WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface structure including

  1. Electrochemical cell structure including an ionomeric barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, Timothy N.; Hibbs, Michael

    2017-06-20

    An apparatus includes an electrochemical half-cell comprising: an electrolyte, an anode; and an ionomeric barrier positioned between the electrolyte and the anode. The anode may comprise a multi-electron vanadium phosphorous alloy, such as VP.sub.x, wherein x is 1-5. The electrochemical half-cell is configured to oxidize the vanadium and phosphorous alloy to release electrons. A method of mitigating corrosion in an electrochemical cell includes disposing an ionomeric barrier in a path of electrolyte or ion flow to an anode and mitigating anion accumulation on the surface of the anode.

  2. Brain surface parameterization using Riemann surface structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yalin; Gu, Xianfeng; Hayashi, Kiralee M; Chan, Tony F; Thompson, Paul M; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2005-01-01

    We develop a general approach that uses holomorphic 1-forms to parameterize anatomical surfaces with complex (possibly branching) topology. Rather than evolve the surface geometry to a plane or sphere, we instead use the fact that all orientable surfaces are Riemann surfaces and admit conformal structures, which induce special curvilinear coordinate systems on the surfaces. Based on Riemann surface structure, we can then canonically partition the surface into patches. Each of these patches can be conformally mapped to a parallelogram. The resulting surface subdivision and the parameterizations of the components are intrinsic and stable. To illustrate the technique, we computed conformal structures for several types of anatomical surfaces in MRI scans of the brain, including the cortex, hippocampus, and lateral ventricles. We found that the resulting parameterizations were consistent across subjects, even for branching structures such as the ventricles, which are otherwise difficult to parameterize. Compared with other variational approaches based on surface inflation, our technique works on surfaces with arbitrary complexity while guaranteeing minimal distortion in the parameterization. It also offers a way to explicitly match landmark curves in anatomical surfaces such as the cortex, providing a surface-based framework to compare anatomy statistically and to generate grids on surfaces for PDE-based signal processing.

  3. Soil-structure interaction including nonlinear soil

    OpenAIRE

    Gicev, Vlado

    2008-01-01

    There are two types of models of soil-structure system depending upon the rigidity of foundation: models with rigid and models with flexible foundation. Main features of the soil-structure interaction phenomenon: -wave scattering, -radiation damping, -reduction of the system frequencies. In this presentation, the influence of interaction on the development of nonlinear zones in the soil is studied.

  4. Sea Surface Temperature from EUMETSAT Including Sentinel-3 SLSTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, Anne; Bonekamp, Hans; Montagner, Francois; Santacesaria, Vincenzo; Tomazic, Igor

    2015-12-01

    The paper gives an overview of sea surface temperature (SST) activities at EUMETSAT including information on SST planned from the Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR). Operational oceanography activities within the Marine Applications group at EUMETSAT continue with a focus on SST, sea surface winds, sea-ice products, radiative fluxes, significant wave height and sea surface topography. These are achieved through the mandatory, optional and third-party programmes, and for some products with the EUMETSAT Ocean and Sea-Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF). Progress towards products from sea-ice surface temperature, ocean colour products, turbidity and aerosol optical depth over water continue. Information on oceanography products from EUMETSAT can be found through the product navigator (http://navigator.eumetsat.int). EUMETSAT have been collaborating with ESA for a number of years on the development of SST for SLSTR.

  5. Helical surface structures

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A; Brandenburg, Axel; Blackman, Eric G.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years there has been growing interest in helical magnetic field structures seen at the solar surface, in coronal mass ejections, as well as in the solar wind. Although there is a great deal of randomness in the data, on average the extended structures are mostly left-handed on the northern hemisphere and right-handed on the southern. Surface field structures are also classified as dextral (= right bearing) and sinistral (= left bearing) occurring preferentially in the northern and southern hemispheres respectively. Of particular interest here is a quantitative measurement of the associated emergence rates of helical structures, which translate to magnetic helicity fluxes. In this review, we give a brief survey of what has been found so far and what is expected based on models. Particular emphasis is put on the scale dependence of the associated fields and an attempt is made to estimate the helicity flux of the mean field vs. fluctuating field.

  6. Ceramic substrate including thin film multilayer surface conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Joseph Ambrose; Peterson, Kenneth A.

    2017-05-09

    A ceramic substrate comprises a plurality of ceramic sheets, a plurality of inner conductive layers, a plurality of vias, and an upper conductive layer. The ceramic sheets are stacked one on top of another and include a top ceramic sheet. The inner conductive layers include electrically conductive material that forms electrically conductive features on an upper surface of each ceramic sheet excluding the top ceramic sheet. The vias are formed in each of the ceramic sheets with each via being filled with electrically conductive material. The upper conductive layer includes electrically conductive material that forms electrically conductive features on an upper surface of the top ceramic sheet. The upper conductive layer is constructed from a stack of four sublayers. A first sublayer is formed from titanium. A second sublayer is formed from copper. A third sublayer is formed from platinum. A fourth sublayer is formed from gold.

  7. Parabasal theory for plane-symmetric systems including freeform surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Maksoud, Rania H.; Hillenbrand, Matthias; Sinzinger, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    An extension of paraxial theory to systems with a single plane of symmetry is provided. This parabasal model is based on the evaluation of a differential region around the reference ray that is defined by the center of the object and the center of the stop. To include freeform surfaces in this model, the local curvatures at the intersection point of the reference ray and the surface are evaluated. As an application, a generalized Scheimpflug principle is presented. The validity of the derived formulas is tested for highly tilted surfaces and is in good agreement with the exact ray tracing results. The analytical expressions are used to provide a first-order layout design of a planar imaging system.

  8. Structure of the moon's surface

    CERN Document Server

    Fielder, Gilbert

    1961-01-01

    Structure of the Moon's Surface aims to assemble and marshal relevant matter, and to produce a largely unprejudiced text which brings lunar studies up to date and stresses the importance of certain features of the Moon which have frequently been disregarded in the past, largely because of lack of knowledge about them. The book contains 14 chapters organized into two parts. Part I reviews and summarizes important physical problems. These include the liberations of the moon; height determinations of points of the moon's surface; the figure of the moon; and the moon's temperature and atmosphere.

  9. Evaluation of FEMA-440 for including soil-structure interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khoshnoudian F.; Behmanesh I.

    2010-01-01

    Replacing the entire soil-structure system with a fixed base oscillator to consider the effect of soil-structure interaction (SSI) is a common analysis method in seismic design. This technique has been included in design procedures such as NEHRP, ASCE, etc. By defining an equivalent fundamental period and damping ratio that can modify the response of the structure. However, recent studies indicate that the effects of SSI should be reconsidered when a structure undergoes a nonlinear displacement demand. In recent documents on Nonlinear Static Procedures (NSPs), FEMA-440 (2005), a modified damping ratio of the replacement oscillator was proposed by introducing the ductility of the soil-structure system obtained from pushover analysis. In this paper, the damping defined in FEMA-440 to include the soil-structure interaction effect is evaluated, and the accuracy of the Coefficiem Method given in FEMA-440 and the Equivalent Linearization Method is studied. Although the improvements for Nonlinear Static Procedures (NSPs) in FEMA-440 are achieved for a fixed base SDOF structure, the soil effects are not perfectly obtained. Furthermore, the damping definition of a soil-structure system is extended to structures to consider bilinear behavior.

  10. Flat surfaces and stability structures

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We identify spaces of half-translation surfaces, equivalently complex curves with quadratic differential, with spaces of stability structures on Fukaya-type categories of punctured surfaces. This is achieved by new methods involving the complete classification of objects in these categories, which are defined in an elementary way. We also introduce a number of tools to deal with surfaces of infinite area, where structures similar to those in cluster algebra appear.

  11. Including Finite Surface Span Effects in Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finite span on the jet-surface interaction noise source and the jet mixing noise shielding and reflection effects is considered using recently acquired experimental data. First, the experimental setup and resulting data are presented with particular attention to the role of surface span on far-field noise. These effects are then included in existing empirical models that have previously assumed that all surfaces are semi-infinite. This extended abstract briefly describes the experimental setup and data leaving the empirical modeling aspects for the final paper.

  12. Bioinspired structured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-01-24

    Nature has evolved objects with desired functionality using commonly found materials. Nature capitalizes on hierarchical structures to achieve functionality. The understanding of the functions provided by objects and processes found in nature can guide us to produce nanomaterials, nanodevices, and processes with desirable functionality. Various natural objects which provide functionality of commercial interest have been characterized to understand how a natural object provides functionality. We have modeled and fabricated structures in the lab using nature's route and developed optimum structures. Once it is understood how nature does it, optimum structures have been fabricated using smart materials and fabrication techniques. This feature article provides an overview of four topics: Lotus effect, rose petal effect, gecko feet, and shark skin.

  13. Surface acoustic wave devices including Langmuir-Blodgett films (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesskii, V. P.

    1991-06-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental research related to the use of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films in surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices is reviewed. The sensitivity of the different cuts of quartz and lithium niobate to inertial loading is investigated, and it is shown that some cuts in lithium niobate are twice as sensitive to mass loading than the commonly used YZ-cut. The large variety of organic compounds suitable for the production of LB films makes it possible to create SAW sensors reacting selectively to certain substances. The existing SAW sensors based on LB films are characterized by high sensitivity and fast response.

  14. Hydrodynamics of interaction of particles (including cells) with surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszyk, Marek; Doroszewski, Jan

    The study of the phenomena related to the motion of particles flowing in the proximity of the wall is pursued for purely cognitive reason as well as for some important practical purposes in various fields of technology, biology and medicine. When small spherical rigid particles move in the direction parallel to the surface their velocity is smaller than that of the fluid and depends on the ratio of the distance from the wall to the particle radius. The velocity of a particle falling down in a vertical cylinder is maximal in an eccentric position. A sphere in contact with the wall remains stationary. Translational velocity of spherical rigid particles the dimension of which are comparable to that of the tube is only slightly dependent of their lateral position. The differences in the flow parameters of deformable particles in comparison with rigid ones depend on the particle and fluid viscosity coefficient. When the particles move perpendicularly toward the wall, their velocity decreases as the particle approaches the surface. The change of particle velocity is inversely proportional to the gap. There are several theories explaining the influence of the channel diameter on the suspension viscosity (sigma phenomenon); a modern approach is based on the analysis of rheological properties of suspensions. The explanations of the Fahraeus effect (i.e. the fact that the concentration of particles flowing in a tube linking two containers are smaller than that in the containers) are based on non-uniform particle distribution in a transverse cross section and on the differences of velocities of particles and medium. The deviation of the velocity profile of a suspension of rigid particles flowing through a tube from the parabolic shape (blunting) does not depend on the flow velocity; as concerns deformable particles, however, this effect is the smaller the greater is the flow velocity. When the Reynolds number for particles is greater than 10 -3, there appears a component of

  15. Sonic-boom-induced building structure responses including damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, B. L.; Mayes, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    Concepts of sonic-boom pressure loading of building structures and the associated responses are reviewed, and results of pertinent theoretical and experimental research programs are summarized. The significance of sonic-boom load time histories, including waveshape effects, are illustrated with the aid of simple structural elements such as beams and plates. Also included are discussions of the significance of such other phenomena as three-dimensional loading effects, air cavity coupling, multimodal responses, and structural nonlinearities. Measured deflection, acceleration, and strain data from laboratory models and full-scale building tests are summarized, and these data are compared, where possible, with predicted values. Damage complaint and claim experience due both to controlled and uncontrolled supersonic flights over communities are summarized with particular reference to residential, commercial, and historic buildings. Sonic-boom-induced building responses are compared with those from other impulsive loadings due to natural and cultural events and from laboratory simulation tests.

  16. Numerical simulation of condensation on structured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaowu; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2014-11-25

    Condensation of liquid droplets on solid surfaces happens widely in nature and industrial processes. This phase-change phenomenon has great effect on the performance of some microfluidic devices. On the basis of micro- and nanotechnology, superhydrophobic structured surfaces can be well-fabricated. In this work, the nucleating and growth of droplets on different structured surfaces are investigated numerically. The dynamic behavior of droplets during the condensation is simulated by the multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which has the ability to incorporate the microscopic interactions, including fluid-fluid interaction and fluid-surface interaction. The results by the LBM show that, besides the chemical properties of surfaces, the topography of structures on solid surfaces influences the condensation process. For superhydrophobic surfaces, the spacing and height of microridges have significant influence on the nucleation sites. This mechanism provides an effective way for prevention of wetting on surfaces in engineering applications. Moreover, it suggests a way to prevent ice formation on surfaces caused by the condensation of subcooled water. For hydrophilic surfaces, however, microstructures may be submerged by the liquid films adhering to the surfaces. In this case, microstructures will fail to control the condensation process. Our research provides an optimized way for designing surfaces for condensation in engineering systems.

  17. Colloids with high-definition surface structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsien-Yeh; Rouillard, Jean-Marie; Gulari, Erdogan; Lahann, Joerg

    2007-01-01

    Compared with the well equipped arsenal of surface modification methods for flat surfaces, techniques that are applicable to curved, colloidal surfaces are still in their infancy. This technological gap exists because spin-coating techniques used in traditional photolithographic processes are not applicable to the curved surfaces of spherical objects. By replacing spin-coated photoresist with a vapor-deposited, photodefinable polymer coating, we have now fabricated microstructured colloids with a wide range of surface patterns, including asymmetric and chiral surface structures, that so far were typically reserved for flat substrates. This high-throughput method can yield surface-structured colloidal particles at a rate of ≈107 to 108 particles per operator per day. Equipped with spatially defined binding pockets, microstructured colloids can engage in programmable interactions, which can lead to directed self-assembly. The ability to create a wide range of colloids with both simple and complex surface patterns may contribute to the genesis of previously unknown colloidal structures and may have important technological implications in a range of different applications, including photonic and phononic materials or chemical sensors. PMID:17592149

  18. Colloids with high-definition surface structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsien-Yeh; Rouillard, Jean-Marie; Gulari, Erdogan; Lahann, Joerg

    2007-07-03

    Compared with the well equipped arsenal of surface modification methods for flat surfaces, techniques that are applicable to curved, colloidal surfaces are still in their infancy. This technological gap exists because spin-coating techniques used in traditional photolithographic processes are not applicable to the curved surfaces of spherical objects. By replacing spin-coated photoresist with a vapor-deposited, photodefinable polymer coating, we have now fabricated microstructured colloids with a wide range of surface patterns, including asymmetric and chiral surface structures, that so far were typically reserved for flat substrates. This high-throughput method can yield surface-structured colloidal particles at a rate of approximately 10(7) to 10(8) particles per operator per day. Equipped with spatially defined binding pockets, microstructured colloids can engage in programmable interactions, which can lead to directed self-assembly. The ability to create a wide range of colloids with both simple and complex surface patterns may contribute to the genesis of previously unknown colloidal structures and may have important technological implications in a range of different applications, including photonic and phononic materials or chemical sensors.

  19. Dynamic Analysis of Wind Turbines Including Soil-Structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harte, M.; Basu, B.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the along-wind forced vibration response of an onshore wind turbine. The study includes the dynamic interaction effects between the foundation and the underlying soil, as softer soils can influence the dynamic response of wind turbines. A Multi-Degree-of-Freedom (MDOF...... rotational speed (3P effects). The effect of dynamic soil-structure interaction on the rotation of the foundation has also been investigated.......) horizontal axes onshore wind turbine model is developed for dynamic analysis using an Euler–Lagrangian approach. The model is comprised of a rotor blade system, a nacelle and a flexible tower connected to a foundation system using a substructuring approach. The rotor blade system consists of three rotating...

  20. Deformable registration of multi-modal data including rigid structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huesman, Ronald H.; Klein, Gregory J.; Kimdon, Joey A.; Kuo, Chaincy; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2003-05-02

    Multi-modality imaging studies are becoming more widely utilized in the analysis of medical data. Anatomical data from CT and MRI are useful for analyzing or further processing functional data from techniques such as PET and SPECT. When data are not acquired simultaneously, even when these data are acquired on a dual-imaging device using the same bed, motion can occur that requires registration between the reconstructed image volumes. As the human torso can allow non-rigid motion, this type of motion should be estimated and corrected. We report a deformation registration technique that utilizes rigid registration for bony structures, while allowing elastic transformation of soft tissue to more accurately register the entire image volume. The technique is applied to the registration of CT and MR images of the lumbar spine. First a global rigid registration is performed to approximately align features. Bony structures are then segmented from the CT data using semi-automated process, and bounding boxes for each vertebra are established. Each CT subvolume is then individually registered to the MRI data using a piece-wise rigid registration algorithm and a mutual information image similarity measure. The resulting set of rigid transformations allows for accurate registration of the parts of the CT and MRI data representing the vertebrae, but not the adjacent soft tissue. To align the soft tissue, a smoothly-varying deformation is computed using a thin platespline(TPS) algorithm. The TPS technique requires a sparse set of landmarks that are to be brought into correspondence. These landmarks are automatically obtained from the segmented data using simple edge-detection techniques and random sampling from the edge candidates. A smoothness parameter is also included in the TPS formulation for characterization of the stiffness of the soft tissue. Estimation of an appropriate stiffness factor is obtained iteratively by using the mutual information cost function on the result

  1. Biophysical insights into how surfaces, including lipid membranes, modulate protein aggregation related to neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Burke

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available There are a vast number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and Huntington’s disease (HD, associated with the rearrangement of specific proteins to non-native conformations that promotes aggregation and deposition within tissues and/or cellular compartments. These diseases are commonly classified as protein misfolding or amyloid diseases. The interaction of these proteins with liquid/surface interfaces is a fundamental phenomenon with potential implications for protein misfolding diseases. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies indicate that significant conformational changes can be induced in proteins encountering surfaces, which can play a critical role in nucleating aggregate formation or stabilizing specific aggregation states. Surfaces of particular interest in neurodegenerative diseases are cellular and subcellular membranes that are predominately comprised of lipid components. The two-dimensional liquid environments provided by lipid bilayers can profoundly alter protein structure and dynamics by both specific and nonspecific interactions. Importantly for misfolding diseases, these bilayer properties can not only modulate protein conformation, but also exert influence on aggregation state. A detailed understanding of the influence of (subcellular surfaces in driving protein aggregation and/or stabilizing specific aggregate forms could provide new insights into toxic mechanisms associated with these diseases. Here, we review the influence of surfaces in driving and stabilizing protein aggregation with a specific emphasis on lipid membranes.

  2. Designing visual appearance using a structured surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Villads Egede; Thamdrup, Lasse Højlund; Smitrup, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    We present an approach for designing nanostructured surfaces with prescribed visual appearances, starting at design analysis and ending with a fabricated sample. The method is applied to a silicon wafer structured using deep ultraviolet lithography and dry etching and includes preliminary design ...

  3. Nature inspired structured surfaces for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, H K; Hasan, J; Truong, V K; Crawford, R J; Ivanova, E P

    2011-01-01

    Nature has created an array of superhydrophobic surfaces that possess water-repellent, self-cleaning and anti-icing properties. These surfaces have a number of potential applications in the biomedical industry, as they have the potential to control protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Natural superhydrophobic surfaces are typically composed of materials with a low intrinsic surface free-energy (e.g the cuticular waxes of lotus leaves and insect wings) with a hierarchical structural configuration. This hierarchical surface topography acts to decrease the contact area of water droplets in contact with the surface, thereby increasing the extent of the air/water interface, resulting in water contact angles greater than 150º. In order to employ these surfaces in biotechnological applications, fabrication techniques must be developed so that these multi-scale surface roughness characteristics can be reproduced. Additionally, these fabrication techniques must also be able to be applied to the material required for the intended application. An overview of some of the superhydrophobic surfaces that exist in nature is presented, together with an explanation of the theories of their wettability. Also included is a description of some of the biomedical applications of superhydrophobic surfaces and fabrication techniques that can be used to mimic superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature.

  4. An Efficient Seismic Analysis Procedure for Torsionally Coupled Multistory Buildings Including Soil-Structure Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    ÇELEBİ, Erkan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a simplified methodology of analysis for the seismic response of 3-dimensional irregular high-rise buildings on a rigid footing resting on the surface of a linear elastic half-space is formulated. An efficient method using modal decomposition and carried out in the frequency domain by using the fast Fourier transform to obtain the structural response of torsionally asymmetric buildings, including soil-structure interaction effects, is presented. Applying this algorithm...

  5. Design of an HHFW antenna including high impedance surfaces for FTU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesio, Daniele; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2013-10-01

    The successful design of an Ion Cyclotron antenna mainly relies on the capability of coupling high power to the plasma (MW), feature that is currently reached by allowing rather high voltages (tens of kV) on the unavoidable unmatched part of the feeding lines. This requirement is often responsible of arcs along the transmission lines and other unwanted phenomena that considerably limit the usage of IC launchers. In this work, we suggest and describe a revolutionary approach based on high impedance surfaces, which allows to increase the antenna radiation efficiency and, hence, to highly reduce the imposed voltages to couple the same level of power to the plasma. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) displaced usually on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts usually embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. In terms of working properties, high impedance surfaces are electrically thin in-phase reflectors, i.e. they present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. This work documents the design by means of numerical codes of an antenna including high impedance surfaces to be tested on the FTU IBW port and fed by the FTU IBW generators at 433 MHz. The test on FTU, if successful, will confirm the possibility to adopt this approach for future HHFW antennas.

  6. Cement-aggregate compatibility and structure property relationships including modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, H.M.; Xi, Y.

    1993-07-15

    The role of aggregate, and its interface with cement paste, is discussed with a view toward establishing models that relate structure to properties. Both short (nm) and long (mm) range structure must be considered. The short range structure of the interface depends not only on the physical distribution of the various phases, but also on moisture content and reactivity of aggregate. Changes that occur on drying, i.e. shrinkage, may alter the structure which, in turn, feeds back to alter further drying and shrinkage. The interaction is dynamic, even without further hydration of cement paste, and the dynamic characteristic must be considered in order to fully understand and model its contribution to properties. Microstructure and properties are two subjects which have been pursued somewhat separately. This review discusses both disciplines with a view toward finding common research goals in the future. Finally, comment is made on possible chemical reactions which may occur between aggregate and cement paste.

  7. Structures that Include a Semi-Outdoor Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papachristou, C.; Foteinaki, Kyriaki; Kazanci, Ongun Berk

    2016-01-01

    The thermal environment of buildings with a second "skin" and semi-outdoor space is examined in the present study. A literature review was conducted on similar structures and only a few studies were found focusing on the thermal environment. Two different building case studies were chosen...... building can be used by the occupants. The study was based on weather data for Copenhagen. In addition to the simulations, physical measurements were performed in DoV to assess the thermal environment in the semi-outdoor space. Since existing standards are not applicable for semi-outdoor spaces...

  8. Evaporation of hydrocarbon compounds, including gasoline and diesel fuel, on heated metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fardad, D.; Ladommatos, N. [Brunel Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Uxbridge (United Kingdom)

    1999-11-01

    An investigation was carried out on the evaporation of various hydrocarbon liquids on heated surfaces. Single and multicomponent hydrocarbon compounds were used, including hexane, heptane, octane, a hexane-octane mixture, gasoline and diesel fuel. The heated surface included aluminium, mild steel, cast iron and copper. Tests were also carried out with different surface textures and surface coatings. The motivation for this work was a desire to improve understanding of the evaporation processes taking place in the inlet port and, to a lesser extent, within the combustion chamber of internal combustion engines. The hydrocarbon compounds were released on the heated surfaces as individual small droplets, and the subsequent evaporation was recorded using a CCD (charge coupled device) camera. These observations were then used to ascertain the effects of material, surface temperature, surface textures, surface coating and liquid composition on the heat flux and other aspects of droplet behaviour. (Author)

  9. Bubble-included chocolate: relating structure with sensory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haedelt, J; Beckett, S T; Niranjan, K

    2007-04-01

    Bubbles impart a very unique texture, chew, and mouth-feel to foods. However, little is known about the relationship between structure of such products and consumer response in terms of mouth-feel and eating experience. The objective of this article is to investigate the sensory properties of 4 types of bubble-containing chocolates, produced by using different gases: carbon dioxide, nitrogen, nitrous oxide, and argon. The structure of these chocolates were characterized in terms of (1) gas hold-up values determined by density measurements and (2) bubble size distribution which was measured by undertaking an image analysis of X-ray microtomograph sections. Bubble size distributions were obtained by measuring bubble volumes after reconstructing 3D images from the tomographic sections. A sensory study was undertaken by a nonexpert panel of 20 panelists and their responses were analyzed using qualitative descriptive analysis (QDA). The results show that chocolates made from the 4 gases could be divided into 2 groups on the basis of bubble volume and gas hold-up: the samples produced using carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide had a distinctly higher gas hold-up containing larger bubbles in comparison with those produced using argon and nitrogen. The sensory study also demonstrated that chocolates made with the latter were perceived to be harder, less aerated, slow to melt in the mouth, and having a higher overall flavor intensity. These products were further found to be creamier than the chocolates made by using carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide; the latter sample also showed a higher intensity of cocoa flavor.

  10. Surface structure of AU3Cu(001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckstein, G.A.; Maupai, S.; Dakkouri, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    The surface morphology, composition, and structure of Au3Cu(001) as determined by scanning tunneling microscopy and surface x-ray diffraction are presented. Atomic resolution STM images reveal distinctive geometric features. The analysis of the surface x-ray diffraction data provides clear evidence...... for the surface structure. [S0163-1829(99)04535-X]....

  11. Do Newtonian large-scale structure simulations fail to include relativistic effects?

    CERN Document Server

    Faraoni, Valerio; Prain, Angus

    2015-01-01

    The Newtonian simulations describing the formation of large-scale structures do not include relativistic effects. A new approach to this problem is proposed, which consists of splitting the Hawking-Hayward quasi-local energy of a closed spacelike 2-surface into a "Newtonian" part due to local perturbations and a "relativistic" part due to the cosmology. It is found that the Newtonian part dominates over the relativistic one as time evolves, lending support to the validity of Newtonian simulations.

  12. On real structures on rigid surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulikov, Vik S [Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Kharlamov, V M [Institut de Recherche Matematique Avanee Universite Louis Pasteur et CNRS 7 rue Rene Descartes (France)

    2002-02-28

    We construct examples of rigid surfaces (that is, surfaces whose deformation class consists of a unique surface) with a particular behaviour with respect to real structures. In one example the surface has no real structure. In another it has a unique real structure, which is not maximal with respect to the Smith-Thom inequality. These examples give negative answers to the following problems: the existence of real surfaces in each deformation class of complex surfaces, and the existence of maximal real surfaces in every complex deformation class that contains real surfaces. Moreover, we prove that there are no real surfaces among surfaces of general type with p{sub g}=q=0 and K{sup 2}=9. These surfaces also provide new counterexamples to the 'Dif = Def' problem.

  13. Bacterial cell surface structures in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białas, Nataniel; Kasperkiewicz, Katarzyna; Radziejewska-Lebrecht, Joanna; Skurnik, Mikael

    2012-06-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a widespread member of the family of Enterobacteriaceae that contains both non-virulent and virulent isolates. Pathogenic Y. enterocolitica strains, especially belonging to serotypes O:3, O:5,27, O:8 and O:9 are etiologic agents of yersiniosis in animals and humans. Y. enterocolitica cell surface structures that play a significant role in virulence have been subject to many investigations. These include outer membrane (OM) glycolipids such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) and several cell surface adhesion proteins present only in virulent Y. enterocolitica, i.e., Inv, YadA and Ail. While the yadA gene is located on the Yersinia virulence plasmid the Ail, Inv, LPS and ECA are chromosomally encoded. These structures ensure the correct architecture of the OM, provide adhesive properties as well as resistance to antimicrobial peptides and to host innate immune response mechanisms.

  14. An ArcGIS approach to include tectonic structures in point data regionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsow, Andreas; Schafmeister, Maria-Theresia; Hofmann, Thilo

    2009-01-01

    Point data derived from drilling logs must often be regionalized. However, aquifers may show discontinuous surface structures, such as the offset of an aquitard caused by tectonic faults. One main challenge has been to incorporate these structures into the regionalization process of point data. We combined ordinary kriging and inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation to account for neotectonic structures in the regionalization process. The study area chosen to test this approach is the largest porous aquifer in Austria. It consists of three basins formed by neotectonic events and delimited by steep faults with a vertical offset of the aquitard up to 70 m within very short distances. First, ordinary kriging was used to incorporate the characteristic spatial variability of the aquitard location by means of a variogram. The tectonic faults could be included into the regionalization process by using breaklines with buffer zones. All data points inside the buffer were deleted. Last, IDW was performed, resulting in an aquitard map representing the discontinuous surface structures. This approach enables one to account for such surfaces using the standard software package ArcGIS; therefore, it could be adopted in many practical applications.

  15. The Meaning of Surface Structure and Deep Structure to Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗源

    2014-01-01

    Surface structure and deep structure first come up with by Chomsky is an innovative action in linguistics. Despite the arguments involved around surface structure and deep structure, it is instructional to English-Chinese translation to some degree and its scientific connotation is meaningful to deepen language study and construct related disciplinary both in theory and practice.

  16. Nanocoating of titanium implant surfaces with organic molecules. Polysaccharides including glycosaminoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurzawska, Katarzyna Aleksandra; Svava, Rikke; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye;

    2012-01-01

    Long-term stability of titanium implants are dependent on a variety of factors. Nanocoating with organic molecules is one of the method used to improve osseointegration. Nanoscale modification of titanium implants affects surface properties, such as hydrophilicity, biochemical bonding capacity...... and roughness. This influences cell behaviour on the surface such as adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells as well as the mineralization of the extracellular matrix at the implant surfaces. The aim of the present systematic review was to describe organic molecules used for surface nanocoating...... nanocoatings. The included in vivo studies, showed improvement of bone interface reactions measured as increased Bone-to-Implant Contact length and Bone Mineral Density adjacent to the polysaccharide coated surfaces. Based on existing literature, surface modification with polysaccharide and glycosaminoglycans...

  17. Locally homogeneous structures on Hopf surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    McKay, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    We study holomorphic locally homogeneous geometric structures modelled on line bundles over the projective line. We classify these structures on primary Hopf surfaces. We write out the developing map and holonomy morphism of each of these structures explicitly on each primary Hopf surface.

  18. Tuning Wettability and Adhesion of Structured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badge, Ila

    Structured surfaces with feature size ranging from a few micrometers down to nanometers are of great interest in the applications such as design of anti-wetting surfaces, tissue engineering, microfluidics, filtration, microelectronic devices, anti-reflective coatings and reversible adhesives. A specific surface property demands particular roughness geometry along with suitable surface chemistry. Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) is a technique that offers control over surface chemistry without significantly affecting the roughness and thus, provides a flexibility to alter surface chemistry selectively for a given structured surface. In this study, we have used PECVD to fine tune wetting and adhesion properties. The research presented focuses on material design aspects as well as the fundamental understanding of wetting and adhesion phenomena of structured surfaces. In order to study the effect of surface roughness and surface chemistry on the surface wettability independently, we developed a model surface by combination of colloidal lithography and PECVD. A systematically controlled hierarchical roughness using spherical colloidal particles and surface chemistry allowed for quantitative prediction of contact angles corresponding to metastable and stable wetting states. A well-defined roughness and chemical composition of the surface enabled establishing a correlation between theory predictions and experimental measurements. We developed an extremely robust superhydrophobic surface based on Carbon-Nanotubes (CNT) mats. The surface of CNTs forming a nano-porous mesh was modified using PECVD to deposit a layer of hydrophobic coating (PCNT). The PCNT surface thus formed is superhydrophobic with almost zero contact angle hysteresis. We demonstrated that the PCNT surface is not wetted under steam condensation even after prolonged exposure and also continues to retain its superhydrophobicity after multiple frosting-defrosting cycles. The anti

  19. Rheological characteristics of soft rock structural surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈沅江; 吴超; 傅衣铭

    2008-01-01

    There are two mechanisms of the coarse surface asperity resistance effect and rubbing resistance effect in the course of the soft rock structural surface creep,of which the former plays a dominant role in hindering the deformation in the starting creep phase,so that the structural surface creep usually displays the strong surface roughness effect,and so does the latter when the asperities in the coarse surface were fractured by shearing.Under the low stress condition,there are only two phases of the decelerating creep and the constant creep for the soft rock structural surface,and as the stress increases and overcomes the rubbing resistance,the accelerating creep failure of the structural surface will happen suddenly.Therefore,a multiple rheological model,which combines the nonlinear NEWTON body(NN) of a certain mass and the empirical plastic body(EM) with the classical SAINT VENANT body,NEWTON body,KELVIN body and HOOKE body,could be used to comprehensively describe the creep characteristics of the soft rock structural surface.Its mechanical parameter values will vary owing to the different surface roughness of the structural surface.The parameters of GH,GK and ηL are positively linearly correlative to the surface roughness.The surface roughness and m are negative exponential function correlation.The long-term strength τS is positively correlative to the surface roughness.

  20. Exotic geometric structures on Kodaira surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    McKay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    On all compact complex surfaces (modulo finite unramified coverings), we classify all of the locally homogeneous geometric structures which are locally isomorphic to the exotic homogeneous surfaces of Lie.

  1. Silicon surface structure-controlled oleophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Xiu, Yonghao; Hess, Dennis W; Wong, C P

    2010-06-01

    Superoleophobic surfaces display contact angles >150 degrees with liquids that have lower surface energies than does water. The design of superoleophobic surfaces requires an understanding of the effect of the geometrical shape of etched silicon surfaces on the contact angle and hysteresis observed when different liquids are brought into contact with these surfaces. This study used liquid-based metal-assisted etching and various silane treatments to create superoleophobic surfaces on a Si(111) surface. Etch conditions such as the etch time and etch solution concentration played critical roles in establishing the oleophobicity of Si(111). When compared to Young's contact angle, the apparent contact angle showed a transition from a Cassie to a Wenzel state for low-surface-energy liquids as different silane treatments were applied to the silicon surface. These results demonstrated the relationship between the re-entrant angle of etched surface structures and the contact angle transition between Cassie and Wenzel behavior on etched Si(111) surfaces.

  2. Highly charged ions interacting with carbon surfaces : An influence of surface structure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morgenstern, R; Winters, D; Schlatholter, T; Hoekstra, R

    Auger electron spectroscopy has been used to investigate the reaction of various carbon surfaces - including fullerene covered metal surfaces - on the impact of highly charged ions. An influence of the electronic surface structure on the interaction is clearly observed. However, the goal of

  3. Moulding of Sub-micrometer Surface Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pranov, Henrik; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2006-01-01

    The experiments strongly suggest that the possibility to injection mould sub-micrometer surface structures in polymers mainly relates to the forces originating from the adhesive energy between polymer and shim.......The experiments strongly suggest that the possibility to injection mould sub-micrometer surface structures in polymers mainly relates to the forces originating from the adhesive energy between polymer and shim....

  4. Evidence for water structuring forces between surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, Christopher B [ORNL; Rau, Dr. Donald [National Institutes of Health

    2011-01-01

    Structured water on apposing surfaces can generate significant energies due to reorganization and displacement as the surfaces encounter each other. Force measurements on a multitude of biological structures using the osmotic stress technique have elucidated commonalities that point toward an underlying hydration force. In this review, the forces of two contrasting systems are considered in detail: highly charged DNA and nonpolar, uncharged hydroxypropyl cellulose. Conditions for both net repulsion and attraction, along with the measured exclusion of chemically different solutes from these macromolecular surfaces, are explored and demonstrate features consistent with a hydration force origin. Specifically, the observed interaction forces can be reduced to the effects of perturbing structured surface water.

  5. Modeling of laser induced periodic surface structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skolski, J.Z.P.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.; Mitko, V.S.; Obona, J.V.; Ocelik, V.; Hosson, J.T.M. de

    2010-01-01

    In surfaces irradiated by short laser pulses, Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) have been observed on all kind of materials for over forty years. These LIPSS, also referred to as ripples, consist of wavy surfaces with periodicity equal or smaller than the wavelength of the laser radi

  6. Phonons on the clean metal surfaces and in adsorption structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, Galina G.; Chulkov, Evgenii V.

    2013-06-01

    The state-of-the-art studies of the vibrational dynamics of clean metal surfaces and metal surface structures formed upon the sub-monolayer adsorption of the atoms of various elements are considered. A brief historical survey of the milestones of investigations of surface phonons is presented. The results of studies of the atomic structure and vibration characteristics of surfaces with low and high Miller indices and adsorption structures are analyzed. It is demonstrated that vicinal surfaces of FCC metals tend to exhibit specific vibrational modes located on the step and polarized along the step. Irrespective of the type and position of adsorption or the substrate structure, the phonon spectra of sub-monolayer adsorption structures always tend to display two modes for combined translational displacements of adatoms and for coupled vibrations of substrate atoms and adatoms polarized in the direction normal to the surface. The bibliography includes 202 references.

  7. Systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Anyin; Luo, Qingjie

    2017-08-01

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions. In certain aspects, the invention provides methods that involve providing a metal and a solvent. The methods additionally involve applying voltage to the solvated metal to thereby produce solvent droplets including ions of the metal containing compound, and directing the solvent droplets including the metal ions to a target. In certain embodiments, once at the target, the metal ions can react directly or catalyze reactions.

  8. Systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Anyin; Luo, Qingjie

    2017-01-24

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions. In certain aspects, the invention provides methods that involve providing a metal and a solvent. The methods additionally involve applying voltage to the solvated metal to thereby produce solvent droplets including ions of the metal containing compound, and directing the solvent droplets including the metal ions to a target. In certain embodiments, once at the target, the metal ions can react directly or catalyze reactions.

  9. [Oligoglycine surface structures: molecular dynamics simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kova, O A; Khalatur, P G; Khokhlov, A R; Chinarev, A A; Tsygankova, S V; Bovin, N V

    2010-01-01

    The full-atomic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of adsorption mode for diantennary oligoglycines [H-Gly4-NH(CH2)5]2 onto graphite and mica surface is described. The resulting structure of adsorption layers is analyzed. The peptide second structure motives have been studied by both STRIDE (structural identification) and DSSP (dictionary of secondary structure of proteins) methods. The obtained results confirm the possibility of polyglycine II (PGII) structure formation in diantennary oligoglycine (DAOG) monolayers deposited onto graphite surface, which was earlier estimated based on atomic-force microscopy measurements.

  10. Structure and functions of fungal cell surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 24 references on the biochemistry, molecular structure, and function of cell surfaces of fungi, especially dermatophytes: the chemistry and structure of the cell wall, the effect of polyene antibiotics on the morphology and function of cytoplasmic membranes, and the chemical structure and function of pigments produced by various fungi are discussed.

  11. Laser Surface Preparation and Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical prebonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  12. Coherent flow structures at earth's surface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Venditti, J.G; Best, J.L; Church, M; Hardy, R.J

    2013-01-01

    This book reviews the recent progress in the study of the turbulent flows that sculpt the Earth's surface, focusing in particular on the organized structures that have been identified in recent years...

  13. Correlating simulated surface marks with near-surface tornado structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Michael I.

    Tornadoes often leave behind patterns of debris deposition, or "surface marks", which provide a direct signature of their near surface winds. The intent of this thesis is to investigate what can be learned about near-surface tornado structure and intensity through the properties of surface marks generated by simulated, debris-laden tornadoes. Earlier work showed through numerical simulations that the tornado's structure and intensity is highly sensitive to properties of the near-surface flow and can change rapidly in time for some conditions. The strongest winds often occur within tens of meters of the surface where the threat to human life and property is highest, and factors such as massive debris loadings and asymmetry of the main vortex have proven to be critical complications in some regimes. However, studying this portion of the flow in the field is problematic; while Doppler radar provides the best tornado wind field measurements, it cannot probe below about 20 m, and interpretation of Doppler data requires assumptions about tornado symmetry, steadiness in time, and correlation between scatterer and air velocities that are more uncertain near the surface. As early as 1967, Fujita proposed estimating tornado wind speeds from analysis of aerial photography and ground documentation of surface marks. A handful of studies followed but were limited by difficulties in interpreting physical origins of the marks, and little scientific attention has been paid to them since. Here, Fujita's original idea is revisited in the context of three-dimensional, large-eddy simulations of tornadoes with fully-coupled debris. In this thesis, the origins of the most prominent simulated marks are determined and compared with historical interpretations of real marks. The earlier hypothesis that cycloidal surface marks were directly correlated with the paths of individual vortices (either the main vortex or its secondary vortices, when present) is unsupported by the simulation results

  14. Long Range Surface Plasmons in Multilayer Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Delfan, Aida

    2013-01-01

    We present a new strategy, based on a Fresnel coefficient pole analysis, for designing an asymmetric multilayer structure that supports long range surface plasmons (LRSP). We find that the electric field intensity in the metal layer of a multilayer LRSP structure can be even slightly smaller than in the metal layer of the corresponding symmetric LRSP structure, minimizing absorption losses and resulting in LRSP propagation lengths up to 2mm. With a view towards biosensing applications, we also present semi-analytic expressions for a standard surface sensing parameter in arbitrary planar resonant structures, and in particular show that for an asymmetric structure consisting of a gold film deposited on a multilayer of SiO2 and TiO2 a surface sensing parameter G = 1.28(1/nm) can be achieved.

  15. SIMULATION OF STRONG TURBULENCE FLOW WITH FREE SURFACE INCLUDING THE EFFECTS OF STREAMLINE CURVATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Hui-chao; LIU Yu-ling; WEI Wen-li

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a mathematical model for two-dimensional strong turbulence flow with free surface including the effects of streamline curvature in orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system, with which the characteristics of the turbulence flow field on the ogee spillway was numerical simulated. In the numerical simulation, the flow control equations in orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system were discretized by the finite volume method, the physical parameters( P, U,V,K,ε,γt,etc.) were arranged on a staggered grid, the discretized equations were solved with the SIMPLEC method, and the complex free surface was dealt with VOF method. The computed results show that the velocity fields, pressure field, shear stress distribution and kinetic energy of turbulent flow on the ogee spillway are in agreement with experimental data. This confirms that the model can be used for numerical simulation of the turbulence flow on ogee spillway.

  16. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Structures Including Metallic Glass-Based Materials Using Ultrasonic Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Roberts, Scott N. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention fabricate objects including metallic glass-based materials using ultrasonic welding. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes a metallic glass-based material includes: ultrasonically welding at least one ribbon to a surface; where at least one ribbon that is ultrasonically welded to a surface has a thickness of less than approximately 150.mu.m; and where at least one ribbon that is ultrasonically welded to a surface includes a metallic glass-based material.

  17. The Surface Structure of Relative Clauses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Michael A.

    1974-01-01

    This article attempts to show that a more rigorous approach to surface structure analysis can reveal distinctions just as subtle as those discovered through analyzing deep structures or transformations. Relative clauses are examined in relation to nominal constructions, and alternatives to restrictive and non-restrictive classifications are…

  18. Sub-µm structured lotus surfaces manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worgull, Matthias; Heckele, Mathias; Mappes, Timo

    2009-01-01

    . Unlike to stochastic methods, patterning with a LIGA-mold insert it is possible to structure surfaces very uniformly or even with controlled variations (e.g., with gradients). In this paper we present the process chain to realize polymer sub-lm structures with minimum lateral feature size of 400 nm...

  19. Sub-µ structured Lotus Surfaces Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worgull, Matthias; Heckele, Mathias; Mappes, Timo

    2008-01-01

    . Unlike to stochastic methods, patternin¬g with a LIGA-mold insert it is possible to structure surfaces very uniformly or even with controlled variations (e.g. with gradients). In this paper we present the process chain to realize polymer sub-micro structures with minimum lateral feature size of 400 nm...

  20. Pressurizable structures comprising different surface sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koussios, S.; Bergsma, O.K.; Beukers, A.

    2004-01-01

    The invention relates to composite pressurizable structures which are overwound with fibres or are braided. The pressurizable structures comprise axial sections which in turn comprise both concave and convex surfaces. The shape characteristics are related to geodesic as well as non-geodesic trajecto

  1. Longitudinal surface structures (flowstripes on Antarctic glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Glasser

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal surface structures (''flowstripes'' are common on many glaciers but their origin and significance are poorly understood. In this paper we present observations of the development of these longitudinal structures from four different Antarctic glacier systems (the Lambert Glacier/Amery Ice Shelf area, outlet glaciers in the Ross Sea sector, ice-shelf tributary glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula, and the onset zone of a tributary to the Recovery Glacier Ice Stream in the Filchner Ice Shelf area. Mapping from optical satellite images demonstrates that longitudinal surface structures develop in two main situations: (1 as relatively wide flow stripes within glacier flow units and (2 as relatively narrow flow stripes where there is convergent flow around nunataks or at glacier confluence zones. Our observations indicate that the confluence features are narrower, sharper, and more clearly defined features. They are characterised by linear troughs or depressions on the ice surface and are much more common than the former type. Longitudinal surface structures within glacier flow units have previously been explained as the surface expression of localised bed perturbations but a universal explanation for those forming at glacier confluences is lacking. Here we propose that these features are formed at zones of ice acceleration and extensional flow at glacier confluences. We provide a schematic model for the development of longitudinal surface structures based on extensional flow that can explain their ridge and trough morphology as well as their down-ice persistence.

  2. Thermal Tomography of Asteroid Surface Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the surface thermal inertia of an asteroid can provide insight into surface structure: porous material has a lower thermal inertia than rock. We develop a means to estimate thermal inertia values of asteroids and use it to show that thermal inertia appears to increase with spin period in the case of main-belt asteroids (MBAs). Similar behavior is found on the basis of thermophysical modeling for near-Earth objects (NEOs). We interpret our results in terms of rapidly increasing material density and thermal conductivity with depth, and provide evidence that thermal inertia increases by factors of 10 (MBAs) to 20 (NEOs) within a depth of just 10 cm. Our results are consistent with a very general picture of rapidly changing material properties in the topmost regolith layers of asteroids and have important implications for calculations of the Yarkovsky effect, including its perturbation of the orbits of potentially hazardous objects and those of asteroid family members after the break-up event. Eviden...

  3. Thermal Tomography of Asteroid Surface Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alan W.; Drube, Line

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the surface thermal inertia of an asteroid can provide insight into its surface structure: porous material has a lower thermal inertia than rock. We develop a means to estimate thermal inertia values of asteroids and use it to show that thermal inertia appears to increase with spin period in the case of main-belt asteroids (MBAs). Similar behavior is found on the basis of thermophysical modeling for near-Earth objects (NEOs). We interpret our results in terms of rapidly increasing material density and thermal conductivity with depth, and provide evidence that thermal inertia increases by factors of 10 (MBAs) to 20 (NEOs) within a depth of just 10 cm. Our results are consistent with a very general picture of rapidly changing material properties in the topmost regolith layers of asteroids and have important implications for calculations of the Yarkovsky effect, including its perturbation of the orbits of potentially hazardous objects and those of asteroid family members after the break-up event. Evidence of a rapid increase of thermal inertia with depth is also an important result for studies of the ejecta-enhanced momentum transfer of impacting vehicles (“kinetic impactors”) in planetary defense.

  4. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Harry W.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  5. Surface and grain boundary scattering in nanometric Cu thin films: A quantitative analysis including twin boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barmak, Katayun [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 and Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Darbal, Amith [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Ganesh, Kameswaran J.; Ferreira, Paulo J. [Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Rickman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Sun, Tik; Yao, Bo; Warren, Andrew P.; Coffey, Kevin R., E-mail: kb2612@columbia.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The relative contributions of various defects to the measured resistivity in nanocrystalline Cu were investigated, including a quantitative account of twin-boundary scattering. It has been difficult to quantitatively assess the impact twin boundary scattering has on the classical size effect of electrical resistivity, due to limitations in characterizing twin boundaries in nanocrystalline Cu. In this study, crystal orientation maps of nanocrystalline Cu films were obtained via precession-assisted electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope. These orientation images were used to characterize grain boundaries and to measure the average grain size of a microstructure, with and without considering twin boundaries. The results of these studies indicate that the contribution from grain-boundary scattering is the dominant factor (as compared to surface scattering) leading to enhanced resistivity. The resistivity data can be well-described by the combined Fuchs–Sondheimer surface scattering model and Mayadas–Shatzkes grain-boundary scattering model using Matthiessen's rule with a surface specularity coefficient of p = 0.48 and a grain-boundary reflection coefficient of R = 0.26.

  6. Photoelectron spectroscopy bulk and surface electronic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Suga, Shigemasa

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is now becoming more and more required to investigate electronic structures of various solid materials in the bulk, on surfaces as well as at buried interfaces. The energy resolution was much improved in the last decade down to 1 meV in the low photon energy region. Now this technique is available from a few eV up to 10 keV by use of lasers, electron cyclotron resonance lamps in addition to synchrotron radiation and X-ray tubes. High resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) is now widely applied to band mapping of materials. It attracts a wide attention from both fundamental science and material engineering. Studies of the dynamics of excited states are feasible by time of flight spectroscopy with fully utilizing the pulse structures of synchrotron radiation as well as lasers including the free electron lasers (FEL). Spin resolved studies also made dramatic progress by using higher efficiency spin detectors and two dimensional spin detectors. Polarization depend...

  7. Crystallography and surface structure an introduction for surface scientists and nanoscientists

    CERN Document Server

    Hermann, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    A valuable learning tool as well as a reference, this book provides students and researchers in surface science and nanoscience with the theoretical crystallographic foundations, which are necessary to understand local structure and symmetry of bulk crystals, including ideal and real single crystal surfaces. The author deals with the subject at an introductory level, providing numerous graphic examples to illustrate the mathematical formalism. The book brings together and logically connects many seemingly disparate structural issues and notations used frequently by surface scientists and nanoscientists. Numerous exercises of varying difficulty, ranging from simple questions to small research projects, are included to stimulate discussions about the different subjects.

  8. Numerical Modeling of the Surface Fatigue Crack Propagation Including the Closure Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guchinsky, Ruslan; Petinov, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Presently modeling of surface fatigue crack growth for residual life assessment of structural elements is almost entirely based on application of the Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM). Generally, it is assumed that the crack front does not essentially change its shape, although it is not always confirmed by experiment. Furthermore, LEFM approach cannot be applied when the stress singularity vanishes due to material plasticity, one of the leading factors associated with the material degradation and fracture. Also, evaluation of stress intensity factors meets difficulties associated with changes in the stress state along the crack front circumference. An approach proposed for simulation the evolution of surface cracks based on application of the Strain-life criterion for fatigue failure and of the finite element modeling of damage accumulation. It takes into account the crack closure effect, the nonlinear behavior of damage accumulation and material compliance increasing due to the damage advance. The damage accumulation technique was applied to model the semi-elliptical crack growth from the initial defect in the steel compact specimen. The results of simulation are in good agreement with the published experimental data.

  9. Super water repellent surface 'strictly' mimicking the surface structure of lotus leaf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Tae Gon; Kim, Ho Young [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Jin Woo; Lee, Kwang Ryeol; Moon, Myoung Woon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    To achieve the hierarchy of roughness as observed in lotus leaves, most artificial water-repellent surfaces have nano-asperities on top of micropillars. However, observation of real lotus leaves through SEM reveals that nonoscale roughness covers the entire surface including the base as well as bumps. Thus we fabricate surfaces having the same hierarchical roughness structure as the lotus leaf by forming nanopillars on both micropillars and base. We compare the measures of water-repellency (static contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, and transition pressure between the Cassie and Wenzel states) of the lotus-like surface with those of surfaces having single micro- and nano- roughness. The results show that nanoscale roughness covering entire surface area leads to superior water-repellency to other surface roughness structures. We also give a theoretical consideration of this observation.

  10. Surface Appendages of Archaea: Structure, Function, Genetics and Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Siu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisms representing diverse subgroupings of the Domain Archaea are known to possess unusual surface structures. These can include ones unique to Archaea such as cannulae and hami as well as archaella (archaeal flagella and various types of pili that superficially resemble their namesakes in Bacteria, although with significant differences. Major advances have occurred particularly in the study of archaella and pili using model organisms with recently developed advanced genetic tools. There is common use of a type IV pili-model of assembly for several archaeal surface structures including archaella, certain pili and sugar binding structures termed bindosomes. In addition, there are widespread posttranslational modifications of archaellins and pilins with N-linked glycans, with some containing novel sugars. Archaeal surface structures are involved in such diverse functions as swimming, attachment to surfaces, cell to cell contact resulting in genetic transfer, biofilm formation, and possible intercellular communication. Sometimes functions are co-dependent on other surface structures. These structures and the regulation of their assembly are important features that allow various Archaea, including thermoacidophilic, hyperthermophilic, halophilic, and anaerobic ones, to survive and thrive in the extreme environments that are commonly inhabited by members of this domain.

  11. Surface structure and electronic properties of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Somorjai, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    A surface potential model is developed to explain dopant effects on chemical vapor deposition. Auger analysis of the interaction between allotropic forms of carbon and silicon films has shown Si-C formation for all forms by glassy carbon. LEED intensity measurements have been used to determine the mean square displacement of surface atoms of silicon single crystals, and electron loss spectroscopy has shown the effect of structure and impurities on surface states located within the band gap. A thin film of Al has been used to enhance film crystallinity at low temperature.

  12. Beyond the surface atlas: A roadmap and gazetteer for surface symmetry and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Stephen J.; Pratt, Stephanie J.

    2007-10-01

    , highlights elementary one-dimensional (1D) features lying parallel to the surface plane. Crucial to the utility of these concepts is that both structure and symmetry can conveniently be represented independently within a single stereographic projection; this then serves as a "roadmap" that fully embodies the essential relationships between different surfaces and facilitates navigation amongst them. Key locations on the map identify surfaces of particular structural simplicity, which are collated in a "gazetteer" with an accompanying description of their essential symmetry and structural character. Our symmetry-structure surface stereography (4S) analysis of fcc, bcc and hcp crystals reveals various new insights about the types of surface that they present. For instance, although the asymmetry of chiral fcc planes has hitherto been associated with the presence of kink sites, we show that the same is not always true of either bcc or hcp chiral surfaces. Kink-free chiral bcc planes offer particular advantages as model systems for asymmetric applications. We further reveal that the hcp crystal structure gives rise to intriguing types of surface that are not observed for either fcc or bcc materials. These include surfaces with intrinsic glide symmetry, surfaces with intrinsic racemic character and others displaying intrinsic double-chirality, analogous to the existence of diastereoisomers in molecular chemistry. We also identify several elementary surface structural categories that are specific to the hcp case. Having thus established a secure framework via ideal bulk-terminated crystalline surfaces, we subsequently demonstrate its extension to real surfaces. In considering how these differ from ideal surfaces we discuss relaxation and reconstruction within the same symmetry-resolved and structure-resolved perspective, drawing on numerous examples from the literature. Finally we illustrate the application of our scheme in one selected branch of surface science by exploring the

  13. Structure of adsorbed monolayers. The surface chemical bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, G.A.; Bent, B.E.

    1984-06-01

    This paper attempts to provide a summary of what has been learned about the structure of adsorbed monolayers and about the surface chemical bond from molecular surface science. While the surface chemical bond is less well understood than bonding of molecules in the gas phase or in the solid state, our knowledge of its properties is rapidly accumulating. The information obtained also has great impact on many surface science based technologies, including heterogeneous catalysis and electronic devices. It is hoped that much of the information obtained from studies at solid-gas interfaces can be correlated with molecular behavior at solid-liquid interfaces. 31 references, 42 figures, 1 table.

  14. Formation of Surface Corrosion-Resistant Nanocrystalline Structures on Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykyforchyn, Hryhoriy; Kyryliv, Volodymyr; Maksymiv, Olha; Slobodyan, Zvenomyra; Tsyrulnyk, Oleksandr

    2016-12-01

    Engineering materials with nanocrystalline structure could be exploited under simultaneous action of mechanical loading and corrosion environments; therefore, their corrosion resistance is important. Surface nanocrystalline structure was generated on middle carbon steels by severe plastic deformation using the method of mechanical pulse friction treatment. This treatment additionally includes high temperature phase transformation and alloying. Using a complex of the corrosive, electrochemical and physical investigations, it was established that nanocrystalline structures can be characterized by lower or increased corrosion resistance in comparison with the reference material. It is caused by the action of two confronting factors: arising energy level and anticorrosive alloying of the surface layer.

  15. Melamine structures on the Au(111) surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silly, Fabien; Shaw, Adam Q.; Castell, Martin R.; Briggs, G. A. D.; Mura, Manuela; Martsinovich, Natalia; Kantorovich, Lev

    2008-01-01

    We report on a joint experimental and theoretical study of the ordered structures of melamine molecules formed on the Au(111)-(22 x root 3) surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images taken under UHV conditions reveal two distinct monolayers one of which has never been reported before on gol

  16. Surface and Core Electronic Structure of Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor A. Nama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio restricted Hartree-Fock method within the framework of large unit cell formalism is used to simulate silicon nanocrystals between 216 and 1000 atoms (1.6–2.65 nm in diameter that include Bravais and primitive cell multiples. The investigated properties include core and oxidized surface properties. Results revealed that electronic properties converge to some limit as the size of the nanocrystal increases. Increasing the size of the core of a nanocrystal resulted in an increase of the energy gap, valence band width, and cohesive energy. The lattice constant of the core and oxidized surface parts shows a decreasing trend as the nanocrystal increases in a size that converges to 5.28 Ǻ in a good agreement with the experiment. Surface and core convergence to the same lattice constant reflects good adherence of oxide layer at the surface. The core density of states shows highly degenerate states that split at the oxygenated (001-(1×1 surface due to symmetry breaking. The nanocrystal surface shows smaller gap and higher valence and conduction bands when compared to the core part, due to oxygen surface atoms and reduced structural symmetry. The smaller surface energy gap shows that energy gap of the nanocrystal is controlled by the surface part. Unlike the core part, the surface part shows a descending energy gap that proves its obedience to quantum confinement effects. Nanocrystal geometry proved to have some influence on all electronic properties including the energy gap.

  17. Nanocoating of titanium implant surfaces with organic molecules. Polysaccharides including glycosaminoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurzawska, Katarzyna; Svava, Rikke; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2012-01-01

    and roughness. This influences cell behaviour on the surface such as adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells as well as the mineralization of the extracellular matrix at the implant surfaces. The aim of the present systematic review was to describe organic molecules used for surface nanocoating...

  18. Pool Boiling Heat Transfer on structured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, J.; Olbricht, M.; Müller, B.; Luke, A.

    2016-09-01

    The development in the process and energy sector shows the importance of efficient utilization of available resources to improve thermal devices. To achieve this goal, all thermal components have to be optimized continuously. Various applications of multi-phase heat and mass transfer have to be improved. Therefore, the heat transfer and the influence of surface roughness in nucleate boiling with the working fluid propane is experimentally investigated on structured mild steel tubes, because only few data are available in the literature. The mild steel tube is sandblasted to obtain different surface roughness. The measurements are carried out over wide ranges of heat flux and pressure. The experimental results are compared with correlations from literature and the effect of surface roughness on the heat transfer is discussed. It is shown that the heat transfer coefficient increases with increasing surface roughness, heat flux and reduced pressure at nucleate pool boiling.

  19. Surface structure of oriented PET films

    CERN Document Server

    Kirov, K

    2001-01-01

    crystallinity and the level of molecular orientation of the polymer are highest at the film surface and gradually decrease away from it. The same trend for an increase in structural order nearer the film surface was observed in a series of PET films drawn uniaxially in laboratory conditions. The observed strong dependence of stratification in the oriented films on drawing ratio, lead to the conclusion, that the structural gradients arise as a result of viscous flow. The molecular mechanism of stratification is discussed and leads to the idea of enhanced chain mobility at the PET film surface. The idea is in line with recent studies showing a depression of the glass transition temperature of free polymer surfaces. In addition, the results on structure formation in PET films during drawing, give support to the existing view that polymer crystallisation is assisted by a spinodal-decomposition nucleation process. Polymer films are widely used as substrates in nano-composite materials and therefore have to possess...

  20. Nanoscale Structuring of Surfaces by Using Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Nicolas; Hess, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Controlled structuring of surfaces is interesting for a wide variety of areas, including microelectronic device fabrication, optical devices, bio(sensing), (electro-, photo)catalysis, batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, and sorption. A unique feature of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the possibility to form conformal uniform coatings on arbitrarily shaped materials with controlled atomic-scale thickness. In this Minireview, we discuss the potential of ALD for the nanoscale structuring of surfaces, highlighting its versatile application to structuring both planar substrates and powder materials. Recent progress in the application of ALD to porous substrates has even made the nanoscale structuring of high-surface-area materials now feasible, thereby enabling novel applications, such as those in the fields of catalysis and alternative energy.

  1. Structurally tuned iridescent surfaces inspired by nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deparis, Olivier; Rassart, Marie; Vandenbem, Cedric; Welch, Victoria; Vigneron, Jean Pol [Laboratoire de Physique du Solide, University of Namur, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Lucas, Stephane [Laboratoire d' Analyses par Reactions Nucleaires, University of Namur, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium)], E-mail: olivier.deparis@fundp.ac.be

    2008-01-15

    Iridescent surfaces exhibit vivid colours which change with the angle of incidence or viewing due to optical wave interference in the multilayer structure present at the wavelength scale underneath the surface. In nature, one can find examples of iridescent Coleoptera for which the hue changes either greatly or slightly with the angle. Because these species typically make these structures from a single biological material (usually chitin) and air or water as the low refractive index component, they have evolved by adjusting the layer thicknesses in order to display quite different iridescent aspects. Taking inspiration from this proven strategy, we have designed and fabricated periodic TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} multilayer films in order to demonstrate the concept of structurally tuned iridescent surfaces. Titanium or silicon oxide layers were deposited on a glass substrate using dc reactive or RF magnetron sputtering techniques, respectively. Two structures were designed for which the period and the TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} layer thickness ratio were varied in such a way that the films displayed radically different iridescent aspects: a reddish-to-greenish changing hue and a stable bluish hue. The fabricated samples were characterized through specular reflectance/transmittance measurements. Modelling of transmittance spectra using standard multilayer film theory confirmed the high quality of the twelve-period Bragg reflectors. The chromaticity coordinates, which were calculated from measured reflectance spectra taken at different angles, were in accordance with theoretical predictions.

  2. Damped structural dynamics models of large wind-turbine blades including material and structural damping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chortis, D I; Chrysochoidis, N A; Saravanos, D A [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautics, University of Patras, Patras 26500 (Greece)

    2007-07-15

    The paper presents a brief description of composite damping mechanics for blade sections of arbitrary lamination and geometry. A damped 3-D shear beam element is presented enabling the assembly of damped structural dynamic models of blades with hollow multi-cell tubular laminated sections. Emphasis is placed to the inclusion of composite material coupling effects, first in the blade section stiffness and damping matrices and finally into the stiffness and damping matrices of the finite element. Evaluations of the beam element are presented, to quantify the material coupling effect on composite beams of simple box sections. Correlations between predicted and measured modal frequencies and damping values in small model Glass/Epoxy are also shown. Finally, the damped modal characteristics of a 35m realistic wind-turbine blade model design, are predicted.

  3. Superhydrophobic Behavior on Nano-structured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Daniel

    2008-05-01

    Superhydrophobic behavior is observed in natural occurrences and has been thoroughly studied over the past few years. Water repellant properties on uniform arrays of vertically aligned nano-cones were investigated to determine the highest achievable contact angle (a measure of water drop repellency), which is measured from the reference plane on which the water drop sits to the tangent line of the point at which the drop makes contact with the reference plane. At low aspect ratios (height vs. width of the nano-cones), surface tension pulls the water into the nano-cone array, resulting in a wetted surface. Higher aspect ratios reverse the effect of the surface tension, resulting in a larger contact angle that causes water drops to roll off the surface. Fiber drawing, bundling, and redrawing are used to produce the structured array glass composite surface. Triple-drawn fibers are fused together, annealed, and sliced into thin wafers. The surface of the composite glass is etched to form nano-cones through a differential etching process and then coated with a fluorinated self-assembled monolayer (SAM). Cone aspect ratios can be varied through changes in the chemistry and concentration of the etching acid solution. Superhydrophobic behavior occurs at contact angles >150 and it is predicted and measured that optimal behavior is achieved when the aspect ratio is 4:1, which displays contact angles >=175 .

  4. Surface-wave mode coupling : modelling and inverting waveforms including body-wave phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquering, H.A.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with a similar problem as addressed by Li & Tanimoto (1993) in the surfacewave mode approach. In this thesis it is shown that surface-wave mode coupling is required when body-wave phases in laterally heterogeneous media are modelled by surface-wave mode summation. An efficie

  5. Advances on surface structural determination by LEED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Edmar A; De Carvalho, Vagner E [Departamento de Fisica, ICEX, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-090, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); De Castilho, Caio M C, E-mail: edmar@fisica.ufmg.br [Grupo de Fisica de SuperfIcies e Materiais, Instituto de Fisica and Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia em Energia e Ambiente (CIENAM)INCT-E and A, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitario da Federacao, 40170-115, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2011-08-03

    In the last 40 years, low energy electron diffraction (LEED) has proved to be the most reliable quantitative technique for surface structural determination. In this review, recent developments related to the theory that gives support to LEED structural determination are discussed under a critical analysis of the main theoretical approximation-the muffin-tin calculation. The search methodologies aimed at identifying the best matches between theoretical and experimental intensity versus voltage curves are also considered, with the most recent procedures being reviewed in detail. (topical review)

  6. Advances on surface structural determination by LEED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Edmar A; de Castilho, Caio M C; de Carvalho, Vagner E

    2011-08-03

    In the last 40 years, low energy electron diffraction (LEED) has proved to be the most reliable quantitative technique for surface structural determination. In this review, recent developments related to the theory that gives support to LEED structural determination are discussed under a critical analysis of the main theoretical approximation-the muffin-tin calculation. The search methodologies aimed at identifying the best matches between theoretical and experimental intensity versus voltage curves are also considered, with the most recent procedures being reviewed in detail.

  7. Structured light for focusing surface plasmon polaritons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z J; Tan, P S; Zhu, S W; Yuan, X-C

    2010-05-10

    We propose a structureless method for focusing surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on a flat metal film under illumination of radially polarized cogwheel-like structured light beams. Without metal structures, the locally induced SPPs can further be propagated following the predefined patterns to form symmetric focal spots with dimensions beyond diffraction limit. Benefiting from the radial polarization, this method can be employed to pattern various center-symmetric evanescent distributions for generating SPPs reconfigurably. The SPPs will be propagating and focusing in radial directions.

  8. Single crystal surface structure by bragg scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens

    1985-01-01

    X-ray diffraction is becoming an important tool in the measurements of surface structures. Single crystalline samples are used as in Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED)-studies. The X-ray technique is somewhat more involved due to the need of bright, collimated photon sources, in general...... synchrotron X-rays, and of very accurate angular settings in the ultrahigh-vacuum environment of the sample. We present the technique and discuss examples of experimental results....

  9. Condensation and Wetting Dynamics on Micro/Nano-Structured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olceroglu, Emre

    Because of their adjustable wetting characteristics, micro/nanostructured surfaces are attractive for the enhancement of phase-change heat transfer where liquid-solid-vapor interactions are important. Condensation, evaporation, and boiling processes are traditionally used in a variety of applications including water harvesting, desalination, industrial power generation, HVAC, and thermal management systems. Although they have been studied by numerous researchers, there is currently a lack of understanding of the underlying mechanisms by which structured surfaces improve heat transfer during phase-change. This PhD dissertation focuses on condensation onto engineered surfaces including fabrication aspect, the physics of phase-change, and the operational limitations of engineered surfaces. While superhydrophobic condensation has been shown to produce high heat transfer rates, several critical issues remain in the field. These include surface manufacturability, heat transfer coefficient measurement limitations at low heat fluxes, failure due to surface flooding at high supersaturations, insufficient modeling of droplet growth rates, and the inherent issues associated with maintenance of non-wetted surface structures. Each of these issues is investigated in this thesis, leading to several contributions to the field of condensation on engineered surfaces. A variety of engineered surfaces have been fabricated and characterized, including nanostructured and hierarchically-structured superhydrophobic surfaces. The Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is used here as a biological template for the fabrication of nickel nanostructures, which are subsequently functionalized to achieve superhydrophobicity. This technique is simple and sustainable, and requires no applied heat or external power, thus making it easily extendable to a variety of common heat transfer materials and complex geometries. To measure heat transfer rates during superhydrophobic condensation in the presence of non

  10. Derivation of a viscous KP including surface tension, and related equations

    CERN Document Server

    Meur, Hervé Le

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to derive surface wave models in the presence of surface tension and viscosity. Using the Navier-Stokes equations with a free surface, flat bottom and surface tension, we derive the viscous 2D Boussinesq system with a weak transverse variation. The assumed transverse variation is on a larger scale than along the main propagation direction. This Boussinesq system is only an intermediate result that enables us to derive the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation which is a 2D generalization of the KdV equation. In addition, we get the 1D KdV equation, and lastly the Boussinesq equation. All these equations are derived for non-vanishing initial conditions.

  11. Sulfur-induced structural motifs on copper and gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walen, Holly [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of sulfur with copper and gold surfaces plays a fundamental role in important phenomena that include coarsening of surface nanostructures, and self-assembly of alkanethiols. Here, we identify and analyze unique sulfur-induced structural motifs observed on the low-index surfaces of these two metals. We seek out these structures in an effort to better understand the fundamental interactions between these metals and sulfur that lends to the stability and favorability of metal-sulfur complexes vs. chemisorbed atomic sulfur. The experimental observations presented here—made under identical conditions—together with extensive DFT analyses, allow comparisons and insights into factors that favor the existence of metal-sulfur complexes, vs. chemisorbed atomic sulfur, on metal terraces. We believe this data will be instrumental in better understanding the complex phenomena occurring between the surfaces of coinage metals and sulfur.

  12. Structural and spectroscopic studies of surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Laitenberger, P

    1996-01-01

    and on a 10ML thick Ar spacer layer, a remarkable substrate dependence is revealed. A new STM-based technique for fabricating simple metal-structures with dimensions in the 10-100nm regime which are partially electrically isolated from their environment was developed in collaboration with Dr. L. A. Silva. This technique employs the STM tip as a mechanical nanofabrication tool to machine gaps into a thin metallic film deposited on an insulating substrate, which laterally confine and electrically isolate the desired metal regions. Several metal structures, such as nanoscale wires and pads, were successfully created. Finally, the conceptual basis and present stage of construction of a new surface analytical tool, the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer (SPELS), is discussed. The SPELS offers the exciting prospect of collecting structural as well as spectroscopic information with a spatial resolution of a few nanometres. Once successfully developed, it will be ideally suited for spectroscopic studies of nanos...

  13. Architectural Surfaces and Structures from Circular Arcs

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Ling

    2013-12-01

    In recent decades, the popularity of freeform shapes in contemporary architecture poses new challenges to digital design. One of them is the process of rationalization, i.e. to make freeform skins or structures affordable to manufacture, which draws the most attention from geometry researchers. In this thesis, we aim to realize this process with simple geometric primitives, circular arcs. We investigate architectural surfaces and structures consisting of circular arcs. Our focus is lying on how to employ them nicely and repetitively in architectural design, in order to decrease the cost in manufacturing. Firstly, we study Darboux cyclides, which are algebraic surfaces of order ≤ 4. We provide a computational tool to identify all families of circles on a given cyclide based on the spherical model of M ̈obius geometry. Practical ways to design cyclide patches that pass through certain inputs are presented. In particular, certain triples of circle families on Darboux cyclides may be suitably arranged as 3-webs. We provide a complete classification of all possible 3-webs of circles on Darboux cyclides. We then investigate the circular arc snakes, which are smooth sequences of circu- lar arcs. We evolve the snakes such that their curvature, as a function of arc length, remains unchanged. The evolution of snakes is utilized to approximate given surfaces by circular arcs or to generated freeform shapes, and it is realized by a 2-step pro- cess. More interestingly, certain 6-arc snake with boundary constraints can produce a smooth self motion, which can be employed to build flexible structures. Another challenging topic is approximating smooth freeform skins with simple panels. We contribute to this problem area by approximating a negatively-curved 5 surface with a smooth union of rational bilinear patches. We provide a proof for vertex consistency of hyperbolic nets using the CAGD approach of the rational B ́ezier form. Moreover, we use Darboux transformations for the

  14. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical pre-bonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  15. Global Surface Solar Energy Anomalies Including El Nino and La Nina Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Brown, D. E.; Chandler, W. S.; DiPasquale, R. C.; Ritchey, Nancy A.; Gupta, Shashi K.; Wilber, Anne C.; Kratz, David P.; Stackhouse, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper synthesizes past events in an attempt to define the general magnitude, duration, and location of large surface solar anomalies over the globe. Surface solar energy values are mostly a function of solar zenith angle, cloud conditions, column atmospheric water vapor, aerosols, and surface albedo. For this study, solar and meteorological parameters for the 10-yr period July 1983 through June 1993 are used. These data were generated as part of the Release 3 Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) activity under the NASA Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) effort. Release 3 SSE uses upgraded input data and methods relative to previous releases. Cloud conditions are based on recent NASA Version-D International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) global satellite radiation and cloud data. Meteorological inputs are from Version-I Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) reanalysis data that uses both weather station and satellite information. Aerosol transmission for different regions and seasons are for an 'average' year based on historic solar energy data from over 1000 ground sites courtesy of Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). These data are input to a new Langley Parameterized Shortwave Algorithm (LPSA) that calculates surface albedo and surface solar energy. That algorithm is an upgraded version of the 'Staylor' algorithm. Calculations are performed for a 280X280 km equal-area grid system over the globe based on 3-hourly input data. A bi-linear interpolation process is used to estimate data output values on a 1 X 1 degree grid system over the globe. Maximum anomalies are examined relative to El Nino and La Nina events in the tropical Pacific Ocean. Maximum year-to-year anomalies over the globe are provided for a 10-year period. The data may assist in the design of systems with increased reliability. It may also allow for better planning for emergency assistance during some atypical events.

  16. Neisserial surface lipoproteins: structure, function and biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooda, Yogesh; Shin, Hyejin E; Bateman, Thomas J; Moraes, Trevor F

    2017-03-01

    The surface of many Gram-negative bacteria contains lipidated protein molecules referred to as surface lipoproteins or SLPs. SLPs play critical roles in host immune evasion, nutrient acquisition and regulation of the bacterial stress response. The focus of this review is on the SLPs present in Neisseria, a genus of bacteria that colonise the mucosal surfaces of animals. Neisseria contains two pathogens of medical interest, namely Neisseria meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae. Several SLPs have been identified in Neisseria and their study has elucidated key strategies used by these pathogens to survive inside the human body. Herein, we focus on the identification, structure and function of SLPs that have been identified in Neisseria. We also survey the translocation pathways used by these SLPs to reach the cell surface. Specifically, we elaborate on the strategies used by neisserial SLPs to translocate across the outer membrane with an emphasis on Slam, a novel outer membrane protein that has been implicated in SLP biogenesis. Taken together, the study of SLPs in Neisseria illustrates the widespread roles played by this family of proteins in Gram-negative bacteria. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Predicting transmission of structure-borne sound power from machines by including terminal cross-coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlrich, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Structure-borne sound generated by audible vibration of machines in vehicles, equipment and house-hold appliances is often a major cause of noise. Such vibration of complex machines is mostly determined and quantified by measurements. It has been found that characterization of the vibratory source......, especially at mid- and high-frequencies. For structurally compact machines, however, the influence of cross-coupling cannot always be ignored. The present paper addresses this problem and examines the transmission of structure-borne sound power by including spatial cross-coupling between pairs...

  18. Integrated optoelectronic probe including a vertical cavity surface emitting laser for laser Doppler perfusion monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serov, Alexander N.; Nieland, Janharm; Oosterbaan, Sjoerd; Mul, de Frits F.M.; Kranenburg, van Herma; Bekman, Herman H.P.Th.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2006-01-01

    An integrated optoelectronic probe with small dimensions, for direct-contact laser Doppler blood flow monitoring has been realized. A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL), and a chip with photodetectors and all necessary electronics are integrated in a miniature probe head connected to a l

  19. Integrated Optoelectronic Probe Including a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser for Laser Doppler Perfusion Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serov, A.N.; Nieland, J.; Oosterbaan, S.; Steenbergen, W.; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Mul, F.F.M. de; Kranenburg, H. van

    2006-01-01

    An integrated optoelectronic probe with small dimensions, for direct-contact laser Doppler blood flow monitoring has been realized. A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL), and a chip with photodetectors and all necessary electronics are integrated in a miniature probe head connected to a l

  20. Electronic Structure and Catalysis on Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Jeff; Norskov, Jens K.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2002-10-01

    The powerful computational resources available to scientists today, together with recent improvements in electronic structure calculation algorithms, are providing important new tools for researchers in the fields of surface science and catalysis. In this review, we discuss first principles calculations that are now capable of providing qualitative and, in many cases, quantitative insights into surface chemistry. The calculations can aid in the establishment of chemisorption trends across the transition metals, in the characterization of reaction pathways on individual metals, and in the design of novel catalysts. First principles studies provide an excellent fundamental complement to experimental investigations of the above phenomena and can often allow the elucidation of important mechanistic details that would be difficult, if not impossible, to determine from experiments alone.

  1. Structure and thermodynamics of surface recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, G.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Interactions of the surface glycoprotein, gp120, with the receptors of host cells define the pathogenesis of HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS. gp120 is made of several disulfide-bridged loops--the amino acid sequences of some of these loops are fairly conserved whereas the rest are variable. The third variable (V3) loop has been the target of vaccine design for quite some time since this loop is involved in various steps of viral pathogenesis. However, this loop also happens to be the most variable one. The authors have carried out structural and immunological studies to determine the sequence-structure-antigenicity correlations of the HIV-1 V3 loops. This resulted in the identification of a secondary structure at the tip of the V3 loop that remains invariant in spite of the sequence variation. The authors designed a multi-valent V3-based antigen that presents multiple copies of the same tip element several times in the same structure. During the course of this project, they realized that the protective epitopes of gp120 should be judged in the context of the native structure. Therefore, the authors developed a method to obtain a model of gp120 that is consistent with all the immunology and virology data. This model is useful in choosing or designing gp120 subdomains for vaccine development.

  2. Surface wave site characterization at 27 locations near Boston, Massachusetts, including 2 strong-motion stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Eric M.; Carkin, Bradley A.; Baise, Laurie G.; Kayen, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    The geotechnical properties of the soils in and around Boston, Massachusetts, have been extensively studied. This is partly due to the importance of the Boston Blue Clay and the extent of landfill in the Boston area. Although New England is not a region that is typically associated with seismic hazards, there have been several historical earthquakes that have caused significant ground shaking (for example, see Street and Lacroix, 1979; Ebel, 1996; Ebel, 2006). The possibility of strong ground shaking, along with heightened vulnerability from unreinforced masonry buildings, motivates further investigation of seismic hazards throughout New England. Important studies that are pertinent to seismic hazards in New England include source-parameter studies (Somerville and others, 1987; Boore and others, 2010), wave-propagation studies (Frankel, 1991; Viegas and others, 2010), empirical ground-motion prediction equations (GMPE) for computing ground-motion intensity (Tavakoli and Pezeshk, 2005; Atkinson and Boore, 2006), site-response studies (Hayles and others, 2001; Ebel and Kim, 2006), and liquefaction studies (Brankman and Baise, 2008). The shear-wave velocity (VS) profiles collected for this report are pertinent to the GMPE, site response, and liquefaction aspects of seismic hazards in the greater Boston area. Besides the application of these data for the Boston region, the data may be applicable throughout New England, through correlations with geologic units (similar to Ebel and Kim, 2006) or correlations with topographic slope (Wald and Allen, 2007), because few VS measurements are available in stable tectonic regions.Ebel and Hart (2001) used felt earthquake reports to infer amplification patterns throughout the greater Boston region and noted spatial correspondence with the dominant period and amplification factors obtained from ambient noise (horizontal-to-vertical ratios) by Kummer (1998). Britton (2003) compiled geotechnical borings in the area and produced a

  3. APPLICATIONS OF SURFACE SPLINEFUNCTIONS TO STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS IN COAL GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HanJinyan; YuZhiwei

    1996-01-01

    A surface spline function is used to fit a coal seam surface in structural analysis in coal geology. From the surface spline function, the first and second partial derivatives can also be derived and used to structural analysis, especially for recognition of the concealed structures. The detection of structures related to faulting is emphasized.

  4. Nanoscale surface topographies for structural colors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik

    The thesis describes and demonstrates the possibilities for utilization of structural colors in mass fabricated plastic products as replacement for or in combination with pigments and inks. The motivation is the possible advantages related to re-cycling and re-use of plastic by limiting the number...... of materials in a given plastic part. Also, the reduction of process steps and materials leads to a reduction of the fabrication costs. In the thesis only surfaces, which may be fabricated using replication based methods, such as injection molding, are considered. Nanostructures with sizes comparable......-polymer interface is suppressed. This improves the ability to see through a clear plastic in the presence of specular reflection. The tapered nanostructures are also utilized to enhance the chroma of pigmented polymers. Larger tapered structures fabricated in a similar manor are shown to work as color filters...

  5. On the modelling of semi-insulating GaAs including surface tension and bulk stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, W.; Duderstadt, F.

    2004-07-01

    Necessary heat treatment of single crystal semi-insulating Gallium Arsenide (GaAs), which is deployed in micro- and opto- electronic devices, generate undesirable liquid precipitates in the solid phase. The appearance of precipitates is influenced by surface tension at the liquid/solid interface and deviatoric stresses in the solid. The central quantity for the description of the various aspects of phase transitions is the chemical potential, which can be additively decomposed into a chemical and a mechanical part. In particular the calculation of the mechanical part of the chemical potential is of crucial importance. We determine the chemical potential in the framework of the St. Venant-Kirchhoff law which gives an appropriate stress/strain relation for many solids in the small strain regime. We establish criteria, which allow the correct replacement of the St. Venant-Kirchhoff law by the simpler Hooke law. The main objectives of this study are: (i) We develop a thermo-mechanical model that describes diffusion and interface motion, which both are strongly influenced by surface tension effects and deviatoric stresses. (ii) We give an overview and outlook on problems that can be posed and solved within the framework of the model. (iii) We calculate non-standard phase diagrams, i.e. those that take into account surface tension and non-deviatoric stresses, for GaAs above 786 C, and we compare the results with classical phase diagrams without these phenomena. (orig.)

  6. A Study of Neutron Star Structure in Strong Magnetic Fields that includes Anomalous Magnetic Moments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Jun Mao; Akira Iwamoto; Zhu-Xia Li

    2003-01-01

    We study the effect of strong magnetic fields on the structure of neutronstar. We find that if the interior field is on the same order as the surface fieldcurrently observed, then the influences of the field on the star's mass and radius arenegligible; if the field is as large as that estimated from the scalar virial theorem,then considerable effects will be induced. The maximum mass of the star will beincreased substantially while the central density is greatly reduced. The radius ofa magnetic star can be larger by about 10% ~ 20% than a nonmagnetic star of thesame mass.

  7. Bio-Inspired Functional Surfaces Based on Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A. Müller

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nature developed numerous solutions to solve various technical problems related to material surfaces by combining the physico-chemical properties of a material with periodically aligned micro/nanostructures in a sophisticated manner. The utilization of ultra-short pulsed lasers allows mimicking numerous of these features by generating laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS. In this review paper, we describe the physical background of LIPSS generation as well as the physical principles of surface related phenomena like wettability, reflectivity, and friction. Then we introduce several biological examples including e.g., lotus leafs, springtails, dessert beetles, moth eyes, butterfly wings, weevils, sharks, pangolins, and snakes to illustrate how nature solves technical problems, and we give a comprehensive overview of recent achievements related to the utilization of LIPSS to generate superhydrophobic, anti-reflective, colored, and drag resistant surfaces. Finally, we conclude with some future developments and perspectives related to forthcoming applications of LIPSS-based surfaces.

  8. Extending the Intermediate Data Structure (IDS for longitudinal historical databases to include geographic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn Hedefalk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Intermediate Data Structure (IDS is a standardised database structure for longitudinal historical databases. Such a common structure facilitates data sharing and comparative research. In this study, we propose an extended version of IDS, named IDS-Geo, that also includes geographic data. The geographic data that will be stored in IDS-Geo are primarily buildings and/or property units, and the purpose of these geographic data is mainly to link individuals to places in space. When we want to assign such detailed spatial locations to individuals (in times before there were any detailed house addresses available, we often have to create tailored geographic datasets. In those cases, there are benefits of storing geographic data in the same structure as the demographic data. Moreover, we propose the export of data from IDS-Geo using an eXtensible Markup Language (XML Schema. IDS-Geo is implemented in a case study using historical property units, for the period 1804 to 1913, stored in a geographically extended version of the Scanian Economic Demographic Database (SEDD. To fit into the IDS-Geo data structure, we included an object lifeline representation of all of the property units (based on the snapshot time representation of single historical maps and poll-tax registers. The case study verifies that the IDS-Geo model is capable of handling geographic data that can be linked to demographic data.

  9. Learning surface molecular structures via machine vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziatdinov, Maxim; Maksov, Artem; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2017-08-01

    Recent advances in high resolution scanning transmission electron and scanning probe microscopies have allowed researchers to perform measurements of materials structural parameters and functional properties in real space with a picometre precision. In many technologically relevant atomic and/or molecular systems, however, the information of interest is distributed spatially in a non-uniform manner and may have a complex multi-dimensional nature. One of the critical issues, therefore, lies in being able to accurately identify (`read out') all the individual building blocks in different atomic/molecular architectures, as well as more complex patterns that these blocks may form, on a scale of hundreds and thousands of individual atomic/molecular units. Here we employ machine vision to read and recognize complex molecular assemblies on surfaces. Specifically, we combine Markov random field model and convolutional neural networks to classify structural and rotational states of all individual building blocks in molecular assembly on the metallic surface visualized in high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. We show how the obtained full decoding of the system allows us to directly construct a pair density function—a centerpiece in analysis of disorder-property relationship paradigm—as well as to analyze spatial correlations between multiple order parameters at the nanoscale, and elucidate reaction pathway involving molecular conformation changes. The method represents a significant shift in our way of analyzing atomic and/or molecular resolved microscopic images and can be applied to variety of other microscopic measurements of structural, electronic, and magnetic orders in different condensed matter systems.

  10. Design of a lunar surface structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottaghi, Sohrob

    The next step for manned exploration and settlement is a return to the Moon. In such a return, the most challenging task is the construction of structures for habitation, considering the Moon's hostile environment. Therefore the question is: What is the best way to erect habitable structures on the lunar surface? Given the cost associated with bringing material to the Moon, In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) is viewed by most as the basis for a successful manned exploration and settlement of the Solar system. Along these lines, we propose an advanced concept where the use of freeform fabrication technologies by autonomous mini-robots can form the basis for habitable lunar structures. Also, locally-available magnesium is proposed as the structural material. While it is one of the most pervasive metals in the regolith, magnesium has been only suggested only briefly as a viable option in the past. Therefore, a study has been conducted on magnesium and its alloys, taking into account the availability of the alloying elements on the Moon. An igloo-shaped magnesium structure, covered by sandbags of regolith shielding and supported on a sintered regolith foundation, is considered as a potential design of a lunar base, as well as the test bed for the proposed vision. Three studies are carried out: First a static analysis is conducted which proves the feasibility of the proposed material and method. Second, a thermal analysis is carried out to study the effect of the regolith shielding as well as the sensitivity of such designs to measurement uncertainties of regolith and sintered thermal properties. The lunar thermal environment is modeled for a potential site at 88º latitude in the lunar South Pole Region. Our analysis shows that the uncertainties are in an acceptable range where a three-meter thick shield is considered. Also, the required capacity of a thermal rejection system is estimated, choosing the thermal loads to be those of the Space Station modules. In the

  11. A structure zone diagram including plasma based deposition and ion etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2009-10-14

    An extended structure zone diagram is proposed that includes energetic deposition, characterized by a large flux of ions typical for deposition by filtered cathodic arcs and high power impulse magnetron sputtering. The axes are comprised of a generalized homologous temperature, the normalized kinetic energy flux, and the net film thickness, which can be negative due to ion etching. It is stressed that the number of primary physical parameters affecting growth by far exceeds the number of available axes in such a diagram and therefore it can only provide an approximate and simplified illustration of the growth condition?structure relationships.

  12. Trajectory Surface-Hopping Dynamics Including Intersystem Crossing in [Ru(bpy)3](2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Andrew J; González, Leticia

    2017-08-17

    Surface-hopping dynamics coupled to linear response TDDFT and explicit nonadiabatic and spin-orbit couplings have been used to model the ultrafast intersystem crossing (ISC) dynamics in [Ru(bpy)3](2+). Simulations using an ensemble of trajectories starting from the singlet metal-to-ligand charge transfer ((1)MLCT) band show that the manifold of (3)MLCT triplet states is first populated from high-lying singlet states within 26 ± 3 fs. ISC competes with an intricate internal conversion relaxation process within the singlet manifold to the lowest singlet state. Normal-mode analysis and principal component analysis, combined with further dynamical simulations where the nuclei are frozen, unequivocally demonstrate that it is not only the high density of states and the large spin-orbit couplings of the system that promote ISC. Instead, geometrical relaxation involving the nitrogen atoms is required to allow for state mixing and efficient triplet population transfer.

  13. Electrical mapping of microtubular structures by surface potential microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Cantiello, Horacio F.

    2009-09-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are important cytoskeletal polymers that play an essential role in cell division and transport in all eukaryotes and information processing in neurons. MTs are highly charged polyelectrolytes, composed of hollow cylindrical arrangements of αβ-tubulin dimers. To date, there is little information about electrical properties of MTs. Here, we deposited and dried MTs onto a gold-plated surface to image their topology by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and determined their electrical mapping with surface potential microscopy (SPM). We found a strong linear correlation between the magnitude of relative surface potential and MT parameters, including diameter and height. AFM images confirmed the cylindrical topology of microtubular structures, and the presence of topological discontinuities along their surface, which may contribute to their unique electrical properties.

  14. Structure and dynamics of water in mixed solutions including laponite and PEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikubo, Satoshi; Sekine, Yurina; Ikeda-Fukazawa, Tomoko

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the structure and dynamics of water in mixed solutions including laponite clay particles and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), we measured the Raman spectra of the mixed solutions in the temperature range 283-313 K. The results show that the vibrational energies of the O-H stretching modes in the mixed solutions depend on the water content and temperature. The energy shifts of the O-H stretching modes are attributed to changes in the water structure. By applying a structural model of bulk water to the spectra in the O-H stretching region, the local structures of water in the solutions were analyzed. The result shows that the formation probability of hydrogen bonds in the solutions decreases as the water content decreases. Laponite and PEO have effects to disrupt the network structure of hydrogen bonds between water molecules. Further, it was found that laponite and PEO cause increase in the strength of hydrogen bonds of surrounding water,although the strength of the hydrogen bonds increases with the order water-laponite laponite-PEO mixed solutions has a less-networked structure with strong hydrogen bonds compared with bulk water.

  15. Femtosecond laser surface structuring technique for making human enamel and dentin surfaces superwetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2013-12-01

    It is known that good wettability of enamel and dentin surfaces is a key factor in enhancing adhesion of restorative materials in dentistry. Here, we report on a femtosecond laser surface texturing approach that makes both the enamel and dentine surfaces superwetting. In contrast to the traditional chemical etching that yields random surface structures, this new approach produces engineered surface structures. The surface structure engineered and tested here is an array of femtosecond laser-produced parallel microgrooves that generates a strong capillary force. Due to the powerful capillary action, water is rapidly sucked into this engineered surface structure and spreads even on a vertical surface.

  16. Protein-induced surface structuring in myelin membrane monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosetti, Carla M; Maggio, Bruno

    2007-12-15

    Monolayers prepared from myelin conserve all the compositional complexity of the natural membrane when spread at the air-water interface. They show a complex pressure-dependent surface pattern that, on compression, changes from the coexistence of two liquid phases to a viscous fractal phase embedded in a liquid phase. We dissected the role of major myelin protein components, myelin basic protein (MBP), and Folch-Lees proteolipid protein (PLP) as crucial factors determining the structural dynamics of the interface. By analyzing mixtures of a single protein with the myelin lipids we found that MBP and PLP have different surface pressure-dependent behaviors. MBP stabilizes the segregation of two liquid phases at low pressures and becomes excluded from the film under compression, remaining adjacent to the interface. PLP, on the contrary, organizes a fractal-like pattern at all surface pressures when included in a monolayer of the protein-free myelin lipids but it remains mixed in the MBP-induced liquid phase. The resultant surface topography and dynamics is regulated by combined near to equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium effects. PLP appears to act as a surface skeleton for the whole components whereas MBP couples the structuring to surface pressure-dependent extrusion and adsorption processes.

  17. Structure of the airflow above surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Marc; Veron, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    Weather, climate and upper ocean patterns are controlled by the exchanges of momentum, heat, mass, and energy across the ocean surface. These fluxes are, in turn, influenced by the small-scale physics at the wavy air-sea interface. We present laboratory measurements of the fine-scale airflow structure above waves, achieved in over 15 different wind-wave conditions, with wave ages Cp/u* ranging from 1.4 to 66.7 (where Cp is the peak phase speed of the waves, and u* the air friction velocity). The experiments were performed in the large (42-m long) wind-wave-current tank at University of Delaware's Air-Sea Interaction laboratory (USA). A combined Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Induced Fluorescence system was specifically developed for this study, and provided two-dimensional airflow velocity measurement as low as 100 um above the air-water interface. Starting at very low wind speeds (U10~2m/s), we directly observe coherent turbulent structures within the buffer and logarithmic layers of the airflow above the air-water interface, whereby low horizontal velocity air is ejected away from the surface, and higher velocity fluid is swept downward. Wave phase coherent quadrant analysis shows that such turbulent momentum flux events are wave-phase dependent. Airflow separation events are directly observed over young wind waves (Cp/u*wind waves (Cp/u*=3.7). Over slightly older wind waves (Cp/u* = 6.5), the measured wave-induced airflow perturbations are qualitatively consistent with linear critical layer theory.

  18. Protein-mediated surface structuring in biomembranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggio B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The lipids and proteins of biomembranes exhibit highly dissimilar conformations, geometrical shapes, amphipathicity, and thermodynamic properties which constrain their two-dimensional molecular packing, electrostatics, and interaction preferences. This causes inevitable development of large local tensions that frequently relax into phase or compositional immiscibility along lateral and transverse planes of the membrane. On the other hand, these effects constitute the very codes that mediate molecular and structural changes determining and controlling the possibilities for enzymatic activity, apposition and recombination in biomembranes. The presence of proteins constitutes a major perturbing factor for the membrane sculpturing both in terms of its surface topography and dynamics. We will focus on some results from our group within this context and summarize some recent evidence for the active involvement of extrinsic (myelin basic protein, integral (Folch-Lees proteolipid protein and amphitropic (c-Fos and c-Jun proteins, as well as a membrane-active amphitropic phosphohydrolytic enzyme (neutral sphingomyelinase, in the process of lateral segregation and dynamics of phase domains, sculpturing of the surface topography, and the bi-directional modulation of the membrane biochemical reactivity.

  19. Local structural ordering in surface-confined liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwa, I.; Jeżewski, W.; Zakharov, A. V.

    2017-06-01

    The effect of the interplay between attractive nonlocal surface interactions and attractive pair long-range intermolecular couplings on molecular structures of liquid crystals confined in thin cells with flat solid surfaces has been studied. Extending the McMillan mean field theory to include finite systems, it has been shown that confining surfaces can induce complex orientational and translational ordering of molecules. Typically, local smectic A, nematic, and isotropic phases have been shown to coexist in certain temperature ranges, provided that confining cells are sufficiently thick, albeit finite. Due to the nonlocality of surface interactions, the spatial arrangement of these local phases can display, in general, an unexpected complexity along the surface normal direction. In particular, molecules located in the vicinity of surfaces can still be organized in smectic layers, even though nematic and/or isotropic order can simultaneously appear in the interior of cells. The resulting surface freezing of smectic layers has been confirmed to occur even for rather weak surface interactions. The surface interactions cannot, however, prevent smectic layers from melting relatively close to system boundaries, even when molecules are still arranged in layers within the central region of the system. The internal interfaces, separating individual liquid-crystal phases, are demonstrated here to form fronts of local finite-size transitions that move across cells under temperature changes. Although the complex molecular ordering in surface confined liquid-crystal systems can essentially be controlled by temperature variations, specific thermal properties of these systems, especially the nature of the local transitions, are argued to be strongly conditioned to the degree of molecular packing.

  20. Human blood basophils display a unique phenotype including activation linked membrane structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stain, C; Stockinger, H; Scharf, M; Jäger, U; Gössinger, H; Lechner, K; Bettelheim, P

    1987-12-01

    To evaluate the membrane marker profile of human basophils a panel of well-established monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs, n = 60) was used for a combined toluidine/immunofluorescence staining procedure. Myeloid-associated MoAbs (particularly MoAbs against the LFA-1 family (CD11, CDw18), MoAbs directed against lactosylceramide (CDw17), anti-glycoprotein (gp) 150 MoAbs MCS 2 and MY 7 (CDw13), anti-gp 67 MoAb MY 9, anti Fc gamma-receptor (mol wt 40 kd) MoAb CIKM5, anti-CR 1 MoAb E 11, and the antiglycolipid MoAb VIM-2) were reactive with basophils, indicating a close relationship to other mature myeloid cells. Under normal conditions, basophils surprisingly express at least three activation-linked structures not detectable on mature neutrophils, ie, the p45 structure defined by MoAbs OKT-10 and VIP-2b, the p24 structure identified by the CD9 MoAb BA-2, and the receptor for interleukin 2 (IL 2) recognized by three different MoAbs (anti-TAC, IL2RI, anti-IL 2). Moreover, under short-term culture conditions basophils both in mononuclear cell (MNC) suspension and as purified fractions display the HLA-DR and T4 antigens. The neutrophilic/eosinophilic structure 3-fucosyl-N-acetyllactosamine is expressed on basophils only after neuraminidase treatment. Basophils were not stained at all by CD 16 MoAbs directed against the Fc gamma-receptor (mol wt 50 to 70 kd) of neutrophils, by the MoAb 63D3 (CDw12) recognizing the monocyte/granulocyte-associated p 200 antigen, and by the CDw 14 antibodies (VIM-13, Mo 2) defining the monocyte-specific structure p 55. Enriched basophils freshly obtained from chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL) patients yielded identical results in FACS analyses. In summary, these data indicate that basophils generate a unique combination of surface determinants and possibly represent an activated cell population.

  1. [Function of surface membrane structures in Thiobacillus thiooxidans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, T A; Karavaĭko, G I

    1975-01-01

    The function of the surface membrane structures was studied with cytochemical techniques on ultrathin sections of Thiobacillus thiooxidans. The transport of elementary sulphur inside the cell involves the surface membrane structures, while oxidation of the sulphur to sulphuric acid takes place on the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. The surface membrane structures are supposed also to participate in the primary dissolution of elementary sulphur at the site of contact of the cells with the mineral.

  2. Joining and fabrication techniques for high temperature structures including the first wall in fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Kim, K. B

    2003-09-01

    The materials for PFC's (Plasma Facing Components) in a fusion reactor are severely irradiated with fusion products in facing the high temperature plasma during the operation. The refractory materials can be maintained their excellent properties in severe operating condition by lowering surface temperature by bonding them to the high thermal conducting materials of heat sink. Hence, the joining and bonding techniques between dissimilar materials is considered to be important in case of the fusion reactor or nuclear reactor which is operated at high temperature. The first wall in the fusion reactor is heated to approximately 1000 .deg. C and irradiated severely by the plasma. In ITER, beryllium is expected as the primary armour candidate for the PFC's; other candidates including W, Mo, SiC, B4C, C/C and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Since the heat affected zones in the PFC's processed by conventional welding are reported to have embrittlement and degradation in the sever operation condition, both brazing and diffusion bonding are being considered as prime candidates for the joining technique. In this report, both the materials including ceramics and the fabrication techniques including joining technique between dissimilar materials for PFC's are described. The described joining technique between the refractory materials and the dissimilar materials may be applicable for the fusion reactor and Generation-4 future nuclear reactor which are operated at high temperature and high irradiation.

  3. The structure of hypersonic shock waves using Navier-Stokes equations modified to include mass diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Greenshields, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    Howard Brenner has recently proposed modifications to the Navier-Stokes equations that relate to a diffusion of fluid volume that would be significant for flows with high density gradients. In a previous paper (Greenshields & Reese, 2007), we found these modifications gave good predictions of the viscous structure of shock waves in argon in the range Mach 1.0-12.0 (while conventional Navier-Stokes equations are known to fail above about Mach 2). However, some areas of concern with this model were a somewhat arbitrary choice of modelling coefficient, and potentially unphysical and unstable solutions. In this paper, we therefore present slightly different modifications to include molecule mass diffusion fully in the Navier-Stokes equations. These modifications are shown to be stable and produce physical solutions to the shock problem of a quality broadly similar to those from the family of extended hydrodynamic models that includes the Burnett equations. The modifications primarily add a diffusion term to t...

  4. Atomic and electronic structure of surfaces theoretical foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Lannoo, Michel

    1991-01-01

    Surfaces and interfaces play an increasingly important role in today's solid state devices. In this book the reader is introduced, in a didactic manner, to the essential theoretical aspects of the atomic and electronic structure of surfaces and interfaces. The book does not pretend to give a complete overview of contemporary problems and methods. Instead, the authors strive to provide simple but qualitatively useful arguments that apply to a wide variety of cases. The emphasis of the book is on semiconductor surfaces and interfaces but it also includes a thorough treatment of transition metals, a general discussion of phonon dispersion curves, and examples of large computational calculations. The exercises accompanying every chapter will be of great benefit to the student.

  5. Including Functional Annotations and Extending the Collection of Structural Classifications of Protein Loops (ArchDB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Hermoso

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Loops represent an important part of protein structures. The study of loop is critical for two main reasons: First, loops are often involved in protein function, stability and folding. Second, despite improvements in experimental and computational structure prediction methods, modeling the conformation of loops remains problematic. Here, we present a structural classification of loops, ArchDB, a mine of information with application in both mentioned fields: loop structure prediction and function prediction. ArchDB (http://sbi.imim.es/archdb is a database of classified protein loop motifs. The current database provides four different classification sets tailored for different purposes. ArchDB-40, a loop classification derived from SCOP40, well suited for modeling common loop motifs. Since features relevant to loop structure or function can be more easily determined on well-populated clusters, we have developed ArchDB-95, a loop classification derived from SCOP95. This new classification set shows a ∼40% increase in the number of subclasses, and a large 7-fold increase in the number of putative structure/function-related subclasses. We also present ArchDB-EC, a classification of loop motifs from enzymes, and ArchDB-KI, a manually annotated classification of loop motifs from kinases. Information about ligand contacts and PDB sites has been included in all classification sets. Improvements in our classification scheme are described, as well as several new database features, such as the ability to query by conserved annotations, sequence similarity, or uploading 3D coordinates of a protein. The lengths of classified loops range between 0 and 36 residues long. ArchDB offers an exhaustive sampling of loop structures. Functional information about loops and links with related biological databases are also provided. All this information and the possibility to browse/query the database through a web-server outline an useful tool with application in the

  6. pknotsRG: RNA pseudoknot folding including near-optimal structures and sliding windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Jens; Steffen, Peter; Giegerich, Robert

    2007-07-01

    RNA pseudoknots are an important structural feature of RNAs, but often neglected in computer predictions for reasons of efficiency. Here, we present the pknotsRG Web Server for single sequence RNA secondary structure prediction including pseudoknots. pknotsRG employs the newest Turner energy rules for finding the structure of minimal free energy. The algorithm has been improved in several ways recently. First, it has been reimplemented in the C programming language, resulting in a 60-fold increase in speed. Second, all suboptimal foldings up to a user-defined threshold can be enumerated. For large scale analysis, a fast sliding window mode is available. Further improvements of the Web Server are a new output visualization using the PseudoViewer Web Service or RNAmovies for a movie like animation of several suboptimal foldings. The tool is available as source code, binary executable, online tool or as Web Service. The latter alternative allows for an easy integration into bio-informatics pipelines. pknotsRG is available at the Bielefeld Bioinformatics Server (http://bibiserv.techfak.uni-bielefeld.de/pknotsrg).

  7. Expansion Hamiltonian model for a diatomic molecule adsorbed on a surface: Vibrational states of the CO/Cu(100) system including surface vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingyong; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2015-10-28

    Molecular-surface studies are often done by assuming a corrugated, static (i.e., rigid) surface. To be able to investigate the effects that vibrations of surface atoms may have on spectra and cross sections, an expansion Hamiltonian model is proposed on the basis of the recently reported [R. Marquardt et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074108 (2010)] SAP potential energy surface (PES), which was built for the CO/Cu(100) system with a rigid surface. In contrast to other molecule-surface coupling models, such as the modified surface oscillator model, the coupling between the adsorbed molecule and the surface atoms is already included in the present expansion SAP-PES model, in which a Taylor expansion around the equilibrium positions of the surface atoms is performed. To test the quality of the Taylor expansion, a direct model, that is avoiding the expansion, is also studied. The latter, however, requests that there is only one movable surface atom included. On the basis of the present expansion and direct models, the effects of a moving top copper atom (the one to which CO is bound) on the energy levels of a bound CO/Cu(100) system are studied. For this purpose, the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree calculations are carried out to obtain the vibrational fundamentals and overtones of the CO/Cu(100) system including a movable top copper atom. In order to interpret the results, a simple model consisting of two coupled harmonic oscillators is introduced. From these calculations, the vibrational levels of the CO/Cu(100) system as function of the frequency of the top copper atom are discussed.

  8. Expansion Hamiltonian model for a diatomic molecule adsorbed on a surface: Vibrational states of the CO/Cu(100) system including surface vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Qingyong, E-mail: mengqingyong@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongshan Road 457, 116023 Dalian (China); Meyer, Hans-Dieter, E-mail: hans-dieter.meyer@pci.uni-heidelberg.de [Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-10-28

    Molecular-surface studies are often done by assuming a corrugated, static (i.e., rigid) surface. To be able to investigate the effects that vibrations of surface atoms may have on spectra and cross sections, an expansion Hamiltonian model is proposed on the basis of the recently reported [R. Marquardt et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074108 (2010)] SAP potential energy surface (PES), which was built for the CO/Cu(100) system with a rigid surface. In contrast to other molecule-surface coupling models, such as the modified surface oscillator model, the coupling between the adsorbed molecule and the surface atoms is already included in the present expansion SAP-PES model, in which a Taylor expansion around the equilibrium positions of the surface atoms is performed. To test the quality of the Taylor expansion, a direct model, that is avoiding the expansion, is also studied. The latter, however, requests that there is only one movable surface atom included. On the basis of the present expansion and direct models, the effects of a moving top copper atom (the one to which CO is bound) on the energy levels of a bound CO/Cu(100) system are studied. For this purpose, the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree calculations are carried out to obtain the vibrational fundamentals and overtones of the CO/Cu(100) system including a movable top copper atom. In order to interpret the results, a simple model consisting of two coupled harmonic oscillators is introduced. From these calculations, the vibrational levels of the CO/Cu(100) system as function of the frequency of the top copper atom are discussed.

  9. Advanced Deployable Shell-Based Composite Booms for Small Satellite Structural Applications Including Solar Sails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    State of the art deployable structures are mainly being designed for medium to large size satellites. The lack of reliable deployable structural systems for low cost, small volume, rideshare-class spacecraft severely constrains the potential for using small satellite platforms for affordable deep space science and exploration precursor missions that could be realized with solar sails. There is thus a need for reliable, lightweight, high packaging efficiency deployable booms that can serve as the supporting structure for a wide range of small satellite systems including solar sails for propulsion. The National Air and Space Administration (NASA) is currently investing in the development of a new class of advanced deployable shell-based composite booms to support future deep space small satellite missions using solar sails. The concepts are being designed to: meet the unique requirements of small satellites, maximize ground testability, permit the use of low-cost manufacturing processes that will benefit scalability, be scalable for use as elements of hierarchical structures (e.g. trusses), allow long duration storage, have high deployment reliability, and have controlled deployment behavior and predictable deployed dynamics. This paper will present the various rollable boom concepts that are being developed for 5-20 m class size deployable structures that include solar sails with the so-called High Strain Composites (HSC) materials. The deployable composite booms to be presented are being developed to expand the portfolio of available rollable booms for small satellites and maximize their length for a given packaged volume. Given that solar sails are a great example of volume and mass optimization, the booms were designed to comply with nominal solar sail system requirements for 6U CubeSats, which are a good compromise between those of smaller form factors (1U, 2U and 3U CubeSats) and larger ones (12 U and 27 U future CubeSats, and ESPA-class microsatellites). Solar

  10. Mechanically robust superhydrophobicity on hierarchically structured Si surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiu Yonghao; Hess, Dennis W [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332-0100 (United States); Liu Yan; Wong, C P, E-mail: dennis.hess@chbe.gatech.edu, E-mail: cp.wong@mse.gatech.edu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States)

    2010-04-16

    Improvement of the robustness of superhydrophobic surfaces is critical in order to achieve commercial applications of these surfaces in such diverse areas as self-cleaning, water repellency and corrosion resistance. In this study, the mechanical robustness of superhydrophobic surfaces was evaluated on hierarchically structured silicon surfaces. The effect of two-scale hierarchical structures on robustness was investigated using an abrasion test and the results compared to those of superhydrophobic surfaces fabricated from polymeric materials and from silicon that contains only nanostructures. Unlike the polymeric and nanostructure-only surfaces, the hierarchical structures retained superhydrophobic behavior after mechanical abrasion.

  11. On the structure of Si(100) surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Back, Seoin; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht; Ji, Hyunjun;

    2013-01-01

    We revisit a dangling theoretical question of whether the surface reconstruction of the Si(100) surface would energetically favor the symmetric or buckled dimers on the intrinsic potential energy surfaces at 0 K. This seemingly simple question is still unanswered definitively since all existing...

  12. Intelligent sampling for the measurement of structured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Jiang, X.; Blunt, L. A.; Leach, R. K.; Scott, P. J.

    2012-08-01

    Uniform sampling in metrology has known drawbacks such as coherent spectral aliasing and a lack of efficiency in terms of measuring time and data storage. The requirement for intelligent sampling strategies has been outlined over recent years, particularly where the measurement of structured surfaces is concerned. Most of the present research on intelligent sampling has focused on dimensional metrology using coordinate-measuring machines with little reported on the area of surface metrology. In the research reported here, potential intelligent sampling strategies for surface topography measurement of structured surfaces are investigated by using numerical simulation and experimental verification. The methods include the jittered uniform method, low-discrepancy pattern sampling and several adaptive methods which originate from computer graphics, coordinate metrology and previous research by the authors. By combining the use of advanced reconstruction methods and feature-based characterization techniques, the measurement performance of the sampling methods is studied using case studies. The advantages, stability and feasibility of these techniques for practical measurements are discussed.

  13. Fluid-structure interaction including volumetric coupling with homogenised subdomains for modeling respiratory mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Lena; Roth, Christian J; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2017-04-01

    In this article, a novel approach is presented for combining standard fluid-structure interaction with additional volumetric constraints to model fluid flow into and from homogenised solid domains. The proposed algorithm is particularly interesting for investigations in the field of respiratory mechanics as it enables the mutual coupling of airflow in the conducting part and local tissue deformation in the respiratory part of the lung by means of a volume constraint. In combination with a classical monolithic fluid-structure interaction approach, a comprehensive model of the human lung can be established that will be useful to gain new insights into respiratory mechanics in health and disease. To illustrate the validity and versatility of the novel approach, three numerical examples including a patient-specific lung model are presented. The proposed algorithm proves its capability of computing clinically relevant airflow distribution and tissue strain data at a level of detail that is not yet achievable, neither with current imaging techniques nor with existing computational models. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Health Promotion Behavior of Chinese International Students in Korea Including Acculturation Factors: A Structural Equation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Jung; Yoo, Il Young

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explain the health promotion behavior of Chinese international students in Korea using a structural equation model including acculturation factors. A survey using self-administered questionnaires was employed. Data were collected from 272 Chinese students who have resided in Korea for longer than 6 months. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. The p value of final model is .31. The fitness parameters of the final model such as goodness of fit index, adjusted goodness of fit index, normed fit index, non-normed fit index, and comparative fit index were more than .95. Root mean square of residual and root mean square error of approximation also met the criteria. Self-esteem, perceived health status, acculturative stress and acculturation level had direct effects on health promotion behavior of the participants and the model explained 30.0% of variance. The Chinese students in Korea with higher self-esteem, perceived health status, acculturation level, and lower acculturative stress reported higher health promotion behavior. The findings can be applied to develop health promotion strategies for this population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Automatic phylogenetic classification of bacterial beta-lactamase sequences including structural and antibiotic substrate preference information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianmin; Eisenhaber, Frank; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian

    2013-12-01

    Beta lactams comprise the largest and still most effective group of antibiotics, but bacteria can gain resistance through different beta lactamases that can degrade these antibiotics. We developed a user friendly tree building web server that allows users to assign beta lactamase sequences to their respective molecular classes and subclasses. Further clinically relevant information includes if the gene is typically chromosomal or transferable through plasmids as well as listing the antibiotics which the most closely related reference sequences are known to target and cause resistance against. This web server can automatically build three phylogenetic trees: the first tree with closely related sequences from a Tachyon search against the NCBI nr database, the second tree with curated reference beta lactamase sequences, and the third tree built specifically from substrate binding pocket residues of the curated reference beta lactamase sequences. We show that the latter is better suited to recover antibiotic substrate assignments through nearest neighbor annotation transfer. The users can also choose to build a structural model for the query sequence and view the binding pocket residues of their query relative to other beta lactamases in the sequence alignment as well as in the 3D structure relative to bound antibiotics. This web server is freely available at http://blac.bii.a-star.edu.sg/.

  16. Structure map including off-stoichiometric and ternary sp-d-valent compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschmidt, T.; Bialon, A. F.; Drautz, R.

    2017-10-01

    Structure maps predict the crystal structure of a compound from the knowledge of constituent elements and chemical composition. We recently developed a highly predictive, three-dimensional structure map for stoichiometric binary sp- d-valent compounds. Here we show that the descriptors of this structure map are transferable to off-stoichiometric compounds with similar predictive power. We furthermore demonstrate that the descriptors are suitable for ternary prototypes. In particular, we construct a three-dimensional structure map for 129 prototypical crystal structures for ternary compounds. The crystal structure is predicted correctly with a probability of 78%. With a confidence of 95% the correct crystal structure is among the three most likely crystal structures predicted by the structure map.

  17. Simultaneous measurements of top surface and its underlying film surfaces in multilayer film structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghim, Young-Sik; Rhee, Hyug-Gyo; Davies, Angela

    2017-09-19

    With the growth of 3D packaging technology and the development of flexible, transparent electrodes, the use of multilayer thin-films is steadily increasing throughout high-tech industries including semiconductor, flat panel display, and solar photovoltaic industries. Also, this in turn leads to an increase in industrial demands for inspection of internal analysis. However, there still remain many technical limitations to overcome for measurement of the internal structure of the specimen without damage. In this paper, we propose an innovative optical inspection technique for simultaneous measurements of the surface and film thickness corresponding to each layer of multilayer film structures by computing the phase and reflectance over a wide range of wavelengths. For verification of our proposed method, the sample specimen of multilayer films was fabricated via photolithography process, and the surface profile and film thickness of each layer were measured by two different techniques of a stylus profilometer and an ellipsometer, respectively. Comparison results shows that our proposed technique enables simultaneous measurements of the top surface and its underlying film surfaces with high precision, which could not be measured by conventional non-destructive methods.

  18. Dissipative surface solitons in periodic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Vysloukh, Victor A

    2010-01-01

    We report dissipative surface solitons forming at the interface between a semi-infinite lattice and a homogeneous Kerr medium. The solitons exist due to balance between amplification in the near-surface lattice channel and two-photon absorption. The stable dissipative surface solitons exist in both focusing and defocusing media, when propagation constants of corresponding states fall into a total semi-infinite and or into one of total finite gaps of the spectrum (i.e. in a domain where propagation of linear waves is inhibited for the both media). In a general situation, the surface solitons form when amplification coefficient exceeds threshold value. When a soliton is formed in a total finite gap there exists also the upper limit for the linear gain.

  19. Reliability Analysis of Brittle Material Structures - Including MEMS(?) - With the CARES/Life Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.

    2002-01-01

    Brittle materials are being used, or considered, for a wide variety of high tech applications that operate in harsh environments, including static and rotating turbine parts. thermal protection systems, dental prosthetics, fuel cells, oxygen transport membranes, radomes, and MEMS. Designing components to sustain repeated load without fracturing while using the minimum amount of material requires the use of a probabilistic design methodology. The CARES/Life code provides a general-purpose analysis tool that predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component as a function of its time in service. For this presentation an interview of the CARES/Life program will be provided. Emphasis will be placed on describing the latest enhancements to the code for reliability analysis with time varying loads and temperatures (fully transient reliability analysis). Also, early efforts in investigating the validity of using Weibull statistics, the basis of the CARES/Life program, to characterize the strength of MEMS structures will be described as as well as the version of CARES/Life for MEMS (CARES/MEMS) being prepared which incorporates single crystal and edge flaw reliability analysis capability. It is hoped this talk will open a dialog for potential collaboration in the area of MEMS testing and life prediction.

  20. Coal surface structure and thermodynamics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, J.W.; Wernett, P.C.; Glass, A.S.; Quay, D.; Roberts, J.

    1994-05-01

    Coals surfaces were studied using static surface adsorption measurements, low angle x-ray scattering (LAXS), inverse gas chromatography (IGC) and a new {sup 13}C NMR relaxation technique. A comparison of surface areas determined by hydrocarbon gas adsorption and LAXS led to the twin conclusions that the hydrocarbons had to diffuse through the solid to reach isolated pores and that the coal pores do not form interconnected networks, but are largely isolated. This conclusion was confirmed when IGC data for small hydrocarbons showed no discontinuities in their size dependence as usually observed with porous solids. IGC is capable of providing adsorption thermodynamics of gases on coal surfaces. The interactions of non-polar molecules and coal surfaces are directly proportioned to the gas molecular polarizability. For bases, the adsorption enthalpy is equal to the polarizability interaction plus the heat of hydrogen bond formation with phenol. Amphoteric molecules have more complex interactions. Mineral matter can have highly specific effects on surface interactions, but with most of the molecules studied is not an important factor.

  1. Surface and Internal Structure of Pristine Presolar Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Rhonda, M.; Bernatowicz, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Silicon carbide is the most well-studied type of presolar grain. Isotope measurements of thousands [1,2] and structural data from over 500 individual grains have been reported [3]. The isotope data indicate that approximately 98% originated in asymptotic giant branch stars and 2% in supernovae. Although tens of different polytypes of SiC are known to form synthetically, only two polytypes have been reported for presolar grains. Daulton et al. [3] found that for SiC grains isolated from Murchison by acid treatments, 79.4% are 3C cubic beta-SiC, 2.7% are 2H hexagonal alpha-SiC, 17.1% are intergrowths of and , and 0.9% are heavily disordered. They report that the occurrence of only the and polytypes is consistent with the observed range of condensation temperatures of circumstellar dust for carbon stars. Further constraint on the formation and subsequent alteration of the grains can be obtained from studies of the surfaces and interior structure of grains in pristine form, i.e., prepared without acid treatments [4,5]. The acid treatments remove surface coatings, produce etch pits around defect sites and could remove some subgrains. Surface oxides have been predicted by theoretical modeling as a survival mechanism for SiC grains exposed to the hot oxidizing solar nebula [6]. Scanning electron microscopy studies of pristine SiC shows some evidence for the existence of oxide and organic coatings [4]. We report herein on transmission electron microscopy studies of the surface and internal structure of two pristine SiC grains, including definitive evidence of an oxide rim on one grain, and the presence of internal TiC and AlN grains.

  2. Hydroxyl migration disorders the surface structure of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiajie; Wu, Hong; Zhang, Li; Ma, Xingtao; Zhang, Xingdong; Yang, Mingli

    2017-09-01

    The surface structure of nano-hydroxyapatite (HAP) was investigated using a combined simulated annealing and molecular dynamics method. The stationary structures of nano-HAP with 4-7 nm in diameter and annealed under different temperatures were analyzed in terms of pair distribution function, structural factor, mean square displacement and atomic coordination number. The particles possess different structures from bulk crystal. A clear radial change in their atomic arrangements was noted. From core to surface the structures change from ordered to disordered. A three-shell model was proposed to describe the structure evolution of nano-HAP. Atoms in the core zone keep their arrangements as in crystal, while atoms in the surface shell are in short-range order and long-range disorder, adopting a typically amorphous structure. Atoms in the middle shell have small displacements and/or deflections but basically retain their original locations as in crystal. The disordered shell is about 1 nm in thickness, in agreement with experimental observations. The disordering mainly stems from hydroxyl migration during which hydroxyls move to the surface and bond with the exposed Ca ions, and their left vacancies bring about a rearrangement of nearby atoms. The disordering is to some extent different for particles unannealed under different temperatures, resulting from fewer number of migrated hydroxyls at lower temperatures. Particles with different sizes have similar surface structures, and their surface energy decreases with increasing size. Moreover, the surface energy is reduced by hydroxyl migration because the exposed Ca ions on the surface are ionically bonded with the migrated hydroxyls. Our calculations proposed a new structure model for nano-HAP, which indicates a surface structure with activities different from those without surface reorganization. This is particularly interesting because most bioactivities of biomaterials are dominated by their surface activity.

  3. Structure of aqueous electrolyte solutions near a hydrophobic surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Kinoshita

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The structure of aqueous solutions of 1:1 salts (KCl, NaCl, KF,and CsI near a hydrophobic surface is analysed using the angle-dependent integral equation theory. Water molecules are taken to be hard spheres imbedded with multipolar moments including terms up to octupole order, and hard spherical ions are immersed in this model water. The many-body interactions associated with molecular polarizability are treated at the self-consistent mean field level. The effects of cationic and anionic sizes and salt concentration in the bulk are discussed in detail. As the salt concentration increases, the layer of water molecules next to the surface becomes denser but its orientational order remains almost unchanged. The concentration of each ion at the surface can be drastically different from that in the bulk. Asa striking example, at sufficiently low salt concentrations, the concentration of I- is about 500 times higher than that of F- at the surface.

  4. UV spectral filtering by surface structured multilayer mirrors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Q.; Paardekooper, Daniel Mathijs; Zoethout, E.; Medvedev, V. V.; van de Kruijs, Robbert; Bosgra, Jeroen; Louis, Eric; F. Bijkerk,

    2014-01-01

    A surface structured extreme ultraviolet multilayer mirror was developed showing full band suppression of UV (lambda = 100-400 nm) and simultaneously a high reflectance of EUV light (lambda = 13.5 nm). The surface structure consists of Si pyramids, which are substantially transparent for EUV but

  5. UV spectral filtering by surface structured multilayer mirrors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Q.; Paardekooper, Daniel Mathijs; Zoethout, E.; Medvedev, V. V.; van de Kruijs, Robbert; Bosgra, Jeroen; Louis, Eric; F. Bijkerk,

    2014-01-01

    A surface structured extreme ultraviolet multilayer mirror was developed showing full band suppression of UV (lambda = 100-400 nm) and simultaneously a high reflectance of EUV light (lambda = 13.5 nm). The surface structure consists of Si pyramids, which are substantially transparent for EUV but ref

  6. Structures of surface and interface of amorphous ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yu; Ikeda-Fukazawa, Tomoko

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the surface structure, we performed molecular dynamics calculations of amorphous ice. The result shows that a low density layer, which forms a few hydrogen bonds with weaker strength, exists in the surface. Furthermore, the sintering processes were simulated to investigate the structure of grain boundary formed from the adsorption of two surfaces. The result indicates that a low density region exists in a boundary between amorphous ice grains. The structures of surface and interface of amorphous ice have important implications for adsorption, diffusion, and chemical reaction in ice grains of interstellar molecular clouds.

  7. Hierarchically structured superoleophobic surfaces with ultralow contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Arun K; Li, Yongxin; Mabry, Joseph M; Tuteja, Anish

    2012-11-14

    Hierarchically structured, superoleophobic surfaces are demonstrated that display one of the lowest contact angle hysteresis values ever reported - even with extremely low-surface-tension liquids such as n-heptane. Consequently, these surfaces allow, for the first time, even ≈2 μL n-heptane droplets to bounce and roll-off at tilt angles. ≤ 2°.

  8. Metrology of sub-micron structured polymer surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quagliotti, Danilo; Tosello, Guido; Salaga, J.

    surface replication of the tool insert component when moulding the polymer melt [1]. This aspect is particularly critical when dealing with increasingly small dimensional scales in micro- and nano-structured surfaces [2, 3].In this context, a metrological investigation of polymer replicated surfaces using...

  9. Structure dependence of Pt surface activated ammonia oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santen, R A van; Offermans, W K [Schuit Institute of Catalysis, Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Ricart, J M; Novell-Leruth, G [Department of Chemical Physics and Inorganic Chemistry, University Rovira I Virgili, C/ Marcel.lI Domingo s/n, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Perez-RamIrez, J [Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ) and Catalan, Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Avinguda Paisos Catalans 16, 43007, Tarragona (Spain)], E-mail: r.a.v.santen@tue.nl

    2008-06-01

    Computational advances that enable the prediction of the structures and the energies of surface reaction intermediates are providing essential information to the formulation of theories of surface chemical reactivity. In this contribution this is illustrated for the activation of ammonia by coadsorbed oxygen and hydroxyl on the Pt(111), Pt(100), and Pt(211) surfaces.

  10. Structures and Functions of Pestivirus Glycoproteins: Not Simply Surface Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fun-In Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pestiviruses, which include economically important animal pathogens such as bovine viral diarrhea virus and classical swine fever virus, possess three envelope glycoproteins, namely Erns, E1, and E2. This article discusses the structures and functions of these glycoproteins and their effects on viral pathogenicity in cells in culture and in animal hosts. E2 is the most important structural protein as it interacts with cell surface receptors that determine cell tropism and induces neutralizing antibody and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. All three glycoproteins are involved in virus attachment and entry into target cells. E1-E2 heterodimers are essential for viral entry and infectivity. Erns is unique because it possesses intrinsic ribonuclease (RNase activity that can inhibit the production of type I interferons and assist in the development of persistent infections. These glycoproteins are localized to the virion surface; however, variations in amino acids and antigenic structures, disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, and RNase activity can ultimately affect the virulence of pestiviruses in animals. Along with mutations that are driven by selection pressure, antigenic differences in glycoproteins influence the efficacy of vaccines and determine the appropriateness of the vaccines that are currently being used in the field.

  11. Thermoelectric material including a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jihui; Shi, Xun; Bai, Shengqiang; Zhang, Wenqing; Chen, Lidong; Yang, Jiong

    2012-01-17

    A thermoelectric material includes a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure having the formula A.sub.8TM.sub.y.sub.1.sup.1TM.sub.y.sub.2.sup.2 . . . TM.sub.y.sub.n.sup.nM.sub.zX.sub.46-y.sub.1.sub.-y.sub.2.sub.- . . . -y.sub.n.sub.-z. In the formula, A is selected from the group consisting of barium, strontium, and europium; X is selected from the group consisting of silicon, germanium, and tin; M is selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, and indium; TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, and TM.sup.n are independently selected from the group consisting of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals; and y.sub.1, y.sub.2, y.sub.n and Z are actual compositions of TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, TM.sup.n, and M, respectively. The actual compositions are based upon nominal compositions derived from the following equation: z=8q.sub.A-|.DELTA.q.sub.1|y.sub.1-|.DELTA.q.sub.2|y.sub.2- . . . -|.DELTA.q.sub.n|y.sub.n, wherein q.sub.A is a charge state of A, and wherein .DELTA.q.sub.1, .DELTA.q.sub.2, .DELTA.q.sub.n are, respectively, the nominal charge state of the first, second, and n-th TM.

  12. Surface Nano-Structuring by Adsorption and Chemical Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Ken-ichi Tanaka

    2010-01-01

    Nano-structuring of the surface caused by adsorption of molecules or atoms and by the reaction of surface atoms with adsorbed species are reviewed from a chemistry viewpoint. Self-assembly of adsorbed species is markedly influenced by weak mutual interactions and the local strain of the surface induced by the adsorption. Nano-structuring taking place on the surface is well explained by the notion of a quasi-molecule provided by the reaction of surface atoms with adsorbed species. Self-assembl...

  13. Response surface reconciliation method of bolted joints structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Mohd Azmi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural joining methods such as bolted joints are commonly used for the assembly of structural components due to their simplicity and easy maintenance. Understandably, the dynamic characteristic of bolted joined structure is mainly influenced by the properties of their joints such as preload on the bolts and joints stiffness which alter the measured dynamics response of the structure. Therefore, the need to include the local effect of the bolted joints into the numerical model of the bolted joined structure is vitally important in order to represent the model accurately. In this paper, a few types of connector elements that can be used to represent the bolted joints such as CBAR, CBEAM and CELAS have been investigated numerically and experimentally. The initial numerical results of these element connectors are compared with the experimental results in term of natural frequencies and mode shapes. The comparative evaluation of numerical and the experimental data are performed in order to provide some insights of inaccuracies in the numerical model due to invalid assumption in the numerical modelling such as geometry, material properties, and boundary conditions. The discrepancies between both results (numerical and experimental data are then corrected using the response surface reconciliation method (RSRM through which the finite element model is altered in order to provide closer agreement with the measured data so that it can be used for subsequence analysis.

  14. Fragmentation pathways of nanofractal structures on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Veronika V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the post-growth processes occurring in nanofractals grown on a surface. For this study we have developed a method that accounts for the internal dynamics of particles in a fractal. We demonstrate that the detachment of particles from the fractal and their diff......We present a theoretical analysis of the post-growth processes occurring in nanofractals grown on a surface. For this study we have developed a method that accounts for the internal dynamics of particles in a fractal. We demonstrate that the detachment of particles from the fractal...... and their diffusion within the fractal and over the surface determines the shape of the islands remaining on a surface after the fractal fragmentation. We consider different scenarios of fractal post-growth relaxation and analyze the time evolution of the island's morphology. The results of our calculations...... are compared with available experimental observations, and experiments in which the post-growth relaxation of deposited nanostructures can be tested are suggested....

  15. Structural optimization of super-repellent surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalli, Andrea; Bøggild, Peter; Okkels, Fridolin

    2013-01-01

    Micro-patterning is an effective way to achieve surfaces with extreme liquid repellency. This technique does not rely on chemical coatings and is therefore a promising concept for application in food processing and bio-compatibile coatings. This super-repellent behaviour is obtained by suspending...

  16. Fragmentation pathways of nanofractal structures on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Veronika V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the post-growth processes occurring in nanofractals grown on a surface. For this study we have developed a method that accounts for the internal dynamics of particles in a fractal. We demonstrate that the detachment of particles from the fractal and their diff...

  17. Voice, Post-Structural Representation and the Subjectivity of "Included" Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitburn, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Aligned with the broader movement from structuralism to the post-structuralisms [Lather, P. 2013. "Methodology-21: What Do We Do in the Afterward?" "International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education" 26 (6): 634-645; St. Pierre, E. A. 2009. "Afterword: Decentering Voice in Qualitative Inquiry." In "Voice…

  18. Probing topological protection using a designer surface plasmon structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Gao, Zhen; Shi, Xihang; Yang, Zhaoju; Lin, Xiao; Xu, Hongyi; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng; Lu, Ling; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    Topological photonic states, inspired by robust chiral edge states in topological insulators, have recently been demonstrated in a few photonic systems, including an array of coupled on-chip ring resonators at communication wavelengths. However, the intrinsic difference between electrons and photons determines that the ‘topological protection' in time-reversal-invariant photonic systems does not share the same robustness as its counterpart in electronic topological insulators. Here in a designer surface plasmon platform consisting of tunable metallic sub-wavelength structures, we construct photonic topological edge states and probe their robustness against a variety of defect classes, including some common time-reversal-invariant photonic defects that can break the topological protection, but do not exist in electronic topological insulators. This is also an experimental realization of anomalous Floquet topological edge states, whose topological phase cannot be predicted by the usual Chern number topological invariants. PMID:27197877

  19. Macrofaunal community structure in the western Indian continental margin including the oxygen minimum zone

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Sautya, S.; Sivadas, S.; Singh, R.; Nanajkar, M.

    group was abundant in the OMZ core (100 – 200 m) off Central Chile (Gallardo et al. 2004). Because these polychaetes are deposit-feeders (both surface and sub-surface), their predominance may reflect food availability (e.g. sediment C org and Chl... of stressful conditions such as the low DO (<0.5 ml l -1 ) has been observed in the OMZs of the Oman margin and off central Chile (Levin et al. 2000; Gallardo et al. 2004). Group 2 was restricted to the slope region (1001 m and 1524 m) where the SSDF...

  20. Multiscale features including water content of polymer-induced kaolinite floc structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sugandha

    Despite their many uses, fine clay particles such as kaolinite are a nuisance in management of tailings in various industries such as the oil sands and phosphate processing industry. The effective flocculation, sedimentation, and consolidation of these fine particles are a major challenge. In industries, polymers are added to tailings suspension to facilitate formation and eventual sedimentation of flocs. The structure of floc and the water entrapped within the floc determine floc behavior and settling characteristics. The quantification of water entrapped within the kaolinite flocs has not been reported before. The information on kaolinite floc size and shape is also limited due to the challenges in experimental procedures for these delicate structures. In this thesis research, operating conditions for kaolinite flocculation were determined and a suitable polymer was chosen by settling experiments. Further investigation of the floc formed was done in suspended state as well as in sedimented state. The flocs were analyzed for their size, shape, water content, and microstructure. A pool of analytical techniques like the Particle Vision & Measurement (PVM), Dynamic Image Analysis (DIA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), High Resolution X-ray Microtomography (HRXMT), and image processing software like Fiji, Medical Image Processing Analysis & Visualization (MIPAV), and Drishti were used. The analysis of suspended flocs by PVM and DIA revealed a mean floc size of about 225 microm for high molecular weight, 5% anionic polyacrylamide-induced flocs. The low molecular weight, 70% cationic polymer-induced flocs were found to be smaller in size (145 microm). DIA was used to analyze the flocs at different solid concentration. It was found that the increase in solid concentration leads to increase in floc size. Floc circularity was also analyzed by using both these methods. Most flocs were irregular in shape with circularity ranging between 0.2-0.3. However, the circularity

  1. Structural and electronic properties of hydrosilylated silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumer, A.

    2005-11-15

    The structural and electronic properties of alkyl-terminated Si surfaces prepared by thermallyinduced hydrosilylation have been studied in detail in the preceding chapters. Various surfaces have been used for the functionalization ranging from crystalline Si over amorphous hydrogenated Si to nanoscaled materials such as Si nanowires and nanoparticles. In each case, the alkyl-terminated surfaces have been compared to the native oxidized and H-terminated surfaces. (orig.)

  2. Carbon Nanomaterials: Surface Structure and Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansurov, Z. A.; Shabanova, T. A.; Mofa, N. N.; Glagolev, V. A.

    2014-09-01

    We propose a classification of individual nanoparticles on the basis of the form of the surface and the internal architectural packing for investigations carried out with the help of transmission electron microscopy. The investigated samples contain individual nanoparticles of seven kinds in different ratios: rounded, tubular, fibrous, fi lm, "veil," "active" particles and "particles with regular geometric contours." The classification was made on the basis of an analysis of the results of investigations of the surfaces and internal architectural packing of carbon particles obtained in different physiochemical processes (carbonization, carburizing, arc discharge, mechanochemical treatment, plasma chemistry, and in carbon-containing fl ames). For the source materials, we used waste of farming products and widely distributed mineral raw materials.

  3. Dyeing of Snow Surfaces to Observe Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    of freezeup problems important to obtain a clear visual perspective and with water. We found that both coloring agents to obtain good photographic...a dye of methanol coloring in with floodlights, whereas Figure 7b is a view of the water. Freezeup at the sprayer nozzle was one same area lighted...from behind, problem and the snow surface had a blemished appearance because of the addition of the water, which then froze. Freezeup may not be a

  4. Surface Structure Enhanced Microchannel Flow Boiling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yangying; Antao, Dion Savio; Chu, Kuang-Han; Chen, Siyu; Hendricks, Terry J.; Zhang, Tiejun; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of surface microstructures in two-phase microchannels on suppressing flow instabilities and enhancing heat transfer. We designed and fabricated microchannels with well-defined silicon micropillar arrays on the bottom heated microchannel wall to promote capillary flow for thin film evaporation while facilitating nucleation only from the sidewalls. Our experimental results show significantly reduced temperature and pressure drop fluctuation especially at high heat fluxe...

  5. Multi-state analysis of the OCS ultraviolet absorption including vibrational structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johan Albrecht; Johnson, Matthew Stanley; McBane, G.C.

    2012-01-01

    The first absorption band of OCS (carbonyl sulfide) is analyzed using potential energy surfaces and transition dipole moment functions of the lowest four singlet and the lowest four triplet states. Excitation of the 2 (1)A' state is predominant except at very low photon energies. It is shown that...

  6. Imprinted and injection-molded nano-structured optical surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by nature, nano-textured surfaces have attracted much attention as a method to realize optical surface functionality. The moth-eye antireflective structure and the structural colors of Morpho butterflies are wellknown examples used for inspiration for such biomimetic research...... of light from polymer surfaces and their implication for creating structural colors is discussed. In the case of injection-moulding compatible designs, the maximum reflection of nano-scale textured surfaces cannot exceed the Fresnel reflection of a corresponding flat polymer surface, which is approx. 4...... % for normal incidence. Diffraction gratings provide strong color reflection defined by the diffraction orders. However, the apperance varies strongly with viewing angles. Three different methods to address the strong angular-dependence of diffraction grating based structural color are discussed....

  7. Front surface structured targets for enhancing laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Joseph; George, Kevin; Ji, Liangliang; Yalamanchili, Sasir; Simonoff, Ethan; Cochran, Ginevra; Daskalova, Rebecca; Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Lewis, Nathan; Schumacher, Douglass

    2016-10-01

    We present recent progress made using front surface structured interfaces for enhancing ultrashort, relativistic laser-plasma interactions. Structured targets can increase laser absorption and enhance ion acceleration through a number of mechanisms such as direct laser acceleration and laser guiding. We detail experimental results obtained at the Scarlet laser facility on hollow, micron-scale plasma channels for enhancing electron acceleration. These targets show a greater than three times enhancement in the electron cutoff energy as well as an increased slope temperature for the electron distribution when compared to a flat interface. Using three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we have modeled the interaction to give insight into the physical processes responsible for the enhancement. Furthermore, we have used PIC simulations to design structures that are more advantageous for ion acceleration. Such targets necessitate advanced target fabrication methods and we describe techniques used to manufacture optimized structures, including vapor-liquid-solid growth, cryogenic etching, and 3D printing using two-photon-polymerization. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-14-1-0085.

  8. The Dynamics and Structures of Adsorbed Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Ellenson, W. D.; McTague, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Reviews neutron scattering work performed on films of simple gas atoms and molecules adsorbed primarily on graphite surfaces. Exfoliated graphite substrates such as Grafoil were first used in this kind of measurements about five years ago and new results have been reported at an increasing pace...... of molecules such as NH3 or the internal modes of adsorbed molecules such as C4H10. Neutron scattering measurements where substrates other than graphite products are used as the adsorbents will not be reviewed here. However, the power of the technique will be demonstrated in an example of H2 physisorbed...

  9. Computational prediction of riboswitch tertiary structures including pseudoknots by RAGTOP: a hierarchical graph sampling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namhee; Zahran, Mai; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    The modular organization of RNA structure has been exploited in various computational and theoretical approaches to identify RNA tertiary (3D) motifs and assemble RNA structures. Riboswitches exemplify this modularity in terms of both structural and functional adaptability of RNA components. Here, we extend our computational approach based on tree graph sampling to the prediction of riboswitch topologies by defining additional edges to mimick pseudoknots. Starting from a secondary (2D) structure, we construct an initial graph deduced from predicted junction topologies by our data-mining algorithm RNAJAG trained on known RNAs; we sample these graphs in 3D space guided by knowledge-based statistical potentials derived from bending and torsion measures of internal loops as well as radii of gyration for known RNAs. We present graph sampling results for 10 representative riboswitches, 6 of them with pseudoknots, and compare our predictions to solved structures based on global and local RMSD measures. Our results indicate that the helical arrangements in riboswitches can be approximated using our combination of modified 3D tree graph representations for pseudoknots, junction prediction, graph moves, and scoring functions. Future challenges in the field of riboswitch prediction and design are also discussed.

  10. The importance of including dynamic soil-structure interaction into wind turbine simulation codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    A rigorous numerical model, describing a wind turbine structure and subsoil, may contain thousands of degrees of freedom, making the approach computationally inefficient for fast time domain analysis. In order to meet the requirements of real-time calculations, the dynamic impedance of the founda......A rigorous numerical model, describing a wind turbine structure and subsoil, may contain thousands of degrees of freedom, making the approach computationally inefficient for fast time domain analysis. In order to meet the requirements of real-time calculations, the dynamic impedance...... is examined. The optimal order of the models is determined and implemented into the aeroelastic code HAWC2, where the dynamic response of a 5.0 MW wind turbine is evaluated. In contrast to the fore-aft vibrations, the inclusion of soil-structure interaction is shown to be critical for the side-side vibrations...

  11. Integration of Design, Thermal, Structural, and Optical Analysis, Including Thermal Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.

    1993-01-01

    In many industries there has recently been a concerted movement toward 'quality management' and the issue of how to accomplish work more efficiently. Part of this effort is focused on concurrent engineering; the idea of integrating the design and analysis processes so that they are not separate, sequential processes (often involving design rework due to analytical findings) but instead form an integrated system with smooth transfers of information. Presented herein are several specific examples of concurrent engineering methods being carried out at Langley Research Center (LaRC): integration of thermal, structural and optical analyses to predict changes in optical performance based on thermal and structural effects; integration of the CAD design process with thermal and structural analyses; and integration of analysis and presentation by animating the thermal response of a system as an active color map -- a highly effective visual indication of heat flow.

  12. Structure and surface properties of supported oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyrer, J.; Vielhaber, B.; Zaki, M.I.; Zhuang Shuxian; Weitkamp, J.; Knoezinger, H.

    1985-09-15

    Supported molybdate catalysts have been prepared on Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/,TiO/sub 2/, CeO/sub 2/, ZrO/sub 2/ and SiO/sub 2/ by impregnation from aqueous solution. The isoelectric point (IEPS) of the support surfaces determines the primary adsorption interaction of the molybdate species with the surface at a given pH. Raman spectroscopy shows monolayer formation on Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, TiO/sub 2/ and CeO/sub 2/, while high proportions of MoO/sub 3/ are detected on SiO/sub 2/ and ZrO/sub 2/. Strong support effects influence the reducibility of the supported molybdate, which decreases in the sequence Mo/TiO/sub 2/ > Mo/ > CeO/sub 2/ > Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ > Mo/ZrO/sub 2/. The dispersion of the monolayer on TiO/sub 2/, CeO/sub 2/ and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ seems to be fairly stable under reduction conditions, indicating strong chemical interaction with the supports.

  13. Crystal structure of HIV-1 gp41 including both fusion peptide and membrane proximal external regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Buzon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env composed of the receptor binding domain gp120 and the fusion protein subunit gp41 catalyzes virus entry and is a major target for therapeutic intervention and for neutralizing antibodies. Env interactions with cellular receptors trigger refolding of gp41, which induces close apposition of viral and cellular membranes leading to membrane fusion. The energy released during refolding is used to overcome the kinetic barrier and drives the fusion reaction. Here, we report the crystal structure at 2 A resolution of the complete extracellular domain of gp41 lacking the fusion peptide and the cystein-linked loop. Both the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR and the membrane proximal external region (MPER form helical extensions from the gp41 six-helical bundle core structure. The lack of regular coiled-coil interactions within FPPR and MPER splay this end of the structure apart while positioning the fusion peptide towards the outside of the six-helical bundle and exposing conserved hydrophobic MPER residues. Unexpectedly, the section of the MPER, which is juxtaposed to the transmembrane region (TMR, bends in a 90 degrees-angle sideward positioning three aromatic side chains per monomer for membrane insertion. We calculate that this structural motif might facilitate the generation of membrane curvature on the viral membrane. The presence of FPPR and MPER increases the melting temperature of gp41 significantly in comparison to the core structure of gp41. Thus, our data indicate that the ordered assembly of FPPR and MPER beyond the core contributes energy to the membrane fusion reaction. Furthermore, we provide the first structural evidence that part of MPER will be membrane inserted within trimeric gp41. We propose that this framework has important implications for membrane bending on the viral membrane, which is required for fusion and could provide a platform for epitope and lipid bilayer recognition for broadly

  14. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1016 protons/cm2. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples' surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson-Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  15. Solar cells, structures including organometallic halide perovskite monocrystalline films, and methods of preparation thereof

    KAUST Repository

    Bakr, Osman M.

    2017-03-02

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for solar cells including an organometallic halide perovskite monocrystalline film (see fig. 1.1B), other devices including the organometallic halide perovskite monocrystalline film, methods of making organometallic halide perovskite monocrystalline film, and the like.

  16. The importance of including dynamic soil-structure interaction into wind turbine simulation codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    is examined. The optimal order of the models is determined and implemented into the aeroelastic code HAWC2, where the dynamic response of a 5.0 MW wind turbine is evaluated. In contrast to the fore-aft vibrations, the inclusion of soil-structure interaction is shown to be critical for the side-side vibrations......A rigorous numerical model, describing a wind turbine structure and subsoil, may contain thousands of degrees of freedom, making the approach computationally inefficient for fast time domain analysis. In order to meet the requirements of real-time calculations, the dynamic impedance...

  17. Simple vibration modeling of structural fuzzy with continuous boundary by including two-dimensional spatial memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Lars; Ohlrich, Mogens

    2008-01-01

    -dimensional continuous boundary. Additionally, a simple method for determining the so-called equivalent coupling factor is presented. The validity of this method is demonstrated by numerical simulations of the vibration response of a master plate structure with fuzzy attachments. It is revealed that the method performs...

  18. Nematic films at chemically structured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, N. M.; Telo da Gama, M. M.; Tasinkevych, M.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate theoretically the morphology of a thin nematic film adsorbed at flat substrate patterned by stripes with alternating aligning properties, normal and tangential respectively. We construct a simple ‘exactly-solvable’ effective interfacial model where the liquid crystal distortions are accounted for via an effective interface potential. We find that chemically patterned substrates can strongly deform the nematic-air interface. The amplitude of this substrate-induced undulations increases with decreasing average film thickness and with increasing surface pattern pitch. We find a regime where the interfacial deformation may be described in terms of a material-independent universal scaling function. Surprisingly, the predictions of the effective interfacial model agree semi-quantitatively with the results of the numerical solution of a full model based on the Landau-de Gennes theory coupled to a square-gradient phase field free energy functional for a two phase system.

  19. Imprinted and injection-molded nano-structured optical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Alexander B.; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Clausen, Jeppe; Caringal, Gideon P.; Mortensen, N. Asger; Kristensen, Anders

    2013-09-01

    Inspired by nature, nano-textured surfaces have attracted much attention as a method to realize optical surface functionality. The moth-eye antireflective structure and the structural colors of Morpho butterflies are well- known examples used for inspiration for such biomimetic research. In this paper, nanostructured polymer surfaces suitable for up-scalable polymer replication methods, such as imprinting/embossing and injection-molding, are discussed. The limiting case of injection-moulding compatible designs is investigated. Anti-reflective polymer surfaces are realized by replication of Black Silicon (BSi) random nanostructure surfaces. The optical transmission at normal incidence is measured for wavelengths from 400 nm to 900 nm. For samples with optimized nanostructures, the reflectance is reduced by 50 % compared to samples with planar surfaces. The specular and diffusive reflection of light from polymer surfaces and their implication for creating structural colors is discussed. In the case of injection-moulding compatible designs, the maximum reflection of nano-scale textured surfaces cannot exceed the Fresnel reflection of a corresponding flat polymer surface, which is approx. 4 % for normal incidence. Diffraction gratings provide strong color reflection defined by the diffraction orders. However, the apperance varies strongly with viewing angles. Three different methods to address the strong angular-dependence of diffraction grating based structural color are discussed.

  20. Structure sensitivity of CO dissociation on Rh surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mavrikakis, Manos; Baumer, M.; Freund, H.J.;

    2002-01-01

    Using periodic self-consistent density functional calculations it is shown that the barrier for CO dissociation is similar to120 kJ/mol lower on the stepped Rh(211) surface than on the close-packed Rh(111) surface. The stepped surface binds molecular CO and the dissociation products more strongly...... than the flat surface, but the effect is considerably weaker than the effect of surface structure on the dissociation barrier. Our findings are compared with available experimental data, and the consequences for CO activation in methanation and Fischer-Tropsch reactions are discussed....

  1. Pyrometry temperature studies of shocked tin including investigations exploring surface defects, anvil diameter and the integration with emissivity diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenton-Taylor, Caroline; de'Ath, James; Ota, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    Accurate temperature measurement of shock-loaded systems continues to present experimental challenges. With short measurable time durations diagnostic methods are almost exclusively restricted to optical techniques. By preventing full sample pressure unloading, through the use of an anvil, partial release temperature measurements can be deduced from multiple wavelength optical pyrometry. This paper presents our recent studies of tin shocked to 28GPa including investigations exploring surface defects, anvil dimensions and the integration with emissivity diagnostics. The results indicate that a ring groove, 5mm across and with a nominal machined depth of 50 microns, acts to enhance the measured temperature by approximately 150K. Additionally on reducing the LiF anvil diameter from 20mm to 15mm, comparable partial release temperatures were observed. With the anticipated development of multiple anvil target designs, the smaller anvil diameter is desirable. British Crown Copyright 2009/MOD.

  2. Concentrations and distribution of mercury and other heavy metals in surface sediments of the Yatsushiro Sea including Minamata Bay, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Haruhiko; Shimada, Hideaki; Yoshimoto, Maki; Narumi, Rika; Akimoto, Kazumi; Yamashita, Takayuki; Matsunaga, Tomoya; Nishimura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Masakazu; Hiraki, Kenju; Shimasaki, Hideyuki; Takikawa, Kiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    The concentrations and distribution of heavy metals, such as mercury, zinc, copper, lead, and iron in surface sediments from 234 stations of the Yatsushiro Sea including Minamata bay were investigated. High concentrations of mercury were found in sediments from Minamata bay and its vicinity, but the levels decreased gradually with distance from the bay. The concentrations of mercury in sediments decreased gradually from south to north of the Yatsushiro Sea. These imply the lack of movement of mercury from Minamata bay to the northern Yatsushiro Sea. The geographical profiles of zinc and copper were contrary to that found for mercury, indicating the presence of natural and anthropogenic sources of copper and zinc in the northern Yatsushiro Sea.

  3. Structural and functional effects of heavy metals on the nervous system, including sense organs, of fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, E

    1991-01-01

    metals are well known pollutants in the aquatic environment. Their interaction with relevant chemical stimuli may interfere with the communication between fish and environment. 5. The affinity for a number of ligands and macromolecules makes heavy metals most potent neurotoxins. 6. The present Mini......-Review highlights some aspects of how trace concentrations of mercury, copper and lead affect the integrity of the fish nervous system; structurally, physiologically and biochemically. Udgivelsesdato: 1991-null...

  4. Analysis of Factors That Affects the Capital Structure within Companies Included In the Index of LQ45 During 2011 - 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominica Rufina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the factors of ROA, Asset Structure, Sales Growth, and Firm Size affecting Capital Structure. The population in this study is the companies included in the Index LQ45 Indonesia Stock Exchange from the period 2011 to 2013, the data of a total of 270 listed companies in LQ45 during that period, only 90 corporate data that successively included in the index LQ45. The data used in this study uses secondary data from the Indonesia Stock Exchange website www.idx.co.id. In the process of data analysis and testing the assumptions of classical hypothesis testing using multiple linear regression analysis using SPSS v20.00. The results showed that partially variable ROA, Asset Structure, and Firm Size has a significant influence on the Capital Structure, Growth Sales whereas variable has no influence on the Capital Structure. Simultaneously ROA, Asset Structure, Sales Growth, and Firm Size effect on Capital Structure.

  5. Electronic structure of disordered alloys, surfaces and interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Turek, Ilja; Kudrnovský, Josef; Šob, Mojmír; Weinberger, Peter

    1997-01-01

    At present, there is an increasing interest in the prediction of properties of classical and new materials such as substitutional alloys, their surfaces, and metallic or semiconductor multilayers. A detailed understanding based on a thus of the utmost importance for fu­ microscopic, parameter-free approach is ture developments in solid state physics and materials science. The interrela­ tion between electronic and structural properties at surfaces plays a key role for a microscopic understanding of phenomena as diverse as catalysis, corrosion, chemisorption and crystal growth. Remarkable progress has been made in the past 10-15 years in the understand­ ing of behavior of ideal crystals and their surfaces by relating their properties to the underlying electronic structure as determined from the first principles. Similar studies of complex systems like imperfect surfaces, interfaces, and mul­ tilayered structures seem to be accessible by now. Conventional band-structure methods, however, are of limited use ...

  6. Functional oxide structures on a surface of metals and alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ The investigations of the plasma electrolytic processes in our laboratory are aimed to the development of conditions of formation of oxide layers with determined composition, structure and functional properties on the surface of valve metals (Al, Ti) and their alloys.

  7. Surface structure of polymer Gels and emerging functions

    CERN Document Server

    Kobiki, Y

    1999-01-01

    We report the surface structure of polymer gels on a submicrometer scale during the volume phase transition. Sponge-like domains with a mesoscopic scale were directly observed in water by using at atomic force microscope (AFM). The surface structure characterized by the domains is discussed in terms of the root-mean-square roughness and the auto-correlation function, which were calculated from the AFM images. In order to demonstrate the role of surface structure in determining the macroscopic properties of film-like poly (N-isopropylacrylamide: NIPA) gels. It was found that the temperature dependence, as well as the absolute values of the static contact angle, were strongly dependent on the bulk network inhomogeneities. The relation between the mesoscopic structure and the macroscopic properties is qualitatively discussed in terms of not only the changes in the chemical, but also in the physical, surface properties of the NIPA gels in response to a temperature change.

  8. Domain Structures in Nematic Liquid Crystals on a Polycarbonate Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasily F. Shabanov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface.

  9. Hydration structure of Ti(III and Cr(III: Monte Carlo simulation including three-body corrections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Mohammed

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Classical Monte Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the solvation structures of Ti(III and Cr(III ions in water with only ion-water pair interaction potential and by including three-body correction terms. The hydration structures were evaluated in terms of radial distribution functions, coordination numbers and angular distributions. The structural parameters obtained by including three-body correction terms are in good agreement with experimental values proving that many-body effects play a crucial role in the description of the hydration structure of highly charged ions.

  10. Protein Adsorption to Surface Chemistry and Crystal Structure Modification of Titanium Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Jimbo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To observe the early adsorption of extracellular matrix and blood plasma proteins to magnesium-incorporated titanium oxide surfaces, which has shown superior bone response in animal models.Material and Methods: Commercially pure titanium discs were blasted with titanium dioxide (TiO2 particles (control, and for the test group, TiO2 blasted discs were further processed with a micro-arc oxidation method (test. Surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, surface topography by optic interferometry, characterization by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and by X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. The adsorption of 3 different proteins (fibronectin, albumin, and collagen type I was investigated by an immunoblotting technique.Results: The test surface showed a porous structure, whereas the control surface showed a typical TiO2 blasted structure. XPS data revealed magnesium-incorporation to the anodic oxide film of the surface. There was no difference in surface roughness between the control and test surfaces. For the protein adsorption test, the amount of albumin was significantly higher on the control surface whereas the amount of fibronectin was significantly higher on the test surface. Although there was no significant difference, the test surface had a tendency to adsorb more collagen type I.Conclusions: The magnesium-incorporated anodized surface showed significantly higher fibronectin adsorption and lower albumin adsorption than the blasted surface. These results may be one of the reasons for the excellent bone response previously observed in animal studies.

  11. The effect of surfaces on the domain structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    1987-12-01

    The second-order phase transition from the paramagnetic phase to the ferromagnetic phase with domain structure in a ferromagnetic film with strong uniaxial anisotropy is studied. The easy axis is perpendicular to the surface of the film. It is assumed that the short range interactions depend on the distance to the surface. The phase diagram of the film and the form of the domain structure which occurs at the phase transition temperature are obtained.

  12. Underwater 3D Surface Scanning using Structured Light

    OpenAIRE

    Törnblom, Nils

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis project, an underwater 3D scanner based on structured light has been constructed and developed. Two other scanners, based on stereoscopy and a line-swept laser, were also tested. The target application is to examine objects inside the water filled reactor vessel of nuclear power plants. Structured light systems (SLS) use a projector to illuminate the surface of the scanned object, and a camera to capture the surfaces' reflection. By projecting a series of specific line-patterns...

  13. Dimers on Surface Graphs and Spin Structures. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimasoni, David; Reshetikhin, Nicolai

    2007-01-01

    Partition functions for dimers on closed oriented surfaces are known to be alternating sums of Pfaffians of Kasteleyn matrices. In this paper, we obtain the formula for the coefficients in terms of discrete spin structures.......Partition functions for dimers on closed oriented surfaces are known to be alternating sums of Pfaffians of Kasteleyn matrices. In this paper, we obtain the formula for the coefficients in terms of discrete spin structures....

  14. Fold classification based on secondary structure – how much is gained by including loop topology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przytycka Teresa

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that secondary structure information can be used to classify (to some extend protein folds. Since this method utilizes very limited information about the protein structure, it is not surprising that it has a higher error rate than the approaches that use full 3D fold description. On the other hand, the comparing of 3D protein structures is computing intensive. This raises the question to what extend the error rate can be decreased with each new source of information, especially if the new information can still be used with simple alignment algorithms. We consider the question whether the information about closed loops can improve the accuracy of this approach. While the answer appears to be obvious, we had to overcome two challenges. First, how to code and to compare topological information in such a way that local alignment of strings will properly identify similar structures. Second, how to properly measure the effect of new information in a large data sample. We investigate alternative ways of computing and presenting this information. Results We used the set of beta proteins with at most 30% pairwise identity to test the approach; local alignment scores were used to build a tree of clusters which was evaluated using a new log-odd cluster scoring function. In particular, we derive a closed formula for the probability of obtaining a given score by chance.Parameters of local alignment function were optimized using a genetic algorithm. Of 81 folds that had more than one representative in our data set, log-odds scores registered significantly better clustering in 27 cases and significantly worse in 6 cases, and small differences in the remaining cases. Various notions of the significant change or average change were considered and tried, and the results were all pointing in the same direction. Conclusion We found that, on average, properly presented information about the loop topology improves noticeably

  15. Thermal Testing for Resin Structure Including Artificial Cavity Made by Three-Dimensional Printer

    OpenAIRE

    倉橋, 貴彦; 丸岡, 宏太郎; 井山, 徹郎; Kurahashi, Takahiko; Maruoka, Kotaro; Iyama, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the thermal testing is carried out by using the resin structure with artificial cavity made by three-dimensional printer. There are some non-destructive testing method such as the ultrasonic testing method, the thermal testing method and so on. It is known that the size of defect can be found at the target point by using the ultrasonic testing method. On the other hand, the thermal testing method has a characteristic that the location of the defect, the cavity, the corrosion an...

  16. Synthesis, Structure and Reactivity of Molecules Attached to Electrode Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Structure and Reactivity of Molecules Attached to Electrode Surfaces", AFOSR #81-0149 III. REPORTING PERIOD: April 15, 1981 through April 14, 1985 IV...Adsorption .... ............... 17 9. Effect of Surface Roughness on Adsorbate Orientation and Reactivity . 20 10. Ordered/ Disordered Packing in Chemisorbed... reactivity only when present in the edge-pendant orientation. Clearly, molecular orientation (i.e., mode of +. .4 o,, -12- attachment to the surface) is a

  17. Electron-Hole Counting Approach to Surface Atomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadi, D. J.

    The observed reconstructions of III-V semiconductor surfaces are shown to be consistent with constraints imposed by a simple "electron-hole" counting rule proposed by Pashley. The rule ensures that the predicted surfaces are nonmetallic, nonpolar, and at least, metastable since the compensation of the "donor" electrons leaves no occupied states in the upper part of the band gap which can easily induce other reconstructions. Applications of the method to the problem of surface structure and passivation are examined.

  18. Effective Quantification of the Paper Surface 3D Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Fidjestøl, Svein

    2005-01-01

    This thesis covers the topic of image processing in relation to the segmentation and analysis of pores protruding the surface in the three dimensional surface structure of paper. The successful analysis of pores is related to a greater goal of relating such an analysis to the perceived quality of the surface of a paper sample. The first part of the thesis gives an introduction to the context of image processing in relation to paper research. Also, an overview of the image processing framewor...

  19. Surface structure of coherently strained ceria ultrathin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yezhou; Stone, Kevin H.; Guan, Zixuan; Monti, Matteo; Cao, Chuntian; El Gabaly, Farid; Chueh, William C.; Toney, Michael F.

    2016-11-01

    Cerium oxide, or ceria, is an important material for solid oxide fuel cells and water splitting devices. Although the ceria surface is active in catalytic and electrochemical reactions, how its catalytic properties are affected by the surface structure under operating conditions is far from understood. We investigate the structure of the coherently strained Ce O2 ultrathin films on yttria-stabilized zirconia (001) single crystals by specular synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD) under oxidizing conditions as a first step to study the surface structure in situ. An excellent agreement between the experiment data and the model is achieved by using a "stacks and islands" model that has a two-component roughness. One component is due to the tiny clusters of nanometer scale in lateral dimensions on each terrace, while the other component is due to slightly different Ce O2 thickness that span over hundreds of nanometers on neighboring terraces. We attribute the nonuniform thickness to step depairing during the thin film deposition that is supported by the surface morphology results on the microscopic level. Importantly, our model also shows that the polarity of the ceria surface is removed by a half monolayer surface coverage of oxygen. The successful resolution of the ceria surface structure using in situ specular synchrotron XRD paves the way to study the structural evolution of ceria as a fuel cell electrode under catalytically relevant temperatures and gas pressures.

  20. Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures induced by surface plasmons coupled via roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, E. L.; Gurevich, S. V.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper the formation mechanisms of the femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are discussed. One of the most frequently used theories explains the structures by interference between the incident laser beam and surface plasmon-polariton waves. The latter is most commonly attributed to the coupling of the incident laser light to the surface roughness. We demonstrate that this excitation of surface plasmons contradicts the results of laser-ablation experiments. As an alternative approach to the excitation of LIPSS we analyse development of hydrodynamic instabilities in the melt layer.

  1. Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures induced by surface plasmons coupled via roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurevich, E.L., E-mail: gurevich@lat.rub.de [Chair of Applied Laser Technology, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstraße 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Gurevich, S.V., E-mail: gurevics@uni-muenster.de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Straße 9, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    In this paper the formation mechanisms of the femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are discussed. One of the most frequently used theories explains the structures by interference between the incident laser beam and surface plasmon-polariton waves. The latter is most commonly attributed to the coupling of the incident laser light to the surface roughness. We demonstrate that this excitation of surface plasmons contradicts the results of laser-ablation experiments. As an alternative approach to the excitation of LIPSS we analyse development of hydrodynamic instabilities in the melt layer.

  2. Simulation of microwave circuits and laser structures including PML by means of FIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Hebermehl

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Field-oriented methods which describe the physical properties of microwave circuits and optical structures are an indispensable tool to avoid costly and time-consuming redesign cycles. Commonly the electromagnetic characteristics of the structures are described by the scattering matrix which is extracted from the orthogonal decomposition of the electric field. The electric field is the solution of an eigenvalue and a boundary value problem for Maxwell’s equations in the frequency domain. We discretize the equations with staggered orthogonal grids using the Finite Integration Technique (FIT. Maxwellian grid equations are formulated for staggered nonequidistant rectangular grids and for tetrahedral nets with corresponding dual Voronoi cells. The interesting modes of smallest attenuation are found solving a sequence of eigenvalue problems of modified matrices. To reduce the execution time for high-dimensional problems a coarse and a fine grid is used. The calculations are carried out, using two levels of parallelization. The discretized boundary value problem, a large-scale system of linear algebraic equations with different right-hand sides, is solved by a block Krylov subspace method with various preconditioning techniques. Special attention is paid to the Perfectly Matched Layer boundary condition (PML which causes non physical modes and a significantly increased number of iterations in the iterative methods.

  3. Wireless monitoring of structural components of wind turbines including tower and foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondra, B.; Botz, M.; Grosse, C. U.

    2016-09-01

    Only few large wind turbines contain an extensive structural health monitoring (SHM) system. Such SHM systems could provide deeper insight into the real load history of a wind turbine along its standard lifetime of 20 years and support a justified extension of operation beyond the original intended period. This paper presents a new concept of a wireless SHM system based on acceleration measurement sensor nodes to permanently record acceleration of the tower structure at different heights. Exploitation of acceleration data and its referring position on the turbine tower enables calculation of vibration frequencies, their amplitudes and subsequently eigenmodes. Tower heights of 100 m and more are within the transmission range of wireless nodes, enabling a complete surveillance of the tower in three dimensions without the need for long cabling or electric signal amplification. Mounting of the sensor nodes on the tower is not limited to a few positions by the presence of an electric cable anymore. Still a comparison between data recorded by wireless sensors and data recorded by high-resolution wire-based sensors shows that the present resolution of the wireless sensors has to be improved to record accelerations more accurately and thus analyze vibration frequencies more precisely.

  4. Strains of Sarcocystis neurona exhibit differences in their surface antigens, including the absence of the major surface antigen SnSAG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Daniel K; Gaji, Rajshekhar Y; Marsh, Antoinette E; Patil, Bhagyashree A; Saville, William J; Lindsay, David S; Dubey, J P; Granstrom, David E

    2008-05-01

    A gene family of surface antigens is expressed by merozoites of Sarcocystis neurona, the primary cause of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). These surface proteins, designated SnSAGs, are immunodominant and therefore excellent candidates for development of EPM diagnostics or vaccines. Prior work had identified an EPM isolate lacking the major surface antigen SnSAG1, thus suggesting there may be some diversity in the SnSAGs expressed by different S. neurona isolates. Therefore, a bioinformatic, molecular and immunological study was conducted to assess conservation of the SnSAGs. Examination of an expressed sequence tag (EST) database revealed several notable SnSAG polymorphisms. In particular, the EST information implied that the EPM strain SN4 lacked the major surface antigen SnSAG1. The absence of this surface antigen from the SN4 strain was confirmed by both Western blot and Southern blot. To evaluate SnSAG polymorphisms in the S. neurona population, 14 strains were examined by Western blots using monospecific polyclonal antibodies against the four described SnSAGs. The results of these analyses demonstrated that SnSAG2, SnSAG3, and SnSAG4 are present in all 14 S. neurona strains tested, although some variance in SnSAG4 was observed. Importantly, SnSAG1 was not detected in seven of the strains, which included isolates from four cases of EPM and a case of fatal meningoencephalitis in a sea otter. Genetic analyses by PCR using gene-specific primers confirmed the absence of the SnSAG1 locus in six of these seven strains. Collectively, the data indicated that there is heterogeneity in the surface antigen composition of different S. neurona isolates, which is an important consideration for development of serological tests and prospective vaccines for EPM. Furthermore, the diversity reported herein likely extends to other phenotypes, such as strain virulence, and may have implications for the phylogeny of the various Sarcocystis spp. that undergo sexual stages

  5. Osteoblast Behavior on Hierarchical Micro-/Nano-Structured Titanium Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiyan Meng; Yanmin Zhou; Yanjing Zhang; Qing Cai; Liming Yang; Jinghui Zhao; Chnnyan Li

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, osteoblast behavior on a hierarchical micro-/nano-structured titanium surface was investigated. A hierarchical hybrid micro-/nano-structured titanium surface topography was produced via Electrolytic Etching (EE). MG-63 cells were cultured on disks for 2 h to 7 days. The osteoblast response to the hierarchical hybrid micro-/nano-structured titanium surface was evaluated through the osteoblast cell morphology, attachment and proliferation. For comparison, MG-63 cells were also cultured on Sandblasted and Acid-etched (SLA) as well as Machined (M) surfaces respectively. The results show significant differences in the adhesion rates and proliferation levels of MG-63 cells on EE, SLA, and M surfaces. Both adhesion rate and proliferation level on EE surface are higher than those on SLA and M surfaces. Therefore, we may expect that, comparing with SLA and M surfaces, bone growth on EE surface could be accelerated and bone formation could be promoted at an early stage, which could be applied in the clinical practices for immediate and early-stage loadings.

  6. Structures of multidomain proteins adsorbed on hydrophobic interaction chromatography surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gospodarek, Adrian M; Sun, Weitong; O'Connell, John P; Fernandez, Erik J

    2014-12-05

    In hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), interactions between buried hydrophobic residues and HIC surfaces can cause conformational changes that interfere with separations and cause yield losses. This paper extends our previous investigations of protein unfolding in HIC chromatography by identifying protein structures on HIC surfaces under denaturing conditions and relating them to solution behavior. The thermal unfolding of three model multidomain proteins on three HIC surfaces of differing hydrophobicities was investigated with hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HXMS). The data were analyzed to obtain unfolding rates and Gibbs free energies for unfolding of adsorbed proteins. The melting temperatures of the proteins were lowered, but by different amounts, on the different surfaces. In addition, the structures of the proteins on the chromatographic surfaces were similar to the partially unfolded structures produced in the absence of a surface by temperature as well as by chemical denaturants. Finally, it was found that patterns of residue exposure to solvent on different surfaces at different temperatures can be largely superimposed. These findings suggest that protein unfolding on various HIC surfaces might be quantitatively related to protein unfolding in solution and that details of surface unfolding behavior might be generalized.

  7. Classical density-functional theory of inhomogeneous water including explicit molecular structure and nonlinear dielectric response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischner, Johannes; Arias, T A

    2010-02-11

    We present an accurate free-energy functional for liquid water written in terms of a set of effective potential fields in which fictitious noninteracting water molecules move. The functional contains an exact expression of the entropy of noninteracting molecules and thus provides an ideal starting point for the inclusion of complex intermolecular interactions which depend on the orientation of the interacting molecules. We show how an excess free-energy functional can be constructed to reproduce the following properties of water: the dielectric response; the experimental site-site correlation functions; the surface tension; the bulk modulus of the liquid and the variation of this modulus with pressure; the density of the liquid and the vapor phase; and liquid-vapor coexistence. As a demonstration, we present results for the application of this theory to the behavior of liquid water in a parallel plate capacitor. In particular, we make predictions for the dielectric response of water in the nonlinear regime, finding excellent agreement with known data.

  8. Facile method for preparing superoleophobic surfaces with hierarchical microcubic/nanowire structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Wonshik; Hwang, Woonbong

    2016-02-01

    To facilitate the fabrication of superoleophobic surfaces having hierarchical microcubic/nanowire structures (HMNS), even for low surface tension liquids including octane (surface tension = 21.1 mN m-1), and to understand the influences of surface structures on the oleophobicity, we developed a convenient method to achieve superoleophobic surfaces on aluminum substrates using chemical acid etching, anodization and fluorination treatment. The liquid repellency of the structured surface was validated through observable experimental results the contact and sliding angle measurements. The etching condition required to ensure high surface roughness was established, and an optimal anodizing condition was determined, as a critical parameter in building the superoleophobicity. The microcubic structures formed by acid etching are essential for achieving the formation of the hierarchical structure, and therefore, the nanowire structures formed by anodization lead to an enhancement of the superoleophobicity for low surface tension liquids. Under optimized morphology by microcubic/nanowire structures with fluorination treatment, the contact angle over 150° and the sliding angle less than 10° are achieved even for octane.

  9. Color effects from scattering on random surface structures in dielectrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jeppe; Christiansen, Alexander B; Garnæs, Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    We show that cheap large area color filters, based on surface scattering, can be fabricated in dielectric materials by replication of random structures in silicon. The specular transmittance of three different types of structures, corresponding to three different colors, have been characterized....... The angle resolved scattering has been measured and compared to predictions based on the measured surface topography and by the use of non-paraxial scalar diffraction theory. From this it is shown that the color of the transmitted light can be predicted from the topography of the randomly textured surfaces....

  10. Bionic Duplication of Fresh Navodon septentrionalis Fish Surface Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Qu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic superhydrophobic surface was fabricated by replicating topography of the fresh fish skin surface of Navodon septentrionalis with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS elastomer. A two-step replicating method was developed to make the surface structure of the fresh fish skin be replicated with high fidelity. After duplication, it was found that the static contact angle of the replica was as large as 173°. Theoretic analysis based on Young's and Cassie-Baxter (C-B model was performed to explain the relationship between structure and hydrophobicity.

  11. Effect of Surface Oxidation on Interfacial Water Structure at a Pyrite (100) Surface as Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.; Wick, Collin D.

    2015-06-01

    In the first part of this paper, a Scanning Electron Microscopy and contact angle study of a pyrite surface (100) is reported describing the relationship between surface oxidation and the hydrophilic surface state. In addition to these experimental results, the following simulated surface states were examined using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS): fresh unoxidized (100) surface; polysulfide at the (100) surface; elemental sulfur at the (100) surface. Crystal structures for the polysulfide and elemental sulfur at the (100) surface were simulated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) quantum chemical calculations. The well known oxidation mechanism which involves formation of a metal deficient layer was also described with DFT. Our MDS results of the behavior of interfacial water at the fresh and oxidized pyrite (100) surfaces without/with the presence of ferric hydroxide include simulated contact angles, number density distribution for water, water dipole orientation, water residence time, and hydrogen-bonding considerations. The significance of the formation of ferric hydroxide islands in accounting for the corresponding hydrophilic surface state is revealed not only from experimental contact angle measurements but also from simulated contact angle measurements using MDS. The hydrophilic surface state developed at oxidized pyrite surfaces has been described by MDS, on which basis the surface state is explained based on interfacial water structure. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  12. The climate dependence of the terrestrial carbon cycle; including parameter and structural uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Smith

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The feedback between climate and the terrestrial carbon cycle will be a key determinant of the dynamics of the Earth System over the coming decades and centuries. However Earth System Model projections of the terrestrial carbon-balance vary widely over these timescales. This is largely due to differences in their carbon cycle models. A major goal in biogeosciences is therefore to improve understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle to enable better constrained projections. Essential to achieving this goal will be assessing the empirical support for alternative models of component processes, identifying key uncertainties and inconsistencies, and ultimately identifying the models that are most consistent with empirical evidence. To begin meeting these requirements we data-constrained all parameters of all component processes within a global terrestrial carbon model. Our goals were to assess the climate dependencies obtained for different component processes when all parameters have been inferred from empirical data, assess whether these were consistent with current knowledge and understanding, assess the importance of different data sets and the model structure for inferring those dependencies, assess the predictive accuracy of the model, and to identify a methodology by which alternative component models could be compared within the same framework in future. Although formulated as differential equations describing carbon fluxes through plant and soil pools, the model was fitted assuming the carbon pools were in states of dynamic equilibrium (input rates equal output rates. Thus, the parameterised model is of the equilibrium terrestrial carbon cycle. All but 2 of the 12 component processes to the model were inferred to have strong climate dependencies although it was not possible to data-constrain all parameters indicating some potentially redundant details. Similar climate dependencies were obtained for most processes whether inferred

  13. The climate dependence of the terrestrial carbon cycle, including parameter and structural uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Smith

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The feedback between climate and the terrestrial carbon cycle will be a key determinant of the dynamics of the Earth System (the thin layer that contains and supports life over the coming decades and centuries. However, Earth System Model projections of the terrestrial carbon-balance vary widely over these timescales. This is largely due to differences in their terrestrial carbon cycle models. A major goal in biogeosciences is therefore to improve understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle to enable better constrained projections. Utilising empirical data to constrain and assess component processes in terrestrial carbon cycle models will be essential to achieving this goal. We used a new model construction method to data-constrain all parameters of all component processes within a global terrestrial carbon model, employing as data constraints a collection of 12 empirical data sets characterising global patterns of carbon stocks and flows. Our goals were to assess the climate dependencies inferred for all component processes, assess whether these were consistent with current knowledge and understanding, assess the importance of different data sets and the model structure for inferring those dependencies, assess the predictive accuracy of the model and ultimately to identify a methodology by which alternative component models could be compared within the same framework in the future. Although formulated as differential equations describing carbon fluxes through plant and soil pools, the model was fitted assuming the carbon pools were in states of dynamic equilibrium (input rates equal output rates. Thus, the parameterised model is of the equilibrium terrestrial carbon cycle. All but 2 of the 12 component processes to the model were inferred to have strong climate dependencies, although it was not possible to data-constrain all parameters, indicating some potentially redundant details. Similar climate dependencies were obtained for most

  14. Ganymede's internal structure including thermodynamics of magnesium sulfate oceans in contact with ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Steve; Bouffard, Mathieu; Choukroun, Mathieu; Sotin, Christophe

    2014-06-01

    The large icy moons of Jupiter contain vast quantities of liquid water, a key ingredient for life. Ganymede and Callisto are weaker candidates for habitability than Europa, in part because of the model-based assumption that high-pressure ice layers cover their seafloors and prevent significant water-rock interaction. Water-rock interactions may occur, however, if heating at the rock-ice interface melts the high pressure ice. Highly saline fluids would be gravitationally stable, and might accumulate under the ice due to upward migration, refreezing, and fractionation of salt from less concentrated liquids. To assess the influence of salinity on Ganymede's internal structure, we use available phase-equilibrium data to calculate activity coefficients and predict the freezing of water ice in the presence of aqueous magnesium sulfate. We couple this new equation of state with thermal profiles in Ganymede's interior-employing recently published thermodynamic data for the aqueous phase-to estimate the thicknesses of layers of ice I, III, V, and VI. We compute core and silicate mantle radii consistent with available constraints on Ganymede's mass and gravitational moment of inertia. Mantle radii range from 800 to 900 km for the values of salt and heat flux considered here (4-44 mW m-2 and 0 to 10 wt% MgSO4). Ocean concentrations with salinity higher than 10 wt% have little high pressure ice. Even in a Ganymede ocean that is mostly liquid, achieving such high ocean salinity is permissible for the range of likely S/Si ratios. However, elevated salinity requires a smaller silicate mantle radius to satisfy mass and moment-of-inertia constraints, so ice VI is always present in Ganymede's ocean. For lower values of heat flux, oceans with salinity as low as 3 wt% can co-exist with ice III. Available experimental data indicate that ice phases III and VI become buoyant for salinity higher than 5 wt% and 10 wt%, respectively. Similar behavior probably occurs for ice V at salinities

  15. New 1,3,4-thiadiazole compounds including pyrazine moiety: Synthesis, structural properties and antimicrobial features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gür, Mahmut; Şener, Nesrin; Muğlu, Halit; Çavuş, M. Serdar; Özkan, Osman Emre; Kandemirli, Fatma; Şener, İzzet

    2017-07-01

    In the study, some new 1,3,4-thiadiazole compounds were synthesized and we have reported identification of the structures by using UV-Vis, FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and Mass spectroscopic methods. Antimicrobial activities of the compounds against three microorganisms, namely, Candida albicans ATCC 26555, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 9144, and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 were investigated by using disk diffusion method. These thiadiazoles exhibited an antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. The experimental data was supported by the quantum chemical calculations. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to obtain the ground state optimized geometries of the molecules using the B3LYP, M06 and PBE1PBE methods with 3-21 g, 4-31 g, 6-311++g(2d,2p), cc-pvtz and cc-pvqz basis sets in the different combinations. Frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) energies, band gap energies and some chemical reactivity parameters were calculated by using the aforementioned methods and basis sets, and the results were also compared with the experimental UV-Vis data.

  16. Flavonoids: their structure, biosynthesis and role in the rhizosphere, including allelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Leslie A; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2013-02-01

    Flavonoids are biologically active low molecular weight secondary metabolites that are produced by plants, with over 10,000 structural variants now reported. Due to their physical and biochemical properties, they interact with many diverse targets in subcellular locations to elicit various activities in microbes, plants, and animals. In plants, flavonoids play important roles in transport of auxin, root and shoot development, pollination, modulation of reactive oxygen species, and signalling of symbiotic bacteria in the legume Rhizobium symbiosis. In addition, they possess antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and anticancer activities. In the plant, flavonoids are transported within and between plant tissues and cells, and are specifically released into the rhizosphere by roots where they are involved in plant/plant interactions or allelopathy. Released by root exudation or tissue degradation over time, both aglycones and glycosides of flavonoids are found in soil solutions and root exudates. Although the relative role of flavonoids in allelopathic interference has been less well-characterized than that of some secondary metabolites, we present classic examples of their involvement in autotoxicity and allelopathy. We also describe their activity and fate in the soil rhizosphere in selected examples involving pasture legumes, cereal crops, and ferns. Potential research directions for further elucidation of the specific role of flavonoids in soil rhizosphere interactions are considered.

  17. Riblet Sensor -- Light Scattering on Micro Structured Surface Coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Imlau, Mirco; Voit, Kay-Michael; Tschentscher, Juliane; Dieckmann, Volker

    2016-01-01

    With the application of appropriate surface structuring on aircrafts, up to 8\\% fuel may be saved in regular air traffic. Before these techniques can be introduced into productive environments, a controlling method for the quality of surface structuring is needed to be used during fabrication and service, ensuring persistent quality of the structured coatings and a justified decision for surface renewal. In this project, these important requirements for achieving the improvements defined above are fulfilled. We have shown that fast sampling is possible using noncontacting laser probing, and we have presented a working preliminary configuration for the sensor. In the theoretical part, a model for the interaction between a probing laser beam and the surface is developed and the resulting wavefront is derived. This is done using a combination of Huygens-Fresnel diffraction theory and geometrical optics. The model is then used to counsel the design of the experimental setup, to interpret the emerging data and to ...

  18. Structural and functional effects of heavy metals on the nervous system, including sense organs, of fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, E

    1991-01-01

    metals are well known pollutants in the aquatic environment. Their interaction with relevant chemical stimuli may interfere with the communication between fish and environment. 5. The affinity for a number of ligands and macromolecules makes heavy metals most potent neurotoxins. 6. The present Mini......1. Today, fish in the environment are inevitably exposed to chemical pollution. Although most hazardous substances are present at concentrations far below the lethal level, they may still cause serious damage to the life processes of these animals. 2. Fish depend on an intact nervous system......, including their sense organs, for mediating relevant behaviour such as food search, predator recognition, communication and orientation. 3. Unfortunately, the nervous system is most vulnerable and injuries to its elements may dramatically change the behaviour and consequently the survival of fish. 4. Heavy...

  19. On the Convergence of the Electronic Structure Properties of the FCC Americium (001) Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Da; Ray, Asok K.

    2006-01-01

    Electronic and magnetic properties of the fcc Americium (001) surface have been investigated via full-potential all-electron density-functional electronic structure calculations at both scalar and fully relativistic levels. Effects of various theoretical approximations on the fcc Am (001) surface properties have been thoroughly examined. The ground state of fcc Am (001) surface is found to be anti-ferromagnetic with spin-orbit coupling included (AFM-SO). At the ground state, the magnetic mome...

  20. Hemocompatibility research on the micro-structure surface of a bionic heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xia; Wang, Ze; Zhang, Xianghua; Zhou, Ming; Cai, Lan

    2014-01-01

    In order to study how the geometric parameters and shape of the micro-structure surface of a bionic heart valve affects hemocompatibility, mastoid micro-structures with different periodic space were fabricated using a femtosecond laser on a polyurethane (PU) surface. The apparent contact angles of droplets on the micro-structure surfaces were measured to characterize their wettability. Then a series of blood compatibility experiments, including platelet adhesion, dynamic coagulation and hemolysis were completed. The experimental results showed that the micro-structure on the biomaterial surface helped improve its hydrophobicity and hemocompatibility. Also, the periodic space affected not only the hydrophobicity but also the hemocompatibility of the biomaterial. With the increasing of the periodic space, the apparent contact angle increased, the number of platelet adhesion decreased, the dynamic clotting time became longer and the hemolysis ratio reduced. In addition, the shape of the micro-structure also affected the hemocompatibility of the biomaterial.

  1. Including crystal structure attributes in machine learning models of formation energies via Voronoi tessellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Logan; Liu, Ruoqian; Krishna, Amar; Hegde, Vinay I.; Agrawal, Ankit; Choudhary, Alok; Wolverton, Chris

    2017-07-01

    While high-throughput density functional theory (DFT) has become a prevalent tool for materials discovery, it is limited by the relatively large computational cost. In this paper, we explore using DFT data from high-throughput calculations to create faster, surrogate models with machine learning (ML) that can be used to guide new searches. Our method works by using decision tree models to map DFT-calculated formation enthalpies to a set of attributes consisting of two distinct types: (i) composition-dependent attributes of elemental properties (as have been used in previous ML models of DFT formation energies), combined with (ii) attributes derived from the Voronoi tessellation of the compound's crystal structure. The ML models created using this method have half the cross-validation error and similar training and evaluation speeds to models created with the Coulomb matrix and partial radial distribution function methods. For a dataset of 435 000 formation energies taken from the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD), our model achieves a mean absolute error of 80 meV/atom in cross validation, which is lower than the approximate error between DFT-computed and experimentally measured formation enthalpies and below 15% of the mean absolute deviation of the training set. We also demonstrate that our method can accurately estimate the formation energy of materials outside of the training set and be used to identify materials with especially large formation enthalpies. We propose that our models can be used to accelerate the discovery of new materials by identifying the most promising materials to study with DFT at little additional computational cost.

  2. A genetic algorithm approach in interface and surface structure optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jian [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The thesis is divided into two parts. In the first part a global optimization method is developed for the interface and surface structures optimization. Two prototype systems are chosen to be studied. One is Si[001] symmetric tilted grain boundaries and the other is Ag/Au induced Si(111) surface. It is found that Genetic Algorithm is very efficient in finding lowest energy structures in both cases. Not only existing structures in the experiments can be reproduced, but also many new structures can be predicted using Genetic Algorithm. Thus it is shown that Genetic Algorithm is a extremely powerful tool for the material structures predictions. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the explanation of an experimental observation of thermal radiation from three-dimensional tungsten photonic crystal structures. The experimental results seems astounding and confusing, yet the theoretical models in the paper revealed the physics insight behind the phenomena and can well reproduced the experimental results.

  3. Sliding surface searching method for slopes containing a potential weak structural surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijun Yao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Weak structural surface is one of the key factors controlling the stability of slopes. The stability of rock slopes is in general concerned with set of discontinuities. However, in soft rocks, failure can occur along surfaces approaching to a circular failure surface. To better understand the position of potential sliding surface, a new method called simplex-finite stochastic tracking method is proposed. This method basically divides sliding surface into two parts: one is described by smooth curve obtained by random searching, the other one is polyline formed by the weak structural surface. Single or multiple sliding surfaces can be considered, and consequently several types of combined sliding surfaces can be simulated. The paper will adopt the arc-polyline to simulate potential sliding surface and analyze the searching process of sliding surface. Accordingly, software for slope stability analysis using this method was developed and applied in real cases. The results show that, using simplex-finite stochastic tracking method, it is possible to locate the position of a potential sliding surface in the slope.

  4. Sliding surface searching method for slopes containing a potential weak structural surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aijun Yao; Zhizhou Tian; Yongjun Jin

    2014-01-01

    Weak structural surface is one of the key factors controlling the stability of slopes. The stability of rock slopes is in general concerned with set of discontinuities. However, in soft rocks, failure can occur along surfaces approaching to a circular failure surface. To better understand the position of potential sliding surface, a new method called simplex-finite stochastic tracking method is proposed. This method basically divides sliding surface into two parts: one is described by smooth curve obtained by random searching, the other one is polyline formed by the weak structural surface. Single or multiple sliding surfaces can be considered, and consequently several types of combined sliding surfaces can be simu-lated. The paper will adopt the arc-polyline to simulate potential sliding surface and analyze the searching process of sliding surface. Accordingly, software for slope stability analysis using this method was developed and applied in real cases. The results show that, using simplex-finite stochastic tracking method, it is possible to locate the position of a potential sliding surface in the slope.

  5. Impact of electromagnetism on phase structure for Wilson and twisted-mass fermions including isospin breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Horkel, Derek P

    2015-01-01

    In a recent paper we used chiral perturbation theory to determine the phase diagram and pion spectrum for Wilson and twisted-mass fermions at non-zero lattice spacing with non-degenerate up and down quarks. Here we extend this work to include the effects of electromagnetism, so that it is applicable to recent simulations incorporating all sources of isospin breaking. For Wilson fermions, we find that the phase diagram is unaffected by the inclusion of electromagnetism---the only effect is to raise the charged pion masses. For maximally twisted fermions, we previously took the twist and isospin-breaking directions to be different, in order that the fermion determinant is real and positive. However, this is incompatible with electromagnetic gauge invariance, and so here we take the twist to be in the isospin-breaking direction, following the RM123 collaboration. We map out the phase diagram in this case, which has not previously been studied. The results differ from those obtained with different twist and isosp...

  6. Sorting of droplets by migration on structured surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Konrad

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Controlled transport of microdroplets is a topic of interest for various applications. It is well known that liquid droplets move towards areas of minimum contact angle if placed on a flat solid surface exhibiting a gradient of contact angle. This effect can be utilised for droplet manipulation. In this contribution we describe how controlled droplet movement can be achieved by a surface pattern consisting of cones and funnels whose length scales are comparable to the droplet diameter.Results: The surface energy of a droplet attached to a cone in a symmetry-preserving way can be smaller than the surface energy of a freely floating droplet. If the value of the contact angle is fixed and lies within a certain interval, then droplets sitting initially on a cone can gain energy by moving to adjacent cones.Conclusion: Surfaces covered with cone-shaped protrusions or cavities may be devised for constructing “band-conveyors” for droplets. In our approach, it is essentially the surface structure which is varied, not the contact angle. It may be speculated that suitably patterned surfaces are also utilised in biological surfaces where a large variety of ornamentations and surface structuring are often observed.

  7. Structure and reactivity of water at biomaterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, E A

    1998-02-01

    Molecular self association in liquids is a physical process that can dominate cohesion (interfacial tension) and miscibility. In water, self association is a powerful organizational force leading to a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network (water structure). Localized perturbations in the chemical potential of water as by, for example, contact with a solid surface, induces compensating changes in water structure that can be sensed tens of nanometers from the point of origin using the surface force apparatus (SFA) and ancillary techniques. These instruments reveal attractive or repulsive forces between opposing surfaces immersed in water, over and above that anticipated by continuum theory (DLVO), that are attributed to a variable density (partial molar volume) of a more-or-less ordered water structure, depending on the water wettability (surface energy) of the water-contacting surfaces. Water structure at surfaces is thus found to be a manifestation of hydrophobicity and, while mechanistic/theoretical interpretation of experimental results remain the subject of some debate in the literature, convergence of experimental observations permit, for the first time, quantitative definition of the relative terms 'hydrophobic' and 'hydrophilic'. In particular, long-range attractive forces are detected only between surfaces exhibiting a water contact angle theta > 65 degrees (herein defined as hydrophobic surfaces with pure water adhesion tension tau O = gamma O cos theta 30 dyn/cm). These findings suggest at least two distinct kinds of water structure and reactivity: a relatively less-dense water region against hydrophobic surfaces with an open hydrogen-bonded network and a relatively more-dense water region against hydrophilic surfaces with a collapsed hydrogen-bonded network. Importantly, membrane and SFA studies reveal a discrimination between biologically-important ions that preferentially solubilizes divalent ions in more-dense water regions relative to less

  8. One common structural peculiarity of the Solar system bodies including the star, planets, satellites and resulting from their globes rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, , G. G.

    2008-09-01

    Often observed a sensible difference in appearance and structure between tropical and extra-tropical zones of various heavenly bodies including rocky and gas planets, satellites and Sun compels to look for a common reason of such phenomenon. All bodies rotate and their spherical shape makes zones at different latitudes to have differing angular momenta as a distance to the rotation axis diminishes gradually from the equator to the poles (this is felt particularly when one launches rockets into space -preferable more cheap launches are from the equatorial regions - Kourou is better than Baikonur). One of remarkable changes occurs at tropics. As a single rotating planetary body tends to have angular momenta of its tectonic blocks equilibrated it starts mechanisms leveling this basic physical property. At tropical zones (bulged also due to the rotation ellipsoid) the outer shell - crust as a consequence tends to be destroyed, sunk, subsided and shrunk; a density of crust material changes; the atmosphere reacts changing chemistry and structure; in terrestrial anthroposphere man looses its mass and stature. But according to the Le Chatelier rule mechanisms with an opposing tendency also begin to act. At Earth the wide planetary long tropical zone is marked by destruction of the crust. It is demonstrated by development of numerous islands of the Malay Archipelago (the Sunda Isls., Maluku Isls, Philippines) between the Southeastern Asia and Australia. In Africa and South America huge depressions of the Congo and Amazon Rivers develops where the Archean crust is subsided to depths of more than 2 km. In the Pacific along the equator numerous islands of Micronesia occur. Subsidence of the basaltic oceanic crust is followed by an intensive folding and faulting of basalt and sedimentary layers (Fig. 1) as a larger mass must be held by a smaller space (a planetary radius is diminished). The central Atlantic is very demonstrative in this sense suffering huge transform fault

  9. Understanding surface structure and chemistry of single crystal lanthanum aluminate

    KAUST Repository

    Pramana, Stevin S.

    2017-03-02

    The surface crystallography and chemistry of a LaAlO3 single crystal, a material mainly used as a substrate to deposit technologically important thin films (e.g. for superconducting and magnetic devices), was analysed using surface X-ray diffraction and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The surface was determined to be terminated by Al-O species, and was significantly different from the idealised bulk structure. Termination reversal was not observed at higher temperature (600 °C) and chamber pressure of 10−10 Torr, but rather an increased Al-O occupancy occurred, which was accompanied by a larger outwards relaxation of Al from the bulk positions. Changing the oxygen pressure to 10−6 Torr enriched the Al site occupancy fraction at the outermost surface from 0.245(10) to 0.325(9). In contrast the LaO, which is located at the next sub-surface atomic layer, showed no chemical enrichment and the structural relaxation was lower than for the top AlO2 layer. Knowledge of the surface structure will aid the understanding of how and which type of interface will be formed when LaAlO3 is used as a substrate as a function of temperature and pressure, and so lead to improved design of device structures.

  10. Structure, Bonding and Surface Chemistry of Metal Oxide Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    Characterization of these ligand- coated oxides included laser desorption mass spectrometry, infrared, Raman and UV - visible spectroscopy ...desorption and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, optical spectroscopy methods (IR, surface-enhanced Raman, UV - visible absorption and...clusters are studied with laser desorption and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, optical spectroscopy methods (IR, surface-enhanced Raman, UV

  11. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of laser-induced periodic surface structures on nickel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedao, Xxx; Maurice, Claire; Garrelie, Florence; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Quey, Romain; Blanc, Gilles; Pigeon, Florent

    2014-05-01

    We report on the structural investigation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) generated in polycrystalline nickel target after multi-shot irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is used to reveal lattice rotation caused by dislocation storage during LIPSS formation. Localized crystallographic damages in the LIPSS are detected from both surface and cross-sectional EBSD studies. A surface region (up to 200 nm) with 1-3° grain disorientation is observed in localized areas from the cross-section of the LIPSS. The distribution of the local disorientation is inhomogeneous across the LIPSS and the subsurface region.

  12. Basic reactions of osteoblasts on structured material surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B�chter A.

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess how bone substitute materials determine bone formation in vivo it is useful to understand the mechanisms of the material surface/tissue interaction on a cellular level. Artificial materials are used in two applications, as biomaterials alone or as a scaffold for osteoblasts in a tissue engineering approach. Recently, many efforts have been undertaken to improve bone regeneration by the use of structured material surfaces. In vitro studies of bone cell responses to artificial materials are the basic tool to determine these interactions. Surface properties of materials surfaces as well as biophysical constraints at the biomaterial surface are of major importance since these features will direct the cell responses. Studies on osteoblastlike cell reactivity towards materials will have to focus on the different steps of protein and cell reactions towards defined surface properties. The introduction of new techniques allows nowadays the fabrication of materials with ordered surface structures. This paper gives a review of present knowledge on the various stages of osteoblast reactions on material surfaces, focused on basic cell events under in vitro conditions. Special emphasis is given to cellular reactions towards ordered nano-sized topographies.

  13. Compact surface structures for the efficient excitation of surface plasmon-polaritons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Cruz, S.; Mendez, E.R. [Division de Fisica Applicada, Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Carretera Ensenada-Tijuana No. 3918, Ensenada 22860, BC (Mexico); Macias, D.; Salas-Montiel, R.; Adam, P.M. [Laboratoire de Nanotechnologie et d' Instrumentation Optique, Universite de Technologie de Troyes, 12 rue Marie Curie, BP-2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France)

    2012-06-15

    We present calculations of the efficiency of excitation of surface plasmon-polaritons (SPPs) with surface structures illuminated by focussed beams. First, it is shown that the low reflectivity observed with broad highly directional beams and periodic gratings does not necessarily imply an efficient coupling to SPPs. We then consider the coupling through surface features like steps, grooves and angled steps, and calculate efficiency maps for these structures as functions of the parameters that define them. Finally, we explore the possibilities of improving the coupling efficiency using periodic structures consisting of a small number of rectangular grooves. We find that a surface section with a length of about four wavelengths can couple as much as 45% of the incident light into a directional SPP. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of laser-induced periodic surface structures on nickel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedao, Xxx, E-mail: sedao.xxx@gmail.com [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France); Maurice, Claire [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 St-Etienne (France); Garrelie, Florence; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France); Quey, Romain; Blanc, Gilles [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 St-Etienne (France); Pigeon, Florent [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlight: •Lattice rotation and its distribution in laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the subsurface region on a nickel substrate are revealed using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). -- Abstract: We report on the structural investigation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) generated in polycrystalline nickel target after multi-shot irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is used to reveal lattice rotation caused by dislocation storage during LIPSS formation. Localized crystallographic damages in the LIPSS are detected from both surface and cross-sectional EBSD studies. A surface region (up to 200 nm) with 1–3° grain disorientation is observed in localized areas from the cross-section of the LIPSS. The distribution of the local disorientation is inhomogeneous across the LIPSS and the subsurface region.

  15. Surface photochemistry: Diffuse reflectance studies of thioketones included into p-tert-butylcalix[6 and 8]arenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Ferreira, L. F.; Ferreira Machado, I.; Oliveira, A. S.; Da Silva, J. P.; Krawczyk, A.; Sikorski, M.

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents time resolved laser induced luminescence (LIL) and diffuse reflectance laser flash-photolysis (DRLFP) studies of solid powdered samples of xanthione (XT) and 4H-1-benzopyran-4-thione (BPT). These thioketones form inclusion complexes with p-tert-butylcalix[6]arene (CLX[6]) and p-tert-butylcalix[8]arene (CLX[8]). Room temperature air equilibrated LIL studies for XT/CLX[8] inclusion complex have shown the existence of both fluorescence and delayed fluorescence emission (S 2 → S 0 emissions in the nanosecond and microsecond time ranges, respectively) peaking at ca. 460 nm while phosphorescence peaks at about 670 nm with a half life of about 4 μs. For the BPT/CLX[8] inclusion complex, the emissions now peak at ca. 450 and 630 nm, respectively. When these two thioketones are included into the CLX[6] nanocavities similar luminescence spectra were detected. The phosphorescence spectra in all cases present a clear vibrational structure characteristic of non-polar environments, in accordance with the non-polar character of the calixarene's cavities. Diffuse reflectance transient absorption spectra revealed in all cases the presence of the triplet state of the thioketones and also of longer lived species. The use of chromatographic methods (GC-MS) allowed us to identify the formation of xanthone, chromone and hydroxy-thioketones following laser irradiation at 355 or 337 nm.

  16. Effect of heat treatment on structure, surface composition, infrared emission and surface electrical properties of tourmaline

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dengliang; Liu, Shuxin

    2017-02-01

    Crystal structure, surface composition, infrared emission properties and surface electrical properties of tourmaline from Guangxi of China, when subjected to heat treatment in air atmosphere had been studied by some methods, including X-ray fluorescence spectrum (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) meter, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Zeta potential analyzer, etc. Experimental results show that the unit cell of tourmaline would shrink during heat treatment because Fe2+ were oxidized. Moreover, the Fe3+/Fetotal inside tourmaline can be raised after treatment. Infrared normal total emissivity of tourmaline reaches 0.87, and infrared radiation energy density is 4.56 × 102W/m2. It can maintain excellent infrared emission properties at high temperature. Simultaneously, tourmaline presents negative Zeta potential in the aqueous solution, and its Zeta potential reaches ‑18.04 mV. Zeta potential of tourmaline was increased to ‑24.83 mV after heat treatment at 400∘C, and decrease to ‑11.78 mV after heat treatment at 600∘C. These findings may provide reference data for tourmaline’s application in the field of functional materials.

  17. Electric arc surfacing on low carbon steel: Structure and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yurii; Gromov, Victor; Kormyshev, Vasilii; Konovalov, Sergey; Kapralov, Evgenii; Semin, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    By the methods of modern materials science, the structure-phase state and microhardness distribution along the cross-section of single and double coatings surfaced on martensite low carbon steel by alloy powder-cored wire were studied. It was established that the increased mechanical properties of surfaced layer are determined by the sub-micro and nanodispersed martensite structure formation, containing iron borides forming the eutectic of lamellar form. The plates of Fe2B are formed mainly in the eutectic of a single-surfaced layer, while FeB is formed in a double-surfaced layer. The existence of bend extinction contours indicating the internal stress fields formation at the boundaries of Fe borides-α-Fe phases were revealed.

  18. Robust biomimetic-structural superhydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingjie; Huang, Tao; Lei, Jinglei; He, Jianxin; Qu, Linfeng; Huang, Peiling; Zhou, Wei; Li, Nianbing; Pan, Fusheng

    2015-01-28

    The following facile approach has been developed to prepare a biomimetic-structural superhydrophobic surface with high stabilities and strong resistances on 2024 Al alloy that are robust to harsh environments. First, a simple hydrothermal treatment in a La(NO3)3 aqueous solution was used to fabricate ginkgo-leaf like nanostructures, resulting in a superhydrophilic surface on 2024 Al. Then a low-surface-energy compound, dodecafluoroheptyl-propyl-trimethoxylsilane (Actyflon-G502), was used to modify the superhydrophilic 2024 Al, changing the surface character from superhydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity. The water contact angle (WCA) of such a superhydrophobic surface reaches up to 160°, demonstrating excellent superhydrophobicity. Moreover, the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface shows high stabilities in air-storage, chemical and thermal environments, and has strong resistances to UV irradiation, corrosion, and abrasion. The WCAs of such a surface almost remain unchanged (160°) after storage in air for 80 days, exposure in 250 °C atmosphere for 24 h, and being exposed under UV irradiation for 24 h, are more than 144° whether in acidic or alkali medium, and are more than 150° after 48 h corrosion and after abrasion under 0.98 kPa for 1000 mm length. The remarkable durability of the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface can be attributed to its stable structure and composition, which are due to the existence of lanthanum (hydr)oxides in surface layer. The robustness of the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface to harsh environments will open their much wider applications. The fabricating approach for such robust superhydrophobic surface can be easily extended to other metals and alloys.

  19. Surface Plasmon Coupling and Control Using Spherical Cap Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; Zhang, Xin; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2017-06-05

    Propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) launched from a protruded silver spherical cap structure are investigated using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) and finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculations. Our combined experimental and theoretical findings reveal that PSP coupling efficiency is comparable to conventional etched-in plasmonic coupling structures. Additionally, plasmon propagation direction can be varied by a linear rotation of the driving laser polarization. A simple geometric model is proposed in which the plasmon direction selectivity is proportional to the projection of the linear laser polarization on the surface normal. An application for the spherical cap coupler as a gate device is proposed. Overall, our results indicate that protruded cap structures hold great promise as elements in emerging surface plasmon applications.

  20. Dimers on surface graphs and spin structures. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimasoni, David; Reshetikhin, Nicolai

    2009-01-01

    In a previous paper [3], we showed how certain orientations of the edges of a graph Γ embedded in a closed oriented surface Σ can be understood as discrete spin structures on Σ. We then used this correspondence to give a geometric proof of the Pfaffian formula for the partition function of the di......In a previous paper [3], we showed how certain orientations of the edges of a graph Γ embedded in a closed oriented surface Σ can be understood as discrete spin structures on Σ. We then used this correspondence to give a geometric proof of the Pfaffian formula for the partition function...... of the dimer model on Γ. In the present article, we generalize these results to the case of compact oriented surfaces with boundary. We also show how the operations of cutting and gluing act on discrete spin structures and how they change the partition function. These operations allow to reformulate the dimer...

  1. Persistent Near-Surface Flow Structures from Local Helioseismology

    CERN Document Server

    Howe, R; Baker, D; Harra, L; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L; Bogart, R S

    2015-01-01

    Near-surface flows measured by the ring-diagram technique of local helioseismology show structures that persist over multiple rotations. We examine these phenomena using data from the {\\em Global Oscillation Network Group} (GONG) and the {\\em Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager} (HMI) and show that a correlation analysis of the structures can be used to estimate the rotation rate as a function of latitude, giving a result consistent with the near-surface rate from global helioseismology and slightly slower than that obtained from a similar analysis of the surface magnetic field strength. At latitudes of 60$^{\\circ}$ and above the HMI flow data reveal a strong signature of a two-sided zonal flow structure. This signature may be related to recent reports of "giant cells" in solar convection.

  2. Surface plasmon polariton amplification in metal-semiconductor structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu; Arsenin, Aleksey V

    2011-06-20

    We propose a novel scheme of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) amplification that is based on a minority carrier injection in a Schottky diode. This scheme uses compact electrical pumping instead of bulky optical pumping. Compact size and a planar structure of the proposed amplifier allow one to utilize it in integrated plasmonic circuits and couple it easily to passive plasmonic devices. Moreover, this technique can be used to obtain surface plasmon lasing.

  3. Fractal analysis of the hierarchic structure of fossil coal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, A.D.; Vasilenko, T.A.; Kirillov, A.K. [National Academy of Sciences, Donetsk (Ukraine)

    2008-05-15

    The fractal analysis is described as method of studying images of surface of fossil coal, one of the natural sorbent, with the aim of determining its structural surface heterogeneity. The deformation effect as a reduction in the dimensions of heterogeneity boundaries is considered. It is shown that the theory of nonequilibrium dynamic systems permits to assess a formation level of heterogeneities involved into a sorbent composition by means of the Hurst factor.

  4. Structure and properties of GMA surfaced armour plates

    OpenAIRE

    A. Klimpel; K. Luksa; M. Burda

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In the combat vehicles many materials can be used for the armour. Application of the monolithic armour plates in light combat vehicles is limited by the high armour weigh. Introduction of the layered armour plates is a way to limit the vehicle weight. In the paper test results of graded and nanostructural GMA surfaced armour plates are presented.Design/methodology/approach: Metallographic structure, chemical composition and hardness of surfaced layers were investigated in order to ex...

  5. Positron studies of surfaces, structure and electronic properties of nanocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    Eijt, S. W. H.; Barbiellini, B.; Houtepen, A.J.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Bansil, A.

    2007-01-01

    A brief review is given of recent positron studies of metal and semiconductor nanocrystals. The prospects offered by positron annihilation as a sensitive method to access nanocrystal (NC) properties are described and compared with other experimental methods. The tunability of the electronic structure of nanocrystals underlies their great potential for application in many areas. Owing to their large surface-to-volume ratio, the surfaces and interfaces of NCs play a crucial role in determining ...

  6. Modeling liquid crystal bilayer structures with minimal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enlow, J D; Enlow, R L; McGrath, K M; Tate, M W

    2004-01-22

    This paper describes a new convenient and accurate method of calculating x-ray diffraction integrated intensities from detailed cubic bilayer structures. The method is employed to investigate the structure of a particular surfactant system (didodecyldimethylammonium bromide in a solution of oil and heavy water), for which single-crystal experimental data have recently been collected. The diffracted peak intensities correlate well with theoretical structures based on mathematical minimal surfaces. Optimized electron density profiles of the bilayer are presented, providing new insight into key features of the bilayer structure.

  7. Transparent, self-cleaning and waterproof surfaces with tunable micro/nano dual-scale structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yujin; You, Eun-Ah; Ha, Young-Geun

    2016-09-01

    The rational design and facile fabrication of optically transparent, superhydrophobic surfaces can advance their versatile applications, including optoelectronic devices. For the easily accessible and scalable preparation of transparent, superhydrophobic surfaces, various coating methods using a solution-process have been developed. However, obtaining highly transparent, non-wetting surfaces with excellent properties is challenging due to the difficulty in controlling surface roughness. Here, we report on a novel approach to control the surface roughness by fabricating tailorable micro/nano dual-scale surface structures via solution-processed nanoparticle coating. The surface roughness was able to be controlled by micro/nano dual-scale structures that can be manipulated by varying the mixture ratio of two different sizes of Al2O3 nanoparticles. The controllable micro/nano dual-scale structures were optimized to achieve the superior surface properties in both hydrophobicity and transparency, exhibiting a high water contact angle (>160°), low sliding angle (90%). These characteristics allowed an excellent transparency and self-cleaning capability as well as a superior waterproof ability even under applied voltage. Furthermore, we demonstrated the versatile applicability of the developed surface-coating method to a wide range of substrates including glass, paper, fabrics, and even flexible plastics.

  8. Detailed diesel exhaust characteristics including particle surface area and lung deposited dose for better understanding of health effects in human chamber exposure studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicka, Aneta; Nilsson, Patrik T.; Rissler, Jenny; Sallsten, Gerd; Xu, Yiyi; Pagels, Joakim H.; Albin, Maria; Österberg, Kai; Strandberg, Bo; Eriksson, Axel; Bohgard, Mats; Bergemalm-Rynell, Kerstin; Gudmundsson, Anders

    2014-04-01

    Several diesel exhaust (DE) characteristics, comprising both particle and gas phase, recognized as important when linking with health effects, are not reported in human chamber exposure studies. In order to understand effects of DE on humans there is a need for better characterization of DE when performing exposure studies. The aim of this study was to determine and quantify detailed DE characteristics during human chamber exposure. Additionally to compare to reported DE properties in conducted human exposures. A wide battery of particle and gas phase measurement techniques have been used to provide detailed DE characteristics including the DE particles (DEP) surface area, fraction and dose deposited in the lungs, chemical composition of both particle and gas phase such as NO, NO2, CO, CO2, volatile organic compounds (including aldehydes, benzene, toluene) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Eyes, nose and throat irritation effects were determined. Exposure conditions with PM1 (<1 μm) mass concentration 280 μg m-3, number concentration 4 × 105 cm-3 and elemental to total carbon fraction of 82% were generated from a diesel vehicle at idling. When estimating the lung deposited dose it was found that using the size dependent effective density (in contrast to assuming unity density) reduced the estimated respiratory dose by 132% by mass. Accounting for agglomerated structure of DEP prevented underestimation of lung deposited dose by surface area by 37% in comparison to assuming spherical particles. Comparison of DE characteristics reported in conducted chamber exposures showed that DE properties vary to a great extent under the same DEP mass concentration and engine load. This highlights the need for detailed and standardized approach for measuring and reporting of DE properties. Eyes irritation effects, most probably caused by aldehydes in the gas phase, as well as nose irritation were observed at exposure levels below current occupational exposure limit

  9. Optimal Design of Surface Structure of a Magnetic Head

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yazhen; NIU Rongjun; HUANG Ping

    2009-01-01

    Currently, the surface structure of a magnetic head has been transferred from a positive to a negative model. In order to increase magnetic storage density and to decrease the flight height, the surface structure of a head needs to be optimized continually. In the present paper, the influence of surface structure of a negative magnetic head on its flight attitude is analyzed in brief by both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. Firstly, based on theoretical analysis, one-dimensional model of optimal design is built whose results play an important role in guiding for the two-dimensional model. Secondly, to analyze the impacts of different structures of negative pressure heads, the original head structure is divided into five zones;the impacts of different zones on both pressure distribution and load carrying capacity were detailed analyzed by numerical analysis. Thirdly, remain the leading-head structure of the negative head, and optimized tail-end structure can be gained by the regional planning strategy to control the gas film pressure distribution. With layout strategy, three kinds of structures of the head were designed. The results show that the tail-end structure impacts on the flight performances significantly and the middle boss plays a major role on positive pressure, while the bilateral bosses lying in either side play assistant regulating role. The structures of bilateral bosses have slightly impact on pressure distribution. The results also show that an optimum tail structure can meet the needs of a lower flight height and a larger magnetic storage density.

  10. Investigation of surface magnetostatic wave propagation in ferrite superconductor structure

    CERN Document Server

    Semenov, A A; Melkov, A A; Bobyl', A V; Suris, R A; Gal'perin, Y M; Iokhansen, T K

    2001-01-01

    Electrodynamic model describing dispersion properties of surface magnetostatic wave in ferrite/superconductor structure was suggested. On the basis of the model a new method of ascertaining superhigh frequency surface resistance R sub s of superconducting films in magnetic fields was developed. The calculated values agree with the results obtained by the Tauber method, making up R sub s =0.20-1.96 m Ohm. A regulated incursion of wave phase amounting to about 1.5 pi with the change in penetration depth 2.0-0.8 mu m for YBCO film was attained for YIG/YBCO structures

  11. Surface plasmon polariton amplification in semiconductor-graphene-dielectric structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadoenkova, Yuliya S. [Ulyanovsk State University, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Novgorod State University, Veliky Novgorod (Russian Federation); Donetsk Institute for Physics and Technology, Donetsk (Ukraine); Moiseev, Sergey G. [Ulyanovsk State University, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Kotelnikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Abramov, Aleksei S. [Ulyanovsk State University, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Kadochkin, Aleksei S.; Zolotovskii, Igor O. [Ulyanovsk State University, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Nanotechnologies of Microelectronics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 32A Leninskiy Prosp., 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fotiadi, Andrei A. [Ulyanovsk State University, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Universite de Mons (Belgium)

    2017-05-15

    A mechanism of amplification of surface plasmon polaritons due to the transfer of electromagnetic energy from a drift current wave into a far-infrared surface wave propagating along a semiconductor-dielectric boundary in waveguide geometry is proposed. A necessary condition of the interaction of these waves is phase matching condition, i. e., when the phase velocity of the surface wave approaches the drift velocity of charge carriers. It is shown that in the spectral region of the surface plasmon polariton slowing-down its amplification coefficient can reach values substantially exceeding the ohmic loss coefficient of the surface wave in the structure. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. A vertical/horizontal integration wind-induced circulation model (VH13D): A method for including surface and bottom logarithmic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Tsanis, Ioannis K.

    A three-dimensional model called VH13D is developed using the vertical/horizontal integration (VHI) approach. The double-logarithmic velocity profile including both the surface and bottom sublayer characteristic lengths is employed to accurately evaluate the bottom shear stress and depth-averaged advective terms. The model is verified using analytical solutions and laboratory data for shear-induced countercurrent flows and is compared with other two- and three-dimensional circulation models in a simplified basin. It is demonstrated that the newly developed model improves the conventional two-dimensional depth-averaged and Quasi-3D models and provides a new approach to the three-dimensional wind-induced circulation model. It can efficiently simulate the wind-induced 3D current structure in lakes and estuaries under isothermal conditions.

  13. Waveguiding in surface plasmon polariton band gap structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Østergaard, John Erland; Leosson, Kristjan

    2001-01-01

    Using near-held optical microscopy, we investigate propagation and scattering of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP's) excited in the wavelength range of 780-820 nm at nanostructured gold-film surfaces with areas of 200-nm-wide scatterers arranged in a 400-nm-period triangular lattice containing line...... defects. We observe the SPP reflection by such an area and SPP guiding along line defects at 782 nm, as well as significant deterioration of these effects is 815 nm, thereby directly demonstrating the SPP band gap effect and showing first examples of SPP channel waveguides in surface band gap structures....

  14. Exploring new topography-based subgrid spatial structures for improving land surface modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesfa, Teklu K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Leung, Lai-Yung Ruby [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-02-22

    Topography plays an important role in land surface processes through its influence on atmospheric forcing, soil and vegetation properties, and river network topology and drainage area. Land surface models with a spatial structure that captures spatial heterogeneity, which is directly affected by topography, may improve the representation of land surface processes. Previous studies found that land surface modeling, using subbasins instead of structured grids as computational units, improves the scalability of simulated runoff and streamflow processes. In this study, new land surface spatial structures are explored by further dividing subbasins into subgrid structures based on topographic properties, including surface elevation, slope and aspect. Two methods (local and global) of watershed discretization are applied to derive two types of subgrid structures (geo-located and non-geo-located) over the topographically diverse Columbia River basin in the northwestern United States. In the global method, a fixed elevation classification scheme is used to discretize subbasins. The local method utilizes concepts of hypsometric analysis to discretize each subbasin, using different elevation ranges that also naturally account for slope variations. The relative merits of the two methods and subgrid structures are investigated for their ability to capture topographic heterogeneity and the implications of this on representations of atmospheric forcing and land cover spatial patterns. Results showed that the local method reduces the standard deviation (SD) of subgrid surface elevation in the study domain by 17 to 19 % compared to the global method, highlighting the relative advantages of the local method for capturing subgrid topographic variations. The comparison between the two types of subgrid structures showed that the non-geo-located subgrid structures are more consistent across different area threshold values than the geo-located subgrid structures. Overall the local

  15. Exploring new topography-based subgrid spatial structures for improving land surface modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Leung, Lai-Yung Ruby

    2017-02-01

    Topography plays an important role in land surface processes through its influence on atmospheric forcing, soil and vegetation properties, and river network topology and drainage area. Land surface models with a spatial structure that captures spatial heterogeneity, which is directly affected by topography, may improve the representation of land surface processes. Previous studies found that land surface modeling, using subbasins instead of structured grids as computational units, improves the scalability of simulated runoff and streamflow processes. In this study, new land surface spatial structures are explored by further dividing subbasins into subgrid structures based on topographic properties, including surface elevation, slope and aspect. Two methods (local and global) of watershed discretization are applied to derive two types of subgrid structures (geo-located and non-geo-located) over the topographically diverse Columbia River basin in the northwestern United States. In the global method, a fixed elevation classification scheme is used to discretize subbasins. The local method utilizes concepts of hypsometric analysis to discretize each subbasin, using different elevation ranges that also naturally account for slope variations. The relative merits of the two methods and subgrid structures are investigated for their ability to capture topographic heterogeneity and the implications of this on representations of atmospheric forcing and land cover spatial patterns. Results showed that the local method reduces the standard deviation (SD) of subgrid surface elevation in the study domain by 17 to 19 % compared to the global method, highlighting the relative advantages of the local method for capturing subgrid topographic variations. The comparison between the two types of subgrid structures showed that the non-geo-located subgrid structures are more consistent across different area threshold values than the geo-located subgrid structures. Overall the local method

  16. Surface Structure and Growth Mode of Pd Deposited on Mo(110) Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehara, Y.; Kawanowa, H.; Gotoh, Y.

    The surface structure and growth mode of Pd/Mo(110) have been studied using reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The surface diagram of Pd on the Mo(110) substrate for deposition thickness versus substrate temperature was obtained. Four kinds of surface structures, namely α1, α2, β and γ, were observed. At less than 1 ML, α2 appeared in temperatures ranging from 400 to 1050°C and α1 appeared from RT to 400°C. α2 has a structure intermediate between those of Pd(111) and Mo(110), in which the dense direction of the layer is parallel to the [111]Mo orientation and their atomic row distances are coincident, resulting in formation of a long-period structure with a Mo surface, namely a coincident site lattice. The α1 structure is similar to the 1 × 1 structure. At more than 1.0 ML, β and γ structures appeared simultaneously in the temperature region from 500 to 950°C. However, at a high temperature region from 950 to 1050°C, the α2 structure was observed. β shows a one-dimensional ordered structure, in which Pd atoms line along [111]Mo. γ exhibits a 3 × 1 structure with the same atomic arrangement as the Mo(110) plane rotated at 70.5°. At greater than 2.0 ML, the Pd film grows in the Frank van der Merwe growth mode at a low temperature with accumulation of a Pd(111) layer, and in the Stranski Krastanov growth mode at a high temperature with two-dimensional growth of the γ structure followed by formation of flat crystallites.

  17. Studies on electronic structure of GaN(0001) surface

    CERN Document Server

    Xie Chang Kun; Xu Fa Qiang; Deng Rui; Liu Feng; Yibulaxin, K

    2002-01-01

    An electronic structure investigation on GaN(0001) is reported. The authors employ a full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FPLAPW) approach to calculate the partial density of state, which is in agreement with previous experimental results. The effects of the Ga3d semi-core levels on the electronic structure of GaN are discussed. The valence-electronic structure of the wurtzite GaN(0001) surface is investigated using synchrotron radiation excited angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The bulk bands dispersion along GAMMA A direction in the Brillouin zones is measured using normal-emission spectra by changing photon-energy. The band structure derived from authors' experimental data is compared well with the results of authors' FPLAPW calculation. Furthermore, off-normal emission spectra are also measured along the GAMMA K and GAMMA M directions. Two surface states are identified, and their dispersions are characterized

  18. Structural Integrity Assessment Using Laser Measured Surface Vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    structures. Figure 2. (Left) Experimental arrangement for plaster wall assessments at the U.S. Capitol Building showing the SLDV monitoring system, a... termite -like damage to the wood. Broadband SLDV scans were obtained across the available surface of the structure providing dynamic displacement...Figure 2. (Left) Experimental arrangement for plaster wall assessments at the U.S. Capitol Building showing the SLDV monitoring system, a shaker

  19. A range of complex probabilistic models for RNA secondary structure prediction that includes the nearest-neighbor model and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Elena; Lang, Raymond; Eddy, Sean R

    2012-02-01

    The standard approach for single-sequence RNA secondary structure prediction uses a nearest-neighbor thermodynamic model with several thousand experimentally determined energy parameters. An attractive alternative is to use statistical approaches with parameters estimated from growing databases of structural RNAs. Good results have been reported for discriminative statistical methods using complex nearest-neighbor models, including CONTRAfold, Simfold, and ContextFold. Little work has been reported on generative probabilistic models (stochastic context-free grammars [SCFGs]) of comparable complexity, although probabilistic models are generally easier to train and to use. To explore a range of probabilistic models of increasing complexity, and to directly compare probabilistic, thermodynamic, and discriminative approaches, we created TORNADO, a computational tool that can parse a wide spectrum of RNA grammar architectures (including the standard nearest-neighbor model and more) using a generalized super-grammar that can be parameterized with probabilities, energies, or arbitrary scores. By using TORNADO, we find that probabilistic nearest-neighbor models perform comparably to (but not significantly better than) discriminative methods. We find that complex statistical models are prone to overfitting RNA structure and that evaluations should use structurally nonhomologous training and test data sets. Overfitting has affected at least one published method (ContextFold). The most important barrier to improving statistical approaches for RNA secondary structure prediction is the lack of diversity of well-curated single-sequence RNA secondary structures in current RNA databases.

  20. Refining femtosecond laser induced periodical surface structures with liquid assist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, L.S. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Ng, E.Y.K., E-mail: mykng@ntu.edu.sg [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Zheng, H.Y. [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, 638075 Singapore (Singapore)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LIPSS on silicon wafer was made in air and in ethanol environment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ethanol environment produce cleaner surface ripples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ethanol environment decrease spatial wavelength of the LIPSS by 30%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More number of pulses produce smaller spatial wavelength in air. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Number of pulses do not influence spatial wavelength in ethanol environment. - Abstract: Laser induced periodic surface structures were generated on silicon wafer using femtosecond laser. The medium used in this study is both air and ethanol. The laser process parameters such as wavelength, number of pulse, laser fluence were kept constant for both the mediums. The focus of the study is to analyze spatial wavelength. When generating surface structures with air as a medium and same process parameter of the laser, spatial wavelength results showed a 30% increase compared to ethanol. The cleanliness of the surface generated using ethanol showed considerably less debris than in air. The results observed from the above investigation showed that the medium plays a predominant role in the generation of surface structures.

  1. Microphase separated structure and surface properties of fluorinated polyurethane resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudaryanto; Nishino, T.; Hori, Y.; Nakamae, K. [Dept. Chem. Sci. and Eng., Faculty of Engineering, Kobe University, Kobe (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    The effect of fluorination on microphase separation and surface properties of segmented polyurethane (PU) resin were investigated. A series of fluorinated polyurethane resin (FPU) was synthesized by reacting a fluorinated diol with aromatic diisocyanate. The microphase separated structure of FPU was studied by thermal analysis, and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) as well as wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). The surface structure and properties were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and dynamic contact angle measurement. The incorporation of fluorine into hard segment brings the FPU to have a higher hard domain cohesion and increase the phase separation, however localization of fluorine on the surface could not be observed. On the other hands, localization of fluorine on the surface could be achieved for soft segment fluorinated PU without any significant change in microphase separated structure. The result from this study give an important basic information for designing PU coating material with a low surface energy and strong adhesion as well as for development of release film on pressure sensitive adhesive tape. (author)

  2. Effect of the free surface and the rigid plane on structural vibration and acoustic radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Yuanjie; ZHAO Deyou; LI Sheng

    2004-01-01

    The coupled fluid-structure interaction equation is established for bodies in the haft-space fluid domain, especially sitting on the infinite plane, based on the BEM (Boundary Element Method) theory. Then, the natural frequencies, vibration responses and the acoustic radiation for a box are calculated, and the effect of the free surface and the rigid plane is discussed. Finally, several relative factors including the plate thickness, the structure damping and the distance between the body and the infinite plane are studied. The results show that the effect of the free surface and the rigid plane on the structural natural frequencies, vibration responses and the acoustic radiation cannot be ignored.

  3. Geometric and electronic structure of dysprosium thin films on tungsten surfaces Structural and magnetic properties

    CERN Document Server

    Moslemzadeh, N

    2001-01-01

    The rare earth thin films are frequently the focus of investigators due to their unusual structural and magnetic properties. Despite the potential interest of Dy/W systems to the surface/rare earth community, they have been little studied. This study is the first try of growing Dy on W(100) and W(112) and W(110) in which almost a complete set of information about film morphology and electronic structure of the surface and interface have been achieved. A set of different experiments have been done for this purpose including LEED, XPS, UPS (with synchrotron radiation) and STM. The growth modes of Dy on different W substrates (W(100), W(112) and W(110)) at RT and at elevated temperatures have been determined by XPS of Dy 3d sub 3 sub / sub 2 and W 4f intensities. Crystallographic ordering and the epitaxial relationship between adsorbate Dy and different W substrates have been studied with LEED and the effect of annealing temperature on the resultant superstructures was investigated. As a complementary study to t...

  4. Not just fractal surfaces, but surface fractal aggregates: Derivation of the expression for the structure factor and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besselink, R.; Stawski, T. M.; Van Driessche, A. E. S.; Benning, L. G.

    2016-12-01

    Densely packed surface fractal aggregates form in systems with high local volume fractions of particles with very short diffusion lengths, which effectively means that particles have little space to move. However, there are no prior mathematical models, which would describe scattering from such surface fractal aggregates and which would allow the subdivision between inter- and intraparticle interferences of such aggregates. Here, we show that by including a form factor function of the primary particles building the aggregate, a finite size of the surface fractal interfacial sub-surfaces can be derived from a structure factor term. This formalism allows us to define both a finite specific surface area for fractal aggregates and the fraction of particle interfacial sub-surfaces at the perimeter of an aggregate. The derived surface fractal model is validated by comparing it with an ab initio approach that involves the generation of a "brick-in-a-wall" von Koch type contour fractals. Moreover, we show that this approach explains observed scattering intensities from in situ experiments that followed gypsum (CaSO4 ṡ 2H2O) precipitation from highly supersaturated solutions. Our model of densely packed "brick-in-a-wall" surface fractal aggregates may well be the key precursor step in the formation of several types of mosaic- and meso-crystals.

  5. Fracture Resistance, Surface Defects and Structural Strength of Glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodichev, Y.M.; Veer, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper poses the theory that the fracture resistance of basic float glass is dependent on it physicochemical properties and the surface defects fonned under the float glass production, glass processing and handling at the service conditions compose the aggregate basis for structural glass

  6. Probing surface structures of Shewanella spp. by microelectrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dague, E.; Duval, J.F.L.; Jorand, R.; Thomas, F.; Gaboriaud, F.

    2006-01-01

    Long-range electrostatic forces substantially influence bacterial interactions and bacterial adhesion during the preliminary steps of biofilm formation. The strength of these forces depends strongly on the structure of the bacterium surfaces investigated. The latter may be addressed from appropriate

  7. Moduli spaces of convex projective structures on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fock, V. V.; Goncharov, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    We introduce explicit parametrisations of the moduli space of convex projective structures on surfaces, and show that the latter moduli space is identified with the higher Teichmüller space for defined in [V.V. Fock, A.B. Goncharov, Moduli spaces of local systems and higher Teichmüller theory, ma...

  8. Functional oxide structures on a surface of metals and alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rudnev; V.; S.; Yarovaya; T.; P.; Boguta; D.; L.; Lukiyanchuk; I.; V.; Tyrina; L.; M.; Morozova; V.; P.; Nedozorov; P.; M.; Vasilyeva; M.; S.; Kondrikov; N.; B.

    2005-01-01

    The investigations of the plasma electrolytic processes in our laboratory are aimed to the development of conditions of formation of oxide layers with determined composition, structure and functional properties on the surface of valve metals (Al, Ti) and their alloys.……

  9. Towards Friction Control using laser-induced periodic Surface Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichstädt, J.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at contributing to the study of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the description of their tribological properties in order to facilitate the knowledge for contact mechanical applications. To obtain laser parameters for LIPSS formation, we propose to execute two D

  10. Bio-Inspired Functional Surfaces Based on Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Frank A.; Clemens Kunz; Stephan Gräf

    2016-01-01

    Nature developed numerous solutions to solve various technical problems related to material surfaces by combining the physico-chemical properties of a material with periodically aligned micro/nanostructures in a sophisticated manner. The utilization of ultra-short pulsed lasers allows mimicking numerous of these features by generating laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS). In this review paper, we describe the physical background of LIPSS generation as well as the physical princip...

  11. Structural and surface changes of copper modified manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gac, Wojciech, E-mail: wojciech.gac@umcs.lublin.pl; Słowik, Grzegorz; Zawadzki, Witold

    2016-05-01

    Highlights: • Formation of MnO with regular rippled-like surface patterns. • Synthesis of copper nanorods supported on MnO nanoparticles. • Hydrogen production in steam methanol reforming over supported copper nanorods. - Abstract: The structural and surface properties of manganese and copper–manganese oxides were investigated. The oxides were prepared by the redox-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy studies evidenced transformation of cryptomelane-type nanoparticles with 1-D channel structure into the large MnO crystallites with regular rippled-like surface patterns under reduction conditions. The development of Cu/CuO nanorods from strongly dispersed species was evidenced. Coper-modified manganese oxides showed good catalytic performance in methanol steam reforming reaction for hydrogen production. Low selectivity to CO was observed in the wide range of temperatures.

  12. 30 CFR 785.19 - Surface coal mining and reclamation operations on areas or adjacent to areas including alluvial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., and evapotranspiration, relief, slope and density of drainage channels; (B) Factors contributing to... coal mining operation may affect this alluvial valley floor or waters that supply the alluvial valley... alluvial valley floor that would be affected by the surface coal mining operation is of such small...

  13. Osteogenic activity of titanium surfaces with nanonetwork structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing H

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helin Xing,1,2 Satoshi Komasa,3 Yoichiro Taguchi,4 Tohru Sekino,5 Joji Okazaki3 1Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China; 2Graduate School of Dentistry (Removable Prosthodontics and Occlusion, 3Department of Removable Prosthodontics and Occlusion, 4Department of Periodontology, Osaka Dental University, Hirakata, Osaka, Japan; 5Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Japan Background: Titanium surfaces play an important role in affecting osseointegration of dental implants. Previous studies have shown that the titania nanotube promotes osseointegration by enhancing osteogenic differentiation. Only relatively recently have the effects of titanium surfaces with other nanostructures on osteogenic differentiation been investigated. Methods: In this study, we used NaOH solutions with concentrations of 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0, and 12.5 M to develop a simple and useful titanium surface modification that introduces the nanonetwork structures with titania nanosheet (TNS nanofeatures to the surface of titanium disks. The effects of such a modified nanonetwork structure, with different alkaline concentrations on the osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs, were evaluated. Results: The nanonetwork structures with TNS nanofeatures induced by alkali etching markedly enhanced BMMSC functions of cell adhesion and osteogenesis-related gene expression, and other cell behaviors such as proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, extracellular matrix deposition, and mineralization were also significantly increased. These effects were most pronounced when the concentration of NaOH was 10.0 M. Conclusion: The results suggest that nanonetwork structures with TNS nanofeatures improved BMMSC proliferation and induced BMMSC osteogenic differentiation. In addition, the surfaces formed

  14. Surface structure and relaxation during the oxidation of carbon monoxide on Pt Pd bimetallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, C. A.; Markovic, N. M.; Ball, M.; Stamenkovic, V.; Climent, V.; Ross, P. N.

    2001-05-01

    The atomic structure and surface relaxation of Pd monolayer on Pt(1 1 1) has been studied by surface X-ray scattering, in an aqueous environment under electrostatic potential control, during the adsorption and oxidation of carbon monoxide. The results show that the Pd-Pt layer spacing contracts at the onset of CO oxidation before the Pd adlayer forms an oxide structure that is incommensurate with the Pt lattice. Both the oxide formation and the lattice contraction are fully reversible over many cycles of the applied electrode potential.

  15. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  16. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Tiziana C; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-11-03

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  17. On Surface Structure and Friction Regulation in Reptilian Limbless Locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Aal, Hisham A

    2012-01-01

    One way of controlling friction and associated energy losses is to engineer a deterministic structural pattern on the surface of the rubbing parts (i.e., texture engineering). Custom texturing enhances the quality of lubrication, reduces friction, and allows the use of lubricants of lower viscosity. To date, a standardized procedure to generate deterministic texture constructs is virtually non-existent. Many engineers, therefore, study natural species to explore surface construction and to probe the role surface topography assumes in friction control. Snakes offer rich examples of surfaces where topological features allow the optimization and control of frictional behavior. In this paper, we investigate the frictional behavior of a constrictor type reptile, Python regius. The study employed a specially designed tribo-acoustic probe capable of measuring the coefficient of friction and detecting the acoustical behavior of the skin in vivo. The results confirm the anisotropy of the frictional response of snakesk...

  18. Electronic structure tuning via surface modification in semimetallic nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Soares, Alfonso; O'Donnell, Conor; Greer, James C.

    2016-12-01

    Electronic structure properties of nanowires (NWs) with diameters of 1.5 and 3 nm based on semimetallic α -Sn are investigated by employing density functional theory and perturbative GW methods. We explore the dependence of electron affinity, band structure, and band-gap values with crystallographic orientation, NW cross-sectional size, and surface passivants of varying electronegativity. We consider four chemical terminations in our study: methyl (CH3), hydrogen (H ), hydroxyl (OH ), and fluorine (F ). Results suggest a high degree of elasticity of Sn-Sn bonds within the Sn NWs' cores with no significant structural variations for nanowires with different surface passivants. Direct band gaps at Brillouin-zone centers are found for most studied structures with quasiparticle corrected band-gap magnitudes ranging from 0.25 to 3.54 eV in 1.5-nm-diameter structures, indicating an exceptional range of properties for semimetal NWs below the semimetal-to-semiconductor transition. Band-gap variations induced by changes in surface passivants indicate the possibility of realizing semimetal-semiconductor interfaces in NWs with constant cross-section and crystallographic orientation, allowing the design of novel dopant-free NW-based electronic devices.

  19. Fabrication of laser induced periodic surface structure for geometrical engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutsumi, Naoto [Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)], E-mail: tsutsumi@kit.jp; Fujihara, Arata; Nagata, Kazuya [Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2008-12-31

    The paper presents the highly ordered geometrical structures of laser induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) in azobenzene urethane polymer (DR19 polymer) from 4-(N,N-dihydroxyethylamino)-4'-nitroazobenzene (Disperse red 19) with tolylene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI). One or two regulated striped LIPSS was formed in confined spaces between surface relief gratings (SRG) induced by the s-polarized interfered beams. The pitch of LIPSS was one-half or one-third of SRG pitch. Standing wave with some selected mode between SRG in the surface waveguide is responsible for the formation of the regulated striped LIPSS. The crossed illumination of the interfered beams showed the waffle-like structure for s-polarization beam and the egg crate-like (ECL) structure for p-polarized beam. Photoinduced microscopic molecular ordering was also investigated. The linear polarized beam gave the large optical anisotropy in the polymer and the circularly polarized beam produced the chiral structure. The circular dichroism spectra showed the sharp peak due to the circular Bragg reflection from which the chiral pitch was evaluated.

  20. Frequency selective surface structure optimized by genetic algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Jun; Wang Jian-Bo; Sun Guan-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Frequency selective surface(FSS)is a two-dimensional periodic structure which has prominent characteristics of bandpass or bandblock when interacting with electromagnetic waves.In this paper,the thickness,the dielectric constant,the element graph and the arrangement periodicity of an FSS medium are investigated by Genetic Algorithm(GA)when an electromagnetic wave is incident on the FSS at a wide angle,and an optimized FSS structure and transmission characteristics are obtained.The results show that the optimized structure has better stability in relation to incident angle of electromagnetic wave and preserves the stability of centre frequency even at an incident angle as large as 80°,thereby laying the foundation for the application of FSS to curved surfaces at wide angles.

  1. Electronic structure of graphene on Ni surfaces with different orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudikov, D.A., E-mail: gelbry@gmail.com; Zhizhin, E.V.; Rybkin, A.G.; Rybkina, A.A.; Zhukov, Y.M.; Vilkov, O. Yu.; Shikin, A.M.

    2016-08-15

    An experimental study of the graphene, synthesized by propylene cracking on Ni surfaces with different orientation: (100) and (111), using angle-resolved photoemission, has been performed. It has been shown that graphene on Ni(111) had a perfect lateral structure due to consistency of their lattices, whereas graphene/Ni(100) consisted of a lot of domains. For both systems electronic structure was quite similar and demonstrated a strong bonding of graphene to the underlying Ni surface. After Au intercalation the electronic structure of graphene in both systems was shifted to the Fermi level and became linear in the vicinity of the K point of the Brillouin zone. - Highlights: • Graphene on Ni(111) is well-ordered, whereas on Ni(100) – multi-domain. • Graphene on Ni(111) and Ni(100) is strongly bonded with substrate. • Intercalation of Au atoms restores the linearity in dispersion and makes graphene quasi-free on both Ni(100) and Ni(111).

  2. UV spectral filtering by surface structured multilayer mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiushi; Paardekooper, Daniel Mathijs; Zoethout, Erwin; Medvedev, V V; van de Kruijs, Robbert; Bosgra, Jeroen; Louis, Eric; Bijkerk, Fred

    2014-03-01

    A surface structured extreme ultraviolet multilayer mirror was developed showing full band suppression of UV (λ=100-400  nm) and simultaneously a high reflectance of EUV light (λ=13.5  nm). The surface structure consists of Si pyramids, which are substantially transparent for EUV but reflective for UV light. The reflected UV is filtered out by blazed diffraction, interference, and absorption. A first demonstration pyramid structure was fabricated on a multilayer by using a straightforward deposition technique. It shows an average suppression of 14 times over the whole UV range and an EUV reflectance of 56.2% at 13.5 nm. This robust scheme can be used as a spectral purity solution for all XUV sources that emit longer wavelength radiation as well.

  3. Plant Surfaces: Structures and Functions for Biomimetic Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthlott, Wilhelm; Mail, Matthias; Bhushan, Bharat; Koch, Kerstin

    2017-04-01

    An overview of plant surface structures and their evolution is presented. It combines surface chemistry and architecture with their functions and refers to possible biomimetic applications. Within some 3.5 billion years biological species evolved highly complex multifunctional surfaces for interacting with their environments: some 10 million living prototypes (i.e., estimated number of existing plants and animals) for engineers. The complexity of the hierarchical structures and their functionality in biological organisms surpasses all abiotic natural surfaces: even superhydrophobicity is restricted in nature to living organisms and was probably a key evolutionary step with the invasion of terrestrial habitats some 350-450 million years ago in plants and insects. Special attention should be paid to the fact that global environmental change implies a dramatic loss of species and with it the biological role models. Plants, the dominating group of organisms on our planet, are sessile organisms with large multifunctional surfaces and thus exhibit particular intriguing features. Superhydrophilicity and superhydrophobicity are focal points in this work. We estimate that superhydrophobic plant leaves (e.g., grasses) comprise in total an area of around 250 million km2, which is about 50% of the total surface of our planet. A survey of structures and functions based on own examinations of almost 20,000 species is provided, for further references we refer to Barthlott et al. (Philos. Trans. R. Soc. A 374: 20160191, 1). A basic difference exists between aquatic non-vascular and land-living vascular plants; the latter exhibit a particular intriguing surface chemistry and architecture. The diversity of features is described in detail according to their hierarchical structural order. The first underlying and essential feature is the polymer cuticle superimposed by epicuticular wax and the curvature of single cells up to complex multicellular structures. A descriptive terminology

  4. Adsorption of gaseous hydrocarbons on activated carbon: characteristic kinetic curve. [Includes effect of surface migration on kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, E.; Calleja, G.; Domingo, F.

    1985-06-01

    The internal diffusion coefficients, D /sub i/ , of pure methane, ethane and ethylene as well as some of their binary and ternary mixtures, have been calculated at 20/sup 0/C for solid particles of a commercial activated carbon. It has been observed that the contribution of the surface migration mechanism to the global mass transfer process inside the adsorbent particles can be as much as 70-80%. Values for the surface migration coefficient D /sub s/ have also been calculated from the relation D /sub i/ = D /sub g/ + KD /sub s/ , where K is a dimensionless mean slope factor. Values found for both coefficients are of the same order of magnitude as those reported in the literature for similar systems. All the values for the internal diffusion coefficients of these pure components and their mixtures fit into a single correlation curve, the characteristic kinetic curve of the adsorbent.

  5. Novel genetic algorithm search procedure for LEED surface structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, M L; dos Reis, D D; Soares, E A; Van Hove, M A; Moritz, W; de Carvalho, V E

    2014-06-04

    Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) is one of the most powerful experimental techniques for surface structure analysis but until now only a trial-and-error approach has been successful. So far, fitting procedures developed to optimize structural and nonstructural parameters-by minimization of the R-factor-have had a fairly small convergence radius, suitable only for local optimization. However, the identification of the global minimum among the several local minima is essential for complex surface structures. Global optimization methods have been applied to LEED structure determination, but they still require starting from structures that are relatively close to the correct one, in order to find the final structure. For complex systems, the number of trial structures and the resulting computation time increase so rapidly that the task of finding the correct model becomes impractical using the present methodologies. In this work we propose a new search method, based on Genetic Algorithms, which is able to determine the correct structural model starting from completely random structures. This method-called here NGA-LEED for Novel Genetic Algorithm for LEED-utilizes bond lengths and symmetry criteria to select reasonable trial structures before performing LEED calculations. This allows a reduction of the parameter space and, consequently of the calculation time, by several orders of magnitude. A refinement of the parameters by least squares fit of simulated annealing is performed only at some intermediate stages and in the final step. The method was successfully tested for two systems, Ag(1 1 1)(4 × 4)-O and Au(1 1 0)-(1 × 2), both in theory versus theory and in theory versus experiment comparisons. Details of the implementation as well as the results for these two systems are presented.

  6. Vibration of bioliquid-filled microtubules embedded in cytoplasm including surface effects using modified couple stress theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A; Abdollahian, M; Jalaei, M H

    2015-02-21

    This paper aims to investigate vibrational behavior of bioliquid-filled microtubules (MTs) embedded in cytoplasm considering surface effects. The interactions between the MT, considered as an orthotropic beam within the framework of Euler-Bernoulli beam (EBB) and Timoshenko beam (TB) models, and its surrounding elastic media are simulated by Pasternak foundation model. The modified couple stress theory (MCST) is applied so as to consider the small scale effects while motion equations are derived using energy method and Hamilto's principle for both EBB and TB models. Finally, an analytical method is employed to obtain the frequency of a bioliquid-filled MT, and therefore frequency-response curves are plotted to investigate the influences of small scale parameter, mass density of bioliquid, surface layer and surrounding elastic medium graphically. The results indicate that bioliquid and surface layers play a key role on the frequency of MTs and that the frequency of MTs is decreased with increasing of the mass density of the bioliquid. Vibration analysis of MTs is being considered as a vital problem since MTs look like the nervous system of the biological cells and transmit vibrational signals. It should be noted that the results of this work are hoped to be of use in advanced medical applications especially in the forthcoming use of MTs in transporters for bio-nanosensors.

  7. Surface and Structure: Transcribing Intonation within and across Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Frota

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Intonation is the phonologically structured variation in phonetic features, primarily pitch, to express phrase-level meanings. As in other speech sound domains, analyzing intonation involves mapping continuously variable physical parameters to categories. The categories of intonation are organized in a set of relations and rule-governed distributions that define the intonation system of a language. From physical realizations, as shown by pitch tracks, surface or phonetic tonal patterns can be identified in terms of tonal targets. Whether surface patterns correspond or not to categories within a given intonation system requires looking at their distributions and contrastiveness. In this paper, I assume the view that a transcription is an analysis of the intonation system, which ultimately aims to identify the contrastive intonation categories of a given language and establish how they signal meaning. Under this view, it is crucial to discuss the ways surface pitch patterns and structural pitch patterns (or phonological categories are related. Given that intonational analysis is driven by system-internal considerations and that cues to a given category can vary across languages, it is also important to address the issue of how a language-specific transcription can be reconciled with the need and ability to do cross-language comparison of intonation. Bearing on these two issues, I discuss surface and structure in intonational analysis, drawing on mismatches between (dissimilarities in the phonetics and phonology of pitch contours, across languages and language varieties.

  8. Can atom-surface potential measurements test atomic structure models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2011-06-30

    van der Waals (vdW) atom-surface potentials can be excellent benchmarks for atomic structure calculations. This is especially true if measurements are made with two different types of atoms interacting with the same surface sample. Here we show theoretically how ratios of vdW potential strengths (e.g., C₃(K)/C₃(Na)) depend sensitively on the properties of each atom, yet these ratios are relatively insensitive to properties of the surface. We discuss how C₃ ratios depend on atomic core electrons by using a two-oscillator model to represent the contribution from atomic valence electrons and core electrons separately. We explain why certain pairs of atoms are preferable to study for future experimental tests of atomic structure calculations. A well chosen pair of atoms (e.g., K and Na) will have a C₃ ratio that is insensitive to the permittivity of the surface, whereas a poorly chosen pair (e.g., K and He) will have a ratio of C₃ values that depends more strongly on the permittivity of the surface.

  9. Language learners privilege structured meaning over surface frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Jennifer; Adger, David

    2014-04-22

    Although it is widely agreed that learning the syntax of natural languages involves acquiring structure-dependent rules, recent work on acquisition has nevertheless attempted to characterize the outcome of learning primarily in terms of statistical generalizations about surface distributional information. In this paper we investigate whether surface statistical knowledge or structural knowledge of English is used to infer properties of a novel language under conditions of impoverished input. We expose learners to artificial-language patterns that are equally consistent with two possible underlying grammars--one more similar to English in terms of the linear ordering of words, the other more similar on abstract structural grounds. We show that learners' grammatical inferences overwhelmingly favor structural similarity over preservation of superficial order. Importantly, the relevant shared structure can be characterized in terms of a universal preference for isomorphism in the mapping from meanings to utterances. Whereas previous empirical support for this universal has been based entirely on data from cross-linguistic language samples, our results suggest it may reflect a deep property of the human cognitive system--a property that, together with other structure-sensitive principles, constrains the acquisition of linguistic knowledge.

  10. Biomimetic surface structuring using cylindrical vector femtosecond laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoulas, Evangelos; Manousaki, Alexandra; Fotakis, Costas; Stratakis, Emmanuel

    2017-03-01

    We report on a new, single-step and scalable method to fabricate highly ordered, multi-directional and complex surface structures that mimic the unique morphological features of certain species found in nature. Biomimetic surface structuring was realized by exploiting the unique and versatile angular profile and the electric field symmetry of cylindrical vector (CV) femtosecond (fs) laser beams. It is shown that, highly controllable, periodic structures exhibiting sizes at nano-, micro- and dual- micro/nano scales can be directly written on Ni upon line and large area scanning with radial and azimuthal polarization beams. Depending on the irradiation conditions, new complex multi-directional nanostructures, inspired by the Shark’s skin morphology, as well as superhydrophobic dual-scale structures mimicking the Lotus’ leaf water repellent properties can be attained. It is concluded that the versatility and features variations of structures formed is by far superior to those obtained via laser processing with linearly polarized beams. More important, by exploiting the capabilities offered by fs CV fields, the present technique can be further extended to fabricate even more complex and unconventional structures. We believe that our approach provides a new concept in laser materials processing, which can be further exploited for expanding the breadth and novelty of applications.

  11. Surface Structure of Thin Films of Multifunctional Ionizable Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Anuradhi; Perahia, Dvora

    Phase segregation results in a rich variety of structures in co-polymers where interfacial forces often dominate the structure of thin films. Introduction of ionizable segments often drives the formation of compounded structures with multiple blocks residing at the interfaces. Here we probe thin films, 40-50nm, of an A-B-C-B-A co-polymer where C is a randomly sulfonated polystyrene with sulfonation fractions of 0, 26 and 52 mole %, B is poly (ethylene-r-propylene), and A is poly (t-butyl styrene) as the sulfonation level and temperature are varied using Neutron Reflectivity AFM, and surface tension measurements. As cast films form layers with both hydrophobic blocks dominating the solid and air interfaces and the ionizable block segregating to the center. Following annealing at 1700C, above Tg of styrene sulfonate, the films coarsen, with surface aggregation dominating the structure, though interfacial regions remain dominated by the hydrophobic segments. We show that in contrast to non-ionic co-polymers, formation of micelles dominated the structure of these ionic structured films. Supported in part by DOE Grant No. DE-SC007908.

  12. Surface-plasmons lasing in double-graphene-layer structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinov, A. A. [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Institute for Physics of Microstructures of Russian Academy of Sciences, and Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Aleshkin, V. Ya. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of Russian Academy of Sciences, and Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Ryzhii, V. [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Center for Photonics and Infrared Engineering, Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Shur, M. S. [Department of Electrical, Electronics, and System Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Otsuji, T. [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-01-28

    We consider the concept of injection terahertz lasers based on double-graphene-layer (double-GL) structures with metal surface-plasmon waveguide and study the conditions of their operation. The laser under consideration exploits the resonant radiative transitions between GLs. This enables the double-GL laser room temperature operation and the possibility of voltage tuning of the emission spectrum. We compare the characteristics of the double-GL lasers with the metal surface-plasmon waveguides with those of such laser with the metal-metal waveguides.

  13. Enhancing the chroma of pigmented polymers using antireflective surface structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Kristensen, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate how the color of a pigmented polymer is affected by reduction of the reflectance at the air-polymer interface. Both theoretical and experimental investigations show modified diffuse-direct reflectance spectra when the reflectance of the surface is lowered. Specifically...... it is found that the color change is manifested as an increase in chroma, leading to a clearer color experience. The experimental implementation is done using random tapered surface structures replicated in polymer from silicon masters using hot embossing....

  14. Surface Monitoring of CFRP Structures for Adhesive Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Rodolfo; Palmieri, Frank L.; Yost, William T.; Connell, John W.; Fitz-Gerald, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of composite materials requires reliable monitoring and detection of surface contaminants to assure robust and durable bonded structures. Surface treatment and effective monitoring prior to bonding is essential in order to obtain a surface free from contaminants that may degrade structural performance. Two techniques which monitor the effectiveness of the laser surface treatment of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) materials are being investigated: laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and optically stimulated electron emission (OSEE). The applicability of LIBS to detect silicone contaminants on CFRP composites is studied using 35 ns Nd:YAG laser pulses at 355 nm with a pulse energy of 45 mJ. The LIBS regime in which pulse energies are < 100 mJ is referred to as mLIBS. CFRP surfaces were contaminated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a major component of silicone based mold release agents. The presence of PDMS is found by inspecting the Si I emission line at 288.2 nm. Untreated CFRP samples and CFRP contaminated with PDMS were tested. The PDMS areal density ranged from 0.36 Â+/- 0.04 to 0.51 Â+/- 0.16 mg/cm2. The results demonstrate the successful detection of PDMS on CFRP using mLIBS. In addition, OSEE was used to measure CFRP surface cleanliness pre- and post-treatment by laser ablation on specimens contaminated with PDMS coatings from 8 nm to 1311 nm in thickness. The results showed a significant increase in the OSEE photocurrent after laser surface treatment.

  15. A Gas-Surface Interaction Model based on Accelerated Reactive Molecular Dynamics for Hypersonic Conditions including Thermal Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    oxygen interactions with a specific crystalline polymorph of SiO2 (called β- cristobalite ). Computer images of this crystal lattice are shown in Fig. 2...The choice of β- cristobalite is motivated by experimental studies from Balat-Pichelin et al. [15,22,23] where silicon-carbide (SiC) surfaces were...that the measured loss rates correspond to β- cristobalite was based on the fact that for polymorph diagrams of SiO2, β- cristobalite is most stable

  16. Nonlinear Thermo-mechanical Finite Element Analysis of Polymer Foam Cored Sandwich Structures including Geometrical and Material Nonlinearity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palleti, Hara Naga Krishna Teja; Thomsen, Ole Thybo; Taher, Siavash Talebi;

    In this paper, polymer foam cored sandwich structures with fibre reinforced composite face sheets subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads will be analysed using the commercial FE code ABAQUS® incorporating both material and geometrical nonlinearity. Large displacements and rotations ar...... are included in the analysis. The full nonlinear stress-strain curves up to failure will be considered for the polymer foams at different temperatures to study the effect of material nonlinearity in detail....

  17. Fitting C² continuous parametric surfaces to frontiers delimiting physiologic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Jason D; Epstein, Matthew; Beaumont, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    We present a technique to fit C(2) continuous parametric surfaces to scattered geometric data points forming frontiers delimiting physiologic structures in segmented images. Such mathematical representation is interesting because it facilitates a large number of operations in modeling. While the fitting of C(2) continuous parametric curves to scattered geometric data points is quite trivial, the fitting of C(2) continuous parametric surfaces is not. The difficulty comes from the fact that each scattered data point should be assigned a unique parametric coordinate, and the fit is quite sensitive to their distribution on the parametric plane. We present a new approach where a polygonal (quadrilateral or triangular) surface is extracted from the segmented image. This surface is subsequently projected onto a parametric plane in a manner to ensure a one-to-one mapping. The resulting polygonal mesh is then regularized for area and edge length. Finally, from this point, surface fitting is relatively trivial. The novelty of our approach lies in the regularization of the polygonal mesh. Process performance is assessed with the reconstruction of a geometric model of mouse heart ventricles from a computerized tomography scan. Our results show an excellent reproduction of the geometric data with surfaces that are C(2) continuous.

  18. Nox diffusion-simulation in an urban area in using the vertical diffusion diagram including a surface roughness parameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, Hitoshi; Fujimoto, Akira; Nakano, Hiroshi

    1988-03-31

    In recent years, in order to attain a total quantity regulation of air pollution and to prepare a local air-control program, a diffusion simulation is often made using a Gaussian plume model. NOx diffusion simulation of the urban area was carried out using a vertical diffusion width by taking a parameter of ground-surface roughness using Smith's correction to the Gaussian model. For the diffusion of car exhaust gas, comparison was made for the estimate and the measurement by jointly using the values of ground-surface roughness and the initial diffusion width. As a result, change in the diffusion width of the car exhaust gas due to the urban buildings was expressed at a necessary practical level by giving the height of the point of calculation, 1 - 3 m in the central part and 30 cm at the peripheral part, and giving the initial diffusion width of roughly half to equal size of initial diffusion width to the average height of the buildings. (2 figs, 8 tabs, 20 refs)

  19. Wireless structural sensor made with frequency selective surface antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sang-Dong; Kim, Jaehwan

    2012-04-01

    Nondestructive Structural health monitoring (SHM) system using wireless sensor network is the one of important issue for aerospace and civil engineering. Chipless passive wireless sensor system is one of novel methods for SHM which uses the electromagnetic wave characteristic change by geometrical change of electromagnetic resonators or impedance change of functional material sensing part without RFID chip. In this paper, the chipless passive wireless SHM sensor using frequency selective surface (FSS) is investigated. Electromagnetic characteristic change of FSS by mechanical strain or structural damage is investigated by simulation and experiment.

  20. Structural phases of adsorption for flexible polymers on nanocylinder surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jonathan; Vogel, Thomas; Bachmann, Michael

    2015-11-11

    By means of generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the thermodynamic behavior of a flexible, elastic polymer model in the presence of an attractive nanocylinder. We systematically identify the structural phases that are formed by competing monomer-monomer and monomer-substrate interactions. The influence of the relative surface attraction strength on the structural phases in the hyperphase diagram, parameterized by cylinder radius and temperature, is discussed as well. In the limiting case of the infinitely large cylinder radius, our results coincide with previous outcomes of studies of polymer adsorption on planar substrates.

  1. Laser-induced periodic surface structuring of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Susana; Rebollar, Esther; Oujja, Mohamed; Martín, Margarita; Castillejo, Marta

    2013-03-01

    We report here on a systematic study about the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on biopolymers. Self-standing films of the biopolymers chitosan, starch and the blend of chitosan with the synthetic polymer poly (vinyl pyrrolidone), PVP, were irradiated in air with linearly polarized laser beams at 193, 213 and 266 nm, with pulse durations in the range of 6-17 ns. The laser-induced periodic surface structures were topographically characterized by atomic force microscopy and the chemical modifications induced by laser irradiation were inspected via Raman spectroscopy. Formation of LIPSS parallel to the laser polarization direction, with periods similar to the laser wavelength, was observed at efficiently absorbed wavelengths in the case of the amorphous biopolymer chitosan and its blend with PVP, while formation of LIPSS is prevented in the crystalline starch biopolymer.

  2. Atomic force microscopy for the study of specially prepared surfaces including transferred Langmuir-Blodgett layers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. J. D. Miller

    1999-06-02

    During the past four years a major number of surface science research programs in the Department of Metallurgical Engineering at the University of Utah have involved the use of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film balance procured with financial assistance from DOE under grant number DE-FG03-96ER76049. These instruments have been used for research in the areas of nonsulfide flotation chemistry, mineral processing, waste paper deinking, water treatment, treatment of contaminated soil, coal preparation, and plastics recycling. In addition, the AFM and LB film balance have been of great help to university researchers in other departments at the University of Utah and elsewhere, as well as researchers from industry.

  3. Femtosecond laser-induced surface structures on carbon fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajzew, Roman; Schröder, Jan; Kunz, Clemens; Engel, Sebastian; Müller, Frank A; Gräf, Stephan

    2015-12-15

    The influence of different polarization states during the generation of periodic nanostructures on the surface of carbon fibers was investigated using a femtosecond laser with a pulse duration τ=300  fs, a wavelength λ=1025  nm, and a peak fluence F=4  J/cm². It was shown that linear polarization results in a well-aligned periodic pattern with different orders of magnitude concerning their period and an alignment parallel and perpendicular to fiber direction, respectively. For circular polarization, both types of uniform laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) patterns appear simultaneously with different dominance in dependence on the position at the fiber surface. Their orientation was explained by the polarization-dependent absorptivity and the geometrical anisotropy of the carbon fibers.

  4. MODELING OF THE BUILDING LOCAL PROTECTION (SHELTER – IN PLACE INCLUDING SORBTION OF THE HAZARDOUS CONTAMINANT ON INDOOR SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Belyayev

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Chemically hazardous objects, where toxic substances are used, manufactured and stored, and also main lines, on which the hazardous materials transportation is conducted, pose potential sources of atmosphere accidental pollution.Development of the CFD model for evaluating the efficiency of the building local protection from hazardous substantives ingress by using air curtain and sorption/desorption of hazardous substance on indoor surfaces. Methodology. To solve the problem of hydrodynamic interaction of the air curtain with wind flow and considering the building influence on this process the model of ideal fluid is used. In order to calculate the transfer process of the hazardous substance in the atmosphere an equation of convection-diffusion transport of impurities is applied. To calculate the process of indoors air pollution under leaking of foul air Karisson & Huber model is used. This model takes into account the sorption of the hazardous substance at various indoors surfaces. For the numerical integration of the model equations differential methods are used. Findings. In this paper we construct an efficient CFD model of evaluating the effectiveness of the buildings protection against ingress of hazardous substances through the use of an air curtain. On the basis of the built model a computational experiment to assess the effectiveness of this protection method under varying the location of the air curtain relative to the building was carried out. Originality. A new model was developed to compute the effectiveness of the air curtain supply to reduce the toxic chemical concentration inside the building. Practical value. The developed model can be used for design of the building local protection against ingress of hazardous substances.

  5. Curved hierarchically micro-micro structured polypropylene surfaces by injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielonen, K.; Suvanto, M.; Pakkanen, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    Structural hierarchy of polymer surfaces has been of central interest due to its diverse surface functionalities. However, the research on hierarchically structured polymer surfaces has been focused on planar surfaces even though applications may also be variously curved. This study demonstrates the fabrication of curved rigid polymer surfaces with precisely controlled hierarchical microstructures. The surface structuration was made on an aluminum foil with a microworking robot, and polypropylene replicas were produced by injection molding. Depending on the mold structuration procedure, the curved mold can have either radially or vertically oriented structures. Both convex and concave curvatures were here applied to spherically and cylindrically curved surfaces. A simple structure protection technique was applied to support the structures during mechanical bending of the foil. The planar hierarchically microstructured polypropylene surfaces were characterized to exhibit superhydrophobicity, and similar structures were obtained on the curved surfaces. Introducing the curvature to the hierarchically structured surfaces may further widen the applicability of functionalized polymer surfaces.

  6. Study on Dielectric Function Models for Surface Plasmon Resonance Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Jahanshahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common permittivity function models are compared and identifying the best model for further studies is desired. For this study, simulations using several different models and an analytical analysis on a practical surface Plasmon structure were done with an accuracy of ∼94.4% with respect to experimental data. Finite element method, combined with dielectric properties extracted from the Brendel-Bormann function model, was utilized, the latter being chosen from a comparative study on four available models.

  7. Towards Friction Control using laser-induced periodic Surface Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Eichstädt, J.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at contributing to the study of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the description of their tribological properties in order to facilitate the knowledge for contact mechanical applications. To obtain laser parameters for LIPSS formation, we propose to execute two D2-Experiments. For the transfer of results from static experiments to areas of LIPSS we propose the discrete accumulation of fluences. Areas covered by homogeneously distributed LIPSS were machined...

  8. Antireflective surface structures on infrared optics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Lynda E.; Frantz, Jesse A.; Shaw, L. Brandon; Bayya, Shyam; Villalobos, Guillermo; Aggarwal, Ishwar D.; Sanghera, Jas S.

    2017-06-01

    Infrared-transmitting optics used in imaging systems have high refractive indices (n=1.4 to n > 3) that require antireflective (AR) coatings. These coatings have limitations in that they can delaminate in operational environments, which is a problem particularly for broadband coatings that consist of multiple layers of dissimilar materials. In addition, residual reflections within an imaging system can cause ghost reflections, degrading performance. Recently, new methods have been developed for fabrication of anti-reflective surface structures (ARSS) on optics that significantly reduce reflection losses at the surface. The ARSS approach provides a more robust solution by using surface structures built directly into the actual surface of the optics, without the need for a coating with extraneous materials. We present recent results that demonstrate superior ARSS performance on a variety of optics for use in the infrared spectral region. These materials have been successfully patterned with ARSS using reactive ion etching (RIE) or using photolithography and etching. We report on reflection losses as low as 0.02% for fused silica at 1.06 microns, and have also demonstrated low reflection losses for ARSS on germanium, spinel ceramic, and sapphire, all of which are important for mid- to long-wave infrared imaging applications.

  9. Mapping cardiac surface mechanics with structured light imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughner, Jacob I; Zhang, Song; Li, Hao; Shao, Connie C; Efimov, Igor R

    2012-09-15

    Cardiovascular disease often manifests as a combination of pathological electrical and structural heart remodeling. The relationship between mechanics and electrophysiology is crucial to our understanding of mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias and the treatment of cardiac disease. While several technologies exist for describing whole heart electrophysiology, studies of cardiac mechanics are often limited to rhythmic patterns or small sections of tissue. Here, we present a comprehensive system based on ultrafast three-dimensional (3-D) structured light imaging to map surface dynamics of whole heart cardiac motion. Additionally, we introduce a novel nonrigid motion-tracking algorithm based on an isometry-maximizing optimization framework that forms correspondences between consecutive 3-D frames without the use of any fiducial markers. By combining our 3-D imaging system with nonrigid surface registration, we are able to measure cardiac surface mechanics at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. In conclusion, we demonstrate accurate cardiac deformation at over 200,000 surface points of a rabbit heart recorded at 200 frames/s and validate our results on highly contrasting heart motions during normal sinus rhythm, ventricular pacing, and ventricular fibrillation.

  10. Coherence in ultrafast laser-induced periodic surface structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Li, Chen; Faure, Nicolas; Cheng, Guanghua; Stoian, Razvan

    2015-11-01

    Ultrafast laser irradiation can trigger anisotropically structured nanoscaled gratinglike arrangements of matter, the laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs). We demonstrate here that the formation of LIPSS is intrinsically related to the coherence of the laser field. Employing several test materials that allow large optical excursions, we observe the effect of randomizing spatial phase in generating finite domains of ripples. Using three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain methods, we evaluate energy deposition patterns below a material's rough surface and show that modulated pattern, i.e., a spatially ordered electromagnetic solution, results from the coherent superposition of waves. By separating the field scattered from a surface rough topography from the total field, the inhomogeneous energy absorption problem is reduced to a simple interference equation. We further distinguish the contribution of the scattered near field and scattered far field on various types of inhomogeneous energy absorption features. It is found that the inhomogeneous energy absorption which could trigger the low-spatial-frequency LIPSSs (LSFLs) and high-spatial-frequency LIPSSs (HSFLs) of periodicity Λ >λ /Re(n ˜) are due to coherent superposition between the scattered far field (propagation) and the refracted field, while HSFLs of Λ λ ) related to a feedback-driven topography evolution. Those results strongly suggest the electromagnetic interpretation of LIPSSs in interplay with an evolving surface topography.

  11. Spot--like Structures of Neutron Star Surface Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Geppert, U; Gil, J

    2003-01-01

    There is growing evidence, based on both X-ray and radio observations of isolated neutron stars, that besides the large--scale (dipolar) magnetic field, which determines the pulsar spin--down behaviour, small--scale poloidal field components are present, which have surface strengths one to two orders of magnitude larger than the dipolar component. We argue in this paper that the Hall--effect can be an efficient process in producing such small--scale field structures just above the neutron star surface. It is shown that due to a Hall--drift induced instability, poloidal magnetic field structures can be generated from strong subsurface toroidal fields, which are the result of either a dynamo or a thermoelectric instability acting at early times of a neutron star's life. The geometrical structure of these small--scale surface anomalies of the magnetic field resembles that of some types of ``star--spots''. The magnetic field strength and the length--scales are comparable with values that can be derived from vario...

  12. Simple surface structure determination from Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Shirley, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The authors show by Fourier analyses of experimental data, with no further treatment, that the positions of all the strong peaks in Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) from adsorbed surfaces can be explicitly predicted from a trial structure with an accuracy of about {+-} 0.3 {angstrom} based on a single-scattering cluster model together with the concept of a strong backscattering cone, and without any additional analysis. This characteristic of ARPEFS Fourier transforms can be developed as a simple method for determining the structures of adsorbed surfaces to an accuracy of about {+-} 0.1 {angstrom}.

  13. Resistance given by tiling grain surface with micro surface structures in polycrystalline metal oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, T.; Yamasaki, T.; Ohno, T.; Kishida, S.; Kinoshita, K.

    2016-12-01

    Practical use of Resistive Random Access Memory (ReRAM) depends on thorough understanding of the resistive switching (RS) mechanism in transition metal oxides. Although most of ReRAM samples have polycrystalline structures, both experimental studies and theoretical calculations do not often consider the effects that grain boundaries have on the RS mechanism. This paper discusses what determines resistance values in a Pt/polycrystalline NiO/Pt ReRAM structures by using both experiments and first-principles calculations. Electrical measurements suggest that the RS is caused in the grain boundaries of NiO films. First-principles calculations indicate that slight displacements of atoms with a small energy change of 0.04 eV per atom on the surfaces exposed in the grain boundaries can drastically change conductivities. We propose the tiling model, in which grain surfaces are composed by insulating and conductive micro surface structures, and the surface resistances are determined by the tiling patterns.

  14. Enhanced osteointegration of medical titanium implant with surface modifications in micro/nanoscale structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwen Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic design and substrate-based surface modification of medical implants will help to improve the integration of tissue to its material interfaces. Surface energy, composition, roughness, and topography all influence the biological responses of the implants, such as protein adsorption and cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. In the current study, different surface structures of Ti implants were constructed using facile surface techniques to create various micro-, nano-, and nano/micro composite scale topography. We have fabricated three types of hierarchical structures of TiO2 coating on Ti implants, including nanotube structure, nano sponge-like structure, and nano/micro nest-like structure. The osteointegration and biomechanical performance of the coated Ti screws were evaluated by histology and removal of torque force test in vivo. We found that the nano/micro nest-like and nanotube structured surface possessed better osteointegration ability. It indicated that the alkaline hydrothermally treated Ti substrate was the best for bone-implant integration in terms of all in vitro and in vivo testing parameters. The alkaline hydrothermally treated surface displayed a hydrophilic (contact angle value 5.92 ± 1.2, higher roughness (Ra value 911.3 ± 33.8 nm, higher specific surface area (8.26 ± 1.051 m2/g, and greater apatite inductivity. The electrochemical surface modification may become a powerful approach to enhance metal implant to bone integration in orthopaedic applications.

  15. Structures and surface tensions of fluids near solid surfaces: an integral equation theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengjin; Zhang, Chen; Du, Zhongjie; Mi, Jianguo

    2012-06-07

    In this work, integral equation theory is extended to describe the structures and surface tensions of confined fluids. To improve the accuracy of the equation, a bridge function based on the fundamental measure theory is introduced. The density profiles of the confined Lennard-Jones fluids and water are calculated, which are in good agreement with simulation data. On the basis of these density profiles, the grand potentials are then calculated using the density functional approach, and the corresponding surface tensions are predicted, which reproduce the simulation data well. In particular, the contact angles of water in contact with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic walls are evaluated.

  16. TEM investigation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on polymer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Úna; Kudzma, Sylwester; Sherlock, Richard; O'Connell, Claire; Glynn, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) may have numerous applications, ranging from biomaterial applications to LCDs, microelectronic fabrication and photonics. However, in order to control the development of these structures for their particular application, it is necessary to understand how they are generated. We report our work on investigating the melting that occurs during LIPSS formation. LIPSS were generated on three polymer surfaces - polyethylene terephthalate (PET), amorphous polycarbonate (APC) and oriented crystalline polycarbonate (OPC) - which were irradiated with a polarized ArF excimer laser (193 nm) beam with fluences between 3 and 5 mJ/cm2. The structures were imaged using a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), which facilitated investigation of changes in the polymer structures and consequently the depth of the melt zone that accompanies LIPSS generation. We also present theoretical calculations of the temperature-depth profile due to the interaction of the low fluence 193 nm laser beam with the polymer surfaces and compare these calculations with our experimental results.

  17. Ash liberation from included minerals during combustion of pulverized coal: the relationship with char structure and burnout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, H.; Wall, T.; Liu, G.; Bryant, G. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia). CRC for Black Coal Utilization and Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-12-01

    In this study, the float fraction ({lt} specific gravity of 2.0) of a size cut (63-90 {mu}m) bituminous coal was combusted in a drop tube furnace (DTF) at a gas temperature of 1300{degree}C under an atmosphere of air, to investigate the ash liberation at five coal burnoff levels (35.5%, 54.3%, 70.1%, 87.1% and 95.6%). The data indicated that char structure determines the ash liberation at different burnoff levels. Fragmentation of porous char was found to be the determinative mechanism for formation of fine ash during the early and middle stages of char combustion, while coalescence of included mineral matter determines the coarse ash formed in the later stages of combustion. The investigation confirmed that the char morphology and structure play a key role in determining char fragmentation, char burnout history, and the ash liberation during combustion. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Detection of a periodic structure embedded in surface roughness, for various correlation functions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V C Vani; S Chatterjee

    2011-10-01

    This paper deals with surface profilometry, where we try to detect a periodic structure, hidden in randomness using the matched filter method of analysing the intensity of light, scattered from the surface. From the direct problem of light scattering from a composite rough surface of the above type, we find that the detectability of the periodic structure can be hindered by the randomness, being dependent on the correlation function of the random part. In our earlier works, we had concentrated mainly on the Cauchy-type correlation function for the rough part. In the present work, we show that this technique can determine the periodic structure of different kinds of correlation functions of the roughness, including Cauchy, Gaussian etc. We study the detection by the matched filter method as the nature of the correlation function is varied.

  19. Fabrication of semi-transparent super-hydrophobic surface based on silica hierarchical structures

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ping-Hei

    2011-01-01

    This study successfully develops a versatile method of producing superhydrophobic surfaces with micro/nano-silica hierarchical structures on glass surfaces. Optically transparent super hydrophobic silica thin films were prepared by spin-coating silica particles suspended in a precursor solution of silane, ethanol, and H2O with molar ratio of 1:4:4. The resulting super hydrophobic films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical transmission, and contact angle measurements. The glass substrates in this study were modified with different particles: micro-silica particles, nano-silica particles, and hierarchical structures. This study includes SEM micrographs of the modified glass surfaces with hierarchical structures at different magnifications. © 2011 The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  20. Enhanced pool boiling heat transfer on mini- and micro- structured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuszko, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The surfaces used for investigating nucleate pool boiling for four working fluids had mini- and micro-fins of variable configurations, cross-sections and pitches, restrained by perforated foil or mesh cloth with various pore/opening diameters. Unique enhanced structures on these surfaces formed a system of interconnected horizontal and vertical tunnels. Four structured surfaces were proposed, each being a system of subsurface tunnels connected to 10 and 5 mm fins or 1 and 0.5 mm mini-fins. Measurement results for boiling water, ethanol, Fluorinert FC-72 and R-123 from more than 60 samples constituted the database used to verify the proposed theoretical models. These models were based on the results from the visualization studies, including internal visualization allowing observation of bubble nucleation, growth and displacement inside the tunnels, and on the analysis of existing boiling models for mini- and micro-structures.

  1. Structural changes of radial forging die surface during service under thermo-mechanical fatigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nematzadeh, Fardin [Materials and Energy Research Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akbarpour, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: mreza.akbarpour@gmail.com [Materials and Energy Research Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokabi, Amir Hosein; Sadrnezhaad, Seyed Khatiboleslam [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Radial forging is one of the modern open die forging techniques and has a wide application in producing machine parts. During operation at high temperatures, severe temperature change associated with mechanical loads and the resultant wearing of the die surface lead to intense variation in strain on the die surface. Therefore, under this operating condition, thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) occurs on the surface of the radial forging die. TMF decreases the life of the die severely. In the present research, different layers were deposited on a 1.2714 steel die by SMAW and GTAW, with a weld wire of UDIMET 520. The microstructure of the radial forging die surface was investigated during welding and service using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The results revealed that, after welding, the structure of the radial forging die surface includes the {gamma} matrix with a homogeneous distribution of fine semi-spherical carbides. The weld structure consisted mostly of columnar dendrites with low grain boundaries. Also, microstructural investigation of the die surface during operation showed that the weld structure of the die surface has remained without any considerable change. Only dendrites were deformed and broken. Moreover, grain boundaries of the dendrites were revealed during service.

  2. Value of the small cohort study including a physical examination for minor structural defects in identifying new human teratogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Christina D

    2011-03-01

    Most known human teratogens are associated with a unique or characteristic pattern of major and minor malformations and this pattern helps to establish the causal link between the teratogenic exposure and the outcome. Although traditional case-control and cohort study designs can help identify potential teratogens, there is an important role for small cohort studies that include a dysmorphological examination of exposed and unexposed infants for minor structural defects. In combination with other study design approaches, the small cohort study with a specialized physical examination fulfills a necessary function in screening for new potential teratogens and can help to better delineate the spectrum and magnitude of risk for known teratogens.

  3. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Ben, Mauro, E-mail: delben@chem.uzh.ch; Hutter, Jürg, E-mail: hutter@chem.uzh.ch [Department of Chemistry, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); VandeVondele, Joost, E-mail: joost.vandevondele@mat.ethz.ch [Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-08-07

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance.

  4. Structure of a bacterial cell surface decaheme electron conduit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Thomas A; Edwards, Marcus J; Gates, Andrew J; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye F; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alexander S; Marshall, Matthew J; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas J; Fredrickson, James K; Zachara, John M; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J

    2011-06-07

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves decaheme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outer-membrane electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular intercytochrome electron exchange along "nanowire" appendages. We present a 3.2-Å crystal structure of one of these decaheme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the 10 hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65-Å octaheme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45-Å tetraheme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g., minerals), soluble substrates (e.g., flavins), and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  5. A Note on the Relationship Between Temperature and Water Vapor over Oceans, Including Sea Surface Temperature Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An ideal and simple formulation is successfully derived that well represents a quasi-linear relationship found between the domain-averaged water vapor, Q (mm), and temperature, T (K), fields for the three tropical oceans (i.e., the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans) based on eleven GEOS-3 [Goddard Earth Observing System (EOS) Version-3] global re-analysis monthly products. A Q - T distribution analysis is also performed for the tropical and extra-tropical regions based on in-situ sounding data and numerical simulations [GEOS-3 and the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model]. A similar positively correlated Q - T distribution is found over the entire oceanic and tropical regions; however, Q increases faster with T for the former region. It is suspected that the tropical oceans may possess a moister boundary layer than the Tropics. The oceanic regime falls within the lower bound of the tropical regime embedded in a global, curvilinear Q - T relationship. A positive correlation is also found between T and sea surface temperature (SST); however, for one degree of increase in T, SST is found to increase 1.1 degrees for a warmer ocean, which is slightly less than an increase of 1.25 degrees for a colder ocean. This seemingly indicates that more (less) heat is needed for an open ocean to maintain an air mass above it with a same degree of temperature rise during a colder (warmer) season [or in a colder (warmer) region]. Q and SST are also found to be positively correlated. Relative humidity (RH) exhibits similar behaviors for oceanic and tropical regions. RH increases with increasing SST and T over oceans, while it increases with increasing T in the Tropics. RH, however, decreases with increasing temperature in the extratropics. It is suspected that the tropical and oceanic regions may possess a moister local boundary layer than the extratropics so that a faster moisture increase than a saturated moisture increase is favored for the former regions.T, Q, saturated water

  6. Structured Regions of Alpha-synuclein Fibrils Include the Early Onset Parkinson's Disease Mutation Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comellas Canal, Gemma; Lemkau, Luisel R.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Kloepper, Kathryn D.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Ebisu, Reika; Woods, Wendy S.; Lipton, Andrew S.; George, Julia M.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-08-26

    Alpha-Synuclein (AS) fibrils constitute the major proteinaceous component of Lewy bodies (LBs), the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. Three single point mutations in the AS gene, as well as multiplication of the wild-type (WT) AS allele, have been previously identified in families with early-onset PD. Although AS fibrils have been the subject of intense study, critical details about their structure including the precise location of the B-strands and the extent of the core, the three-dimensional structure and the effects of the mutations—remain unknown. Here, we have used magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy to present a detailed characterization of the full-length WT AS fibrils. With improved sample preparations, isotopic labeling patterns and NMR experiments, we have confidently assigned more than 90% of the 13C and 15N backbone and sidechain chemical shifts of the detected residues from residue 39 to 97, and quantified the conformational dynamics throughout this region. Our results demonstrate that the core of AS fibrils extends with a repeated motif and that residues 30, 46 and 53-the early-onset PD mutant sites-are located in structured regions of AS fibrils.

  7. Polymer masks for structured surface and plasma etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vital, Alexane [Centre de Recherche sur la Matière Divisée (CRMD), 1b rue de la Férollerie, F45071 Orléans Cedex (France); Groupe de Recherches sur l’Énergétique des Milieux Ionisés (GREMI), Polytech’Orléans, 14 rue d’Issoudun, B.P. 6744, F45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Vayer, Marylène, E-mail: marylene.vayer@univ-orleans.fr [Centre de Recherche sur la Matière Divisée (CRMD), 1b rue de la Férollerie, F45071 Orléans Cedex (France); Sinturel, Christophe [Centre de Recherche sur la Matière Divisée (CRMD), 1b rue de la Férollerie, F45071 Orléans Cedex (France); Tillocher, Thomas; Lefaucheux, Philippe; Dussart, Rémi [Groupe de Recherches sur l’Énergétique des Milieux Ionisés (GREMI), Polytech’Orléans, 14 rue d’Issoudun, B.P. 6744, F45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sub-micrometric silicon structures were prepared by cryogenic plasma etching. • Polymer templates based on phase-separated films of PS/PLA were used. • Silica structured masks were prepared by filling the polymer templates. • Etching of underlying silicon through silica templates gave original structures. - Abstract: Silica and silicon structures have been prepared at the sub-micrometer length-scale, using laterally phase-separated thin films of poly(styrene) (PS) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) homopolymer blends. The selective removal of one polymer and the filling of the released space by silica precursor solution led, after calcination, to silica structures on silicon such as arrays of bowl-shape features or pillars, layers with through or non-through cylindrical holes, which has not been observed for some of them. The control of the morphology of the initial polymer film was a key point to achieve such type of structures. Particularly relevant was the use of solvent vapor annealing (vs thermal annealing) of the initial spin-coated films that favored and stabilized laterally phase-separated morphologies. Characteristic dimension of the domains were shown to be coupled with the thickness of the film, thinner films giving smaller domain sizes. Despite a relatively high incompatibility of the two polymers, a macro-phase separation was prevented in all the studied conditions. Sub-micrometric domains were formed, and for the thinner films, nanometric domains as small as 74 nm in size can be obtained. The silica structures formed by the infiltration of the polymer templates were used as hard masks for the cryogenic etching of underlying silicon. New structured surfaces, arrays of silicon pillars which can be plain or hollow at the upper part or arrays of cylindrical holes were formed. A selectivity as high as 21 was obtained using this type of mask for 1.5 μm deep holes having a typical diameter of 200 nm.

  8. Preservation of Archaeal Surface Layer Structure During Mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Adrienne; Miot, Jennyfer; Lombard, Carine; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bernard, Sylvain; Zirah, Séverine; Guyot, François

    2016-05-25

    Proteinaceous surface layers (S-layers) are highly ordered, crystalline structures commonly found in prokaryotic cell envelopes that augment their structural stability and modify interactions with metals in the environment. While mineral formation associated with S-layers has previously been noted, the mechanisms were unconstrained. Using Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a hyperthermophilic archaeon native to metal-enriched environments and possessing a cell envelope composed only of a S-layer and a lipid cell membrane, we describe a passive process of iron phosphate nucleation and growth within the S-layer of cells and cell-free S-layer "ghosts" during incubation in a Fe-rich medium, independently of metabolic activity. This process followed five steps: (1) initial formation of mineral patches associated with S-layer; (2) patch expansion; (3) patch connection; (4) formation of a continuous mineral encrusted layer at the cell surface; (5) early stages of S-layer fossilization via growth of the extracellular mineralized layer and the mineralization of cytosolic face of the cell membrane. At more advanced stages of encrustation, encrusted outer membrane vesicles are formed, likely in an attempt to remove damaged S-layer proteins. The S-layer structure remains strikingly well preserved even upon the final step of encrustation, offering potential biosignatures to be looked for in the fossil record.

  9. Preservation of Archaeal Surface Layer Structure During Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Adrienne; Miot, Jennyfer; Lombard, Carine; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bernard, Sylvain; Zirah, Séverine; Guyot, François

    2016-05-01

    Proteinaceous surface layers (S-layers) are highly ordered, crystalline structures commonly found in prokaryotic cell envelopes that augment their structural stability and modify interactions with metals in the environment. While mineral formation associated with S-layers has previously been noted, the mechanisms were unconstrained. Using Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a hyperthermophilic archaeon native to metal-enriched environments and possessing a cell envelope composed only of a S-layer and a lipid cell membrane, we describe a passive process of iron phosphate nucleation and growth within the S-layer of cells and cell-free S-layer “ghosts” during incubation in a Fe-rich medium, independently of metabolic activity. This process followed five steps: (1) initial formation of mineral patches associated with S-layer; (2) patch expansion; (3) patch connection; (4) formation of a continuous mineral encrusted layer at the cell surface; (5) early stages of S-layer fossilization via growth of the extracellular mineralized layer and the mineralization of cytosolic face of the cell membrane. At more advanced stages of encrustation, encrusted outer membrane vesicles are formed, likely in an attempt to remove damaged S-layer proteins. The S-layer structure remains strikingly well preserved even upon the final step of encrustation, offering potential biosignatures to be looked for in the fossil record.

  10. Tunable Omnidirectional Surface Plasmon Resonance in Cylindrical Plasmonic Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yi; WANG Bing; ZHOU Zhi-Ping

    2008-01-01

    @@ The tunable omnidirectional surface plasmon resonance in the optical range is theoretically demonstrated in a cylindrical plasmonic crystal by using rigorous coupled-wave analysis.The cylindrical plasmonic crystal consists of an infinite chain of two-dimensional cylindrical metal-dielectric-dielectric-metal structures.The dispersion relation of the cylindrical plasmonic crystal is obtained by calculating the absorptance as a function of a TM-polarized incident plane wave and its in-plane wave vector.The omnidirectional surface plasmon resonance can be tuned from UV region to visible region by adjusting the thickness of the cylindrical dielectric layers.The absorption spectrum of the infinite chain of nanocylinders is also investigated for comparison.

  11. Using Pattern Search Methods for Surface Structure Determinationof Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Van Hove, Michel

    2006-06-09

    Atomic scale surface structure plays an important roleindescribing many properties of materials, especially in the case ofnanomaterials. One of the most effective techniques for surface structuredetermination is low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), which can beused in conjunction with optimization to fit simulated LEED intensitiesto experimental data. This optimization problem has a number ofcharacteristics that make it challenging: it has many local minima, theoptimization variables can be either continuous or categorical, theobjective function can be discontinuous, there are no exact analyticderivatives (and no derivatives at all for categorical variables), andfunction evaluations are expensive. In this study, we show how to apply aparticular class of optimization methods known as pattern search methodsto address these challenges. These methods donot explicitly usederivatives, and are particularly appropriate when categorical variablesare present, an important feature that has not been addressed in previousLEED studies. We have found that pattern search methods can produceexcellent results, compared to previously used methods, both in terms ofperformance and locating optimal results.

  12. Surface structure and stability of MoSx model clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiao-Dong; Zeng, Tao; Li, Yong-Wang; Wang, Jianguo; Jiao, Haijun

    2005-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) computations have been carried out to study the structure and stability of MoSx clusters with the change of sulfur coverage at both Mo and S edges. DFT shows that adding sulfur to the Mo edge is always exothermic. However, deleting corner sulfur from the S edge is exothermic for 67 and 50% sulfur coverages, while deleting edge sulfur from the S edge is endothermic for 33 and 0% sulfur coverages. On the basis of the computed free energies along a wide range of H2S/H2 ratios, it is found that there are two stable structures with 33 and 50% sulfur coverages on the Mo edge by having 100% sulfur coverage on the S edge and one stable structure with 67% sulfur coverage on the S edge by having 0% sulfur coverage on the Mo edge. Under fully sulfiding atmosphere or at a very high H2S/H2 ratio, triangle MoSx structures with 100% sulfur coverage on the Mo edge are computed to be more stable than those with 100% sulfur coverage on the S edge, in agreement with the observation of scanning tunneling microscopy. In addition, the effects of cluster sizes on the surface structures are discussed.

  13. Porous silicon Bloch surface and sub-surface wave structure for simultaneous detection of small and large molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Gilberto A.; Lonai, John D.; Mernaugh, Raymond L.; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2014-08-01

    A porous silicon (PSi) Bloch surface wave (BSW) and Bloch sub-surface wave (BSSW) composite biosensor is designed and used for the size-selective detection of both small and large molecules. The BSW/BSSW structure consists of a periodic stack of high and low refractive index PSi layers and a reduced optical thickness surface layer that gives rise to a BSW with an evanescent tail that extends above the surface to enable the detection of large surface-bound molecules. Small molecules were detected in the sensor by the BSSW, which is a large electric field intensity spatially localized to a desired region of the Bragg mirror and is generated by the implementation of a step or gradient refractive index profile within the Bragg mirror. The step and gradient BSW/BSSW sensors are designed to maximize both resonance reflectance intensity and sensitivity to large molecules. Size-selective detection of large molecules including latex nanospheres and the M13KO7 bacteriophage as well as small chemical linker molecules is reported.

  14. Probing the molecular structures of plasma-damaged and surface-repaired low-k dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Myers, John N; Lin, Qinghuang; Bielefeld, Jeffery D; Chen, Zhan

    2015-10-21

    Fully understanding the effect and the molecular mechanisms of plasma damage and silylation repair on low dielectric constant (low-k) materials is essential to the design of low-k dielectrics with defined properties and the integration of low-k dielectrics into advanced interconnects of modern electronics. Here, analytical techniques including sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), contact angle goniometry (CA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been employed to provide a comprehensive characterization of the surface and bulk structure changes of poly(methyl)silsesquioxane (PMSQ) low-k thin films before and after O2 plasma treatment and silylation repair. O2 plasma treatment altered drastically both the molecular structures and water structures at the surfaces of the PMSQ film while no bulk structural change was detected. For example, ∼34% Si-CH3 groups were removed from the PMSQ surface, and the Si-CH3 groups at the film surface tilted toward the surface after the O2 plasma treatment. The oxidation by the O2 plasma made the PMSQ film surface more hydrophilic and thus enhanced the water adsorption at the film surface. Both strongly and weakly hydrogen bonded water were detected at the plasma-damaged film surface during exposure to water with the former being the dominate component. It is postulated that this enhancement of both chemisorbed and physisorbed water after the O2 plasma treatment leads to the degradation of low-k properties and reliability. The degradation of the PMSQ low-k film can be recovered by repairing the plasma-damaged surface using a silylation reaction. The silylation method, however, cannot fully recover the plasma induced damage at the PMSQ film surface as evidenced by the existence of hydrophilic groups, including C-O/C[double bond, length as m-dash]O and residual Si-OH groups. This work provides a molecular level picture on the surface structural changes of low

  15. Evaluation of multilayered pavement structures from measurements of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryden, N.; Lowe, M.J.S.; Cawley, P.; Park, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    A method is presented for evaluating the thickness and stiffness of multilayered pavement structures from guided waves measured at the surface. Data is collected with a light hammer as the source and an accelerometer as receiver, generating a synthetic receiver array. The top layer properties are evaluated with a Lamb wave analysis. Multiple layers are evaluated by matching a theoretical phase velocity spectrum to the measured spectrum. So far the method has been applied to the testing of pavements, but it may also be applicable in other fields such as ultrasonic testing of coated materials. ?? 2006 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Variable structure guidance law for attacking surface maneuver targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Yanhua; Xu Bo

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of surface maneuver targets are analyzed and a 3-D relative motion model for missiles and targets is established. A variable structure guidance law is designed considering the characteristics of targets. In the guidance law, the distance between missiles and targets as well as the missile-target relative velocity are all substituted by estimation values. The estimation errors, the target's velocity, and the maneuver acceleration are all treated as bounded disturbance. The guidance law proposed can be implemented conveniently in engineering with little target information. The performance of the guidance system is analyzed theoretically and the numerical simulation result shows the effectiveness of the guidance law.

  17. Surface flaw detection in structural ceramics by scanning photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, P. K.; Heitman, P. W.; Wakefield, T. D.; Silversmith, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Laser-scanned photoacoustic spectroscopy has been used to detect tightly closed surface cracks in three structural ceramic materials: sintered silicon nitride, reaction-bonded silicon nitride, and sintered silicon carbide. It is found that the amplitude of the photoacoustic signal from the flaws is greater for the silicon nitrides than for silicon carbide, which is attributed to the lower thermal diffusivity of silicon nitride as well as differences in the grain size distribution and chemical composition. Signal amplitude, reproducibility, and signal-to-noise ratio are acceptable for effective flaw detection

  18. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Surface Structures of Icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe Quasicrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanhong Cai

    2002-12-31

    Three papers are included in this dissertation. The first paper: ''Structural aspects of the fivefold quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe surface from STM and dynamical LEED studies'', is in press with ''Surface Science''. The second paper: ''An STM study of the atomic structure of the icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe fivefold surface'' is submitted to ''Physical Review B, Rapid Communication''. The third paper: ''Pseudomorphic starfish: arrangement of extrinsic metal atoms on a quasicrystalline substrate'' is submitted to ''Nature''. Following the third paper are general conclusions and appendices that document the published paper ''Structural aspects of the three-fold surface of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn'' (appearing in volume 461, issue 1-3 of ''Surface Science'' on page L521-L527, 2000), the design as well as the specifications of the aluminum evaporator used in the aluminum deposition study in this dissertation, an extended discussion of the aluminum deposition on the quasicrystalline surface, and the STM database.

  19. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Surface Structures of Icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe Quasicrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Tanhong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Three papers are included in this dissertation. The first paper: ''Structural aspects of the fivefold quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe surface from STM and dynamical LEED studies'', is in press with ''Surface Science''. The second paper: ''An STM study of the atomic structure of the icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe fivefold surface'' is submitted to ''Physical Review B, Rapid Communication''. The third paper: ''Pseudomorphic starfish: arrangement of extrinsic metal atoms on a quasicrystalline substrate'' is submitted to ''Nature''. Following the third paper are general conclusions and appendices that document the published paper ''Structural aspects of the three-fold surface of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn'' (appearing in volume 461, issue 1-3 of ''Surface Science'' on page L521-L527, 2000), the design as well as the specifications of the aluminum evaporator used in the aluminum deposition study in this dissertation, an extended discussion of the aluminum deposition on the quasicrystalline surface, and the STM database.

  20. Structures and construction of nuclear power plants on lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Katsunori; Kobatake, Masuhiko; Ogawa, Sachio; Kanamori, Hiroshi; Okada, Yasuhiko; Mano, Hideyuki; Takagi, Kenji

    1991-07-01

    The best structure and construction techniques of nuclear power plants in the severe environments on the lunar surface are studied. Facility construction types (functional conditions such as stable structure, shield thickness, maintainability, safety distances, and service life), construction conditions (such as construction methods, construction equipment, number of personnel, time required for construction, external power supply, and required transportation) and construction feasibility (construction method, reactor transportation between the moon and the earth, ground excavation for installation, loading and unloading, transportation, and installation, filling up the ground, electric power supply of plant S (300 kW class) and plant L (3000 kW class)) are outlined. Items to pay attention to in construction are (1) automation and robotization of construction; (2) cost reduction by multi functional robots; and (3) methods of supplying power to robots. A precast concrete block manufacturing plant is also outlined.

  1. Structure of a passivated Ge surface prepared from aqueous solution.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyman, P. F.; Sakata, O.; Marasco, D, L.; Lee, T.-L.; Breneman, K. D.; Keane, D. T.; Bedzyk, M. J.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Milwaukee

    2000-08-10

    The structure of a passivating sulfide layer on Ge(001) was studied using X-ray standing waves and X-ray fluorescence. The sulfide layer was formed by reacting clean Ge substrates in (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S solutions of various concentrations at 80{sup o}C. For each treatment, a sulfide layer containing approximately two to three monolayers (ML) of S was formed on the surface, and an ordered structure was found at the interface that contained approximately 0.4 ML of S. Our results suggest the rapid formation of a glassy GeS{sub x} layer containing 1.5-2.5 ML S residing atop a partially ordered interfacial layer of bridge-bonded S. The passivating reaction appears to be self-limited to 2-3 ML at this reaction temperature.

  2. Permeation Properties and Pore Structure of Surface Layer of Fly Ash Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Qiu, Qiwen; Xing, Feng; Pan, Dong

    2014-05-30

    This paper presents an experimental study on the nature of permeation properties and pore structure of concrete surface layers containing fly ash. Concretes containing different dosages of fly ash as a replacement for cement (15% and 30% by weight of total cement materials, respectively) were investigated. Concrete without any fly ash added was also employed as the reference specimen. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the surface layer properties of concrete including chloride transport, apparent water permeability and pore structure. The results demonstrate that incorporation of fly ash, for the early test period, promotes the chloride ingress at the surface layer of concrete but substituting proportions of fly ash may have little impact on it. With the process of chloride immersion, the chloride concentration at the surface layer of concrete with or without fly ash was found to be nearly the same. In addition, it is suggested that the water permeability at the concrete surface area is closely related to the fly ash contents as well as the chloride exposure time. Pore structure was characterized by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) test and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. The modification of pore structure of concrete submersed in distilled water is determined by the pozzolanic reaction of fly ash and the calcium leaching effect. The pozzolanic reaction was more dominant at the immersion time of 180 days while the calcium leaching effect became more evident after 270 days.

  3. Permeation Properties and Pore Structure of Surface Layer of Fly Ash Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study on the nature of permeation properties and pore structure of concrete surface layers containing fly ash. Concretes containing different dosages of fly ash as a replacement for cement (15% and 30% by weight of total cement materials, respectively were investigated. Concrete without any fly ash added was also employed as the reference specimen. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the surface layer properties of concrete including chloride transport, apparent water permeability and pore structure. The results demonstrate that incorporation of fly ash, for the early test period, promotes the chloride ingress at the surface layer of concrete but substituting proportions of fly ash may have little impact on it. With the process of chloride immersion, the chloride concentration at the surface layer of concrete with or without fly ash was found to be nearly the same. In addition, it is suggested that the water permeability at the concrete surface area is closely related to the fly ash contents as well as the chloride exposure time. Pore structure was characterized by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP test and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM images. The modification of pore structure of concrete submersed in distilled water is determined by the pozzolanic reaction of fly ash and the calcium leaching effect. The pozzolanic reaction was more dominant at the immersion time of 180 days while the calcium leaching effect became more evident after 270 days.

  4. Some recent developments in surface and interface design for photocatalytic and electrocatalytic hybrid structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Song; Xiong, Yujie

    2015-06-28

    The surface and interface are considered as the crucial features that can be engineered to improve the performance of catalysts. The great advancements in both controlled syntheses and catalytic mechanism studies have paved the way for the rational surface and interface design of catalysts. In this feature article, we overview our recent progress in surface and interface design for well-defined hybrid structures mainly toward the photocatalytic and electrocatalytic applications in which charge carriers play an important role. First, we outline the surface parameters of components including exposed facets, compositions, surface areas and crystal phases that have been tailored toward higher surface activation abilities for electrocatalytic and photocatalytic reactions. Second, we summarize the designing rules for the interface between two components to favor the charge transfer for photocatalytic reactions on the surface. Furthermore, we outline the synergistic effects on photocatalysis and electrocatalysis through the simultaneous control of the surface and the interface, which can also be extended to enhance other catalytic reactions (e.g., CO oxidation). Finally, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for further development of surface and interface design toward catalytic performance tuning.

  5. The Right to be Included: Homeschoolers Combat the Structural Discrimination Embodied in Their Lawful Protection in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Kašparová

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a 240-year tradition of compulsory school attendance in the Czech Republic. To many, compulsory school attendance is synonymous with the right to be educated. After the collapse of communism in 1989, along with the democratization of the government, the education system was slowly opened to alternatives, including the right to educate children at home, expressed in Act no. 561/2004. This inclusive law has had exclusionary consequences for many families who wish to choose this mode of education. The situation reveals a clear struggle over various forms of capital in the field of education, as famously described by Bourdieu (1998. The article, based on a longitudinal ethnographic study of homeschooling families, maps the structural discriminative dimension of the law and displays the strategies that the actors have adopted in order to combat them.

  6. Microscopically derived potential energy surfaces from mostly structural considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermamatov, M.J. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-340, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Institute of Nuclear Physics, Ulughbek, Tashkent 100214 (Uzbekistan); Hess, Peter O., E-mail: hess@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, Circuito Exterior, C.U., A.P. 70-543, 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2016-08-15

    A simple procedure to estimate the quadrupole Potential-Energy-Surface (PES) is presented, using mainly structural information, namely the content of the shell model space and the Pauli exclusion principle. Further microscopic properties are implicitly contained through the use of results from the Möller and Nix tables or experimental information. A mapping to the geometric potential is performed yielding the PES. The General Collective Model is used in order to obtain an estimate on the spectrum and quadrupole transitions, adjusting only the mass parameter. First, we test the conjecture on known nuclei, deriving the PES and compare them to known data. We will see that the PES approximates very well the structure expected. Having acquired a certain confidence, we predict the PES of several chain of isotopes of heavy and super-heavy nuclei and at the end we investigate the structure of nuclei in the supposed island of stability. One of the main points to show is that simple assumptions can provide already important information on the structure of nuclei outside known regions and that spectra and electromagnetic transitions can be estimated without using involved calculations and assumptions. The procedure does not allow to calculate binding energies. The method presented can be viewed as a starting point for further improvements.

  7. Insight into the adsorption and dissociation of water over different CuO(111) surfaces: The effect of surface structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Riguang, E-mail: zhangriguang@tyut.edu.cn; Wang, Baojun; Ling, Lixia

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • OH species is the main product of H{sub 2}O dissociation on CuO(111) surface. • The presence of hydrogen (produced from H{sub 2}O dissociation) is in favor of OH dissociation. • OH species fails to dissociate into H and O on the stoichiometric CuO(111) surface. • Oxygen-vacancy surface is favorable for H{sub 2}O dissociation than the stoichiometric surface. • Oxygen-rich surface is the most favorable for H{sub 2}O dissociation than other two surfaces. - Abstract: Water adsorption and dissociation on solid surfaces play a key role in a variety of industrial processes, a detailed comprehension of this process and the effect of the surface structure will assist in developing the improved catalysts. In this study, the adsorption and dissociation of H{sub 2}O on three different types of CuO(111) surfaces, including the stoichiometric, oxygen-vacancy and oxygen-rich surfaces, have been systematically investigated and compared using density functional theory methods. All possible initial configurations of H{sub 2}O adsorbed on those surfaces with only one coverage have been identified. Our results show that the adsorption ability of H{sub 2}O is substantially weaker than that of the dissociated species (HO, H and O). H{sub 2}O chemisorbs at the Cu{sub SUB}, Cu{sup 2} and Cu{sub SUB} sites of the stoichiometric, oxygen-vacancy and oxygen-rich surfaces, respectively; subsequently, the chemisorption H{sub 2}O dissociates into OH and H species. The dissociation mechanisms of chemisorption H{sub 2}O and the single OH group leading to the final O and H species suggest that the dissociation of single OH species occurs at a higher barrier compared to the dissociation of OH in the presence of neighboring H atom (produced from the initial step of H{sub 2}O dissociation), namely, the presence of H is in favor of OH dissociation, which agrees with the results of charge transfer. However, owing to the significantly high barrier of OH

  8. Multiscale approach to the electronic structure of doped semiconductor surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinai, Ofer; Hofmann, Oliver T.; Rinke, Patrick; Scheffler, Matthias; Heimel, Georg; Kronik, Leeor

    2015-02-01

    The inclusion of the global effects of semiconductor doping poses a unique challenge for first-principles simulations, because the typically low concentration of dopants renders an explicit treatment intractable. Furthermore, the width of the space-charge region (SCR) at charged surfaces often exceeds realistic supercell dimensions. Here, we present a multiscale technique that fully addresses these difficulties. It is based on the introduction of a charged sheet, mimicking the SCR-related field, along with free charge which mimics the bulk charge reservoir, such that the system is neutral overall. These augment a slab comprising "pseudoatoms" possessing a fractional nuclear charge matching the bulk doping concentration. Self-consistency is reached by imposing charge conservation and Fermi level equilibration between the bulk, treated semiclassically, and the electronic states of the slab, which are treated quantum-mechanically. The method, called CREST—the charge-reservoir electrostatic sheet technique—can be used with standard electronic structure codes. We validate CREST using a simple tight-binding model, which allows for comparison of its results with calculations encompassing the full SCR explicitly. Specifically, we show that CREST successfully predicts scenarios spanning the range from no to full Fermi level pinning. We then employ it with density functional theory, obtaining insight into the doping dependence of the electronic structures of the metallic "clean-cleaved" Si(111) surface and its semiconducting (2 ×1 ) reconstructions.

  9. Structural characterization of surface glycans from Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Christopher W; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Li, Jianjun; Jarrell, Harold C; Logan, Susan M; Brisson, Jean-Robert

    2012-06-01

    Whole-cell high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR was employed to survey the surface polysaccharides of a group of clinical and environmental isolates of Clostridium difficile. Results indicated that a highly conserved surface polysaccharide profile among all strains studied. Multiple additional peaks in the anomeric region were also observed which prompted further investigation. Structural characterization of the isolated surface polysaccharides from two strains confirmed the presence of the conserved water soluble polysaccharide originally described by Ganeshapillai et al. which was composed of a hexaglycosyl phosphate repeat consisting of [→6)-β-D-Glcp-(1-3)-β-D-GalpNAc-(1-4)-α-D-Glcp-(1-4)-[β-D-Glcp(1-3]-β-D-GalpNAc-(1-3)-α-D-Manp-(1-P→]. In addition, analysis of phenol soluble polysaccharides revealed a similarly conserved lipoteichoic acid (LTA) which could be detected on whole cells by HR-MAS NMR. Conventional NMR and mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the structure of this LTA consisted of the repeat unit [→6)-α-D-GlcpNAc-(1-3)-[→P-6]-α-D-GlcpNAc-(1-2)-D-GroA] where GroA is glyceric acid. The repeating units were linked by a phosphodiester bridge between C-6 of the two GlcNAc residues (6-P-6). A minor component consisted of GlcpN-(1-3) instead of GlcpNAc-(1-3) in the repeat unit. Through a 6-6 phosphodiester bridge this polymer was linked to →6)-β-D-Glcp-(1-6)-β-D-Glcp-(1-6)-β-D-Glcp-(1-1)-Gro, with glycerol (Gro) substituted by fatty acids. This is the first report of the utility of HR-MAS NMR in the examination of surface carbohydrates of Gram positive bacteria and identification of a novel LTA structure from Clostridium difficile.

  10. Structure of turbulent wedges created by isolated surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuester, Matthew S.; White, Edward B.

    2016-04-01

    Isolated surface roughness in a laminar boundary layer can create a wedge of turbulence that spreads laterally into the surrounding laminar flow. Some recent studies have identified high- and low-speed streaks along the exterior of turbulent wedges. In this experiment, developing turbulent wedges are measured to observe the creation of these streaks. Naphthalene shear stress surface visualization and hotwire measurements are utilized to investigate the details of turbulent wedges created by cylinders in a laminar flat-plate boundary layer. Both the surface visualization and the hotwire measurements show high- and low-speed streaks in the wake of the cylinder that devolve into a turbulent wedge. The turbulent wedge spreading is associated with the emergence of these high- and low-speed streaks along the outside of the wedge. As the wedge evolves in the streamwise direction, these streaks persist inside of the core of the wedge, while new, lower amplitude streaks form along the outside of the wedge. Adding asymmetry to the cylinder moved the virtual origin closer to the roughness and increased the vortex shedding frequency, while adding small-scale roughness features did not strongly affect turbulent wedge development. Intermittency calculations additionally show the origin of the turbulent core inside of the wedge. The structure and spacing of the high-speed streaks along the extremities of the turbulent wedge give insight into the spreading angle of the turbulent wedge.

  11. Photoemission Fingerprints for Structural Identification of Titanium Dioxide Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghetti, Patrizia; Meriggio, Elisa; Rousse, Gwenaëlle; Cabailh, Gregory; Lazzari, Rémi; Jupille, Jacques

    2016-08-18

    The wealth of properties of titanium dioxide relies on its various polymorphs and on their mixtures coupled with a sensitivity to crystallographic orientations. It is therefore pivotal to set out methods that allow surface structural identification. We demonstrate herein the ability of photoemission spectroscopy to provide Ti LMV (V = valence) Auger templates to quantitatively analyze TiO2 polymorphs. The Ti LMV decay reflects Ti 4sp-O 2p hybridizations that are intrinsic properties of TiO2 phases and orientations. Ti LMV templates collected on rutile (110), anatase (101), and (100) single crystals allow for the quantitative analysis of mixed nanosized powders, which bridges the gap between surfaces of reference and complex materials. As a test bed, the anatase/rutile P25 is studied both as received and during the anatase-to-rutile transformation upon annealing. The agreement with X-ray diffraction measurements proves the reliability of the Auger analysis and highlights its ability to detect surface orientations.

  12. Surface morphologic and structural analysis of IR irradiated silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latif, Anwar, E-mail: anwarlatif@uet.edu.p [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan); Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Rafique, M.S.; Bhatti, K.A. [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan)

    2011-04-15

    The microstructural morphological changes in laser irradiated targets are investigated. Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, {approx}12 ns nominal, 1.1 MW) is used to irradiate 4 N pure (99.99%) fine polished and annealed silver samples in ambient air and under vacuum {approx}10{sup -6} Torr. The laser spot size and power density at tight focus are 12 {mu}m and 3x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}, respectively. SEM micrographs and X-ray diffractograms of the exposed and unexposed targets reveal the surface texture and structural changes, respectively. Amongst the ablation mechanisms involved, exfoliation and hydrodynamic sputtering are found to be dominant. Surface modifications appear in the form of craters and ripples formation. Heat is conducted non-uniformly through narrow channels at the surface. Thermal stresses induced by the laser do not disturb inter planar distance of the target. On the other hand irradiation causes significant variations in grain size and diffracted X-rays intensities.

  13. Surface molecular aggregation structure and surface physicochemical properties of poly(fluoroalkyl acrylate) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, K.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Morita, M.; Takahara, A.

    2008-03-01

    Effect of side chain length on the molecular aggregation states and surface properties of poly(fluoroalkyl acrylate)s [PFA-Cy, where y is fluoromethylene number in Rf group] thin films were systematically investigated. Spin-coated PFA-Cy thin films were characterized by static and dynamic contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and grazing- incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD). The receding contact angles showed small values for PFA-Cy with short side chain (y=8. GIXD revealed that fluoroalkyl side chain of PFA-Cy with y>=8 was crystallized and formed ordered structures at the surface region as well as bulk one. These results suggest that water repellent mechanism of PFA-Cy can be attributed to the presence of highly ordered fluoroalkyl side chains at the outermost surfaces. The results of XPS in the dry and hydrated states and contact angle measurement in water support the mechanism of lowering contact angle for water by exposure of carbonyl group to the water interface through reorientation of short fluoroalkyl chains. The surface nanotextured PFA-C8 through imprinting of anodic aluminum oxide mold showed extremely high hydrophobicity as well as high oleophobicity.

  14. Surface molecular aggregation structure and surface physicochemical properties of poly(fluoroalkyl acrylate) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, K; Yamaguchi, H; Takahara, A [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka, 819-0395 (Japan); Kobayashi, M [Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University, Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka, 819-0395 (Japan); Morita, M [Fundamental Research Department, Chemical Division, Daikin Industries, Ltd., 1-1 Nishi Hitotsuya, Settsu-shi, Osaka 566-8585 (Japan)], E-mail: takahara@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2008-03-15

    Effect of side chain length on the molecular aggregation states and surface properties of poly(fluoroalkyl acrylate)s [PFA-C{sub y}, where y is fluoromethylene number in R{sub f} group] thin films were systematically investigated. Spin-coated PFA-C{sub y} thin films were characterized by static and dynamic contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and grazing- incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD). The receding contact angles showed small values for PFA-C{sub y} with short side chain (y{<=}6) and increased above y{>=}8. GIXD revealed that fluoroalkyl side chain of PFA-C{sub y} with y{>=}8 was crystallized and formed ordered structures at the surface region as well as bulk one. These results suggest that water repellent mechanism of PFA-C{sub y} can be attributed to the presence of highly ordered fluoroalkyl side chains at the outermost surfaces. The results of XPS in the dry and hydrated states and contact angle measurement in water support the mechanism of lowering contact angle for water by exposure of carbonyl group to the water interface through reorientation of short fluoroalkyl chains. The surface nanotextured PFA-C{sub 8} through imprinting of anodic aluminum oxide mold showed extremely high hydrophobicity as well as high oleophobicity.

  15. Multi-structural variational transition state theory: kinetics of the 1,5-hydrogen shift isomerization of the 1-butoxyl radical including all structures and torsional anharmonicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuefei; Papajak, Ewa; Zheng, Jingjing; Truhlar, Donald G

    2012-03-28

    We investigate the statistical thermodynamics and kinetics of the 1,5-hydrogen shift isomerization reaction of the 1-butoxyl radical and its reverse isomerization. The partition functions and thermodynamic functions (entropy, enthalpy, heat capacity, and Gibbs free energy) are calculated using the multi-structural torsional (MS-T) anharmonicity method including all structures for three species (reactant, product, and transition state) involved in the reaction. The calculated thermodynamic quantities have been compared to those estimated by the empirical group additivity (GA) method. The kinetics of the unimolecular isomerization reaction was investigated using multi-structural canonical variational transition state theory (MS-CVT) including both multiple-structure and torsional (MS-T) anharmonicity effects. In these calculations, multidimensional tunneling (MT) probabilities were evaluated by the small-curvature tunneling (SCT) approximation and compared to results obtained with the zero-curvature tunneling (ZCT) approximation. The high-pressure-limit rate constants for both the forward and reverse reactions are reported as calculated by MS-CVT/MT, where MT can be ZCT or SCT. Comparison with the rate constants obtained by the single-structural harmonic oscillator (SS-HO) approximation shows the importance of anharmonicity in the rate constants of these reactions, and the effect of multi-structural anharmonicity is found to be very large. Whereas the tunneling effect increases the rate constants, the MS-T anharmonicity decreases them at all temperatures. The two effects counteract each other at temperatures 385 K and 264 K for forward and reverse reactions, respectively, and tunneling dominates at lower temperatures while MS-T anharmonicity has a larger effect at higher temperatures. The multi-structural torsional anharmonicity effect reduces the final reverse reaction rate constants by a much larger factor than it does to the forward ones as a result of the

  16. Turbulent Structures and Coherence in the Atmospheric Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Träumner, K.; Damian, Th.; Stawiarski, Ch.; Wieser, A.

    2015-01-01

    Organized structures in turbulent flow fields are a well-known and still fascinating phenomenon. Although these so-called coherent structures are obvious from visual inspection, quantitative assessment is a challenge and many aspects e.g., formation mechanisms and contribution to turbulent fluxes, are discussed controversially. During the "High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for Advancing Climate Prediction" Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) from April to May 2013, an advanced dual Doppler lidar technique was used to image the horizontal wind field near the surface for approximately 300 h. A visual inspection method, as well as a two-dimensional integral length scale analysis, were performed to characterize the observations qualitatively and quantitatively. During situations with forcing due to shear, the wind fields showed characteristic patterns in the form of clearly bordered, elongated areas of enhanced or reduced wind speed, which can be associated with near-surface streaks. During calm situations with strong buoyancy forcing, open cell patterns in the horizontal divergence field were observed. The measurement technique used enables the calculation of integral length scales of both horizontal wind components in the streamwise and cross-stream directions. The individual length scales varied considerably during the observation period but were on average shorter during situations with compared to strongly stable situations. During unstable situations, which were dominated by wind fields with structures, the streamwise length scales increased with increasing wind speed, whereas the cross-stream length scales decreased. Consequently, the anisotropy increased from 1 for calm situations to values of 2-3 for wind speeds of 8-10. During neutral to stable situations, the eddies were on average quite isotropic in the horizontal plane.

  17. Dissecting the structure of surface stabilizer on the dispersion of inorganic nanoparticles in aqueous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong; Yu, Zongzhi; Zheng, Junping

    2017-03-01

    Dispersing inorganic nanoparticles in aqueous solutions is a key requirement for a great variety of products and processes, including carriers in drug delivery or fillers in polymers. To be highly functional in the final product, inorganic particles are required to be finely dispersed in nanoscale. In this study, silica was selected as a representative inorganic particle. Surface stabilizers with different chain length and charged group were designed to reveal the influence of electrostatic and van der Waals forces between silica and stabilizer on the dispersion of silica particles in aqueous medium. Results showed surface stabilizer with longer alkyl chain and charged group exerted best ability to deaggregate silica, leading to a hydrodynamic size of 51.1 nm. Surface stabilizer designing with rational structure is a promising solution for deagglomerating and reducing process time and energy. Giving the designability and adaptability of surface stabilizer, this method is of potential for dispersion of other inorganic nanoparticles.

  18. Regular subwavelength surface structures induced by femtosecond laser pulses on stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Litao; Nishii, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu

    2009-06-15

    In this research, we studied the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on the stainless steel surface using femtosecond laser pulses. A 780 nm wavelength femtosecond laser, through a 0.2 mm pinhole aperture for truncating fluence distribution, was focused onto the stainless steel surface. Under different experimental condition, low-spatial-frequency laser-induced periodic surface structures with a period of 526 nm and high-spatial-frequency laser-induced periodic surface structures with a period of 310 nm were obtained. The mechanism of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on the stainless steel surface is discussed.

  19. Comparing Multiple Evapotranspiration-calculating Methods, Including Eddy Covariance and Surface Renewal, Using Empirical Measurements from Alfalfa Fields in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, J.; Kent, E. R.; Leinfelder-Miles, M.; Lambert, J. J.; Little, C.; Paw U, K. T.; Snyder, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Eddy covariance and surface renewal measurements were used to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) over a variety of crop fields in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta during the 2016 growing season. However, comparing and evaluating multiple measurement systems and methods for determining ET was focused upon at a single alfalfa site. The eddy covariance systems included two systems for direct measurement of latent heat flux: one using a separate sonic anemometer and an open path infrared gas analyzer and another using a combined system (Campbell Scientific IRGASON). For these methods, eddy covariance was used with measurements from the Campbell Scientific CSAT3, the LI-COR 7500a, the Campbell Scientific IRGASON, and an additional R.M. Young sonic anemometer. In addition to those direct measures, the surface renewal approach included several energy balance residual methods in which net radiation, ground heat flux, and sensible heat flux (H) were measured. H was measured using several systems and different methods, including using multiple fast-response thermocouple measurements and using the temperatures measured by the sonic anemometers. The energy available for ET was then calculated as the residual of the surface energy balance equation. Differences in ET values were analyzed between the eddy covariance and surface renewal methods, using the IRGASON-derived values of ET as the standard for accuracy.

  20. Surface topology and electronic structure of layered strontium ruthenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienert, Robert; Klinke, Melanie; Waelsch, Michael; Mietke, Sebastian; Matzdorf, Rene [Experimentalphysik II, Universitaet Kassel (Germany); Peng, Jin; Mao, Zhiqiang [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans (United States)

    2012-07-01

    In complex materials the interplay of properties like crystal structure, electronic structure and magnetism results in very interesting physical phenomena. The Ruddlesden-Popper series of layered Strontium Ruthenates Sr{sub n+1}Ru{sub n}O{sub 3n+1} describes one class of these materials. The double and triple layer systems behave like a Fermi liquid up to the transition temperature of 15 K and 24 K, respectively. In both compounds the local density of states (LDOS) shows a peak within the dip-like feature around the Fermi energy E{sub F}. Using low-temperature (LT) STM and STS we studied the temperature dependence of the LDOS in the range from 4.7 to 35 K. By increasing the temperature the peak within the dip in the LDOS at E{sub F} is only affected by thermal broadening. The surface unit cell of the Strontium Ruthenates exhibits a c(2 x 2) super structure, which is stable from 4.7 K up to room temperature as shown by our atomically resolved LT STM images and room temperature LEED experiments.

  1. Calculation of surface acoustic waves in a multilayered piezoelectric structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zuwei; Wen Zhiyu; Hu Jing

    2013-01-01

    The propagation properties of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in a ZnO-SiO2-Si multilayered piezoelectric structure are calculated by using the recursive asymptotic method.The phase velocities and the electromechanical coupling coefficients for the Rayleigh wave and the Love wave in the different ZnO-SiO2-Si structures are calculated and analyzed.The Love mode wave is found to be predominantly generated since the c-axis of the ZnO film is generally perpendicular to the substrate.In order to prove the calculated results,a Love mode SAW device based on the ZnO-SiO2-Si multilayered structure is fabricated by micromachining,and its frequency responses are detected.The experimental results are found to be mainly consistent with the calculated ones,except for the slightly larger velocities induced by the residual stresses produced in the fabrication process of the films.The deviation of the experimental results from the calculated ones is reduced by thermal annealing.

  2. One-dimensional supramolecular surface structures: 1,4-diisocyanobenzene on Au(111) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscoboinik, Jorge [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Calaza, Florencia C [ORNL; Habeeb, Zeesham [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Bennett, Dennis [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Stacchiola, Dario [Michigan Technological University; Purino, Martin [Universidad de La Laguna, Tenerife-Canary Islands, Spain; Tysoe, Wilfred [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

    2010-01-01

    One-dimensional supramolecular structures formed by adsorbing low coverages of 1,4-diisocyanobenzene on Au(111) at room temperature are obtained and imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. The structures originate from step edges or surface defects and arrange predominantly in a straight fashion on the substrate terraces along the h110i directions. They are proposed to consist of alternating units of 1,4-diisocyanobenzene molecules and gold atoms with a unit cell in registry with the substrate corresponding to four times the lattice interatomic distance. Their long 1-D chains and high thermal stability offer the potential to use them as conductors in nanoelectronic applications.

  3. Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship on Prediction of Surface Tension of Nonionic Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) study has been made for the prediction of the surface tension of nonionic surfactants in aqueous solution.The regressed model includes a topological descriptor,the Kier & Hall index of zero order (KH0) of the hydrophobic segment of surfactant and a quantum chemical one,the heat of formation () of surfactant molecules.The established general QSPR between the surface tension and the descriptors produces a correlation coefficient of multiple determination,=0.9877,for 30 studied nonionic surfactants.

  4. Syndecans as cell surface receptors: Unique structure equates with functional diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Youngsil; Chung, Heesung; Jung, Heyjung

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of functions for syndecan cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans have been proposed over the last decade. Moreover, aberrant syndecan regulation has been found to play a critical role in multiple pathologies, including cancers, as well as wound healing and inflammation. A...... glycosaminoglycan chains, especially heparan sulfate. This heterodisperse polysaccharide has the potential to interact with many ligands from diverse protein families. Here, we relate the structural features of syndecans to some of their known functions....

  5. Assessment of Femtosecond Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures on Polymer Films

    OpenAIRE

    Rebollar, Esther; Vázquez De Aldana, Javier R.; Martín-Fabiani, Ignacio; Hernández, Margarita; Rueda, Daniel R.; Ezquerra, Tiberio A.; Domingo, Concepción; Moreno, Pablo; Castillejo, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present the formation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on spin-coated thin films of several model aromatic polymers including poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(trimethylene terephthalate) and poly carbonate bis-phenol A upon irradiation with femtosecond pulses of 795 and 265 nm at fluences well below the ablation threshold. LIPSS are formed with period lengths similar to the laser wavelength and parallel to the direction of the laser polarization vector. F...

  6. In vitro flow assessment: from PC-MRI to computational fluid dynamics including fluid-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Jonas; Rengier, Fabian; Weis, Christian; Beller, Carsten J.; Heuveline, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Initiation and development of cardiovascular diseases can be highly correlated to specific biomechanical parameters. To examine and assess biomechanical parameters, numerical simulation of cardiovascular dynamics has the potential to complement and enhance medical measurement and imaging techniques. As such, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have shown to be suitable to evaluate blood velocity and pressure in scenarios, where vessel wall deformation plays a minor role. However, there is a need for further validation studies and the inclusion of vessel wall elasticity for morphologies being subject to large displacement. In this work, we consider a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model including the full elasticity equation to take the deformability of aortic wall soft tissue into account. We present a numerical framework, in which either a CFD study can be performed for less deformable aortic segments or an FSI simulation for regions of large displacement such as the aortic root and arch. Both of the methods are validated by means of an aortic phantom experiment. The computational results are in good agreement with 2D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) velocity measurements as well as catheter-based pressure measurements. The FSI simulation shows a characteristic vessel compliance effect on the flow field induced by the elasticity of the vessel wall, which the CFD model is not capable of. The in vitro validated FSI simulation framework can enable the computation of complementary biomechanical parameters such as the stress distribution within the vessel wall.

  7. Finite Element Modeling and Analysis of Nonlinear Impact and Frictional Motion Responses Including Fluid—Structure Coupling Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhao

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear three dimensional (3D single rack model and a nonlinear 3D whole pool multi-rack model are developed for the spent fuel storage racks of a nuclear power plant (NPP to determine impacts and frictional motion responses when subjected to 3D excitations from the supporting building floor. The submerged free standing rack system and surrounding water are coupled due to hydrodynamic fluid-structure interaction (FSI using potential theory. The models developed have features that allow consideration of geometric and material nonlinearities including (1 the impacts of fuel assemblies to rack cells, a rack to adjacent racks or pool walls, and rack support legs to the pool floor; (2 the hydrodynamic coupling of fuel assemblies with their storing racks, and of a rack with adjacent racks, pool walls, and the pool floor; and (3 the dynamic motion behavior of rocking, twisting, and frictional sliding of rack modules. Using these models 3D nonlinear time history dynamic analyses are performed per the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC criteria. Since few such modeling, analyses, and results using both the 3D single and whole pool multiple rack models are available in the literature, this paper emphasizes description of modeling and analysis techniques using the SOLVIA general purpose nonlinear finite element code. Typical response results with different Coulomb friction coefficients are presented and discussed.

  8. Mitigating ground vibration by periodic inclusions and surface structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Bucinskas, Paulius; Persson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    -dimensional finite-element model. The laboratory model employs soaked mattress foam placed within a box to mimic a finite volume of soil. The dynamic properties of the soaked foam ensure wavelengths representative of ground vibration in small scale. Comparison of the results from the two models leads......Ground vibration from traffic is a source of nuisance in urbanized areas. Trenches and wave barriers can provide mitigation of vibrations, but single barriers need to have a large depth to be effective-especially in the low-frequency range relevant to traffic-induced vibration. Alternatively...... well-defined behavior can be expected for transient loads and finite structures. However, some mitigation may occur. The paper aims at quantifying the mitigation effect of nearly periodic masses placed on the ground surface using two approaches: a small-scale laboratory model and a three...

  9. Chemically Resolved Structure of the Sn/Ge(111) Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tien-Lin; Warren, Samantha; Cowie, Bruce C. C.; Zegenhagen, Jörg

    2006-02-01

    The structure and chemical states of the Sn/Ge(111) surface are characterized by x-ray standing waves combined with photoemission. For the room temperature 3×3 phase two chemical components, approximately 0.4 eV apart, are observed for both Sn 3d and 4d core levels. Our model-independent, x-ray standing wave analysis shows unambiguously that the two components originate from Sn adatoms located at two different heights separated vertically by 0.23 Å, in favor of a model composed of a fluctuating Sn layer. Contrary to the most accepted scenario, the stronger Sn 3d and 4d components, which appear at the lower binding-energy sides and account for 2/3 of the Sn adatoms, are identified to be associated with the higher Sn position, manifesting their filled valence state character.

  10. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  11. LEED STUDY OF NAXWO3 TUNGSTEN BRONZE - STRUCTURAL RELAXATION OF A PEROVSKITE SURFACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PEACOR, SD; HIBMA, T

    1993-01-01

    We have performed a low energy electron diffraction study of the sodium tungsten bronze, NaxWO3, x = 0.8, surface. Temperature dependent changes of both polished and cleaved surfaces indicate structural phase transitions of the surface structure, and reflect the general trend in structural phase tra

  12. 30 CFR 57.4530 - Exits for surface buildings and structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exits for surface buildings and structures. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4530 Exits for surface buildings and structures. Surface buildings or structures in which persons work shall have a sufficient number...

  13. Comparison of 3 methods on fabricating micro- /nano- structured surface on 3D mold cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bissacco, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    The methods to manufacture micro- or nano- structures on surfaces have been an area of intense investigation. Demands are shown for technologies for surface structuring on real 3D parts in many fields. However, most technologies for the fabrication of micro-structured functional surfaces are stil...

  14. Femtosecond laser surface structuring of molybdenum thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Biophotonics Lab: National Laser Centre Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Center for Nano Science and Technology, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Pascoli 70/3, 20133 Milano, Itala (Italy); Sechoghela, P.; Mongwaketsi, N. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies (IFN)–CNR, Piazza Leanardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Color change of the molybdenum thin film from shinny to violet–yellowish color after laser irradiation at various laser powers. • Formation of the molybdenum dioxide coating after laser exposure, as confirmed by the X-ray diffraction spectrometry. • Selective solar absorbing nature of the laser exposed films. • Study of the binding energies is presented in this contribution using the XPS spectrometry. - Abstract: This contribution reports on the femtosecond surface structuring of molybdenum thin coatings deposited by electron beam evaporation onto Corning glass substrates. The 1-D type periodic grating lines created by such an ablation showed that the widths of the shallow grooves followed a logarithmic dependence with the laser energy incident on the molybdenum film. The electronic valence “x” of the created oxide surface layer MoO{sub x} was found to be incident laser power dependent via Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction investigations. Such a photo-induced MoO{sub x}–Mo nanocomposite exhibited effective selective solar absorption in the UV–vis–IR spectral range.

  15. Picosecond laser induced periodic surface structure on copper thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, Thi Trang Dai; Petit, Agnès; Semmar, Nadjib, E-mail: nadjib.semmar@univ-orleans.fr

    2014-05-01

    LIPSS (Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structure) formation on copper thin films induced by a picosecond laser beam (Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm, 42 ps and 10 Hz) was studied experimentally. Copper thin films were deposited on glass and silicon substrates by magnetron sputtering. The surface modifications of irradiated zones were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Two distinct types of LIPSS were identified with respect to the laser fluence (F), number of laser shots (N) and substrate material. Namely, with a number of laser shots (1000 < N < 10,000) and a fluence of (200 mJ/cm{sup 2} < F < 500 mJ/cm{sup 2}), Low Spatial Frequency LIPSS (LSFL with a spatial period of Λ ∼ 260 nm and an orientation perpendicular to polarization) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS (HSFL with a spatial period of Λ ∼ 130 nm and an orientation parallel to the polarization) were observed. The regime of regular spikes formation was determined for N ≥ 1000. Moreover, the 2D-map of the relationship among LIPSS formation, laser fluence and number of laser shots on copper thin film with two different substrates was established. A physics interpretation of regular spikes and LIPSS formation on copper thin film induced by ps laser with overlapping multi-shots is proposed based on experimental data and the theory of Plateau-Rayleigh instability.

  16. Picosecond laser induced periodic surface structure on copper thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Thi Trang Dai; Petit, Agnès; Semmar, Nadjib

    2014-05-01

    LIPSS (Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structure) formation on copper thin films induced by a picosecond laser beam (Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm, 42 ps and 10 Hz) was studied experimentally. Copper thin films were deposited on glass and silicon substrates by magnetron sputtering. The surface modifications of irradiated zones were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Two distinct types of LIPSS were identified with respect to the laser fluence (F), number of laser shots (N) and substrate material. Namely, with a number of laser shots (1000 LIPSS (LSFL with a spatial period of Λ ∼ 260 nm and an orientation perpendicular to polarization) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS (HSFL with a spatial period of Λ ∼ 130 nm and an orientation parallel to the polarization) were observed. The regime of regular spikes formation was determined for N ≥ 1000. Moreover, the 2D-map of the relationship among LIPSS formation, laser fluence and number of laser shots on copper thin film with two different substrates was established. A physics interpretation of regular spikes and LIPSS formation on copper thin film induced by ps laser with overlapping multi-shots is proposed based on experimental data and the theory of Plateau-Rayleigh instability.

  17. Effects of Zr doping on the surface energy and surface structure of UO{sub 2}: Atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Hongxing, E-mail: xiaohongxing2003@163.com [Science and Technology on Reactor Fuel and Materials Laboratory, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu (China); Long, Chongsheng; Chen, Hongsheng [Science and Technology on Reactor Fuel and Materials Laboratory, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu (China); Tian, Xiaofeng [The College of Nuclear Technology and Automation Engineering, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu (China); Wei, Tianguo; Zhao, Yi; Gao, Wen [Science and Technology on Reactor Fuel and Materials Laboratory, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu (China)

    2015-10-01

    A shell-core model is applied to investigate the effects of Zr doping on the surface energies and surface structures of the three low Miller index surfaces in UO{sub 2} using the molecular dynamics (MD) technique. The surface energies and atomic structures of the Zr-doped and undoped UO{sub 2} (1 0 0), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) surfaces are compared. Simulation results indicate that (i) the surface energy of (U{sub 1−y}Zr{sub y})O{sub 2} depend on the crystallographic orientation, as well as of undoped UO{sub 2}. The (1 0 0) surface exhibits the highest surface energy, followed by the (1 1 0) surface, and the (1 1 1) surface; (ii) Zr doping will significantly increase the surface energy of UO{sub 2} by approximately 20% on (1 0 0) surface, 10% on (1 1 0) surface and 15% on (1 1 1) surface with the ZrO{sub 2} contents ranging from 0 to 12.5 mol%, respectively; (iii) the surface energies of the three low Miller index surfaces decrease with increasing temperature both in undoped UO{sub 2} and in (U{sub 1−y}Zr{sub y})O{sub 2}; (iv) the addition of Zr induces a severe distortion of the (U{sub 1−y}Zr{sub y})O{sub 2} surface structure, and the outermost top layer exhibits the strongest rumpling; (v) the considerable reconstructions can be observed in the two top layers of Zr-doped and undoped UO{sub 2} surfaces when the temperature is elevated to 900–1500 K.

  18. 30 CFR 57.14130 - Roll-over protective structures (ROPS) and seat belts for surface equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....14130 Roll-over protective structures (ROPS) and seat belts for surface equipment. (a) Equipment included. Roll-over protective structures (ROPS) and seat belts shall be installed on— (1) Crawler tractors..., that is equipped with ROPS and seat belts that meet the installation and performance requirements of...

  19. A structural study of porphyrins interacting with a metallic surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brede, Jens; Hoffmann, Germar; Wiesendanger, Roland [Institut of Applied Physics, University of Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    A porphyrin is a heterocyclic macrocycle derived from pyrrolic subunits interconnected via methine bridges. Porphyrins are an ubiquitous class of naturally occurring compounds with important biological representatives including hemes and chlorophylls. We prepared various tetra phenyl prophyrins (TPP) with different central metal (M) ions on metallic substrates. The molecular systems were investigated by scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy. The experiments were performed in a home-built low temperature STM working at 6 K in ultra-high vacuum conditions. Upon deposition of porphyrins on metal substrates the aromatic core of the molecule may undergo a structural deformation depending on the details of the molecule-substrate interaction. We will discuss the structural conformation of TPPs and their electronic properties.

  20. The interior structure of Ceres as revealed by surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Roger R.; Ermakov, Anton I.; Marchi, Simone; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Raymond, Carol A.; Hager, Bradford H.; Zuber, Maria T.; King, Scott D.; Bland, Michael T.; Cristina De Sanctis, Maria; Preusker, Frank; Park, Ryan S.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2017-10-01

    Ceres, the largest body in the asteroid belt (940 km diameter), provides a unique opportunity to study the interior structure of a volatile-rich dwarf planet. Variations in a planetary body's subsurface rheology and density affect the rate of topographic relaxation. Preferential attenuation of long wavelength topography (≥150 km) on Ceres suggests that the viscosity of its crust decreases with increasing depth. We present finite element (FE) geodynamical simulations of Ceres to identify the internal structures and compositions that best reproduce its topography as observed by the NASA Dawn mission. We infer that Ceres has a mechanically strong crust with maximum effective viscosity ∼1025 Pa s. Combined with density constraints, this rheology suggests a crustal composition of carbonates or phyllosilicates, water ice, and at least 30 volume percent (vol.%) low-density, high-strength phases most consistent with salt and/or clathrate hydrates. The inference of these crustal materials supports the past existence of a global ocean, consistent with the observed surface composition. Meanwhile, we infer that the uppermost ≥60 km of the silicate-rich mantle is mechanically weak with viscosity history that avoided igneous differentiation due to late accretion or efficient heat loss through hydrothermal processes.

  1. Counterintuitive dispersion effect near surface plasmon resonances in Otto structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Li-Gang; Ye, Lin-Hua; Al-Amri, M.; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the counterintuitive dispersion effect associated with the poles and zeros of reflection and transmission functions in an Otto configuration when a surface plasmon resonance is excited. We show that the zeros and/or poles in the reflection and transmission functions may move into the upper-half complex-frequency plane (CFP), and these locations of the zeros and poles determine the dispersion properties of the whole structures (i.e., the frequency-dependent change of both reflected and transmitted phases). Meanwhile, we demonstrate various dispersion effects (both normal and abnormal) related to the changes of the poles and zeros in both reflection and transmission functions when considering the properties of metal substrates. For a realistic metal substrate in an Otto structure, there are the optimal thickness and incident angle, which correspond to the transitions of the zeros in the reflection function from the upper-half to lower-half CFP. These properties may be helpful to manipulate light propagation in optical devices.

  2. Dummy-surface molecularly imprinted polymers on magnetic graphene oxide for rapid and selective quantification of acrylamide in heat-processed (including fried) foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Fangjian; Qiu, Tingting; Wang, Qi; Peng, Hailong; Li, Yanbin; Wu, Xiaqing; Zhang, Zhong; Chen, Linxin; Xiong, Hua

    2017-04-15

    Novel nano-sized dummy-surface molecularly imprinted polymers (DSMIPs) on a magnetic graphene oxide (GO-Fe3O4) surface were developed as substrates, using propionamide as a dummy template molecule for the selective recognition and rapid pre-concentration and removal of acrylamide (AM) from food samples. These products showed rapid kinetics, high binding capacity (adsorption at 3.68mg·g(-1)), and selectivity (imprinting factor α 2.83); the adsorption processes followed the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. Excellent recognition selectivity toward acrylamide was achieved compared to structural analogs, such as propionic and acrylic acids (selectivity factor β 2.33, and 2.20, respectively). Moreover, DSMIPs-GO-Fe3O4 was used to quantify acrylamide in food samples, yielding satisfactory recovery (86.7-94.3%) and low relative standard deviation (acrylamide from food samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Importance of including small-scale tile drain discharge in the calibration of a coupled groundwater-surface water catchment model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Lausten; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Christensen, Britt Stenhøj Baun;

    2013-01-01

    the catchment. In this study, a coupled groundwater-surface water model based on the MIKE SHE code was developed for the 4.7 km2 Lillebæk catchment in Denmark, where tile drain flow is a major contributor to the stream discharge. The catchment model was calibrated in several steps by incrementally including...... the observation data into the calibration to see the effect on model performance of including diverse data types, especially tile drain discharge. For the Lillebæk catchment, measurements of hydraulic head, daily stream discharge, and daily tile drain discharge from five small (1–4 ha) drainage areas exist....... The results showed that including tile drain data in the calibration of the catchment model improved its general performance for hydraulic heads and stream discharges. However, the model failed to correctly describe the local-scale dynamics of the tile drain discharges, and, furthermore, including the drain...

  4. Superhydrophobic hierarchically structured surfaces in biology: evolution, structural principles and biomimetic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mail, M.; Neinhuis, C.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of the construction principles and occurrences of superhydrophobic surfaces in plants, animals and other organisms is provided and is based on our own scanning electron microscopic examinations of almost 20 000 different species and the existing literature. Properties such as self-cleaning (lotus effect), fluid drag reduction (Salvinia effect) and the introduction of new functions (air layers as sensory systems) are described and biomimetic applications are discussed: self-cleaning is established, drag reduction becomes increasingly important, and novel air-retaining grid technology is introduced. Surprisingly, no evidence for lasting superhydrophobicity in non-biological surfaces exists (except technical materials). Phylogenetic trees indicate that superhydrophobicity evolved as a consequence of the conquest of land about 450 million years ago and may be a key innovation in the evolution of terrestrial life. The approximate 10 million extant species exhibit a stunning diversity of materials and structures, many of which are formed by self-assembly, and are solely based on a limited number of molecules. A short historical survey shows that bionics (today often called biomimetics) dates back more than 100 years. Statistical data illustrate that the interest in biomimetic surfaces is much younger still. Superhydrophobicity caught the attention of scientists only after the extreme superhydrophobicity of lotus leaves was published in 1997. Regrettably, parabionic products play an increasing role in marketing. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science’. PMID:27354736

  5. Superhydrophobic hierarchically structured surfaces in biology: evolution, structural principles and biomimetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthlott, W; Mail, M; Neinhuis, C

    2016-08-06

    A comprehensive survey of the construction principles and occurrences of superhydrophobic surfaces in plants, animals and other organisms is provided and is based on our own scanning electron microscopic examinations of almost 20 000 different species and the existing literature. Properties such as self-cleaning (lotus effect), fluid drag reduction (Salvinia effect) and the introduction of new functions (air layers as sensory systems) are described and biomimetic applications are discussed: self-cleaning is established, drag reduction becomes increasingly important, and novel air-retaining grid technology is introduced. Surprisingly, no evidence for lasting superhydrophobicity in non-biological surfaces exists (except technical materials). Phylogenetic trees indicate that superhydrophobicity evolved as a consequence of the conquest of land about 450 million years ago and may be a key innovation in the evolution of terrestrial life. The approximate 10 million extant species exhibit a stunning diversity of materials and structures, many of which are formed by self-assembly, and are solely based on a limited number of molecules. A short historical survey shows that bionics (today often called biomimetics) dates back more than 100 years. Statistical data illustrate that the interest in biomimetic surfaces is much younger still. Superhydrophobicity caught the attention of scientists only after the extreme superhydrophobicity of lotus leaves was published in 1997. Regrettably, parabionic products play an increasing role in marketing.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Structure Irregularity Impedes Drop Roll-Off at Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Tylsgaard; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard; Søgaard, Emil

    2014-01-01

    We study water drop roll-off at superhydrophobic surfaces with different surface patterns. Superhydrophobic microcavity surfaces were fabricated in silicon and coated with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FDTS). For the more irregular surface patterns, the observed increase in roll...

  7. Importance of surface structure on dissolution of fluorite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godinho, Jose; Piazolo, Sandra; Balic Zunic, Tonci

    2014-01-01

    Dissolution rates are usually calculated as a function of surface area, which is assumed to remain constant ignoring the changes occurring on the surface during dissolution. Here we present a study of how topography of natural fluorite surfaces with different orientation changes during up to 3200 h...... of dissolution. Results are analyzed in terms of changes in surface area, surface reactivity and dissolution rates. All surfaces studied present fast changes in topography during the initial 200 h of dissolution. The controlling factors that cause the development of topography are the stability of the step edges...... forming the initial surface and its inclination to the closest stable planes, which are specific for each surface orientation. During an initial dissolution regime dissolution rates decrease significantly, even though the total surface area increases. During a second dissolution regime, some surfaces...

  8. Study on mechanics of driving drum with superelastic convexity surface covering-layer structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, L.J.; Sui, X.H.; Miao, D.J. [Shandong University of Science & Technology, Qingdao (China)

    2008-09-15

    Belt conveyor is one of the main transport equipment in coal mine and the driving drum is its key part. With the method of bionic design, the mushroom morphological structure is applied to the design of covering-layer structure of driving drum surface of belt conveyor. Superelastic rubber with large deformation is adopted as the covering-layer material. Nonlinear constitutive model of rubber, which is of superelasticity and large deformation, is established. The stress states and deformation principles of driving drums including both bionic covering-layer and common covering-layer are obtained by static intensity analysis with Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software ANSYS. The values of the stress and strain on the driving drum surface are gotten and the dangerous area is determined. FEA results show that the superelastic convexity surface structure can enlarge the contact area between the driving drum and viscoelastic belt. The results also show that in comparison with common driving drum, the bionic surface driving drum can not only increase the friction coefficient between drum and belt but also prolong its service life.

  9. Effects of topography and surface roughness in analyses of landscape structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hoechstetter

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Topography and relief variability play a key role in ecosystem functioning and structuring. However, the most commonly used concept to relate pattern to process in landscape ecology, the so-called patch-corridor-matrix model, perceives the landscape as a planimetric surface. As a consequence, landscape metrics, used as numerical descriptors of the spatial arrangement of landscape mosaics, generally do not allow for the examination of terrain characteristics and may even produce erroneous results, especially in mountainous areas. This brief methodological study provides basic approaches to include relief properties into large-scale landscape analyses, including the calculation of standard landscape metrics on the basis of “true” surface geometries and the application of roughness parameters derived from surface metrology. The methods are tested for their explanatory power using neutral landscapes and simulated elevation models. The results reveal that area and distance metrics possess a high sensitivity to terrain complexity, while the values of shape metrics change only slightly when surface geometries are considered for their calculation. In summary, the proposed methods prove to be a valuable extension of the existing set of metrics mainly in “rough” landscape sections, allowing for a more realistic assessment of the spatial structure

  10. Enhancement of life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology to include the effect of surface albedo on climate change: Comparing black and white roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susca, Tiziana

    2012-04-01

    Traditionally, life cycle assessment (LCA) does not estimate a key property: surface albedo. Here an enhancement of the LCA methodology has been proposed through the development and employment of a time-dependent climatological model for including the effect of surface albedo on climate. The theoretical findings derived by the time-dependent model have been applied to the case study of a black and a white roof evaluated in the time-frames of 50 and 100 years focusing on the impact on global warming potential. The comparative life cycle impact assessment of the two roofs shows that the high surface albedo plays a crucial role in offsetting radiative forcings. In the 50-year time horizon, surface albedo is responsible for a decrease in CO(2)eq of 110-184 kg and 131-217 kg in 100 years. Furthermore, the white roof compared to the black roof, due to the high albedo, decreases the annual energy use of about 3.6-4.5 kWh/m(2).

  11. Effects of Surface Chemistry on the Porous Structure of Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radovic, Ljubisa R; Hatcher, Patrick G

    1997-05-01

    In this report, 129 Xe nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of xenon gas adsorbed in coal is used to describe some poorly understood features of coal microporous structure, particularly in establishing that a connected network exists, the type of connectivity, and its changes with the rank of coal. Micropore size scale and distribution are also considered. Two methods are developed which are new and versatile tools for the investigation of porous structure. Both utilize xenon gas that is in motion, while undergoing diffusion or exchange in coal, to describe the connectivity of the micropore structure of coal. Time tracking of the adsorption process by NMR, selective saturation, and saturation transfer techniques were used to obtain new information on the coal rank dependence of porous structure. In addition, an existing 129 Xe chemical shift-pore diameter model was used to calculate micropore diameters for coals, as well as for a microporous carbon, before and after pore-size alteration. In the initial study performed, straightforward 129 Xe NMR spectra at equilibrium xenon adsorption at a series of pressures were acquired for a rank-varied set of six coals. Acquisition of the NMR signal as an echo was tested and found to improve spectral quality. The spectra were used to calculate micropore diameters for the six coals. These range from 5.6 to 7.5 and exhibit a minimum value for the intermediate coal rank. The smallest pores occur in coals of about 82-85% carbon; at both lower and higher coal ranks, the average micropore size tends to be larger. The changes in the spectra with coal rank and surface area were explored. Signal linewidths were found to decrease with increasing coal rank and were interpreted in terms of increasing chemical or physical homogeneity of the coal as rank increases. The packing density of powdered coal was found to alter the spectral appearance in a high volatile bituminous coal, which is preliminary evidence that exchange affects the

  12. Population structure and characterization of viridans group streptococci (VGS) including Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yasunori; Elborn, J Stuart; Parkins, Michael D; Reihill, James; Goldsmith, Colin E; Coulter, Wilson A; Mason, Charlene; Millar, B Cherie; Dooley, James S G; Lowery, Colm J; Ennis, Madeleine; Rendall, Jacqueline C; Moore, John E

    2011-03-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the population structure of viridans group streptococci (VGS) in the sputum of adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Freshly expectorated sputa (n=58) from 45 adult CF patients were examined by selective conventional culture on Mitis-Salivarius agar and yielded 190 isolates of VGS. Sequence analyses of the rpnB and 16-23S rRNA ITS genes identified these isolates to belong to 12 species of VGS and included S. anginosus, S. australis, S. cristatus, S. gordonii, S. infantis, S. mitis, S. mutans, S. oralis, S. parasanguinis, S. pneumoniae, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis. The most frequently VGS organism isolated was S. salivarius (47/190; 24.7%), followed by S. mitis (36/190; 19%), S. sanguinis (25/190; 13.2%), S. oralis (20/190; 11.0%), S. pneumoniae (19/190; 10.0%), S. parasanguinis (16/190; 8.4%), S. infantis (11/190; 5.8%), S. gordonii (7/190; 3.7%), S. anginosus (4/190; 2.1%), S. cristatus (2/190; 1.1%), S. australis (1/190; 0.5%), S. mutans (1/190; 0.5%) and S. agalactiae (1/190; 0.5%). All, but four, patients harboured at least one VGS species, which ranged from one to five streptococcal species, with a mean of 2.85 species per patient. There was no clonality at the subspecies level employing ERIC RAPD PCR. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) testing against penicillin, erythromycin and ciprofloxacin. Overall, resistance to penicillin with all VGS was 73/190 (38.4%) and 167/190 (87.9%) for erythromycin. With regard to ciprofloxacin, 27/190 (14.2%) were fully resistant, whilst a further 21/190 (11.1%) showed intermediate resistance, which equated to approximately three quarters (74.7%) of isolates being fully sensitive to this agent. In addition, as a comparator control population, we examined antibiotic susceptibility, as above, in a non-CF population comprising 12 individuals (50 VGS isolates), who were not receiving chronic antibiotics. In comparison, 8% and 38% of VGS

  13. Do we see what we should see? Describing non-covalent interactions in protein structures including precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manickam Gurusaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The power of X-ray crystal structure analysis as a technique is to `see where the atoms are'. The results are extensively used by a wide variety of research communities. However, this `seeing where the atoms are' can give a false sense of security unless the precision of the placement of the atoms has been taken into account. Indeed, the presentation of bond distances and angles to a false precision (i.e. to too many decimal places is commonplace. This article has three themes. Firstly, a basis for a proper representation of protein crystal structure results is detailed and demonstrated with respect to analyses of Protein Data Bank entries. The basis for establishing the precision of placement of each atom in a protein crystal structure is non-trivial. Secondly, a knowledge base harnessing such a descriptor of precision is presented. It is applied here to the case of salt bridges, i.e. ion pairs, in protein structures; this is the most fundamental place to start with such structure-precision representations since salt bridges are one of the tenets of protein structure stability. Ion pairs also play a central role in protein oligomerization, molecular recognition of ligands and substrates, allosteric regulation, domain motion and α-helix capping. A new knowledge base, SBPS (Salt Bridges in Protein Structures, takes these structural precisions into account and is the first of its kind. The third theme of the article is to indicate natural extensions of the need for such a description of precision, such as those involving metalloproteins and the determination of the protonation states of ionizable amino acids. Overall, it is also noted that this work and these examples are also relevant to protein three-dimensional structure molecular graphics software.

  14. Enhancing vapor generation at a liquid-solid interface using micro/nanoscale surface structures fabricated by femtosecond laser surface processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Troy P.; Wilson, Chris; Zuhlke, Craig A.; Kruse, Corey; Gogos, George; Ndao, Sidy; Alexander, Dennis

    2015-03-01

    Femtosecond Laser Surface Processing (FLSP) is a versatile technique for the fabrication of a wide variety of micro/nanostructured surfaces with tailored physical and chemical properties. Through control over processing conditions such as laser fluence, incident pulse count, polarization, and incident angle, the size and density of both micrometer and nanometer-scale surface features can be tailored. Furthermore, the composition and pressure of the environment both during and after laser processing have a substantial impact on the final surface chemistry of the target material. FLSP is therefore a powerful tool for optimizing interfacial phenomena such as wetting, wicking, and phasetransitions associated with a vapor/liquid/solid interface. In the present study, we utilize a series of multiscale FLSPgenerated surfaces to improve the efficiency of vapor generation on a structured surface. Specifically, we demonstrate that FLSP of stainless steel 316 electrode surfaces in an alkaline electrolysis cell results in increased efficiency of the water-splitting reaction used to generate hydrogen. The electrodes are fabricated to be superhydrophilic (the contact angle of a water droplet on the surface is less than 5 degrees). The overpotential of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is measured using a 3-electrode configuration with a structured electrode as the working electrode. The enhancement is attributed to several factors including increased surface area, increased wettability, and the impact of micro/nanostructures on the bubble formation and release. Special emphasis is placed on identifying and isolating the relative impacts of the various contributions.

  15. Transparent, Superhydrophobic Surface with Varied Surface Tension Responsiveness in Wettability Based on Tunable Porous Silica Structure for Gauging Liquid Surface Tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhu, Yingjie; Zhang, Chunyang; Li, Jun; Guan, Zisheng

    2017-02-01

    Any solid surface can spontaneously exhibit variational wettability toward liquids with varied surface tension (γ). However, this correspondence has seldom been proposed or used on an artificial superhydrophobic surface, which should be more remarkable and peculiar. Herein, we fabricated robust, transparent superhydrophobic surfaces utilizing acid- and base-catalyzed silica (AC- and BC-silica) particles combined with candle soot template for structural construction and the CVD process for chemical modification. Three types of porous silica structures were devised, which presented distinctive surface tension responsiveness in wettability. Interestingly, all types of surfaces (i.e., AC-, AC/BC-, and BC-silica) show high repellence to high surface tension liquid (γ > 35 mN/m), and small differences are observed. With decreasing γ of the ethanol-water mixtures (γ superhydrophobic surfaces.

  16. Structuring of functional thin films and surfaces with picosecond-pulsed lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciukaitis, G.; Gecys, P.; Gedvilas, M.; Voisiat, B.

    2012-03-01

    During the recent few years picosecond lasers have been proved as a reliable tool for microfabrication of diverse materials. We present results of our research on structuring of thin films and surfaces using the direct laser writing and the laser beam interference ablation techniques. The processes of micro-pattering were developed for metallic, dielectric films as well as complex multi-layer structures of thin-film solar cells as a way to manufacture frequency-selective surfaces, fine optical components and integrated series interconnects for photovoltaics. Technologies of nano-structuring of surfaces of advanced technical materials such as tungsten carbide were developed using picosecond lasers as well. Experimental work was supported by modeling and simulation of energy coupling and dissipation inside the layers. Selectiveness of the ablation process is defined by optical and mechanical properties of the materials, and selection of the laser wavelength facilitated control of the structuring process. Implementation of the technologies required fine adjustment of spatial distribution of laser irradiation, therefore both techniques are benefiting from shaping the laser beam with diffractive optical elements. Utilization of the whole laser energy included beam splitting and multi-beam processing.

  17. [Adhesion of corynebacterium diphtheriae: the role of surface structures and formation mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharseeva, G G; Alieva, A A

    2014-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of surface structures including pili (fimbriae) 67-72p surface protein, DIP 1281 surface protein, lipoarabinomannan CdiLAM and their role in the adhesion and colonization of the mucous membrane of the throat by Corynebacterium diphtheriae. A description is offered for the main stages in the adhesion process of diphtheria causative agent and the ability of its adhesins to stimulate the effect of innate and acquired immunity factors. The paper stresses prospectiveness of the development of vaccines forming immunoprotection of the organism against adhesive activity of C. diphtheriae and also preventing their colonization and reproduction. That would facilitate a solution for the problem of diphtheria carrier state, which cannot be solved using the existing means of preventive vaccination.

  18. Surface structure of Bi2Se3(111) determined by low-energy electron diffraction and surface x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Reis, Diogo Duarte; Barreto, Lucas; Bianchi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The surface structure of the prototypical topological insulator Bi2Se3 is determined by low-energy electron diffraction and surface x-ray diffraction at room temperature. Both approaches show that the crystal is terminated by an intact quintuple layer. Specifically, an alternative termination by ...... by a bismuth bilayer is ruled out. Surface relaxations obtained by both techniques are in good agreement with each other and found to be small. This includes the relaxation of the van der Waals gap between the first two quintuple layers....

  19. Structural characterization and Hirshfeld surface analysis of racemic baclofen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniukiewicz, Waldemar; Oracz, Monika; Sieroń, Lesław

    2016-11-01

    The crystal structure of baclofen, (R,S) [4-amino-3-(4-chlorophenyl)butanoic acid], (C10H12ClNO2, Mr = 213.66) has been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The title compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbca (No. 61) with a = 9.2704(5), b = 7.0397(4), c = 30.4015(15) Å, V = 1984.0(2) Å3 and Z = 8. The molecules exist as zwitterions, adopting a gauche conformation with respect to the Cαsbnd Cβ bond, and held in a cross-linked chain arrangement by strong Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds and Csbnd Cl⋯π interactions. The electrostatic molecular potential as well as the intermolecular interactions of the title compound were analyzed by the Hirshfeld surfaces. The FT-IR spectrum is also reported. The DTA, TG and DTG results indicate that baclofen is stable up to 205 °C.

  20. Managing ambiguity in reference generation: the role of surface structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imtiaz H; van Deemter, Kees; Ritchie, Graeme

    2012-04-01

    This article explores the role of surface ambiguities in referring expressions, and how the risk of such ambiguities should be taken into account by an algorithm that generates referring expressions, if these expressions are to be optimally effective for a hearer. We focus on the ambiguities that arise when adjectives occur in coordinated structures. The central idea is to use statistical information about lexical co-occurrence to estimate which interpretation of a phrase is most likely for human readers, and to avoid generating phrases where misunderstandings are likely. Various aspects of the problem were explored in three experiments in which responses by human participants provided evidence about which reading was most likely for certain phrases, which phrases were deemed most suitable for particular referents, and the speed at which various phrases were read. We found a preference for ''clear'' expressions to ''unclear'' ones, but if several of the expressions are ''clear,'' then brief expressions are preferred over non-brief ones even though the brief ones are syntactically ambiguous and the non-brief ones are not; the notion of clarity was made precise using Kilgarriff's Word Sketches. We outline an implemented algorithm that generates noun phrases conforming to our hypotheses.

  1. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehm, S.; Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krueger, J.; Bonse, J. [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und-pruefung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on two different silica polymorphs (single-crystalline synthetic quartz and commercial fused silica glass) upon irradiation in air with multiple linearly polarized single- and double-fs-laser pulse sequences ({tau} = 150 fs pulse duration, {lambda} = 800 nm center wavelength, temporal pulse separation {Delta}t < 40 ps) is studied experimentally and theoretically. Two distinct types of fs-LIPSS [so-called low-spatial-frequency LIPSS (LSFL) and high-spatial-frequency LIPSS (HSFL)] with different spatial periods and orientations were identified. Their appearance was characterized with respect to the experimental parameters peak laser fluence and number of laser pulses per spot. Additionally, the 'dynamics' of the LIPSS formation was addressed in complementary double-fs-pulse experiments with varying delays, revealing a characteristic change of the LSFL periods. The experimental results are interpreted on the basis of a Sipe-Drude model considering the carrier dependence of the optical properties of fs-laser excited silica. This new approach provides an explanation of the LSFL orientation parallel to the laser beam polarisation in silica - as opposed to the behaviour of most other materials.

  2. Rapid fabrication of surface micro/nano structures with enhanced broadband absorption on Cu by picosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Peixun; Zhong, Minlin; Li, Lin; Huang, Ting; Zhang, Hongjun

    2013-05-20

    A surface micro/nano structuring technique was demonstrated by utilizing a picosecond laser beam to rapidly modify the optical property of copper surfaces with a scanning speed up to tens of millimeters per second. Three kinds of surface micro/nanostructures corresponding to three levels of reflectance were produced which are obviously different from those induced by a femtosecond or nanosecond laser. Specifically, a porous coral-like structure results in over 97% absorptivity in the visible spectral region and over 90% absorptivity in average in the UV, visible, and NIR regions (250 - 2500 nm). Potential applications may include solar energy absorbers, thermal radiation sources, and radiative heat transfer devices.

  3. Structural Stability and Optical Properties of Nanomaterials with Reconstructed Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puzder, A; Williamson, A; Reboredo, F; Galli, G

    2003-10-24

    The authors present density functional and quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the stability and optical properties of semiconductor nanomaterials with reconstructed surfaces. they predict the relative stability of silicon nanostructures with reconstructed and unreconstructed surfaces, and show that surface step geometries unique to highly curved surfaces dramatically reduce the optical gaps and decrease excitonic lifetimes. These predictions provide an explanation of both the variations in the photoluminescence spectra of colloidally synthesized nanoparticles and observed deep gap levels in porous silicon.

  4. Characteristics of the Aragonitic Layer in Adult Oyster Shells, Crassostrea gigas: Structural Study of Myostracum including the Adductor Muscle Scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Woo Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myostracum, which is connected from the umbo to the edge of a scar, is not a single layer composed of prismatic layers, but a hierarchically complex multilayered shape composed of minerals and an organic matrix. Through the analysis of the secondary structure, the results revealed that a β-antiparallel structure was predominant in the mineral phase interface between the myostracum (aragonite and bottom folia (calcite. After the complete decalcification and deproteinization, the membrane obtained from the interface between the myostracum buried in upper folia, and the bottom folia was identified as chitin. The transitional zone in the interface between the adductor muscle scar and folia are verified. The myostracum disappeared at the edge of the scar of the posterior side. From this study, the entire structure of the myostracum from the adult oyster shell of Crassostrea gigas could be proposed.

  5. Novel pili-like surface structures of Halobacterium salinarum strain R1 are crucial for surface adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald eLosensky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It was recently shown that haloarchaeal strains of different genera are able to adhere to surfaces and form surface-attached biofilms. However the surface structures mediating the adhesion were still unknown. We have identified a novel surface structure with Halobacterium salinarum strain R1, crucial for surface adhesion. Electron microscopic studies of surface-attached cells frequently showed pili-like surface structures of two different diameters that were irregularly distributed on the surface. The thinner filaments, 7 - 8 nm in diameter, represented a so far unobserved novel pili-like structure. Examination of the Hbt. salinarum R1 genome identified two putative gene loci (pil-1 and pil-2 encoding type IV pilus biogenesis complexes besides the archaellum encoding fla gene locus. Both pil-1 and pil-2 were expressed as transcriptional units, and the transcriptional start of pil-1 was identified. In silico analyses revealed that the pil-1 locus is present with other euryarchaeal genomes whereas the pil-2 is restricted to haloarchaea. Comparative real time qRT-PCR studies indicated that the general transcriptional activity was reduced in adherent versus planktonic cells. In contrast, the transcription of pilB1 and pilB2, encoding putative type IV pilus assembly ATPases, was induced in comparison to the archaella assembly/motor ATPase (flaI and the ferredoxin gene. Mutant strains were constructed that incurred a flaI deletion or flaI/pilB1 gene deletions. The absence of flaI caused the loss of the archaella while the additional absence of pilB1 led to loss of the novel pili-like surface structures. The ΔflaI/ΔpilB1 double mutants showed a 10-fold reduction in surface adhesion compared to the parental strain. Since surface adhesion was not reduced with the non-archaellated ΔflaI mutants, the pil-1 filaments have a distinct function in the adhesion process.

  6. Hydrography, Surface water within Sedgwick County including rivers, streams, lakes, ponds and floodways. Some additional drainage ways and aqueducts are also included., Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County, Kansas.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hydrography dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2008. It is described as 'Surface...

  7. Pentanol and Benzyl Alcohol Attack Bacterial Surface Structures Differently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Takehisa; Miyahara, Yoshiko; Morii, Noriyuki; Okano, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    The genus Methylobacterium tolerates hygiene agents like benzalkonium chloride (BAC), and infection with this organism is an important public health issue. Here, we found that the combination of BAC with particular alcohols at nonlethal concentrations in terms of their solitary uses significantly reduced bacterial viability after only 5 min of exposure. Among the alcohols, Raman spectroscopic analyses showed that pentanol (pentyl alcohol [PeA]) and benzyl alcohol (BzA) accelerated the cellular accumulation of BAC. Fluorescence spectroscopic assays and morphological assays with giant vesicles indicated that PeA rarely attacked membrane structures, while BzA increased the membrane fluidity and destabilized the structures. Other fluorescent spectroscopic assays indicated that PeA and BzA inactivate bacterial membrane proteins, including an efflux pump for BAC transportation. These findings suggested that the inactivation of membrane proteins by PeA and BzA led to the cellular accumulation but that only BzA also enhanced BAC penetration by membrane fluidization at nonlethal concentrations. PMID:26519389

  8. (A structural assessment of the role of the cell surface carbohydrates of Rhizobium in the Rhizobium/legume symbiosis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, R.I.

    1991-01-01

    Research continued on the study of cell surface carbohydrates of Rhizobium. Objectives include: To characterize, at a structural level, the differences between the lipopolysaccharides of a representative number of strains from different Rhizobium species to determine which features of LPS structure are species-specific and might, therefore, be determinants of host specificity. Determine the effect(s) of nod gene induction on the structure of Rhizobium lipopolysaccharides and determine whether synthesis of a modified LPS molecule or a new surface glycoconjugate is initiated by nod gene induction. Develop a non-chemical means for rapidly screening large numbers of bacterial strains in order to determine which glycoconjugate structural features are conserved between strains of the same species. Provide the necessary structural information which, when coupled with developments in the rapidly expanding field of Rhizobium genetics, should lead to a clear understanding of the role of Rhizobium surface glycoconjugates in host/symbiont interactions. Progress is discussed.

  9. Gradient induced liquid motion on laser structured black Si surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisanos, I.; Fotakis, C.; Anastasiadis, S. H.; Stratakis, E.

    2015-09-01

    This letter reports on the femtosecond laser fabrication of gradient-wettability micro/nano-patterns on Si surfaces. The dynamics of directional droplet spreading on the surface tension gradients developed is systematically investigated and discussed. It is shown that microdroplets on the patterned surfaces spread at a maximum speed of 505 mm/s, which is the highest velocity demonstrated so far for liquid spreading on a surface tension gradient in ambient conditions. The application of the proposed laser patterning technique for the precise fabrication of surface tension gradients for open microfluidic systems, liquid management in fuel cells, and drug delivery is envisaged.

  10. Gradient induced liquid motion on laser structured black Si surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Paradisanos, I; Anastasiadis, S H; Stratakis, E

    2015-01-01

    This letter reports on the femtosecond laser fabrication of gradient-wettability micro/nano- patterns on Si surfaces. The dynamics of directional droplet spreading on the surface tension gradients developed is systematically investigated and discussed. It is shown that microdroplets on the patterned surfaces spread at a maximum speed of 505 mm/sec, that is the highest velocity demonstrated so far for liquid spreading on a surface tension gradient in ambient conditions. The application of the proposed laser patterning technique for the precise fabrication of surface tension gradients for open microfluidic systems, liquid management in fuel cells and drug delivery is envisaged.

  11. Calcite surface structure and reactivity: molecular dynamics simulations and macroscopic surface modelling of the calcite-water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, M.; Di Tommaso, D.; Du, Z.; de Leeuw, N.H.

    2012-01-01

    Calcite–water interactions are important not only in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle, but also in contaminant behaviour in calcite-bearing host rock and in many industrial applications. Here we quantify the effect of variations in surface structure on calcite surface reactivity. Fir

  12. On the microscopic structure of a nominal Ag(441) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Thorsten; Fritz, Daniel Roman; Zimmerleiter, Robert; Zeppenfeld, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Regularly stepped (vicinal) surfaces provide a convenient means to control the number of defects of a surface. They can easily be prepared by a slight miscut of a low index surface. In the case of an fcc(n n 1) surface with small integer n, it is even expected that the large number of steps will dominate the surface properties. We are the first to study the Ag(441) surface with a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and high resolution electron diffraction (SPA-LEED). The surface is found to consist of different building blocks, which can be either (331) or (551) microfacets. To unravel the actual morphology, we carried out simulations of the reciprocal space maps (RSMs) in the framework of the simple kinematic approximation.

  13. Propagation of liquid surface waves over finite graphene structured arrays of cylinders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Based on the multiple scattering method,this paper investigates a benchmark problem of the propagation of liquid surface waves over finite graphene (or honeycomb) structured arrays of cylinders.Comparing the graphene structured array with the square structured and with triangle structured arrays,it finds that the finite graphene structure can produce more complete band gaps than the other finite structures,and the finite graphene structure has less localized ability than the other finite structures.

  14. PREVALENCE OF SOME HELMINTHS IN RODENTS CAPTURED FROM DIFFERENT CITY STRUCTURES INCLUDING POULTRY FARMS AND HUMAN POPULATION OF FAISALABAD, PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. RAFIQUE, S. A. RANA, H. A. KHAN AND A. SOHAIL1

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate prevalence of zoonotic helminths from human, Rattus rattus (R. rattus, Rattus norvegicus (R. norvegicus and Mus musculus of eight different structures, namely grain shops in grain market, departmental stores, railway godowns, food processing plants (bakeries, poultry farms, houses in kachi-abadies, houses in departmental colonies and posh residences and banglows in Faisalabad city. All the structures were sampled for 2 months each and completed in 16 months. Highest prevalence (70% of Vsmpirolepis spp. was observed in R. rattus sampled from poultry farms, which was significantly higher (P<0.05 than the prevalence of all the helminths recovered from other structures. Hymenolepis nana (H. nana was observed in 60% of the sampled Mus musculus collected from kachi-abadies, which was significantly higher (P<0.05 than all other structures studies for H. nana, except R. rattus from kachi-abadies (55% and R. norvegicus from grain shops in grain market (55%. The rodent’s endo-parasites viz., Hymenolepis nana, Teania taenaeformis, Entrobius spps and Trichuiris spps observed in R. rattus, R. norvegicus and M. musculus at different percentages were also recorded in human stool samples with an incidence of 48, 21, 76 and 10%, respectively.

  15. The electronic structure of NiO for Ni 3s-hole states including full orbital relaxation and localization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Broer, R; Graaf, C. de; Nieuwpoort, W.C.

    1999-01-01

    The electronic structure of NiO, with emphasis on the Ni 3s-hole ionic states, is studied using non-orthogonal configuration interaction, NOCI, wavefunctions for an NiO6 model of the crystal. Orbital sets are relaxed, or optimized, separately for each configuration used in the NOCI and orbital

  16. Evolution of kinetically controlled In-induced surface structure on Si(5 5 7) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Eldose, Nirosh M.; Mishra, Monu [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Niazi, Asad; Nair, Lekha [Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Gupta, Govind, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Evolution of In induced superstructures on Si(5 5 7) surface during RT and HT adsorption/desorption process. • Kinetics is governed by substrate temperature which exhibits various growth modes (FM, SK, VB) under different conditions. • Strain relaxation play significant role in the commencement of desorption/rearrangement of atoms. • A consolidated phase diagram of In/Si(5 5 7) interface has been reported with new √3 × √3-R30° and 4 × 1 phases. - Abstract: This paper introduces issue of kinetically controlled and temperature driven superstructural phase transition of Indium (In) on atomically clean high index Si(5 5 7)-7 × 1 surface. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that at room-temperature (RT) with a controlled incident flux of 0.002 ML/s; In overlayers evolve through the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode and yield a (1 × 1) diffraction pattern for coverage ≥1 ML. For substrate temperature <500°C, growth of In follows Stranski–Krastanov growth mode while for temperature >500°C island growth is observed. On annealing the In/Si(5 5 7) interface in the temperature range 250–340°C, clusters to two dimensional (2D) layer transformation on top of a stable monolayer is predominated. In-situ RT and HT adsorption and thermal desorption phenomena revealed the formation of coverage and temperature dependent thermally stable In induced superstructural phases such as (4 × 1) at 0.5 ML (520°C), (√3 × √3-R30°) at 0.3 ML (560°C) and (7 × 7) at 0.1 ML (580°C). These indium induced superstructures could be utilized as potential substrate for the growth of various exotic 1D/2D structures.

  17. Surface structures from low energy electron diffraction: Atoms, small molecules and an ordered ice film on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Materer, N.F.

    1995-09-01

    We investigated the surface bonding of various adsorbates (0, S, C{sub 2}H{sub 3} and NO) along with the resulting relaxation of the Pt(111) surface using low energy electron diffiraction (LEED). LEED experiments have been performed on these ordered overlayers along with theoretical structural analysis using automated tensor LEED (ATLEED). The resulting surface structures of these ordered overlayers exhibit similar adsorbate-induced relaxations. In all cases the adsorbate occupies the fcc hollow site and induces an approximately 0.1 A buckling of the metal surface. The three metal atoms directly bonded to the adsorbate are ``pulled`` out of the surface and the metal atom that is not bound to the adsorbate is `pushed`` inward. In order to understand the reliability of such details, we have carried out a comprehensive study of various non-structural parameters used in a LEED computation. We also studied the adsorption of water on the Pt(lll) surface. We ordered an ultra thin ice film on this surface. The film`s surface is found to be the (0001) face of hexagonal ice. This surface is apparently terminated by a full-bilayer, in which the uppermost water molecules have large vibrational amplitudes even at temperatures as low as 90 K. We examined two other metal surfaces besides Pt(111): Ni(111) and Fe(lll). On Ni(111), we have studied the surface under a high coverage of NO. On both Ni(111) and Pt(111) NO molecules occupy the hollow sites and the N-0 bond distances are practically identical. The challenging sample preparation of an Fe(111) surface has been investigated and a successful procedure has been obtained. The small interlayer spacing found on Fe(111) required special treatment in the LEED calculations. A new ATLEED program has been developed to handle this surface.

  18. Adjoint-tomography for a Local Surface Structure: Methodology and a Blind Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubina, Filip; Michlik, Filip; Moczo, Peter; Kristek, Jozef; Stripajova, Svetlana

    2017-04-01

    We have developed a multiscale full-waveform adjoint-tomography method for local surface sedimentary structures with complicated interference wavefields. The local surface sedimentary basins and valleys are often responsible for anomalous earthquake ground motions and corresponding damage in earthquakes. In many cases only relatively small number of records of a few local earthquakes is available for a site of interest. Consequently, prediction of earthquake ground motion at the site has to include numerical modeling for a realistic model of the local structure. Though limited, the information about the local structure encoded in the records is important and irreplaceable. It is therefore reasonable to have a method capable of using the limited information in records for improving a model of the local structure. A local surface structure and its interference wavefield require a specific multiscale approach. In order to verify our inversion method, we performed a blind test. We obtained synthetic seismograms at 8 receivers for 2 local sources, complete description of the sources, positions of the receivers and material parameters of the bedrock. We considered the simplest possible starting model - a homogeneous halfspace made of the bedrock. Using our inversion method we obtained an inverted model. Given the starting model, synthetic seismograms simulated for the inverted model are surprisingly close to the synthetic seismograms simulated for the true structure in the target frequency range up to 4.5 Hz. We quantify the level of agreement between the true and inverted seismograms using the L2 and time-frequency misfits, and, more importantly for earthquake-engineering applications, also using the goodness-of-fit criteria based on the earthquake-engineering characteristics of earthquake ground motion. We also verified the inverted model for other source-receiver configurations not used in the inversion.

  19. Osteoblast growth behavior on porous-structure titanium surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Yuan; Ding Siyang; Peng Hui; Lu Shanming; Wang Guoping [Research Institute of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Xia Lu, E-mail: shelueia@yahoo.com.cn [Research Institute of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Wang Peizhi, E-mail: wangpzi@sina.com [Research Institute of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Micro-arc oxidation technology formed a porous feature on titanium surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This porous surface accelerated adhesion, proliferation and differentiation compared with smooth surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osteogenesis-related proteins and genes were up regulated by this porous surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is anticipated that micro-arc oxidation surface could enhance osteoblastic activity and bone regeneration. - Abstract: A bioavailable surface generated by nano-technology could accelerate implant osteointegration, reduce healing time and enable implants to bear early loading. In this study, a nano-porous surface of titanium wafers was modified using micro-arc oxidation technique; surface of smooth titanium was used as control group. Surface characteristic was evaluated by investigating morphology, roughness and hydrophilicity of titanium wafers. In vitro studies, osteoblastic adhesion, proliferation and ALP activity, as well as gene and protein expressions relative to mineralization were assayed. Our results showed that a crater-liked nano-porous surface with greater roughness and better hydrophilicity were fabricated by micro-arc oxidation. It was further indicated that nano-porous surface could enhance adhesion, proliferation and ALP activity of osteoblasts compared with smooth surfaces. In addition, gene and protein expression of collagen-I, osteocalcin and osteopontin were also obviously increased. In summary, micro-arc oxidized techniques could form an irregular nano-porous morphology on implant surface which is favorable to improve osteoblastic function and prospected to be a potent modification of dental implant.

  20. Surface structure and energy of B2 type intermetallic compound NiAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jianmin [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian 710062, Shaanxi (China)], E-mail: jianm_zhang@yahoo.com; Wang Doudou [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian 710062, Shaanxi (China); Institute of Telecommunication Engineering of the Air Force Engineering University (AFEU1), Xian 710077, Shaanxi (China); Chen Guoxiang [School of Science, Xian Shiyou University, Xian 710065, Shaanxi (China); Xu Kewei [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xian Jiaotong University, Xian 710049, Shaanxi (China)

    2008-02-15

    The surface structure and energies for 22 surfaces of NiAl, an ordered intermetallic compound of B2 structure, have been studied by using embedded atom method. The results show that, for alternating Ni and Al surfaces with odd numbers of the sum of their three Miller indices, the energy difference between the Ni terminated surface and Al terminated surface increase linearly with increasing the interlayer distance. So from surface energy minimization, the Al terminated surface is favorable for each alternating Ni and Al surface. This is in agreement with experimental results. However, the energy of the (1 1 0) surface belonged to the other kind of the surface consisted of stoichiometric atomic layers and with even numbers of the sum of their three Miller indices, is the lowest in all two kinds of the surfaces. Therefore the (1 1 0) texture of NiAl appears mostly in the experiments.

  1. Electronic structure of reconstructed InAs(001) surfaces - identification of bulk and surface bands based on their symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszowska, Natalia; Kolodziej, Jacek J.

    2016-02-01

    Using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) band structures of indium- and arsenic-terminated InAs(001) surfaces are investigated. These surfaces are highly reconstructed, elementary cells of their lattices contain many atoms in different chemical configurations, and moreover, they are composed of domains having related but different reconstructions. These domain-type surface reconstructions result in the reciprocal spaces containing regions with well-defined k→∥-vector and regions with not-well-defined one. In the ARPES spectra most of the surface related features appear as straight lines in the indeterminate k→∥-vector space. It is shown that, thanks to differences in crystal and surface symmetries, the single photon energy ARPES may be successfully used for classification of surface and bulk bands of electronic states on complex, highly reconstructed surfaces instead of the most often used variable photon energy studies.

  2. Biomimetics Bioinspired Hierarchical-Structured Surfaces for Green Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the general field of biomimetics - lessons from nature. It presents various examples of biomimetics, including roughness-induced superomniphobic surfaces which provide functionality of commercial interest. The major focus in the book is on lotus effect, rose petal effect, shark skin effect, and gecko adhesion.  For each example, the book first presents characterization of an object to understand how a natural object provides functionality, followed by modeling and then fabrication of structures in the lab using nature’s route to verify one’s understanding of nature and provide guidance for development of optimum structures. Once it is understood how nature does it, examples of fabrication of optimum structures using smart materials and fabrication techniques, are presented. Examples of nature inspired objects are also presented throughout.

  3. R-matrix calculations for electron-impact excitation of C(+), N(2+), and O(3+) including fine structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, D.; Pradhan, A. K.

    1990-01-01

    The new R-matrix package for comprehensive close-coupling calculations for electron scattering with the first three ions in the boron isoelectronic sequence, the astrophysically significant C(+), N(2+), and O(3+), is presented. The collision strengths are calculated in the LS coupling approximation, as well as in pair-coupling scheme, for the transitions among the fine-structure sublevels. Calculations are carried out at a large number of energies in order to study the detailed effects of autoionizing resonances.

  4. Inherited structures impact on co-seismic surface deformation pattern during the 2013 Balochistan, Pakistan, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallage, Amaury; Klinger, Yann; Grandin, Raphael; Delorme, Arthur; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Marc

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of earthquake processes and the interaction of earthquake rupture with Earth's free surface relies on the resolution of the observations. Recent and detailed post-earthquake measurements bring new insights on shallow mechanical behavior of rupture processes as it becomes possible to measure and locate surficial deformation distribution. The 2013 Mw 7.7 Balochistan earthquake, Pakistan, offers a nice opportunity to comprehend where and why surficial deformation might differs from at-depth localized slip. This earthquake ruptured the Hoshab fault over 200 km; the motion was mainly left lateral with a small and discontinuous vertical component in the southern part of the rupture. Using images with the finest resolution currently available, we measured the surface displacement amplitude and its orientation at the ground surface (including the numerous tensile cracks). We combined these measurements with the 1:500 scale ground rupture map to focus on the behavior of the frontal rupture in the area where deformation distributes. Comparison with orientations of inherited tectonic structures, visible in older rocks formation surrounding the actual 2013 rupture, shows the control exercised by such structures on co-seismic rupture distribution. Such observation raises the question on how pre-existing tectonic structures in a medium, mapped in several seismically active places around the globe; can control the co-seismic distribution of the deformation during earthquakes.

  5. A standard format for reporting atomic positions in measured or calculated surface structures: The CIF file

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Laurence D.

    2010-06-01

    In his editorial in this issue, the editor-in-chief emphasizes the editorial policy that any paper which involves a crystallographic structure (whether experimentally measured or theoretically calculated) must also include a complete listing of all the atomic positions within the crystal structure, either as supporting information or directly within the paper itself. He also strongly recommends that the complete crystallographic data set be included as supporting information. At the request of the editor-in-chief, I outline here the reasons why this is scientifically desirable. Furthermore, I propose here that the Surface Science community adopt the same standard format for reporting these as is already widely used in bulk crystallography publications, namely the inclusion of a Crystallographic Information Format file (or CIF file) as supporting information. Finally, I describe the details of this specific file format, with illustrative examples.

  6. Reinforcement Toolbox, a Parametric Reinforcement Modelling Tool for Curved Surface Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauppe, J.; Rolvink, A.; Coenders, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a computational strategy and parametric modelling toolbox which aim at enhancing the design- and production process of reinforcement in freeform curved surface structures. The computational strategy encompasses the necessary steps of raising an architectural curved surface model

  7. Electronic Structure of Solids and Their Surfaces and Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-30

    point and several articles relating to these studies are being prepared for publication. I. ~ -- ~ i n’J This irnvest.gf.gation has the iur-Pose of...the ideal terminated cubic ,- cristobalite ) surface. Using an admittedly crude model for the surface, they found no states in the band gap. The purpose...this level is an E’ center at or near the surface ( ). The method of sample preparation which they have used (grinding) could easily have caused

  8. Surface structure of thin pseudomorphous GeSi layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, A. I.; Timofeev, V. F.; Pchelyakov, O. P.

    2015-11-01

    Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) was used to study the evolution of thin GexSi1-x film surface superstructures s in the course of molecular beam epitaxy. The (2 × N) superstructure of the epitaxial film surface at periodicity N from 14 to 8, the latter being characteristic of pure germanium at the Si(1 0 0) surface. The epitaxial film thickness that is required for the formation of the (2 × 8) superstructure depends on the deposition temperature and germanium content in the solid solution. The germanium segregation on the growing film surface is shown to be responsible for the observed superstructural changes.

  9. Evolution of kinetically controlled In-induced surface structure on Si(5 5 7) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh; Eldose, Nirosh M.; Mishra, Monu; Niazi, Asad; Nair, Lekha; Gupta, Govind

    2014-09-01

    This paper introduces issue of kinetically controlled and temperature driven superstructural phase transition of Indium (In) on atomically clean high index Si(5 5 7)-7 × 1 surface. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that at room-temperature (RT) with a controlled incident flux of 0.002 ML/s; In overlayers evolve through the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode and yield a (1 × 1) diffraction pattern for coverage ≥1 ML. For substrate temperature 500 °C island growth is observed. On annealing the In/Si(5 5 7) interface in the temperature range 250-340 °C, clusters to two dimensional (2D) layer transformation on top of a stable monolayer is predominated. In-situ RT and HT adsorption and thermal desorption phenomena revealed the formation of coverage and temperature dependent thermally stable In induced superstructural phases such as (4 × 1) at 0.5 ML (520 °C), (√3 × √3-R30°) at 0.3 ML (560 °C) and (7 × 7) at 0.1 ML (580 °C). These indium induced superstructures could be utilized as potential substrate for the growth of various exotic 1D/2D structures.

  10. Self-assembly of metal-organic coordination structures on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei; Gao, Zi'Ang; Lin, Nian

    2016-08-01

    Metal-organic coordination structures are materials comprising reticular metal centers and organic linkers in which the two constituents bind with each other via metal-ligand coordination interaction. The underlying chemistry is more than a century old but has attracted tremendous attention in the last two decades owing to the rapidly development of metal-organic (or porous coordination) frameworks. These metal-coordination materials exhibit extraordinarily versatile topologies and many potential applications. Since 2002, this traditionally three-dimensional chemistry has been extended to two-dimensional space, that is, to synthesize metal-organic coordination structures directly on solid surfaces. This endeavor has made possible a wide range of so-called surface-confined metal-organic networks (SMONs) whose topology, composition, property and function can be tailored by applying the principle of rational design. The coordination chemistry manifests unique characteristics at the surfaces, and in turn the surfaces provide additional control for design structures and properties that are inaccessible in three-dimensional space. In this review, our goal is to comprehensively cover the progress made in the last 15 years in this rapidly developing field. The review summarizes (1) the experimental and theoretical techniques used in this field including scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, density functional theory, and Monte Carlo and kinetic Monte Carlo simulation; (2) molecular ligands, metal atoms, substrates, and coordination motifs utilized for synthesizing SMON; (3) representative SMON structures with different topologies ranging from finite-size discrete clusters to one-dimensional chains, two-dimensional periodical frameworks and random networks; and (4) the properties and potential applications of SMONs. We conclude the review with some perspectives.

  11. Atomic structure of the adsorption of transition metals on silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocoletzi, G.H. [IF-BUAP, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Takeuchi, N. [CCMC-UNAM, Ensenada, BCN (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Full text: Solid state devices are useful for their high sensitivity in a small volume. Applications of such devices as dose materials include semi-conducting dose-rate, and dose-reading measuring devices. Transition metals (TM) have electronic and atomic properties similar to those of rare earth elements when they are adsorbed on silicon surfaces. The interfaces of transition metals silicides with Si (111) have very small lattice mismatches, sharp interfaces, and low Schottky barrier, making them ideal in electronic devices, such as infrared detectors and rectifying contacts. In this work we shall describe our first principles total energy calculations to investigate structural properties of bulk ScSi and YSi, the two dimensional arrangement of ScSi{sub 2} and YSi{sub 2} on the Si(111) surface, and the growth of a few layers of ScSi{sub 1.7} and YSi{sub 1.7} on the Si(111) surface. Our calculated bulk structural parameters are in excellent agreement with experimental values. It will be shown that one monolayer of a TM on Si( l l 1) yields a two dimensional phase with (lxl) periodicity consisting of a layer of TM atoms on T4 sites and a Si bilayer on top. This double layer of Si atoms is very close to ideal Si(111)-(1x1) surface, but rotated 180 with respect to the rest of the crystal. More layers of TM silicide epitaxially grown on Si(l 11) result in a hexagonal structure similar to bulk ScSi2 and YSi2: graphite-like Si planes (with vacancies) intercalated with TM planes, and forming a ({radical}3x{radical}3) arrangement with a ScSi{sub 1.7} and YSi{sub 1.7} stoichiometry. The top Si layer does not contain vacancies and it does not present a graphite-like structure, but forms a bilayer arrangement as in bulk Si. (Author)

  12. Physical-chemistry of radionuclide/mineral surface interaction: II - Structural aspect; Physico-chimie de l`interaction radionucleides/surfaces minerales: II - Aspect structural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallec, R.; Drot, R.; Hubert, S.; Simoni, E. [Experimental Research Division, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France); Denauwer, Ch. [Direction du Cycle du Combustible, CEA Centre d`Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, 30 - Marcoule (France); Ehrhardt, J.J. [Centre de Cinetique Physique et Chimique, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 54 - Villers-les-Nancy (France)

    1999-11-01

    Most of the studies on sorption processes takes into account only the thermodynamical approach and does not have paid attention to the structural aspect (i.e. structure of the surface complex, sorption mechanism). We have here considered this structural point of view using various spectroscopic methods such as photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser induced fluorescence and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). (authors) 1 tab.

  13. Surfaces with combined microscale and nanoscale structures: a route to mechanically stable superhydrophobic surfaces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groten, Jonas; Rühe, Jürgen

    2013-03-19

    Materials with superhydrophobic properties are usually generated by covering the surfaces with hydrophobic nanoscale rough features. A major problem, however, for any practical application of such strongly water-repellent surfaces is the mechanical fragility of the nanostructures. Even moderate forces caused by touching or rubbing the surfaces are frequently strong enough to destroy the nanostructures and lead to the loss of the superhydrophobic properties. In this article, we study the mechanical stability of superhydrophobic surfaces with three different topographies: nano- and microscale features and surfaces carrying a combination of both. The surfaces are generated by silicon etching and subsequent coating with a monolayer of a fluoropolymer (PFA). We perform controlled wear tests on the different surfaces and discuss the impact of wear on the wetting properties of the different surfaces.

  14. Real-Time Visualization of Platelet Interaction With Micro Structured Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gester, Kathrin; Birtel, Stephan; Clauser, Johanna; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Sonntag, Simon Johannes

    2016-02-01

    Improving the hemocompatibility of artificial implants by micro structuring their surfaces has shown promising results, but the mechanisms which lead to this improvement are not yet understood. Therefore, we built a test setup for real-time visualization of platelet interaction with a plain and two micro structured surfaces. The micro structures, defined by the distance of the plain surface area between the structures, were chosen to be 3 and 30 μm, representing a positive and a negative effect on the hemocompatibility. The main part of the test setup was a flow chamber containing films of low density polyethylene (LDPE) with the differently structured surfaces. For different wall shear stresses, no considerable differences were observed in the platelet-surface interaction for all surface types. Whereas, major differences in flow behavior were observed when comparing the surfaces to each other. The platelets "rolled" along the smooth surface, being in constant contact with the surface material. Although the platelets "rolled" over the surface with small structures as well, they were only in contact with the tips of the structure and therefore had less surface contact with the foreign material. The increased distance and height of the structures of the last surface led to a trapping of platelets between the structures. This resulted in a longer contact time with the foreign material as well as a larger contact area, which both increase the risk of platelet activation, adhesion, and finally clotting. Our results showed the mechanisms which lead to these effects and thus revealed why micro structuring of surfaces impacts the hemocompatibility. Furthermore, we established a test setup which can be used for future investigations on the platelet-structure interactions.

  15. The Right to Be Included: Homeschoolers Combat the Structural Discrimination Embodied in Their Lawful Protection in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kašparová, Irena

    2015-01-01

    There is a 240-year tradition of compulsory school attendance in the Czech Republic. To many, compulsory school attendance is synonymous with the right to be educated. After the collapse of communism in 1989, along with the democratization of the government, the education system was slowly opened to alternatives, including the right to educate…

  16. Surface structure determinations of crystalline ionic thin films grown on transition metal single crystal surfaces by low energy electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Joel Glenn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The surface structures of NaCl(100), LiF(100) and alpha-MgCl2(0001) adsorbed on various metal single crystals have been determined by low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Thin films of these salts were grown on metal substrates by exposing the heated metal surface to a molecular flux of salt emitted from a Knudsen cell. This method of investigating thin films of insulators (ionic salts) on a conducting substrate (metal) circumvents surface charging problems that plagued bulk studies, thereby allowing the use of electron-based techniques to characterize the surface.

  17. Electronic and structural properties of the (1010) and (1120) ZnO surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marana, N L; Longo, V M; Longo, E; Martins, J B L; Sambrano, J R

    2008-09-25

    The structural and electronic properties of ZnO (1010) and (1120) surfaces were investigated by means of density functional theory applied to periodic calculations at B3LYP level. The stability and relaxation effects for both surfaces were analyzed. The electronic and energy band properties were discussed on the basis of band structure as well as density of states. There is a significant relaxation in the (1010) as compared to the (1120) terminated surfaces. The calculated direct gap is 3.09, 2.85, and 3.09 eV for bulk, (1010), and (1120) surfaces, respectively. The band structures for both surfaces are very similar.

  18. The Case for Tetrahedral Oxy-subhydride (TOSH Structures in the Exclusion Zones of Anchored Polar Solvents Including Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Oehr

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesize a mechanistic model of how negatively-charged exclusion zones (EZs are created. While the growth of EZs is known to be associated with the absorption of ambient photonic energy, the molecular dynamics giving rise to this process need greater elucidation. We believe they arise due to the formation of oxy-subhydride structures (OH−(H2O4 with a tetrahedral (sp3 (OH−(H2O3 core. Five experimental data sets derived by previous researchers were assessed in this regard: (1 water-derived EZ light absorbance at specific infrared wavelengths, (2 EZ negative potential in water and ethanol, (3 maximum EZ light absorbance at 270 nm ultraviolet wavelength, (4 ability of dimethyl sulphoxide but not ether to form an EZ, and (5 transitory nature of melting ice derived EZs. The proposed tetrahedral oxy-subhydride structures (TOSH appear to adequately account for all of the experimental evidence derived from water or other polar solvents.

  19. Assessment of Wind Turbine Structural Integrity using Response Surface Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Svenningsen, Lasse; Moser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights •A new approach to assessment of site specific wind turbine loads is proposed. •The approach can be applied in both fatigue and ultimate limit state. •Two different response surface methodologies have been investigated. •The model uncertainty introduced by the response surfaces is dete...

  20. Droplet impact on superheated micro-structured surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, A.T.; Staat, H.J.J.; Susarrey-Arce, A.; Foertsch, T.C.; Houselt, van A.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Prosperetti, A.; Lohse, D.; Sun, C.

    2013-01-01

    When a droplet impacts upon a surface heated above the liquid's boiling point, the droplet either comes into contact with the surface and boils immediately (contact boiling), or is supported by a developing vapor layer and bounces back (film boiling, or Leidenfrost state). We study the transition be

  1. Bend loss in surface plasmon polariton band-gap structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Volkov, V.S.; Leosson, Kristjan

    2001-01-01

    Using near-field optical microscopy, we investigate propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) excited in the wavelength range of 720-830 nm at a corrugated gold-film surface with areas of 200-nm-wide and 45-nm-high scatterers arranged in a 410-nm-period triangular lattice containing line...

  2. Fabrication and condensation characteristics of metallic superhydrophobic surface with hierarchical micro-nano structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Fuqiang; Wu, Xiaomin

    2016-05-01

    Metallic superhydrophobic surfaces have various applications in aerospace, refrigeration and other engineering fields due to their excellent water repellent characteristics. This study considers a simple but widely applicable fabrication method using a two simultaneous chemical reactions method to prepare the acid-salt mixed solutions to process the metal surfaces with surface deposition and surface etching to construct hierarchical micro-nano structures on the surface and then modify the surface with low surface-energy materials. Al-based and Cu-based superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated using this method. The Al-based superhydrophobic surface had a water contact angle of 164° with hierarchical micro-nano structures similar to the lotus leaves. The Cu-based surface had a water contact angle of 157° with moss-like hierarchical micro-nano structures. Droplet condensation experiments were also performed on these two superhydrophobic surfaces to investigate their condensation characteristics. The results show that the Al-based superhydrophobic surface has lower droplet density, higher droplet jumping probability, slower droplet growth rate and lower surface coverage due to the more structured hierarchical structures.

  3. Tapered dielectric structure in metal as a wavelength-selective surface plasmon polariton focuser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yang; Zhao Qing; Liao Zhi-Min; Yu Da-Peng

    2009-01-01

    Symmetric tapered dielectric structures in metal have demonstrated applications such as the nanofocusing of surface plasmon polaxitons, as well as the waveguiding of V-channel polaxitons. Yet the fabrication of smooth-surfaced tapered structure remains an obstacle to most researchers. We have successfully developed a handy method to fabricate metal-sandwiched tapered nanostructures simply with electron beam lithography. Though these structures are slightly different from conventional symmetric V-shaped structures, systematic simulations show that similar functionality of surface plasmon polaxiton nanofocusing can still be achieved, When parameters are properly selected, wavelengthselective nanofocusing of surface plasmon polaritons can be obtained.

  4. Surface Plasmon Polaritons of Two-Dimensional Three-Order Dendritic Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敏凤; 周鲁卫

    2011-01-01

    We study surface plasmon polaritons excited on two-dimensional three-order dendritic structures. Previous studies show that split ring resonators (SRRs) can be used to obtain magnetic resonance, thus sustairdng surface waves behaving like surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). In this paper, we obtain detailed results on surface plasmon polaritons of several different grating structures and theoretically prove that this kind of structures can sustain SPPs. Besides, since dendritic structures can be fabricated by double template-assisted electrochemical deposition, it is worth noting that fabrication of SPP-based materials might be much easier.

  5. Photoluminescence Imaging of Polyfluorene Surface Structures on Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes: Implications for Thin Film Exciton Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Nicolai F; Pramanik, Rajib; Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Ihly, Rachelle; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Doorn, Stephen K

    2016-12-27

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have potential to act as light-harvesting elements in thin film photovoltaic devices, but performance is in part limited by the efficiency of exciton diffusion processes within the films. Factors contributing to exciton transport can include film morphology encompassing nanotube orientation, connectivity, and interaction geometry. Such factors are often defined by nanotube surface structures that are not yet well understood. Here, we present the results of a combined pump-probe and photoluminescence imaging study of polyfluorene (PFO)-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs that provide additional insight into the role played by polymer structures in defining exciton transport. Pump-probe measurements suggest exciton transport occurs over larger length scales in films composed of PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, compared to those prepared from PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs. To explore the role the difference in polymer structure may play as a possible origin of differing transport behaviors, we performed a photoluminescence imaging study of individual polymer-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs. The PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs showed more uniform intensity distributions along their lengths, in contrast to the PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, which showed irregular, discontinuous intensity distributions. These differences likely originate from differences in surface coverage and suggest the PFO wrapping on (7,5) nanotubes produces a more open surface structure than is available with the PFO-bpy wrapping of (6,5) nanotubes. The open structure likely leads to improved intertube coupling that enhances exciton transport within the (7,5) films, consistent with the results of our pump-probe measurements.

  6. Photoluminescence Imaging of Polyfluorene Surface Structures on Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes: Implications for Thin Film Exciton Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Nicolai F.; Pramanik, Rajib; Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Ihly, Rachelle; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Doorn, Stephen K.

    2016-12-27

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have potential to act as light-harvesting elements in thin film photovoltaic devices, but performance is in part limited by the efficiency of exciton diffusion processes within the films. Factors contributing to exciton transport can include film morphology encompassing nanotube orientation, connectivity, and interaction geometry. Such factors are often defined by nanotube surface structures that are not yet well understood. Here, we present the results of a combined pump-probe and photoluminescence imaging study of polyfluorene (PFO)-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs that provide additional insight into the role played by polymer structures in defining exciton transport. Pump-probe measurements suggest exciton transport occurs over larger length scales in films composed of PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, compared to those prepared from PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs. To explore the role the difference in polymer structure may play as a possible origin of differing transport behaviors, we performed a photoluminescence imaging study of individual polymer-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs. The PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs showed more uniform intensity distributions along their lengths, in contrast to the PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, which showed irregular, discontinuous intensity distributions. These differences likely originate from differences in surface coverage and suggest the PFO wrapping on (7,5) nanotubes produces a more open surface structure than is available with the PFO-bpy wrapping of (6,5) nanotubes. The open structure likely leads to improved intertube coupling that enhances exciton transport within the (7,5) films, consistent with the results of our pump-probe measurements.

  7. Surface wave velocity structure of the western Himalayan syntaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, A. C.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2013-09-01

    The Nanga Parbat Haramosh massif (NPHM) is located in the western syntaxis of the India-Eurasia collision zone and is subject to erosion rates that are so extreme as to impact the isostatic equilibrium of the massif. In order to investigate the interaction between large scale tectonic forces and local isostatic processes, we employ a Rayleigh wave tomography method to measure phase velocities within the massif and surrounding region at crust and mantle depths. Our inversion solves for phase velocity anomalies by representing perturbations in the wavefield as the interference of two plane waves. Our data set was obtained from a temporary seismic array deployed in 1996 and includes 53 teleseismic events with Mw ≥ 5.0, at periods from 20 to 79 s. Phase velocities at short periods are low, ranging from 3.2 km s-1 at 20 s, and increasing gradually to 3.5 km s-1 at 40 s. These velocities are 11 per cent lower than velocities observed in the Indian continental Plate at periods below 45 s. Above 50 s, phase velocities in the Nanga Parbat region are significantly higher, ranging from 3.7 km s-1 at 45 s to 4.0 km s-1 at 79 s. These high phase velocities above 60 s are consistent with average velocities measured within the Indian Plate. Comparison of these results with surface wave studies in other regions of the Tibetan plateau including the eastern syntaxis and central Tibet show a similar low velocity anomaly below 45 s. Phase velocities above 55 s, however, are significantly higher in the Nanga Parbat region compared to velocities reported for all other regions of the plateau. Shear wave inversions produce significantly low velocities in the upper crust of the NPHM but exceed average lithospheric velocities below the Moho. We suggest the combination of anomalously low velocities in the upper crust and high velocities at lithospheric depths is due to rapid exhumation of deep crustal material causing elevated geothermal gradients. Azimuthal anisotropy shows a NNW-SSE fast

  8. Super-hydrophobic and oleophobic transparent surfaces using micro-nano-structuring techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Von Rudno, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Treball fet en col·laboració amb Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Universitat de Barcelona (UB) i Institut de Ciències Fotòniques (ICFO) In this thesis we describe the successful design and fabrication of three distinct high-order hierarchical structures based on silica to invoke super-hydrophobicity and oleophobicity on optically transparent surfaces, which may find application in display screens, solar cell panels and smart windows. These include directly synthesized and highly ...

  9. Self-consistent electronic structure and segregation profiles of the Cu-Ni (001) random-alloy surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Abrikosov, I. A.; Kats, D. Ya.

    1994-01-01

    We have calculated the electronic structure and segregation profiles of the (001) surface of random Cu-Ni alloys with varying bulk concentrations by means of the coherent potential approximation and the linear muffin-tin-orbitals method. Exchange and correlation were included within the local-den...... to be oscillatory with a strong preference for Cu to segregate towards the surface of the alloy....

  10. Femtosecond-laser induced dynamics of CO on Ru(0001): Deep insights from a hot-electron friction model including surface motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Robert; Floß, Gereon; Saalfrank, Peter; Füchsel, Gernot; Lončarić, Ivor; Juaristi, J. I.

    2016-10-01

    A Langevin model accounting for all six molecular degrees of freedom is applied to femtosecond-laser induced, hot-electron driven dynamics of Ru(0001)(2 ×2 ):CO. In our molecular dynamics with electronic friction approach, a recently developed potential energy surface based on gradient-corrected density functional theory accounting for van der Waals interactions is adopted. Electronic friction due to the coupling of molecular degrees of freedom to electron-hole pairs in the metal are included via a local density friction approximation, and surface phonons by a generalized Langevin oscillator model. The action of ultrashort laser pulses enters through a substrate-mediated, hot-electron mechanism via a time-dependent electronic temperature (derived from a two-temperature model), causing random forces acting on the molecule. The model is applied to laser induced lateral diffusion of CO on the surface, "hot adsorbate" formation, and laser induced desorption. Reaction probabilities are strongly enhanced compared to purely thermal processes, both for diffusion and desorption. Reaction yields depend in a characteristic (nonlinear) fashion on the applied laser fluence, as well as branching ratios for various reaction channels. Computed two-pulse correlation traces for desorption and other indicators suggest that aside from electron-hole pairs, phonons play a non-negligible role for laser induced dynamics in this system, acting on a surprisingly short time scale. Our simulations on precomputed potentials allow for good statistics and the treatment of long-time dynamics (300 ps), giving insight into this system which hitherto has not been reached. We find generally good agreement with experimental data where available and make predictions in addition. A recently proposed laser induced population of physisorbed precursor states could not be observed with the present low-coverage model.

  11. Numerical modeling and experimental validation of the acoustic transmission of aircraft's double-wall structures including sound package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhazi, Dilal

    In the field of aeronautics, reducing the harmful effects of acoustics constitutes a major concern at the international level and justifies the call for further research, particularly in Canada where aeronautics is a key economic sector, which operates in a context of global competition. Aircraft sidewall structure is usually of a double wall construction with a curved ribbed metallic skin and a lightweight composite or sandwich trim separated by a cavity filled with a noise control treatment. The latter is of a great importance in the transport industry, and continues to be of interest in many engineering applications. However, the insertion loss noise control treatment depends on the excitation of the supporting structure. In particular, Turbulent Boundary Layer is of interest to several industries. This excitation is difficult to simulate in laboratory conditions, given the prohibiting costs and difficulties associated with wind tunnel and in-flight tests. Numerical simulation is the only practical way to predict the response to such excitations and to analyze effects of design changes to the response to such excitation. Another kinds of excitations encountered in industrial are monopole, rain on the Roof and diffuse acoustic field. Deterministic methods can calculate in each point the spectral response of the system. Most known are numerical methods such as finite elements and boundary elements methods. These methods generally apply to the low frequency where modal behavior of the structure dominates. However, the high limit of calculation in frequency of these methods cannot be defined in a strict way because it is related to the capacity of data processing and to the nature of the studied mechanical system. With these challenges in mind, and with limitations of the main numerical codes on the market, the manufacturers have expressed the need for simple models immediately available as early as the stage of preliminary drafts. This thesis represents an attempt

  12. An Asset Pricing Approach to Testing General Term Structure Models including Heath-Jarrow-Morton Specifications and Affine Subclasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; van der Wel, Michel

    of the risk premium is associated with the slope factor, and individual risk prices depend on own past values, factor realizations, and past values of other risk prices, and are significantly related to the output gap, consumption, and the equity risk price. The absence of arbitrage opportunities is strongly...... is tested, but in addition to the standard bilinear term in factor loadings and market prices of risk, the relevant mean restriction in the term structure case involves an additional nonlinear (quadratic) term in factor loadings. We estimate our general model using likelihood-based dynamic factor model...... techniques for a variety of volatility factors, and implement the relevant likelihood ratio tests. Our factor model estimates are similar across a general state space implementation and an alternative robust two-step principal components approach. The evidence favors time-varying market prices of risk. Most...

  13. THE TEMPIO DELLA CONSOLAZIONE IN TODI: INTEGRATED GEOMATIC TECHNIQUES FOR A MONUMENT DESCRIPTION INCLUDING STRUCTURAL DAMAGE EVOLUTION IN TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Radicioni

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Tempio della Consolazione in Todi (16th cent. has always been one of the most significant symbols of the Umbrian landscape. Since the first times after its completion (1606 the structure has exhibited evidences of instability, due to foundation subsiding and/or seismic activity. Structural and geotechnical countermeasures have been undertaken on the Tempio and its surroundings from the 17th century until recent times. Until now a truly satisfactory analysis of the overall deformation and attitude of the building has not been performed, since the existing surveys record the overhangs of the pillars, the crack pattern or the subsidence over limited time spans. Describing the attitude of the whole church is in fact a complex operation due to the architectural character of the building, consisting of four apses (three polygonal and one semicircular covered with half domes, which surround the central area with the large dome. The present research aims to fill the gap of knowledge with a global study based on geomatic techniques for an accurate 3D reconstruction of geometry and attitude, integrated with a historical research on damage and interventions and a geotechnical analysis. The geomatic survey results from the integration of different techniques: GPS-GNSS for global georeferencing, laser scanning and digital photogrammetry for an accurate 3D reconstruction, high precision total station and geometric leveling for a direct survey of deformations and cracks, and for the alignment of the laser scans. The above analysis allowed to assess the dynamics of the cracks occurred in the last 25 years by a comparison with a previous survey. From the photographic colour associated to the point cloud was also possible to map the damp patches showing on the domes intrados, mapping their evolution over the last years.

  14. The Tempio della Consolazione in Todi: Integrated Geomatic Techniques for a Monument Description Including Structural Damage Evolution in Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radicioni, F.; Matracchi, P.; Brigante, R.; Brozzi, A.; Cecconi, M.; Stoppini, A.; Tosi, G.

    2017-05-01

    The Tempio della Consolazione in Todi (16th cent.) has always been one of the most significant symbols of the Umbrian landscape. Since the first times after its completion (1606) the structure has exhibited evidences of instability, due to foundation subsiding and/or seismic activity. Structural and geotechnical countermeasures have been undertaken on the Tempio and its surroundings from the 17th century until recent times. Until now a truly satisfactory analysis of the overall deformation and attitude of the building has not been performed, since the existing surveys record the overhangs of the pillars, the crack pattern or the subsidence over limited time spans. Describing the attitude of the whole church is in fact a complex operation due to the architectural character of the building, consisting of four apses (three polygonal and one semicircular) covered with half domes, which surround the central area with the large dome. The present research aims to fill the gap of knowledge with a global study based on geomatic techniques for an accurate 3D reconstruction of geometry and attitude, integrated with a historical research on damage and interventions and a geotechnical analysis. The geomatic survey results from the integration of different techniques: GPS-GNSS for global georeferencing, laser scanning and digital photogrammetry for an accurate 3D reconstruction, high precision total station and geometric leveling for a direct survey of deformations and cracks, and for the alignment of the laser scans. The above analysis allowed to assess the dynamics of the cracks occurred in the last 25 years by a comparison with a previous survey. From the photographic colour associated to the point cloud was also possible to map the damp patches showing on the domes intrados, mapping their evolution over the last years.

  15. Tensioned Fabric Structures with Surface in the Form of Chen-Gackstatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Hooi Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Form-finding has to be carried out for tensioned fabric structure in order to determine the initial equilibrium shape under prescribed support condition and prestress pattern. Tensioned fabric structures are normally designed to be in the form of equal tensioned surface. Tensioned fabric structure is highly suited to be used for realizing surfaces of complex or new forms. However, research study on a new form as a tensioned fabric structure has not attracted much attention. Another source of inspiration minimal surface which could be adopted as form for tensioned fabric structure is very crucial. The aim of this study is to propose initial equilibrium shape of tensioned fabric structures in the form of Chen-Gackstatter. Computational form-finding using nonlinear analysis method is used to determine the Chen-Gackstatter form of uniformly stressed surfaces. A tensioned fabric structure must curve equally in opposite directions to give the resulting surface a three dimensional stability. In an anticlastic doubly curved surface, the sum of all positive and all negative curvatures is zero. This study provides an alternative choice for structural designer to consider the Chen-Gackstatter applied in tensioned fabric structures. The results on factors affecting initial equilibrium shape can serve as a reference for proper selection of surface parameter for achieving a structurally viable surface.

  16. Electronic structures of the oxygenated diamond (100)surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fengbin; WANG Jiadao; LIU Bing; LI Xuemin; CHEN Darong

    2006-01-01

    By means of first principles method on the basis of density functional theory (DFT), the equilibrium geometries and density of states (DOS) of the two oxygenated diamond (100) surfaces, bridging model and on-top model are calculated. The results indicate that there are no surface states located in the band gap of the bridging model of oxygenated diamond (100) surface, and the occupied surface states in the valence band are attributed to the non-bonded O 2p orbital, O 2p and C 2p bonding orbitals, and C 2p and H1s bonding orbitals. By contrast, for the on-top model of oxygenated diamond (100) surface,the unoccupied surface states exist in the band gap,which originate from non-bonded C 2p and O 2p orbitals. In addition, the occupied surface states in the valence band are induced by non-bonded O 2p orbital and the C=O π bond.

  17. Molecular surface structural changes of plasticized PVC materials after plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Chi; Hankett, Jeanne M; Chen, Zhan

    2013-03-26

    In this research, a variety of analytical techniques including sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been employed to investigate the surface and bulk structures of phthalate plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) at the molecular level. Two types of phthalate molecules with different chain lengths, diethyl phthalate (DEP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP), mixed with PVC in various weight ratios were examined to verify their different surface and bulk behaviors. The effects of oxygen and argon plasma treatment on PVC/DBP and PVC/DEP hybrid films were investigated on both the surface and bulk of films using SFG and CARS to evaluate the different plasticizer migration processes. Without plasma treatment, SFG results indicated that more plasticizers segregate to the surface at higher plasticizer bulk concentrations. SFG studies also demonstrated the presence of phthalates on the surface even at very low bulk concentration (5 wt %). Additionally, the results gathered from SFG, CARS, and XPS experiments suggested that the PVC/DEP system was unstable, and DEP molecules could leach out from the PVC under low vacuum after several minutes. In contrast, the PVC/DBP system was more stable; the migration process of DBP out of PVC could be effectively suppressed after oxygen plasma treatment. XPS results indicated the increase of C═O/C-O groups and decrease of C-Cl functionalities on the polymer surface after oxygen plasma treatment. The XPS results also suggested that exposure to argon plasma induced chemical bond breaking and formation of cross-linking or unsaturated groups with chain scission on the surface. Finally, our results indicate the potential risk of using DEP molecules in PVC since DEP can easily leach out from the polymeric bulk.

  18. Joining of Metal-Plastics-Hybrid Structures Using Laser Radiation by Considering the Surface Structure of the Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hopmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight construction is a central technology in today’s industrial production. One way to achieve the climate goals is the production of hybrid compounds of metal and plastic. The manufacturing process for these hybrid parts can be divided into in-mold assembly and postmold assembly. The postmold assembly includes thermal joining by laser, which is applied in the context of this paper. For the investigations, four plastics (MABS, PA6.6-GF35, PP, and PC, which differ in their properties, and three metals (unalloyed steel, stainless steel, and aluminum are combined and analyzed. These materials have been used, since they have a huge significance in the automotive industry. Preliminary studies showed that an adhesive bond between the two materials is achieved using metal with a structured surface. According to these studies, three structuring processes for metals (selective laser melting (SLM, NRX, and a welded metallic tissue are tested. The quality of the material/structure combinations is tested in tensile-shear-tests, microscopy images, and alternating climate tests. Compounds with SLM-Structure achieve highest strength, while compounds with aluminum are much more complex to manufacture.

  19. Effects of electrode surface structure on the mechanoelectrical transduction of IPMC sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmre, Viljar; Pugal, David; Kim, Kwang

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the effects of electrode surface structure on the mechanoelectrical transduction of IPMC sensors. A physics-based mechanoelectrical transduction model was developed that takes into account the electrode surface profile (shape) by describing the polymer-electrode interface as a Koch fractal structure. Based on the model, the electrode surface effects were experimentally investigated in case of IPMCs with Pd-Pt electrodes. IPMCs with different electrode surface structures were fabricated through electroless plating process by appropriately controlling the synthesis parameters and conditions. The changes in the electrode surface morphology and the corresponding effects on the IPMC mechanoelectrical transduction were examined. Our experimental results indicate that increasing the dispersion of Pd particles near the membrane surface, and thus the polymer-electrode interfacial area, leads to a higher peak mechanoelectrically induced voltage of IPMC. However, the overall effect of the electrode surface structure is relatively low compared to the electromechanical transduction, which is in good agreement with theoretical prediction.

  20. Genetic diversity and haplotype structure of 21 Y-STRs, including nine noncore loci, in South Tunisian Population: Forensic relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makki-Rmida, Faten; Kammoun, Arwa; Mahfoudh, Nadia; Ayadi, Adnene; Gibriel, Abdullah Ahmed; Mallek, Bakhta; Maalej, Leila; Hammami, Zouheir; Maatoug, Samir; Makni, Hafedh; Masmoudi, Saber

    2015-12-01

    Y chromosome STRs (Y-STRs) are being used frequently in forensic laboratories. Previous studies of Y-STR polymorphisms in different groups of the Tunisian population identified low levels of diversity and discrimination capacity (DC) using various commercial marker sets. This definitely limits the use of such systems for Y-STRs genotyping in Tunisia. In our investigation on South Tunisia, 200 unrelated males were typed for the 12 conventional Y-STRs included in the PowerPlex® Y System. Additional set of nine noncore Y-STRs including DYS446, DYS456, DYS458, DYS388, DYS444, DYS445, DYS449, DYS710, and DYS464 markers were genotyped and evaluated for their potential in improving DC. Allele frequency, gene diversity, haplotype diversity (HD), and DC calculation revealed that DYS464 was the most diverse marker followed by DYS710 and DYS449 markers. The standard panel of 12 Y-STRs (DC = 80.5%) and the nine markers were combined to obtain DC of 99%. Among the 198 different haplotypes observed, 196 haplotypes were unique (HD = 99.999). Out of the nine noncore set, six Y-STRs (DYS458, DYS456, DYS449, DYS710, DYS444, and DYS464) had the greatest impact on enhancing DC. Our data provided putative Y-STRs combination to be used for genetic and forensic applications.

  1. Surface structures and adherence properties of diverse strains of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Geme, J W; Gilsdorf, J R; Falkow, S

    1991-10-01

    Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius is an important cause of conjunctivitis and has recently been associated with Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF), a fulminant systemic disease of children. To gain insight into the bacterial factors involved in the pathogenesis of this disease, we investigated the surface structures and adherence properties of eight different strains of H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius, including both BPF and non-BPF isolates. All eight strains were able to express long peritrichous pili similar to those observed in H. influenzae. As in H. influenzae, piliation correlated with colony binding of human erythrocytes. However, two strains were capable of hemagglutination in the absence of pili; in these strains, hemagglutination was insensitive to protease treatment, suggesting a nonproteinaceous hemagglutinin. All strains possessed short, thin, surface fibers distinct from long pili and demonstrated efficient attachment to cultured human conjunctival cells. Attachment to conjunctival cells occurred independently of long pili or a capacity for hemagglutination.

  2. Surface nano-patterning in realizing large-scale ordered arrays of metallic nanoshells with controllable structures and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shikuan; Xu, Feng; Winkler, Nina; Zhao, Huaping; Lei, Yong [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Muenster (Germany); Center for Nanotechnology (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Surface patterns of metallic nanostructure arrays play an important role in many application areas such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors, lithium-ion batteries, solar cells, and optical devices. Here we present an innovative surface nano-patterning technique in our group for realizing large-scale ordered arrays of metallic spherical nanoshells with well-defined structures. Silver nanoshell arrays are synthesized using polystyrene sphere templates by an electrophoretic process. The fabricated Ag nanoshell arrays have a high controllability of the structural parameters, including the diameter, the surface roughness, and the inter-shell spacing. And the properties of the synthesized nanoshell arrays can be controlled based on the adjustment of the structural parameters. As an example, tunable surface-enhanced Raman scattering and localized surface plasmon resonance of the nanoshell arrays are demonstrated by controlling the structural parameters. The presented surface nano-patterning technique is a general fabrication process in achieving not only metallic nanoshell arrays, but also nanoshell arrays of other materials, such as semiconductors and metallic oxides.

  3. Stable isotopes document the trophic structure of a deep-sea cephalopod assemblage including giant octopod and giant squid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherel, Y; Ridoux, V; Spitz, J; Richard, P

    2009-06-23

    Although deep-sea cephalopods are key marine organims, their feeding ecology remains essentially unknown. Here, we report for the first time the trophic structure of an assemblage of these animals (19 species) by measuring the isotopic signature of wings of their lower beaks, which accumulated in stomachs of stranded sperm whales. Overall, the species encompassed a narrow range in delta(13)C values (1.7 per thousand), indicating that they lived in closely related and overlapping habitats. delta(13)C values can be interpreted in terms of distribution with the more (13)C-depleted species (e.g. Stigmatoteuthis arcturi, Vampyroteuthis infernalis) having a more pelagic habitat than the more (13)C-enriched, bathyal species (e.g. Todarodes sagittatus and the giant squid Architeuthis dux). The cephalopods sampled had delta(15)N values ranging 4.6 per thousand, which is consistent with the species spanning approximately 1.5 trophic levels. Neither the giant octopod (Haliphron atlanticus) nor the giant squid reached the highest trophic position. Species delta(15)N was independent of body size, with large squids having both the highest (Taningia danae) and lowest (Lepidoteuthis grimaldii) delta(15)N values. Their trophic position indicates that some species share the top of the food web, together with other megacarnivores such as the sperm whale.

  4. Ligand structure-function relationships in the vitamin D endocrine system from the perspective of drug development (including cancer treatment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Anthony W; Mizwicki, Mathew T; Okamura, William H

    2003-01-01

    It has become readily apparent to many scientists and pharmaceutical companies that the vitamin D endocrine system offers a wide array of drug development opportunities. There are already successes, as noted by 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 (Roche, and Abbott) for renal osteodystrophy and osteoporosis and 1alpha(OH)D3 (Leo, Chugai, Teijin) for renal osteodystrophy and (in Japan) osteoporosis, 1alpha,24(OH)2-24-cyclopropyl-D3 (Dovonex) and 1alpha,24(OH)2D3 (Teijin) for psoriasis, and 19-nor-1alpha,25(OH)2D2 (Abbott) for renal osteodystrophy, as well as drugs under active development. Yet there are still many important and challenging drug development frontiers, particularly in the area of cancer treatment and immune system disorders where exploration is only in the initial early stages. In addition, the application of vitamin D-related drugs in neurology and brain pathology should not be overlooked. It is to be hoped that the cellular and molecular basis for the vexing problem of analog-induced hypercalcemia will be elucidated. Given that there are believed to be over 2000 analogs of 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 already available for consideration, it is to be expected that over the next decade a significant number of new vitamin D structure-function drug development projects will be brought to conclusion.

  5. Surface forces between rough and topographically structured interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thormann, Esben

    2017-01-01

    Within colloidal science, direct or indirect measurements of surface forces represent an important tool for developing a fundamental understanding of colloidal systems, as well as for predictions of the stability of colloidal suspensions. While the general understanding of colloidal interactions ...

  6. Anopheles darlingi polytene chromosomes: revised maps including newly described inversions and evidence for population structure in Manaus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J Cornel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Salivary gland polytene chromosomes of 4th instar Anopheles darlingi Root were examined from multiple locations in the Brazilian Amazon. Minor modifications were made to existing polytene photomaps. These included changes to the breakpoint positions of several previously described paracentric inversions and descriptions of four new paracentric inversions, two on the right arm of chromosome 3 and two on the left arm of chromosome 3 that were found in multiple locations. A total of 18 inversions on the X (n = 1 chromosome, chromosome 2 (n = 7 and 3 (n = 11 were scored for 83 individuals from Manaus, Macapá and Porto Velho municipalities. The frequency of 2Ra inversion karyotypes in Manaus shows significant deficiency of heterozygotes (p < 0.0009. No significant linkage disequilibrium was found between inversions on chromosome 2 and 3. We hypothesize that at least two sympatric subpopulations exist within the An. darlingi population at Manaus based on inversion frequencies.

  7. Anopheles darlingi polytene chromosomes: revised maps including newly described inversions and evidence for population structure in Manaus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornel, Anthony J; Brisco, Katherine K; Tadei, Wanderli P; Secundino, Nágila FC; Rafael, Miriam S; Galardo, Allan KR; Medeiros, Jansen F; Pessoa, Felipe AC; Ríos-Velásquez, Claudia M; Lee, Yoosook; Pimenta, Paulo FP; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    Salivary gland polytene chromosomes of 4th instar Anopheles darlingi Root were examined from multiple locations in the Brazilian Amazon. Minor modifications were made to existing polytene photomaps. These included changes to the breakpoint positions of several previously described paracentric inversions and descriptions of four new paracentric inversions, two on the right arm of chromosome 3 and two on the left arm of chromosome 3 that were found in multiple locations. A total of 18 inversions on the X (n = 1) chromosome, chromosome 2 (n = 7) and 3 (n = 11) were scored for 83 individuals from Manaus, Macapá and Porto Velho municipalities. The frequency of 2Ra inversion karyotypes in Manaus shows significant deficiency of heterozygotes (p < 0.0009). No significant linkage disequilibrium was found between inversions on chromosome 2 and 3. We hypothesize that at least two sympatric subpopulations exist within the An. darlingi population at Manaus based on inversion frequencies. PMID:27223867

  8. Structural characteristics of surface-functionalized nitrogen-doped diamond-like carbon films and effective adjustment to cell attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ai-Ping; Liu, Min; Yu, Jian-Can; Qian, Guo-Dong; Tang, Wei-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Nitrogen-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC:N) films prepared by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology are functionalized with various chemical molecules including dopamine (DA), 3-Aminobenzeneboronic acid (APBA), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and the impacts of surface functionalities on the surface morphologies, compositions, microstructures, and cell compatibility of the DLC:N films are systematically investigated. We demonstrate that the surface groups of DLC:N have a significant effect on the surface and structural properties of the film. The activity of PC12 cells depends on the particular type of surface functional groups of DLC:N films regardless of surface roughness and wettability. Our research offers a novel way for designing functionalized carbon films as tailorable substrates for biosensors and biomedical engineering applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51272237, 51272231, and 51010002) and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant Nos. 2012M520063, 2013T60587, and Bsh1201016).

  9. Swimming of E. coli near micro-structured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsler, Vasily; Dunkel, Jorn; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that govern surface accumulation of swimming bacteria is a key challenge for controlling biofilm formation. Here, we report detailed measurements of density and orientation distributions for Escherichia coli bacteria as a function of the distance from a solid surface. Experiments were performed for wild-type and non-tumbling strains in both quasi-2D and 3D microfluidic chambers. We find that, for both geometries, the density profile in dilute suspensions decays sharply within a few microns from flat surfaces approaching a constant value in the bulk. Our measurements of the orientation distributions show that bacteria preserve memory of aligning collisions with surfaces for surprisingly long periods of time even after escaping into the bulk fluid. These experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of a minimal mechanistic model that accounts for steric interactions between bacteria and surfaces. We further demonstrate that optimal micro-scale surface patterning can substantially decrease accumulation of swimming bacteria, thereby providing a novel mechanism for preventing biofilm formation.

  10. Atomistic structural change of silicon surface under a nanoparticle collision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Fangli; LUO Jianbin; WEN Shizhu; WANG Jiaxu

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of the incident angle on the trajectory of a nanoparticle and the damaged region on a silicon surface, by molecular dynamic simulation of the collision and recoil of a nanoparticle with a monocrystlline silicon surface. With the change of the incident angle, the recoil angle of the particle changes in a large range from an obtuse angle to an acute angle. The incident angle determines which part of the particle is in contact with the surface when the particle penetrates into the deepest position. Furthermore, it is the contacting part of the particle that the released elastic deformation energy of the surface acts on. These lead to the phenomenon that the recoil angle is sensitive to the incident angle in the collision process at a nanoscale. A depressed region is formed on the surface after the collision. The shape of the damaged region changes from a deep scoop to a flat arc, which is consistent with the trajectory of the particle. Some silicon atoms on the surface are extruded out by the incident particle, and form a pileup at the rim of the depressed region.

  11. New developments in the manufacture of large freeform surfaces with micro-structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roblee, Jeff; Walter, Mark; Jacobs, Ben

    2015-10-01

    A new capability for simultaneously generating micro-structures and large freeform surfaces has been developed. Multiple axes of CNC coordinated motion have been integrated into an ultra precision machine platform, enabling a wide variety of optical mold masters to be created. Facilitated by a specially developed control system, freeform optical surfaces as large as 600 x 600 x 100 mm are possible. Some machine alignments are critical to the production of accurate parts and these will be discussed. A bridge construction reduces Abbe offsets, and oil hydrostatic linear slide ways provide sub-micron straightness. The linear axes are capable of accurate positioning by means of linear motors in combination with the non contact oil hydrostatic slide ways. Optical surface finishes are achieved with the stability of a large granite base supported by a high performance vibration isolation system. The machine includes a unique, self-compensating, patented oil bearing rotary axis. Critical machine errors are measured and corrected with integrated CNC machine compensation. The machine has accuracy and repeatability for the creation of precise, intersecting groove structures with multiple angles over large areas. Optical surfaces can be generated either by a ruling/shaping operation with a non-rotating tool, or by a flycutting tool rotating on a high speed air bearing spindle. The spindle can double as a positioning axis to generate variable angle grooves in ruling mode. A Fast Tool Servo can be utilized to create fine micro-structures. Work piece quality can be evaluated in-situ with metrology sensors.

  12. Crystal and molecular structures of two silver(I amidinates, including an unexpected co-crystal with a lithium amidinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sida Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The silver(I amidinates bis[μ-N1,N2-bis(propan-2-ylbenzamidinato-κ2N1:N2]disilver(I, [Ag2(C13H19N22] or [Ag{PhC(NiPr2}]2 (1, and bis(μ-N1,N2-dicyclohexyl-3-cyclopropylpropynamidinato-κ2N1:N2disilver(I, [Ag2(C18H27N22] or [Ag{cyclo-C3H5–C[triple-bond]C–C(NCy2}]2 (2a, exist as centrosymmetric dimers with a planar Ag2N4C2 ring and a common linear coordination of the metal atoms in the crystalline state. Moiety 2a forms a co-crystal with the related lithium amidinate, namely bis(μ-N1,N2-dicyclohexyl-3-cyclopropylpropynamidinato-κ2N1:N2disilver(I bis(μ-N1,N2-dicyclohexyl-3-cyclopropylpropynamidinato-κ3N1,N2:N1bis(tetrahydrofuran-κOlithium(I toluene monosolvate, [Ag2(C18H27N22][Li2(C18H27N22(C4H8O2]·C7H8 or [Ag{cyclo-C3H5–C[triple-bond]C–C(NCy2}]2[Li{cyclo-C3H5–C[triple-bond]C–C(NCy2}(THF]2·C7H8, composed as 2a × 2b × toluene. The lithium moiety 2b features a typical ladder-type dimeric structure with a distorted tetrahedral coordination of the metal atoms. In the silver(I derivatives 1 and 2a, the amidinate ligand adopts a μ-κN:κN′ coordination, while it is a μ-κN:κN:κN′-coordination in the case of lithium derivative 2b.

  13. ELECTROSTATIC SURFACE STRUCTURES OF COAL AND MINERAL PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    It is the purpose of this research to study electrostatic charging mechanisms related to electrostatic beneficiation of coal with the goal of improving models of separation and the design of electrostatic separators. Areas addressed in this technical progress report are (a) electrostatic beneficiation of Pittsburgh #8 coal powders as a function of grind size and processing atmosphere; (b) the use of fluorescent micro-spheres to probe the charge distribution on the surfaces of coal particles; (c) the use of electrostatic beneficiation to recover unburned carbon from flyash; (d) the development of research instruments for investigation of charging properties of coal. Pittsburgh #8 powders were beneficiated as a function of grind size and under three atmosphere conditions: fresh ground in air , after 24 hours of air exposure, or under N2 atmosphere. The feed and processed powders were analyzed by a variety of methods including moisture, ash, total sulfur, and pyritic sulfur content. Mass distribution and cumulative charge of the processed powders were also measured. Fresh ground coal performed the best in electrostatic beneficiation. Results are compared with those of similar studies conducted on Pittsburgh #8 powders last year (April 1, 1997 to September 30, 1997). Polystyrene latex spheres were charged and deposited onto coal particles that had been passed through the electrostatic separator and collected onto insulating filters. The observations suggest bipolar charging of individual particles and patches of charge on the particles which may be associated with particular maceral types or with mineral inclusions. A preliminary investigation was performed on eletrostatic separation of unburned carbon particles from flyash. Approximately 25% of the flyash acquired positive charge in the copper tribocharger. This compares with 75% of fresh ground coal. The negatively charged material had a slightly reduced ash content suggesting some enrichment of carbonaceous material

  14. Systematic approach to assess and mitigate longwall subsidence influences on surface structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yi

    2008-01-01

    The surface subsidence process associated with Iongwall mining operations isoften capable of causing disturbances to various surface structures. Inadequate consid-erations of the subsidence influences could result in poor public relation with local resi-dents and regulatory agencies, uneconomic operations, hazardous conditions, etc. A sys-tematic approach to assess and mitigate influences caused by Iongwall subsidence hadbeen developed and adopted to minimize the severity of these potential problems. Theapproach included accurate prediction of final and dynamic surface movements and de-formations, assessment of the severities and locations of the potential disturbances, anddesign and implementation of proper mitigation measures. The approach had been suc-cessfully applied at many Iongwall mining companies on numerous and various residential,farming, public and industrial structures. As a matter of fact, the state of Pennsylvania, thestate with largest number of Iongwall mines and highest Iongwall production in U.S., wouldlike to use such approach as the standards in dealing with Iongwall subsidence cases.

  15. Assessment of femtosecond laser induced periodic surface structures on polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollar, Esther; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Martín-Fabiani, Ignacio; Hernández, Margarita; Rueda, Daniel R; Ezquerra, Tiberio A; Domingo, Concepción; Moreno, Pablo; Castillejo, Marta

    2013-07-21

    In this work we present the formation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on spin-coated thin films of several model aromatic polymers including poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(trimethylene terephthalate) and poly carbonate bis-phenol A upon irradiation with femtosecond pulses of 795 and 265 nm at fluences well below the ablation threshold. LIPSS are formed with period lengths similar to the laser wavelength and parallel to the direction of the laser polarization vector. Formation of LIPSS upon IR irradiation at 795 nm, a wavelength at which the polymers absorb weakly, contrasts with the absence of LIPSS in this spectral range upon irradiation with nanosecond pulses. Real and reciprocal space characterization of LIPSS obtained by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS), respectively, yields well correlated morphological information. Comparison of experimental and simulated GISAXS patterns suggests that LIPSS can be suitably described considering a quasi-one-dimensional paracrystalline lattice and that irradiation parameters have an influence on the order of such a lattice. Fluorescence measurements, after laser irradiation, provide indirect information about dynamics and structure of the polymer at the molecular level. Our results indicate that the LIPSS are formed by interference of the incident and surface scattered waves. As a result of this process, heating of the polymer surface above its glass transition temperature takes place enabling LIPSS formation.

  16. Reliability-based design optimization of reinforced concrete structures including soil-structure interaction using a discrete gravitational search algorithm and a proposed metamodel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibinia, M.; Salajegheh, E.; Salajegheh, J.; Fadaee, M. J.

    2013-10-01

    A new discrete gravitational search algorithm (DGSA) and a metamodelling framework are introduced for reliability-based design optimization (RBDO) of reinforced concrete structures. The RBDO of structures with soil-structure interaction (SSI) effects is investigated in accordance with performance-based design. The proposed DGSA is based on the standard gravitational search algorithm (GSA) to optimize the structural cost under deterministic and probabilistic constraints. The Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS) method is considered as the most reliable method for estimating the probabilities of reliability. In order to reduce the computational time of MCS, the proposed metamodelling framework is employed to predict the responses of the SSI system in the RBDO procedure. The metamodel consists of a weighted least squares support vector machine (WLS-SVM) and a wavelet kernel function, which is called WWLS-SVM. Numerical results demonstrate the efficiency and computational advantages of DGSA and the proposed metamodel for RBDO of reinforced concrete structures.

  17. Modeling of Surface Geometric Structure State After Integratedformed Milling and Finish Burnishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berczyński, Stefan; Grochała, Daniel; Grządziel, Zenon

    2017-06-01

    The article deals with computer-based modeling of burnishing a surface previously milled with a spherical cutter. This method of milling leaves traces, mainly asperities caused by the cutting crossfeed and cutter diameter. The burnishing process - surface plastic treatment - is accompanied by phenomena that take place right in the burnishing ball-milled surface contact zone. The authors present the method for preparing a finite element model and the methodology of tests for the assessment of height parameters of a surface geometrical structure (SGS). In the physical model the workpieces had a cuboidal shape and these dimensions: (width × height × length) 2×1×4.5 mm. As in the process of burnishing a cuboidal workpiece is affected by plastic deformations, the nonlinearities of the milled item were taken into account. The physical model of the process assumed that the burnishing ball would be rolled perpendicularly to milling cutter linear traces. The model tests included the application of three different burnishing forces: 250 N, 500 N and 1000 N. The process modeling featured the contact and pressing of a ball into the workpiece surface till the desired force was attained, then the burnishing ball was rolled along the surface section of 2 mm, and the burnishing force was gradually reduced till the ball left the contact zone. While rolling, the burnishing ball turned by a 23° angle. The cumulative diagrams depict plastic deformations of the modeled surfaces after milling and burnishing with defined force values. The roughness of idealized milled surface was calculated for the physical model under consideration, i.e. in an elementary section between profile peaks spaced at intervals of crossfeed passes, where the milling feed fwm = 0.5 mm. Also, asperities after burnishing were calculated for the same section. The differences of the obtained values fall below 20% of mean values recorded during empirical experiments. The adopted simplification in after

  18. Structured free-water clusters near lubricating surfaces are essential in water-based lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jiapeng; Veeregowda, Deepak H; de Vries, Joop; Van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2016-10-01

    Water-based lubrication provides cheap and environmentally friendly lubrication and, although hydrophilic surfaces are preferred in water-based lubrication, often lubricating surfaces do not retain water molecules during shear. We show here that hydrophilic (42° water contact angle) quartz surfaces facilitate water-based lubrication to the same extent as more hydrophobic Si crystal surfaces (61°), while lubrication by hydrophilic Ge crystal surfaces (44°) is best. Thus surface hydrophilicity is not sufficient for water-based lubrication. Surface-thermodynamic analyses demonstrated that all surfaces, regardless of their water-based lubrication, were predominantly electron donating, implying water binding with their hydrogen groups. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that Ge crystal surfaces providing optimal lubrication consisted of a mixture of -O and =O functionalities, while Si crystal and quartz surfaces solely possessed -O functionalities. Comparison of infrared absorption bands of the crystals in water indicated fewer bound-water layers on hydrophilic Ge than on hydrophobic Si crystal surfaces, while absorption bands for free water on the Ge crystal surface indicated a much more pronounced presence of structured, free-water clusters near the Ge crystal than near Si crystal surfaces. Accordingly, we conclude that the presence of structured, free-water clusters is essential for water-based lubrication. The prevalence of structured water clusters can be regulated by adjusting the ratio between surface electron-donating and electron-accepting groups and between -O and =O functionalities.

  19. Thomas Kuhn's 'Structure of Scientific Revolutions' applied to exercise science paradigm shifts: example including the Central Governor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Flávio de Oliveira; de Oliveira Pires, Flávio

    2013-07-01

    According to Thomas Kuhn, the scientific progress of any discipline could be distinguished by a pre-paradigm phase, a normal science phase and a revolution phase. The science advances when a scientific revolution takes place after silent period of normal science and the scientific community moves ahead to a paradigm shift. I suggest there has been a recent change of course in the direction of the exercise science. According to the 'current paradigm', exercise would be probably limited by alterations in either central command or peripheral skeletal muscles, and fatigue would be developed in a task-dependent manner. Instead, the central governor model (GCM) has proposed that all forms of exercise are centrally-regulated, the central nervous system would calculate the metabolic cost required to complete a task in order to avoid catastrophic body failure. Some have criticized the CGM and supported the traditional interpretation, but recently the scientific community appears to have begun an intellectual trajectory to accept this theory. First, the increased number of citations of articles that have supported the CGM could indicate that the community has changed the focus. Second, relevant journals have devoted special editions to promote the debate on subjects challenged by the CGM. Finally, scientists from different fields have recognized mechanisms included in the CGM to understand the exercise limits. Given the importance of the scientific community in demarcating a Kuhnian paradigm shift, I suggest that these three aspects could indicate an increased acceptance of a centrally-regulated effort model, to understand the limits of exercise.

  20. Analysis of the structural parameters that influence gas production from the Devonian shale. Annual progress report, 1979-1980. Volume II. Data repository and reports published during fiscal year 1979-1980: regional structure, surface structure, surface fractures, hydrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negus-De Wys, J.; Dixon, J. M.; Evans, M. A.; Lee, K. D.; Ruotsala, J. E.; Wilson, T. H.; Williams, R. T.

    1980-10-01

    This volume comprises appendices giving regional structure data, surface structure data, surface fracture data, and hydrology data. The fracture data covers oriented Devonian shale cores from West Virginia, Ohio, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Kentucky. The subsurface structure of the Eastern Kentucky gas field is also covered. (DLC)

  1. Characteristics of Offshore Hawai';i Island Seismicity and Velocity Structure, including Lo';ihi Submarine Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, D. K.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Thurber, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Island of Hawai';i is home to the most active volcanoes in the Hawaiian Islands. The island's isolated nature, combined with the lack of permanent offshore seismometers, creates difficulties in recording small magnitude earthquakes with accuracy. This background offshore seismicity is crucial in understanding the structure of the lithosphere around the island chain, the stresses on the lithosphere generated by the weight of the islands, and how the volcanoes interact with each other offshore. This study uses the data collected from a 9-month deployment of a temporary ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) network fully surrounding Lo';ihi volcano. This allowed us to widen the aperture of earthquake detection around the Big Island, lower the magnitude detection threshold, and better constrain the hypocentral depths of offshore seismicity that occurs between the OBS network and the Hawaii Volcano Observatory's land based network. Although this study occurred during a time of volcanic quiescence for Lo';ihi, it establishes a basis for background seismicity of the volcano. More than 480 earthquakes were located using the OBS network, incorporating data from the HVO network where possible. Here we present relocated hypocenters using the double-difference earthquake location algorithm HypoDD (Waldhauser & Ellsworth, 2000), as well as tomographic images for a 30 km square area around the summit of Lo';ihi. Illuminated by using the double-difference earthquake location algorithm HypoDD (Waldhauser & Ellsworth, 2000), offshore seismicity during this study is punctuated by events locating in the mantle fault zone 30-50km deep. These events reflect rupture on preexisting faults in the lower lithosphere caused by stresses induced by volcano loading and flexure of the Pacific Plate (Wolfe et al., 2004; Pritchard et al., 2007). Tomography was performed using the double-difference seismic tomography method TomoDD (Zhang & Thurber, 2003) and showed overall velocities to be slower than

  2. Structured light optical microscopy for three-dimensional reconstruction of technical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettel, Johannes; Reinecke, Holger; Müller, Claas

    2016-04-01

    In microsystems technology quality control of micro structured surfaces with different surface properties is playing an ever more important role. The process of quality control incorporates three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of specularand diffusive reflecting technical surfaces. Due to the demand on high measurement accuracy and data acquisition rates, structured light optical microscopy has become a valuable solution to solve this problem providing high vertical and lateral resolution. However, 3D reconstruction of specular reflecting technical surfaces still remains a challenge to optical measurement principles. In this paper we present a measurement principle based on structured light optical microscopy which enables 3D reconstruction of specular- and diffusive reflecting technical surfaces. It is realized using two light paths of a stereo microscope equipped with different magnification levels. The right optical path of the stereo microscope is used to project structured light onto the object surface. The left optical path is used to capture the structured illuminated object surface with a camera. Structured light patterns are generated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP) device in combination with a high power Light Emitting Diode (LED). Structured light patterns are realized as a matrix of discrete light spots to illuminate defined areas on the object surface. The introduced measurement principle is based on multiple and parallel processed point measurements. Analysis of the measured Point Spread Function (PSF) by pattern recognition and model fitting algorithms enables the precise calculation of 3D coordinates. Using exemplary technical surfaces we demonstrate the successful application of our measurement principle.

  3. Effect of Pd surface structure on the activation of methyl acetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Lijun [ORNL; Xu, Ye [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The activation of methyl acetate (CH3COOCH3; MA) has been studied using periodic density functional theory calculations to probe the effect of Pd surface structure on the selectivity in MA activation. The adsorption of MA, dehydrogenated derivatives, enolate (CH2COOCH3; ENL) and methylene acetate (CH3COOCH2; MeA), and several dissociation products (including acetate, acetyl, ketene, methoxy, formaldehyde, CO, C, O, and H); and C-H and C-O (mainly in the RCO-OR position) bond dissociation in MA, ENL, and MeA, are calculated on Pd(111) terrace, step, and kink; and on Pd(100) terrace and step. The adsorption of most species is not strongly affected between (111)- to (100)-type surfaces, but is clearly enhanced by step/kink compared to the corresponding terrace. Going from terrace to step edge and from (111)- to (100)-type surfaces both stabilize the transition states of C-O bond dissociation steps. Going from terrace to step edge also stabilizes the transition states of C-H bond dissociation steps, but going from (111)- to (100)-type surfaces does not clearly do so. We propose that compared to the Pd(111) terrace, the Pd(100) terrace is more selective for C-O bond dissociation that is desirable for alcohol formation, whereas the Pd step edges are more selective for C-H bond dissociation.

  4. Elements of the Chicxulub Impact Structure as Revealed in SRTM and Surface GPS Topographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsland, Gary L.; Sanchez, Gary; Kobrick, Michael; Cardador, Manuel Hurtado

    2003-01-01

    Pope et al. [1] utilized the elevations from the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) gravity data files to show that the main component of the surface expression of the Chicxulub Impact Structure is a roughly semi-circular, lowrelief depression about 90 km in diameter. They also identified other topographic features and the elements of the buried impact, which possibly led to the development of these features. These are summarized in Table 1. Kinsland et al. [2] presented a connection between these topographic anomalies, small gravity anomalies and buried structure of the impact. Very recently we have acquired digital topography data from NASA s Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Our subset covers 6 square degrees from 20deg N 91degW to 22deg N 88degW (corner to corner) with a pixel size of about 90m. This area includes all of the identified portion of the crater on land.

  5. Controlled crystalline structure and surface stability of cobalt nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuping; Beerman, Michael; Pakhomov, Alexandre B; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2005-04-21

    The synthesis of monodispersed 10 nm cobalt nanocrystals with controlled crystal morphology and investigation of the surface stability of these nanocrystals are described. Depending on the surfactants used, single crystalline or multiple grain nanocrystals can be reproducibly produced. The relative surface stability of these nanocrystals is analyzed using the temperature dependences of the dc magnetic susceptibility. The novel method, which allows sensitive monitoring of the surface stability, is based on the observation that, with particle oxidation, an anomalous peak appears at 8 K in zero-field-cooled magnetization measurements. It is found that the surfactant protective layer is more important for long-term stability at room temperature, while the high-temperature oxidation rate is controlled by the crystal morphology of the nanoparticles.

  6. SURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF CARBON FIBER POLYMER COMPOSITES AFTER LASER STRUCTURING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Chen, Jian [ORNL; Jones, Jonaaron F. [University of Tennessee (UT); Alexandra, Hackett [University of Tennessee (UT); Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL; Daniel, Claus [ORNL; Warren, Charles David [ORNL; Rehkopf, Jackie D. [Plasan Carbon Composites

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of Carbon Fiber Polymer Composite (CFPC) as a lightweight material in automotive and aerospace industries requires the control of surface morphology. In this study, the composites surface was prepared by ablating the resin in the top fiber layer of the composite using an Nd:YAG laser. The CFPC specimens with T700S carbon fiber and Prepreg - T83 resin (epoxy) were supplied by Plasan Carbon Composites, Inc. as 4 ply thick, 0/90o plaques. The effect of laser fluence, scanning speed, and wavelength was investigated to remove resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. In addition, resin ablation due to the power variation created by a laser interference technique is presented. Optical property measurements, optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and high-resolution optical profiler images were used to study the effect of the laser processing on the surface morphology.

  7. Disorder enabled band structure engineering of a topological insulator surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yishuai; Chiu, Janet; Miao, Lin; He, Haowei; Alpichshev, Zhanybek; Kapitulnik, A.; Biswas, Rudro R.; Wray, L. Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional topological insulators are bulk insulators with Z2 topological electronic order that gives rise to conducting light-like surface states. These surface electrons are exceptionally resistant to localization by non-magnetic disorder, and have been adopted as the basis for a wide range of proposals to achieve new quasiparticle species and device functionality. Recent studies have yielded a surprise by showing that in spite of resisting localization, topological insulator surface electrons can be reshaped by defects into distinctive resonance states. Here we use numerical simulations and scanning tunnelling microscopy data to show that these resonance states have significance well beyond the localized regime usually associated with impurity bands. At native densities in the model Bi2X3 (X=Bi, Te) compounds, defect resonance states are predicted to generate a new quantum basis for an emergent electron gas that supports diffusive electrical transport.

  8. Structural Changes of Surface Layers of Steel Plates in the Process of Explosive Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataev, I. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Mali, V. I.; Bataev, V. A.; Balaganskii, I. A.

    2014-01-01

    Structural changes developing in surface layers of plates from steel 20 in the process of explosive welding are studied with the help of light metallography and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Mathematical simulation is used to compute the depth of the action of severe plastic deformation due to explosive welding of steel plates on the structure of their surface layers.

  9. Ultrathin film of nickel on the Cu (100) surface: Atomic structure and phonons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisova, Svetlana D., E-mail: svbor@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: rusina@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: rusina-g@mail.ru; Rusina, Galina G., E-mail: svbor@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: rusina@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: rusina-g@mail.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    We investigated the structural and vibrational properties of the Cu (100) surface covered with ultrathin (1-5 ML) Ni films using interaction potential from the embedded atom method. The surface relaxation, dispersion relation and polarization of vibrational modes are discussed. Our calculated structural parameters are in good agreement with experimental results. The obtained vibrational frequencies compare well with the available experimental data.

  10. The spatial emergence of laser-induced periodic surface structures under lateral displacement irradiation conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichstädt, J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, laser-induced periodic surface structures, abbreviated LIPSS, gained interest, because potential applications are seen in the field of surface functionalisation. The feasibility to produce LIPSS and the potential to influence surface functionality have been shown. But so far, the

  11. Structural investigation of the ZnSe(001)-c(2×2) surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weigand, W.; Müller, A.; Kilian, L.

    2003-01-01

    Zinc selenide is a model system for II-VI compound semiconductors. The geometric structure of the clean (001)-c(2x2) surface has recently been the subject of intense debate. We report here a surface x-ray-diffraction study on the ZnSe(001)-c(2x2) surface performed under ultrahigh vacuum using...

  12. The spatial emergence of laser-induced periodic surface structures under lateral displacement irradiation conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eichstädt, Justus

    2015-01-01

    Recently, laser-induced periodic surface structures, abbreviated LIPSS, gained interest, because potential applications are seen in the field of surface functionalisation. The feasibility to produce LIPSS and the potential to influence surface functionality have been shown. But so far, the implement

  13. Structural analysis of the indium-stabilized GaAs(001)-c(8×2) surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, T.-L.; Kumpf, C.; Kazimirov, A.

    2002-01-01

    The indium-stabilized GaAs(001)-c(8x2) surface was investigated by surface x-ray diffraction and x-ray standing waves. We find that the reconstruction closely resembles the c(8x2) structure described by the recently proposed unified model for clean III-V semiconductor surfaces [Kumpf , Phys. Rev....

  14. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Zhaoxia [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  15. Surface structure of quark stars with magnetic fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prashanth Jaikumar

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the impact of magnetic fields on the electron distribution of the electrosphere of quark stars. For moderately strong magnetic fields of ∼ 1013 G, quantization effects are generally weak due to the large number density of electrons at surface, but can nevertheless affect the photon emission properties of quark stars. We outline the main observational characteristics of quark stars as determined by their surface emission, and briefly discuss their formation in explosive events termed as quark-novae, which may be connected to the -process.

  16. Surface potential domains on lamellar P3OT structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-GarcIa, B [Departamento Fisica, Facultad de Quimica (Campus Espinardo), Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Murcia (Spain); Abad, J [Departamento Fisica, Facultad de Quimica (Campus Espinardo), Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Murcia (Spain); Urbina, A [Departamento Electronica, TecnologIa de Computadoras y Proyectos, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, E-30202 Cartagena (Spain); Colchero, J [Departamento Fisica, Facultad de Quimica (Campus Espinardo), Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Murcia (Spain); Palacios-Lidon, E [Departamento Fisica, Facultad de Quimica (Campus Espinardo), Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Murcia (Spain)

    2008-02-13

    In this work the electrostatic properties of poly(3-octylthiophene) thin films have been studied on a nanometer scale by means of electrostatic force microscopy and Kelvin probe microscopy (KPM). The KPM images reveal that different surface contact potential domains coexist on the polymer surface. This result, together with additional capacitance measurements, indicates that the potential domains are related to the existence of dipoles due to different molecular arrangements. Finally, capacitance measurements as a function of the tip-sample bias voltage show that in all regions large band bending effects take place.

  17. Influence of etching and annealing on evolution of surface structure of metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, Ivan V.; Feodorov, Victor A.; Permyakova, Inga J.

    2004-04-01

    Evolution of surface structure of metallic glass subjected to etching was investigated. The changes of surface structure of metallic glass 82K3XCP after chemical etching and different modes of annealing were studied. Samples of metallic glass were etched in solutions of sulphurous acid with different concentration. Corrosion-resistance was determined. The dependence of corrosion rate on acid concentration was found. Characteristic concentric circumferences on the etching surface were investigated. Their formation mechanism is discussed. Crystallization on surface stimulated by both acid and annealing was examined. The formation of first dendrites on surface of annealed metallic glass and their evolution were investigated.

  18. Porous structure and surface chemistry of phosphoric acid activated carbon from corncob

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sych, N.V.; Trofymenko, S.I.; Poddubnaya, O.I.; Tsyba, M.M. [Institute for Sorption and Endoecology Problems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 13 General Naumov St., 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Sapsay, V.I.; Klymchuk, D.O. [M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 2 Tereshchenkivska St., 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine); Puziy, A.M., E-mail: alexander.puziy@ispe.kiev.ua [Institute for Sorption and Endoecology Problems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 13 General Naumov St., 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activation results in formation of carbons with acidic surface groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum amount of surface groups is introduced at impregnation ratio 1.25. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activated carbons show high capacity to copper. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activated carbons are predominantly microporous. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum surface area and pore volume achieved at impregnation ratio 1.0. - Abstract: Active carbons have been prepared from corncob using chemical activation with phosphoric acid at 400 Degree-Sign C using varied ratio of impregnation (RI). Porous structure of carbons was characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was studied by IR and potentiometric titration method. It has been shown that porosity development was peaked at RI = 1.0 (S{sub BET} = 2081 m{sup 2}/g, V{sub tot} = 1.1 cm{sup 3}/g), while maximum amount of acid surface groups was observed at RI = 1.25. Acid surface groups of phosphoric acid activated carbons from corncob includes phosphate and strongly acidic carboxylic (pK = 2.0-2.6), weakly acidic carboxylic (pK = 4.7-5.0), enol/lactone (pK = 6.7-7.4; 8.8-9.4) and phenol (pK = 10.1-10.7). Corncob derived carbons showed high adsorption capacity to copper, especially at low pH. Maximum adsorption of methylene blue and iodine was observed for carbon with most developed porosity (RI = 1.0).

  19. Characterization and fabrication of nano- and micron-sized structures on the Si surface using scanning probe microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Elain Su-Eng

    The fabrication and stability of nanostructures on the Si surface were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We used direct current heating to fabricate step bunch structures, 30 to 50 angstroms in size, on the Si(111) surface. Using STM, we monitored their relaxation as a function of electron bombardment heating time at 930, made quantitative comparison with a step based theory of mass transport, and found good agreement with the size scaling predictions of a locally conserved mechanism of mass transport. We then monitored the relaxation of the step bunch structures as a function of direct current heating time, and found that the presence of the electric field significantly increased the rate of the relaxation relative to the zero field case. We made quantitative comparison with a step based model modified to include a surface diffusion bias and obtained an upper limit on the effective charge of an adatom on the surface. We also studied the step bunching effect in the temperature range 1155-1215. The step patterns on the surface were analyzed using STM and the model of Kandel and Weeks was used to calculate the anisotropy ratio on the surface. Assuming the operation of a surface diffusion bias, we calculated the effective charge of an adatom on the surface in this higher temperature range. We used AFM to fabricate and characterize micron-sized structures on the Si(100) surface. We couple the fabrication process of Snow and Campbell to anneals in ultra-high vacuum. We then present the results of a preliminary study of the thermal decay of two-dimensional structures fabricated on the Si(100) surface.

  20. Structural considerations on acridine/acridinium derivatives: Synthesis, crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis and computational studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wera, Michał; Storoniak, Piotr; Serdiuk, Illia E.; Zadykowicz, Beata

    2016-02-01

    This article describes a detailed study of the molecular packing and intermolecular interactions in crystals of four derivatives of acridine, i.e. 9-methyl-, 9-ethyl, 9-bromomethyl- and 9-piperidineacridine (1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively) and three 10-methylacridinium salts containing the trifluoromethanesulphonate anion and 9-vinyl-, 9-bromomethyl, and 9-phenyl-10-methylacridinium cations (5, 6 and 7, respectively). The crystal structures of all of the compounds are stabilized by long-range electrostatic interactions, as well as by a network of short-range C-HṡṡṡO (in hydrates and salts 3 and 5-7, respectively), C-Hṡṡṡπ, π-π, C-Fṡṡṡπ and S-Oṡṡṡπ (in salts 5-7) interactions. Hirshfeld surface analysis shows that various intermolecular contacts play an important role in the crystal packing, graphically exhibiting the differences in spatial arrangements of the acridine/acridinium derivatives under scrutiny here. Additionally, computational methods have been used to compare the intermolecular interactions in the crystal structures of the investigated compounds. Computations have confirmed the great contribution of dispersive interactions for crystal lattice stability in the case of 9-substituted acridine and electrostatic interactions for the crystal lattice stability in the case of 9-substituted 10-methylacridinium trifluoromethanesulphonates. The value of crystal lattice energy and the electrostatic contribution in the crystal lattice energy of monohydrated acridine derivatives have confirmed that these compounds have behave as acridinium derivatives.