WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface stress variability

  1. Variability in the coupling between sea surface temperature and wind stress in the global coastal ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuntao; Castelao, Renato M.

    2016-08-01

    Mesoscale ocean-atmosphere interaction between sea surface temperature (SST) and wind stress throughout the global coastal ocean was investigated using 7 years of satellite observations. Coupling coefficients between crosswind SST gradients and wind stress curl and between downwind SST gradients and wind stress divergence were used to quantify spatial and temporal variability in the strength of the interaction. The use of a consistent data set and standardized methods allow for direct comparisons between coupling coefficients in the different coastal regions. The analysis reveals that strong coupling is observed in many mid-latitude regions throughout the world, especially in regions with strong fronts like Eastern and Western Boundary Currents. Most upwelling regions in Eastern Boundary Currents are characterized by strong seasonal variability in the strength of the coupling, which generally peaks during summer in mid latitudes and during winter at low latitudes. Seasonal variability in coastal regions along Western Boundary Currents is comparatively smaller. Intraseasonal variability is especially important in regions of strong eddy activity (e.g., Western Boundary Currents), being particularly relevant for the coupling between crosswind SST gradients and wind stress curl. Results from the analysis can be used to guide modeling studies, since it allows for the a priori identification of regions in which regional models need to properly represent the ocean-atmosphere interaction to accurately represent local variability.

  2. Spatio-temporal variability in sea surface wind stress near and off the east coast of Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NAM SungHyun; KIM Young Ho; PARK Kyung-Ae; KIM Kuh

    2005-01-01

    Sea surface wind stress variabilities near and off the east coast of Korea, are examined using 7 kinds of wind datasets from measurements at 2 coastal (land) stations and 2 ocean buoys,satellite scatterometer (QuikSCAT), and global reanalyzed products (ECMWF,NOGAPS,and NCEP/NCAR). Temporal variabilities are analyzed at 3 frequency bands; synoptic (2~20 d), intra-seasonal (20~90 d),and seasonal (>90 d).Synoptic and intra-seasonal variations are predominant near and off the Donghae City due to the passage of the mesoscale weather system. Seasonal variation is caused by southeastward wind stress during Asian winter monsoon. The sea surface wind stress from reanalyzed datasets,QuikSCAT and KMA-B measurements off the coast show good agreement in the magnitude and direction,which are strongly aligned with the alongshore direction. At the land-based sites,wind stresses are much weaker by factors of 3~10 due to the mountainous landmass on the east parts of Korea Peninsula. The first EOF modes(67 % ~70%) of wind stresses from reanalyzed and QuikSCAT data have similar structures of the strong southeastward wind stress in winter along the coast but show different curl structures at scales less than 200 kn due to the orographic effects. The second EOF modes (23 % ~25%)show southwestward wind stress in every September along the east coast of the North Korea

  3. Ocean surface wind stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The need for improved surface wind and wind stress data is discussed. The collection of wind data using ship reports, research buoys, and cloud motion vectors is examined. The need for data on surface-wind stress fields is emphasized. Accurate stress data are required for studying: (1) the normal seasonal cycle and the intraannual events; (2) wind stress curls and the forcing of ocean circulation; (3) El Nino events; and (4) the low response of the midlatitude ocean circulation.

  4. Occupational stress and heart rate variability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin Rauber; Marjan Bilban; Radovan Starc

    2015-01-01

    Brief description of the article: This article considers heart rate variability as a measurable parameter of stress reaction and present recent studies that examined the impact of occupational stress on heart rate variability...

  5. Coastal sea-surface temperature anomalies during the 2014-2016 northeast Pacific marine heat wave: regional variability, timing, and relation to wind stress anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentemann, C. L.; Fewings, M. R.; Garcia-Reyes, M.

    2016-12-01

    In 2014-2016, sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) in the region along the Washington, Oregon, and California coasts were significantly warmer than usual, with a maximum SST anomaly of 6.2°C measured near Santa Barbara. This marine heat wave was associated with major ecosystem disturbances, including a toxic algae bloom of Pseudo-nitzschia that had massive economic and ecological impacts. Here, we use satellite and blended reanalysis products to report the magnitude, extent, duration, and evolution of SST, wind stress, and wind stress curl anomalies along the west coast of the continental United States during 2014-2016. Using high-resolution wind stress instead of the Bakun upwelling index shows clear differences in upwelling phenology in 2015.

  6. Surface stress-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Shengbo; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Wendong; Li, Pengwei; Hu, Jie; Li, Gang

    2014-01-15

    Surface stress-based biosensors, as one kind of label-free biosensors, have attracted lots of attention in the process of information gathering and measurement for the biological, chemical and medical application with the development of technology and society. This kind of biosensors offers many advantages such as short response time (less than milliseconds) and a typical sensitivity at nanogram, picoliter, femtojoule and attomolar level. Furthermore, it simplifies sample preparation and testing procedures. In this work, progress made towards the use of surface stress-based biosensors for achieving better performance is critically reviewed, including our recent achievement, the optimally circular membrane-based biosensors and biosensor array. The further scientific and technological challenges in this field are also summarized. Critical remark and future steps towards the ultimate surface stress-based biosensors are addressed.

  7. Electrochromic Variable-Emissivity Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, R. David; Cogan, Stuart F.

    1988-01-01

    Temperature controlled by altering infrared radiative properties. Infrared emissivity of electrochromically active layer changed by applying voltage to insert or remove Li atoms electrochemically. Change reversible and continuously variable between specified limits of layered structure.

  8. Surface thermodynamics, surface stress, equations at surfaces and triple lines for deformable bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olives, Juan

    2010-03-01

    The thermodynamics and mechanics of the surface of a deformable body are studied here, following and refining the general approach of Gibbs. It is first shown that the 'local' thermodynamic variables of the state of the surface are only the temperature, the chemical potentials and the surface strain tensor (true thermodynamic variables, for a viscoelastic solid or a viscous fluid). A new definition of the surface stress is given and the corresponding surface thermodynamics equations are presented. The mechanical equilibrium equation at the surface is then obtained. It involves the surface stress and is similar to the Cauchy equation for the volume. Its normal component is a generalization of the Laplace equation. At a (body-fluid-fluid) triple contact line, two equations are obtained, which represent: (i) the equilibrium of the forces (surface stresses) for a triple line fixed on the body; (ii) the equilibrium relative to the motion of the line with respect to the body. This last equation leads to a strong modification of Young's classical capillary equation.

  9. Determining Electrochemical Surface Stress of Single Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Shan, Xiaonan; Yu, Hui; Wang, Yan; Schmickler, Wolfgang; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Tao, Nongjian

    2017-02-13

    Electrochemical surface stress is important in nanomaterials because of their large surface-to-volume ratios, which lead to unique mechanical and electrocatalytic properties, but directly measuring this quantity has been challenging. Here we report on experimental determination of the surface stress, and associated electrochemical processes of a single gold nanowire with an optical imaging technique. We show that surface stress changes linearly and reversibly with the potential between 0 and 0.8 V versus Ag/AgCl, but abruptly with large hysteresis, associated with the oxidation and reduction of the nanowire, between 0.8 and 1.5 V. The potential derivative of the surface stress closely resembles the cyclic voltammograms. We described the observations in terms of anion adsorption and surface oxidation/reduction. This work demonstrates a new approach to study electrochemical processes and the associated surface stress changes of nanomaterials.

  10. Stress-based Variable-inductor for Electronic Ballasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lihui; Xia, Yongming; Lu, Kaiyuan

    2015-01-01

    presents a new stress-based variable inductor to control inductance using the inverse magnetostrictive effect of a magnetostrictive material. The stress can be applied by a piezoelectrical material, and thus a voltage-controlled variable inductor can be realized with zero-power consumption. The new stress...

  11. A Family of Invariant Stress Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, S.

    A family of invariant stress surfaces with a cubic dependence on the deviatoric stress components is expressed as a linear combination of the second and third deviatori stress invariants. A simple geometric derivation demonstrates the convexity of the contours in the deviatoric plane. An explicit...

  12. Middle Pliocene sea surface temperature variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, H.J.; Chandler, M.A.; Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    Estimates of sea surface temperature (SST) based upon foraminifer, diatom, and ostracod assemblages from ocean cores reveal a warm phase of the Pliocene between about 3.3 and 3.0 Ma. Pollen records and plant megafossils, although not as well dated, show evidence for a warmer climate at about the same time. Increased greenhouse forcing and altered ocean heat transport are the leading candidates for the underlying cause of Pliocene global warmth. Despite being a period of global warmth, this interval encompasses considerable variability. Two new SST reconstructions are presented that are designed to provide a climatological error bar for warm peak phases of the Pliocene and to document the spatial distribution and magnitude of SST variability within the mid-Pliocene warm period. These data suggest long-term stability of low-latitude SST and document greater variability in regions of maximum warming. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Blood Pressure Variability and Stress Management Training for Essential Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Vera, Maria Paz; Sanz, Jesus; Labrador, Francisco J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether stress management training reduces blood pressure (BP) variability in hypertensive patients. Previous literature suggests that cardiovascular risk is not only a function of BP levels, but also of BP variability, and this partially depends on changes induced by the stress of everyday life. The…

  14. Stress analysis and stress-intensity factors for finite geometry solids containing rectangular surface cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1977-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement field in a finite geometry bar containing a variable depth rectangular surface crack under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Using the obtained displacement field, normal stresses, and the stress-intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated for different crack depth to bar thickness ratios. Crack opening displacements and stress-intensity factors are also obtained for a through-thickness, center-cracked bar with variable thickness. The reported results show a considerable potential for using this method in calculating stress-intensity factors for commonly encountered surface crack geometries in finite solids

  15. Stress analysis and stress intensity factors for finite geometry solids containing rectangular surface cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1975-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement field in a finite geometry bar containing a variable depth rectangular surface crack under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Using the obtained displacement field, normal stresses and the stress intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated for different crack depth to bar thickness ratios. Crack opening displacements and stress intensity factors are also obtained for a through-thickness, center cracked bar with variable thickness. The reported results show a considerable potential for using this method in calculating stress intensity factors for commonly encountered surface crack geometries in finite solids.

  16. REPLY: Reply to comment on 'Surface thermodynamics and surface stress for deformable bodies'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olives, Juan

    2010-10-01

    The above comment and a previous letter by the same author reveal a great misunderstanding of what Eulerian and Lagrangian quantities are, and a confusion between the deformation of an element of a surface and the creation of a new element of a surface. Surface thermodynamics is complex because the surface quantities are not 'intuitive' (as surface excesses on some dividing surface) and the thermodynamic variables of the state of a surface are a priori completely unknown. This is why we introduced a new concept ('ideal transformation') and presented detailed proof, leading to the determination of the 'local' thermodynamic variables of the state of the surface, the exact expression of the work of deformation of the surface, and the definition of surface stress, for any deformable body (Olives 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 085005). These results are not obvious (despite their similarity with some expressions in volume thermodynamics). We explicitly write the Eulerian forms of (i) the relation between the surface grand potential per unit area, the surface stress and the surface strain, showing its exact equivalence with the Lagrangian form, and (ii) the variation of the surface energy due to both the deformation of an element of the surface and the creation of a new element of the surface.

  17. Influence of surface stresses on indentation response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, J.; Mayr, S. G.

    2015-03-01

    Surface stresses lead to an effective change in the elastic constants of thin films and at surfaces. The development of modern scanning probe techniques like contact resonance atomic force microscopy empowers the experimenter to measure at scales where these effects become increasingly relevant. In this paper we employ a computational multiscale approach where we compare density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics simulations as tools to calculate the thin-film/surface elastic behavior for silicon and strontiumtitanate. From the surface elastic constants gained by DFT calculations we develop a continuum finite-element multilayer model to study the impact of surface stresses on indentation experiments. In general the stress field of an indenter and thus the impact of surface stresses on the indentation modulus depends on its contact radius and on its particular shape. We propose an analytical model that describes the behavior of the indentation modulus as a function of the contact radius. We show that this model fits well to simulation results gained for a spherical and a flat punch indenter. Our results demonstrate a surface-stress-induced reduction of the indentation modulus of about 5% for strontiumtitanate and 6% for silicon for a contact radius of {{r}c}=5 \\text{nm}, irrespective of the indenter shape.

  18. Acute stress affects heart rate variability during sleep

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, Martica; Vasko, Raymond; Buysse, Daniel; Ombao, Hernando; Chen, Qingxia; Cashmere, J David; Kupfer, David; Thayer, Julian F

    2004-01-01

    .... In this study, we used autoregressive spectral analysis of the electrocardiogram (EKG) interbeat interval sequence to characterize stress-related changes in heart rate variability during sleep in 59 healthy men and women. Participants (N = 59...

  19. Variability salt stress response analysis of Tunisian natural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variability salt stress response analysis of Tunisian natural populations of Medicago ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... from 11 Tunisian natural populations collected from areas that varied in soil composition, salinity and water availability.

  20. Surface stress, surface elasticity, and the size effect in surface segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, M.; Hofer, W.; Varga, P.;

    1995-01-01

    Surface stress and surface elasticity of low-index fcc surfaces have been studied using effective-medium theory potentials. In addition to total-energy calculations giving stress components and elastic data for the surface as a whole, the use of artificial atoms with modified size allows us...

  1. SURFACE ALBEDO AND SPECTRAL VARIABILITY OF CERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Reddy, Vishnu; Corre, Lucille Le; Sykes, Mark V.; Prettyman, Thomas H. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 E. Ft. Lowell Road, Suite 106, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Nathues, Andreas; Hoffmann, Martin; Schaefer, Michael [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Göttingen (Germany); Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A. [University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Carsenty, Uri; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Schröder, Stefan E. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Planetary Research, Berlin (Germany); Castillo-Rogez, Julie C. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Schenk, Paul [Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Williams, David A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Smith, David E. [Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Zuber, Maria T. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); and others

    2016-02-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active, but possibly sporadic, water outgassing as well as possibly varying spectral characteristics over a timescale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as the newly acquired images by the Dawn  Framing Camera, to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, on both a global scale and in local regions, particularly the bright spots inside the Occator crater, over timescales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in the Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over the various timescales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun–Ceres–Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km{sup 2}, too small to cause global albedo and spectral variations detectable in our data. Impact ejecta due to impacting projectiles of tens of meters in size like those known to cause observable changes to the surface albedo on Asteroid Scheila cannot cause detectable albedo change on Ceres due to its relatively large size and strong gravity. The water vapor activity on Ceres is independent of Ceres’ heliocentric distance, ruling out the possibility of the comet-like sublimation process as a possible mechanism driving the activity.

  2. Towards an improved and more flexible representation of water stress in coupled photosynthesis-stomatal conductance models; implications for simulated land surface fluxes and variables at various spatiotemporal scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, G.; Verhoef, A.; Vidale, P. L.; Black, E.; Van den Hoof, C.

    2012-04-01

    effect that the revised parameterization will have on GCM simulations of climate variability and change. Best, M. J. et al. (2011). The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), model description - Part 1: Energy and water fluxes. Geosci. Model Dev., 4, 677-699. Egea, G., Verhoef, A., Vidale, P.L. (2011) Towards an improved and more flexible representation of water stress in coupled photosynthesis-stomatal conductance models. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 151 (10), 1370-1384.

  3. Is Terzaghi’s effective stress a stress variable under seepage conditions?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷国辉; 赵仲辉; 吴宏伟

    2015-01-01

    From the continuum mechanics perspective, an attempt was made to clarify the role of Terzaghi’s effective stress in the theoretical analysis of saturated soil subjected to seepage. The necessity of performing a coupled hydromechanical analysis to solve the seepage−deformation interaction problem was illustrated by examining the equations of static equilibrium among the effective stress, seepage force, pore-water pressure and total stress. The conceptual definition of stress variable that satisfies the principles of continuum mechanics is applied in the coupled hydromechanical analysis. It is shown that Terzaghi’s effective stress is in fact not a stress variable under seepage conditions, and the seepage force acting on the soil skeleton cannot be viewed as a body force. This offers a clue to the underlying cause of a paradox between the real Pascal’s hydrostatic state and the hydrostatic state predicted by a class of continuum hydromechanical theories.

  4. Corroding and Protecting of Surface Residual Stress With the Surface Hardening of Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Qing-hua

    2004-01-01

    The states of the stress with the surface hardening are analyzed, the related experiential formula of the stress -temperature and stress-depth hardened curves are set up, the protecting measures against hydrogen stress corrosion are discussed.

  5. Heart rate variability (HRV): an indicator of stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Durek, Joseph J.; O'Kane, Barbara L.; Tran, Nhien; Moses, Sophia; Luthra, Megha; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki N.

    2014-05-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) can be an important indicator of several conditions that affect the autonomic nervous system, including traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder and peripheral neuropathy [3], [4], [10] & [11]. Recent work has shown that some of the HRV features can potentially be used for distinguishing a subject's normal mental state from a stressed one [4], [13] & [14]. In all of these past works, although processing is done in both frequency and time domains, few classification algorithms have been explored for classifying normal from stressed RRintervals. In this paper we used 30 s intervals from the Electrocardiogram (ECG) time series collected during normal and stressed conditions, produced by means of a modified version of the Trier social stress test, to compute HRV-driven features and subsequently applied a set of classification algorithms to distinguish stressed from normal conditions. To classify RR-intervals, we explored classification algorithms that are commonly used for medical applications, namely 1) logistic regression (LR) [16] and 2) linear discriminant analysis (LDA) [6]. Classification performance for various levels of stress over the entire test was quantified using precision, accuracy, sensitivity and specificity measures. Results from both classifiers were then compared to find an optimal classifier and HRV features for stress detection. This work, performed under an IRB-approved protocol, not only provides a method for developing models and classifiers based on human data, but also provides a foundation for a stress indicator tool based on HRV. Further, these classification tools will not only benefit many civilian applications for detecting stress, but also security and military applications for screening such as: border patrol, stress detection for deception [3],[17], and wounded-warrior triage [12].

  6. Laser pulse heating of surfaces and thermal stress analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir S; Al-Aqeeli, Nasser; Al-Qahtani, Hussain M

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces laser pulse heating and thermal stress analysis in materials surface. Analytical temperature treatments and stress developed in the surface region are also explored. The book will help the reader analyze the laser induced stress in the irradiated region and presents solutions for the stress field. Detailed thermal stress analysis in different laser pulse heating situations and different boundary conditions are also presented. Written for surface engineers.

  7. Growth variability in a tissue governed by stress dependent growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alim, Karen; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2012-02-01

    Cell wall mechanics lie at the heart of plant cell growth and tissue morphogenesis. Conversely, mechanical forces generated at tissue level can feedback on cellular dynamics. Differential growth of neighboring cells is one eminent origin of mechanical forces and stresses in tissues where cells adhere to each other. How can stresses arising from differential growth orchestrate large scale tissue growth? We show that cell growth coupled to the cell's main stress can reduce or increase tissue growth variability. Employing a cell-based two dimensional tissue model we investigate the dynamics of a tissue with stress depending growth dynamics. We find that the exact cell division rule strongly affects not only the tissue geometry and topology but also its growth dynamics. Our results should enable to infer underlying growth dynamics from live tissue statistics.

  8. SHAPE BIFURCATION OF AN ELASTIC WAFER DUE TO SURFACE STRESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫琨; 何陵辉; 刘人怀

    2003-01-01

    A geometrically nonlinear analysis was proposed for the deformation of a freestanding elastically isotropic wafer caused by the surface stress change on one surface. Thelink between the curvature and the change in surface stress was obtained analytically fromenergetic consideration. In contrast to the existing linear analysis, a remarkableconsequence is that, when the wafer is very thin or the surface stress difference between thetwo major surfaces is large enough, the shape of the wafer will bifurcate.

  9. Stress, positive personal variables and burnout: A path analytic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Otero-López

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The notion that personal resources are a powerful screen for the negative influence of stressors in the burnout process is one of the aspects where consensus is more widespread in the domain of Positive Psychology. It is nonetheless true that identifying them and finding out how these “personal strengths or competences” operate would be crucial to improve health and well-being in the workplace. It seems therefore urgent to throw light –from a research perspective– not merely on whether the positive variables play a mediating role between the potential stressors and burnout but also on which the alternative paths are that have an influence on occupational stress. So, the fundamental objective of this study is to analyze a model of influences in which the levels of stress perceived by the teacher from the different disruptive behaviors of the students (verbal abuse at the teacher, aggressions among students, vandalism are the exogenous variables while the different positive personal variables (optimism, hardiness, life satisfaction are mediating variables and burnout is the endogenous variable. The results obtained from a sample of 523 secondary education teachers confirm that teacher “resilience” (optimism and hardiness and life satisfaction mediate the negative impact that stressors from student behavior have on experiencing burnout.

  10. SYNTHETIC STRESS LIFE TESTING OF MECHATRONIC PRODUCTS UNDER VARIABLE STRESS SPECTRUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Mechatronic products usually endure the variable stress spectrum when they operate in certain operational condition and environmental condition, which obey the Weibull distribution. In accordance with the features of mechatronic product, this paper analyzes the failure mode, its corresponding sensitive stress and the design principles of life testing profiles. Based on the above analyses, this paper presents a synthetic stress life testing method based on the hybrid Weibull distribution and its statistical method under variable stress spectrum to evaluate the reliability and life indices of mechatronic products. Because the mechatronic products have many characteristics such as high price, long life and small testing samples, the synthetic stress life testing method under variable load spectrum can simulate the real various spectra, decrease the life testing time and reduce the testing samples. So it is effective to carry out the life testing to mechatronic products. The application results of hydraulic pumps indicate that this method can easily handle the experimental data under variable amplitude spectrum, obtain the high precision parameters point estimation and confidence interval estimation and reduce the testing cost greatly.

  11. Surface Albedo and Spectral Variability of Ceres

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jian-Yang; Nathues, Andreas; Corre, Lucille Le; Izawa, Matthew R M; Clouts, Edward A; Sykes, Mark V; Carsenty, Uri; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C; Hoffmann, Martin; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Prettyman, Thomas H; Schaefer, Michael; Schenk, Paul; Schröder, Stefan E; Williams, David A; Smith, David E; Zuber, Maria T; Konopliv, Alexander S; Park, Ryan S; Raymond, Carol A; Russell, Christopher T

    2016-01-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active but possibly sporadic water outgassing, and possibly varying spectral characteristics in a time scale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, and the newly acquired images by Dawn Framing Camera to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, in both a global scale and local regions, particularly the bright spots inside Occator crater, over time scales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over various time scales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun-Ceres-Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km$^2...

  12. Historical temperature variability affects coral response to heat stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Carilli

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching is the breakdown of symbiosis between coral animal hosts and their dinoflagellate algae symbionts in response to environmental stress. On large spatial scales, heat stress is the most common factor causing bleaching, which is predicted to increase in frequency and severity as the climate warms. There is evidence that the temperature threshold at which bleaching occurs varies with local environmental conditions and background climate conditions. We investigated the influence of past temperature variability on coral susceptibility to bleaching, using the natural gradient in peak temperature variability in the Gilbert Islands, Republic of Kiribati. The spatial pattern in skeletal growth rates and partial mortality scars found in massive Porites sp. across the central and northern islands suggests that corals subject to larger year-to-year fluctuations in maximum ocean temperature were more resistant to a 2004 warm-water event. In addition, a subsequent 2009 warm event had a disproportionately larger impact on those corals from the island with lower historical heat stress, as indicated by lower concentrations of triacylglycerol, a lipid utilized for energy, as well as thinner tissue in those corals. This study indicates that coral reefs in locations with more frequent warm events may be more resilient to future warming, and protection measures may be more effective in these regions.

  13. Comparison among four kinds of data of sea surface wind stress in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢强; 王卫强; 毛庆文

    2002-01-01

    By using remote sensing (ERS) data, FSU data, GOADS data and Hellerman & Rcsenstein objective analysis data to analyze the sea surface wind stress in the South China Sea, it is found that the remote sensing data have higher resolution and more reasonable values. Therefore we suggest that remote sensing data be chosen in the study of climatological features of sea surface wind stress and its seasonal variability in the South China Sea, especially in the study of small and middle scale eddies.

  14. Comment on 'Surface thermodynamics, surface stress, equations at surfaces and triple lines for deformable bodies'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, E M

    2010-10-27

    In a recent publication by Olives (2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 085005) he studied 'the thermodynamics and mechanics of the surface of a deformable body, following and refining the general approach of Gibbs' and believed that 'a new definition of the surface stress is given'. However, using the usual way of deriving the equations of Gibbs-Duhem type the author, nevertheless, has fallen into a mathematical discrepancy because he has tried to unite in one equation different thermodynamic systems and 'a new definition of the surface stress' has appeared known in the usual theory of elasticity.

  15. The surface stress theory of microbial morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A L

    1983-01-01

    From the physics of the situation, one might conclude that the osmotic pressure within most prokaryotes creates a sufficiently high tension in the wall that organisms are at risk of ripping themselves apart. The Surface Stress Theory holds that they avoid this, and are able to carry out certain morphogenetic processes by linking the cleavages of appropriate bonds to enzymes that are sensitive to the stress in the bonds under attack. This tends to maintain the internal pressure and couples wall growth to cytoplasmic growth. Mechanisms with widely different geometry function for different organisms, but they have in common the requirement that new murein be covalently linked, and usually in an unextended conformation. Organisms differ in the site of wall addition and site of cleavage. In the Gram-positive Streptococcus, septum formation, and septal splitting occurs with little stretching of the unsplit septum. In Gram-positive bacilli, the cylinder grows by the inside-to-outside mechanism, and the poles appear to be formed by a split-and-stretch mechanism. Gram-negative rods, with their much thinner wall, resist a spherical shape and are capable of cell division by altering the biochemical mechanism so that initially one-third to one-fifth of the pressure-volume work required to increase the area of the side wall is needed to increase that in a developing pole. The growth of hyphae is a separate case; it requires that much less work is needed to force growth of the apex relative to the side wall. Some other bacterial shapes also can be explained by the theory. But at present, it is only a theory, although it is gradually becoming capable of accounting for current observations in detail. Its importance is that it prescribes many experiments that now need to be done.

  16. Surface fluxes and tropical intraseasonal variability: a reassessment

    CERN Document Server

    Sobel, Adam H; Bellon, Gilles; Frierson, Dargan M

    2008-01-01

    The authors argue for the hypothesis that interactive feedbacks involving surface enthalpy fluxes are important to the dynamics of tropical intraseasonal variability. These include cloud-radiative feedbacks as well as surface turbulent flux feedbacks; the former effectively act to transport enthalpy from the ocean to the atmosphere, as do the latter. Evidence in favor of this hypothesis includes the observed spatial distribution of intraseasonal variance in precipitation and outgoing longwave radiation, the observed relationship between intraseasonal latent heat flux and precipitation anomalies in regions where intraseasonal variability is strong, and sensitivity experiments performed with a small number of general circulation and idealized models. The authors argue that it would be useful to assess the importance of surface fluxes to intraseasonal variability in a larger number of comprehensive numerical models. Such an assessment could provide insight into the relevance of interactive surface fluxes to real...

  17. Determination of Surface Stress Distributions in Steel Using Laser-Generated Surface Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi; Yifei; Ni; Chenyin; Shen; Zhonghua; Ni; Xiaowu; Lu; Jian

    2008-05-01

    High frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are excited by a pulsed laser and detected by a specially designed poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) transducer to investigate surface stress distribution. Two kinds of stressed surfaces are examined experimentally. One is a steel plate elastically deformed under simple bending forces, where the surface stress varies slowly. The other is a welded steel plate for which the surface stress varies very rapidly within a small area near the welding seam. Applying a new signal processing method developed from correlation technique, the velocity distribution of the SAWs, which reflects the stress distribution, is obtained in these two samples with high resolution.

  18. Effect of Surface Topography on Stress Concentration Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zhengkun; LIAO Ridong

    2015-01-01

    Neuber rule and Arola-Ramulu model are widely used to predict the stress concentration factor of rough specimens. However, the height parameters and effective valley radius used in these two models depend strongly on the resolution of the roughness-measuring instruments and are easily introduce measuring errors. Besides, it is difficult to find a suitable parameter to characterize surface topography to quantitatively describe its effect on stress concentration factor. In order to overcome these disadvantages, profile moments are carried out to characterize surface topography, surface topography is simulated by superposing series of cosine components, the stress concentration factors of different micro cosine-shaped surface topographies are investigated by finite element analysis. In terms of micro cosine-shaped surface topography, an equation using the second profile moment to estimate the stress concentration factor is proposed, predictions for the stress concentration factor using the proposed expression are within 10% error compared with the results of finite element analysis, which are more accurate than other models. Moreover, the proposed equation is applied to the real surface topography machined by turning. Predictions for the stress concentration factor using the proposed expression are within 10% of the maximum stress concentration factors and about 5% of the effective stress concentration factors estimated from the finite element analysis for three levels of turning surface topographies under different simulated scales. The proposed model is feasible in predicting the stress concentration factors of real machined surface topographies.

  19. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lovenduski

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−] on the basis of a~long control simulation with an Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32−] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean time series sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32−] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in association with El Niño–Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32−] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20–30-year periods. North Atlantic [CO32−] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these results

  20. Surface Wave Velocity-Stress Relationship in Uniaxially Loaded Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shokouhi, Parisa; Zoëga, Andreas; Wiggenhauser, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    loading cycles revealed that the velocities show a stress-memory effect in good agreement with the Kaiser effect. Comparing the velocities measured during loading and unloading, the effects of stress and damage on the measured velocities could be differentiated. Moreover, the stress dependency of surface......The sonic surface wave (or Rayleigh wave) velocity measured on prismatic concrete specimens under uniaxial compression was found to be highly stress-dependent. At low stress levels, the acoustoelastic effect and the closure of existing microcracks results in a gradual increase in surface wave...... velocities. At higher stress levels, concrete suffers irrecoverable damage: the existing microcracks widen and coalesce and new microcracks form. This progressive damage process leads first to the flattening and eventually the drop in the velocity-stress curves. Measurements on specimens undergoing several...

  1. WIND STRESS AND SURFACE ROUGHNESS AT AIR-SEA INTERFACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Based on the compiled data of thirty independent observations, the report presents the wind - stress coefficient, the surface roughness and the...boundary layer flow regime at the air-sea interface under various wind conditions. Both the wind - stress coefficient and the surface roughness are found to...data and Charnock’s proportionality constant is determined. Finally, two approximate formulae for the wind - stress coefficient, one for light wind and the other for strong wind are suggested.

  2. Processes of India's offshore summer intraseasonal sea surface temperature variability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kurian, N.; Lengaigne, M.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Vialard, J.; Pous, S.; Peter, A-C.; Durand; Naik, Shweta

    ., vol.63; 2013; 329-346 Processes of India’s offshore summer intraseasonal sea surface temperature variability K. Nisha1, M. Lengaigne1,2, V.V. Gopalakrishna,1 J. Vialard2, S. Pous2, A.-C. Peter2, F. Durand3, S.Naik1 1. NIO, CSIR, Goa, India 2...

  3. A METHOD FOR TOPOLOGICAL OPTIMIZATION OF STRUCTURES WITH DISCRETE VARIABLES UNDER DYNAMIC STRESS AND DISPLACEMENT CONSTRAINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石连栓; 孙焕纯; 冯恩民

    2001-01-01

    A method for topological optimization of structures with discrete variables subjected to dynamic stress and displacement constraints is presented. By using the quasistatic method, the structure optimization problem under dynamic stress and displacement constraints is converted into one subjected to static stress and displacement constraints. The comprehensive algorithm for topological optimization of structures with discrete variables is used to find the optimum solution.

  4. Residual stress around the cortical surface in bovine femoral diaphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Satoshi; Tadano, Shigeru

    2010-04-01

    Residual stress in living tissue plays an important role in mechanical strength. We have reported that residual stress exists in the bone tissue of a rabbit's tibiofibula. The purpose of this study is to measure the residual stress around the outer cortical region of bovine femoral diaphysis and to discuss the distribution of the stress. This work proposed the sin(2) psi method of X-ray diffraction to the measurement of residual stresses in bone tissue. In this method, residual stress can be estimated from the variation in the interplanar spacings orientated to a number of directions without the lattice strain in the stress direction. Four-point bending tests of strip specimens taken from bovine femoral diaphysis were carried out during X-ray irradiation in advance. In the proximal, middle, and distal sections of bovine femoral diaphyses, the residual stresses at the cortical surface were measured using characteristic Mo-Kalpha X-rays. The bending tests of strip specimens with X-ray irradiation showed that the method could reliably estimate residual stresses in the bone tissue. The residual stress of the bone axial direction was larger than that of the circumferential direction. The stresses in the middle part of five diaphyses along the bone axial direction were tensile. The maximum stress was 162 MPa at the lateral position and the minimum was 78 MPa at the posterior position. The residual stress in the bone axial direction varies around the circumferential region. In addition, the bone axial distributions of residual stresses were different in the proximal, middle, and distal sections of the individual femur. Furthermore, it was confirmed that residual stress in the bone tissue was released by the cutting out of the specimen. The residual stresses in bone tissue could be measured by this method. The results show that residual stress in the bone axial direction at the cortical surface in bovine femoral diaphysis is tensile and varies around the circumferential

  5. Proton Dissociation from Surfaces of Variable Charge Soil and Minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUYA-HAI; HUANGCHANG-YONG; 等

    1994-01-01

    Experiments on proton dissociation from the surfaces of goethite,amorphous Al oxide.kaolinite and latosol were carried out,showing amphoteric behavior with reacions of proton dissociation-association on the surfaces and buffering capacity in such a sequence as amorphous Al oxide>latosol>kaolinite>goethite.Dissociation constants of surface proton,pKsa are significantly correlated with surface charge density,which has been proved with an elecrochemical model.The intrinsic constants of proton dissociation,Ksa(int),gained by eptrapolation to zero charge conditions of plots of pKsa against σ0,could be used to estimate the acidity strength of variable charge surfaces,The value of pKsa(int) is 8.08 for goethite,1.2 for a morphous Al oxide,6.62 for kaolinite and 5.32 for latosol.

  6. Dominant patterns of winter Arctic surface wind variability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bingyi; John Walsh; LIU Jiping; ZHANG Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Dominant statistical patterns of winter Arctic surface wind (WASW) variability and their impacts on Arctic sea ice motion are investigated using the complex vector empirical orthogonal function (CVEOF) method. The results indicate that the leading CVEOF of Arctic surface wind variability, which accounts for 33% of the covariance, is characterized by two different and alternating spatial patterns (WASWP1 and WASWP2). Both WASWP1 and WASWP2 show strong interannual and decadal variations, superposed on their declining trends over past decades. Atmospheric circulation anomalies associated with WASWP1 and WASWP2 exhibit, respectively, equivalent barotropic and some baroclinic characteristics, differing from the Arctic dipole anomaly and the seesaw structure anomaly between the Barents Sea and the Beaufort Sea. On decadal time scales, the decline trend of WASWP2 can be attributed to persistent warming of sea surface temperature in the Greenland—Barents—Kara seas from autumn to winter, relfecting the effect of the Arctic warming. The second CVEOF, which accounts for 18% of the covariance, also contains two different spatial patterns (WASWP3 and WASWP4). Their time evolutions are signiifcantly correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index and the central Arctic Pattern, respectively, measured by the leading EOF of winter sea level pressure (SLP) north of 70°N. Thus, winter anomalous surface wind pattern associated with the NAO is not the most important surface wind pattern. WASWP3 and WASWP4 primarily relfect natural variability of winter surface wind and neither exhibits an apparent trend that differs from WASWP1 or WASWP2. These dominant surface wind patterns strongly inlfuence Arctic sea ice motion and sea ice exchange between the western and eastern Arctic. Furthermore, the Fram Strait sea ice volume lfux is only signiifcantly correlated with WASWP3. The results demonstrate that surface and geostrophic winds are not interchangeable in terms of

  7. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lovenduski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−] on the basis of a long control simulation with a fully-coupled Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32−] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean timeseries sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32−] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in association with El Niño–Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32−] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20–30 year periods. North Atlantic [CO32−] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these

  8. Dynamic Mechanism of Interannual Sea Surface Height Variability in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong-Chui; ZHANG Li-Feng; L(U) Qing-Ping

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the dynamic mechanisms of interannual sea surface height (SSH) variability are investigated based on the first-mode baroclinic Rossby wave model, with a focus on the effects of different levels of wind stress curl (WSC)、 Maximum covariance analysis (MCA) of WSC and SSH anomalies displays a mode with significant WSC anomalies located primarily in the mid-latitude eastern North Pacific and central tropical Pacific with corresponding SSH anomalies located to the west. This leading mode can be attributed to Ekman pumping induced by local wind stress and the westward-propagating Rossby wave driven by largescale wind stress. It is further found that in the middle latitudes, the SSH anomalies are largely determined by WSC variations associated with the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO)、 rather than the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The sensitivity of the predictive skill of the linear first-mode baroclinic model to different wind products is also examined.

  9. Near-surface residual stresses and microstructural changes after turning of a nickel-based superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlauer, Christian

    2003-07-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are precipitation hardened alloys with complex compositions. They are used in aircraft engines and land-based gas turbines in load bearing structural components that are exposed to high temperatures. Failure mechanisms in this environment are high and low cycle fatigue, creep, and corrosion. During manufacturing, residual stresses are often introduced into the material due to inhomogeneous plastic deformations, both intentionally and unintentionally. One such manufacturing process is metal cutting, which introduces residual stresses in the surface layer. The stress state in the near-surface zone of components is of special interest as the surface often experiences peak loads and cracks have their starting point there. In this thesis, near-surface residual stress distributions and microstructural changes are studied in the nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 for two different turning operations, face grooving and facing. Process variables are in both cases cutting speed and feed that have been varied between (10 and 1200) m/min and (0.01 and 0.5) mm, respectively. The first turning technique face grooving, which gives cutting conditions similar to orthogonal cutting, showed a clear dependency of the residual stresses on the cutting speed. The tensile stress at the surface, the maximum compressive stress below the surface, and the thickness of the affected layer increase with increasing cutting speed. The tensile stresses are constrained to a thin surface layer and compressive residual stresses below the surface dominate the depth profile of the residual stresses. Only at low cutting speed, residual stresses were largely avoided. The second turning technique facing confirmed the dependency of the residual stresses on the cutting speed and revealed a similar dependency on the feed. Microstructural investigations of near-surface cross-sections by means of transmission electron microscopy showed a zone where the grains had undergone plastic

  10. Optimization of Process Variables by Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashipeta Ravinder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study optimisation of the growth medium for the production of Cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase was carried out using response surface methodology. Four important parameters namely starch, yeast extract, K2HPO4 and MgSO4 concentrations were selected as the independent variables and the enzyme activity (CGTase activity U/mL was the dependent response variable. Each of these independent variables was studied at five different levels as per central composite design (CCD in four variables with a total of 28 experimental runs. The optimal calculated values of tested variables for maximal production of CGTase were found to be comprised of: starch, 2.16 %; yeast extract, 0.6 %; K2HPO4, 0.62 %; MgSO4, 0.04 % with a predicted CGTase activity of 150 U/ml. These predicted optimal parameters were tested in the laboratory and the final CGTase activity obtained was very close to the predicted value at 148.2 U/ml.

  11. Understanding Mountain Range Spatial Variability of Surface Hoar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikx, J.

    2014-12-01

    Surface hoar, once buried often produce a persistent weak layer that is a common instability problem in the snow pack in SW Montana and many other areas around the world. Surface hoar is a common weak layer type in avalanche accidents in a continental and intermountain snowpack. It is however relatively well understood that aspect plays an important role in the spatial location of the growth, and survival of these grain forms, due to the unequal distribution of incoming radiation. However this factor alone does not explain the complex and often confusing spatial pattern of these grains forms throughout the landscape at larger, mountain range spatial scales. In this paper we present a unique data set including over one hundred days of manual observations of surface hoar at sixteen locations on Pioneer Mountain at the Yellowstone Club in southwestern Montana. Using this wealth of observational data located on different aspects, elevations and exposures, coupled with detailed meteorological observations, detailed site scale observations (e.g. Sky view plots) we examine the spatial variability of surface hoar at this scale, and examine the factors that control its spatial distribution. Our results further supports our preliminary work, which shows that small-scale meteorological differences, site scale differences, and local scale lapse rates can greatly influence the spatial variability of surface hoar, over and above that which aspect alone can explain. These results highlight our incomplete understanding of the processes at this large, mountain range scale, and are likely to have implications for both regional and local scale avalanche forecasting in environments where surface hoar cause ongoing instabilities.

  12. Near surface stress analysis strategies for axisymmetric fretting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Ramesh; Satish V Kailas; K R Y Simha

    2008-06-01

    Fretting is essentially a surface phenomenon, but bulk stresses and material properties contribute to subsequent failure. This feature of fretting demands a thorough understanding of near surface stresses under the joint action of normal, shear and thermal loading. Axisymmetric fretting is of great concern in piping and coupling design. In this paper, we develop design tools for Near Surface Analysis (NSA) for understanding axisymmetric fretting. Axisymmetric Fretting Analysis (AFA) becomes formidable owing to localised tractions that call for Fourier transform techniques. We develop two different NSA strategies based on two-dimensional plane strain models: 2D strip model (2DS) and half-plane Flamant model (2DF). We compare the results of 2DS and 2DF with the exact results for AFA obtained using Love’s stress function in conjunction with Fourier transform. There is a good correspondence between stress components obtained from 2D-models.

  13. Heart rate variability in relation to stress in the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vézina-Audette, Raphaël; Herry, Christophe; Burns, Patrick; Frasch, Martin; Chave, Emmanuelle; Theoret, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a safe, reliable, and accessible means to measure heart rate (HR) and HR variability (HRV) and evaluates the use of HRV as a physiological correlate of stress in the Asian elephant. A probabilistic model indicates that HRV measurements may adequately distinguish between stressed and non-stressed elephants. PMID:26933266

  14. Heart rate variability response to mental arithmetic stress in patients with schizophrenia Autonomic response to stress in schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro, Mariana N.; Vigo, Daniel E.; Weidema, Hylke; Fahrer, Rodolfo D.; Chu, Elvina M.; De Achaval, Delfina; Nogues, Martin; Leiguarda, Ramon C.; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Guinjoan, Salvador N.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The vulnerability-stress hypothesis is an established model of schizophrenia symptom formation. We sought to characterise the pattern of the cardiac autonomic response to mental arithmetic stress in patients with stable schizophrenia. Methods: We performed heart rate variability (HRV) an

  15. Heart rate variability response to mental arithmetic stress in patients with schizophrenia Autonomic response to stress in schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro, Mariana N.; Vigo, Daniel E.; Weidema, Hylke; Fahrer, Rodolfo D.; Chu, Elvina M.; De Achaval, Delfina; Nogues, Martin; Leiguarda, Ramon C.; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Guinjoan, Salvador N.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The vulnerability-stress hypothesis is an established model of schizophrenia symptom formation. We sought to characterise the pattern of the cardiac autonomic response to mental arithmetic stress in patients with stable schizophrenia. Methods: We performed heart rate variability (HRV) an

  16. Variable structure guidance law for attacking surface maneuver targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Yanhua; Xu Bo

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of surface maneuver targets are analyzed and a 3-D relative motion model for missiles and targets is established. A variable structure guidance law is designed considering the characteristics of targets. In the guidance law, the distance between missiles and targets as well as the missile-target relative velocity are all substituted by estimation values. The estimation errors, the target's velocity, and the maneuver acceleration are all treated as bounded disturbance. The guidance law proposed can be implemented conveniently in engineering with little target information. The performance of the guidance system is analyzed theoretically and the numerical simulation result shows the effectiveness of the guidance law.

  17. Understanding and determining the variability of the primitive stress environment.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sellers, EJ

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The primitive stress state is an important input into the design of underground excavations. However, it is well known that the stress state varies considerably from place to place. The aim of this project was to determine the main causes...

  18. Droplet impact patterns on inclined surfaces with variable properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockard, Michael; Neitzel, G. Paul; Smith, Marc K.

    2014-11-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis is used in the investigation of a crime scene to infer the impact velocity and size of an impacting droplet and, from these, the droplet's point and cause of origin. The final pattern is the result of complex fluid mechanical processes involved in the impact and spreading of a blood drop on a surface coupled with the wetting properties of the surface itself. Experiments have been designed to study these processes and the resulting patterns for the case of a single Newtonian water droplet impacting a planar, inclined surface with variable roughness and wetting properties. Results for Reynolds numbers in the range of (9,000 - 27,000) and Weber numbers in the range of (300 - 2,600) will be presented. Transient video images and final impact patterns will be analyzed and compared with results from traditional bloodstain pattern-analysis techniques used by the forensics community. In addition, preliminary work with a new Newtonian blood simulant designed to match the viscosity and surface tension of blood will be presented. Supported by the National Institute of Justice.

  19. Chlorine stress mediates microbial surface attachment in drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Le, Yang; Jin, Juliang; Zhou, Yuliang; Chen, Guowei

    2015-03-01

    Microbial attachment to drinking water pipe surfaces facilitates pathogen survival and deteriorates disinfection performance, directly threatening the safety of drinking water. Notwithstanding that the formation of biofilm has been studied for decades, the underlying mechanisms for the origins of microbial surface attachment in biofilm development in drinking water pipelines remain largely elusive. We combined experimental and mathematical methods to investigate the role of environmental stress-mediated cell motility on microbial surface attachment in chlorination-stressed drinking water distribution systems. Results show that at low levels of disinfectant (0.0-1.0 mg/L), the presence of chlorine promotes initiation of microbial surface attachment, while higher amounts of disinfectant (>1.0 mg/L) inhibit microbial attachment. The proposed mathematical model further demonstrates that chlorination stress (0.0-5.0 mg/L)-mediated microbial cell motility regulates the frequency of cell-wall collision and thereby controls initial microbial surface attachment. The results reveal that transport processes and decay patterns of chlorine in drinking water pipelines regulate microbial cell motility and, thus, control initial surface cell attachment. It provides a mechanistic understanding of microbial attachment shaped by environmental disinfection stress and leads to new insights into microbial safety protocols in water distribution systems.

  20. Atomistic modelling of residual stress at UO2 surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arayro, Jack; Tréglia, Guy; Ribeiro, Fabienne

    2016-01-13

    Modelling oxide surface behaviour is of both technological and fundamental interest. In particular, in the case of the UO2 system, which is of major importance in the nuclear industry, it is essential to account for the link between microstructure and macroscopic mechanical properties. Indeed micromechanical models at the mesoscale need to be supplied by the energetic and stress data calculated at the nanoscale. In this framework, we present a theoretical study, coupling an analytical model and thermostatistical simulation to investigate the modifications induced by the presence of a surface regarding atomic relaxation and energetic and stress profiles. In particular, we show that the surface effective thickness as well as the stress profile, which are required by micromechanical approaches, are strongly anisotropic.

  1. Highly variable Pliocene sea surface conditions in the Norwegian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachem, Paul E.; Risebrobakken, Bjørg; De Schepper, Stijn; McClymont, Erin L.

    2017-09-01

    The Pliocene was a time of global warmth with small sporadic glaciations, which transitioned towards the larger-scale Pleistocene glacial-interglacial variability. Here, we present high-resolution records of sea surface temperature (SST) and ice-rafted debris (IRD) in the Norwegian Sea from 5.32 to 3.14 Ma, providing evidence that the Pliocene surface conditions of the Norwegian Sea underwent a series of transitions in response to orbital forcing and gateway changes. Average SSTs are 2 °C above the regional Holocene mean, with notable variability on millennial to orbital timescales. Both gradual changes and threshold effects are proposed for the progression of regional climate towards the Late Pliocene intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. Cooling from 4.5 to 4.3 Ma may be linked to the onset of poleward flow through the Bering Strait. This cooling was further intensified by a period of cool summers due to weak obliquity forcing. A 7 °C warming of the Norwegian Sea at 4.0 Ma suggests a major increase in northward heat transport from the North Atlantic, leading to an enhanced zonal SST gradient in the Nordic Seas, which may be linked to the expansion of sea ice in the Arctic and Nordic Seas. A warm Norwegian Sea and enhanced zonal temperature gradient between 4.0 and 3.6 Ma may have been a priming factor for increased glaciation around the Nordic Seas due to enhanced evaporation and precipitation at high northern latitudes.

  2. Measurement of heart rate variability and stress evaluation by using microwave reflectometric vital signal sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagae, Daisuke; Mase, Atsushi

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we present two robust signal processing techniques for stress evaluation using a microwave reflectometric cardiopulmonary sensing instrument. These techniques enable the heart rate variability (HRV) to be recovered from measurements of body-surface dynamic motion, which is subsequently used for the stress evaluation. Specifically, two novel elements are introduced: one is a reconfiguration of the HRV from the cross-correlation function between a measurement signal and a template signal which is constructed by averaging periodic component over a measurement time. The other is a reconstruction of the HRV from the time variation of the heartbeat frequency; this is evaluated by a repetition of the maximum entropy method. These two signal processing techniques accomplish the reconstruction of the HRV, though they are completely different algorithms. For validations of our model, an experimental setup is presented and several sets of experimental data are analyzed using the two proposed signal processing techniques, which are subsequently used for the stress evaluation. The results presented herein are consistent with electrocardiogram data.

  3. The stress-induced surface wave velocity variations in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvier, Agustin; Bittner, James; Evani, Sai Kalyan; Popovics, John S.

    2017-02-01

    This investigation studies the behavior of surface wave velocity in concrete specimens subjected to low levels of compressive and tensile stress in beams from applied flexural loads. Beam specimen is loaded in a 4-point-load bending configuration, generating uniaxial compression and tension stress fields at the top and bottom surfaces of the beam, respectively. Surface waves are generated through contactless air-coupled transducers and received through contact accelerometers. Results show a clear distinction in responses from compression and tension zones, where velocity increases in the former and decreases in the latter, with increasing load levels. These trends agree with existing acoustoelastic literature. Surface wave velocity tends to decrease more under tension than it tends to increase under compression, for equal load levels. It is observed that even at low stress levels, surface wave velocity is affected by acoustoelastic effects, coupled with plastic effects (stress-induced damage). The acoustoelastic effect is isolated by means of considering the Kaiser effect and by experimentally mitigating the viscoelastic effects of concrete. Results of this ongoing investigation contribute to the overall knowledge of the acoustoelastic behavior of concrete. Applications of this knowledge may include structural health monitoring of members under flexural loads, improved high order modelling of materials, and validation of results seen in dynamic acoustoelasticity testing.

  4. Back-casting global water stress: Reconstruction of past water demand and climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Y.; van Beek, L. P.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    Water scarcity, caused by an existing regional imbalance of water availability and water demand, poses a serious environmental issue to the global society. Since the late 1990s, several studies have quantified blue water stress at the global scale by using the global hydrological models to simulate blue water availability (i.e., surface freshwater in rivers, lakes and reservoirs) which is confronted against water demand to compute water stress. While these assessments have identified regions suffering from current water stress and vulnerable to future water scarcity due to the effects of the climate change and prone to frequent droughts (e.g., Australia, Central and West USA, India, North-East China, Pakistan), the development of past water stress with the influences of population and economic growth and expanding irrigated area has not yet been quantified, which might give an important implication for the future assessment of water stress. Here, we developed a method to reconstruct past water demand from agricultural (i.e., irrigation and livestock), industrial and domestic (i.e., households and municipalities) sector over the period 1960 to 2001, which was used to contrast transient effects in its development against climate variability in the severity of water stress. Agricultural water demand was estimated based on past extents of irrigated area and livestock densities. We developed a simple algorithm to approximate the past economic development based on GDP, energy and household consumption and electricity production, which was subsequently used together with population numbers to estimate industrial and domestic water demand. Desalinated water use and groundwater abstraction were additionally calculated over the same period, the latter being proportional to water demand. Various annual country statistics were used but resulted estimates were gridded at a spatial resolution of 0.5° and disaggregated into a monthly temporal scale as it can be expected that

  5. Prediction and Optimization of Residual Stresses on Machined Surface and Sub-Surface in MQL Turning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xia; Zou, Pan; Li, Beizhi; Rajora, Manik; Shao, Yamin; Liang, Steven Y.

    Residual stress in the machined surface and subsurface is affected by materials, machining conditions, and tool geometry and can affect the component life and service quality significantly. Empirical or numerical experiments are commonly used for determining residual stresses but these are very expensive. There has been an increase in the utilization of minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) in recent years in order to reduce the cost and tool/part handling efforts, while its effect on machined part residual stress, although important, has not been explored. This paper presents a hybrid neural network that is trained using Simulated Annealing (SA) and Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm (LM) in order to predict the values of residual stresses in cutting and radial direction on the surface and within the work piece after the MQL face turning process. Once the ANN has successfully been trained, an optimization procedure, using Genetic Algorithm (GA), is applied in order to find the best cutting conditions in order to minimize the surface tensile residual stresses and maximize the compressive residual stresses within the work piece. The optimization results show that the usage of MQL decreases the surface tensile residual stresses and increases the compressive residual stresses within the work piece.

  6. A weather type method to study surface ocean variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, M.; Camus, P.; Mendez, F. J.; Losada, I. J.

    2012-04-01

    The set of methodologies for obtaining wave climate information at high spatial resolution from relatively coarse resolution is known as downscaling. Dynamic downscaling, based on the use of numerical models, is perhaps the most widely used methodology for surface ocean variables. An alternative approach is the statistical downscaling, that can be conducted by means of regression methods or weather pattern-based approaches. The main advantages of the statistical downscaling based on weather patterns are: the low computational requirements; the ease of implementation; the additional climatology information; and local forecast application. Moreover, this technique allows exploring the synoptic atmospheric climatology and their relationship with surface ocean variables. It is well known nowadays that the seasonal-to-interannual variability of wave climate is linked to the atmosphere circulation patterns. We proposed a statistical approach based on the predictand (eg. local wave characteristics) is associated to a particular synoptic-scale weather type (predictor). The predictor is the n-days-averaged sea level pressure field (SLP) anomalies, which are synthesized using data mining techniques to describe a number of weather types. In particular, we focus in NE Atlantic (NAO region) using as predictor the 3-days-averaged SLP fields calculated by NCEP atmospheric reanalysis (1948-2010). A principal component analysis is applied over SLP fields to reduce the spatial and temporal dimensions. The K-means clustering technique is then applied to the two-dimensional sample of the principal components which explain more than 95% variance of the SLP. The K-means technique divides the data space into a number of clusters, where each of them is characterized by a centroid and formed by the data for which the centroid is the nearest. Finally, we visualize the weather types associated to each centroid in an ordered way similar to self-organizing maps, SOMs. The probability

  7. INTERFACE DEVICE FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING OF RESIDUAL SURFACE STRESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady A. Perepelkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the organization of connection of a personal computer with a device for nondestructive testing of residual surface stresses. The device works is based on the phenomenon of diffraction of ionizing radiation from the crystal lattice near the surface of the crystallites. Proposed software interface to the organization for each type of user: the device developers, administrators, users. Some aspects of the organization of communication microcontroller to a PC via USB-port

  8. Variability on Raman Shift to Stress Coefficient of Porous Silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Zhen-Kun; KANG Yi-Lan; CEN Hao; HU Ming

    2006-01-01

    Porous silicon film is a capillary-like medium, which is able to reveal different meso-elastic modulus with porosity. During the preparation of porous silicon samples, the capillary force is a non-classic force related to the liquid evaporation which directly influences the evolution of residual stress. In this study, a non-linear relation of Raman shift to stress coefficient and the porosity is obtained from the elastic modulus measured with nano-indentation by Bellet et al. fJ. Appl. Phys. 60 (1996) 3772] Dynamic capillarity during the drying process of porous silicon is investigated using micro-Raman spectroscopy, and the results reveal that the residual stress resulted from the capillarity increased rapidly. Indeed, the dynamic capillarity has a close relationship with a great deal of micro-pore structures of the porous silicon.

  9. Elephant overflows: Multi-annual variability in Weddell Sea Deep Water driven by surface forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, Andrew; Meredith, Michael; Abrahamsen, Povl; Naviera-Garabato, Alberto; Ángel Morales Maqueda, Miguel; Polzin, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    The volume of the deepest and densest water mass in Drake Passage, Lower Weddell Sea Deep Water (LWSDW), is shown to have been decreasing over the last 20 years of observations, with an associated reduction in density driven by freshening. Superimposed on this long term trend is a multi-annual oscillation with a period of 3-5 years. This variability only appears in Drake Passage; observations in the east of the Scotia Sea show a similar long term trend, but with no apparent multi-annual variability. Clues as to the source of this variability may be found on the continental slope at approximately 1000 m immediately north of Elephant Island on the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. Here there is an intermittent westward flowing cold/fresh slope current whose volume and properties are strongly correlated with the LWSDW multi-annual variability, although leading the LWSDW by around one year. As the slope current and LWSDW are separated from each other both geographically and in water mass characteristics, their co-variability implies that they are responding to a common forcing, while the lag between deep LWSDW and shallow slope current provides information on the timescale of this response. A newly available high resolution temperature and salinity multi-year time series from the Elephant Island slope at 1000 m is compared with reanalysis and model derived surface fluxes, sea ice extent and wind stress. We find that there are strong positive relationships between the surface wind stress and heat flux over the shelf at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula and the properties of the slope current at 1000 m on seasonal to annual timescales. We use tracer release experiments in the Southern Ocean State Estimate (SOSE) model to investigate the lag between the slope current and LWSDW timeseries and hypothesise that the observed multi-annual variability in both water masses is driven by surface forcing over the shelf and the overflow of modified water from the slope in

  10. Formaldehyde Surface Distributions and Variability in the Mexico City Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkermann, W.; Mohr, C.; Steinbrecher, R.; Ruiz Suarez, L.

    2007-05-01

    Formaldehyde ambient air mole fractions were measured throughout the dry season in March at three different locations in the Mexico City basin. The continuously running instruments were operated at Tenago del Aire, a site located in the Chalco valley in the southern venting area of the basin, at the Intituto Mexicano del Petroleo (IMP) in the northern part of the city and about 30 km north of the city at the campus of the Universidad Tecnològica de Tecamac (UTTEC). The technique used is the Hantzsch technology with a time resolution of 2 minutes and a detection limit of 100 ppt. Daily maxima peaked at 35 ppb formaldehyde in the city and about 15 to 20 ppb at the other sites. During night formaldehyde levels dropped to about 5 ppb or less. It is evident that the observed spatial and temporal variability in near surface formaldehyde distributions is strongly affected by local and regional advection processes.

  11. Interaction of stress and phase transformations during thermochemical surface engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard

    Low temperature nitriding of austenitic stainless steel causes a surface zone of expanded austenite, which improves the wear resistance of the stainless steel while preserving the stainless behavior. During nitriding huge residual stresses are introduced in the treated zone, arising from the volume...... expansion that accompanies the dissolution of high nitrogen contents in expanded austenite. An intriguing phenomenon during low-temperature nitriding, is that the residual stresses evoked by dissolution of nitrogen in the solid state, affect the thermodynamics and the diffusion kinetics of nitrogen...... dissolution. The present project is devoted to understanding the mutual interaction of stresses and phase transformations during thermochemical surface engineering by combining numerical modelling with experimental materials science. The modelling was done by combining solid mechanics with thermodynamics...

  12. A micromachined surface stress sensor with electronic readout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlen, E.T.; Weinberg, M.S.; Zapata, A.M.; Borenstein, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    A micromachined surface stress sensor has been fabricated and integrated off chip with a low-noise, differential capacitance, electronic readout circuit. The differential capacitance signal is modulated with a high frequency carrier signal, and the output signal is synchronously demodulated and filt

  13. Cantilever surface stress sensors with single-crystalline silicon piezoresistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Andreas; Hansen, Ole; Boisen, Anja

    2005-01-01

    on cantilever sensors with integrated piezoresistive readout, that one finds between typical atomic force microscopy measurements and the surface stress sensors used in, e.g., biochemical measurements. We have simulated the response from piezoresistive cantilevers as a function of resistor type and placement...

  14. Highly variable Pliocene sea surface conditions in the Norwegian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Bachem

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Pliocene was a time of global warmth with small sporadic glaciations, which transitioned towards the larger-scale Pleistocene glacial–interglacial variability. Here, we present high-resolution records of sea surface temperature (SST and ice-rafted debris (IRD in the Norwegian Sea from 5.32 to 3.14 Ma, providing evidence that the Pliocene surface conditions of the Norwegian Sea underwent a series of transitions in response to orbital forcing and gateway changes. Average SSTs are 2 °C above the regional Holocene mean, with notable variability on millennial to orbital timescales. Both gradual changes and threshold effects are proposed for the progression of regional climate towards the Late Pliocene intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. Cooling from 4.5 to 4.3 Ma may be linked to the onset of poleward flow through the Bering Strait. This cooling was further intensified by a period of cool summers due to weak obliquity forcing. A 7 °C warming of the Norwegian Sea at 4.0 Ma suggests a major increase in northward heat transport from the North Atlantic, leading to an enhanced zonal SST gradient in the Nordic Seas, which may be linked to the expansion of sea ice in the Arctic and Nordic Seas. A warm Norwegian Sea and enhanced zonal temperature gradient between 4.0 and 3.6 Ma may have been a priming factor for increased glaciation around the Nordic Seas due to enhanced evaporation and precipitation at high northern latitudes.

  15. Northern North Atlantic Sea Surface Height and Ocean Heat Content Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa; Rhines, Peter; Worthen, Denise L.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of nearly 20 years of altimetric sea surface height (SSH) is investigated to understand its association with decadal to multidecadal variability of the North Atlantic heat content. Altimetric SSH is dominated by an increase of about 14 cm in the Labrador and Irminger seas from 1993 to 2011, while the opposite has occurred over the Gulf Stream region over the same time period. During the altimeter period the observed 0-700 m ocean heat content (OHC) in the subpolar gyre mirrors the increased SSH by its dominantly positive trend. Over a longer period, 1955-2011, fluctuations in the subpolar OHC reflect Atlantic multidecadal variability (AMV) and can be attributed to advection driven by the wind stress ''gyre mode'' bringing more subtropical waters into the subpolar gyre. The extended subpolar warming evident in SSH and OHC during the altimeter period represents transition of the AMV from cold to warm phase. In addition to the dominant trend, the first empirical orthogonal function SSH time series shows an abrupt change 2009-2010 reaching a new minimum in 2010. The change coincides with the change in the meridional overturning circulation at 26.5N as observed by the RAPID (Rapid Climate Change) project, and with extreme behavior of the wind stress gyre mode and of atmospheric blocking. While the general relationship between northern warming and Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) volume transport remains undetermined, the meridional heat and salt transport carried by AMOC's arteries are rich with decade-to-century timescale variability.

  16. Variable impact of chronic stress on spatial learning and memory in BXD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Chloe J A; Carhuatanta, Kimberly A K; Wagner, Jessica; Bechmann, Naomi; Moore, Raquel; Herman, James P; Jankord, Ryan

    2015-10-15

    The effects of chronic stress on learning are highly variable across individuals. This variability stems from gene-environment interactions. However, the mechanisms by which stress affects genetic predictors of learning are unclear. Thus, we aim to determine whether the genetic pathways that predict spatial memory performance are altered by previous exposure to chronic stress. Sixty-two BXD recombinant inbred strains of mice, as well as parent strains C57BL/6J and DBA/2J, were randomly assigned as behavioral control or to a chronic variable stress paradigm and then underwent behavioral testing to assess spatial memory and learning performance using the Morris water maze. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping was completed for average escape latency times for both control and stress animals. Loci on chromosomes 5 and 10 were found in both control and stress environmental populations; eight additional loci were found to be unique to either the control or stress environment. In sum, results indicate that certain genetic loci predict spatial memory performance regardless of prior stress exposure, while exposure to stress also reveals unique genetic predictors of training during the memory task. Thus, we find that genetic predictors contributing to spatial learning and memory are susceptible to the presence of chronic stress.

  17. Decadal modulation of global surface temperature by internal climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Aiguo; Fyfe, John C.; Xie, Shang-Ping; Dai, Xingang

    2015-06-01

    Despite a steady increase in atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs), global-mean surface temperature (T) has shown no discernible warming since about 2000, in sharp contrast to model simulations, which on average project strong warming. The recent slowdown in observed surface warming has been attributed to decadal cooling in the tropical Pacific, intensifying trade winds, changes in El Niño activity, increasing volcanic activity and decreasing solar irradiance. Earlier periods of arrested warming have been observed but received much less attention than the recent period, and their causes are poorly understood. Here we analyse observed and model-simulated global T fields to quantify the contributions of internal climate variability (ICV) to decadal changes in global-mean T since 1920. We show that the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) has been associated with large T anomalies over both ocean and land. Combined with another leading mode of ICV, the IPO explains most of the difference between observed and model-simulated rates of decadal change in global-mean T since 1920, and particularly over the so-called `hiatus' period since about 2000. We conclude that ICV, mainly through the IPO, was largely responsible for the recent slowdown, as well as for earlier slowdowns and accelerations in global-mean T since 1920, with preferred spatial patterns different from those associated with GHG-induced warming or aerosol-induced cooling. Recent history suggests that the IPO could reverse course and lead to accelerated global warming in the coming decades.

  18. Sensing stress: stress detection from physiological variables in controlled and uncontrolled conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsman, J.L.P

    2014-01-01

    Recently, general concern about work-related stress is increasing. Chronic stress induces a number of mental and physical health problems that impact personal life, organizations and society. Timely detection and reduction of stress could prevent these health problems and their negative effects.

  19. Predicting Teacher Retention Using Stress and Support Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, Daniel A.; Seal, Andrea K.; Martin, Nancy K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Teacher attrition is a significant international concern facing administrators. Although a considerable amount of literature exists related to the causes of job dissatisfaction and teachers leaving the profession, relatively few theoretical models test the complex interrelationships between these variables. The goal of this paper is to…

  20. Effects of social stress on heart rate and heart rate variability in growing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, IC; Sgoifo, A; Lambooij, E; Korte, SM; Blokhuis, HJ; Koolhaas, JM

    2000-01-01

    The effects of social stress on heart rate, heart rate variability and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias were studied in 12 growing pigs. Social stress was induced during a good competition test with a pen mate, and subsequently during a resident-intruder test with an unacquainted pig in which t

  1. Effects of social stress on heart rate and heart rate variability in growing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, IC; Sgoifo, A; Lambooij, E; Korte, SM; Blokhuis, HJ; Koolhaas, JM

    2000-01-01

    The effects of social stress on heart rate, heart rate variability and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias were studied in 12 growing pigs. Social stress was induced during a good competition test with a pen mate, and subsequently during a resident-intruder test with an unacquainted pig in which t

  2. Physical activity, mindfulness meditation, or heart rate variability biofeedback for stress reduction: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwan, J.E.; de Vente, W.; Huizink, A.C.; Bögels, S.M.; de Bruin, E.I.

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing

  3. Effects of social stress on heart rate and heart rate variability in growing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, IC; Sgoifo, A; Lambooij, E; Korte, SM; Blokhuis, HJ; Koolhaas, JM

    The effects of social stress on heart rate, heart rate variability and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias were studied in 12 growing pigs. Social stress was induced during a good competition test with a pen mate, and subsequently during a resident-intruder test with an unacquainted pig in which

  4. Physical activity, mindfulness meditation, or heart rate variability biofeedback for stress reduction: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwan, van der J.E.; Vente, de W.; Huizink, A.C.; Bögels, S.M.; Bruin, de E.I.

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing

  5. Physical activity, mindfulness meditation, or heart rate variability biofeedback for stress reduction: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Zwan, van der, G.; Vente, de, W.; Huizink, A.C.; Bögels, S.M.; Bruin,, Henk

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing stress and its related symptoms. We randomly allocated 126 participants to PA, MM, or HRV-BF upon enrollment, of whom 76 agreed to participate. The interventions consisted of psycho-education and a...

  6. The inter-annual variability of the Yellow Sea Warm Current surface axis and its influencing factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Dehai; BAO Xianwen; WANG Xiaohua; XU Lingling; LIN Xiaopei; WU Dexing

    2009-01-01

    Based on the Pathfinder sea surface temperature (PFSST), the surface axis and its pattern of the Yellow Sea Warm Current (YSWC) are discussed. A structure of double-warm-tongue is found in February and it varies in different years. Two indexes are calculated to represent the westward shift (WSI) and northward extension (NEI) of the warm water in the Yellow Sea (YS). Wavelet analysis illustrates that the WSI and NEI have prominent periods of 3-6 years and 3-4 years, respectively. The Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) decomposition is applied to the winter wind stress curl and the Kuroshio Current (KC) transport, which are believed to play important roles in forcing the variability of the YSWC surface axis. Statistics shows that the WSI is significantly related with the second EOF mode of the wind stress curl in February, which may force the YSWC surface axis moving westward and maintaining the double warm tongues because of its opposite curl in the YSWC domain. The first EOF mode of wind stress curl in January is propitious for inducing the warm tongue in the YS to advance more northward. Hence, the wind stress curls both in January and in February could force variations of the YSWC surface axis; however, the effect of the January wind stress curl is relatively weaker than that of the February. The relationship between the NEI and the KC transport is remarkable, and it seems that the stronger KC supplies more power to push the YSWC northward against the southward wind.

  7. Surface micromachined differential piezoelectric shear-stress sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Randall P.; Kim, Donghwan; Gawalt, David P.; Hall, Neal A.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to measure viscous wall shear stress in high-speed flows is important for verifying simulated results typically obtained from direct numerical simulation in the aerodynamics research community, and robust sensors are required to measure wall shear reliably under such high-speed conditions. This letter summarizes the design, fabrication, and testing of a surface micromachined piezoelectric shear-stress sensor which uses a thin piezoelectric film to generate a voltage proportional to an applied shear stress without additional moving parts. A differential-cell architecture is used to enhance selectivity to shear stress while canceling normal-stress sensitivity. The conceptual design, fabrication details, and experimental measurements of device sensitivity are presented. A finite element model is used to validate the device performance against measurements, and to provide insight into the potential and electric fields underlying the device concept. The potential for understanding device behavior and optimization through modeling is illustrated using finite element analysis results. The minimum detectable shear stress for the sensor is estimated to be 52.9 mPa  √Hz-1 at 1.5 kHz.

  8. Atmospheric impacts on climatic variability of surface incident solar radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's climate is driven by surface incident solar radiation (Rs. Direct measurements have shown that Rs has undergone significant decadal variations. However, a large fraction of the global land surface is not covered by these observations. Satellite-derived Rs has a good global coverage but is of low accuracy in its depiction of decadal variability. This paper shows that daily to decadal variations of Rs, from both aerosols and cloud properties, can be accurately estimated using globally available measurements of Sunshine Duration (SunDu. In particular, SunDu shows that since the late 1980's Rs has brightened over Europe due to decreases in aerosols but dimmed over China due to their increases. We found that variation of cloud cover determines Rs at a monthly scale but that aerosols determine the variability of Rs at a decadal time scale, in particular, over Europe and China. Because of its global availability and long-term history, SunDu can provide an accurate and continuous proxy record of Rs, filling in values for the blank areas that are not covered by direct measurements. Compared to its direct measurement, Rs from SunDu appears to be less sensitive to instrument replacement and calibration, and shows that the widely reported sharp increase in Rs during the early 1990s in China was a result of instrument replacement. By merging direct measurements collected by Global Energy Budget Archive with those derived from SunDu, we obtained a good coverage of Rs over the Northern Hemisphere. From this data, the average increase of Rs from 1982 to 2008 is estimated to be 0.87 W m−2 per decade.

  9. The impact of sea surface temperature bias on equatorial Atlantic interannual variability in partially coupled model experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Latif, Mojib; Park, Wonsun

    2015-07-01

    We examine the impact of sea surface temperature (SST) bias on interannual variability during boreal summer over the equatorial Atlantic using two suites of partially coupled model (PCM) experiments with and without surface heat flux correction. In the experiments, surface wind stress anomalies are specified from observations while the thermodynamic coupling between the atmospheric and oceanic components is still active as in the fully coupled model. The results show that the PCM can capture around 50% of the observed variability associated with the Atlantic Niño from 1958 to 2013, but only when the bias is substantially reduced using heat flux correction, with no skill otherwise. We further show that ocean dynamics explain a large part of the SST variability in the eastern equatorial Atlantic in both observations (50-60%) and the PCM experiments (50-70%) with heat flux correction, implying that the seasonal predictability potential may be higher than currently thought.

  10. Entropy Analysis of RR and QT Interval Variability during Orthostatic and Mental Stress in Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Baumert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic activity affects beat-to-beat variability of heart rate and QT interval. The aim of this study was to explore whether entropy measures are suitable to detect changes in neural outflow to the heart elicited by two different stress paradigms. We recorded short-term ECG in 11 normal subjects during an experimental protocol that involved head-up tilt and mental arithmetic stress and computed sample entropy, cross-sample entropy and causal interactions based on conditional entropy from RR and QT interval time series. Head-up tilt resulted in a significant reduction in sample entropy of RR intervals and cross-sample entropy, while mental arithmetic stress resulted in a significant reduction in coupling directed from RR to QT. In conclusion, measures of entropy are suitable to detect changes in neural outflow to the heart and decoupling of repolarisation variability from heart rate variability elicited by orthostatic or mental arithmetic stress.

  11. Inclusion of Respiratory Frequency Information in Heart Rate Variability Analysis for Stress Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, Alberto; Lazaro, Jesus; Gil, Eduardo; Arza, Adriana; Garzon, Jorge Mario; Lopez-Anton, Raul; de la Camara, Concepcion; Laguna, Pablo; Aguilo, Jordi; Bailon, Raquel

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory rate and heart rate variability (HRV) are studied as stress markers in a database of young healthy volunteers subjected to acute emotional stress, induced by a modification of the Trier Social Stress Test. First, instantaneous frequency domain HRV parameters are computed using time-frequency analysis in the classical bands. Then, the respiratory rate is estimated and this information is included in HRV analysis in two ways: 1) redefining the high-frequency (HF) band to be centered at respiratory frequency; 2) excluding from the analysis those instants where respiratory frequency falls within the low-frequency (LF) band. Classical frequency domain HRV indices scarcely show statistical differences during stress. However, when including respiratory frequency information in HRV analysis, the normalized LF power as well as the LF/HF ratio significantly increase during stress ( p-value 0.05 according to the Wilcoxon test), revealing higher sympathetic dominance. The LF power increases during stress, only being significantly different in a stress anticipation stage, while the HF power decreases during stress, only being significantly different during the stress task demanding attention. Our results support that joint analysis of respiration and HRV obtains a more reliable characterization of autonomic nervous response to stress. In addition, the respiratory rate is observed to be higher and less stable during stress than during relax ( p-value 0.05 according to the Wilcoxon test) being the most discriminative index for stress stratification (AUC = 88.2 % ).

  12. Nanoscale patterning, macroscopic reconstruction, and enhanced surface stress by organic adsorption on vicinal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollinger, Florian; Schmitt, Stefan; Sander, Dirk; Tian, Zhen; Kirschner, Jürgen; Vrdoljak, Pavo; Stadler, Christoph; Maier, Florian; Marchetto, Helder; Schmidt, Thomas; Schöll, Achim; Umbach, Eberhard

    2017-01-01

    Self-organization is a promising method within the framework of bottom-up architectures to generate nanostructures in an efficient way. The present work demonstrates that self-organization on the length scale of a few to several tens of nanometers can be achieved by a proper combination of a large (organic) molecule and a vicinal metal surface if the local bonding of the molecule on steps is significantly stronger than that on low-index surfaces. In this case thermal annealing may lead to large mass transport of the subjacent substrate atoms such that nanometer-wide and micrometer-long molecular stripes or other patterns are being formed on high-index planes. The formation of these patterns can be controlled by the initial surface orientation and adsorbate coverage. The patterns arrange self-organized in regular arrays by repulsive mechanical interactions over long distances accompanied by a significant enhancement of surface stress. We demonstrate this effect using the planar organic molecule PTCDA as adsorbate and Ag(10 8 7) and Ag(775) surfaces as substrate. The patterns are directly observed by STM, the formation of vicinal surfaces is monitored by high-resolution electron diffraction, the microscopic surface morphology changes are followed by spectro-microscopy, and the macroscopic changes of surface stress are measured by a cantilever bending method. The in situ combination of these complementary techniques provides compelling evidence for elastic interaction and a significant stress contribution to long-range order and nanopattern formation.

  13. Adulthood stress responses in rats are variably altered as a factor of adolescent stress exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Nicole L T; Altman, Daniel E; Gauchan, Sangeeta; Genovese, Raymond F

    2016-05-01

    Stress exposure during development may influence adulthood stress response severity. The present study investigates persisting effects of two adolescent stressors upon adulthood response to predator exposure (PE). Rats were exposed to underwater trauma (UWT) or PE during adolescence, then to PE after reaching adulthood. Rats were then exposed to predator odor (PO) to test responses to predator cues alone. Behavioral and neuroendocrine assessments were conducted to determine acute effects of each stress experience. Adolescent stress altered behavioral response to adulthood PE. Acoustic startle response was blunted. Bidirectional changes in plus maze exploration were revealed as a factor of adolescent stress type. Neuroendocrine response magnitude did not predict severity of adolescent or adult stress response, suggesting that different adolescent stress events may differentially alter developmental outcomes regardless of acute behavioral or neuroendocrine response. We report that exposure to two different stressors in adolescence may differentially affect stress response outcomes in adulthood. Acute response to an adolescent stressor may not be consistent across all stressors or all dependent measures, and may not predict alterations in developmental outcomes pertaining to adulthood stress exposure. Further studies are needed to characterize factors underlying long-term effects of a developmental stressor.

  14. Inter-annual variability of sea surface temperature, wind speed and sea surface height anomaly over the tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; Pankajakshan, T.; Sathe, P.V.

    have made an attempt to study the annual and inter-annual variability of certain prominent processes occurring over the tropical Indian Ocean. The monthly mean values of Wind Speed (FSU), Sea Surface Temperature (REYNOLDS) and Sea Surface Height Anomaly...

  15. Accurate computation of surface stresses and forces with immersed boundary methods

    CERN Document Server

    Goza, Andres; Morley, Benjamin; Colonius, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Many immersed boundary methods solve for surface stresses that impose the velocity boundary conditions on an immersed body. These surface stresses may contain spurious oscillations that make them ill-suited for representing the physical surface stresses on the body. Moreover, these inaccurate stresses often lead to unphysical oscillations in the history of integrated surface forces such as the coefficient of lift. While the errors in the surface stresses and forces do not necessarily affect the convergence of the velocity field, it is desirable, especially in fluid-structure interaction problems, to obtain smooth and convergent stress distributions on the surface. To this end, we show that the equation for the surface stresses is an integral equation of the first kind whose ill-posedness is the source of spurious oscillations in the stresses. We also demonstrate that for sufficiently smooth delta functions, the oscillations may be filtered out to obtain physically accurate surface stresses. The filtering is a...

  16. Influence of surface stressing on stellar coronae and winds

    CERN Document Server

    Jardine, M; van Ballegooijen, A; Donati, J -F; Morin, J; Fares, R; Gombosi, T I

    2013-01-01

    The large-scale field of the Sun is well represented by its lowest energy (or potential) state. Recent observations, by comparison, reveal that many solar-type stars show large-scale surface magnetic fields that are highly non-potential - that is, they have been stressed above their lowest-energy state. This non-potential component of the surface field is neglected by current stellar wind models. The aim of this paper is to determine its effect on the coronal structure and wind. We use Zeeman-Doppler surface magnetograms of two stars - one with an almost potential, one with a non-potential surface field - to extrapolate a static model of the coronal structure for each star. We find that the stresses are carried almost exclusively in a band of uni-directional azimuthal field that is confined to mid-latitudes. Using this static solution as an initial state for an MHD wind model, we then find that the final state is determined primarily by the potential component of the surface magnetic field. The band of azimut...

  17. Effects of Yoga on Stress, Stress Adaption, and Heart Rate Variability Among Mental Health Professionals--A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Ling; Huang, Ching-Ya; Shiu, Shau-Ping; Yeh, Shu-Hui

    2015-08-01

    Mental health professionals experiencing work-related stress may experience burn out, leading to a negative impact on their organization and patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of yoga classes on work-related stress, stress adaptation, and autonomic nerve activity among mental health professionals. A randomized controlled trial was used, which compared the outcomes between the experimental (e.g., yoga program) and the control groups (e.g., no yoga exercise) for 12 weeks. Work-related stress and stress adaptation were assessed before and after the program. Heart rate variability (HRV) was measured at baseline, midpoint through the weekly yoga classes (6 weeks), and postintervention (after 12 weeks of yoga classes). The results showed that the mental health professionals in the yoga group experienced a significant reduction in work-related stress (t = -6.225, p yoga and control groups, we found the yoga group significantly decreased work-related stress (t = -3.216, p = .002), but there was no significant change in stress adaptation (p = .084). While controlling for the pretest scores of work-related stress, participants in yoga, but not the control group, revealed a significant increase in autonomic nerve activity at midpoint (6 weeks) test (t = -2.799, p = .007), and at posttest (12 weeks; t = -2.099, p = .040). Because mental health professionals experienced a reduction in work-related stress and an increase in autonomic nerve activity in a weekly yoga program for 12 weeks, clinicians, administrators, and educators should offer yoga classes as a strategy to help health professionals reduce their work-related stress and balance autonomic nerve activities. © 2015 The Authors. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing.

  18. The role of cold work and applied stress on surface oxidation of 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano-Perez, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.lozano-perez@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Rd., Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Kruska, Karen [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Rd., Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Iyengar, Ilya [Winchester College, College Street, Winchester SO23 9LX (United Kingdom); Terachi, Takumi; Yamada, Takuyo [Institute of Nuclear Safety System (INSS), 64 Sata, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FIB 3D sequential sectioning is an ideal technique to characterize surface oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3D models of the oxide can be produced with nanometre resolution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of stress and cold work in grain boundary oxidation have been analysed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At least three different oxidation modes are observed when stress is applied. - Abstract: FIB 3-dimensional (3D) sequential sectioning has been used to characterize environmental degradation of 304 stainless steels in pressurized water reactor (PWR) simulated primary water. In particular, the effects of cold work and applied stress on oxidation have been studied in detail. It was found that a description of the oxidation behaviour of this alloy is only complete if it is treated statistically, since it can suffer from high variability depending on the feature described.

  19. Seasonal Variability of Extratropical North Pacific Wind Stress, Ekman Pumping and Sverdrup Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-01

    The annual cycle of the North Pacific wind stress , Ekman pumping and Sverdrup transport is investigated by means of empirical orthogonal function... stress components. These wind stress components are averaged to 624 monthly mean fields from which monthly mean Ekman pumping and Sverdrup transport...Research (NCAR) Reanalysis daily averaged surface wind components covering the extratropical North Pacific are used to calculate daily averaged wind

  20. Stress vs sputtering effects in the propagation of surface ripples produced by ion-beam sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Barrado, A. [Instituto de Investigación Tecnológica (IIT) and Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC), Universidad Pontificia Comillas, E-28015 Madrid (Spain); Castro, M. [GISC and Grupo de Dinámica No Lineal (DNL), Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería (ICAI), Universidad Pontificia Comillas, E-28015 Madrid (Spain); Muñoz-García, J. [Departamento de Matemáticas and GISC, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganés (Spain); Cuerno, R., E-mail: cuerno@math.uc3m.es [Departamento de Matemáticas and GISC, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganés (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    Under low energy ion irradiation, periodic features (ripples) can develop on the surfaces of semiconductor materials, with typical sizes in the nanometric range. Recently, a theory of pattern formation has been able to account for the variability with the ion/target combination of the critical angle value separating conditions on ion incidence that induce the presence or the absence of ripples. Such a theory is based in the accumulation of stress in the damaged irradiated layer and its relaxation via surface-confined viscous flow. Here we explore the role of stress, and its competition with purely erosive mechanisms, to determine the sign of the velocity with which the ripple pattern moves across the target plane. Based on this theory, we discuss different situations and make specific testable predictions for the change of sign in that velocity.

  1. Linear and nonlinear modulus surfaces in stress space, from stress-strain measurements on Berea sandstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boudjema

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The elastic response of many rocks to quasistatic stress changes is highly nonlinear and hysteretic, displaying discrete memory. Rocks also display unusual nonlinear response to dynamic stress changes. A model to describe the elastic behavior of rocks and other consolidated materials is called the Preisach-Mayergoyz (PM space model. In contrast to the traditional analytic approach to stress-strain, the PM space picture establishes a relationship between the quasistatic data and a number density of hysteretic mesoscopic elastic elements in the rock. The number density allows us to make quantitative predictions of dynamic elastic properties. Using the PM space model, we analyze a complex suite of quasistatic stress-strain data taken on Berea sandstone. We predict a dynamic bulk modulus and a dynamic shear modulus surface as a function of mean stress and shear stress. Our predictions for the dynamic moduli compare favorably to moduli derived from time of flight measurements. We derive a set of nonlinear elastic constants and a set of constants that describe the hysteretic behavior of the sandstone.

  2. Local protrusions formed on Si(111) surface by surface melting and solidification under applied tensile stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, T.; Tomitori, M.

    2016-09-01

    The surface structure and composition of Si(111) was modified, by heating it to 1300 °C in ultrahigh vacuum under an external tensile stress. A stress of approximately 1 GPa was applied, by pressing on the center of the rear side of the sample. This process produced two protrusions of approximately 100 μm in height, to the left and right of the center. Scanning Auger electron spectroscopy revealed Fe, Cr, Ni, and C impurities at the top of one protrusion, and C at the top of the other. These impurities likely diffused into the tops of the protrusions during heating, and segregated to the local surface during cooling when the protrusions formed. The protrusion formation mechanism is discussed. Their formation was related to non-uniform surface temperature, electromigration, piezoresistivity, freezing-point depression due to surface alloying with the impurities, and volume expansion during solidification from surface melting. These findings provide a perspective on controlling surface structures and compositions using heat and stress to induce self-assembly.

  3. Variability of surface meteorological parameters over the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Fernandes, A.A.

    The trends and periodicities of surface meteorological parameters (sea surface temperature, air temperature, cloudiness, wind speed and sea level pressure) over the western, central, eastern and southern Arabian Sea regions are studied...

  4. Surface Residual Stresses in Ti-6Al-4V Friction Stir Welds: Pre- and Post-Thermal Stress Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, P.; Ramulu, M.

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the residual stresses present in titanium friction stir welds and if a post-weld thermal stress relief cycle would be effective in minimizing those weld-induced residual stresses. Surface residual stresses in titanium 6Al-4V alloy friction stir welds were measured in butt joint thicknesses ranging from 3 to 12 mm. The residual stress states were also evaluated after the welds were subjected to a post-weld thermal stress relief cycle of 760 °C for 45 min. High (300-400 MPa) tensile residual stresses were observed in the longitudinal direction prior to stress relief and compressive residual stresses were measured in the transverse direction. After stress relief, the residual stresses were decreased by an order of magnitude to negligible levels.

  5. Variability of Hormonal Stress Markers and Stress Responses in a Large Cross-Sectional Sample of Elephant Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    increase our understanding of when stress has biologically significant effects on animals and identify potential mediators and mechanisms of those effects...the metabolic influence of cortisol on target tissues is mediated by carrier protein expression, primarily that of CBG. The exact role of CBG in...buffer mediating alterations in circulating corticosteroids. Nevertheless, assessing the level of circulating CBG and its variability over time permits

  6. Low frequency variability of the Indian Ocean from TOPEX/POSEIDON sea surface height anomalies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Somayajulu, Y.K.; Murty, V.S.N.; Sarma, Y.V.B.

    The sea surface height (SSH) anomalies derived from TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter have been utilized to study the variability of surface circulation in the Indian Ocean during 1993-1999. The Western Bay, southeastern Arabian Sea, regions off Somalia...

  7. Quantifying the spatial variability in critical zone architecture through surface mapping and near-surface geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBiase, R.; Del Vecchio, J.; Mount, G.; Hayes, J. L.; Comas, X.; Guo, L.; Lin, H.; Zarif, F.; Forsythe, B.; Brantley, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    The composition and structure of Earth's surface and shallow subsurface control the flux of water, solutes, and sediment from hillslopes into rivers. Additionally, bedrock weathering profiles and the stratigraphy of soil and colluvium preserve a record of past surface processes. However, landscapes often exhibit heterogeneity in critical zone architecture that is difficult to capture with remote sensing and costly to characterize through direct measurement in soil pits or drill cores. Here we present results from a multifaceted approach to quantifying spatial variability in critical zone architecture using airborne lidar topography, surface mapping, and a suite of geophysical surveys. We focus on Garner Run, a first order sandstone catchment in the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory situated in the valley and ridge province of central Pennsylvania, 80 km southwest of the last glacial maximum ice limit. Results from lidar topographic analysis and detailed mapping of surface cover (e.g., soil versus boulder-mantled) reveal a pattern of relict periglacial landforms and deposits that vary depending on slope position and aspect. Additionally, a drill core taken from an unchanneled valley at the head of Garner Run indicates at least 9 meters of alternating sand- and boulder-rich colluvial fill sourced from adjacent hillslopes, indicating the potential preservation of multiple cycles of periglacial climate conditions. Through the use of shallow geophysical techniques, including cross-valley transects of seismic refraction, multiple frequency ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), we image spatial patterns in subsurface architecture at a range of scales (10-1,000 m), and high spatial resolution (cm). Notably, despite challenging environmental conditions, there is agreement among diverse subsurface methods in highlighting aspect-dependent controls on weathering zone thickness that furthermore can be directly connected to

  8. Numerical analysis of residual stress of Al-Mg-Mn-Sc-Zr alloy subjected to surface strengthening by shot peening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Stegliński

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we presented the results of the analysis of the stresses in the Al-Mg5%-Mn1,5%-Sc0,8%-Zr0,4% alloy after shot peening process using solver ANSYSANSYSANSYS LS-Dyna. The computational model illustrates the phenomena occurring as a result of plastic deformation caused by hitting a steel ball on the surface of the analyzed aluminium alloy. We analyzed two input variables: diameter and speed of a ball. The resulting normal stress distribution centred exposes the minimum compressive stress at a position located at a depth point of Belayev 0.125 mm with a value of σ = –345 MPa. Variable parameter shows the correlation of the boundary conditions of minimum stress increase with increasing ball’s diameter and its speed. Selected points of numerical analysis were verified with experimental results.[b]Keywords[/b]: materials science, numerical analysis, metal forming, shot peening, aluminium

  9. Surface properties and exponential stress relaxations of mammalian meibum films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftimov, Petar; Yokoi, Norihiko; Tonchev, Vesselin; Nencheva, Yana; Georgiev, Georgi As

    2017-03-01

    The surface properties of meibomian secretion (MGS), the major constituent of the tear film (TF) lipid layer, are of key importance for TF stability. The interfacial properties of canine, cMGS, and feline, fMGS, meibum films were studied using a Langmuir surface balance. These species were selected because they have blinking frequency and TF stability similar to those of humans. The sample's performance during dynamic area changes was evaluated by surface pressure (π)-area (A) isocycles and the layer structure was monitored with Brewster angle microscopy. The films' dilatational rheology was probed via the stress-relaxation technique. The animal MGS showed similar behavior both between each other and with human MGS (studied previously). They form reversible, non-collapsible, multilayer thick films. The relaxations of canine, feline, and human MGS films were well described by double exponential decay reflecting the presence of two processes: (1) fast elastic process, with characteristic time τ  100 s-emphasizing the meibum layers viscoelasticity. The temperature decrease from 35 to 25 °C resulted in decreased thickness and lateral expansion of all MGS layers accompanied with increase of the π/A hysteresis and of the elastic process contribution to π relaxation transients. Thus, MGS films of mammals with similar blinking frequency and TF stability have similar surface properties and stress relaxations unaltered by the interspecies MGS compositional variations. Such knowledge may impact the selection of animal mimics of human MGS and on a better understanding of lipid classes' impact on meibum functionality.

  10. Assessing surface water availability considering human water use and projected climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Batool; AghaKouchak, Amir; Mousavi-Baygi, Mohammd; Moftakhari, Hamed; Anjileli, Hassan

    2017-04-01

    Climate variability along with anthropogenic activities alter the hydrological cycle and local water availability. The overarching goal of this presentation is to demonstrate the compounding interactions between human water use/withdrawals and climate change and variability. We focus on Karkheh River basin and Urmia basin, in western Iran, that have high level of human activity and water use, and suffer from low water productivity. The future of these basins and their growth relies on sustainable water resources and hence, requires a holistic, basin-wide management to cope with water scarcity challenges. In this study, we investigate changes in the hydrology of the basin including human-induced alterations of the system, during the past three decades. Then, we investigate the individual and combined effects of climate variability and human water withdrawals on surface water storage in the 21st century. We use bias-corrected historical simulations and future projections from ensemble mean of eleven General Circulation Models (GCMs) under two climate change scenarios RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. The results show that, hydrology of the studied basins are significantly dominated by human activities over the baseline period (1976 - 2005). Results show that the increased anthropogenic water demand resulting from substantial socio-economic growth in the past three decades have put significant stress on water resources. We evaluate a number of future water demand scenarios and their interactions with future climate projections. Our results show that by the end of the 21st century, the compounding effects of increased irrigation water demand and precipitation variability may lead to severe local water scarcity in these basins. Our study highlights the necessity for understanding and considering the compounding effects of human water use and future climate projections. Such studies would be useful for improving water management and developing adaption plans in water scarce regions.

  11. Nonlinear Heart Rate Variability features for real-life stress detection. Case study: students under stress due to university examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Paolo; Bracale, Marcello; Pecchia, Leandro

    2011-11-07

    This study investigates the variations of Heart Rate Variability (HRV) due to a real-life stressor and proposes a classifier based on nonlinear features of HRV for automatic stress detection. 42 students volunteered to participate to the study about HRV and stress. For each student, two recordings were performed: one during an on-going university examination, assumed as a real-life stressor, and one after holidays. Nonlinear analysis of HRV was performed by using Poincaré Plot, Approximate Entropy, Correlation dimension, Detrended Fluctuation Analysis, Recurrence Plot. For statistical comparison, we adopted the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test and for development of a classifier we adopted the Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA). Almost all HRV features measuring heart rate complexity were significantly decreased in the stress session. LDA generated a simple classifier based on the two Poincaré Plot parameters and Approximate Entropy, which enables stress detection with a total classification accuracy, a sensitivity and a specificity rate of 90%, 86%, and 95% respectively. The results of the current study suggest that nonlinear HRV analysis using short term ECG recording could be effective in automatically detecting real-life stress condition, such as a university examination.

  12. Nonlinear Heart Rate Variability features for real-life stress detection. Case study: students under stress due to university examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melillo Paolo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigates the variations of Heart Rate Variability (HRV due to a real-life stressor and proposes a classifier based on nonlinear features of HRV for automatic stress detection. Methods 42 students volunteered to participate to the study about HRV and stress. For each student, two recordings were performed: one during an on-going university examination, assumed as a real-life stressor, and one after holidays. Nonlinear analysis of HRV was performed by using Poincaré Plot, Approximate Entropy, Correlation dimension, Detrended Fluctuation Analysis, Recurrence Plot. For statistical comparison, we adopted the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test and for development of a classifier we adopted the Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA. Results Almost all HRV features measuring heart rate complexity were significantly decreased in the stress session. LDA generated a simple classifier based on the two Poincaré Plot parameters and Approximate Entropy, which enables stress detection with a total classification accuracy, a sensitivity and a specificity rate of 90%, 86%, and 95% respectively. Conclusions The results of the current study suggest that nonlinear HRV analysis using short term ECG recording could be effective in automatically detecting real-life stress condition, such as a university examination.

  13. FreezeFramer: A prototype tool to monitor stress and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Samir; Hilton, Brian; Li, Haiqing; Hassan, Taimur; Tulu, Bengisu; McCraty, Rollin

    2007-10-11

    This paper describes the design, architecture, and implementation of a software application, FreezeFramer, developed to help individuals manage stress. The application measures heart rate variability through a finger or earlobe clip-on sensor that reads pulse information. While a detailed subjective evaluation is on going, system performance analyses are reported here.

  14. A longitudinal study in youth of heart rate variability at rest and in response to stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Zhibin; Snieder, Harold; Su, Shaoyong; Ding, Xiuhua; Thayer, Julian F.; Treiber, Frank A.; Wang, Xiaoling

    2009-01-01

    Background: Few longitudinal studies have examined ethnic and sex differences, predictors and tracking stabilities of heart rate variability (HRV) at rest and in response to stress in youths and young adults. Methods: Two evaluations were performed approximately 1.5 years apart on 399 youths and you

  15. Genetic influences on heart rate variability at rest and during stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Ding, Xiuhua; Su, Shaoyong; Li, Zhibin; Riese, Harriette; Thayer, Julian F.; Treiber, Frank; Snieder, Harold

    2009-01-01

    We tested whether the heritability of heart rate variability (HRV) under stress is different from rest and its dependency on ethnicity or gender. HRV indexed by root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) and high-frequency (HF) power was measured at rest and during 3 stressors in 427 Europea

  16. Process variables in organizational stress management intervention evaluation research: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havermans, B.M.; Schelvis, R.M.C.; Boot, C.R.L.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; Anema, J.R.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This systematic review aimed to explore which process variables are used in stress management intervention (SMI) evaluation research. Methods A systematic review was conducted using seven electronic databases. Studies were included if they reported on an SMI aimed at primary or secondary

  17. Process variables in organizational stress management intervention evaluation research : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havermans, B.M.; Schlevis, Roosmarijn Mc; Boot, Cécile Rl; Brouwers, E.P.M.; Anema, Johannes R; van der Beek, Allard J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This systematic review aimed to explore which process variables are used in stress management intervention (SMI) evaluation research. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted using seven electronic databases. Studies were included if they reported on an SMI aimed at primary or

  18. Variability of surface ozone with cloud coverage over Kolkata, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Ghosh; S K Midya; U Sarkar; T Mukherjee

    2015-03-01

    Critical analysis of experimental surface ozone data and cloud coverage is reported over Kolkata during the period January 2011 to December 2011. Significant relationship between these two parameters is observed. Analysis shows that the trend of surface ozone concentration and cloud coverage follow opposite tendency. Some exceptional observations are also reported. Apart from this, seasonal variation of surface ozone with columnar ozone concentration, NO2 and temperature is also examined in relation with cloud cover to obtain a possible explanation of this type of variation.

  19. On the Relation of Earthquake Stress Drop and Ground Motion Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oth, A.; Miyake, H.; Bindi, D.

    2015-12-01

    The physical properties of the seismic source play a major role in the generation of earthquake ground motions. One of the key parameters typically used in this context is the so-called stress drop since it can be directly linked to the high-frequency spectral level of ground motion, and it is an important input parameter for ground motion modeling. At the same time, classically determined stress drop estimates from moment-corner frequency analysis have been shown to be extremely variable, and this to a much larger degree than might be expected from the decomposition of ground motion variability into its between-event and within-event components following the random effects approach (Cotton et al., 2013). This discrepancy raises the question of whether classically determined stress drop variability is too large, which would have significant implications for ground motion prediction in seismic hazard analysis. We use the rich high-quality accelerometric databases available in Japan to derive non-parametric ground motion models on these data that serve as reference models. We then investigate the relation between the between-event terms for the individual earthquakes from these regressions with stress drop estimates determined nation-wide for crustal earthquakes. As a complement to the non-parametric models, we also apply a parametric mixed effects modeling approach to investigate the influence of between-event, between-region and between-sequence variability. The analysis is carried out for JMA equivalent seismic intensity, PGA and PGV data. Our results indicate a clear correlation of the between-event terms with stress drops estimates, both for non-parametric and parametric approaches - however with the interesting effect of the appearance of two major families of events with widely different stress drop, yet similar range of between-event terms. This effect is in agreement with the observation made by Cotton et al. (2013) that the between-event ground motion

  20. Process variables in organizational stress management intervention evaluation research: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havermans, Bo M; Schlevis, Roosmarijn Mc; Boot, Cécile Rl; Brouwers, Evelien Pm; Anema, Johannes; van der Beek, Allard J

    2016-09-01

    This systematic review aimed to explore which process variables are used in stress management intervention (SMI) evaluation research. A systematic review was conducted using seven electronic databases. Studies were included if they reported on an SMI aimed at primary or secondary stress prevention, were directed at paid employees, and reported process data. Two independent researchers checked all records and selected the articles for inclusion. Nielsen and Randall's model for process evaluation was used to cluster the process variables. The three main clusters were context, intervention, and mental models. In the 44 articles included, 47 process variables were found, clustered into three main categories: context (two variables), intervention (31 variables), and mental models (14 variables). Half of the articles contained no reference to process evaluation literature. The collection of process evaluation data mostly took place after the intervention and at the level of the employee. The findings suggest that there is great heterogeneity in methods and process variables used in process evaluations of SMI. This, together with the lack of use of a standardized framework for evaluation, hinders the advancement of process evaluation theory development.

  1. Physical activity, mindfulness meditation, or heart rate variability biofeedback for stress reduction: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwan, Judith Esi; de Vente, Wieke; Huizink, Anja C; Bögels, Susan M; de Bruin, Esther I

    2015-12-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing stress and its related symptoms. We randomly allocated 126 participants to PA, MM, or HRV-BF upon enrollment, of whom 76 agreed to participate. The interventions consisted of psycho-education and an introduction to the specific intervention techniques and 5 weeks of daily exercises at home. The PA exercises consisted of a vigorous-intensity activity of free choice. The MM exercises consisted of guided mindfulness meditation. The HRV-BF exercises consisted of slow breathing with a heart rate variability biofeedback device. Participants received daily reminders for their exercises and were contacted weekly to monitor their progress. They completed questionnaires prior to, directly after, and 6 weeks after the intervention. Results indicated an overall beneficial effect consisting of reduced stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and improved psychological well-being and sleep quality. No significant between-intervention effect was found, suggesting that PA, MM, and HRV-BF are equally effective in reducing stress and its related symptoms. These self-help interventions provide easily accessible help for people with stress complaints.

  2. Emotional contagion, empathic concern and communicative responsiveness as variables affecting nurses' stress and occupational commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omdahl, B L; O'Donnell, C

    1999-06-01

    Based on data gathered from registered nurses at two hospitals, this research examined the extent to which empathy variables contributed to nursing stress and occupational commitment. The empathy variables examined were emotional contagion (i.e. sharing the emotions of patients), empathic concern (i.e. being concerned for patients) and communicative effectiveness (i.e. effectively communicating with patients and their families). Nursing stress was explored through the variables of depersonalization, reduced personal accomplishment and emotional exhaustion. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the combination of the three emotional communication variables explained significant proportions of the variance in all three of the stress variables, as well as occupational commitment. The analyses further revealed that a lack of empathic concern and poor communicative responsiveness accounted for significant proportions of the variance in depersonalization. Lack of empathic concern, poor communicative responsiveness and high emotional contagion significantly contributed to reduced personal accomplishment. Emotional contagion explained a significant proportion of the variance in emotional exhaustion. Emotional contagion also significantly reduced occupational commitment. The findings are discussed in terms of nursing education and administration.

  3. Finite Element Surface Layer Inheritable Condition Residual Stresses Model in Surface Plastic Deformation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalov, M. S.; Blumenstein, V. Yu

    2016-04-01

    The residual stresses (RS) research and computational algorithms creation in complex types of loading on the product lifecycle stages relevance is shown. The RS forming finite element model at surface plastic deformation strengthening machining, including technological inheritance effect, is presented. A model feature is the production previous stages obtained transformation properties consideration, as well as these properties evolution during metal particles displacement through the deformation space in the present loading step.

  4. Aspects to be considered in case of variable surfaces modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihalache Andrei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper triangulation will bring benefits regarding the numerical conditioning of nodes within the point cloud but will also allow certain nodes to be able to move around those that are neighboring them. In this way, surface features as chained regions or curves will have a certain degree of freedom which will allow them to slide one towards another. At a more careful evaluation there is a major drawback in terms of lack of possibility to take into consideration the operations which depend upon approximate shapes inside the ideal shape evaluation process. In order to be able to control the accuracy of the process there is an impetuous need for all surfaces to be described functionally. Any triangulation procedure has to be able to allow control over the analyzed surface topology and any other after modifications: dividing the surface along an incorporated curve in order to define a new edge or sticking two surfaces together in order to form a mutual boundary edge.

  5. Automatic stress-relieving music recommendation system based on photoplethysmography-derived heart rate variability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Il-Hyung; Cha, Jaepyeong; Cheon, Gyeong Woo; Lee, Choonghee; Lee, Seung Yup; Yoon, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Hee Chan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic stress-relieving music recommendation system (ASMRS) for individual music listeners. The ASMRS uses a portable, wireless photoplethysmography module with a finger-type sensor, and a program that translates heartbeat signals from the sensor to the stress index. The sympathovagal balance index (SVI) was calculated from heart rate variability to assess the user's stress levels while listening to music. Twenty-two healthy volunteers participated in the experiment. The results have shown that the participants' SVI values are highly correlated with their prespecified music preferences. The sensitivity and specificity of the favorable music classification also improved as the number of music repetitions increased to 20 times. Based on the SVI values, the system automatically recommends favorable music lists to relieve stress for individuals.

  6. Unpredictable Variable Prenatal Stress Programs Expression of Genes Involved in Appetite Control and Energy Expenditure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, E. L.; Al-Shayeb, B.; Baer, L. A.; Ronca, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to stress in the womb shapes neurobiological and physiological outcomes of offspring in later life, including body weight regulation and metabolic profiles. Our previous work utilizing a centrifugation-induced hyper-gravity demonstrated significantly increased (8-15%) body mass in male, but not female, rats exposed throughout gestation to chronic 2-g from conception to birth. We reported a similar outcome in adult offspring exposed throughout gestation to Unpredictable Variable Prenatal Stress (UVPS). Here we examine gene expression changes and the plasma of animals treated with our UVPS model to identify a potential role for prenatal stress in this hypergravity programming effect. Specifically we focused on appetite control and energy expenditure pathways in prenatally stressed adult (90-day-old) male Sprague-Dawley rats.

  7. Thermodynamical interpretation of the geometrical variables associated with null surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Sumanta

    2015-01-01

    The emergent gravity paradigm interprets gravitational field equations as a describing the thermodynamic limit of the underlying statistical mechanics of microscopic degrees of freedom of the spacetime. The connection is established by attributing a heat density Ts to the null surfaces where T is the appropriate Davies-Unruh temperature and s is the entropy density. The field equations can be obtained from a thermodynamic variational principle which extremises the total heat density of all null surfaces. The explicit form of s determines the nature of the theory. We explore the consequences of this paradigm for an arbitrary null surface and highlight the thermodynamic significance of various geometrical quantities. In particular, we show that: (a) A conserved current, associated with the time development vector in a natural fashion, has direct thermodynamic interpretation in all Lanczos-Lovelock models of gravity. (b) One can generalize the notion of gravitational momentum, introduced in arXiv 1506.03814 to a...

  8. Biofilm retention on surfaces with variable roughness and hydrophobicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone; Pillai, Saju; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2011-01-01

    (SS) was compared to two novel nanostructured sol-gel coatings with differing hydrophobicity. Surfaces were characterized with respect to roughness, hydrophobicity, protein adsorption, biofilm retention, and community composition of the retained bacteria. Fewer bacteria were retained on the sol-gel...... coated surfaces compared to the rougher SS. However, the two sol-gel coatings did not differ in either protein adsorption, biofilm retention, or microbial community composition. When polished to a roughness similar to sol-gel, the SS was colonized by the same amount of bacteria as the sol-gel...

  9. Surface air temperature variability in global climate models

    CERN Document Server

    Davy, Richard

    2012-01-01

    New results from the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) and multiple global reanalysis datasets are used to investigate the relationship between the mean and standard deviation in the surface air temperature. A combination of a land-sea mask and orographic filter were used to investigate the geographic region with the strongest correlation and in all cases this was found to be for low-lying over-land locations. This result is consistent with the expectation that differences in the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere are an important factor in determining the surface air temperature response to forcing.

  10. Mesoscale SST-wind stress coupling in the Peru-Chile current system: Which mechanisms drive its seasonal variability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerder, Vera; Colas, François; Echevin, Vincent; Masson, Sebastien; Hourdin, Christophe; Jullien, Swen; Madec, Gurvan; Lemarié, Florian

    2016-10-01

    Satellite observations and a high-resolution regional ocean-atmosphere coupled model are used to study the air/sea interactions at the oceanic mesoscale in the Peru-Chile upwelling current system. Coupling between mesoscale sea surface temperature (SST) and wind stress (WS) intensity is evidenced and characterized by correlations and regression coefficients. Both the model and the observations display similar spatial and seasonal variability of the coupling characteristics that are stronger off Peru than off Northern Chile, in relation with stronger wind mean speed and steadiness. The coupling is also more intense during winter than during summer in both regions. It is shown that WS intensity anomalies due to SST anomalies are mainly forced by mixing coefficient anomalies and partially compensated by wind shear anomalies. A momentum balance analysis shows that wind speed anomalies are created by stress shear anomalies. Near-surface pressure gradient anomalies have a negligible contribution because of the back-pressure effect related to the air temperature inversion. As mixing coefficients are mainly unchanged between summer and winter, the stronger coupling in winter is due to the enhanced large-scale wind shear that enables a more efficient action of the turbulent stress perturbations. This mechanism is robust as it does not depend on the choice of planetary boundary layer parameterization.

  11. Biofilm retention on surfaces with variable roughness and hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lone; Pillai, Saju; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Schramm, Andreas; Bischoff, Claus; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms on food processing equipment cause food spoilage and pose a hazard to consumers. The bacterial community on steel surfaces in a butcher's shop was characterized, and bacteria representative of this community enriched from minced pork were used to study biofilm retention. Stainless steel (SS) was compared to two novel nanostructured sol-gel coatings with differing hydrophobicity. Surfaces were characterized with respect to roughness, hydrophobicity, protein adsorption, biofilm retention, and community composition of the retained bacteria. Fewer bacteria were retained on the sol-gel coated surfaces compared to the rougher SS. However, the two sol-gel coatings did not differ in either protein adsorption, biofilm retention, or microbial community composition. When polished to a roughness similar to sol-gel, the SS was colonized by the same amount of bacteria as the sol-gel, but the bacterial community contained fewer Pseudomonas cells. In conclusion, biofilm retention was affected more by surface roughness than chemical composition under the condition described in this study.

  12. Climate change projections of heat stress in Europe: From meteorological variables to impacts on productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanueva, Ana; Kotlarski, Sven; Liniger, Mark A.

    2017-04-01

    Future climate change is likely to have important impacts in many socio-economic sectors. In particular, higher summer temperatures or more prolonged heat waves may be responsible for health problems and productivity losses related to heat stress, especially affecting people exposed to such situations (e.g. working under outside settings or in non-acclimatized workplaces). Heat stress on the body under work load and consequently their productivity loss can be described through heat stress indices that are based on multiple meteorological parameters such as temperature, humidity, wind and radiation. Exploring the changes of these variables under a warmer climate is of prime importance for the Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability communities. In particular, the H2020 project HEAT-SHIELD aims at analyzing the impact of climate change on heat stress in strategic industries in Europe (manufacturing, construction, transportation, tourism and agriculture) within an inter-sectoral framework (climate scientists, biometeorologists, physiologists and stakeholders). In the present work we explore present and future heat stress over Europe using an ensemble of the state-of-the-art RCMs from the EURO-CORDEX initiative. Since RCMs cannot be directly used in impact studies due to their partly substantial biases, a standard bias correction method (empirical quantile mapping) is applied to correct the individual variables that are then used to derive heat stress indices. The objectives of this study are twofold, 1) to test the ability of the separately bias corrected variables to reproduce the main characteristics of heat stress indices in present climate conditions and 2) to explore climate change projections of heat stress indices. We use the wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) as primary heat stress index, considering two different versions for indoor (or in the shade, based on temperature and humidity conditions) and outdoor settings (including also wind and radiation). The WBGT

  13. Stress Analysis of Nonhomogeneous Rotating Disc with Arbitrarily Variable Thickness Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdur Rosyid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rotating discs with variable thickness and nonhomogeneous material properties are frequently used in industrial applications. The nonhomogenity of material properties is often caused by temperature change throughout the disc. The governing differential equation presenting this problem contains many variable coefficients so that no possible analytical closed form solution for this problem. Many numerical approaches have been proposed to obtain the solution. However, in this study the Finite Element Method (FEM, which presents a powerful tool for solving such a problem, is used. Thus, a turbine disc modeled by using ax symmetric finite elements was analyzed. But, in order to avoid inaccuracy of the stress calculation quite fine meshing is implemented. The analysis showed that maximum displacement occurs at the boundary of the disc, either at the outer or inner boundary, depending on the loadings. The maximum radial stress occurs at an area in the middle of the disc which has the smallest thickness. In this study, rotational blade load was shown to give the largest contribution to the total displacement and stress. Also, the radial displacement and stress in a disc with variable thickness are found to be affected by the contour of the thickness variation. In general, the results obtained show excellent agreement with the published works.

  14. Variability of surface velocity in the Kuroshio Current and adjacent waters derived from Argos drifter buoys and satellite altimeter data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Chao; WU Dexing; LIN Xiaopei

    2009-01-01

    By combining Argos drifter buoys and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data, the time series of sea-surface velocity fields in the Kuroshio Current (KC) and adjacent regions are established. And the variability of the KC from the Luzon Strait to the Tokara Strait is studied based on the velocity fields. The results show that the dominant variability period varies in different segments of the KC" The primary period near the Luzon Strait and to the east of Taiwan Island is the intra-seasonal time scale; the KC on the continental shelf of the ECS is the steadiest segment without obvious periodicity, while the Tokara Strait shows the period of seasonal variability. The diverse periods are caused by the Rossby waves propagating from the interior ocean, with adjustments in topography of island chain and local wind stress.

  15. General job stress: a unidimensional measure and its non-linear relations with outcome variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankelevich, Maya; Broadfoot, Alison; Gillespie, Jennifer Z; Gillespie, Michael A; Guidroz, Ashley

    2012-04-01

    This article aims to examine the non-linear relations between a general measure of job stress [Stress in General (SIG)] and two outcome variables: intentions to quit and job satisfaction. In so doing, we also re-examine the factor structure of the SIG and determine that, as a two-factor scale, it obscures non-linear relations with outcomes. Thus, in this research, we not only test for non-linear relations between stress and outcome variables but also present an updated version of the SIG scale. Using two distinct samples of working adults (sample 1, N = 589; sample 2, N = 4322), results indicate that a more parsimonious eight-item SIG has better model-data fit than the 15-item two-factor SIG and that the eight-item SIG has non-linear relations with job satisfaction and intentions to quit. Specifically, the revised SIG has an inverted curvilinear J-shaped relation with job satisfaction such that job satisfaction drops precipitously after a certain level of stress; the SIG has a J-shaped curvilinear relation with intentions to quit such that turnover intentions increase exponentially after a certain level of stress.

  16. Use of heart rate variability in monitoring stress and recovery in judo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, José; Alamo, Juan M; García-Massó, Xavier; Buscà, Bernat; López, Jose L; Serra-Añó, Pilar; González, Luís-Millán

    2014-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the effect of different judo training loads on heart rate variability (HRV) measurements, to determine if they can be used as valid indicators in monitoring stress and recovery in judo athletes. Fourteen male national-standard judo athletes were randomly divided into 2 groups, and each group followed a different type of training, namely, a high training load (HTL) and a moderate training load program (MTL). Data collection included HRV measurements, a Recovery Stress Questionnaire for athletes (RESTQ-SPORT), and strength measurements, 4 weeks before and after the training program. The HTL group had lower square root of the mean squared difference of successive RR intervals, very low frequency, high frequency, short-term variability, short-range scaling exponents, general recovery, sport-specific recovery, general stress, maximum strength, maximum power, and higher low/high frequency ratio at posttest compared with pretest (p ≤ 0.05). The HTL group showed lower short-range and long-range scaling exponents, general recovery, sport-specific recovery, and higher general stress than the MTL group in posttest measurements (p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, judo athletes enrolled in an HTL program showed an imbalance of the autonomic nervous system with decreased vagal modulation, together with a decrease in strength parameters, higher markers for stress, and a lower perception of recovery.

  17. Variability of basin scale water resources indicators derived from global hydrological and land surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Micha; Blyth, Eleanor; Schellekens, Jaap

    2016-04-01

    Global hydrological and land-surface models are becoming increasingly available, and as the resolution of these improves, as well how hydrological processes are represented, so does their potential. These offer consistent datasets at the global scale, which can be used to establish water balances and derive policy relevant indicators in medium to large basins, including those that are poorly gauged. However, differences in model structure, model parameterisation, and model forcing may result in quite different indicator values being derived, depending on the model used. In this paper we explore indicators developed using four land surface models (LSM) and five global hydrological models (GHM). Results from these models have been made available through the Earth2Observe project, a recent research initiative funded by the European Union 7th Research Framework. All models have a resolution of 0.5 arc degrees, and are forced using the same WATCH-ERA-Interim (WFDEI) meteorological re-analysis data at a daily time step for the 32 year period from 1979 to 2012. We explore three water resources indicators; an aridity index, a simplified water exploitation index; and an indicator that calculates the frequency of occurrence of root zone stress. We compare indicators derived over selected areas/basins in Europe, Colombia, Southern Africa, the Indian Subcontinent and Australia/New Zealand. The hydrological fluxes calculated show quite significant differences between the nine models, despite the common forcing dataset, with these differences reflected in the indicators subsequently derived. The results show that the variability between models is related to the different climates types, with that variability quite logically depending largely on the availability of water. Patterns are also found in the type of models that dominate different parts of the distribution of the indicator values, with LSM models providing lower values, and GHM models providing higher values in some

  18. Adaptation of endothelial cells to physiologically-modeled, variable shear stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph S Uzarski

    Full Text Available Endothelial cell (EC function is mediated by variable hemodynamic shear stress patterns at the vascular wall, where complex shear stress profiles directly correlate with blood flow conditions that vary temporally based on metabolic demand. The interactions of these more complex and variable shear fields with EC have not been represented in hemodynamic flow models. We hypothesized that EC exposed to pulsatile shear stress that changes in magnitude and duration, modeled directly from real-time physiological variations in heart rate, would elicit phenotypic changes as relevant to their critical roles in thrombosis, hemostasis, and inflammation. Here we designed a physiological flow (PF model based on short-term temporal changes in blood flow observed in vivo and compared it to static culture and steady flow (SF at a fixed pulse frequency of 1.3 Hz. Results show significant changes in gene regulation as a function of temporally variable flow, indicating a reduced wound phenotype more representative of quiescence. EC cultured under PF exhibited significantly higher endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS activity (PF: 176.0±11.9 nmol/10(5 EC; SF: 115.0±12.5 nmol/10(5 EC, p = 0.002 and lower TNF-a-induced HL-60 leukocyte adhesion (PF: 37±6 HL-60 cells/mm(2; SF: 111±18 HL-60/mm(2, p = 0.003 than cells cultured under SF which is consistent with a more quiescent anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic phenotype. In vitro models have become increasingly adept at mimicking natural physiology and in doing so have clarified the importance of both chemical and physical cues that drive cell function. These data illustrate that the variability in metabolic demand and subsequent changes in perfusion resulting in constantly variable shear stress plays a key role in EC function that has not previously been described.

  19. Perceived stress and symptom patterns in early adolescents: the role of mediating variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarcheski, A; Mahon, N E

    1986-12-01

    The relationship between perceived stress and symptom patterns was investigated in 136 seventh and eighth grade boys and girls. Affective-oriented coping and social support, two variables hypothesized as mediators of this relationship, were examined also. Participants completed the Modified Adolescent Life Change Events Questionnaire, the Jalowiec Coping Scale, the PRQ-A Social Support System, and the Symptom Pattern Scale. As predicted, the positive relationship between perceived stress and symptom patterns decreased when controlling for affective-oriented coping, while it increased when controlling for social support. Implications for nursing practice and further theory development are discussed.

  20. Accurate computation of surface stresses and forces with immersed boundary methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goza, Andres; Liska, Sebastian; Morley, Benjamin; Colonius, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Many immersed boundary methods solve for surface stresses that impose the velocity boundary conditions on an immersed body. These surface stresses may contain spurious oscillations that make them ill-suited for representing the physical surface stresses on the body. Moreover, these inaccurate stresses often lead to unphysical oscillations in the history of integrated surface forces such as the coefficient of lift. While the errors in the surface stresses and forces do not necessarily affect the convergence of the velocity field, it is desirable, especially in fluid-structure interaction problems, to obtain smooth and convergent stress distributions on the surface. To this end, we show that the equation for the surface stresses is an integral equation of the first kind whose ill-posedness is the source of spurious oscillations in the stresses. We also demonstrate that for sufficiently smooth delta functions, the oscillations may be filtered out to obtain physically accurate surface stresses. The filtering is applied as a post-processing procedure, so that the convergence of the velocity field is unaffected. We demonstrate the efficacy of the method by computing stresses and forces that converge to the physical stresses and forces for several test problems.

  1. Evaluation of Tire/Surfacing/Base Contact Stresses and Texture Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.J.vdM. Steyn

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tire rolling resistance has a major impact on vehicle fuel consumption. Rolling resistance is the loss of energy due to the interaction between the tire and the pavement surface. This interaction is a complicated combination of stresses and strains which depend on both tire and pavement related factors. These include vehicle speed, vehicle weight, tire material and type, road camber, tire inflation pressure, pavement surfacing texture etc. In this paper the relationship between pavement surface texture depth and tire/surfacing contact stress and area is investigated. Texture depth and tire/surfacing contact stress were measured for a range of tire inflation pressures on five different pavement surfaces. In the analysis the relationship between texture and the generated contact stresses as well as the contact stress between the surfacing and base layer are presented and discussed, and the anticipated effect of these relationships on the rolling resistance of vehicles on the surfacings, and subsequent vehicle fuel economy discussed.

  2. Do physiological and pathological stresses produce different changes in heart rate variability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eBravi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Although physiological (e.g. exercise and pathological (e.g. infection stress affecting the cardiovascular system have both been documented to be associated with a reduction in overall heart rate variability (HRV, it remains unclear if loss of HRV is ubiquitously similar across different domains of variability analysis or if distinct patterns of altered HRV exist depending on the stressor. Using Continuous Individualized Multiorgan Variability Analysis (CIMVATM software, heart rate (HR and four selected measures of variability were measured over time (windowed analysis from two datasets, a set (n=13 of patients who developed systemic infection (i.e. sepsis after bone marrow transplant, and a matched set of healthy subjects undergoing physical exercise under controlled conditions. HR and the four HRV measures showed similar trends in both sepsis and exercise. The comparison through Wilcoxon sign-rank test of the levels of variability at baseline and during the stress (i.e. exercise or after days of sepsis development showed similar changes, except for LF/HF, ratio of power at low and high frequencies (associated with sympathovagal modulation, which was affected by exercise but did not show any change during sepsis. Furthermore, HRV measures during sepsis showed a lower level of correlation with each other, as compared to HRV during exercise. In conclusion, this exploratory study highlights similar responses during both exercise and infection, with differences in terms of correlation and inter-subject fluctuations, whose physiologic significance merits further investigation.

  3. Effect of the residual stresses on surface coercive force in amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, M.; Garcia, J.A.; Carrizo, J.; Elbaile, L. E-mail: elbaile@pinon.ccu.uniovi.es; Santos, J.D

    2000-06-02

    The dependence of the coercivity H{sub c} on the applied stress {sigma} in the surfaces of various amorphous ribbons with positive magnetostriction is studied. The results obtained show that the behaviour of H{sub c}({sigma}) in the surfaces is the same as in the bulk and the minimum of H{sub c}({sigma}) does not depend on the residual stresses. The residual stresses affect the value of the coercive field but not its stress dependence.

  4. Wrinkling vs. scarring: Stress collapse in surface-confined assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grason, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    Confining assemblies to surfaces possessing Gaussian curvature frustrates the microscopic order of the packing, thus introducing mechanical costs for assemblies in such diverse contexts as viral capsids and particle-coated drops. The structure and stability of these systems is complicated by the non-trivial competition between distinct modes of stress relaxation, including ``elastic'' shape deformation of the surface-bound assembly; defect-mediated ``plastic'' reorganization of packing. We consider the interplay between these shape-deformation and defect-relaxation for a model of crystalline patch bound to an adhesive and deformable sphere, where the distinct patterns of relaxation become, respectively, radial chains of dislocations, or ``scars'', and radial wrinkles. Analysis of highly-wrinkled and defect-riddle states reveals remarkably that both modes achieve the identical mechanical state in the limits of vanishing thickness and lattice spacing, and further, that the degeneracy between these modes is lifted only by the microscopic and sub-dominant energetics that select their optimal symmetry. We present a structural relaxation phase diagram that predicts a wrinkle-to-scar transition driven both by increasing substrate stiffness and substrate curvature.

  5. Relaxation training assisted by heart rate variability biofeedback: Implication for a military predeployment stress inoculation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gregory F; Hourani, Laurel; Tueller, Stephen; Kizakevich, Paul; Bryant, Stephanie; Weimer, Belinda; Strange, Laura

    2015-09-01

    Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) is associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms, but PTSD's effects on the autonomic stress response and the potential influence of HRV biofeedback in stress relaxation training on improving PTSD symptoms are not well understood. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of a predeployment stress inoculation training (PRESTINT) protocol on physiologic measures of HRV in a large sample of the military population randomly assigned to experimental HRV biofeedback-assisted relaxation training versus a control condition. PRESTINT altered the parasympathetic regulation of cardiac activity, with experimental subjects exhibiting greater HRV, that is, less arousal, during a posttraining combat simulation designed to heighten arousal. Autonomic reactivity was also found to be related to PTSD and self-reported use of mental health services. Future PRESTINT training could be appropriate for efficiently teaching self-help skills to reduce the psychological harm following trauma exposure by increasing the capacity for parasympathetically modulated reactions to stress and providing a coping tool (i.e., relaxation method) for use following a stressful situation.

  6. Evaluation of Stress Response During Mesiodens Extraction Under General Anesthesia Using Heart Rate Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hye-Won; Hyun, Hong-Keun; Kim, Young-Jae; Kim, Jung-Wook; Shin, Teo Jeon

    2017-05-01

    Stress related to dental treatment can be associated with negative outcomes. Heart rate variability (HRV) is an objective measurement of autonomic nervous system activity. Therefore, HRV was used to identify autonomic nervous system reactions during mesiodens extraction under general anesthesia in children. Electrocardiography was performed with customized software during treatment. HRV parameters were analyzed according to time and frequency domains during each dental procedure (local anesthesia, incision, flap, bone removal, extraction of mesiodens, and suturing). The relations of HRV parameters to age also were determined. Total autonomic nervous system activity decreased markedly after local anesthesia injection. Depending on the responses of sympathetic nerve activity, patients were categorized in a stress group and a nonstress group. The ratio of low-frequency power (LF) to high-frequency power (HF), an indication of sympathetic and parasympathetic balance, increased in the stress group after incision and flap formation. Conversely, the LF/HF ratio decreased during treatment in the nonstress group. However, HR, widely used to evaluate stress responses, did not change statistically during mesiodens extraction in either group. HRV parameters did not differ statistically according to age. The internal stress related to mesiodens extraction can be evaluated more objectively with HRV parameters than with conventional methods. Sympathetic nerve activity in the stress group differed from that in the nonstress group during the treatment procedures. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental Research on Residual Stress in Surface of Silicon Nitride Ceramic Balls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The influence of the residual stress in surface of ceramic balls on the fatigue life is large, because the life of silicon nitride ball bearings is more sensitive to the load acted on the bearings than the life of all-steel ball bearings. In this paper, the influence of thermal stress produced in sintering and mechanical stress formed in lapping process on residual stress in surface of silicon nitride ceramic balls was discussed. The residual compress stress will be formed in the surface of silicon nitride ...

  8. Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Intervention for Reduction of Psychological Stress During the Early Postpartum Period

    OpenAIRE

    Kudo, Naoko; Shinohara, Hitomi; KODAMA, Hideya

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback intervention for reduction of psychological stress in women in the early postpartum period. On postpartum day 4, 55 healthy subjects received a brief explanation about HRV biofeedback using a portable device. Among them, 25 mothers who agreed to implement HRV biofeedback at home were grouped as the biofeedback group, and other 30 mothers were grouped as the control group. At 1 month postpartum, there was a signi...

  9. Environmental enrichment and cafeteria diet attenuate the response to chronic variable stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeni, N; Bassil, M; Fromentin, G; Chaumontet, C; Darcel, N; Tome, D; Daher, C F

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to an enriched environment (EE) or the intake of a highly palatable diet may reduce the response to chronic stress in rodents. To further explore the relationships between EE, dietary intake and stress, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed one of two diets for 5 weeks: high carbohydrate (HC) or "cafeteria" (CAF) (Standard HC plus a choice of highly palatable cafeteria foods: chocolate, biscuits, and peanut butter). In addition, they were either housed in empty cages or cages with EE. After the first two weeks, half of the animals from each group were stressed daily using a chronic variable stress (CVS) paradigm, while the other half were kept undisturbed. Rats were sacrificed at the end of the 5-week period. The effects of stress, enrichment and dietary intake on animal adiposity, serum lipids, and stress hormones were analyzed. Results showed an increase in intra-abdominal fat associated with the CAF diet and an increase in body weight gain associated with both the CAF diet and EE. Furthermore, the increase in ACTH associated with CVS was attenuated in the presence of EE and the CAF diet independently while the stress-induced increase in corticosterone was reduced by the combination of EE and CAF feeding. The present study provides evidence that the availability of a positive environment combined to a highly palatable diet increases resilience to the effects of CVS in rats. These results highlight the important place of palatable food and supportive environments in reducing central stress responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The forcing of southwestern Asia teleconnections by low-frequency sea surface temperature variability during boreal winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoell, Andrew; Funk, Christopher C.; Mathew Barlow,

    2015-01-01

    Southwestern Asia, defined here as the domain bounded by 20°–40°N and 40°–70°E, which includes the nations of Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, is a water-stressed and semiarid region that receives roughly 75% of its annual rainfall during November–April. The November–April climate of southwestern Asia is strongly influenced by tropical Indo-Pacific variability on intraseasonal and interannual time scales, much of which can be attributed to sea surface temperature (SST) variations. The influences of lower-frequency SST variability on southwestern Asia climate during November–April Pacific decadal SST (PDSST) variability and the long-term trend in SST (LTSST) is examined. The U.S. Climate Variability and Predictability Program (CLIVAR) Drought Working Group forced global atmospheric climate models with PDSST and LTSST patterns, identified using empirical orthogonal functions, to show the steady atmospheric response to these modes of decadal to multidecadal SST variability. During November–April, LTSST forces an anticyclone over southwestern Asia, which results in reduced precipitation and increases in surface temperature. The precipitation and tropospheric circulation influences of LTSST are corroborated by independent observed precipitation and circulation datasets during 1901–2004. The decadal variations of southwestern Asia precipitation may be forced by PDSST variability, with two of the three models indicating that the cold phase of PDSST forces an anticyclone and precipitation reductions. However, there are intermodel circulation variations to PDSST that influence subregional precipitation patterns over the Middle East, southwestern Asia, and subtropical Asia. Changes in wintertime temperature and precipitation over southwestern Asia forced by LTSST and PDSST imply important changes to the land surface hydrology during the spring and summer.

  11. Study of the Influence of Formulation Variables in Bioadhesive Emulgels Using Response Surface Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ochoa-Andrade, Ana; Parente, M Emma; Jimenez-Kairuz, Álvaro; Boinbaser, Lucía; Torregrosa, Annibal

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the main formulation variables that influence attributes of bioadhesive emulgels based on a combination of polymers, using response surface methodology (RSM...

  12. Observed variability of sea surface salinity and thermal inversions in the Lakshadweep Sea during contrast monsoons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Johnson, Z.; Salgaonkar, G.; Nisha, K.; Rajan, C.K.; Rao, R.R.

    The sea surface salinity (SSS) of the Lakshadweep Sea (LS) shows large seasonal variability due to horizontal advection of low (high) salinity waters from south (north) during winter (summer) monsoon. The measurements made in the LS during...

  13. Sea Surface Salinity Variability from Simulations and Observations: Preparing for Aquarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, S. Daniel; LeVine, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Oceanic fresh water transport has been shown to play an important role in the global hydrological cycle. Sea surface salinity (SSS) is representative of the surface fresh water fluxes and the upcoming Aquarius mission scheduled to be launched in December 2010 will provide excellent spatial and temporal SSS coverage to better estimate the net exchange. In most ocean general circulation models, SSS is relaxed to climatology to prevent model drift. While SST remains a well observed variable, relaxing to SST reduces the range of SSS variability in the simulations (Fig.1). The main objective of the present study is to simulate surface tracers using a primitive equation ocean model for multiple forcing data sets to identify and establish a baseline SSS variability. The simulated variability scales are compared to those from near-surface argo salinity measurements.

  14. Sea surface temperature variability over North Indian Ocean - A study of two contrasting monsoon seasons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Sathyendranath, S.; Viswambharan, N.K.; Rao, L.V.G.

    Using the satellite derived sea surface temperature (SST) data for 1979 (bad monsoon) and 1983 (good monsoon), the SST variability for two contrasting monsoon seasons is studied. The study indicates that large negative anomalies off the Somali...

  15. Future climate warming increases Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fyke, J.G.; Vizcaino, M.; Lipscomb, W.; Price, S.

    2014-01-01

    The integrated surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) has large interannual variability. Long-term future changes to this variability will affect GrIS dynamics, freshwater fluxes, regional oceanography, and detection of changes in ice volume trends. Here we analyze a simulated

  16. Uniaxial Stress Dependence of the Fermi Surface of Copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesink, Derk Willem

    Form a comprehensive experimental study of quantum oscillations in magnetostriction and torque, values have been deduced for all non-vanishing tetragonal and angular shear strain derivatives for the five principal extremal cross sections of the Fermi surface of copper, viz., the neck and belly normal to {111}, the dogsbone normal to {110} and the rosette and belly normal to {001}. It is found that the neck is most sensitive to angular shear strain, whereas the bellies are most affected by uniform dilation. For the other orbits the magnitudes of shear and dilation derivatives are comparable. The results are self consistent and agree with experimental tensile stress results of Shoenberg and Watts. Earlier magnetostriction results for the neck obtained by Aron and by Slavin can be brought into agreement with the present data by recalculating the former using the presently accepted value of the neck effective mass. The present experimental values are in reasonable agreement with theoretical values calculated by Lee, except for the tetragonal shear derivative of the {001} belly; the theoretical value is about 50% higher than the experimentally determined derivative.

  17. Influence of ENSO-Related Wind Stress Variability on the Coastal Upwelling off Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huaringa, E. E.; Campos, E. J.; Lentini, C. A.

    2005-05-01

    The Eastern Tropical and Subtropical Pacific, particularly the coastal region off the western South America, is negatively affected by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events. The rise of coastal sea temperatures due to the weakening of coastal upwelling causes the reduction of important fish stocks and other coastal resources of economical significance, especially the sardine and anchovy populations. Here, variability in the intensity of upwelling along the Peruvian coast is studied using monthly means of the ERS-1 and ERS-2 scatterometer wind stress. In the study area, the Trade Winds blow predominantly parallel to the coast, making the upwelling system highly sensitive to variability in the intensity of the wind stress. On its turn, the wind stress intensity is expected to suffer strong variation during ENSO periods. In our ongoing work we try to understand the relationship between coastal upwelling and different ENSO events in the 1991-2000 decade. In this period, two warm events where observed, the relatively weaker 1991-1994 and the stronger 97-98 El Niños. In both cases we found that in the region from 12°S to 3°S, the intensity of alongshore wind stress is reduced considerably, with the coastal upwelled waters being replaced by warmer waters. On the other hand, in the region between 12°S and 19°S the coastal upwelling maintains its intensity because only the cross-shore component of the wind stress was reduced. With respect to the two cold events, the 1996-1997 and the 1998-2000 La Niñas, the intensity of the alongshore windstress was higher than the climatological values. This resulted in more intense upwelling in the entire region.

  18. Recommended Reference Genes for Quantitative PCR Analysis in Soybean Have Variable Stabilities during Diverse Biotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Raman; Mittapelly, Priyanka; Cassone, Bryan J; Mamidala, Praveen; Redinbaugh, Margaret G; Michel, Andy

    2015-01-01

    For real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) in soybean, reference genes in different tissues, developmental stages, various cultivars, and under stress conditions have been suggested but their usefulness for research on soybean under various biotic stresses occurring in North-Central U.S. is not known. Here, we investigated the expression stabilities of ten previously recommended reference genes (ABCT, CYP, EF1A, FBOX, GPDH, RPL30, TUA4, TUB4, TUA5, and UNK2) in soybean under biotic stress from Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV), powdery mildew (PMD), soybean aphid (SBA), and two-spotted spider mite (TSSM). BPMV, PMD, SBA, and TSSM are amongst the most common pest problems on soybean in North-Central U.S. and other regions. Reference gene stability was determined using three software algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper) and a web-based tool (RefFinder). Reference genes showed variability in their expression as well as stability across various stressors and the best reference genes were stress-dependent. ABCT and FBOX were found to be the most stable in soybean under both BPMV and SBA stress but these genes had only minimal to moderate stability during PMD and TSSM stress. Expression of TUA4 and CYP was found to be most stable during PMD stress; TUB4 and TUA4 were stable under TSSM stress. Under various biotic stresses on soybean analyzed, GPDH expression was found to be consistently unstable. For all biotic stressors on soybean, we obtained pairwise variation (V2/3) values less than 0.15 which suggested that combined use of the two most stable reference genes would be sufficient for normalization. Further, we demonstrated the utility of normalizing the qRT-PCR data for target genes using the most stable reference genes validated in current study. Following of the recommendations from our current study will enable an accurate and reliable normalization of qRT-PCR data in soybean under biotic stress.

  19. Technical paper: Environmental heat stress in football is increased in synthetic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Fernando Aragón Vargas

    2012-01-01

    Environmental heat stress is the result of ambient temperature, radiation, and relative humidity. During football practice on synthetic surfaces and no roof, solar radiation causes an important temperature increase of the playing surface. This technical note explains how heat stress is calculated according to the WBGT index (which does not consider playing surface temperature), and quantifies the increase in a synthetic surface compared to natural grass on the same site. Football practice sho...

  20. A method for quantitative analysis of spatially variable physiological processes across leaf surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, Mihai; Frank, Thomas D; DeLucia, Evan H

    2006-11-01

    Many physiological processes are spatially variable across leaf surfaces. While maps of photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, gene expression, water transport, and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for individual leaves are readily obtained, analytical methods for quantifying spatial heterogeneity and combining information gathered from the same leaf but with different instruments are not widely used. We present a novel application of tools from the field of geographical imaging to the multivariate analysis of physiological images. Procedures for registration and resampling, cluster analysis, and classification provide a general framework for the analysis of spatially resolved physiological data. Two experiments were conducted to illustrate the utility of this approach. Quantitative analysis of images of chlorophyll fluorescence and the production of ROS following simultaneous exposure of soybean leaves to atmospheric O3 and soybean mosaic virus revealed that areas of the leaf where the operating quantum efficiency of PSII was depressed also experienced an accumulation of ROS. This correlation suggests a causal relationship between oxidative stress and inhibition of photosynthesis. Overlaying maps of leaf surface temperature and chlorophyll fluorescence following a photoinhibition treatment indicated that areas with low operating quantum efficiency of PSII also experienced reduced stomatal conductance (high temperature). While each of these experiments explored the covariance of two processes by overlaying independent images gathered with different instruments, the same procedures can be used to analyze the covariance of information from multiple images. The application of tools from geographic image analysis to physiological processes occurring over small spatial scales will help reveal the mechanisms generating spatial variation across leaves.

  1. A mobile system for quantifying the spatial variability of the surface energy balance: design and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tasser, Erich

    2015-05-01

    We present a mobile device for the quantification of the small-scale (a few square meters) spatial variability in the surface energy balance components and several auxiliary variables of short-statured (ecological research questions. The potential of the new device is demonstrated through four selected case studies, which cover the issues of net radiation heterogeneity within the footprint of eddy covariance flux measurements due to (1) land use and (2) slope and aspect of the underlying surface, (3) controls on landscape-scale variability in soil temperature and albedo and (4) the estimation of evapotranspiration based exclusively on measurements with the mobile device.

  2. Surface Finish and Residual Stresses Induced by Orthogonal Dry Machining of AA7075-T651.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Walid; Songmene, Victor; Bocher, Philippe

    2014-02-28

    The surface finish was extensively studied in usual machining processes (turning, milling, and drilling). For these processes, the surface finish is strongly influenced by the cutting feed and the tool nose radius. However, a basic understanding of tool/surface finish interaction and residual stress generation has been lacking. This paper aims to investigate the surface finish and residual stresses under the orthogonal cutting since it can provide this information by avoiding the effect of the tool nose radius. The orthogonal machining of AA7075-T651 alloy through a series of cutting experiments was performed under dry conditions. Surface finish was studied using height and amplitude distribution roughness parameters. SEM and EDS were used to analyze surface damage and built-up edge (BUE) formation. An analysis of the surface topography showed that the surface roughness was sensitive to changes in cutting parameters. It was found that the formation of BUE and the interaction between the tool edge and the iron-rich intermetallic particles play a determinant role in controlling the surface finish during dry orthogonal machining of the AA7075-T651 alloy. Hoop stress was predominantly compressive on the surface and tended to be tensile with increased cutting speed. The reverse occurred for the surface axial stress. The smaller the cutting feed, the greater is the effect of cutting speed on both axial and hoop stresses. By controlling the cutting speed and feed, it is possible to generate a benchmark residual stress state and good surface finish using dry machining.

  3. Diurnal variability of surface fluxes at an oceanic station in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, Y.V.B.; Rao, D.P.

    Diurnal variability of the surface fluxes and ocean heat content was studied using the time-series data on marine surface meteorological parameters and upper ocean temperature collected at an oceanic station in the Bay of Bengal during 1st to 8th...

  4. Conserved and Variable Functions of the sigma(E Stress Response in Related Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria often cope with environmental stress by inducing alternative sigma (sigma factors, which direct RNA polymerase to specific promoters, thereby inducing a set of genes called a regulon to combat the stress. To understand the conserved and organism-specific functions of each sigma, it is necessary to be able to predict their promoters, so that their regulons can be followed across species. However, the variability of promoter sequences and motif spacing makes their prediction difficult. We developed and validated an accurate promoter prediction model for Escherichia coli sigma(E, which enabled us to predict a total of 89 unique sigma(E-controlled transcription units in E. coli K-12 and eight related genomes. sigma(E controls the envelope stress response in E. coli K-12. The portion of the regulon conserved across genomes is functionally coherent, ensuring the synthesis, assembly, and homeostasis of lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane porins, the key constituents of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. The larger variable portion is predicted to perform pathogenesis-associated functions, suggesting that sigma(E provides organism-specific functions necessary for optimal host interaction. The success of our promoter prediction model for sigma(E suggests that it will be applicable for the prediction of promoter elements for many alternative sigma factors.

  5. Turbulent oscillating channel flow subjected to a free-surface stress.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, W.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Armenio, V.

    2010-01-01

    The channel flow subjected to a wind stress at the free surface and an oscillating pressure gradient is investigated using large-eddy simulations. The orientation of the surface stress is parallel with the oscillating pressure gradient and a purely pulsating mean flow develops. The Reynolds number is

  6. Forcing variables in simulation of transpiration of water stressed plants determined by principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durigon, Angelica; Lier, Quirijn de Jong van; Metselaar, Klaas

    2016-10-01

    To date, measuring plant transpiration at canopy scale is laborious and its estimation by numerical modelling can be used to assess high time frequency data. When using the model by Jacobs (1994) to simulate transpiration of water stressed plants it needs to be reparametrized. We compare the importance of model variables affecting simulated transpiration of water stressed plants. A systematic literature review was performed to recover existing parameterizations to be tested in the model. Data from a field experiment with common bean under full and deficit irrigation were used to correlate estimations to forcing variables applying principal component analysis. New parameterizations resulted in a moderate reduction of prediction errors and in an increase in model performance. Ags model was sensitive to changes in the mesophyll conductance and leaf angle distribution parameterizations, allowing model improvement. Simulated transpiration could be separated in temporal components. Daily, afternoon depression and long-term components for the fully irrigated treatment were more related to atmospheric forcing variables (specific humidity deficit between stomata and air, relative air humidity and canopy temperature). Daily and afternoon depression components for the deficit-irrigated treatment were related to both atmospheric and soil dryness, and long-term component was related to soil dryness.

  7. Red mangrove life history variables along latitudinal and anthropogenic stress gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proffitt, C Edward; Travis, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Mangroves migrate northward in Florida and colonize marshes historically dominated by salt marsh species. In theory, this migration should be facilitated by greater numbers of propagules stemming from increased reproductive activity and greater genetic variability caused by outcrossing. We aimed to determine if stand reproduction and % outcrossing were affected by cold stress (stress increases with latitude), anthropogenic stress (human population density as a proxy), and years since a major hurricane. Further, we wished to determine if mutation rate varied with the stressors and if that affected stand reproduction. Both coasts of Florida from the southern Florida Keys to Tampa Bay on the Gulf of Mexico coast, and Merritt Island on the Atlantic coast. We conducted field surveys of frequency of reproducing trees (104,211 trees surveyed in 102 forested stands), incidence of trees showing albinism in propagules, and% outcrossing estimated from the ratio of albino:normal propagules. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test a conceptual model that served as a multivariate hypothesis. Reproductive frequencies varied by site and increased with latitude although more strongly on the Gulf coast. Our SEM results indicate that outcrossing increases in this predominately selfing species under conditions of cold and anthropogenic stress, and that this increases reproductive output in the population. Further, we find that increased mutation rates suppress stand reproductive output but there is no significant relationship between outcrossing and mutation rate. Tree size responded to stressors but did not affect stand reproduction. Reproduction increased with years since major hurricane. Potential for colonization of northern Florida salt marshes by mangroves is enhanced by increased reproductive rates that provides more propagules and outcrossing that should enhance genetic variation thereby promoting adaptation to novel environmental conditions. Natural (cold) stress

  8. Dispersion in deep polar firn driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Commonly, three mechanisms of firn air transport are distinguished: molecular diffusion, advection, and near-surface convective mixing. Here we identify and describe a fourth mechanism, namely dispersion driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability (or barometric pumping). We use published gas chromatography experiments on firn samples to derive the along-flow dispersivity of firn, and combine this dispersivity with a dynamical air pressure propagation model forced by surface air pre...

  9. A parametric study on the contact stress of half toroidal continuously variable transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nabil Abdulla Attia; QIN Datong; SHI Wankai; LI Huaying

    2003-01-01

    The most general contact in mechanical transmission is the elliptical one. In particular, a toroidal continuously variable transmission (CVT) has an elliptical shape in the contact area under the elastohydrodynamic lubrication regime, where the shearing of the fluid subjects to high contact stress and transmits the power. Many parameters affect the contact service performance of the half toroidal CVT, which include the properties of the contacting material (Young's modulus), operating parameters (input torque and maximum traction coefficient) and geometrical parameters (aspect cavity ratio, curvature ratio and half cone angle of the power roller). In this paper, the contacts between the input disk, the power roller and the output disk are formulated using the classical Hertzian contact theory. Based on the formulated equations, different system parameters, which affect the maximum Hertzian stresses, are compared. The comparative results will provide some observations of the relations between the maximum Hertzian stresses and transmission ratios in the form of graphs. These graphs give useful information for designer to know the maximum Hertzian stress during operation in such s ystems.

  10. Finite Element Analysis and Experiment Research on Surface Residual Stress of Ceramics Grinding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The theoretical model of residual stress of ceramics grinding has been established applying thermal elastoplastic mechanics theory. While grinding at the course of grinding wheel moved along workpiece surface the distributing regulation of residual stress can be simplified into thermal elastioplastic mechanical issue, under the action of the both moving centralized force and heat source. Calculating and evaluating of surface residual stress using current procedure of finite element analysis which has been...

  11. Retrieval of ocean surface wind stress and drag coefficient from spaceborne SAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨劲松; 黄韦艮; 周长宝

    2001-01-01

    A model for retrieval of wind stress and drag coefficient on the sea surface with the data measured by spacebome synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been developed based on the SAR imaging mechanisms of ocean surface capillary waves and short gravity waves. This model consists of radiometric calibration, wind speed retrieval and wind stress and drag coefficient calculation. A Radarsat SAR image has been used to calculate wind stress and drag coeffi cient. Good results have been achieved.

  12. Stress Formation During Self-Assembly of Alkanethiols on Differently Pre-Treated Gold Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Mortensen, Michael Wrang; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2001-01-01

    surface roughness induced by aqua regia etching, resulting in a higher density of adsorption sites. Surfaces cleaned willi oxygen plasma, however, give more reproducible stress change curves. The stress change curves of surfaces cleaned with aqua regia become less stable af ter three subsequent cleanings...... the rate and reproducibility of the adsorption process. Further objectives have been to maximise the stress signal during adsorption and to develop a method for removing sulphur immobilised molecules. Before each adsorption experiment the gold surface was cleaned in aqua regia, or in oxygen plasma....... Adsorption of alkanethiols caused changes in surface stress, which closely followed Langmuir type kinetics. Cleaning with aqua regia generally provides higher adsorption rates and a larger stress change than cleaning with oxygen plasma. Based on AFM imaging, we propose that this is related to a larger...

  13. The depth of pseudotachylyte formation from detailed thermochronology and constraints on coseismic stress drop variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Dobson, K. J.; Mark, D. F.; Shipton, Z. K.; Brodsky, E. E.; Stuart, F. M.

    2012-06-01

    Pseudotachylytes are accepted as recording paleo-seismicity in the rock record. However, the interpretation of the mechanics of faulting based on pseudotachylyte generation is often hindered because the depth at which they form is poorly constrained. Here, we use thermochronology to determine the depth at which pseudotachylytes in the Sierra Nevada, California, formed. The pseudotachylytes formed in ≤10 m long patches over a rupture surface, the rest of which comprised cataclasites that did not melt. The age of the pseudotachylytes is found to be 76.6 ± 0.3 Ma (2σ) from 40Ar/39Ar dating of pristine vein matrix. A suite of thermochronometers define the temperature-time path of the host rock granodiorite from ˜550 to 60°C. When the pseudotachylytes formed, the ambient temperature was 110 to 160°C, implying a depth of ˜2.4 to 6.0 km under typical geothermal gradients. At these depths, the failure stress on optimally oriented faults with Byerlee friction and hydrostatic pore pressure was ≤51 MPa. Following melting, the dynamic stress acting on the fault is the melt shear resistance, which we calculate to be <0.2 MPa, suggesting that the stress drop associated with melting was complete. To conform with seismologically observed dynamic stress drops averaged over an entire rupture (1 to 10 MPa), dynamic stress drop must have varied by at least an order of magnitude between the parts of the fault that melted and those that did not. Constraining the depth of pseudotachylyte formation using thermochronology therefore provides a quantitative estimate of the degree and scale of coseismic stress heterogeneity.

  14. Variability of earthquake stress drop in a subduction setting, the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, Rachel E.; Bannister, Stephen; Ristau, John; Doser, Diane

    2017-01-01

    We calculate stress drops for 176 earthquakes (M2.6-M6.6) from four sequences of earthquakes in New Zealand. Two sequences are within the subducting Pacific plate (2014 Eketahuna and 2005 Upper Hutt), one in the over-riding plate (2013 Cook Strait) and one involved reverse faulting at the subduction interface (2015 Pongaroa). We focus on obtaining precise and accurate measurements of corner frequency and stress drop for the best-recorded earthquakes. We use an empirical Green's function (EGF) approach, and require the EGF earthquakes to be highly correlated (cross-correlation ≥ 0.8) to their respective main shocks. In order to improve the quality, we also stack the spectral ratios and source time functions obtained from the best EGF. We perform a grid search for each individual ratio, and each stacked ratio to obtain quantitative uncertainty measurements, and restrict our analysis to the well-constrained corner frequency measurements. We are able to analyse both P and S waves independently and the high correlation between these measurements strengthens the reliability of our results. We find that there is significant real variability in corner frequency, and hence stress drop, within each sequence; the range of almost 2 orders of magnitude is larger than the uncertainties. The four sequences have overlapping stress drop ranges, and the variability within a sequence is larger than any between different sequences. There is no clear systematic difference in the populations analysed here with tectonic setting. We see no dependence of the stress drop values on depth, time, or magnitude after taking the frequency bandwidth limitations into consideration. Small-scale heterogeneity must therefore exert a more primary influence on earthquake stress drop than these larger scale factors. We confirm that when fitting individual spectral ratios, a corner frequency within a factor of three of the maximum signal frequency is likely to be underestimated. Stacked ratios are

  15. Surface-temperature trends and variability in the low-latitude North Atlantic since 1552

    KAUST Repository

    Saenger, Casey

    2009-06-21

    Sea surface temperature variability in the North Atlantic Ocean recorded since about 1850 has been ascribed to a natural multidecadal oscillation superimposed on a background warming trend1-6. It has been suggested that the multidecadal variability may be a persistent feature6-8, raising the possibility that the associated climate impacts may be predictable7,8. owever, our understanding of the multidecadal ocean variability before the instrumental record is based on interpretations of high-latitude terrestrial proxy records. Here we present an absolutely dated and annually resolved record of sea surface temperature from the Bahamas, based on a 440-year time series of coral growth rates. The reconstruction indicates that temperatures were as warm as today from about 1552 to 1570, then cooled by about 1° C from 1650 to 1730 before warming until the present. Our estimates of background variability suggest that much of the warming since 1900 was driven by anthropogenic forcing. Interdecadal variability with a period of 15-25 years is superimposed on most of the record, but multidecadal variability becomes significant only after 1730. We conclude that the multidecadal variability in sea surface temperatures in the low-latitude western Atlantic Ocean may not be persistent, potentially making accurate decadal climate forecasts more difficult to achieve. © 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  16. Surface-temperature trends and variability in the low-latitude North Atlantic since 1552

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, Casey; Cohen, Anne L.; Oppo, Delia W.; Halley, Robert B.; Carilli, Jessica E.

    2009-07-01

    Sea surface temperature variability in the North Atlantic Ocean recorded since about 1850 has been ascribed to a natural multidecadal oscillation superimposed on a background warming trend. It has been suggested that the multidecadal variability may be a persistent feature, raising the possibility that the associated climate impacts may be predictable. However, our understanding of the multidecadal ocean variability before the instrumental record is based on interpretations of high-latitude terrestrial proxy records. Here we present an absolutely dated and annually resolved record of sea surface temperature from the Bahamas, based on a 440-year time series of coral growth rates. The reconstruction indicates that temperatures were as warm as today from about 1552 to 1570, then cooled by about 1∘C from 1650 to 1730 before warming until the present. Our estimates of background variability suggest that much of the warming since 1900 was driven by anthropogenic forcing. Interdecadal variability with a period of 15-25years is superimposed on most of the record, but multidecadal variability becomes significant only after 1730. We conclude that the multidecadal variability in sea surface temperatures in the low-latitude western Atlantic Ocean may not be persistent, potentially making accurate decadal climate forecasts more difficult to achieve.

  17. Wind influence on surface current variability in the Ibiza Channel from HF Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lana, Arancha; Marmain, Julien; Fernández, Vicente; Tintoré, Joaquin; Orfila, Alejandro

    2016-04-01

    Surface current variability is investigated using 2.5 years of continuous velocity measurements from an high frequency radar (HFR) located in the Ibiza Channel (Western Mediterranean Sea). The Ibiza Channel is identified as a key geographical feature for the exchange of water masses but still poorly documented. Operational, quality controlled, HFR derived velocities are provided by the Balearic Islands Coastal Observing and Forecasting System (SOCIB). They are assessed by performing statistical comparisons with current-meter, ADCP, and surface lagrangian drifters. HFR system does not show significant bias, and its accuracy is in accordance with previous studies performed in other areas. The main surface circulation patterns are deduced from an EOF analysis. The first three modes represent almost 70 % of the total variability. A cross-correlation analysis between zonal and meridional wind components and the temporal amplitudes of the first three modes reveal that the first two modes are mainly driven by local winds, with immediate effects of wind forcing and veering following Ekman effect. The first mode (37 % of total variability) is the response of meridional wind while the second mode (24 % of total variability) is linked primarily with zonal winds. The third and higher order modes are related to mesoscale circulation features. HFR derived surface transport presents a markedly seasonal variability being mostly southwards. Its comparison with Ekman-induced transport shows that wind contribution to the total surface transport is on average around 65 %.

  18. Heart Rate Variability as an Indicator of Chronic Stress Caused by Lameness in Dairy Cows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levente Kovács

    Full Text Available Most experimental studies on animal stress physiology have focused on acute stress, while chronic stress, which is also encountered in intensive dairy cattle farming--e.g. in case of lameness--, has received little attention. We investigated heart rate (HR and heart rate variability (HRV as indicators of the autonomic nervous system activity and fecal glucocorticoid concentrations as the indicator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in lame (with locomotion scores 4 and 5; n = 51 and non-lame (with locomotion scores 1 and 2; n = 52 Holstein-Friesian cows. Data recorded during the periods of undisturbed lying--representing baseline cardiac activity--were involved in the analysis. Besides linear analysis methods of the cardiac inter-beat interval (time-domain geometric, frequency domain and Poincaré analyses non-linear HRV parameters were also evaluated. With the exception of standard deviation 1 (SD1, all HRV indices were affected by lameness. Heart rate was lower in lame cows than in non-lame ones. Vagal tone parameters were higher in lame cows than in non-lame animals, while indices of the sympathovagal balance reflected on a decreased sympathetic activity in lame cows. All geometric and non-linear HRV measures were lower in lame cows compared to non-lame ones suggesting that chronic stress influenced linear and non-linear characteristics of cardiac function. Lameness had no effect on fecal glucocorticoid concentrations. Our results demonstrate that HRV analysis is a reliable method in the assessment of chronic stress, however, it requires further studies to fully understand the elevated parasympathetic and decreased sympathetic tone in lame animals.

  19. Tibiofemoral joint subchondral surface conformity: Individual variability with race and sex-specific trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Joshua S; Flanigan, David C; Chaudhari, Ajit M W; Siston, Robert A

    2016-10-01

    Femoral and tibial subchondral surface morphology has been extensively studied to aid in anatomically correct total knee arthroplasty (TKA) implant design. Emphasis has been placed on shape variations in individual bones, and person-to-person variability in joint conformity has been overlooked. The purpose of this study is to 1) determine individual variability in key measures of tibiofemoral joint conformity, and 2) determine whether variability differs by sex or race. Laser-scanner-generated surface models of tibiofemoral joints were obtained from 165 archival skeletons (at death: age 28.8±7.6years; 85 African-American, 80 Caucasian, 86 men, 79 women). Ratios and correlations were determined among related femoral and tibial subchondral surface areas (SA), alignment, curvatures, and linear dimensions between opposing surfaces with stratification by race and sex. Anterior-posterior length (R=0.80, pconformity at the subchondral surface, and for some measures this variability is sex-or-race specific. Key measures of joint conformity including surface area, curvature, width, and depth covary weakly or not at all, and a wide range of TKA component sizes and shapes would be required to accurately replicate native joint conformity in most people. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A coral-based reconstruction of Atlantic sea surface temperature trends and variability since 1552 (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, C. P.; Cohen, A. L.; Oppo, D.; Carilli, J.; Halley, R. B.

    2009-12-01

    North Atlantic sea-surface temperature (SST) variability can have a near global impact on climate. Observed variability has been described as a natural multidecadal (65-100 year) oscillation superimposed upon a linearly- increasing, externally-forced background warming. The multidecadal portion of this variability may be persistent, suggesting useful decadal climate predictions may soon be possible. However, our understanding of multidecadal Atlantic SST variability prior to the brief instrumental record relies almost exclusively on high latitude tree-ring proxies. No proxy SST reconstruction from the Atlantic itself has the resolution, dating accuracy and length needed to assess the behavior of multidecadal variability. We present the first absolutely dated and annually-resolved multi-centennial record of Atlantic sea surface temperature. Our 439-year coral-based reconstruction suggests western low-latitude Atlantic SSTs were nearly as warm as today from ~1552-1570 A.D., cooled by more than 1°C from ~1650-1730 A.D. and generally warmed to the present. Estimates of externally-forced background variability suggest that anthropogenic forcing can account for most of the warming since 1850 A.D. Multidecadal variations superimposed upon this background disappear prior to ~1730 A.D. in favor of interdecadal (15-20 year) variability. This suggests observed multidecadal variability is not persistent and may be difficult to predict.

  1. Surface stress relaxation of oxide glasses: The effects on mechanical strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezzi, Peter Joseph

    A new glass strengthening mechanism based upon surface compressive stress formation by surface stress relaxation of glasses that were held under a tensile stress, at a temperature lower than the glass transition temperature, in low water vapor pressure, has been demonstrated. Although glass fibers are traditionally known to become mechanically weaker when heat-treated at a temperature lower than the glass transition temperature in the presence of water vapor, the strength was found to become greater than the as-received fiber strength when fibers were subjected to a sub-critical tensile stress during heat-treatment. The observed strengthening was attributed to surface compressive residual stress formation through surface stress relaxation during the sub-critical tensile stress application in the atmosphere containing water vapor. Surface stress relaxation of the same glass fibers was shown to take place under conditions identical to those experienced by the strengthened mechanical test specimens by observing permanent bending of the fiber. Furthermore, the magnitude and presence of the residual stresses formed during bending or tensile heat-treatments were confirmed by FTIR, fiber etching, and fiber slicing methods. The method can in principle be used to strengthen any oxide glass and is not subjected to the constraints of traditional strengthening methods such as a minimum thickness for tempering, or a glass containing alkali ions for ion-exchange. Thus far, the method has been successful in strengthening silica glass, E-glass, and soda-lime silicate glass by approximately 20-30%.

  2. Mesoscale Near-Surface Wind Speed Variability Mapping with Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, George; Sikora, Todd; Winstead, Nathaniel

    2008-11-05

    Operationally-significant wind speed variability is often observed within synthetic aperture radar-derived wind speed (SDWS) images of the sea surface. This paper is meant as a first step towards automated distinguishing of meteorological phenomena responsible for such variability. In doing so, the research presented in this paper tests feature extraction and pixel aggregation techniques focused on mesoscale variability of SDWS. A sample of twenty eight SDWS images possessing varying degrees of near-surface wind speed variability were selected to serve as case studies. Gaussian high- and low-pass, local entropy, and local standard deviation filters performed well for the feature extraction portion of the research while principle component analysis of the filtered data performed well for the pixel aggregation. The findings suggest recommendations for future research.

  3. Detection of land surface memory by correlations between thickness of colluvial deposits and morphometric variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitusov, A. V.; Dreibrodt, S.; Mitusova, O. E.; Khamnueva, S. V.; Bork, H.-R.

    2013-06-01

    Some morphometric variables store information about past land surfaces longer than others. This property of morphometric variables is recognised as land surface memory. Slope deposits, soils, and vegetation also have this memory. In this study, a memory effect was quantitatively detected by Spearman correlations between thickness of colluvium and morphometric variables of the modern land surface. During long-term sedimentation, the sign of horizontal curvature (kh) may be inverted from minus to plus, suggesting that locations with positive kh values are not accumulation zones. However, the thickness of colluvial deposits at such locations in our study area indicates sediment accumulation. The sign of minimal curvature (kmin) tends to be more stable and remains negative. This difference provides the stronger correlation of colluvial layer thickness with kmin than with kh. The strongest correlation was found for total thickness of the colluvial deposits of the Neolithic and Iron Age with kmin (- 0.84); the correlation with kh was weaker (- 0.71).

  4. Modeling neuroendocrine stress reactivity in salivary cortisol: adjusting for peak latency variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Duran, Nestor L; Mayer, Stefanie E; Abelson, James L

    2014-07-01

    In this report, we present growth curve modeling (GCM) with landmark registration as an alternative statistical approach for the analysis of time series cortisol data. This approach addresses an often-ignored but critical source of variability in salivary cortisol analyses: individual and group differences in the time latency of post-stress peak concentrations. It allows for the simultaneous examination of cortisol changes before and after the peak while controlling for timing differences, and thus provides additional information that can help elucidate group differences in the underlying biological processes (e.g., intensity of response, regulatory capacity). We tested whether GCM with landmark registration is more sensitive than traditional statistical approaches (e.g., repeated measures ANOVA--rANOVA) in identifying sex differences in salivary cortisol responses to a psychosocial stressor (Trier Social Stress Test--TSST) in healthy adults (mean age 23). We used plasma ACTH measures as our "standard" and show that the new approach confirms in salivary cortisol the ACTH finding that males had longer peak latencies, higher post-stress peaks but a more intense post-peak decline. This finding would have been missed if only saliva cortisol was available and only more traditional analytic methods were used. This new approach may provide neuroendocrine researchers with a highly sensitive complementary tool to examine the dynamics of the cortisol response in a way that reduces risk of false negative findings when blood samples are not feasible.

  5. Mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction variably increases oxidant stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingley, Stephen; Polyak, Erzsebet; Lightfoot, Richard; Ostrovsky, Julian; Rao, Meera; Greco, Todd; Ischiropoulos, Harry; Falk, Marni J

    2010-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and associated oxidant stress have been linked with numerous complex diseases and aging largely by in vitro determination of mitochondria oxidant production and scavenging. We applied targeted in vivo fluorescence analyses of mitochondria-dense pharyngeal tissue in Caenorhabditis elegans to better understand relative mitochondrial effects, particularly on matrix oxidant burden, of respiratory chain complex, MnSOD, and insulin receptor mutants displaying variable longevity. The data demonstrate significantly elevated in vivo matrix oxidant burden in the short-lived complex I mutant, gas-1(fc21), which was associated with limited superoxide scavenging capacity despite robust MnSOD induction, as well as decreased mitochondria content and membrane potential. Significantly increased MnSOD activity was associated with in vivo matrix oxidant levels similar to wild-type in the long-lived respiratory chain complex III mutant, isp-1(qm150). Yet, despite greater superoxide scavenging capacity in the complex III mutant than in the significantly longer-lived insulin receptor mutant, daf-2(e1368), only the former showed modest oxidative stress sensitivity. Furthermore, increased longevity was seen in MnSOD knockout mutants (sod-2(ok1030) and sod-2(gk257)) that had decreased MnSOD scavenging capacity and increased in vivo matrix oxidant burden. Thus, factors beside oxidant stress must underlie RC mutant longevity in C. elegans. This work highlights the utility of the C. elegans model as a tractable means to non-invasively monitor multi-dimensional in vivo consequences of primary mitochondrial dysfunction.

  6. Impact of Surface Chemistry on Grain Boundary Induced Intrinsic Stress Evolution during Polycrystalline Thin Film Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Y.; Sheldon, B. W.; Guo, H.; Xiao, X.; Kothari, A. K.

    2009-02-01

    First principles calculations were integrated with cohesive zone and growth chemistry models to demonstrate that adsorbed species can significantly alter stresses associated with grain boundary formation during polycrystalline film growth. Using diamond growth as an example, the results show that lower substrate temperatures increase the hydrogen content at the surface, which reduces tensile stress, widens the grain boundary separations, and permits additional atom insertions that can induce compressive stress. More generally, this work demonstrates that surface heteroatoms can lead to behavior which is not readily described by existing models of intrinsic stress evolution.

  7. Spatial variability of surface temperature as related to cropping practice with implications for irrigation management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, J. L.; Millard, J. P.; Reginato, R. J.; Jackson, R. D.; Idso, S. B.; Pinter, P. J., Jr.; Goettelman, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Crop stress measured using thermal infrared emission is evaluated with the stress-degree-day (SDD) concept. Throughout the season, the accumulation of SDD during the reproductive stage of growth is inversely related to yield. This relationship is shown for durum wheat, hard red winter wheat, barley, grain sorghum and soybeans. It is noted that SDD can be used to schedule irrigations for maximizing yields and for applying remotely sensed data to management of water resources. An airborne flight with a thermal-IR scanner was used to examine the variability in temperature that may exist from one field to another and to determine realistic within-field temperature variations. It was found that the airborne and the ground-based data agreed very well and that there was less variability in the fields that were completely covered with crops than those of bare soil.

  8. Which Surface Atmospheric Variable Drives the Seasonal Cycle of Sea Surface Temperature over the Global Ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-03

    8217 J. . , ...J* j. ... short (e.g., diurnal) time scales but can also change the ble spatial and temporal variability over the global...Hydrographic Clima - tology (PHC) to keep the evaporation-precipitation balance on track in the model. The PHC climatology is chosen for its... temporal varia- tions in water turbidity [Kara et al, 2005a]. This scheme is designed to improve the simulation of upper ocean quanti- ties

  9. Technical paper: Environmental heat stress in football is increased in synthetic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Aragón Vargas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Environmental heat stress is the result of ambient temperature, radiation, and relative humidity. During football practice on synthetic surfaces and no roof, solar radiation causes an important temperature increase of the playing surface. This technical note explains how heat stress is calculated according to the WBGT index (which does not consider playing surface temperature, and quantifies the increase in a synthetic surface compared to natural grass on the same site. Football practice should be avoided during those hours with the highest solar radiation and temperature on this type of surface.

  10. Structural and functional variability within the canopyand its relevance for carbon gain and stress avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Christiane; Ryel, Ronald J.; Correia, Otília; Beyschlag, Wolfram

    2001-04-01

    The functional variability in leaf angle distribution within the canopy was analysed with respect to regulation of light interception and photoprotection. Leaf orientation strongly determined the maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII (F v/F m) during summer: horizontal leaves were highly photoinhibited whereas vertical leaf orientation protected the leaves from severe photoinhibition. The importance of leaf orientation within the canopy was analysed in two Mediterranean macchia species with distinct strategies for drought and photoinhibition avoidance during summer. The semi-deciduous species ( Cistus monspeliensis) exhibited strong seasonal but minimal spatial variability in leaf orientation. Reversible structural regulation of light interception by vertical leaf orientation during summer protected the leaves from severe photoinhibition. The evergreen sclerophyll ( Quercus coccifera) exhibited high spatial variability in leaf angle distribution throughout the year and was less susceptible to photoinhibition. The importance of both strategies for plant primary production was analysed with a three-dimensional canopy photoinhibition model (CANO-PI). Simulations indicated that high variability in leaf angle orientation in Q. coccifera resulted in whole-plant carbon gain during the summer, which was 94 % of the maximum rate achieved by theoretical homogeneous leaf orientations. The high spatial variability in leaf angle orientation may be an effective compromise between efficient light harvesting and avoidance of excessive radiation in evergreen plants and may optimize annual primary production. Whole plant photosynthesis was strongly reduced by water stress and photoinhibition in C. monspeliensis; however, the simulations indicated that growth-related structural regulation of light interception served as an important protection against photoinhibitory reduction in whole-plant carbon gain.

  11. Geometrical Considerations for Piezoresistive Microcantilever Response to Surface Stress during Chemical Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loui, A; Goericke, F; Ratto, T; Lee, J; Hart, B; King, W

    2008-04-25

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested five piezoresistive cantilever configurations to investigate the effect of shape and piezoresistor placement on the sensitivity of microcantilevers under either point loading and surface stress loading. The experimental study reveals that: (1) high aspect ratio cantilevers that are much longer than they are wide are optimal for point-loading applications such as microscopy and force measurements; (2) low aspect ratio cantilevers that are short and wide are optimal for surface stress loading scenarios such as those that occur in biological and chemical sensor applications. The sensitivity data for both point loads and surface stress are consistent with previously developed finite-element models.

  12. A stress tensor eigenvector projection space for the (H2O)5 potential energy surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tianlv; Farrell, James; Momen, Roya; Azizi, Alireza; Kirk, Steven R.; Jenkins, Samantha; Wales, David J.

    2017-01-01

    A stress tensor eigenvector projection space is created to describe reaction pathways on the (H2O)5 MP2 potential energy surface. Evidence for the stabilizing role of the O--O bonding interactions is found from the length of the recently introduced stress tensor trajectory in the stress tensor eigenvector projection space. The stress tensor trajectories demonstrate coupling behavior of the adjoining covalent (σ) O-H and hydrogen bonds due to sharing of covalent character. Additionally, the stress tensor trajectories can show dynamic coupling effects of pairs of σ bonds and of pairs of hydrogen bonds.

  13. Experimental measurements of surface damage and residual stresses in micro-engineered plasma facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, David; Wirz, Richard E.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2017-04-01

    The thermomechanical damage and residual stresses in plasma-facing materials operating at high heat flux are experimentally investigated. Materials with micro-surfaces are found to be more resilient, when exposed to cyclic high heat flux generated by an arc-jet plasma. An experimental facility, dedicated to High Energy Flux Testing (HEFTY), is developed for testing cyclic heat flux in excess of 10 MW/m2. We show that plastic deformation and subsequent fracture of the surface can be controlled by sample cooling. We demonstrate that W surfaces with micro-pillar type surface architecture have significantly reduced residual thermal stresses after plasma exposure, as compared to those with flat surfaces. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of the W-(110) peak reveal that broadening of the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) for micro-engineered samples is substantially smaller than corresponding flat surfaces. Spectral shifts of XRD signals indicate that residual stresses due to plasma exposure of micro-engineered surfaces build up in the first few cycles of exposure. Subsequent cyclic plasma heat loading is shown to anneal out most of the built-up residual stresses in micro-engineered surfaces. These findings are consistent with relaxation of residual thermal stresses in surfaces with micro-engineered features. The initial residual stress state of highly polished flat W samples is compressive (≈ -1.3 GPa). After exposure to 50 plasma cycles, the surface stress relaxes to -1.0 GPa. Micro-engineered samples exposed to the same thermal cycling show that the initial residual stress state is compressive at (- 250 MPa), and remains largely unchanged after plasma exposure.

  14. Dispersion in deep polar firn driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Commonly, three mechanisms of firn air transport are distinguished: molecular diffusion, advection, and near-surface convective mixing. Here we identify and describe a fourth mechanism, namely dispersion driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability (or barometric pumping). We use published gas chromatography experiments on firn samples to derive the along-flow dispersivity of firn, and combine this dispersivity with a dynamical air pressure propagation model forced ...

  15. A Study on the Relationships among Surface Variables to Adjust the Height of Surface Temperature for Data Assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J. H.; Song, H. J.; Han, H. J.; Ha, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    The observation processing system, KPOP (KIAPS - Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems - Package for Observation Processing) have developed to provide optimal observations to the data assimilation system for the KIAPS Integrated Model (KIM). Currently, the KPOP has capable of processing almost all of observations for the KMA (Korea Meteorological Administration) operational global data assimilation system. The height adjustment of SURFACE observations are essential for the quality control due to the difference in height between observation station and model topography. For the SURFACE observation, it is usual to adjust the height using lapse rate or hypsometric equation, which decides values mainly depending on the difference of height. We have a question of whether the height can be properly adjusted following to the linear or exponential relationship solely with regard to the difference of height, with disregard the atmospheric conditions. In this study, firstly we analyse the change of surface variables such as temperature (T2m), pressure (Psfc), humidity (RH2m and Q2m), and wind components (U and V) according to the height difference. Additionally, we look further into the relationships among surface variables . The difference of pressure shows a strong linear relationship with difference of height. But the difference of temperature according to the height shows a significant correlation with difference of relative humidity than with the height difference. A development of reliable model for the height-adjustment of surface temperature is being undertaken based on the preliminary results.

  16. Large-scale stress factors affecting coral reefs: open ocean sea surface temperature and surface seawater aragonite saturation over the next 400 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, K. J.; Lippmann, T.; Sen Gupta, A.

    2012-06-01

    One-third of the world's coral reefs have disappeared over the last 30 years, and a further third is under threat today from various stress factors. The main global stress factors on coral reefs have been identified as changes in sea surface temperature (SST) and changes in surface seawater aragonite saturation (Ωarag). Here, we use a climate model of intermediate complexity, which includes an ocean general circulation model and a fully coupled carbon cycle, in conjunction with present-day observations of inter-annual SST variability to investigate three IPCC representative concentration pathways (RCP 3PD, RCP 4.5, and RCP 8.5), and their impact on the environmental stressors of coral reefs related to open ocean SST and open ocean Ωarag over the next 400 years. Our simulations show that for the RCP 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios, the threshold of 3.3 for zonal and annual mean Ωarag would be crossed in the first half of this century. By year 2030, 66-85% of the reef locations considered in this study would experience severe bleaching events at least once every 10 years. Regardless of the concentration pathway, virtually every reef considered in this study (>97%) would experience severe thermal stress by year 2050. In all our simulations, changes in surface seawater aragonite saturation lead changes in temperatures.

  17. Processing word prosody – behavioral and neuroimaging evidence for heterogeneous performance in a language with variable stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam eHeisterueber

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present behavioral and fMRI study, we investigated for the first time interindividual variability in word stress processing in a language with variable stress position (German in order to identify behavioral predictors and neural correlates underlying these differences. It has been argued that speakers of languages with variable stress should perform relatively well in tasks tapping into the representation and processing of word stress, given that this is a relevant feature of their language. Nevertheless, in previous studies on word stress processing large degrees of interindividual variability have been observed but were ignored or left unexplained.Twenty-five native speakers of German performed a sequence recall task using both segmental and suprasegmental stimuli. In general, the suprasegmental condition activated a subcortico-cortico-cerebellar network including, amongst others, bilateral inferior frontal gyrus, insula, precuneus, cerebellum, the basal ganglia, pre-SMA and SMA, which has been suggested to be dedicated to the processing of temporal aspects of speech. However, substantial interindividual differences were observed. In particular, main effects of group were observed in the left middle temporal gyrus (below vs. above average performance in stress processing and in the left precuneus (above vs. below average. Moreover, condition (segmental vs. suprasegmental and group (above vs. below average interacted in the right hippocampus and cerebellum. At the behavioral level, differences in word stress processing could be partly explained by individual performance in basic auditory perception including duration discrimination and by working memory performance (WM.We conclude that even in a language with variable stress, interindividual differences in behavioral performance and in the neuro-cognitive foundations of stress processing can be observed which may partly be traced back to individual basic auditory processing and WM

  18. Processing word prosody-behavioral and neuroimaging evidence for heterogeneous performance in a language with variable stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisterueber, Miriam; Klein, Elise; Willmes, Klaus; Heim, Stefan; Domahs, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In the present behavioral and fMRI study, we investigated for the first time interindividual variability in word stress processing in a language with variable stress position (German) in order to identify behavioral predictors and neural correlates underlying these differences. It has been argued that speakers of languages with variable stress should perform relatively well in tasks tapping into the representation and processing of word stress, given that this is a relevant feature of their language. Nevertheless, in previous studies on word stress processing large degrees of interindividual variability have been observed but were ignored or left unexplained. Twenty-five native speakers of German performed a sequence recall task using both segmental and suprasegmental stimuli. In general, the suprasegmental condition activated a subcortico-cortico-cerebellar network including, amongst others, bilateral inferior frontal gyrus, insula, precuneus, cerebellum, the basal ganglia, pre-SMA and SMA, which has been suggested to be dedicated to the processing of temporal aspects of speech. However, substantial interindividual differences were observed. In particular, main effects of group were observed in the left middle temporal gyrus (below vs. above average performance in stress processing) and in the left precuneus (above vs. below average). Moreover, condition (segmental vs. suprasegmental) and group (above vs. below average) interacted in the right hippocampus and cerebellum. At the behavioral level, differences in word stress processing could be partly explained by individual performance in basic auditory perception including duration discrimination and by working memory performance (WM). We conclude that even in a language with variable stress, interindividual differences in behavioral performance and in the neuro-cognitive foundations of stress processing can be observed which may partly be traced back to individual basic auditory processing and WM performance.

  19. Investigation of contact-induced charging kinetics on variably modified glass surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnello, G., E-mail: agnellogp@corning.com [Science and Technology Division, Corning Incorporated, Corning, NY 14831 (United States); New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, NY 14802 (United States); Hamilton, J.; Manley, R.; Streltsova, E. [Science and Technology Division, Corning Incorporated, Corning, NY 14831 (United States); LaCourse, W.; Cormack, A. [New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, NY 14802 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • Flat glass surfaces with different treatments were assessed for contact charge behavior. • Charging kinetics are believed to be highly dependent on surface reactivity with atmospheric water. • A proton driven model is proposed to account for charge transfer in metal–glass contact systems. - Abstract: The accumulation and dissipation of electrical charge on glass surfaces is of considerable academic and industrial interest. The purpose of the present article, is to report on the differences in charging kinetics of several flat alumina-borosilicate (low alkali content) glass surfaces via a rolling sphere test (RST) [1] that have been physically and/or chemically modified by different approaches and exposed to variable environmental conditions (i.e. relative humidity). Methods used for surface modification include chemical etching (HF based chemistries of variable molarity) and plasma processing/thin film deposition (CH4 via Reactive Ion Etch (RIE) and/or Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (APPCVD)). Trends in glass surface charge rates, along with corresponding surface resistivity, energy and zeta potential measurements indicate that glass surface, and perhaps bulk, chemistry (specifically a surface’ reactivity/affinity with/to water) play critical roles in charge dynamics. Based on the results, we propose an ion-based transfer model facilitated by surface–water molecular interactions as the primary mechanism responsible for contact electrification in glass–metal contact systems.

  20. Variable aberration generator using a high-order even aspheric singlet for testing optical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jinfeng; Chen, Shanyong; Xue, Shuai

    2016-10-01

    Traditional null optics is generally designed for a particular optical surface. It must be redesigned when the test surface is changed no matter the null optic is reflective, transmitted or a CGH. Development of advanced optical machining and testing based on deterministic figuring and null test makes it possible to apply high-order aspheres. This paper presents a plano-concave singlet to realize variable aberration correction for testing different surfaces. The concave surface is an even asphere with high-order terms. By changing the axial distances among the transmission sphere, the null singlet and the test surface, variable aberrations are generated to meet the aberration balance requirement for various surfaces. The residual aberrations are confirmed within the vertical dynamic range of measurement of the interferometer. It enables flexible testing of optical surfaces without dedicated null optics. The optical design verifies that the aspheric singlet can be used to test conic surfaces with different conic constant and radius of curvature ranging from ellipsoid, paraboloid to hyperboloid and an even asphere.

  1. Stress levels of student population in Costa Rica. Differences according to socioeconomic, academic achievement, educational level, and geographic location variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Belhumeur

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available : In this paper are described the stress levels of the student population about the variables: socioeconomic status, academic performance, academic level, geographical area and gender. For this purpose, a survey was administered to a randomized sample of 112 students of different careers from the main campus of the University of Costa Rica. Results showed that the major sources of stress in students are academic and financial pressures. Also, results showed that students whose place of origin is far from the main campus of the university have higher levels of stress and finally, women tend to handle higher levels of stress than men.

  2. Introduction of Enhanced Compressive Residual Stress Profiles in Aerospace Components Using Combined Mechanical Surface Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Abhay; Lim, Andre; Nagarajan, Balasubramanian; Cher Wong, Chow; Maiti, Rajarshi; Castagne, Sylvie

    2016-11-01

    Mechanical surface treatments such as Shot Peening (SP) and Deep Cold Rolling (DCR) are being used to introduce Compressive Residual Stress (CRS) at the surface and subsurface layers of aerospace components, respectively. This paper investigates the feasibility of a combined introduction of both the surface and sub-surface compressive residual stress on Ti6Al4V material through a successive application of the two aforementioned processes, one after the other. CRS profiles between individual processes were compared to that of combination of processes to validate the feasibility. It was found out that shot peening introduces surface compressive residual stress into the already deep cold rolled sample, resulting in both surface and sub-surface compressive residual stresses in the material. However the drawback of such a combination would be the increased surface roughness after shot peening a deep cold rolled sample which can be critical especially in compressor components. Hence, a new technology, Vibro-Peening (VP) may be used as an alternative to SP to introduce surface stress at reduced roughness.

  3. Surface patterns on single-crystal films under uniaxial stress: Experimental evidence for the Grinfeld instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berréhar, J.; Caroli, C.; Lapersonne-Meyer, C.; Schott, M.

    1992-11-01

    We study the stress relaxation in single-crystal films of polymerized polydiacetylene, in epitaxy with their monomer substrate. Polymerization induces a uniaxial stress. Two types of surface patterns are observed and studied by atomic force microscopy: films thicker than 175 nm exhibit quasiperiodic cracks perpendicular to the polymer chains; thinner ones exhibit regular wrinkles with the same orientation. The wrinkle surface deformation is stress relaxing and plastic. We show that all experimental results, in particular, the order of magnitude of the pattern spacings, are compatible with the following interpretation: as polymerization proceeds, the uniaxial stress generates a Grinfeld instability (Dok. Akad. Nauk SSSR 290, 1358 (1986) [Sov. Phys. Dokl. 31, 831 (1986)]) fed by surface diffusion. The crack pattern is a secondary instability, initiated at the sites of stress concentration provided by the wrinkles.

  4. Temporal and spatial variability of the sea surface salinity in the Nordic Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furevik, Tore; Bentsen, Mats; Drange, Helge; Johannessen, Johnny A.; Korablev, Alexander

    2002-12-01

    In this paper, the temporal and spatial variability of the sea surface salinity (SSS) in the Nordic Seas is investigated. The data include a Russian hydrographical database for the Nordic Seas and daily to weekly observations of salinity at Ocean Weather Station Mike (OWSM) (located at 66°N, 2°E in the Norwegian Sea). In addition, output from a medium-resolution version of the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM), forced with daily National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis data, is used to complement the analysis of the temporal and spatial fields constructed from the observational data sets. The Nordic Seas show a strong seasonal variability in the vertical density stratification and the mixed layer (ML) depth, with a weak stratification and a several hundred meters deep ML during winter and a well-defined shallow ML confined to the upper few tens of meters during summer. The seasonal variability strongly influences the strength of the high-frequency variability and to what extent subsurface anomalies are isolated from the surface. High-frequency variability has been investigated in terms of standard deviation of daily SSS, calculated for the different months of the year. From observations at OWSM, typical winter values range from 0.03 to 0.04 psu and summer values range from 0.06 to 0.07 psu. Results from the model simulation show that highest variability is found in frontal areas and in areas with strong stratification and lowest variability in the less stratified areas in the central Norwegian Sea and south of Iceland. Investigation of the interannual variability over the last 50 years shows a marked freshening of the Atlantic Water in the Norwegian and Greenland Seas. Moreover, the strength of the southern sector of the Polar front, as defined by the 34.8-35.0 psu isohalines along the western boundary of the inflowing Atlantic Water, undergoes significant interannual variability

  5. Stress errors in a case of developmental surface dyslexia in Filipino.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulay, Katrina May; Hanley, J Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the case of a dyslexic boy (L.A.) whose impaired reading of Filipino is consistent with developmental surface dyslexia. Filipino has a transparent alphabetic orthography with stress typically falling on the penultimate syllable of multisyllabic words. However, exceptions to the typical stress pattern are not marked in the Filipino orthography. L.A. read words with typical stress patterns as accurately as controls, but made many more stress errors than controls when reading Filipino words with atypical stress. He regularized the pronunciation of many of these words by incorrectly placing the stress on the penultimate syllable. Since he also read nonwords as accurately and quickly as controls and performed well on tests of phonological awareness, L.A. appears to present a clear case of developmental surface dyslexia in a transparent orthography.

  6. Indian Ocean sea surface temperature variability and change since 1960s: forcing and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, W.; Meehl, G. A.; Hu, A.

    2005-12-01

    Indian Ocean sea surface temperature (SST) variability and change since 1960s are investigated using global coupled models,the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) and parallel climate model (PCM). Results from the CCSM3 and a series of PCM experiments are analyzed in order to understand the roles played by internal variability, human-induced warming, and external forcing in causing the SST variations. To consolidate the model results, the simple Ocean model Data Assimilation (SODA) products are also analyzed. The results suggest that the SST in both the south and north Indian Ocean (IO) has an increasing trend. Overlying on this trend is decadal variability. Consistent with previous studies, the warming trend results mainly from the human-induced increased green house gases, which increase downward longwave fluxes. Interestingly, warming of the upper tropical and subtropical basins is accomanied by cooling in higher-latitudes in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) region, which results from the reduced southward heat transports by weakened the subtropical cells (STCs). This colder, ACC water can enter the IO via deep layers in the south and then shoals upward to the thermocline layer in the tropical Indian Ocean, causing a distinct vertical structrure: with warming in the near surface and below the thermocline and cooling in the thermocline. The SST decadal variability, however, is caused primarily by external forcing, due to a combined effect of surface heat flux and lateral heat transport. Internal variability of the coupled system also plays a role.

  7. Projected Changes in Mean and Interannual Variability of Surface Water over Continental China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leng, Guoyong; Tang, Qiuhong; Huang, Maoyi; Hong, Yang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2015-05-09

    Five General Circulation Model (GCM) climate projections under the RCP8.5 emission scenario were used to drive the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model to investigate the impacts of climate change on hydrologic cycle over continental China in the 21st century. The bias-corrected climatic variables were generated for the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR5) by the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP). Results showed much larger fractional changes of annual mean Evaportranspiration (ET) per unit warming than the corresponding fractional changes of Precipitation (P) per unit warming across the country especially for South China, which led to notable decrease of surface water variability (P-E). Specifically, negative trends for annual mean runoff up to -0.33%/decade and soil moisture trends varying between -0.02 to -0.13%/decade were found for most river basins across China. Coincidentally, interannual variability for both runoff and soil moisture exhibited significant positive trends for almost all river basins across China, implying an increase in extremes relative to the mean conditions. Noticeably, the largest positive trends for runoff variability and soil moisture variability, which were up to 38 0.41%/decade and 0.90%/decade, both occurred in Southwest China. In addition to the regional contrast, intra-seasonal variation was also large for the runoff mean and runoff variability changes, but small for the soil moisture mean and variability changes. Our results suggest that future climate change could further exacerbate existing water-related risks (e.g. floods and droughts) across China as indicated by the marked decrease of surface water amounts combined with steady increase of interannual variability throughout the 21st century. This study highlights the regional contrast and intra-seasonal variations for the projected hydrologic changes and could provide muti

  8. Annual and interannual variability of scatterometer ocean surface wind over the South China Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, GS; Xu, Q.; Gong, Z.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the annual and interannual variability of ocean surface wind over the South China Sea (SCS), the vector empirical orthogonal function (VEOF) method and the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) method were employed to analyze a set of combined satellite scatterometer wind data during...

  9. Multimodel simulations of Arctic Ocean sea surface height variability in the period 1970-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koldunov, Nikolay V.; Serra, Nuno; Koehl, Armin

    2014-01-01

    The performance of several numerical ocean models is assessed with respect to their simulation of sea surface height (SSH) in the Arctic Ocean, and the main patterns of SSH variability and their causes over the past 40 years (1970-2009) are analyzed. In comparison to observations, all tested mode...

  10. A variable hydrophobic surface improves corrosion resistance of electroplating copper coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiuqing; Zhu, Liqun; Li, Weiping; Liu, Huicong

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, Cu/liquid microcapsule composite coating was prepared by electroplating method. And a variable hydrophobic surface was obtained due to the slow release of microcapsules and the rough surface. The hydrophobic property and corrosion resistance of the composite was investigated by means of water contact angle instrument and electrochemical technique, respectively. The results suggest that the contact angle (CA) of composite increases gradually with the increasing storing time, and the stable super-hydrophobic property was exhibited after storing in air for 15 days. Meanwhile, the excellent corrosion resistance was displayed, which could be ascribed to the good stability of hydrophobic film on composite surface.

  11. Estimating river discharge from earth observation measurement of river surface hydraulic variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Negrel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available River discharge is a key variable to quantify the water cycle, its fluxes and stocks at different scales, from local scale for the efficient management of water resource to global scale for the monitoring of climate change. Therefore, developing Earth observation (EO techniques for the measurement or estimation of river discharge is a major challenge. A key question deals with the possibility of deriving river discharge values from EO surface variables (width, level, slope, velocity the only one accessible through EO without any in situ measurement. Based on a literature study and original developments, the possibilities of estimating water surface variables using remote-sensing techniques have been explored, mainly RADAR altimetry as well as across-track and along-track interferometry.

  12. Surface Finish and Residual Stresses Induced by Orthogonal Dry Machining of AA7075-T651

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Jomaa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface finish was extensively studied in usual machining processes (turning, milling, and drilling. For these processes, the surface finish is strongly influenced by the cutting feed and the tool nose radius. However, a basic understanding of tool/surface finish interaction and residual stress generation has been lacking. This paper aims to investigate the surface finish and residual stresses under the orthogonal cutting since it can provide this information by avoiding the effect of the tool nose radius. The orthogonal machining of AA7075-T651 alloy through a series of cutting experiments was performed under dry conditions. Surface finish was studied using height and amplitude distribution roughness parameters. SEM and EDS were used to analyze surface damage and built-up edge (BUE formation. An analysis of the surface topography showed that the surface roughness was sensitive to changes in cutting parameters. It was found that the formation of BUE and the interaction between the tool edge and the iron-rich intermetallic particles play a determinant role in controlling the surface finish during dry orthogonal machining of the AA7075-T651 alloy. Hoop stress was predominantly compressive on the surface and tended to be tensile with increased cutting speed. The reverse occurred for the surface axial stress. The smaller the cutting feed, the greater is the effect of cutting speed on both axial and hoop stresses. By controlling the cutting speed and feed, it is possible to generate a benchmark residual stress state and good surface finish using dry machining.

  13. Low-Stress Silicon Cladding for Surface Finishing Large UVOIR Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I research, ZeCoat Corporation demonstrated a low-stress silicon cladding process for surface finishing large UVOIR mirrors. A polishable cladding is...

  14. Residual stresses in the surface layer of laser-treated steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussel, B.A. van; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1993-01-01

    Although laser treatment of certain metals may enhance the wear performance in general it may result equally well in large residual stresses which affect the wear performance detrimentally. Tensile stresses generated in the surface layer may lead to severe cracking of the material. This paper

  15. Comparative Study on Response Surfaces for Reliability Analysis of Spatially Variable Soil Slope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亮; 褚雪松

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the performance of the second-order polynomial-based response surfaces on the reliability of spatially variable soil slope. A single response surface constructed to approximate the slope system failure performance functionG(X) (called single RS) and multiple response surfaces constructed on finite number of slip surfaces (called multiple RS) are developed, respectively. Single RS and multiple RS are applied to evaluate the system failure probability pf for a cohesive soil slope together with Monte Carlo simulation (MCS). It is found thatpf calculated by single RS deviates significantly from that obtained by searching a large number of potential slip surfaces, and this deviation becomes insignificant with the decrease of the number of random variables or the increase of the scale of fluctuation. In other words, single RS cannot approximateG(X) with reasonable accuracy. The value ofpf from multiple response surfaces fits well with that obtained by searching a large number of potential slip surfaces. That is, multiple RS can estimateG(X) with reasonable accuracy.

  16. Climate variability and environmental stress in the Sudan-Sahel zone of West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz, Ole; D'haen, Sarah Ann Lise; Maiga, Abdou

    2012-01-01

    Environmental change in the Sudan-Sahel region of West Africa (SSWA) has been much debated since the droughts of the 1970s. In this article we assess climate variability and environmental stress in the region. Households in Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, and Nigeria were asked about climatic...... to household perceptions, observed rainfall patterns showed an increasing trend over the past 20 years. However, August rainfall declined, and could therefore potentially explain the contrasting negative household perceptions of rainfall trends. Most households reported degradation of soils, water resources......, vegetation, and fauna, but more so in the 500–900 mm zones. Adaptation measures to counter environmental degradation included use of manure, reforestation, soil and water conservation, and protection of fauna and vegetation. The results raise concerns for future environmental management in the region...

  17. Influence of Cushioning Variables in the Workplace and in the Family on the Probability of Suffering Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, David Cárdenas

    2016-09-01

    Stress at work and in the family is a very common issue in our society that generates many health-related problems. During recent years, numerous studies have sought to define the term stress, raising many contradictions that various authors have studied. Other authors have attempted to establish some criteria, in subjective and not very quantitative ways, in an attempt to reduce and even to eliminate stressors and their effects at work and in the family context. The purpose of this study was to quantify so-called cushioning variables, such as control, social support, home/work life conciliation, and even sports and leisure activities, with the purpose of, as much as possible, reducing the negative effects of stress, which seriously affects the health of workers. The study employs data from the Fifth European Working Conditions Survey, in which nearly 44,000 interviewees from 34 countries in the European Union participated. We constructed a probabilistic model based on a Bayesian network, using variables from both the workplace and the family, the aforementioned cushioning variables, as well as the variable stress. If action is taken on the above variables, then the probabilities of suffering high levels of stress may be reduced. Such action may improve the quality of life of people at work and in the family.

  18. Modelling of composition and stress profiles in low temperature surface engineered stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    stresses are introduced in the developing case, arising from the volume expansion that accompanies the dissolution of high interstitial contents in expanded austenite. Modelling of the composition and stress profiles developing during low temperature surface engineering from the processing parameters...... temperature, time and gas composition is a prerequisite for targeted process optimization. A realistic model to simulate the developing case has to take the following influences on composition and stress into account: - a concentration dependent diffusion coefficient - trapping of nitrogen by chromium atoms...... - the effect of residual stress on diffusive flux - the effect of residual stress on solubility of interstitials - plastic accommodation of residual stress. The effect of all these contributions on composition and stress profiles will be addressed....

  19. Optimization of process variables on flexural properties of epoxy/organo-montmorillonite nanocomposite by response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to investigate the preparation and optimization of the flexural properties for epoxy/organomontmorillonite (OMMT nanocomposites. In-situ polymerization method was used to prepare epoxy/OMMT nanocomposites. The diglycidyl ether bisphenol A (DGEBA and curing agent were mixed first, followed by the addition of OMMT. In this study, computer aided statistical methods of experimental design (Response Surface Methodology, RSM was used to investigate the process variables on the flexural properties of epoxy/4wt% OMMT nanocomposites. Speed of mechanical stirrer, post-curing time and post-curing temperature were chosen as process variables in the experimental design. Results showed that the speed of mechanical stirrer, post-curing time and post-curing temperature were able to influence the flexural modulus and flexural yield stress of epoxy/4 wt% OMMT nanocomposites. The results of optimization showed that the design of experiment (DOE has six combination of operating variables which have been obtained in order to attain the greatest overall desirability.

  20. GENETIC VARIABILITY OF CULTURED PLANT TISSUES UNDER NORMAL CONDITIONS AND UNDER STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgikh Yu.I.

    2012-08-01

    , the same mechanisms determine both in vitro and in vivo variability. Stress during tissue culture can induce somaclonal variation. For example during cryopreservation the callus cells experience stress caused by exposure to a complex of various factors, which may induce free radical formation and provide conditions for the appearance of genetic changes. ISSR and retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism (REMAP markers were applied to study the influence of individual steps of dehydration cryopreservation technique on DNA in calli and regenerated plants of bread wheat. The precultivation with sucrose and freezing had no influence on the genetic stability of plant material. After the dehydration step, a new fragment appeared in the REMAP profiles for one DNA sample in calli of one line. The most likely cause of the this change is triggered by the stress experienced by cells during dehydration, insertion of a new copy of retrotransposon close to the microsatellite sequence complementary to the ISSR primer.

  1. Heart rate variability (HRV) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Gabriel; Dao, Tam K; Farmer, Lorie; Sutherland, Roy John; Gevirtz, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Exposure to combat experiences is associated with increased risk of developing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Prolonged exposure therapy and cognitive processing therapy have garnered a significant amount of empirical support for PTSD treatment; however, they are not universally effective with some patients continuing to struggle with residual PTSD symptoms. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of the autonomic nervous system functioning and reflects an individual's ability to adaptively cope with stress. A pilot study was undertaken to determine if veterans with PTSD (as measured by the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale and the PTSD Checklist) would show significantly different HRV prior to an intervention at baseline compared to controls; specifically, to determine whether the HRV among veterans with PTSD is more depressed than that among veterans without PTSD. The study also aimed at assessing the feasibility, acceptability, and potential efficacy of providing HRV biofeedback as a treatment for PTSD. The findings suggest that implementing an HRV biofeedback as a treatment for PTSD is effective, feasible, and acceptable for veterans. Veterans with combat-related PTSD displayed significantly depressed HRV as compared to subjects without PTSD. When the veterans with PTSD were randomly assigned to receive either HRV biofeedback plus treatment as usual (TAU) or just TAU, the results indicated that HRV biofeedback significantly increased the HRV while reducing symptoms of PTSD. However, the TAU had no significant effect on either HRV or symptom reduction. A larger randomized control trial to validate these findings appears warranted.

  2. Stress variability in the Parnaíba Basin, Brazil, during Cretaceous rifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Delano M.; Pestilho, André L. S.; Turra, Bruno B.; Destro, Nivaldo; Miranda, Fernando P.; Riccomini, Claudio; Lammoglia, Talita; Dubois, Daniel S.; Schmidt, Jaques S.

    2017-03-01

    The Cretaceous section of the Parnaíba Basin, designated as Grajaú Basin, represents an intracontinental half-graben formed during the Early Cretaceous due to the separation between the South American and African continents during the final dispersal of Western Gondwana. Here, through a synergetic approach between fluid inclusion planes (FIPs), outcropping geologic structures, borehole breakouts and remote sensing data, we elucidate in different scales the main structural features and their kinematic indicators. Normal faults strike mainly NNE-SSW and WNW-ESE, while deformation bands and extension joints trend to NW-SE and NE-SW, and FIPs to NE-SW and WNW-ESE. In addition, normal fault-generated scarps border geomorphological units and constitute dense zones of deformation bands and fluidization. Microthermometric FIP analyses suggest this fracturing event occurred at shallow basin levels, at temperatures below 50 °C. Furthermore, joints, bands and FIPs present mutually cross-cutting relationships, thus indicating contemporaneity. The numerical inversions applied to striated faults, non-striated faults, joints, deformation bands and FIPs suggest the occurrence of an extensional event characterized by variable direction of extension (σ3) trending from NW-SE to WNW-ESE or NE-SE to NNE-SSW. This event probably started in the Albian during the final Gondwana fragmentation stages. The quasi-perpendicular σ3 trend could be caused by one or all of the following phenomena: a) stress ratio R values obtained (switch positions in relation to the regional extension (WNW-ESE) by rotating 90°; c) influence of the pre-existing structures on the regional stress field. Thus, the spatial and temporal relationships between Cretaceous fault activity, stress field and the development of the geomorphological features in the Grajaú Basin contribute to understanding of the Brazilian Equatorial margin geodynamics.

  3. Tropical Ocean Surface Energy Balance Variability: Linking Weather to Climate Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Clayson, Carol Anne

    2013-01-01

    Radiative and turbulent surface exchanges of heat and moisture across the atmosphere-ocean interface are fundamental components of the Earth s energy and water balance. Characterizing the spatiotemporal variability of these exchanges of heat and moisture is critical to understanding the global water and energy cycle variations, quantifying atmosphere-ocean feedbacks, and improving model predictability. These fluxes are integral components to tropical ocean-atmosphere variability; they can drive ocean mixed layer variations and modify the atmospheric boundary layer properties including moist static stability, thereby influencing larger-scale tropical dynamics. Non-parametric cluster-based classification of atmospheric and ocean surface properties has shown an ability to identify coherent weather regimes, each typically associated with similar properties and processes. Using satellite-based observational radiative and turbulent energy flux products, this study investigates the relationship between these weather states and surface energy processes within the context of tropical climate variability. Investigations of surface energy variations accompanying intraseasonal and interannual tropical variability often use composite-based analyses of the mean quantities of interest. Here, a similar compositing technique is employed, but the focus is on the distribution of the heat and moisture fluxes within their weather regimes. Are the observed changes in surface energy components dominated by changes in the frequency of the weather regimes or through changes in the associated fluxes within those regimes? It is this question that the presented work intends to address. The distribution of the surface heat and moisture fluxes is evaluated for both normal and non-normal states. By examining both phases of the climatic oscillations, the symmetry of energy and water cycle responses are considered.

  4. Processes of 30-90 days sea surface temperature variability in the northern Indian Ocean during boreal summer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vialard, J. [Univerite P. et M. Curie, Laboratoire d' Oceanographie Experimentation et Approches Numeriques (LOCEAN), Case 100, CNRS, IRD, Paris Cedex 05 (France); Jayakumar, A.; Gnanaseelan, C.; Goswami, B.N. [Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune (India); Lengaigne, M. [Univerite P. et M. Curie, Laboratoire d' Oceanographie Experimentation et Approches Numeriques (LOCEAN), Case 100, CNRS, IRD, Paris Cedex 05 (France); CSIR, National Institute of Oceanography, Goa (India); Sengupta, D. [Indian Institute of Sciences, Centre of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Bangalore (India)

    2012-05-15

    During summer, the northern Indian Ocean exhibits significant atmospheric intraseasonal variability associated with active and break phases of the monsoon in the 30-90 days band. In this paper, we investigate mechanisms of the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) signature of this atmospheric variability, using a combination of observational datasets and Ocean General Circulation Model sensitivity experiments. In addition to the previously-reported intraseasonal SST signature in the Bay of Bengal, observations show clear SST signals in the Arabian Sea related to the active/break cycle of the monsoon. As the atmospheric intraseasonal oscillation moves northward, SST variations appear first at the southern tip of India (day 0), then in the Somali upwelling region (day 10), northern Bay of Bengal (day 19) and finally in the Oman upwelling region (day 23). The Bay of Bengal and Oman signals are most clearly associated with the monsoon active/break index, whereas the relationship with signals near Somali upwelling and the southern tip of India is weaker. In agreement with previous studies, we find that heat flux variations drive most of the intraseasonal SST variability in the Bay of Bengal, both in our model (regression coefficient, 0.9, against {proportional_to}0.25 for wind stress) and in observations (0.8 regression coefficient); {proportional_to}60% of the heat flux variation is due do shortwave radiation and {proportional_to}40% due to latent heat flux. On the other hand, both observations and model results indicate a prominent role of dynamical oceanic processes in the Arabian Sea. Wind-stress variations force about 70-100% of SST intraseasonal variations in the Arabian Sea, through modulation of oceanic processes (entrainment, mixing, Ekman pumping, lateral advection). Our {proportional_to}100 km resolution model suggests that internal oceanic variability (i.e. eddies) contributes substantially to intraseasonal variability at small-scale in the Somali upwelling region

  5. Climate Variability in Coastal Ecosystems - Use of MODIS Land Surface and Sea Surface Temperature Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintalapati, S.; Lakshmi, V.

    2007-12-01

    The intertidal zone, with its complex blend of marine and terrestrial environments, is one of the intensively studied ecosystems, in understanding the effects of climate change on species abundance and distribution. As climatic conditions change, the geographic limits of the intertidal species will likely move towards more tolerable coastal conditions. Traditionally, understanding climate change effects through species physiologic response have involved use of in situ measurements and thermal engineering models. But these approaches are constrained by their data intensive requirements and may not be suitable for predicting change patterns relevant to large scale species distributions. Satellite remote sensing provides an alternate approach, given the regular global coverage at moderate spatial resolutions. The present study uses six years of land surface temperature (LST) and sea surface temperature (SST) data from MODIS/Terra instrument along various coastlines around the globe - East and West Coast US, Southern Africa, Northern Japan and New Zealand. Apart from the dominant annual cycle in LST and SST, the other seasonal cycles vary from dominant semi-annual cycles in lower latitudes to 1.5 and 2 year cycles at higher latitudes. The monthly anomalies show strong spatial structure at lower latitudes when compared to higher latitudes, with the exception of US east coast, where the spatial structure extended almost along the whole coastline, indicating strong regulation from the Gulf Stream. The patterns along different coast lines are consistent with the atmospheric and ocean circulation patterns existing at those regions. These results suggest that the climatology at the coastal regions can be adequately represented using satellite-based temperature data, thus enabling further research in understanding the effects of climate change on species abundance and distribution at larger scales.

  6. Effects of Unpredictable Variable Prenatal Stress (UVPS) on Bdnf DNA Methylation and Telomere Length in the Adult Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaze, Jennifer; Asok, A.; Moyer, E. L.; Roth, T. L.; Ronca, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    In utero exposure to stress can shape neurobiological and behavioral outcomes in offspring, producing vulnerability to psychopathology later in life. Animal models of prenatal stress likewise have demonstrated long-­-term alterations in brain function and behavioral deficits in offspring. For example, using a rodent model of unpredictable variable prenatal stress (UVPS), in which dams are exposed to unpredictable, variable stress across pregnancy, we have found increased body weight and anxiety-­-like behavior in adult male, but not female, offspring. DNA methylation (addition of methyl groups to cytosines which normally represses gene transcription) and changes in telomere length (TTAGGG repeats on the ends of chromosomes) are two molecular modifications that result from stress and could be responsible for the long-­-term effects of UVPS. Here, we measured methylation of brain-­-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf), a gene important in development and plasticity, and telomere length in the brains of adult offspring from the UVPS model. Results indicate that prenatally stressed adult males have greater methylation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) compared to non-­-stressed controls, while females have greater methylation in the ventral hippocampus compared to controls. Further, prenatally stressed males had shorter telomeres than controls in the mPFC. These findings demonstrate the ability of UVPS to produce epigenetic alterations and changes in telomere length across behaviorally-­-relevant brain regions, which may have linkages to the phenotypic outcomes.

  7. Local stresses, dyke arrest and surface deformation in volcanic edificesand rift zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Brenner

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Field studies indicate that nearly all eruptions in volcanic edifices and rift zones are supplied with magma through fractures (dykes that are opened by magmatic overpressure. While (inferred dyke injections are frequent during unrest periods, volcanic eruptions are, in comparison, infrequent, suggesting that most dykes become arrested at certain depths in the crust, in agreement with field studies. The frequency of dyke arrest can be partly explained by the numerical models presented here which indicate that volcanic edifices and rift zones consisting of rocks of contrasting mechanical properties, such as soft pyroclastic layers and stiff lava flows, commonly develop local stress fields that encourage dyke arrest. During unrest, surface deformation studies are routinely used to infer the geometries of arrested dykes, and some models (using homogeneous, isotropic half-spaces infer large grabens to be induced by such dykes. Our results, however, show that the dyke-tip tensile stresses are normally much greater than the induced surface stresses, making it difficult to explain how a dyke can induce surface stresses in excess of the tensile (or shear strength while the same strength is not exceeded at the (arrested dyke tip. Also, arrested dyke tips in eroded or active rift zones are normally not associated with dyke-induced grabens or normal faults, and some dykes arrested within a few metres of the surface do not generate faults or grabens. The numerical models show that abrupt changes in Young's moduli(stiffnesses, layers with relatively high dyke-normal compressive stresses (stress barriers, and weak horizontal contacts may make the dyke-induced surface tensile stresses too small for significant fault or graben formation to occur in rift zones or volcanic edifices. Also, these small surface stresses may have no simple relation to the dyke geometry or the depth to its tip. Thus, for a layered crust with weak contacts, straightforward

  8. Improving evapotranspiration in a land surface model using biophysical variables derived from MSG/SEVIRI satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ghilain

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring evapotranspiration over land is highly dependent on the surface state and vegetation dynamics. Data from spaceborn platforms are desirable to complement estimations from land surface models. The success of daily evapotranspiration monitoring at continental scale relies on the availability, quality and continuity of such data. The biophysical variables derived from SEVIRI on board the geostationary satellite Meteosat Second Generation (MSG and distributed by the Satellite Application Facility on Land surface Analysis (LSA-SAF are particularly interesting for such applications, as they aimed at providing continuous and consistent daily time series in near-real time over Africa, Europe and South America. In this paper, we compare them to monthly vegetation parameters from a database commonly used in numerical weather predictions (ECOCLIMAP-I, showing the benefits of the new daily products in detecting the spatial and temporal (seasonal and inter-annual variability of the vegetation, especially relevant over Africa. We propose a method to handle Leaf Area Index (LAI and Fractional Vegetation Cover (FVC products for evapotranspiration monitoring with a land surface model at 3–5 km spatial resolution. The method is conceived to be applicable for near-real time processes at continental scale and relies on the use of a land cover map. We assess the impact of using LSA-SAF biophysical variables compared to ECOCLIMAP-I on evapotranspiration estimated by the land surface model H-TESSEL. Comparison with in-situ observations in Europe and Africa shows an improved estimation of the evapotranspiration, especially in semi-arid climates. Finally, the impact on the land surface modelled evapotranspiration is compared over a north–south transect with a large gradient of vegetation and climate in Western Africa using LSA-SAF radiation forcing derived from remote sensing. Differences are highlighted. An evaluation against remote sensing derived land

  9. Surface sediment diatoms from the western Pacific marginal seas and their correlation to environmental variables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yue; JIANG Hui; Svante Bj(o)rck; LI Tiegang; LU Houyuan; RAN Lihua

    2009-01-01

    Diatom data of 192 surface sediment samples from the marginal seas in the western Pacific together with modern summer and winter sea surface temperature and salinity data were analyzed. The results of canonical correspondence analysis show that summer sea-surface salinity (SSS) is highly positively correlated with winter SSS and so is summer sea-surface temperature (SST) with winter SST. The correlations between SSSs and SSTs are less positively correlated, which may be due to interactions of regional current pattern and monsoon climate. The correlations between diatom species, sample sites and environmental variables concur with known diatom ecology and regional oceanographic characters. The results of forward selection of the environmental variables and associated Monte Carlo permutation tests of the statistical significance of each variable suggest that summer SSS and winter SST are the main environmental factors affecting the diatom distribution in the area and therefore preserved diatom data from down core could be used for reconstructions of summer SSS and winter SST in the region.

  10. Crystal Structure of Neurotropism-Associated Variable Surface Protein 1 (VSP1) of Borrelia Turicatae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson,C.; Yung, B.; Barbour, A.; Zuckert, W.

    2006-01-01

    Vsp surface lipoproteins are serotype-defining antigens of relapsing fever spirochetes that undergo multiphasic antigenic variation to allow bacterial persistence in spite of an immune response. Two isogenic serotypes of Borrelia turicatae strain Oz1 differ in their Vsp sequences and in disease manifestations in infected mice: Vsp1 is associated with the selection of a neurological niche, while Vsp2 is associated with blood and skin infection. We report here crystal structures of the Vsp1 dimer at 2.7 and 2.2 Angstroms. The structures confirm that relapsing fever Vsp proteins share a common helical fold with OspCs of Lyme disease-causing Borrelia. The fold features an inner stem formed by highly conserved N and C termini and an outer 'dome' formed by the variable central residues. Both Vsp1 and OspC structures possess small water-filled cavities, or pockets, that are lined largely by variable residues and are thus highly variable in shape. These features appear to signify tolerance of the Vsp-OspC fold for imperfect packing of residues at its antigenic surface. Structural comparison of Vsp1 with a homology model for Vsp2 suggests that observed differences in disease manifestation may arise in part from distinct differences in electrostatic surface properties; additional predicted positively charged surface patches on Vsp2 compared to Vsp1 may be sufficient to explain the relative propensity of Vsp2 to bind to acidic glycosaminoglycans.

  11. Incorporation of water vapor transfer in the JULES land surface model: Implications for key soil variables and land surface fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Gonzalez, Raquel; Verhoef, Anne; Luigi Vidale, Pier; Braud, Isabelle

    2012-05-01

    This study focuses on the mechanisms underlying water and heat transfer in upper soil layers, and their effects on soil physical prognostic variables and the individual components of the energy balance. The skill of the JULES (Joint UK Environment Simulator) land surface model (LSM) to simulate key soil variables, such as soil moisture content and surface temperature, and fluxes such as evaporation, is investigated. The Richards equation for soil water transfer, as used in most LSMs, was updated by incorporating isothermal and thermal water vapor transfer. The model was tested for three sites representative of semiarid and temperate arid climates: the Jornada site (New Mexico, USA), Griffith site (Australia), and Audubon site (Arizona, USA). Water vapor flux was found to contribute significantly to the water and heat transfer in the upper soil layers. This was mainly due to isothermal vapor diffusion; thermal vapor flux also played a role at the Jornada site just after rainfall events. Inclusion of water vapor flux had an effect on the diurnal evolution of evaporation, soil moisture content, and surface temperature. The incorporation of additional processes, such as water vapor flux among others, into LSMs may improve the coupling between the upper soil layers and the atmosphere, which in turn could increase the reliability of weather and climate predictions.

  12. Variability and trends of surface solar radiation in Europe based on CM SAF satellite data records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentmann, Jörg; Pfeifroth, Uwe; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Urbain, Manon; Clerbaux, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    The EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) generates satellite-based high-quality climate data records, with a focus on the global energy and water cycle. Here, the latest releases of the CM SAF's data records of surface solar radiation, Surface Solar Radiation Data Set - Heliosat (SARAH), and CM SAF cLouds, Albedo and Radiation dataset from AVHRR data (CLARA), are analyzed and validated with reference to ground-based measurements, e.g., provided by the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN), the World Radiation Data Center (WRDC) and the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA). Focus is given to the trends and the variability of the surface irradiance in Europe as derived from the surface and the satellite-based data records. Both data sources show an overall increase (i.e., brightening) after the 1980s, and indicate substantial decadal variability with periods of reduced increase (or even a decrease) and periods with a comparable high increase. Also the increase shows a pronounced spatial pattern, which is also found to be consistent between the two data sources. The good correspondence between the satellite-based data records and the surface measurements highlight the potential of the satellite data to represent the variability and changes in the surface irradiance and document the dominant role of clouds over aerosol to explain its variations. Reasons for remaining differences between the satellite- and the surface-based data records (e.g., in Southern Europe) will be discussed. To test the consistency of the CM SAF solar radiation data records we also assess the decadal variability of the solar reflected radiation at the top-of-the atmosphere (TOA) from the CM SAF climate data record based on the MVIRI / SEVIRI measurements from 1983 to 2015. This data record complements the SARAH data record in its temporal and spatial coverage; fewer and different assumptions are used in the retrieval to generate the TOA reflected solar

  13. Effect of shot peening and grit blasting on surface integrity: Influence on residual stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.TOSHA; LU Jian

    2006-01-01

    The influences of factors such as particle size (0.55-2.2 mm), particle velocity (15-35 m/s) and thickness of work material on the surface integrity were investigated. The residual stresses induced by shot peening or grit blasting were examined. In order to clarify the influences of those factors on residual stress included in the surface integrity, a medium carbon steel (w(C)= 0.45%, 180 HV) was peened by a centrifugal type peening machine using cast steel particles (650-800 HV). The results show that the compressive residual stresses on the peened surface are larger than those of grit blasting; the critical thickness of shot peening is about 50% thicker than that of grit blasting; the high compressive stresses induced by blasting are owing to the wrought or peening effect.

  14. Evaluation of near-surface stress distributions in dissimilar welded joint by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Dong Ryul; Yoshida, Sanichiro; Sasaki, Tomohiro; Todd, Judith A; Park, Ik Keun

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results from a set of experiments designed to ultrasonically measure the near surface stresses distributed within a dissimilar metal welded plate. A scanning acoustic microscope (SAM), with a tone-burst ultrasonic wave frequency of 200 MHz, was used for the measurement of near surface stresses in the dissimilar welded plate between 304 stainless steel and low carbon steel. For quantitative data acquisition such as leaky surface acoustic wave (leaky SAW) velocity measurement, a point focus acoustic lens of frequency 200 MHz was used and the leaky SAW velocities within the specimen were precisely measured. The distributions of the surface acoustic wave velocities change according to the near-surface stresses within the joint. A three dimensional (3D) finite element simulation was carried out to predict numerically the stress distributions and compare with the experimental results. The experiment and FE simulation results for the dissimilar welded plate showed good agreement. This research demonstrates that a combination of FE simulation and ultrasonic stress measurements using SAW velocity distributions appear promising for determining welding residual stresses in dissimilar material joints.

  15. Land surface phenological response to decadal climate variability across Australia using satellite remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broich, M.; Huete, A.; Tulbure, M. G.; Ma, X.; Xin, Q.; Paget, M.; Restrepo-Coupe, N.; Davies, K.; Devadas, R.; Held, A.

    2014-05-01

    Land surface phenological cycles of vegetation greening and browning are influenced by variability in climatic forcing. Quantitative information on phenological cycles and their variability is important for agricultural applications, wildfire fuel accumulation, land management, land surface modeling, and climate change studies. Most phenology studies have focused on temperature-driven Northern Hemisphere systems, where phenology shows annually reoccurring patterns. Yet, precipitation-driven non-annual phenology of arid and semi-arid systems (i.e. drylands) received much less attention, despite the fact that they cover more than 30% of the global land surface. Here we focused on Australia, the driest inhabited continent with one of the most variable rainfall climates in the world and vast areas of dryland systems. Detailed and internally consistent studies investigating phenological cycles and their response to climate variability across the entire continent designed specifically for Australian dryland conditions are missing. To fill this knowledge gap and to advance phenological research, we used existing methods more effectively to study geographic and climate-driven variability in phenology over Australia. We linked derived phenological metrics with rainfall and the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI). We based our analysis on Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) data from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) from 2000 to 2013, which included extreme drought and wet years. We conducted a continent-wide investigation of the link between phenology and climate variability and a more detailed investigation over the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB), the primary agricultural area and largest river catchment of Australia. Results showed high inter- and intra-annual variability in phenological cycles. Phenological cycle peaks occurred not only during the austral summer but at any time of the year, and their timing varied by more than a month in the interior of the

  16. Land surface phenological response to decadal climate variability across Australia using satellite remote sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Broich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Land surface phenological cycles of vegetation greening and browning are influenced by variability in climatic forcing. Quantitative information on phenological cycles and their variability is important for agricultural applications, wildfire fuel accumulation, land management, land surface modeling, and climate change studies. Most phenology studies have focused on temperature-driven Northern Hemisphere systems, where phenology shows annually reoccurring patterns. Yet, precipitation-driven non-annual phenology of arid and semi-arid systems (i.e. drylands received much less attention, despite the fact that they cover more than 30% of the global land surface. Here we focused on Australia, the driest inhabited continent with one of the most variable rainfall climates in the world and vast areas of dryland systems. Detailed and internally consistent studies investigating phenological cycles and their response to climate variability across the entire continent designed specifically for Australian dryland conditions are missing. To fill this knowledge gap and to advance phenological research, we used existing methods more effectively to study geographic and climate-driven variability in phenology over Australia. We linked derived phenological metrics with rainfall and the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI. We based our analysis on Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI data from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS from 2000 to 2013, which included extreme drought and wet years. We conducted a continent-wide investigation of the link between phenology and climate variability and a more detailed investigation over the Murray–Darling Basin (MDB, the primary agricultural area and largest river catchment of Australia. Results showed high inter- and intra-annual variability in phenological cycles. Phenological cycle peaks occurred not only during the austral summer but at any time of the year, and their timing varied by more than a month in

  17. Normalization of flow-mediated dilation to shear stress area under the curve eliminates the impact of variable hyperemic stimulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickleborough Timothy D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normalization of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD to individual shear stress area under the curve (peak FMD:SSAUC ratio has recently been proposed as an approach to control for the large inter-subject variability in reactive hyperemia-induced shear stress; however, the adoption of this approach among researchers has been slow. The present study was designed to further examine the efficacy of FMD normalization to shear stress in reducing measurement variability. Methods Five different magnitudes of reactive hyperemia-induced shear stress were applied to 20 healthy, physically active young adults (25.3 ± 0. 6 yrs; 10 men, 10 women by manipulating forearm cuff occlusion duration: 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 min, in a randomized order. A venous blood draw was performed for determination of baseline whole blood viscosity and hematocrit. The magnitude of occlusion-induced forearm ischemia was quantified by dual-wavelength near-infrared spectrometry (NIRS. Brachial artery diameters and velocities were obtained via high-resolution ultrasound. The SSAUC was individually calculated for the duration of time-to-peak dilation. Results One-way repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated distinct magnitudes of occlusion-induced ischemia (volume and peak, hyperemic shear stress, and peak FMD responses (all p AUC (p = 0.785. Conclusion Our data confirm that normalization of FMD to SSAUC eliminates the influences of variable shear stress and solidifies the utility of FMD:SSAUC ratio as an index of endothelial function.

  18. Spatiotemporal variability in surface energy balance across tundra, snow and ice in Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Magnus; Stiegler, Christian; Abermann, Jakob; Citterio, Michele; Hansen, Birger U; van As, Dirk

    2017-02-01

    The surface energy balance (SEB) is essential for understanding the coupled cryosphere-atmosphere system in the Arctic. In this study, we investigate the spatiotemporal variability in SEB across tundra, snow and ice. During the snow-free period, the main energy sink for ice sites is surface melt. For tundra, energy is used for sensible and latent heat flux and soil heat flux leading to permafrost thaw. Longer snow-free period increases melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet and glaciers and may promote tundra permafrost thaw. During winter, clouds have a warming effect across surface types whereas during summer clouds have a cooling effect over tundra and a warming effect over ice, reflecting the spatial variation in albedo. The complex interactions between factors affecting SEB across surface types remain a challenge for understanding current and future conditions. Extended monitoring activities coupled with modelling efforts are essential for assessing the impact of warming in the Arctic.

  19. Implementation of variable time step stochastic dynamics for electronically inelastic gas-surface collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Murthy, C. S.; Redmon, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    A variable time step algorithm has been implemented for solving the stochastic equations of motion for gas-surface collisions. It has been tested for a simple model of electronically inelastic collisions with an insulator surface in which the phonon manifold acts as a heat bath and electronic states are localized. In addition to reproducing the accurate nuclear dynamics of the surface atoms, numerical calculations have shown the algorithm to yield accurate ensemble averages of physical observables such as electronic transition probabilities and total energy loss of the gas atom to the surface. This new algorithm offers a gain in efficieny of up to an order of magnitude compared to fixed time step integration.

  20. Spatiotemporal variability in surface energy balance across tundra, snow and ice in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Magnus; Stiegler, Christian; Abermann, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    The surface energy balance (SEB) is essential for understanding the coupled cryosphere–atmosphere system in the Arctic. In this study, we investigate the spatiotemporal variability in SEB across tundra, snow and ice. During the snow-free period, the main energy sink for ice sites is surface melt....... For tundra, energy is used for sensible and latent heat flux and soil heat flux leading to permafrost thaw. Longer snow-free period increases melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet and glaciers and may promote tundra permafrost thaw. During winter, clouds have a warming effect across surface types whereas during...... summer clouds have a cooling effect over tundra and a warming effect over ice, reflecting the spatial variation in albedo. The complex interactions between factors affecting SEB across surface types remain a challenge for understanding current and future conditions. Extended monitoring activities coupled...

  1. Stress distribution and surface instability of an inclined granular layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng He-Peng; Jiang Yi-Min; Peng Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Static granular materials may avalanche suddenly under continuous quasi-static drives.This phenomenon,which is important in many engineering applications,can be explained by analyzing the stability of the elastic solutions.We show this for a granular layer driven by its inclination angle in gravity,where the elastic problem can be solved generally and analytically.It is found that a loss of stability may occur only at the free surface of the layer.This result is considered to be relevant for understanding surface avalanches and the flows observed experimentally.

  2. Towards quantifying horizontal stresses of free-polling pneumatic rubber tyres on road surfaces

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Multi-dimensional forces (and stresses) inside the contact patch of a freerolling pneumatic rubber tyre generally occur as a direct result of a complex interaction between flexible rubber and a rigid test surface or road surface. These forces...

  3. Interannual variability of surface and bottom sediment transport on the Laptev Sea shelf during summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wegner

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sediment transport dynamics were studied during ice-free conditions under different atmospheric circulation regimes on the Laptev Sea shelf (Siberian Arctic. To study the interannual variability of suspended particulate matter (SPM dynamics and their coupling with the variability in surface river water distribution on the Laptev Sea detailed oceanographic, optical (turbidity and Ocean Color satellite data, and hydrochemical (nutrients, SPM, stable oxygen isotopes process studies were carried out continuously during the summers of 2007 and 2008. Thus, for the first time SPM and nutrient variations on the Laptev Sea shelf under different atmospheric forcing and the implications for the turbidity and transparency of the water column can be presented.

    The data indicate a clear link between different surface distributions of riverine waters and the SPM transport dynamics within the entire water column. The summer of 2007 was dominated by shoreward winds and an eastward transport of riverine surface waters. The surface SPM concentration on the south-eastern inner shelf was elevated, which led to decreased transmissivity and increased light absorption. Surface SPM concentrations in the Central and Northern Laptev Sea were comparatively low. However, the SPM transport and concentration within the bottom nepheloid layer increased considerably on the entire eastern shelf. The summer of 2008 was dominated by offshore-winds and northwards transport of the river plume. The surface SPM transport was enhanced and extended onto the mid-shelf whereas the bottom SPM transport and concentration was diminished. This study suggests that the SPM concentration and transport in both, the surface and bottom nepheloid layers, are associated with the distribution of riverine surface waters which are linked to the atmospheric circulation patterns over the Laptev Sea and the adjacent Arctic Ocean during open water season. A continuing trend toward shoreward winds

  4. Three-dimensional analysis of elastic stress distribution of indented ceramic surface by finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatsuyuki NEZU

    2006-01-01

    The three-dimensional stress distributions in the area surrounding indentation pattern for three different materials,Al2O3,Si3N4 and SiC were analyzed by finite element method(FEM). Those theoretical results were also compared with the experimental ones by Rockwell hardness test. The effect of loading stress on the plastic deformation in specimens,surface was investigated on the assumption of shear strain energy theory by Huber-Mises when the materials were indented. The distributions of nomal stress,shear stress,and Mises stress were analysed with variations of loading conditions. It is clear that the analytical results for the stress distributions,the crack length and its density of probability are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Age of oil palm plantations causes a strong change in surface biophysical variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabajo, Clifton; le Maire, Guerric; Knohl, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades, Indonesia has experienced dramatic land transformations with an expansion of oil palm plantations at the expense of tropical forests. As vegetation is a modifier of the climate near the ground these large-scale land transformations are expected to have major impacts on the surface biophysical variables i.e. surface temperature, albedo, and vegetation indices, e.g. the NDVI. Remote sensing data are needed to assess such changes at regional scale. We used 2 Landsat images from Jambi Province in Sumatra/Indonesia covering a chronosequence of oil palm plantations to study the 20 - 25 years life cycle of oil palm plantations and its relation with biophysical variables. Our results show large differences between the surface temperature of young oil palm plantations and forest (up to 9.5 ± 1.5 °C) indicating that the surface temperature is raised substantially after the establishment of oil palm plantations following the removal of forests. During the oil palm plantation lifecycle the surface temperature differences gradually decreases and approaches zero around an oil palm plantation age of 10 years. Similarly, NDVI increases and the albedo decreases approaching typical values of forests. Our results show that in order to assess the full climate effects of oil palm expansion biophysical processes play an important role and the full life cycle of oil palm plantations need to be considered.

  6. Density functional theory calculations of the stress of oxidised (110) silicon surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Melis, C; Colombo, L; Mana, G

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the lattice-parameter of silicon by x-ray interferometry assumes the use of strain-free crystals. This might not be the case because surface relaxation, reconstruction, and oxidation cause strains without the application of any external force. In a previous work, this intrinsic strain was estimated by a finite element analysis, where the surface stress was modeled by an elastic membrane having a 1 N/m tensile strength. The present paper quantities the surface stress by a density functional theory calculation. We found a value exceeding the nominal value used, which potentially affects the measurement accuracy.

  7. Stresses and strains developed by the reflection of seismic waves at a free surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banister, J.R.; Ellett, D.M.; Mehl, C.R.; Dean, F.F.

    1978-07-01

    Exact and approximate equations have been derived for the stresses and strains beneath a free surface when an incoming longitudinal wave and an incoming shear wave reflect from the surface. Results of the approximate solution for depths much less than the wave length of the incoming wave are given in tabular form and are graphed for Poisson's ratios of 0.25, 0.3, and 0.333. The results should be of use in categorizing the magnitude of near-surface stresses and strains resulting from seismic waves produced by deeply buried explosives or earthquakes.

  8. Changes of the rats’ heart rate variability caused by chlorpromazine modulation of central noradrenergic neurotransmission during prolonged stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Z. Мelnikova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It’s established that under the prolonged stress there were changes of geometric and spectral indices of the rats’ heart rate variability (HRV, manifestations of which depended on duration of stressful factors acting and represented the stress reaction development from the stage of anxiety to the exhaustion phase. Application of chlorpromazine at the beginning and against the background of stress blocked the central alpha adrenoceptors and contributed to renewal of the most HRV indices into the limits of control values at the end of experiment. The results of research show that the modulation of functional state of central noradrenergic system plays a great role in the changes of HRV during prolonged stress.

  9. Surface Wave Speed of Functionally Graded Magneto-Electro-Elastic Materials with Initial Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The shear surface wave at the free traction surface of half- infinite functionally graded magneto-electro-elastic material with initial stress is investigated. The material parameters are assumed to vary ex- ponentially along the thickness direction, only. The velocity equations of shear surface wave are derived on the electrically or magnetically open circuit and short circuit boundary conditions, based on the equations of motion of the graded magneto-electro-elastic material with the initial stresses and the free traction boundary conditions. The dispersive curves are obtained numerically and the influences of the initial stresses and the material gradient index on the dispersive curves are discussed. The investigation provides a basis for the development of new functionally graded magneto-electro-elastic surface wave devices.

  10. Engineering the residual stress state and microstructure of stainless steel with mechanical surface treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turski, M.; Clitheroe, S.; Withers, P.J. [Manchester University, School of Materials, Manchester (United Kingdom); Evans, A.D. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Rodopoulos, C. [University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Hughes, D.J. [Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    2010-06-15

    Four mechanical surface treatments have been considered for the application to austenitic stainless steel structures. Shot peening (SP), laser shock peening (LSP), ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT) and water jet cavitation peening (WJCP), also known as cavitation shotless peening (CSP), have been applied to 8 mm thick Type 304 austenitic stainless steel coupons. This study considers the merits of each of these mechanical surface treatments in terms of their effect on the surface roughness, microstructure, level of plastic work and through thickness residual stress distribution. Microstructural studies have revealed the formation of martensite close to the treated surface for each process. Residual stress measurements in the samples show compressive stresses to a significantly greater depth for the LSP, UIT and WJCP samples compared to the more conventional SP treated sample. (orig.)

  11. Influence of fractality of fracture surfaces on stress and displacement fields at crack tips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the classic theory of fracture mechanics,expressions for calculating the stresses and displacements in the vicinity of the crack tip are deduced on the basis of the assumption that a fracture surface is a smooth surface or that a crack is a smooth crack.In fact,the surface of a crack formed during the fracture is usually very irregular.So the real asymptotic form of the stress and displacement fields at the crack tip is different from the classic one.Considering the irregularity of a real fracture surface or a real crack profile,the crack is taken as a fractal one,and then the real asymptotic form at the crack tip is developed by applying Griffith’s energy balance principle and fractal geometry.Through the developed asymptotic form,it is discovered that the fractality of the crack reduces the stress singularity at the crack tip.

  12. Intra-Individual Variability of Surface Electromyography in Front Crawl Swimming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Martens

    Full Text Available The variability of electromyographic (EMG recordings between and within participants is a complex problem, rarely studied in swimming. The importance of signal normalization has long been recognized, but the method used might influence variability. The aims of this study were to: (i assess the intra-individual variability of the EMG signal in highly skilled front crawl swimmers, (ii determine the influence of two methods of both amplitude and time normalization of the EMG signal on intra-individual variability and of time normalization on muscle activity level and (iii describe the muscle activity, normalized using MVIC, in relation to upper limb crawl stroke movements. Muscle activity of rectus abdominis and deltoideus medialis was recorded using wireless surface EMG in 15 adult male competitive swimmers during three trials of 12.5 m front crawl at maximal speed without breathing. Two full upper limb cycles were analyzed from each of the swimming trials, resulting in six full cycles used for the intra-individual variability assessment, quantified with the coefficient of variation (CV, coefficient of quartile variation (CQV and the variance ratio (VR. The results of this study support previous findings on EMG patterns of deltoideus medialis and rectus abdominis as prime mover during the recovery (45% activity relative to MVIC, and stabilizer of the trunk during the pull (14.5% activity respectively. The intra-individual variability was lower (VR of 0.34-0.47 when compared to other cyclic movements. No meaningful differences were found between variability measures CV or VR when applying either of the amplitude or the time normalization methods. In addition to reporting the mean amplitude and standard deviation, future EMG studies in swimming should also report the intra-individual variability, preferably using VR as it is independent of peak amplitude, provides a good measure of repeatability and is insensitive to mean EMG amplitude and the

  13. Intra-Individual Variability of Surface Electromyography in Front Crawl Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Jonas; Daly, Daniel; Deschamps, Kevin; Fernandes, Ricardo Jorge Pinto; Staes, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The variability of electromyographic (EMG) recordings between and within participants is a complex problem, rarely studied in swimming. The importance of signal normalization has long been recognized, but the method used might influence variability. The aims of this study were to: (i) assess the intra-individual variability of the EMG signal in highly skilled front crawl swimmers, (ii) determine the influence of two methods of both amplitude and time normalization of the EMG signal on intra-individual variability and of time normalization on muscle activity level and (iii) describe the muscle activity, normalized using MVIC, in relation to upper limb crawl stroke movements. Muscle activity of rectus abdominis and deltoideus medialis was recorded using wireless surface EMG in 15 adult male competitive swimmers during three trials of 12.5 m front crawl at maximal speed without breathing. Two full upper limb cycles were analyzed from each of the swimming trials, resulting in six full cycles used for the intra-individual variability assessment, quantified with the coefficient of variation (CV), coefficient of quartile variation (CQV) and the variance ratio (VR). The results of this study support previous findings on EMG patterns of deltoideus medialis and rectus abdominis as prime mover during the recovery (45% activity relative to MVIC), and stabilizer of the trunk during the pull (14.5% activity) respectively. The intra-individual variability was lower (VR of 0.34-0.47) when compared to other cyclic movements. No meaningful differences were found between variability measures CV or VR when applying either of the amplitude or the time normalization methods. In addition to reporting the mean amplitude and standard deviation, future EMG studies in swimming should also report the intra-individual variability, preferably using VR as it is independent of peak amplitude, provides a good measure of repeatability and is insensitive to mean EMG amplitude and the degree of

  14. Atmospheric response to the North Pacific enabled by daily sea surface temperature variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guidi; Latif, Mojib; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Park, Wonsun

    2015-09-01

    Ocean-atmosphere interactions play a key role in climate variability on a wide range of timescales from seasonal to decadal and longer. The extratropical oceans are thought to exert noticeable feedbacks on the atmosphere especially on decadal and longer timescales, yet the large-scale atmospheric response to anomalous extratropical sea surface temperature (SST) is still under debate. Here we show, by means of dedicated high-resolution atmospheric model experiments, that sufficient daily variability in the extratropical background SST needs to be resolved to force a statistically significant large-scale atmospheric response to decadal North Pacific SST anomalies associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, which is consistent with observations. The large-scale response is mediated by atmospheric eddies. This implies that daily extratropical SST fluctuations must be simulated by the ocean components and resolved by the atmospheric components of global climate models to enable realistic simulation of decadal North Pacific sector climate variability.

  15. Examining Stress Changes Due to Subducting Topography and Variable Rheology in the Middle America Trench at Nicoya Gulf, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, C. E.; Bilek, S. L.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.

    2007-05-01

    Offshore of the Nicoya Gulf at the Middle America Trench, the Cocos Plate is subducting beneath the Caribbean plate at about 84 mm per year. A line of seamounts are entering the trench in this region, causing dramatic deformation of the seafloor landward of the thrust. It has been suggested that these seamounts are being subducted, causing coastal uplift and seismicity. The March 25, 1990 Mw 7.0 Nicoya Gulf earthquake is thought to have occurred as one of these seamounts ruptured. How do these seamounts affect the rupture process? Are they behaving as patches of increased or decreased friction along the seismic interface? How does the subducting topography change the stress field after an earthquake? Can triggered events be explained by static stress changes, or does the rheology down dip from the seismogenic zone influence subsequent events in the region? Using a three dimensional model with patches of variable friction to simulate the seamounts as asperities, we compare the location of aftershocks to the stress changes associated with increased and decreased friction. We compare this to a model of Coulomb static stress change, which displays lobes of static stress increase and decrease due to slip on the fault plane, and the distribution of aftershocks within these lobes. To examine the stress changes associated with a set of delayed inland triggered events, we also vary the rheology of our model, using a linear elastic half space for the seismogenic zone, and viscous creep along the lower, aseismic portion of the fault below 40 kilometers. These models allow us to examine the spatial and temporal relationship of seismicity associated with stress changes due to variable friction and rheology. Our results indicate that stresses increase away from the fault with time if viscous creep is included in the model. These stress increases roughly correspond to inland areas of noted increase in seismicity, suggesting that creep along the down dip, aseismic portion of the

  16. Spatial variability and landscape controls of near-surface permafrost within the Alaskan Yukon River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastick, Neal J.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Wylie, Bruce K.; Rose, Joshua R.; Rigge, Matthew; Walvoord, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of permafrost is important to understand because of permafrost's influence on high-latitude ecosystem structure and functions. Moreover, near-surface (defined here as within 1 m of the Earth's surface) permafrost is particularly susceptible to a warming climate and is generally poorly mapped at regional scales. Subsequently, our objectives were to (1) develop the first-known binary and probabilistic maps of near-surface permafrost distributions at a 30 m resolution in the Alaskan Yukon River Basin by employing decision tree models, field measurements, and remotely sensed and mapped biophysical data; (2) evaluate the relative contribution of 39 biophysical variables used in the models; and (3) assess the landscape-scale factors controlling spatial variations in permafrost extent. Areas estimated to be present and absent of near-surface permafrost occupy approximately 46% and 45% of the Alaskan Yukon River Basin, respectively; masked areas (e.g., water and developed) account for the remaining 9% of the landscape. Strong predictors of near-surface permafrost include climatic indices, land cover, topography, and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus spectral information. Our quantitative modeling approach enabled us to generate regional near-surface permafrost maps and provide essential information for resource managers and modelers to better understand near-surface permafrost distribution and how it relates to environmental factors and conditions.

  17. HadISDH land surface multi-variable humidity and temperature record for climate monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Willett

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available HadISDH.2.0.0 is the first gridded, multi-variable humidity and temperature climate-data product that is homogenised and annually updated. It provides physically consistent estimates for specific humidity, vapour pressure, relative humidity, dew point temperature, wet bulb temperature, dew point depression and temperature. It is a monthly-mean gridded (5° by 5° product with uncertainty estimates that account for spatio-temporal sampling, climatology calculation, homogenisation and irreducible random measurement effects. It provides a unique tool for the monitoring of a variety of humidity-related variables which have different impacts and implications for society. HadISDH.2.0.0 is shown to be in good agreement both with other estimates where they are available, and with theoretical understanding. The dataset is available from 1973 to the present. The theme common to all variables is of a warming world with more water vapour present in the atmosphere. The largest increases in water vapour are found over the tropics and Mediterranean. Over the tropics and high northern latitudes the surface air over land is becoming more saturated. However, despite increasing water vapour over the mid-latitudes and Mediterranean, the surface air over land is becoming less saturated. These observed features may be due to atmospheric circulation changes, land–sea warming disparities and reduced water availability or changed land surface properties.

  18. Estimation of the shear stress on the surface of an aortic valve leaflet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, M W; LaBorde, D V; Yoganathan, A P

    1999-01-01

    The limited durability of xenograft heart valves and the limited supply of allografts have sparked interest in tissue engineered replacement valves. A bioreactor for tissue engineered valves must operate at conditions that optimize the biosynthetic abilities of seeded cells while promoting their adherence to the leaflet matrix. An important parameter is shear stress, which is known to influence cellular behavior and may thus be crucial in bioreactor optimization. Therefore, an accurate estimate of the shear stress on the leaflet surface would not only improve our understanding of the mechanical environment of aortic valve leaflets, but it would also aid in bioreactor design. To estimate the shear stress on the leaflet surface, two-component laser-Doppler velocimetry measurements have been conducted inside a transparent polyurethane valve with a trileaflet structure similar to the native aortic valve. Steady flow rates of 7.5, 15.0, and 22.5 L/min were examined to cover the complete range possible during the cardiac cycle. The laminar shear stresses were calculated by linear regression of four axial velocity measurements near the surface of the leaflet. The maximum shear stress recorded was 79 dyne/cm2, in agreement with boundary layer theory and previous experimental and computational studies. This study has provided a range of shear stresses to be explored in bioreactor design and has defined a maximum shear stress at which cells must remain adherent upon a tissue engineered construct.

  19. Evaluation of Residual Stress Relaxation in Surface-Treated Engine Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    account for the inevitable stress release during this process. This method is inherently destructive since it leaves a deep hole on the surface...accelerator or a nuclear reactor. 3 Surface enhancement methods, such as shot peening, laser shock peening, and low- plasticity burnishing , significantly...peening, laser shock peening, or low-plasticity burnishing , surface treatment also leaves substantial microstructural damage behind in the material

  20. Thermally induced stresses in boulders on airless body surfaces, and implications for rock breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaro, J. L.; Byrne, S.; Le, J.-L.

    2017-09-01

    This work investigates the macroscopic thermomechanical behavior of lunar boulders by modeling their response to diurnal thermal forcing. Our results reveal a bimodal, spatiotemporally-complex stress response. During sunrise, stresses occur in the boulders' interiors that are associated with large-scale temperature gradients developed due to overnight cooling. During sunset, stresses occur at the boulders' exteriors due to the cooling and contraction of the surface. Both kinds of stresses are on the order of 10 MPa in 1 m boulders and decrease for smaller diameters, suggesting that larger boulders break down more quickly. Boulders ≤ 30 cm exhibit a weak response to thermal forcing, suggesting a threshold below which crack propagation may not occur. Boulders of any size buried by regolith are shielded from thermal breakdown. As boulders increase in size (>1 m), stresses increase to several 10 s of MPa as the behavior of their surfaces approaches that of an infinite halfspace. As the thermal wave loses contact with the boulder interior, stresses become limited to the near-surface. This suggests that the survival time of a boulder is not only controlled by the amplitude of induced stress, but also by its diameter as compared to the diurnal skin depth. While stresses on the order of 10 MPa are enough to drive crack propagation in terrestrial environments, crack propagation rates in vacuum are not well constrained. We explore the relationship between boulder size, stress, and the direction of crack propagation, and discuss the implications for the relative breakdown rates and estimated lifetimes of boulders on airless body surfaces.

  1. Nickel-regulated heart rate variability: The roles of oxidative stress and inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi, E-mail: r92841005@ntu.edu.tw [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Tzu-Wei, E-mail: r95841015@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, Department of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chuen-Chau, E-mail: nekota@tmu.edu.tw [Department of Anaesthesiology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Jing-Shiang, E-mail: jshwang@stat.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Statistical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Kai-Jen, E-mail: kjc@tmu.edu.tw [Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yan, Yuan-Horng, E-mail: d97841006@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, Department of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Ditmanson Medical Foundation Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi City, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tsun-Jen, E-mail: tcheng@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, Department of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-15

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been reported to be a putative marker of cardiac autonomic imbalance caused by exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM). Our objective in this study was to determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel, an important chemical component of ambient PM that results in oxidative stress and inflammation. HRV data were collected for 72 h before lung exposure (baseline) and 72 h after intratracheal exposure (response) to nickel sulphate (NiSO{sub 4}; 526 μg) in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and the anti-inflammatory celecoxib were intraperitoneally injected to examine post-exposure oxidative and inflammatory responses. Self-controlled experiments examined the effects of NiSO{sub 4} exposure on average normal-to-normal intervals (ANN), natural logarithm-transformed standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals (LnSDNN) and root mean square of successive differences of adjacent normal-to-normal intervals (LnRMSSD); the resulting data were sequentially analysed using the generalised estimating equation model. HRV effects on NiSO{sub 4}-exposed SH rats were greater than those on NiSO{sub 4}-exposed WKY rats. After adjusted the HRV responses in the WKY rats as control, ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased over 72 h after exposure to NiSO{sub 4}. Both NAC and celecoxib mitigated the NiSO{sub 4}-induced alterations in HRV during the exposure period. The results suggest that concurrent Ni-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses play important roles in regulating HRV. These findings help bridge the gap between epidemiological and clinical studies on the plausible mechanisms of the cardiovascular consequences induced by chemical components in ambient PM. -- Highlights: ► To determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel. ► ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased after exposure to Ni. ► NAC and

  2. A Phase-Variable Surface Layer from the Gut Symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketani, Mao; Donia, Mohamed S; Jacobson, Amy N; Lambris, John D; Fischbach, Michael A

    2015-09-29

    The capsule from Bacteroides, a common gut symbiont, has long been a model system for studying the molecular mechanisms of host-symbiont interactions. The Bacteroides capsule is thought to consist of an array of phase-variable polysaccharides that give rise to subpopulations with distinct cell surface structures. Here, we report the serendipitous discovery of a previously unknown surface structure in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron: a surface layer composed of a protein of unknown function, BT1927. BT1927, which is expressed in a phase-variable manner by ~1:1,000 cells in a wild-type culture, forms a hexagonally tessellated surface layer. The BT1927-expressing subpopulation is profoundly resistant to complement-mediated killing, due in part to the BT1927-mediated blockade of C3b deposition. Our results show that the Bacteroides surface structure is capable of a far greater degree of structural variation than previously known, and they suggest that structural variation within a Bacteroides species is important for productive gut colonization. Many bacterial species elaborate a capsule, a structure that resides outside the cell wall and mediates microbe-microbe and microbe-host interactions. Species of Bacteroides, the most abundant genus in the human gut, produce a capsule that consists of an array of polysaccharides, some of which are known to mediate interactions with the host immune system. Here, we report the discovery of a previously unknown surface structure in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. We show that this protein-based structure is expressed by a subset of cells in a population and protects Bacteroides from killing by complement, a component of the innate immune system. This novel surface layer protein is conserved across many species of the genus Bacteroides, suggesting an important role in colonization and host immune modulation. Copyright © 2015 Taketani et al.

  3. Physiological, Diurnal and Stress-Related Variability of Cadmium-Metallothionein Gene Expression in Land Snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini-Martha, Veronika; Niederwanger, Michael; Kopp, Renate; Schnegg, Raimund; Dallinger, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial Roman snail Helix pomatia has successfully adapted to strongly fluctuating conditions in its natural soil habitat. Part of the snail's stress defense strategy is its ability to express Metallothioneins (MTs). These are multifunctional, cysteine-rich proteins that bind and inactivate transition metal ions (Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(+)) with high affinity. In Helix pomatia a Cadmium (Cd)-selective, inducible Metallothionein Isoform (CdMT) is mainly involved in detoxification of this harmful metal. In addition, the snail CdMT has been shown to also respond to certain physiological stressors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological and diurnal variability of CdMT gene expression in snails exposed to Cd and non-metallic stressors such as desiccation and oxygen depletion. CdMT gene expression was upregulated by Cd exposure and desiccation, whereas no significant impact on the expression of CdMT was measured due to oxygen depletion. Overall, Cd was clearly more effective as an inducer of the CdMT gene expression compared to the applied non-metallic stressors. In unexposed snails, diurnal rhythmicity of CdMT gene expression was observed with higher mRNA concentrations at night compared to daytime. This rhythmicity was severely disrupted in Cd-exposed snails which exhibited highest CdMT gene transcription rates in the morning. Apart from diurnal rhythmicity, feeding activity also had a strong impact on CdMT gene expression. Although underlying mechanisms are not completely understood, it is clear that factors increasing MT expression variability have to be considered when using MT mRNA quantification as a biomarker for environmental stressors.

  4. Analysis of characteristics in the sea surface temperature variability in the East/Japan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Sang-Wook; Park, Young-Gyu; Min, HongSik; Kim, Cheol-Ho; Lee, Jae-Hak

    2010-06-01

    We examine the characteristics of sea surface temperature (SST) variability in the East/Japan Sea (EJS) for the period of 1891-2005 using 1°×1° latitude and longitude resolution datasets from the Japan Meteorological Agency and the Hadley Centre. A significant warming trend that manifests itself more strongly over the southern part of the sea is observed. In addition, it is found in the EJS that warming during the boreal winter is more significant than that during the summer. The EJS SST index, obtained from the time series of monthly SST anomaly averaged over the western half of the EJS, where large SST anomaly standard deviation is observed, has a primary spectral density at a frequency longer than a decade and a secondary peak at the annual frequency band. The variability of the low-frequency EJS SST, which is mostly explained by that during winter, is characterized by significant warming from the early 1940s to the late 1940s and from the mid-1980s to the present. Between the two warming periods, the EJS SST variability is dominated by decadal fluctuations. Finally, we discuss possible mechanisms of the low frequency EJS SST variability in conjunction with atmospheric variability. When the northwesterly winter monsoon becomes weaker (stronger), less (greater) amount of cold air is advected to the EJS. Sensible heat loss from the sea to the air becomes smaller (greater) producing a warm (cold) SST anomaly.

  5. Regional Climate Variability Responses to Future Land Surface Forcing in the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropical deforestation could destabilize regional climate changes. This paper aimed to model the potential climatological variability caused by future forest vulnerability in the Brazilian Amazon over the 21th century. The underlying land surface changes between 2005 and 2100 are first projected based on the respectable output produced by Hurtt et al. Then the weather research and forecasting (WRF model is applied to assess the impacts of future deforestation on regional climate during 2090–2100. The study results show that the forests in the Brazilian Amazon will primarily be converted into dryland cropland and pasture in the northwest part and into cropland/woodland mosaic in the southeast part, with 5.12% and 13.11%, respectively. These land surface changes will therefore lead to the significant reduction of the sum of sensible heat flux and latent heat flux and precipitation and the increase of the surface temperature. Furthermore, the variability of surface temperature is observed with close link to the deforested areas.

  6. Compositional variability across Mercury's surface revealed by MESSENGER measurements of variations in thermal neutron count rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplowski, P. N.; Lawrence, D. J.; Goldsten, J. O.; Nittler, L. R.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements by MESSENGER's Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) have revealed variations in the flux of thermal neutrons across Mercury's northern hemisphere. These variations are interpreted to originate from spatial variations in surface elemental composition. In particular, the measurements are sensitive to the near-surface abundances of elements that absorb thermal neutrons, including major rock-forming elements such as Fe and Ti, minor elements such as Mn and Cl, and rare-earth elements such as Gd and Sm. We have constructed a map of thermal neutron variability across the surface and compared it with known variations in elemental composition and with the distribution of geologic units. Development of the map included the derivation of the macroscopic thermal neutron absorption cross section across the surface, a quantity whose value and variability provides useful constraints on the formation and geochemical evolution of Mercury's crust. Finally, by combining the thermal neutron measurements with previously reported elemental measurements from the GRNS and MESSENGER's X-Ray Spectrometer, we have derived constraints on the abundances of neutron-absorbing elements, including previously unreported limits for some minor and rare-earth elements.

  7. Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety in Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease: The Role of Intrapersonal Characteristics and Stress Processing Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Katherine; Barakat, Lamia P.; Patterson, Chavis A.; Dampier, Carlton

    2009-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) complications place patients at risk for poor psychosocial adaptation, including depression and anxiety symptoms. This study aimed to test a mediator model based on the Risk and Resistance model to explore the role of intrapersonal characteristics and stress processing variables in psychosocial functioning. Participants…

  8. The Examination of the Needs and Stress Levels of the Parents of Handicapped Children in Terms of Some Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ender, Durualp; Kubra, Kocabas; Asli, Arslan; Kezban, Ozaydin

    2011-01-01

    The investigation was concerned with the examination of the needs and stress levels of the parents of mentally disabled children in terms of some variables. The study included parents (15 mothers and 13 fathers) of 28 mentally disabled children composed of 14 girls and 14 boys who were getting education in the School of Practice and Work Center…

  9. Climate variability and environmental stress in the Sudan-Sahel zone of West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Ole; D'haen, Sarah; Maiga, Abdou; Moussa, Ibrahim Bouzou; Barbier, Bruno; Diouf, Awa; Diallo, Drissa; Da, Evariste Dapola; Dabi, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Environmental change in the Sudan-Sahel region of West Africa (SSWA) has been much debated since the droughts of the 1970s. In this article we assess climate variability and environmental stress in the region. Households in Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, and Nigeria were asked about climatic changes and their perceptions were compared across north-south and west-east rainfall gradients. More than 80% of all households found that rainfall had decreased, especially in the wettest areas. Increases in wind speeds and temperature were perceived by an overall 60-80% of households. Contrary to household perceptions, observed rainfall patterns showed an increasing trend over the past 20 years. However, August rainfall declined, and could therefore potentially explain the contrasting negative household perceptions of rainfall trends. Most households reported degradation of soils, water resources, vegetation, and fauna, but more so in the 500-900 mm zones. Adaptation measures to counter environmental degradation included use of manure, reforestation, soil and water conservation, and protection of fauna and vegetation. The results raise concerns for future environmental management in the region, especially in the 500-900 mm zones and the western part of SSWA.

  10. Measuring stress level of dairy cows during milking using by geometric indices of heart rate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levente Kovács

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractHeart rate (HR and heart rate variability (HRV were investigated in cows (n=32, age: 3.86 years, milk production: 35±2.5 kg, DIM: 150±15 milked in a parallel milking parlour. Geometric parameters of HRV (SD1 and SD2 were calculated using Poincare graphs. HRV indices of resting 1 h after midday milking (reference period were compared to those measured during the different phases of the evening milking (driving; in the holding pen; udder preparation; milking; after milking in the milking stall. There was no difference between the reference period and the different phases of milking in animal welfare terms. During the reference period SD2 (198.5 ms was significantly higher (p<0.05 than every other measured period suggesting an increasing parasympathetic tone after milking. This parasympathetic predominance decreased with time of the day (1.5 h after milking. SD2 was significantly affected by parity, by the breeding bull (p<0.01 and by milk production (p<0.05. SD2 was notably higher (102.8 ms in multiparous cows than in primiparous cows (p<0.017; α=0.005 during resting and milking. Results suggested that a conventional milking process is not really stressful for cows. Primiparous cows were more susceptible of milking process than multiparous ones. SD2 is a good marker of vagus activity and affected by several independent factors.

  11. Exposure to Discrimination and Heart Rate Variability Reactivity to Acute Stress among Women with Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Julie; Lampert, Rachel; Tennen, Howard; Feinn, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to racial discrimination has been linked to physiological reactivity. This study investigated self-reported exposure to racial discrimination and parasympathetic [high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV)] and sympathetic (norepinephrine and cortisol) activity at baseline and then again after acute laboratory stress. Lifetime exposure to racial discrimination was measured with the Schedule of Racist Events scale. Thirty-two women (16 Black and 16 White) with type 2 diabetes performed a public speaking stressor. Beat-to-beat intervals were recorded on electrocardiograph recorders, and HF-HRV was calculated using spectral analysis and natural log transformed. Norepinephrine and cortisol were measured in blood. Higher discrimination predicted lower stressor HF-HRV, even after controlling for baseline HF-HRV. When race, age, A1c and baseline systolic blood pressure were also controlled, racial discrimination remained a significant independent predictor of stressor HF-HRV. There was no association between lifetime discrimination and sympathetic markers. In conclusion, preliminary data suggest that among women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), exposure to racial discrimination is adversely associated with parasympathetic, but not sympathetic, reactivity. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Heart rate variability biofeedback intervention for reduction of psychological stress during the early postpartum period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Naoko; Shinohara, Hitomi; Kodama, Hideya

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback intervention for reduction of psychological stress in women in the early postpartum period. On postpartum day 4, 55 healthy subjects received a brief explanation about HRV biofeedback using a portable device. Among them, 25 mothers who agreed to implement HRV biofeedback at home were grouped as the biofeedback group, and other 30 mothers were grouped as the control group. At 1 month postpartum, there was a significant decrease in total Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale score (P biofeedback group; this change was brought about mainly by decreases in items related to anxiety or difficulty sleeping. There was also a significant increase in standard deviation of the normal heartbeat interval (P biofeedback group after adjusting for potential covariates. In conclusion, postpartum women who implemented HRV biofeedback after delivery were relatively free from anxiety and complained less of difficulties sleeping at 1 month postpartum. Although the positive effects of HRV biofeedback may be partly attributable to intervention effects, due to its clinical outcome, HRV biofeedback appears to be recommendable for many postpartum women as a feasible health-promoting measure after childbirth.

  13. ABA flow modelling in Ricinus communis exposed to salt stress and variable nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuke, Andreas D.

    2016-01-01

    In a series of experiments with Ricinus communis, abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations in tissues and transport saps, its de novo biosynthesis, long-distance transport, and metabolism (degradation) were affected by nutritional conditions, nitrogen (N) source, and nutrient limitation, or salt stress. In the present study these data were statistically re-evaluated, and new correlations presented that underpin the importance of this universal phytohormone. The biggest differences in ABA concentration were observed in xylem sap. N source had the strongest effect; however, nutrient limitation (particularly phosphorus limitation) and salt also had significant effects. ABA was found in greater concentration in phloem sap compared with xylem sap; however, the effect of treatment on ABA concentration in phloem was lower. In the leaves, ABA concentration was most variable compared with the other tissues. This variation was only affected by the N source. In roots, ABA was significantly decreased by nutrient limitation. Of the compartments in which ABA was quantified, xylem sap ABA concentration was most significantly correlated with leaf stomatal conductance and leaf growth. Additionally, ABA concentration in xylem was significantly correlated to that in phloem, indicating a 6-fold concentration increase from xylem to phloem. The ABA flow model showed that biosynthesis of ABA in roots affected the xylem flow of ABA. Moreover, ABA concentration in xylem affected the degradation of the phytohormone in shoots and also its export from shoots via phloem. The role of phloem transport is discussed since it stimulates ABA metabolism in roots. PMID:27440939

  14. Creeping Ray Tracing Algorithm for Arbitrary NURBS Surfaces Based on Adaptive Variable Step Euler Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Fu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the uniform theory of diffraction (UTD could be theoretically applied to arbitrarilyshaped convex objects modeled by nonuniform rational B-splines (NURBS, one of the great challenges in calculation of the UTD surface diffracted fields is the difficulty in determining the geodesic paths along which the creeping waves propagate on arbitrarilyshaped NURBS surfaces. In differential geometry, geodesic paths satisfy geodesic differential equation (GDE. Hence, in this paper, a general and efficient adaptive variable step Euler method is introduced for solving the GDE on arbitrarilyshaped NURBS surfaces. In contrast with conventional Euler method, the proposed method employs a shape factor (SF ξ to efficiently enhance the accuracy of tracing and extends the application of UTD for practical engineering. The validity and usefulness of the algorithm can be verified by the numerical results.

  15. APPROACH FOR LAYOUT OPTIMIZATION OF TRUSS STRUCTURES WITH DISCRETE VARIABLES UNDER DYNAMIC STRESS, DISPLACEMENT AND STABILITY CONSTRAINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Lian-shuan; WANG Yue-fang; SUN Huan-chun

    2006-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for layout optimization of truss structures with discrete variables subjected to dynamic stress, dynamic displacement and dynamic stability constraints. By using the quasi-static method, the mathematical model of structure optimization under dynamic stress, dynamic displacement and dynamic stability constraints were transformed into one subjected to static stress, displacement and stability constraints. The optimization procedures include two levels, i.e., the topology optimization and the shape optimization. In each level, the comprehensive algorithm was used and the relative difference quotients of two kinds of variables were used to search the optimum solution. A comparison between the optimum results of model with stability constraints and the optimum results of model without stability constraint was given. And that shows the stability constraints have a great effect on the optimum solutions.

  16. Effect of temperature-dependent surface heat transfer coefficient on the maximum surface stress in ceramics during quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Y. F.; Song, F.; Jiang, C. P.; Xu, X. H.; Wei, J. C.; Zhou, Z. L.

    2016-02-01

    We study the difference in the maximum stress on a cylinder surface σmax using the measured surface heat transfer coefficient hm instead of its average value ha during quenching. In the quenching temperatures of 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 and 800°C, the maximum surface stress σmmax calculated by hm is always smaller than σamax calculated by ha, except in the case of 800°C; while the time to reach σmax calculated by hm (fmmax) is always earlier than that by ha (famax). It is inconsistent with the traditional view that σmax increases with increasing Biot number and the time to reach σmax decreases with increasing Biot number. Other temperature-dependent properties also have a small effect on the trend of their mutual ratios with quenching temperatures. Such a difference between the two maximum surface stresses is caused by the dramatic variation of hm with temperature, which needs to be considered in engineering analysis.

  17. Investigation on the effects of geometric variables on the residual stresses and PWSCC growth in the RPV BMI penetration nozzles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Sung; Ra, Myoung Soo [Sunchon National University, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo [Korea Hydro Nuclear Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    This study investigated the effects of various geometric variables on the residual stresses and PWSCC growth of RPV BMI penetration nozzles. An FE residual stress analysis procedure was developed and validated from the viewpoint of FFS assessment. The validated FE residual stress analysis procedure and the PWSCC growth assessment procedure in the ASME B and PV Code, Sec.XI were applied to the BMI penetration nozzles with specified ranges of the geometric variables. The total stresses at steady state during normal operation including welding residual stresses increase with increasing inclination angle of the BMI nozzles, and with tilt angle, depth, and root width of the J-groove weld. The lifetime from the assumed initial crack to the acceptance criteria according to the ASME B and PV Code, Sec.XI also decreases under these conditions. The total stresses decrease and the lifetime increases with increasing nozzle thickness, but outer radius of the BMI nozzles has an insignificant effect on both of these factors.

  18. Determination of stress glut moments of total degree 2 from teleseismic surface wave amplitude spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukchin, B. G.

    1995-08-01

    A special case of the seismic source, where the stress glut tensor can be expressed as a product of a uniform moment tensor and a scalar function of spatial coordinates and time, is considered. For such a source, a technique of determining stress glut moments of total degree 2 from surface wave amplitude spectra is described. The results of application of this technique for the estimation of spatio-temporal characteristics of the Georgian earthquake, 29.04.91 are presented.

  19. Temporal Dynamics of Soil Moisture Variability at the Landscape Scale: Implications for Land Surface Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaldo, N.; Albertson, J. D.

    2001-12-01

    Meteorological and hydrological forecasting models share soil moisture as a critical boundary condition. Partitioning of received energy at the land surface depends directly on this variable, as does the partitioning of rainfall into its possible routes over and through the soil. In Land Surface Models (LSMs) the temporal dynamic of soil moisture spatial variability is a fundamental issue in large-scale flux predictions. From remote sensing observations soil moisture values are averaged in the horizontal over rather large regions (pixels). The averaging areas will be getting even larger as we move from aircraft mounted sensors to satellite mounting. These data are to be used ultimately to estimate spatial averages of other processes that depend on soil moisture, such as, runoff generation, drainage, evaporation, sensible heat fluxes, crop yield, microbial activity, etc. Consequently, the LSMs have to predict spatial averaged flux over large region from average values of the soil moisture. But soil moisture variances affect flux predictions, which depend nonlinearly on soil moisture, because many of the other processes possess distinct threshold aspects to their nonlinear dependence on soil moisture. Through application of well-developed Reynolds averaging rules from fluid mechanics to the equation of Richards and Darcy-Buckingham, we write a conservation equation for the horizontal variance of soil moisture. And, through closure arguments, we are able to describe the individual terms that produce and destroy spatial variance through time in terms of the mean soil moisture state and other observable system properties such as vegetation and soil properties variability. Finally, we calculate land surface fluxes from second order Taylor expansion, using our soil moisture variance closure model, and the other observable system properties. In this work, we demonstrate significant improvements in land surface large-scale flux predictions using the proposed soil moisture

  20. Temporal Dynamics of Soil Moisture Variability: Implications For Land Surface Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaldo, N.; Albertson, J. D.

    Meteorological and hydrological forecasting models share soil moisture as a critical boundary condition. Partitioning of received energy at the land surface depends di- rectly on this variable, as does the partitioning of rainfall into its possible routes over and through the soil. In Land Surface Models (LSMs) the temporal dynamic of soil moisture spatial variability is a fundamental issue in large-scale flux predictions. From remote sensing observations soil moisture values are averaged in the horizontal over rather large regions (pixels). The averaging areas will be getting even larger as we move from aircraft mounted sensors to satellite mounting. These data are to be used ultimately to estimate spatial averages of other processes that depend on soil moisture, such as, runoff generation, drainage, evaporation, sensible heat fluxes, crop yield, mi- crobial activity, etc. Consequently, the LSMs have to predict spatial averaged flux over large region from average values of the soil moisture. But soil moisture variances af- fect flux predictions, which depend nonlinearly on soil moisture, because many of the other processes possess distinct threshold aspects to their nonlinear dependence on soil moisture. Through application of well-developed Reynolds averaging rules from fluid mechanics to the equation of Richards and Darcy-Buckingham, we write a con- servation equation for the horizontal variance of soil moisture. And, through closure arguments, we are able to describe the individual terms that produce and destroy spa- tial variance through time in terms of the mean soil moisture state and other observable system properties such as vegetation and soil properties variability. Finally, we calcu- late land surface fluxes from second order Taylor expansion, using our soil moisture variance closure model, and the other observable system properties. In this work, we demonstrate significant improvements in land surface large-scale flux predictions us- ing the proposed

  1. Quantification of the surface stress in microcantilever biosensors: revisiting Stoney’s equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Javier; Ruz, Jose J.; Pini, Valerio; Kosaka, Priscila; Calleja, Montserrat

    2012-11-01

    Microcantilever biosensors in the static operation mode translate molecular recognition into a surface stress signal. Surface stress is derived from the nanomechanical cantilever bending by applying Stoney’s equation, derived more than 100 years ago. This equation ignores the clamping effect on the cantilever deformation, which induces significant errors in the quantification of the biosensing response. This leads to discrepancies in the surface stress induced by biomolecular interactions in measurements with cantilevers with different sizes and geometries. So far, more accurate solutions have been precluded by the formidable complexity of the theoretical problem that involves solving the two-dimensional biharmonic equation. In this paper, we present an accurate and simple analytical expression to quantify the response of microcantilever biosensors. The equation exhibits an excellent agreement with finite element simulations and DNA immobilization experiments on gold-coated microcantilevers.

  2. Variability of winter and summer surface ozone in Mexico City on the intraseasonal timescale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Bradford S.; Raga, Graciela B.

    2016-12-01

    Surface ozone concentrations in Mexico City frequently exceed the Mexican standard and have proven difficult to forecast due to changes in meteorological conditions at its tropical location. The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is largely responsible for intraseasonal variability in the tropics. Circulation patterns in the lower and upper troposphere and precipitation are associated with the oscillation as it progresses eastward around the planet. It is typically described by phases (labeled 1 through 8), which correspond to the broad longitudinal location of the active component of the oscillation with enhanced precipitation. In this study we evaluate the intraseasonal variability of winter and summer surface ozone concentrations in Mexico City, which was investigated over the period 1986-2014 to determine if there is a modulation by the MJO that would aid in the forecast of high-pollution episodes. Over 1 000 000 hourly observations of surface ozone from five stations around the metropolitan area were standardized and then binned by active phase of the MJO, with phase determined using the real-time multivariate MJO index. Highest winter ozone concentrations were found in Mexico City on days when the MJO was active and in phase 2 (over the Indian Ocean), and highest summer ozone concentrations were found on days when the MJO was active and in phase 6 (over the western Pacific Ocean). Lowest winter ozone concentrations were found during active MJO phase 8 (over the eastern Pacific Ocean), and lowest summer ozone concentrations were found during active MJO phase 1 (over the Atlantic Ocean). Anomalies of reanalysis-based cloud cover and UV-B radiation supported the observed variability in surface ozone in both summer and winter: MJO phases with highest ozone concentration had largest positive UV-B radiation anomalies and lowest cloud-cover fraction, while phases with lowest ozone concentration had largest negative UV-B radiation anomalies and highest cloud

  3. Morphology, stresses, and surface reactivity of nanoporous gold synthesized from nanostructured precursor alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouya, Eric

    Nanoporous metallic materials (NMMs) are generally synthesized using dealloying, whereby the more reactive component is dissolved from a homogeneous alloy in a suitable electrolyte, and the more noble metal atoms simultaneously diffuse into 3-D clusters, forming a bi-continuous network of interconnected ligaments. Nanoporous gold (NPG) in particular is a well-known NMM; it is inert, bio-compatible, and capable of developing large surface areas with 1--100nm pores. While several studies have demonstrated its potential usefulness in fuel cell and sensing devices, its structural, mechanical, and electrocatalytic properties still require further investigation, particularly if NPG is synthesized from precursor alloy films exhibiting metastable nanostructures. In this dissertation, the electrodeposition (ECD) process, microstrucural characteristics, and metatstability of Au-Ni precursor alloys are investigated. The stresses evolved during Au-Ni alloy nucleation and growth are investigated in situ and correlated with microstructural and electrochemical data in order to identify the various stress-inducing mechanisms. In situ stresses generated during Au-Ni and Au-Ag dealloying were investigated, and additionally correlated with the growth stresses. Finally, the surface area and electrocatalytic properties of NPG are characterized using a variety of electrochemical techniques. Potentiostatically electrodeposited Au1-x-Nix (x: 0--90at%) films form a continuous series of metastable solid solutions and exhibit a nanocrystalline morphology, with ˜10--20 nm grains, the size of which decreases with increasing Ni content. The formation of a metastable structure was interpreted in terms of the limited surface diffusivities of adatoms at the growing interface and atomic volume differences (˜15%). Internal stresses generated during ECD of Ni-rich films can be explained assuming a 3-D Volmer-Weber growth mode, where the stress is initially compressive, then transitions into tension

  4. Trends in Extremes of Surface Humidity, Temperature, and Summertime Heat Stress in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the past half century, the mean summertime temperature in China has increased, with nights warm ing more than days. Using surface station observations, we show that the frequency of extreme heat-stress events in China, caused by extremely hot and humid days as well as by heatwaves lasting for a few days, has increased over the period from 1951 to 1994. When humidity is high, hot weather can cause heat stress in humans. The increased heat-stress trend may pose a public health problem.

  5. The global structure of the annual and semiannual sea surface height variability from Geosat altimeter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gregg A.; Born, George H.; Parke, Mike E.; Allen, Patrick C.

    1992-01-01

    Two years of data from the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission are employed to study the annual and semiannual variability of sea-surface height on a global basis. The data are treated with atmospheric corrections and interpolations, and the orbit error of about 40 cm RMS is purged. The spatial variability of the Geosat data is constructed for particular frequencies, and the estimate of the M2 tidal error indicates that the error is aliased to 1.15 cycles/yr and has an unusual spatial pattern. Sine and cosine coefficients are derived for the annual and semiannual frequencies by means of a least squares fit yielding the amplitude and phase of the changes in sea-surface height. A 180-deg phase difference is noted between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for the annual variability, and large-scale westward propagating waves are identified. The Geosat data also indicate the phase relationships between major current systems and the systems of variations at work in the Intertropical Convergence Zone.

  6. VARIABILITY OF ATMOSPHERIC CO2 OVER INDIA AND SURROUNDING OCEANS AND CONTROL BY SURFACE FLUXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Nayak

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, seasonal and inter-annual variability of atmospheric CO2 concentration over India and surrounding oceans during 2002–2010 derived from Atmospheric InfrarRed Sounder observation and their relation with the natural flux exchanges over terrestrial Indian and surrounding oceans were analyzed. The natural fluxes over the terrestrial Indian in the form of net primary productivity (NPP were simulated based on a terrestrial biosphere model governed by time varying climate parameters (solar radiation, air temperature, precipitation etc and satellite greenness index together with the land use land cover and soil attribute maps. The flux exchanges over the oceans around India (Tropical Indian Ocean: TIO were calculated based on a empirical model of CO2 gas dissolution in the oceanic water governed by time varying upper ocean parameters such as gradient of partial pressure of CO2 between ocean and atmosphere, winds, sea surface temperature and salinity. Comparison between the variability of atmospheric CO2 anomaly with the anomaly of surface fluxes over India and surrounding oceans suggests that biosphere uptake over India and oceanic uptake over the south Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of seasonal variability of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate. On inter-annual scale, flux exchanges over the tropical north Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate.

  7. Instantaneous stress release in fault surface asperities during mining-induced fault-slip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsushi Sainoki; Hani S. Mitri

    2016-01-01

    Fault-slip taking place in underground mines occasionally causes severe damage to mine openings as a result of strong ground motion induced by seismic waves arising from fault-slip. It is indicated from previous studies that intense seismic waves could be generated with the shock unloading of fault surface asperities during fault-slip. This study investigates the shock unloading with numerical simulation. A three-dimensional (3D) numerical model with idealized asperities is constructed with the help of discrete element code 3DEC. The idealization is conducted to particularly focus on simulating the shock unloading that previous numerical models, which replicate asperity degradation and crack development during the shear behavior of a joint surface in previous studies, fail to capture and simulate. With the numerical model, static and dynamic analyses are carried out to simulate unloading of asperities in the course of fault-slip. The results obtained from the dynamic analysis show that gradual stress release takes place around the center of the asperity tip at a rate of 45 MPa/ms for the base case, while an instantaneous stress release greater than 80 MPa occurs near the periphery of the asperity tip when the contact between the upper and lower asperities is lost. The instantaneous stress release becomes more intense in the vicinity of the asperity tip, causing tensile stress more than 20 MPa. It is deduced that the tensile stress could further increase if the numerical model is discretized more densely and analysis is carried out under stress conditions at a great depth. A model parametric study shows that in-situ stress state has a significant influence on the magnitude of the generated tensile stress. The results imply that the rapid stress release generating extremely high tensile stress on the asperity tip can cause intense seismic waves when it occurs at a great depth.

  8. IDENTIFIKASI FATOR-FAKTOR RISIKO STRESS DAN VARIABLE SOSIODEMOGRAFI BERDASARKAN SURKESDA NANGGROE ACEH DARUSSALAM 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Idaiani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam (NAD is a region which has faced protracted conflict following by tsunami disarter on December, 26 2004. Surkesda NAD 2006, as post tsunami health survey, was conducted in the middle of 2006 which included Self Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ to assess mental health problem in NAD province. The identification of stress factors and socio demographic variables in NAD is a further analysis based on SRQ from Surkesda NAD 2006. The analysis covered 1210 people aged 15 years and over spread out in 21 distiricts/cities in NAD. The overall prevalence of neurosis in NAD in 2006 was 22,6% with prevalences by districts/cities ranged from 5% to 59%. Two districts with prevalence above 50% were Aceh Singkil and Gayo Lues, while districts/cities with prevalence below 10% belonged to Sabang and Aceh Jaya. Symptoms that most people reported were headache (51,2%, fatique easy (37%, sleep difficulty (26%, abdominal discomfort (25.6% and loss of appetite (21,1%. Female had risk more than one and a half to neurosis (OR=1.598; 95% CI: 1,121- 1,772. Aged ≥ 55 year had risk almost two times to neurosis (OR=1,923; 95% CI: 1,592-2,323. Divorce status had risk 1.7 times (OR=1,73; 95% CI: 1.082-2.767. Living in rural had risk 1.4 times (OR=1,409; 95% CI: 1,155-1,858. Married with low socioeconomic status had risk 1.7 times (OR=1,790; 95% CI: 1,263-2,539. The study suggests that the most important region to get more attention are Aceh Singkil and Gayo Lues districts. The study also recommend of the need of mental health intervention for old group, community mental health that focus on non psychosis mental disorder identification to prevent serious mental disorder, and availability of some medicines to overcome chronic stress symptoms. Keywords: tsunami, mental health, SRQ

  9. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS ABOUT STRESS AND STRAIN OF SURFACE PEELING IN Cu-Fe-P SHEET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Juanhua; Li Hejun; Dong Qiming; Liu Ping; Kang Buxi

    2005-01-01

    The microstructure of surface peeling in finish rolled Cu-0.1Fe-0.03P sheet is analyzed by scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscope. Fe-rich areas of different contents are observed in the matrix. The stress distributions and strain characteristics at the interface between Cu matrix and Fe particle are studied by elastic-plastic finite element plane strain model. Larger Fe particles and higher deforming extent of finish rolling are attributed to the intense stress gradient and significant non-homogeneity equivalent strain at the interface and accelerate surface peeling of Cu-0.1Fe-0.03P lead frame sheet.

  10. Low-frequency variability of surface air temperature over the Barents Sea: causes and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Eveline C.; Bintanja, Richard; Hazeleger, Wilco; Graversen, Rune G.

    2016-08-01

    The predominant decadal to multidecadal variability in the Arctic region is a feature that is not yet well-understood. It is shown that the Barents Sea is a key region for Arctic-wide variability. This is an important topic because low-frequency changes in the ocean might lead to large variations in the sea-ice cover, which then cause massive changes in the ocean-atmosphere heat exchanges. Here we describe the mechanism driving surface temperatures and heat fluxes in the Barents Sea based primarily on analyzes of one global coupled climate model. It is found that the ocean drives the low-frequency changes in surface temperature, whereas the atmosphere compensates the oceanic transport anomalies. The seasonal dependence and the role of individual components of the ocean-atmosphere energy budget are analyzed in detail, showing that seasonally-varying climate mechanisms play an important role. Herein, sea ice is governing the seasonal response, by acting as a lid that opens and closes during warm and cold periods, respectively, thereby modulating the surface heat fluxes.

  11. Inter-individual variability and pattern recognition of surface electromyography in front crawl swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Jonas; Daly, Daniel; Deschamps, Kevin; Staes, Filip; Fernandes, Ricardo J

    2016-12-01

    Variability of electromyographic (EMG) recordings is a complex phenomenon rarely examined in swimming. Our purposes were to investigate inter-individual variability in muscle activation patterns during front crawl swimming and assess if there were clusters of sub patterns present. Bilateral muscle activity of rectus abdominis (RA) and deltoideus medialis (DM) was recorded using wireless surface EMG in 15 adult male competitive swimmers. The amplitude of the median EMG trial of six upper arm movement cycles was used for the inter-individual variability assessment, quantified with the coefficient of variation, coefficient of quartile variation, the variance ratio and mean deviation. Key features were selected based on qualitative and quantitative classification strategies to enter in a k-means cluster analysis to examine the presence of strong sub patterns. Such strong sub patterns were found when clustering in two, three and four clusters. Inter-individual variability in a group of highly skilled swimmers was higher compared to other cyclic movements which is in contrast to what has been reported in the previous 50years of EMG research in swimming. This leads to the conclusion that coaches should be careful in using overall reference EMG information to enhance the individual swimming technique of their athletes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ice surface temperatures: seasonal cycle and daily variability from in-situ and satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Kristine S.; Dybkjær, Gorm; Høyer, Jacob L.; Nielsen-Englyst, Pia; Rasmussen, Till A. S.; Tonboe, Rasmus T.

    2016-04-01

    Surface temperature is an important parameter for understanding the climate system, including the Polar Regions. Yet, in-situ temperature measurements over ice- and snow covered regions are sparse and unevenly distributed, and atmospheric circulation models estimating surface temperature may have large biases. To change this picture, we will analyse the seasonal cycle and daily variability of in-situ and satellite observations, and give an example of how to utilize the data in a sea ice model. We have compiled a data set of in-situ surface and 2 m air temperature observations over land ice, snow, sea ice, and from the marginal ice zone. 2523 time series of varying length from 14 data providers, with a total of more than 13 million observations, have been quality controlled and gathered in a uniform format. An overview of this data set will be presented. In addition, IST satellite observations have been processed from the Metop/AVHRR sensor and a merged analysis product has been constructed based upon the Metop/AVHRR, IASI and Modis IST observations. The satellite and in-situ observations of IST are analysed in parallel, to characterize the IST variability on diurnal and seasonal scales and its spatial patterns. The in-situ data are used to estimate sampling effects within the satellite observations and the good coverage of the satellite observations are used to complete the geographical variability. As an example of the application of satellite IST data, results will be shown from a coupled HYCOM-CICE ocean and sea ice model run, where the IST products have been ingested. The impact of using IST in models will be assessed. This work is a part of the EUSTACE project under Horizon 2020, where the ice surface temperatures form an important piece of the puzzle of creating an observationally based record of surface temperatures for all corners of the Earth, and of the ESA GlobTemperature project which aims at applying surface temperatures in models in order to

  13. lnvestigation of Patch Coatings lnfluence on the Stress lntensity Factor for Surface Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, Søren Heide; Jepsen, Michael S.; Damkilde, Lars

    2013-01-01

    to damp the free end of the crack, which will reduce the stress intensity factor and subsequently reduce the crack growth. The considered patch consists of a surface layer of 0.2 mm two component adhesive Epoxy, 3M DP 460. The models described in this work contains five different crack sizes with a patch......In this paper, it is investigated how a surface layer of epoxy glue will affect the crack propagation of a surface crack. The intension is to reduce or even stop the crack propagation by means of patch layer coating. When adding a patch layer to the surface with small cracks, the layer will attempt...... layer on the surface. The stress intensity factor is computed by means of the J-integral and the FE-model is setup with a nonlinear material model to establish the upper boundary for the patch stress capacity. A reduction of the stress intensity factor of approximately 2 % and a reduction of the crack...

  14. Effectiveness of emWave biofeedback in improving heart rate variability reactivity to and recovery from stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, Amanda; Larkin, Kevin T; Whited, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    The current study examined the efficacy of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback using emWave, a publicly available biofeedback device, to determine whether training affected physiological tone and stress responses. Twenty-seven individuals aged 18-30 years were randomized to a treatment or no-treatment control group. Treatment participants underwent 4-8 sessions of emWave intervention, and all participants attended pre-treatment and post-treatment assessment sessions during which acute stressors were administered. Physiological data were collected at rest, during stress, and following stress. emWave treatment did not confer changes in tonic measures of HRV or in HRV recovery following stress. However, treatment participants exhibited higher parasympathetic responses (i.e., pNN50) during stress presentations at the post-treatment session than their control counterparts. No treatment effects were evident on self-reported measures of stress, psychological symptoms, or affect. Overall, results from the current study suggest that the emWave may confer some limited treatment effects by increasing HRV during exposure to stress. Additional development and testing of the emWave treatment protocol is necessary before it can be recommended for regular use in clinical settings, including the determination of what physiological changes are clinically meaningful during HRV biofeedback training.

  15. A One-Layer Satellite Surface Energy Balance for Estimating Evapotranspiration Rates and Crop Water Stress Indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Barbagallo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Daily evapotranspiration fluxes over the semi-arid Catania Plain area (Eastern Sicily, Italy were evaluated using remotely sensed data from Landsat Thematic Mapper TM5 images. A one-source parameterization of the surface sensible heat flux exchange using satellite surface temperature has been used. The transfer of sensible and latent heat is described by aerodynamic resistance and surface resistance. Required model inputs are brightness, temperature, fractional vegetation cover or leaf area index, albedo, crop height, roughness lengths, net radiation, air temperature, air humidity and wind speed. The aerodynamic resistance (rah is formulated on the basis of the Monin-Obukhov surface layer similarity theory and the surface resistance (rs is evaluated from the energy balance equation. The instantaneous surface flux values were converted into evaporative fraction (EF over the heterogeneous land surface to derive daily evapotranspiration values. Remote sensing-based assessments of crop water stress (CWSI were also made in order to identify local irrigation requirements. Evapotranspiration data and crop coefficient values obtained from the approach were compared with: (i data from the semi-empirical approach “Kc reflectance-based”, which integrates satellite data in the visible and NIR regions of the electromagnetic spectrum with ground-based measurements and (ii surface energy flux measurements collected from a micrometeorological tower located in the experiment area. The expected variability associated with ET flux measurements suggests that the approach-derived surface fluxes were in acceptable agreement with the observations.

  16. Seasonal variability in sea surface salinity (SSS) in the Tropical Atlantic from SMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzortzi, E.; Gommenginger, C. P.; Srokosz, M.; Josey, S.

    2012-12-01

    A natural indicator of changes in the hydrological cycle, salinity variations in recent decades have been linked to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) strength, and the tropics/subtropics are considered important regions in relation to the reversal of northern N. Atlantic freshening and MOC recovery. Benefiting from the advent of satellite SSS maps, this study focuses on the seasonal variability of sea surface salinity (SSS) from SMOS in the tropical Atlantic between 20°N-20°S. Encompassing both Precipitation-dominated (P) and Evaporation-dominated (E) regimes, this region features the influence of the ITCZ as well as large freshwater outflow from the Amazon/Orinoco and Niger/Congo river systems. Therefore, SSS is characterized by very strong variability through the year appearing as two "poles" in the western and eastern tropical Atlantic basin, respectively. Here, we examine how the area-weighted mean SSS in this tropical band 20°N-20°S relates to seasonal changes in riverine outflow and to the ITCZ movement north and south of the equator. By considering both the whole tropical region and the two basins separately, the analyses explore how the SSS seasonal cycle differs in each region, looking for e.g. differences in magnitude, speed of occurrence and spread, and timing of the strongest SSS changes between the eastern and western basins during the year. Accordingly, we relate this to the role of controlling mechanisms, particularly of E-P (using NCEP, OAFlux and GPCP datasets), on the seasonal variability of SSS, and the contribution of surface freshwater forcing in the different regions of the tropical Atlantic. Finally, this work contributes to a regional validation of SSS measurements from satellites and determines the value of satellite SSS data to help understand freshwater fluxes and SSS variability in the tropical Atlantic.

  17. Variability of the temporal bone surface's topography: implications for otologic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoeur, Jérémy; Noble, Jack H.; Balachandran, Ramya; Labadie, Robert F.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2012-02-01

    Otologic surgery is performed for a variety of reasons including treatment of recurrent ear infections, alleviation of dizziness, and restoration of hearing loss. A typical ear surgery consists of a tympanomastoidectomy in which both the middle ear is explored via a tympanic membrane flap and the bone behind the ear is removed via mastoidectomy to treat disease and/or provide additional access. The mastoid dissection is performed using a high-speed drill to excavate bone based on a pre-operative CT scan. Intraoperatively, the surface of the mastoid component of the temporal bone provides visual feedback allowing the surgeon to guide their dissection. Dissection begins in "safe areas" which, based on surface topography, are believed to be correlated with greatest distance from surface to vital anatomy thus decreasing the chance of injury to the brain, large blood vessels (e.g. the internal jugular vein and internal carotid artery), the inner ear, and the facial nerve. "Safe areas" have been identified based on surgical experience with no identifiable studies showing correlation of the surface with subsurface anatomy. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether such a correlation exists. Through a three-step registration process, we defined a correspondence between each of twenty five clinically-applicable temporal bone CT scans of patients and an atlas and explored displacement and angular differences of surface topography and depth of critical structures from the surface of the skull. The results of this study reflect current knowledge of osteogenesis and anatomy. Based on two features (distance and angular difference), two regions (suprahelical and posterior) of the temporal bone show the least variability between surface and subsurface anatomy.

  18. Towards the Consideration of Surface and Environment variables for a Microwave Precipitation Algorithm Over Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N. Y.; You, Y.; Ferraro, R. R.; Guch, I.

    2014-12-01

    Microwave satellite remote sensing of precipitation over land is a challenging problem due to the highly variable land surface emissivity, which, if not properly accounted for, can be much greater than the precipitation signal itself, especially in light rain/snow conditions. Additionally, surfaces such as arid land, deserts and snow cover have brightness temperatures characteristics similar to precipitation Ongoing work by NASA's GPM microwave radiometer team is constructing databases for the GPROF algorithm through a variety of means, however, there is much uncertainty as to what is the optimal information needed for the wide array of sensors in the GPM constellation, including examination of regional conditions. The at-launch database focuses on stratification by emissivity class, surface temperature and total precipitable water (TPW). We'll perform sensitivity studies to determine the potential role of environmental factors such as land surface temperature, surface elevation, and relative humidity and storm morphology such as storm vertical structure, height, and ice thickness to improve precipitation estimation over land, including rain and snow. In other words, what information outside of the satellite radiances can help describe the background and subsequent departures from it that are active precipitating regions? It is likely that this information will be a function of the various precipitation regimes. Statistical methods such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) will be utilized in this task. Databases from a variety of sources are being constructed. They include existing satellite microwave measurements of precipitating and non-precipitating conditions, ground radar precipitation rate estimates, surface emissivity climatology from satellites, surface temperature and TPW from NWP reanalysis. Results from the analysis of these databases with respect to the microwave precipitation sensitivity to the variety of environmental conditions in different climate

  19. Surface energy balance sensitivity to meteorological variability on Haig Glacier, Canadian Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Samaneh; Marshall, Shawn J.

    2016-11-01

    Energy exchanges between the atmosphere and the glacier surface control the net energy available for snow and ice melt. This paper explores the response of a midlatitude glacier in the Canadian Rocky Mountains to daily and interannual variations in the meteorological parameters that govern the surface energy balance. We use an energy balance model to run sensitivity tests to perturbations in temperature, specific humidity, wind speed, incoming shortwave radiation, glacier surface albedo, and winter snowpack depth. Variables are perturbed (i) in isolation, (ii) including internal feedbacks, and (iii) with co-evolution of meteorological perturbations, derived from the North American regional climate reanalysis (NARR) over the period 1979-2014. Summer melt at this site has the strongest sensitivity to interannual variations in temperature, albedo, and specific humidity, while fluctuations in cloud cover, wind speed, and winter snowpack depth have less influence. Feedbacks to temperature forcing, in particular summer albedo evolution, double the melt sensitivity to a temperature change. When meteorological perturbations covary through the NARR forcing, summer temperature anomalies remain important in driving interannual summer energy balance and melt variability, but they are reduced in importance relative to an isolated temperature forcing. Covariation of other variables (e.g., clear skies, giving reduced incoming longwave radiation) may be partially compensating for the increase in temperature. The methods introduced in this paper provide a framework that can be extended to compare the sensitivity of glaciers in different climate regimes, e.g., polar, maritime, or tropical environments, and to assess the importance of different meteorological parameters in different regions.

  20. Temporal and spatial characteristics of sea surface height variability in the North Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cromwell

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatial and temporal variability of sea surface height (SSH in the North Atlantic basin using satellite altimeter data from October 1992–January 2004. Our primary aim is to provide a detailed description of such variability, including that associated with propagating signals. We also investigate possible correlations between SSH variability and atmospheric pressure changes as represented by climate indices. We first investigate interannual SSH variations by deriving the complex empirical orthogonal functions (CEOFs of altimeter data lowpass-filtered at 18 months. We determine the spatial structure of the leading four modes (both in amplitude and phase and also the associated principal component (PC time series. Using wavelet analysis we derive the time-varying spectral density of the PCs, revealing when particular modes were strongest between 1992–2004. The spatial pattern of the leading CEOF, comprising 30% of the total variability, displays a 5-year periodicity in phase; signal propagation is particularly marked in the Labrador Sea. The second mode, with a dominant 3-year signal, has strong variability in the eastern basin. Secondly, we focus on the Azores subtropical frontal zone. The leading mode (35% is strong in the south and east of this region with strong variations at 3- and 5-year periods. The second mode (21% has a near-zonal band of low variance between  22°–27° N, sandwiched between two regions of high variance. Thirdly, we lowpass filter the altimeter data at a cutoff of 30 days, instead of 18 months, in order to retain signals associated with propagating baroclinic Rossby waves and/or eddies. The leading mode is the annual steric signal, around 46% of the SSH variability. The third and fourth CEOFs,  11% of the remaining variability, are associated with westward propagation which is particularly dominant in a "waveband" between 32°–36° N. For all three cases considered above, no significant cross

  1. Climatic variability of river outflow in the Pantanal region and the influence of sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carlos Batista; Silva, Maria Elisa Siqueira; Ambrizzi, Tércio

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates possible linear relationships between climate, hydrology, and oceanic surface variability in the Pantanal region (in South America's central area), over interannual and interdecadal time ranges. In order to verify the mentioned relations, lagged correlation analysis and linear adjustment between river discharge at the Pantanal region and sea surface temperature were used. Composite analysis for atmospheric fields, air humidity flux divergence, and atmospheric circulation at low and high levels, for the period between 1970 and 2003, was analyzed. Results suggest that the river discharge in the Pantanal region is linearly associated with interdecadal and interannual oscillations in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, making them good predictors to continental hydrological variables. Considering oceanic areas, 51 % of the annual discharge in the Pantanal region can be linearly explained by mean sea surface temperature (SST) in the Subtropical North Pacific, Tropical North Pacific, Extratropical South Pacific, and Extratropical North Atlantic over the period. Considering a forecast approach in seasonal scale, 66 % of the monthly discharge variance in Pantanal, 3 months ahead of SST, is explained by the oceanic variables, providing accuracy around 65 %. Annual discharge values in the Pantanal region are strongly related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) variability (with 52 % of linear correlation), making it possible to consider an interdecadal variability and a consequent subdivision of the whole period in three parts: 1st (1970-1977), 2nd (1978-1996), and 3rd (1997-2003) subperiods. The three subperiods coincide with distinct PDO phases: negative, positive, and negative, respectively. Convergence of humidity flux at low levels and the circulation pattern at high levels help to explain the drier and wetter subperiods. During the wetter 2nd subperiod, the air humidity convergence at low levels is much more evident than during the other two

  2. Hourly to Decadal variability of sea surface carbon parameters in the north western Mediteranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Jacqueline; Merlivat, Liliane; Antoine, David; Beaumont, Laurence; Golbol, Melek; Velluci, Vincenzo

    2017-04-01

    Sea surface CO2 fugacity, fCO2, is recorded hourly in the north western Mediterranean Sea since 2013 by two CARIOCA (Carbon Interface Ocean Atmosphere) sensors installed on the BOUSSOLE (Buoy for the acquisition of long term optical time series, http://www.obs-vlfr.fr/Boussole/html/project/introduction.php) mooring at 3m and 10m depth. fCO2 exhibits a large seasonal cycle, about 150 microatm peak to peak, very consistent with earlier CARIOCA measurements taken in 1995-1999 at the DYFAMED site (located 6km apart from the BOUSSOLE mooring) (Hood and Merlivat, JMR, 2001; Copin-Montegut et al., Mar. Chem., 2004): this seasonal cycle is driven primarily by intense mixing in Winter, biological uptake during Spring and warming during Summer. Interannual variability of these processes leads to interannual variability of monthly mean fCO2 that can reach more than 20 microatm. The short term variability (1 hour to 1 week) is large, especially during Summer 2014 (more than 40 microatm) due to a very strong vertical stratification and to the influence of internal waves. The hourly CARIOCA measurements allow to correctly filter out the high frequency variability while the three year long time series allow to smooth out interannual variability. Hence, for the first time, we get a precise estimate of the change of fCO2 in surface waters within 20 years. Over the 1995-2015 interval, we estimate an increase of fCO2 computed at a constant temperature of 13˚ C equal to 1.8 microatm per year. Given the alkalinity/salinity relationship in this region, we estimate mean annual rates of change of -0.0023+/-0.0001 pH unit and of +1.47+/-0.03 μmol kg-1 for pH and DIC respectively. These results give a quantitative estimate of the penetration of anthropogenic carbon in the surface waters of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea, about 80% via air-sea exchange and 20% via transport of carbon from the Atlantic across the Strait of Gibraltar as suggested by Palmieri et al (BG, 2015). We estimate

  3. Climatic variability of river outflow in the Pantanal region and the influence of sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carlos Batista; Silva, Maria Elisa Siqueira; Ambrizzi, Tércio

    2017-07-01

    This paper investigates possible linear relationships between climate, hydrology, and oceanic surface variability in the Pantanal region (in South America's central area), over interannual and interdecadal time ranges. In order to verify the mentioned relations, lagged correlation analysis and linear adjustment between river discharge at the Pantanal region and sea surface temperature were used. Composite analysis for atmospheric fields, air humidity flux divergence, and atmospheric circulation at low and high levels, for the period between 1970 and 2003, was analyzed. Results suggest that the river discharge in the Pantanal region is linearly associated with interdecadal and interannual oscillations in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, making them good predictors to continental hydrological variables. Considering oceanic areas, 51 % of the annual discharge in the Pantanal region can be linearly explained by mean sea surface temperature (SST) in the Subtropical North Pacific, Tropical North Pacific, Extratropical South Pacific, and Extratropical North Atlantic over the period. Considering a forecast approach in seasonal scale, 66 % of the monthly discharge variance in Pantanal, 3 months ahead of SST, is explained by the oceanic variables, providing accuracy around 65 %. Annual discharge values in the Pantanal region are strongly related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) variability (with 52 % of linear correlation), making it possible to consider an interdecadal variability and a consequent subdivision of the whole period in three parts: 1st (1970-1977), 2nd (1978-1996), and 3rd (1997-2003) subperiods. The three subperiods coincide with distinct PDO phases: negative, positive, and negative, respectively. Convergence of humidity flux at low levels and the circulation pattern at high levels help to explain the drier and wetter subperiods. During the wetter 2nd subperiod, the air humidity convergence at low levels is much more evident than during the other two

  4. Daily scale wintertime sea surface temperature and IPC-Navidad variability in the southern Bay of Biscay from 1981 to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esnaola, G.; Sáenz, J.; Zorita, E.; Fontán, A.; Valencia, V.; Lazure, P.

    2013-07-01

    The combination of remotely sensed gappy Sea surface temperature (SST) images with the missing data filling DINEOF (data interpolating empirical orthogonal functions) technique, followed by a principal component analysis of the reconstructed data, has been used to identify the time evolution and the daily scale variability of the wintertime surface signal of the Iberian Poleward Current (IPC), or Navidad, during the 1981-2010 period. An exhaustive comparison with the existing bibliography, and the vertical temperature and salinity profiles related to its extremes over the Bay of Biscay area, show that the obtained time series accurately reflect the IPC-Navidad variability. Once a time series for the evolution of the SST signal of the current over the last decades is well established, this time series is used to propose a physical mechanism in relation to the variability of the IPC-Navidad, involving both atmospheric and oceanic variables. According to the proposed mechanism, an atmospheric circulation anomaly observed in both the 500 hPa and the surface levels generates atmospheric surface level pressure, wind-stress and heat-flux anomalies. In turn, those surface level atmospheric anomalies induce mutually coherent SST and sea level anomalies over the North Atlantic area, and locally, in the Bay of Biscay area. These anomalies, both locally over the Bay of Biscay area and over the North Atlantic, are in agreement with several mechanisms that have separately been related to the variability of the IPC-Navidad, i.e. the south-westerly winds, the joint effect of baroclinicity and relief (JEBAR) effect, the topographic β effect and a weakened North Atlantic gyre.

  5. Daily scale wintertime sea surface temperature and IPC-Navidad variability in the southern Bay of Biscay from 1981 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Esnaola

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The combination of remotely sensed gappy Sea surface temperature (SST images with the missing data filling DINEOF (data interpolating empirical orthogonal functions technique, followed by a principal component analysis of the reconstructed data, has been used to identify the time evolution and the daily scale variability of the wintertime surface signal of the Iberian Poleward Current (IPC, or Navidad, during the 1981–2010 period. An exhaustive comparison with the existing bibliography, and the vertical temperature and salinity profiles related to its extremes over the Bay of Biscay area, show that the obtained time series accurately reflect the IPC-Navidad variability. Once a time series for the evolution of the SST signal of the current over the last decades is well established, this time series is used to propose a physical mechanism in relation to the variability of the IPC-Navidad, involving both atmospheric and oceanic variables. According to the proposed mechanism, an atmospheric circulation anomaly observed in both the 500 hPa and the surface levels generates atmospheric surface level pressure, wind-stress and heat-flux anomalies. In turn, those surface level atmospheric anomalies induce mutually coherent SST and sea level anomalies over the North Atlantic area, and locally, in the Bay of Biscay area. These anomalies, both locally over the Bay of Biscay area and over the North Atlantic, are in agreement with several mechanisms that have separately been related to the variability of the IPC-Navidad, i.e. the south-westerly winds, the joint effect of baroclinicity and relief (JEBAR effect, the topographic β effect and a weakened North Atlantic gyre.

  6. Surface profile and stress field evaluation using digital gradient sensing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, C.; Sundaram, B. M.; Huang, L.; Tippur, H. V.

    2016-09-01

    Shape and surface topography evaluation from measured orthogonal slope/gradient data is of considerable engineering significance since many full-field optical sensors and interferometers readily output such a data accurately. This has applications ranging from metrology of optical and electronic elements (lenses, silicon wafers, thin film coatings), surface profile estimation, wave front and shape reconstruction, to name a few. In this context, a new methodology for surface profile and stress field determination based on a recently introduced non-contact, full-field optical method called digital gradient sensing (DGS) capable of measuring small angular deflections of light rays coupled with a robust finite-difference-based least-squares integration (HFLI) scheme in the Southwell configuration is advanced here. The method is demonstrated by evaluating (a) surface profiles of mechanically warped silicon wafers and (b) stress gradients near growing cracks in planar phase objects.

  7. Theoretical modeling and experimental validation of surface stress in thrombin aptasensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yang Choon; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Kaynak, Akif; Dai, Xiujuan J; Littlefair, Guy; Duan, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Adsorption of target molecules on the immobilized microcantilever surface produced beam displacement due to the differential surface stress generated between the immobilized and non-immobilized surface. Surface stress is caused by the intermolecular forces between the molecules. Van der Waals, electrostatic forces, hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic effect and steric hindrance are some of the intermolecular forces involved. A theoretical framework describing the adsorption-induced microcantilever displacement is derived in this paper. Experimental displacement of thrombin aptamer-thrombin interactions was carried out. The relation between the electrostatic interactions involved between adsorbates (thrombin) as well as adsorbates and substrates (thrombin aptamer) and the microcantilever beam displacement utilizing the proposed mathematical model was quantified and compared to the experimental value. This exercise is important to aid the designers in microcantilever sensing performance optimization.

  8. Assessment of the Impact of Geomechanical Parameters Variability on Underground Excavations Stability Using Response Surface Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Witold; Świtoń, Joanna

    2013-03-01

    Recognition of properties of the rock mass surrounding a mineral deposit is particularly important for the mining operations at greater depths. Since the rock mass is usually not homogeneous, and its parameters have characteristics of randomness, underground workings safety issue should always be analysed taking into account the dispersion of the values of these parameters around their mean values. In order to assess the impact of geotechnical parameters uncertainty on the excavation stability one uses the appropriate statistical approach. In this paper, by analysing successive combinations of geomechanical parameters of the rock in the measured range, we examined the effect of their variability on risk of underground excavation instability using response surface method.

  9. Daily scale winter-time sea surface temperature variability and the Iberian Poleward Current in the southern Bay of Biscay from 1981 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Esnaola

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The combination of remotely sensed gappy sea surface temperature (SST images with the missing data filling Data Interpolating EOFs (DINEOF technique followed by a Principal Component Analysis of the reconstructed data, has been used to identify the time evolution and the daily scale variability of the winter-time surface signal of the Iberian Poleward Current (IPC during the 1981–2010 period. An exhaustive comparison with the existing bibliography, and the vertical temperature and salinity profiles related to its extremes over the Bay of Biscay area, show that the obtained time series accurately reflect the variability of the IPC. A physical mechanism involving both atmospheric and oceanic variables is proposed in relation to the variability of the IPC. It jointly takes into account several mechanisms that have separately been related to the variability of the IPC, i.e. the south-westerly winds, the Joint Effect of Baroclinicity And Relief (JEBAR effect, the topographic β effect and a weakened North Atlantic Gyre. This mechanism emerges from an atmospheric 500 hPa circulation anomaly that has not a simple relationship with any of the most common North Atlantic teleconnection patterns. It then generates mutually coherent SST and sea level anomaly patterns in the North Atlantic area due to the action of anomalous wind-stress and heat-fluxes, and locally, it also generates the conditions for the mentioned mechanisms in the Bay of Biscay area.

  10. Spatial Variability Some Physical and Chemical Prpperties Soil surface In Dasht-e-Tabriz Different Landforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughifar, Hamed; Asghar Jafarzadeh, Ali; Torabi, Hosien; Aliasgharzad, Naser; Toomanian, Norair

    2010-05-01

    Spatial distribution of soil properties at the field and watershed scale(region scale) affect yield potential, hydrologic responses , and transport of herbicides and No3 to surface or groundwater.The present study aim was to evaluate some physical and chemical properties spatial variability and frequency distribution within and between landforms of Dash-e-Tabriz in the northwest of Iran.For this evaluation 98 samples from soils surface of layer according to grid sampling design and with 500-1000 meters distance based on soils variability were selected and analysed.Landforms were hill, piedmont plain, plain, river alluvial plain and lowland.The study of soil variables frequency distribution showed that Bd, CEC, Caco3, pH,clay and silt follow normal distribution ,which to study their variation one can use parametric statistical method.Variables such as MWD, N(total), SAR, EC, P(available) and sand showed log-normal distribution,that for their variation study,should first be transformed to a logarithmic scale.The variables frequency distribution increase within landforms,which in lowland, hill, and river alluvial plain they showed normal distribution and only EC in piedmont plain and sand, OC and N(total) in plain had log-normal distributions.The results indicate significantly differences of soil properties distribution among landforms,which clay ,pH, EC ,SAR and MWD, CEC, Bd, N(total), OC, P(available), sand, silt were strongly and moderately spatial dependent respectively and Caco3 had no spatial dependence and it is following nugget model.These results indicate that strong spatial dependence due to the effects of intrinsic factors such as parent material, relief and soil types. Also soil properties variations result from variation in depositional environments and or differences in pedogenic or hydrologic processes for different landform positions,and so it can be affected by the flood irrigation,fertilizeir addition,high watertable level or agriculture practices

  11. A description of the Mediterranean surface variable circulation from combined ERS-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, Nadia; Le Traon, Pierre-Yves; De Mey, Pierre

    1998-12-01

    The ERS-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) data have been combined to study the surface circulation variability in the Mediterranean Sea, from October 1992 to December 1993. The ERS-1 orbit error is corrected using T/P data as a reference which yields two consistent datasets. We combine them via a space-time objective analysis method. Comparison of sea level anomaly (SLA) maps allows us to check that the specific contribution of ERS-1 consists of an improved mesoscale circulation description with respect to the analysis of T/P only. The Mediterranean circulation variability, as observed by T/P and ERS-1, is characterised by a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. As the various signals are superimposed and very likely to interact with each other, it is difficult to isolate them. Moreover, as shown by the comparison of fall 1992 and fall 1993 maps, strong interannual signals are suspected to affect the seasonal circulation. This makes the reference to previous observations almost impossible, especially in the Eastern Basin. However, several well-known signals have been recovered and new interesting features are observed. The variability in the Western Basin consists of a wintertime intensification of the basin-scale cyclonic cell, with the acceleration of coastal narrow currents, and in mesoscale activity all year round in the southern part of the basin and in the Tyrrhenian Sea. The Alboran gyres temporal variations and eastward and seaward propagations of Algerian Current eddies are detected. The analysis of ECMWF monthly averages suggests that wind stress curl variations are responsible for the large-scale seasonal variability. In the Ionian Basin, the signals are more complex. In winter 1993, the eastward current along the coast of Africa is strongly intensified; in summer 1993, it is shifted to the north and forms a large anticyclonic meander extending up to the Otranto Strait. From April to December 1993, an anticyclone is detected around 17°E-34°N. In the

  12. Long-term Variability of Sea Surface Temperature in the East China Sea: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hak Lee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The long-term variability of sea surface temperature in the East China Sea was reviewed based mainly on published literatures. Though the quantitative results are not the same, it is generally shown that sea surface temperature is increasing especially in recent years with the rate of increase about 0.03oC/year. Other meaningful results presented in the literatures is that the difference of water properties between layers upper and lower than the thermocline in summer shows an increasing trend both in temperature and salinity, suggesting that the stratification has been intensified. As a mechanism by which to evaluate the wintertime warming trend in the region, the weakening of wind strength, which is related to the variation of sea level pressure and atmospheric circulation in the western North Pacific and northern Asian continent, is suggested in the most of related studies.

  13. Variable Optical Attenuator Based on Long-Range Surface Plasmon Polariton Multimode Interference Coupler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiang Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication and characterization of a thermal variable optical attenuator based on long-range surface plasmon polariton (LRSPP waveguide with multimode interference architecture were investigated. The surface morphology and waveguide configuration of Au stripe were studied by atomic force microscopy. The fluctuation of refractive index of poly(methyl-methacrylate-glycidyl-methacrylate polymer cladding was confirmed to be less than 3×10-4 within 8 h curing at 120°C. The end-fire excitation of LRSPP mode guiding at 1550 nm along Au stripe indicated that the extinction ratio of attenuator was about 12 dB at a driving power of 69 mW. The measured optical rise time and fall time are 0.57 and 0.87 ms, respectively. These favorable properties promise potentials of this plasmonic device in the application of optical interconnection.

  14. Evaluating the variability in surface water reservoir planning characteristics during climate change impacts assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundharajan, Bankaru-Swamy; Adeloye, Adebayo J.; Remesan, Renji

    2016-07-01

    This study employed a Monte-Carlo simulation approach to characterise the uncertainties in climate change induced variations in storage requirements and performance (reliability (time- and volume-based), resilience, vulnerability and sustainability) of surface water reservoirs. Using a calibrated rainfall-runoff (R-R) model, the baseline runoff scenario was first simulated. The R-R inputs (rainfall and temperature) were then perturbed using plausible delta-changes to produce simulated climate change runoff scenarios. Stochastic models of the runoff were developed and used to generate ensembles of both the current and climate-change-perturbed future runoff scenarios. The resulting runoff ensembles were used to force simulation models of the behaviour of the reservoir to produce 'populations' of required reservoir storage capacity to meet demands, and the performance. Comparing these parameters between the current and the perturbed provided the population of climate change effects which was then analysed to determine the variability in the impacts. The methodology was applied to the Pong reservoir on the Beas River in northern India. The reservoir serves irrigation and hydropower needs and the hydrology of the catchment is highly influenced by Himalayan seasonal snow and glaciers, and Monsoon rainfall, both of which are predicted to change due to climate change. The results show that required reservoir capacity is highly variable with a coefficient of variation (CV) as high as 0.3 as the future climate becomes drier. Of the performance indices, the vulnerability recorded the highest variability (CV up to 0.5) while the volume-based reliability was the least variable. Such variabilities or uncertainties will, no doubt, complicate the development of climate change adaptation measures; however, knowledge of their sheer magnitudes as obtained in this study will help in the formulation of appropriate policy and technical interventions for sustaining and possibly enhancing

  15. Quantitative assessments of residual stress fields at the surface of alumina hip joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Munisso, Maria Chiara; Lessnau, Kristina; Zhu, Wenliang

    2010-11-01

    In-depth and in-plane response functions of photo- and electro-stimulated probes have been modeled and quantitatively evaluated in order to assess their suitability to detect the highly graded residual stress fields generated at the surface of alumina hip joints. Optical calibrations revealed large differences in probe size, which strongly affected the detected magnitude of residual stress. A comparison between the responses of Raman and fluorescence probes in polycrystalline alumina showed that the depth of those probes spread to an extent in the order of the tens of microns even with using a confocal probe configuration. On the other hand, the electro-stimulated luminescence emitted by oxygen vacancy sites (F(+) center) in the alumina lattice represented the most suitable choice for confining to a shallow volume the stress probe. This latter probe enabled us to reduce the measurement depth to the order of the tens of nanometers. We show maps of surface residual stress as collected on both main-wear and nonwear zones of an alumina femoral head. A comparison among stress maps taken at exactly the same location, but employing different probes, revealed averaging effects on the stress magnitude detected with photo-stimulated probes, while proving the superior spatial resolution of the electron probe.

  16. Residual Stress on Surface and Cross-section of Porous Silicon Studied by Micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Zhen-Kun; KANG YI-Lan; CEN Hao; HU Ming; QIU Yu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Surface and cross-sectional residual stresses of electrochemical etching porous silicon are investigated quantitatively by micro-Raman spectroscopy.The results reveal that a larger tensile residual stress exists on the surface and increase linearly with the porosity.On the other hand, across the depth direction perpendicular to the surface, the tensile residual stress decreases gradually from the surface to regions near the interface between the porous silicon layer and the Si substrate.However, a compressive stress appears at the interface near to the Si substrate for balancing with the tensile stress in the porous silicon layer.The cross-sectional residual stress profile is due to the porosity and lattice mismatch gradients existing in the cross-section and influencing each other.Furthermore, the presented residual stresses of the porous silicon have a close relation with its microstructure.

  17. Enhanced Vertical Atmosphere Resolution improves Climate Model Simulation of Tropical Atlantic Sea Surface Temperature and Interannual Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlass, Jan; Latif, Mojib; Park, Wonsun

    2015-04-01

    A long-standing problem in climate modelling is the inaccurate simulation of tropical Atlantic (TA) sea surface temperature (SST), known as the TA SST bias. Basically all state-of-the-art global climate models suffer from a reversed equatorial zonal SST gradient in the Atlantic and too warm surface temperatures in the Benguela upwelling region. These biases have far-reaching consequences for climate prediction as they go along, among others, with erroneous precipitation patterns. We used the coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice Kiel Climate Model (KCM) to conduct experiments with varying atmosphere model resolutions, while keeping the ocean component unchanged. Atmosphere model resolution has been increased not only in the horizontal (from T42 to T159), but also in the vertical (from L31 to L62). We show that the TA SST bias can be largely reduced by increasing both the atmospheric horizontal and vertical resolution. In particular, the zonal SST gradient along the equator is simulated with the correct sign. At high horizontal resolution, enhanced vertical resolution is indispensable to substantially improve the simulation of TA SST by enhancing the surface wind stress. This also reduces biases in the upper ocean thermal structure and precipitation. A major step forward is a more northward position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. Although enhanced horizontal resolution alone leads to some improvement in the mean climate, typical bias patterns, characterized by a reversed zonal SST gradient at the equator and too warm SST along the Benguela Coast, remain. Notable changes in the pattern of interannual SST variability occur with increased resolution. Seasonal phase locking is captured only at high vertical resolution, although a phase lag of 2 months still exists. Our study highlights the importance of sufficiently high atmospheric model resolution and, equally important, a consistent choice of horizontal and vertical model resolution.

  18. The relevance of socio-demographic and occupational variables for the assessment of work-related stress risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaccio, Alessandro; Ferrante, Pierpaolo; Corfiati, Marisa; Di Tecco, Cristina; Rondinone, Bruna M; Bonafede, Michela; Ronchetti, Matteo; Persechino, Benedetta; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2013-12-10

    Work-related stress is widely recognized as one of the major challenges to occupational health and safety. The correlation between work-related stress risk factors and physical health outcomes is widely acknowledged. This study investigated socio-demographic and occupational variables involved in perceived risk of work-related stress. The Italian version of the Health and Safety Executive Management Standards Indicator Tool was used in a large survey to examine the relationship between work-related stress risks and workers' demographic and occupational characteristics. Out of 8,527 questionnaires distributed among workers (from 75 organizations) 6,378 were returned compiled (74.8%); a set of mixed effects models were adopted to test single and combined effects of the variables on work-related stress risk. Female workers reported lower scores on control and peer support and more negative perceptions of relationships and change at work than male workers, most of them with full-time contracts. Age, job seniority, and educational level appeared positively correlated with control at work, but negatively with job demands. Fixed-term workers had positive perceptions regarding job demands and relationships, but more difficulties about their role at work than permanent workers. A commuting time longer than one hour and shift work appeared to be associated with higher levels of risk factors for work-related stress (except for role), the latter having more negative effects, increasing with age. The findings suggest that the assessment and management of work-related stress risk should consider specific socio-demographic and occupational risk factors such as gender, age, educational level, job status, shift work, commuting time, job contracts.

  19. Standard test method for calibration of surface/stress measuring devices

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    Return to Contents page 1.1 This test method covers calibration or verification of calibration, or both, of surface-stress measuring devices used to measure stress in annealed and heat-strengthened or tempered glass using polariscopic or refractometry based principles. 1.2 This test method is nondestructive. 1.3 This test method uses transmitted light, and therefore, is applicable to light-transmitting glasses. 1.4 This test method is not applicable to chemically tempered glass. 1.5 Using the procedure described, surface stresses can be measured only on the “tin” side of float glass. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  20. Realignment of Nanocrystal Aggregates into Single Crystals as a Result of Inherent Surface Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhaoming [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027 China; Pan, Haihua [Qiushi Academy for Advanced Studies, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027 China; Zhu, Genxing [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027 China; Li, Yaling [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027 China; Tao, Jinhui [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Jin, Biao [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027 China; Tang, Ruikang [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027 China; Qiushi Academy for Advanced Studies, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027 China

    2016-07-19

    Assembly of nanoparticles building blocks during single crystal growth is widely observed in both natural and synthetic environments. Although this form of non-classical crystallization is generally described by oriented attachment, random aggregation of building blocks leading to single crystal products is also observed, but the mechanism of crystallographic realignment is unknown. We herein reveal that random attachment during aggregation-based growth initially produces a non-oriented growth front. Subsequent evolution of the orientation is driven by the inherent surface stress applied by the disordered surface layer and results in single crystal formation via grain boundary migration. This mechanism is corroborated by measurements of orientation rate vs external stress, demonstrating a predictive relationship between the two. These findings advance our understanding of aggregation-based growth of natural minerals by nanocrystals, and suggest an approach to material synthesis that takes advantage of stress induced co-alignment.

  1. Surface Chemistry and Structural Effects in the Stress Corrosion of Glass and Ceramic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-31

    elimination of ’weakened’ siloxane linkages, the creation of a ’ microplastic ’ surface layer, and consequently a more uniform distribution of applied stress...examined the impact toughness of plate glass treated at elevated temperatures with sulfur dioxide and also difluorodichloromethane. They, too, observed an

  2. Comparison of surface wind stress measurements - Airborne radar scatterometer versus sonic anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucks, J. T.; Leming, T. D.; Jones, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Sea surface wind stress measurements recorded by a sonic anemometer are correlated with airborne scatterometer measurements of ocean roughness (cross section of radar backscatter) to establish the accuracy of remotely sensed data and assist in the definition of geophysical algorithms for the scatterometer sensor aboard Seasat A. Results of this investigation are as follows: Comparison of scatterometer and sonic anemometer wind stress measurements are good for the majority of cases; however, a tendency exists for scatterometer wind stress to be somewhat high for higher wind conditions experienced in this experiment (6-9 m/s). The scatterometer wind speed algorithm tends to overcompute the higher wind speeds by approximately 0.5 m/s. This is a direct result of the scatterometer overestimate of wind stress from which wind speeds are derived. Algorithmic derivations of wind speed and direction are, in most comparisons, within accuracies defined by Seasat A scatterometer sensor specifications.

  3. Long-Term Variability of Satellite Lake Surface Water Temperatures in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierach, M. M.; Matsumoto, K.; Holt, B.; McKinney, P. J.; Tokos, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Great Lakes are the largest group of freshwater lakes on Earth that approximately 37 million people depend upon for fresh drinking water, food, flood and drought mitigation, and natural resources that support industry, jobs, shipping and tourism. Recent reports have stated (e.g., the National Climate Assessment) that climate change can impact and exacerbate a range of risks to the Great Lakes, including changes in the range and distribution of certain fish species, increased invasive species and harmful algal blooms, declining beach health, and lengthened commercial navigation season. In this study, we will examine the impact of climate change on the Laurentian Great Lakes through investigation of long-term lake surface water temperatures (LSWT). We will use the ATSR Reprocessing for Climate: Lake Surface Water Temperature & Ice Cover (ARC-Lake) product over the period 1995-2012 to investigate individual and interlake variability. Specifically, we will quantify the seasonal amplitude of LSWTs, the first and last appearances of the 4°C isotherm (i.e., an important identifier of the seasonal evolution of the lakes denoting winter and summer stratification), and interpret these quantities in the context of global interannual climate variability such as ENSO.

  4. Spatial Variability in Surface Elevation Changes of Central-West Greenland Outlet Glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felikson, D.; Catania, G. A.; Kjaer, K. H.; Korsgaard, N. J.; Stearns, L. A.; Nash, J. D.; Shroyer, E.; Sutherland, D.; Walker, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    The mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) is, in part, governed by the dynamics of ocean-terminating glaciers. GRACE data reveal that along the central-west coast of the GrIS, overall ice loss has been accelerating since 2007. However, we do not know the physical processes controlling the loss here, and the changes observed are not uniform in this region; several glaciers have gone through periods of slow-down in the recent past. To address these uncertainties, we have performed ~30-year DEM differences of outlet glaciers in the region. Present-day DEMs have been created from WorldView-1 and -2 (WV) stereo imagery acquired in 2012 and 2013 using the AMES Stereo Pipeline. A 1985 DEM was created from a Greenland aerial photo survey. The DEM differences between the present-day WV DEMs and the 1985 aerial photo DEM show clearly that spatial variability in the surface elevation and terminus position changes of the glaciers in the region has been ongoing for the last ~30 years. We examine this variability in the context of ocean temperature and surface mass balance estimates to yield further insight into the external controls on these glaciers.

  5. Use of response surface methodology to optimise environmental stress conditions on Penicillium glabrum, a food spoilage mould.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevarez, Laurent; Vasseur, Valérie; Debaets, Stella; Barbier, Georges

    2010-01-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous microorganisms often associated with spoilage and biodeterioration of a large variety of foods and feedstuffs. Their growth may be influenced by temporary changes in intrinsic or environmental factors such as temperature, water activity, pH, preservatives, atmosphere composition, all of which may represent potential sources of stress. Molecular-based analyses of their physiological responses to environmental conditions would help to better manage the risk of alteration and potential toxicity of food products. However, before investigating molecular stress responses, appropriate experimental stress conditions must be precisely defined. Penicillium glabrum is a filamentous fungus widely present in the environment and frequently isolated in the food processing industry as a contaminant of numerous products. Using response surface methodology, the present study evaluated the influence of two environmental factors (temperature and pH) on P. glabrum growth to determine 'optimised' environmental stress conditions. For thermal and pH shocks, a large range of conditions was applied by varying factor intensity and exposure time according to a two-factorial central composite design. Temperature and exposure duration varied from 30 to 50 °C and from 10 min to 230 min, respectively. The effects of interaction between both variables were observed on fungal growth. For pH, the duration of exposure, from 10 to 230 min, had no significant effect on fungal growth. Experiments were thus carried out on a range of pH from 0.15 to 12.50 for a single exposure time of 240 min. Based on fungal growth results, a thermal shock of 120 min at 40 °C or a pH shock of 240 min at 1.50 or 9.00 may therefore be useful to investigate stress responses to non-optimal conditions.

  6. Natural variability of surface oceanographic conditions in the offshore Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Karger, Frank E.; Smith, Joseph P.; Werner, Sandra; Chen, Robert; Roffer, Mitchell; Liu, Yanyun; Muhling, Barbara; Lindo-Atichati, David; Lamkin, John; Cerdeira-Estrada, Sergio; Enfield, David B.

    2015-05-01

    This work characterizes patterns of temporal variability in surface waters of the central Gulf of Mexico. We examine remote-sensing based observations of sea surface temperature (SST), wind speed, sea surface height anomaly (SSHA), chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a) and Net Primary Production (NPP), along with model predictions of mixed layer depth (MLD), to determine seasonal changes and long-term trends in the central Gulf of Mexico between the early 1980s and 2012. Specifically, we examine variability in four quadrants of the Gulf of Mexico (water depth >1000 m). All variables show strong seasonality. Chl-a and NPP show positive anomalies in response to short-term increases in wind speed and to cold temperature events. The depth of the mixed layer (MLD) directly and significantly affects primary productivity throughout the region. This relationship is sufficiently robust to enable real-time estimates of MLD based on satellite-based estimates of NPP. Over the past 15-20 years, SST, wind speed, and SSHA show a statistically significant, gradual increase. However, Chl-a and NPP show no significant trends over this period. There has also been no trend in the MLD in the Gulf of Mexico interior. The positive long-term trend in wind speed and SST anomalies is consistent with the warming phase of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) that started in the mid-90s. This also coincides with a negative trend in the El Niño/Southern Oscillation Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI) related to an increase in the frequency of cooler ENSO events since 1999-2000. The results suggest that over decadal scales, increasing temperature, wind speed, and mesoscale ocean activity have offsetting effects on the MLD. The lack of a trend in MLD anomalies over the past 20 years explains the lack of long-term changes in chlorophyll concentration and productivity over this period in the Gulf. Understanding the background of seasonal and long-term variability in these ocean characteristics is

  7. Exploring the role of genetic variability and lifestyle in oxidative stress response for healthy aging and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dato, Serena; Crocco, Paolina; D'Aquila, Patrizia; de Rango, Francesco; Bellizzi, Dina; Rose, Giuseppina; Passarino, Giuseppe

    2013-08-08

    Oxidative stress is both the cause and consequence of impaired functional homeostasis characterizing human aging. The worsening efficiency of stress response with age represents a health risk and leads to the onset and accrual of major age-related diseases. In contrast, centenarians seem to have evolved conservative stress response mechanisms, probably derived from a combination of a diet rich in natural antioxidants, an active lifestyle and a favorable genetic background, particularly rich in genetic variants able to counteract the stress overload at the level of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. The integration of these factors could allow centenarians to maintain moderate levels of free radicals that exert beneficial signaling and modulator effects on cellular metabolism. Considering the hot debate on the efficacy of antioxidant supplementation in promoting healthy aging, in this review we gathered the existing information regarding genetic variability and lifestyle factors which potentially modulate the stress response at old age. Evidence reported here suggests that the integration of lifestyle factors (moderate physical activity and healthy nutrition) and genetic background could shift the balance in favor of the antioxidant cellular machinery by activating appropriate defense mechanisms in response to exceeding external and internal stress levels, and thus possibly achieving the prospect of living a longer life.

  8. Coralline algal barium as indicator for 20th century northwestern North Atlantic surface ocean freshwater variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzinger, S; Halfar, J; Zack, T; Mecking, J V; Kunz, B E; Jacob, D E; Adey, W H

    2013-01-01

    During the past decades climate and freshwater dynamics in the northwestern North Atlantic have undergone major changes. Large-scale freshening episodes, related to polar freshwater pulses, have had a strong influence on ocean variability in this climatically important region. However, little is known about variability before 1950, mainly due to the lack of long-term high-resolution marine proxy archives. Here we present the first multidecadal-length records of annually resolved Ba/Ca variations from Northwest Atlantic coralline algae. We observe positive relationships between algal Ba/Ca ratios from two Newfoundland sites and salinity observations back to 1950. Both records capture episodical multi-year freshening events during the 20th century. Variability in algal Ba/Ca is sensitive to freshwater-induced changes in upper ocean stratification, which affect the transport of cold, Ba-enriched deep waters onto the shelf (highly stratified equals less Ba/Ca). Algal Ba/Ca ratios therefore may serve as a new resource for reconstructing past surface ocean freshwater changes.

  9. Joint spatiotemporal variability of global sea surface temperatures and global Palmer drought severity index values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apipattanavis, S.; McCabe, G.J.; Rajagopalan, B.; Gangopadhyay, S.

    2009-01-01

    Dominant modes of individual and joint variability in global sea surface temperatures (SST) and global Palmer drought severity index (PDSI) values for the twentieth century are identified through a multivariate frequency domain singular value decomposition. This analysis indicates that a secular trend and variability related to the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are the dominant modes of variance shared among the global datasets. For the SST data the secular trend corresponds to a positive trend in Indian Ocean and South Atlantic SSTs, and a negative trend in North Pacific and North Atlantic SSTs. The ENSO reconstruction shows a strong signal in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and Indian Ocean regions. For the PDSI data, the secular trend reconstruction shows high amplitudes over central Africa including the Sahel, whereas the regions with strong ENSO amplitudes in PDSI are the southwestern and northwestern United States, South Africa, northeastern Brazil, central Africa, the Indian subcontinent, and Australia. An additional significant frequency, multidecadal variability, is identified for the Northern Hemisphere. This multidecadal frequency appears to be related to the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO). The multidecadal frequency is statistically significant in the Northern Hemisphere SST data, but is statistically nonsignificant in the PDSI data.

  10. Modeling seasonal variability of fecal coliform in natural surface waters using the modified SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung Hwa; Pachepsky, Yakov A.; Kim, Minjeong; Pyo, JongCheol; Park, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Young Mo; Kim, Jung-Woo; Kim, Joon Ha

    2016-04-01

    Fecal coliforms are indicators of pathogens and thereby, understanding of their fate and transport in surface waters is important to protect drinking water sources and public health. We compiled fecal coliform observations from four different sites in the USA and Korea and found a seasonal variability with a significant connection to temperature levels. In all observations, fecal coliform concentrations were relatively higher in summer and lower during the winter season. This could be explained by the seasonal dominance of growth or die-off of bacteria in soil and in-stream. Existing hydrologic models, however, have limitations in simulating the seasonal variability of fecal coliform. Soil and in-stream bacterial modules of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model are oversimplified in that they exclude simulations of alternating bacterial growth. This study develops a new bacteria subroutine for the SWAT in an attempt to improve its prediction accuracy. We introduced critical temperatures as a parameter to simulate the onset of bacterial growth/die-off and to reproduce the seasonal variability of bacteria. The module developed in this study will improve modeling for environmental management schemes.

  11. Refraction of the principal stress trajectories at a surface of discontinuity and related problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamediev, Shamil

    2014-05-01

    The principal stress trajectories (PST) obtainable from the inversion of data on various types of coeval natural stress indicators provide important information on the real stress fields of the Earth's crust. In particular, once the PST field has been obtained, the stress field can be calculated from equilibrium conditions without regard to the crust rheological properties. In the case under consideration the equilibrium conditions form a closed hyperbolic system of differential equations on unknown magnitudes of the principal stresses. The PST concept is significantly complicated in presence of faults, natural interfaces, and other surfaces of discontinuity where according to laboratory experiments and drilling results the stress trajectories are usually refracted. Unfortunately, the phenomenon of the PST refraction is poorly understood theoretically and often ignored in mathematical modelling which leads to unjustified conclusions. The full investigation of the phenomenon has been carried out for discontinuity surface D for which we distinguish "+" and "-" sides. Inclinations of axes of the extreme principal stresses T1 and T3 (T1 >T3, tension is positive) from both sides are different but should be potentially compatible which means existence of stress magnitudes ensuring equilibrium. To check the compatibility of axes at any point, they should be orthogonally projected in a special way onto the plane tangent to the surface. This yields the so-called shear sectors S+ and S- containing all the possible shear stress direction vectors p+ and p-, |p+| = |p-|=1, at a local point. The T1 and T3 axes from both sides are potentially compatible if and only if the intersection of S- and S+ is nonempty. Indeed, if the intersection is empty the necessary condition of equilibrium, p-=p+, cannot be fulfilled. Let now the S- sector with the central angle ϕ- be given at any point on the surface D. Then possible orientations of the T1 and T3 axes at this point from the "+" side

  12. The influence of surface effect on vibration behaviors of carbon nanotubes under initial stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Fang, C. Q.; Wang, X.

    2017-01-01

    An analytical method is presented to solve the influence of surface effect on non-coaxial resonance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in matrix utilizing laminated structures model. Due to coupled van der Waals forces between adjacent tubes and surface effect exerted carbon nanotubes, the resonance frequencies and amplitude ratios of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under initial stresses show that the resonant characteristics of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes become complex and the numbers of vibrational modes do not keep increase under identical conditions after considering surface effects. The result obtained can be used as a beneficial reference for investigating the electronic and physical behaviors of carbon nanotubes.

  13. A next generation altimeter for mapping the sea surface height variability: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Morrow, Rosemary

    2016-07-01

    The global observations of the sea surface height (SSH) have revolutionized oceanography since the beginning of precision radar altimetry in the early 1990s. For the first time we have continuous records of SSH with spatial and temporal sampling for detecting the global mean sea level rise, the waxing and waning of El Niño, and the ocean circulation from gyres to ocean eddies. The limit of spatial resolution of the present constellation of radar altimeters in mapping SSH variability is approaching 100 km (in wavelength) with 3 or more simultaneous altimetric satellites in orbit. At scales shorter than 100 km, the circulation contains substantial amount of kinetic energy in currents, eddies and fronts that are responsible for the stirring and mixing of the ocean, especially from the vertical exchange of the upper ocean with the deep. A mission currently in development will use the technique of radar interferometry for making high-resolution measurement of the height of water over the ocean as well as on land. It is called Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT), which is a joint mission of US NASA and French CNES, with contributions from Canada and UK. SWOT promises the detection of SSH at scales approaching 15 km, depending on the sea state. SWOT will make SSH measurement over a swath of 120 km with a nadir gap of 20 km in a 21-day repeat orbit. A conventional radar altimeter will provide measurement along the nadir. This is an exploratory mission with applications in oceanography and hydrology. The increased spatial resolution offers an opportunity to study ocean surface processes to address important questions about the ocean circulation. However, the limited temporal sampling poses challenges to map the evolution of the ocean variability that changes rapidly at the small scales. The measurement technique and the development of the mission will be presented with emphasis on its science program with outlook on the opportunities and challenges.

  14. Long-Term Variability of Precipitation of Charged Particles on Mercury's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benna, M.; Slavin, J. A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Baker, D. N.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; McClintock, W. E.; Schriver, D.; Travnicek, P. M.; Zurbuchen, T.; Raines, J. M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    With over 18 months in orbit, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has been providing the opportunity for studying the long-term variability of Mercury's magnetosphere and exosphere with high temporal and spatial resolution. To investigate the variability of the planet's magnetospheric and exospheric structures, we computed global models of the magnetosphere for the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions measured during MESSENGER's first 270 orbits. These global models were generated for a wide range of possible solar wind ram pressures. By fitting the locations of the modeled boundary crossings with those measured by the spacecraft Magnetometer we were able to recover the values of the solar wind moments that were acting on the magnetosphere during each orbit. The reliability of this method was validated through comparisons with the solar wind moments derived independently from the WSA-ENLIL model. Results from these models reveal that the magnitude of the solar wind forcing is modulated primarily by the orbital distance of the planet from the Sun. Moreover, sporadic fluctuations in solar wind and IMF inputs (on timescales of a few hours) lead to the major reconfigurations of the magnetosphere and the exosphere that were observed by MESSENGER. These reconfigurations not only affect the distributions and energetics of charged particles but also the geographical location and extent of space weathering from charged particle precipitation onto the planet's surface. Modeling the precipitation of charged particle on Mercury's surface reveals an intermittent, often (north-south) asymmetric and IMF-driven bombardment of the dayside of the planet. The intensity of the dayside precipitation is function of the solar wind pressure and the magnitude of induction in the Mercury's outer core. In contrast, precipitation in nightside regions appears to be persistent and less dependent in location and intensity on IMF

  15. Effect of dielectric coating on the electron work function and the surface stress of a metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babich, A. V.; Pogosov, V. V.

    2009-08-01

    The electron work function, contact potential difference, and surface stress of the elastically deformed faces of the metal covered by a dielectric are calculated by using the Kohn-Sham method and stabilized jellium model. Our calculations demonstrate the opposite deformation dependencies of the work function and contact potential difference. Dielectric coating leads to a negative change in the work function and a positive change in the contact potential difference. It is shown that the measurements of the contact potential difference of a deformed face by the Kelvin method give only the change in the value of the one-electron effective potential in the plane of a virtual image behind the surface, rather than the value of the electron work function. The obtained values of the electron work function and surface stress for Al, Au, Cu, and Zn are in agreement with the results of experiments for polycrystals.

  16. Evaluation of missing pellet surface geometry on cladding stress distribution and magnitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capps, Nathan [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Montgomery, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Sunderland, Dion [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); ANATECH Corp, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Pytel, Martin [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Stress concentrations are related to pellet defect geometries. • The presence of radial cracks cause increases in stress concentration. • Increasing the size of MPS causes an increase hoop stress concentrations. - Abstract: Missing pellet surface (MPS) defects are local geometric defects in nuclear fuel pellets that result from pellet mishandling or manufacturing. The presence of MPS defects can cause significant clad stress concentrations that can lead to through-wall cladding failure for certain combinations of fuel burnup, and reactor power level or power change. Consequently, the impact of MPS defects has limited the rate of power increase, or ramp rate, in both pressurized and boiling water reactors (PWRs and BWRs, respectively). Improved three-dimensional (3-D) fuel performance models of MPS defect geometry can provide better understanding of the probability for pellet clad mechanical interaction (PCMI), and correspondingly the available margin against cladding failure by stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The Consortium of Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) has been developing the Bison-CASL fuel performance code to consider the inherently multi-physics and multi-dimensional mechanisms that control fuel behavior, including cladding stress concentrations resulting from MPS defects. This paper evaluates the cladding hoop stress distributions as a function of MPS defect geometry with discrete pellet radial cracks for a set of typical operating conditions in a PWR fuel rod. The results provide a first step toward a probabilistic approach to assess cladding failure during power maneuvers. This analysis provides insight into how varying pellet defect geometries affect the distribution of the cladding stress, as well as the temperature distributions within the fuel and clad; and are used to develop stress concentration factors for comparing 2-D and 3-D models.

  17. Voluntary Field Data Collection for Landscape Phenology and Surface Water Essential Climate Variable Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. W.; Hudson-Dunn, A.; Aquino, K.; Pasa, M.; Paez, F.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is developing techniques to monitor vegetation and surface water condition for improved resource management. Educational materials and data forms that allow volunteer Citizen Scientists to collect information on vegetation and surface water extent to enhance satellite and web camera data analyses (http://egsc.usgs.gov/shenandoah.html) have been developed, tested, and refined. Collection is focused on supplementing landscape phenology and surface water extent (SWE) essential climate variable (ECV) research. Low cost instrumentation, subject education, and measurement calibration techniques all have utility for multiple remote sensing and biophysical studies. Trials have been conducted with subjects ranging from elementary school-aged summer camp children to science major undergraduate and graduate students. Experiments were replicated in several project study areas in Virginia that are also phenology and SWE-ECV research sites. Analysis of volunteer responses and their narrative feedback have improved the ability to request and assess data from volunteers. Children ages 12 and over were able to provide reliable supplemental information for phenology and aquatic research. Finally, trial observation and subject feedback both confirmed that participation furthered volunteer interest in science.

  18. Dispersion in deep polar firn driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buizert, Christo; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    2016-09-01

    Commonly, three mechanisms of firn air transport are distinguished: molecular diffusion, advection, and near-surface convective mixing. Here we identify and describe a fourth mechanism, namely dispersion driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability (or barometric pumping). We use published gas chromatography experiments on firn samples to derive the along-flow dispersivity of firn, and combine this dispersivity with a dynamical air pressure propagation model forced by surface air pressure time series to estimate the magnitude of dispersive mixing in the firn. We show that dispersion dominates mixing within the firn lock-in zone. Trace gas concentrations measured in firn air samples from various polar sites confirm that dispersive mixing occurs. Including dispersive mixing in a firn air transport model suggests that our theoretical estimates have the correct order of magnitude, yet may overestimate the true dispersion. We further show that strong barometric pumping, such as at the Law Dome site, may reduce the gravitational enrichment of δ15N-N2 and other tracers below gravitational equilibrium, questioning the traditional definition of the lock-in depth as the depth where δ15N enrichment ceases. Last, we propose that 86Kr excess may act as a proxy for past synoptic activity (or paleo-storminess) at the site.

  19. Sea surface height variability in the North East Atlantic from satellite altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterlini, Paul; de Vries, Hylke; Katsman, Caroline

    2016-08-01

    Data from 21 years of satellite altimeter measurements are used to identify and understand the major contributing components of sea surface height variability (SSV) on monthly time-scales in the North East Atlantic. A number of SSV drivers is considered, which are categorised into two groups; local (wind and sea surface temperature) and remote (sea level pressure and the North Atlantic oscillation index). A multiple linear regression model is constructed to model the SSV for a specific target area in the North Sea basin. Cross-correlations between candidate regressors potentially lead to ambiguity in the interpretation of the results. We therefore use an objective hierarchical selection method based on variance inflation factors to select the optimal number of regressors for the target area and accept these into the regression model if they can be associated to SSV through a direct underlying physical forcing mechanism. Results show that a region of high SSV exists off the west coast of Denmark and that it can be represented well with a regression model that uses local wind, sea surface temperature and sea level pressure as primary regressors. The regression model developed here helps to understand sea level change in the North East Atlantic. The methodology is generalised and easily applied to other regions.

  20. Variable-period surface-wave magnitudes: A rapid and robust estimator of seismic moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, J.; Herrmann, R.; Benz, H.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that surface-wave magnitudes (Ms), measured at local, regional, and teleseismic distances, can be used as a rapid and robust estimator of seismic moment magnitude (Mw). We used the Russell (2006) variable-period surface-wave magnitude formula, henceforth called Ms(VMAX), to estimate the Ms for 165 North American events with 3.2 scatter of the Mw[Ms(VMAX)] with respect to Mw[Waveform Modeling] was approximately ??0.2 magnitude units (m.u). The residuals between Mw [Ms(VMAX)] and Mw [Waveform Modeling] show a significant focal mechanism effect, especially when strike-slip events are compared with other mechanisms. Validation testing of this method suggests that Ms(VMAX)-predicted Mw's can be estimated within minutes after the origin of an event and are typically within ??0.2 m.u. of the final Mw[Waveform Modeling]. While Mw estimated from Ms(VMAX) has a slightly higher variance than waveform modeling results, it can be measured on the first short-period surface-wave observed at a local or near-regional distance seismic station after a preliminary epicentral location has been formed. Therefore, it may be used to make rapid measurements of Mw, which are needed by government agencies for early warning systems.

  1. A wafer mapping technique for residual stress in surface micromachined films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavone, G.; Murray, J.; Smith, S.; Desmulliez, M. P. Y.; Mount, A. R.; Walton, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    The design of MEMS devices employing movable structures is crucially dependant on the mechanical behaviour of the deposited materials. It is therefore important to be able to fully characterize the micromachined films and predict with confidence the mechanical properties of patterned structures. This paper presents a characterization technique that enables the residual stress in MEMS films to be mapped at the wafer level by using microstructures released by surface micromachining. These dedicated MEMS test structures and the associated measurement techniques are used to extract localized information on the strain and Young’s modulus of the film under investigation. The residual stress is then determined by numerically coupling this data with a finite element analysis of the structure. This paper illustrates the measurement routine and demonstrates it with a case study using electrochemically deposited alloys of nickel and iron, particularly prone to develop high levels of residual stress. The results show that the technique enables wafer mapping of film non-uniformities and identifies wafer-to-wafer differences. A comparison between the results obtained from the mapping technique and conventional wafer bow measurements highlights the benefits of using a procedure tailored to films that are non-uniform, patterned and surface-micromachined, as opposed to simple standard stress extraction methods. The presented technique reveals detailed information that is generally unexplored when using conventional stress extraction methods such as wafer bow measurements.

  2. Diurnal and vertical variability of the sensible heat and carbon dioxide budgets in the atmospheric surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casso-Torralba, P.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Bosveld, F.; Soler, M.R.; Vermeulen, A.; Werner, C.; Moors, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    The diurnal and vertical variability of heat and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmospheric surface layer are studied by analyzing measurements from a 213 m tower in Cabauw (Netherlands). Observations of thermodynamic variables and CO2 mixing ratio as well as vertical profiles of the turbulent fluxes

  3. Ensemble reconstruction of small-scale variability in Atlantic sea surface temperatures from 1870 - 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karspeck, A. R.; Sain, S.; Kaplan, A.

    2008-12-01

    Existing historical records of sea surface temperature extending back to the mid 1800's are a valuable source of information for understanding climate variability at interannual and decadal time-scales. However, the temporal and spatial irregularity of these data make them difficult to use in scientific climate research, where gridded data fields are preferred for both direct analysis and forcing of numerical models of the atmosphere. Infilling methods based on constraining the leading eigenvectors of the global-scale covariance have proven very successful in creating gridded estimates of sea surface temperature. These methods are especially useful for infilling within the vast regions of unobserved ocean that characterize the earliest segments of the data record. Regional variability, on the other hand, is not well represented by these methods. This is especially true in data-poor regions. Here we present a method for augmenting the existing large-scale reconstruction methods with a statistical model of the regional scale variability. Using high quality sea surface temperature data from the last 25 years, including satellite-derived records, we specify a spatially non-stationary covariance model for the regional scale marine surface temperature variability. The use of a non-stationary, non-isotropic correlation function in the covariance model is a novel aspect in this work. With the covariance model estimated from the modern record, historical observations are used to condition posterior distributions on the regional scales back to the mid 1800's It is common in the geosciences for the expected value of the distribution to be offered as the data reconstruction. If uncertainty information is provided, it often takes the form of a point-wise estimate that neglects the covariability inherent in the full distribution. In contrast to this common practice, we generate multiple realizations from the full posterior distribution. These samples will be made available to

  4. On the modelling of semi-insulating GaAs including surface tension and bulk stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, W.; Duderstadt, F.

    2004-07-01

    Necessary heat treatment of single crystal semi-insulating Gallium Arsenide (GaAs), which is deployed in micro- and opto- electronic devices, generate undesirable liquid precipitates in the solid phase. The appearance of precipitates is influenced by surface tension at the liquid/solid interface and deviatoric stresses in the solid. The central quantity for the description of the various aspects of phase transitions is the chemical potential, which can be additively decomposed into a chemical and a mechanical part. In particular the calculation of the mechanical part of the chemical potential is of crucial importance. We determine the chemical potential in the framework of the St. Venant-Kirchhoff law which gives an appropriate stress/strain relation for many solids in the small strain regime. We establish criteria, which allow the correct replacement of the St. Venant-Kirchhoff law by the simpler Hooke law. The main objectives of this study are: (i) We develop a thermo-mechanical model that describes diffusion and interface motion, which both are strongly influenced by surface tension effects and deviatoric stresses. (ii) We give an overview and outlook on problems that can be posed and solved within the framework of the model. (iii) We calculate non-standard phase diagrams, i.e. those that take into account surface tension and non-deviatoric stresses, for GaAs above 786 C, and we compare the results with classical phase diagrams without these phenomena. (orig.)

  5. Central Mechanisms Underlying Variability in the Behavioral and Neuroendocrine Responses to Stress in Fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moltesen, Maria Møller

    of the stress response. In mammals, the hippocampus and amygdala in the telencephalon play central roles in the process of discriminating sensory inputs that, potentially, will threaten the homeostasis of an individual. These regions are part of the limbic system, which interacts with the hypothalamic....... The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) also plays an important role in the neuroendocrine stress response by controlling CRF release in hypothalamus. The transmission of 5-HT and CRF are under feedback control of glucocorticoids and interact with the stress response by affecting processes...

  6. Effects of surface orientation, fluid chemistry and mechanical polishing on the variability of dolomite dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Voltolini, Marco; Knauss, Kevin G.

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies of carbonate surface reactivity have underscored the fundamental variability of dissolution rates and the heterogeneous distribution of the reaction over the mineral surface due to the inhomogeneous distribution of surface energy. Dolomite dissolution rates relative to different cleavage planes (r-planes) and surfaces cut approximately perpendicular to the c-axis (c-planes) were studied at 50 °C as a function of pH (3.4 ≤ pH ≤ 9.0) and solution composition by vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), with the aim of providing an estimate of the intrinsic rate variation of dolomite single crystals and describing the surface reaction distribution and the rate controlling mechanisms. Surface normal retreat rates measured under acidic conditions increased linearly with time and were not visibly affected by the parallel increase of surface roughness. Mean total dissolution rates of r-planes decreased by over 200 times from pH 3.4 to pH 9.0 and CO32--rich solutions, whereas corresponding rate variations spanned over 3 orders of magnitude when also c-plane rate distributions were included in the analysis. At acid to near neutral pH, c-planes dissolved ∼ three times faster than the adjoining r-planes but slower at basic pH and high total carbon concentration, displaying a distinctive morphologic evolution in these two regimes. The comparison of polished and unpolished crystals showed that polished cleavage planes dissolved about three times faster than the unpolished counterpart at near neutral to basic conditions, whereas no significant difference in reactivity was observed at pH topography over the course of the reaction, the evolution of the entire crystal morphology depends also on the reactivity of edge and corner regions, whose contribution to measured rates is not generally taken into account by laboratory experiments. The study of time-dependent mineral morphology and reactivity requires an integrated approach

  7. Image-based Exploration of Iso-surfaces for Large Multi- Variable Datasets using Parameter Space.

    KAUST Repository

    Binyahib, Roba S.

    2013-05-13

    With an increase in processing power, more complex simulations have resulted in larger data size, with higher resolution and more variables. Many techniques have been developed to help the user to visualize and analyze data from such simulations. However, dealing with a large amount of multivariate data is challenging, time- consuming and often requires high-end clusters. Consequently, novel visualization techniques are needed to explore such data. Many users would like to visually explore their data and change certain visual aspects without the need to use special clusters or having to load a large amount of data. This is the idea behind explorable images (EI). Explorable images are a novel approach that provides limited interactive visualization without the need to re-render from the original data [40]. In this work, the concept of EI has been used to create a workflow that deals with explorable iso-surfaces for scalar fields in a multivariate, time-varying dataset. As a pre-processing step, a set of iso-values for each scalar field is inferred and extracted from a user-assisted sampling technique in time-parameter space. These iso-values are then used to generate iso- surfaces that are then pre-rendered (from a fixed viewpoint) along with additional buffers (i.e. normals, depth, values of other fields, etc.) to provide a compressed representation of iso-surfaces in the dataset. We present a tool that at run-time allows the user to interactively browse and calculate a combination of iso-surfaces superimposed on each other. The result is the same as calculating multiple iso- surfaces from the original data but without the memory and processing overhead. Our tool also allows the user to change the (scalar) values superimposed on each of the surfaces, modify their color map, and interactively re-light the surfaces. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach over a multi-terabyte combustion dataset. We also illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of our

  8. A 1-D Analytical Model for the Thermally Induced Stresses in the Mould Surface During Die Casting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper; Hansen, Preben

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an anlytically based method for predicting the normal stresses in a die mold surface exposed to a thermal load. A example of application of the method is the high-pressure di casting process where the surface stresses in critical cases lead to cracks. Expressions for the normal...

  9. Physiological-metabolic variables of heat stress in cows grazing in silvopastoral systems and in one treeless prairie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Andrés Berragán-Hernández

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to analyze changes of physiological and metabolic parameters as indicators of heat stress of cows in pasture systems. The research was carried out from 2011 to 2012 at the Turipaná Agricultural Research Center of Corpoica located in the Caribbean region in Cereté–Colombia. Environmental temperature (T and relative humidity (H were determined, as well as and rectal temperature (RT, skin temperature (ST, respiratory frequency (RF and the acid-basic status of animals. The variables were measured in the morning (6:00 h and in the afternoon (13:00 h. Significant Statistical differences were observed (p<0.05 in environmental temperature treatments (T with 7% and 6% less temperature in p-Arbus-Arbor y p-Arbor, respectively, compared with grass treatment. There was a significant hour effect on T and H (p<0.05 and a significant treatment-hour interaction on T (p<0.05. TP and FR showed a significant treatment-hour interaction per hour (6:00/13:00 h. The results show a positive effect of shadow from trees on the physiological variables. The negative effects observed on the physiological variables of unshaded treatments impacted in a minimal way the metabolic variables suggesting homeostatic responses in the animals under the evaluated stressful environmental conditions.

  10. Cortisol Variability and Self-reports in the Measurement of Work-related Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlson, Björn; Eek, Frida; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2011-01-01

    We examined whether a high cortisol awakening response (CAR) and low cortisol decline over the day (CDD) are related to self-reported work stress and well-being, and whether there are gender differences in these relationships. Three hundred eighty-three working men and women responded to a survey...... was associated only with higher job demands, but the self-report scores showed a number of interactions between cortisol group and gender. Among women, those showing a low CDD, compared with those with a higher CDD, had more favourable scores on a number of job stress factors and symptom load. In contrast, among...... men, a similar comparison showed those with low CDD to have poorer scores on job stress factors and symptom load. We conclude that individuals displaying high CAR or low CDD differ from those not displaying these cortisol profi les in self-report of work stress and well-being, and that gender...

  11. Modelling global water stress of the recent past: on the relative importance of trends in water demand and climate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wada

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During the past decades, human water use has more than doubled, yet available freshwater resources are finite. As a result, water scarcity has been prevalent in various regions of the world. Here, we present the first global assessment of past development of water stress considering not only climate variability but also growing water demand, desalinated water use and non-renewable groundwater abstraction over the period 1960–2001 at a spatial resolution of 0.5°. Agricultural water demand is estimated based on past extents of irrigated areas and livestock densities. We approximate past economic development based on GDP, energy and household consumption and electricity production, which are subsequently used together with population numbers to estimate industrial and domestic water demand. Climate variability is expressed by simulated blue water availability defined by freshwater in rivers, lakes, wetlands and reservoirs by means of the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. We thus define blue water stress by comparing blue water availability with corresponding net total blue water demand by means of the commonly used, Water Scarcity Index. The results show a drastic increase in the global population living under water-stressed conditions (i.e. moderate to high water stress due to growing water demand, primarily for irrigation, which has more than doubled from 1708/818 to 3708/1832 km3 yr−1 (gross/net over the period 1960–2000. We estimate that 800 million people or 27% of the global population were living under water-stressed conditions for 1960. This number is eventually increased to 2.6 billion or 43% for 2000. Our results indicate that increased water demand is a decisive factor for heightened water stress in various regions such as India and North China, enhancing the intensity of water stress up to 200%, while climate variability is often a main determinant of extreme events. However, our results also suggest

  12. Modelling global water stress of the recent past: on the relative importance of trends in water demand and climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Y.; van Beek, L. P. H.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2011-12-01

    During the past decades, human water use has more than doubled, yet available freshwater resources are finite. As a result, water scarcity has been prevalent in various regions of the world. Here, we present the first global assessment of past development of water stress considering not only climate variability but also growing water demand, desalinated water use and non-renewable groundwater abstraction over the period 1960-2001 at a spatial resolution of 0.5°. Agricultural water demand is estimated based on past extents of irrigated areas and livestock densities. We approximate past economic development based on GDP, energy and household consumption and electricity production, which are subsequently used together with population numbers to estimate industrial and domestic water demand. Climate variability is expressed by simulated blue water availability defined by freshwater in rivers, lakes, wetlands and reservoirs by means of the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. We thus define blue water stress by comparing blue water availability with corresponding net total blue water demand by means of the commonly used, Water Scarcity Index. The results show a drastic increase in the global population living under water-stressed conditions (i.e. moderate to high water stress) due to growing water demand, primarily for irrigation, which has more than doubled from 1708/818 to 3708/1832 km3 yr-1 (gross/net) over the period 1960-2000. We estimate that 800 million people or 27% of the global population were living under water-stressed conditions for 1960. This number is eventually increased to 2.6 billion or 43% for 2000. Our results indicate that increased water demand is a decisive factor for heightened water stress in various regions such as India and North China, enhancing the intensity of water stress up to 200%, while climate variability is often a main determinant of extreme events. However, our results also suggest that in several emerging and developing economies

  13. Differential regulation of Neuropeptide Y (NPY in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex during recovery from chronic variable stress (CVS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lynne McGuire

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence from clinical studies and pre-clinical animal models supports a role for neuropeptide Y (NPY in adaptive emotional response following stress. The long-term impact of stress, particularly chronic stress, on availability and function of resilience factors such as NPY may be critical to understanding the etiology of stress-related psychopathology. In these studies, we examined expression of NPY during recovery from a chronic variable stress (CVS model of repetitive trauma in rats. Due to the importance of amygdala and prefrontal cortex in regulating emotional responses, we predicted chronic changes in NPY expression could contribute to persistent behavioral deficits seen in this model. Consistent with the hypothesis, ELISA for NPY peptide identified a significant reduction in NPY at the delayed (7 days recovery timepoint. Interestingly, a significant increase in prefrontal NPY was observed at the same recovery timepoint.. The mRNA expression for NPY was not changed in the amygdala or PFC, although there was a modest but not statistically significant increase in NPY mRNA at the delayed recovery timepoint in the prefrontal cortex. The observed changes in NPY expression are consistent with maladaptive coping and enhanced emotionality, due to the nature of NPY signaling within these respective regions, and the nature of reciprocal connections between amygdala and prefrontal cortex.

  14. Moderating laboratory adaptation with the use of a heart-rate variability biofeedback device (StressEraser).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, Matthew R; Kurbatov, Vadim; Pollak, Charles P

    2009-12-01

    Difficulty sleeping is a common problem with laboratory polysomnograms. This affects both polysomnograms that are used as a clinical tool to investigate sleep pathology or as an outcome variable in research. The goal of this study was to use a handheld biofeedback device (StressEraser) to improve sleep quality in the laboratory. Ten subjects without a history of sleep disorders were randomly assigned to either a StressEraser or no-treatment control condition. A sleep disturbance scale derived from sleep efficiency, REM latency, minutes of stage 1 sleep, and wake after sleep onset was created to evaluate the differences between these groups. Subjects in the StressEraser group had significantly lower scores on the sleep disturbance scale compared to the no-treatment control group (p = 0.003). Sleep latency was not improved. In conclusion, the StressEraser significantly improved sleep quality compared to a no-treatment control group. This suggests that the StressEraser may be an effective tool to help reduce the first-night effect in nighttime laboratory sleep studies.

  15. Dynamics of microbial growth and coexistence on variably saturated rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Tao; Or, Dani

    2009-08-01

    The high degree of microbial diversity found in soils is attributed to the highly heterogeneous pore space and the dynamic aqueous microenvironments. Previous studies have shown that spatial and temporal variations in aqueous diffusion pathways play an important role in shaping microbial habitats and biological activity in unsaturated porous media. A new modeling framework was developed for the quantitative description of diffusion-dominated microbial interactions focusing on competitive growth of two microbial species inhabiting partially saturated rough surfaces. Surface heterogeneity was represented by patches with different porosities and water retention properties, yielding heterogeneous distribution of water contents that varies with changes in relative humidity or soil matric potential. Nutrient diffusion and microbial growth on the variably hydrated and heterogeneous surface was modeled using a hybrid method that combines a reaction diffusion method for nutrient field with individual based model for microbial growth and expansion. The model elucidated the effects of hydration dynamics and heterogeneity on nutrient fluxes and mobility affecting microbial population growth, expansion, and coexistence at the microscale. In contrast with single species dominance under wet conditions, results demonstrated prolonged coexistence of two competing species under drier conditions where nutrient diffusion and microbial movement were both limited. The uneven distribution of resources and diffusion pathways in heterogeneous surfaces highlighted the importance of position in the landscape for survival that may compensate for competitive disadvantages conferred by physiological traits. Increased motility was beneficial for expansion and survival. Temporal variations in hydration conditions resulted in fluctuations in microbial growth rate and population size. Population growth dynamics of the dominant species under wet-dry cycles were similar to growth under average value

  16. Effects of work stress on work-related rumination, restful sleep, and nocturnal heart rate variability experienced on workdays and weekends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahle-Hinz, Tim; Bamberg, Eva; Dettmers, Jan; Friedrich, Niklas; Keller, Monika

    2014-04-01

    The present study reports the lagged effects of work stress on work-related rumination, restful sleep, and nocturnal heart rate variability experienced during both workdays and weekends. Fifty employees participated in a diary study. Multilevel and regression analyses revealed a significant relationship between work stress measured at the end of a workday, work-related rumination measured during the evening, and restful sleep measured the following morning. Work stress, measured as the mean of 2 consecutive workdays, was substantially but not significantly related to restful sleep on weekends. Work stress was unrelated to nocturnal heart rate variability. Work-related rumination was related to restful sleep on weekends but not on workdays. Additionally, work-related rumination on weekends was positively related to nocturnal heart rate variability during the night between Saturday and Sunday. No mediation effects of work stress on restful sleep or nocturnal heart rate variability via work-related rumination were confirmed.

  17. Downscaling reanalysis data to high-resolution variables above a glacier surface (Cordillera Blanca, Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Marlis; Mölg, Thomas; Marzeion, Ben; Kaser, Georg

    2010-05-01

    Recently initiated observation networks in the Cordillera Blanca provide temporally high-resolution, yet short-term atmospheric data. The aim of this study is to extend the existing time series into the past. We present an empirical-statistical downscaling (ESD) model that links 6-hourly NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data to the local target variables, measured at the tropical glacier Artesonraju (Northern Cordillera Blanca). The approach is particular in the context of ESD for two reasons. First, the observational time series for model calibration are short (only about two years). Second, unlike most ESD studies in climate research, we focus on variables at a high temporal resolution (i.e., six-hourly values). Our target variables are two important drivers in the surface energy balance of tropical glaciers; air temperature and specific humidity. The selection of predictor fields from the reanalysis data is based on regression analyses and climatologic considerations. The ESD modelling procedure includes combined empirical orthogonal function and multiple regression analyses. Principal component screening is based on cross-validation using the Akaike Information Criterion as model selection criterion. Double cross-validation is applied for model evaluation. Potential autocorrelation in the time series is considered by defining the block length in the resampling procedure. Apart from the selection of predictor fields, the modelling procedure is automated and does not include subjective choices. We assess the ESD model sensitivity to the predictor choice by using both single- and mixed-field predictors of the variables air temperature (1000 hPa), specific humidity (1000 hPa), and zonal wind speed (500 hPa). The chosen downscaling domain ranges from 80 to 50 degrees west and from 0 to 20 degrees south. Statistical transfer functions are derived individually for different months and times of day (month/hour-models). The forecast skill of the month/hour-models largely depends on

  18. The Effect of Heterogeneous Lithospheric Structure on Surface Stress and Tectonics on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenburg, M. A.; Williams, J.; Aharonson, O.

    2008-12-01

    Observations of Mercury's surface from the Mariner 10 and MESSENGER spacecraft reveal a planet-wide distribution of lobate scarps, which are interpreted to be the surface expression of thrust faults due to global contraction. Statistical analysis of scarps mapped in images from both missions suggests that the orientations of these features are not consistent with a uniform distribution, the expected outcome for a contracting lithosphere of constant thickness. One possible explanation for this observation considers Mercury's thermal state, which is driven by the insolation pattern. Mercury's 3:2 spin-orbit resonance, in concert with its substantial orbital eccentricity of e = 0.20, causes long-wavelength surface temperature variations of more than 130 K. Corresponding variations in lithospheric thickness are hence expected. If the contraction occurred while Mercury was in this dynamical state, the resulting stress distribution recorded on the surface during global cooling and inner core solidification may reflect this heterogeneity. We seek to determine whether contraction of a lithosphere with lateral thickness variations can explain the observed lobate scarp orientations on Mercury's surface. We employ the three-dimensional, viscoelastic, finite element model CitcomSVE along with a thermal evolution model to study Mercury's response to cooling, inner core formation, and lithosphere growth and to track the accumulation of stress in the lithosphere. The resulting stress pattern can then be compared to the orientations and distribution of scarps mapped on the surface of Mercury. Preliminary results indicate systematic variations between the expected orientation of faults in the "cold poles," where the lithosphere is thicker and the "hot poles," where the lithosphere is weaker. As MESSENGER returns more data, comparisons between model results and surface features will be refined.

  19. Analytical Modeling of Surface Roughness, Hardness and Residual Stress Induced by Deep Rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Frederico C.; Abrão, Alexandre M.; Denkena, Berend; Breidenstein, Bernd; Mörke, Tobias

    2016-12-01

    Deep rolling is a mechanical surface treatment that can significantly alter the features of metallic components and despite the fact that it has been used for a long time, to date the influence of the interaction among the principal process parameters has not been thoroughly understood. Aiming to fulfill this gap, this work addresses the effect of deep rolling on surface finish and mechanical properties from the analytical and experimental viewpoints. More specifically, the influence of deep rolling pressure and number of passes on surface roughness, hardness and residual stress induced on AISI 1060 steel is investigated. The findings indicate that the surface roughness after deep rolling is closely related to the yield strength of the work material and the available models can satisfactorily predict the former parameter. Better agreement between the mathematical and experimental hardness values is achieved when a single deep rolling pass is employed, as well as when the yield strength of the work material increases. Compressive residual stress is generally induced after deep rolling, irrespectively of the selected heat treatment and deep rolling parameters. Finally, the model proposed to predict residual stress provides results closest to the experimental data especially when the annealed material is considered.

  20. Surface Wind Stresses and Triggering of Global Dust Storms on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischna, Michael A.; Shirley, James H.

    2016-10-01

    Global dust storms on Mars occur during summer in the southern hemisphere, but their occurrence in some years and not in others has stubbornly eluded explanation. Shirley (2016, in review, and at arxiv.org/abs/1605.02707) and Mischna and Shirley (2016, in revision, and at arxiv.org/abs/1602.09137) have demonstrated the role of a so-called "coupling term acceleration" (CTA) in modifying the Mars global circulation through potential exchange of Mars' orbital and rotational momenta. The CTA has been incorporated into the MarsWRF general circulation model (GCM), which reveals distinct changes to the circulation due to the CTA, leading to conditions favorable to GDS formation in all years in which perihelion season GDS were observed, and conditions unfavorable in nearly all other years. These circulation changes reveal themselves, in part, through changes in surface wind stress, which is a strong function of near-surface wind speed. We present additional analysis of these results for the past years with perihelion season GDS (7 in total) showing commonalities in the evolution of surface stresses in the season leading up to GDS initiation. Specifically, the enhancement of surface stress during this pre-storm season, arising from the orbit-spin coupling in years with perihelion season storms, presents some common patterns. Among these are the rate and duration of increase of wind stress, and the minimum level of enhancement from the CTA that is apparently required in these years prior to initiation of a GDS. Previously we assessed changes in surface stress using a simple, dust-free model atmosphere. Here, further, we perform parallel simulations for MY 24-27 using realistic dust profiles from TES limb observations. The inclusion of dust in the GCM modifies atmospheric opacity and will alter global atmospheric temperatures leading to a markedly different atmospheric state. We find that the inclusion of dust in the atmosphere reduces the magnitude of surface stresses as

  1. The influence of the weld toe grinding and wig remelting weld toe rehabilitation techniques, on variable stresses, in case of cross fillet welds, reinforced with additional welding rows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babis Claudiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Variable stresses where the load value varies between a maximum and a minimum value, or varies the position in time, cause after accumulating a large number of load cycles in those structures, the emergence of drug fatigue. Fatigue is characterized by failure on values of the applied stress from the load cycles, below the material flow, values which in case of static stress would not have caused problems. Knowing that the variable stressed structures are sensitive to stress concentrators, the paper aims to highlight the influence of two techniques to reduce stress concentrator weld toe grinding and WIG remelting weld toe, on the behavior of variable tensile test of cross corner welded specimens, reinforced with additional welding rows.

  2. Effect of Laser Shock Peening on surface properties and residual stress of Al6061-T6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimianrizi, A.; Foroozmehr, E.; Badrossamay, M.; Farrokhpour, H.

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of Laser Shock Peening (LSP) on Al 6061-T6. The confined LSP regime using Nd: YAG laser with 1200 mJ of energy per pulse and 8 ns of pulse width were applied. The treated specimens were evaluated by means of surface integrity with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope, microhardness, surface roughness and induced residual stress using an X-ray diffraction method. Results showed that by the use of LSP, compressive residual stress could effectively be induced on the surface of treated material. It was also revealed that the hardened depth of the material, up to a maximum depth of 1875 μm, could be achieved due to work hardening and grain refinement. In addition, surface roughness measurements showed that the LSP could deteriorate surface quality depending on the LSP parameters. The influences of beam overlap rates, number of laser shots and scanning pattern on microhardness as well as surface roughness are discussed.

  3. A comparative study of fatty acid profile and formation of biofilm in Geobacillus gargensis exposed to variable abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Beloshei, Noor Essa; Al-Awadhi, Husain; Al-Khalaf, Rania A; Afzal, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Understanding bacterial fatty acid (FA) profile has a great taxonomic significance as well as clinical importance for diagnosis issues. Both the composition and nature of membrane FAs change under different nutritional, biotic and (or) abiotic stresses, and environmental stress. Bacteria produce both odd-carbon as well as branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs). This study was designed to examine the effect of abiotic pressure, including salinity, temperature, pH, and oxinic stress on the growth, development, and FA profile in thermophilic Geobacillus gargensis. Under these stresses, 3 parametric ratios, 2-methyl fatty acids/3-methyl fatty acids (iso-/anteiso-FAs), BCFAs/straight-chain saturated fatty acids (SCSFA), and SCSFAs/straight-chain unsaturated fatty acids (SCUFA), in addition to total lipids affected by variable stresses were measured. Our results indicate that the ratio of total iso-/anteiso-FAs increased at the acidic pH range of 4.1-5.2 and decreased with increasing pH. The reverse was true for salt stress when iso-/anteiso-FAs ratio increased with salt concentration. The BCFAs/SCSFAs and SCSFAs/SCUFAs ratios increased at neutral and alkaline pH and high salt concentration, reduced incubation time, and comparatively high temperature (55-65 °C) of the growth medium. The bacterial total lipid percentage deceased with increasing salt concentration, incubation period, but it increased with temperature. The formation of extracellular polymeric substances was observed under all stress conditions and with the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (2 and 5 mmol/L) to the growth medium. The membrane phospholipid composition of the bacterium was analyzed by thin-layer chromatography.

  4. Surface Area Variability of a North-Central Tanzanian Crater Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey Higgins

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A history of modern (1973–2015 surface area variability for Lake Basotu in north-central Tanzania has been reconstructed using archived Landsat images from the dry season between June and October. This record was compared to local weather data as well as larger scale weather patterns. The lake has been in a state of decline interrupted by major flood events since the beginning of the satellite record. From 1973 to 1997, the lake area was between 0.97 km2 and 4.28 km2. Lake extent abruptly increased to 13.86 km2 in 1998, when a co-occurrence of El Niño and a positive Indian Ocean Dipole led to extensive flooding. It is hypothesized that local agricultural practices leading to soil erosion and subsequent basin sedimentation have most likely increased the sensitivity of Lake Basotu to climatic fluctuations.

  5. Surface Variability of Short-wavelength Radiation and Temperature on Exoplanets around M Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Tian, Feng; Wang, Yuwei; Dudhia, Jimy; Chen, Ming

    2017-03-01

    It is a common practice to use 3D General Circulation Models (GCM) with spatial resolution of a few hundred kilometers to simulate the climate of Earth-like exoplanets. The enhanced albedo effect of clouds is especially important for exoplanets in the habitable zones around M dwarfs that likely have fixed substellar regions and substantial cloud coverage. Here, we carry out mesoscale model simulations with 3 km spatial resolution driven by the initial and boundary conditions in a 3D GCM and find that it could significantly underestimate the spatial variability of both the incident short-wavelength radiation and the temperature at planet surface. Our findings suggest that mesoscale models with cloud-resolving capability be considered for future studies of exoplanet climate.

  6. Optimization of Process Variables for Insulation Coating of Conductive Particles by Response Surface Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Chol-Ho [Sangji University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The powder core, conventionally fabricated from iron particles coated with insulator, showed large eddy current loss under high frequency, because of small specific resistance. To overcome the eddy current loss, the increase in the specific resistance of powder cores was needed. In this study, copper oxide coating onto electrically conductive iron particles was performed using a planetary ball mill to increase the specific resistance. Coating factors were optimized by the Response surface methodology. The independent variables were the CuO mass fraction, mill revolution number, coating time, ball size, ball mass and sample mass. The response variable was the specific resistance. The optimization of six factors by the fractional factorial design indicated that CuO mass fraction, mill revolution number, and coating time were the key factors. The levels of these three factors were selected by the three-factors full factorial design and steepest ascent method. The steepest ascent method was used to approach the optimum range for maximum specific resistance. The Box-Behnken design was finally used to analyze the response surfaces of the screened factors for further optimization. The results of the Box-Behnken design showed that the CuO mass fraction and mill revolution number were the main factors affecting the efficiency of coating process. As the CuO mass fraction increased, the specific resistance increased. In contrast, the specific resistance increased with decreasing mill revolution number. The process optimization results revealed a high agreement between the experimental and the predicted data (Adj-R2=0.944). The optimized CuO mass fraction, mill revolution number, and coating time were 0.4, 200 rpm, and 15 min, respectively. The measured value of the specific resistance of the coated pellet under the optimized conditions of the maximum specific resistance was 530 kΩ·cm.

  7. Seasonal Variability of the Yellow Sea/East China Sea Surface Fluxes and Thermohaline Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter CHU; CHEN Yuchun; Akira KUNINAKA

    2005-01-01

    We use the U.S. Navy's Master Oceanographic Observation Data Set (MOODS) for the Yellow Sea/East China Sea (YES) to investigate the climatological water mass features and the seasonal and non-seasonal variabilities of the thermohaline structure, and use the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) from 1945 to 1989 to investigate the linkage between the fluxes (momentum, heat, and moisture) across the air-ocean interface and the formation of the water mass features. After examining the major current systems and considering the local bathymetry and water mass properties, we divide YES into five regions: East China Sea (ECS) shelf, Yellow Sea (YS) Basin, Cheju bifurcation (CB) zone, Taiwan Warm Current (TWC) region, Kuroshio Current (KG) region. The long term mean surface heat balance corresponds to a heat loss of 30 W m-2 in the ESC and CB regions, a heat loss of 65 W m-2 in the KG and TWC regions, and a heat gain of 15 W m-2 in the YS region. The surface freshwater balance is defined by precipitation minus evaporation. The annual water loss from the surface for the five subareas ranges from 1.8 to 4 cm month-1. The fresh water loss from the surface should be compensated for from the river run-off. The entire water column of the shelf region (ECS, YS, and CB) undergoes an evident seasonal thermal cycle with maximum values of temperature during summer and maximum mixed layer depths during winter. However, only the surface waters of the TWC and KG regions exhibit a seasonal thermal cycle.We also found two different relations between surface salinity and the Yangtze River run-off, namely, out-of-phase in the East China Sea shelf and in-phase in the Yellow Sea. This may confirm an earlier study that the summer fresh water discharge from the Yangtze River forms a relatively shallow, low salinity plume-like structure extending offshore on average towards the northeast.

  8. A 1700-year history of West African multidecadal sea surface temperature and rainfall variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnert, Henning; Stefan, Mulitza; Gesine, Mollenhauer

    2010-05-01

    Tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SST) exert a major influence on the latitudinal position and intensity of the West African Monsoon and the tropical rainbelt. The impact of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) in particular has previously been demonstrated, but little information is available beyond the instrumental time period. We have reconstructed summer-fall SST and relative changes in the discharge of the Senegal River from a sediment core off southern Mauritania. Time series of SST and seawater-d18O (a measure of salinity and hence discharge) were estimated from planktonic foraminiferal Mg/Ca and d18O. The records are sufficiently resolved to infer multidecadal variability over the past 1700 years and centennial variability over the past 3300 years. River discharge increases slightly over the entire time series. This can be brought into agreement with the general Sahel drying trend indicated by previous studies, when we assume a southward migration of the rainbelt that leads to locally enhanced rainfall over the southernmost Senegal River catchment area in Guinea. SST cooled by 1-1.5 °C between AD 1250 and 1500, more pronounced and somewhat earlier compared with the North Atlantic mean. Spectral analysis reveals several multidecadal periods (38, ~45 and ~62 years) where SST and Senegal River discharge are tightly coupled and are driven by the AMO. The exception is a 30-year periodicity in discharge that has no counterpart in SST, and is potentially linked to meridional tropical SST gradient anomalies. AMO signatures are present throughout the past 1700 years, but vary in amplitude. The most recent and persistent phase of enhanced AMO variability commences around AD 1250 contemporaneous with the transition from the Medieval Climate Anomaly to the Little Ice Age.

  9. Heart rate variability and surface electromyography of trained cyclists at different cadences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Saraiva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The heart rate variability (HRV and surface electromyography (sEMG are important tools in the evaluation of cardiac autonomic system and neuromuscular parameters, respectively. The aim of the study was to evaluate the behavior of HRV and sEMG of the vastus lateralis in two exercise protocols on a cycle ergometer at 60 and 80 rpm. Eight healthy men cyclists who have trained for at least two years were evaluated. Reduction was observed followed by stabilization of RMSSD and SDNN indices of HRV (p<0.05 along with increases in the amplitude of the sEMG signal (p<0.05 in both protocols. Significant correlations were observed between the responses of HRV and sEMG in the cadence of 60 rpm (RMSSD and sEMG: r = -0.42, p=0.03; SDNN and sEMG: r = -0.45, p=0.01 and 80 rpm (RMSSD and sEMG: r = -0.47, p=0.02; SDNN and sEMG: r = -0.49, p=0.01, yet no difference was observed for these variables between the two protocols. We concluded that the parasympathetic cardiac responses and sEMG are independent of cadences applied at the same power output.

  10. Variability of the Coupling Between Surface Air Temperature and Northern Annular Mode at Various Levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Benkui; SUO Lingling; HUANG Jiayou

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the variability of the coupling between surface air temperature(SAT)and northern annular mode(NAM)at various levels.To measure the coupling intensity between the SAT and the NAM anomaly fields.the coupling index has been defined as the leading principal component of the partial least squares regression model of the SAT and NAM anomalies.Both a composite analysis and the coupling index have been used to reveal level-by-level and month-to-month variability of the coupling between the upper anomalous NAM and the SAT in the Northern Hemisphere.The major results are as follows:the January SAT anomaly is more strongly coupled with the January NAM anomaly at the middle-upper tropospheric levels than that at the other levels,while the same is true for the February SAT anomaly with the January NAM anomaly at the lower stratospheric levels.The January NAM anomaly at the middleupper tropospheric levels is most strongly coupled with the January SAT anomaly,and the coupling intensity is successively reduced month by month and becomes trivial after April.The January NAM anomaly at the lower stratospheric levels is more strongly coupled with January,Febrnary and March SAT anomalies,but the coupling becomes trivial after April.

  11. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Satellite-Derived Cloud and Surface Characteristics During FIRE-ACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslanik, J. A.; Key, J.; Fowler, C. W.; Nguyen, T.; Wang, X.a

    2000-01-01

    Advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) products calculated for the western Arctic for April-July 1998 are used to investigate spatial, temporal, and regional patterns and variability in energy budget parameters associated with ocean- ice-atmosphere interactions over the Arctic Ocean during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) project and the First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) Regional Experiment - Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE-ACE). The AVHRR-derived parameters include cloud fraction, clear-sky and all-sky skin temperature and broadband albedo, upwelling and downwelling shortwave and longwave radiation, cloud top pressure and temperature, and cloud optical depth. The remotely sensed products generally agree well with field observations at the SHEBA site, which in turn is shown to be representative of a surrounding region comparable in size to a climate-model grid cell. Time series of products for other locations in the western Arctic illustrate the magnitude of spatial variability during the study period and provide spatial and temporal detail useful for studying regional processes. The data illustrate the progression of reduction in cloud cover, albedo decrease, and the considerable heating of the open ocean associated with the anomalous decrease in sea ice cover in the eastern Beaufort Sea that began in late spring. Above-freezing temperatures are also recorded within the ice pack, suggesting warming of the open water areas within the ice cover.

  12. Effects of prenatal exposure to a mild chronic variable stress on body weight, preweaning mortality and rat behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabrera R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Early stimulation has been shown to produce long-lasting effects in many species. Prenatal exposure to some strong stressors may affect development of the nervous system leading to behavioral impairment in adult life. The purpose of the present work was to study the postnatal harmful effects of exposure to variable mild stresses in rats during pregnancy. Female Holtzman rats were submitted daily to one session of a chronic variable stress (CVS during pregnancy (prenatal stress; PS group. Control pregnant rats (C group were undisturbed. The pups of PS and C dams were weighed and separated into two groups 48 h after delivery. One group was maintained with their own dams (PS group, N = 70; C group, N = 36 while the other PS pups were cross-fostered with C dams (PSF group, N = 47 and the other C pups were cross-fostered with PS dams (CF group, N = 58. Pups were undisturbed until weaning (postnatal day 28. The male offspring underwent motor activity tests (day 28, enriched environment tests (day 37 and social interaction tests (day 42 in an animal activity monitor. Body weight was recorded on days 2, 28 and 60. The PS pups showed lower birth weight than C pups (Duncan's test, P<0.05. The PS pups suckling with their stressed mothers displayed greater preweaning mortality (C: 23%, PS: 60%; c2 test, P<0.05 and lower body weight than controls at days 28 and 60 (Duncan's test, P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively. The PS, PSF and CF groups showed lower motor activity scores than controls when tested at day 28 (Duncan's test, P<0.01 for PS group and P<0.05 for CF and PSF groups. In the enriched environment test performed on day 37, between-group differences in total motor activity were not detected; however, the PS, CF and PSF groups displayed less exploration time than controls (Duncan's test, P<0.05. Only the PS group showed impaired motor activity and impaired social behavior at day 42 (Duncan's test, P<0.05. In fact, CVS treatment during gestation plus

  13. Sea Surface Height Variability and Eddy Statistical Properties in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Peng

    2013-05-01

    Satellite sea surface height (SSH) data over 1992-2012 are analyzed to study the spatial and temporal variability of sea level in the Red Sea. Empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) analysis suggests the remarkable seasonality of SSH in the Red Sea, and a significant correlation is found between SSH variation and seasonal wind cycle. A winding-angle based eddy identification algorithm is employed to derive the mesoscale eddy information from SSH data. Totally more than 5500 eddies are detected, belonging to 2583 eddy tracks. Statistics suggest that eddies generate over the entire Red Sea, with two regions in the central basin of high eddy frequency. 76% of the detected eddies have a radius ranging from 40km to 100km, of which both intensity and absolute vorticity decrease with eddy radius. The average eddy lifespan is about 5 weeks, and eddies with longer lifespan tend to have larger radius but less intensity. Different deformation rate exists between anticyclonic eddies (AEs) and cyclonic eddies (CEs), those eddies with higher intensity appear to be less deformed and more circular. Inspection of the 84 long-lived eddies suggests the AEs tend to move a little more northward than CEs. AE generation during summer is obviously lower than that during other seasons, while CE generation is higher during spring and summer. Other features of AEs and CEs are similar with both vorticity and intensity reaching the summer peaks in August and winter peaks in January. Inter-annual variability reveals that the eddies in the Red Sea are isolated from the global event. The eddy property tendencies are different from the south and north basin, both of which exhibit a two-year cycle. Showing a correlation coefficient of -0.91, Brunt–Väisälä frequency is negatively correlated with eddy kinetic energy (EKE), which results from AE activities in the high eddy frequency region. Climatological vertical velocity shear variation is identical with EKE except in the autumn, suggesting the

  14. Stress Recovery Effects of High- and Low-Frequency Amplified Music on Heart Rate Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshie Nakajima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sounds can induce autonomic responses in listeners. However, the modulatory effect of specific frequency components of music is not fully understood. Here, we examined the role of the frequency component of music on autonomic responses. Specifically, we presented music that had been amplified in the high- or low-frequency domains. Twelve healthy women listened to white noise, a stress-inducing noise, and then one of three versions of a piece of music: original, low-, or high-frequency amplified. To measure autonomic response, we calculated the high-frequency normalized unit (HFnu, low-frequency normalized unit, and the LF/HF ratio from the heart rate using electrocardiography. We defined the stress recovery ratio as the value obtained after participants listened to music following scratching noise, normalized by the value obtained after participants listened to white noise after the stress noise, in terms of the HFnu, low-frequency normalized unit, LF/HF ratio, and heart rate. Results indicated that high-frequency amplified music had the highest HFnu of the three versions. The stress recovery ratio of HFnu under the high-frequency amplified stimulus was significantly larger than that under the low-frequency stimulus. Our results suggest that the high-frequency component of music plays a greater role in stress relief than low-frequency components.

  15. Interplay Between Residual Stresses, Microstructure, Process Variables and Engine Block Casting Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Anthony; D'Elia, Francesco; Ravindran, Comondore; Sediako, Dimitry; Murty, B. S.; MacKay, Robert

    2012-12-01

    The replacement of nodular cast iron with 319 type aluminum (Al) alloys in gasoline engine blocks is an example of the shift towards the use of lighter alloys in the automotive industry. However, excessive residual stress along the cylinder bore may lead to bore distortion, significantly reducing engine operating efficiency. In the current study, microstructure, mechanical properties and residual stress were characterized along the cylinder bridge of engine blocks following thermal sand reclamation (TSR), T7 heat treatment, and service testing of the casting. Neutron diffraction was effectively used to quantify the residual stress along both the Al cylinder bridge and the adjacent gray cast iron cylinder liners in the hoop, radial, and axial orientations with respect to the cylinder axis. The results suggest that an increase in cooling rate along the cylinder caused a significant refinement in microstructure at the bottom of the cylinder. In turn, this suggested an increase in alloy strength at the bottom of the cylinder relative to the top. This increased strength at the bottom of the cylinder likely reduced the susceptibility of the cylinder to rapid relief of residual stress at elevated temperature. In contrast, the coarse microstructure at the top of the cylinder likely triggered stress relief at an elevated temperature.

  16. Impacts of Climate Variability on the Spatio-temporal Characteristics of Water Stress in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soojun; Devineni, Naresh; Lall, Upmanu; Kim, Hung Soo

    2017-04-01

    This study intended to evaluate water stress quantitatively targeted at the Korean Peninsula and to analyze the spatial and temporal characteristics of its occurrence. First, the severity and multiyear influence of water stress were analyzed by realizing water balance based on water supply and demand and by calculating the normalized deficit index (NDI) and the normalized deficit cumulated (NDC) for 113 small basins in the Korean Peninsula. Next, a change in the periodic characteristics of water stress was analyzed using wavelet transform of the NDI by small basins and 3 bands of periods of 1 year, 2-4 years, and 4-8 years were separated. Through an analysis of the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) on each band, it was found that water stress occurring in the Korean Peninsula has the characteristics of spatial distribution that it is extended from the south coast to the northern area and inland as its period gets longer. An analysis of the band with a period of 2-8 years for water stress showed that it has a relationship with El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Acknowledgment This research was supported by a grant (14AWMP-B082564-01) from Advanced Water Management Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government.

  17. Interannual to decadal summer drought variability over Europe and its relationship to global sea surface temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionita, M.; Lohmann, G. [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany); University of Bremen, MARUM, Bremen (Germany); Rimbu, N. [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany); Climed Norad, Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest University, Faculty of Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Chelcea, S. [National Institute of Hydrology and Water Management, Bucharest (Romania); Dima, M. [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany); Bucharest University, Faculty of Physics, Bucharest (Romania)

    2012-01-15

    Interannual to decadal variability of European summer drought and its relationship with global sea surface temperature (SST) is investigated using the newly developed self calibrated Palmer drought severity index (scPDSI) and global sea surface temperature (SST) field for the period 1901-2002. A European drought severity index defined as the average of scPDSI over entire Europe shows quasiperiodic variations in the 2.5-5 year band as well as at 12-13 years suggesting a possible potential predictability of averaged drought conditions over Europe. A Canonical Correlation Analysis between summer scPDSI anomalies over Europe and global SST anomalies reveals the existence of three modes of coupled summer drought scPDSI patterns and winter global SST anomalies. The first scPDSI-SST coupled mode represents the long-term trends in the data which manifest in SST as warming over all oceans. The associated long-term trend in scPDSI suggests increasing drought conditions over the central part of Europe. The second mode is related to the inter-annual ENSO and decadal PDO influence on the European climate and the third one captures mainly the drought pattern associated to Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. The lag relationships between winter SST and summer drought conditions established in this study can provide a valuable skill for the prediction of drought conditions over Europe on interannual to decadal time scales. (orig.)

  18. Variability of Surface Temperature and Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet, 2000-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Comiso, Josefino, C.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Koenig, Lora S.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced melting along with surface-temperature increases measured using infrared satellite data, have been documented for the Greenland Ice Sheet. Recently we developed a climate-quality data record of ice-surface temperature (IST) of the Greenland Ice Sheet using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 1ST product -- http://modis-snow-ice.gsfc.nasa.gov. Using daily and mean monthly MODIS 1ST maps from the data record we show maximum extent of melt for the ice sheet and its six major drainage basins for a 12-year period extending from March of 2000 through December of 2011. The duration of the melt season on the ice sheet varies in different drainage basins with some basins melting progressively earlier over the study period. Some (but not all) of the basins also show a progressively-longer duration of melt. The short time of the study period (approximately 12 years) precludes an evaluation of statistically-significant trends. However the dataset provides valuable information on natural variability of IST, and on the ability of the MODIS instrument to capture changes in IST and melt conditions indifferent drainage basins of the ice sheet.

  19. Variable Structure Controller with Time-Varying Switching Surface under the Bound of Input using Evolution Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Jung; Choi, Young Kiu [Pusan National University (Korea); Kim, Hyun Sik [Agency for Defense Development (Korea); Jeon, Seong Jeub [Pukyong National University (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    Variable structure control law is well known to be a robust control algorithm and evolution strategy is used as an effective search algorithm in optimization problems. In this paper, we propose a variable structure controller with time-varying switching surface. We calculate the maximum value of switching surface gradient under the bound of input. To enhance the robustness, we choose a time-varying switching surface gradient that is of the 3 rd order polynomial form. Evolution strategy is used to optimize the parameters of the switching surface gradient. Finally, the proposed method is applied to position tracking control for BLDC motor. Experimental results show that the proposed method is more useful than the conventional variable structure control. (author). 8 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Seed set, pollen morphology and pollen surface composition response to heat stress in field pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunfei; Lahlali, Rachid; Karunakaran, Chithra; Kumar, Saroj; Davis, Arthur R; Bueckert, Rosalind A

    2015-11-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is a major legume crop grown in a semi-arid climate in Western Canada, where heat stress affects pollination, seed set and yield. Seed set and pod growth characteristics, along with in vitro percentage pollen germination, pollen tube growth and pollen surface composition, were measured in two pea cultivars (CDC Golden and CDC Sage) subjected to five maximum temperature regimes ranging from 24 to 36 °C. Heat stress reduced percentage pollen germination, pollen tube length, pod length, seed number per pod, and the seed-ovule ratio. Percentage pollen germination of CDC Sage was greater than CDC Golden at 36 °C. No visible morphological differences in pollen grains or the pollen surface were observed between the heat and control-treated pea. However, pollen wall (intine) thickness increased due to heat stress. Mid-infrared attenuated total reflectance (MIR-ATR) spectra revealed that the chemical composition (lipid, proteins and carbohydrates) of each cultivar's pollen grains responded differently to heat stress. The lipid region of the pollen coat and exine of CDC Sage was more stable compared with CDC Golden at 36 °C. Secondary derivatives of ATR spectra indicated the presence of two lipid types, with different amounts present in pollen grains from each cultivar.

  1. A Variable-resolution Surface Wave Dispersion Study of Eurasia, North Africa, and Surrounding Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasyanos, M E

    2005-03-21

    This paper presents the results of a large-scale study of surface wave dispersion performed across Eurasia and North Africa. Improvements were made to previous surface wave work by enlarging the study region, increasing path density, improving spatial resolution, and expanding the period range. This study expands the coverage area northwards and eastwards relative to a previous dispersion analysis, which covered only North Africa and the Middle East. We have significantly increased the number of seismograms examined and group velocity measurements made. We have now made good quality dispersion measurements for about 30,000 Rayleigh wave and 20,000 Love wave paths, and have incorporated measurements from several other researchers into the study. A conjugate gradient method was employed for the group velocity tomography, which improved the inversion from the previous study by adopting a variable smoothness. This technique allows us to go to higher resolution where the data allow without producing artifacts. The current results include both Love and Rayleigh wave inversions across the region for periods from 7 to 100 seconds at 1{sup o} resolution. Short period group velocities are sensitive to slow velocities associated with large sedimentary features such as the Caspian Sea, West Siberian Platform, Mediterranean Sea, Bay of Bengal, Tarim Basin, and Persian Gulf. Intermediate periods are sensitive to differences in crustal thickness, such as those between oceanic and continental crust or along orogenic zones and continental plateaus. At longer periods, fast velocities are consistently found beneath cratons while slow upper mantle velocities occur along rift systems, subduction zones, and collision zones such as the Tethys Belt. We have compared the group velocities at various periods with features such as sediment thickness, topographic height, crustal thickness, proximity to plate boundaries, lithospheric age and lithospheric thickness, and find significant

  2. Experimental Determination of Surface Stress Changes in Electrochemical Systems – Possibilities and Pitfalls

    OpenAIRE

    G. G. Láng; Sas, N. S.; Vesztergom, S.

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, the different techniques used for the determination of changes of surface stress of solid electrodes, as well as the kind and quality of information that can be achieved using these methods are discussed. The most important methods are briefly reviewed and advantages/drawbacks highlighted. Special attention is paid to issues related to the use of the “bending beam” (“bending cantilever”, “laser beam deflection”, “wafer curvature”, etc.) methods. Recent dev...

  3. Surface Chemistry and Structural Effects in the Stress Corrosion of Glass and Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-15

    the strength and fatigue characteristics of ZBLAN (zirconium barium-lanthanum-aluminum-sodium fluoride) optical glass fiber obtained from British...Surface Chemistry and Structural Effects in the Stress Corrosion of Glass and Ceramic Materlals 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Carlo G. Pantano 13a. TYPE OF...fluorozirconate glasses . °. DTICS ELEC T E DEC 09 I 20. DISTRIBUTION/ AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 21.-A% RACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION [BUNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED

  4. Psycho-social and Mental Variables and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Traffic Accident Survivors in Northern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadi-Hassankiadeh, Naema; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Shahsavari, Hooman; Yousefzadeh-Chabok, Shahrokh; Haghani, Hamid

    2017-07-01

    To assess the psycho-social and mental variables associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a series of Iranian patients. A total of 528 eligible accident survivors in pre-sampling of a randomized controlled trial targeting PTSD were included in this cross-sectional study. Psycho-social characteristics associated to PTSD were explored in these survivors in an outpatient clinic. They completed the questionnaires via interview between six weeks to six months after accident. Data collection tools were PSS (DSM-V version) for PTSD and BDI-II for depression and a researcher-made questionnaire for psycho-social variables. There was a significant association between PTSD and the following variables; family communication, current depression, return to work, history of death of relatives, witnessed the death, length of amnesia, hospitalization, injured situation, and accident severity. Multivariate logistic regression indicated that some variables were associated with PTSD such as accident severity, (paccident and poor family communication who do not return to work. Thus, routine assessment of PTSD, depression and psycho-social variables after traffic accidents must be taken into account.

  5. Residual Stress Sensitivity Analysis Using a Complex Variable Finite Element Method (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-17

    differencing FD), it takes advantage of complex variable algebra to eliminate the rror developed by traditional numerical differentiation methods such s...iterative procedure for solving nonlinear prob- ems. Through the use of complex variable algebra , ZFEM overcomes he inherent truncation errors that...DTIC Document; 1972 . [23] Davis R , Keith H . Finite-element analysis of pressure vessels. J Basic Eng 1972;94(2):401–5 . [24] Chen P . Prediction of

  6. Interfacial stress balances in structured continua and free surface flows in ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaves, Arlex [School of Chemical Engineering, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9 Cra. 27, Edificio 24, Bucaramanga, Santander (Colombia); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Interfacial linear and internal angular momentum balances are obtained for a structured continuum and for the special case of a ferrofluid, a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles in a Newtonian fluid. The interfacial balance equations account for the effects of surface tension and surface tension gradient, magnetic surface excess forces, antisymmetric stresses, and couple stresses in driving interfacial flows in ferrofluids. Application of the interfacial balance equations is illustrated by obtaining analytical expressions for the translational and spin velocity profiles in a thin film of ferrofluid on an infinite flat plate when a rotating magnetic field is applied with axis of rotation parallel to the ferrofluid/air interface. The cases of zero and non-zero spin viscosity are considered for small applied magnetic field amplitude. Expressions for the maximum translational velocity, slope of the translational velocity profile at the ferrofluid/air interface, and volumetric flow rate are obtained and their use to test the relevance of spin viscosity and couple stresses in the flow situation under consideration is discussed.

  7. Deposition of Low Stress Silicon Nitride Thin Film and Its Application in Surface Micromachining Device Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beirong Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface machining processes are responsible for creating microstructures that reside near the surfaces of a substrate and are characterized by the fabrication of micromechanical structures from deposited thin films. These films can be selectively removed to build three-dimensional structures whose functionality typically requires that they should be freed from the planar substrate. Silicon nitride thin film is one of these important materials. In this paper, by adjusting the SiH2Cl2/NH3 gaseous ratio, low stress silicon nitride (LS SiN is deposited by the low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD process. The internal stress generally in 135 MPa has been detected using an FLX-2320 film stress tester. Based on the wide application in surface micromachining devices, the mechanical properties of LS SiN are measured by nanoindentation, giving the value of Young’s modulus of 224 GPa and the hardness of 22.5 GPa, respectively. Dry etching and wet etching are utilized to fabricate the LS SiN thin film for structural layers. The etching rate compared with normal Si3N4 film by LPCVD is demonstrated for silicon chip manufacture.

  8. Water stress indices for the sugarcane crop on different irrigated surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo G. Brunini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. is a crop of vital importance to Brazil, in the production of sugar and ethanol, power generation and raw materials for various purposes. Strategic information such as topography and canopy temperature can provide management technologies accessible to farmers. The objective of this study was to determine water stress indices for sugarcane in irrigated areas, with different exposures and slopes. The daily water stress index of the plants and the water potential in the soil were evaluated and the production system was analyzed. The experiment was carried out in an “Experimental Watershed”, using six surfaces, two horizontal and the other ones with 20 and 40% North and South exposure slopes. Water stress level was determined by measuring the temperatures of the vegetation cover and the ambient air. Watering was carried out using a drip irrigation system. The results showed that water stress index of sugarcane varies according to exposure and slope of the terrain, while areas whose water stress index was above 5.0 oC had lower yield values.

  9. Auricular Acupressure to Improve Menstrual Pain and Menstrual Distress and Heart Rate Variability for Primary Dysmenorrhea in Youth with Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dysmenorrhea and accompanying symptoms can have a negative impact on academic achievement, physical activity and functioning, and quality of life. Unfortunately, stress increases the sensitivity and severity of pain, activating sympathetic responses while inhibiting parasympathetic responses. Objective. This study used objective, physiological measurements to evaluate the effects of auricular acupressure on menstrual pain and menstrual distress in young college students with primary dysmenorrhea across two menstrual cycles. The aim was to determine if significant differences could be detected between the intervention and follow-up phases after controlling life stress. Design. A one-group experimental research design was used, and repeated measurements and followups were done. Thirty-two women completed questionnaires and physiological parameters were measured. Results. Significant differences between the intervention and follow-up phases were found for high frequency (HF and blood pressure on day 1 and no significant differences in menstrual pain and menstrual distress, heart rate variability, low frequency (LF, LF/HF ratio, or heart rate. Conclusion. Auricular acupressure effectively increases parasympathetic activity to maintain autonomic function homeostasis in young women with primary dysmenorrhea and may have a value in alleviating menstrual pain and menstrual distress in a high-stress life. Future studies should consider stress, stimulus dose of auricular acupressure, severity of menstrual pain, and a longitudinal research design.

  10. Effects of heart rate variability biofeedback in subjects with stress-related chronic neck pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, David M; Olsson, Erik M G; von Schéele, Bo; Melin, Lennart; Lyskov, Eugene

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies focusing on autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunctions, together with theoretical pathophysiological models of musculoskeletal disorders, indicate the involvement of ANS regulation in development and maintenance of chronic muscle pain. Research has demonstrated the effectiveness of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback (BF) in increasing HRV and reducing the symptoms of different disorders characterized by ANS aberration. The study investigated the effects of resonance frequency HRV BF on autonomic regulation and perceived health, pain, stress and disability in 24 subjects with stress-related chronic neck-shoulder pain. Twelve subjects participated in 10 weekly sessions of resonant HRV BF and were compared to a control group. Subjective reports and HRV measures during relaxation and in response to a standardized stress protocol were assessed for both groups pre- and post-intervention. Group × time interactions revealed a significantly stronger increase over time in perceived health (SF-36) for the treatment group, including vitality, bodily pain and social functioning. Interactions were also seen for HRV during relaxation and reactivity to stress. The present pilot study indicates improvement in perceived health over a 10 week intervention with HRV-biofeedback in subjects with chronic neck-pain. Increased resting HRV as well as enhanced reactivity to hand grip and cold pressor tests might reflect beneficial effects on ANS regulation, and suggest that this intervention protocol is suitable for a larger controlled trial.

  11. Spatial variability in the coefficient of thermal expansion induces pre-service stresses in computer models of virgin Gilsocarbon bricks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arregui-Mena, José David; Margetts, Lee; Griffiths, D. V.; Lever, Louise; Hall, Graham; Mummery, Paul M.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the authors test the hypothesis that tiny spatial variations in material properties may lead to significant pre-service stresses in virgin graphite bricks. To do this, they have customised ParaFEM, an open source parallel finite element package, adding support for stochastic thermo-mechanical analysis using the Monte Carlo Simulation method. For an Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor brick, three heating cases have been examined: a uniform temperature change; a uniform temperature gradient applied through the thickness of the brick and a simulated temperature profile from an operating reactor. Results are compared for mean and stochastic properties. These show that, for the proof-of-concept analyses carried out, the pre-service von Mises stress is around twenty times higher when spatial variability of material properties is introduced. The paper demonstrates that thermal gradients coupled with material incompatibilities may be important in the generation of stress in nuclear graphite reactor bricks. Tiny spatial variations in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and Young's modulus can lead to the presence of thermal stresses in bricks that are free to expand.

  12. Residual compressive surface stress increases the bending strength of dental zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokoshi, Masanao; Zhang, Fei; Vanmeensel, Kim; De Munck, Jan; Minakuchi, Shunsuke; Naert, Ignace; Vleugels, Jozef; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2017-04-01

    To assess the influence of surface treatment and thermal annealing on the four-point bending strength of two ground dental zirconia grades. Fully-sintered zirconia specimens (4.0×3.0×45.0mm(3)) of Y-TZP zirconia (LAVA Plus, 3M ESPE) and Y-TZP/Al2O3 zirconia (ZirTough, Kuraray Noritake) were subjected to four surface treatments: (1) 'GROUND': all surfaces were ground with a diamond-coated grinding wheel on a grinding machine; (2) 'GROUND+HEAT': (1) followed by annealing at 1100°C for 30min; (3) 'GROUND+Al2O3 SANDBLASTED': (1) followed by sandblasting using Al2O3; (4) 'GROUND+CoJet SANDBLASTED': (1) followed by tribochemical silica (CoJet) sandblasting. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the zirconia-phase composition and potentially induced residual stress. The four-point bending strength was measured using a universal material-testing machine. Weibull analysis revealed a substantially higher Weibull modulus and slightly higher characteristic strength for ZirTough (Kuraray Noritake) than for LAVA Plus (3M ESPE). For both zirconia grades, the 'GROUND' zirconia had the lowest Weibull modulus in combination with a high characteristic strength. Sandblasting hardly changed the bending strength but substantially increased the Weibull modulus of the ground zirconia, whereas a thermal treatment increased the Weibull modulus of both zirconia grades but resulted in a significantly lower bending strength. Micro-Raman analysis revealed a higher residual compressive surface stress that correlated with an increased bending strength. Residual compressive surface stress increased the bending strength of dental zirconia. Thermal annealing substantially reduced the bending strength but increased the consistency (reliability) of 'GROUND' zirconia. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Summer Monsoon and Annual Variability of Sea Surface Slope and Their Effects on Alongshore Current near Qingdao

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲书箴; 程军; 张义钧; 石强; 骆敬新; 范文静

    2004-01-01

    Based on the monthly mean sea level data obtained from 3 years′ (1999-2001) tide-gauge measurements, the annual variability of the sea level near Qingdao and Jiaozhou Bay is studied and discussed in this paper. Results show that the sea surface height at all the tide gauges becomes higher in summer than that in winter,with an obvious seasonal variability.Furthermore the sea surface height measured at a short distance outside the bay is lower than that in thebay, showing a sea surface slope downward from north to south. The reasons for the formation of the slope are explained as well, The dynamic action ofthe summer monsoon and the sea surface slope, and their effects on the monthly mean current are studied by means of dynamics principles. The importance of the summer monsoon and the pressure gradient generated by the sea surface slope, with their effects on the alongshore current, is pointed out and emphasized in this paper.

  14. Spatial and temporal variability of surface water pollution in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbers, Gert-Jan; Becker, Mathias; Nga, La Thi; Sebesvari, Zita; Renaud, Fabrice G

    2014-07-01

    Surface water pollution in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta (MD) could threaten human, animal and ecosystem health given the fact that this water source is intensively used for drinking, irrigation and domestic services. We therefore determined the levels of pollution by organic pollutants, salts, metals and microbial indicators by (bi)monthly monitoring of canals between November 2011 and July 2012 at 32 sampling locations, representing fresh and saline/brackish environments. The results were compared with national water quality guidelines, between the studied regions and with water quality data from main waterways. Key factors explaining the observed levels of pollution in surface water were identified through principal component analysis (PCA). Temporal variations due to tidal regime and seasonality were also assessed. Based on regression models, the spatial variability of five water quality parameters was visualized using GIS based maps. Results indicate that pH (max. 8.6), turbidity (max. 461 FTU), maximum concentrations of ammonium (14.7 mg L(-1)), arsenic (44.1 μg L(-1)), barium (157.5 μg L(-1)), chromium (84.7 μg L(-1)), mercury (45.5 μg L(-1)), manganese (1659.7 μg L(-1)), aluminum (14.5 mg L(-1)), iron (17.0 mg L(-1)) and the number of Escherichia coli (87,000 CFU 100 mL(-1)) and total coliforms (2,500,000 CFU 100 mL(-1)) in canals exceed the thresholds set by Vietnamese quality guidelines for drinking and domestic purposes. The PCA showed that i) urbanization; ii) metal leaching from soils; iii) aquaculture; and iv) tidal regime explain 85% of the variance of surface water quality attributes. Significant differences in water quality were found due to daily tidal regime and as a result of seasonality. Surface water quality maps for dissolved oxygen, ammonium, ortho-phosphate, manganese and total coliforms were developed to highlight hot-spot areas of pollution. The results of this study can assist policy makers in developing water management strategies

  15. Modeling South America regional smoke plume: aerosol optical depth variability and shortwave surface forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosário, N. E.; Longo, K. M.; Freitas, S. R.; Yamasoe, M. A.; Fonseca, R. M.

    2012-07-01

    Intra-seasonal variability of smoke aerosol optical depth (AOD) and downwelling solar irradiance at the surface during the 2002 biomass burning season in South America was modeled using the Coupled Chemistry-Aerosol-Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CCATT-BRAMS). Measurements of AOD from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and solar irradiance at the surface from the Solar Radiation Network (SolRad-NET) were used to evaluate model results. In general, the major features associated with AOD evolution over the southern part of the Amazon Basin and cerrado ecosystem are captured by the model. The main discrepancies were found for high aerosol loading events. In the northeastern portion of the Amazon Basin the model systematically underestimated AOD. This is likely due to the cloudy nature of the region, preventing accurate detection of the fire spots used in the emission model. Moreover, measured AOD were very often close to background conditions and emissions other than smoke were not considered in the simulation. Therefore, under the background scenario, one would expect the model to underestimate AOD. The issue of high aerosol loading events in the southern part of the Amazon and cerrado is also discussed in the context of emission shortcomings. The Cuiabá cerrado site was the only one where the highest quality AERONET data were unavailable. Thus, lower quality data were used. Root-mean-square-error (RMSE) between the model and observations decreased from 0.48 to 0.17 when extreme AOD events (AOD550 nm ≥ 1.0) and Cuiabá were excluded from analysis. Downward surface solar irradiance comparisons also followed similar trends when extremes AOD were excluded. This highlights the need to improve the modelling of the regional smoke plume in order to enhance the accuracy of the radiative energy budget. Aerosol optical model based on the mean intensive properties of smoke from the southern part of the

  16. Study of process variables in industrial acetic fermentation by a continuous pilot fermentor and response surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Vidal, Diego; Pizarro, Consuelo; González-Sáiz, José M

    2003-01-01

    The modeling and optimization of industrial processes requires an intensive study of the factors involved. In this work, a continuous pilot system for studying the industrial process of acetic fermentation is developed. A Doehlert design is applied to the five variables involved in the pilot process. This experimental design allows reduction of the experimental burden and the maximum amount of information to be obtained, studying the factors at different levels depending on their significance. The experimental system provides a robust measure of the specific growth rate and the rates of substrates consumption and acetic acid production, related to the flow of effluent stream evaluated in the steady state. The results demonstrate the growth-associated kinetics of substrates and product, and the yield factors are calculated with low values of variances for the coefficients, i.e., within the range 1-11%. The specific growth rate suits the quadratic model proposed. The response surfaces generated by the model are applied to explain the behavior of the bacterial growth and, therefore, the effects of the process variables studied over the acetic acid production. Very low levels of ethanol or oxygen make the acetification rate decrease, and a saturation effect with high levels of ethanol or oxygen is also deduced. The effects of the aeration rate, agitation, and overpressure suggest a kind of inhibition of the acetic acid production caused by the oxygen that has not been practically studied before. The temperature strengthens the inhibitory effect of the ethanol and the oxygen. The conclusions of this work consolidate the structure of a hybrid model for the acetic fermentation.

  17. Modelling global water stress of the recent past: on the relative importance of trends in water demand and climate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wada

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During the past decades, human water use more than doubled, yet available freshwater resources are finite. As a result, water scarcity has been prevalent in various regions of the world. Here, we present the first global assessment of past development of water scarcity considering not only climate variability but also growing water demand, desalinated water use and non-renewable groundwater abstraction over the period 1960–2001 at a spatial resolution of 0.5°. Agricultural water demand is estimated based on past extents of irrigated areas and livestock densities. We approximate past economic development based on GDP, energy and household consumption and electricity production, which is subsequently used together with population numbers to estimate industrial and domestic water demand. Climate variability is expressed by simulated blue water availability defined by freshwater in rivers, lakes and reservoirs by means of the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. The results show a drastic increase in the global population living under water-stressed conditions (i.e., moderate to high water stress due to the growing water demand, primarily for irrigation, which more than doubled from 1708/818 to 3708/1832 km3 yr−1 (gross/net over the period 1960–2000. We estimate that 800 million people or 27 % of the global population were under water-stressed conditions for 1960. This number increased to 2.6 billion or 43 % for 2000. Our results indicate that increased water demand is the decisive factor for the heightened water stress, enhancing the intensity of water stress up to 200 %, while climate variability is often the main determinant of onsets for extreme events, i.e. major droughts. However, our results also suggest that in several emerging and developing economies (e.g., India, Turkey, Romania and Cuba some of the past observed droughts were anthropogenically driven due to increased water demand rather than being climate

  18. A model study of the seasonal and long term North Atlantic surface pCO2 variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Heinze

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A coupled biogeochemical-physical ocean model is used to study the long term variations of surface pCO2 in the North Atlantic Ocean. The model agrees well with recent underway pCO2 observations from the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT database in various locations in the North Atlantic. The distinct seasonal cycles observed at different parts of the North Atlantic are well reproduced by the model. In most regions except the subpolar domain, the recent observed trends in pCO2 and air–sea carbon fluxes are also simulated by the model. Over a long period between 1960–2008, the primary mode of surface pCO2 variability is dominated by the increasing trend associated with the invasion of anthropogenic CO2 into the ocean. We show that, to first order, the ocean surface circulation and air–sea heat flux patterns can explain the spatial variability of this dominant increasing trend. Regions with strong surface mass transport and negative air–sea heat flux have the tendency to maintain lower surface pCO2. Regions of surface convergence and mean positive air–sea heat flux such as the subtropical gyre and the western subpolar gyre have faster increase in pCO2 over a long term period. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO plays a major role in controlling the variability occurring at interannual to decadal time scales. The NAO predominantly influences surface pCO2 in the North Atlantic by changing the physical properties of the North Atlantic water masses, particularly by perturbing the temperature and dissolved inorganic carbon in the surface ocean. We show that present underway observations are valuable for both calibrating the model, as well as for improving our understanding of the regionally heterogeneous variability of surface pCO2. In addition, they can be important for detecting any long term change in the regional carbon cycle due to ongoing climate change.

  19. Variable-Domain Displacement Transfer Functions for Converting Surface Strains into Deflections for Structural Deformed Shape Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2015-01-01

    Variable-Domain Displacement Transfer Functions were formulated for shape predictions of complex wing structures, for which surface strain-sensing stations must be properly distributed to avoid jointed junctures, and must be increased in the high strain gradient region. Each embedded beam (depth-wise cross section of structure along a surface strain-sensing line) was discretized into small variable domains. Thus, the surface strain distribution can be described with a piecewise linear or a piecewise nonlinear function. Through discretization, the embedded beam curvature equation can be piece-wisely integrated to obtain the Variable-Domain Displacement Transfer Functions (for each embedded beam), which are expressed in terms of geometrical parameters of the embedded beam and the surface strains along the strain-sensing line. By inputting the surface strain data into the Displacement Transfer Functions, slopes and deflections along each embedded beam can be calculated for mapping out overall structural deformed shapes. A long tapered cantilever tubular beam was chosen for shape prediction analysis. The input surface strains were analytically generated from finite-element analysis. The shape prediction accuracies of the Variable- Domain Displacement Transfer Functions were then determined in light of the finite-element generated slopes and deflections, and were fofound to be comparable to the accuracies of the constant-domain Displacement Transfer Functions

  20. Influence of stress factors of firewalking on heart rate frequency and variability of karate sportsmen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dykij B.V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Influence of passing is studied on burning hot coal on the indexes of frequency of heart-throbs and variability of cardiac rhythm of sportsmen. In procedure of passing on coal took part 4 sportsmen (karate of high qualification aged 20-25 years. All of participants of experiment were healthy and gave the informed consent to participating in research. Found out the increase of frequency of heart-throbs (to 160-180 shots in a minute and change of separate indexes of spectral and statistical analysis of variability of cardiac rhythm. In particular, during passing of VLF grows on 36%, TP goes down on 97%. The changes of these parameters on the preparatory and finishings stages of procedure and distributing of components of spectrum of variability of cardiac rhythm specify on the leading role of psychoemotional factors and higher departments of central nervous system during passing on coal.

  1. Effects of surface properties on the impact process of a yield stress fluid drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidi, Alireza [UMR 5518 CNRS-Grenoble Institut Polytechnique (Grenoble INP), Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Graphic Arts (LGP2), St Martin d' Heres (France); Martin, Celine [UMR 5518 CNRS-Grenoble Institut Polytechnique (Grenoble INP), Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Graphic Arts (LGP2), St Martin d' Heres (France); Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble I, CNRS, Laboratoire de Rheologie, CNRS UMR 5520, Grenoble Institut Polytechnique, BP 53, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Magnin, Albert [Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble I, CNRS, Laboratoire de Rheologie, CNRS UMR 5520, Grenoble Institut Polytechnique, BP 53, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-07-15

    The impact of a yield stress fluid drop onto a solid surface with diversified interface properties has been experimentally investigated. Two smooth substrates with distinct surface energies and three similar substrates with different roughnesses have been used. The bulk shear rheological behaviour of Carbopol gels, concentrated suspensions of swollen micro-gels, has been measured. Wall friction has also been characterized on each substrate. Slip effects of gels proved to be greater on a more hydrophobic substrate. They decreased with an increase in roughness. The drop hydrodynamics during the impact was correlated with the wall friction of the gels on all substrates and with the ratio of surface roughness to size of the swollen micro-gels. At very low impact velocities, the gravitational subsidence amplitude depends greatly on surface properties. At higher impact velocities, no significant difference is observed during the spreading phase. The drop behaviour differs during the retraction depending on the substrate. Interface effects during the retraction stage proved to diminish when the yield stress value increases. (orig.)

  2. Climatic driven variability of surface water energy potential and implications for future hydroelectricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worman, A. L. E.; Lindstrom, G.

    2014-12-01

    An average year the production in Norway and Sweden is around 190 TWh and these two countries stand for about 70% of the hydropower energy stored in the available reservoirs of Europe. There are large challenges for the future use of this regulatory capacity with regard to balancing the electricity production in Europe under climate variability, compliance to water management plans under the Water Framework Directive and to the shifts to more renewable, but intermittent, energy sources required by the Renewable Energy Directive. A main aim of this project is to describe the variation over time of hydrological fluxes across Scandinavia in terms of their energy properties and to link that information to climatic factors and the regulation of hydroelectricty. Along these lines we explored daily data of digitalized hydro-climatological data from 1961, which were used to calibrate the HBV-model for 1001 watersheds in Sweden and the energy potential has been estimated as an average for that period (Figure below). These tentative results show that the surface water energy potential constitutes about one per mille of the latent heat flux due to evapotranspiration and it is, therefore, very sensitive to any fluctuation in the energy quantities of the hydrometeorological system. Tentative analysis suggests that the energy availability of surface water in Sweden exhibits significant decadal long fluctuations from 115 TWh/year up to 180 TWh/year, which follow several different time scales and periodicities, ranging from century-long trends to fluctuations occurring on time scales of a decade and shorter. In addition, recent investigations show that land-use changes and hydropower regulation has caused significant changes in the annual runoff periodicity in Swedish rivers during the 20th century. Those changes in the annual periodicities are caused by structural alterations in river basins affected by intense agriculture and hydropower regulation.

  3. Frequency content of sea surface height variability from internal gravity waves to mesoscale eddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Anna C.; Arbic, Brian K.; Richman, James G.; Shriver, Jay F.; Alford, Matthew H.; Buijsman, Maarten C.; Thomas Farrar, J.; Sharma, Hari; Voet, Gunnar; Wallcraft, Alan J.; Zamudio, Luis

    2017-03-01

    High horizontal-resolution (1/12.5° and 1/25°) 41-layer global simulations of the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), forced by both atmospheric fields and the astronomical tidal potential, are used to construct global maps of sea surface height (SSH) variability. The HYCOM output is separated into steric and nonsteric and into subtidal, diurnal, semidiurnal, and supertidal frequency bands. The model SSH output is compared to two data sets that offer some geographical coverage and that also cover a wide range of frequencies—a set of 351 tide gauges that measure full SSH and a set of 14 in situ vertical profilers from which steric SSH can be calculated. Three of the global maps are of interest in planning for the upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) two-dimensional swath altimeter mission: (1) maps of the total and (2) nonstationary internal tidal signal (the latter calculated after removing the stationary internal tidal signal via harmonic analysis), with an average variance of 1.05 and 0.43 cm2, respectively, for the semidiurnal band, and (3) a map of the steric supertidal contributions, which are dominated by the internal gravity wave continuum, with an average variance of 0.15 cm2. Stationary internal tides (which are predictable), nonstationary internal tides (which will be harder to predict), and nontidal internal gravity waves (which will be very difficult to predict) may all be important sources of high-frequency "noise" that could mask lower frequency phenomena in SSH measurements made by the SWOT mission.

  4. Mapping Temperate Vegetation Climate Adaptation Variability Using Normalized Land Surface Phenology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Liang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Climate influences geographic differences of vegetation phenology through both contemporary and historical variability. The latter effect is embodied in vegetation heterogeneity underlain by spatially varied genotype and species compositions tied to climatic adaptation. Such long-term climatic effects are difficult to map and therefore often neglected in evaluating spatially explicit phenological responses to climate change. In this study we demonstrate a way to indirectly infer the portion of land surface phenology variation that is potentially contributed by underlying genotypic differences across space. The method undertaken normalized remotely sensed vegetation start-of-season (or greenup onset with a cloned plants-based phenological model. As the geography of phenological model prediction (first leaf represents the instantaneous effect of contemporary climate, the normalized land surface phenology potentially reveals vegetation heterogeneity that is related to climatic adaptation. The study was done at the continental scale for the conterminous U.S., with a focus on the eastern humid temperate domain. Our findings suggest that, in an analogous scenario, if a uniform contemporary climate existed everywhere, spring vegetation greenup would occur earlier in the north than in the south. This is in accordance with known species-level clinal variations—for many temperate plant species, populations adapted to colder climates require less thermal forcing to initiate growth than those in warmer climates. This study, for the first time, shows that such geographic adaption relationships are supported at the ecosystem level. Mapping large-scale vegetation climate adaptation patterns contributes to our ability to better track geographically varied phenological responses to climate change.

  5. Variability of Hormonal Stress Markers Collected from a Managed Dolphin Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    the study was to compare immunological profiles of dolphins that were wild (coastal Charleston/Indian River ) and those that were semi- domestic living...REFERENCES Houser, D. S., Yeates, L. C., and Crocker, D. E. (2011). “Cold stress induces an adrenocortical response in bottlenose dolphins ( Tursiops ... truncatus ),” J. Zoo Wild. Med. 42: 565-571. Tomasi, T. E. Utilization rates of thyroid hormones in mammals. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 100, 503- 516 (1991

  6. Variability of Hormonal Stress Markers Collected from a Managed Dolphin Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    in blubber potentially mean that increased plasma cortisol after administration of ACTH treatment may not elevate plasma cortisol for a sufficient...five bottlenose dolphins. Since abrupt cessation of cortisol treatment has been observed to cause side-effects, dolphin subjects will be weaned off...by stress, which can lead to conditions of both hypo- and hyperthyroidism . Persistent elevated or diminished levels of these hormones are known to

  7. Stress Recovery Effects of High- and Low-Frequency Amplified Music on Heart Rate Variability

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Sounds can induce autonomic responses in listeners. However, the modulatory effect of specific frequency components of music is not fully understood. Here, we examined the role of the frequency component of music on autonomic responses. Specifically, we presented music that had been amplified in the high- or low-frequency domains. Twelve healthy women listened to white noise, a stress-inducing noise, and then one of three versions of a piece of music: original, low-, or high-frequency amplifi...

  8. Spatial and temporal variability in the δ18Ow and salinity compositions of Gulf of Maine coastal surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Nina M.; Wanamaker, Alan D.; Kreutz, Karl J.; Introne, Douglas S.

    2017-04-01

    Hydrographic variability and dynamics in the Gulf of Maine are examined through the investigation of δ18Ow and salinity properties of coastal surface waters. Data from Gulf of Maine waters sampled over a decade, from 2003 to 2015, including a suite of samples that were collected monthly from April 2014 to March 2015, are presented. These water samples fall on a mixing line between Maine River Water (MRW) and Scotian Shelf Water (SSW). However, slope waters likely also contribute to these surface waters. The seasonal variability in water samples collected during 2014 and 2015 indicates the strong influence of river runoff on coastal Gulf of Maine surface water properties. The coastal Gulf of Maine mixing line presented in this paper is a needed baseline for reconstructing hydrographic variability in bicarbonates using oxygen isotopes.

  9. ESA STSE Project “Sea Surface Temperature Diurnal Variability: Regional Extend – Implications in Atmospheric Modelling”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna

    Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and ocean-surface winds have been identified as essential variables by the Global Climate Observing system (GCO). Satellite observations have aided the understanding of air-sea interactions and the important role these two parameters hold in climate related studies, ...... located offshore. The project resulted in expanding the scientific background for understanding the spatial and temporal variability of key climate variables and their representativity in atmospheric and oceanic models....... of the vertical extend of diurnal signals. Drifting buoys provide measurements close to the surface but are not always available. Moored buoys are generally not able to resolve the daily SST signal, which strongly weakens with depth within the upper water column. For such reasons, the General Ocean Turbulence...

  10. Residual stress and electromagnetic characteristics in loop type frequency selective surface embedded hybrid structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyung Mi; Seo, Yun Seok; Chun, Heoung Jae [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ik Pyo [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong Bae [Ajoo University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yoon Jae [Agency for defense development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Residual stresses occur in frequency-selective surface (FSS)-embedded composite structures after co-curing due to differences between the coefficients of thermal expansion between composite skins and FSSs. Furthermore, the electromagnetic characteristics may be affected by the deformation of the FSS pattern by residual stresses. Therefore, we studied the changes in electromagnetic characteristics due to the deformation of FSS, using residual stresses to deform loop-type FSS-embedded hybrid composites. We considered the effects of loop-type FSS patterns of equal dimension as well as the stacking sequences of composite laminates on the electromagnetic characteristics of FSSs: Square loop, triangular loop and circular loop. The stacking sequences of composite laminates considered in this study were [0]{sub 8}, [0/90]{sub 4}, [+-45]{sub 4} and [0/+-45/90]{sub 2}. The FSS was located between composite laminates in the middle plane. To determine the residual stresses and deformations in the FSS embedded laminate structures, the thermal loading condition in the finite element analysis was induced by cooling the hybrid structures from 125 .deg. C to 20 .deg. C based on the cure cycle of the composite. Also, the electromagnetic reflection characteristics of the hybrid structures were predicted using deformed models by residual stresses, considering the effects of stacking sequence of composite laminates. The results showed that the maximum residual stresses and deformations were produced in the [0]{sub 8} composites with all three loop-types of FSS pattern. However, the maximum resonance frequency shifts occurred in the square and triangle loop-types with stacking sequence of [0]{sub 8} , while the maximum resonance frequency shift occurred in the circular loop-type with stacking sequence of [0/+-45/90]{sub 2}.

  11. Evaluation of Stress Intensity Factors for Multiple Cracked Circular Disks Under Crack Surface Tractions with SBFEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun-yu; LIN Gao; LI Xiao-chuan; XU Feng-lin

    2013-01-01

    Stress intensity factors (SIFs) for the cracked circular disks under different distributing surface tractions are evaluated with the scaled boundary finite element method (SBFEM).In the SBFEM,the analytical advantage of the solution in the radial direction allows SIFs to be directly determined from its definition,therefore no special crack-tip treatment is necessary.Furthermore anisotropic material behavior can be treated easily.Different distributions of surface tractions are considered for the center and double-edge-cracked disks.The benchmark examples are modeled and an excellent agreement between the results in the present study and those in published literature is found.It shows that SBFEM is effective and possesses high accuracy.The SIFs of the cracked orthotropic material circular disks subjected to different surface tractions are also evaluated.The technique of substructure is applied to handle the multiple cracks problem.

  12. Prescriptive variables for D-cycloserine augmentation of exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleine, R.A. de; Hendriks, G.J.; Smits, J.A.J.; Broekman, T.G.; Minnen, A. van

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have demonstrated efficacy of D-cycloserine (DCS) enhanced exposure therapy across anxiety disorders. In this study we examined person-level variables that predicted response to DCS enhanced exposure therapy in a chronic, mixed trauma PTSD sample. The sample consiste

  13. Prescriptive variables for d-cycloserine augmentation of exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleine, R.A. de; Hendriks, G.J.; Smits, J.A.; Broekman, T.G.; Minnen, A. van

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have demonstrated efficacy of d-cycloserine (DCS) enhanced exposure therapy across anxiety disorders. In this study we examined person-level variables that predicted response to DCS enhanced exposure therapy in a chronic, mixed trauma PTSD sample. The sample consiste

  14. Long-term variability of surface nutrient concentrations in the North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunaka, S.; Ono, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Whitney, F. A.; Wada, C.; Murata, A.; Nakaoka, S.; Hosoda, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present the spatial distributions and temporal changes of the long-term variability of surface nutrient concentrations in the North Pacific by using nutrient samples collected by volunteer ships and research vessels from 1961 to 2012. Nutrient samples are optimally interpolated onto 1° × 1° monthly grid boxes. When the Pacific Decadal Oscillation is in its positive phase, nutrient concentrations in the western North Pacific are significantly higher than the climatological means, and those in the eastern North Pacific are significantly lower. When the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation is in its positive phase, nutrient concentrations in the subarctic are significantly higher than the climatological means. The trends of phosphate and silicate averaged over the North Pacific are -0.012 ± 0.005 µmol l-1 decade-1 and -0.38 ± 0.13 µmol l-1 decade-1, whereas the nitrate trend is not significant (0.01 ± 0.13 µmol l-1 decade-1).

  15. Sea surface temperature variability in southern Okinawa Trough during last 2700 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weichao; Tan, Wenbing; Zhou, Liping; Yang, Huan; Xu, Yunping

    2012-07-01

    Most of the temperature reconstructions for the past two millennia are based on proxy data from various sites on land. Here we present a bidecadal resolution record of sea surface temperature (SST) in Southern Okinawa Trough for the past ca. 2700 years by analyzing tetraether lipids of planktonic archaea in the ODP Hole 1202B, a site under the strong influence of Kuroshio Current and East Asian monsoon. The reconstructed SST anomalies generally coincided with previously reported late Holocene climate events, including the Roman Warm Period, Sui-Tang dynasty Warm Period, Medieval Warm Period, Current Warm Period, Dark Age Cold Period and Little Ice Age. However, the Medieval Warm Period usually thought to be a historical analogue for the Current Warm Period has a mean SST of 0.6-0.8°C lower than that of the Roman Warm Period and Sui-Tang dynasty Warm Period. Despite an increase since 1850 AD, the mean SST in the 20th century is still within the range of natural variability during the past 2700 years. A close correlation of SST in Southern Okinawa Trough with air temperature in East China, intensity of East Asian monsoon and the El-Niño Southern Oscillation index has been attributed to the fluctuations in solar output and oceanic-atmospheric circulation.

  16. Statistical parameters of the spatiotemporal variability of the wind direction in the surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishov, E. A.; Koprov, B. M.; Koprov, V. M.

    2017-01-01

    Multipoint measurements of wind direction were carried out during the expedition of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IPA RAS), in Tsimlyansk in 2012. Spatial correlation functions for the transverse direction and temporal correlation functions for the longitudinal direction are plotted under stable and unstable stratification of the atmosphere. The longitudinal correlation radius is much higher than the transverse one, and radii in daytime realizations are larger than in nighttime. To determine the stratification conditions, an ultrasonic anemometer-thermometer was used. Autospectra of wind direction fluctuations were plotted. They include long segments of power dependence on the frequency. The spectral correlation coefficients of variations in the wind direction versus intersensor distance in the transverse direction are also calculated. A set of fast-response thermometers was used in the experiment. They allowed temperature mapping, i.e., plotting the time variations in the isothermal surface altitude. That analysis was also applied to visualization of the spatiotemporal variability of wind direction. The resulting data were used for planning the helicity measurements in the Tsimlyansk expedition in 2014.

  17. Recognition by human sera of a variable region of the surface glycoprotein of HTLV-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edouard, E; Londos-Gagliardi, D; Busetta, B; Geoffre, S; Dalbon, P; Moreau, J P; Guillemain, B

    1994-04-01

    The region comprised between the amino acids 175 and 199 of the HTLV-I envelope surface glycoprotein is one of the immunodominant domains of this molecule. In this region, which is well recognized by sera from HTLV-I infected patients, a substitution of the proline at position 192 by a serine has been described in some isolates. Because this mutation could modify the secondary structure of the glycoprotein molecule, we studied the inference of the presence of proline or serine on the recognition of the region 175-199 by human sera. For this, three peptides have been synthetized (a 25-mer 175-199 corresponding to the sequence of the ATK prototype, and two internal 10-mer 190-Pro-199 and 190-Ser-199 having a proline or a serine at position 192) and tested by immunosorbent assay. While most sera reacted with 190-Pro-199 and with 190-Ser-199 synthetic peptides, a differential recognition was observed according to the pathology associated to HTLV-I infection. Moreover sera corresponding to patients infected with a virus harboring a serine at position 192 were found to recognize only the 10-mer with a serine. These data indicates that HTLV-I is subject to antigenic variability.

  18. Effects of Surface State and Applied Stress on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 690TT in Lead-containing Caustic Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiming Zhang; Jianqiu Wang; En-Hou Han; Wei Ke

    2012-01-01

    The effects of surface state and applied stress on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors of thermally treated (TT) Alloy 690 in 10 wt% NaOH solution with 100 mg/L litharge at 330 ℃ were investigated using C-ring samples with four kinds of surface states and two different stress levels. Sample outer surfaces of the first three kinds were ground to 400 grit (ground), shot-peened (SP) and electro-polished (EP) and the last one was used as the as-received state. Two samples of every kind were stressed to 100% and 200% yield stress of Alloy 690TT, respectively. The results showed that the oxide film consisted of three layers whereas continuous layer rich in Cr was not found. The poor adhesive ability indicated that the oxide film could not protect the matrix from further corrosion. Lead was found in the oxide film and the oxides at the crack paths and accelerated the dissolution of thermodynamically unstable Cr in these locations and also in the matrix. The crack initiation and propagation on Alloy 690TT were effectively retarded by SP and EP treatments but were enhanced by grinding treatment, compared with the cracks on the as-received surface. The cracking severity was also enhanced by increasing the externally applied stress. The accelerated dissolution of Cr and the local tensile stress concentration in the near-surface layer caused by cold-working and higher applied stress reduced the SCC-resistance of Alloy 690TT in the studied solution.

  19. Altered blood oxygen level-dependent signal variability in chronic post-traumatic stress disorder during symptom provocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Jun Ke,1,* Li Zhang,2,* Rongfeng Qi,1,* Qiang Xu,1 Weihui Li,2 Cailan Hou,3 Yuan Zhong,1 Zhiqiang Zhang,1 Zhong He,4 Lingjiang Li,2,5 Guangming Lu11Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, 2Mental Health Institute, the Second Xiangya Hospital, National Technology Institute of Psychiatry, Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, Central South University, Changsha, 3Guangdong Academy of Medical Science, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Mental Health Center, Guangzhou, 4Department of Radiology of the Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 5Shenzhen Kangning Hospital of Guangdong Province, Shenzhen, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Recent research suggests that variability in brain signal provides important information about brain function in health and disease. However, it is unknown whether blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal variability is altered in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. We aimed to identify the BOLD signal variability changes of PTSD patients during symptom provocation and compare the brain patterns of BOLD signal variability with those of brain activation.Methods: Twelve PTSD patients and 14 age-matched controls, who all experienced a mining accident, underwent clinical assessment as well as fMRI scanning while viewing trauma-related and neutral pictures. BOLD signal variability and brain activation were respectively examined with standard deviation (SD and general linear model analysis, and compared between the PTSD and control groups. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to explore the association between PTSD symptom severity and these two brain measures across all subjects as well as in the PTSD group.Results: PTSD patients showed increased activation in the middle occipital gyrus compared with controls, and an inverse correlation was found between PTSD

  20. CO2 laser scribe of chemically strengthened glass with high surface compressive stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinghua; Vaddi, Butchi R.

    2011-03-01

    Chemically strengthened glass is finding increasing use in handheld, IT and TV cover glass applications. Chemically strengthened glass, particularly with high (>600MPa) compressive stress (CS) and deeper depth of layer (DOL), enable to retain higher strength after damage than non-strengthened glass when its surface is abraded. Corning Gorilla® Glass has particularly proven to be advantageous over competition in this attribute. However, due to high compressive stress (CS) and Central Tension (CT) cutting ion-exchanged glass is extremely difficult and often unmanageable where ever the applications require dicing the chemically strengthened mother glass into smaller parts. We at Corning have developed a CO2 laser scribe and break method (LSB) to separate a single chemically strengthened glass sheet into plurality of devices. Furthermore, CO2 laser scribe and break method enables debris-free separation of glass with high edge strength due to its mirror-like edge finish. We have investigated laser scribe and break of chemically strengthened glass with surface compressive stress greater than 600 MPa. In this paper we present the results of CO2 scribe and break method and underlying laser scribing mechanisms. We demonstrated cross-scribe repetitively on GEN 2 size chemically strengthened glass substrates. Specimens for edge strength measurements of different thickness and CS/DOL glass were prepared using the laser scribe and break technique. The specimens were tested using the standard 4-point bend method and the results are presented.

  1. 3-D description of fracture surfaces and stress-sensitivity analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.Q.; Jioa, D.; Meng, Y.F.; Fan, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Three kinds of reservoir cores (limestone, sandstone, and shale with natural fractures) were used to study the effect of morphology of fracture surfaces on stress sensitivity. The cores, obtained from the reservoirs with depths of 2170 to 2300 m, have fractures which are mated on a large scale, but unmated on a fine scale. A specially designed photoelectric scanner with a computer was used to describe the topography of the fracture surfaces. Then, theoretical analysis of the fracture closure was carried out based on the fracture topography generated. The scanning results show that the asperity has almost normal distributions for all three types of samples. For the tested samples, the fracture closure predicted by the elastic-contact theory is different from the laboratory measurements because plastic deformation of the aspirates plays an important role under the testing range of normal stresses. In this work, the traditionally used elastic-contact theory has been modified to better predict the stress sensitivity of reservoir fractures. Analysis shows that the standard deviation of the probability density function of asperity distribution has a great effect on the fracture closure rate.

  2. Effects of thermophoresis and variable properties on mixed convection along a vertical wavy surface in a fluid saturated porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darbhasayanam Srinivasacharya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the influence of thermophoresis on mixed convection heat and mass transfer flow over a vertical wavy surface in a porous medium with variable properties, namely variable viscosity and variable thermal conductivity. The effect of wavy surface is incorporated into non-dimensional equations by using suitable transformations and then transformed into non-linear ordinary differential equations by employing the similarity transformations and then solved numerically. The transport process of flow, heat and mass transfer in the boundary layer for aiding and opposing flow cases is discussed. The structure of flow, temperature and concentration fields in the Darcy porous media are more pronounced by complex interactions among variable viscosity, variable thermal conductivity, mixed convective parameter, thermophoresis and amplitude of the wavy surface. Increasing thermophoresis parameter enhances velocity profile, concentration distribution and Sherwood number while reduces Nusselt number. As increase in variable viscosity, temperature and concentration distributions are enhanced while velocity profile, Nusselt number and Sherwood numbers are reduced. This study finds applications in aerosol Technology, space technology and processes involving high temperatures.

  3. Effect of initial stress on reflection at the free surface of anisotropic elastic medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M D Sharma

    2007-12-01

    The propagation of plane waves is considered in a general anisotropic elastic medium in the presence of initial stress. The Christoffel equations are solved into a polynomial of degree six. The roots of this polynomial represent the vertical slowness values for the six quasi-waves resulting from the presence of a discontinuity in the medium. Three of these six values are identified with the three quasi-waves traveling in the medium but away from its boundary. Reflection at the free plane surface is studied for partition of energy among the three reflected waves. For post-critical incidence, the reflected waves are inhomogeneous (evanescent) waves. Numerical examples are considered to exhibit the effects of initial stress on the phase direction, attenuation and reflection coefficients of the reflected waves. The phase velocities and energy shares of the reflected waves change significantly with initial stress as well as anisotropic symmetry. The presence of initial stress, however, has a negligible effect on the phase directions of reflected waves.

  4. Evaluation of Missing Pellet Surface Geometry on Cladding Stress Distribution and Magnitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capps, Nathan A.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Sunderland, Dion J.; Spencer, Ben; Pytel, Martin; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-10-01

    Missing pellet surface (MPS) defects are local geometric defects that periodically occur in nuclear fuel pellets, usually as a result of the mishandling during the manufacturing process. The presences of these defects can lead to clad stress concentrations that are substantial enough to cause a through wall failure for certain conditions of power level, burnup, and power increase. Consequently, the impact of potential MPS defects has limited the rate of power increase or ramp rates in both PWR and BWR systems. Improved 3D MPS models that consider the effect of the MPS geometry can provide better understanding of the margins against PCMI clad failure. The Peregrine fuel performance code has been developed as a part the Consortium of Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) to consider the inherently multi-physics and multi-dimensional mechanisms that control fuel behavior, including cladding failure by the presence of MPS defects. This paper presents an evaluation of the cladding stress concentrations as a function of MPS defect geometry. The results are the first step in a probabilistic approach to assess cladding failure during power maneuvers. This analysis provides insight into how varying pellet defect geometries affect the distribution of the cladding stress and fuel and cladding temperature and will be used to develop stress concentration factors for 2D and 3D models.

  5. Spatiotemporal Variability of Surface Meteorological Variables During Fog and No-Fog Events in the Heber Valley, UT; Selected Case Studies From MATERHORN-Fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bossche, Michael; De Wekker, Stephan F. J.

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the spatiotemporal variability of surface meteorological variables in the nocturnal boundary layer using six automatic weather stations deployed in the Heber Valley, UT, during the MATERHORN-Fog experiment. The stations were installed on the valley floor within a 1.5 km × 0.8 km area and collected 1-Hz wind and pressure data and 0.2-Hz temperature and humidity data. We describe the weather stations and analyze the spatiotemporal variability of the measured variables during three nights with radiative cooling. Two nights were characterized by the presence of dense ice fog, one night with a persistent (`heavy') fog, and one with a short-lived (`moderate') fog, while the third night had no fog. Frost-point depressions were larger preceding the night without fog and showed a continued decrease during the no-fog night. On both fog nights, the frost-point depression reached values close to zero early in the night, but ~5 h earlier on the heavy-fog night than on the moderate-fog night. Spatial variability of temperature and humidity was smallest during the heavy-fog night and increased temporarily during short periods when wind speeds increased and the fog lifted. During all three nights, wind speeds did not exceed 2 m/s. The temporal variability of the wind speed and direction was larger during the fog nights than during the no-fog nights, but was particularly large during the heavy-fog night. The large variability corresponded with short-lived (5-10 min) pressure variations with amplitudes on the order of 0.5 hPa, indicating gravity wave activity. These pressure fluctuations occurred at all stations and were correlated in particular with variability in wind direction. Although not able to provide a complete picture of the nocturnal boundary layer, our low-cost weather stations were able to continuously collect data that were comparable to those of nearby research-grade instruments. From these data, we distinguished between fog and no-fog events

  6. Seasonal variability of diurnal temperature range in Egypt with links to atmospheric circulations and sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kenawy, A.; Lopez Moreno, J. I.; Vicente-Serrano, S.

    2010-09-01

    The diurnal temperature range (DTR) is an important climate-change variable. Seasonal and annual variability of DTR in Egypt was investigated based on a monthly dataset of 40 observatories distributing across the country. The trends were calculated using the Rho spearman rank test at the 95 % level of significance. The trends at the independent individual scale were compared with a regional series created for the whole country following the Thiessen polygon approach. A cross-tabulation analysis was performed between the trends of the DTR and the trends of maximum and minimum temperatures to account for directional causes of variability of the DTR at seasonal and annual scales. The physical processes controlling the DTR variability were also assessed in terms of large atmospheric circulations representing in the indices of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the East Atlantic (EA) pattern, El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index and the EAWR (East Atlantic/West Russia) Pattern. Also, the variability of the DTR was linked with anomaly of Sea Surface Temperature (SST). A cooling trend was observed in Egypt with strong behavior in winter and summer rather than fall and spring. The upwarding trend of the mean minimum temperature was mainly responsible for variability of the DTR rather than the mean maximum temperature. Also, the EA and the EAWR indices were the main indices accounted for most of variation in the DTR in Egypt, particularly in summer. Key words: trend analysis, temperature variability, Diurnal temperature range, atmospheric circulation, sea surface temperature, Egypt.

  7. Decadal co-variability of the summer surface air temperature and soil moisture in China under global warming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU MingFeng; WANG HuiJun

    2007-01-01

    The self-calibrating Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) is calculated using newly updated ground observations of monthly surface air temperature (SAT) and precipitation in China. The co-variabilities of PDSI and SAT are examined for summer for the period 1961-2004. The results show that there exist decadal climate co-variabilities and strong nonlinear interactions between SAT and soil moisture in many regions of China. Some of the co-variabilities can be linked to global warming. In summer, significant decadal co-variabilities from cool-wet to warm-dry conditions are found in the east region of Northwest China, North China, and Northeast China. An important finding is that in the west region of Northwest China and Southeast China, pronounced decadal co-variabilities take place from warm-dry to cool-wet conditions. Because significant warming was observed over most areas of the global land surface during the past 20-30 years, the shift to cool-wet conditions is a unique phenomenon which may deserve much scientific attention. The nonlinear interactions between SAT and soil moisture may partly account for the observed decadal co-variabilities. It is shown that anomalies of SAT will greatly affect the climatic co-variabilities, and changes of SAT may bring notable influence on the PDSI in China. These results provide observational evidence for increasing risks of decadal drought and wetness as anthropogenic global warming progresses.

  8. Mineral content and biochemical variables of Aloe vera L. under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo-Amador, Bernardo; Córdoba-Matson, Miguel Víctor; Villegas-Espinoza, Jorge Arnoldo; Hernández-Montiel, Luis Guillermo; Troyo-Diéguez, Enrique; García-Hernández, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Despite the proven economic importance of Aloe vera, studies of saline stress and its effects on the biochemistry and mineral content in tissues of this plant are scarce. The objective of this study was to grow Aloe under NaCl stress of 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 mM and compare: (1) proline, total protein, and enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEP-case) in chlorenchyma and parenchyma tissues, and (2) ion content (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, Fe, P. N, Zn, B, Mn, and Cu) in roots, stems, leaves and sprouts. Proline and PEP-case increased as salinity increased in both parenchyma and chlorenchyma, while total protein increased in parenchyma and decreased in chlorenchyma, although at similar salt concentrations total protein was always higher in chlorenchyma. As salinity increased Na and Cl ions increased in roots, stems, leaves, while K decreased only significantly in sprouts. Salinity increases typically caused mineral content in tissue to decrease, or not change significantly. In roots, as salinity increased Mg decreased, while all other minerals failed to show a specific trend. In stems, the mineral concentrations that changed were Fe and P which increased with salinity while Cu decreased. In leaves, Mg, Mn, N, and B decreased with salinity, while Cu increased. In sprouts, the minerals that decreased with increasing salinity were Mg, Mn, and Cu. Zinc did not exhibit a trend in any of the tissues. The increase in protein, proline and PEP-case activity, as well as the absorption and accumulation of cations under moderate NaCl stress caused osmotic adjustment which kept the plant healthy. These results suggest that Aloe may be a viable crop for soil irrigated with hard water or affected by salinity at least at concentrations used in the present study.

  9. Mineral Content and Biochemical Variables of Aloe vera L. under Salt Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo-Amador, Bernardo; Córdoba-Matson, Miguel Víctor; Villegas-Espinoza, Jorge Arnoldo; Hernández-Montiel, Luis Guillermo; Troyo-Diéguez, Enrique; García-Hernández, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Despite the proven economic importance of Aloe vera, studies of saline stress and its effects on the biochemistry and mineral content in tissues of this plant are scarce. The objective of this study was to grow Aloe under NaCl stress of 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 mM and compare: (1) proline, total protein, and enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEP-case) in chlorenchyma and parenchyma tissues, and (2) ion content (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, Fe, P. N, Zn, B, Mn, and Cu) in roots, stems, leaves and sprouts. Proline and PEP-case increased as salinity increased in both parenchyma and chlorenchyma, while total protein increased in parenchyma and decreased in chlorenchyma, although at similar salt concentrations total protein was always higher in chlorenchyma. As salinity increased Na and Cl ions increased in roots, stems, leaves, while K decreased only significantly in sprouts. Salinity increases typically caused mineral content in tissue to decrease, or not change significantly. In roots, as salinity increased Mg decreased, while all other minerals failed to show a specific trend. In stems, the mineral concentrations that changed were Fe and P which increased with salinity while Cu decreased. In leaves, Mg, Mn, N, and B decreased with salinity, while Cu increased. In sprouts, the minerals that decreased with increasing salinity were Mg, Mn, and Cu. Zinc did not exhibit a trend in any of the tissues. The increase in protein, proline and PEP-case activity, as well as the absorption and accumulation of cations under moderate NaCl stress caused osmotic adjustment which kept the plant healthy. These results suggest that Aloe may be a viable crop for soil irrigated with hard water or affected by salinity at least at concentrations used in the present study. PMID:24736276

  10. Methodological framework for heart rate variability analysis during exercise: application to running and cycling stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, David; Hernando, Alberto; Casajús, Jose A; Laguna, Pablo; Garatachea, Nuria; Bailón, Raquel

    2017-09-26

    Standard methodologies of heart rate variability analysis and physiological interpretation as a marker of autonomic nervous system condition have been largely published at rest, but not so much during exercise. A methodological framework for heart rate variability (HRV) analysis during exercise is proposed, which deals with the non-stationary nature of HRV during exercise, includes respiratory information, and identifies and corrects spectral components related to cardiolocomotor coupling (CC). This is applied to 23 male subjects who underwent different tests: maximal and submaximal, running and cycling; where the ECG, respiratory frequency and oxygen consumption were simultaneously recorded. High-frequency (HF) power results largely modified from estimations with the standard fixed band to those obtained with the proposed methodology. For medium and high levels of exercise and recovery, HF power results in a 20 to 40% increase. When cycling, HF power increases around 40% with respect to running, while CC power is around 20% stronger in running.

  11. Sleep characteristics as predictor variables of stress systems markers in insomnia disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floam, Samantha; Simpson, Norah; Nemeth, Emese; Scott-Sutherland, Jennifer; Gautam, Shiva; Haack, Monika

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the extent to which sleep characteristics serve as predictor variables for inflammatory, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and autonomic systems markers. Twenty-nine participants with a diagnosis of insomnia disorder based on the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (age 25.3 ± 1.6 years, insomnia duration 6.6 ± 0.8 years) and 19 healthy control sleepers (age 25.4 ± 1.4 years) underwent a 2-week at-home evaluation keeping a sleep diary and wearing an actigraph, followed by a visit to the Research Center to measure blood pressure, and collect blood and urine samples. The actigraphy- and diary-based variables of sleep duration, sleep-onset latency, wake after sleep onset and sleep fragmentation/number of night-time awakenings were averaged and entered as dependent variables in regression analyses. Composite scores were calculated for the autonomic (blood pressure, norepinephrine), inflammatory (monocyte counts, interleukin-6, C-reactive protein) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal systems (cortisol), and used as predictor variables in regression models. Compared with controls, individuals with insomnia had a shorter sleep duration (P sleep onset, suggesting that wake after sleep onset may serve as a marker to identify individuals at increased risks for disorders associated with a hyperactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system. The absence of autonomic and pro-inflammatory changes (interleukin-6, C-reactive protein), despite a substantial decrease in actigraphic sleep duration, may relate to a higher resilience to the adverse biological consequences of insomnia in this young age group.

  12. Classification of acute stress using linear and non-linear heart rate variability analysis derived from sternal ECG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanev, George; Saadi, Dorthe B; Hoppe, Karsten; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress detection is an important factor in predicting and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. This work is a pilot study with a focus on developing a method for detecting short-term psychophysiological changes through heart rate variability (HRV) features. The purpose of this pilot study is to establish and to gain insight on a set of features that could be used to detect psychophysiological changes that occur during chronic stress. This study elicited four different types of arousal by images, sounds, mental tasks and rest, and classified them using linear and non-linear HRV features from electrocardiograms (ECG) acquired by the wireless wearable ePatch® recorder. The highest recognition rates were acquired for the neutral stage (90%), the acute stress stage (80%) and the baseline stage (80%) by sample entropy, detrended fluctuation analysis and normalized high frequency features. Standardizing non-linear HRV features for each subject was found to be an important factor for the improvement of the classification results.

  13. Quantifying the impact of sub-grid surface wind variability on sea salt and dust emissions in CAM5

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Wan, Hui; Qian, Yun; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J; Sakaguchi, Koichi; LIU, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates the impact of sub-grid variability of surface wind on sea salt and dust emissions in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). The basic strategy is to calculate emission fluxes multiple times, using different wind speed samples of a Weibull probability distribution derived from model-predicted grid-box mean quantities. In order to derive the Weibull distribution, the sub-grid standard deviation of surface wind speed is estimated by taking into ac...

  14. X-ray measurement of residual stresses in laser surface melted Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, J.M.; van Brussel, B.A.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Reed, R.C.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the residual stresses in laser surface melted Ti-6Al-4V, determined using X-ray diffraction methods. The principal result is that there is an increase in the transverse residual stress with each successive, overlapping laser track. The result can be used to explain the ob

  15. Diffraction analysis of nonuniform stresses in surface layers : Application to cracked TiN coatings chemically vapor deposited on Mo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, W.G.; Kooi, B.J.; Delhez, R.; Keijser, Th.H. de; Mittemeijer, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Variations of residual stresses in layers on substrates can occur in directions parallel and perpendicular to the surface as a result of compositional inhomogeneity and/or porosity or cracks. Diffraction methods to evaluate such stress variations are presented. Comparison of the experimental value f

  16. Global analysis of ocean surface wind and wind stress using a general circulation model and Seasat scatterometer winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnay, E.; Atlas, R.

    1986-01-01

    Instantaneous and 15-day time-averaged fields of surface wind, wind stress, curl of the wind stress, and wind divergence are presented. These fields are derived from the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres four-dimensional analysis/forecast cycle, for the period September 6-30, 1978, using conventional data, satellite temperature soundings, cloud-track winds, and subjectively dealiased Seasat scatterometer winds.

  17. High yield stress associated with capillary attraction between alumina surfaces in the presence of low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, E-Jen; Leong, Yee-Kwong; Liu, Yinong; Craig, Vincent S J; Walsh, Rick B; Howard, Shaun C

    2010-03-02

    Adsorbed low molecular weight charged molecules are known to give rise to a range of surface forces that affect the rheological behavior of oxide dispersions. The behavior of dicarboxylic acid bolaform compounds in alumina slurry was investigated to determine the influence of the molecular structure on the nanoscale interactions between alumina surfaces and on the macroscopic properties of the slurry. The surface forces in dispersions and between a single particle and a flat surface were characterized by yield stress and atomic force microscopy (AFM) respectively. Absorbed muconic acid increased the yield stress of the alumina system, which indicates an additional attractive interaction between the particles. Adsorbed trans,trans (TT) muconic acid resulted in a much higher yield stress than cis,cis (CC) muconic acid. Force-distance data obtained via AFM displayed features indicating the presence of a capillary force attraction at low pH between the alumina surfaces when TT and CC muconic acids were adsorbed at high surface coverage. This force appeared to explain the high yield stress at low pH (pH 3.6), but the absence of a net attractive force at higher pH (pH 5) did not correlate with the yield stress results. At low pH, the muconic acids become less soluble in the confined space between the interacting surfaces resulting in the formation of an "oily" muconic acid phase located between the interacting surfaces. The nanosized "oil" phase is the source of the capillary force.

  18. Modeling the South American regional smoke plume: aerosol optical depth variability and surface shortwave flux perturbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Rosário

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Intra-seasonal variability of smoke aerosol optical depth (AOD and downwelling solar irradiance at the surface during the 2002 biomass burning season in South America was modeled using the Coupled Chemistry-Aerosol-Tracers Transport model with the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CCATT-BRAMS. Measurements of total and fine mode fraction (FMF AOD from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET and solar irradiance at the surface from the Solar Radiation Network (SolRad-NET were used to evaluate model results. In general, the major features associated with AOD evolution over the southern part of the Amazon basin and cerrado ecosystem are captured by the model. The main discrepancies were found for high aerosol loading events. In the northeastern portion of the Amazon basin the model systematically underestimated total AOD, as expected, since smoke contribution is not dominant as it is in the southern portion and emissions other than smoke were not considered in the simulation. Better agreement was obtained comparing the model results with observed FMF AOD, which pointed out the relevance of coarse mode aerosol emission in that region. Likewise, major discrepancies over cerrado during high AOD events were found to be associated with coarse mode aerosol omission in our model. The issue of high aerosol loading events in the southern part of the Amazon was related to difficulties in predicting the smoke AOD field, which was discussed in the context of emissions shortcomings. The Cuiabá cerrado site was the only one where the highest quality AERONET data were unavailable for both total and FMF AOD. Thus, lower quality data were used. Root-mean-square error (RMSE between the model and observed FMF AOD decreased from 0.34 to 0.19 when extreme AOD events (FMF AOD550 nm ≥ 1.0 and Cuiabá were excluded from the analysis. Downward surface solar irradiance comparisons also followed similar trends when extreme AOD were excluded

  19. The Contribution of Io-Raised Tides to Europa's Diurnally-Varying Surface Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose; Hurford, Terry A,; Manga, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Europa's icy surface records a rich history of geologic activity, Several features appear to be tectonic in origin and may have formed in response to Europa's daily-varying tidal stress [I]. Strike-slip faults and arcuate features called cycloids have both been linked to the patterns of stress change caused by eccentricity and obliquity [2J[3]. In fact, as Europa's obliquity has not been directly measured, observed tectonic patterns arc currently the best indicators of a theoretically supported [4] non-negligible obliquity. The diurnal tidal stress due to eccentricity is calculated by subtracting the average (or static) tidal shape of Europa generated by Jupiter's gravitational field from the instantaneous shape, which varies as Europa moves through its eccentric orbit [5]. In other words, it is the change of shape away from average that generates tidal stress. One might expect tidal contributions from the other large moons of Jupiter to be negligible given their size and the height of the tides they raise on Europa versus Jupiter's mass and the height of the tide it raises on Europa, However, what matters for tidally-induced stress is not how large the lo-raised bulge is compared to the Jupiter-raised bulge but rather the differences bet\\Veen the instantaneous and static bulges in each case. For example, when Europa is at apocenter, Jupiter raises a tide 30m lower than its static tide. At the same time, 10 raises a tide about 0.5m higher than its static tide. Hence, the change in Io's tidal distortion is about 2% of the change in the Jovian distortion when Europa is at apocenter

  20. Visualisation of variable binding pockets on protein surfaces by probabilistic analysis of related structure sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashford Paul

    2012-03-01

    conserved occurrence of surface pockets at the active and regulatory sites; ii a simulated ensemble of unliganded Bcl2 structures reveals extensions of a known ligand-binding pocket not apparent in the apo crystal structure; iii visualisations of interleukin-2 and its homologues highlight conserved pockets at the known receptor interfaces and regions whose conformation is known to change on inhibitor binding. Conclusions Through post-processing of the output of a variety of pocket prediction software, Provar provides a flexible approach to the analysis and visualization of the persistence or variability of pockets in sets of related protein structures.

  1. Microstructuring of thermo-mechanically highly stressed surfaces final report of the DFG research group 576

    CERN Document Server

    Rienäcker, Adrian; Knoll, Gunter; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Maier, Hans; Reithmeier, Eduard; Dinkelacker, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    This contributed volume presents the final research results of the DFG Research Group 576, which is a joint initiative of five different institutes of the Leibniz Universität Hannover and the Universität Kassel, Germany. The research of the DFG Research Group 576 focuses on improving the tribological behavior of thermomechanically highly stressed surfaces, particularly on cylinder liner for combustion engines. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students who want to specialize in the field.

  2. Decadal surface water quality trends under variable climate, land use, and hydrogeochemical setting in Iowa, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Kalkhoff, Stephen J.; Hirsch, Robert M.; Liao, Lixia; Barnes, Kimberlee K.

    2014-03-01

    Understanding how nitrogen fluxes respond to changes in agriculture and climate is important for improving water quality. In the midwestern United States, expansion of corn cropping for ethanol production led to increasing N application rates in the 2000s during a period of extreme variability of annual precipitation. To examine the effects of these changes, surface water quality was analyzed in 10 major Iowa Rivers. Several decades of concentration and flow data were analyzed with a statistical method that provides internally consistent estimates of the concentration history and reveals flow-normalized trends that are independent of year-to-year streamflow variations. Flow-normalized concentrations of nitrate+nitrite-N decreased from 2000 to 2012 in all basins. To evaluate effects of annual discharge and N loading on these trends, multiple conceptual models were developed and calibrated to flow-weighted annual concentrations. The recent declining concentration trends can be attributed to both very high and very low discharge in the 2000s and to the long (e.g., 8 year) subsurface residence times in some basins. Dilution of N and depletion of stored N occurs in years with high discharge. Reduced N transport and increased N storage occurs in low-discharge years. Central Iowa basins showed the greatest reduction in flow-normalized concentrations, likely because of smaller storage volumes and shorter residence times. Effects of land-use changes on the water quality of major Iowa Rivers may not be noticeable for years or decades in peripheral basins of Iowa, and may be obscured in the central basins where extreme flows strongly affect annual concentration trends.

  3. Spatial variability in cortex-muscle coherence investigated with magnetoencephalography and high-density surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piitulainen, Harri; Botter, Alberto; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Jousmäki, Veikko; Hari, Riitta

    2015-11-01

    Cortex-muscle coherence (CMC) reflects coupling between magnetoencephalography (MEG) and surface electromyography (sEMG), being strongest during isometric contraction but absent, for unknown reasons, in some individuals. We used a novel nonmagnetic high-density sEMG (HD-sEMG) electrode grid (36 mm × 12 mm; 60 electrodes separated by 3 mm) to study effects of sEMG recording site, electrode derivation, and rectification on the strength of CMC. Monopolar sEMG from right thenar and 306-channel whole-scalp MEG were recorded from 14 subjects during 4-min isometric thumb abduction. CMC was computed for 60 monopolar, 55 bipolar, and 32 Laplacian HD-sEMG derivations, and two derivations were computed to mimic "macroscopic" monopolar and bipolar sEMG (electrode diameter 9 mm; interelectrode distance 21 mm). With unrectified sEMG, 12 subjects showed statistically significant CMC in 91-95% of the HD-sEMG channels, with maximum coherence at ∼25 Hz. CMC was about a fifth stronger for monopolar than bipolar and Laplacian derivations. Monopolar derivations resulted in most uniform CMC distributions across the thenar and in tightest cortical source clusters in the left rolandic hand area. CMC was 19-27% stronger for HD-sEMG than for "macroscopic" monopolar or bipolar derivations. EMG rectification reduced the CMC peak by a quarter, resulted in a more uniformly distributed CMC across the thenar, and provided more tightly clustered cortical sources than unrectifed sEMGs. Moreover, it revealed CMC at ∼12 Hz. We conclude that HD-sEMG, especially with monopolar derivation, can facilitate detection of CMC and that individual muscle anatomy cannot explain the high interindividual CMC variability.

  4. Combined heart rate variability and dynamic measures for quantitatively characterizing the cardiac stress status during cycling exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szi-Wen; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Chang, Ya-Ju; Chuang, Li-Ling; Chien, Chun-Tse

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we aimed to seek for different ways of measuring cardiac stress in terms of heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate (HR) dynamics, and to develop a novel index that can effectively summarize the information reflected by these measures to continuously and quantitatively characterize the cardiac stress status during physical exercise. Standard deviation, spectral measure of HRV as well as a nonlinear detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) based fractal-like behavior measure of HR dynamics were all evaluated on the RR time series derived from windowed electrocardiogram (ECG) data for the subjects undergoing cycling exercise. We recruited eleven young healthy subjects in our tests. Each subject was asked to maintain a fixed speed under a constant load during the pedaling test. We obtained the running estimates of the standard deviation of the normal-to-normal interval (SDNN), the high-fidelity power spectral density (PSD) of HRV, and the DFA scaling exponent α, respectively. A trend analysis and a multivariate linear regression analysis of these measures were then performed. Numerical experimental results produced by our analyses showed that a decrease in both SDNN and α was seen during the cycling exercise, while there was no significant correlation between the standard lower frequency to higher frequency (LF-to-HF) spectral power ratio of HRV and the exercise intensity. In addition, while the SDNN and α were both negatively correlated with the Borg rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale value, it seemed that the LF-to-HF power ratio might not have substantial impact on the Borg value, suggesting that the SDNN and α may be further used as features to detect the cardiac stress status during the physical exercise. We further approached this detection problem by applying a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to both feature candidates for the task of cardiac stress stratification. As a result, a time-varying parameter, referred to as the cardiac

  5. Organismal climatology: analyzing environmental variability at scales relevant to physiological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmuth, Brian; Broitman, Bernardo R; Yamane, Lauren; Gilman, Sarah E; Mach, Katharine; Mislan, K A S; Denny, Mark W

    2010-03-15

    Predicting when, where and with what magnitude climate change is likely to affect the fitness, abundance and distribution of organisms and the functioning of ecosystems has emerged as a high priority for scientists and resource managers. However, even in cases where we have detailed knowledge of current species' range boundaries, we often do not understand what, if any, aspects of weather and climate act to set these limits. This shortcoming significantly curtails our capacity to predict potential future range shifts in response to climate change, especially since the factors that set range boundaries under those novel conditions may be different from those that set limits today. We quantitatively examine a nine-year time series of temperature records relevant to the body temperatures of intertidal mussels as measured using biomimetic sensors. Specifically, we explore how a 'climatology' of body temperatures, as opposed to long-term records of habitat-level parameters such as air and water temperatures, can be used to extrapolate meaningful spatial and temporal patterns of physiological stress. Using different metrics that correspond to various aspects of physiological stress (seasonal means, cumulative temperature and the return time of extremes) we show that these potential environmental stressors do not always occur in synchrony with one another. Our analysis also shows that patterns of animal temperature are not well correlated with simple, commonly used metrics such as air temperature. Detailed physiological studies can provide guidance to predicting the effects of global climate change on natural ecosystems but only if we concomitantly record, archive and model environmental signals at appropriate scales.

  6. Observed year-to-year sea surface salinity variability in the Bay of Bengal during the 2009–2014 period

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chaitanya, A.V.S.; Durand, F.; Mathew, S.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Papa, F.; Lengaigne, M.; Vialard, J.; KranthiKumar, C.; Venkatesan, R.

    The present study describes the observed sea surface salinity (SSS) interannual variability in the Bay of Bengal over the 2009–2014 period. It is based on an original compilation of all available in situ SSS observations in that region, assembled...

  7. Reliability analysis for aeroengine turbine disc fatigue life with multiple random variables based on distributed collaborative response surface method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高海峰; 白广忱; 高阳; 鲍天未

    2015-01-01

    The fatigue life of aeroengine turbine disc presents great dispersion due to the randomness of the basic variables, such as applied load, working temperature, geometrical dimensions and material properties. In order to ameliorate reliability analysis efficiency without loss of reliability, the distributed collaborative response surface method (DCRSM) was proposed, and its basic theories were established in this work. Considering the failure dependency among the failure modes, the distributed response surface was constructed to establish the relationship between the failure mode and the relevant random variables. Then, the failure modes were considered as the random variables of system response to obtain the distributed collaborative response surface model based on structure failure criterion. Finally, the given turbine disc structure was employed to illustrate the feasibility and validity of the presented method. Through the comparison of DCRSM, Monte Carlo method (MCM) and the traditional response surface method (RSM), the results show that the computational precision for DCRSM is more consistent with MCM than RSM, while DCRSM needs far less computing time than MCM and RSM under the same simulation conditions. Thus, DCRSM is demonstrated to be a feasible and valid approach for improving the computational efficiency of reliability analysis for aeroengine turbine disc fatigue life with multiple random variables, and has great potential value for the complicated mechanical structure with multi-component and multi-failure mode.

  8. Tracing variability in the iodine isotopes and species along surface water transect from the North Sea to the Canary Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Peng; Aldahan, Ala; Hou, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    A complete transect of surface water samples from the North Sea to the Canary Islands was collected during a continuous period in 2010. The samples were analyzed for total 129I and 127I isotopes and their iodide and iodate species. The results indicate a large variability in the total 129I and it...

  9. Northern South China Sea Surface Circulation and its Variability Derived by Combining Satellite Altimetry and Surface Drifter Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Peter Benny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study analyses the mean and seasonal mesoscale surface circulation of the Northern South China Sea (NSCS and determines the influence of El Niño/SouthernNiño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO. High resolution Eulerian velocity field is derived by combining the available satellite tracked surface drifter data with satellite altimetry during 1993 - 2012. The wind driven current is computed employing the weekly ocean surface mean wind fields derived from the scatterometers on board ERS 1/2, QuikSCAT and ASCAT. The derived mean velocity field exhibits strong boundary currents and broad zonal flow across NSCS. The anomalous field is quite strong in the southern part and the Seasonal circulation clearly depicts the monsoonal forcing. Eddy Kinetic Energy (EKE distribution and its spatial and temporal structures are determined employing Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF analysis. The ENSO influence on NSCS surface circulation has been analyzed using monthly absolute geostrophic velocity fields during 1996 - 1999.

  10. Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes. Shopdiabetes.org: Your Stress-Free System for Family Dinners! - 2017-03-book-oclock-scramble.html Shopdiabetes.org Your Stress-Free System for Family Dinners! A year of delicious meals to help prevent ...

  11. Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or illness Traumatic stress, which happens when you ... stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  12. Enhanced surface recombination in a-Si:H solar cells caused by light stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusian, W.; Pfleiderer, H.

    1991-08-01

    The change of the spectral photocurrent characteristics of amorphous silicon pin solar cells with light induced degradation is compared with the effect of slightly doping the ``i-layer''. Both treatments yield similar results. Light stress lets the primary photocurrent, measured with blue light, decrease and the secondary photocurrent, measured with red light, increased. The similar change occurs when a slight n-doping of the ``i-layer'' is replaced by a slight p-doping. A simple interpretation in terms of unfirom fields and preponderant surface recombination is possible and will be outlined. We additionally resort to numerical similations. Degradation is to be simulated by the introduction of stronger recombination. The crombination rate will be distributed in space. We indeed find that enhanced surface recombination plays the key role in guiding the simulation towards our experiment.

  13. Analysis of distribution rule of surface stress on cross wedge rolling contact zone by finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xuedao; Li, Lianpeng; Hu, Zhenghuan

    2005-12-01

    Contact surface of cross-wedge rolling is a complicated space surface and distribution rule of contact surface stress is very complicated. So far, its analyzed result was still based on slippery line method. Designing mould and actual production mainly depend on experiential factor. Application and development of cross-wedge rolling was baffled seriously. Based on the forming characteristics of cross-wedge rolling with flat wedge-shape, the ANSYS/DYNA software was developed secondly on the basis of itself, and the corresponding command program was compiled. Rolling process of cross-wedge rolling with flat wedge-shape was simulated successfully. Through simulation, space surface shape of contact surface was achieved, and distribution rule of contact surface stress was analyzed detailed and obtained. The results provide important theoretical foundation for avoiding appearing bug on surface of rolled part, instructing to design cross-wedge mould and confirming force and energy parameter.

  14. Comparison of Oxidative Stresses Mediated by Different Crystalline Forms and Surface Modification of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Samy El-Said

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs are manufactured worldwide for use in a wide range of applications. There are two common crystalline forms of TiO2 anatase and rutile with different physical and chemical characteristics. We previously demonstrated that an increased DNA damage response is mediated by anatase crystalline form compared to rutile. In the present study, we conjugated TiO2 NPs with polyethylene glycol (PEG in order to reduce the genotoxicity and we evaluated some oxidative stress parameters to obtain information on the cellular mechanisms of DNA damage that operate in response to TiO2 NPs different crystalline forms exposure in hepatocarcinoma cell lines (HepG2. Our results indicated a significant increase in oxidative stress mediated by the anatase form of TiO2 NPs compared to rutile form. On the other hand, PEG modified TiO2 NPs showed a significant decrease in oxidative stress as compared to TiO2 NPs. These data suggested that the genotoxic potential of TiO2 NPs varies with crystalline form and surface modification.

  15. EFFECT OF TENSILE STRESS AND RESIDUAL STRESS ON THE SPONTANEOUS STRAY FIELD SIGNALS FROM THE SURFACE OF 0.45%C STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In order to explore the quantitative method of metal magnetic memory testing(MMMT) and clarify the relationship between Hp(y), the normal component of spontaneous stray field, and applied stress or residual stress, the static tensile tests of 0.45%C steel sheet specimens are carried out on a servo hydraulic MTS810 machine. Hp(y) values are measured during the test process by an EMS-2003 metal magnetic memory diagnostic apparatus and a non-magnetic electric control displacement instrument. Residual stresses of some points on the surface of a specimen are measured by a Stress Tech X-Stress 3000 X-ray diffraction instrument. The results show that the same variation rules of Hp(y) value versus applied tensile stress are presented under the different conditions of load-on and load-off. However, the same rule does not exist between the Hp(y) value and residual stress. The variation of Hp(y) value reflects the history of applied tensile stress.

  16. The Alignment of the Mean Wind and Stress Vectors in the Unstable Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, M.; Dias, N. L.

    2010-01-01

    A significant non-alignment between the mean horizontal wind vector and the stress vector was observed for turbulence measurements both above the water surface of a large lake, and over a land surface (soybean crop). Possible causes for this discrepancy such as flow distortion, averaging times and the procedure used for extracting the turbulent fluctuations (low-pass filtering and filter widths etc.), were dismissed after a detailed analysis. Minimum averaging times always less than 30 min were established by calculating ogives, and error bounds for the turbulent stresses were derived with three different approaches, based on integral time scales (first-crossing and lag-window estimates) and on a bootstrap technique. It was found that the mean absolute value of the angle between the mean wind and stress vectors is highly related to atmospheric stability, with the non-alignment increasing distinctively with increasing instability. Given a coordinate rotation that aligns the mean wind with the x direction, this behaviour can be explained by the growth of the relative error of the u- w component with instability. As a result, under more unstable conditions the u- w and the v- w components become of the same order of magnitude, and the local stress vector gives the impression of being non-aligned with the mean wind vector. The relative error of the v- w component is large enough to make it undistinguishable from zero throughout the range of stabilities. Therefore, the standard assumptions of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory hold: it is fair to assume that the v- w stress component is actually zero, and that the non-alignment is a purely statistical effect. An analysis of the dimensionless budgets of the u- w and the v- w components confirms this interpretation, with both shear and buoyant production of u- w decreasing with increasing instability. In the v- w budget, shear production is zero by definition, while buoyancy displays very low-intensity fluctuations around

  17. Weight Function Method for Stress Intensity Factor of Internal Surface Semi-elliptical Crack in Elliptical Holes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The hatches for inspecting are usually designed with elliptical holes in airplane structures, so computation of the stress intensity factor of three dimensional crack at elliptical holes is pivotal for damage tolerance analysis of these structures. In this paper, weight function is derived for a two dimensional through cracks at elliptical holes by applying a compounding method. Stress intensity factor formulas for an internal surface semi-elliptical crack in elliptical holes are obtained using the three dimensional weight function method. Stress intensity factors for an internal surface semi-elliptical crack in elliptical holes under remote tension are computed. At the same time, research on how radius of curvature for elliptical holes affect stress intensity factors was conducted. Stress intensity factors decrease when radius of curvature increases. Some results and conclusions which are of practical value are given.

  18. Effect of surface stress states on the corrosion behavior of alloy 690

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Mo; Shim, Hee Sang; Seo, Myung Ji; Hur, Do Haeng [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The test environment simulated the primary water chemistry in PWRs. Dissolved oxygen (DO), dissolved hydrogen (DH), pH and conductivity were monitored at room temperature using sensors manufactured by Orbisphere and Mettler Toledo. The temperature and pressure were maintained at 330 .deg. C and 150 bars during the corrosion test. The condition of the test solution was lithium (LiOH) 2 ppm and boron (H3BO4) 1,200 ppm, DH 35 cc/kg (STP) and less than 5 ppb DO. The flow rate of the loop system was 3.8 L/hour. Corrosion tests were conducted for 500 hours. The corrosion release rate was evaluated by a gravimetric analysis method using a two-step alkaline permanganate-ammonium citrate (AP/AC) descaling process. Compressive residual stress is induced by shot peening treatment but its value reveals some different trend between the shot peening intensity on the surface of Alloy 690 TT. A higher shot peening intensity causes a reduction in the corrosion rate and it is considered that the compressive residual stress beneath the surface layer suppresses the metal ion transfer in an alloy matrix.

  19. An analytical and numerical study of the nonlinear reflection at a stress-free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, Anne; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2015-03-01

    Implementation of the ultrasonic second harmonic generation has typically been restricted to simple setups such as through-transmission or Rayleigh surface waves. Recent research has evaluated the second harmonic waves generation in P- and SV- waves reflected from a stress-free surface to enable the single-sided interrogation of a specimen. This research considers the second harmonic generation in an aluminum specimen, which is analytically evaluated using an approach based on a perturbation method. Here, the model is chosen to mimic an experimental setup where the longitudinal wave is generated at oblique angle using a wedge transducer. Due to the mode conversion at the interface of the wedge and the specimen, it is necessary to evaluate longitudinal and shear waves, determining all second harmonic waves generated in the bulk and at the stress-free boundary. The theoretically developed model is then implemented in a commercial finite element code, COMSOL, using increasing fundamental wave amplitudes for different values of third order elastic constants. The results of this computational model verify the analytical approach and the proposed measurement setup, taking into account assumptions and approximations of the solution procedure. Furthermore, the computational model is used to draw important conclusions relevant to the experimental setup, including the need to avoid interaction with diffracted waves.

  20. Stress response of Escherichia coli induced by surface streamer discharge in humid air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doležalová, Eva; Prukner, Václav; Lukeš, Petr; Šimek, Milan

    2016-02-01

    Inactivation of Escherichia coli by means of surface streamer discharge has been investigated to obtain new insights into the key mechanisms involved, with a particular emphasis placed on the microbial response to plasma-induced stress. The surface streamer discharge was produced in coplanar dielectric barrier discharge electrode geometry, and was driven by an amplitude-modulated ac high voltage in humid synthetic air at atmospheric pressure. The response to plasma-induced stress was evaluated by using conventional cultivation, sublethal injury and resazurin assay and the LIVE/DEAD® BacLight™ Bacterial Viability kit. Compared to conventional cultivation, the LIVE/DEAD® test labels bacteria with damaged membranes, while resazurin assay tracks their metabolic activity. Our results clearly demonstrate that the treated bacteria partly lost their ability to grow properly, i.e. they became injured and culturable, or even viable but nonculturable (VBNC). The ability to develop colonies could have been lost due to damage of the bacterial membrane. Damage of the membranes was mainly caused by the lipid peroxidation, evidencing the key role of oxygen reactive species, in particular ozone. We conclude that the conventional cultivation method overestimates the decontamination efficiency of various plasma sources, and must therefore be complemented by alternative techniques capable of resolving viable but nonculturable bacteria.

  1. A novel PDMS micro membrane biosensor based on the analysis of surface stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Shengbo; Witte, Hartmut

    2010-07-15

    The biological and medical application of biosensors is more and more important with the development of technology and society. Detection of cells and biological molecules utilizing biosensors based on the analysis of surface stress would facilitate inexpensive and high-throughput test and diagnosis. This paper presents a biocompatible surface stress-based polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro membrane biosensor. Each biosensor chip consists of two available PDMS micro membranes, one acts as active membrane and the other as reference. Biosensors were functionalized using different functional materials respectively: MUA (11 Mercapto 1 undecanoicacid), MUO (11 Mercapto 1 undecanol) and DOT (Dodecane thiol). Two biosensor test systems were built based on a white light interferometer and a fiber optic interferometer respectively. Finally, testing experiments using Escherichia coli (E. coli) were performed based on the biosensor test systems we built. The results of the experiments showed that the MUA is a better functional material to functionalize the biosensor membranes than MUO and DOT for E. coli detection, some properties of E. coli, such as healthily living and dead status, can be analyzed based on the PDMS micro membrane biosensors.

  2. An analytical and numerical study of the nonlinear reflection at a stress-free surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romer, Anne, E-mail: anne.romer@gmx.net; Kim, Jin-Yeon, E-mail: anne.romer@gmx.net [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Jacobs, Laurence J. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA and G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Implementation of the ultrasonic second harmonic generation has typically been restricted to simple setups such as through-transmission or Rayleigh surface waves. Recent research has evaluated the second harmonic waves generation in P- and SV- waves reflected from a stress-free surface to enable the single-sided interrogation of a specimen. This research considers the second harmonic generation in an aluminum specimen, which is analytically evaluated using an approach based on a perturbation method. Here, the model is chosen to mimic an experimental setup where the longitudinal wave is generated at oblique angle using a wedge transducer. Due to the mode conversion at the interface of the wedge and the specimen, it is necessary to evaluate longitudinal and shear waves, determining all second harmonic waves generated in the bulk and at the stress-free boundary. The theoretically developed model is then implemented in a commercial finite element code, COMSOL, using increasing fundamental wave amplitudes for different values of third order elastic constants. The results of this computational model verify the analytical approach and the proposed measurement setup, taking into account assumptions and approximations of the solution procedure. Furthermore, the computational model is used to draw important conclusions relevant to the experimental setup, including the need to avoid interaction with diffracted waves.

  3. Interindividual variability in stress susceptibility: A role for epigenetic mechanisms in PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva eZovkic

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a psychiatric condition characterized by intrusive and persistent memories of a psychologically traumatic event that leads to significant functional and social impairment in affected individuals. The molecular bases underlying persistent outcomes of a transient traumatic event have remained elusive for many years, but recent studies in rodents have implicated epigenetic modifications of chromatin structure and DNA methylation as fundamental mechanisms for the induction and stabilization of fear memory. In addition to mediating adaptations to traumatic events that ultimately cause PTSD, epigenetic mechanisms are also involved in establishing individual differences in PTSD risk and resilience by mediating long-lasting effects of genes and early environment on adult function and behavior. In this review, we discuss the current evidence for epigenetic regulation of PTSD in human studies and in animal models and comment on ways in which these models can be expanded. In addition, we identify key outstanding questions in the study of epigenetic mechanisms of PTSD in the context of rapidly evolving technologies that are constantly updating and adjusting our understanding of epigenetic modifications and their functional roles. Finally, we discuss the potential application of epigenetic approaches in identifying markers of risk and resilience that can be utilized to promote early intervention and develop therapeutic strategies to combat PTSD after symptom onset.

  4. Interindividual Variability in Stress Susceptibility: A Role for Epigenetic Mechanisms in PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zovkic, Iva B; Meadows, Jarrod P; Kaas, Garrett A; Sweatt, J David

    2013-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric condition characterized by intrusive and persistent memories of a psychologically traumatic event that leads to significant functional and social impairment in affected individuals. The molecular bases underlying persistent outcomes of a transient traumatic event have remained elusive for many years, but recent studies in rodents have implicated epigenetic modifications of chromatin structure and DNA methylation as fundamental mechanisms for the induction and stabilization of fear memory. In addition to mediating adaptations to traumatic events that ultimately cause PTSD, epigenetic mechanisms are also involved in establishing individual differences in PTSD risk and resilience by mediating long-lasting effects of genes and early environment on adult function and behavior. In this review, we discuss the current evidence for epigenetic regulation of PTSD in human studies and in animal models and comment on ways in which these models can be expanded. In addition, we identify key outstanding questions in the study of epigenetic mechanisms of PTSD in the context of rapidly evolving technologies that are constantly updating and adjusting our understanding of epigenetic modifications and their functional roles. Finally, we discuss the potential application of epigenetic approaches in identifying markers of risk and resilience that can be utilized to promote early intervention and develop therapeutic strategies to combat PTSD after symptom onset.

  5. Investigation of surface ozone variability over the Antractic Plateau by observations at the "Concordia" WMO/GAW contributing station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofanelli, Paolo; Udisti, Roberto; Busetto, Maurizio; Calzolari, Francescopiero; Putero, Davide; Lupi, Angelo; Mazzola, Mauro; Petkov, Boyan; Bonasoni, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3), is a greenhouse gas and a driver for atmosphere oxidative capacity. It has at least doubled since pre-industrial age but a comprehensive understanding of the global distribution and trends are difficult to achieve due to its reactivity. Measurements at Antarctic locations provide the opportunity to investigate O3 variability without direct anthropogenic influence providing information on its background variability. This work will focus on the investigation of the variability of surface tropospheric O3 over the eastern Antarctic Plateau. In particular, we will analyze seven years (2006 - 2013) of continuous observations at the WMO/GAW Contributing Station Concordia (75.10°S, 123.33°E, 3233m a.s.l. m) with the purpose of shading light on specific atmospheric processes that need to be accurately taken into account for interpreting O3 variability: (i) in-situ NOx emissions and subsequent photochemical O3 production during summer, (ii) long-range transport of air-masses enriched in O3 by photochemical production over the surface of Antarctic Plateau, (iii) long-range transport of air-masses depleted in O3 from coastal regions or open oceans. Moreover, even if their influence is expected to be limited, the possible influence of STE will be specifically investigated. To this aims, in-situ O3 variability will be analyzed as a function of 3D air-mass back-trajectories calculated by the HYSPLIT and FLEXTRA models. Co-variability with meteorological parameters and other atmospheric tracers (e.g. aerosol measurement as a function of key source and transport processes) will be also studied in order to provide a preliminary assessment of their impact on O3 variability. The STEFLUX (Stratosphere-to-Troposphere Exchange Flux) tool will be used to investigate the influence of stratosphere-to-troposphere transport on ozone variability over eastern Antarctic Plateau.

  6. Low-frequency variability of surface air temperature over the Barents Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der Eveline C.; Bintanja, Richard; Hazeleger, Wilco; Graversen, R.G.

    2016-01-01

    The predominant decadal to multidecadal variability in the Arctic region is a feature that is not yet well-understood. It is shown that the Barents Sea is a key region for Arctic-wide variability. This is an important topic because low-frequency changes in the ocean might lead to large variations

  7. Surface chemistry regulates the sensitivity and tolerability of osteoblasts to various magnitudes of fluid shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Jinfeng; Xing, Juan; Wang, Yuanliang; Luo, Yanfeng

    2016-12-01

    Scaffolds provide a physical support for osteoblasts and act as the medium to transfer mechanical stimuli to cells. To verify our hypothesis that the surface chemistry of scaffolds regulates the perception of cells to mechanical stimuli, the sensitivity and tolerability of osteoblasts to fluid shear stress (FSS) of various magnitudes (5, 12, 20 dynes/cm(2) ) were investigated on various surface chemistries (-OH, -CH3 , -NH2 ), and their follow-up effects on cell proliferation and differentiation were examined as well. The sensitivity was characterized by the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) while the tolerability was by cellular membrane integrity. The cell proliferation was characterized by S-phase cell fraction and the differentiation by ALP activity and ECM expression (fibronectin and type I collagen). As revealed, osteoblasts demonstrated higher sensitivity and lower tolerability on OH and CH3 surfaces, yet lower sensitivity and higher tolerability on NH2 surfaces. Observations on the focal adhesion formation, F-actin organization and cellular orientation before and after FSS exposure suggest that the potential mechanism lies in the differential control of F-actin organization and focal adhesion formation by surface chemistry, which further divergently mediates the sensitivity and tolerability of ROBs to FSS and the follow-up cell proliferation and differentiation. These findings are essentially valuable for design/selection of desirable surface chemistry to orchestrate with FSS stimuli, inducing appropriate cell responses and promoting bone formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2978-2991, 2016.

  8. Stress-strain curves of adsorbed protein layers at the air/water interface measured with surface shear rheology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, A.; Bos, M.; Stuart, M.C.; Vliet, T. van

    2002-01-01

    Interfacial shear properties of adsorbed protein layers at the air/water interface were determined using a Couette-type surface shear rheometer. Such experiments are often used to determine a steady-state ratio between stress and rate of strain, which is then denoted as "surface shear viscosity". Ho

  9. Effect of process variables on the Drucker-Prager cap model and residual stress distribution of tablets estimated by the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Otoguro, Saori; Miura, Takahiro; Onuki, Yoshinori; Obata, Yasuko; Takayama, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    A multivariate statistical technique was applied to clarify the causal correlation between variables in the manufacturing process and the residual stress distribution of tablets. Theophylline tablets were prepared according to a Box-Behnken design using the wet granulation method. Water amounts (X1), kneading time (X2), lubricant-mixing time (X3), and compression force (X4) were selected as design variables. The Drucker-Prager cap (DPC) model was selected as the method for modeling the mechanical behavior of pharmaceutical powders. Simulation parameters, such as Young's modulus, Poisson rate, internal friction angle, plastic deformation parameters, and initial density of the powder, were measured. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the simulation parameters were significantly affected by process variables. The constructed DPC models were fed into the analysis using the finite element method (FEM), and the mechanical behavior of pharmaceutical powders during the tableting process was analyzed using the FEM. The results of this analysis revealed that the residual stress distribution of tablets increased with increasing X4. Moreover, an interaction between X2 and X3 also had an effect on shear and the x-axial residual stress of tablets. Bayesian network analysis revealed causal relationships between the process variables, simulation parameters, residual stress distribution, and pharmaceutical responses of tablets. These results demonstrated the potential of the FEM as a tool to help improve our understanding of the residual stress of tablets and to optimize process variables, which not only affect tablet characteristics, but also are risks of causing tableting problems.

  10. Surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effects on the electro-thermo nonlocal wave propagation of SWBNNTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A.; Roudbari, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the electro-thermal nonlocal wave propagation of fluid-conveying single-walled Boron Nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) using nonlocal piezoelasticity with surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effect. SWBNNT is embedded in a vicsoelastic medium which is simulated as visco-Pasternak foundation. Using Euler-Bernoulli beam (EBB) model, Hamilton's principle and nonlocal piezoelasticity theory, the higher order governing equation is derived. A detailed parametric study is conducted, focusing on the combined effects of the electric parameters, viscoelastic medium, initial stress, surface stress, Knudsen number (Kn) and small scale on the wave propagation behaviour of the fluid-conveying SWBNNT. The results show that for smaller values of wave number the dispersion relation for different fluid viscosities seems to be similar. At the higher values of wave numbers, increase in the wave frequency values is remarkable due to increase in fluid viscosity. The electric field as a smart controller, surface effect, initial stress, temperature change and slip velocity effect have significant role on the wave frequency. The results of this work is hoped to be of use in design and manufacturing of smart MEMS/NEMS in advanced medical applications such as drug delivery systems with great applications in biomechanics.

  11. Surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effects on the electro-thermo nonlocal wave propagation of SWBNNTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A., E-mail: aghorban@kashanu.ac.ir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran. (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roudbari, M.A. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran. (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the electro-thermal nonlocal wave propagation of fluid-conveying single-walled Boron Nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) using nonlocal piezoelasticity with surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effect. SWBNNT is embedded in a vicsoelastic medium which is simulated as visco-Pasternak foundation. Using Euler–Bernoulli beam (EBB) model, Hamilton's principle and nonlocal piezoelasticity theory, the higher order governing equation is derived. A detailed parametric study is conducted, focusing on the combined effects of the electric parameters, viscoelastic medium, initial stress, surface stress, Knudsen number (Kn) and small scale on the wave propagation behaviour of the fluid-conveying SWBNNT. The results show that for smaller values of wave number the dispersion relation for different fluid viscosities seems to be similar. At the higher values of wave numbers, increase in the wave frequency values is remarkable due to increase in fluid viscosity. The electric field as a smart controller, surface effect, initial stress, temperature change and slip velocity effect have significant role on the wave frequency. The results of this work is hoped to be of use in design and manufacturing of smart MEMS/NEMS in advanced medical applications such as drug delivery systems with great applications in biomechanics.

  12. The Formation of the Surface during AN Abrasive Finishing at Constant and Variable Clamping Forces: Finishing at Constant and Variable Clamping Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratov, Karim Ravilevich; Muratov, Ravil Arifovich; Ablyaz, Timur Rizovich; Gashev, Evgeniy Anatolyevich

    2017-06-01

    In this work the flat abrasive finishing process is reported. The mechanical and chemical phenomena taking place during the finishing process are described. The most common forming process schemes observed during abrasive treatment are reviewed. The schemes of pulsed, geometrical and energetic models are discussed. On the basis of the energetic hypothesis and Preston hypothesis, the rational law of clamping force variation during the finishing is established. This law allowed for the stabilization of the contact pressure and an increase of the treatment efficiency. An exponential dependence of a boundary contact area variation during the finishing of planes with different initial profiles of the macro-topography is developed. An experimental confirmation of the Preston hypothesis during the abrasive finishing is carried out with the plane-finishing machine “Rastr 220”. The comparison experiments are carried out at constant and variable clamping forces of the treated surface towards the tool. It is found that by varying the forces according to the exponential law (i.e. similar to the changing of the boundary contact area during the abrasive finishing) the process efficiency is increasing by a factor of 2.5-3. It is shown that the changes of the root mean square deviation σ of the roughness Ra of a treated surface in the beginning of the process (at time t=1 min) during the finishing at a constant clamping force is two times higher compared to the treatment at a variable clamping force in the same time period.

  13. Correcting North Atlantic sea surface salinity biases in the Kiel Climate Model: influences on ocean circulation and Atlantic Multidecadal Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, T.; Park, W.; Latif, M.

    2016-10-01

    A long-standing problem in climate models is the large sea surface salinity (SSS) biases in the North Atlantic. In this study, we describe the influences of correcting these SSS biases on the circulation of the North Atlantic as well as on North Atlantic sector mean climate and decadal to multidecadal variability. We performed integrations of the Kiel Climate Model (KCM) with and without applying a freshwater flux correction over the North Atlantic. The quality of simulating the mean circulation of the North Atlantic Ocean, North Atlantic sector mean climate and decadal variability is greatly enhanced in the freshwater flux-corrected integration which, by definition, depicts relatively small North Atlantic SSS biases. In particular, a large reduction in the North Atlantic cold sea surface temperature bias is observed and a more realistic Atlantic Multidecadal Variability simulated. Improvements relative to the non-flux corrected integration also comprise a more realistic representation of deep convection sites, sea ice, gyre circulation and Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. The results suggest that simulations of North Atlantic sector mean climate and decadal variability could strongly benefit from alleviating sea surface salinity biases in the North Atlantic, which may enhance the skill of decadal predictions in that region.

  14. Impacts of Sea Surface Salinity Bias Correction on North Atlantic Ocean Circulation and Climate Variability in the Kiel Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Taewook; Park, Wonsun; Latif, Mojib

    2016-04-01

    We investigated impacts of correcting North Atlantic sea surface salinity (SSS) biases on the ocean circulation of the North Atlantic and on North Atlantic sector mean climate and climate variability in the Kiel Climate Model (KCM). Bias reduction was achieved by applying a freshwater flux correction over the North Atlantic to the model. The quality of simulating the mean circulation of the North Atlantic Ocean, North Atlantic sector mean climate and decadal variability is greatly enhanced in the freshwater flux-corrected integration which, by definition, depicts relatively small North Atlantic SSS biases. In particular, a large reduction in the North Atlantic cold sea surface temperature (SST) bias is observed and a more realistic Atlantic Multidecadal Variability (AMV) simulated. Improvements relative to the non-flux corrected integration also comprise a more realistic representation of deep convection sites, sea ice, gyre circulation and Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The results suggest that simulations of North Atlantic sector mean climate and decadal variability could strongly benefit from alleviating sea surface salinity biases in the North Atlantic, which may enhance the skill of decadal predictions in that region.

  15. "ECG variability contour" method reveals amplitude changes in both ischemic patients and normal subjects during Dipyridamole stress: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dori, Guy; Gershinsky, Michal; Ben-Haim, Simona; Lewis, Basil S; Bitterman, Haim

    2011-11-01

    To detect and quantify consistent ECG amplitude changes, the "ECG variability contour" (EVC) method was proposed. Using this method we investigated amplitude changes in subjects undergoing myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with Dipyridamole (Dp). Fifty-three patients having reversible perfusion defects and 19 normal subjects (NS) who were free of: perfusion defects on their MPI, standard ST-T changes during Dp stress, and a negative clinical follow up. Mean ∏¹() was similar for the NS and patient group (6.2 ± 6.1 vs. 6.3 ± 6.2, P = 0.95). was 4.6 ± 3.0 in patients not having ST-T changes during Dp stress (n = 42), whereas in patients having ST-T changes (n = 11) it was 13.1 ± 10.2 (P was smaller than , which in turn was smaller than . The values of , , and for the NS, patients without and with ST-T changes were: 26.8 ± 28.6, 42.6 ± 41.8, 44.9 ± 36.5; 19.6 ± 20.8, 26.4 ± 31.4, 38.7 ± 27.3; 51.0 ± 30.0, 71.0 ± 36.8, 75.1 ± 20.9, respectively (P EVC method. The EVC method did not distinguish between NS and patients in this clinical setting.

  16. Drought stress variability in ancient Near Eastern agricultural systems evidenced by δ13C in barley grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Simone; Pustovoytov, Konstantin E; Weippert, Heike; Klett, Stefan; Hole, Frank

    2014-08-26

    The collapse and resilience of political systems in the ancient Near East and their relationship with agricultural development have been of wide interest in archaeology and anthropology. Despite attempts to link the archaeological evidence to local paleoclimate data, the precise role of environmental conditions in ancient agricultural production remains poorly understood. Recently, stable isotope analysis has been used for reconstructing site-specific ancient growing conditions for crop species in semiarid and arid landscapes. To open the discussion of the role of regional diversity in past agricultural production as a factor in societal development, we present 1.037 new stable carbon isotope measurements from 33 archaeological sites and modern fields in the geographic area of the Fertile Crescent, spanning the Aceramic Neolithic [10,000 calibrated years (cal) B.C.] to the later Iron Age (500 cal B.C.), alongside modern data from 13 locations. Our data show that drought stress was an issue in many agricultural settlements in the ancient Near East, particularly in correlation with the major Holocene climatic fluctuations, but its regional impact was diverse and influenced by geographic factors. Although cereals growing in the coastal areas of the northern Levant were relatively unaffected by Holocene climatic fluctuations, farmers of regions further inland had to apply irrigation to cope with increased water stress. However, inland agricultural strategies showed a high degree of variability. Our findings suggest that regional differences in climatic effects led to diversified strategies in ancient subsistence and economy even within spatially limited cultural units.

  17. Incidence of stressful life events and influence of sociodemographic and clinical variables on the onset of first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butjosa, Anna; Gómez-Benito, Juana; Huerta-Ramos, Elena; Del Cacho, Núria; Barajas, Ana; Baños, Iris; Usall, Judith; Dolz, Montserrat; Sánchez, Bernardo; Carlson, Janina; Maria Haro, Josep; Ochoa, Susana

    2016-11-30

    This study presents a quantitative analysis of the incidence of stressful life events (SLEs) and the variables gender, age at onset, family history and psychotic symptoms in patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP). A descriptive, cross-sectional methodology was used to interview 68 patients with FEP between 13 and 47 years of age. The Psychiatric Epidemiology Research Interview Life Events Scale collected one-year period prior to onset of FEP - used to analyse the subcategories academic, work, love and marriage, children, residence, legal affairs, finances and social activities-, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, and Clinical Global Impression-Schizophrenia scale were used to assess the relevance of certain SLEs during adolescence. Age at onset showed a significant negative correlation with the categories academic and social activities. By contrast, it showed a positive correlation with work and children. A significant relationship was found between paternal family history and social activities and between maternal family history and academic and love and marriage. Finally, an inverse relationship was observed between negative symptoms and the categories children and finance. Depressive symptoms were significantly correlated with the category academic. Our results show the importance of SLEs during adolescence and suggest that there is a clear need to develop preventive actions that promote effective strategies for dealing with the accumulation of psychosocial stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of atomic-scale surface morphology on the size-dependent yield stress of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liang; Bian, Jian-Jun; Wang, Gang-Feng

    2017-06-01

    Size-dependent mechanical properties have been revealed for nanowires, nanopillars and nanoparticles. On the surfaces of these nanosized elements, discrete atomic-scale steps will be naturally generated, however their impact on the mechanical properties and deformation has seldom been a concern. In this paper, large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to calculate the yield stress of gold nanoparticles under compression. In addition to absolute particle size, atomic-scale surface morphology induces significant fluctuation of the yield stress. An analytical relation is advanced to predict the yield stress of nanoparticles accounting for the influence of both size and surface morphology, which agrees well with atomic simulations. This study illuminates an important mechanism in nanosized elements, atomic-scale surface steps.

  19. Interannual variability in the surface energy budget and evaporation over a large southern inland water in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianyu; Liu, Heping