessment of the transient period and mass fluxes. At the basin scale, initial porosity and hydraulic conductivity fields, related to each other by a cubic law, are assumed to follow a Weibull distribution. From this initial state, the transient model calculates the evolution of porosity with time, taking into account Darcy's velocity as it was formulated by Yao et al. (2014). Progress in dissolution and transport gives rise to the creation of dissolution channels. Channels mechanical behavior is investigated through extending 2D model into 3D one. The calculations show that open channels collapse when they reach a width of approximatively one meter. The results of these investigations are consistent with the in situ measurements, notably with the estimation of the subsidence rate

  15. Ground Subsidence in Areas of Loose Porous Aquifers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yixiang; GAO Guanhua

    2004-01-01

    Groundwater is one of the important water resources in northern China's plain areas. Many severe geological hazards have occurred in these areas due to ground subsidence which is caused by over exploitation of groundwater. This paper introduces and analyses the ground subsidence caused by groundwater exploitation and its mechanism in the northern China's plains. A ground subsidence prediction model has been developed based on the consolidation theory. The authors have tested this model in a case study of Fuyang City, Anhui Province, where ground subsidence is a severe environmental problem. In the case study, the model results match very well with those of the actual measurement. Two schemes of groundwater exploitation are assessed. The conclusion from the study could be used in the long-term water and economical management planning. The strategies for the control of ground subsidence are discussed.

  16. Coal mining GPS subsidence monitoring technology and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jian; Peng Xiangguo; Xu Chang hui

    2011-01-01

    We proved theoretically that geodetic height,measured with Global Positioning System (GPS),can be applied directly to monitor coal mine subsidence.Based on a Support Vector Machine (SVM) model,we built a regional geoid model with a Gaussian Radial Basis Function (RBF) and the technical scheme for GPS coal mine subsidence monitoring is presented to provide subsidence information for updating the regional Digital Elevation Model (DEM).The theory proposed was applied to monitor mining subsidence in an Inner Mongolia coal mine in China.The scheme established an accurate GPS reference network and a comprehensive leveling conjunction provided the normal height of all GPS control points.According to the case study,the SVM model to establish geoid-model is better than a polynomial fit or a Genetic Algorithm based Back Propagation (GA-BP) neural network.GPS-RTK measurements of coal mine subsidence information can be quickly acquired for updating the DEM.

  17. Evolution of kinetically controlled In-induced surface structure on Si(5 5 7) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Eldose, Nirosh M.; Mishra, Monu [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Niazi, Asad; Nair, Lekha [Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Gupta, Govind, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Evolution of In induced superstructures on Si(5 5 7) surface during RT and HT adsorption/desorption process. • Kinetics is governed by substrate temperature which exhibits various growth modes (FM, SK, VB) under different conditions. • Strain relaxation play significant role in the commencement of desorption/rearrangement of atoms. • A consolidated phase diagram of In/Si(5 5 7) interface has been reported with new √3 × √3-R30° and 4 × 1 phases. - Abstract: This paper introduces issue of kinetically controlled and temperature driven superstructural phase transition of Indium (In) on atomically clean high index Si(5 5 7)-7 × 1 surface. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that at room-temperature (RT) with a controlled incident flux of 0.002 ML/s; In overlayers evolve through the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode and yield a (1 × 1) diffraction pattern for coverage ≥1 ML. For substrate temperature <500°C, growth of In follows Stranski–Krastanov growth mode while for temperature >500°C island growth is observed. On annealing the In/Si(5 5 7) interface in the temperature range 250–340°C, clusters to two dimensional (2D) layer transformation on top of a stable monolayer is predominated. In-situ RT and HT adsorption and thermal desorption phenomena revealed the formation of coverage and temperature dependent thermally stable In induced superstructural phases such as (4 × 1) at 0.5 ML (520°C), (√3 × √3-R30°) at 0.3 ML (560°C) and (7 × 7) at 0.1 ML (580°C). These indium induced superstructures could be utilized as potential substrate for the growth of various exotic 1D/2D structures.

  18. TEM investigation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on polymer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Úna; Kudzma, Sylwester; Sherlock, Richard; O'Connell, Claire; Glynn, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) may have numerous applications, ranging from biomaterial applications to LCDs, microelectronic fabrication and photonics. However, in order to control the development of these structures for their particular application, it is necessary to understand how they are generated. We report our work on investigating the melting that occurs during LIPSS formation. LIPSS were generated on three polymer surfaces - polyethylene terephthalate (PET), amorphous polycarbonate (APC) and oriented crystalline polycarbonate (OPC) - which were irradiated with a polarized ArF excimer laser (193 nm) beam with fluences between 3 and 5 mJ/cm2. The structures were imaged using a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), which facilitated investigation of changes in the polymer structures and consequently the depth of the melt zone that accompanies LIPSS generation. We also present theoretical calculations of the temperature-depth profile due to the interaction of the low fluence 193 nm laser beam with the polymer surfaces and compare these calculations with our experimental results.

  19. Physical experiments of land subsidence within a maar crater: insights for porosity variations and fracture localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerca, M.; Rocha, L.; Carreón-Freyre, D.; Aranda, J.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a series of physical models aiming to reproduce rapid subsidence (at least 25 m in 30 years) observed in the sediments of a maar crater caused by extraction of groundwater in the interconnected adjacent aquifer. The model considered plausible variations in the geometry of the crater basement and the measured rate of groundwater extraction (1 m per year in the time interval from 2005 to 2011) in 15 wells located around the structure. The experiments were built within a rigid plastic bowl in which the sediments and rocks of the maar sequence were modeled using different materials: (a) plasticine for the rigid country rock, (b) gravel for the fractured country rock forming the diatreme fill and, (c) water saturated hollow glass microbeads for the lacustrine sedimentary fill of the crater. Water table was maintained initially at the surface of the sediments and then was allowed to flow through a hole made at the base of the rigid bowl. Water extraction provoked a sequence of gentle deformation, fracturing, and faulting of the surface in all the experiments. Vertical as well as lateral displacements were observed in the surface of the experiments. We discuss the results of 2 representative models. The model results reproduced the main geometry of the ring faults affecting the crater sediments and helps to explain the diversity of structures observed in relation with the diatreme geometry. The surface of the models was monitored continuously with an optical interferometric technique called structured light projection. Images collected at nearly constant time intervals were analyzed using the ZEBRA software and the obtained interferometric pairs permitted to analyze the full field subsidence in the model (submilimetric vertical displacements). The experiments were conducted at a continuous flow rate extraction and show a also a linear subsidence rate. Comparison among the results of the physical models and the fault system associated to

  20. Morphology, genesis and distribution of subsidence features in Dinaric karst in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihevc, Andrej

    2016-04-01

    Dinaric karst is built mostly of Mesozoic limestones and dolomites. Because of large uninterrupted areas of karst, long geomorphic evolution and pure karst rocks there is not much sediment cover over karst. In spite of that the appearing of subsidence are very common. They are connected to parts of karst with specific geomorphic evolution, mostly contact karst and karst poljes where thick clastic sediments are deposited. Contact karst is the karst that developed under the impact of allogenic streams. As the contact of surface and underground flow is sensitive in some past climatic conditions these areas were often zones of sedimentation. At present washing of sediments into karst prevails sedimentation causing subsidence in ponor zones of blind valleys or border depressions very frequent. Karst poljes are the areas of karst where karst water table is close to the surface. This means low vertical gradient in karst and sedimentation or good sediment preservation. However, because of regular seasonal oscillations of water level, part of the year these sediments are in conditions where piping and subsidence can occur. In both areas collapses occur after the floods or after drop of the level of karst water below surface, mostly close to ponors or estavelles. On other geomorphic settings where collapses occur like relict poljes, dry valleys or on levelled surfaces they occur after heavy rains, often connected with thawing of snow. Collapse features are mostly cylindrical or steep-sided, usually a few metres to tens of metres in diameter. With time they transform to shallow depressions or funnel like dolines. From the point of view of geohazard the main zones of subsidence are well known and respected by locals. Even land use in endangered zones is usual less intensive and the damage caused by them is relatively small. However with loosing traditional knowledge, disobeying recommendations and growth of settlements and infrastructure the likelihood of damage increases.

  1. Laser-induced selective copper plating of polypropylene surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratautas, K.; Gedvilas, M.; Stankevičiene, I.; JagminienÄ--, A.; Norkus, E.; Li Pira, N.; Sinopoli, S.; Emanuele, U.; Račiukaitis, G.

    2016-03-01

    Laser writing for selective plating of electro-conductive lines for electronics has several significant advantages, compared to conventional printed circuit board technology. Firstly, this method is faster and cheaper at the prototyping stage. Secondly, material consumption is reduced, because it works selectively. However, the biggest merit of this method is potentiality to produce moulded interconnect device, enabling to create electronics on complex 3D surfaces, thus saving space, materials and cost of production. There are two basic techniques of laser writing for selective plating on plastics: the laser-induced selective activation (LISA) and laser direct structuring (LDS). In the LISA method, pure plastics without any dopant (filler) can be used. In the LDS method, special fillers are mixed in the polymer matrix. These fillers are activated during laser writing process, and, in the next processing step, the laser modified area can be selectively plated with metals. In this work, both methods of the laser writing for the selective plating of polymers were investigated and compared. For LDS approach, new material: polypropylene with carbon-based additives was tested using picosecond and nanosecond laser pulses. Different laser processing parameters (laser pulse energy, scanning speed, the number of scans, pulse durations, wavelength and overlapping of scanned lines) were applied in order to find out the optimal regime of activation. Areal selectivity tests showed a high plating resolution. The narrowest width of a copper-plated line was less than 23 μm. Finally, our material was applied to the prototype of the electronic circuit board on a 2D surface.

  2. Monitoring delta subsidence with Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, S.; Overeem, I.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Can subsidence in river deltas be monitored in near real-time at the spatial and temporal resolution needed for informing critical management decisions? Interferometric Synthetic Radar Aperture (InSAR) is a satellite-based technique that can map ground deformation with millimeter-scale vertical resolution over thousands of square kilometers. InSAR has enormous potential to shed light on the dynamics of actively subsiding deltas, but the technique is not commonly applied outside of major cities due to the difficulty of performing InSAR in wet, vegetated settings. Given these limitations, how can InSAR best serve the global effort to monitor sinking deltas? Here, an overview of InSAR processing is provided that addresses delta-specific challenges, including frequent cloud-cover in tropical areas; noisy signals in wetlands and flooded fields; dense forests that interact unpredictably with different radar wavelengths; flat landscapes that hinder image stacking algorithms; rapid urban development that can render Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) inaccurate; and a lack of in situ GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers for InSAR calibration. InSAR has unique value for monitoring subsidence in deltas, and some natural and anthropogenic drivers of subsidence can be resolved by InSAR. High-resolution InSAR measurements from the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) are then presented and validated against GPS data. Surface motion is shown to reflect subsurface stratigraphy, and sediment compaction is shown to be the most important factor in this delta on short (non-tectonic) timescales. Average compaction rates throughout the eastern delta range from 0 to > 18 mm/y, varying by more than an order of magnitude depending on the ages and grain sizes of surface and subsurface sediment layers. Fastest subsidence is observed in Holocene organic-rich mud, and slowest subsidence is observed along the Meghna River and in areas with surface or subsurface sand deposits. Although groundwater

  3. Electric field cancellation on quartz: a Rb adsorbate induced negative electron affinity surface

    CERN Document Server

    Sedlacek, J A; Rittenhouse, S T; Weck, P F; Sadeghpour, H R; Shaffer, J P

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the (0001) surface of single crystal quartz with a submonolayer of Rb adsorbates. Using Rydberg atom electromagnetically induced transparency, we investigate the electric fields resulting from Rb adsorbed on the quartz surface, and measure the activation energy of the Rb adsorbates. We show that the adsorbed Rb induces a negative electron affinity (NEA) on the quartz surface. The NEA surface allows low energy electrons to bind to the surface and cancel the electric field from the Rb adsorbates. Our results are important for integrating Rydberg atoms into hybrid quantum systems and the fundamental study of atom-surface interactions, as well as applications for electrons bound to a 2D surface.

  4. An integrated assessment framework for land subsidence in delta cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. M. Bucx

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In many delta cities land subsidence exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten by excessive groundwater extraction related to rapid urbanization and population growth. Without change, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other delta (and coastal cities will sink below sea level. Increased flooding and also other widespread impacts of land subsidence result already in damage of billions of dollars per year. In order to gain insight in the complex, multi-sectoral aspects of subsidence, to raise awareness and to support decision making on appropriate adaptation strategies and measures, an Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF for subsidence is introduced, illustrated by several (delta case studies. Based on that a list of 10 generic key issues and possible solutions is presented in order to further develop and support a (generic approach how to deal with subsidence in current and future subsidence-prone areas. For exchange of experiences and knowledge development.on subsidence in deltas the Delta Alliance, a knowledge network of deltas worldwide, can be supportive.

  5. The interaction between land subsidence and urban development in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Wang, R.; Zhou, Y.; Jiang, Y.; Wang, X.

    2015-11-01

    The Yangtze River Delta and North China Plain are experiencing serious land subsidence development and are also the areas that have undergone the fastest urbanization. Rapid urban development inevitably requires more water resources. However, China is a country with small per capita water resources, nonuniform distribution of water resources, and over-exploitation of groundwater - all of which are critical factors contributing to the potential for a land subsidence disaster. In addition, land subsidence has brought about elevation loss, damaged buildings, decreased safety of rail transit projects, lowered land value, and other huge economic losses and potential safety hazards in China. In this paper, Beijing, a typical northern Chinese city deficient in water, is taken as an example to explore (a) the problems of urban development, utilization of water resources, and land subsidence development; (b) the harm and influence of land subsidence hazards on urban construction; and (c) the relationship between urban development and land subsidence. Based on the results, the author has predicted the trend of urban development and land subsidence in Beijing and puts forward her viewpoints and suggestions.

  6. An integrated assessment framework for land subsidence in delta cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucx, T. H. M.; van Ruiten, C. J. M.; Erkens, G.; de Lange, G.

    2015-11-01

    In many delta cities land subsidence exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten by excessive groundwater extraction related to rapid urbanization and population growth. Without change, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other delta (and coastal) cities will sink below sea level. Increased flooding and also other widespread impacts of land subsidence result already in damage of billions of dollars per year. In order to gain insight in the complex, multi-sectoral aspects of subsidence, to raise awareness and to support decision making on appropriate adaptation strategies and measures, an Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF) for subsidence is introduced, illustrated by several (delta) case studies. Based on that a list of 10 generic key issues and possible solutions is presented in order to further develop and support a (generic) approach how to deal with subsidence in current and future subsidence-prone areas. For exchange of experiences and knowledge development.on subsidence in deltas the Delta Alliance, a knowledge network of deltas worldwide, can be supportive.

  7. Electromagnetic fields induced by surface ring waves in the deep sea

    OpenAIRE

    Kozitskiy, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with electromagnetic effects associated with a radially symmetric system of progressive surface waves in the deep sea, induced by underwater oscillating sources or by dispersive decay of the initial localized perturbations of the sea surface.

  8. Substrate texture properties induce triatomine probing on bitten warm surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Marcelo G

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this work we initially evaluated whether the biting process of Rhodnius prolixus relies on the detection of mechanical properties of the substrate. A linear thermal source was used to simulate the presence of a blood vessel under the skin of a host. This apparatus consisted of an aluminium plate and a nickel-chrome wire, both thermostatized and presented at 33 and 36°C, respectively. To evaluate whether mechanical properties of the substrate affect the biting behaviour of bugs, this apparatus was covered by a latex membrane. Additionally, we evaluated whether the expression of probing depends on the integration of bilateral thermal inputs from the antennae. Results The presence of a latex cover on a thermal source induced a change in the biting pattern shown by bugs. In fact, with latex covered sources it was possible to observe long bites that were never performed in response to warm metal surfaces. The total number of bites was higher in intact versus unilaterally antennectomized insects. These bites were significantly longer in intact than in unilaterally antennectomized insects. Conclusions Our results suggest that substrate recognition by simultaneous input through thermal and mechanical modalities is required for triggering maxillary probing activity.

  9. Magnetically induced decrease in droplet contact angle on nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qian; Ristenpart, William D; Stroeve, Pieter

    2011-10-04

    We report a magnetic technique for altering the apparent contact angle of aqueous droplets deposited on a nanostructured surface. Polymeric tubes with embedded superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles were prepared via layer-by-layer deposition in the 800 nm diameter pores of polycarbonate track-etched (PCTE) membranes. Etching away the original membrane yields a superparamagnetic film composed of mostly vertical tubes attached to a rigid substrate. We demonstrate that the apparent contact angle of pure water droplets deposited on the nanostructured film is highly sensitive to the ante situm strength of an applied magnetic field, decreasing linearly from 117 ± 1.3° at no applied field to 105 ± 0.4° at an applied field of approximately 500 G. Importantly, this decrease in contact angle did not require an inordinately strong magnetic field: a 15° decrease in contact angle was observed even with a standard alnico bar magnet. We interpret the observed contact angle behavior in terms of magnetically induced conformation changes in the film nanostructure, and we discuss the implications for reversibly switching substrates from hydrophilic to hydrophobic via externally tunable magnetic fields.

  10. Nanoscale rippling on polymer surfaces induced by AFM manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Acunto, Mario; Dinelli, Franco; Pingue, Pasqualantonio

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale rippling induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip can be observed after performing one or many scans over the same area on a range of materials, namely ionic salts, metals, and semiconductors. However, it is for the case of polymer films that this phenomenon has been widely explored and studied. Due to the possibility of varying and controlling various parameters, this phenomenon has recently gained a great interest for some technological applications. The advent of AFM cantilevers with integrated heaters has promoted further advances in the field. An alternative method to heating up the tip is based on solvent-assisted viscoplastic deformations, where the ripples develop upon the application of a relatively low force to a solvent-rich film. An ensemble of AFM-based procedures can thus produce nanoripples on polymeric surfaces quickly, efficiently, and with an unprecedented order and control. However, even if nanorippling has been observed in various distinct modes and many theoretical models have been since proposed, a full understanding of this phenomenon is still far from being achieved. This review aims at summarizing the current state of the art in the perspective of achieving control over the rippling process on polymers at a nanoscale level.

  11. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehm, S.; Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krueger, J.; Bonse, J. [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und-pruefung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on two different silica polymorphs (single-crystalline synthetic quartz and commercial fused silica glass) upon irradiation in air with multiple linearly polarized single- and double-fs-laser pulse sequences ({tau} = 150 fs pulse duration, {lambda} = 800 nm center wavelength, temporal pulse separation {Delta}t < 40 ps) is studied experimentally and theoretically. Two distinct types of fs-LIPSS [so-called low-spatial-frequency LIPSS (LSFL) and high-spatial-frequency LIPSS (HSFL)] with different spatial periods and orientations were identified. Their appearance was characterized with respect to the experimental parameters peak laser fluence and number of laser pulses per spot. Additionally, the 'dynamics' of the LIPSS formation was addressed in complementary double-fs-pulse experiments with varying delays, revealing a characteristic change of the LSFL periods. The experimental results are interpreted on the basis of a Sipe-Drude model considering the carrier dependence of the optical properties of fs-laser excited silica. This new approach provides an explanation of the LSFL orientation parallel to the laser beam polarisation in silica - as opposed to the behaviour of most other materials.

  12. Wolbachia surface protein induces innate immune responses in mosquito cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto Sofia B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria are capable of inducing chronic upregulation of insect immune genes in some situations and this phenotype may influence the transmission of important insect-borne pathogens. However the molecules involved in these interactions have not been characterized. Results Here we show that recombinant Wolbachia Surface Protein (WSP stimulates increased transcription of immune genes in mosquito cells derived from the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, which is naturally uninfected with Wolbachia; at least two of the upregulated genes, TEP1 and APL1, are known to be important in Plasmodium killing in this species. When cells from Aedes albopictus, which is naturally Wolbachia-infected, were challenged with WSP lower levels of upregulation were observed than for the An. gambiae cells. Conclusions We have found that WSP is a strong immune elicitor in a naturally Wolbachia-uninfected mosquito species (Anopheles gambiae while a milder elicitor in a naturally-infected species (Aedes albopictus. Since the WSP of a mosquito non-native (nematode Wolbachia strain was used, these data suggest that there is a generalized tolerance to WSP in Ae. albopictus.

  13. Subsidence of River Delta Systems and Enclosed Basins Caused by Multi-decadal to Millennial Scale Sediment and Ocean Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Ronald G.; Ivins, Erik R.; Klemann, Volker; Dokka, Roy K.; Lohman, Rowena; Fielding, Eric J.

    2010-05-01

    The causes of multi-decadal coastal subsidence that exceed the rate of 20th-21st Century mean sea-level rise are numerous. A host of causal relationships between anthropogenic activity and coastal erosion and subsidence are both compelling and well understood. A short list of these processes should include: fluid extraction, reservoir compaction; fluid-induced motion of shallow growth-faults; decomposition of organic sediments (left in the wake of major water diversion projects) and sediment empoundment and/or diversion. Non-anthropogenic post-glacial sediment loading-induced subsidence has also been demonstrated to be a candidate mechanism that could dominate the GPS-mapped subsidence in the Mississippi-Atchafalaya Rive Delta system (Ivins, Dokka and Blum, GRL, 34, L16303, 2007). More recent changes in sediment load can also have a substantial impact on the active subsidence of the crust and mantle. These can be of both anthropogenic and natural origins. Here we examine, in varying degrees of detail, the world's major delta systems wherein the necessary and sufficient conditions are met that allow sediment plus water load to drive gravitationally-layered, hydrostatically pre-stressed viscoelastic Earth model simulations far enough away from gravitational equilibrium that a detectable geodetic signal in tide-gauges and GPS vertical position would be predicted. Sediment-load-induced subsidence occurs over horizontal length scales, λ, comparable to thickness of the lithosphere: λ ≥ 40-60 km and has amplitudes ranging from of 0.5 to 8 mm/yr (Ivins et al. GRL34, 2007; Syvitski Sustain. Sci., 3, 2008). The cases of the pan-Arctic deltas, the Atchafalya -Mississippi River Delta system, the Yangzte River and Yellow River Deltas of China, the Danube River Delta Plain, and the generally complex postglacial water-sediment loading of the Black Sea and Caspian Sea.

  14. Evolution of kinetically controlled In-induced surface structure on Si(5 5 7) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh; Eldose, Nirosh M.; Mishra, Monu; Niazi, Asad; Nair, Lekha; Gupta, Govind

    2014-09-01

    This paper introduces issue of kinetically controlled and temperature driven superstructural phase transition of Indium (In) on atomically clean high index Si(5 5 7)-7 × 1 surface. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that at room-temperature (RT) with a controlled incident flux of 0.002 ML/s; In overlayers evolve through the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode and yield a (1 × 1) diffraction pattern for coverage ≥1 ML. For substrate temperature 500 °C island growth is observed. On annealing the In/Si(5 5 7) interface in the temperature range 250-340 °C, clusters to two dimensional (2D) layer transformation on top of a stable monolayer is predominated. In-situ RT and HT adsorption and thermal desorption phenomena revealed the formation of coverage and temperature dependent thermally stable In induced superstructural phases such as (4 × 1) at 0.5 ML (520 °C), (√3 × √3-R30°) at 0.3 ML (560 °C) and (7 × 7) at 0.1 ML (580 °C). These indium induced superstructures could be utilized as potential substrate for the growth of various exotic 1D/2D structures.

  15. Stability and effects of carbon-induced surface reconstructions in cobalt Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobîcă, I. M.; van Helden, P.; van Santen, R. A.

    2016-11-01

    This computational study of carbon induced reconstruction of Co surfaces demonstrates that surface reconstruction is stable in the presence of a hydrogen at low coverage. These reconstructions can create new sites that allow for low activation energy CO dissociation. Carbon induced surface reconstruction of the edge of the FCC-Co(221) step surface will result in highly reactive step-edge sites. Such sites also provide a low activation energy for carbon to diffuse into the subsurface layer of cobalt.

  16. 试论湖相高频旋回水下间断面的成因:揭示湖盆短期沉降过程的突破口%Brief discussion about formation cause of underwater discontinuity surface in lacustrine high-frequency cycle: Breakthrough of revealing the short-term subsidence of lake basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冠民; 吴智平; 陈清华

    2012-01-01

    High-frequency cycle of upward-shallowing often develops in lake facies.Underwater discontinuity surface,located at the bottom of cycle,above that paleobathymetry rapidly increases.In continental sequence stratigraphy study,this kind of discontinuity surface is usually directly attributed to ancient lake flooding caused by climate change and underwater non-depositional surface formed by source back.However,this understanding is still difficult to get a satisfactory explanation,and it seems more reasonable if it is classified as results of the basin's short-cycle intermittent tectonic subsidence.The research of underwater discontinuity surface's formation cause in lacustrine high-frequency cycle,not only further explore the basin's short-period tectonic activity patterns and its influence on lake sedimentation in the high-frequency cycle,but provide research base for better application of Milankovitch cycle theory in lake facies.%在湖相条件下,常发育沉积水体单一向上变浅的高频旋回,旋回底部为水下间断面,间断面之上的古水深迅速增大。在陆相层序地层学研究中,常将这类间断面直接归为古气候变化引起湖泛和物源后退形成的水下无沉积作用面。但这种认识目前还难以得到圆满的解释,而如果将其归为盆地短周期的间歇性构造沉降成因似乎显得更为合理。针对湖相高频旋回水下间断面的成因研究,不仅可以进一步探讨盆地短周期的构造活动方式及其对湖相高频旋回沉积过程的影响,也为在湖相条件下更好地应用米兰柯维奇旋回理论提供研究基础。

  17. Land Subsidence and Aquifer-System Compaction in the Tucson Active Management Area, South-Central Arizona, 1987-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruth, Rob; Flynn, Pool; Donald, R.; Anderson, Carl E.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey monitors land subsidence and aquifer-system compaction caused by ground-water depletion in Tucson Basin and Avra Valley - two of the three alluvial basins within the Tucson Active Management Area. In spring 1987, the Global Positioning System was used to measure horizontal and vertical positions for bench marks at 43 sites to establish a network for monitoring land subsidence in Tucson Basin and Avra Valley. Between 1987 and 2005, the original number of subsidence monitoring stations was gradually increased to more than 100 stations to meet the need for information in the growing metropolitan area. Data from approximately 60 stations common to the Global Positioning System surveys done after an initial survey in 1987 are used to document land subsidence. For the periods of comparison, average land-surface deformation generally is less than the maximum subsidence at an individual station and takes into account land-surface recovery from elastic aquifer-system compaction. Between 1987 and 1998, as much as 3.2 inches of subsidence occurred in Tucson Basin and as much as 4 inches of subsidence occurred in Avra Valley. For the 31 stations that are common to both the 1987 and 1998 Global Positioning System surveys, the average subsidence during the 11-year period was about 0.5 inch in Tucson Basin and about 1.2 inches in Avra Valley. For the approximately 60 stations that are common to both the 1998 and 2002 Global Positioning System surveys, the data indicate that as much as 3.5 inches of subsidence occurred in Tucson Basin and as much as 1.1 inches of subsidence occurred in Avra Valley. The average subsidence for the 4-year period is about 0.4 inch in Tucson Basin and 0.6 inch in Avra Valley. Between the 2002 and the 2005 Global Positioning System surveys, the data indicate that as much as 0.2 inch of subsidence occurred in Tucson Basin and as much as 2.2 inches of subsidence occurred in Avra Valley. The average subsidence for the 3-year

  18. Steady subsidence of a repeatedly erupting caldera through InSAR observations: Aso, Japan

    KAUST Repository

    Nobile, Adriano

    2017-04-05

    The relation between unrest and eruption at calderas is still poorly understood. Aso caldera, Japan, shows minor episodic phreatomagmatic eruptions associated with steady subsidence. We analyse the deformation of Aso using SAR images from 1993 to 2011 and compare it with the eruptive activity. Although the dataset suffers from limitations (e.g. atmospheric effects, coherence loss, low signal-to-noise ratio), we observe a steady subsidence signal from 1996 to 1998, which suggests an overall contraction of a magmatic source below the caldera centre, from 4 to 5 km depth. We propose that the observed contraction may have been induced by the release of the magmatic fluids feeding the eruptions. If confirmed by further data, this hypothesis suggests that degassing processes play a crucial role in triggering minor eruptions within open conduit calderas, such as at Aso. Our study underlines the importance of defining any eruptive potential also from deflating magmatic systems with open conduit.

  19. Current-induced surface roughness reduction in conducting thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lin; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2017-03-01

    Thin film surface roughness is responsible for various materials reliability problems in microelectronics and nanofabrication technologies, which requires the development of surface roughness reduction strategies. Toward this end, we report modeling results that establish the electrical surface treatment of conducting thin films as a physical processing strategy for surface roughness reduction. We develop a continuum model of surface morphological evolution that accounts for the residual stress in the film, surface diffusional anisotropy and film texture, film's wetting of the layer that is deposited on, and surface electromigration. Supported by linear stability theory, self-consistent dynamical simulations based on the model demonstrate that the action over several hours of a sufficiently strong and properly directed electric field on a conducting thin film can reduce its surface roughness and lead to a smooth planar film surface. The modeling predictions are in agreement with experimental measurements on copper thin films deposited on silicon nitride layers.

  20. Equivalent materials simulation experimental study on bed separations developing and mining subsidence in constant humidity and constant temperature conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zhi-liang; WANG Su-hua; GAO Yan-fa

    2008-01-01

    A new experiment was made on the developing of bed separations and mining subsidence from Tangshan T2192 working face by equivalent materials simulation.The overburden deformation and the developing of bed separations with working face advancing was simulated by a new model.The results show that the maximum value of bed separations moved forward gradually along with the working face advancing; the maximum value of bed separations is 0.31~0.50 times of mining thickness.The key strata have a great influence upon surface subsidence during the overburden movement process.The mechanics parameters of new experiment are fitted with results in fields perfectly.

  1. Equivalent materials simulation experimental study on bed separations developing and mining subsidence in constant humidity and constant temperature conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zhi-liang; WANG Su-hua; GAO Yan-fa

    2008-01-01

    A new experiment was made on the developing of bed separations and mining subsidence from Tangshan T2192 working face by equivalent materials simulation. The overburden deformation and the developing of bed separations with working face advanc-ing was simulated by a new model. The results show that the maximum value of bed separations moved forward gradually along with the working face advancing; the maxi-mum value of bed separations is 0.31 ~0.50 times of mining thickness. The key strata have a great influence upon surface subsidence during the overburden movement process. The mechanics parameters of new experiment are fitted with results in fields perfectly.

  2. Reactivation of subsidence zones due to coal-mine closure in Donbass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yermakov, V.N. [Ministry of Coal Industry, Donetsk (Ukraine)

    2000-12-01

    Many mines in the Ukraine are in the process of being closed as part of the coal industry restructuring programme. The termination of pumping operations results in the flooding of abandoned mine workings. This causes changes in the hydrogeological characteristics and geomechanical stability of the rock mass. There is no reliable method for predicting the effect of these processes. In the Central Donbass Basin, if only one mine horizon is flooded, surface subsidence of up to 500 mm can occur when the mine is abandoned. The period required for the stabilization of areas liable to subsidence after the mines are closed can be as long as 10 years. The mechanical properties of caved rock can change significantly during the long-term operation of coal mines in the Central Regions of Donbass. The mechanical properties of the rock can also change during flooding. It is therefore necessary to study the physical-mechanical properties of the caved strata when they are saturated during the flooding of abandoned workings. Research into methods of estimating the amount of additional surface subsidence caused by the reactivation of the geomechanical caving processes during flooding is reported.

  3. Diamond detectors with laser induced surface graphite electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komlenok, M.; Bolshakov, A.; Ralchenko, V.; Konov, V.; Conte, G.; Girolami, M.; Oliva, P.; Salvatori, S.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the response of metal-less CVD polycrystalline-diamond pixel sensors under β-particles irradiation. A 21×21 array of 0.18×0.18 mm2 pixels was realized on one side of a 10.0×10.0×0.5 mm3 polycrystalline diamond substrate by means of laser induced surface graphitization. With the same technique, a large graphite contact, used for detector biasing, was fabricated on the opposite side. A coincidence detecting method was used with two other reference polycrystalline diamond detectors for triggering, instead of commonly used scintillators, positioned in the front and on the back of the sensor-array with respect to the impinging particles trajectory. The collected charge distribution at each pixel was analyzed as a function of the applied bias. No change in the pulse height distribution was recorded by inverting the bias voltage polarity, denoting contacts ohmicity and symmetry. A fairly good pixel response uniformity was obtained: the collected charge most probable value saturates for all the pixels at an electric field strength of about ±0.6 V/μm. Under saturation condition, the average collected charge was equal to =1.64±0.02 fC, implying a charge collection distance of about 285 μm. A similar result, within 2%, was also obtained for 400 MeV electrons at beam test facility at INFN Frascati National Laboratory. Experimental results highlighted that more than 84% of impinging particles involved only one pixel, with no significant observed cross-talk effects.

  4. Evaluation of Subterranean Subsidence at Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of subsurface subsidence at Naval Weapons Station Seal Beach (NWSSB) areas which include Seal Beach National...

  5. Subsidence of the femoral prosthesis. A stereophotogrammetric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafetz, N; Baumrind, S; Murray, W R; Genant, H K; Korn, E L

    1985-12-01

    A quantitative three-dimensional measurement method, radiographic stereophotogrammetry (SPG), was employed to assess the relation between early subsidence of the femoral prosthesis after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and subsequent clinical course. The SPG technique and the authors' error control mechanisms are described in 15 patients in the early postoperative period, and the findings are correlated with those of follow-up clinical examinations. Among the 12 patients who remained clinically asymptomatic with respect to pain, only one had an SPG estimate of subsidence in excess of 1 mm at any point in time. Each of the three patients who later became symptomatic had SPG estimates of subsidence in excess of 1.75 mm within six months of the operation. Thus far, the patient with the largest estimate of subsidence is the only one who required surgical revision.

  6. Water quality variation of mining-subsidence lake during the initial stage: cases study of Zhangji and Guqiao Mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Tina-yu; YAN Jia-ping; WANG Shun; ZHANG Bing; RUAN Shu-xian; ZHANG Mei-li; LI Shou-qin; CHEN Yong-chun; LIU Jin

    2012-01-01

    Four quarters' water collecting and monitoring samples were done in the mining subsidence lakes of different water storing periods (2 to 7 years),considering the water storing time and pollution sources state of the subsidence lakes.The following indexes were discussed such as organic indexes (TOC,CODMn,BOD,COD),nutrient salts (TN,NH4+,NO3-,NO2-,Kjeldahl Nitrogen,TP,PO43-),etc.It is shown that water quality of the mining subsidence lake during the initial stage (2 years to 7 years) can stay relatively stable with a fluctuation during different quarters in a year,which can reach class Ⅲ or Ⅳ of the Surface Water Environmental Quality Standard.

  7. Study on Subsidence Monitoring Application in theH uainan Mining Area Based on D-InSAR Technique%D-InSAR技术在淮南矿区沉陷监测中的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鲜妮; 王磊

    2014-01-01

    综合矿区开采沉陷特点和D-InSAR基本原理指出,当前D-InSAR矿区沉陷监测的难点为:1)不易采用同一传感器数据监测整个地表移动周期内的矿区沉陷;2)在低潜水位矿区,地表移动活跃期内最大变形梯度往往超过雷达临界探测梯度导致去相干;3)在高潜水位矿区,变形梯度大、沉陷积水区雷达回波信号弱,导致干涉测量结果不理想。因此,为了改善D-InSAR在矿区的沉陷监测中的应用效果,针对上述问题提出了相应的解决方案。最后,通过选择淮南矿区形变期内的两景数据,进行二轨差分干涉处理,获得了研究区域煤炭开采形成的地表沉降场,并分析了不可靠形变信息产生的原因。%Comprehensive characteristics of mining subsidence and the principle of D -InSAR, pointed out that the difficulty of D -InSAR subsidence monitoring in the mining area are for:1 ) it is hard to use the same sensor data for monitoring mining subsidence during the whole surface movement period;2) in the lower groundwater level , during the surface movement active period ,maximum deformation gradient often exceed radar critical detection gradient , that leads to loss of coherence;3) Mining area in high groundwater level, in addition to the deformation gradient is big problem , the situation in the subsidence water area without radar echo signal will induce the inefficiency of interferometry .In order to improve the application effect of D -InSAR in the mining area , aiming to the a-bove problem , put forward that corresponding solution .Finally by selecting two scene data covered the deformation period of in the Huainan mining area , carrying out two-track difference interference method , obtained surface subsidence field of the research area by coal mining , at the same time, analyzing the causes of the unreliable deformation information .

  8. Subsidence history and forming mechanism of anomalous tectonic subsidence in the Bozhong depression, Bohaiwan basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; XiNong

    2007-01-01

    [1]Li D S.Tectonic framework of the Bohai Gulf and coastal basins.Mar Sci,1982,1:82-93[2]Li S T.Basin geodynamics background of formation of huge petroleum systems (in Chinese).Earth Sci-J China Univ Geosci,2004,29(5):505-512[3]Allen M B,Macdonald D I M,Zhao X,et al.Early Cenozoic two-phase extension and late Cenozoic thermal subsidence and inversion of the Bohai basin,northern China.Mar Petrol Geol,1997,14(7/8):951-972[4]Gong Z S,Wang G C.Neotectonism and late hydrocarbon accumulation in Bohai Sea.Acta Pet Sin (in Chinese),2001,22(2):1-8[5]Hu S B,O'Sullivan P B,Raza A,et al.Thermal history and tectonic subsidence of the Bohai Basin,northern China:a Cenozoic rifted and local pull-apart basin.Phys Earth Planet Int,2001,126:221-235[6]Ren J Y,Tamaki K,Li S T,et al.Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic rifting and its dynamic setting in Eastern China and adjacent areas.Tectonophysics,2002,344:175-205[7]Li D S.Tectonics of Petroliferous Basins in China (in Chinese).Beijing:Petroleum Industry Press,2002.674[8]Xu J,Ma Z J,Deng Q D,et al.Regional tectonic conditions for intensive subsidence of the middle Bohai Sea since Oligocene.Acta Pet Sin (in Chinese),2004,25(5):11-16[9]Sclater J G,Christie P A F.Continental stretching:an explanation of the post Mid-Cretaceous subsidence of the central North Sea basin.J Geophys Res,1980,85:3711-3739[10]Xie X N,Müller R D,Li S T,et al.Origin of anomalous tectonic subsidence along the northern South China Sea Margin and its relationship to dynamic topography.Mar Pet Geol,2006,23(7):745-765[11]White N.Recovery of strain-rate variation from inversion of subsidence data.Nature,1993,366(6454):449-452[12]White N.An inverse method for determining lithosphere strain rate variation on geological time scales.Earth Planet Sci Lett,1994,122:351-371[13]Xie X N,Bethke C M,Li S T,et al.Overpressure and Petroleum generation and accumulation in the Dongying Depression of the Bohaiwan Basin,China.Geofluids,2001,1(4):257-271[14]Hall R.Reconstructing Cenozoic SE

  9. Areas of ground subsidence due to geofluid withdrawal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimsrud, G.P.; Turner, B.L.; Frame, P.A.

    1978-08-01

    Detailed information is provided on four geothermal areas with histories of subsidence. These were selected on the basis of: physical relevance of subsidence areas to high priority US geothermal sites in terms of withdrawn geofluid type, reservoir depth, reservoir geology and rock characteristics, and overburden characteristics; and data completeness, quality, and availability. The four areas are: Chocolate Bayou, Raft River Valley, Wairakei, and the Geysers. (MHR)

  10. Adaptation and mitigation of land subsidence in Semarang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreas, Heri; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Gumilar, Irwan; Sidiq, Teguh Purnama; Yuwono, Bambang

    2017-07-01

    Land subsidence is not a new phenomenon for Semarang. Some report said the subsidence in Semarang probably is occurring for more than 100 years. Based on the leveling surveys conducted by the Centre of Environmental Geology from 1999 to 2003 it was found that relatively large subsidence was detected around Semarang Harbor, Pondok Hasanuddin, Bandar Harjo and around Semarang Tawang Railway station, with the rates ranging from 1 to 17 cm/year. Results derived from GPS show that land subsidence in Semarang has spatial and temporal variations. In general, subsidence rates in Semarang have an average rate of about 6 to 7 cm/year, with maximum rates that can go up to 14-19 cm/year at certain locations. The impact of land subsidence in Semarang can be seen in several forms, such as the wider expansion of (coastal) flooding areas "rob", cracking of buildings and infrastructure, and increased inland sea water intrusion. It also badly influences the quality and amenity of the living environment and life (e.g. health and sanitation condition) in the affected areas. In the case of Semarang, adaptation and mitigation are considered very important. We have been done some investigations to this area by field observations (mapping the flooded area, mapping the infrastructure problems, interviewing people and seeing the adaptations, conduct GPS measurement to see deformation, etc.), gather information from Government, from digital media, etc., and we noticed people increased their house, and the local goverment elevated the road and the bridge, etc. regulary over less decade periode as part of adaptation. We also noticed the Central Goverment built the dyke and pumping station. Our conclusions said that the adaptation only made temporaly since significant land subsidence keep coming and worsening by the sea level which is keep rising. Another conclusion, so far we have seen lack of mitigation program, monitoring or even inevective mitigation in Semarang related to this subsidence

  11. Electron dynamics at surfaces induced by highly charged ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morgenstern, R

    1998-01-01

    Energy spectra of electrons resulting from hydrogen-like multiply charged N6+ and Q(7+) ions on various surfaces are presented and discussed. Por metal target surfaces thr formation and decay of hollow atoms during the approach towards the surface is rather well understood in terms of the classical

  12. Electron dynamics at surfaces induced by highly charged ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morgenstern, R

    Energy spectra of electrons resulting from hydrogen-like multiply charged N6+ and Q(7+) ions on various surfaces are presented and discussed. Por metal target surfaces thr formation and decay of hollow atoms during the approach towards the surface is rather well understood in terms of the classical

  13. Monitoring subsidence with InSAR and inference of groundwater change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, T. G.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater use is increasing in many parts of the world due to population pressure and reduced availability of surface water and rainfall. California's Central Valley and southern Arizona in particular have experienced subsidence in many groundwater basins in recent years due to groundwater overdraft. In order to make informed decisions for adaptation, water resource managers need to know the extent of groundwater depletion, both spatially and volumetrically, and to be able to monitor it over long periods. Water wells provide one solution, but owing to remoteness, funding limitations, a lack of wells, and the difficulty of mandating government monitoring of private wells, less direct methods are necessary. Mapping and monitoring subsidence and rebound from orbit with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) may provide important indicators of groundwater state and dynamics for water resource managers as well as warnings of potential damage to infrastructure. We are working with water resource managers at the California Department of Water Resources to produce and update maps of subsidence 'hot-spots' where subsidence threatens to cause irreversible aquifer compaction and loss of groundwater storage capacity. In the future, Germany's TerraSAR-X, Italy's Cosmo SkyMed, Japan's PALSAR-2, Europe's Sentinels, and NASA's NISAR offer the promise of extending the time series of observations and expanding this capability to regions of the world with no effective means to monitor the state of their groundwater. This would provide societal benefits to large segments of the global population dependent on groundwater to bridge gaps in surface and rain water supply. As Earth's climate changes, monitoring of this critical resource will help reduce conflicts over water. * Work performed under contract to NASA

  14. Characterizing land subsidence mechanisms as a function of urban basin geohazards using space geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawden, G. W.

    2016-12-01

    Land subsidence in urban basins will likely become a more significant geohazard in many of the global sedimentary basins as population growth, resource availability, and climate change compound natural and anthropogenic contributors that influence basin elevation. Coastal basins are at the greatest risk where land subsidence is additive to sea level rise, thereby increasing the rate of exposure to coastal populations. Land surface elevation change is a function of many different parameters, including: elastic and inelastic surface response to managed and natural groundwater levels; anthropogenic activities (hydrocarbon extraction, wastewater injection, fracking, geothermal production, and mass redistribution); local tectonic deformation and regional tectonic drivers (such as repeated uplift and subsidence cycles above subduction zones); climate change (influencing the timing, magnitude, nature and duration of seasonal/annual precipitation and permafrost extent); material properties of the basin sediments (influencing susceptibility to soil compaction, oxidization, and dissolution); post glacial rebound; isostatic flexure associated with sea-level and local mass changes; and large scale gravitational processes (such as growth faults and landslides). Geodetic measurements, such as InSAR and GPS, help track spatial and temporal changes in both relative and absolute basin elevation thereby helping to characterize the mechanism(s) driving the geohazards. In addition to a number of commercial radar satellites, European Space Agency's Sentinel-1a/b satellites are beginning to provide a wealth of data over many basin targets with C-band (5.5 cm wavelength). The NISAR (NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar) L-band (24 cm wavelength) mission (anticipated 2021 launch) will image nearly every basin globally every 12 days and data from the mission will help characterize land subsidence and many other solid-Earth and hydrologic geohazards that impact urban basins.

  15. Land subsidence monitoring by D-InSAR technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Hongdong; Deng Kazhong; Ju Chengyu; Zhu Chuanguang; Xue Jiqun

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays,the researches of using Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (D-InSAR) technique to monitor the land subsidence are mainly on how to qualitatively analyze the subsidence areas and values,but the analysis of subsidence process and mechanism are insufficient.In order to resolve these problems,6 scenes of ERS1/2 images captured during 1995 and 2000 in a certain place of Jiangsu province were selected to obtain the subsidence and velocities in three time segments by “two-pass” DInSAR method.Then the relationships among distributions of pumping wells,exploitation quantity of groundwater,and confined water levels were studied and the subsidence mechanism was systematically analyzed.The results show that using D-InSAR technique to monitor the deformation of large area can obtain high accuracies,the disadvantages of classical observation methods can be remedied and there is a linear relationship among the velocities of land subsidence,the water level and the exploitation quantity.

  16. Development of TDR distributed sensors for land subsidence measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chih-Chung; Lin, Chih-Ping

    2016-04-01

    The influences subjected by land subsidence and notably inundation are raising in Taiwan recently. To efficiently access the problems, historical trends and the instant field measurement data (at least by days), including multi-depth subsidence leveling and water leveling, are essential and urgent. However, current multi-depth subsidence leveling with magnetic rings conducted by manual operating, for example, lacks high temporal and spatial resolution data, which cannot evaluate the consistency between the subsidence leveling and the limited underground water levels in the same aquifer layer appropriately. To improve the field measurements, this study is carried out based on the core technology of Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR). In the preliminary idea, TDR distributed sensors, as magnetic rings for land subsidence measurements in a borehole, are developed with the underground water level sensors embedded. The prototypes of TDR distributed sensors indicates the feasibility of measuring, but the influence of signal dissipating due to the long transmission line (>100 m) need to be brought attention to, as well as the corresponding measurement accuracy. Therefore, a laboratorial physical modeling is suggested for further evaluation, and this modeling is constructed now. All the measurement data are expected to be employed and fed back as the calibrators and indicators to propose the defense strategy for land subsidence and inundation.

  17. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Mexico City Subsidence by Means of Interferometric Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Quiroz, P.; Tupin, F.; Briole, P.; Doin, M.; Nicolas, J.

    2007-05-01

    In Mexico city, water over-consumption leads to subsidence. Before the Spanish conquest, the southern part of the Mexico Valley, an endoreic basin surrounded by mountains, was filled by a large lake. Flooding problems oblige conquerors to dry the lakes, which by now have almost completely disappeared and have been replaced by buildings. The simplified hydrogeologic structure of Mexico Valley includes a superficial 50 to 300 m thick lacustrine aquitard overlying a thicker aquifer made of alluvial deposits. The aquitard layer plays a crucial role in the subsidence process due to the very high compressibility of its clay deposits separated by a less compressible sand layer where the biggest buildings are anchored. The aquifer over-exploitation leads to a depression of its piezometric level, inducing water downwards flow in the clays, yielding compaction and subsidence (Rivera, 1990). In order to quantitatively link subsidence to water pumping, the Mexico city subsidence needs to be mapped and analyzed through space and time. It will help identify possible variations related with seasonal recharge, anchored and non anchored buildings, old and new pumping areas with varying clay compressibility through time due to consolidation (Rivera, 1990, Ortega-Guerrero et al., 1999). Radar interferometry (InSAR, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) has been successfully applied to map subsidence caused by water pumping (e. g., Amelung et al., 2000). It uses two repeated SAR acquisitions to obtain distance measurements. After geometrical corrections, the interferometric phase contains deformation information as well as residual orbital and topographic errors and atmospheric delays. A previous work using levelling, interferometry and GPS techniques over Mexico city showed that the location of the maximum subsidence rates (about 400 mm/yr) has changed and moved from the downtown area to the east of the city over a 50 years interval (Cabral-Cano et al., 2006). In this previous

  18. Time series analysis of Mexico City subsidence constrained by radar interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doin, Marie-Pierre; Lopez-Quiroz, Penelope; Yan, Yajing; Bascou, Pascale; Pinel, Virginie

    2010-05-01

    In Mexico City, subsidence rates reach up to 40 cm/yr mainly due to soil compaction led by the over exploitation of the Mexico Basin aquifer. The Mexico Valley, an endoreic basin surrounded by mountains, was in the past covered by large lakes. After the Spanish conquest, the lakes have almost completely disappeared, being progressively replaced by buildings of the current Mexican capital. The simplified hydrogeologic structure includes a superficial 50 to 300 m thick lacustrine aquitard overlying a thicker aquifer made of alluvial deposits. The aquitard layer plays a crucial role in the subsidence process due to the extremely high compressibility of its clay deposits separated by a less compressible sand layer where the biggest buildings of the city are anchored. The aquifer over-exploitation leads to a large scale 30m depression of its piezometric level, inducing water downwards flow in the clays, yielding compaction and subsidence. In order to quantitatively link subsidence to water pumping, the Mexico city subsidence needs to be mapped and analyzed through space and time. We map its spatial and temporal patterns by differential radar interferometry, using 38 ENVISAT images acquired between end of 2002 and beginning of 2007. We employ both a Permanent Scatterer (PS) and a small baseline (SBAS) approach. The main difficulty consists in the severe unwrapping problems mostly due to the high deformation rate. We develop a specific SBAS approach based on 71 differential interferograms with a perpendicular baseline smaller than 500 m and a temporal baseline smaller than 9 months, forming a redundant network linking all images: (1) To help the unwrapping step, we use the fact that the deformation shape is stable for similar time intervals during the studied period. As a result, a stack of the five best interferograms can be used to reduce the number of fringes in wrapped interferograms. (2) Based on the redundancy of the interferometric data base, we quantify the

  19. Gradient induced liquid motion on laser structured black Si surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisanos, I.; Fotakis, C.; Anastasiadis, S. H.; Stratakis, E.

    2015-09-01

    This letter reports on the femtosecond laser fabrication of gradient-wettability micro/nano-patterns on Si surfaces. The dynamics of directional droplet spreading on the surface tension gradients developed is systematically investigated and discussed. It is shown that microdroplets on the patterned surfaces spread at a maximum speed of 505 mm/s, which is the highest velocity demonstrated so far for liquid spreading on a surface tension gradient in ambient conditions. The application of the proposed laser patterning technique for the precise fabrication of surface tension gradients for open microfluidic systems, liquid management in fuel cells, and drug delivery is envisaged.

  20. Gradient induced liquid motion on laser structured black Si surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Paradisanos, I; Anastasiadis, S H; Stratakis, E

    2015-01-01

    This letter reports on the femtosecond laser fabrication of gradient-wettability micro/nano- patterns on Si surfaces. The dynamics of directional droplet spreading on the surface tension gradients developed is systematically investigated and discussed. It is shown that microdroplets on the patterned surfaces spread at a maximum speed of 505 mm/sec, that is the highest velocity demonstrated so far for liquid spreading on a surface tension gradient in ambient conditions. The application of the proposed laser patterning technique for the precise fabrication of surface tension gradients for open microfluidic systems, liquid management in fuel cells and drug delivery is envisaged.

  1. Free surface damage induced by irradiation of BCC iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchuganov, Aleksandr V.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of the crystallographic orientation of bcc iron samples on the character of structural changes near the free surface irradiated with ions was studied in the framework of a molecular dynamics method. Irradiation of the (111) surface leads to the formation of craters surrounded by atoms escaped on the surface (adatoms). In the case of the (110) surface irradiation, a vacancy-type dislocation loop with the Burgers vector a or a/2 was formed. The number of adatoms and survived point defects was greater in the sample with the (110) surface than in the sample with the (111) surface for the atomic displacement cascade energies lower than 20 keV. The influence of the irradiated surface orientation on the number of generated point defects decreased with the increasing atomic displacement cascade energy.

  2. U.S. Geological Survey Subsidence Interest Group conference, Edwards Air Force Base, Antelope Valley, California, November 18-19, 1992; abstracts and summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Keith R.; Galloway, Devin L.; Leake, Stanley A.

    1995-01-01

    Land subsidence, the loss of surface elevation as a result of the removal of subsurface support, affects every state in the United States. More than 17,000 mi2 of land in the United States has been lowered by the various processes that produce land subsidence with annual costs from resulting flooding and structural damage that exceed $125 million. It is estimated that an additional $400 million is spent nationwide in attempts to control subsidence. Common causes of land subsidence include the removal of oil, gas, and water from underground reservoirs; dissolution of limestone aquifers (sinkholes); underground mining activities; drainage of organic soils; and hydrocompaction (the initial wetting of dry soils). Overdrafting of aquifers is the major cause of areally extensive land subsidence, and as ground-water pumping increases, land subsidence also will increase. Land subsidence and its effects on engineering structures have been recognized for centuries, but it was not until this century that the processes that produce land subsidence were identified and understood. In 1928, while working with field data from a test of the Dakota Sandstone aquifer, O.E. Meinzer of the U.S. Geological Survey recognized the compressibility of aquifers. Around the same time, Karl Terzaghi, a soil scientist working at Harvard University, developed the one-dimensional consolidation theory that provided a quantitative means of predicting soil compaction resulting from the drainage of compressible soils. Thus, with the recognition of the compressibility of aquifers (Meinzer), and the development of a quantitative means of predicting soil compaction as a consequence of the reduction of intergranular pore pressure (Terzaghi), the theory of aquifer-system compaction was formed. With the widespread availa- bility of electric power in rural areas, and the advent of the deep turbine pump, ground-water withdrawals increased dramatically throughout the country in the 1940's and 1950's. Along

  3. Land subsidence in the modern Yellow River Delta and its impacts upon its evolvement%现代黄河三角洲地面沉降对洲体演变的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜廷芹; 黄海军; 别君

    2011-01-01

    The causes for the evolvement of the modern Yellow River Delta have been a main topic for a long time. Recent studies have shown that the entire modern Yellow River Delta has experienced complicated patterns of land subsidence. Our study analyzed the characteristics and impacts of the land subsidence, and particularly discussed the effect to the development of the delta. Factors including structural geology, the sediment consolidation, and human activity have simultaneously affected the pattern of land subsidence over the highly developed Modem Yellow River Deltaic area but with various degrees of effect as a function of region and time. Subsidence has induced marked environmental geologic changes, including coastal erosion, storm surge disaster enhanced, and salt water incursion. Its impact is particularly critical because of the flat low-lying topography and the presence of a thick soft silt layer at the ground surface. The accumulating land subsidence can change the surface slope, consequently influencing the riverbed and estuary evolution. Additionally accumulating land subsidence has increased the rise of the relative sea level, changed the models of coastal erosion, forced the coastline retreat landward, and narrowed the tidal fiats at an accelerating rate with the strengthened hydrodynamic action. The land subsidence in the Yellow River Delta will continue owing to the time-dependent consolidation behavior of the soft silt layer and anthropic activity; therefore, the further research on the land subsidence is urgently needed to be actualized.%对现代黄河三角洲地区地面沉降的特点和对三角洲发育演变的影响进行了分析研究。分析认为,现代黄河三角洲地区普遍发生的地面沉降具有多因素和时空不连续性的特点,给沉降区带来了一系列的危害,使多种海岸带灾害的破坏和影响加剧;地面沉降不仅可以造成地面标高损失,影响三角洲的垂向发育,还通过改变

  4. The spatial emergence of laser-induced periodic surface structures under lateral displacement irradiation conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichstädt, J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, laser-induced periodic surface structures, abbreviated LIPSS, gained interest, because potential applications are seen in the field of surface functionalisation. The feasibility to produce LIPSS and the potential to influence surface functionality have been shown. But so far, the

  5. Surface-induced ordering and disordering in face-centered-cubic alloys: A Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweika, W.; Landau, D. P.; Binder, K.

    1996-04-01

    Using extensive Monte Carlo simulations we have studied phase transitions in a fcc model with antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor couplings J in the presence of different free surfaces which lead either to surface-induced order or to surface-induced disorder. Our model is a prototype for CuAu-type ordering alloys and shows a strong first-order bulk transition at a temperature kTcb/||J||=1.738 005(50). For free (100) surfaces, we find a continuous surface transition at a temperature Tcs>~Tcb exhibiting critical exponents of the two-dimensional Ising model. Surface-induced ordering occurs as the temperature approaches Tcb and the surface excess order and surface excess energy diverges logarithmically. For a free (111) surface, the surface order vanishes continuously at Tcb accompanied by surface-induced disorder (SID). In addition to a logarithmic divergence of the excess quantities of order and energy, we find further critical exponents which confirm the actual theory of SID and critical wetting and which can be understood in terms of rough interfaces. For both cases of free surfaces, the asymptotic behavior of the squared interfacial width shows the expected logarithmic divergence.

  6. The spatial emergence of laser-induced periodic surface structures under lateral displacement irradiation conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichstädt, Justus

    2015-01-01

    Recently, laser-induced periodic surface structures, abbreviated LIPSS, gained interest, because potential applications are seen in the field of surface functionalisation. The feasibility to produce LIPSS and the potential to influence surface functionality have been shown. But so far, the implement

  7. Velocity Diagnosis of Critical Surface at Microwave Band in Laser-Induced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ying; WANG Junyan; BAI Shunbo; CHEN Jianping; CHU Ran; YUN Xiaohua; NI Xiaowu

    2008-01-01

    The velocity of critical surface at microwave band in laser-induced plasma was mea-sured and the results are presented. The results indicate that the velocity of critical surface with low electron density is larger than that with the high one; and the velocity of critical surface increases with the laser power density.

  8. Monitoring ground subsidence in urban environments: M-30 tunnels under Madrid City (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Martínez Marín

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Big cities improvement usually requires the construction of large underground infrastructures, in order to ensure proper communication and optimize urban use. Monitoring ground subsidences is therefore one of the main challenges in changing urban environments. The "Madrid Río" project (2003-2008 is an effort to reclaim the riverfront land and improve the busy M-30 beltway that involved the construction of 7.93 km of tunnels underneath the southern center of Madrid City. This paper presents a remote-sensing approach to monitor ground subsidences induced by tunneling excavation.  The Persistent Scatterers Interferometry technique (PSI was used to estimate subsidence and displacement time series from Synthetic Aperture Radar images, acquired between August 2003 and April 2008 from ENVISAT.  Remote sensed results were compared to traditional extensometric measures, fitting adequately for selected sectors. Spatial analysis of displacements allowed evaluating impacts of tunneling on surrounding buildings and facilities, highlighting critical areas. The availability of a spatial distribution of displacements in a time series allowed analyzing longitudinal, cross-sectional and temporal dynamics. The main limitations during this work were the heterogeneous spatial distribution of Persistent Scatterers, the absence of measurement points in work areas, the threshold for velocity detection and low temporal resolution of ENVISAT images. Nevertheless, these limitations of DInSAR for monitoring infrastructures are overcome by actual satellites, being a complementary technique with an exceptional added value and temporal analysis capability.

  9. Environmental Investigation and Evaluation of Land Subsidence in the Datong Coalfield Based on InSAR Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Xiuming; MA Chao; ZHAO Anyuan

    2008-01-01

    Heavy mining of Jurassic and Carboniferous horizontal coal seams in the Datong coalfield has seriously affected the local geological environment, which is mainly manifested by such geohazards as soil avalanches, landslides, mudflows, surface subsidence, surface cracks, surface solid waste accumulation and surface deformation. More seriously, coal mining causes groundwater to leak.Overpumping of groundwater has resulted in substantial land subsidence of the urban area in Datong City. Based on the previous geo-environmental investigation in the work area, the authors used radar remote sensing techniques such as InSAR (synthetic aperture radar interferometry) and D-InSAR(differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry), supplemented by the optical remote sensing method, for geo-environmental investigation to ascertain the geo-environmentai background of the Datong Jurassic and Carboniferous-Permian coalfield and evaluate the effects of the geohazards, thus providing a basis for the geo-environmental protection, geohazard control and prevention, land improvement and optimization of the human environment. In this study 8 cog-nominal ERS-1/2 SAR data frames during 1992 to 2003 were used, but the following processing was made: (1) the multi-temporal SAR magnitude images were used to interpret the geological structure, vegetation, micro-geomorphology and drainage system; (2) the multi-temporal InSAR coherent images were used to make a classification of surface features and evaluate the coherence change due to coal mining; and (3) the multi-temporal cog-nominal SAR images were used to complete D-InSAR processing to remove the information of differential deformation areas (sites). In the end, a ten-year time series of differential interferograms were obtained using the multi-temporal cog-nominal SAR images. In the tests, 84 deformed areas (sites) were obtained, belonging to those in 1993-1996, 1996-1997, 1997-1998,1998-2001, 1998--2002 and 2001-2003 respectively. Of the

  10. Metal surface temperature induced by moving laser beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, G.R.B.E.; Meijer, J.

    1995-01-01

    Whenever a metal is irradiated with a laser beam, electromagnetic energy is transformed into heat in a thin surface layer. The maximum surface temperature is the most important quantity which determines the processing result. Expressions for this maximum temperature are provided by the literature fo

  11. Surface paraconductivity induced by an external electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, B.Y. (Jack and Pearl Resnik Institute of Advance Technology, Physics Department, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel))

    1993-12-01

    The fluctuating properties of the surface superconducting layers created by an electric field perpendicular to the surface are investigated. Shifts of the critical temperature, heat capacity, and the conductivity above the critical temperature have been calculated for arbitrary relations between the screening and coherence lengths.

  12. Subsidence rates at the southern Salton Sea consistent with reservoir depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Andrew; Evans, Eileen; Hickman, Stephen H.; Eneva, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Space geodetic measurements from the Envisat satellite between 2003 and 2010 show that subsidence rates near the southeastern shoreline of the Salton Sea in Southern California are up to 52mmyr−1 greater than the far-field background rate. By comparing these measurements with model predictions, we find that this subsidence appears to be dominated by poroelastic contraction associated with ongoing geothermal fluid production, rather than the purely fault-related subsidence proposed previously. Using a simple point source model, we suggest that the source of this proposed volumetric strain is at depths between 1.0 km and 2.4 km (95% confidence interval), comparable to generalized boundaries of the Salton Sea geothermal reservoir. We find that fault slip on two previously imaged tectonic structures, which are part of a larger system of faults in the Brawley Seismic Zone, is not an adequate predictor of surface velocity fields because the magnitudes of the best fitting slip rates are often greater than the full plate boundary rate and at least 2 times greater than characteristic sedimentation rates in this region. Large-scale residual velocity anomalies indicate that spatial patterns predicted by fault slip are incompatible with the observations.

  13. Hurricane Katrina sediment slowed elevation loss in subsiding brackish marshes of the Mississippi River delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, K.L.; Cherry, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Although hurricanes can damage or destroy coastal wetlands, they may play a beneficial role in reinvigorating marshes by delivering sediments that raise soil elevations and stimulate organic matter production. Hurricane Katrina altered elevation dynamics of two subsiding brackish marshes in the Mississippi River deltaic plain by adding 3 to 8 cm of sediment to the soil surface in August 2005. Soil elevations at both sites subsequently declined due to continued subsidence, but net elevation gain was still positive at both Pearl River (+1.7 cm) and Big Branch (+0.7 cm) marshes two years after the hurricane. At Big Branch where storm sediments had higher organic matter and water contents, post-storm elevation loss was more rapid due to initial compaction of the storm layer in combination with root-zone collapse. In contrast, elevation loss was slower at Pearl River where the storm deposit (high sand content) did not compact and the root zone did not collapse. Vegetation at both sites fully recovered within one year, and accumulation of root matter at Big Branch increased 10-fold from 2005 to 2006, suggesting that the hurricane stimulated belowground productivity. Results of this study imply that hurricane sediment may benefit subsiding marshes by slowing elevation loss. However, long-term effects of hurricane sediment on elevation dynamics will depend not only on the amount of sediment deposited, but on sediment texture and resistance to compaction as well as on changes in organic matter accumulation in the years following the hurricane.

  14. Subsidence and Deforestation: Implications for Flooding in Delta’s Southeast and East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Nurhamidah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Delta is a low-lying area which can be found at the mouth of a river. Nowadays, concentration of flooding occurs in many deltaic areas due to combination of several factors. Meanwhile, a big number of people live on flood plain of main rivers and river deltas which will be threatened by flooding.  Land subsidence and deforestation are two phenomena which had been occurring very high until recently in SEE Asia region. Increasing of population strongly influences the natural hydrological processes. Due to pressure for land, substantial areas of peat swamps in SEE Asia have been presently are being reclaimed for agriculture or for other land use. In natural conditions swamp areas functioned as a retention area by adsorbing flood water, thereby preventing or mitigation flooding in downstream areas. But unfortunately, large areas of the original forests in large peat swamp forests have disappeared due to human activities such as illegal logging and fires. In other side increasing population, industries, agricultures and plantations will increase water demand. Activities of ground water extraction will be increasing as well. It can cause land subsidence and furthermore tide can easily propagate into deltaic areas moreover compounded by lowering of land surface due to land subsidence. Since flooding is an issue has been identified then these two phenomena need to be identified as well.

  15. Radiation-Induced Nano-Explosions at the Solid Surface:Near Surface Radiation Damage in CR-39 Polymer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mukhtar Ahmed Rana

    2011-01-01

    @@ New measurements of fission fragment and alpha particle induced surface damage in the most sensitive and commonly used nuclear track detector CR-39 are presented here.Precisely designed and optimized exposure and chemical etching experiments are employed to unfold the structure of radiation induced surface damage (RISD).Delay in the startup of the chemical etching of latent tracks or surface radiation damage is measured and is found to contain important information about the structure of the surface damage.Simple atomic scale pictures of RISD and its chemical etching are developed in an empirical manner.Theoretical model and experimental findings coherently compose a realistic picture of early or ferntosecond evolution of RISD.

  16. Simulation of regional land subsidence in the southern Yangtze Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Investigation of the deformation characteristics of individual hydrostratigraphic units is the key to construct a regional land subsidence model. All of 12 hydrostratigraphic units in the study area were discussed throughout. On the basis of the measured data of groundwater level, five kinds of changing patterns of groundwater level were deduced and the relationship between the deformation characteris-tics of aquifer units and the corresponding changing patterns of groundwater level was discussed. The study area is 1.7×104 km2, where the geological condition is complex. The changing patterns of groundwater level the hydrostratigraphic units have experienced vary from site to site and from time to time. Consequently, the deformation characteristics of units are sophisticated. An identical hydros-tratigraphic unit may exhibit different deformation characteristics, such as elasticity, elasto-plasticity, visco-elasticity, and visco-elasto-plasticity, at different sites or during different periods, not to mention the different units. The existing models are difficult to describe the complex visco-elasto-plastic con-stitutive law under the condition of land subsidence. So the Merchant’s model was modified to depict the visco-elasto-plastic behavior of units. Then a three-dimensional flow model with variable parame-ters and a vertical one-dimensional subsidence model were constructed and coupled. The coupled model was applied in simulating land subsidence in the southern Yangtze Delta and a satisfactory re-sult was obtained. The simulation results show that the new coupled model can depict the complex geological conditions and describe the developing process of land subsidence very well in the south-ern Yangtze Delta. The new model can surely be used to predict land subsidence in the future, which is very helpful to taking measurements to control land subsidence.

  17. Shrink-induced superhydrophobic and antibacterial surfaces in consumer plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschauf, Lauren R; McLane, Jolie; Sharma, Himanshu; Khine, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Structurally modified superhydrophobic surfaces have become particularly desirable as stable antibacterial surfaces. Because their self-cleaning and water resistant properties prohibit bacteria growth, structurally modified superhydrophobic surfaces obviate bacterial resistance common with chemical agents, and therefore a robust and stable means to prevent bacteria growth is possible. In this study, we present a rapid fabrication method for creating such superhydrophobic surfaces in consumer hard plastic materials with resulting antibacterial effects. To replace complex fabrication materials and techniques, the initial mold is made with commodity shrink-wrap film and is compatible with large plastic roll-to-roll manufacturing and scale-up techniques. This method involves a purely structural modification free of chemical additives leading to its inherent consistency over time and successive recasting from the same molds. Finally, antibacterial properties are demonstrated in polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), and polyethylene (PE) by demonstrating the prevention of gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria growth on our structured plastic surfaces.

  18. Surface tension alteration on calcite, induced by ion substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakuma, Hiroshi; Andersson, Martin Peter; Bechgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of water and organic molecules with mineral surfaces controls many processes in nature and industry. The thermodynamic property, surface tension, is usually determined from the contact angle between phases, but how does one understand the concept of surface tension at the nanoscale...... in the pore water. Incorporation of MgSO4 into calcite, which is energetically favored, decreases surface tension and releases polar oil compounds......., where particles are smaller than the smallest droplet? We investigated the energy required to exchange Mg2+ and SO4 2- from aqueous solution into calcite {10.4} surfaces using density functional theory. Mg2+ substitution for Ca2+ is favored but only when SO4 2- is also present and MgSO4 incorporates...

  19. Surface induced reactivity for titanium by ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, M T; Reuther, H; Matz, W; Mueller, R; Steiner, G; Oswald, S; Zyganov, I

    2000-06-01

    Calcium and phosphorus storage in a thin layer of titanium surface was achieved by ion implantation. We study the reactivity of this surface in response to a hydrothermal treatment. The incipient implanted species are observed to convert to Ca(2+) and PO(4)(3-), the precursors for generating calcium phosphate polymorphs. Hydroxyapatite is formed from these precursors by an interface-liquid mediated mineralization preceded by the hydrolysis of oxygen compounds of Ca and P from the solid phase. The morphology and organization of apatite mineral is controlled by the fluid dynamics reflecting the surface remodeling to adapt to the available local environment. Exposed to calcium and phosphate ion containing solution, the hydrothermally treated surface templates hydroxyapatite deposition. Ca and P implanted Ti surface was shown to be chemically and morphologically actively involved in the interfacial reactions.

  20. Defect-initiated atomic emissions from semiconductor surfaces induced by laser irradiation: Electronic cleaning of defects on surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanasaki, Jun' ichi; Okano, Akiko; Nakai, Yasuo; Itoh, Noriaki (Dept. of Physics, Nagoya Univ., Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya (Japan))

    1994-05-15

    We compare the emission of Si atoms from Si (100) surfaces and of Ga atoms from GaAs (110) and GaP (110) surfaces induced by irradiation with low-fluence laser pulses, each of which emits atoms of about 10[sup -6] monolayers, and found a strong correlation between the laser fluence that can cause emission and the strength of the bond by which the emitted atoms are bound

  1. Land subsidence along the Delta-Mendota Canal in the northern part of the San Joaquin Valley, California, 2003-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, Michelle; Brandt, Justin; Solt, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Extensive groundwater withdrawal from the unconsolidated deposits in the San Joaquin Valley caused widespread aquifer-system compaction and resultant land subsidence from 1926 to 1970—locally exceeding 8.5 meters. The importation of surface water beginning in the early 1950s through the Delta-Mendota Canal and in the early 1970s through the California Aqueduct resulted in decreased pumping, initiation of water-level recovery, and a reduced rate of compaction in some areas of the San Joaquin Valley. However, drought conditions during 1976–77 and 1987–92, and drought conditions and regulatory reductions in surface-water deliveries during 2007–10, decreased surface-water availability, causing pumping to increase, water levels to decline, and renewed compaction. Land subsidence from this compaction has reduced freeboard and flow capacity of the Delta-Mendota Canal, the California Aqueduct, and other canals that deliver irrigation water and transport floodwater. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and the San Luis and Delta-Mendota Water Authority, assessed land subsidence in the vicinity of the Delta-Mendota Canal as part of an effort to minimize future subsidence-related damages to the canal. The location, magnitude, and stress regime of land-surface deformation during 2003–10 were determined by using extensometer, Global Positioning System (GPS), Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), spirit leveling, and groundwater-level data. Comparison of continuous GPS, shallow extensometer, and groundwater-level data, combined with results from a one-dimensional model, indicated the vast majority of the compaction took place beneath the Corcoran Clay, the primary regional confining unit. Land-surface deformation measurements indicated that much of the northern portion of the Delta-Mendota Canal (Clifton Court Forebay to Check 14) was fairly stable or minimally subsiding on an annual basis; some areas showed

  2. Subsidence and carbon loss in drained tropical peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hooijer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Conversion of tropical peatlands to agriculture leads to a release of carbon from previously stable, long-term storage, resulting in land subsidence that can be a surrogate measure of CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. We present an analysis of recent large-scale subsidence monitoring studies in Acacia and oil palm plantations on peatland in SE Asia, and compare the findings with previous studies. Subsidence in the first 5 yr after drainage was found to be 142 cm, of which 75 cm occurred in the first year. After 5 yr, the subsidence rate in both plantation types, at average water table depths of 0.7 m, remained constant at around 5 cm yr−1. The results confirm that primary consolidation contributed substantially to total subsidence only in the first year after drainage, that secondary consolidation was negligible, and that the amount of compaction was also much reduced within 5 yr. Over 5 yr after drainage, 75 % of cumulative subsidence was caused by peat oxidation, and after 18 yr this was 92 %. The average rate of carbon loss over the first 5 yr was 178 t CO2eq ha−1 yr−1, which reduced to 73 t CO2eq ha−1 yr−1 over subsequent years, potentially resulting in an average loss of 100 t CO2eq ha−1 yr−1 over 25 yr. Part of the observed range in subsidence and carbon loss values is explained by differences in water table depth, but vegetation cover and other factors such as addition of fertilizers also influence peat oxidation. A relationship with groundwater table depth shows that subsidence and carbon loss are still considerable even at the highest water levels theoretically possible in plantations. This implies that improved plantation water management will reduce these impacts by 20 % at most, relative to current conditions, and that high rates of carbon loss and land subsidence are

  3. Preliminary results of land subsidence monitoring project in Konya Closed Basin between 2006–2009 by means of GNSS observations

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    One of the potential dangers that might arise as a result of bringing excessive amounts of groundwater to the surface of the Earth is land subsidence. Such surface deformations – these velocities may vary from a few millimetres to a few metres per year – do the greatest damage to infrastructure facilities and buildings in residential units. Agricultural lands, in which excessive irrigation is performed, and densely populated cities are more likely to suffer from land subs...

  4. Curvature-induced symmetry breaking determines elastic surface patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, Norbert; Lagrange, Romain; Terwagne, Denis; Reis, Pedro M; Dunkel, Jörn

    2015-03-01

    Symmetry-breaking transitions associated with the buckling and folding of curved multilayered surfaces-which are common to a wide range of systems and processes such as embryogenesis, tissue differentiation and structure formation in heterogeneous thin films or on planetary surfaces-have been characterized experimentally. Yet owing to the nonlinearity of the underlying stretching and bending forces, the transitions cannot be reliably predicted by current theoretical models. Here, we report a generalized Swift-Hohenberg theory that describes wrinkling morphology and pattern selection in curved elastic bilayer materials. By testing the theory against experiments on spherically shaped surfaces, we find quantitative agreement with analytical predictions for the critical curves separating labyrinth, hybrid and hexagonal phases. Furthermore, a comparison to earlier experiments suggests that the theory is universally applicable to macroscopic and microscopic systems. Our approach builds on general differential-geometry principles and can thus be extended to arbitrarily shaped surfaces.

  5. Spontaneous formation of optically induced surface relief gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Leblond, H; Ahamadi-kandjani, S; Nunzi, J -M; Ortyl, E; Kucharski, S

    2009-01-01

    A model based on Fick's law of diffusion as a phenomenological description of the molecular motion, and on the coupled mode theory, is developped to describe single-beam surface relief grating formation in azopolymers thin films. It allows to explain the mechanism of spontaneous patterning, and self-organization. It allows also to compute the surface relief profile and its evolution in time with good agreement with experiments.

  6. Grinding induced martensite on the surface of rails

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, C.J.; Zhang, Xiaodan; Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2014-01-01

    determined. Two different rail types R260 and R350HT that both had been ground by a grinding train were investigated. The rail sections, studied using optical and scanning electron microscopy, showed that the surface of both types of rails is covered with WELs. The hardness of the WEL is increased compared...... to the base material and the microstructural investigations reveal that a martensitic structure is present at the surface....

  7. What’s the Score? Walkable Environments and Subsidized Households

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jae Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neighborhood walkability can influence individual health, social interactions, and environmental quality, but the relationships between subsidized households and their walkable environment have not been sufficiently examined in previous empirical studies. Focusing on two types of subsidized housing developments (Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC and Public Housing (PH in Austin, Texas, this study evaluates the neighborhood walkability of place-based subsidized households, utilizing objectively measured Walk Score and walking-related built environment data. We also used U.S. Census block group data to account for the socio-demographic covariates. Based on various data, we employed bivariate and multivariate analyses to specify the relationships between subsidized households and their neighborhood walkable environment. The results of our bivariate analyses show that LIHTC households tend to be located in car-dependent neighborhoods and have more undesirable walking-related built environment conditions compared with non-LIHTC neighborhoods. Our regression results also represent that LIHTC households are more likely to be exposed to neighborhoods with low Walk Score, less sidewalk coverage, and more highways and major roads, while there are no significant associations for PH households. These findings imply that more attention and effort toward reducing the inequitable distributions of walkable neighborhood features supporting rather than hindering healthy lifestyles must be provided to subsidized households.

  8. Selective metallization of polymers using laser induced surface activation (LISA)—characterization and optimization of porous surface topography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; De Grave, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Laser induced selective activation (LISA) is a molded interconnected devices technique for selective metallization of polymers. On the working piece, only the laser-machined area can be metalized in the subsequent plating. The principle of the technology is introduced. Surface analysis was perfor...

  9. Fabrication of "petal effect" surfaces by femtosecond laser-induced forward transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Jin; Fan, Wen-Zhong; Pan, Huai-Hai; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Qian, Jing; Zhao, Quan-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Superhydrophobic adhesive glass surfaces with polystyrene has been obtained via femtosecond laser induced forward transfer (LIFT). Using this facile method, we obtained composite structures on the glass surface, achieving the transformation from hydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity with contact angle from 36.22° on the glass surface to 159.19° on the LIFT modified glass surface. Analogous to the "petal effect", the obtained superhydrophobic surface also shows high adhesion. Furthermore, the wettability of LIFT modified glass surface can be tuned by changing the interval width of laser scanning, which can be explained by the Cassie impregnating wetting model.

  10. Coupling of a reservoir model and of a poro-mechanical model. Application to the study of the compaction of petroleum reservoirs and of the associated subsidence; Couplage d'un modele de gisement et d'un modele mecanique. Application a l'etude de la compaction des reservoirs petroliers et de la subsidence associee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevillon, D.

    2000-11-30

    The aim of this study is to provide a better description of the rock contribution to fluid flows in petroleum reservoirs. The production of oil/gas in soft highly compacting reservoirs induces important reduction of the pore volume, which increases oil productivity. This compaction leads to undesirable effects such as surface subsidence or damage of well equipment. Analysis of compaction and subsidence can be performed using either engineering reservoir models or coupled poro-mechanical models. Poro-mechanical model offers a rigorous mechanical framework, but does not permit a complete description of the fluids. The reservoir model gives a good description of the fluid phases, but the description of the mechanic phenomenon is then simplified. To satisfy the set of equations (mechanical equilibrium and diffusivity equations), two simulators can be used together sequentially. Each of the two simulators solves its own system independently, and information passed both directions between simulators. This technique is usually referred to the partially coupled scheme. In this study, reservoir and hydro-mechanical simulations show that reservoir theory is not a rigorous framework to represent the evolution of the high porous rocks strains. Then, we introduce a partially coupled scheme that is shown to be consistent and unconditionally stable, which permits to describe correctly poro-mechanical theory in reservoir models. (author)

  11. Using Radar Interferometry (DinSAR) to Evaluate Land Subsidence Caused by Excessive Groundwater Withdrawal in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, M. C.; Milewski, A.; El Kadiri, R.

    2013-12-01

    The combination of natural, anthropogenic, and climate change impacts on the water resources of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has devastated its water resources well beyond its current and projected populations. The increased exploitation of groundwater resources in the past half-century coupled with successive droughts has resulted in the acceleration of subsidence rates in the Souss and Massa basins in Morocco. We have completed a preliminary investigation of these impacts on the Souss and Massa basins (~27,000 km2) in the southwestern part of Morocco. This area is characterized by a semi-arid climate (annual precipitation 70-250 mm/year) with agriculture, tourism, and commercial fishing as the primary economic activities, all of which require availability of adequate freshwater resources. Additionally the primary groundwater aquifer (Plio-Quaternary Plain Aquifer), an unconfined aquifer formed mostly of sand and gravel, is being harvested by >20,000 wells at a rate of 650 MCM/yr., exceeding the rate of recharge by 260 MCM/year. Intense development over the past 50 years has exposed the aquifer to a serious risk of groundwater table drawdown (0.5m-2.5m/yr.), land subsidence, loss of artesian pressure, salinization, salt water intrusions along the coast, and deterioration of water quality across the watershed. Differential Interferometry Synthetique Aperture Radar (DInSAR) was utilized to measure ground subsidence induced by groundwater withdrawal. Land subsidence caused by excessive groundwater extraction was determined using a threefold methodology: (1) extraction of subsidence and land deformation patterns using radar interferometry, (2) correlation of the high subsidence areas within the basins to possible natural and anthropogenic factors (e.g. sea level rise, unconsolidated lithological formations distribution, urbanization, excessive groundwater extraction), and (3) forecasting the future of the Souss and Massa basins over the next century

  12. Modeling an RF Cold Crucible Induction Heated Melter with Subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant L. Hawkes

    2004-07-01

    A method to reduce radioactive waste volume that includes melting glass in a cold crucible radio frequency induction heated melter has been investigated numerically. The purpose of the study is to correlate the numerical investigation with an experimental apparatus that in the above mentioned melter. Unique to this model is the subsidence of the glass as it changes from a powder to molten glass and drastically changes density. A model has been created that couples the magnetic vector potential (real and imaginary) to a transient startup of the melter process. This magnetic field is coupled to the mass, momentum, and energy equations that vary with time and position as the melt grows. The coupling occurs with the electrical conductivity of the glass as it rises above the melt temperature of the glass and heat is generated. Natural convection within the molten glass helps determine the shape of the melt as it progresses in time. An electromagnetic force is also implemented that is dependent on the electrical properties and frequency of the coil. This study shows the progression of the melt shape with time along with temperatures, power input, velocities and magnetic vector potential. Coupled to all of this is a generator that will be used for this lab sized experiment. The coupling with the 60 kW generator occurs with the impedance of the melt as it progresses and changes with time. A power controller has been implemented that controls the primary coil current depending on the power that is induced into the molten glass region.

  13. Shrink-induced superhydrophobic and antibacterial surfaces in consumer plastics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren R Freschauf

    Full Text Available Structurally modified superhydrophobic surfaces have become particularly desirable as stable antibacterial surfaces. Because their self-cleaning and water resistant properties prohibit bacteria growth, structurally modified superhydrophobic surfaces obviate bacterial resistance common with chemical agents, and therefore a robust and stable means to prevent bacteria growth is possible. In this study, we present a rapid fabrication method for creating such superhydrophobic surfaces in consumer hard plastic materials with resulting antibacterial effects. To replace complex fabrication materials and techniques, the initial mold is made with commodity shrink-wrap film and is compatible with large plastic roll-to-roll manufacturing and scale-up techniques. This method involves a purely structural modification free of chemical additives leading to its inherent consistency over time and successive recasting from the same molds. Finally, antibacterial properties are demonstrated in polystyrene (PS, polycarbonate (PC, and polyethylene (PE by demonstrating the prevention of gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli bacteria growth on our structured plastic surfaces.

  14. Shrink-Induced Superhydrophobic and Antibacterial Surfaces in Consumer Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschauf, Lauren R.; McLane, Jolie; Sharma, Himanshu; Khine, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Structurally modified superhydrophobic surfaces have become particularly desirable as stable antibacterial surfaces. Because their self-cleaning and water resistant properties prohibit bacteria growth, structurally modified superhydrophobic surfaces obviate bacterial resistance common with chemical agents, and therefore a robust and stable means to prevent bacteria growth is possible. In this study, we present a rapid fabrication method for creating such superhydrophobic surfaces in consumer hard plastic materials with resulting antibacterial effects. To replace complex fabrication materials and techniques, the initial mold is made with commodity shrink-wrap film and is compatible with large plastic roll-to-roll manufacturing and scale-up techniques. This method involves a purely structural modification free of chemical additives leading to its inherent consistency over time and successive recasting from the same molds. Finally, antibacterial properties are demonstrated in polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), and polyethylene (PE) by demonstrating the prevention of gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria growth on our structured plastic surfaces. PMID:22916100

  15. The evolution of machining-induced surface of single-crystal FCC copper via nanoindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Huang, Hu; Zhao, Hongwei; Ma, Zhichao; Yang, Yihan; Hu, Xiaoli

    2013-05-04

    The physical properties of the machining-induced new surface depend on the performance of the initial defect surface and deformed layer in the subsurface of the bulk material. In this paper, three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation are preformed on the single-point diamond turning surface of single-crystal copper comparing with that of pristine single-crystal face-centered cubic copper. The simulation results indicate that the nucleation of dislocations in the nanoindentation test on the machining-induced surface and pristine single-crystal copper is different. The dislocation embryos are gradually developed from the sites of homogeneous random nucleation around the indenter in the pristine single-crystal specimen, while the dislocation embryos derived from the vacancy-related defects are distributed in the damage layer of the subsurface beneath the machining-induced surface. The results show that the hardness of the machining-induced surface is softer than that of pristine single-crystal copper. Then, the nanocutting simulations are performed along different crystal orientations on the same crystal surface. It is shown that the crystal orientation directly influences the dislocation formation and distribution of the machining-induced surface. The crystal orientation of nanocutting is further verified to affect both residual defect generations and their propagation directions which are important in assessing the change of mechanical properties, such as hardness and Young's modulus, after nanocutting process.

  16. MECHANISM OF WATER-SOIL COUPLED ACTION DURING MINING SUBSIDENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    狄乾生; 黄山民

    1991-01-01

    This paper,on the basis ot the scientific research of engineering geological exploration in a mining area ,systematically studies the reasons and influence factors of consolidation and deformation of the saturated soil included in the thick loose water-bearing overburden due to mining subsidence ,and analyses the dissipation of hyperstatic pore water pressure during the change of original stress and strain state of, the soil. Again,by means of the coupled model based on Cambridge model and Biot's three-dimensional consolidation theory,adopting a great many physico-mechanical parameters measured in various soil layers,the paper analyses the consolidation and deformation of saturated soil affected by mining subsidence with elasto-plastic finite element method. Thus ,the research not only reveals the regulation of stress ,straln,displacement and hyperstatic pore water pressure dissipation in overlying soil mass,but also opens up a new direction and way for the research of mining subsidence.

  17. Investigation and characterization of mining subsidence in Kaiyang Phosphorus Mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Jian; BIAN Li

    2007-01-01

    In Kaiyang Phosphorus Mine, serious environmental and safety problems are caused by large scale mining activities in the past 40 years. These problems include mining subsidence, low recovery ratio, too much dead ore in pillars, and pollution of phosphorus gypsum. Mining subsidence falls into four categories: curved ground and mesa, ground cracks and collapse hole, spalling and eboulement, slope slide and creeping. Measures to treat the mining subsidence were put forward: finding out and managing abandoned stopes, optimizing mining method (cut and fill mining method), selecting proper backfilling materials (phosphogypsum mixtures), avoiding disorder mining operation, and treating highway slopes. These investigations and engineering treatment methods are believed to be able to contribute to the safety extraction of ore and sustainable development in Kaiyang Phosphorus Mine.

  18. Study on neural network model for calculating subsidence factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Wen-bing; ZHANG Jie

    2007-01-01

    The major factors influencing subsidence factor were comprehensively analyzed. Then the artificial neural network model for calculating subsidence factor was set up with the theory of artificial neural network (ANN). A large amount of data from observation stations in China was collected and used as learning and training samples to train and test the artificial neural network model. The calculated results of the ANN model and the observed values were compared and analyzed in this paper. The results demonstrate that many factors can be considered in this model and the result is more precise and closer to observed values to calculate the subsidence factor by the ANN model. It can satisfy the need of engineering.

  19. Surface induced self-organization of comb-like macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Konstantin I; Palyulin, Vladimir V; Möller, Martin; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2011-01-01

    Summary We present a review of the theoretical and experimental evidence for the peculiar properties of comb copolymers, demonstrating the uniqueness of these materials among other polymer architectures. These special properties include an increase in stiffness upon increasing side-chain length, the spontaneous curvature of adsorbed combs, rod–globule transition, and specific intramolecular self-assembly. We also propose a theory of chemically heterogeneous surface nanopattern formation in ultrathin films of comblike macromolecules containing two different types (A and B) of incompatible side chains (so-called binary combs). Side chains of the binary combs are strongly adsorbed on a surface and segregated with respect to the backbone. The thickness of surface domains formed by the B side chains is controlled by the interaction with the substrate. We predict the stability of direct and inverse disc-, torus- and stripelike nanostructures. Phase diagrams of the film are constructed. PMID:22003463

  20. Study of surface plasmon chirality induced by Archimedes' spiral grooves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Tomoki; Miyanishi, Shintaro

    2006-06-26

    A chirality of surface plasmons excited on a silver film with Archimedes' spiral grooves during incidence of a circularly polarized light is analytically and numerically studied by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) modeling method. We found that the surface of a plasmon has selective chirality, which is given by the sum of the chiralities of the incident light and the spiral structure. The surface plasmons with the chirality lead to zero-order, first-order, and high-order evanescent Bessel beams with electric charge distributions on the film. This selectivity could be widely applied for chiral detection of the incident light and chiral excitation of several optical modes in nanophotonics.

  1. Competitive Protein Adsorption - Multilayer Adsorption and Surface Induced Protein Aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    In this study, competitive adsorption of albumin and IgG (immunoglobulin G) from human serum solutions and protein mixtures onto polymer surfaces is studied by means of radioactive labeling. By using two different radiolabels (125I and 131I), albumin and IgG adsorption to polymer surfaces...... is monitored simultaneously and the influence from the presence of other human serum proteins on albumin and IgG adsorption, as well as their mutual influence during adsorption processes, is investigated. Exploring protein adsorption by combining analysis of competitive adsorption from complex solutions...... of high concentration with investigation of single protein adsorption and interdependent adsorption between two specific proteins enables us to map protein adsorption sequences during competitive protein adsorption. Our study shows that proteins can adsorb in a multilayer fashion onto the polymer surfaces...

  2. Femtosecond laser irradiation-induced infrared absorption on silicon surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The near-infrared (NIR absorption below band gap energy of crystalline silicon is significantly increased after the silicon is irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses at a simple experimental condition. The absorption increase in the NIR range primarily depends on the femtosecond laser pulse energy, pulse number, and pulse duration. The Raman spectroscopy analysis shows that after the laser irradiation, the silicon surface consists of silicon nanostructure and amorphous silicon. The femtosecond laser irradiation leads to the formation of a composite of nanocrystalline, amorphous, and the crystal silicon substrate surface with microstructures. The composite has an optical absorption enhancement at visible wavelengths as well as at NIR wavelength. The composite may be useful for an NIR detector, for example, for gas sensing because of its large surface area.

  3. The UNESCO-IHP Working Group on Land Subsidence: Four Decades of International Contributions to Hydrogeological Related Subsidence Research and Knowledge Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, D. L.; Carreon-Freyre, D.; Teatini, P.; Ye, S.

    2015-12-01

    Subsidence is globally prevalent and because much of it is related to hydrological processes affected by human development of local land and water resources, "Land Subsidence" was included in the UNESCO programme of the International Hydrological Decade (IHD), 1965-1974 and an ad hoc working group on land subsidence was formed. In 1975 subsidence was retained under the framework of the UNESCO IHP (subproject 8.4: "Investigation of Land Subsidence due to Groundwater Exploitation"), and UNESCO IHP formerly codified the Working Group on Land Subsidence (WGLS). In 1984 the WGLS produced a comprehensive guidebook to serve scientists and engineers, confronting land subsidence problems, particularly in developing countries (http://unesdoc.unesco.org/$other/unesdoc/pdf/065167eo.pdf). During the IHD, UNESCO IHP convened the 1st International Symposium on Land Subsidence in 1969 in Tokyo, Japan. In collaboration with UNESCO IHP, IAHS, and other scientific organizations, the WGLS has convened eight more International Symposia on Land Subsidence in different countries in Asia, Europe and North America. The 9 published symposia proceedings constitute an important source of global subsidence research and case studies during the past 45 years, covering both anthropogenic and natural subsidence processes. Currently, the WGLS comprising 20 subsidence experts from 9 countries promotes and facilitates the international exchange of information regarding the design, implementation and evaluation of risk assessments and mitigation measures, the definition of water and land resource-management strategies that support sustainable development in areas vulnerable to subsidence (http://landsubsidence-unesco.org), and the assessment of related geological risks such as earth fissuring and fault activation (www.igcp641.org). The WGLS has become an important global leader in promoting subsidence awareness, scientific research and its application to subsidence monitoring, analysis and management.

  4. Photo-induced free radicals on a simulated Martian surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, S.-S.; Chang, S.

    1974-01-01

    Results of an electron spin resonance study of free radicals in the ultraviolet irradiation of a simulated Martian surface suggest that the ultraviolet photolysis of CO or CO2, or a mixture of both, adsorbed on silica gel at minus 170 C involves the formation of OH radicals and possibly of H atoms as the primary process, followed by the formation of CO2H radicals. It is concluded that the photochemical synthesis of organic compounds could occur on Mars if the siliceous surface dust contains enough silanol groups and/or adsorbed H2O in the form of bound water.

  5. Laser-induced surface ablation as a probe of optical surface damage mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.

    1990-02-01

    The phenomenon of laser surface damage is briefly reviewed, with an emphasis on the fundamental physical mechanisms of the interaction of laser light with the surface. Recent measurements of laser ablation of charged and neutral surface constituents and impurities are described, and it is shown that these experiments can he used to investigate optical damage mechanisms. Crystalline ZnS is used as the primary example of this work.

  6. Land Subsidence Caused by Groundwater Exploitation in Quetta Valley, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeebullah Kakar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Land subsidence is affecting several metropolitan cities in developing as well as developed countries around the world such as Nagoya (Japan, Shanghai (China, Venice (Italy and San Joaquin valley (United States. This phenomenon is attributed to natural as well as anthropogenic activities that include extensive groundwater withdrawals. Quetta is the largest city of Balochistan province in Pakistan. This valley is mostly dry and ground water is the major source for domestic and agricultural consumption. The unplanned use of ground water resources has led to the deterioration of water quality and quantity in the Quetta valley. Water shortage in the region was further aggravated by the drought during (1998-2004 that hit the area forcing people to migrate from rural to urban areas. Refugees from the war torn neighboring Afghanistan also contributed to rapid increase in population of Quetta valley that has increased from 0.26 million in 1975 to 3.0 million in 2016. The objective of this study was to measure the land subsidence in Quetta valley and identify the effects of groundwater withdrawals on land subsidence. To achieve this goal, data from five Global Positioning System (GPS stations were acquired and processed. Furthermore the groundwater decline data from 41 observation wells during 2010 to 2015 were calculated and compared with the land deformation. The results of this study revealed that the land of Quetta valley is subsiding from 30mm/y on the flanks to 120 mm/y in the central part. 1.5-5.0 m/y of groundwater level drop was recorded in the area where the rate of subsidence is highest. So the extensive groundwater withdrawals in Quetta valley is considered to be the driving force behind land subsidence.

  7. Spatial Analysis of Soil Subsidence in Peat Meadow Areas in Friesland in Relation to Land and Water Management, Climate Change, and Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouns, Karlijn; Eikelboom, Tessa; Jansen, Peter C.; Janssen, Ron; Kwakernaak, Cees; van den Akker, Jan J. H.; Verhoeven, Jos T. A.

    2015-02-01

    Dutch peatlands have been subsiding due to peat decomposition, shrinkage and compression, since their reclamation in the 11th century. Currently, subsidence amounts to 1-2 cm/year. Water management in these areas is complex and costly, greenhouse gases are being emitted, and surface water quality is relatively poor. Regional and local authorities and landowners responsible for peatland management have recognized these problems. In addition, the Netherlands Royal Meteorological Institute predicts higher temperatures and drier summers, which both are expected to enhance peat decomposition. Stakeholder workshops have been organized in three case study areas in the province of Friesland to exchange knowledge on subsidence and explore future subsidence rates and the effects of land use and management changes on subsidence rates. Subsidence rates were up to 3 cm/year in deeply drained parcels and increased when we included climate change in the modeling exercises. This means that the relatively thin peat layers in this province (ca 1 m) would shrink or even disappear by the end of the century when current practices continue. Adaptation measures were explored, such as extensive dairy farming and the production of new crops in wetter conditions, but little experience has been gained on best practices. The workshops have resulted in useful exchange of ideas on possible measures and their consequences for land use and water management in the three case study areas. The province and the regional water board will use the results to develop land use and water management policies for the next decades.

  8. Spatial analysis of soil subsidence in peat meadow areas in Friesland in relation to land and water management, climate change, and adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouns, Karlijn; Eikelboom, Tessa; Jansen, Peter C; Janssen, Ron; Kwakernaak, Cees; van den Akker, Jan J H; Verhoeven, Jos T A

    2015-02-01

    Dutch peatlands have been subsiding due to peat decomposition, shrinkage and compression, since their reclamation in the 11th century. Currently, subsidence amounts to 1-2 cm/year. Water management in these areas is complex and costly, greenhouse gases are being emitted, and surface water quality is relatively poor. Regional and local authorities and landowners responsible for peatland management have recognized these problems. In addition, the Netherlands Royal Meteorological Institute predicts higher temperatures and drier summers, which both are expected to enhance peat decomposition. Stakeholder workshops have been organized in three case study areas in the province of Friesland to exchange knowledge on subsidence and explore future subsidence rates and the effects of land use and management changes on subsidence rates. Subsidence rates were up to 3 cm/year in deeply drained parcels and increased when we included climate change in the modeling exercises. This means that the relatively thin peat layers in this province (ca 1 m) would shrink or even disappear by the end of the century when current practices continue. Adaptation measures were explored, such as extensive dairy farming and the production of new crops in wetter conditions, but little experience has been gained on best practices. The workshops have resulted in useful exchange of ideas on possible measures and their consequences for land use and water management in the three case study areas. The province and the regional water board will use the results to develop land use and water management policies for the next decades.

  9. A new soil mechanics approach to quantify and predict land subsidence by peat compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Kay; Erkens, Gilles; Zwanenburg, Cor

    2016-10-01

    Land subsidence threatens many coastal areas. Quantifying current and predicting future subsidence are essential to sustain the viability of these areas with respect to rising sea levels. Despite its scale and severity, methods to quantify subsidence are scarce. In peat-rich subsidence hot spots, subsidence is often caused by peat compression. We introduce the standard Cone Penetration Test (CPT) as a technique to quantify subsidence due to compression of peat. In a test in the Holland coastal plain, the Netherlands, we found a strong relationship between thickness reduction of peat and cone resistance, due to an increase in peat stiffness after compression. We use these results to quantify subsidence of peat in subsiding areas of Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and Kalimantan, and found values corresponding with previously made observations. These results open the door for CPT as a new method to document past and predict future subsidence due to peat compression over large areas.

  10. Laser induced plasma plume imaging and surface morphology of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M. [Advanced Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, G.T. Road, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan); Siraj, K. [Advanced Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, G.T. Road, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan)], E-mail: ksiraj@uet.edu.pk; Rafique, M.S.; Bhatti, K.A.; Latif, A.; Jamil, H.; Basit, M. [Advanced Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, G.T. Road, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan)

    2009-04-15

    Shot-to-shot variation in the characteristics of laser produced plasma plume and surface profile of N-type silicon (1 1 1) are investigated. In order to produce plasma, a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 mJ, 9-14 ns) is tightly focused on silicon target in air at room temperature. Target was exposed in such a way that number of laser shots was increased from point to point in ascending order starting from single shot at first point. Target was moved 2 mm after each exposure. In order to investigate shot-to-shot variation in the time integrated emission intensity regions within the plasma plume, a computer controlled CCD based image capture system was employed. Various intensity regimes were found depending strongly on the number of incident laser pulses. Plasma plume length was also found to vary with the number of pulses. The topographic analysis of the irradiated Si was performed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) which shows the primary mechanisms like thermal or non-thermal ablation depend on the number of shots. Surface morphological changes were also studied in terms of ripple formation, ejection, debris and re-deposition of material caused by laser beam at sample surface. The micrographs show ripples spacing versus wavelength dependence rule [{lambda} {approx} {lambda}/(1 - sin {theta})]. Intensity variations with number of shots are correlated with the surface morphology of the irradiated sample.

  11. Experimental Study of the Subsidence Characteristics of Clayey Loess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Lan; Wang Lanmin

    2007-01-01

    Presented in this paper are the results of experimental study and analysis of the subsidence characteristics obtained from soil samples with different contents of clay particles though laboratory dynamic triaxial test, Laser particle size analysis, chemical analysis and electronic microscope scanning. By comparison of the obtained data, the following conclusions are drawn out: (1)The stability of the loess varies with different content of clay; (2) The relation between the dynamic shear strength and the clay particles is not monotonous, but parabolic; (3) In the same consolidation ratio, the clayey loess is the weakest subsidence-resistant when the clay particle content is between 16% ~ 17%.

  12. A study on subsidization of private schools in China

    OpenAIRE

    高, 暁楠

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this Paper is to analyze the policies of subsidization of private schools in China, mainly base on the Law of the People’s Republic of China on Promotion of Privately-run Schools and the Regulations for the implementation of this standardization law, which have been promulgated recently. But for the particularity of private schools in China, the general view of the private schools in China, includes the concept of private school and the idea of subsidization of private schools,...

  13. Coastal Flooding Hazards due to storm surges and subsidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo; Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole B.

    Flooding hazard and risk mapping are major topics in low-lying coastal areas before even considering the adverse effects of sea level rise (SLR) due to climate change. While permanent inundation may be a prevalent issue, more often floods related to extreme events (storm surges) have the largest...... damage potential.Challenges are amplified in some areas due to subsidence from natural and/or anthropogenic causes. Subsidence of even a few mm/y may over time greatly impair the safety against flooding of coastal communities and must be accounted for in order to accomplish the economically most viable...

  14. Anomalous microwave reflection from a metal surface induced by spoof surface plasmon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Liang; Cao Jin-Xiang; Lü You; Liu Lei; Du Yin-Chang; Wang Jian

    2012-01-01

    The reflection of X-band microwaves (8-12 GHz) from a metallic aluminum (Al) surface with groove grating corrugations was investigated experimentally.It was shown that the reflection of p-polarization is much less than the microwave reflected from the corresponding area of an unruled Al surface,with selective wavelength.The experimental results demonstrated that the anomalous microwave reflection is strongly associated with the excitation of spoof surface plasmons at the Al-air interface by the surface grating coupler. This near-total absence of reflected microwaves is similar to the famous Wood's anomaly in the optical regime and is of fundamental importance to the applications of spoof surface plasmons in the microwave regime.

  15. Land subsidence in the Yangtze River Delta, China revealed from multi-frequency SAR Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenhong; Motagh, Mahdi; Yu, Jun; Gong, Xulong; Wu, Jianqiang; Zhu, Yefei; Chen, Huogen; Zhang, Dengming; Xu, Yulin

    2014-05-01

    Land subsidence is a major worldwide hazard, and its principal causes are subsurface fluid withdrawal, drainage of organic soils, sinkholes, underground mining, hydrocompaction, thawing permafrost, and natural consolidation. Land subsidence causes many problems including: damage to public facilities such as bridges, roads, railroads, electric power lines, underground pipes; damage to private and public buildings; and in some cases of low-lying land, can increase the risk of coastal flooding from storm surges and rising sea-levels. In China, approximately 48600 km2 of land, an area roughly 30 times of the size of the Greater London, has subsided (nearly 50 cities across 16 provinces), and the annual direct economic loss is estimated to be more than RMB 100 million (~12 million). It is believed that the Suzhou-Wuxi-Changzhou region within the Yangtze River Delta is the most severely affected area for subsidence hazards in China. With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, Interferometric SAR (InSAR) is revolutionizing our ability to image the Earth's surface and the evolution of its shape over time. In this paper, an advanced InSAR time series technique, InSAR TS + AEM, has been employed to analysed ERS (C-band), Envisat (C-band) and TerraSAR-X (X-band) data collected over the Suzhou-Wuxi-Changzhou region during the period from 1992 to 2013. Validation with precise levelling and GPS data suggest: (1) the accuracy of the InSAR-derived mean velocity measurements is 1-3 mm/yr; (2) InSAR-derived displacements agreed with precise levelling with root mean square errors around 5 mm. It is evident that InSAR TS + AEM can be used to image the evolution of deformation patterns in the Suzhou-Wuxi-Changzhou region over time: the maximum mean velocity decreased from ~12 cm/yr during the period of 1992-1993 to ~2 cm/yr in 2003-2013. This is believed to be a result of the prohibition of groundwater use carried out by Jiangsu provincial government. The combination

  16. Land subsidence and caprock dolines caused by subsurface gypsum dissolution and the effect of subsidence on the fluvial system in the Upper Tigris Basin (between Bismil Batman, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Uğur

    2005-11-01

    Karstification-based land subsidence was found in the Upper Tigris Basin with dimensions not seen anywhere else in Turkey. The area of land subsidence, where there are secondary and tertiary subsidence developments, reaches 140 km 2. Subsidence depth ranges between 40 and 70 m. The subsidence was formed as a result of subsurface gypsum dissolution in Lower Miocene formation. Although there are limestones together with gypsum and Eocene limestone below them in the area, a subsidence with such a large area is indicative of karstification in the gypsum. The stratigraphical cross-sections taken from the wells and the water analyses also verify this fact. The Lower Miocene gypsum, which shows confined aquifer features, was completely dissolved by the aggressive waters injected from the top and discharged through by Zellek Fault. This resulted in the development of subsidence and formation of caprock dolines on loosely textured Upper Miocene-Pliocene cover formations. The Tigris River runs through the subsidence area between Batman and Bismil. There are four terrace levels as T1 (40 m), T2 (30 m), T3 (10 m) and T4 (4-5 m) in the Tigris River valley. It was also found that there were some movements of the levels of the terraces in the valley by subsidence. The subsidence developed gradually throughout the Quaternary; however no terrace was formed purely because of subsidence.

  17. Injection Induced Mixing in Flows Separating From Smooth Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, John J. (Technical Monitor); Wundrow, David W.

    2004-01-01

    An analytic model for predicting the effect of unsteady local surface injection on the flow separating from a streamlined body at angle of attack is proposed. The model uses the premise that separation control results from enhanced mixing along the shear layer that develops between the main stream and the fluid in the underlying recirculation zone. High-Reynolds-number asymptotic methods are used to connect the unsteady surface injection to an instability wave propagating on the separating shear layer and then to the large-scale coherent structures that produce the increased mixing. The results is a tool that can guide the choice of fluid-actuator parameters to maximize flow-control effectiveness and may also facilitate computer-based numerical experiments.

  18. Curvature-induced symmetry breaking determines elastic surface patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, Norbert; Lagrange, Romain; Terwagne, Denis; Reis, Pedro M.; Dunkel, Jörn

    2015-03-01

    Symmetry-breaking transitions associated with the buckling and folding of curved multilayered surfaces—which are common to a wide range of systems and processes such as embryogenesis, tissue differentiation and structure formation in heterogeneous thin films or on planetary surfaces—have been characterized experimentally. Yet owing to the nonlinearity of the underlying stretching and bending forces, the transitions cannot be reliably predicted by current theoretical models. Here, we report a generalized Swift-Hohenberg theory that describes wrinkling morphology and pattern selection in curved elastic bilayer materials. By testing the theory against experiments on spherically shaped surfaces, we find quantitative agreement with analytical predictions for the critical curves separating labyrinth, hybrid and hexagonal phases. Furthermore, a comparison to earlier experiments suggests that the theory is universally applicable to macroscopic and microscopic systems. Our approach builds on general differential-geometry principles and can thus be extended to arbitrarily shaped surfaces.

  19. Dynamic effects induced transition of droplets on biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong Chae; Bhushan, Bharat

    2009-08-18

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have considerable technological potential for various applications because of their extreme water-repellent properties. Dynamic effects, such as the bouncing and vibration of a droplet, can destroy the composite solid-air-liquid interface. The impact pressure of a bouncing droplet and the inertia force of a vibrating droplet affect the transition from a solid-air-liquid interface to a solid-liquid interface. Therefore, it is necessary to study the dynamic effect of droplets under various system parameters (impact velocity and frequency and amplitude of vibration). A new model for the prediction of the wetting and dewetting process during droplet vibration based on the relationship between the adhesion force and the inertia force of a droplet is proposed. To investigate whether micro-, nano-, and hierarchical structures can resist the destabilizing factors responsible for the transition, a study of bouncing and vibration of a water droplet is systematically conducted on various surfaces. The physics of wetting phenomena for water droplet studies is of fundamental importance in the geometrical design of superhydrophobic surfaces.

  20. Mapping surface tension induced menisci with application to tensiometry and refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Avanish; Kulkarni, Varun; Khor, Jian-Wei; Wereley, Steve

    2015-07-28

    In this work, we discuss an optical method for measuring surface tension induced menisci. The principle of measurement is based upon the change in the background pattern produced by the curvature of the meniscus acting as a lens. We measure the meniscus profile over an inclined glass plate and utilize the measured meniscus for estimation of surface tension and refractive index.

  1. Theory of alkali-metal-induced reconstructions of fcc(100) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole Bøssing; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of missing-row reconstruction energies of the fcc(100) surfaces of the metals Al, Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, and Au have been performed with the effective-medium theory with and without the presence of a potassium overlayer. It is shown that the tendency to reconstruct in the presence......-metal-induced reconstruction of fcc(110) surfaces are pointed out....

  2. Reduction of Friction of Metals Using Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We report on the effect of femtosecond-laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS on the tribological properties of stainless steel. Uniform periodic nanostructures were produced on AISI 304L (American Iron and Steel Institute steel grade steel surfaces using an 800-nm femtosecond laser. The spatial periods of LIPSS measured by field emission scanning electron microscopy ranged from 530 to 570 nm. The tribological properties of smooth and textured surfaces with periodic nanostructures were investigated using reciprocating ball-on-flat tests against AISI 440C balls under both dry and starved oil lubricated conditions. The friction coefficient of LIPSS covered surfaces has shown a lower value than that of the smooth surface. The induced periodic nanostructures demonstrated marked potential for reducing the friction coefficient compared with the smooth surface.

  3. Numerical modeling of land subsidence due to groundwater withdrawal in Aguascalientes Valley using regional coefficients of deformation determined by InSAR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, J.; Cabral, E.; Wdowinski, S.; Hernandez-Marin, M.; Ortíz, J. Á.; Solano Rojas, D. E.; Oliver-Cabrera, T.

    2014-12-01

    Land subsidence due to groundwater over-exploitation is a deformation process affecting many cities around the world. This type of subsidence develops gradual vertical deformations reaching only a few centimeters per year, but can affect large areas. Consequently, inhabitants of subsiding areas are not aware of the process until others effects are observed, such as ground surface faulting, damage to building, or changes in the natural superficial drain. In order to mitigate and forecast subsidence consequences, it is useful to conduct numerical modeling of the subsidence process. Modeling the subsidence includes the following three basic tasks: a) Delimitation of the shape of the deforming body; b) Determination of the forces that are causing the deformations; and c) Determination of the mechanical properties of the deforming body according with an accepted rheological model. In the case of a land subsidence process, the deforming body is the aquifer system that is being drained. Usually, stratigraphic information from pumping wells, and other geophysical data are used to define the boundaries and shape of the aquifer system. The deformation governing forces, or stresses, can be calculated using the theory of "effective stress". Mechanical properties are usually determined with laboratory testing of samples from shallow strata, because the determination of these properties in samples from the deepest strata is economically or technically unviable. Consequently, the results of the numerical modeling do not necessarily match the observed subsidence evolution and ground faulting. We present in this work numerical simulation results of the land subsiding of the Valley of Aguascalientes, Mexico. Two analyses for the same subsiding area are presented. In the first of them, we used the mechanical properties of only the shallow strata, whereas in the second analysis we used "macroscopic" mechanical properties data determined for the whole aquifer system using In

  4. Optically induced surface relief phenomena in azobenzene polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, NCR; Nikolova, Ludmila; Hvilsted, Søren

    1999-01-01

    Azobenzene polymers and oligomers show intriguing surface relief features when irradiated with polarized laser light. We show through atomic force microscopic investigation of side-chain azobenzene polymers after irradiation through an amplitude mask that large peaks or trenches result depending...... on the architecture of the polymer. Extensive mass transport over long distances has been observed, paving the way for easy replication of nanostructures. We also show that it is possible to store microscopic images as topographic features in the polymers just through polarized light irradiation. (C) 1999 American...

  5. Nematic twist cell: Strong chirality induced at the surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Nemitz, Ian R.; Pendery, Joel S.; Schubert, Christopher P. J.; Lemieux, Robert P.; Rosenblatt, Charles

    2013-04-01

    A nematic twist cell having a thickness gradient was filled with a mixture containing a configurationally achiral liquid crystal (LC) and chiral dopant. A chiral-based linear electrooptic effect was observed on application of an ac electric field. This "electroclinic effect" varied monotonically with d, changing sign at d =d0 where the chiral dopant exactly compensated the imposed twist. The results indicate that a significant chiral electrooptic effect always exists near the surfaces of a twist cell containing molecules that can be conformationally deracemized. Additionally, this approach can be used to measure the helical twisting power (HTP) of a chiral dopant in a liquid crystal.

  6. Evolution of ion-induced nanoparticle arrays on GaAs surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, M.; Al-Heji, A. A.; Shende, O.; Huang, S.; Jeon, S.; Goldman, R. S., E-mail: rsgold@umich.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Beskin, I. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)

    2014-05-05

    We have examined the evolution of irradiation-induced Ga nanoparticle (NP) arrays on GaAs surfaces. Focused-ion-beam irradiation of pre-patterned GaAs surfaces induces monotonic increases in the NP volume and aspect ratio up to a saturation ion dose, independent of NP location within the array. Beyond the saturation ion dose, the NP volume continues to increase monotonically while the NP aspect ratio decreases monotonically. In addition, the NP volumes (aspect ratios) are highest (lowest) for the corner NPs. We discuss the relative influences of bulk and surface diffusion on the evolution of Ga NP arrays.

  7. Evolution of ion-induced nanoparticle arrays on GaAs surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, M.; Beskin, I.; Al-Heji, A. A.; Shende, O.; Huang, S.; Jeon, S.; Goldman, R. S.

    2014-05-01

    We have examined the evolution of irradiation-induced Ga nanoparticle (NP) arrays on GaAs surfaces. Focused-ion-beam irradiation of pre-patterned GaAs surfaces induces monotonic increases in the NP volume and aspect ratio up to a saturation ion dose, independent of NP location within the array. Beyond the saturation ion dose, the NP volume continues to increase monotonically while the NP aspect ratio decreases monotonically. In addition, the NP volumes (aspect ratios) are highest (lowest) for the corner NPs. We discuss the relative influences of bulk and surface diffusion on the evolution of Ga NP arrays.

  8. At Whose Service? Subsidizing Services and the Skill Premium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Groezen, B.J.A.M.; Meijdam, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of subsidizing low-skilled, labourintensive services hired by high-skilled individuals in the presence of labour income taxation. Whether such a subsidy can be Paretoimproving depends crucially on the degree of substitutability of both types of labour in the

  9. Subsidence of residual soils in a karst terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumm, E.C.; Kane, W.F.; Ben-Hassine, J.; Scarborough, J.A. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA)); Ketelle, R.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Siting and operating landfills for solid waste disposal in eastern Tennessee that can operate with minimum impact on groundwater is problematic. The operational requirement of thick, excavational soils and the regulatory requirement of a buffer between disposal units and an aquifer result in siting most operating East Tennessee landfills in outcrop areas of the Knox Group. However, the common occurrence of karst terrain and sinkholes in the Knox Group indicates the vulnerability of such sites to rapid groundwater recharge and flow and the potential for subsidence or collapse of soil into bedrock cavities. To address the potential for subsidence or collapse of soils at the East Chestnut Ridge site on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the following activities and analyses were completed: The locations of karst features on the site were determined by field reconnaissance; several sinkholes were selected for detailed examination; soil boring, sampling, and physical testing were performed in soils located within, adjacent to, and outside of sinkholes to characterize soil strength at various depths; detailed plane surveys were made for 11 sinkholes to measure accurately their dimension and shape for use in determining profile functions for subsidence basins at the site; The stress-deformation response of a typical soil profile overlying a hypothetical bedrock cavity was analyzed numerically for a range of soil thickness and a range of cavity radii. A consistent estimate of the relationship between subsidence basin dimension, soil thickness, and cavity radius has been derived. 30 refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. IMPACT OF OIL ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOIL SUBSIDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Алексей Алексеевич Бурцев

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper studied the effect of oil content on the mechanical properties of soil subsidence - Ek modulus and compressibility factor m0, obtained in the laboratory with the help of artificial impregnation oil soil samples. A comparison of the above parameters with samples of the same soil in the natural and water-saturated conditions has been perfomed.

  11. Tectonics and subsidence evolution of the Sirt Basin, Libya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadi, A.M.; Wees, J.D. van; Dijk, P.M. van; Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.

    2005-01-01

    Backstripping analysis of 225 wells located within the Sirt Basin (Fig. 1) provide new constraints on the Sirt Basin development. Four coherent tectonic phases from Late Jurassic to present. The presentation of contour maps of subsidence and crustal stretching allows to visualize spatial and tempora

  12. Land subsidence and hydrodynamic compaction of sedimentary basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kooi

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional model is used to investigate the relationship between land subsidence and compaction of basin sediments in response to sediment loading. Analysis of the model equations and numerical experiments demonstrate quasi-linear systems behaviour and show that rates of land subsidence due to compaction: (i can attain a significant fraction (>40% of the long-term sedimentation rate; (ii are hydrodynamically delayed with respect to sediment loading. The delay is controlled by a compaction response time τc that can reach values of 10-5-107 yr for thick shale sequences. Both the behaviour of single sediment layers and multiple-layer systems are analysed. Subsequently the model is applied to the coastal area of the Netherlands to illustrate that lateral variability in compaction-derived land subsidence in sedimentary basins largely reflects the spatial variability in both sediment loading and compaction response time. Typical rates of compaction-derived subsidence predicted by the model are of the order of 0.1 mm/yr but may reach values in excess of 1 mm/yr under favourable conditions.

  13. How large-scale subsidence affects stratocumulus transitions (discussion paper)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Dussen, J.J.; De Roode, S.R.; Siebesma, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Some climate modeling results suggest that the Hadley circulation might weaken in a future climate, causing a subsequent reduction in the large-scale subsidence velocity in the subtropics. In this study we analyze the cloud liquid water path (LWP) budget from large-eddy simulation (LES) results of

  14. Subsidized Housing, Public Housing, and Adolescent Violence and Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech, Tamara G. J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the separate relationships of public housing residence and subsidized housing residence to adolescent health risk behavior. Data include 2,530 adolescents aged 14 to 19 who were children of the National the Longitudinal Study of Youth. The author used stratified propensity methods to compare the behaviors of each…

  15. The Opportunity Illusion: Subsidized Housing and Failing Schools in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Deirdre

    2009-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program has funded the bulk of subsidized development nationwide, enabling the construction of over 100,000 units targeted to lower income households in California alone (California Tax Credit Allocation Committee 2009c). Yet, by not encouraging the siting of projects in racially…

  16. Collaboration and Subsidized Early Care and Education Programs in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberger, Julie; Zanoni, Wladimir; Barisik, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    As a result of policy changes following welfare reform in 1996 and the costs associated with providing high-quality early care and education for children of low-income working families, agency collaboration in the state of Illinois has become an increasingly salient feature of subsidized early care and education programs (SECE). The authors…

  17. Frictional Heat-Induced Phase Transformation on Train Wheel Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Hang; PAN Tao; LI Li; YANG Cai-fu; CUI Yin-hui; JI Huai-zhong

    2008-01-01

    By combining thermomechanical coupling finite element analysis with the characteristics of phase transformation [continuous cooling transformation (CCT) curve],the thermal fatigue behavior of train wheel steel under high speed and heavy load conditions was analyzed.The influence of different materials on the formation of the phase transformation zone of the wheel tread was discussed.The result showed that the peak temperature of wheel/track friction zone could be higher than the austenitizing temperature for braking.The depth of the austenitized region could reach a point of 0.9 mm beneath the wheel tread surface.The supercooled austenite is transformed to a hard and brittle martensite layer during the following rapid cooling process,which may lead to cracking and then spalling on the wheel tread surface.The decrease in carbon contents of the train wheel steel helps inhibit the formation of martensite by increasing the austenitizing temperature of the train wheel steel.When the carbon contents decrease from 0.7% to 0.4%,the Ac3 of the wheel steel is increased by 45 ℃,and the thickness of the martensite layer is decreased by 30%,which is helpful in reducing the thermal cycling fatigue of the train wheel tread such as spalling.

  18. Salt Marsh Response and Recovery to Coseismic Subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, A. N.; Carlin, J. A.; Rhodes, B. P.; Kirby, M.; Leeper, R. J.; Smith, R. W.

    2016-12-01

    Salt marshes worldwide are under increasing stress from eustatic sea level rise. Along the tectonically active west coast of North America, some salt marshes are also vulnerable to abrupt increases in relative sea level rise (RSLR) resulting from coseismic subsidence. Elevation zonation of sub-environments within a marsh provides the opportunity to interpret the sedimentary record in marshes to infer past earthquakes, which may improve understanding of regional seismic hazards and ecosystem response to increases in sea level. Our study area is the Seal Beach Wetlands (SBW), an 3 km2 salt marsh straddling the seismically active Newport-Inglewood fault zone in southern California. A previous study of the SBW identified sedimentary evidence of three coseismic subsidence events. Here, our goals were to identify coseismic subsidence events preserved in SBW stratigraphy and to quantify marsh recovery following an earthquake to assess marsh resiliency to rapid RSLR. To do this, we focused on one core collected near the fringe of the SBW and applied a suite of sedimentary and geochemical analyses. Our results indicated that the SBW may preserve sedimentary evidence of four potential coseismic subsidence events. Events were distinguished in the stratigraphy by a sharp upper contact interpreted as an abrupt shift in marsh depositional sub-environments, from a vegetated marsh, to an intertidal mudflat or a subtidal environment. This stratigraphy suggests that the marsh rapidly subsided, preserving the evidence of the vegetated marsh as a peat deposit overlain by a low-organic mud or muddy-sand layer. A typical marsh accretion facies succession occurred above each earthquake event in the core, suggesting full marsh recovery. From the core data, we also observed that the net average rate of marsh recovery, i.e., marsh accretion, was consistent. Estimated recovery rates between 0.6 and 1.1 mm/yr were comparable to the overall accretion rate and regional late Holocene RSLR rate

  19. Inhibition of Cariogenic Plaque Formation on Root Surface with Polydopamine-Induced-Polyethylene Glycol Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Lei Mei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Root caries prevention has been a challenge for clinicians due to its special anatomical location, which favors the accumulation of dental plaque. Researchers are looking for anti-biofouling material to inhibit bacterial growth on exposed root surfaces. This study aimed to develop polydopamine-induced-polyethylene glycol (PEG and to study its anti-biofouling effect against a multi-species cariogenic biofilm on the root dentine surface. Hydroxyapatite disks and human dentine blocks were divided into four groups for experiments. They received polydopamine-induced-PEG, PEG, polydopamine, or water application. Contact angle, quartz crystal microbalance, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to study the wetting property, surface affinity, and an infrared spectrum; the results indicated that PEG was induced by polydopamine onto a hydroxyapatite disk. Salivary mucin absorption on hydroxyapatite disks with polydopamine-induced-PEG was confirmed using spectrophotometry. The growth of a multi-species cariogenic biofilm on dentine blocks with polydopamine-induced-PEG was assessed and monitored by colony-forming units, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that dentine with polydopamine-induced-PEG had fewer bacteria than other groups. In conclusion, a novel polydopamine-induced-PEG coating was developed. Its anti-biofouling effect inhibited salivary mucin absorption and cariogenic biofilm formation on dentine surface and thus may be used for the prevention of root dentine caries.

  20. Investigation Of Breakdown Induced Surface Damage On 805 Mhz Pillbox Cavity Interior Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Jana, M R; Leonova, M; Moretti, A; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, K; Freemire, B; Torun, Y; Bowring, D; Flanagan, G

    2014-01-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, we have tested two 805 MHz vacuum RF cavities in a multi-Tesla magnetic field to study the effects of the static magnetic field on the cavity operation. This study gives useful information on field emitters in the cavity, dark current, surface conditioning, breakdown mechanisms and material properties of the cavity. All these factors determine the maximum accelerating gradient in the cavity. This paper discusses the image processing technique for quantitative estimation of spark damage spot distribution on cavity interior surfaces. The distribution is compared with the electric field distribution predicted by a computer code calculation. The local spark density is proportional to probability of surface breakdown and shows a power law dependence on the maximum electric field (E). This E dependence is consistent with ...

  1. Crowding-induced Cooperativity in DNA Surface Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qun-li; Ren, Chun-lai; Su, Xiao-hang; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2015-01-01

    High density DNA brush is not only used to model cellular crowding, but also has a wide application in DNA-functionalized materials. Experiments have shown complicated cooperative hybridization/melting phenomena in these systems, raising the question that how molecular crowding influences DNA hybridization. In this work, a theoretical modeling including all possible inter and intramolecular interactions, as well as molecular details for different species, is proposed. We find that molecular crowding can lead to two distinct cooperative behaviours: negatively cooperative hybridization marked by a broader transition width, and positively cooperative hybridization with a sharper transition, well reconciling the experimental findings. Moreover, a phase transition as a result of positive cooperativity is also found. Our study provides new insights in crowding and compartmentation in cell, and has the potential value in controlling surface morphologies of DNA functionalized nano-particles. PMID:25875056

  2. Visceral hypersensitivity and altered colonic motility after subsidence of inflammation in a rat model of colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Ho La; Tae-Wan Kim; Tae-Sik Sung; Jeoung-Woo Kang; Kyun-Ju Kim; Il-Suk Yang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterized by visceral hypersensitivity and altered bowel motility. There is increasing evidence suggesting the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of IBS, which addresses the possibility that formerly established rat model of colitis could be used as an TBS model after the inflammation subsided.METHODS: Colitis was induced by intracolonic instillation of 4 % acetic acid in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The extent of inflammation was assessed by histological examination and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity assay. After subsidence of colitis, the rats were subjected to rectal distension and restraint stress, then the abdominal withdrawal reflex and the number of stress-induced fecal output were measured,respectively.RESULTS: At 2 days post-induction of colitis, the colon showed characteristic inflammatory changes in histology and 8-fold increase in MPO activity. At 7 days post-induction of colitis, the histological features and MPO activity returned to normal. The rats at 7 days post-induction of colitis showed hypersensitive response to rectal distension without an accompaning change in rectal compliance, and defecated more stools than control animals when under stress.CONCLUSION: These results concur largely with the characteristic features of IBS, visceral hypersensitivity and altered defecation pattern in the absence of detectable disease, suggesting that this animal model is a methodologically convenient and useful model for studying a subset of IBS.

  3. Impacts of 25 years of groundwater extraction on subsidence in the Mekong delta, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many major river deltas in the world are subsiding and consequently become increasingly vulnerable to flooding and storm surges, salinization and permanent inundation. For the Mekong Delta, annual subsidence rates up to several centimetres have been reported. Excessive groundwate...

  4. Understanding EUV mask blank surface roughness induced LWR and associated roughness requirement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Pei-Yang [Intel Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Zhang, Guojing [Intel Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Gullickson, Eric M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Goldberg, Kenneth A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Benk, Markus P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask multi-layer (ML) blank surface roughness specification historically comes from blank defect inspection tool requirement. Later, new concerns on ML surface roughness induced wafer pattern line width roughness (LWR) arise. In this paper, we have studied wafer level pattern LWR as a function of EUVL mask surface roughness via High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Tool. We found that the blank surface roughness induced LWR at current blank roughness level is in the order of 0.5nm 3σ for NA=0.42 at the best focus. At defocus of ±40nm, the corresponding LWR will be 0.2nm higher. Further reducing EUVL mask blank surface roughness will increase the blank cost with limited benefit in improving the pattern LWR, provided that the intrinsic resist LWR is in the order of 1nm and above.

  5. The improvement of laser induced damage resistance of optical workpiece surface by hydrodynamic effect polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wenqiang; Guan, Chaoliang; Li, Shengyi; Wang, Zhuo

    2016-10-01

    Surface and subsurface damage in optical element will greatly decrease the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) in the intense laser optical system. Processing damage on the workpiece surface can be inevitably caused when the material is removed in brittle or plastic mode. As a non-contact polishing technology, hydrodynamic effect polishing (HEP) shows very good performance on generating an ultra-smooth surface without damage. The material is removed by chemisorption between nanoparticle and workpiece surface in the elastic mode in HEP. The subsurface damage and surface scratches can be effectively removed after the polishing process. Meanwhile ultra-smooth surface with atomic level surface roughness can be achieved. To investigate the improvement of LIDT of optical workpiece, polishing experiment was conducted on a magnetorheological finishing (MRF) silica glass sample. AFM measurement results show that all the MRF directional plastic marks have been removed clearly and the root-mean-square (rms) surface roughness has decreased from 0.673nm to 0.177nm after HEP process. Laser induced damage experiment was conducted with laser pulse of 1064nm wavelength and 10ns time width. Compared with the original state, the LEDT of the silica glass sample polished by HEP has increased from 29.78J/cm2 to 45.47J/cm2. It demonstrates that LIDT of optical element treated by HEP can be greatly improved for ultra low surface roughness and nearly defect-free surface/subsurface.

  6. Time-resolved measurement of single pulse femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure formation induced by a pre-fabricated surface groove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, K R P; Austin, D R; Li, H; Yi, A Y; Cheng, J; Chowdhury, E A

    2015-07-27

    Time-resolved diffraction microscopy technique has been used to observe the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) from the interaction of a single femtosecond laser pulse (pump) with a nano-scale groove mechanically formed on a single-crystal Cu substrate. The interaction dynamics (0-1200 ps) was captured by diffracting a time-delayed, frequency-doubled pulse (probe) from nascent LIPSS formation induced by the pump with an infinity-conjugate microscopy setup. The LIPSS ripples are observed to form asynchronously, with the first one forming after 50 ps and others forming sequentially outward from the groove edge at larger time delays. A 1-D analytical model of electron heating including both the laser pulse and surface plasmon polariton excitation at the groove edge predicts ripple period, melt spot diameter, and qualitatively explains the asynchronous time-evolution of LIPSS formation.

  7. Effects of internal pressure and surface tension on the growth-induced wrinkling of mucosae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei-Hua; Li, Bo; Cao, Yan-Ping; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2014-01-01

    Surface wrinkling of mucosae is crucial for the biological functions of many living tissues. In this paper, we investigate the instability of a cylindrical tube consisting of a mucosal layer and a submucosal layer. Our attention is focused on the effects of internal pressure and surface tension on the critical condition and mode number of surface wrinkling induced by tissue growth. It is found that the internal pressure plays a stabilizing role but basically has no effect on the critical mode number. Surface tension also stabilizes the system and reduces the critical mode number of surface patterns. Besides, the thinner the mucosal layer, the more significant the effect of surface tension. This work may help gain insights into the surface wrinkling and morphological evolution of such tubular organs as airways and esophagi. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Oxygen-induced Y surface segregation in a CuPdY ternary alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tafen, D N.; Miller, J B.; Dogan, O N.; Baltrus, J P.; Kondratyuk, P

    2013-01-01

    We present a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of the segregation behavior of the ternary alloy CuPdY in vacuum (i.e., the clean surface) and in the presence of oxygen. Theoretical prediction shows that for clean surface, yttrium will substitute first for Cu and then for Pd at the subsurface lattice site before segregating to the surface where it substitutes for Cu. XRD characterization of the surface of CuPdY indicates the presence of two major phases, B2 CuPd and Pd{sub 3}Y. In the presence of adsorbed oxygen, theory predicts that Y preferentially occupies surface sites due to its stronger oxygen affinity compared to Cu and Pd. XPS experiments confirm the computational results in the adsorbed oxygen case, showing that surface segregation of yttrium is induced by the formation of Y-oxides at the top-surface of the alloy.

  9. Oxygen-induced Y surface segregation in a CuPdY ternary alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tafen, D N.; Miller, J B.; Dogan, O N.; Baltrus, J P.; Kondratyuk, P

    2013-01-01

    We present a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of the segregation behavior of the ternary alloy CuPdY in vacuum (i.e., the clean surface) and in the presence of oxygen. Theoretical prediction shows that for clean surface, yttrium will substitute first for Cu and then for Pd at the subsurface lattice site before segregating to the surface where it substitutes for Cu. XRD characterization of the surface of CuPdY indicates the presence of two major phases, B2 CuPd and Pd{sub 3}Y. In the presence of adsorbed oxygen, theory predicts that Y preferentially occupies surface sites due to its stronger oxygen affinity compared to Cu and Pd. XPS experiments confirm the computational results in the adsorbed oxygen case, showing that surface segregation of yttrium is induced by the formation of Y-oxides at the top-surface of the alloy.

  10. Fault Length Vs Fault Displacement Evaluation In The Case Of Cerro Prieto Pull-Apart Basin (Baja California, Mexico) Subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacka, E.; Sarychikhina, O.; Nava Pichardo, F. A.; Farfan, F.; Garcia Arthur, M. A.; Orozco, L.; Brassea, J.

    2013-05-01

    The Cerro Prieto pull-apart basin is located in the southern part of San Andreas Fault system, and is characterized by high seismicity, recent volcanism, tectonic deformation and hydrothermal activity (Lomnitz et al, 1970; Elders et al., 1984; Suárez-Vidal et al., 2008). Since the Cerro Prieto geothermal field production started, in 1973, significant subsidence increase was observed (Glowacka and Nava, 1996, Glowacka et al., 1999), and a relation between fluid extraction rate and subsidence rate has been suggested (op. cit.). Analysis of existing deformation data (Glowacka et al., 1999, 2005, Sarychikhina 2011) points to the fact that, although the extraction changes influence the subsidence rate, the tectonic faults control the spatial extent of the observed subsidence. Tectonic faults act as water barriers in the direction perpendicular to the fault, and/or separate regions with different compaction, and as effect the significant part of the subsidence is released as vertical displacement on the ground surface along fault rupture. These faults ruptures cause damages to roads and irrigation canals and water leakage. Since 1996, a network of geotechnical instruments has operated in the Mexicali Valley, for continuous recording of deformation phenomena. To date, the network (REDECVAM: Mexicali Valley Crustal Strain Measurement Array) includes two crackmeters and eight tiltmeters installed on, or very close to, the main faults; all instruments have sampling intervals in the 1 to 20 minutes range. Additionally, there are benchmarks for measuring vertical fault displacements for which readings are recorded every 3 months. Since the crackmeter measures vertical displacement on the fault at one place only, the question appears: can we use the crackmeter data to evaluate how long is the lenth of the fractured fault, and how quickly it grows, so we can know where we can expect fractures in the canals or roads? We used the Wells and Coppersmith (1994) relations between

  11. Human-induced greening of the northern extratropical land surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jiafu; Ribes, Aurélien; Yan, Binyan; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter E.; Séférian, Roland; Ciais, Philippe; Myneni, Ranga B.; Douville, Hervé; Piao, Shilong; Zhu, Zaichun; Dickinson, Robert E.; Dai, Yongjiu; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Jin, Mingzhou; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Wang, Bin; Huang, Mengtian; Lian, Xu

    2016-10-01

    Significant land greening in the northern extratropical latitudes (NEL) has been documented through satellite observations during the past three decades. This enhanced vegetation growth has broad implications for surface energy, water and carbon budgets, and ecosystem services across multiple scales. Discernible human impacts on the Earth's climate system have been revealed by using statistical frameworks of detection-attribution. These impacts, however, were not previously identified on the NEL greening signal, owing to the lack of long-term observational records, possible bias of satellite data, different algorithms used to calculate vegetation greenness, and the lack of suitable simulations from coupled Earth system models (ESMs). Here we have overcome these challenges to attribute recent changes in NEL vegetation activity. We used two 30-year-long remote-sensing-based leaf area index (LAI) data sets, simulations from 19 coupled ESMs with interactive vegetation, and a formal detection and attribution algorithm. Our findings reveal that the observed greening record is consistent with an assumption of anthropogenic forcings, where greenhouse gases play a dominant role, but is not consistent with simulations that include only natural forcings and internal climate variability. These results provide the first clear evidence of a discernible human fingerprint on physiological vegetation changes other than phenology and range shifts.

  12. Surface instabilities and reorientation induced by vibration in microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier; Ezquerro Navarro, Jose Miguel

    2012-07-01

    The behavior of vibrated fluids and, in particular, the surface or interfacial instabilities that commonly arise in these systems have been the subject of continued experimental and theoretical attention since Faraday's seminal experiments in 1831. Both orientation and frequency are critical in determining the response of the fluid to excitation. Low frequencies are associated with sloshing while higher frequencies may generate Faraday waves or cross-waves, depending on whether the axis of vibration is perpendicular or parallel to the interface. In addition, high frequency vibrations are known to produce large scale reorientation of the fluid (vibroequilibria), an effect that becomes especially pronounced in the absence of gravity. We describe the results of investigations conducted at the ESA affiliated Spanish User Support and Operations Centre (E-USOC) on the effect of vibrations on fluid interfaces, particularly the interaction between Faraday waves, which arise in vertically vibrated systems, cross-waves, which are found in horizontally forced systems, and large scale reorientation (vibroequilibria). Ongoing ground experiments utilizing a dual-axis shaker configuration are described, including the effect on pattern formation of varying the two independent forcing frequencies, amplitudes, and phases. Theoretical results, based on the analysis of reduced models, and on numerical simulations, are then described and compared to experiment. Finally, the interest of a corresponding microgravity experiment is discussed and implications for fluid management strategies considered.

  13. Differential substrate subsidence of the EnviHUT project pitched extensive green roof

    OpenAIRE

    Nečadová Klára; Selník Petr; Karafiátová Hana

    2017-01-01

    In primary phase of testing building physical characteristics of the EnviHUT project extensive and semi-intensive roofs with 30° inclination occurred exceptional substrate subsidence. An extensive testing field with retaining geocell-system evinced differential subsidence of individual sectors after six months. Measured subsidence of installed substrate reached 40 % subsidence compared to originally designed height (intended layer thickness). Subsequent deformation of geocell-system additiona...

  14. Some problems of GPS RTK technique application to mining subsidence monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chao; Zhou Feng; Gao Jingxiang; Wang Jian

    2012-01-01

    Owing to the variability of mine surfaces,it is difficult to obtain the deformation monitoring data of the observation stations by traditional leveling technique.GPS RTK (Real-Time Kinematic) technique was employed to the subsidence observation in this paper,and its main sources of errors including rover pole deflection of the vertical,un-modeled systematic errors (gross error,multipath delay etc.) and the height transformation error,were analyzed systematically.Based on the fundamental theories of spherical fitting and Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD),the error reduction models were studied exhaustively.And two experiments were done in different environment to test the proposed models.The results show that the proposed methods can achieve a fourth-grade leveling accuracy,with (Root-Mean-Square) RMS in three orthogonal directions (N,E and H) of 4.1,3.3 and 3.1 mm.respectively,by 3-5 min continuous shaking of the observation GPS antenna,fully satisfying for mine surface subsidence deformation monitoring.

  15. Delineation of uplifting and subsiding zones in the Western Pannonian Basin using sinousity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gál, Judit; Kovács, Gábor; Zámolyi, András.; Pál, Lénárd; Székely, Balázs

    2010-05-01

    The recent tectonic setting of the Pannonian-basin is partly caracterised by different uplift and subsident pattern. Our study area the western part of the Bakony-Hill is currently uplifting while the neighbouring Little Hungarian Plane subsides. The contact zone of this two domain can be outline only from seismic profiles and borehole data. This normal faulting represented displacement int he seismic profile, however cannot be traced up to the surface. The depth conditions can only be partly recontsructed because we use TWT data, but there is evidence that early pannonian strata are faulted. In order to trace the faulted we analysed several seismic profile. We anticipate, that there motions inply surface this placement. Slope angles are therefore are disturbed, the valley slopes are modified and the river courses are sensitive to that change and accomodate to the new setting, restoring the original channel slope. Analysing the sinousity of these river course. We can inply to the differential uplift pattern. Historic maps were used for river course velineation, The Second Military Survey of the Habsburg Empire (1806-1869) perfect possibility for that. This mapsheets record the pre-regulation conditions of the hidrological system, this situation is the closest to the natural unmodified state.

  16. Highway Subsidence Analysis Based on the Advanced InSAR Time Series Analysis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingyun; Zhang, Jingfa; Liu, Guolin; Li, Yongsheng

    2016-08-01

    The synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements have the advantages of all-weather, wide range, high precision on the surface deformation monitoring. Highway as an important index of modern social and economic development, the quality and deformation changes in the process of using have a significant impact in the social development and people's life and property security. In practical applications the InSAR technology should do a variety of error correction analysis. By using a new analysis method – FRAM- SBAS time-series analysis method, to analyze the settlement of highway on Yanzhou area by the ALOS PALSAR datas. Use FRAM- SBAS timing analysis method to obtain the surface timing changes during 2008-09-21 to 2010-07-18 in the Jining area and obtained good results, the Jining area maximum timing settlement is 60mm, the maximum settlement rate reached 30mm/yr. The maximum settlement of the highway section is 53mm, the maximum settlement rate is 32mm/yr. And the settlement of highway worst sections were in severe ground subsidence, thus proving the mining and vehicle load effect on settlement of highway. And it is proved that the timing method on the ground and highway subsidence monitoring is feasible.

  17. Pump-probe imaging of laser-induced periodic surface structures after ultrafast irradiation of Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy has been used to investigate laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) formation on polished Si surfaces. A crater forms on the surface after irradiation by a 150 fs laser pulse, and a second, subsequent pulse forms LIPSS within the crater. Sequentially delayed images show that LIPSS with a periodicity slightly less than the fundamental laser wavelength of 780 nm appear on Si surfaces ∼50 ps after arrival of the second pump laser pulse, well after the onset of melting. LIPSS are observed on the same timescale as material removal, suggesting that their formation involves material ejection.

  18. Pump-probe imaging of laser-induced periodic surface structures after ultrafast irradiation of Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ryan D.; Torralva, Ben; Adams, David P.; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2013-09-01

    Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy has been used to investigate laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) formation on polished Si surfaces. A crater forms on the surface after irradiation by a 150 fs laser pulse, and a second, subsequent pulse forms LIPSS within the crater. Sequentially delayed images show that LIPSS with a periodicity slightly less than the fundamental laser wavelength of 780 nm appear on Si surfaces ˜50 ps after arrival of the second pump laser pulse, well after the onset of melting. LIPSS are observed on the same timescale as material removal, suggesting that their formation involves material ejection.

  19. Temperature-Induced Switchable Adhesion using Nickel–Titanium–Polydimethylsiloxane Hybrid Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frensemeier, Mareike; Kaiser, Jessica S; Frick, Carl P; Schneider, Andreas S; Arzt, Eduard; Fertig, Ray S; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-01-01

    A switchable dry adhesive based on a nickel–titanium (NiTi) shape-memory alloy with an adhesive silicone rubber surface has been developed. Although several studies investigate micropatterned, bioinspired adhesive surfaces, very few focus on reversible adhesion. The system here is based on the indentation-induced two-way shape-memory effect in NiTi alloys. NiTi is trained by mechanical deformation through indentation and grinding to elicit a temperature-induced switchable topography with protrusions at high temperature and a flat surface at low temperature. The trained surfaces are coated with either a smooth or a patterned adhesive polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer, resulting in a temperature-induced switchable surface, used for dry adhesion. Adhesion tests show that the temperature-induced topographical change of the NiTi influences the adhesive performance of the hybrid system. For samples with a smooth PDMS layer the transition from flat to structured state reduces adhesion by 56%, and for samples with a micropatterned PDMS layer adhesion is switchable by nearly 100%. Both hybrid systems reveal strong reversibility related to the NiTi martensitic phase transformation, allowing repeated switching between an adhesive and a nonadhesive state. These effects have been discussed in terms of reversible changes in contact area and varying tilt angles of the pillars with respect to the substrate surface. PMID:26120295

  20. Argon ion beam induced surface pattern formation on Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofsäss, H.; Bobes, O.; Zhang, K. [2nd Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, University Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-01-21

    The development of self-organized surface patterns on Si due to noble gas ion irradiation has been studied extensively in the past. In particular, Ar ions are commonly used and the pattern formation was analyzed as function of ion incidence angle, ion fluence, and ion energies between 250 eV and 140 keV. Very few results exist for the energy regime between 1.5 keV and 10 keV and it appears that pattern formation is completely absent for these ion energies. In this work, we present experimental data on pattern formation for Ar ion irradiation between 1 keV and 10 keV and ion incidence angles between 50° and 75°. We confirm the absence of patterns at least for ion fluences up to 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. Using the crater function formalism and Monte Carlo simulations, we calculate curvature coefficients of linear continuum models of pattern formation, taking into account contribution due to ion erosion and recoil redistribution. The calculations consider the recently introduced curvature dependence of the erosion crater function as well as the dynamic behavior of the thickness of the ion irradiated layer. Only when taking into account these additional contributions to the linear theory, our simulations clearly show that that pattern formation is strongly suppressed between about 1.5 keV and 10 keV, most pronounced at 3 keV. Furthermore, our simulations are now able to predict whether or not parallel oriented ripple patterns are formed, and in case of ripple formation the corresponding critical angles for the whole experimentally studied energies range between 250 eV and 140 keV.

  1. On the use of InSAR technology to assess land subsidence in Jakarta coastal flood plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudogbo, Fifame; Duro, Javier; Garcia Robles, Javier; Arnaud, Alain; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.

    2014-05-01

    Jakarta is the capital of Indonesia and is home to approximately 10 million people on the coast of the Java Sea. It is situated on the northern coastal alluvial plane of Java which shares boundaries with West Java Province in the south and in the east, and with Banten Province in the west. The Capital District of Jakarta (DKI) sits in the lowest lying areas of the basin. Its topography varies, with the northern part just meters above current sea level and lying on a flood plain. Subsequently, this portion of the city frequently floods. The southern part of the city is hilly. Thirteen major rivers flow through Jakarta to the Java Sea. The Ciliwung River is the most significant river and divides the city West to East. In the last three decades, urban growing of Jakarta has been very fast in sectors as industry, trade, transportation, real estate, among others. This exponential development has caused several environmental issues; land subsidence is one of them. Subsidence in Jakarta has been known since the early part of the 20th century. It is mainly due to groundwater extraction, the fast development (construction load), soil natural consolidation and tectonics. Evidence of land subsidence exists through monitoring with GPS, level surveys and InSAR investigations. InSAR states for "Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar". Its principle is based on comparing the distance between the satellite and the ground in consecutive satellite passes over the same area on the Earth's surface. Radar satellites images record, with very high precision, the distance travelled by the radar signal that is emitted by the satellite is registered. When this distance is compared through time, InSAR technology can provide highly accurate ground deformation measurements. ALTAMIRA INFORMATION, company specialized in ground motion monitoring, has developed GlobalSARTM, which combines several processing techniques and algorithms based on InSAR technology, to achieve ground motion

  2. Pressure controlled transition into a self-induced topological superconducting surface state

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2014-02-07

    Ab-initio calculations show a pressure induced trivial-nontrivial-trivial topological phase transition in the normal state of 1T-TiSe2. The pressure range in which the nontrivial phase emerges overlaps with that of the superconducting ground state. Thus, topological superconductivity can be induced in protected surface states by the proximity effect of superconducting bulk states. This kind of self-induced topological surface superconductivity is promising for a realization of Majorana fermions due to the absence of lattice and chemical potential mismatches. For appropriate electron doping, the formation of the topological superconducting surface state in 1T-TiSe 2 becomes accessible to experiments as it can be controlled by pressure.

  3. Crystallographic orientation and induced potential effects in photoelectron emission from metal surfaces by ultrashort laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Rubiano, C A Rios; Mitnik, D M; Silkin, V M; Gravielle, M S

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the crystallographic orientation of a typical metal surface, like aluminum, on electron emission spectra produced by grazing incidence of ultrashort laser pulses is investigated by using the band-structure-based-Volkov (BSB-V) approximation. The present version of the BSB-V approach includes not only a realistic description of the surface interaction, accounting for band structure effects, but also effects due to the induced potential that originates from the collective response of valence-band electrons to the external electromagnetic field. The model is applied to evaluate differential electron emission probabilities from the valence band of Al(100) and Al(111). For both crystallographic orientations, the contribution of partially occupied surface electronic states and the influence of the induced potential are separately analyzed as a function of the laser carrier frequency. We found that the induced potential strongly affects photoelectron emission distributions, opening a window to scrut...

  4. Mapping Land Subsidence Related to Underground Coal Fires in the Wuda Coalfield (Northern China Using a Small Stack of ALOS PALSAR Differential Interferograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delu Pan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Coal fires have been found to be a serious problem worldwide in coal mining reserves. Coal fires burn valuable coal reserves and lead to severe environmental degradation of the region. Moreover, coal fires can result in massive surface displacements due to the reduction in volume of the burning coal and can cause thermal effects in the adjacent rock mass particularly cracks and fissures. The Wuda coalfield in Northern China is known for being an exclusive storehouse of prime coking coal as well as for being the site of occurrence of the maximum number of known coal fires among all the coalfields in China and worldwide, and is chosen as our study area. In this study, we have investigated the capabilities and limitations of ALOS PALSAR data for monitoring the land subsidence that accompanies coal fires by means of satellite differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR observations. An approach to map the large and highly non-linear subsidence based on a small number of SAR images was applied to the Wuda coalfield to reveal the spatial and temporal signals of land subsidence in areas affected by coal fires. The DInSAR results agree well with coal fire data obtained from field investigations and thermal anomaly information, which demonstrates that the capability of ALOS PALSAR data and the proposed approach have remarkable potential to detect this land subsidence of interest. In addition, our results also provide a spatial extent and temporal evolution of the land subsidence behavior accompanying the coal fires, which indicated that several coal fire zones suffer accelerated ongoing land subsidence, whilst other coal fire zones are newly subsiding areas arising from coal fires in the period of development.

  5. Synergistic effects in radiation-induced particle ejection from solid surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Noriaki (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    A description is given on radiation-induced particle ejection from solid surfaces, emphasizing synergistic effects arising from multi-species particle irradiation and from irradiation under complex environments. First, it is pointed out that synergisms can be treated by introducing the effects of material modification on radiation-induced particle ejection. As examples of the effects of surface modification on the sputtering induced by elastic encounters, sputtering of alloys and chemical sputtering of graphite are briefly discussed. Then the particle ejection induced by electronic encounters is explained emphasizing the difference in the behaviors from materials to materials. The possible synergistic effects of electronic and elastic encounters are also described. Lastly, we point out the importance of understanding the elementary processes of material-particle interaction and of developing computer codes describing material behaviors under irradiation. (author).

  6. Mardels, natural subsidence basins or abandoned quarries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, Jan; Slotboom, Ruud

    2015-04-01

    Coversands (chemical poor Late-glacial aeolian sand deposits) dominate the surface geology of an extensive area in northwestern Europe. Plaggic Anthrosols occur in cultural landscapes, developed on coversands. They are the characteristic soils that developed on ancient fertilized arable fields. Plaggic Anthrosols have a complex genesis. They are records of aspects environmental and agricultural history. In previous studies information of the soil records was unlocked by application of pollen analysis, 14C and OSL dating. In this study we applied biomarker analysis to unlock additional information about the applied organic sources in the production of plaggic manure. Radiocarbon dating suggested the start of sedentary agriculture (after a period, characterized by shifting cultivation and Celtic fields) between 3000 and 2000 BP. In previous studies is assumed that farmers applied organic sods, dug on forest soils and heath to produce organic stable manure to fertilize the fields. The mineral fraction of the sods was supposed to be responsible for the development of the plaggic horizon and the raise of the land surface. Optically stimulated Luminescence dating however suggested that plaggic deposition on the fields started relatively late, in the 18th century. The use of ectorganic matter from the forest soils must have been ended in the 10th-12th century, due to commercial forest clear cuttings as recorded in archived documents. These deforestations resulted in the first extension of sand drifting and famers had to protect the valuable heath against this 'environmental catastrophe'. The use of heath for sheep grazing and other purposes as honey production could continue till the 18th century, as recorded in archived documents. In the course of the 18th century, the population growth resulted in increasing demand for food. The deep stable economy was introduced and the booming demand for manure resulted in intensive sod digging on the heath. This caused heath

  7. Time-resolved measurement of single pulse femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kafka, K. R. P.; D. R. Austin; Li, H.; Yi, A; Cheng, J.; Chowdhury, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved diffraction microscopy technique has been used to observe the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) from the interaction of a single femtosecond laser pulse (pump) with a nano-scale groove mechanically formed on a single-crystal Cu substrate. The interaction dynamics (0-1200 ps) was captured by diffracting a time-delayed, frequency-doubled pulse from nascent LIPSS formation induced by the pump with an infinity-conjugate microscopy setup. The LIPSS ripple...

  8. Imprint Control of BaTiO3 Thin Films via Chemically Induced Surface Polarization Pinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungwoo; Kim, Tae Heon; Patzner, Jacob J; Lu, Haidong; Lee, Jung-Woo; Zhou, Hua; Chang, Wansoo; Mahanthappa, Mahesh K; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; Gruverman, Alexei; Eom, Chang-Beom

    2016-04-13

    Surface-adsorbed polar molecules can significantly alter the ferroelectric properties of oxide thin films. Thus, fundamental understanding and controlling the effect of surface adsorbates are crucial for the implementation of ferroelectric thin film devices, such as ferroelectric tunnel junctions. Herein, we report an imprint control of BaTiO3 (BTO) thin films by chemically induced surface polarization pinning in the top few atomic layers of the water-exposed BTO films. Our studies based on synchrotron X-ray scattering and coherent Bragg rod analysis demonstrate that the chemically induced surface polarization is not switchable but reduces the polarization imprint and improves the bistability of ferroelectric phase in BTO tunnel junctions. We conclude that the chemical treatment of ferroelectric thin films with polar molecules may serve as a simple yet powerful strategy to enhance functional properties of ferroelectric tunnel junctions for their practical applications.

  9. Mechanisms of femtosecond LIPSS formation induced by periodic surface temperature modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Evgeny L.

    2016-06-01

    Here we analyze the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on metal surfaces upon single femtosecond laser pulses. Most of the existing models of the femtosecond LIPSS formation discuss only the appearance of a periodic modulation of the electron and ion temperatures. However the mechanism how the inhomogeneous surface temperature distribution induces the periodically-modulated surface profile under the conditions corresponding to ultrashort-pulse laser ablation is still not clear. Estimations made on the basis of different hydrodynamic instabilities allow to sort out mechanisms, which can bridge the gap between the temperature modulation and the LIPSS. The proposed theory shows that the periodic structures can be generated by single ultrashort laser pulses due to ablative instabilities. The Marangoni and Rayleigh-Bénard convection on the contrary cannot cause the LIPSS formation.

  10. Pulse-induced acoustoelectric vibrations in surface-gated GaAs-based quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, S.; Stace, T. M.; Langtangen, H. P.; Kataoka, M.; Barnes, C. H. W.

    2007-05-01

    We present the results of a numerical investigation which show the excitation of acoustoelectric modes of vibration in GaAs-based heterostructures due to sharp nanosecond electric-field pulses applied across surface gates. In particular, we show that the pulses applied in quantum information processing applications are capable of exciting acoustoelectric modes of vibration including surface acoustic modes which propagate for distances greater than conventional device dimensions. We show that the pulse-induced acoustoelectric vibrations are capable of inducing significant undesired perturbations to the evolution of quantum systems.

  11. Surface strains induced by measured loads on teeth in vivo: a methodological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohl, F S; Setchell, D J

    2000-03-01

    Visual feedback enabled three subjects to apply predetermined near-axial loads to the incisal edge of an intact maxillary central incisor. In two subjects, principal strains and orientations developed on the labial surface of the intact incisor were resolved from strains recorded with a multiple element strain gauge. Load application was accurate and precise enough to allow resolution of strains induced by target loads of 10 to 50 N. Axially orientated compressive labial surface strains were induced by measured loads. The method could be used to validate bench-top stress analyses and investigate the effects of restoration on the structural integrity of teeth.

  12. Impact of Typhoon-induced sea surface cooling on the track of next Typhoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Y.; Horiguchi, M.; Kodera, K.; Tachibana, Y.; Yamazaki, K.

    2015-12-01

    Typhoons (TCs) MATMO, HALONG, and NAKRI (2014), which caused Japan catastrophic disaster, landed the western part of Japan. The TCs came to Japan one after another during late July to early August 2014. The tracks of these TCs were similar, i.e., the TCs followed the western edge of the subtropical northwestern Pacific high (SNPH). However, the tracks gradually reached to Japan, which were associated with weakening the westward expansion of the SNPH. It was found that the changes in westward expansion of the SNPH were associated with TC-induced sea surface cooling of previous Typhoon. It has previously been reported that TC-induced sea surface cooling is mainly caused by Ekman upwelling and vertical turbulent mixing. The TCs MATMO, HALONG, and NAKRI passed around the Philippines, and induced sea surface cooling of this area. The sea surface temperatures of this area are important for Pacific-Japan pattern, which was associated with the westward expansion of the SNPH. Consequently, previous Typhoon induced sea surface cooling around the Philippines, which weakening the westward expansion of the SNPH. Then, the tracks of next Typhoon were changed, and gradually reached to Japan.

  13. A three-dimensional phase diagram of growth-induced surface instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiming; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2015-01-01

    A variety of fascinating morphological patterns arise on surfaces of growing, developing or aging tissues, organs and microorganism colonies. These patterns can be classified into creases, wrinkles, folds, period-doubles, ridges and delaminated-buckles according to their distinctive topographical characteristics. One universal mechanism for the pattern formation has been long believed to be the mismatch strains between biological layers with different expanding or shrinking rates, which induce mechanical instabilities. However, a general model that accounts for the formation and evolution of these various surface-instability patterns still does not exist. Here, we take biological structures at their current states as thermodynamic systems, treat each instability pattern as a thermodynamic phase, and construct a unified phase diagram that can quantitatively predict various types of growth-induced surface instabilities. We further validate the phase diagram with our experiments on surface instabilities induced by mismatch strains as well as the reported data on growth-induced instabilities in various biological systems. The predicted wavelengths and amplitudes of various instability patterns match well with our experimental data. It is expected that the unified phase diagram will not only advance the understanding of biological morphogenesis, but also significantly facilitate the design of new materials and structures by rationally harnessing surface instabilities. PMID:25748825

  14. Mining Land Subsidence Monitoring Using SENTINEL-1 SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, W.; Wang, Q.; Fan, J.; Li, H.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, DInSAR technique was used to monitor land subsidence in mining area. The study area was selected in the coal mine area located in Yuanbaoshan District, Chifeng City, and Sentinel-1 data were used to carry out DInSAR techniqu. We analyzed the interferometric results by Sentinel-1 data from December 2015 to May 2016. Through the comparison of the results of DInSAR technique and the location of the mine on the optical images, it is shown that DInSAR technique can be used to effectively monitor the land subsidence caused by underground mining, and it is an effective tool for law enforcement of over-mining.

  15. Stratigraphic record of Holocene coseismic subsidence, Padang, West Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dura, Tina; Rubin, Charles M.; Kelsey, Harvey M.; Horton, Benjamin P.; Hawkes, Andrea; Vane, Christopher H.; Daryono, Mudrik; Pre, Candace Grand; Ladinsky, Tyler; Bradley, Sarah

    2011-11-01

    Stratigraphic evidence is found for two coseismic subsidence events that underlie a floodplain 20 km south of Padang, West Sumatra along the Mentawai segment (0.5°S-0.3°S) of the Sunda subduction zone. Each earthquake is marked by a sharp soil-mud contact that represents a sudden change from mangrove to tidal flat. The earthquakes occurred about 4000 and 3000 cal years B.P. based on radiocarbon ages of detrital plant fragments and seeds. The absence of younger paleoseismic evidence suggests that late Holocene relative sea level fall left the floodplain too high for an earthquake to lower it into the intertidal zone. Our results point to a brief, few thousand year window of preservation of subsidence events in tidal-wetland stratigraphic sequences, a result that is generally applicable to other emergent coastlines of West Sumatra.

  16. Anomalous subsidence at South China Sea rifted margin: Sediments digging their own hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, Sascha; Clift, Peter; Quinteros, Javier

    2015-04-01

    Rifted continental margins subside as a consequence of combined crustal thinning and mantle lithosphere cooling. While standard models predict a slowing of subsidence after the end of rifting, the deep basins on the northern margin of the South China Sea, notably the Baiyun Sag exhibit subsidence that accelerated several million years after the end of active extension. Additionally, backstripping analysis at the South China margin has shown that the amount of subsidence is much greater than that predicted from the degree of brittle upper crustal extension seen in seismic profiles. Here we explain these observations by linking climate change onshore and deformation of the crystalline crust offshore: Early Miocene monsoon intensification increased erosion and thus the sediment flux to offshore basins after the cessation of active extension. When the sediment load encountered the weak crust of the South China Sea margin, it induced lower crustal flow away from the basin axis so that the deep Baiyun basin was formed nearly without brittle extension. We corroborate this concept using seismic observations and backstripping techniques, as well as thermo-mechanical forward modeling. The numerical forward model is a 2D version of the finite element code SLIM3D. The code includes nonlinear temperature- and stress-dependent elasto-visco-plastic rheology and is able to reproduces a wide range of rift-related deformation processes such as flexure, lower crustal flow, and faulting. We find that two factors allow to satisfy the observational constraints: (1) Post-rift increase of sediment load: The East Asian Summer Monsoon strengthened around the start of the Miocene (~23 Ma), several million years after continental rupture. Changes in the flora of continental China date from around this time and sedimentation rates across continental margins and deltas in South and Southeast Asia increased, as might be expected under the influence of heavier precipitation driving faster erosion

  17. The Influence of Land Subsidence, Quarrying, Drainage, Irrigation and Forest Fire on Groundwater Resources and Biodiversity Along the Southern Po Plain Coastal Zone (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonellini, M. A.; Mollema, P. N.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal zone of the southern Po plain is characterized by low lying land, which is reclaimed to permit settlements and agriculture. The history, tourism resorts and peculiar coastal environments make this territory attractive and valuable. Natural and fluid-extraction-induced land subsidence along with coastal erosion are major problems. Touristic development has strongly modified the landscape; coastal dunes have been in part removed to make room for hotels and quarrying has caused the formation of gravel pit lakes close to the shoreline. Protected natural areas include a belt of coastal dunes, wetlands, and the internal historical forests of San Vitale and Classe. The dunes have largely lost their original vegetation ecosystem, because years ago they have been colonized with pine trees to protect the adjacent farmland from sea spray. These pine forests are currently a fire hazard. Land reclamation drainage keeps the water table artificially low. Results of these anthropogenic disturbances on the hydrology include a decrease in infiltration rates, loss of freshwater surface bodies, encroachment of saltwater inland from the river estuaries, salinization of the aquifer, wetlands and soil with a loss in plant and aquatic species biodiversity. Feedback mechanisms are complex: as land subsidence continues, drainage increases at the same pace promoting sea-water intrusion. The salinity of the groundwater does not allow for plant species richness nor for the survival of large pine trees. Farmland irrigation and fires in the pine forests, on the other hand, allow for increased infiltration and freshening of the aquifer and at the same time promote plant species diversity. Our work shows that the characteristics of the southern Po coastal zone require integrated management of economic activities, natural areas, and resources. This approach is different from the ad hoc measures taken so far, because it requires long term planning and setting a priority of objectives.

  18. Surface phase defects induced downstream laser intensity modulation in high-power laser facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhang; Wei Zhou; Wanjun Dai; Dongxia Hu; Xuewei Deng; Wanqing Huang; Lidan Zhou; Qiang Yuan; Xiaoxia Huang; De’en Wang; Ying Yang

    2016-01-01

    Optics surface phase defects induced intensity modulation in high-power laser facility for inertial confinement fusion research is studied. Calculations and experiments reveal an exact mapping of the modulation patterns and the optics damage spot distributions from the surface phase defects. Origins are discussed during the processes of optics manufacturing and diagnostics, revealing potential improvements for future optics manufacturing techniques and diagnostic index, which is meaningful for fusion level laser facility construction and its operation safety.

  19. Photochemical preparation of sub-wavelength heterogeneous laser-induced periodic surface structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Cheol; Reinhardt, Hendrik; Hillebrecht, Pierre; Hampp, Norbert A

    2012-04-17

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are a phenomenon caused by interaction of light with solid surfaces. We present a photochemical concept which uses LIPSS-related light intensity patterns for the generation of heterogeneous nanostructures. The process facilitates arbitrary combinations of substrate and LIPSS-pattern materials. An efficient method for the generation of organometallic hybrid-nanowire arrays on porous anodic aluminum oxide is demonstrated.

  20. Wavelength Dependence of Picosecond Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures on Copper

    OpenAIRE

    Maragkaki, Stella; Derrien, Thibault J. -Y.; Levy, Yoann; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Ostendorf, Andreas; Gurevich, Evgeny L.

    2017-01-01

    The physical mechanisms of the laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) formation are studied in this paper for single-pulse irradiation regimes. The change in the LIPSS period with wavelength of incident laser radiation is investigated experimentally, using a picosecond laser system, which provides 7-ps pulses in near-IR, visible, and UV spectral ranges. The experimental results are compared with predictions made under the assumption that the surface-scattered waves are involved in ...

  1. Effects of PV Module Soiling on Glass Surface Resistance and Potential-Induced Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, Peter; Button, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alex; Spataru, Sergiu; Glick, Stephen

    2015-06-14

    The goals of the project were: Determine applicability of transmission line method (TLM) to evaluate sheet resistance of soils on module glass;
    Evaluate various soils on glass for changes in surface resistance and their ability to promote potential-induced degradation with humidity (PID);
    Evaluate PID characteristics, rate, and leakage current increases on full-size mc-Si modules associated with a conductive soil on the surface.

  2. Regular sub-wavelength surface structures induced by femtosecond laser pulses on nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Litao

    2015-02-01

    In this research, the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on the nickel surface by femtosecond laser pulses was investigated. In the experiment, we used a commercially available amplified Ti:sapphire laser system that generated 164 fs laser pulses with a maximum pulse energy (Ep) of 1 mJ at a 1 kHz repetition rate and with a central wavelength λ= 780 nm. To obtain a fine periodic ordering of surface nanostructures, the laser beam, through a 0.2 mm pinhole aperture positioned near the 10× objective lens, was focused onto the sample. The samples were mounted on an XYZ-translation stage and irradiated in static and line-scanning experiment. The morphology of the induced periodic structure was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The surface profile was measured by atomic force microscopy. LIPSS with a period of around 700 nm entirely covered the irradiated area. Large area of LIPSS in the nickel surface was produced in line-scanning experiment. The mechanism of the formation of LIPSS in the entire irradiated area in static irradiation was discussed. The function of a 0.2 mm pinhole aperture was studied. The regular LIPSS on the nickel surface changed the optical property of the surface. The regular LIPSS on nickel surface could be also applied on the micro-mould fabrication.

  3. Subsidizing Start-Ups: Policy Targeting and Policy Effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Kösters, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Start-up subsidies are a frequently employed policy instrument, the use of which is justified by alleged market failure resulting from positive external effects and capital market imperfections. This article investigates whether the allocation of subsidies reflects a policy focus on addressing these market failure occurrences. However, using survey data from the East German state of Thuringia, logistic regressions reveal a rather random subsidization of start-ups. Furthermore, propensity scor...

  4. Putting teenagers on the pill: The consequences of subsidized contraception

    OpenAIRE

    Grönqvist, Hans

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the consequences of a series of Swedish policy changes beginning in 1989 where different regions started subsidizing the birth control pill. The reforms were significant and applied to all types of oral contraceptives. My identification strategy takes advantage of the fact that the reforms were implemented successively over time and targeted specific cohorts of young women, in particular teenagers. This generates plausibly exogenous variation in access to the subsidy. ...

  5. Ers and Envisat Differential Sar Interferometry for subsidence monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Wegmüller, Urs; Strozzi, Tazio; Tosi, Luigi

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on the potential of differential SAR interferometry to map land subsidence. After a presentation of the methodology, the focus will be on feasibility demonstration and accuracy assessment. The theoretical considerations are verified with the selected cases Ruhrgebiet, Mexico City, Bologna, and Euganean Geothermal Basin, representing fast (m/year) to slow (mm/year) deformation velocities. The accuracy of the generated deformation maps and the maturity of the required process...

  6. Ers and Envisat Differential Sar Interferometry for subsidence monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on the potential of differential SAR interferometry to map land subsidence. After a presentation of the methodology, the focus will be on feasibility demonstration and accuracy assessment. The theoretical considerations are verified with the selected cases Ruhrgebiet, Mexico City, Bologna, and Euganean Geothermal Basin, representing fast (m/year) to slow (mm/year) deformation velocities. The accuracy of the generated deformation maps and the maturity of the required process...

  7. Comparison of estimated and background subsidence rates in Texas-Louisiana geopressured geothermal areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, L.M.; Clayton, M.; Everingham, J.; Harding, R.C.; Massa, A.

    1982-06-01

    A comparison of background and potential geopressured geothermal development-related subsidence rates is given. Estimated potential geopressured-related rates at six prospects are presented. The effect of subsidence on the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast is examined including the various associated ground movements and the possible effects of these ground movements on surficial processes. The relationships between ecosystems and subsidence, including the capability of geologic and biologic systems to adapt to subsidence, are analyzed. The actual potential for environmental impact caused by potential geopressured-related subsidence at each of four prospects is addressed. (MHR)

  8. Problem definition study of subsidence caused by geopressured geothermal resource development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The environmental and socio-economic settings of four environmentally representative Gulf Coast geopressured geothermal fairways were inventoried. Subsidence predictions were prepared using feasible development scenarios for the four representative subsidence sites. Based on the results of the subsidence estimates, an assessment of the associated potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts was prepared. An inventory of mitigation measures was also compiled. Results of the subsidence estimates and impact assessments are presented, as well as conclusions as to what are the major uncertainties, problems, and issues concerning the future study of geopressured geothermal subsidence.

  9. Early Tertiary subsidence and sedimentary facies - Northern Sirte Basin, Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumati, Y.D.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-12-01

    The subsidence curves and subsidence rate curves for the Sirte basin, constructed from the stratigraphic record, show that subsidence was continuous throughout Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times, reaching a maximum during the Paleocene and Eocene, when a major reactivation of faults occurred. Shales and carbonates were deposited during all of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Abrupt lateral facies changes occur from the platform areas toward the deeper troughs along with steep downdip thickening. The absence of upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sediments suggests that the area was domed, faulted, and eroded during the late Mesozoic. As a result of crustal extension during the Paleocene, a marked lithologic and structural change occurred. The Heira Shale succeeded the Kalash Limestone in the Marada trough. Reactivation of the earlier faults, accompanied by an increase in the sediment supply from the south, caused these lower Paleocene shales to cover the entire area, with the exception of the old highs where carbonate deposition continued. An intercalation of shales and carbonates provides a sensitive indicator of change of depth and sediment type. 14 figures.

  10. Early Tertiary subsidence and sedimentary facies - northern Sirte Basin, Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumati, Y.D.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    The subsidence curves and subsidence rate curves for the Sirte basin, constructed from the stratigraphic record, show that subsidence was continuous throughout Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times, reaching a maximum during the Paleocene and Eocene, when a major reactivation of faults occurred. Shales and carbonates were deposited during all of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Abrupt lateral facies changes occur from the platform areas toward the deeper troughs along with steep downdip thickening. These conditions were probably assisted by contemporaneous faulting along structurally weak hinge lines where the dominant structural elements are normal step faults. The absence of upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sediments suggests that the area was domed, faulted, and eroded during the late Mesozoic. As a result of crustal extension during the Paleocene, a marked lithologic and structural change occurred. The Heira Shale succeeded the Kalash Limestone in the Marada trough. Reactivation of the earlier faults, accompanied by an increase in the sediment supply from the south, caused these lower Paleocene shales to cover the entire area, with the exception of the old highs where carbonate deposition continued. An intercalation of shales and carbonates provides a sensitive indicator of change of depth and sediment type.

  11. Sea Level Rise and Subsidence in the Gulf of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemnil, Sommart

    In the Thailand -EC GEO2TECDI-SONG Project we investigate the sea level change and vertical land motion in Thailand. First, Bangkok is situated in river delta and average height is closed to sea level. Second, it is subsiding due to ground water extraction. Third, it is experiencing post-seismic motion due to nearby mega thrust earthquakes and fourth, it suffers from rising of sea levels due to global climate change. This poses a serious threat on Thai society and economy. Before mitigation methods can be devised we aim at charting, qualifying and quantifying all contributing effects by the use of satellite altimetry, GNSS, InSAR techniques and combining results with the in situ observations like tide gauge and with geophysical modeling. Adding GPS based vertical land motion to the tide gauge sea level registration reveals the absolute sea level change, which is nicely confirmed by altimetry. We find an average absolute rise of 3.5 mm/yr + 0.7, but nears mouth of Chao Praya River (Bangkok) and the Mekong delta (Ho Chi Min City), this mounts to 4 to 5 mm/yr, faster than global average. This is reinforced when accounting for the tectonic subsidence that resulted from 2004 9.1Mw Sumatra/Andaman earthquake; from 2005 onwards we find downfall in the order of 10 mm/yr. RADARSAT InSAR analyses show subsidence rates up to 25 mm/yr at many places along coastal Bangkok.

  12. Correlation between precision gravity and subsidence measurements at Cerro Prieto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelwer, R.; Grannell, R.B.

    1982-10-01

    Precision gravity measurements were made in the region of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field at yearly intervals from 1977 to 1981 to assess the feasibility of using gravity to determine subsurface reservoir changes with time. The extent of mass recharge in response to the continued production of fluids from this field was studied. Changes in gravity and ground elevation were observed throughout the region for the period of observation. Results indicate that the largest changes observed were the result of the Magnitude 6.1 (Caltech) Victoria earthquake of 8 June 1980. The epicenter of this earthquake was located 25 km southeast of the field on the Cerro Prieto Fault, which bounds the field on the southwest. Subsidence of up to 55 cm was measured east of the power plant, in the region between the northern end of the Cerro Prieto Fault and the southern end of the Imperial Fault. This area has been postulated to be the site of an active spreading center or pull-apart basin, and has been characterized by a high level of seismic activity during the last 10 years. Minor subsidence and small related gravity changes for the period preceeding the Victoria earthquake suggest that in spite of large fluid production rates, the reservoir is being almost completely recharged and that a measurable increase in subsurface density may be taking place. The results of measurements of horizontal ground motions made in this area are discussed in relation to the gravity and subsidence observations.

  13. ROLE AND EFFECT OF AGROFORESTY SUBSIDES ALLOCATED BY THE COMMON AGRICULTURAL POLICY IN ITALIAN FARMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Galluzzo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 1990s, the European Union has financed a lot of specific measures aimed at promoting agroforestry on farms. In fact, the reform of Common Agricultural Policy proposed by the European Commissioner Ray MacSharry has put in place several actions with the predominant aim of changing the European agricultural model based on an environmental protection instead of a growth of agrarian productions. The purpose of this paper was, using a multiple regression model, to assess the impact of the Common Agricultural Policy, specifically financial subsides allocated by the second pillar of the CAP, in promoting agroforestation actions on the overall output of farmers over the time 2004- 2012 and on the growth of woodland surface. Findings have pointed out a positive correlation between financial support paid by the Rural Development Program and the farmer total income with positive consequences on the growth of afforestated surfaces particularly in lowland areas.

  14. Study of monitoring mining subsidence in coal mining area by D-InSAR technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Liang; LI Wen-jie; TAN Yang

    2008-01-01

    Along with the increasing demand for coal and the great importance attached to mine safety, gaining the information of mine surface distortion timely has already become an urgent need to guarantee the safety of mine production. D-InSAR technology is a new measure which can provide the information of surface distortion in mining areas at centi-meter level through the processing of SAR image gained from radar satellite. In addition, this technology has the advantage of monitoring large areas with no weather limit. Intro-duced the basic principle and data processing steps of D-InSAR systematically and ac-quired the differential interferometry based on case study data. The advantages of D-InSAR and it's usability in monitoring mining subsidence in coal mining areas were proved.

  15. Study of monitoring mining subsidence in coal mining area by D-InSAR technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Liang; LI Wen-jie; TAN Yang

    2008-01-01

    Along with the increasing demand for coal and the great importance attached to mine safety,gaining the information of mine surface distortion timely has already become an urgent need to guarantee the safety of mine production.D-InSAR technology is a new measure which can provide the information of surface distortion in mining areas at centimeter level through the processing of SAR image gained from radar satellite.In addition,this technology has the advantage of monitoring large areas with no weather limit.Introduced the basic principle and data processing steps of D-InSAR systematically and acquired the differential interferometry based on case study data.The advantages of D-InSAR and it's usability in monitoring mining subsidence in coal mining areas were proved.

  16. InSAR time-series analysis of land subsidence due to groundwater overexploitation in groundwater basins of central and northeast Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, M.; Motagh, M.; Aipour, S.; Akbari, V.; Walter, T.; Rajabi, M.; Samadzadegan, F.; Djamour, Y.; Sedighi, M.

    2008-12-01

    We use Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) observations acquired by the Envisat satellite during 2002-2008 to study land subsidence caused by groundwater over-exploitation in groundwater basins of central and northeast Iran. Earlier studies in these regions using a few interferograms showed rapid subsidence in the order of several centimetres per year. Here we use additional ENVISAT data and perform a time-series analysis using the small-baseline concept to better determine the temporal and spatial evolution of surface deformation.

  17. The deformation behavior of soil mass in the subsidence region of Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, F.; Liu, J.-R.; Luo, Y.; Zhu, L.; Yang, Y.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Land subsidence induced by excessive groundwater withdrawal has been a major environmental and geological problem in the Beijing plain area. The monitoring network of land subsidence in Beijing has been established since 2002 and has covered the entire plain area by the end of 2008. Based on data from extensometers and groundwater observation wells, this paper establishes curves of variations over time for both soil mass deformation and water levels and the relationship between soil mass deformation and water level. In addition, an analysis of deformation behavior is carried out for soil mass with various lithologies at different depths depending on the corresponding water level. Finally, the deformation behavior of soil mass is generalized into five categories. The conclusions include: (i) the current rate of deformation of the shallow soil mass is slowing, and most of the mid-deep and deep soil mass continue to compress at a more rapid speed; (ii) the sand strata behaves elastically, while the clay soil mass at different depths is usually characterized by elastic-plastic and creep deformation, which can be considered as visco-elastoplastic.

  18. Steady subsidence of a repeatedly erupting caldera through InSAR observations: Aso, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Adriano; Acocella, Valerio; Ruch, Joel; Aoki, Yosuke; Borgstrom, Sven; Siniscalchi, Valeria; Geshi, Nobuo

    2016-04-01

    The relation between unrest and eruption at calderas is still poorly understood. Aso caldera, Japan, shows minor episodic eruptions, mainly phreatic, associated with steady subsidence. We analyse the recent deformation of Aso using SAR images from 1993 to 2011 and compare this with the eruptive activity. Although the dataset suffers from limitations (e.g., atmospheric effects, coherence loss, low signal to noise ratio), we observe a steady subsidence signal from 1996 to 1998, that suggests an overall contraction of a magmatic source below the caldera centre, from 4.5 to 7 km depth. Because of the similar volumes of the contracting source and erupted material, we propose that the contraction may have been induced by the release of the magmatic fluids feeding the eruptions. If confirmed by further data, this hypothesis suggests that degassing processes play a crucial role in triggering minor eruptions within open conduit calderas, as at Aso. These features underline the importance of defining any eruptive potential also from deflating magmatic systems with open conduit.

  19. Morphology control of laser-induced periodic surface structure on the surface of nickel by femtosecond laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fantong Meng; Jie Hu; Weina Han; Penjun Liu; Qingsong Wang

    2015-01-01

    An interesting transition between low spatial frequency laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) and high spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL) on the surface of nickel is revealed by changing the scanning speed and the laser fluence.The experimental results show the proportion of HSFL area in the overall LIPSS (i.e.,K) presents a quasi-parabola function trend with the polarization orientation under a femtosecond (fs) laser single-pulse train.Moreover,an obvious fluctuation dependence of K on the pulse delay is observed under a fs laser dual-pulse train.The peak value of the fluctuation is found to be determined by the polarization orientation of the dual-pulse train.

  20. Comparison of water-level, extensometric, DInSAR and simulation data for quantification of subsidence in Murcia City (SE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessitore, S.; Fernández-Merodo, J. A.; Herrera, G.; Tomás, R.; Ramondini, M.; Sanabria, M.; Duro, J.; Mulas, J.; Calcaterra, D.

    2016-05-01

    Subsidence due to groundwater overexploitation has been recognized in the metropolitan area of Murcia (25 km2) in south-eastern Spain since the early 1990s. Previous published works have focused their attention on land subsidence that occurred during the drought period between 1995 and 2008. This work first analyzes the groundwater recovery that has occurred since 2008 and then determines the kind of associated ground deformation detected by the new extensometric data. Subsequently, subsidence time series are computed on 24 geotechnical boreholes scattered throughout the study area by means of a hydro-mechanical finite element code and a linear-elastic constitutive law. A spatio-temporal interpolation of the numerically modeled surface displacements is performed over the whole domain and compared with extensometers and DInSAR-derived displacement maps in two different periods: the drought period from 2004 to 2008, and the recovery period from 2008 to 2012. In spite of the limited information on the geomechanical parameters characterizing the modelled geological formations, the proposed approach is able to discriminate areas where the soils have an elastic behavior (small differences in the comparisons) or an elasto-plastic behavior (large differences in the comparisons). This zonation enhances the understanding of the subsidence phenomenon in Murcia City and could prevent, from a quantitatively point of view, future severe subsidence due to aquifer overexploitation.

  1. Laser-induced oxidation of titanium substrate: Analysis of the physicochemical structure of the surface and sub-surface layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antończak, Arkadiusz J., E-mail: arkadiusz.antonczak@pwr.edu.pl [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Skowroński, Łukasz; Trzcinski, Marek [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, University of Technology and Life Sciences, Kaliskiego 7, 85-789 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Kinzhybalo, Vasyl V. [Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, Stabłowicka 147, 54-066 Wrocław (Poland); Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Okólna 2, 50-422 Wrocław (Poland); Łazarek, Łukasz K.; Abramski, Krzysztof M. [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Chemical structure of the films induced by laser on titanium surface was analyzed. • It was shown that outer layer of this films consist of oxides doped with nitrogen. • The optical properties of the laser-induced oxynitride films were characterized. • We found that the films demonstrated significant absorption in the band of 300–580 nm. • The morphology of the layers as a function of the laser fluence was investigated. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of the analysis of the complex chemical structure of the layers made on titanium in the process of the heating of its surfaces in an atmospheric environment, by irradiating samples with a nanosecond-pulsed laser. The study was carried out for electroplated, high purity, polycrystalline titanium substrates using a Yb:glass fiber laser. All measurements were made for samples irradiated in a broad range of accumulated fluence, below the ablation threshold. It has been determined how the complex index of refraction of both the oxynitride layers and the substrate vary as a function of accumulated laser fluence. It was also shown that the top layer of the film produced on titanium, which is transparent, is not a pure TiO{sub 2} as had been supposed before. The XPS and XRD analyses confirmed the presence of nitrogen compounds and the existence of nonstoichiometric compounds. By sputtering of the sample's surface using an Ar{sup +} ion gun, the changes in the concentration of individual elements as a function of the layer's cross-section were determined. Lastly, an analysis of the surface morphology has also been carried out, explaining why the layers crack and exfoliate from their substrate.

  2. Advancing Coastal Climate Adaptation in Denmark by Land Subsidence Mapping using Sentinel-1 Satellite Imagery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo Sass; Broge, Niels H.; Mølgaard, Mads R.

    2016-01-01

    There are still large uncertainties in projections of climate change and sea level rise. Here, land subsidence is an additional factor that may adversely affect the vulnerability towards floods in low-lying coastal communities. The presented study performs an initial assessment of subsidence...... mapping using Sentinel-1 satellite imagery and leveling at two coastal locations in Denmark. Within both investigated areas current subsidence rates of 5-10 millimeters per year are found. This subsidence is related to the local geology, and challenges and potentials in bringing land subsidence mapping...... and geology into climate adaptation are discussed in relation to perspectives of a national subsidence monitoring system partly based on the findings from the two coastal locations. The current lack of subsidence data and a fragmentation of geotechnical information are considered as hindrances to optimal...

  3. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent ion-surface interaction at grazing incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J. (Departamento de Ciencias de la Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial, Facultad de Informatica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 649, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain)); Ponce, V.H. (Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina)); Echenique, P.M. (Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain))

    1992-10-19

    A new spectroscopy based on the resonant coherently induced electron loss to the continuum in ion-surface scattering under grazing incidence is proposed. A series of peaks, corresponding to the energy differences determined by the resonant interaction with the rows of atoms in the surface, is predicted to appear in the energy distribution of electrons emitted from electronic states bound to the probe. Calculations for MeV He{sup +} ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the {l angle}100{r angle} direction with a glancing angle of 0--2 mrad show a total yield close to 1.

  4. Femtosecond diffraction dynamics of laser-induced periodic surface structures on fused silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehm, S.; Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krueger, J.; Bonse, J. [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und - pruefung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-02-04

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on fused silica upon irradiation with linearly polarized fs-laser pulses (50 fs pulse duration, 800 nm center wavelength) is studied experimentally using a transillumination femtosecond time-resolved (0.1 ps-1 ns) pump-probe diffraction approach. This allows to reveal the generation dynamics of near-wavelength-sized LIPSS showing a transient diffraction at specific spatial frequencies even before a corresponding permanent surface relief was observed. The results confirm that the ultrafast energy deposition to the materials surface plays a key role and triggers subsequent physical mechanisms such as carrier scattering into self-trapped excitons.

  5. X-ray spectra induced in highly charged 40Arq+ interacting with Au surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    By use of optical spectrum technology, the spectra of X-ray induced by highly charged 40Arq+ ions interacting with Au surface have been studied. The results show that the argon Kα X-ray were emitted from the hollow atoms formed below the surface. There is a process of multi-electron exciting in neutralization of the Ar16+ion, with electronic configuration 1s2 in its ground state below the solid surface. The yield of the projectile Kα X-ray is related to its initial electronic configuration, and the yield of the target X-ray is related to the projectile kinetic energy.

  6. Surface modifications induced by high fluxes of low energy helium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyeli, İrem; Marot, Laurent; Mathys, Daniel; van de Sanden, Mauritius C M; De Temmerman, Gregory

    2015-04-28

    Several metal surfaces, such as titanium, aluminum and copper, were exposed to high fluxes (in the range of 10(23) m(-2) s(-1)) of low energy (pillars, are observed on these metals. The differences and similarities in the development of surface morphologies are discussed in terms of the material properties and compared with the results of similar experimental studies. The results show that He ions induced void growth and physical sputtering play a significant role in surface modification using high fluxes of low energy He ions.

  7. GPS geodetic measurements of subsidence from groundwater drawdown in central Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansma, P.; Mattioli, G.; Marshall, A.; Czarnecki, J.

    2005-05-01

    The state of Arkansas ranks fifth in the nation in ground water consumption, largely fueled by its robust rice and manufacturing industries. The region centered on Lonoke, Arkansas, Jefferson and Monroe counties in the center of the state has seen dramatic drawdown of its ground-water resources and development of significant cones of depression. Subsidence of 1.5 meters over a few decades was postulated for portions of Arkansas county on the basis of elevation changes of benchmarks. These results were preliminary and measurements were not made with geodetic grade equipment. Validation of these results is the primary goal of our on-going work. We are developing an extensive network of suitable benchmarks throughout central and eastern Arkansas, whose vertical position can be monitored using high-precision Global Positioning System geodesy. Campaign GPS measurements were first obtained in summer 2003. Second epoch observations were acquired throughout 2004. Although errors are high due to the limited temporal dataset, preliminary GPS geodetic results are consistent with subsidence of the ground surface above the cones of depression on the order of tens of millimeters per year.

  8. Evolution of young oceanic lithosphere and the meaning of seafloor subsidence rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenaga, Tomoko; Korenaga, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Plate tectonics, a special class of mantle convection so far observed only