WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface stress estimation

  1. Estimation of the shear stress on the surface of an aortic valve leaflet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, M W; LaBorde, D V; Yoganathan, A P

    1999-01-01

    The limited durability of xenograft heart valves and the limited supply of allografts have sparked interest in tissue engineered replacement valves. A bioreactor for tissue engineered valves must operate at conditions that optimize the biosynthetic abilities of seeded cells while promoting their adherence to the leaflet matrix. An important parameter is shear stress, which is known to influence cellular behavior and may thus be crucial in bioreactor optimization. Therefore, an accurate estimate of the shear stress on the leaflet surface would not only improve our understanding of the mechanical environment of aortic valve leaflets, but it would also aid in bioreactor design. To estimate the shear stress on the leaflet surface, two-component laser-Doppler velocimetry measurements have been conducted inside a transparent polyurethane valve with a trileaflet structure similar to the native aortic valve. Steady flow rates of 7.5, 15.0, and 22.5 L/min were examined to cover the complete range possible during the cardiac cycle. The laminar shear stresses were calculated by linear regression of four axial velocity measurements near the surface of the leaflet. The maximum shear stress recorded was 79 dyne/cm2, in agreement with boundary layer theory and previous experimental and computational studies. This study has provided a range of shear stresses to be explored in bioreactor design and has defined a maximum shear stress at which cells must remain adherent upon a tissue engineered construct.

  2. Model-based inverse estimation for active contraction stresses of tongue muscles using 3D surface shape in speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Narihiko; Ii, Satoshi; Yoshinaga, Tsukasa; Nozaki, Kazunori; Wada, Shigeo

    2017-09-14

    This paper presents a novel inverse estimation approach for the active contraction stresses of tongue muscles during speech. The proposed method is based on variational data assimilation using a mechanical tongue model and 3D tongue surface shapes for speech production. The mechanical tongue model considers nonlinear hyperelasticity, finite deformation, actual geometry from computed tomography (CT) images, and anisotropic active contraction by muscle fibers, the orientations of which are ideally determined using anatomical drawings. The tongue deformation is obtained by solving a stationary force-equilibrium equation using a finite element method. An inverse problem is established to find the combination of muscle contraction stresses that minimizes the Euclidean distance of the tongue surfaces between the mechanical analysis and CT results of speech production, where a signed-distance function represents the tongue surface. Our approach is validated through an ideal numerical example and extended to the real-world case of two Japanese vowels, /ʉ/ and /ɯ/. The results capture the target shape completely and provide an excellent estimation of the active contraction stresses in the ideal case, and exhibit similar tendencies as in previous observations and simulations for the actual vowel cases. The present approach can reveal the relative relationship among the muscle contraction stresses in similar utterances with different tongue shapes, and enables the investigation of the coordination of tongue muscles during speech using only the deformed tongue shape obtained from medical images. This will enhance our understanding of speech motor control. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. A method for canopy water content estimation for highly vegetated surfaces-shortwave infrared perpendicular water stress index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GHULAM; Abduwasit; LI; Zhao-Liang; QIN; QiMing; TONG; QingXi; WANG; JiHua; KASIMU; Alimujiang; ZHU; Lin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for canopy water content (FMC) estimation for highly vegetated surfaces- shortwave infrared perpendicular water stress index (SPSI) is developed using NIR, SWIR wavelengths of Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) on the basis of spectral features and distribution of surface targets with different water conditions in NIR-SWIR spectral space. The developed method is further explored with radiative transfer simulations using PROSPECT, Lillesaeter, SailH and 6S. It is evident from the results of validation derived from satellite synchronous field measurements that SPSI is highly correlated with FMC, coefficient of determination (R squared) and root mean square error are 0.79 and 26.41%. The paper concludes that SPSI has a potential in vegetation water content estimation in terms of FMC.

  4. Altimeter Estimation of Sea Surface Wind Stress for Light to Moderate Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemark, Douglas; Edson, James B.; Chapron, Bertrand

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft altimeter and in situ measurements are used to examine relationships between altimeter backscatter and the magnitude of near-surface wind and friction velocities. Comparison of altimeter radar cross section with wind speed is made through the modified Chelton-Wentz algorithm. Improved agreement is found after correcting 10-m winds for both surface current and atmospheric stability. An altimeter friction velocity algorithm is derived based on the wind speed model and an open-ocean drag coefficient. Close agreement between altimeter- and in situ-derived friction velocities is found. For this dataset, quality of the altimeter inversion to surface friction velocity is comparable to that for adjusted winds and clearly better than the inversion to true 10-m wind speed.

  5. Ocean surface wind stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The need for improved surface wind and wind stress data is discussed. The collection of wind data using ship reports, research buoys, and cloud motion vectors is examined. The need for data on surface-wind stress fields is emphasized. Accurate stress data are required for studying: (1) the normal seasonal cycle and the intraannual events; (2) wind stress curls and the forcing of ocean circulation; (3) El Nino events; and (4) the low response of the midlatitude ocean circulation.

  6. A One-Layer Satellite Surface Energy Balance for Estimating Evapotranspiration Rates and Crop Water Stress Indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Barbagallo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Daily evapotranspiration fluxes over the semi-arid Catania Plain area (Eastern Sicily, Italy were evaluated using remotely sensed data from Landsat Thematic Mapper TM5 images. A one-source parameterization of the surface sensible heat flux exchange using satellite surface temperature has been used. The transfer of sensible and latent heat is described by aerodynamic resistance and surface resistance. Required model inputs are brightness, temperature, fractional vegetation cover or leaf area index, albedo, crop height, roughness lengths, net radiation, air temperature, air humidity and wind speed. The aerodynamic resistance (rah is formulated on the basis of the Monin-Obukhov surface layer similarity theory and the surface resistance (rs is evaluated from the energy balance equation. The instantaneous surface flux values were converted into evaporative fraction (EF over the heterogeneous land surface to derive daily evapotranspiration values. Remote sensing-based assessments of crop water stress (CWSI were also made in order to identify local irrigation requirements. Evapotranspiration data and crop coefficient values obtained from the approach were compared with: (i data from the semi-empirical approach “Kc reflectance-based”, which integrates satellite data in the visible and NIR regions of the electromagnetic spectrum with ground-based measurements and (ii surface energy flux measurements collected from a micrometeorological tower located in the experiment area. The expected variability associated with ET flux measurements suggests that the approach-derived surface fluxes were in acceptable agreement with the observations.

  7. Estimation and correction of surface wind-stress bias in the Tropical Pacific with the Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, O.

    2008-01-01

    The assimilation of high-quality in situ data into ocean models is known to lead to imbalanced analyses and spurious circulations when the model dynamics or the forcing contain systematic errors. Use of a bias estimation and correction scheme has been shown to significantly improve the balance of

  8. Estimation and correction of surface wind-stress bias in the Tropical Pacific with the Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, O.

    2008-01-01

    The assimilation of high-quality in situ data into ocean models is known to lead to imbalanced analyses and spurious circulations when the model dynamics or the forcing contain systematic errors. Use of a bias estimation and correction scheme has been shown to significantly improve the balance of th

  9. Surface stress-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Shengbo; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Wendong; Li, Pengwei; Hu, Jie; Li, Gang

    2014-01-15

    Surface stress-based biosensors, as one kind of label-free biosensors, have attracted lots of attention in the process of information gathering and measurement for the biological, chemical and medical application with the development of technology and society. This kind of biosensors offers many advantages such as short response time (less than milliseconds) and a typical sensitivity at nanogram, picoliter, femtojoule and attomolar level. Furthermore, it simplifies sample preparation and testing procedures. In this work, progress made towards the use of surface stress-based biosensors for achieving better performance is critically reviewed, including our recent achievement, the optimally circular membrane-based biosensors and biosensor array. The further scientific and technological challenges in this field are also summarized. Critical remark and future steps towards the ultimate surface stress-based biosensors are addressed.

  10. Estimating stress heterogeneity from aftershock rate

    CERN Document Server

    Helmstetter, A; Helmstetter, Agnes; Shaw, Bruce E.

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the rate of aftershocks triggered by a heterogeneous stress change, using the rate-and-state model of Dieterich [1994]. We show than an exponential stress distribution P(\\tau)~ exp(-\\tau/\\tau_0) gives an Omori law decay of aftershocks with time ~1/t^p, with an exponent p=1-A\\sigma_n/\\tau_0, where A is a parameter of the rate-and-state friction law, and \\sigma_n the normal stress. Omori exponent p thus decreases if the stress "heterogeneity" \\tau_0 decreases. We also invert the stress distribution P(\\tau) from the seismicity rate R(t), assuming that the stress does not change with time. We apply this method to a synthetic stress map, using the (modified) scale invariant "k^2" slip model [Herrero and Bernard, 1994]. We generate synthetic aftershock catalogs from this stress change. The seismicity rate on the rupture area shows a huge increase at short times, even if the stress decreases on average. This stochastic slip model gives a Gaussian stress distribution, but nevertheless produces an aftersho...

  11. Effect of Surface Topography on Stress Concentration Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zhengkun; LIAO Ridong

    2015-01-01

    Neuber rule and Arola-Ramulu model are widely used to predict the stress concentration factor of rough specimens. However, the height parameters and effective valley radius used in these two models depend strongly on the resolution of the roughness-measuring instruments and are easily introduce measuring errors. Besides, it is difficult to find a suitable parameter to characterize surface topography to quantitatively describe its effect on stress concentration factor. In order to overcome these disadvantages, profile moments are carried out to characterize surface topography, surface topography is simulated by superposing series of cosine components, the stress concentration factors of different micro cosine-shaped surface topographies are investigated by finite element analysis. In terms of micro cosine-shaped surface topography, an equation using the second profile moment to estimate the stress concentration factor is proposed, predictions for the stress concentration factor using the proposed expression are within 10% error compared with the results of finite element analysis, which are more accurate than other models. Moreover, the proposed equation is applied to the real surface topography machined by turning. Predictions for the stress concentration factor using the proposed expression are within 10% of the maximum stress concentration factors and about 5% of the effective stress concentration factors estimated from the finite element analysis for three levels of turning surface topographies under different simulated scales. The proposed model is feasible in predicting the stress concentration factors of real machined surface topographies.

  12. Stress Recovery and Error Estimation for Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, A. A.; Riggs, H. R.; Tessler, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Penalized Discrete Least-Squares (PDLS) stress recovery (smoothing) technique developed for two dimensional linear elliptic problems is adapted here to three-dimensional shell structures. The surfaces are restricted to those which have a 2-D parametric representation, or which can be built-up of such surfaces. The proposed strategy involves mapping the finite element results to the 2-D parametric space which describes the geometry, and smoothing is carried out in the parametric space using the PDLS-based Smoothing Element Analysis (SEA). Numerical results for two well-known shell problems are presented to illustrate the performance of SEA/PDLS for these problems. The recovered stresses are used in the Zienkiewicz-Zhu a posteriori error estimator. The estimated errors are used to demonstrate the performance of SEA-recovered stresses in automated adaptive mesh refinement of shell structures. The numerical results are encouraging. Further testing involving more complex, practical structures is necessary.

  13. Determining Electrochemical Surface Stress of Single Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Shan, Xiaonan; Yu, Hui; Wang, Yan; Schmickler, Wolfgang; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Tao, Nongjian

    2017-02-13

    Electrochemical surface stress is important in nanomaterials because of their large surface-to-volume ratios, which lead to unique mechanical and electrocatalytic properties, but directly measuring this quantity has been challenging. Here we report on experimental determination of the surface stress, and associated electrochemical processes of a single gold nanowire with an optical imaging technique. We show that surface stress changes linearly and reversibly with the potential between 0 and 0.8 V versus Ag/AgCl, but abruptly with large hysteresis, associated with the oxidation and reduction of the nanowire, between 0.8 and 1.5 V. The potential derivative of the surface stress closely resembles the cyclic voltammograms. We described the observations in terms of anion adsorption and surface oxidation/reduction. This work demonstrates a new approach to study electrochemical processes and the associated surface stress changes of nanomaterials.

  14. Residual stress around the cortical surface in bovine femoral diaphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Satoshi; Tadano, Shigeru

    2010-04-01

    Residual stress in living tissue plays an important role in mechanical strength. We have reported that residual stress exists in the bone tissue of a rabbit's tibiofibula. The purpose of this study is to measure the residual stress around the outer cortical region of bovine femoral diaphysis and to discuss the distribution of the stress. This work proposed the sin(2) psi method of X-ray diffraction to the measurement of residual stresses in bone tissue. In this method, residual stress can be estimated from the variation in the interplanar spacings orientated to a number of directions without the lattice strain in the stress direction. Four-point bending tests of strip specimens taken from bovine femoral diaphysis were carried out during X-ray irradiation in advance. In the proximal, middle, and distal sections of bovine femoral diaphyses, the residual stresses at the cortical surface were measured using characteristic Mo-Kalpha X-rays. The bending tests of strip specimens with X-ray irradiation showed that the method could reliably estimate residual stresses in the bone tissue. The residual stress of the bone axial direction was larger than that of the circumferential direction. The stresses in the middle part of five diaphyses along the bone axial direction were tensile. The maximum stress was 162 MPa at the lateral position and the minimum was 78 MPa at the posterior position. The residual stress in the bone axial direction varies around the circumferential region. In addition, the bone axial distributions of residual stresses were different in the proximal, middle, and distal sections of the individual femur. Furthermore, it was confirmed that residual stress in the bone tissue was released by the cutting out of the specimen. The residual stresses in bone tissue could be measured by this method. The results show that residual stress in the bone axial direction at the cortical surface in bovine femoral diaphysis is tensile and varies around the circumferential

  15. A Family of Invariant Stress Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, S.

    A family of invariant stress surfaces with a cubic dependence on the deviatoric stress components is expressed as a linear combination of the second and third deviatori stress invariants. A simple geometric derivation demonstrates the convexity of the contours in the deviatoric plane. An explicit...

  16. Surface tensor estimation from linear sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousholt, Astrid; Kiderlen, Markus; Hug, Daniel

    From Crofton's formula for Minkowski tensors we derive stereological estimators of translation invariant surface tensors of convex bodies in the n-dimensional Euclidean space. The estimators are based on one-dimensional linear sections. In a design based setting we suggest three types of estimators....... These are based on isotropic uniform random lines, vertical sections, and non-isotropic random lines, respectively. Further, we derive estimators of the specific surface tensors associated with a stationary process of convex particles in the model based setting....

  17. Surface tensor estimation from linear sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousholt, Astrid; Kiderlen, Markus; Hug, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    From Crofton’s formula for Minkowski tensors we derive stereological estimators of translation invariant surface tensors of convex bodies in the n-dimensional Euclidean space. The estimators are based on one-dimensional linear sections. In a design based setting we suggest three types of estimators....... These are based on isotropic uniform random lines, vertical sections, and non-isotropic random lines, respectively. Further, we derive estimators of the specific surface tensors associated with a stationary process of convex particles in the model based setting....

  18. Adaptive Response Surface Techniques in Reliability Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, I.; Faber, M. H.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1993-01-01

    Problems in connection with estimation of the reliability of a component modelled by a limit state function including noise or first order discontinuitics are considered. A gradient free adaptive response surface algorithm is developed. The algorithm applies second order polynomial surfaces deter...

  19. Surface roughness estimation of a parabolic reflector

    CERN Document Server

    Casco, Nicolás A

    2010-01-01

    Random surface deviations in a reflector antenna reduce the aperture efficiency. This communication presents a method for estimating the mean surface deviation of a parabolic reflector from a set of measured points. The proposed method takes into account systematic measurement errors, such as the offset between the origin of reference frame and the vertex of the surface, and the misalignment between the surface rotation axis and the measurement axis. The results will be applied to perform corrections to the surface of one of the 30 m diameter radiotelescopes at the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronom\\'ia (IAR).

  20. Influence of surface stresses on indentation response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, J.; Mayr, S. G.

    2015-03-01

    Surface stresses lead to an effective change in the elastic constants of thin films and at surfaces. The development of modern scanning probe techniques like contact resonance atomic force microscopy empowers the experimenter to measure at scales where these effects become increasingly relevant. In this paper we employ a computational multiscale approach where we compare density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics simulations as tools to calculate the thin-film/surface elastic behavior for silicon and strontiumtitanate. From the surface elastic constants gained by DFT calculations we develop a continuum finite-element multilayer model to study the impact of surface stresses on indentation experiments. In general the stress field of an indenter and thus the impact of surface stresses on the indentation modulus depends on its contact radius and on its particular shape. We propose an analytical model that describes the behavior of the indentation modulus as a function of the contact radius. We show that this model fits well to simulation results gained for a spherical and a flat punch indenter. Our results demonstrate a surface-stress-induced reduction of the indentation modulus of about 5% for strontiumtitanate and 6% for silicon for a contact radius of {{r}c}=5 \\text{nm}, irrespective of the indenter shape.

  1. Estimating Insolation Incident on Tilted Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkin, R. E.; Toelle, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    ASHMET computer program estimates amount of solar insolation incident on surfaces of several types of solar collectors, including fixed-position flat-plate, monthly-tilt-adjusted flat-plat, beam-tracting, and fixed-azimuthtracker. Basic methodology employed in ASHMET is to use ASHRAE relationships to obtain clear-day total daily insolation incident on collector surface of representative day of each month of year. ASHMET is interactive program and prompts user for all required data.

  2. Nondestructive, stereological estimation of canopy surface area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulfsohn, Dvora-Laio; Sciortino, Marco; Aaslyng, Jesper M.

    2010-01-01

    with sampling fraction equal to 1/9 followed by point counting using a 4.3 cm2/point grid produced a coefficient of error of less than 7%. The smooth fractionator can be used to ensure that the additional contribution to the estimator variance due to between-plant variability is small.......We describe a stereological procedure to estimate the total leaf surface area of a plant canopy in vivo, and address the problem of how to predict the variance of the corresponding estimator. The procedure involves three nested systematic uniform random sampling stages: (i) selection of plants from...

  3. Surface moisture estimation in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yitong

    Surface moisture is an important parameter because it modifies urban microclimate and surface layer meteorology. The primary objectives of this paper are: 1) to analyze the impact of surface roughness from buildings on surface moisture in urban areas; and 2) to quantify the impact of surface roughness resulting from urban trees on surface moisture. To achieve the objectives, two hypotheses were tested: 1) the distribution of surface moisture is associated with the structural complexity of buildings in urban areas; and 2) The distribution and change of surface moisture is associated with the distribution and vigor of urban trees. The study area is Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. In the part of the morphology of urban trees, Warren Township was selected due to the limitation of tree inventory data. To test the hypotheses, the research design was made to extract the aerodynamic parameters, such as frontal areas, roughness length and displacement height of buildings and trees from Terrestrial and Airborne LiDAR data, then to input the aerodynamic parameters into the urban surface energy balance model. The methodology was developed for comparing the impact of aerodynamic parameters from LiDAR data with the parameters that were derived empirically from land use and land cover data. The analytical procedures are discussed below: 1) to capture the spatial and temporal variation of surface moisture, daily and hourly Land Surface Temperature (LST) were downscaled from 4 km to 1 km, and 960 m to 30 m, respectively, by regression between LST and various components that impact LST; 2) to estimate surface moisture, namely soil moisture and evapotranspiration (ET), land surfaces were classified into soil, vegetation, and impervious surfaces, using Linear Spectral Mixture Analysis (LSMA); 3) aerodynamic parameters of buildings and trees were extracted from Airborne and Terrestrial LiDAR data; 4) the Temperature-Vegetation-Index (TVX) method, and the Two-Source-Energy-Balance (TSEB

  4. ESTIMATION OF INCREASE OF STRESS RESISTANCE AMONG STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drobysheva O. M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available By results of the estimation of stress resistance on dynamics of the regulation-adaptive status we can observe, that the autogenic training at the end of one academic year did not cause authentic changes in stress resistance in students with high and low levels of stress resistance. At the same time, it raised stress resistance for persons with a moderate level of stress resistance

  5. Estimates of stress drop and crustal tectonic stress from the 27 February 2010 Maule, Chile, earthquake: Implications for fault strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, Karen M.; Tong, Xiaopeng; Sandwell, David T.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Bevis, Michael G.

    2011-11-01

    The great 27 February 2010 Mw 8.8 earthquake off the coast of southern Chile ruptured a ˜600 km length of subduction zone. In this paper, we make two independent estimates of shear stress in the crust in the region of the Chile earthquake. First, we use a coseismic slip model constrained by geodetic observations from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and GPS to derive a spatially variable estimate of the change in static shear stress along the ruptured fault. Second, we use a static force balance model to constrain the crustal shear stress required to simultaneously support observed fore-arc topography and the stress orientation indicated by the earthquake focal mechanism. This includes the derivation of a semianalytic solution for the stress field exerted by surface and Moho topography loading the crust. We find that the deviatoric stress exerted by topography is minimized in the limit when the crust is considered an incompressible elastic solid, with a Poisson ratio of 0.5, and is independent of Young's modulus. This places a strict lower bound on the critical stress state maintained by the crust supporting plastically deformed accretionary wedge topography. We estimate the coseismic shear stress change from the Maule event ranged from -6 MPa (stress increase) to 17 MPa (stress drop), with a maximum depth-averaged crustal shear-stress drop of 4 MPa. We separately estimate that the plate-driving forces acting in the region, regardless of their exact mechanism, must contribute at least 27 MPa trench-perpendicular compression and 15 MPa trench-parallel compression. This corresponds to a depth-averaged shear stress of at least 7 MPa. The comparable magnitude of these two independent shear stress estimates is consistent with the interpretation that the section of the megathrust fault ruptured in the Maule earthquake is weak, with the seismic cycle relieving much of the total sustained shear stress in the crust.

  6. Surface stress, surface elasticity, and the size effect in surface segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, M.; Hofer, W.; Varga, P.;

    1995-01-01

    Surface stress and surface elasticity of low-index fcc surfaces have been studied using effective-medium theory potentials. In addition to total-energy calculations giving stress components and elastic data for the surface as a whole, the use of artificial atoms with modified size allows us...

  7. Wall shear stress estimates in coronary artery constrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, L. H.; Crawford, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Wall shear stress estimates from laminar boundary layer theory were found to agree fairly well with the magnitude of shear stress levels along coronary artery constrictions obtained from solutions of the Navier Stokes equations for both steady and pulsatile flow. The relatively simple method can be used for in vivo estimates of wall shear stress in constrictions by using a vessel shape function determined from a coronary angiogram, along with a knowledge of the flow rate.

  8. ESTIMATION OF EFFECTIVE SHEAR STRESS WORKING ON FLAT SHEET MEMBRANE USING FLUIDIZED MEDIA IN MBRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaw, Hlwan Moe; Li, Tairi; Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Mishima, Iori

    This study was aimed at estimating effective shear stress working on flat sheet membrane by the addition of fluidized media in MBRs. In both of laboratory-scale aeration tanks with and without fluidized media, shear stress variations on membrane surface and water phase velocity variations were measured and MBR operation was conducted. For the evaluation of the effective shear stress working on membrane surface to mitigate membrane surface, simulation of trans-membrane pressure increase was conducted. It was shown that the time-averaged absolute value of shear stress was smaller in the reactor with fluidized media than without fluidized media. However, due to strong turbulence in the reactor with fluidized media caused by interaction between water-phase and media and also due to the direct interaction between membrane surface and fluidized media, standard deviation of shear stress on membrane surface was larger in the reactor with fluidized media than without media. Histograms of shear stress variation data were fitted well to normal distribution curves and mean plus three times of standard deviation was defined to be a maximum shear stress value. By applying the defined maximum shear stress to a membrane fouling model, trans-membrane pressure curve in the MBR experiment was simulated well by the fouling model indicting that the maximum shear stress, not time-averaged shear stress, can be regarded as an effective shear stress to prevent membrane fouling in submerged flat-sheet MBRs.

  9. Recent advance in Mean Sea Surface estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, M. I.; Gerald, D.; Claire, D.; Raynal, M.; Faugere, Y.; Picot, N.; Guillot, A.

    2016-12-01

    Gridded Mean Sea Surface (MSS) estimate is an important issue for precise SLA computation along geodetic orbits. Previous studies emphasized that the error from MSS models older than Jason-1 GM was substantial: on average more than 10 to 15% of the SLA variance for wavelengths ranging from 30 to 150 km. Other MSS have been released this last 2 years, and they use geodetic missions such as CryoSat-2 and Jason-1 GM which strongly contribute to improve their resolution and accuracy.We evaluate in this paper the improvements of the recent MSS. This study, mainly based on spectral approach allows us to quantify the errors at various wavelengths. The use of new missions (e.g. SARAL-DP/AltiKa; Sentinel-3A) with low instrumental noise measurement levels (Ka, SAR) opens new perspectives to understand the MSS errors and improve MSS estimate for wavelengths lower than 100km.

  10. Relaxation time estimation in surface NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunewald, Elliot D.; Walsh, David O.

    2017-03-21

    NMR relaxation time estimation methods and corresponding apparatus generate two or more alternating current transmit pulses with arbitrary amplitudes, time delays, and relative phases; apply a surface NMR acquisition scheme in which initial preparatory pulses, the properties of which may be fixed across a set of multiple acquisition sequence, are transmitted at the start of each acquisition sequence and are followed by one or more depth sensitive pulses, the pulse moments of which are varied across the set of multiple acquisition sequences; and apply processing techniques in which recorded NMR response data are used to estimate NMR properties and the relaxation times T.sub.1 and T.sub.2* as a function of position as well as one-dimensional and two-dimension distributions of T.sub.1 versus T.sub.2* as a function of subsurface position.

  11. Relaxation time estimation in surface NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunewald, Elliot D.; Walsh, David O.

    2017-03-21

    NMR relaxation time estimation methods and corresponding apparatus generate two or more alternating current transmit pulses with arbitrary amplitudes, time delays, and relative phases; apply a surface NMR acquisition scheme in which initial preparatory pulses, the properties of which may be fixed across a set of multiple acquisition sequence, are transmitted at the start of each acquisition sequence and are followed by one or more depth sensitive pulses, the pulse moments of which are varied across the set of multiple acquisition sequences; and apply processing techniques in which recorded NMR response data are used to estimate NMR properties and the relaxation times T.sub.1 and T.sub.2* as a function of position as well as one-dimensional and two-dimension distributions of T.sub.1 versus T.sub.2* as a function of subsurface position.

  12. Container Surface Evaluation by Function Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, James G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-03

    Container images are analyzed for specific surface features, such as, pits, cracks, and corrosion. The detection of these features is confounded with complicating features. These complication features include: shape/curvature, welds, edges, scratches, foreign objects among others. A method is provided to discriminate between the various features. The method consists of estimating the image background, determining a residual image and post processing to determine the features present. The methodology is not finalized but demonstrates the feasibility of a method to determine the kind and size of the features present.

  13. Using radiometric surface temperature for surface energy flux estimation in Mediterranean drylands from a two-source perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morillas, L.; Garcia Garcia, Monica; Nieto Solana, Hector;

    2013-01-01

    A two-source model (TSM) for surface energy balance, considering explicitly soil and vegetation components, was tested under water stress conditions. The TSM evaluated estimates the sensible heat flux (H) using the surface-air thermal gradient and the latent heat flux (LE) as a residual from the ...

  14. Corroding and Protecting of Surface Residual Stress With the Surface Hardening of Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Qing-hua

    2004-01-01

    The states of the stress with the surface hardening are analyzed, the related experiential formula of the stress -temperature and stress-depth hardened curves are set up, the protecting measures against hydrogen stress corrosion are discussed.

  15. Laser pulse heating of surfaces and thermal stress analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir S; Al-Aqeeli, Nasser; Al-Qahtani, Hussain M

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces laser pulse heating and thermal stress analysis in materials surface. Analytical temperature treatments and stress developed in the surface region are also explored. The book will help the reader analyze the laser induced stress in the irradiated region and presents solutions for the stress field. Detailed thermal stress analysis in different laser pulse heating situations and different boundary conditions are also presented. Written for surface engineers.

  16. Surface micromachined differential piezoelectric shear-stress sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Randall P.; Kim, Donghwan; Gawalt, David P.; Hall, Neal A.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to measure viscous wall shear stress in high-speed flows is important for verifying simulated results typically obtained from direct numerical simulation in the aerodynamics research community, and robust sensors are required to measure wall shear reliably under such high-speed conditions. This letter summarizes the design, fabrication, and testing of a surface micromachined piezoelectric shear-stress sensor which uses a thin piezoelectric film to generate a voltage proportional to an applied shear stress without additional moving parts. A differential-cell architecture is used to enhance selectivity to shear stress while canceling normal-stress sensitivity. The conceptual design, fabrication details, and experimental measurements of device sensitivity are presented. A finite element model is used to validate the device performance against measurements, and to provide insight into the potential and electric fields underlying the device concept. The potential for understanding device behavior and optimization through modeling is illustrated using finite element analysis results. The minimum detectable shear stress for the sensor is estimated to be 52.9 mPa  √Hz-1 at 1.5 kHz.

  17. Estimation of bed shear stresses in the pearl river estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Wu, Jia-xue

    2015-03-01

    Mean and fluctuating velocities were measured by use of a pulse coherent acoustic Doppler profiler (PC-ADP) and an acoustic Doppler velocimeter in the tidal bottom boundary layer of the Pearl River Estuary. The bed shear stresses were estimated by four different methods: log profile (LP), eddy correlation (EC), turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), and inertial dissipation (ID). The results show that (a) all four methods for estimating bed stresses have advantages and disadvantages, and they should be applied simultaneously to obtain reliable frictional velocity and to identify potential sources of errors; (b) the LP method was found to be the most suitable to estimate the bed stresses in non-stratified, quasi-steady, and homogeneous flows; and (c) in the estuary where the semi-diurnal tidal current is dominant, bed shear stresses exhibit a strong quarter-diurnal variation.

  18. Estimation of Bed Shear Stresses in the Pearl River Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘欢; 吴加学

    2015-01-01

    Mean and fluctuating velocities were measured by use of a pulse coherent acoustic Doppler profiler (PC-ADP) and an acoustic Doppler velocimeter in the tidal bottom boundary layer of the Pearl River Estuary. The bed shear stresses were estimated by four different methods: log profile (LP), eddy correlation (EC), turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), and inertial dissipation (ID). The results show that (a) all four methods for estimating bed stresses have advantages and disadvantages, and they should be applied simultaneously to obtain reliable frictional velocity and to identify potential sources of errors; (b) the LP method was found to be the most suitable to estimate the bed stresses in non-stratified, quasi-steady, and homogeneous flows; and (c) in the estuary where the semi-diurnal tidal current is dominant, bed shear stresses exhibit a strong quarter-diurnal variation.

  19. SHAPE BIFURCATION OF AN ELASTIC WAFER DUE TO SURFACE STRESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫琨; 何陵辉; 刘人怀

    2003-01-01

    A geometrically nonlinear analysis was proposed for the deformation of a freestanding elastically isotropic wafer caused by the surface stress change on one surface. Thelink between the curvature and the change in surface stress was obtained analytically fromenergetic consideration. In contrast to the existing linear analysis, a remarkableconsequence is that, when the wafer is very thin or the surface stress difference between thetwo major surfaces is large enough, the shape of the wafer will bifurcate.

  20. On semiautomatic estimation of surface area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, J.; Jensen, Eva B. Vedel

    2013-01-01

    . For convex particles, the estimator is equal to four times the area of the support set (flower set) of the particle transect. We study the statistical properties of the flower estimator and compare its performance to that of two discretizations of the flower estimator, namely the pivotal estimator...

  1. An estimation method on failure stress of micro thickness Cu film-substrate structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The failure of thin film-substrate structure occurs mainly at the thin film or the interface. However, the characterizing and estimating methods of failure stress in thin film are neither uniform nor effective because there are some complex effects of such as size, interface and stress state on the failure behavior of thin film-substrate structure. Based on the scanning electron microscope (SEM) in-situ in- vestigation on the failure models of the Cu thin film-substrate structure and the nano scratched testing results, the failure stresses in different thicknesses of the Cu film-substrate were characterized, which were compared and confirmed by other methods, such as Stoney formula and other empiric equations. These results indicate that the novel estimating method of failure stress in thin film based on the critical wavelength of surface unstable analysis is better than other methods. The main reason is that the novel estimating method of failure stress in meso thickness film fully considered the effect factors of free surface unstable behavior and elastic anisotropy of thin film. Therefore, the novel estimating method of failure stress assists people to understand the critical interfacial strength and to set up the failure criterion of thin film-substrate structure.

  2. An estimation method on failure stress of micro thickness Cu film-substrate structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XiShu; LI Ying; MENG XiangKang

    2009-01-01

    The failure of thin film-substrate structure occurs mainly at the thin film or the interface.However,the characterizing and estimating methods of failure stress in thin film are neither uniform nor effective because there are some complex effects of such as size,interface and stress state on the failure behavior of thin film-substrate structure.Based on the scanning electron microscope(SEM)in-situ investigation on the failure models of the Cu thin film-substrata structure and the nano scratched testing results,the failure stresses in different thicknesses of the Cu film-substrate were characterized,which were compared and confirmed by other methods,such as Stoney formula and other empiric equations.These results indicate that the novel estimating method of failure stress in thin film based on the critical wavelength of surface unstable analysis is better than other methods.The main reason is that the novel estimating method of failure stress in meso thickness film fully considered the effect factors of free surface unstable behavior and elastic anisotropy of thin film.Therefore,the novel estimating method of failure stress assists people to understand the critical interracial strength and to set up the failure criterion of thin film-substrate structure.

  3. Wave-induced stress and estimation of its driven effect on currents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Fu; GAO Shan; WANG Wei; QIAN Chengchun

    2004-01-01

    A genuine geostrophic small amplitude wave solution is deduced for the first time from the general form of linear fluid dynamic equations with the f-plane approximation, where the horizontal component of angular velocity of the earth rotation is taken into account. The Coriolisinduced stress obtained from this solution consists of lateral and reverse component, while its first order approximation is reduced to the result of Hasselmann or Xu Zhigang. Accordingly,combining the Coriolis-induced wave stress with the virtual wave stress proposed by Longuet-Higgins, the ratio of total wave-induced stress to wind stress on the sea surface is estimated, through which the importance of the wave-induced stress is emphasized in the study of the currents in the seas around China, especially in the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea.

  4. Fluoroalkylated Silicon-Containing Surfaces - Estimation of Solid Surface Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    oleophobicity , solid surface energy, Zisman analysis, Girifalco-Good method 4 Introduction In the recent past, there have been a number of reports on...surfaces that are not wetted by liquid droplets, i. e. superhydrophobic,1-4 oleophobic ,5-15 hygrophobic,16 omniphobic7, 12 surfaces. These surfaces have

  5. Comment on 'Surface thermodynamics, surface stress, equations at surfaces and triple lines for deformable bodies'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, E M

    2010-10-27

    In a recent publication by Olives (2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 085005) he studied 'the thermodynamics and mechanics of the surface of a deformable body, following and refining the general approach of Gibbs' and believed that 'a new definition of the surface stress is given'. However, using the usual way of deriving the equations of Gibbs-Duhem type the author, nevertheless, has fallen into a mathematical discrepancy because he has tried to unite in one equation different thermodynamic systems and 'a new definition of the surface stress' has appeared known in the usual theory of elasticity.

  6. Error estimate for Doo-Sabin surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on a general bound on the distance error between a uniform Doo-Sabin surface and its control polyhedron, an exponential error bound independent of the subdivision process is presented in this paper. Using the exponential bound, one can predict the depth of recursive subdivision of the Doo-Sabin surface within any user-specified error tolerance.

  7. The Effect of Surface Heterogeneity on Cloud Absorption Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan C.; Marshak, Alexander; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents a systematic and quantitative analysis of the effect of inhomogeneous surface albedo on shortwave cloud absorption estimates. We use 3D radiative transfer modeling with gradually complex clouds over a simplified surface to calculate cloud absorption. We find that averaging surface albedo always underestimates cloud absorption, and thus accounting for surface heterogeneity always enhances cloud absorption. However, the impact on cloud absorption estimates is not enough to explain the discrepancy between measured and model calculated shortwave cloud absorptions.

  8. The surface stress theory of microbial morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A L

    1983-01-01

    From the physics of the situation, one might conclude that the osmotic pressure within most prokaryotes creates a sufficiently high tension in the wall that organisms are at risk of ripping themselves apart. The Surface Stress Theory holds that they avoid this, and are able to carry out certain morphogenetic processes by linking the cleavages of appropriate bonds to enzymes that are sensitive to the stress in the bonds under attack. This tends to maintain the internal pressure and couples wall growth to cytoplasmic growth. Mechanisms with widely different geometry function for different organisms, but they have in common the requirement that new murein be covalently linked, and usually in an unextended conformation. Organisms differ in the site of wall addition and site of cleavage. In the Gram-positive Streptococcus, septum formation, and septal splitting occurs with little stretching of the unsplit septum. In Gram-positive bacilli, the cylinder grows by the inside-to-outside mechanism, and the poles appear to be formed by a split-and-stretch mechanism. Gram-negative rods, with their much thinner wall, resist a spherical shape and are capable of cell division by altering the biochemical mechanism so that initially one-third to one-fifth of the pressure-volume work required to increase the area of the side wall is needed to increase that in a developing pole. The growth of hyphae is a separate case; it requires that much less work is needed to force growth of the apex relative to the side wall. Some other bacterial shapes also can be explained by the theory. But at present, it is only a theory, although it is gradually becoming capable of accounting for current observations in detail. Its importance is that it prescribes many experiments that now need to be done.

  9. Determination of Surface Stress Distributions in Steel Using Laser-Generated Surface Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi; Yifei; Ni; Chenyin; Shen; Zhonghua; Ni; Xiaowu; Lu; Jian

    2008-05-01

    High frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are excited by a pulsed laser and detected by a specially designed poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) transducer to investigate surface stress distribution. Two kinds of stressed surfaces are examined experimentally. One is a steel plate elastically deformed under simple bending forces, where the surface stress varies slowly. The other is a welded steel plate for which the surface stress varies very rapidly within a small area near the welding seam. Applying a new signal processing method developed from correlation technique, the velocity distribution of the SAWs, which reflects the stress distribution, is obtained in these two samples with high resolution.

  10. Reliability of Semiautomated Computational Methods for Estimating Tibiofemoral Contact Stress in the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald D. Anderson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings suggest that contact stress is a potent predictor of subsequent symptomatic osteoarthritis development in the knee. However, much larger numbers of knees (likely on the order of hundreds, if not thousands need to be reliably analyzed to achieve the statistical power necessary to clarify this relationship. This study assessed the reliability of new semiautomated computational methods for estimating contact stress in knees from large population-based cohorts. Ten knees of subjects from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study were included. Bone surfaces were manually segmented from sequential 1.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging slices by three individuals on two nonconsecutive days. Four individuals then registered the resulting bone surfaces to corresponding bone edges on weight-bearing radiographs, using a semi-automated algorithm. Discrete element analysis methods were used to estimate contact stress distributions for each knee. Segmentation and registration reliabilities (day-to-day and interrater for peak and mean medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact stress were assessed with Shrout-Fleiss intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs. The segmentation and registration steps of the modeling approach were found to have excellent day-to-day (ICC 0.93–0.99 and good inter-rater reliability (0.84–0.97. This approach for estimating compartment-specific tibiofemoral contact stress appears to be sufficiently reliable for use in large population-based cohorts.

  11. Estimates of stress drop from the 27 February 2010 Chile earthquake and tectonic stress in the crust: Implications for fault strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, K. M.; Tong, X.; Sandwell, D. T.; Brooks, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    The great February 27, 2010 Mw 8.8 earthquake off the coast of southern Chile ruptured a 606 km length of subduction zone. In this study we make two independent estimates of shear stress in the crust in the region of the Chile earthquake. First, we use a coseismic slip model constrained by geodetic observations from InSAR and GPS to derive a spatially variable estimate of the change in static shear stress along the ruptured fault. Second, we use a static force balance model to constrain the crustal shear stress required to support observed accretionary wedge topography and the stress orientation indicated by the earthquake focal mechanism. This includes the derivation of a semi-analytic solution for the stress field exerted by surface and Moho topography loading the crust. We find that the deviatoric stress exerted by topography is minimized in the limit when the crust is considered an incompressible elastic solid, with a Poisson’s ratio of 0.5. This places a lower bound on the critical stress state maintained by the crust supporting plastically deformed accretionary wedge topography. We estimate the shear stress change from the Maule event ranged from -6 MPa (stress increase) to 14 MPa (stress drop), with a maximum depth-averaged shear stress drop of 4 MPa. We separately estimate that the plate driving forces acting in the region, regardless of their exact mechanism, must contribute at least 15 MPa trench-parallel compression, and trench-perpendicular compression must exceed trench-parallel compression by at least 12 MPa. This corresponds to a depth-averaged shear stress of at least 7 MPa. The comparable magnitude of these two independent shear stress estimates is consistent with the interpretation that the section of the megathrust fault ruptured in the Maule earthquake is weak, with the seismic cycle relieving much of the total sustained shear stress in the crust, and an equal portion of plate-driving stress being transmitted through the mantle.

  12. Surface thermodynamics, surface stress, equations at surfaces and triple lines for deformable bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olives, Juan

    2010-03-01

    The thermodynamics and mechanics of the surface of a deformable body are studied here, following and refining the general approach of Gibbs. It is first shown that the 'local' thermodynamic variables of the state of the surface are only the temperature, the chemical potentials and the surface strain tensor (true thermodynamic variables, for a viscoelastic solid or a viscous fluid). A new definition of the surface stress is given and the corresponding surface thermodynamics equations are presented. The mechanical equilibrium equation at the surface is then obtained. It involves the surface stress and is similar to the Cauchy equation for the volume. Its normal component is a generalization of the Laplace equation. At a (body-fluid-fluid) triple contact line, two equations are obtained, which represent: (i) the equilibrium of the forces (surface stresses) for a triple line fixed on the body; (ii) the equilibrium relative to the motion of the line with respect to the body. This last equation leads to a strong modification of Young's classical capillary equation.

  13. Mothers’ estimates of their preschool children and parenting stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Loader

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates whether the results of the study of Willinger and Eisenwort (2005 could also apply to a sample of preschool children not referred to a tertiary medical institution. Moreover, we were interested in the accuracy of maternal estimates of their children’s development regarding vocabulary for parenting stress, regarding behavioural problems, intellectual development, age and gender of the child. 108 children between the ages of three and six and their mothers were investigated by several diagnostic scales concerning child development with respect to language, motor and intellectual development as well as child behavioural problems and parenting stress concering child and parent characteristics. The mothers’ estimates regarding the children`s vocabulary were assessed by the same vocabulary test used for the children by presenting the test as questionnaire to the mothers. There was a significant trend towards an overestimation of a child’s developmental functioning regarding vocabulary. Group comparisons between groups of different levels of maternal overestimations (mild, moderate and severe overestimation of their child’s language development with respect to parenting stress levels considering age, sex, intellectual develoment and child behaviour problems showed the lowest parenting stress level regarding child characteristics in the group of severe overestimation and the highest level of parenting stress regarding parent characteristics in the group of mild overestimation. Significant influences of child behaviour and intellectual level on parenting stress were found. The results showed that mothers should not be used as only source of information about their children’s developmental status, especially with respect to their active vocabulary. However, maternal overestimation seems to have a positive impact on parenting stress regarding child characteristics, which could possibly be explained as a defense

  14. An Empirical Approach for Estimating Stress-Coupling Lengths for Marine-Terminating Glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellyn Mary Enderlin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Variability in the dynamic behavior of marine-terminating glaciers is poorly understood, despite an increase in the abundance and resolution of observations. When paired with ice thicknesses, surface velocities can be used to quantify the dynamic redistribution of stresses in response to environmental perturbations through computation of the glacier force balance. However, because the force balance is not purely local, force balance calculations must be performed at the spatial scale over which stresses are transferred within glacier ice, or the stress-coupling length (SCL. Here we present a new empirical method to estimate the SCL for marine-terminating glaciers using high-resolution observations. We use the empirically-determined periodicity in resistive stress oscillations as a proxy for the SCL. Application of our empirical method to two well-studied tidewater glaciers (Helheim Glacier, SE Greenland, and Columbia Glacier, Alaska, USA demonstrates that SCL estimates obtained using this approach are consistent with theory (i.e., can be parameterized as a function of the ice thickness and with prior, independent SCL estimates. In order to accurately resolve stress variations, we suggest that similar empirical stress-coupling parameterizations be employed in future analyses of glacier dynamics.

  15. Surface Wave Velocity-Stress Relationship in Uniaxially Loaded Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shokouhi, Parisa; Zoëga, Andreas; Wiggenhauser, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    loading cycles revealed that the velocities show a stress-memory effect in good agreement with the Kaiser effect. Comparing the velocities measured during loading and unloading, the effects of stress and damage on the measured velocities could be differentiated. Moreover, the stress dependency of surface......The sonic surface wave (or Rayleigh wave) velocity measured on prismatic concrete specimens under uniaxial compression was found to be highly stress-dependent. At low stress levels, the acoustoelastic effect and the closure of existing microcracks results in a gradual increase in surface wave...... velocities. At higher stress levels, concrete suffers irrecoverable damage: the existing microcracks widen and coalesce and new microcracks form. This progressive damage process leads first to the flattening and eventually the drop in the velocity-stress curves. Measurements on specimens undergoing several...

  16. Equations for estimating muscle fiber stress in the left ventricular wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabben, S I; Irgens, F; Angelsen, B

    1999-01-01

    Left ventricular muscle fiber stress is an important parameter in cardiac energetics. Hence, we developed equations for estimating regional fiber stresses in rotationally symmetric chambers, and equatorial and apical fiber stresses in prolate spheroidal chambers. The myocardium was modeled as a soft incompressible material embedding muscle fibers that support forces only in their longitudinal direction. A thin layer of muscle fibers then contributes with a pressure increment determined by the fiber stress and curvature. The fiber curvature depends on the orientation of the fibers, which varies continuously across the wall. However, by assuming rotational symmetry about the long axis of the ventricle and including a longitudinal force balance, we obtained equations where fiber stress is completely determined by the principal curvatures of the middle wall surface, wall thickness, and cavity pressure. The equations were validated against idealized prolate spheroidal chambers, whose wall thicknesses are such that the fiber stress is uniform from the equator to the apex. Because the apex is free to rotate, the resultant moment about the long axis of the LV must be zero. By using this constraint together with our fiber-stress equations, we were able to estimate a muscle fiber orientation distribution across the wall that was in qualitative agreement with published measurements.

  17. WIND STRESS AND SURFACE ROUGHNESS AT AIR-SEA INTERFACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Based on the compiled data of thirty independent observations, the report presents the wind - stress coefficient, the surface roughness and the...boundary layer flow regime at the air-sea interface under various wind conditions. Both the wind - stress coefficient and the surface roughness are found to...data and Charnock’s proportionality constant is determined. Finally, two approximate formulae for the wind - stress coefficient, one for light wind and the other for strong wind are suggested.

  18. Estimation of the space density of low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briggs, FH

    1997-01-01

    The space density of low surface brightness and tiny gas-rich dwarf galaxies are estimated for two recent catalogs: the Arecibo Survey of Northern Dwarf and Low Surface Brightness Galaxies and the Catalog of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies, List II. The goals are (1) to evaluate the additions to the

  19. Propose a Wall Shear Stress Divergence to Estimate the Risks of Intracranial Aneurysm Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although wall shear stress (WSS has long been considered a critical indicator of intracranial aneurysm rupture, there is still no definite conclusion as to whether a high or a low WSS results in aneurysm rupture. The reason may be that the effect of WSS direction has not been fully considered. The objectives of this study are to investigate the magnitude of WSS (WSS and its divergence on the aneurysm surface and to test the significance of both in relation to the aneurysm rupture. Patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD was used to compute WSS and wall shear stress divergence (WSSD on the aneurysm surface for nineteen patients. Our results revealed that if high WSS is stretching aneurysm luminal surface, and the stretching region is concentrated, the aneurysm is under a high risk of rupture. It seems that, by considering both direction and magnitude of WSS, WSSD may be a better indicator for the risk estimation of aneurysm rupture (154.

  20. Density functional theory calculations of the stress of oxidised (110) silicon surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Melis, C; Colombo, L; Mana, G

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the lattice-parameter of silicon by x-ray interferometry assumes the use of strain-free crystals. This might not be the case because surface relaxation, reconstruction, and oxidation cause strains without the application of any external force. In a previous work, this intrinsic strain was estimated by a finite element analysis, where the surface stress was modeled by an elastic membrane having a 1 N/m tensile strength. The present paper quantities the surface stress by a density functional theory calculation. We found a value exceeding the nominal value used, which potentially affects the measurement accuracy.

  1. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  2. Estimation of Sea Surface Wave Spectra Using Acoustic Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    Holister Dis speciael Dean of Graduate Studiesj ESTIMATION OF SEA SURFACE WAVE SPECTRA USING ACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY by James Henry Miller B.S. Electrical...James Henry Miller 1987 The author hereby prants to MIT permission to reproduce and distribute copies of this thesis in whole or in part. Signature of...ESTIMATION OF SEA SURFACE WAVE SPECTRA USING ACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY by James Henry Miller Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the

  3. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  4. Determination of stress glut moments of total degree 2 from teleseismic surface wave amplitude spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukchin, B. G.

    1995-08-01

    A special case of the seismic source, where the stress glut tensor can be expressed as a product of a uniform moment tensor and a scalar function of spatial coordinates and time, is considered. For such a source, a technique of determining stress glut moments of total degree 2 from surface wave amplitude spectra is described. The results of application of this technique for the estimation of spatio-temporal characteristics of the Georgian earthquake, 29.04.91 are presented.

  5. Geological background of the estimation of natural stresses in soil body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshev Sergey Nikolaevich

    2015-01-01

    fractures. Also the article shows the influence of the surface topography of the territory on stress in soil. In order to draw conclusions the author uses his observations of the construction in Siberia and Mongolia, as well as publications of other scientists. The author notes that in engineering surveys for construction of tunnels, high-rise dams, high rise buildings there is no good method of determining the natural stresses in rocks and soils, which is equal in accuracy to the methods of construction of geological sections and methods for determining the estimated characteristics of the soil. This gap needs to be filled. The possible direction of work is: to combine the methods of direct measurements of compressive stresses with indirect geophysical methods and computer modeling.

  6. Bed shear stress estimation on an open intertidal flat using in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Q.; van Prooijen, B. C.; Wang, Z. B.; Ma, Y. X.; Yang, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate estimations for the bed shear stress are essential to predict the erosion and deposition processes in estuaries and coasts. This study used high-frequency in situ measurements of water depths and near-bed velocities to estimate bed shear stress on an open intertidal flat in the Yangtze Delta, China. To determine the current-induced bed shear stress (τc) the in situ near-bed velocities were first decomposed from the turbulent velocity into separate wave orbital velocities using two approaches: a moving average (MA) and energy spectrum analysis (ESA). τc was then calculated and evaluated using the log-profile (LP), turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), modified TKE (TKEw), Reynolds stress (RS), and inertial dissipation (ID) methods. Wave-induced bed shear stress (τw) was estimated using classic linear wave theory. The total bed shear stress (τcw) was determined based on the Grant-Madsen wave-current interaction model (WCI). The results demonstrate that when the ratio of significant wave height to water depth (Hs/h) is greater than 0.25, τcw is significantly overestimated because the vertical velocity fluctuations are contaminated by the surface waves generated by high winds. In addition, wind enhances the total bed shear stress as a result of the increases in both τw and τc generated by the greater wave height and reinforcing of vertical turbulence, respectively. From a comparison of these various methods, the TKEw method associated with ESA decomposition was found to be the best approach because: (1) this method generates the highest mean index of agreement; (2) it uses vertical velocities that are less affected by Doppler noise; and (3) it is less sensitive to the near-bed stratification structure and uncertainty in bed location and roughness.

  7. ESTIMATING ERROR BOUNDS FOR TERNARY SUBDIVISION CURVES/SURFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ghulam Mustafa; Jiansong Deng

    2007-01-01

    We estimate error bounds between ternary subdivision curves/surfaces and their control polygons after k-fold subdivision in terms of the maximal differences of the initial control point sequences and constants that depend on the subdivision mask. The bound is independent of the process of subdivision and can be evaluated without recursive subdivision.Our technique is independent of parametrization therefore it can be easily and efficiently implemented. This is useful and important for pre-computing the error bounds of subdivision curves/surfaces in advance in many engineering applications such as surface/surface intersection, mesh generation, NC machining, surface rendering and so on.

  8. Propagating Uncertainties from Source Model Estimations to Coulomb Stress Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, C.; Jonsson, S.; Woessner, J.

    2009-12-01

    Multiple studies have shown that static stress changes due to permanent fault displacement trigger earthquakes on the causative and on nearby faults. Calculations of static stress changes in previous studies have been based on fault parameters without considering any source model uncertainties or with crude assumptions about fault model errors based on available different source models. In this study, we investigate the influence of fault model parameter uncertainties on Coulomb Failure Stress change (ΔCFS) calculations by propagating the uncertainties from the fault estimation process to the Coulomb Failure stress changes. We use 2500 sets of correlated model parameters determined for the June 2000 Mw = 5.8 Kleifarvatn earthquake, southwest Iceland, which were estimated by using a repeated optimization procedure and multiple data sets that had been modified by synthetic noise. The model parameters show that the event was predominantly a right-lateral strike-slip earthquake on a north-south striking fault. The variability of the sets of models represents the posterior probability density distribution for the Kleifarvatn source model. First we investigate the influence of individual source model parameters on the ΔCFS calculations. We show through a correlation analysis that for this event, changes in dip, east location, strike, width and in part north location have stronger impact on the Coulomb failure stress changes than changes in fault length, depth, dip-slip and strike-slip. Second we find that the accuracy of Coulomb failure stress changes appears to increase with increasing distance from the fault. The absolute value of the standard deviation decays rapidly with distance within about 5-6 km around the fault from about 3-3.5 MPa down to a few Pa, implying that the influence of parameter changes decrease with increasing distance. This is underlined by the coefficient of variation CV, defined as the ratio of the standard deviation of the Coulomb stress

  9. ESTIMATION OF PV MODULE SURFACE TEMPERATURE USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Coskun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to use the artificial neural network (ANN method to estimate the surface temperature of a photovoltaic (PV panel. Using the experimentally obtained PV data, the accuracy of the ANN model was evaluated. To train the artificial neural network (ANN, outer temperature solar radiation and wind speed values were inputs and surface temperature was an output. The ANN was used to estimate PV panel surface temperature. Using the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM algorithm the feed forward artificial neural network was trained. Two back propagation type ANN algorithms were used and their performance was compared with the estimate from the LM algorithm. To train the artificial neural network, experimental data were used for two thirds with the remaining third used for testing. Additionally scaled conjugate gradient (SCG back propagation and resilient back propagation (RB type ANN algorithms were used for comparison with the LM algorithm. The performances of these three types of artificial neural network were compared and mean error rates of between 0.005962 and 0.012177% were obtained. The best estimate was produced by the LM algorithm. Estimation of PV surface temperature with artificial neural networks provides better results than conventional correlation methods. This study showed that artificial neural networks may be effectively used to estimate PV surface temperature.

  10. Sea surface freshwater flux estimates from GECCO, HOAPS and NCEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, V.; Köhl, A.; Stammer, D.; Klepp, C.; Andersson, A.; Bakan, S.

    2010-08-01

    Surface net freshwater flux fields, estimated from the GECCO ocean state estimation effort over the 50 yr period 1951-2001, are compared to purely satellite-based HOAPS freshwater flux estimates and to the NCEP atmospheric re-analysis net surface freshwater flux fields to assess the quality of all flux products and to improve our understanding of the time-mean surface freshwater flux distribution as well as its temporal variability. Surface flux fields are adjusted by the GECCO state estimation procedure together with initial temperature and salinity conditions so that the model simulation becomes consistent with ocean observations. The entirely independent HOAPS net surface freshwater flux fields result from the difference between SSM/I based precipitation estimates and fields of evaporation resulting from a bulk aerodynamic approach using SSM/I data and the Pathfinder SST. All three products agree well on a global scale. However, overall GECCO seems to have moved away from the NCEP/NCAR first guess surface fluxes and is often closer to the HOAPS data set. This holds for the time mean as well as for the seasonal cycle.

  11. A simple method to estimate fractal dimension of mountain surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kolwankar, Kiran M

    2014-01-01

    Fractal surfaces are ubiquitous in nature as well as in the sciences. The examples range from the cloud boundaries to the corroded surfaces. Fractal dimension gives a measure of the irregularity in the object under study. We present a simple method to estimate the fractal dimension of mountain surface. We propose to use easily available satellite images of lakes for this purpose. The fractal dimension of the boundary of a lake, which can be extracted using image analysis softwares, can be determined easily which gives the estimate of the fractal dimension of the mountain surface and hence a quantitative characterization of the irregularity of the topography of the mountain surface. This value will be useful in validating models of mountain formation

  12. A NOVEL METHOD FOR ESTIMATING SOIL PRECOMPRESSION STRESS FROM UNIAXIAL CONFINED COMPRESSION TESTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Schjønning, Per; Labouriau, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    The concept of precompression stress is used for estimating soil strength of relevance to fieldtraffic. It represents the maximum stress experienced by the soil. The most recently developed fitting method to estimate precompression stress (Gompertz) is based on the assumption of an S-shape stress......-strain curve, which is not always fulfilled. A new simple numerical method was developed to estimate precompression stress from stress-strain curves, based solely on the sharp bend on the stress-strain curve partitioning the curve into an elastic and a plastic section. Our study had three objectives: (i......) Assessing the utility of the numerical method by comparison with the Gompertz method; (ii) Comparing the estimated precompression stress to the maximum preload of test samples; (iii) Determining the influence that soil type, bulk density and soil water potential have on the estimated precompression stress...

  13. Near surface stress analysis strategies for axisymmetric fretting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Ramesh; Satish V Kailas; K R Y Simha

    2008-06-01

    Fretting is essentially a surface phenomenon, but bulk stresses and material properties contribute to subsequent failure. This feature of fretting demands a thorough understanding of near surface stresses under the joint action of normal, shear and thermal loading. Axisymmetric fretting is of great concern in piping and coupling design. In this paper, we develop design tools for Near Surface Analysis (NSA) for understanding axisymmetric fretting. Axisymmetric Fretting Analysis (AFA) becomes formidable owing to localised tractions that call for Fourier transform techniques. We develop two different NSA strategies based on two-dimensional plane strain models: 2D strip model (2DS) and half-plane Flamant model (2DF). We compare the results of 2DS and 2DF with the exact results for AFA obtained using Love’s stress function in conjunction with Fourier transform. There is a good correspondence between stress components obtained from 2D-models.

  14. STEREOLOGICAL ESTIMATION OF SURFACE AREA FROM DIGITAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Ziegel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A sampling design of local stereology is combined with a method from digital stereology to yield a novel estimator of surface area based on counts of configurations observed in a digitization of an isotropic 2- dimensional slice with thickness s. As a tool, a result of the second author and J. Rataj on infinitesimal increase of volumes of morphological transforms is refined and used. The proposed surface area estimator is asymptotically unbiased in the case of sets contained in the ball centred at the origin with radius s and in the case of balls centred at the origin with unknown radius. For general shapes bounds for the asymptotic expected relative worst case error are given. A simulation example is discussed for surface area estimation based on 2×2×2-configurations.

  15. Estimating surface fluxes using eddy covariance and numerical ogive optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sievers, J.; Papakyriakou, T.; Larsen, Søren Ejling;

    2015-01-01

    Estimating representative surface fluxes using eddy covariance leads invariably to questions concerning inclusion or exclusion of low-frequency flux contributions. For studies where fluxes are linked to local physical parameters and up-scaled through numerical modelling efforts, low-frequency con......Estimating representative surface fluxes using eddy covariance leads invariably to questions concerning inclusion or exclusion of low-frequency flux contributions. For studies where fluxes are linked to local physical parameters and up-scaled through numerical modelling efforts, low...

  16. Actual evaporation estimation from infrared measurement of soil surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Pognant

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the hydrological cycle, actual evaporation represents the second most important process in terms of volumes of water transported, second only to the precipitation phenomena. Several methods for the estimation of the Ea were proposed by researchers in scientific literature, but the estimation of the Ea from potential evapotranspiration often requires the knowledge of hard-to-find parameters (e.g.: vegetation morphology, vegetation cover, interception of rainfall by the canopy, evaporation from the canopy surface and uptake of water by plant roots and many existing database are characterized by missing or incomplete information that leads to a rough estimation of the actual evaporation amount. Starting from the above considerations, the aim of this study is to develop and validate a method for the estimation of the Ea based on two steps: i the potential evaporation estimation by using the meteorological data (i.e. Penman-Monteith; ii application of a correction factor based on the infrared soil surface temperature measurements. The dataset used in this study were collected during two measurement campaigns conducted both in a plain testing site (Grugliasco, Italy, and in a mountain South-East facing slope (Cogne, Italy. During those periods, hourly measurement of air temperature, wind speed, infrared surface temperature, soil heat flux, and soil water content were collected. Results from the dataset collected in the two testing sites show a good agreement between the proposed method and reference methods used for the Ea estimation.

  17. Estimation of surface area and surface area measure of three-dimensional sets from digitizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegel, Johanna; Kiderlen, Markus

    2010-01-01

    A local method for estimating surface area and surface area measure of three-dimensional objects from discrete binary images is presented. A weight is assigned to each 2 × 2 × 2 configuration of voxels and the total surface area of an object is given by summation of the local area contributions. ...

  18. Using radiometric surface temperature for surface energy flux estimation in Mediterranean drylands from a two-source perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morillas, L.; Garcia Garcia, Monica; Nieto Solana, Hector;

    2013-01-01

    A two-source model (TSM) for surface energy balance, considering explicitly soil and vegetation components, was tested under water stress conditions. The TSM evaluated estimates the sensible heat flux (H) using the surface-air thermal gradient and the latent heat flux (LE) as a residual from...... and parallel; as well as the iterative algorithm included in the TSM to disaggregate the soil-surface composite temperature into its separate components. Continuous field measurements of composite soil-vegetation surface temperature (T) and bare soil temperature (T) from thermal infrared sensors were used...... T and the simplified version that uses separate inputs of T and T' were minor. This demonstrates the robustness of the iterative procedure to disaggregate a composite soil-vegetation temperature into separate soil and vegetation components in semiarid environments with good prospects for image...

  19. Rapid surface-water volume estimations in beaver ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karran, Daniel J.; Westbrook, Cherie J.; Wheaton, Joseph M.; Johnston, Carol A.; Bedard-Haughn, Angela

    2017-02-01

    Beaver ponds are surface-water features that are transient through space and time. Such qualities complicate the inclusion of beaver ponds in local and regional water balances, and in hydrological models, as reliable estimates of surface-water storage are difficult to acquire without time- and labour-intensive topographic surveys. A simpler approach to overcome this challenge is needed, given the abundance of the beaver ponds in North America, Eurasia, and southern South America. We investigated whether simple morphometric characteristics derived from readily available aerial imagery or quickly measured field attributes of beaver ponds can be used to approximate surface-water storage among the range of environmental settings in which beaver ponds are found. Studied were a total of 40 beaver ponds from four different sites in North and South America. The simplified volume-area-depth (V-A-h) approach, originally developed for prairie potholes, was tested. With only two measurements of pond depth and corresponding surface area, this method estimated surface-water storage in beaver ponds within 5 % on average. Beaver pond morphometry was characterized by a median basin coefficient of 0.91, and dam length and pond surface area were strongly correlated with beaver pond storage capacity, regardless of geographic setting. These attributes provide a means for coarsely estimating surface-water storage capacity in beaver ponds. Overall, this research demonstrates that reliable estimates of surface-water storage in beaver ponds only requires simple measurements derived from aerial imagery and/or brief visits to the field. Future research efforts should be directed at incorporating these simple methods into both broader beaver-related tools and catchment-scale hydrological models.

  20. Using IR Imaging of Water Surfaces for Estimating Piston Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gålfalk, M.; Bastviken, D.; Arneborg, L.

    2013-12-01

    The transport of gasses dissolved in surface waters across the water-atmosphere interface is controlled by the piston velocity (k). This coefficient has large implications for, e.g., greenhouse gas fluxes but is challenging to quantify in situ. At present, empirical k-wind speed relationships from a small number of studies and systems are often extrapolated without knowledge of model performance. It is therefore of interest to search for new methods for estimating k, and to compare the pros and cons of existing and new methods. Wind speeds in such models are often measured at a height of 10 meters. In smaller bodies of water such as lakes, wind speeds can vary dramatically across the surface through varying degrees of wind shadow from e.g. trees at the shoreline. More local measurements of the water surface, through wave heights or surface motion mapping, could give improved k-estimates over a surface, also taking into account wind fetch. At thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths water has very low reflectivity (depending on viewing angle) than can go below 1%, meaning that more than 99% is heat radiation giving a direct measurement of surface temperature variations. Using an IR camera at about 100 frames/s one could map surface temperature structures at a fraction of a mm depth even with waves present. In this presentation I will focus on IR imaging as a possible tool for estimating piston velocities. Results will be presented from IR field measurements, relating the motions of surface temperature structures to k calculated from other simultaneous measurements (flux chamber and ADV-Based Dissipation Rate), but also attempting to calculate k directly from the IR surface divergence. A relation between wave height and k will also be presented.

  1. Estimation of psychological stress in humans: a combination of theory and practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Sood

    Full Text Available Stress has long been known to increase susceptibility to health disorders. In 2009, American Psychological Association further established association of stress to serious health problems. However, a quantitative and accurate way to evaluate and estimate stress status of individuals is still a big challenge. It has been shown, in large animal models using cattle, that psychological stress can be quantified as well as disease susceptibility could be predicted through biomarker discovery. Taking cue from those studies, we have evaluated and estimated psychological stress level of individuals theoretically and validated experimentally. Various biomarkers have also been identified which can be associated to psychological stress to predict stress status of unknown individuals.

  2. Estimation of psychological stress in humans: a combination of theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Parul; Priyadarshini, Sushri; Aich, Palok

    2013-01-01

    Stress has long been known to increase susceptibility to health disorders. In 2009, American Psychological Association further established association of stress to serious health problems. However, a quantitative and accurate way to evaluate and estimate stress status of individuals is still a big challenge. It has been shown, in large animal models using cattle, that psychological stress can be quantified as well as disease susceptibility could be predicted through biomarker discovery. Taking cue from those studies, we have evaluated and estimated psychological stress level of individuals theoretically and validated experimentally. Various biomarkers have also been identified which can be associated to psychological stress to predict stress status of unknown individuals.

  3. Chlorine stress mediates microbial surface attachment in drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Le, Yang; Jin, Juliang; Zhou, Yuliang; Chen, Guowei

    2015-03-01

    Microbial attachment to drinking water pipe surfaces facilitates pathogen survival and deteriorates disinfection performance, directly threatening the safety of drinking water. Notwithstanding that the formation of biofilm has been studied for decades, the underlying mechanisms for the origins of microbial surface attachment in biofilm development in drinking water pipelines remain largely elusive. We combined experimental and mathematical methods to investigate the role of environmental stress-mediated cell motility on microbial surface attachment in chlorination-stressed drinking water distribution systems. Results show that at low levels of disinfectant (0.0-1.0 mg/L), the presence of chlorine promotes initiation of microbial surface attachment, while higher amounts of disinfectant (>1.0 mg/L) inhibit microbial attachment. The proposed mathematical model further demonstrates that chlorination stress (0.0-5.0 mg/L)-mediated microbial cell motility regulates the frequency of cell-wall collision and thereby controls initial microbial surface attachment. The results reveal that transport processes and decay patterns of chlorine in drinking water pipelines regulate microbial cell motility and, thus, control initial surface cell attachment. It provides a mechanistic understanding of microbial attachment shaped by environmental disinfection stress and leads to new insights into microbial safety protocols in water distribution systems.

  4. Remote sensing estimates of impervious surfaces for pluvial flood modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Per Skougaard; Drews, Martin

    This paper investigates the accuracy of medium resolution (MR) satellite imagery in estimating impervious surfaces for European cities at the detail required for pluvial flood modelling. Using remote sensing techniques enables precise and systematic quantification of the influence of the past 30...

  5. Stereological estimation of surface area from digital images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegel, Johanna; Kiderlen, Markus

    2010-01-01

    A sampling design of local stereology is combined with a method from digital stereology to yield a novel estimator of surface area based on counts of configurations observed in a digitization of an isotropic 2- dimensional slice with thickness s. As a tool, a result of the second author and J. Ra....... For general shapes bounds for the asymptotic expected relative worst case error are given. A simulation example is discussed for surface area estimation based on 2×2×2-configurations.......A sampling design of local stereology is combined with a method from digital stereology to yield a novel estimator of surface area based on counts of configurations observed in a digitization of an isotropic 2- dimensional slice with thickness s. As a tool, a result of the second author and J....... Rataj on infinitesimal increase of volumes of morphological transforms is refined and used. The proposed surface area estimator is asymptotically unbiased in the case of sets contained in the ball centred at the origin with radius s and in the case of balls centred at the origin with unknown radius...

  6. Evaluation of Five Formulae for Estimating Body Surface Area of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in pediatric practice and child health is body surface area (BSA) ... Conclusion: Formulae by Boyd and Mosteller are the best BSA estimate for. Nigerian .... weight: (21.5 [7.6] kg vs. 20.8 [6.7] .... formula best fits with the “gold standard.” However ...

  7. Atomistic modelling of residual stress at UO2 surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arayro, Jack; Tréglia, Guy; Ribeiro, Fabienne

    2016-01-13

    Modelling oxide surface behaviour is of both technological and fundamental interest. In particular, in the case of the UO2 system, which is of major importance in the nuclear industry, it is essential to account for the link between microstructure and macroscopic mechanical properties. Indeed micromechanical models at the mesoscale need to be supplied by the energetic and stress data calculated at the nanoscale. In this framework, we present a theoretical study, coupling an analytical model and thermostatistical simulation to investigate the modifications induced by the presence of a surface regarding atomic relaxation and energetic and stress profiles. In particular, we show that the surface effective thickness as well as the stress profile, which are required by micromechanical approaches, are strongly anisotropic.

  8. Estimating surface fluxes using eddy covariance and numerical ogive optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sievers, J.; Papakyriakou, T.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    2015-01-01

    Estimating representative surface fluxes using eddy covariance leads invariably to questions concerning inclusion or exclusion of low-frequency flux contributions. For studies where fluxes are linked to local physical parameters and up-scaled through numerical modelling efforts, low-frequency con......Estimating representative surface fluxes using eddy covariance leads invariably to questions concerning inclusion or exclusion of low-frequency flux contributions. For studies where fluxes are linked to local physical parameters and up-scaled through numerical modelling efforts, low......-frequency contributions interfere with our ability to isolate local biogeochemical processes of interest, as represented by turbulent fluxes. No method currently exists to disentangle low-frequency contributions on flux estimates. Here, we present a novel comprehensive numerical scheme to identify and separate out low...

  9. Using surface heave to estimate reservoir volumetric strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanayakkara, A.S.; Wong, R.C.K. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presented a newly developed numerical tool for estimating reservoir volumetric strain distribution using surface vertical displacements and solving an inverse problem. Waterflooding, steam injection, carbon dioxide sequestration and aquifer storage recovery are among the subsurface injection operations that are responsible for reservoir dilations which propagate to the surrounding formations and extend to the surface resulting in surface heaves. Global positioning systems and surface tiltmeters are often used to measure the characteristics of these surface heaves and to derive valuable information regarding reservoir deformation and flow characteristics. In this study, Tikhonov regularization techniques were adopted to solve the ill-posed inversion problem commonly found in standard inversion techniques such as Gaussian elimination and least squares methods. Reservoir permeability was then estimated by inverting the volumetric strain distribution. Results of the newly developed numerical tool were compared with results from fully-coupled finite element simulation of fluid injection problems. The reservoir volumetric strain distribution was successfully estimated along with an approximate value for reservoir permeability.

  10. An Estimation Method of Stress in Soft Rock Based on In-situ Measured Stress in Hard Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen-ping; LI Xiao-qin; SUN Ru-hua

    2007-01-01

    The law of variation of deep rock stress in gravitational and tectonic stress fields is analyzed based on the Hoek-Brown strength criterion. In the gravitational stress field, the rocks in the shallow area are in an elastic state and the deep, relatively soft rock may be in a plastic state. However, in the tectonic stress field, the relatively soft rock in the shallow area is in a plastic state and the deep rock in an elastic state. A method is proposed to estimate stress values in coal and soft rock based on in-situ measurements of hard rock. Our estimation method relates to the type of stress field and stress state. The equations of rock stress in various stress states are presented for the elastic, plastic and critical states. The critical state is a special stress state, which indicates the conversion of the elastic to the plastic state in the gravitational stress field and the conversion of the plastic to the elastic state in the tectonic stress field. Two cases studies show that the estimation method is feasible.

  11. Towards the prediction of pre-mining stresses in the European continent. [Estimates of vertical and probable maximum lateral stress in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackwood, R.L.

    1980-05-15

    There are now available sufficient data from in-situ, pre-mining stress measurements to allow a first attempt at predicting the maximum stress magnitudes likely to occur in a given mining context. The sub-horizontal (lateral) stress generally dominates the stress field, becoming critical to stope stability in many cases. For cut-and-fill mining in particular, where developed fill pressures are influenced by lateral displacement of pillars or stope backs, extraction maximization planning by mathematical modelling techniques demands the best available estimate of pre-mining stresses. While field measurements are still essential for this purpose, in the present paper it is suggested that the worst stress case can be predicted for preliminary design or feasibility study purposes. In the Eurpoean continent the vertical component of pre-mining stress may be estimated by adding 2 MPa to the pressure due to overburden weight. The maximum lateral stress likely to be encountered is about 57 MPa at depths of some 800m to 1000m below the surface.

  12. Thermally induced stresses in boulders on airless body surfaces, and implications for rock breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaro, J. L.; Byrne, S.; Le, J.-L.

    2017-09-01

    This work investigates the macroscopic thermomechanical behavior of lunar boulders by modeling their response to diurnal thermal forcing. Our results reveal a bimodal, spatiotemporally-complex stress response. During sunrise, stresses occur in the boulders' interiors that are associated with large-scale temperature gradients developed due to overnight cooling. During sunset, stresses occur at the boulders' exteriors due to the cooling and contraction of the surface. Both kinds of stresses are on the order of 10 MPa in 1 m boulders and decrease for smaller diameters, suggesting that larger boulders break down more quickly. Boulders ≤ 30 cm exhibit a weak response to thermal forcing, suggesting a threshold below which crack propagation may not occur. Boulders of any size buried by regolith are shielded from thermal breakdown. As boulders increase in size (>1 m), stresses increase to several 10 s of MPa as the behavior of their surfaces approaches that of an infinite halfspace. As the thermal wave loses contact with the boulder interior, stresses become limited to the near-surface. This suggests that the survival time of a boulder is not only controlled by the amplitude of induced stress, but also by its diameter as compared to the diurnal skin depth. While stresses on the order of 10 MPa are enough to drive crack propagation in terrestrial environments, crack propagation rates in vacuum are not well constrained. We explore the relationship between boulder size, stress, and the direction of crack propagation, and discuss the implications for the relative breakdown rates and estimated lifetimes of boulders on airless body surfaces.

  13. The stress-induced surface wave velocity variations in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvier, Agustin; Bittner, James; Evani, Sai Kalyan; Popovics, John S.

    2017-02-01

    This investigation studies the behavior of surface wave velocity in concrete specimens subjected to low levels of compressive and tensile stress in beams from applied flexural loads. Beam specimen is loaded in a 4-point-load bending configuration, generating uniaxial compression and tension stress fields at the top and bottom surfaces of the beam, respectively. Surface waves are generated through contactless air-coupled transducers and received through contact accelerometers. Results show a clear distinction in responses from compression and tension zones, where velocity increases in the former and decreases in the latter, with increasing load levels. These trends agree with existing acoustoelastic literature. Surface wave velocity tends to decrease more under tension than it tends to increase under compression, for equal load levels. It is observed that even at low stress levels, surface wave velocity is affected by acoustoelastic effects, coupled with plastic effects (stress-induced damage). The acoustoelastic effect is isolated by means of considering the Kaiser effect and by experimentally mitigating the viscoelastic effects of concrete. Results of this ongoing investigation contribute to the overall knowledge of the acoustoelastic behavior of concrete. Applications of this knowledge may include structural health monitoring of members under flexural loads, improved high order modelling of materials, and validation of results seen in dynamic acoustoelasticity testing.

  14. Prediction and Optimization of Residual Stresses on Machined Surface and Sub-Surface in MQL Turning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xia; Zou, Pan; Li, Beizhi; Rajora, Manik; Shao, Yamin; Liang, Steven Y.

    Residual stress in the machined surface and subsurface is affected by materials, machining conditions, and tool geometry and can affect the component life and service quality significantly. Empirical or numerical experiments are commonly used for determining residual stresses but these are very expensive. There has been an increase in the utilization of minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) in recent years in order to reduce the cost and tool/part handling efforts, while its effect on machined part residual stress, although important, has not been explored. This paper presents a hybrid neural network that is trained using Simulated Annealing (SA) and Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm (LM) in order to predict the values of residual stresses in cutting and radial direction on the surface and within the work piece after the MQL face turning process. Once the ANN has successfully been trained, an optimization procedure, using Genetic Algorithm (GA), is applied in order to find the best cutting conditions in order to minimize the surface tensile residual stresses and maximize the compressive residual stresses within the work piece. The optimization results show that the usage of MQL decreases the surface tensile residual stresses and increases the compressive residual stresses within the work piece.

  15. Surface profile and stress field evaluation using digital gradient sensing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, C.; Sundaram, B. M.; Huang, L.; Tippur, H. V.

    2016-09-01

    Shape and surface topography evaluation from measured orthogonal slope/gradient data is of considerable engineering significance since many full-field optical sensors and interferometers readily output such a data accurately. This has applications ranging from metrology of optical and electronic elements (lenses, silicon wafers, thin film coatings), surface profile estimation, wave front and shape reconstruction, to name a few. In this context, a new methodology for surface profile and stress field determination based on a recently introduced non-contact, full-field optical method called digital gradient sensing (DGS) capable of measuring small angular deflections of light rays coupled with a robust finite-difference-based least-squares integration (HFLI) scheme in the Southwell configuration is advanced here. The method is demonstrated by evaluating (a) surface profiles of mechanically warped silicon wafers and (b) stress gradients near growing cracks in planar phase objects.

  16. An algorithm for estimating surface normal from its boundary curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisoon Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, along with the improvements of geometry modeling methods using sketch-based interface, there have been a lot of developments in research about generating surface model from 3D curves. However, surfacing a 3D curve network remains an ambiguous problem due to the lack of geometric information. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm for estimating the normal vectors of the 3D curves which accord closely with user intent. Bending energy is defined by utilizing RMF(Rotation-Minimizing Frame of 3D curve, and we estimated this minimal energy frame as the one that accords design intent. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated with surface model creation of various curve networks. The algorithm of estimating geometric information in 3D curves which is proposed in this paper can be utilized to extract new information in the sketch-based modeling process. Also, a new framework of 3D modeling can be expected through the fusion between curve network and surface creating algorithm.

  17. REPLY: Reply to comment on 'Surface thermodynamics and surface stress for deformable bodies'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olives, Juan

    2010-10-01

    The above comment and a previous letter by the same author reveal a great misunderstanding of what Eulerian and Lagrangian quantities are, and a confusion between the deformation of an element of a surface and the creation of a new element of a surface. Surface thermodynamics is complex because the surface quantities are not 'intuitive' (as surface excesses on some dividing surface) and the thermodynamic variables of the state of a surface are a priori completely unknown. This is why we introduced a new concept ('ideal transformation') and presented detailed proof, leading to the determination of the 'local' thermodynamic variables of the state of the surface, the exact expression of the work of deformation of the surface, and the definition of surface stress, for any deformable body (Olives 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 085005). These results are not obvious (despite their similarity with some expressions in volume thermodynamics). We explicitly write the Eulerian forms of (i) the relation between the surface grand potential per unit area, the surface stress and the surface strain, showing its exact equivalence with the Lagrangian form, and (ii) the variation of the surface energy due to both the deformation of an element of the surface and the creation of a new element of the surface.

  18. INTERFACE DEVICE FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING OF RESIDUAL SURFACE STRESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady A. Perepelkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the organization of connection of a personal computer with a device for nondestructive testing of residual surface stresses. The device works is based on the phenomenon of diffraction of ionizing radiation from the crystal lattice near the surface of the crystallites. Proposed software interface to the organization for each type of user: the device developers, administrators, users. Some aspects of the organization of communication microcontroller to a PC via USB-port

  19. Asymptotic variance of grey-scale surface area estimators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Anne Marie

    Grey-scale local algorithms have been suggested as a fast way of estimating surface area from grey-scale digital images. Their asymptotic mean has already been described. In this paper, the asymptotic behaviour of the variance is studied in isotropic and sufficiently smooth settings, resulting...... in a general asymptotic bound. For compact convex sets with nowhere vanishing Gaussian curvature, the asymptotics can be described more explicitly. As in the case of volume estimators, the variance is decomposed into a lattice sum and an oscillating term of at most the same magnitude....

  20. Identification of the Rayleigh surface waves for estimation of viscoelasticity using the surface wave elastography technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this Letter to the Editor is to demonstrate an effective method for estimating viscoelasticity based on measurements of the Rayleigh surface wave speed. It is important to identify the surface wave mode for measuring surface wave speed. A concept of start frequency of surface waves is proposed. The surface wave speeds above the start frequency should be used to estimate the viscoelasticity of tissue. The motivation was to develop a noninvasive surface wave elastography (SWE) technique for assessing skin disease by measuring skin viscoelastic properties. Using an optical based SWE system, the author generated a local harmonic vibration on the surface of phantom using an electromechanical shaker and measured the resulting surface waves on the phantom using an optical vibrometer system. The surface wave speed was measured using a phase gradient method. It was shown that different standing wave modes were generated below the start frequency because of wave reflection. However, the pure symmetric surface waves were generated from the excitation above the start frequency. Using the wave speed dispersion above the start frequency, the viscoelasticity of the phantom can be correctly estimated.

  1. Interaction of stress and phase transformations during thermochemical surface engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard

    Low temperature nitriding of austenitic stainless steel causes a surface zone of expanded austenite, which improves the wear resistance of the stainless steel while preserving the stainless behavior. During nitriding huge residual stresses are introduced in the treated zone, arising from the volume...... expansion that accompanies the dissolution of high nitrogen contents in expanded austenite. An intriguing phenomenon during low-temperature nitriding, is that the residual stresses evoked by dissolution of nitrogen in the solid state, affect the thermodynamics and the diffusion kinetics of nitrogen...... dissolution. The present project is devoted to understanding the mutual interaction of stresses and phase transformations during thermochemical surface engineering by combining numerical modelling with experimental materials science. The modelling was done by combining solid mechanics with thermodynamics...

  2. A micromachined surface stress sensor with electronic readout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlen, E.T.; Weinberg, M.S.; Zapata, A.M.; Borenstein, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    A micromachined surface stress sensor has been fabricated and integrated off chip with a low-noise, differential capacitance, electronic readout circuit. The differential capacitance signal is modulated with a high frequency carrier signal, and the output signal is synchronously demodulated and filt

  3. Cantilever surface stress sensors with single-crystalline silicon piezoresistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Andreas; Hansen, Ole; Boisen, Anja

    2005-01-01

    on cantilever sensors with integrated piezoresistive readout, that one finds between typical atomic force microscopy measurements and the surface stress sensors used in, e.g., biochemical measurements. We have simulated the response from piezoresistive cantilevers as a function of resistor type and placement...

  4. Estimation of surface insolation using sun-synchronous satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, Wayne L.; Staylor, W. Frank; Gupta, Shashi K.; Denn, Fred M.

    1988-01-01

    A technique is presented for estimating insolation at the earth's surface using only sun-synchronous satellite data. The technique was tested by comparing the insolation results from year-long satellite data sets with simultaneous ground-measured insolation taken at five continental United States sites. Monthly average insolation values derived from the satellite data showed a standard error of 4.2 W/sq m, or 2.7 percent of the average ground insolation value.

  5. Stress analysis and stress-intensity factors for finite geometry solids containing rectangular surface cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1977-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement field in a finite geometry bar containing a variable depth rectangular surface crack under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Using the obtained displacement field, normal stresses, and the stress-intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated for different crack depth to bar thickness ratios. Crack opening displacements and stress-intensity factors are also obtained for a through-thickness, center-cracked bar with variable thickness. The reported results show a considerable potential for using this method in calculating stress-intensity factors for commonly encountered surface crack geometries in finite solids

  6. Stress analysis and stress intensity factors for finite geometry solids containing rectangular surface cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1975-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement field in a finite geometry bar containing a variable depth rectangular surface crack under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Using the obtained displacement field, normal stresses and the stress intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated for different crack depth to bar thickness ratios. Crack opening displacements and stress intensity factors are also obtained for a through-thickness, center cracked bar with variable thickness. The reported results show a considerable potential for using this method in calculating stress intensity factors for commonly encountered surface crack geometries in finite solids.

  7. Reducing measurement scale mismatch to improve surface energy flux estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture importantly controls land surface processes such as energy and water partitioning. A good understanding of these controls is needed especially when recognizing the challenges in providing accurate hyper-resolution hydrometeorological simulations at sub-kilometre scales. Soil moisture controlling factors can, however, differ at distinct scales. In addition, some parameters in land surface models are still often prescribed based on observations obtained at another scale not necessarily employed by such models (e.g., soil properties obtained from lab samples used in regional simulations). To minimize such effects, parameters can be constrained with local data from Eddy-Covariance (EC) towers (i.e., latent and sensible heat fluxes) and Point Scale (PS) soil moisture observations (e.g., TDR). However, measurement scales represented by EC and PS still differ substantially. Here we use the fact that Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNS) estimate soil moisture at horizontal footprint similar to that of EC fluxes to help answer the following question: Does reduced observation scale mismatch yield better soil moisture - surface fluxes representation in land surface models? To answer this question we analysed soil moisture and surface fluxes measurements from twelve COSMOS-Ameriflux sites in the USA characterized by distinct climate, soils and vegetation types. We calibrated model parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) against PS and CRNS soil moisture data, respectively. We analysed the improvement in soil moisture estimation compared to uncalibrated model simulations and then evaluated the degree of improvement in surface fluxes before and after calibration experiments. Preliminary results suggest that a more accurate representation of soil moisture dynamics is achieved when calibrating against observed soil moisture and further improvement obtained with CRNS relative to PS. However, our results also suggest that a more accurate

  8. Homomorphic Deconvolution for MUAP Estimation From Surface EMG Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagetti, Giorgio; Crippa, Paolo; Orcioni, Simone; Turchetti, Claudio

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a technique for parametric model estimation of the motor unit action potential (MUAP) from the surface electromyography (sEMG) signal by using homomorphic deconvolution. The cepstrum-based deconvolution removes the effect of the stochastic impulse train, which originates the sEMG signal, from the power spectrum of sEMG signal itself. In this way, only information on MUAP shape and amplitude were maintained, and then, used to estimate the parameters of a time-domain model of the MUAP itself. In order to validate the effectiveness of this technique, sEMG signals recorded during several biceps curl exercises have been used for MUAP amplitude and time scale estimation. The parameters so extracted as functions of time were used to evaluate muscle fatigue showing a good agreement with previously published results.

  9. Use of surface electromyography to estimate neck muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerich, C M; Joines, S M; Hermans, V; Moon, S D

    2000-12-01

    This paper reviews the literature concerning the use of surface electromyography (sEMG) for the study of the neck musculature in response to work and workplace design during light work and semi-static tasks. The paper also draws upon basic research and biomechanical modeling in order to provide methodological recommendations for the use of surface electromyography in this region of the body and to identify areas which require further investigation. The paper includes review and discussion of electrode site location, methods of normalization, data reliability, and factors that can affect sEMG signals from this region, including noise, physiologic artifact, stress, visual deficiencies, and pain. General guidance for maximum exertions with the neck musculature, for sEMG normalization or other purposes, is also included.

  10. A New Estimate of the Earth's Land Surface Temperature History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, R. A.; Curry, J. A.; Groom, D.; Jacobsen, B.; Perlmutter, S.; Rohde, R. A.; Rosenfeld, A.; Wickham, C.; Wurtele, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature team has re-evaluated the world's atmospheric land surface temperature record using a linear least-squares method that allow the use of all the digitized records back to 1800, including short records that had been excluded by prior groups. We use the Kriging method to estimate an optimal weighting of stations to give a world average based on uniform weighting of the land surface. We have assembled a record of the available data by merging 1.6 billion temperature reports from 16 pre-existing data archives; this data base will be made available for public use. The former Global Historic Climatology Network (GHCN) monthly data base shows a sudden drop in the number of stations reporting monthly records from 1980 to the present; we avoid this drop by calculating monthly averages from the daily records. By using all the data, we reduce the effects of potential data selection bias. We make an independent estimate of the urban heat island effect by calculating the world land temperature trends based on stations chosen to be far from urban sites. We calculate the effect of poor station quality, as documented in the US by the team led by Anthony Watts by estimating the temperature trends based solely on the stations ranked good (1,2 or 1,2,3 in the NOAA ranking scheme). We avoid issues of homogenization bias by using raw data; at times when the records are discontinuous (e.g. due to station moves) we break the record into smaller segments and analyze those, rather than attempt to correct the discontinuity. We estimate the uncertainties in the final results using the jackknife procedure developed by J. Tukey. We calculate spatial uncertainties by measuring the effects of geographical exclusion on recent data that have good world coverage. The results we obtain are compared to those published by the groups at NOAA, NASA-GISS, and Hadley-CRU in the UK.

  11. Stress relaxation and estimation of activation volume in a commercial hard PZT piezoelectric ceramic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B L Cheng; M J Reece

    2001-04-01

    The stress relaxation of ferroelectric/piezoelectric material was studied using compression testing. The deformation was produced by the switching of ferroelectric domains. The internal stresses were estimated by decremental stress relaxation during unloading. The results were interpreted in terms of reversible and irreversible switching of the domains.

  12. Oceanic Wind Speed and Wind Stress Estimation from Ambient Noise Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-02-01

    it was found that noise records may be used to monitor wind speed and wind stress over the ocean. Time series of wind speeds can be produced from...wind direction, the wind stress has also been estimated and vector-averaged. The monthly mean stress from the authors’ data is higher than values

  13. Estimation of the surface tension of ocular cornea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueyong; Ma, Jianguo; Lu, Rongsheng; Xia, Ruixue

    2008-12-01

    Considering the potential clinical importance, the surface tension of ocular cornea under the action of normal physiological intraocular pressure is estimated, and a novel technique and a simple mechanical model for determining the tension are also presented in this paper. An instrument embodying mainly a CCD camera, an optical staff gauge and a manometer was developed primarily to measure both the surface point displacement and intraocular pressure of the cornea. A simple theoretical model was used to characterize the tensions of the ocular corneas under the action of the intraocular pressure. Due to the difficulty in obtaining the human cornea, laboratory experiments were carried out on porcine cornea specimens. The thickness of the specimens was accurately measured by optical coherence tomography. The matrix and collagen properties within the corneal tissue were manifested in the experiment. Experimental results on porcine corneas showed that the present technique is applicable to estimate the surface tension. In the normal physiological intraocular pressure range, both meridian and circumference tensions of the porcine corneas along the radial coordinate distribute are not uniform.

  14. Spatial Statistical Estimation for Massive Sea Surface Temperature Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Y.; Vazquez, J.; Nguyen, H.; Braverman, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    We combine several large remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST) datasets to create a single high-resolution SST dataset that has no missing data and provides an uncertainty associated with each value. This high resolution dataset will optimize estimates of SST in critical parts of the world's oceans, such as coastal upwelling regions. We use Spatial Statistical Data Fusion (SSDF), a statistical methodology for predicting global spatial fields by exploiting spatial correlations in the data. The main advantages of SSDF over spatial smoothing methodologies include the provision of probabilistic uncertainties, the ability to incorporate multiple datasets with varying footprints, measurement errors and biases, and estimation at any desired resolution. In order to accommodate massive input and output datasets, we introduce two modifications of the existing SSDF algorithm. First, we compute statistical model parameters based on coarse resolution aggregated data. Second, we use an adaptive spatial grid that allows us to perform estimation in a specified region of interest, but incorporate spatial dependence between locations in that region and all locations globally. Finally, we demonstrate with a case study involving estimations on the full globe at coarse resolution grid (30 km) and a high resolution (1 km) inset for the Gulf Stream region.

  15. Theoretical and experimental estimates of the Peierls stress

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nabarro, FRN

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available an error of a factor of 2 in this exponent in Peierls's original estimate. A revised estimate by Huntington introduced a further factor of 2. Three experimental estimates are available, from the Bordoni peaks (which agrees with the Huntington theory), from...

  16. Nanoscale patterning, macroscopic reconstruction, and enhanced surface stress by organic adsorption on vicinal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollinger, Florian; Schmitt, Stefan; Sander, Dirk; Tian, Zhen; Kirschner, Jürgen; Vrdoljak, Pavo; Stadler, Christoph; Maier, Florian; Marchetto, Helder; Schmidt, Thomas; Schöll, Achim; Umbach, Eberhard

    2017-01-01

    Self-organization is a promising method within the framework of bottom-up architectures to generate nanostructures in an efficient way. The present work demonstrates that self-organization on the length scale of a few to several tens of nanometers can be achieved by a proper combination of a large (organic) molecule and a vicinal metal surface if the local bonding of the molecule on steps is significantly stronger than that on low-index surfaces. In this case thermal annealing may lead to large mass transport of the subjacent substrate atoms such that nanometer-wide and micrometer-long molecular stripes or other patterns are being formed on high-index planes. The formation of these patterns can be controlled by the initial surface orientation and adsorbate coverage. The patterns arrange self-organized in regular arrays by repulsive mechanical interactions over long distances accompanied by a significant enhancement of surface stress. We demonstrate this effect using the planar organic molecule PTCDA as adsorbate and Ag(10 8 7) and Ag(775) surfaces as substrate. The patterns are directly observed by STM, the formation of vicinal surfaces is monitored by high-resolution electron diffraction, the microscopic surface morphology changes are followed by spectro-microscopy, and the macroscopic changes of surface stress are measured by a cantilever bending method. The in situ combination of these complementary techniques provides compelling evidence for elastic interaction and a significant stress contribution to long-range order and nanopattern formation.

  17. T-stress estimation by the two-parameter approach for a specimen with a V-shaped notch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouledroua, O.; Elazzizi, A.; Hadj Meliani, M.; Pluvinage, G.; Matvienko, Y. G.

    2017-05-01

    In the present research, T-stress solutions are provided for a V-shaped notch in the case of surface defects in a pressurised pipeline. The V-shaped notch is analyzed with the use of the finite element method by the Castem2000 commercial software to determine the stress distribution ahead of the notch tip. The notch aspect ratio is varied. In contrast to a crack, it is found that the T-stress is not constant and depends on the distance from the notch tip. To estimate the T-stress in the case of a notch, a novel method is developed, inspired by the volumetric method approach proposed by Pluvinage. The method is based on averaging the T-stress over the effective distance ahead of the notch tip. The effective distance is determined by the point with the minimum stress gradient in the fracture process zone. This approach is successfully used to quantify the constraints of the notch-tip fields for various geometries and loading conditions. Moreover, the proposed T-stress estimation creates a basis for analyzing the crack path under mixed-mode loading from the viewpoint of the two-parameter fracture mechanics.

  18. Accurate computation of surface stresses and forces with immersed boundary methods

    CERN Document Server

    Goza, Andres; Morley, Benjamin; Colonius, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Many immersed boundary methods solve for surface stresses that impose the velocity boundary conditions on an immersed body. These surface stresses may contain spurious oscillations that make them ill-suited for representing the physical surface stresses on the body. Moreover, these inaccurate stresses often lead to unphysical oscillations in the history of integrated surface forces such as the coefficient of lift. While the errors in the surface stresses and forces do not necessarily affect the convergence of the velocity field, it is desirable, especially in fluid-structure interaction problems, to obtain smooth and convergent stress distributions on the surface. To this end, we show that the equation for the surface stresses is an integral equation of the first kind whose ill-posedness is the source of spurious oscillations in the stresses. We also demonstrate that for sufficiently smooth delta functions, the oscillations may be filtered out to obtain physically accurate surface stresses. The filtering is a...

  19. Influence of surface stressing on stellar coronae and winds

    CERN Document Server

    Jardine, M; van Ballegooijen, A; Donati, J -F; Morin, J; Fares, R; Gombosi, T I

    2013-01-01

    The large-scale field of the Sun is well represented by its lowest energy (or potential) state. Recent observations, by comparison, reveal that many solar-type stars show large-scale surface magnetic fields that are highly non-potential - that is, they have been stressed above their lowest-energy state. This non-potential component of the surface field is neglected by current stellar wind models. The aim of this paper is to determine its effect on the coronal structure and wind. We use Zeeman-Doppler surface magnetograms of two stars - one with an almost potential, one with a non-potential surface field - to extrapolate a static model of the coronal structure for each star. We find that the stresses are carried almost exclusively in a band of uni-directional azimuthal field that is confined to mid-latitudes. Using this static solution as an initial state for an MHD wind model, we then find that the final state is determined primarily by the potential component of the surface magnetic field. The band of azimut...

  20. Inverse Estimation of Transient Heat Flux to Slab Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Miao; YANG Kai; LIU Yun-fei; GAO Xiao-wei

    2012-01-01

    The transient heat flux was calculated using a model for inverse heat conduction problems based on temper- ature measurements. The unknown heat flux was taken as an optimization variable and solved by minimizing the differences between the calculated temperatures and the measured ones. Several examples were given to show the ef- fectiveness and the accuracy of the inverse algorithm in estimating the transient heat flux to a slab surface. The re sults show that the inverse approach can be applied in the steel industry or in other areas where the target of investi- gation is inaccessible to direct measurements or difficult to be directly modeled.

  1. Error bounds for surface area estimators based on Crofton's formula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiderlen, Markus; Meschenmoser, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    and the mean is approximated by a finite weighted sum S(A) of the total projections in these directions. The choice of the weights depends on the selected quadrature rule. We define an associated zonotope Z (depending only on the projection directions and the quadrature rule), and show that the relative error...... in the sense that the relative error of the surface area estimator is very close to the minimal error.......According to Crofton’s formula, the surface area S(A) of a sufficiently regular compact set A in R^d is proportional to the mean of all total projections pA (u) on a linear hyperplane with normal u, uniformly averaged over all unit vectors u. In applications, pA (u) is only measured in k directions...

  2. GlobCurrent- Multisensor Synergy for Surface Current Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, J. A.; Chapron, B.; Collard, F.; Rio, M.-H.; Piolle, J.-F.; Gaultier, L.; Quartly, G.; Shutler, J.; Escola, R.; Raj, R. P.; Donlon, C.; Danielson, R.; Korosov, A.; Nencioli, F.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Roca, M.; Tournadre, J.; Larnicol, G.; Guitton, G.; Miller, P.; Warren, M.; Hansen, M.

    2016-08-01

    The GlobCurrent project (http://www.globcurrent.org) aims to: (i) advance the quantitative estimation of ocean surface currents from satellite sensor synergy; and (ii) demonstrate impact in user-led scientific, operational and commercial applications that, in turn, will improve and strengthen the uptake of satellite measurements. It is often demonstrated that sharp gradients in the sea surface temperature (SST) and current fields and the ocean surface chlorophyll-a distribution are spatially correlated with the sea surface roughness anomaly fields at small spatial scales, in the sub-mesocale (1-10 km) to the mesoscale (30-80 km). At the larger mesoscale range (>50 km), information derived from radar altimeters often depict the presence of coherent structures and eddies. The variability often appears largest in regions where the intense surface current regimes (>100 - 200 km) are found. These 2- dimensional structures manifested in the satellite observations represent evidence of the upper ocean ( 100-200 m) dynamics. Whereas the quasi geostrophic assumption is valid for the upper ocean dynamics at the larger scale (>100 km), possible triggering mechanisms for the expressions at the mesoscale-to-submesoscale may include spiraling tracers of inertial motion and the interaction of the wind-driven Ekman layer with the quasi-geostrophic current field. This latter, in turn, produces bands of downwelling (convergence) and upwelling (divergence) near fronts. A regular utilization of the sensor synergy approach with the combination of Sentinel-3, Sentinel-2 and Sentinel-1 together with other satellite missions will provide a highly valuable data set for further research and development to better relate the 2-dimensional surface expressions and the upper ocean dynamics.

  3. Estimation of In Situ Stress and Permeability from an Extended Leak-off Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiep Quach, Quoc; Jo, Yeonguk; Chang, Chandong; Song, Insun

    2016-04-01

    Among many parameters needed to analyze a variety of geomechanical problems related to subsurface CO2 storage projects, two important ones are in situ stress states and permeability of the storage reservoirs and cap rocks. In situ stress is needed for investigating potential risk of fault slip in the reservoir systems and permeability is needed for assessing reservoir flow characteristics and sealing capability of cap rocks. We used an extended leak-off test (XLOT), which is often routinely conducted to assess borehole/casing integrity as well as fracture gradient, to estimate both in situ least principal stress magnitude and in situ permeability in a CO2 storage test site, offshore southeast Korea. The XLOT was conducted at a casing shoe depth (700 m below seafloor) within the cap rock consisting of mudstone, approximately 50 m above the interface between cap rock and storage reservoir. The test depth was cement-grouted and remained for 4 days for curing. Then the hole was further drilled below the casing shoe to create a 4 m open-hole interval at the bottom. Water was injected using hydraulic pump at an approximately constant flowrate into the bottom interval through the casing, during which pressure and flowrate were recorded continuously at the surface. The interval pressure (P) was increased linearly with time (t) as water was injected. At some point, the slope of P-t curve deviated from the linear trend, which indicates leak-off. Pressure reached its peak upon formation breakdown, followed by a gradual pressure decrease. Soon after the formation breakdown, the hole was shut-in by pump shut-off, from which we determined the instantaneous shut-in pressure (ISIP). The ISIP was taken to be the magnitude of the in situ least principal stress (S3), which was determined to be 12.1 MPa. This value is lower than the lithostatic vertical stress, indicating that the S3 is the least horizontal principal stress. The determined S3 magnitude will be used to characterize the

  4. A Variational Method for Estimating Near-Surface Soil Moisture and Surface Heat Fluxes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shuwen; ZHANG Weidong; QIU Chongjian

    2007-01-01

    A variational data assimilation method is proposed to estimate the near-surface soil moisture and surface sensible and latent heat fluxes. The method merges the five parts into a cost function, I.e., the differences of wind, potential temperature, and specific humidity gradient between observations and those computed by the profile method, the difference of latent heat fluxes calculated using the ECMWF land surface evaporation scheme and the profile method, and a weak constraint for surface energy balance. By using an optimal algorithm, the best solutions are found. The method is tested with the data collected at Feixi Station (31.41°N, 117.08°E) supported by the China Heavy Rain Experiment and Study (HeRES) during 7-30 June 2001. The results show that estimated near-surface soil moistures can quickly respond to rainfall, and their temporal variation is consistent with that of measurements of average soil moisture over 15-cm top depth with a maximum error less than 0.03 m3 m-3. The surface heat fluxes calculated by this method are consistent with those by the Bowen ratio method, but at the same time it can overcome the instability problem occurring in the Bowen ratio method when the latter is about -1. Meanwhile, the variational method is more accurate than the profile method in terms of satisfying the surface energy balance. The sensitivity tests also show that the variational method is the most stable one among the three methods.

  5. Daytime sensible heat flux estimation over heterogeneous surfaces using multitemporal land-surface temperature observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellví, F.; Cammalleri, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Maltese, A.; Rossi, F.

    2016-05-01

    Equations based on surface renewal (SR) analysis to estimate the sensible heat flux (H) require as input the mean ramp amplitude and period observed in the ramp-like pattern of the air temperature measured at high frequency. A SR-based method to estimate sensible heat flux (HSR-LST) requiring only low-frequency measurements of the air temperature, horizontal mean wind speed, and land-surface temperature as input was derived and tested under unstable conditions over a heterogeneous canopy (olive grove). HSR-LST assumes that the mean ramp amplitude can be inferred from the difference between land-surface temperature and mean air temperature through a linear relationship and that the ramp frequency is related to a wind shear scale characteristic of the canopy flow. The land-surface temperature was retrieved by integrating in situ sensing measures of thermal infrared energy emitted by the surface. The performance of HSR-LST was analyzed against flux tower measurements collected at two heights (close to and well above the canopy top). Crucial parameters involved in HSR-LST, which define the above mentioned linear relationship, were explained using the canopy height and the land surface temperature observed at sunrise and sunset. Although the olive grove can behave as either an isothermal or anisothermal surface, HSR-LST performed close to H measured using the eddy covariance and the Bowen ratio energy balance methods. Root mean square differences between HSR-LST and measured H were of about 55 W m-2. Thus, by using multitemporal thermal acquisitions, HSR-LST appears to bypass inconsistency between land surface temperature and the mean aerodynamic temperature. The one-source bulk transfer formulation for estimating H performed reliable after calibration against the eddy covariance method. After calibration, the latter performed similar to the proposed SR-LST method.

  6. Estimation of the Iron Loss in Deep-Sea Permanent Magnet Motors considering Seawater Compressive Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxiang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea permanent magnet motor equipped with fluid compensated pressure-tolerant system is compressed by the high pressure fluid both outside and inside. The induced stress distribution in stator core is significantly different from that in land type motor. Its effect on the magnetic properties of stator core is important for deep-sea motor designers but seldom reported. In this paper, the stress distribution in stator core, regarding the seawater compressive stress, is calculated by 2D finite element method (FEM. The effect of compressive stress on magnetic properties of electrical steel sheet, that is, permeability, BH curves, and BW curves, is also measured. Then, based on the measured magnetic properties and calculated stress distribution, the stator iron loss is estimated by stress-electromagnetics-coupling FEM. At last the estimation is verified by experiment. Both the calculated and measured results show that stator iron loss increases obviously with the seawater compressive stress.

  7. First-order estimate of the Canary Islands plate-scale stress field: Implications for volcanic hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, A.; Martí, J.; Villaseñor, A.

    2016-06-01

    In volcanic areas, the existing stress field is a key parameter controlling magma generation, location and geometry of the magmatic plumbing systems and the distribution of the resulting volcanism at surface. Therefore, knowing the stress configuration in the lithosphere at any scale (i.e. local, regional and plate-scale) is fundamental to understand the distribution of volcanism and, subsequently, to interpret volcanic unrest and potential tectonic controls of future eruptions. The objective of the present work is to provide a first-order estimate of the plate-scale tectonic stresses acting on the Canary Islands, one of the largest active intraplate volcanic regions of the World. In order to obtain the orientation of the minimum and maximum horizontal compressive stresses, we perform a series of 2D finite element models of plate scale kinematics assuming plane stress approximation. Results obtained are used to develop a regional model, which takes into account recognized archipelago-scale structural discontinuities. Maximum horizontal compressive stress directions obtained are compared with available stress, geological and geodynamic data. The methodology used may be easily applied to other active volcanic regions, where a first order approach of their plate/regional stresses can be essential information to be used as input data for volcanic hazard assessment models.

  8. Estimation of the Level of Residual Stress in Wires with a Magnetic Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suliga M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Residual stress present in wires after drawing process affects their magnetic properties. The paper presents a concept to estimate the level of residual stress on the basis of measurements of hysteresis loops. In order to describe the effect qualitatively the Jiles-Atherton-Sablik description is adapted. On the basis of variations in hysteresis loop shapes the average values of residual stress in wires for different single draft values are determined. It was found that the estimated average values by magnetic stresses are comparable with the results of numerical modeling and experimental studies.

  9. Linear and nonlinear modulus surfaces in stress space, from stress-strain measurements on Berea sandstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boudjema

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The elastic response of many rocks to quasistatic stress changes is highly nonlinear and hysteretic, displaying discrete memory. Rocks also display unusual nonlinear response to dynamic stress changes. A model to describe the elastic behavior of rocks and other consolidated materials is called the Preisach-Mayergoyz (PM space model. In contrast to the traditional analytic approach to stress-strain, the PM space picture establishes a relationship between the quasistatic data and a number density of hysteretic mesoscopic elastic elements in the rock. The number density allows us to make quantitative predictions of dynamic elastic properties. Using the PM space model, we analyze a complex suite of quasistatic stress-strain data taken on Berea sandstone. We predict a dynamic bulk modulus and a dynamic shear modulus surface as a function of mean stress and shear stress. Our predictions for the dynamic moduli compare favorably to moduli derived from time of flight measurements. We derive a set of nonlinear elastic constants and a set of constants that describe the hysteretic behavior of the sandstone.

  10. Local protrusions formed on Si(111) surface by surface melting and solidification under applied tensile stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, T.; Tomitori, M.

    2016-09-01

    The surface structure and composition of Si(111) was modified, by heating it to 1300 °C in ultrahigh vacuum under an external tensile stress. A stress of approximately 1 GPa was applied, by pressing on the center of the rear side of the sample. This process produced two protrusions of approximately 100 μm in height, to the left and right of the center. Scanning Auger electron spectroscopy revealed Fe, Cr, Ni, and C impurities at the top of one protrusion, and C at the top of the other. These impurities likely diffused into the tops of the protrusions during heating, and segregated to the local surface during cooling when the protrusions formed. The protrusion formation mechanism is discussed. Their formation was related to non-uniform surface temperature, electromigration, piezoresistivity, freezing-point depression due to surface alloying with the impurities, and volume expansion during solidification from surface melting. These findings provide a perspective on controlling surface structures and compositions using heat and stress to induce self-assembly.

  11. Surface Residual Stresses in Ti-6Al-4V Friction Stir Welds: Pre- and Post-Thermal Stress Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, P.; Ramulu, M.

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the residual stresses present in titanium friction stir welds and if a post-weld thermal stress relief cycle would be effective in minimizing those weld-induced residual stresses. Surface residual stresses in titanium 6Al-4V alloy friction stir welds were measured in butt joint thicknesses ranging from 3 to 12 mm. The residual stress states were also evaluated after the welds were subjected to a post-weld thermal stress relief cycle of 760 °C for 45 min. High (300-400 MPa) tensile residual stresses were observed in the longitudinal direction prior to stress relief and compressive residual stresses were measured in the transverse direction. After stress relief, the residual stresses were decreased by an order of magnitude to negligible levels.

  12. Bayesian estimation of regularization parameters for deformable surface models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, G.S.; Lehovich, A.; Hanson, K.M.

    1999-02-20

    In this article the authors build on their past attempts to reconstruct a 3D, time-varying bolus of radiotracer from first-pass data obtained by the dynamic SPECT imager, FASTSPECT, built by the University of Arizona. The object imaged is a CardioWest total artificial heart. The bolus is entirely contained in one ventricle and its associated inlet and outlet tubes. The model for the radiotracer distribution at a given time is a closed surface parameterized by 482 vertices that are connected to make 960 triangles, with nonuniform intensity variations of radiotracer allowed inside the surface on a voxel-to-voxel basis. The total curvature of the surface is minimized through the use of a weighted prior in the Bayesian framework, as is the weighted norm of the gradient of the voxellated grid. MAP estimates for the vertices, interior intensity voxels and background count level are produced. The strength of the priors, or hyperparameters, are determined by maximizing the probability of the data given the hyperparameters, called the evidence. The evidence is calculated by first assuming that the posterior is approximately normal in the values of the vertices and voxels, and then by evaluating the integral of the multi-dimensional normal distribution. This integral (which requires evaluating the determinant of a covariance matrix) is computed by applying a recent algorithm from Bai et. al. that calculates the needed determinant efficiently. They demonstrate that the radiotracer is highly inhomogeneous in early time frames, as suspected in earlier reconstruction attempts that assumed a uniform intensity of radiotracer within the closed surface, and that the optimal choice of hyperparameters is substantially different for different time frames.

  13. Surface layer scintillometry for estimating the sensible heat flux component of the surface energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Savage

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The relatively recently developed scintillometry method, with a focus on the dual-beam surface layer scintillometer (SLS, allows boundary layer atmospheric turbulence, surface sensible heat and momentum flux to be estimated in real-time. Much of the previous research using the scintillometer method has involved the large aperture scintillometer method, with only a few studies using the SLS method. The SLS method has been mainly used by agrometeorologists, hydrologists and micrometeorologists for atmospheric stability and surface energy balance studies to obtain estimates of sensible heat from which evaporation estimates representing areas of one hectare or larger are possible. Other applications include the use of the SLS method in obtaining crucial input parameters for atmospheric dispersion and turbulence models. The SLS method relies upon optical scintillation of a horizontal laser beam between transmitter and receiver for a separation distance typically between 50 and 250 m caused by refractive index inhomogeneities in the atmosphere that arise from turbulence fluctuations in air temperature and to a much lesser extent the fluctuations in water vapour pressure. Measurements of SLS beam transmission allow turbulence of the atmosphere to be determined, from which sub-hourly, real-time and in situ path-weighted fluxes of sensible heat and momentum may be calculated by application of the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Unlike the eddy covariance (EC method for which corrections for flow distortion and coordinate rotation are applied, no corrections to the SLS measurements, apart from a correction for water vapour pressure, are applied. Also, path-weighted SLS estimates over the propagation path are obtained. The SLS method also offers high temporal measurement resolution and usually greater spatial coverage compared to EC, Bowen ratio energy balance, surface renewal and other sensible heat measurement methods. Applying the shortened surface

  14. Variation in wind speed and surface shear stress from open floor to porous parallel windbreaks: A wind tunnel study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, De-Xin; Zhong, Ye; Jin, Chang-Jie; Wang, An-Zhi; Wu, Jia-Bing; Shi, Ting-Ting; Zhu, Ting-Yao

    2009-08-01

    As vegetative windbreaks become established on a large scale in agricultural ecosystems, understanding the influence of windbreak networks on the momentum budget of the atmospheric boundary layer becomes important. The authors conducted a wind tunnel experiment to study the variation of wind speed profile and surface shear stress of wind flow passing from an open surface to another with parallel windbreaks. Five spacing (L = 5, 10, 15, 20, 30 h, wherein h is the windbreak height) windbreak arrays with moderate porosity (aerodynamic porosity α = 0.501) were used in the experiments. Both near-floor and over-array wind speed measurements showed that airflow will approach equilibrium state behind a special windbreak of the array, varying from 4th to 9th windbreak when the spacing change from 30 to 5 h. Within the range of L/h values investigated, arrays with narrower spacing cause higher friction velocity and roughness length, which were up to 2.26 and nearly 100 times those observed over open floor, respectively. A semiempirical momentum budget model is developed on the arrayed surface to estimate windbreak drag and shear stress on the protected floor. Windbreak drag accounts for more than 80% of shear stress on the arrayed surface, and the shear stress on protected floor is less than 20% when L/h < 40 based on the model estimation. The sum of the two estimated components agrees well with the estimates obtained from over-array wind profiles.

  15. Estimation of turbulent shear stress in free jets: application to valvular regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winoto, S H; Shah, D A; Liu, H

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to better assess the severity of valvular regurgitation, an in-vitro experiment has been conducted to estimate turbulent shear stress levels within free jets issuing from different orifice shapes and sizes by means of hot-wire anemometry. On the basis of the measured mean velocities and the jet profiles, the distributions of the normalized kinematic turbulent shear stress (uv/Um2) were estimated for different jets by using an equation available for self-preserving circular jet. The results indicate that the equation can estimate the distributions of uv/Um2 independent of the orifice shape and Reynolds number of the jet. For the range of Reynolds numbers considered, the estimation of maximum turbulent shear stress inferred from these distributions suggests that the critical shear stress level of approximately 200 N/m2, corresponding to destruction of blood cells, is exceeded for typical blood flow velocity of 5 m/s at the valvular lesion.

  16. Estimating Stresses, Fault Friction and Fluid Pressure from Topography and Coseismic Slip Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styron, R. H.; Hetland, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    Stress is a first-order control on the deformation state of the earth. However, stress is notoriously hard to measure, and researchers typically only estimate the directions and relative magnitudes of principal stresses, with little quantification of the uncertainties or absolute magnitude. To improve upon this, we have developed methods to constrain the full stress tensor field in a region surrounding a fault, including tectonic, topographic, and lithostatic components, as well as static friction and pore fluid pressure on the fault. Our methods are based on elastic halfspace techniques for estimating topographic stresses from a DEM, and we use a Bayesian approach to estimate accumulated tectonic stress, fluid pressure, and friction from fault geometry and slip rake, assuming Mohr-Coulomb fault mechanics. The nature of the tectonic stress inversion is such that either the stress maximum or minimum is better constrained, depending on the topography and fault deformation style. Our results from the 2008 Wenchuan event yield shear stresses from topography up to 20 MPa (normal-sinistral shear sense) and topographic normal stresses up to 80 MPa on the faults; tectonic stress had to be large enough to overcome topography to produce the observed reverse-dextral slip. Maximum tectonic stress is constrained to be >0.3 * lithostatic stress (depth-increasing), with a most likely value around 0.8, trending 90-110°E. Minimum tectonic stress is about half of maximum. Static fault friction is constrained at 0.1-0.4, and fluid pressure at 0-0.6 * total pressure on the fault. Additionally, the patterns of topographic stress and slip suggest that topographic normal stress may limit fault slip once failure has occurred. Preliminary results from the 2013 Balochistan earthquake are similar, but yield stronger constraints on the upper limits of maximum tectonic stress, as well as tight constraints on the magnitude of minimum tectonic stress and stress orientation. Work in progress on

  17. Surface properties and exponential stress relaxations of mammalian meibum films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftimov, Petar; Yokoi, Norihiko; Tonchev, Vesselin; Nencheva, Yana; Georgiev, Georgi As

    2017-03-01

    The surface properties of meibomian secretion (MGS), the major constituent of the tear film (TF) lipid layer, are of key importance for TF stability. The interfacial properties of canine, cMGS, and feline, fMGS, meibum films were studied using a Langmuir surface balance. These species were selected because they have blinking frequency and TF stability similar to those of humans. The sample's performance during dynamic area changes was evaluated by surface pressure (π)-area (A) isocycles and the layer structure was monitored with Brewster angle microscopy. The films' dilatational rheology was probed via the stress-relaxation technique. The animal MGS showed similar behavior both between each other and with human MGS (studied previously). They form reversible, non-collapsible, multilayer thick films. The relaxations of canine, feline, and human MGS films were well described by double exponential decay reflecting the presence of two processes: (1) fast elastic process, with characteristic time τ  100 s-emphasizing the meibum layers viscoelasticity. The temperature decrease from 35 to 25 °C resulted in decreased thickness and lateral expansion of all MGS layers accompanied with increase of the π/A hysteresis and of the elastic process contribution to π relaxation transients. Thus, MGS films of mammals with similar blinking frequency and TF stability have similar surface properties and stress relaxations unaltered by the interspecies MGS compositional variations. Such knowledge may impact the selection of animal mimics of human MGS and on a better understanding of lipid classes' impact on meibum functionality.

  18. Modeling Surface Roughness to Estimate Surface Moisture Using Radarsat-2 Quad Polarimetric SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurtyawan, R.; Saepuloh, A.; Budiharto, A.; Wikantika, K.

    2016-08-01

    Microwave backscattering from the earth's surface depends on several parameters such as surface roughness and dielectric constant of surface materials. The two parameters related to water content and porosity are crucial for estimating soil moisture. The soil moisture is an important parameter for ecological study and also a factor to maintain energy balance of land surface and atmosphere. Direct roughness measurements to a large area require extra time and cost. Heterogeneity roughness scale for some applications such as hydrology, climate, and ecology is a problem which could lead to inaccuracies of modeling. In this study, we modeled surface roughness using Radasat-2 quad Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) data. The statistical approaches to field roughness measurements were used to generate an appropriate roughness model. This modeling uses a physical SAR approach to predicts radar backscattering coefficient in the parameter of radar configuration (wavelength, polarization, and incidence angle) and soil parameters (surface roughness and dielectric constant). Surface roughness value is calculated using a modified Campbell and Shepard model in 1996. The modification was applied by incorporating the backscattering coefficient (σ°) of quad polarization HH, HV and VV. To obtain empirical surface roughness model from SAR backscattering intensity, we used forty-five sample points from field roughness measurements. We selected paddy field in Indramayu district, West Java, Indonesia as the study area. This area was selected due to intensive decreasing of rice productivity in the Northern Coast region of West Java. Third degree polynomial is the most suitable data fitting with coefficient of determination R2 and RMSE are about 0.82 and 1.18 cm, respectively. Therefore, this model is used as basis to generate the map of surface roughness.

  19. Estimation of Plasma Density by Surface Plasmons for Surface-Wave Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhao-Quan; LIU Ming-Hai; LAN Chao-Hui; CHEN Wei; LUO Zhi-Qing; HU Xi-Wei

    2008-01-01

    @@ An estimation method of plasma density based on surface plasmons theory for surface-wave plasmas is proposed. The number of standing-wave is obtained directly from the discharge image, and the propagation constant is calculated with the trim size of the apparatus in this method, then plasma density can be determined with the value of 9.1 × 1017 m-3. Plasma density is measured using a Langmuir probe, the value is 8.1 × 1017 m-3 which is very close to the predicted value of surface plasmons theory. Numerical simulation is used to check the number of standing-wave by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method also. All results are compatible both of theoretical analysis and experimental measurement.

  20. Estimating a Global Hydrological Carrying Capacity Using GRACE Observed Water Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, K.; Reager, J. T.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Global population is expected to reach 9 billion people by the year 2050, causing increased demands for water and potential threats to human security. This study attempts to frame the overpopulation problem through a hydrological resources lens by hypothesizing that observed groundwater trends should be directly attributed to human water consumption. This study analyzes the relationships between available blue water, population, and cropland area on a global scale. Using satellite data from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) along with land surface model data from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS), a global groundwater depletion trend is isolated, the validity of which has been verified in many regional studies. By using the inherent distributions of these relationships, we estimate the regional populations that have exceeded their local hydrological carrying capacity. Globally, these populations sum to ~3.5 billion people that are living in presently water-stressed or potentially water-scarce regions, and we estimate total cropland is exceeding a sustainable threshold by about 80 million km^2. Key study areas such as the North China Plain, northwest India, and Mexico City were qualitatively chosen for further analysis of regional water resources and policies, based on our distributions of water stress. These case studies are used to verify the groundwater level changes seen in the GRACE trend . Tfor the many populous, arid regions of the world that have already begun to experience the strains of high water demand.he many populous, arid regions of the world have already begun to experience the strains of high water demand. It will take a global cooperative effort of improving domestic and agricultural use efficiency, and summoning a political will to prioritize environmental issues to adapt to a thirstier planet. Global Groundwater Depletion Trend (Mar 2003-Dec 2011)

  1. ESTIMATION OF SHEAR STRESS WORKING ON SUBMERGED HOLLOW FIBRE MEMBRANE BY CFD METHOD IN MBRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaw, Hlwan Moe; Li, Tairi; Nagaoka, Hiroshi

    This study was conducted to evaluate shear stress working on submerged hollow fibre membrane by CFD (Computation Fluid Dynamics) method in MBRs. Shear stress on hollow fibre membrane caused by aeration was measured directly using a two-direction load sensor. The measurement of water-phase flow velocity was done also by using laser doppler velocimeter. It was confirmed that the shear stress was possible to be evaluated from the water-phase flow velocityby the result of comparison of time average shear stress actually measured with one hollow fibre membrane and the one calculated by the water-phase flow velocity. In the estimation of the water-phase flow velocity using the CFD method, time average water-phase flow velocity estimated by consideration of the fluid resistance of the membrane module nearly coincided with the measured values, and it was shown that it was possible to be estimated also within the membrane module. Moreover, the measured shear stress and drag force well coincided with the values calculated from the estimated water-phase flow velocity outside of membrane module and in the center of membrane module, and it was suggested that the shear stress on the hollow fibre membrane could be estimated by the CFD method in MBRs.

  2. Finite Element Surface Layer Inheritable Condition Residual Stresses Model in Surface Plastic Deformation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalov, M. S.; Blumenstein, V. Yu

    2016-04-01

    The residual stresses (RS) research and computational algorithms creation in complex types of loading on the product lifecycle stages relevance is shown. The RS forming finite element model at surface plastic deformation strengthening machining, including technological inheritance effect, is presented. A model feature is the production previous stages obtained transformation properties consideration, as well as these properties evolution during metal particles displacement through the deformation space in the present loading step.

  3. Estimation of in-situ stresses in concrete members using polarized ultrasonic shear waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Andrew; Schumacher, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasonic testing is commonly used to detect flaws, estimate geometries, and characterize properties of materials and structures. Acoustoelasticity refers to the dependency of stress wave velocity with applied stresses and is a phenomenon that has been known by geophysicists since the 1960s. A way to capitalize on this effect for concrete applications is by using ultrasonic shear waves which are particularly sensitive to applied stresses when polarized in the direction of the applied stress. The authors conducted an experiment on a 150 mm (6 in.) diameter concrete cylinder specimen with a length of 305 mm (12 in.) that was loaded in discrete load steps to failure. At each load step two ultrasonic shear waves were transmitted through the specimen, one with the polarization perpendicular and the other transverse to the applied stress. The velocity difference between the two sets of polarized shear waves was found to correlate with the applied stress in the specimen. Two potential applications for this methodology include estimation of stresses in pre-stressed concrete bridge girders and investigation of load redistribution in structural support elements after extreme events. This paper introduces the background of the methodology, presents an analysis of the collected data, and discusses the relationship between the recorded signals and the applied stress.

  4. Estimating regional methane surface fluxes: the relative importance of surface and GOSAT mole fraction measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fraser

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We use an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF, together with the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model, to estimate regional monthly methane (CH4 fluxes for the period June 2009–December 2010 using proxy dry-air column-averaged mole fractions of methane (XCH4 from GOSAT (Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite and/or NOAA ESRL (Earth System Research Laboratory and CSIRO GASLAB (Global Atmospheric Sampling Laboratory CH4 surface mole fraction measurements. Global posterior estimates using GOSAT and/or surface measurements are between 510–516 Tg yr−1, which is less than, though within the uncertainty of, the prior global flux of 529 ± 25 Tg yr−1. We find larger differences between regional prior and posterior fluxes, with the largest changes in monthly emissions (75 Tg yr−1 occurring in Temperate Eurasia. In non-boreal regions the error reductions for inversions using the GOSAT data are at least three times larger (up to 45% than if only surface data are assimilated, a reflection of the greater spatial coverage of GOSAT, with the two exceptions of latitudes >60° associated with a data filter and over Europe where the surface network adequately describes fluxes on our model spatial and temporal grid. We use CarbonTracker and GEOS-Chem XCO2 model output to investigate model error on quantifying proxy GOSAT XCH4 (involving model XCO2 and inferring methane flux estimates from surface mole fraction data and show similar resulting fluxes, with differences reflecting initial differences in the proxy value. Using a series of observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs we characterize the posterior flux error introduced by non-uniform atmospheric sampling by GOSAT. We show that clear-sky measurements can theoretically reproduce fluxes within 10% of true values, with the exception of tropical regions where, due to a large seasonal cycle in the number of measurements because of clouds and aerosols, fluxes are within 15% of true fluxes. We evaluate our

  5. Performance of five surface energy balance models for estimating daily evapotranspiration in high biomass sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Pradeep; Bhattarai, Nishan; Gowda, Prasanna H.; Kakani, Vijaya G.

    2017-06-01

    Robust evapotranspiration (ET) models are required to predict water usage in a variety of terrestrial ecosystems under different geographical and agrometeorological conditions. As a result, several remote sensing-based surface energy balance (SEB) models have been developed to estimate ET over large regions. However, comparison of the performance of several SEB models at the same site is limited. In addition, none of the SEB models have been evaluated for their ability to predict ET in rain-fed high biomass sorghum grown for biofuel production. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of five widely used single-source SEB models, namely Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), Mapping ET with Internalized Calibration (METRIC), Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS), Simplified Surface Energy Balance Index (S-SEBI), and operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop), for estimating ET over a high biomass sorghum field during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons. The predicted ET values were compared against eddy covariance (EC) measured ET (ETEC) for 19 cloud-free Landsat image. In general, S-SEBI, SEBAL, and SEBS performed reasonably well for the study period, while METRIC and SSEBop performed poorly. All SEB models substantially overestimated ET under extremely dry conditions as they underestimated sensible heat (H) and overestimated latent heat (LE) fluxes under dry conditions during the partitioning of available energy. METRIC, SEBAL, and SEBS overestimated LE regardless of wet or dry periods. Consequently, predicted seasonal cumulative ET by METRIC, SEBAL, and SEBS were higher than seasonal cumulative ETEC in both seasons. In contrast, S-SEBI and SSEBop substantially underestimated ET under too wet conditions, and predicted seasonal cumulative ET by S-SEBI and SSEBop were lower than seasonal cumulative ETEC in the relatively wetter 2013 growing season. Our results indicate the necessity of inclusion of soil moisture or plant water stress

  6. Estimation of basal shear stresses from now ice-free LIA glacier forefields in the Swiss Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Mauro; Haeberli, Wilfried; Huss, Matthias; Paul, Frank; Linsbauer, Andreas; Hoelzle, Martin

    2013-04-01

    In most cases, assessing the impacts of climatic changes on glaciers requires knowledge about the ice thickness distribution. Miscellaneous methodological approaches with different degrees of sophistication have been applied to model glacier thickness so far. However, all of them include significant uncertainty. By applying a parameterization scheme for ice thickness determination relying on assumptions about basal shear stress by Haeberli and Hoelzle (1995) to now ice-free glacier forefields in the Swiss Alps, basal shear stress values can be calculated based on a fast and robust experimental approach. In a GIS, the combination of recent (1973) and Little Ice Age (LIA) maximum (around 1850) glacier outlines, central flowlines, a recent Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and a DEM of glacier surface topography for the LIA maximum allows extracting local ice thickness over the forefield of individual glaciers. Subsequently, basal shear stress is calculated via the rheological assumption of perfect-plasticity relating ice thickness and surface slope to shear stress. The need of only very few input data commonly stored in glacier inventories permits an application to a large number of glaciers. Basal shear stresses are first calculated for subsamples of glaciers belonging to two test sites where the LIA maximum glacier surface is modeled with DEMs derived from accurate topographic maps for the mid 19th century. Neglecting outliers, the average resulting mean basal shear stress is around 80 kPa for the Bernina region (range 25-100 kPa) and 120 kPa (range 50-150 kPa) for the Aletsch region. For the entire Swiss Alps it is 100 kPa (range 40-175 kPa). Because complete LIA glacier surface elevation information is lacking there, a DEM is first created from reconstructed height of LIA lateral moraines and trimlines by using a simple GIS-based tool. A sensitivity analysis of the input parameters reveals that the performance of the developed approach primarily depends on the

  7. Accurate computation of surface stresses and forces with immersed boundary methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goza, Andres; Liska, Sebastian; Morley, Benjamin; Colonius, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Many immersed boundary methods solve for surface stresses that impose the velocity boundary conditions on an immersed body. These surface stresses may contain spurious oscillations that make them ill-suited for representing the physical surface stresses on the body. Moreover, these inaccurate stresses often lead to unphysical oscillations in the history of integrated surface forces such as the coefficient of lift. While the errors in the surface stresses and forces do not necessarily affect the convergence of the velocity field, it is desirable, especially in fluid-structure interaction problems, to obtain smooth and convergent stress distributions on the surface. To this end, we show that the equation for the surface stresses is an integral equation of the first kind whose ill-posedness is the source of spurious oscillations in the stresses. We also demonstrate that for sufficiently smooth delta functions, the oscillations may be filtered out to obtain physically accurate surface stresses. The filtering is applied as a post-processing procedure, so that the convergence of the velocity field is unaffected. We demonstrate the efficacy of the method by computing stresses and forces that converge to the physical stresses and forces for several test problems.

  8. Quantitative Estimates of Bio-Remodeling on Coastal Rock Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Pappalardo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Remodeling of rocky coasts and erosion rates have been widely studied in past years, but not all the involved processes acting over rocks surface have been quantitatively evaluated yet. The first goal of this paper is to revise the different methodologies employed in the quantification of the effect of biotic agents on rocks exposed to coastal morphologic agents, comparing their efficiency. Secondly, we focus on geological methods to assess and quantify bio-remodeling, presenting some case studies in an area of the Mediterranean Sea in which different geological methods, inspired from the revised literature, have been tested in order to provide a quantitative assessment of the effects some biological covers exert over rocky platforms in tidal and supra-tidal environments. In particular, different experimental designs based on Schmidt hammer test results have been applied in order to estimate rock hardness related to different orders of littoral platforms and the bio-erosive/bio-protective role of Chthamalus ssp. and Verrucariaadriatica. All data collected have been analyzed using statistical tests to evaluate the significance of the measures and methodologies. The effectiveness of this approach is analyzed, and its limits are highlighted. In order to overcome the latter, a strategy combining geological and experimental–computational approaches is proposed, potentially capable of revealing novel clues on bio-erosion dynamics. An experimental-computational proposal, to assess the indirect effects of the biofilm coverage of rocky shores, is presented in this paper, focusing on the shear forces exerted during hydration-dehydration cycles. The results of computational modeling can be compared to experimental evidence, from nanoscopic to macroscopic scales.

  9. Estimating the surface area of non-convex particles from central planar sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thórisdóttir, Ólöf; H.Rafati, Ali; Kiderlen, Markus

    . In this section plane a modification of the area tangent count method is used. The Morse type estimator generalizes Cruz-Orive's pivotal estimator for convex objects to non-convex objects. The advantages of the Morse type estimator over existing local surface area estimators are illustrated in a simulation study......In this paper, we present a new surface area estimator in local stereology. This new estimator is called the 'Morse type surface area estimator' and is obtained using a two-stage sampling procedure. First a plane section through a fixed reference point of a three-dimensional structure is taken....... The Morse type estimator is well suited for computer assisted confocal microscopy and we demonstrate its practicability in a biological application: the surface area estimation of the nuclei of giant-cell glioblastoma from microscopy images. We also present an interactive software that allows the user...

  10. Evaluation of Tire/Surfacing/Base Contact Stresses and Texture Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.J.vdM. Steyn

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tire rolling resistance has a major impact on vehicle fuel consumption. Rolling resistance is the loss of energy due to the interaction between the tire and the pavement surface. This interaction is a complicated combination of stresses and strains which depend on both tire and pavement related factors. These include vehicle speed, vehicle weight, tire material and type, road camber, tire inflation pressure, pavement surfacing texture etc. In this paper the relationship between pavement surface texture depth and tire/surfacing contact stress and area is investigated. Texture depth and tire/surfacing contact stress were measured for a range of tire inflation pressures on five different pavement surfaces. In the analysis the relationship between texture and the generated contact stresses as well as the contact stress between the surfacing and base layer are presented and discussed, and the anticipated effect of these relationships on the rolling resistance of vehicles on the surfacings, and subsequent vehicle fuel economy discussed.

  11. Effect of the residual stresses on surface coercive force in amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, M.; Garcia, J.A.; Carrizo, J.; Elbaile, L. E-mail: elbaile@pinon.ccu.uniovi.es; Santos, J.D

    2000-06-02

    The dependence of the coercivity H{sub c} on the applied stress {sigma} in the surfaces of various amorphous ribbons with positive magnetostriction is studied. The results obtained show that the behaviour of H{sub c}({sigma}) in the surfaces is the same as in the bulk and the minimum of H{sub c}({sigma}) does not depend on the residual stresses. The residual stresses affect the value of the coercive field but not its stress dependence.

  12. Wrinkling vs. scarring: Stress collapse in surface-confined assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grason, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    Confining assemblies to surfaces possessing Gaussian curvature frustrates the microscopic order of the packing, thus introducing mechanical costs for assemblies in such diverse contexts as viral capsids and particle-coated drops. The structure and stability of these systems is complicated by the non-trivial competition between distinct modes of stress relaxation, including ``elastic'' shape deformation of the surface-bound assembly; defect-mediated ``plastic'' reorganization of packing. We consider the interplay between these shape-deformation and defect-relaxation for a model of crystalline patch bound to an adhesive and deformable sphere, where the distinct patterns of relaxation become, respectively, radial chains of dislocations, or ``scars'', and radial wrinkles. Analysis of highly-wrinkled and defect-riddle states reveals remarkably that both modes achieve the identical mechanical state in the limits of vanishing thickness and lattice spacing, and further, that the degeneracy between these modes is lifted only by the microscopic and sub-dominant energetics that select their optimal symmetry. We present a structural relaxation phase diagram that predicts a wrinkle-to-scar transition driven both by increasing substrate stiffness and substrate curvature.

  13. Estimation of surface energy fluxes under complex terrain of Mt. Qomolangma over the Tibetan Plateau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Xuelong; Su, Zhongbo; Ma, Y.; Yang, K.; Wang, B.

    2013-01-01

    Surface solar radiation is an important parameter in surface energy balance models and in estimation of evapotranspiration. This study developed a DEM based radiation model to estimate instantaneous clear sky solar radiation for surface energy balance system to obtain accurate energy absorbed by the

  14. Basic Study on Estimating Water Stress of a Plant Using Vibration Measurement of Leaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Motoaki; Sugimoto, Tsuneyoshi; Hosoya, Hiroshi; Ohaba, Motoyoshi; Shibusawa, Sakae

    2013-07-01

    A new noninvasive method for estimating the water stress of a plant was proposed. In order to investigate this method, we first examined the characteristic frequency of an individual leaf picked from the plant, and obtained the result that its characteristic frequency decreased in proportion to the reduction in the water content of the leaf. Next, we applied this method to a leaf on a branch and confirmed the same tendency when the water stress was increased by stopping the water supply of a plant cultured in water. From these results, it was suggested that the water stress of the plant could be estimated from the vibration measurement of the leaf. Lastly, the relationship between the water potential of the leaf and its elastic constant was discussed with the soil-plant-atmosphere-continuum model (SPAC model), and Young's modulus of a tomato leaf was roughly estimated.

  15. Using Estimations of Entropy to Optimize Complex Human Dynamic Networks under Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    blood components , during various physically and mentally stressful exercises, we will be able to determine the factors that drive overall team success and assemble more effective teams using these factors. Sixteen WVU Air Force ROTC participants were selected, divided into four different teams of four individuals, their biological responses were monitored (some in real-time and some prior to and immediately following) in response to stressful teamwork exercises (mock hostage rescue). Individuals were outfitted with EEG, heart rate, breathing rate, estimated core

  16. Experimental Research on Residual Stress in Surface of Silicon Nitride Ceramic Balls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The influence of the residual stress in surface of ceramic balls on the fatigue life is large, because the life of silicon nitride ball bearings is more sensitive to the load acted on the bearings than the life of all-steel ball bearings. In this paper, the influence of thermal stress produced in sintering and mechanical stress formed in lapping process on residual stress in surface of silicon nitride ceramic balls was discussed. The residual compress stress will be formed in the surface of silicon nitride ...

  17. Inter-comparison of four remote sensing based surface energy balance methods to retrieve surface evapotranspiration and water stress of irrigated fields in semi-arid climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chirouze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Remotely sensed surface temperature can provide a good proxy for water stress level and is therefore particularly useful to estimate spatially distributed evapotranspiration. Instantaneous stress levels or instantaneous latent heat flux are deduced from the surface energy balance equation constrained by this equilibrium temperature. Pixel average surface temperature depends on two main factors: stress and vegetation fraction cover. Methods estimating stress vary according to the way they treat each factor. Two families of methods can be defined: the contextual methods, where stress levels are scaled on a given image between hot/dry and cool/wet pixels for a particular vegetation cover, and single-pixel methods which evaluate latent heat as the residual of the surface energy balance for one pixel independently from the others. Four models, two contextual (S-SEBI and a triangle method, inspired by Moran et al., 1994 and two single-pixel (TSEB, SEBS are applied at seasonal scale over a four by four km irrigated agricultural area in semi-arid northern Mexico. Their performances, both at local and spatial standpoints, are compared relatively to energy balance data acquired at seven locations within the area, as well as a more complex soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer model forced with true irrigation and rainfall data. Stress levels are not always well retrieved by most models, but S-SEBI as well as TSEB, although slightly biased, show good performances. Drop in model performances is observed when vegetation is senescent, mostly due to a poor partitioning both between turbulent fluxes and between the soil/plant components of the latent heat flux and the available energy. As expected, contextual methods perform well when extreme hydric and vegetation conditions are encountered in the same image (therefore, esp. in spring and early summer while they tend to exaggerate the spread in water status in more homogeneous conditions (esp. in winter.

  18. Inter-comparison of four remote sensing based surface energy balance methods to retrieve surface evapotranspiration and water stress of irrigated fields in semi-arid climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirouze, J.; Boulet, G.; Jarlan, L.; Fieuzal, R.; Rodriguez, J. C.; Ezzahar, J.; Er-Raki, S.; Bigeard, G.; Merlin, O.; Garatuza-Payan, J.; Watts, C.; Chehbouni, G.

    2013-01-01

    Remotely sensed surface temperature can provide a good proxy for water stress level and is therefore particularly useful to estimate spatially distributed evapotranspiration. Instantaneous stress levels or instantaneous latent heat flux are deduced from the surface energy balance equation constrained by this equilibrium temperature. Pixel average surface temperature depends on two main factors: stress and vegetation fraction cover. Methods estimating stress vary according to the way they treat each factor. Two families of methods can be defined: the contextual methods, where stress levels are scaled on a given image between hot/dry and cool/wet pixels for a particular vegetation cover, and single-pixel methods which evaluate latent heat as the residual of the surface energy balance for one pixel independently from the others. Four models, two contextual (S-SEBI and a triangle method, inspired by Moran et al., 1994) and two single-pixel (TSEB, SEBS) are applied at seasonal scale over a four by four km irrigated agricultural area in semi-arid northern Mexico. Their performances, both at local and spatial standpoints, are compared relatively to energy balance data acquired at seven locations within the area, as well as a more complex soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer model forced with true irrigation and rainfall data. Stress levels are not always well retrieved by most models, but S-SEBI as well as TSEB, although slightly biased, show good performances. Drop in model performances is observed when vegetation is senescent, mostly due to a poor partitioning both between turbulent fluxes and between the soil/plant components of the latent heat flux and the available energy. As expected, contextual methods perform well when extreme hydric and vegetation conditions are encountered in the same image (therefore, esp. in spring and early summer) while they tend to exaggerate the spread in water status in more homogeneous conditions (esp. in winter).

  19. Estimating the surface area of birds: using the homing pigeon (Columba livia as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina R. Perez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of the surface area of the avian body is valuable for thermoregulation and metabolism studies as well as for assessing exposure to oil and other surface-active organic pollutants from a spill. The use of frozen carcasses for surface area estimations prevents the ability to modify the posture of the bird. The surface area of six live homing pigeons in the fully extended flight position was estimated using a noninvasive method. An equation was derived to estimate the total surface area of a pigeon based on its body weight. A pigeon's surface area in the fully extended flight position is approximately 4 times larger than the surface area of a pigeon in the perching position. The surface area of a bird is dependent on its physical position, and, therefore, the fully extended flight position exhibits the maximum area of a bird and should be considered the true surface area of a bird.

  20. Estimating the surface area of birds: using the homing pigeon (Columba livia) as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Cristina R; Moye, John K; Pritsos, Chris A

    2014-05-08

    Estimation of the surface area of the avian body is valuable for thermoregulation and metabolism studies as well as for assessing exposure to oil and other surface-active organic pollutants from a spill. The use of frozen carcasses for surface area estimations prevents the ability to modify the posture of the bird. The surface area of six live homing pigeons in the fully extended flight position was estimated using a noninvasive method. An equation was derived to estimate the total surface area of a pigeon based on its body weight. A pigeon's surface area in the fully extended flight position is approximately 4 times larger than the surface area of a pigeon in the perching position. The surface area of a bird is dependent on its physical position, and, therefore, the fully extended flight position exhibits the maximum area of a bird and should be considered the true surface area of a bird.

  1. Estimating Subdivision Depth of Catmull-Clark Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Wei Wang; Kai-Huai Qin

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, both general and exponential bounds of the distance between a uniform Catmull-Clark surface and its control polyhedron are derived. The exponential bound is independent of the process of subdivision and can be evaluated without recursive subdivision. Based on the exponential bound, we can predict the depth of subdivision within a user-specified error tolerance. This is quite useful and important for pre-computing the subdivision depth of subdivision surfaces in many engineering applications such as surface/surface intersection,mesh generation, numerical control machining and surface rendering.

  2. METHODOLOGY FOR ESTIMATION OF HEAT-STRESSED STATE FOR CYLINDER HEAD OF DIESEL ENGINE WITH AIR COOLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Avramenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance tuning improvement of modern diesel engines exerts an influence on technical and economic, ecological and resource indices of an internal combustion engine (ICE. In its turn, that requires a complex estimation and improvement of engine indices. As is known, working process and thermal intensity of combustion chamber parts are interconnected between themselves. Changes in design, operating and adjustment parameters of systems and structural elements of internal combustion engines that enable air-fuel mixing and combustions processes stressed state of combustion chamber parts. Joint estimation of operating cycle parameters and strength indices of ICE parts makes it possible to solve a number of problems originating in the process of designing new engine models and further development of the existing ones. The paper provides results of comparative estimation on heat-stressed state of a cylinder head for a high-speed diesel engine Д21A (2Ч10,5/12 while operating a rated power mode. In order to simulate and specify a heat-stressed state for description of boundary heat conductivity conditions the following adjoint “gas – wall” problems have been solved: the first one – for combustion chamber of a diesel engine (an internal problem – simulation of a working cycle for a diesel engine; the second one – for cooling edges while blowing over them by air flow (an external problem. Calculations have been made in three-dimensional non-stationary presentation within the Cartesian coordinates. In order to simulate a working cycle of the diesel engine a computational grid describing combustion chamber configuration, inlet and outlet channels has been used in the paper. Solution of the external problem for cooling edge surface in case of blowing over them by air flow has permitted to specify temperatures and heat-transfer coefficient and later to improve an accuracy while estimating level of temperatures and stresses of the cylinder head.

  3. ESTIMATION OF RELIABILITY FOR MULTICOMPONENT SYSTEMS USING EXPONENTIAL, GAMMA AND LINDLEY STRESS-STRENGTH DISTRIBUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gogoi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the stress vs. strength problem incorporating multi-componentsystems viz. standby redundancy. The models developed have been illustrated assuming that allthe components in the system for both stress and strength are independent and follow differentprobability distributions viz. Exponential, Gamma and Lindley. Four different conditions forstress and strength have been considered for this investigation. Under these assumptions thereliabilities of the system have been obtained with the help of the particular forms of densityfunctions of n-standby system when all stress-strengths are random variables. The expressions forthe marginal reliabilities R(1, R(2, R(3 etc. have been derived based on its stress- strengthmodels. Then the corresponding system reliabilities Rn have been computed numerically andpresented in tabular forms for different stress-strength distributions with different values of theirparameters. Here we consider n  3 for estimating the system reliability R3.

  4. Probabilistic estimates of the distribution of near-surface (within 1m) permafrost in Alaska.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This medium resolution (i.e. 30-m pixels) spatial dataset provides an estimate of the occurrence of near-surface (within 1 m of the ground surface) permafrost in...

  5. Probabilistic estimates of the distribution of near-surface (within 1m) permafrost in Alaska.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This medium resolution (i.e. 30-m pixels) spatial dataset provides an estimate of the occurrence of near-surface (within 1 m of the ground surface) permafrost in...

  6. Estimation of sea surface temperature (SST) using marine seismic data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sinha, S.K.; Dewangan, P.; Sain, K.

    .g. Wu et al. [1999]). However, due to the skin effect, sea surface temperatures as measured by satellites can be very different from temperatures a few centimeters below the sea surface (i.e. in-situ temperatures) [Emery et al., 1994]. Therefore...

  7. estimation of land surface temperature of kaduna metropolis, nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zaharaddeen et. al

    Understanding the spatial variation of Land Surface Temperature. (LST), will be ... positive correlation between mean of surface emissivity with date and ... deviation of 1.92 of LST and coefficient determinant R2 (0.46) show a ... (LST), as the prime and basic physical parameter of the earth's ..... thorough review of the paper.

  8. Combining multi-atlas segmentation with brain surface estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yuankai; Carass, Aaron; Resnick, Susan M.; Pham, Dzung L.; Prince, Jerry L.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    Whole brain segmentation (with comprehensive cortical and subcortical labels) and cortical surface reconstruction are two essential techniques for investigating the human brain. The two tasks are typically conducted independently, however, which leads to spatial inconsistencies and hinders further integrated cortical analyses. To obtain self-consistent whole brain segmentations and surfaces, FreeSurfer segregates the subcortical and cortical segmentations before and after the cortical surface reconstruction. However, this "segmentation to surface to parcellation" strategy has shown limitation in various situations. In this work, we propose a novel "multi-atlas segmentation to surface" method called Multi-atlas CRUISE (MaCRUISE), which achieves self-consistent whole brain segmentations and cortical surfaces by combining multi-atlas segmentation with the cortical reconstruction method CRUISE. To our knowledge, this is the first work that achieves the reliability of state-of-the-art multi-atlas segmentation and labeling methods together with accurate and consistent cortical surface reconstruction. Compared with previous methods, MaCRUISE has three features: (1) MaCRUISE obtains 132 cortical/subcortical labels simultaneously from a single multi-atlas segmentation before reconstructing volume consistent surfaces; (2) Fuzzy tissue memberships are combined with multi-atlas segmentations to address partial volume effects; (3) MaCRUISE reconstructs topologically consistent cortical surfaces by using the sulci locations from multi-atlas segmentation. Two data sets, one consisting of five subjects with expertly traced landmarks and the other consisting of 100 volumes from elderly subjects are used for validation. Compared with CRUISE, MaCRUISE achieves self-consistent whole brain segmentation and cortical reconstruction without compromising on surface accuracy. MaCRUISE is comparably accurate to FreeSurfer while achieving greater robustness across an elderly population.

  9. Estimation of Upper Limb Joint Angle Using Surface EMG Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Mon Aung

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the development of robot-assisted rehabilitation systems for upper limb rehabilitation therapy, human electromyogram (EMG is widely used due to its ability to detect the user intended motion. EMG is one kind of biological signal that can be recorded to evaluate the performance of skeletal muscles by means of a sensor electrode. Based on recorded EMG signals, user intended motion could be extracted via estimation of joint torque, force or angle. Therefore, this estimation becomes one of the most important factors to achieve accurate user intended motion. In this paper, an upper limb joint angle estimation methodology is proposed. A back propagation neural network (BPNN is developed to estimate the shoulder and elbow joint angles from the recorded EMG signals. A Virtual Human Model (VHM is also developed and integrated with BPNN to perform the simulation of the estimated angle. The relationships between sEMG signals and upper limb movements are observed in this paper. The effectiveness of our developments is evaluated with four healthy subjects and a VHM simulation. The results show that the methodology can be used in the estimation of joint angles based on EMG.

  10. Uniaxial Stress Dependence of the Fermi Surface of Copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesink, Derk Willem

    Form a comprehensive experimental study of quantum oscillations in magnetostriction and torque, values have been deduced for all non-vanishing tetragonal and angular shear strain derivatives for the five principal extremal cross sections of the Fermi surface of copper, viz., the neck and belly normal to {111}, the dogsbone normal to {110} and the rosette and belly normal to {001}. It is found that the neck is most sensitive to angular shear strain, whereas the bellies are most affected by uniform dilation. For the other orbits the magnitudes of shear and dilation derivatives are comparable. The results are self consistent and agree with experimental tensile stress results of Shoenberg and Watts. Earlier magnetostriction results for the neck obtained by Aron and by Slavin can be brought into agreement with the present data by recalculating the former using the presently accepted value of the neck effective mass. The present experimental values are in reasonable agreement with theoretical values calculated by Lee, except for the tetragonal shear derivative of the {001} belly; the theoretical value is about 50% higher than the experimentally determined derivative.

  11. Technical paper: Environmental heat stress in football is increased in synthetic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Fernando Aragón Vargas

    2012-01-01

    Environmental heat stress is the result of ambient temperature, radiation, and relative humidity. During football practice on synthetic surfaces and no roof, solar radiation causes an important temperature increase of the playing surface. This technical note explains how heat stress is calculated according to the WBGT index (which does not consider playing surface temperature), and quantifies the increase in a synthetic surface compared to natural grass on the same site. Football practice sho...

  12. Minimizing instrumentation requirement for estimating crop water stress index and transpiration of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research was conducted in northern Colorado in 2011 to estimate the Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) and actual water transpiration (Ta) of maize under a range of irrigation regimes. The main goal was to obtain these parameters with minimum instrumentation and measurements. The results confirmed that ...

  13. Estimates of global dew collection potential on artificial surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Vuollekoski, H.; Vogt, M.; Sinclair, V. A.; Duplissy, J; Järvinen, H; Kyrö, E.-M.; R. Makkonen; T. Petäjä; N. L. Prisle; Räisänen, P.; M. Sipilä; J. Ylhäisi; Kulmala, M

    2015-01-01

    The global potential for collecting usable water from dew on an artificial collector sheet was investigated by utilizing 34 years of meteorological reanalysis data as input to a dew formation model. Continental dew formation was found to be frequent and common, but daily yields were mostly below 0.1 mm. Nevertheless, some water-stressed areas such as parts of the coastal regions of northern Africa and the Arabian Peninsula show potential for large-scale dew harvesting, as th...

  14. Estimation of broadband surface emissivity from narrowband emissivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo-Hui; Wu, Hua; Li, Chuanrong; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2011-01-01

    This work analyzed and addressed the estimate of the broadband emissivities for the spectral domains 3-14μm (ε(3-14)) and 3-∞μm (ε(3-∞). Two linear narrow-to-broadband conversion models were proposed to estimate broadband emissivities ε(3-14) and ε(3-∞) using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) derived emissivities in three thermal infrared channels 29 (8.4-8.7μm), 31 (10.78-11.28μm) and 32 (11.77-12.27μm). Two independent spectral libraries, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) spectral library and the MODIS UCSB (University of California, Santa Barbara) emissivity library, were used to calibrate and validate the proposed models. Comparisons of the estimated broadband emissivities using the proposed models and the calculated values from the spectral libraries, showed that the proposed method of estimation of broadband emissivity has potential accuracy and the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) between estimated and calculated broadband emissivities is less than 0.01 for both ε(3-14) and ε(3-∞).

  15. Surface Finish and Residual Stresses Induced by Orthogonal Dry Machining of AA7075-T651.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Walid; Songmene, Victor; Bocher, Philippe

    2014-02-28

    The surface finish was extensively studied in usual machining processes (turning, milling, and drilling). For these processes, the surface finish is strongly influenced by the cutting feed and the tool nose radius. However, a basic understanding of tool/surface finish interaction and residual stress generation has been lacking. This paper aims to investigate the surface finish and residual stresses under the orthogonal cutting since it can provide this information by avoiding the effect of the tool nose radius. The orthogonal machining of AA7075-T651 alloy through a series of cutting experiments was performed under dry conditions. Surface finish was studied using height and amplitude distribution roughness parameters. SEM and EDS were used to analyze surface damage and built-up edge (BUE) formation. An analysis of the surface topography showed that the surface roughness was sensitive to changes in cutting parameters. It was found that the formation of BUE and the interaction between the tool edge and the iron-rich intermetallic particles play a determinant role in controlling the surface finish during dry orthogonal machining of the AA7075-T651 alloy. Hoop stress was predominantly compressive on the surface and tended to be tensile with increased cutting speed. The reverse occurred for the surface axial stress. The smaller the cutting feed, the greater is the effect of cutting speed on both axial and hoop stresses. By controlling the cutting speed and feed, it is possible to generate a benchmark residual stress state and good surface finish using dry machining.

  16. Estimation of minimum surface temperature at stage ll (Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Dimri

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting minimum surface temperature at a station, Stage II, located in mountainous region requires information on the meteorological fields. An attempt has been made to develop a statistical model for forecasting minimum temperature at ground level using previous years' data. Surface data were collected at StageII (longitude 73 oB, latitude 34 oN, and altitude 2650 m. Atmospheric variables are influenced by complex orography and surface features to a great extent. In the present study, statistical relationship between atmosphere parameters and minimum temperature at the site has been established. Multivariate linear regression analysis has been used to establish the relationship to predict the minimum surface temperature for the following day. A comparison between the observed and the calculated forecast minimum temperature has been made. Most of the cases are well predicted (multiple correlation coefficient of 0.94.

  17. An Estimation of Land Surface Temperatures from Landsat ETM+ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr-Adeline

    2 National Authority for Remote Sensing and Space Sciences, Cairo, Egypt. 3University of ... Keywords: Urban growth, urban heat Island, land surface temperatures, satellite remote sensing .... observed target includes green vegetation or not.

  18. Surface renewal method for estimating sensible heat flux

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-09-18

    Sep 18, 2008 ... Keywords: surface energy balance, sensible heat flux, latent energy flux, evaporation ... Hill et al., 1992; Thiermann and Grassl, 1992; Green et al.,. 1994; De ...... the time traces over rangeland grass near Ione (California).

  19. Estimation of residual stress in welding of dissimilar metals at nuclear power plants using cascaded support vetor regression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Young Do; Yoo, Kwae Hwan; Na, Man Gyun [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Residual stress is a critical element in determining the integrity of parts and the lifetime of welded structures. It is necessary to estimate the residual stress of a welding zone because residual stress is a major reason for the generation of primary water stress corrosion cracking in nuclear power plants. That is, it is necessary to estimate the distribution of the residual stress in welding of dissimilar metals under manifold welding conditions. In this study, a cascaded support vector regression (CSVR) model was presented to estimate the residual stress of a welding zone. The CSVR model was serially and consecutively structured in terms of SVR modules. Using numerical data obtained from finite element analysis by a subtractive clustering method, learning data that explained the characteristic behavior of the residual stress of a welding zone were selected to optimize the proposed model. The results suggest that the CSVR model yielded a better estimation performance when compared with a classic SVR model.

  20. Uniform convergence and a posteriori error estimation for assumed stress hybrid finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Guozhu; Carstensen, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Assumed stress hybrid methods are known to improve the performance of standard displacement-based finite elements and are widely used in computational mechanics. The methods are based on the Hellinger-Reissner variational principle for the displacement and stress variables. This work analyzes two existing 4-node hybrid stress quadrilateral elements due to Pian and Sumihara [Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng, 1984] and due to Xie and Zhou [Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng, 2004], which behave robustly in numerical benchmark tests. For the finite elements, the isoparametric bilinear interpolation is used for the displacement approximation, while different piecewise-independent 5-parameter modes are employed for the stress approximation. We show that the two schemes are free from Poisson-locking, in the sense that the error bound in the a priori estimate is independent of the relevant Lame constant $\\lambda$. We also establish the equivalence of the methods to two assumed enhanced strain schemes. Finally, we derive reliable ...

  1. Reducing thermal mismatch stress in anodically bonded silicon-glass wafers: theoretical estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinev, Leonid S.; Ryabov, Vladimir T.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the theoretical study and estimations of thermal mismatch stress reduction in anodically bonded silicon-glass stacks by justifiable selection of bonding temperature and glass thickness. This can be done only after prior thorough study of temperature dependence of the linear thermal expansion coefficient of the glass and silicon to be used. We show by analyzing such a dependence of several glass brands that the usual idea of decreasing the bonding process temperature as a solution to the thermal mismatch stress problem can be a failure. Interchanging glass brands during device design is shown to produce very contrasting changes in residual stresses. These results are in good agreement with finite-element modeling. This paper reports there is proportion between glass and silicon wafer thicknesses minimizing thermal mismatch stress at unbonded side of the silicon independently of the bonding or working temperatures chosen.

  2. Turbulent oscillating channel flow subjected to a free-surface stress.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, W.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Armenio, V.

    2010-01-01

    The channel flow subjected to a wind stress at the free surface and an oscillating pressure gradient is investigated using large-eddy simulations. The orientation of the surface stress is parallel with the oscillating pressure gradient and a purely pulsating mean flow develops. The Reynolds number is

  3. Technique for the estimation of surface temperatures from embedded temperature sensing for rapid, high energy surface deposition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Tyson R.; Schunk, Peter Randall; Roberts, Scott Alan

    2014-07-01

    Temperature histories on the surface of a body that has been subjected to a rapid, highenergy surface deposition process can be di cult to determine, especially if it is impossible to directly observe the surface or attach a temperature sensor to it. In this report, we explore two methods for estimating the temperature history of the surface through the use of a sensor embedded within the body very near to the surface. First, the maximum sensor temperature is directly correlated with the peak surface temperature. However, it is observed that the sensor data is both delayed in time and greatly attenuated in magnitude, making this approach unfeasible. Secondly, we propose an algorithm that involves tting the solution to a one-dimensional instantaneous energy solution problem to both the sensor data and to the results of a one-dimensional CVFEM code. This algorithm is shown to be able to estimate the surface temperature 20 C.

  4. Wind Resource Estimation using QuikSCAT Ocean Surface Winds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Qing; Zhang, Guosheng; Cheng, Yongcun

    2011-01-01

    and the complexity of air-sea interaction processes, an empirical relationship that adjusts QuikSCAT winds in coastal waters was first proposed based on vessel measurements. Then the shape and scale parameters of Weibull function are determined for wind resource estimation. The wind roses are also plotted. Results...

  5. Estimation of shape model parameters for 3D surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erbou, Søren Gylling Hemmingsen; Darkner, Sune; Fripp, Jurgen;

    2008-01-01

    Statistical shape models are widely used as a compact way of representing shape variation. Fitting a shape model to unseen data enables characterizing the data in terms of the model parameters. In this paper a Gauss-Newton optimization scheme is proposed to estimate shape model parameters of 3D s...

  6. Estimating surface fluxes using eddy covariance and numerical ogive optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sievers, J.; Papakyriakou, T.; Larsen, Søren Ejling;

    2015-01-01

    -frequency contributions interfere with our ability to isolate local biogeochemical processes of interest, as represented by turbulent fluxes. No method currently exists to disentangle low-frequency contributions on flux estimates. Here, we present a novel comprehensive numerical scheme to identify and separate out low...

  7. Surface evaluation by estimation of fractal dimension and statistical tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotar, Vlastimil; Salac, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Structured and complex data can be found in many applications in research and development, and also in industrial practice. We developed a methodology for describing the structured data complexity and applied it in development and industrial practice. The methodology uses fractal dimension together with statistical tools and with software modification is able to analyse data in a form of sequence (signals, surface roughness), 2D images, and dividing lines. The methodology had not been tested for a relatively large collection of data. For this reason, samples with structured surfaces produced with different technologies and properties were measured and evaluated with many types of parameters. The paper intends to analyse data measured by a surface roughness tester. The methodology shown compares standard and nonstandard parameters, searches the optimal parameters for a complete analysis, and specifies the sensitivity to directionality of samples for these types of surfaces. The text presents application of fractal geometry (fractal dimension) for complex surface analysis in combination with standard roughness parameters (statistical tool).

  8. Finite Element Analysis and Experiment Research on Surface Residual Stress of Ceramics Grinding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The theoretical model of residual stress of ceramics grinding has been established applying thermal elastoplastic mechanics theory. While grinding at the course of grinding wheel moved along workpiece surface the distributing regulation of residual stress can be simplified into thermal elastioplastic mechanical issue, under the action of the both moving centralized force and heat source. Calculating and evaluating of surface residual stress using current procedure of finite element analysis which has been...

  9. Retrieval of ocean surface wind stress and drag coefficient from spaceborne SAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨劲松; 黄韦艮; 周长宝

    2001-01-01

    A model for retrieval of wind stress and drag coefficient on the sea surface with the data measured by spacebome synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been developed based on the SAR imaging mechanisms of ocean surface capillary waves and short gravity waves. This model consists of radiometric calibration, wind speed retrieval and wind stress and drag coefficient calculation. A Radarsat SAR image has been used to calculate wind stress and drag coeffi cient. Good results have been achieved.

  10. Estimation of viscous dissipative stresses induced by a mechanical heart valve using PIV data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi-Pei; Lo, Chi-Wen; Lu, Po-Chien

    2010-03-01

    Among the clinical complications of mechanical heart valves (MHVs), hemolysis was previously thought to result from Reynolds stresses in turbulent flows. A more recent hypothesis suggests viscous dissipative stresses at spatial scales similar in size to red blood cells may be related to hemolysis in MHVs, but the resolution of current instrumentation is insufficient to measure the smallest eddy sizes. We studied the St. Jude Medical (SJM) 27 mm valve in the aortic position of a pulsatile circulatory mock loop under physiologic conditions with particle image velocimetry (PIV). Assuming a dynamic equilibrium assumption between the resolved and sub-grid-scale (SGS) energy flux, the SGS energy flux was calculated from the strain rate tensor computed from the resolved velocity fields and the SGS stress was determined by the Smagorinsky model, from which the turbulence dissipation rate and then the viscous dissipative stresses were estimated. Our results showed Reynolds stresses up to 80 N/m2 throughout the cardiac cycle, and viscous dissipative stresses below 12 N/m2. The viscous dissipative stresses remain far below the threshold of red blood cell hemolysis, but could potentially damage platelets, implying the need for further study in the phenomenon of MHV hemolytic complications.

  11. Stress Formation During Self-Assembly of Alkanethiols on Differently Pre-Treated Gold Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Mortensen, Michael Wrang; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2001-01-01

    surface roughness induced by aqua regia etching, resulting in a higher density of adsorption sites. Surfaces cleaned willi oxygen plasma, however, give more reproducible stress change curves. The stress change curves of surfaces cleaned with aqua regia become less stable af ter three subsequent cleanings...... the rate and reproducibility of the adsorption process. Further objectives have been to maximise the stress signal during adsorption and to develop a method for removing sulphur immobilised molecules. Before each adsorption experiment the gold surface was cleaned in aqua regia, or in oxygen plasma....... Adsorption of alkanethiols caused changes in surface stress, which closely followed Langmuir type kinetics. Cleaning with aqua regia generally provides higher adsorption rates and a larger stress change than cleaning with oxygen plasma. Based on AFM imaging, we propose that this is related to a larger...

  12. Estimating surface turbulent heat fluxes from land surface temperature and soil moisture observations using the particle batch smoother

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Dong, Jianzhi; Steele-Dunne, Susan C.; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-11-01

    Surface heat fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere and play a crucial role in meteorology, hydrology, and climate change studies, but in situ observations are costly and difficult. It has been demonstrated that surface heat fluxes can be estimated from assimilation of land surface temperature (LST). One approach is to estimate a neutral bulk heat transfer coefficient (CHN) to scale the sum of turbulent heat fluxes, and an evaporative fraction (EF) that represents the partitioning between fluxes. Here the newly developed particle batch smoother (PBS) is implemented. The PBS makes no assumptions about the prior distributions and is therefore well-suited for non-Gaussian processes. It is also particularly advantageous for parameter estimation by tracking the entire prior distribution of parameters using Monte Carlo sampling. To improve the flux estimation on wet or densely vegetated surfaces, a simple soil moisture scheme is introduced to further constrain EF, and soil moisture observations are assimilated simultaneously. This methodology is implemented with the FIFE 1987 and 1988 data sets. Validation against observed fluxes indicates that assimilating LST using the PBS significantly improves the flux estimates at both daily and half-hourly timescales. When soil moisture is assimilated, the estimated EFs become more accurate, particularly when the surface heat flux partitioning is energy-limited. The feasibility of extending the methodology to use remote sensing observations is tested by limiting the number of LST observations. Results show that flux estimates are greatly improved after assimilating soil moisture, particularly when LST observations are sparse.

  13. Estimating surface faulting impacts from the shakeout scenario earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, J.A.; Pontib, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    An earthquake scenario, based on a kinematic rupture model, has been prepared for a Mw 7.8 earthquake on the southern San Andreas Fault. The rupture distribution, in the context of other historic large earthquakes, is judged reasonable for the purposes of this scenario. This model is used as the basis for generating a surface rupture map and for assessing potential direct impacts on lifelines and other infrastructure. Modeling the surface rupture involves identifying fault traces on which to place the rupture, assigning slip values to the fault traces, and characterizing the specific displacements that would occur to each lifeline impacted by the rupture. Different approaches were required to address variable slip distribution in response to a variety of fault patterns. Our results, involving judgment and experience, represent one plausible outcome and are not predictive because of the variable nature of surface rupture. ?? 2011, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  14. Development and validation of satellite based estimates of surface visibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J.; Pierce, R. B.; Lenzen, A.

    2015-10-01

    A satellite based surface visibility retrieval has been developed using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements as a proxy for Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) data from the next generation of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES-R). The retrieval uses a multiple linear regression approach to relate satellite aerosol optical depth, fog/low cloud probability and thickness retrievals, and meteorological variables from numerical weather prediction forecasts to National Weather Service Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) surface visibility measurements. Validation using independent ASOS measurements shows that the GOES-R ABI surface visibility retrieval (V) has an overall success rate of 64.5% for classifying Clear (V ≥ 30 km), Moderate (10 km ≤ V skill during June through September, when Heidke skill scores are between 0.2 and 0.4. We demonstrate that the aerosol (clear sky) component of the GOES-R ABI visibility retrieval can be used to augment measurements from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and National Park Service (NPS) Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network, and provide useful information to the regional planning offices responsible for developing mitigation strategies required under the EPA's Regional Haze Rule, particularly during regional haze events associated with smoke from wildfires.

  15. Near-surface attenuation estimation using wave-propagation modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Yadari, N.; Ernst, F.; Mulder, W.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the near surface on seismic land data can be so severe that static corrections are insufficient. Full-waveform inversion followed by redatuming may be an alternative, but inversion will work only if the starting model is sufficiently close to the true model. As a first step toward dete

  16. Estimation of Specific Surface Area using Langmuir Isotherm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    13.884) units in multiple of 10-3km2kg-1. The reliability of the ... In this present study, the linear least- squares method via the correlation coefficient (R2) was used (Yuh,2006). ... specific surface area determination has been adopted widely for ...

  17. Estimating the stresses within the lithosphere: parameter check with applications to the African Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Sergei; Werner, Stephanie; Steinberger, Bernhard; "African Plate" Working Group

    2010-05-01

    Several mechanisms control the state of stress within plates on Earth. The list is rather long, but well-known and includes ridge push, mantle drag, stresses invoked by lateral variations of lithospheric density structure and subduction processes. We attempt to quantify the influence of these mechanisms and to construct a reliable model to understand modern and palaeo-stresses using the African plate (TAP) as an example. Previous studies explained stress patterns and their evolution solely by assigning different rheological properties to sub-domains and their boundaries. Such an approach often leads to unrealistically high variations of properties within a modeled plate. In our approach we find the best possible agreement with observations before differentiating between sub-domains of TAP. The finite-element based suite ProShell was utilized to calculate stresses on the real geometry of TAP (non-planar). The approach allows us to combine several data sets and to estimate stresses caused by lateral and vertical distribution of properties within the lithosphere, to quantify the in-plane and bending stresses, to account for forces due to ridge push and mantle heterogeneities and mantle flow. The modeled results are tested and iterated to match the observed stress pattern and potential fields as good as possible. The starting model is based on the CRUST2 data set to construct the model crust and half-space cooling model to approximate properties of the lithospheric mantle. The results however, are not satisfactory, and might be related to oversimplifications in the uniform model of lithosphere or/and to the unrealistic representation of the CRUST2 model in certain areas of TAP. The latter was also shown by simple evaluation using gravity forward modeling of the model boundaries. The model implementation of the crustal structure calculated from simple gravity inversion or derived through isostatical considerations agree better to today's observed stress pattern.

  18. Estimation of cyclic stress-strain curves for low-alloy steel from hardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Basan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes investigations into the existence of correlation between experimentally determined cyclic parameters and hardness of quenched and tempered representative low-alloy steel 42CrMo4. A good correlation was found to exist between cyclic strength coefficient K’ and Brinell hardness HB, but not between cyclic strain hardening exponent n‘ and hardness HB. Nevertheless, good agreement between calculated and experimental cyclic stress-strain curves shows that cyclic parameters i.e. cyclic stress-strain curves of the investigated steel can be successfully estimated from its hardness.

  19. Estimates of global dew collection potential on artificial surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuollekoski, H.; Vogt, M.; Sinclair, V. A.; Duplissy, J.; Järvinen, H.; Kyrö, E.-M.; Makkonen, R.; Petäjä, T.; Prisle, N. L.; Räisänen, P.; Sipilä, M.; Ylhäisi, J.; Kulmala, M.

    2015-01-01

    The global potential for collecting usable water from dew on an artificial collector sheet was investigated by utilizing 34 years of meteorological reanalysis data as input to a dew formation model. Continental dew formation was found to be frequent and common, but daily yields were mostly below 0.1 mm. Nevertheless, some water-stressed areas such as parts of the coastal regions of northern Africa and the Arabian Peninsula show potential for large-scale dew harvesting, as the yearly yield may reach up to 100 L m-2 for a commonly used polyethylene foil. Statistically significant trends were found in the data, indicating overall changes in dew yields of between ±10% over the investigated time period.

  20. Estimating Stream Surface Flow Velocities from Video Clips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, S. V.; Brauchli, T.; Chen, Z.; Huwald, H.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring surface flow velocities in streams can provide important information on discharge. This information is independent of water level, the most commonly used proxy for discharge and therefore has significant potential to reduce uncertainties. Advances in cheap and commonly used imaging devices (e.g. smartphone cameras) and image processing techniques offer new opportunities to get velocity information. Short video clips of streams can be used in combination with optical flow algorithms to get proxies for stream surface velocities. Here some initial results are presented and the main challenges are discussed, especially in view of using these techniques in a citizen science context (specifically the "WeSenseIt" project, a citizen observatory of water), where we try to minimize the need for site preparation and additional equipment needed to take measurements.

  1. Ionization efficiency estimations for the SPES surface ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Meneghetti, G.; Rossignoli, M.; Corradetti, S.; Biasetto, L.; Scarpa, D.; Monetti, A.; Carturan, S.; Maggioni, G.

    2013-12-01

    Ion sources play a crucial role in ISOL (Isotope Separation On Line) facilities determining, with the target production system, the ion beam types available for experiments. In the framework of the SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) project, a preliminary study of the alkali metal isotopes ionization process was performed, by means of a surface ion source prototype. In particular, taking into consideration the specific SPES in-target isotope production, Cs and Rb ion beams were produced, using a dedicated test bench at LNL (Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro). In this work the ionization efficiency test results for the SPES Ta surface ion source prototype are presented and discussed.

  2. Estimation of Near Surface Wind Speeds in Strongly Rotating Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Crowell, Sean; Wicker, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Modeling studies consistently demonstrate that the most violent winds in tornadic vortices occur in the lowest tens of meters above the surface. These velocities are unobservable by radar platforms due to line of sight consider- ations. In this work, a methodology is developed which utilizes parametric tangential velocity models derived from Doppler radar measurements, to- gether with a tangential momentum and mass continuity constraint, to esti- mate the radial and vertical velocities in a steady axisymmetric frame. The main result is that information from observations aloft can be extrapolated into the surface layer of the vortex. The impact of the amount of information available to the retrieval is demonstrated through some numerical tests with pseudo-data.

  3. Model for estimating the effects of surface roughness on mass ejection from shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asay, J R; Bertholf, L D

    1978-10-01

    A statistical model is presented for estimating the effects of surface roughness on mass ejection from shocked surfaces. In the model, roughness is characterized by the total volume of defects, such as pits, scratches and machine marks, on a surface. The amount of material ejected from these defects during shock loading can be estimated by assuming that jetting from surface depressions is the primary mode of ejection and by making simplifying assumptions about jetting processes. Techniques are discussed for estimating the effects of distribution in defect size and shape, and results are presented for several different geometries of defects. The model is used to compare predicted and measured ejecta masses from six different materials. Surface defects in these materials range from pits and scratches on polished surfaces to prepared defects such as machined or porous surfaces. Good agreement is achieved between predicted and measured results which suggests general applicability of the model.

  4. Estimating multivariate response surface model with data outliers, case study in enhancing surface layer properties of an aircraft aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, Edy; Kariyam

    2017-03-01

    To determine the input variable settings that create the optimal compromise in response variable used Response Surface Methodology (RSM). There are three primary steps in the RSM problem, namely data collection, modelling, and optimization. In this study focused on the establishment of response surface models, using the assumption that the data produced is correct. Usually the response surface model parameters are estimated by OLS. However, this method is highly sensitive to outliers. Outliers can generate substantial residual and often affect the estimator models. Estimator models produced can be biased and could lead to errors in the determination of the optimal point of fact, that the main purpose of RSM is not reached. Meanwhile, in real life, the collected data often contain some response variable and a set of independent variables. Treat each response separately and apply a single response procedures can result in the wrong interpretation. So we need a development model for the multi-response case. Therefore, it takes a multivariate model of the response surface that is resistant to outliers. As an alternative, in this study discussed on M-estimation as a parameter estimator in multivariate response surface models containing outliers. As an illustration presented a case study on the experimental results to the enhancement of the surface layer of aluminium alloy air by shot peening.

  5. Surface stress relaxation of oxide glasses: The effects on mechanical strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezzi, Peter Joseph

    A new glass strengthening mechanism based upon surface compressive stress formation by surface stress relaxation of glasses that were held under a tensile stress, at a temperature lower than the glass transition temperature, in low water vapor pressure, has been demonstrated. Although glass fibers are traditionally known to become mechanically weaker when heat-treated at a temperature lower than the glass transition temperature in the presence of water vapor, the strength was found to become greater than the as-received fiber strength when fibers were subjected to a sub-critical tensile stress during heat-treatment. The observed strengthening was attributed to surface compressive residual stress formation through surface stress relaxation during the sub-critical tensile stress application in the atmosphere containing water vapor. Surface stress relaxation of the same glass fibers was shown to take place under conditions identical to those experienced by the strengthened mechanical test specimens by observing permanent bending of the fiber. Furthermore, the magnitude and presence of the residual stresses formed during bending or tensile heat-treatments were confirmed by FTIR, fiber etching, and fiber slicing methods. The method can in principle be used to strengthen any oxide glass and is not subjected to the constraints of traditional strengthening methods such as a minimum thickness for tempering, or a glass containing alkali ions for ion-exchange. Thus far, the method has been successful in strengthening silica glass, E-glass, and soda-lime silicate glass by approximately 20-30%.

  6. Surface Pressure Estimates for Pitching Aircraft Model at High Angles-of-attack (Short Communication)

    OpenAIRE

    A.A. Pashilkar

    2002-01-01

    The surface pressure on a pitching delta wing aircraft is estimated from the normal force and the pitching moment characteristics. The pressure model is based on parametrising the surface pressure distribution on a simple delta wing. This model is useful as a first approximation of the load distribution on the aircraft wing. Leeward surface pressure distributions computed by this method are presented.

  7. Estimation of Surface Heat Flux and Surface Temperature during Inverse Heat Conduction under Varying Spray Parameters and Sample Initial Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aamir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck’s sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m2 was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa.

  8. Estimation of surface heat flux and surface temperature during inverse heat conduction under varying spray parameters and sample initial temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Aqeel-ur-Rehman; Wang, Hong; Zubair, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm) 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck's sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF) within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m(2) was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa.

  9. Estimation of surface charges on dielectric materials for high power rf windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michizono, Shinichiro, E-mail: shinichiro.michizono@kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Saito, Yoshio [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Suharyanto [Faculty of Engineering, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta 55284 (Indonesia); Yamano, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Shinichi [Faculty of Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    The surface discharges observed at rf windows and vacuum circuit breakers (VCBs) are one of the difficulties faced when developing high-power rf windows or compact VCBs. The surface discharge is considered to take place due to the release of the surface charges. Despite the importance of the surface charging/discharging, these phenomena have not been well evaluated. In this paper, the surface charges are estimated using the multipulse method, where electron beam irradiates a sample up to the saturation condition of surface charges. The amount of surface charges on alumina and TiN coated alumina are compared and the charging mechanism is discussed.

  10. Surface height map estimation from a single image using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Zhong, Guoqiang; Qi, Lin; Dong, Junyu; Pham, Tuan D.; Mao, Jianzhou

    2017-02-01

    Surface height map estimation is an important task in high-resolution 3D reconstruction. This task differs from general scene depth estimation in the fact that surface height maps contain more high frequency information or fine details. Existing methods based on radar or other equipments can be used for large-scale scene depth recovery, but might fail in small-scale surface height map estimation. Although some methods are available for surface height reconstruction based on multiple images, e.g. photometric stereo, height map estimation directly from a single image is still a challenging issue. In this paper, we present a novel method based on convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for estimating the height map from a single image, without any equipments or extra prior knowledge of the image contents. Experimental results based on procedural and real texture datasets show the proposed algorithm is effective and reliable.

  11. Quantitative estimates of the surface habitability of Kepler-452b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Laura; Vladilo, Giovanni; Murante, Giuseppe; Provenzale, Antonello

    2017-09-01

    Kepler-452b is currently the best example of an Earth-size planet in the habitable zone of a sun-like star, a type of planet whose number of detections is expected to increase in the future. Searching for biosignatures in the supposedly thin atmospheres of these planets is a challenging goal that requires a careful selection of the targets. Under the assumption of a rocky-dominated nature for Kepler-452b, we considered it as a test case to calculate a temperature-dependent habitability index, h050, designed to maximize the potential presence of biosignature-producing activity. The surface temperature has been computed for a broad range of climate factors using a climate model designed for terrestrial-type exoplanets. After fixing the planetary data according to the experimental results, we changed the surface gravity, CO2 abundance, surface pressure, orbital eccentricity, rotation period, axis obliquity and ocean fraction within the range of validity of our model. For most choices of parameters, we find habitable solutions with h050 > 0.2 only for CO2 partial pressure p_CO_2 ≲ 0.04 bar. At this limiting value of CO2 abundance, the planet is still habitable if the total pressure is p ≲ 2 bar. In all cases, the habitability drops for eccentricity e ≳ 0.3. Changes of rotation period and obliquity affect the habitability through their impact on the equator-pole temperature difference rather than on the mean global temperature. We calculated the variation of h050 resulting from the luminosity evolution of the host star for a wide range of input parameters. Only a small combination of parameters yields habitability-weighted lifetimes ≳2 Gyr, sufficiently long to develop atmospheric biosignatures still detectable at the present time.

  12. The Alignment of the Mean Wind and Stress Vectors in the Unstable Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, M.; Dias, N. L.

    2010-01-01

    A significant non-alignment between the mean horizontal wind vector and the stress vector was observed for turbulence measurements both above the water surface of a large lake, and over a land surface (soybean crop). Possible causes for this discrepancy such as flow distortion, averaging times and the procedure used for extracting the turbulent fluctuations (low-pass filtering and filter widths etc.), were dismissed after a detailed analysis. Minimum averaging times always less than 30 min were established by calculating ogives, and error bounds for the turbulent stresses were derived with three different approaches, based on integral time scales (first-crossing and lag-window estimates) and on a bootstrap technique. It was found that the mean absolute value of the angle between the mean wind and stress vectors is highly related to atmospheric stability, with the non-alignment increasing distinctively with increasing instability. Given a coordinate rotation that aligns the mean wind with the x direction, this behaviour can be explained by the growth of the relative error of the u- w component with instability. As a result, under more unstable conditions the u- w and the v- w components become of the same order of magnitude, and the local stress vector gives the impression of being non-aligned with the mean wind vector. The relative error of the v- w component is large enough to make it undistinguishable from zero throughout the range of stabilities. Therefore, the standard assumptions of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory hold: it is fair to assume that the v- w stress component is actually zero, and that the non-alignment is a purely statistical effect. An analysis of the dimensionless budgets of the u- w and the v- w components confirms this interpretation, with both shear and buoyant production of u- w decreasing with increasing instability. In the v- w budget, shear production is zero by definition, while buoyancy displays very low-intensity fluctuations around

  13. Lp Estimates of Rough Maximal Functions Along Surfaces with Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmad AL-SALMAN; Abdulla M. JARRAH

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Lp mapping properties of certain class of maximal oscillatory singular integral operators. We prove a general theorem for a class of maximal functions along surfaces. As a consequence of such theorem, we establish the Lp boundedness of various maximal oscillatory singular integrals provided that their kernels belong to the natural space L log L(Sn−1). Moreover, we highlight some additional results concerning operators with kernels in certain block spaces. The results in this paper substantially improve previously known results.

  14. Estimation of surface heat flux for ablation and charring of thermal protection material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei-qi; He, Kai-feng; Zhou, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Ablation of the thermal protection material of the reentry hypersonic flight vehicle is a complex physical and chemical process. To estimate the surface heat flux from internal temperature measurement is much more complex than the conventional inverse heat conduction problem case. In the paper, by utilizing a two-layer pyrogeneration-plane ablation model to model the ablation and charring of the material, modifying the finite control volume method to suit for the numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation with variable-geometry, the CGM along with the associated adjoint problem is developed to estimate the surface heat flux. This estimation method is verified with a numerical example at first, the results show that the estimation method is feasible and robust. The larger is the measurement noise, the greater is the deviation of the estimated result from the exact value, and the measurement noise of ablated surface position has a significant and more direct influence on the estimated result of surface heat flux. Furthermore, the estimation method is used to analyze the experimental data of ablation of blunt Carbon-phenolic material Narmco4028 in an arc-heater. It is shown that the estimated surface heat flux agrees with the heating power value of the arc-heater, and the estimation method is basically effective and potential to treat the engineering heat conduction problem with ablation.

  15. Continuous Estimation of Wrist Torque from Surface EMG Signals Using Path-dependent Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Li-zhi; ZHANG Ding-guo; SHENG Xin-jun; ZHU Xiang-yang

    2014-01-01

    Continuous estimation of wrist torque from surface electromyography (EMG) signals has been studied by some research institutes. Hysteresis effect is a phenomenon in EMG force relationship. In this work, a path-dependent model based on hysteresis effect was used for continuously estimating wrist torque from surface EMG signals. The surface EMG signals of the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) were collected along with wrist torque of flexion/extension degree-of-freedom. EMG signal of FCU was used to estimate the torque of wrist flexion and EMG signal of ECR to estimate the torque of wrist extension. The existence of hysteresis effect has been proven either during wrist flexion or extension on all subjects. And the estimation performance of path-dependent model is much better than the overall model. Thus, the path-dependent model is suitable to improve the wrist torque's estimation accuracy.

  16. Impact of Surface Chemistry on Grain Boundary Induced Intrinsic Stress Evolution during Polycrystalline Thin Film Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Y.; Sheldon, B. W.; Guo, H.; Xiao, X.; Kothari, A. K.

    2009-02-01

    First principles calculations were integrated with cohesive zone and growth chemistry models to demonstrate that adsorbed species can significantly alter stresses associated with grain boundary formation during polycrystalline film growth. Using diamond growth as an example, the results show that lower substrate temperatures increase the hydrogen content at the surface, which reduces tensile stress, widens the grain boundary separations, and permits additional atom insertions that can induce compressive stress. More generally, this work demonstrates that surface heteroatoms can lead to behavior which is not readily described by existing models of intrinsic stress evolution.

  17. Interval Estimation of Stress-Strength Reliability Based on Lower Record Values from Inverse Rayleigh Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Tarvirdizade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the estimation of stress-strength reliability based on lower record values when X and Y are independently but not identically inverse Rayleigh distributed random variables. The maximum likelihood, Bayes, and empirical Bayes estimators of R are obtained and their properties are studied. Confidence intervals, exact and approximate, as well as the Bayesian credible sets for R are obtained. A real example is presented in order to illustrate the inferences discussed in the previous sections. A simulation study is conducted to investigate and compare the performance of the intervals presented in this paper and some bootstrap intervals.

  18. Study of muscular deformation based on surface slope estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carli, M.; Goffredo, M.; Schmid, M.; Neri, A.

    2006-02-01

    During contraction and stretching, muscles change shape and size, and produce a deformation of skin tissues and a modification of the body segment shape. In human motion analysis, it is very important to take into account these phenomena. The aim of this work is the evaluation of skin and muscular deformation, and the modeling of body segment elastic behavior obtained by analysing video sequences that capture a muscle contraction. The soft tissue modeling is accomplished by using triangular meshes that automatically adapt to the body segment during the execution of a static muscle contraction. The adaptive triangular mesh is built on reference points whose motion is estimated by using non linear operators. Experimental results, obtained by applying the proposed method to several video sequences, where biceps brachial isometric contraction was present, show the effectiveness of this technique.

  19. An easy and reliable automated method to estimate oxidative stress in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassalle, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    During the last few years, reliable and simple tests have been proposed to estimate oxidative stress in vivo. Many of them can be easily adapted to automated analyzers, permitting the simultaneous processing of a large number of samples in a greatly reduced time, avoiding manual sample and reagent handling, and reducing variability sources. In this chapter, description of protocols for the estimation of reactive oxygen metabolites and the antioxidant capacity (respectively the d-ROMs and OXY Adsorbent Test, Diacron, Grosseto, Italy) by using the clinical chemistry analyzer SYNCHRON, CX 9 PRO (Beckman Coulter, Brea, CA, USA) is reported as an example of such an automated procedure that can be applied in the clinical setting. Furthermore, a calculation to compute a global oxidative stress index (Oxidative-INDEX), reflecting both oxidative and antioxidant counterparts, and, therefore, a potentially more powerful parameter, is also described.

  20. Technical paper: Environmental heat stress in football is increased in synthetic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Aragón Vargas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Environmental heat stress is the result of ambient temperature, radiation, and relative humidity. During football practice on synthetic surfaces and no roof, solar radiation causes an important temperature increase of the playing surface. This technical note explains how heat stress is calculated according to the WBGT index (which does not consider playing surface temperature, and quantifies the increase in a synthetic surface compared to natural grass on the same site. Football practice should be avoided during those hours with the highest solar radiation and temperature on this type of surface.

  1. A physically-based hybrid framework to estimate daily-mean surface fluxes over complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

    2016-06-01

    In this study we developed and examined a hybrid modeling approach integrating physically-based equations and statistical downscaling to estimate fine-scale daily-mean surface turbulent fluxes (i.e., sensible and latent heat fluxes) for a region of southern California that is extensively covered by varied vegetation types over a complex terrain. The selection of model predictors is guided by physical parameterizations of surface flux used in land surface models and analysis showing net shortwave radiation that is a major source of variability in the surface energy budget. Through a structure of multivariable regression processes with an application of near-surface wind estimates from a previous study, we successfully reproduce dynamically-downscaled 3 km resolution surface flux data. The overall error in our estimates is less than 20 % for both sensible and latent heat fluxes, while slightly larger errors are seen in high-altitude regions. The major sources of error in estimates include the limited information provided in coarse reanalysis data, the accuracy of near-surface wind estimates, and an ignorance of the nonlinear diurnal cycle of surface fluxes when using daily-mean data. However, with reasonable and acceptable errors, this hybrid modeling approach provides promising, fine-scale products of surface fluxes that are much more accurate than reanalysis data, without performing intensive dynamical simulations.

  2. Bayesian Estimation for Land Surface Temperature Retrieval: The Nuisance of Emissivities

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, J A

    2004-01-01

    An approach to the remote sensing of land surface temperature is developed using the methods of Bayesian inference. The starting point is the maximum entropy estimate for the posterior distribution of radiance in multiple bands. In order to convert this quantity to an estimator for surface temperature and emissivity with Bayes' theorem, it is necessary to obtain the joint prior probability for surface temperature and emissivity, given available prior knowledge. The requirement that any pair of distinct observers be able to relate their descriptions of radiance under arbitrary Lorentz transformations uniquely determines the prior probability. Perhaps surprisingly, surface temperature acts as a scale parameter, while emissivity acts as a location parameter, giving the prior probability P(T,emissivity|K)=const./T dT d(emissivity). Given this result, it is a simple matter to construct estimators for surface temperature and emssivity. Monte Carlo simulations of land surface temeprature retrieval in selected MODIS ...

  3. Geometrical Considerations for Piezoresistive Microcantilever Response to Surface Stress during Chemical Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loui, A; Goericke, F; Ratto, T; Lee, J; Hart, B; King, W

    2008-04-25

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested five piezoresistive cantilever configurations to investigate the effect of shape and piezoresistor placement on the sensitivity of microcantilevers under either point loading and surface stress loading. The experimental study reveals that: (1) high aspect ratio cantilevers that are much longer than they are wide are optimal for point-loading applications such as microscopy and force measurements; (2) low aspect ratio cantilevers that are short and wide are optimal for surface stress loading scenarios such as those that occur in biological and chemical sensor applications. The sensitivity data for both point loads and surface stress are consistent with previously developed finite-element models.

  4. A stress tensor eigenvector projection space for the (H2O)5 potential energy surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tianlv; Farrell, James; Momen, Roya; Azizi, Alireza; Kirk, Steven R.; Jenkins, Samantha; Wales, David J.

    2017-01-01

    A stress tensor eigenvector projection space is created to describe reaction pathways on the (H2O)5 MP2 potential energy surface. Evidence for the stabilizing role of the O--O bonding interactions is found from the length of the recently introduced stress tensor trajectory in the stress tensor eigenvector projection space. The stress tensor trajectories demonstrate coupling behavior of the adjoining covalent (σ) O-H and hydrogen bonds due to sharing of covalent character. Additionally, the stress tensor trajectories can show dynamic coupling effects of pairs of σ bonds and of pairs of hydrogen bonds.

  5. Experimental measurements of surface damage and residual stresses in micro-engineered plasma facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, David; Wirz, Richard E.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2017-04-01

    The thermomechanical damage and residual stresses in plasma-facing materials operating at high heat flux are experimentally investigated. Materials with micro-surfaces are found to be more resilient, when exposed to cyclic high heat flux generated by an arc-jet plasma. An experimental facility, dedicated to High Energy Flux Testing (HEFTY), is developed for testing cyclic heat flux in excess of 10 MW/m2. We show that plastic deformation and subsequent fracture of the surface can be controlled by sample cooling. We demonstrate that W surfaces with micro-pillar type surface architecture have significantly reduced residual thermal stresses after plasma exposure, as compared to those with flat surfaces. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of the W-(110) peak reveal that broadening of the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) for micro-engineered samples is substantially smaller than corresponding flat surfaces. Spectral shifts of XRD signals indicate that residual stresses due to plasma exposure of micro-engineered surfaces build up in the first few cycles of exposure. Subsequent cyclic plasma heat loading is shown to anneal out most of the built-up residual stresses in micro-engineered surfaces. These findings are consistent with relaxation of residual thermal stresses in surfaces with micro-engineered features. The initial residual stress state of highly polished flat W samples is compressive (≈ -1.3 GPa). After exposure to 50 plasma cycles, the surface stress relaxes to -1.0 GPa. Micro-engineered samples exposed to the same thermal cycling show that the initial residual stress state is compressive at (- 250 MPa), and remains largely unchanged after plasma exposure.

  6. DIAGONAL POINT BY POINT SURFACE DEVELOPMENT METHOD BASED ON NURBS SURFACE FOR BLANK SHAPE ESTIMATION OF COVER PANEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yuqin; Li Fuzhu; Jiang Hong; Wang Xiaochun

    2005-01-01

    According to the characteristics of a complex cover panel, its geometry shape is described by the NURBS surface with great description capability. With the reference to the surface classification determined by Gauss curvature, the proportion of the mid-surface area between before and after being developed is derived from the displacement variation of the mid-surface in the normal vector direction of the sheet metal during the sheet metal forming process. Hereby, based on the curve development theory in differential geometry, a novel diagonal point by point surface development method is put forward to estimate a complex cover panel's blank contour efficiently. By comparing the sample's development result of diagonal point by point surface development method with that of available one-step method, the validity of the proposed surface development method is verified.

  7. Effect of Random Clustering on Surface Damage Density Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, M J; Feit, M D

    2007-10-29

    Identification and spatial registration of laser-induced damage relative to incident fluence profiles is often required to characterize the damage properties of laser optics near damage threshold. Of particular interest in inertial confinement laser systems are large aperture beam damage tests (>1cm{sup 2}) where the number of initiated damage sites for {phi}>14J/cm{sup 2} can approach 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6}, requiring automatic microscopy counting to locate and register individual damage sites. However, as was shown for the case of bacteria counting in biology decades ago, random overlapping or 'clumping' prevents accurate counting of Poisson-distributed objects at high densities, and must be accounted for if the underlying statistics are to be understood. In this work we analyze the effect of random clumping on damage initiation density estimates at fluences above damage threshold. The parameter {psi} = a{rho} = {rho}/{rho}{sub 0}, where a = 1/{rho}{sub 0} is the mean damage site area and {rho} is the mean number density, is used to characterize the onset of clumping, and approximations based on a simple model are used to derive an expression for clumped damage density vs. fluence and damage site size. The influence of the uncorrected {rho} vs. {phi} curve on damage initiation probability predictions is also discussed.

  8. A One-Source Approach for Estimating Land Surface Heat Fluxes Using Remotely Sensed Land Surface Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmin Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The partitioning of available energy between sensible heat and latent heat is important for precise water resources planning and management in the context of global climate change. Land surface temperature (LST is a key variable in energy balance process and remotely sensed LST is widely used for estimating surface heat fluxes at regional scale. However, the inequality between LST and aerodynamic surface temperature (Taero poses a great challenge for regional heat fluxes estimation in one-source energy balance models. To address this issue, we proposed a One-Source Model for Land (OSML to estimate regional surface heat fluxes without requirements for empirical extra resistance, roughness parameterization and wind velocity. The proposed OSML employs both conceptual VFC/LST trapezoid model and the electrical analog formula of sensible heat flux (H to analytically estimate the radiometric-convective resistance (rae via a quartic equation. To evaluate the performance of OSML, the model was applied to the Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX in United States and the Multi-Scale Observation Experiment on Evapotranspiration (MUSOEXE in China, using remotely sensed retrievals as auxiliary data sets at regional scale. Validated against tower-based surface fluxes observations, the root mean square deviation (RMSD of H and latent heat flux (LE from OSML are 34.5 W/m2 and 46.5 W/m2 at SMACEX site and 50.1 W/m2 and 67.0 W/m2 at MUSOEXE site. The performance of OSML is very comparable to other published studies. In addition, the proposed OSML model demonstrates similar skills of predicting surface heat fluxes in comparison to SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System. Since OSML does not require specification of aerodynamic surface characteristics, roughness parameterization and meteorological conditions with high spatial variation such as wind speed, this proposed method shows high potential for routinely acquisition of latent heat flux estimation

  9. Estimation of surface area concentration of workplace incidental nanoparticles based on number and mass concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. Y.; Ramachandran, G.; Raynor, P. C.; Kim, S. W.

    2011-10-01

    Surface area was estimated by three different methods using number and/or mass concentrations obtained from either two or three instruments that are commonly used in the field. The estimated surface area concentrations were compared with reference surface area concentrations (SAREF) calculated from the particle size distributions obtained from a scanning mobility particle sizer and an optical particle counter (OPC). The first estimation method (SAPSD) used particle size distribution measured by a condensation particle counter (CPC) and an OPC. The second method (SAINV1) used an inversion routine based on PM1.0, PM2.5, and number concentrations to reconstruct assumed lognormal size distributions by minimizing the difference between measurements and calculated values. The third method (SAINV2) utilized a simpler inversion method that used PM1.0 and number concentrations to construct a lognormal size distribution with an assumed value of geometric standard deviation. All estimated surface area concentrations were calculated from the reconstructed size distributions. These methods were evaluated using particle measurements obtained in a restaurant, an aluminum die-casting factory, and a diesel engine laboratory. SAPSD was 0.7-1.8 times higher and SAINV1 and SAINV2 were 2.2-8 times higher than SAREF in the restaurant and diesel engine laboratory. In the die casting facility, all estimated surface area concentrations were lower than SAREF. However, the estimated surface area concentration using all three methods had qualitatively similar exposure trends and rankings to those using SAREF within a workplace. This study suggests that surface area concentration estimation based on particle size distribution (SAPSD) is a more accurate and convenient method to estimate surface area concentrations than estimation methods using inversion routines and may be feasible to use for classifying exposure groups and identifying exposure trends.

  10. Introduction of Enhanced Compressive Residual Stress Profiles in Aerospace Components Using Combined Mechanical Surface Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Abhay; Lim, Andre; Nagarajan, Balasubramanian; Cher Wong, Chow; Maiti, Rajarshi; Castagne, Sylvie

    2016-11-01

    Mechanical surface treatments such as Shot Peening (SP) and Deep Cold Rolling (DCR) are being used to introduce Compressive Residual Stress (CRS) at the surface and subsurface layers of aerospace components, respectively. This paper investigates the feasibility of a combined introduction of both the surface and sub-surface compressive residual stress on Ti6Al4V material through a successive application of the two aforementioned processes, one after the other. CRS profiles between individual processes were compared to that of combination of processes to validate the feasibility. It was found out that shot peening introduces surface compressive residual stress into the already deep cold rolled sample, resulting in both surface and sub-surface compressive residual stresses in the material. However the drawback of such a combination would be the increased surface roughness after shot peening a deep cold rolled sample which can be critical especially in compressor components. Hence, a new technology, Vibro-Peening (VP) may be used as an alternative to SP to introduce surface stress at reduced roughness.

  11. Surface patterns on single-crystal films under uniaxial stress: Experimental evidence for the Grinfeld instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berréhar, J.; Caroli, C.; Lapersonne-Meyer, C.; Schott, M.

    1992-11-01

    We study the stress relaxation in single-crystal films of polymerized polydiacetylene, in epitaxy with their monomer substrate. Polymerization induces a uniaxial stress. Two types of surface patterns are observed and studied by atomic force microscopy: films thicker than 175 nm exhibit quasiperiodic cracks perpendicular to the polymer chains; thinner ones exhibit regular wrinkles with the same orientation. The wrinkle surface deformation is stress relaxing and plastic. We show that all experimental results, in particular, the order of magnitude of the pattern spacings, are compatible with the following interpretation: as polymerization proceeds, the uniaxial stress generates a Grinfeld instability (Dok. Akad. Nauk SSSR 290, 1358 (1986) [Sov. Phys. Dokl. 31, 831 (1986)]) fed by surface diffusion. The crack pattern is a secondary instability, initiated at the sites of stress concentration provided by the wrinkles.

  12. Stress errors in a case of developmental surface dyslexia in Filipino.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulay, Katrina May; Hanley, J Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the case of a dyslexic boy (L.A.) whose impaired reading of Filipino is consistent with developmental surface dyslexia. Filipino has a transparent alphabetic orthography with stress typically falling on the penultimate syllable of multisyllabic words. However, exceptions to the typical stress pattern are not marked in the Filipino orthography. L.A. read words with typical stress patterns as accurately as controls, but made many more stress errors than controls when reading Filipino words with atypical stress. He regularized the pronunciation of many of these words by incorrectly placing the stress on the penultimate syllable. Since he also read nonwords as accurately and quickly as controls and performed well on tests of phonological awareness, L.A. appears to present a clear case of developmental surface dyslexia in a transparent orthography.

  13. Estimation of Land Surface Temperature from 1-km AVHRR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Corinne

    2016-04-01

    In order to re-process DLRs 1km AVHRR data archive to different geophysical and descriptive parameters of the land surface and the atmosphere, a series of scientific data processors are being developed in the framework of the TIMELINE project. The archive of DLR ranges back to the 80ies. One of the data processors is SurfTemp, which processes L2 LST and emissivity datasets from AVHRR L1b data. The development of the data processor included the selection of statistical procedures suitable for time series processing, including four mono-window and six split window algorithms. For almost all of these algorithms, new constants were generated, which better account for different atmospheric and geometric acquisition situations. The selection of optimal algorithms for SurfTemp is based on a round robin approach, in which the selected mono-window and split window algorithms are tested on the basis of a large number of TOA radiance/LST pairs, which were generated using a radiative transfer model and the SeeBorV5 profile database. The original LSTs are thereby compared to the LSTs derived from the TOA radiances using the mono- and split window algorithms. The algorithm comparison includes measures of precision, as well as the sensitivity of a method to the accuracy of its input data. The results of the round robin are presented, as well as the implementation of selected algorithms into SurfTemp. Further, first cross-validation results between the AVHRR LST and MODIS LST are shown.

  14. Improved Critical Eigenfunction Restriction Estimates on Riemannian Surfaces with Nonpositive Curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yakun; Zhang, Cheng

    2016-07-01

    We show that one can obtain improved L 4 geodesic restriction estimates for eigenfunctions on compact Riemannian surfaces with nonpositive curvature. We achieve this by adapting Sogge's strategy in (Improved critical eigenfunction estimates on manifolds of nonpositive curvature, Preprint). We first combine the improved L 2 restriction estimate of Blair and Sogge (Concerning Toponogov's Theorem and logarithmic improvement of estimates of eigenfunctions, Preprint) and the classical improved {L^∞} estimate of Bérard to obtain an improved weak-type L 4 restriction estimate. We then upgrade this weak estimate to a strong one by using the improved Lorentz space estimate of Bak and Seeger (Math Res Lett 18(4):767-781, 2011). This estimate improves the L 4 restriction estimate of Burq et al. (Duke Math J 138:445-486, 2007) and Hu (Forum Math 6:1021-1052, 2009) by a power of {(log logλ)^{-1}} . Moreover, in the case of compact hyperbolic surfaces, we obtain further improvements in terms of {(logλ)^{-1}} by applying the ideas from (Chen and Sogge, Commun Math Phys 329(3):435-459, 2014) and (Blair and Sogge, Concerning Toponogov's Theorem and logarithmic improvement of estimates of eigenfunctions, Preprint). We are able to compute various constants that appeared in (Chen and Sogge, Commun Math Phys 329(3):435-459, 2014) explicitly, by proving detailed oscillatory integral estimates and lifting calculations to the universal cover H^2.

  15. Five Year Mean Surface Chlorophyll Estimates in the Northern Gulf of Mexico for 2005 through 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These images were created by combining the mean surface chlorophyll estimates to produce seasonal representations for winter, spring, summer and fall. Winter...

  16. Estimation of measurement uncertainty caused by surface gradient for a white light interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingyu; Cheung, Chi Fai; Ren, Mingjun; Cheng, Ching-Hsiang

    2015-10-10

    Although the scanning white light interferometer can provide measurement results with subnanometer resolution, the measurement accuracy is far from perfect. The surface roughness and surface gradient have significant influence on the measurement uncertainty since the corresponding height differences within a single CCD pixel cannot be resolved. This paper presents an uncertainty estimation method for estimating the measurement uncertainty due to the surface gradient of the workpiece. The method is developed based on the mathematical expression of an uncertainty estimation model which is derived and verified through a series of experiments. The results show that there is a notable similarity between the predicted uncertainty from the uncertainty estimation model and the experimental measurement uncertainty, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the method. With the establishment of the proposed uncertainty estimation method, the uncertainty associated with the measurement result can be determined conveniently.

  17. Method of estimating mechanical stress on Si body of MOSFET using drain–body junction current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Gang-Jun; Son, Donghee; Lee, Nam-Hyun; Kang, Bongkoo

    2017-01-01

    A simple and accurate method of estimating the mechanical stress σ on the Si body of a MOSFET is proposed. This method measures the doping concentration of the body, N d, and the onset voltage V hl for the high-level injection of the drain–body junction, uses N d, the ideality factor η, and the Fermi potential ϕf ≈ V hl/2η to calculate the intrinsic carrier concentration n i of the Si body, and then uses the calculated n i to obtain the bandgap energy E g of the Si body. σ is estimated from E g using the deformation potential theory. The estimates of σ agree well with those obtained using previous methods. The proposed method requires one MOSFET, whereas the others require at least two MOSFETs, so the proposed method can give an absolute measurement of σ on the Si body of a MOSFET.

  18. Near-surface residual stresses and microstructural changes after turning of a nickel-based superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlauer, Christian

    2003-07-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are precipitation hardened alloys with complex compositions. They are used in aircraft engines and land-based gas turbines in load bearing structural components that are exposed to high temperatures. Failure mechanisms in this environment are high and low cycle fatigue, creep, and corrosion. During manufacturing, residual stresses are often introduced into the material due to inhomogeneous plastic deformations, both intentionally and unintentionally. One such manufacturing process is metal cutting, which introduces residual stresses in the surface layer. The stress state in the near-surface zone of components is of special interest as the surface often experiences peak loads and cracks have their starting point there. In this thesis, near-surface residual stress distributions and microstructural changes are studied in the nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 for two different turning operations, face grooving and facing. Process variables are in both cases cutting speed and feed that have been varied between (10 and 1200) m/min and (0.01 and 0.5) mm, respectively. The first turning technique face grooving, which gives cutting conditions similar to orthogonal cutting, showed a clear dependency of the residual stresses on the cutting speed. The tensile stress at the surface, the maximum compressive stress below the surface, and the thickness of the affected layer increase with increasing cutting speed. The tensile stresses are constrained to a thin surface layer and compressive residual stresses below the surface dominate the depth profile of the residual stresses. Only at low cutting speed, residual stresses were largely avoided. The second turning technique facing confirmed the dependency of the residual stresses on the cutting speed and revealed a similar dependency on the feed. Microstructural investigations of near-surface cross-sections by means of transmission electron microscopy showed a zone where the grains had undergone plastic

  19. Surface Finish and Residual Stresses Induced by Orthogonal Dry Machining of AA7075-T651

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Jomaa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface finish was extensively studied in usual machining processes (turning, milling, and drilling. For these processes, the surface finish is strongly influenced by the cutting feed and the tool nose radius. However, a basic understanding of tool/surface finish interaction and residual stress generation has been lacking. This paper aims to investigate the surface finish and residual stresses under the orthogonal cutting since it can provide this information by avoiding the effect of the tool nose radius. The orthogonal machining of AA7075-T651 alloy through a series of cutting experiments was performed under dry conditions. Surface finish was studied using height and amplitude distribution roughness parameters. SEM and EDS were used to analyze surface damage and built-up edge (BUE formation. An analysis of the surface topography showed that the surface roughness was sensitive to changes in cutting parameters. It was found that the formation of BUE and the interaction between the tool edge and the iron-rich intermetallic particles play a determinant role in controlling the surface finish during dry orthogonal machining of the AA7075-T651 alloy. Hoop stress was predominantly compressive on the surface and tended to be tensile with increased cutting speed. The reverse occurred for the surface axial stress. The smaller the cutting feed, the greater is the effect of cutting speed on both axial and hoop stresses. By controlling the cutting speed and feed, it is possible to generate a benchmark residual stress state and good surface finish using dry machining.

  20. A general scheme for the estimation of oxygen binding energies on binary transition metal surface alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    A simple scheme for the estimation of oxygen binding energies on transition metal surface alloys is presented. It is shown that a d-band center model of the alloy surfaces is a convenient and appropriate basis for this scheme; variations in chemical composition, strain effects, and ligand effects...... for the estimation of oxygen binding energies on a wide variety of transition metal alloys. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  1. Low-Stress Silicon Cladding for Surface Finishing Large UVOIR Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I research, ZeCoat Corporation demonstrated a low-stress silicon cladding process for surface finishing large UVOIR mirrors. A polishable cladding is...

  2. Residual stresses in the surface layer of laser-treated steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussel, B.A. van; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1993-01-01

    Although laser treatment of certain metals may enhance the wear performance in general it may result equally well in large residual stresses which affect the wear performance detrimentally. Tensile stresses generated in the surface layer may lead to severe cracking of the material. This paper

  3. Comparison among four kinds of data of sea surface wind stress in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢强; 王卫强; 毛庆文

    2002-01-01

    By using remote sensing (ERS) data, FSU data, GOADS data and Hellerman & Rcsenstein objective analysis data to analyze the sea surface wind stress in the South China Sea, it is found that the remote sensing data have higher resolution and more reasonable values. Therefore we suggest that remote sensing data be chosen in the study of climatological features of sea surface wind stress and its seasonal variability in the South China Sea, especially in the study of small and middle scale eddies.

  4. The photoload sampling technique: estimating surface fuel loadings from downward-looking photographs of synthetic fuelbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Laura J. Dickinson

    2007-01-01

    Fire managers need better estimates of fuel loading so they can more accurately predict the potential fire behavior and effects of alternative fuel and ecosystem restoration treatments. This report presents a new fuel sampling method, called the photoload sampling technique, to quickly and accurately estimate loadings for six common surface fuel components (1 hr, 10 hr...

  5. Estimating Subglottal Pressure from Neck-Surface Acceleration during Normal Voice Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryd, Amanda S.; Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Hillman, Robert E.; Mehta, Daryush D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for estimating subglottal air pressure using a neck-surface accelerometer and to compare the accuracy of predicting subglottal air pressure relative to predicting acoustic sound pressure level (SPL). Method: Indirect estimates of subglottal pressure (P[subscript sg]') were obtained…

  6. Modelling of composition and stress profiles in low temperature surface engineered stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    stresses are introduced in the developing case, arising from the volume expansion that accompanies the dissolution of high interstitial contents in expanded austenite. Modelling of the composition and stress profiles developing during low temperature surface engineering from the processing parameters...... temperature, time and gas composition is a prerequisite for targeted process optimization. A realistic model to simulate the developing case has to take the following influences on composition and stress into account: - a concentration dependent diffusion coefficient - trapping of nitrogen by chromium atoms...... - the effect of residual stress on diffusive flux - the effect of residual stress on solubility of interstitials - plastic accommodation of residual stress. The effect of all these contributions on composition and stress profiles will be addressed....

  7. Age-surface temperature estimation model: When will oil palm plantation reach the same surface temperature as natural forest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushayati, S. B.; Hermawan, R.; Meilani, R.

    2017-01-01

    Oil palm plantation has often been accused as the cause of global warming. However, along with its growth, it would be able to decrease surface temperature. The question is ‘when will the plantation be able to reach the same surface temperature as natural forest’. This research aimed to estimate the age of oil palm plantation that create similar surface temperature to those in natural forest (land cover before the opening and planting of oil palm). The method used in this research was spatial analysis of land cover and surface temperature distribution. Based on the spatial analysis of surface temperature, five points was randomly taken from each planting age (age 1 15 years). Linear regression was then employed in the analysis. The linear regression formula between surface temperature and age of oil palm plantation was Y = 26.002 – 0.1237X. Surface temperature will decrease as much as 0.1237 ° C with one year age growth oil palm. Surface temperature that was similar to the initial temperature, when the land cover was natural forest (23.04 °C), was estimated to occur when the oil palm plantation reach the age 24 year.

  8. A posteriori error estimates for finite volume approximations of elliptic equations on general surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Lili; Tian, Li; Wang, Desheng

    2008-10-31

    In this paper, we present a residual-based a posteriori error estimate for the finite volume discretization of steady convection– diffusion–reaction equations defined on surfaces in R3, which are often implicitly represented as level sets of smooth functions. Reliability and efficiency of the proposed a posteriori error estimator are rigorously proved. Numerical experiments are also conducted to verify the theoretical results and demonstrate the robustness of the error estimator.

  9. Comparison of surface energy fluxes with satellite-derived surface energy flux estimates from a shrub-steppe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkham, Randy R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This thesis relates the components of the surface energy balance (i.e., net radiation, sensible and latent heat flux densities, soil heat flow) to remotely sensed data for native vegetation in a semi-arid environment. Thematic mapper data from Landsat 4 and 5 were used to estimate net radiation, sensible heat flux (H), and vegetation amount. Several sources of ground truth were employed. They included soil water balance using the neutron thermalization method and weighing lysimeters, and the measurement of energy fluxes with the Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) technique. Sensible and latent heat flux were measured at four sites on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site using a weighing lysimeter and/or BREB stations. The objective was to calibrate an aerodynamic transport equation that related H to radiant surface temperature. The transport equation was then used with Landsat thermal data to generate estimates of H and compare these estimates against H values obtained with BREB/lysimeters at the time of overflight. Landsat and surface meteorologic data were used to estimate the radiation budget terms at the surface. Landsat estimates of short-wave radiation reflected from the surface correlate well with reflected radiation measured using inverted Eppley pyranometers. Correlation of net radiation estimates determined from satellite data, pyranometer, air temperature, and vapor pressure compared to net radiometer values obtained at time of overflight were excellent for a single image, but decrease for multiple images. Soil heat flux, GT, is a major component of the energy balance in arid systems and G{sub T} generally decreases as vegetation cover increases. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values generated from Landsat thermatic mapper data were representative of field observations of the presence of green vegetation, but it was not possible to determine a single relationship between NDVI and GT for all sites.

  10. Comparison of surface fractal dimensions of chromizing coating and P110 steel for corrosion resistance estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Naiming, E-mail: lnmlz33@163.com [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Guo, Junwen [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Xie, Faqin [School of Aeronautics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Zou, Jiaojuan; Tian, Wei [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Yao, Xiaofei [School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Xi’an Technological University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Zhang, Hongyan; Tang, Bin [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Continuous chromizing coating was synthesized on P110 steel by pack cementation. • The chromizing coating showed better corrosion resistance. • Comparison of surface fractal dimensions can estimate corrosion resistance. - Abstract: In the field of corrosion research, mass gain/loss, electrochemical tests and comparing the surface elemental distributions, phase constitutions as well as surface morphologies before and after corrosion are extensively applied to investigate the corrosion behavior or estimate the corrosion resistance of materials that operated in various environments. Most of the above methods are problem oriented, complex and longer-period time-consuming. However from an object oriented point of view, the corroded surfaces of materials often have self-similar characterization: fractal property which can be employed to efficiently achieve damaged surface analysis. The present work describes a strategy of comparison of the surface fractal dimensions for corrosion resistance estimation: chromizing coating was synthesized on P110 steel surface to improve its performance via pack cementation. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to investigate the surface morphologies of the original and corroded samples. Surface fractal dimensions of the detected samples were calculated by binary images related to SEM images of surface morphologies with box counting algorithm method. The results showed that both surface morphologies and surface fractal dimensions of P110 steel varied greatly before and after corrosion test, but the chromizing coating changed slightly. The chromizing coating indicated better corrosion resistance than P110 steel. Comparison of surface fractal dimensions of original and corroded samples can rapidly and exactly realize the estimation of corrosion resistance.

  11. A Remote Sensing Method for Estimating Surface Air Temperature and Surface Vapor Pressure on a Regional Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renhua Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of estimating regional distributions of surface air temperature (Ta and surface vapor pressure (ea, which uses remotely-sensed data and meteorological data as its inputs. The method takes into account the effects of both local driving force and horizontal advection on Ta and ea. Good correlation coefficients (R2 and root mean square error (RMSE between the measurements of Ta/ea at weather stations and Ta/ea estimates were obtained; with R2 of 0.77, 0.82 and 0.80 and RMSE of 0.42K, 0.35K and 0.20K for Ta and with R2 of 0.85, 0.88, 0.88 and RMSE of 0.24hpa, 0.35hpa and 0.16hpa for ea, respectively, for the three-day results. This result is much better than that estimated from the inverse distance weighted method (IDW. The performance of Ta/ea estimates at Dongping Lake illustrated that the method proposed in the paper also has good accuracy for a heterogeneous surface. The absolute biases of Ta and ea estimates at Dongping Lake from the proposed method are less than 0.5Kand 0.7hpa, respectively, while the absolute biases of them from the IDW method are more than 2K and 3hpa, respectively. Sensitivity analysis suggests that the Ta estimation method presented in the paper is most sensitive to surface temperature and that the ea estimation method is most sensitive to available energy.

  12. Surface wave inversion for a p-wave velocity profile: Estimation of the squared slowness gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarenko, A.V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Surface waves can be used to obtain a near-surface shear wave profile. The inverse problem is usually solved for the locally 1-D problem of a set of homogeneous horizontal elastic layers. The output is a set of shear velocity values for each layer in the profile. P-wave velocity profile can be estim

  13. Effective aerodynamic roughness estimated from airborne laser altimeter measurements of surface features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, AC; Kustas, WP; Ritchie, JC; Klaassen, W; Menenti, M; Rango, A; Prueger, JH

    2003-01-01

    Aerodynamic roughness length (z(0)) and displacement height (d(0)) are important surface parameters for estimating surface fluxes in numerical models. These parameters are generally determined from wind flow characteristics using logarithmic wind profiles measured at a meteorological tower or by

  14. Effective aerodynamic roughness estimated from airborne laser altimeter measurements of surface features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, AC; Kustas, WP; Ritchie, JC; Klaassen, W; Menenti, M; Rango, A; Prueger, JH

    2003-01-01

    Aerodynamic roughness length (z(0)) and displacement height (d(0)) are important surface parameters for estimating surface fluxes in numerical models. These parameters are generally determined from wind flow characteristics using logarithmic wind profiles measured at a meteorological tower or by bal

  15. Estimation of the Axial Stress in High-Tension Bolt by Acoustoelastic Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Hae Hwa; Lee, Tae Hoon; Jhang, Kyung Young [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Noh Yu [Korea University of Technology and Education, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-15

    The evaluation of clamping condition has been regarded as the main issue in the safety-maintenance of the clamped high-tension bolts. For this, this paper proposes a method to estimate the axial stress by measuring the Tofu (Time-Of-Flight) of ultrasonic wave, which is based on the acetylsalicylate or the dependency of sound speed on the stress. In this method, however, the variation of sound speed within the range of stress induced under the field condition is very small, and thus the accuracy of the Tofu measurement is important. We adopted the phase detection method using tone-burst ultrasonic wave to measure the precise Tofu. In order to verify the usefulness of the proposed method experiments are carried out and the results were compared with the stress measured by the strain gage. The results show good agreement with each other, and from these we can conclude that the proposed method is highly useful fnr the evaluation of clamping condition in the clamped high-tension bolts

  16. Real-Time Personalized Monitoring to Estimate Occupational Heat Stress in Ambient Assisted Working

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Pancardo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ambient Assisted Working (AAW is a discipline aiming to provide comfort and safety in the workplace through customization and technology. Workers’ comfort may be compromised in many labor situations, including those depending on environmental conditions, like extremely hot weather conduces to heat stress. Occupational heat stress (OHS happens when a worker is in an uninterrupted physical activity and in a hot environment. OHS can produce strain on the body, which leads to discomfort and eventually to heat illness and even death. Related ISO standards contain methods to estimate OHS and to ensure the safety and health of workers, but they are subjective, impersonal, performed a posteriori and even invasive. This paper focuses on the design and development of real-time personalized monitoring for a more effective and objective estimation of OHS, taking into account the individual user profile, fusing data from environmental and unobtrusive body sensors. Formulas employed in this work were taken from different domains and joined in the method that we propose. It is based on calculations that enable continuous surveillance of physical activity performance in a comfortable and healthy manner. In this proposal, we found that OHS can be estimated by satisfying the following criteria: objective, personalized, in situ, in real time, just in time and in an unobtrusive way. This enables timely notice for workers to make decisions based on objective information to control OHS.

  17. Real-Time Personalized Monitoring to Estimate Occupational Heat Stress in Ambient Assisted Working.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancardo, Pablo; Acosta, Francisco D; Hernández-Nolasco, José Adán; Wister, Miguel A; López-de-Ipiña, Diego

    2015-07-13

    Ambient Assisted Working (AAW) is a discipline aiming to provide comfort and safety in the workplace through customization and technology. Workers' comfort may be compromised in many labor situations, including those depending on environmental conditions, like extremely hot weather conduces to heat stress. Occupational heat stress (OHS) happens when a worker is in an uninterrupted physical activity and in a hot environment. OHS can produce strain on the body, which leads to discomfort and eventually to heat illness and even death. Related ISO standards contain methods to estimate OHS and to ensure the safety and health of workers, but they are subjective, impersonal, performed a posteriori and even invasive. This paper focuses on the design and development of real-time personalized monitoring for a more effective and objective estimation of OHS, taking into account the individual user profile, fusing data from environmental and unobtrusive body sensors. Formulas employed in this work were taken from different domains and joined in the method that we propose. It is based on calculations that enable continuous surveillance of physical activity performance in a comfortable and healthy manner. In this proposal, we found that OHS can be estimated by satisfying the following criteria: objective, personalized, in situ, in real time, just in time and in an unobtrusive way. This enables timely notice for workers to make decisions based on objective information to control OHS.

  18. Local stresses, dyke arrest and surface deformation in volcanic edificesand rift zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Brenner

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Field studies indicate that nearly all eruptions in volcanic edifices and rift zones are supplied with magma through fractures (dykes that are opened by magmatic overpressure. While (inferred dyke injections are frequent during unrest periods, volcanic eruptions are, in comparison, infrequent, suggesting that most dykes become arrested at certain depths in the crust, in agreement with field studies. The frequency of dyke arrest can be partly explained by the numerical models presented here which indicate that volcanic edifices and rift zones consisting of rocks of contrasting mechanical properties, such as soft pyroclastic layers and stiff lava flows, commonly develop local stress fields that encourage dyke arrest. During unrest, surface deformation studies are routinely used to infer the geometries of arrested dykes, and some models (using homogeneous, isotropic half-spaces infer large grabens to be induced by such dykes. Our results, however, show that the dyke-tip tensile stresses are normally much greater than the induced surface stresses, making it difficult to explain how a dyke can induce surface stresses in excess of the tensile (or shear strength while the same strength is not exceeded at the (arrested dyke tip. Also, arrested dyke tips in eroded or active rift zones are normally not associated with dyke-induced grabens or normal faults, and some dykes arrested within a few metres of the surface do not generate faults or grabens. The numerical models show that abrupt changes in Young's moduli(stiffnesses, layers with relatively high dyke-normal compressive stresses (stress barriers, and weak horizontal contacts may make the dyke-induced surface tensile stresses too small for significant fault or graben formation to occur in rift zones or volcanic edifices. Also, these small surface stresses may have no simple relation to the dyke geometry or the depth to its tip. Thus, for a layered crust with weak contacts, straightforward

  19. Estimation of Solar Radiation Incident on Horizontal and Tilted Surfaces For 7 Colombian Zones

    OpenAIRE

    Corredor, L.M

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a procedure that was adopted for the development of a linear regression model for estimating solar radiation on horizontal surfaces for 7 Colombian zones. The correlations, the simulated global solar radiation on tilted surface and the simulated diffuse solar radiation on a horizontal surface for each zone are shown. The values of sunshine-hours and the solar radiation were taken from January 2012 to January 2013. The solar radiation values...

  20. Surface Pressure Estimates for Pitching Aircraft Model at High Angles-of-attack (Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Pashilkar

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The surface pressure on a pitching delta wing aircraft is estimated from the normal force and the pitching moment characteristics. The pressure model is based on parametrising the surface pressure distribution on a simple delta wing. This model is useful as a first approximation of the load distribution on the aircraft wing. Leeward surface pressure distributions computed by this method are presented.

  1. Maximum likelihood estimation of parameterized 3-D surfaces using a moving camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Y.; Cernuschi-Frias, B.; Cooper, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    A new approach is introduced to estimating object surfaces in three-dimensional space from a sequence of images. A surface of interest here is modeled as a 3-D function known up to the values of a few parameters. The approach will work with any parameterization. However, in work to date researchers have modeled objects as patches of spheres, cylinders, and planes - primitive objects. These primitive surfaces are special cases of 3-D quadric surfaces. Primitive surface estimation is treated as the general problem of maximum likelihood parameter estimation based on two or more functionally related data sets. In the present case, these data sets constitute a sequence of images taken at different locations and orientations. A simple geometric explanation is given for the estimation algorithm. Though various techniques can be used to implement this nonlinear estimation, researches discuss the use of gradient descent. Experiments are run and discussed for the case of a sphere of unknown location. These experiments graphically illustrate the various advantages of using as many images as possible in the estimation and of distributing camera positions from first to last over as large a baseline as possible. Researchers introduce the use of asymptotic Bayesian approximations in order to summarize the useful information in a sequence of images, thereby drastically reducing both the storage and amount of processing required.

  2. Direction-of-Arrival Estimation for Radar Ice Sounding Surface Clutter Suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik; Dall, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Ice sounding radars are able to measure ice sheets by profiling their glaciological features from the surface to the bedrock. The current airborne and, in particular, future space-based systems are suffering from off-nadir surface clutter, which can mask the depth signal of interest. The most...... estimation for surface clutter signals, which includes a formulation of the mathematical foundation of spatial aliasing. DOA estimation is applied to data acquired with the P-band POLarimetric Airborne Radar Ice Sounder at the Jutulstraumen Glacier, Antarctica. The effects of spatial aliasing related...

  3. Understanding the Role of Wind in Reducing the Surface Mass Balance Estimates over East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, I.; Scambos, T. A.; Koenig, L.; Creyts, T. T.; Bell, R. E.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Lenaerts, J.; Paden, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate quantification of surface snow-accumulation over Antarctica is important for mass balance estimates and climate studies based on ice core records. An improved estimate of surface mass balance must include the significant role near-surface wind plays in the sublimation and redistribution of snow across Antarctica. We have developed an empirical model based on airborne radar and lidar observations, and modeled surface mass balance and wind fields to produce a continent-wide prediction of wind-scour zones over Antarctica. These zones have zero to negative surface mass balance, are located over locally steep ice sheet areas (>0.002) and controlled by bedrock topography. The near-surface winds accelerate over these zones, eroding and sublimating the surface snow. This scouring results in numerous localized regions (≤ 200 km2) with reduced surface accumulation. Each year, tens of gigatons of snow on the Antarctic ice sheet are ablated by persistent near-surface katabatic winds over these wind-scour zones. Large uncertainties remain in the surface mass balance estimates over East Antarctica as climate models do not adequately represent the small-scale physical processes that lead to mass loss through sublimation or redistribution over the wind-scour zones. In this study, we integrate Operation IceBridge's snow radar over the Recovery Ice Stream with a series of ice core dielectric and depth-density profiles for improved surface mass balance estimates that reflect the mass loss over the wind-scour zones. Accurate surface mass balance estimates from snow radars require spatially variable depth-density profiles. Using an ensemble of firn cores, MODIS-derived surface snow grain size, modeled accumulation rates and surface temperatures from RACMO2, we assemble spatially variable depth-density profiles and use our mapping of snow density variations to estimate layer mass and net accumulation rates from snow radar layer data. Our study improves the quantification of

  4. Allowing for surface preparation in stress corrosion cracking modelling; Prise en compte de l`etat de surface dans la modelisation de la fissuration par corrosion sous contrainte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, P.; Buisine, D. [Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France); Gelpi, A. [FRAMATOME, 92 - Paris-La-Defence (France)

    1997-12-31

    When a 600 alloy component is significantly deformed during installation, by welding, rolling, bending, its stress corrosion cracking in Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactor`s primary coolant, is significantly changed by the initial surface treatment. Therefore, the crack initiated time may be reduced by several orders of magnitude for certain surfaces preparations. Allowing for cold working of the surface, for which modelling is proposed, depends less on the degree of cold work then on the depths of the hardened layers. Honing hardens the metal over depths of about one micron for vessel head penetrations, for example, and has little influence on subsequent behaviour after the part deforms. On the other hand, coarser turning treatment produces cold worked layers which can reach several tens of microns and can very significantly reduce the initiation time compared to fine honing. So evaluation after depths of hardening is vital on test pieces for interpreting laboratory results as well as on service components for estimating their service life. Suppression by mechanical or chemical treatment of these layers, after deformation, seems to be the most appropriate solution for reducing over-stressing connected with surface treatment carried out before deformation. (author). 14 refs.

  5. The Surface-Forced Overturning of the North Atlantic: Estimates from Modern Era Atmospheric Reanalysis Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grist, Jeremy; Josey, Simon; Marsh, Robert; Kwon, Young-Oh; Bingham, Rory; Blaker, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Estimates of the recent mean and time varying water mass transformation rates associated with North Atlantic surface-forced overturning are presented. The estimates are derived from heat and freshwater surface fluxes and sea surface temperature fields from six atmospheric reanalyses (JRA, NCEP-1, NCEP-2, ERA-I, CFSR and MERRA) together with sea surface salinity fields from two globally gridded data sets (World Ocean Atlas and EN3). The resulting twelve estimates of the 1979-2007 mean surface-forced streamfunction all depict a sub-polar cell, with maxima north of 45oN, near σ = 27.5 kgm-3, and a sub-tropical cell between 20oN and 40oN, near σ = 26.1 kgm-3. The mean magnitude of the sub-polar cell varies between 12-18 Sv, consistent with estimates of the overturning circulation from sub-surface observations. Analysis of the thermal and haline components of the surface density fluxes indicate large differences in the inferred low latitude circulation are largely due to the biases in reanalysis net heat flux fields, which range in the global mean from -13 Wm-2 to 19 Wm-2. The different estimates of temporal variability in the sub-polar cell are well correlated with each other. This suggests the uncertainty associated with the choice of reanalysis product does not critically limit the ability of the method to infer the variability in the sub-polar overturning. In contrast, the different estimates of sub-tropical variability are poorly correlated with each other, and only a subset of them capture a significant fraction of the variability in independently estimated North Atlantic Sub-Tropical Mode Water volume.

  6. Effect of shot peening and grit blasting on surface integrity: Influence on residual stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.TOSHA; LU Jian

    2006-01-01

    The influences of factors such as particle size (0.55-2.2 mm), particle velocity (15-35 m/s) and thickness of work material on the surface integrity were investigated. The residual stresses induced by shot peening or grit blasting were examined. In order to clarify the influences of those factors on residual stress included in the surface integrity, a medium carbon steel (w(C)= 0.45%, 180 HV) was peened by a centrifugal type peening machine using cast steel particles (650-800 HV). The results show that the compressive residual stresses on the peened surface are larger than those of grit blasting; the critical thickness of shot peening is about 50% thicker than that of grit blasting; the high compressive stresses induced by blasting are owing to the wrought or peening effect.

  7. Evaluation of near-surface stress distributions in dissimilar welded joint by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Dong Ryul; Yoshida, Sanichiro; Sasaki, Tomohiro; Todd, Judith A; Park, Ik Keun

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results from a set of experiments designed to ultrasonically measure the near surface stresses distributed within a dissimilar metal welded plate. A scanning acoustic microscope (SAM), with a tone-burst ultrasonic wave frequency of 200 MHz, was used for the measurement of near surface stresses in the dissimilar welded plate between 304 stainless steel and low carbon steel. For quantitative data acquisition such as leaky surface acoustic wave (leaky SAW) velocity measurement, a point focus acoustic lens of frequency 200 MHz was used and the leaky SAW velocities within the specimen were precisely measured. The distributions of the surface acoustic wave velocities change according to the near-surface stresses within the joint. A three dimensional (3D) finite element simulation was carried out to predict numerically the stress distributions and compare with the experimental results. The experiment and FE simulation results for the dissimilar welded plate showed good agreement. This research demonstrates that a combination of FE simulation and ultrasonic stress measurements using SAW velocity distributions appear promising for determining welding residual stresses in dissimilar material joints.

  8. Can We Estimate Surface Carbon Fluxes With a 6-hour Data Assimilation System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnay, E.; Kang, J.; Liu, J.; Fung, I.

    2011-12-01

    The estimation of surface carbon fluxes from atmospheric measurements of CO2 is an ill-posed problem (Enting, 2002). In the real atmosphere emissions are transported and mixed, losing information; measuring atmospheric concentrations introduces further errors; and the calculation of transports with imperfect models amplifies the errors in estimating surface sources and sinks. Because of this ill-posedness, prior information on carbon surface fluxes is essential for inverse estimations (e.g., Gurney et al., 2004, Baker et al., 2006, Roedenbeck et al., 2003). Peters et al. (2007) have used instead an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) data assimilation approach where the winds are given (e.g., from ECMWF). They use a Kalman smoother with a 5-week smoother, producing the operational "Carbon Tracker" estimation of surface fluxes at NOAA. We address the ill-posedness by assimilating simultaneously every 6 hours both carbon concentrations and meteorological variables, since within this time scale changes in atmospheric CO2 concentrations should be dominated by surface fluxes rather than transport and mixing. A simulation system using the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF) to assimilate CO2 from a realistic observing system including GOSAT, AIRS and surface observations, and is able to estimate in detail the seasonal evolution of "true" surface fluxes (including fossil fuel emissions) even in the absence of prior information. These promising results (albeit simulated) suggest that with more advanced models and accurate column observations such as those expected from OCO-2 it may be possible to estimate surface carbon fluxes if the LETKF is optimized (Kang et al., 2011).

  9. Stress distribution and surface instability of an inclined granular layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng He-Peng; Jiang Yi-Min; Peng Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Static granular materials may avalanche suddenly under continuous quasi-static drives.This phenomenon,which is important in many engineering applications,can be explained by analyzing the stability of the elastic solutions.We show this for a granular layer driven by its inclination angle in gravity,where the elastic problem can be solved generally and analytically.It is found that a loss of stability may occur only at the free surface of the layer.This result is considered to be relevant for understanding surface avalanches and the flows observed experimentally.

  10. Towards quantifying horizontal stresses of free-polling pneumatic rubber tyres on road surfaces

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Multi-dimensional forces (and stresses) inside the contact patch of a freerolling pneumatic rubber tyre generally occur as a direct result of a complex interaction between flexible rubber and a rigid test surface or road surface. These forces...

  11. Three-dimensional analysis of elastic stress distribution of indented ceramic surface by finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatsuyuki NEZU

    2006-01-01

    The three-dimensional stress distributions in the area surrounding indentation pattern for three different materials,Al2O3,Si3N4 and SiC were analyzed by finite element method(FEM). Those theoretical results were also compared with the experimental ones by Rockwell hardness test. The effect of loading stress on the plastic deformation in specimens,surface was investigated on the assumption of shear strain energy theory by Huber-Mises when the materials were indented. The distributions of nomal stress,shear stress,and Mises stress were analysed with variations of loading conditions. It is clear that the analytical results for the stress distributions,the crack length and its density of probability are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Stresses and strains developed by the reflection of seismic waves at a free surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banister, J.R.; Ellett, D.M.; Mehl, C.R.; Dean, F.F.

    1978-07-01

    Exact and approximate equations have been derived for the stresses and strains beneath a free surface when an incoming longitudinal wave and an incoming shear wave reflect from the surface. Results of the approximate solution for depths much less than the wave length of the incoming wave are given in tabular form and are graphed for Poisson's ratios of 0.25, 0.3, and 0.333. The results should be of use in categorizing the magnitude of near-surface stresses and strains resulting from seismic waves produced by deeply buried explosives or earthquakes.

  13. Improving winter leaf area index estimation in coniferous forests and its significance in estimating the land surface albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Chen, Jing M.; Pavlic, Goran; Arain, Altaf

    2016-09-01

    Winter leaf area index (LAI) of evergreen coniferous forests exerts strong control on the interception of snow, snowmelt and energy balance. Simulation of winter LAI and associated winter processes in land surface models is challenging. Retrieving winter LAI from remote sensing data is difficult due to cloud contamination, poor illumination, lower solar elevation and higher radiation reflection by snow background. Underestimated winter LAI in evergreen coniferous forests is one of the major issues limiting the application of current remote sensing LAI products. It has not been fully addressed in past studies in the literature. In this study, we used needle lifespan to correct winter LAI in a remote sensing product developed by the University of Toronto. For the validation purpose, the corrected winter LAI was then used to calculate land surface albedo at five FLUXNET coniferous forests in Canada. The RMSE and bias values for estimated albedo were 0.05 and 0.011, respectively, for all sites. The albedo map over coniferous forests across Canada produced with corrected winter LAI showed much better agreement with the GLASS (Global LAnd Surface Satellites) albedo product than the one produced with uncorrected winter LAI. The results revealed that the corrected winter LAI yielded much greater accuracy in simulating land surface albedo, making the new LAI product an improvement over the original one. Our study will help to increase the usability of remote sensing LAI products in land surface energy budget modeling.

  14. Estimating Aerodynamic Parameters of Urban-Like Surfaces with Heterogeneous Building Heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millward-Hopkins, J. T.; Tomlin, A. S.; Ma, L.; Ingham, D.; Pourkashanian, M.

    2011-12-01

    There are many geometrical factors than can influence the aerodynamic parameters of urban surfaces and hence the vertical wind profiles found above. The knowledge of these parameters has applications in numerous fields, such as dispersion modelling, wind loading calculations, and estimating the wind energy resource at urban locations. Using quasi-empirical modelling, we estimate the dependence of the aerodynamic roughness length and zero-plane displacement for idealized urban surfaces, on the two most significant geometrical characteristics; surface area density and building height variability. A validation of the spatially-averaged, logarithmic wind profiles predicted by the model is carried out, via comparisons with available wind-tunnel and numerical data for arrays of square based blocks of uniform and heterogeneous heights. The model predicts two important properties of the aerodynamic parameters of surfaces of heterogeneous heights that have been suggested by experiments. Firstly, the zero-plane displacement of a heterogeneous array can exceed the surface mean building height significantly. Secondly, the characteristic peak in roughness length with respect to surface area density becomes much softer for heterogeneous arrays compared to uniform arrays, since a variation in building height can prevent a skimming flow regime from occurring. Overall the simple model performs well against available experimental data and may offer more accurate estimates of surface aerodynamic parameters for complex urban surfaces compared to models that do not include height variability.

  15. Surface Wave Speed of Functionally Graded Magneto-Electro-Elastic Materials with Initial Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The shear surface wave at the free traction surface of half- infinite functionally graded magneto-electro-elastic material with initial stress is investigated. The material parameters are assumed to vary ex- ponentially along the thickness direction, only. The velocity equations of shear surface wave are derived on the electrically or magnetically open circuit and short circuit boundary conditions, based on the equations of motion of the graded magneto-electro-elastic material with the initial stresses and the free traction boundary conditions. The dispersive curves are obtained numerically and the influences of the initial stresses and the material gradient index on the dispersive curves are discussed. The investigation provides a basis for the development of new functionally graded magneto-electro-elastic surface wave devices.

  16. Engineering the residual stress state and microstructure of stainless steel with mechanical surface treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turski, M.; Clitheroe, S.; Withers, P.J. [Manchester University, School of Materials, Manchester (United Kingdom); Evans, A.D. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Rodopoulos, C. [University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Hughes, D.J. [Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    2010-06-15

    Four mechanical surface treatments have been considered for the application to austenitic stainless steel structures. Shot peening (SP), laser shock peening (LSP), ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT) and water jet cavitation peening (WJCP), also known as cavitation shotless peening (CSP), have been applied to 8 mm thick Type 304 austenitic stainless steel coupons. This study considers the merits of each of these mechanical surface treatments in terms of their effect on the surface roughness, microstructure, level of plastic work and through thickness residual stress distribution. Microstructural studies have revealed the formation of martensite close to the treated surface for each process. Residual stress measurements in the samples show compressive stresses to a significantly greater depth for the LSP, UIT and WJCP samples compared to the more conventional SP treated sample. (orig.)

  17. Influence of fractality of fracture surfaces on stress and displacement fields at crack tips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the classic theory of fracture mechanics,expressions for calculating the stresses and displacements in the vicinity of the crack tip are deduced on the basis of the assumption that a fracture surface is a smooth surface or that a crack is a smooth crack.In fact,the surface of a crack formed during the fracture is usually very irregular.So the real asymptotic form of the stress and displacement fields at the crack tip is different from the classic one.Considering the irregularity of a real fracture surface or a real crack profile,the crack is taken as a fractal one,and then the real asymptotic form at the crack tip is developed by applying Griffith’s energy balance principle and fractal geometry.Through the developed asymptotic form,it is discovered that the fractality of the crack reduces the stress singularity at the crack tip.

  18. Fatigue Life Estimation of Medium-Carbon Steel with Different Surface Roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyou Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Medium-carbon steel is commonly used for the rail, wire ropes, tire cord, cold heading, forging steels, cold finished steel bars, machinable steel and so on. Its fatigue behavior analysis and fatigue life estimation play an important role in the machinery industry. In this paper, the estimation of fatigue life of medium-carbon steel with different surface roughness using established S-N and P-S-N curves is presented. To estimate the fatigue life, the effect of the average surface roughness on the fatigue life of medium-carbon steel has been investigated using 75 fatigue tests in three groups with average surface roughness (Ra: 0.4 μm, 0.8 μm, and 1.6 μm, respectively. S-N curves and P-S-N curves have been established based on the fatigue tests. The fatigue life of medium-carbon steel is then estimated based on Tanaka-Mura crack initiation life model, the crack propagation life model using Paris law, and material constants of the S-N curves. Six more fatigue tests have been conducted to validate the presented fatigue life estimation formulation. The experimental results have shown that the presented model could estimate well the mean fatigue life of medium-carbon steel with different surface roughness.

  19. Evaluation of Residual Stress Relaxation in Surface-Treated Engine Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    account for the inevitable stress release during this process. This method is inherently destructive since it leaves a deep hole on the surface...accelerator or a nuclear reactor. 3 Surface enhancement methods, such as shot peening, laser shock peening, and low- plasticity burnishing , significantly...peening, laser shock peening, or low-plasticity burnishing , surface treatment also leaves substantial microstructural damage behind in the material

  20. Validation of surface crack stress intensity factors of a tubular K-joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lie, S.T. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)]. E-mail: cstlie@ntu.edu.sg; Lee, C.K. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Chiew, S.P. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Shao, Y.B. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2005-08-01

    Tubular K-joints are encountered widely in offshore structures, and the prediction of damaged joints depends very much on the accuracy of stress intensity factor solutions (SIFs). No parametric equations and very few results have been proposed and published in the literature for estimating the SIFs of any K-joints subjected to complex loading conditions. In this paper, a mesh generation method proposed previously for the Y-joint and T-joint has been extended to the K-joint. This method is realized by dividing the K-joint into several sub-zones with each zone consisting of different types of elements and mesh densities. This method has a distinct advantage of controlling the mesh quality, and most importantly the aspect ratio of the elements along the crack front. When the mesh of all the sub-zones has been generated automatically and completely, they are merged to form the complete model. The two most commonly used methods, namely the J-integral and displacement extrapolation, are used to evaluate the SIF values along the crack front of a typical K-joint. To validate the accuracy of these computed SIFs, a full-scale K-joint specimen was tested to failure under fatigue loading conditions. The standard alternating current potential drop (ACPD) technique was used to monitor the rate of crack propagation of the surface crack located at the hot spot stress region. Using the given material parameters C and m, the experimental SIFs were deduced, and they are found to be in good agreement with the computed SIFs obtained from the generated models. Hence, the proposed finite element models are both efficient and reliable.

  1. Estimation of surface energy fluxes under complex terrain of Mt. Qomolangma over the Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Chen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Surface solar radiation is an important parameter in surface energy balance models and in estimation of evapotranspiration. This study developed a DEM based radiation model to estimate instantaneous clear sky solar radiation for surface energy balance system to obtain accurate energy absorbed by the mountain surface. Efforts to improve spatial accuracy of satellite based surface energy budget in mountainous regions were made in this work. Based on eight scenes of Landsat TM/ETM+ (Thematic Mapper/Enhanced Thematic Mapper+ data and observations around the Qomolangma region of the Tibetan Plateau, the topographical enhanced surface energy balance system (TESEBS was tested for deriving net radiation, ground heat flux, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux distributions over the heterogeneous land surface. The land surface energy fluxes over the study area showed a wide range in accordance with the surface features and their thermodynamic states. The model was validated by observations at QOMS/CAS site in the research area with a reasonable accuracy. The mean bias of net radiation, sensible heat flux, ground heat flux and latent heat flux is lower than 23.6 W m−2. The surface solar radiation estimated by the DEM based radiation model developed by this study has a mean bias as low as −9.6 W m−2. TESEBS has a decreased mean bias of about 5.9 W m−2 and 3.4 W m−2 for sensible heat and latent heat flux, respectively, compared to the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS.

  2. The Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS for estimation of turbulent heat fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Su

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS is proposed for the estimation of atmospheric turbulent fluxes and evaporative fraction using satellite earth observation data, in combination with meteorological information at proper scales. SEBS consists of: a set of tools for the determination of the land surface physical parameters, such as albedo, emissivity, temperature, vegetation coverage etc., from spectral reflectance and radiance measurements; a model for the determination of the roughness length for heat transfer; and a new formulation for the determination of the evaporative fraction on the basis of energy balance at limiting cases. Four experimental data sets are used to assess the reliabilities of SEBS. Based on these case studies, SEBS has proven to be capable to estimate turbulent heat fluxes and evaporative fraction at various scales with acceptable accuracy. The uncertainties in the estimated heat fluxes are comparable to in-situ measurement uncertainties. Keywords: Surface energy balance, turbulent heat flux, evaporation, remote sensing

  3. Influence of Initial Inclined Surface Crack on Estimated Residual Fatigue Lifetime of Railway Axle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Náhlík, Luboš; Pokorný, Pavel; Ševčík, Martin; Hutař, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    Railway axles are subjected to cyclic loading which can lead to fatigue failure. For safe operation of railway axles a damage tolerance approach taking into account a possible defect on railway axle surface is often required. The contribution deals with an estimation of residual fatigue lifetime of railway axle with initial inclined surface crack. 3D numerical model of inclined semi-elliptical surface crack in railway axle was developed and its curved propagation through the axle was simulated by finite element method. Presence of press-fitted wheel in the vicinity of initial crack was taken into account. A typical loading spectrum of railway axle was considered and residual fatigue lifetime was estimated by NASGRO approach. Material properties of typical axle steel EA4T were considered in numerical calculations and lifetime estimation.

  4. Recursive estimation of 3D motion and surface structure from local affine flow parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calway, Andrew

    2005-04-01

    A recursive structure from motion algorithm based on optical flow measurements taken from an image sequence is described. It provides estimates of surface normals in addition to 3D motion and depth. The measurements are affine motion parameters which approximate the local flow fields associated with near-planar surface patches in the scene. These are integrated over time to give estimates of the 3D parameters using an extended Kalman filter. This also estimates the camera focal length and, so, the 3D estimates are metric. The use of parametric measurements means that the algorithm is computationally less demanding than previous optical flow approaches and the recursive filter builds in a degree of noise robustness. Results of experiments on synthetic and real image sequences demonstrate that the algorithm performs well.

  5. Uav Aerial Survey: Accuracy Estimation for Automatically Generated Dense Digital Surface Model and Orthothoto Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altyntsev, M. A.; Arbuzov, S. A.; Popov, R. A.; Tsoi, G. V.; Gromov, M. O.

    2016-06-01

    A dense digital surface model is one of the products generated by using UAV aerial survey data. Today more and more specialized software are supplied with modules for generating such kind of models. The procedure for dense digital model generation can be completely or partly automated. Due to the lack of reliable criterion of accuracy estimation it is rather complicated to judge the generation validity of such models. One of such criterion can be mobile laser scanning data as a source for the detailed accuracy estimation of the dense digital surface model generation. These data may be also used to estimate the accuracy of digital orthophoto plans created by using UAV aerial survey data. The results of accuracy estimation for both kinds of products are presented in the paper.

  6. Evaluation of an Odour Emission Factor (OEF) to estimate odour emissions from landfill surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucernoni, Federico; Tapparo, Federica; Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena

    2016-11-01

    Emission factors are fundamental tools for air quality management. Odour Emission Factors (OEFs) can be developed in analogy with the emission factors defined for other chemical compounds, which relate the quantity of a pollutant released to the atmosphere to a given associated activity. Landfills typically represent a common source of odour complaint; for this reason, the development of specific OEFs allowing the estimation of odour emissions from this kind of source would be of great interest both for the landfill design and management. This study proposes an up-to-date methodology for the development of an OEF for the estimation of odour emissions from landfills, thereby focusing on the odour emissions related to the emissions of landfill gas (LFG) from the exhausted landfill surface. The proposed approach is an "indirect" approach based on the quantification of the LFG emissions from methane concentration measurements carried out on an Italian landfill. The Odour Emission Rate (OER) is then obtained by multiplying the emitted gas flow rate by the LFG odour concentration. The odour concentration of the LFG emitted through the landfill surface was estimated by means of an ad hoc correlation investigated between methane concentration and odour concentration. The OEF for the estimation of odour emissions from landfill surfaces was computed, considering the landfill surface as the activity index, as the product between the mean specific LFG flux emitted through the surface resulting from the experimental campaigns, equal to 0.39 l/m2/h, and its odour concentration, which was estimated to be equal to 105‧000 eq. ouE/m3, thus giving an OEF of 0.011 ouE/m2/s. This value, which is considerably lower than those published in previous works, should be considered as an improved estimation based on the most recent developments of the research in the field of odour sampling on surface sources.

  7. Explicit formula of finite difference method to estimate human peripheral tissue temperatures during exposure to severe cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanday, M A; Hussain, Fida

    2015-02-01

    During cold exposure, peripheral tissues undergo vasoconstriction to minimize heat loss to preserve the maintenance of a normal core temperature. However, vasoconstricted tissues exposed to cold temperatures are susceptible to freezing and frostbite-related tissue damage. Therefore, it is imperative to establish a mathematical model for the estimation of tissue necrosis due to cold stress. To this end, an explicit formula of finite difference method has been used to obtain the solution of Pennes' bio-heat equation with appropriate boundary conditions to estimate the temperature profiles of dermal and subdermal layers when exposed to severe cold temperatures. The discrete values of nodal temperature were calculated at the interfaces of skin and subcutaneous tissues with respect to the atmospheric temperatures of 25 °C, 20 °C, 15 °C, 5 °C, -5 °C and -10 °C. The results obtained were used to identify the scenarios under which various degrees of frostbite occur on the surface of skin as well as the dermal and subdermal areas. The explicit formula of finite difference method proposed in this model provides more accurate predictions as compared to other numerical methods. This model of predicting tissue temperatures provides researchers with a more accurate prediction of peripheral tissue temperature and, hence, the susceptibility to frostbite during severe cold exposure.

  8. Surface estimation methods with phased-arrays for adaptive ultrasonic imaging in complex components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, S.; Calmon, P.; Calvo, M.; Le Jeune, L.; Iakovleva, E.

    2015-03-01

    Immersion ultrasonic testing of structures with complex geometries may be significantly improved by using phased-arrays and specific adaptive algorithms that allow to image flaws under a complex and unknown interface. In this context, this paper presents a comparative study of different Surface Estimation Methods (SEM) available in the CIVA software and used for adaptive imaging. These methods are based either on time-of-flight measurements or on image processing. We also introduce a generalized adaptive method where flaws may be fully imaged with half-skip modes. In this method, both the surface and the back-wall of a complex structure are estimated before imaging flaws.

  9. Estimation of transient creep crack-tip stress fields for SE(B) specimen under elastic-plastic-creep conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Sang; Je, Jin Ho; Kim, Dong Jun; Kim, Yun Jae [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This paper estimates the time-dependent crack-tip stress fields under elastic-plastic-creep conditions. We perform Finite-Element (FE) transient creep analyses for a Single-Edge-notched-Bend (SEB) specimen. We investigate the effect of the initial plasticity on the transient creep by systematically varying the magnitude of the initial step-load. We consider both the same stress exponent and different stress exponent in the power-law creep and plasticity to determine the elastic-plastic-creep behaviour. To estimation of the crack-tip stress fields, we compare FE analysis results with those obtained numerically formulas. In addition, we propose a new equation to predict the crack-tip stress fields when the creep exponent is different from the plastic exponent.

  10. Effect of temperature-dependent surface heat transfer coefficient on the maximum surface stress in ceramics during quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Y. F.; Song, F.; Jiang, C. P.; Xu, X. H.; Wei, J. C.; Zhou, Z. L.

    2016-02-01

    We study the difference in the maximum stress on a cylinder surface σmax using the measured surface heat transfer coefficient hm instead of its average value ha during quenching. In the quenching temperatures of 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 and 800°C, the maximum surface stress σmmax calculated by hm is always smaller than σamax calculated by ha, except in the case of 800°C; while the time to reach σmax calculated by hm (fmmax) is always earlier than that by ha (famax). It is inconsistent with the traditional view that σmax increases with increasing Biot number and the time to reach σmax decreases with increasing Biot number. Other temperature-dependent properties also have a small effect on the trend of their mutual ratios with quenching temperatures. Such a difference between the two maximum surface stresses is caused by the dramatic variation of hm with temperature, which needs to be considered in engineering analysis.

  11. Soil Organic Carbon Stocks in Terrestrial Ecosystems of China: Revised Estimation on Three-Dimensional Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of soil organic carbon (SOC stock in terrestrial ecosystems of China is of particular importance because it exerts a major influence on worldwide terrestrial carbon (C storage and global climate change. Map-based estimates of SOC stocks conducted in previous studies have typically been applied on planimetric areas, which led to the underestimation of SOC stock. In the present study, SOC stock in China was estimated using a revised method on three-dimensional (3-D surfaces, which considered the undulation of the landforms. Data were collected from the 1:4 M China Soil Map and a search work from the Second Soil Survey in China. Results indicated that the SOC stocks were 28.8 Pg C and 88.5 Pg C in soils at depths of 0–20 cm and 0–100 cm, corresponding to significant increases of 5.66% and 5.44%, respectively. Regression analysis revealed that the SOC stock accumulated with the increase of areas on 3-D surfaces. These results provide more reasonable estimates and new references about SOC stocks in terrestrial ecosystems of China. The method of estimation on 3-D surfaces has scientific meaning to promote the development of new approaches to estimate accurate SOC stocks.

  12. Determining the required accuracy of LST products for estimating surface energy fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, A. C.; Reichle, R.; Sujay, K.; Arsenault, K.; Privette, J. L.; Yu, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is an important parameter to assess the energy state of a surface. Synoptic satellite observations of LST must be used when attempting to estimate fluxes over large spatial scales. Due to the close coupling between LST, root level water availability, and mass and energy fluxes at the surface, LST is particularly useful over agricultural areas to help determine crop water demands and facilitate water management decisions (e.g., irrigation). Further, LST can be assimilated into land surface models to help improve estimates of latent and sensible heat fluxes. However, the accuracy of LST products and its impact on surface flux estimation is not well known. In this study, we quantify the uncertainty limits in LST products for accurately estimating latent heat fluxes over agricultural fields in the Rio Grande River basin of central New Mexico. We use the Community Land Model (CLM) within the Land Information Systems (LIS), and adopt an Ensemble Kalman Filter approach to assimilate the LST fields into the model. We evaluate the LST and assimilation performance against field measurements of evapotranspiration collected at two eddy-covariance towers in semi-arid cropland areas. Our results will help clarify sensor and LST product requirements for future remote sensing systems.

  13. Analyses of freshwater stress with a couple ground and surface water model in the Pra Basin, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu, George; Owusu, Alex B.; Amankwaa, Ebenezer Forkuo; Eshun, Fatima

    2015-04-01

    The optimal management of water resources requires that the collected hydrogeological, meteorological, and spatial data be simulated and analyzed with appropriate models. In this study, a catchment-scale distributed hydrological modeling approach is applied to simulate water stress for the years 2000 and 2050 in a data scarce Pra Basin, Ghana. The model is divided into three parts: The first computes surface and groundwater availability as well as shallow and deep groundwater residence times by using POLFLOW model; the second extends the POLFLOW model with water demand (Domestic, Industrial and Agricultural) model; and the third part involves modeling water stress indices—from the ratio of water demand to water availability—for every part of the basin. On water availability, the model estimated long-term annual Pra river discharge at the outflow point of the basin, Deboase, to be 198 m3/s as against long-term average measurement of 197 m3/s. Moreover, the relationship between simulated discharge and measured discharge at 9 substations in the basin scored Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient of 0.98, which indicates that the model estimation is in agreement with the long-term measured discharge. The estimated total water demand significantly increases from 959,049,096 m3/year in 2000 to 3,749,559,019 m3/year in 2050 (p < 0.05). The number of districts experiencing water stress significantly increases (p = 0.00044) from 8 in 2000 to 21 out of 35 by the year 2050. This study will among other things help the stakeholders in water resources management to identify and manage water stress areas in the basin.

  14. Estimated Chemical Warfare Agent Surface Clearance Goals for Remediation Pre-Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolislager, Frederick [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bansleben, Dr. Donald [U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Health-based surface clearance goals, in units of mg/cm2, have been developed for the persistent chemical warfare agents sulfur mustard (HD) and nerve agent VX as well as their principal degradation products. Selection of model parameters and critical receptor (toddler child) allow calculation of surface residue estimates protective for the toddler child, the general population and adult employees of a facilty that has undergone chemical warfare agent attack.

  15. Microclimatic models. Estimation of components of the energy balance over land surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikinheimo, M.; Venaelaeinen, A.; Tourula, T. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Air Quality Dept.

    1996-12-31

    Climates at regional scale are strongly dependent on the interaction between atmosphere and its lower boundary, the oceans and the land surface mosaic. Land surfaces influence climate through their albedo, and the aerodynamic roughness, the processes of the biosphere and many soil hydrological properties; all these factors vary considerably geographically. Land surfaces receive a certain portion of the solar irradiance depending on the cloudiness, atmospheric transparency and surface albedo. Short-wave solar irradiance is the source of the heat energy exchange at the earth`s surface and also regulates many biological processes, e.g. photosynthesis. Methods for estimating solar irradiance, atmospheric transparency and surface albedo were reviewed during the course of this project. The solar energy at earth`s surface is consumed for heating the soil and the lower atmosphere. Where moisture is available, evaporation is one of the key components of the surface energy balance, because the conversion of liquid water into water vapour consumes heat. The evaporation process was studied by carrying out field experiments and testing parameterisation for a cultivated agricultural surface and for lakes. The micrometeorological study over lakes was carried out as part of the international `Northern Hemisphere Climatic Processes Experiment` (NOPEX/BAHC) in Sweden. These studies have been aimed at a better understanding of the energy exchange processes of the earth`s surface-atmosphere boundary for a more accurate and realistic parameterisation of the land surface in atmospheric models

  16. Quantification of the surface stress in microcantilever biosensors: revisiting Stoney’s equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Javier; Ruz, Jose J.; Pini, Valerio; Kosaka, Priscila; Calleja, Montserrat

    2012-11-01

    Microcantilever biosensors in the static operation mode translate molecular recognition into a surface stress signal. Surface stress is derived from the nanomechanical cantilever bending by applying Stoney’s equation, derived more than 100 years ago. This equation ignores the clamping effect on the cantilever deformation, which induces significant errors in the quantification of the biosensing response. This leads to discrepancies in the surface stress induced by biomolecular interactions in measurements with cantilevers with different sizes and geometries. So far, more accurate solutions have been precluded by the formidable complexity of the theoretical problem that involves solving the two-dimensional biharmonic equation. In this paper, we present an accurate and simple analytical expression to quantify the response of microcantilever biosensors. The equation exhibits an excellent agreement with finite element simulations and DNA immobilization experiments on gold-coated microcantilevers.

  17. Morphology, stresses, and surface reactivity of nanoporous gold synthesized from nanostructured precursor alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouya, Eric

    Nanoporous metallic materials (NMMs) are generally synthesized using dealloying, whereby the more reactive component is dissolved from a homogeneous alloy in a suitable electrolyte, and the more noble metal atoms simultaneously diffuse into 3-D clusters, forming a bi-continuous network of interconnected ligaments. Nanoporous gold (NPG) in particular is a well-known NMM; it is inert, bio-compatible, and capable of developing large surface areas with 1--100nm pores. While several studies have demonstrated its potential usefulness in fuel cell and sensing devices, its structural, mechanical, and electrocatalytic properties still require further investigation, particularly if NPG is synthesized from precursor alloy films exhibiting metastable nanostructures. In this dissertation, the electrodeposition (ECD) process, microstrucural characteristics, and metatstability of Au-Ni precursor alloys are investigated. The stresses evolved during Au-Ni alloy nucleation and growth are investigated in situ and correlated with microstructural and electrochemical data in order to identify the various stress-inducing mechanisms. In situ stresses generated during Au-Ni and Au-Ag dealloying were investigated, and additionally correlated with the growth stresses. Finally, the surface area and electrocatalytic properties of NPG are characterized using a variety of electrochemical techniques. Potentiostatically electrodeposited Au1-x-Nix (x: 0--90at%) films form a continuous series of metastable solid solutions and exhibit a nanocrystalline morphology, with ˜10--20 nm grains, the size of which decreases with increasing Ni content. The formation of a metastable structure was interpreted in terms of the limited surface diffusivities of adatoms at the growing interface and atomic volume differences (˜15%). Internal stresses generated during ECD of Ni-rich films can be explained assuming a 3-D Volmer-Weber growth mode, where the stress is initially compressive, then transitions into tension

  18. Estimation of Land Surface Temperature under Cloudy Skies Using Combined Diurnal Solar Radiation and Surface Temperature Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature (LST is a key parameter in the interaction of the land-atmosphere system. However, clouds affect the retrieval of LST data from thermal-infrared remote sensing data. Thus, it is important to determine a method for estimating LSTs at times when the sky is overcast. Based on a one-dimensional heat transfer equation and on the evolution of daily temperatures and net shortwave solar radiation (NSSR, a new method for estimating LSTs under cloudy skies (Tcloud from diurnal NSSR and surface temperatures is proposed. Validation is performed against in situ measurements that were obtained at the ChangWu ecosystem experimental station in China. The results show that the root-mean-square error (RMSE between the actual and estimated LSTs is as large as 1.23 K for cloudy data. A sensitivity analysis to the errors in the estimated LST under clear skies (Tclear and in the estimated NSSR reveals that the RMSE of the obtained Tcloud is less than 1.5 K after adding a 0.5 K bias to the actual Tclear and 10 percent NSSR errors to the actual NSSR. Tcloud is estimated by the proposed method using Tclear and NSSR products of MSG-SEVIRI for southern Europe. The results indicate that the new algorithm is practical for retrieving the LST under cloudy sky conditions, although some uncertainty exists. Notably, the approach can only be used during the daytime due to the assumption of the variation in LST caused by variations in insolation. Further, if there are less than six Tclear observations on any given day, the method cannot be used.

  19. Estimating the global surface area of rivers and streams using satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, George; Pavelsky, Tamlin

    2017-04-01

    Global observational assessments of river and stream systems are based largely on gauge station data, which are fragmented and often limited to country-level statistics. This limitation severely impedes our understanding of global-scale hydrologic, geomorphic, and biogeochemical fluvial processes. In contrast, satellite remote sensing data provide a globally-consistent and spatially-continuous tool for studying rivers. Here we present a novel method estimate the total surface area of all rivers and stream globally using measurements from the recently-developed Global River Widths from Landsat (GRWL) database and field surveys. The surface area of rivers and streams is a key model parameter in global evaluations of greenhouse gas emissions from inland waters. Preliminary analysis suggests that rivers occupy a total area of 80 thousand square kilometers, or 0.58% of Earth's land surface. This result is 30% greater than the previous best estimate that is based on digital elevation models and gauge station measurements. Compared to previous regional assessments, we find that rivers and streams occupy a greater proportion of the land surface in the arctic and in the tropics, and a lower proportion of land surface in the United States and in Europe. Our results suggest that current estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from inland waters should be revised upwards to account for the greater abundance of river and stream surface area.

  20. Trends in Extremes of Surface Humidity, Temperature, and Summertime Heat Stress in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the past half century, the mean summertime temperature in China has increased, with nights warm ing more than days. Using surface station observations, we show that the frequency of extreme heat-stress events in China, caused by extremely hot and humid days as well as by heatwaves lasting for a few days, has increased over the period from 1951 to 1994. When humidity is high, hot weather can cause heat stress in humans. The increased heat-stress trend may pose a public health problem.

  1. Instantaneous stress release in fault surface asperities during mining-induced fault-slip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsushi Sainoki; Hani S. Mitri

    2016-01-01

    Fault-slip taking place in underground mines occasionally causes severe damage to mine openings as a result of strong ground motion induced by seismic waves arising from fault-slip. It is indicated from previous studies that intense seismic waves could be generated with the shock unloading of fault surface asperities during fault-slip. This study investigates the shock unloading with numerical simulation. A three-dimensional (3D) numerical model with idealized asperities is constructed with the help of discrete element code 3DEC. The idealization is conducted to particularly focus on simulating the shock unloading that previous numerical models, which replicate asperity degradation and crack development during the shear behavior of a joint surface in previous studies, fail to capture and simulate. With the numerical model, static and dynamic analyses are carried out to simulate unloading of asperities in the course of fault-slip. The results obtained from the dynamic analysis show that gradual stress release takes place around the center of the asperity tip at a rate of 45 MPa/ms for the base case, while an instantaneous stress release greater than 80 MPa occurs near the periphery of the asperity tip when the contact between the upper and lower asperities is lost. The instantaneous stress release becomes more intense in the vicinity of the asperity tip, causing tensile stress more than 20 MPa. It is deduced that the tensile stress could further increase if the numerical model is discretized more densely and analysis is carried out under stress conditions at a great depth. A model parametric study shows that in-situ stress state has a significant influence on the magnitude of the generated tensile stress. The results imply that the rapid stress release generating extremely high tensile stress on the asperity tip can cause intense seismic waves when it occurs at a great depth.

  2. Effects of spatial resolution of remotely sensed data on estimating urban impervious surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weifeng Li; Zhiyun Ouyang; Weiqi Zhou; Qiuwen Chen

    2011-01-01

    Impervious surfaces are the result of urbanization that can be explicitly quantified,managed and controlled at each stage of land development.It is a very useful environmental indicator that can be used to measure the impacts of urbanization on surface runoff,water quality,air quality,biodiversity and microclimate.Therefore,accurate estimation of impervious surfaces is critical for urban environmental monitoring,land management,decision-making and urban planning.Many approaches have been developed to estimate surface imperviousness,using remotely sensed data with various spatial resolutions.However,few studies,have investigated the effects of spatial resolution on estimating surface imperviousness.We compare medium-resolution Landsat data with high-resolution SPOT images to quantify the imperviousness in Beijing,China.The results indicated that the overall 91% accuracy of estimates of imperviousness based on TM data was considerably higher than the 81% accuracy of the SPOT data.The higher resolution SPOT data did not always predict the imperviousness of the land better than the TM data.At the whole city level,the TM data better predicts the percentage cover of impervious surfaces.At the sub-city level,however,the ring belts from the central core to the urban-rural peripheral,the SPOT data may better predict the imperviousness.These results highlighted the need to combine multiple resolution data to quantify the percentage of imperviousness,as higher resolution data do not necessarily lead to more accurate estimates.The methodology and results in this study can be utilized to identify the most suitable remote sensing data to quickly and efficiently extract the pattern of the impervious land,which could provide the base for further study on many related urban environmental problems.

  3. Effects of spatial resolution of remotely sensed data on estimating urban impervious surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifeng; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Zhou, Weiqi; Chen, Qiuwen

    2011-01-01

    Impervious surfaces are the result of urbanization that can be explicitly quantified, managed and controlled at each stage of land development. It is a very useful environmental indicator that can be used to measure the impacts of urbanization on surface runoff, water quality, air quality, biodiversity and microclimate. Therefore, accurate estimation of impervious surfaces is critical for urban environmental monitoring, land management, decision-making and urban planning. Many approaches have been developed to estimate surface imperviousness, using remotely sensed data with various spatial resolutions. However, few studies, have investigated the effects of spatial resolution on estimating surface imperviousness. We compare medium-resolution Landsat data with high-resolution SPOT images to quantify the imperviousness in Beijing, China. The results indicated that the overall 91% accuracy of estimates of imperviousness based on TM data was considerably higher than the 81% accuracy of the SPOT data. The higher resolution SPOT data did not always predict the imperviousness of the land better than the TM data. At the whole city level, the TM data better predicts the percentage cover of impervious surfaces. At the sub-city level, however, the ring belts from the central core to the urban-rural peripheral, the SPOT data may better predict the imperviousness. These results highlighted the need to combine multiple resolution data to quantify the percentage of imperviousness, as higher resolution data do not necessarily lead to more accurate estimates. The methodology and results in this study can be utilized to identify the most suitable remote sensing data to quickly and efficiently extract the pattern of the impervious land, which could provide the base for further study on many related urban environmental problems.

  4. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS ABOUT STRESS AND STRAIN OF SURFACE PEELING IN Cu-Fe-P SHEET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Juanhua; Li Hejun; Dong Qiming; Liu Ping; Kang Buxi

    2005-01-01

    The microstructure of surface peeling in finish rolled Cu-0.1Fe-0.03P sheet is analyzed by scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscope. Fe-rich areas of different contents are observed in the matrix. The stress distributions and strain characteristics at the interface between Cu matrix and Fe particle are studied by elastic-plastic finite element plane strain model. Larger Fe particles and higher deforming extent of finish rolling are attributed to the intense stress gradient and significant non-homogeneity equivalent strain at the interface and accelerate surface peeling of Cu-0.1Fe-0.03P lead frame sheet.

  5. Round robin analysis on stress intensity factor of inner surface cracks in welded stainless steel pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Chang Gi; Chang, Yoon Suk [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Sung [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Maan Won [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Austenitic stainless steels (ASSs) are widely used for nuclear pipes as they exhibit a good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, high tensile residual stresses may occur in ASS welds because postweld heat treatment is not generally conducted in order to avoid sensitization, which causes a stress corrosion crack. In this study, round robin analyses on stress intensity factors (SIFs) were carried out to examine the appropriateness of structural integrity assessment methods for ASS pipe welds with two types of circumferential cracks. Typical stress profiles were generated from finite element analyses by considering residual stresses and normal operating conditions. Then, SIFs of cracked ASS pipes were determined by analytical equations represented in fitness-for-service assessment codes as well as reference finite element analyses. The discrepancies of estimated SIFs among round robin participants were confirmed due to different assessment procedures and relevant considerations, as well as the mistakes of participants. The effects of uncertainty factors on SIFs were deducted from sensitivity analyses and, based on the similarity and conservatism compared with detailed finite element analysis results, the R6 code, taking into account the applied internal pressure and combination of stress components, was recommended as the optimum procedure for SIF estimation.

  6. Round Robin Analyses on Stress Intensity Factors of Inner Surface Cracks in Welded Stainless Steel Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Gi Han

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels (ASSs are widely used for nuclear pipes as they exhibit a good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, high tensile residual stresses may occur in ASS welds because postweld heat treatment is not generally conducted in order to avoid sensitization, which causes a stress corrosion crack. In this study, round robin analyses on stress intensity factors (SIFs were carried out to examine the appropriateness of structural integrity assessment methods for ASS pipe welds with two types of circumferential cracks. Typical stress profiles were generated from finite element analyses by considering residual stresses and normal operating conditions. Then, SIFs of cracked ASS pipes were determined by analytical equations represented in fitness-for-service assessment codes as well as reference finite element analyses. The discrepancies of estimated SIFs among round robin participants were confirmed due to different assessment procedures and relevant considerations, as well as the mistakes of participants. The effects of uncertainty factors on SIFs were deducted from sensitivity analyses and, based on the similarity and conservatism compared with detailed finite element analysis results, the R6 code, taking into account the applied internal pressure and combination of stress components, was recommended as the optimum procedure for SIF estimation.

  7. lnvestigation of Patch Coatings lnfluence on the Stress lntensity Factor for Surface Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, Søren Heide; Jepsen, Michael S.; Damkilde, Lars

    2013-01-01

    to damp the free end of the crack, which will reduce the stress intensity factor and subsequently reduce the crack growth. The considered patch consists of a surface layer of 0.2 mm two component adhesive Epoxy, 3M DP 460. The models described in this work contains five different crack sizes with a patch......In this paper, it is investigated how a surface layer of epoxy glue will affect the crack propagation of a surface crack. The intension is to reduce or even stop the crack propagation by means of patch layer coating. When adding a patch layer to the surface with small cracks, the layer will attempt...... layer on the surface. The stress intensity factor is computed by means of the J-integral and the FE-model is setup with a nonlinear material model to establish the upper boundary for the patch stress capacity. A reduction of the stress intensity factor of approximately 2 % and a reduction of the crack...

  8. Various methods of numerical estimation of generalized stress intensity factors of bi-material notches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klusák J.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of bi-material notches becomes a topical problem as they can model efficiently geometrical or material discontinuities. When assessing crack initiation conditions in the bi-material notches, the generalized stress intensity factors H have to be calculated. Contrary to the determination of the K-factor for a crack in an isotropic homogeneous medium, for the ascertainment of the H-factor there is no procedure incorporated in the calculation systems. The calculation of these fracture parameters requires experience. Direct methods of estimation of H-factors need choosing usually length parameter entering into calculation. On the other hand the method combining the application of the reciprocal theorem (Ψ-integral and FEM does not require entering any length parameter and is capable to extract the near-tip information directly from the far-field deformation.

  9. Cost Estimation for Surface Navy Investment in Arctic-capable Platform to Maintain National Security Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    perspective 24 China’s environment is significantly effected by Arctic weather patterns (International Studies on the Polar Region, 2014). This...space for Arctic cold- weather gear, which translates into greater sustainability and an increased HADR capability. The possibility of incorporating...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT COST ESTIMATION FOR SURFACE NAVY INVESTMENT IN ARCTIC

  10. Computation of lower derivatives of rational triangular Bézier surfaces and their bounds estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lei; WANG Guo-jin

    2005-01-01

    By introducing the homogenous coordinates, degree elevation formulas and combinatorial identities, also by using multiplication of Bernstein polynomials and identity transformation on equations, this paper presents some explicit formulas of the derives some estimations of bound both on the direction and magnitude of the corresponding derivatives. All the results above have value not only in surface theory but also in practice.

  11. Application of stereological methods to estimate post-mortem brain surface area using 3T MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furlong, Carolyn; García-Fiñana, Marta; Puddephat, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The Cavalieri and Vertical Sections methods of design based stereology were applied in combination with 3 tesla (i.e. 3T) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to estimate cortical and subcortical volume, area of the pial surface, area of the grey-white matter boundary, and thickness of the cerebral...

  12. Improving Distributed Runoff Prediction in Urbanized Catchments with Remote Sensing based Estimates of Impervious Surface Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chormanski, Jaroslaw; Van de Voorde, Tim; De Roeck, Tim; Batelaan, Okke; Canters, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The amount and intensity of runoff on catchment scale are strongly determined by the presence of impervious land-cover types, which are the predominant cover types in urbanized areas. This paper examines the impact of different methods for estimating impervious surface cover on the prediction of peak discharges, as determined by a fully distributed rainfall-runoff model (WetSpa), for the upper part of the Woluwe River catchment in the southeastern part of Brussels. The study shows that detailed information on the spatial distribution of impervious surfaces, as obtained from remotely sensed data, produces substantially different estimates of peak discharges than traditional approaches based on expert judgment of average imperviousness for different types of urban land use. The study also demonstrates that sub-pixel estimation of imperviousness may be a useful alternative for more expensive high-resolution mapping for rainfall-runoff modelling at catchment scale.

  13. Modified polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function with diffuse scattering: surface parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Hanyu; Voelz, David G.

    2016-12-01

    The polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function (pBRDF) describes the relationships between incident and scattered Stokes parameters, but the familiar surface-only microfacet pBRDF cannot capture diffuse scattering contributions and depolarization phenomena. We propose a modified pBRDF model with a diffuse scattering component developed from the Kubelka-Munk and Le Hors et al. theories, and apply it in the development of a method to jointly estimate refractive index, slope variance, and diffuse scattering parameters from a series of Stokes parameter measurements of a surface. An application of the model and estimation approach to experimental data published by Priest and Meier shows improved correspondence with measurements of normalized Mueller matrix elements. By converting the Stokes/Mueller calculus formulation of the model to a degree of polarization (DOP) description, the estimation results of the parameters from measured DOP values are found to be consistent with a previous DOP model and results.

  14. Estimating local atmosphere-surface fluxes using eddy covariance and numerical Ogive optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sievers, Jakob; Papakyriakou, Tim; Larsen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Estimating representative surface-fluxes using eddy covariance leads invariably to questions concerning inclusion or exclusion of low-frequency flux contributions. For studies where fluxes are linked to local physical parameters and up-scaled through numerical modeling efforts, low-frequency cont......Estimating representative surface-fluxes using eddy covariance leads invariably to questions concerning inclusion or exclusion of low-frequency flux contributions. For studies where fluxes are linked to local physical parameters and up-scaled through numerical modeling efforts, low......-frequency contributions interfere with our ability to isolate local biogeochemical processes of interest, as represented by turbulent fluxes. No method currently exists to disentangle low-frequency contributions on flux estimates. Here, we present a novel comprehensive numerical scheme to identify and separate out low...

  15. Theoretical modeling and experimental validation of surface stress in thrombin aptasensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yang Choon; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Kaynak, Akif; Dai, Xiujuan J; Littlefair, Guy; Duan, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Adsorption of target molecules on the immobilized microcantilever surface produced beam displacement due to the differential surface stress generated between the immobilized and non-immobilized surface. Surface stress is caused by the intermolecular forces between the molecules. Van der Waals, electrostatic forces, hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic effect and steric hindrance are some of the intermolecular forces involved. A theoretical framework describing the adsorption-induced microcantilever displacement is derived in this paper. Experimental displacement of thrombin aptamer-thrombin interactions was carried out. The relation between the electrostatic interactions involved between adsorbates (thrombin) as well as adsorbates and substrates (thrombin aptamer) and the microcantilever beam displacement utilizing the proposed mathematical model was quantified and compared to the experimental value. This exercise is important to aid the designers in microcantilever sensing performance optimization.

  16. Estimating surface fluxes over the north Tibetan Plateau area with ASTER imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiqiang Ma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface fluxes are important boundary conditions for climatological modeling and Asian monsoon system. The recent availability of high-resolution, multi-band imagery from the ASTER (Advanced Space-borne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer sensor has enabled us to estimate surface fluxes to bridge the gap between local scale flux measurements using micrometeorological instruments and regional scale land-atmosphere exchanges of water and heat fluxes that are fundamental for the understanding of the water cycle in the Asian monsoon system. A parameterization method based on ASTER data and field observations has been proposed and tested for deriving surface albedo, surface temperature, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI, vegetation coverage, Leaf Area Index (LAI, net radiation flux, soil heat flux, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux over heterogeneous land surface in this paper. As a case study, the methodology was applied to the experimental area of the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP Asia-Australia Monsoon Project (CAMP on the Tibetan Plateau (CAMP/Tibet, located at the north Tibetan Plateau. The ASTER data of 24 July 2001, 29 November 2001 and 12 March 2002 was used in this paper for the case of summer, winter and spring. To validate the proposed methodology, the ground-measured surface variables (surface albedo and surface temperature and land surface heat fluxes (net radiation flux, soil heat flux, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux were compared to the ASTER derived values. The results show that the derived surface variables and land surface heat fluxes in three different months over the study area are in good accordance with the land surface status. Also, the estimated land surface variables and land surface heat fluxes are in good accordance with ground measurements, and all their absolute percentage difference (APD is less than 10% in the validation sites

  17. A blended land emissivity product from the Inter-Comparison of different Land Surface Emissivity Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, H.; Temimi, M.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2012-12-01

    Passive microwave observations are routinely used to estimate rain rate, cloud liquid water, and total precipitable water. In order to have accurate estimations from microwave, the contribution of the surface should be accounted for. Over land, due to the complex interaction between the microwave signal and the soil surface, retrieval of land surface emissivity and other surface and subsurface parameters is not straightforward. Several microwave emissivity products from various microwave sensors have been proposed. However, lack of ground truth measurements makes the validation of these products difficult. This study aims to inter-compare several available emissivity products over land and ultimately proposes a unique blended product that overcomes the flaws of each individual product. The selected products are based on observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E), the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I), the Advanced Microwave Sounding unit (AMSU), and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS). In retrieval of emissivities from these sensors different methods and ancillary data have been used. Some inherent discrepancies between the selected products can be introduced by as the difference in geometry in terms of incident angle, spectral response, and the foot print size which can affect the estimations. Moreover, ancillary data especially skin temperature and cloud mask cover can cause significant discrepancies between various estimations. The time series and correlation between emissivity maps are explored to assess the consistency of emissivity variations with geophysical variable such as snow, precipitation and drought. Preliminary results reveal that inconsistency between products varies based on land cover type due to penetration depth effect and ancillary data. Six years of estimations are employed in this research study, and a global blended emissivity estimations based on all product with minimal discrepancies

  18. Toward the Estimation of Surface Soil Moisture Content Using Geostationary Satellite Data over Sparsely Vegetated Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Leng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on a novel bare surface soil moisture (SSM retrieval model developed from the synergistic use of the diurnal cycles of land surface temperature (LST and net surface shortwave radiation (NSSR (Leng et al. 2014. “Bare Surface Soil Moisture Retrieval from the Synergistic Use of Optical and Thermal Infrared Data”. International Journal of Remote Sensing 35: 988–1003., this paper mainly investigated the model’s capability to estimate SSM using geostationary satellite observations over vegetated area. Results from the simulated data primarily indicated that the previous bare SSM retrieval model is capable of estimating SSM in the low vegetation cover condition with fractional vegetation cover (FVC ranging from 0 to 0.3. In total, the simulated data from the Common Land Model (CoLM on 151 cloud-free days at three FLUXNET sites that with different climate patterns were used to describe SSM estimates with different underlying surfaces. The results showed a strong correlation between the estimated SSM and the simulated values, with a mean Root Mean Square Error (RMSE of 0.028 m3·m−3 and a coefficient of determination (R2 of 0.869. Moreover, diurnal cycles of LST and NSSR derived from the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG satellite data on 59 cloud-free days were utilized to estimate SSM in the REMEDHUS soil moisture network (Spain. In particular, determination of the model coefficients synchronously using satellite observations and SSM measurements was explored in detail in the cases where meteorological data were not available. A preliminary validation was implemented to verify the MSG pixel average SSM in the REMEDHUS area with the average SSM calculated from the site measurements. The results revealed a significant R2 of 0.595 and an RMSE of 0.021 m3·m−3.

  19. Evaluation of satellite and reanalysis-based global net surface energy flux and uncertainty estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Richard; Liu, Chunlei

    2017-04-01

    The net surface energy flux is central to the climate system yet observational limitations lead to substantial uncertainty (Trenberth and Fasullo, 2013; Roberts et al., 2016). A combination of satellite-derived radiative fluxes at the top of atmosphere (TOA) adjusted using the latest estimation of the net heat uptake of the Earth system, and the atmospheric energy tendencies and transports from the ERA-Interim reanalysis are used to estimate surface energy flux globally (Liu et al., 2015). Land surface fluxes are adjusted through a simple energy balance approach using relations at each grid point with the consideration of snowmelt to improve regional realism. The energy adjustment is redistributed over the oceans using a weighting function to avoid meridional discontinuities. Uncertainties in surface fluxes are investigated using a variety of approaches including comparison with a range of atmospheric reanalysis input data and products. Zonal multiannual mean surface flux uncertainty is estimated to be less than 5 Wm-2 but much larger uncertainty is likely for regional monthly values. The meridional energy transport is calculated using the net surface heat fluxes estimated in this study and the result shows better agreement with observations in Atlantic than before. The derived turbulent fluxes (difference between the net heat flux and the CERES EBAF radiative flux at surface) also have good agreement with those from OAFLUX dataset and buoy observations. Decadal changes in the global energy budget and the hemisphere energy imbalances are quantified and present day cross-equator heat transports is re-evaluated as 0.22±0.15 PW southward by the atmosphere and 0.32±0.16 PW northward by the ocean considering the observed ocean heat sinks (Roemmich et al., 2006) . Liu et al. (2015) Combining satellite observations and reanalysis energy transports to estimate global net surface energy fluxes 1985-2012. J. Geophys. Res., Atmospheres. ISSN 2169-8996 doi: 10.1002/2015JD

  20. Estimated work ability in warm outdoor environments depends on the chosen heat stress assessment metric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröde, Peter; Fiala, Dusan; Lemke, Bruno; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2017-04-01

    With a view to occupational effects of climate change, we performed a simulation study on the influence of different heat stress assessment metrics on estimated workability (WA) of labour in warm outdoor environments. Whole-day shifts with varying workloads were simulated using as input meteorological records for the hottest month from four cities with prevailing hot (Dallas, New Delhi) or warm-humid conditions (Managua, Osaka), respectively. In addition, we considered the effects of adaptive strategies like shielding against solar radiation and different work-rest schedules assuming an acclimated person wearing light work clothes (0.6 clo). We assessed WA according to Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) by means of an empirical relation of worker performance from field studies (Hothaps), and as allowed work hours using safety threshold limits proposed by the corresponding standards. Using the physiological models Predicted Heat Strain (PHS) and Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI)-Fiala, we calculated WA as the percentage of working hours with body core temperature and cumulated sweat loss below standard limits (38 °C and 7.5% of body weight, respectively) recommended by ISO 7933 and below conservative (38 °C; 3%) and liberal (38.2 °C; 7.5%) limits in comparison. ANOVA results showed that the different metrics, workload, time of day and climate type determined the largest part of WA variance. WBGT-based metrics were highly correlated and indicated slightly more constrained WA for moderate workload, but were less restrictive with high workload and for afternoon work hours compared to PHS and UTCI-Fiala. Though PHS showed unrealistic dynamic responses to rest from work compared to UTCI-Fiala, differences in WA assessed by the physiological models largely depended on the applied limit criteria. In conclusion, our study showed that the choice of the heat stress assessment metric impacts notably on the estimated WA. Whereas PHS and UTCI-Fiala can account for

  1. Quantitative assessments of residual stress fields at the surface of alumina hip joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Munisso, Maria Chiara; Lessnau, Kristina; Zhu, Wenliang

    2010-11-01

    In-depth and in-plane response functions of photo- and electro-stimulated probes have been modeled and quantitatively evaluated in order to assess their suitability to detect the highly graded residual stress fields generated at the surface of alumina hip joints. Optical calibrations revealed large differences in probe size, which strongly affected the detected magnitude of residual stress. A comparison between the responses of Raman and fluorescence probes in polycrystalline alumina showed that the depth of those probes spread to an extent in the order of the tens of microns even with using a confocal probe configuration. On the other hand, the electro-stimulated luminescence emitted by oxygen vacancy sites (F(+) center) in the alumina lattice represented the most suitable choice for confining to a shallow volume the stress probe. This latter probe enabled us to reduce the measurement depth to the order of the tens of nanometers. We show maps of surface residual stress as collected on both main-wear and nonwear zones of an alumina femoral head. A comparison among stress maps taken at exactly the same location, but employing different probes, revealed averaging effects on the stress magnitude detected with photo-stimulated probes, while proving the superior spatial resolution of the electron probe.

  2. Evaluation of association between psychological stress and serum cortisol levels in patients with chronic periodontitis - Estimation of relationship between psychological stress and periodontal status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshni Jaiswal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress classically describes a destructive notion that can have a bearing on one's physical and mental health. It may also add to an increased propensity to periodontal disease. Aim: To investigate the association between psychological stress and serum cortisol levels in patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Forty subjects were recruited from the outpatient department at the Department of Periodontics, from a college in Mangalore, divided into two groups, i.e., twenty as healthy controls and twenty were stressed subjects with chronic periodontitis. The clinical examination included the assessment of probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level and oral hygiene index-simplified. Serum cortisol levels were estimated biochemically using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and the estimation of psychological stress was done by a questionnaire. Results: Descriptive statistics such as mean and standard deviation was used to review the collected data. Independent sample t-test was used for comparison and correlation was evaluation using Pearson's correlation test. As per our observation, high serum cortisol levels and psychological stress are positively linked with chronic periodontitis establishing a risk profile showing a significant correlation (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Routine serum cortisol assessment may be a reasonable and a valuable investigative indicator to rule out stress in periodontitis patients as it should be considered as an imperative risk factor for periodontal disease.

  3. Residual Stress on Surface and Cross-section of Porous Silicon Studied by Micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Zhen-Kun; KANG YI-Lan; CEN Hao; HU Ming; QIU Yu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Surface and cross-sectional residual stresses of electrochemical etching porous silicon are investigated quantitatively by micro-Raman spectroscopy.The results reveal that a larger tensile residual stress exists on the surface and increase linearly with the porosity.On the other hand, across the depth direction perpendicular to the surface, the tensile residual stress decreases gradually from the surface to regions near the interface between the porous silicon layer and the Si substrate.However, a compressive stress appears at the interface near to the Si substrate for balancing with the tensile stress in the porous silicon layer.The cross-sectional residual stress profile is due to the porosity and lattice mismatch gradients existing in the cross-section and influencing each other.Furthermore, the presented residual stresses of the porous silicon have a close relation with its microstructure.

  4. Standard test method for calibration of surface/stress measuring devices

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    Return to Contents page 1.1 This test method covers calibration or verification of calibration, or both, of surface-stress measuring devices used to measure stress in annealed and heat-strengthened or tempered glass using polariscopic or refractometry based principles. 1.2 This test method is nondestructive. 1.3 This test method uses transmitted light, and therefore, is applicable to light-transmitting glasses. 1.4 This test method is not applicable to chemically tempered glass. 1.5 Using the procedure described, surface stresses can be measured only on the “tin” side of float glass. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  5. Realignment of Nanocrystal Aggregates into Single Crystals as a Result of Inherent Surface Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhaoming [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027 China; Pan, Haihua [Qiushi Academy for Advanced Studies, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027 China; Zhu, Genxing [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027 China; Li, Yaling [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027 China; Tao, Jinhui [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Jin, Biao [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027 China; Tang, Ruikang [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027 China; Qiushi Academy for Advanced Studies, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang 310027 China

    2016-07-19

    Assembly of nanoparticles building blocks during single crystal growth is widely observed in both natural and synthetic environments. Although this form of non-classical crystallization is generally described by oriented attachment, random aggregation of building blocks leading to single crystal products is also observed, but the mechanism of crystallographic realignment is unknown. We herein reveal that random attachment during aggregation-based growth initially produces a non-oriented growth front. Subsequent evolution of the orientation is driven by the inherent surface stress applied by the disordered surface layer and results in single crystal formation via grain boundary migration. This mechanism is corroborated by measurements of orientation rate vs external stress, demonstrating a predictive relationship between the two. These findings advance our understanding of aggregation-based growth of natural minerals by nanocrystals, and suggest an approach to material synthesis that takes advantage of stress induced co-alignment.

  6. Surface Chemistry and Structural Effects in the Stress Corrosion of Glass and Ceramic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-31

    elimination of ’weakened’ siloxane linkages, the creation of a ’ microplastic ’ surface layer, and consequently a more uniform distribution of applied stress...examined the impact toughness of plate glass treated at elevated temperatures with sulfur dioxide and also difluorodichloromethane. They, too, observed an

  7. Comparison of surface wind stress measurements - Airborne radar scatterometer versus sonic anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucks, J. T.; Leming, T. D.; Jones, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Sea surface wind stress measurements recorded by a sonic anemometer are correlated with airborne scatterometer measurements of ocean roughness (cross section of radar backscatter) to establish the accuracy of remotely sensed data and assist in the definition of geophysical algorithms for the scatterometer sensor aboard Seasat A. Results of this investigation are as follows: Comparison of scatterometer and sonic anemometer wind stress measurements are good for the majority of cases; however, a tendency exists for scatterometer wind stress to be somewhat high for higher wind conditions experienced in this experiment (6-9 m/s). The scatterometer wind speed algorithm tends to overcompute the higher wind speeds by approximately 0.5 m/s. This is a direct result of the scatterometer overestimate of wind stress from which wind speeds are derived. Algorithmic derivations of wind speed and direction are, in most comparisons, within accuracies defined by Seasat A scatterometer sensor specifications.

  8. Uncertainty quantification of surface-water/groundwater exchange estimates in large wetland systems using Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J. D.; Metz, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Most watershed studies include observation-based water budget analyses to develop first-order estimates of significant flow terms. Surface-water/groundwater (SWGW) exchange is typically assumed to be equal to the residual of the sum of inflows and outflows in a watershed. These estimates of SWGW exchange, however, are highly uncertain as a result of the propagation of uncertainty inherent in the calculation or processing of the other terms of the water budget, such as stage-area-volume relations, and uncertainties associated with land-cover based evapotranspiration (ET) rate estimates. Furthermore, the uncertainty of estimated SWGW exchanges can be magnified in large wetland systems that transition from dry to wet during wet periods. Although it is well understood that observation-based estimates of SWGW exchange are uncertain it is uncommon for the uncertainty of these estimates to be directly quantified. High-level programming languages like Python can greatly reduce the effort required to (1) quantify the uncertainty of estimated SWGW exchange in large wetland systems and (2) evaluate how different approaches for partitioning land-cover data in a watershed may affect the water-budget uncertainty. We have used Python with the Numpy, Scipy.stats, and pyDOE packages to implement an unconstrained Monte Carlo approach with Latin Hypercube sampling to quantify the uncertainty of monthly estimates of SWGW exchange in the Floral City watershed of the Tsala Apopka wetland system in west-central Florida, USA. Possible sources of uncertainty in the water budget analysis include rainfall, ET, canal discharge, and land/bathymetric surface elevations. Each of these input variables was assigned a probability distribution based on observation error or spanning the range of probable values. The Monte Carlo integration process exposes the uncertainties in land-cover based ET rate estimates as the dominant contributor to the uncertainty in SWGW exchange estimates. We will discuss

  9. Combining nutation and surface gravity observations to estimate the Earth's core and inner core resonant frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Yann; Lambert, Sébastien; Rosat, Séverine; Nurul Huda, Ibnu; Bizouard, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Nutation time series derived from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and time varying surface gravity data recorded by superconducting gravimeters (SG) have long been used separately to assess the Earth's interior via the estimation of the free core and inner core resonance effects on nutation or tidal gravity. The results obtained from these two techniques have been shown recently to be consistent, making relevant the combination of VLBI and SG observables and the estimation of Earth's interior parameters in a single inversion. We present here the intermediate results of the ongoing project of combining nutation and surface gravity time series to improve estimates of the Earth's core and inner core resonant frequencies. We use VLBI nutation time series spanning 1984-2016 derived by the International VLBI Service for geodesy and astrometry (IVS) as the result of a combination of inputs from various IVS analysis centers, and surface gravity data from about 15 SG stations. We address here the resonance model used for describing the Earth's interior response to tidal excitation, the data preparation consisting of the error recalibration and amplitude fitting for nutation data, and processing of SG time-varying gravity to remove any gaps, spikes, steps and other disturbances, followed by the tidal analysis with the ETERNA 3.4 software package, the preliminary estimates of the resonant periods, and the correlations between parameters.

  10. Variable-period surface-wave magnitudes: A rapid and robust estimator of seismic moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, J.; Herrmann, R.; Benz, H.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that surface-wave magnitudes (Ms), measured at local, regional, and teleseismic distances, can be used as a rapid and robust estimator of seismic moment magnitude (Mw). We used the Russell (2006) variable-period surface-wave magnitude formula, henceforth called Ms(VMAX), to estimate the Ms for 165 North American events with 3.2 scatter of the Mw[Ms(VMAX)] with respect to Mw[Waveform Modeling] was approximately ??0.2 magnitude units (m.u). The residuals between Mw [Ms(VMAX)] and Mw [Waveform Modeling] show a significant focal mechanism effect, especially when strike-slip events are compared with other mechanisms. Validation testing of this method suggests that Ms(VMAX)-predicted Mw's can be estimated within minutes after the origin of an event and are typically within ??0.2 m.u. of the final Mw[Waveform Modeling]. While Mw estimated from Ms(VMAX) has a slightly higher variance than waveform modeling results, it can be measured on the first short-period surface-wave observed at a local or near-regional distance seismic station after a preliminary epicentral location has been formed. Therefore, it may be used to make rapid measurements of Mw, which are needed by government agencies for early warning systems.

  11. Real-time GPU surface curvature estimation on deforming meshes and volumetric data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Wesley; Wang, Yu; Berrios, David; Olano, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Surface curvature is used in a number of areas in computer graphics, including texture synthesis and shape representation, mesh simplification, surface modeling, and nonphotorealistic line drawing. Most real-time applications must estimate curvature on a triangular mesh. This estimation has been limited to CPU algorithms, forcing object geometry to reside in main memory. However, as more computational work is done directly on the GPU, it is increasingly common for object geometry to exist only in GPU memory. Examples include vertex skinned animations and isosurfaces from GPU-based surface reconstruction algorithms. For static models, curvature can be precomputed and CPU algorithms are a reasonable choice. For deforming models where the geometry only resides on the GPU, transferring the deformed mesh back to the CPU limits performance. We introduce a GPU algorithm for estimating curvature in real time on arbitrary triangular meshes. We demonstrate our algorithm with curvature-based NPR feature lines and a curvature-based approximation for an ambient occlusion. We show curvature computation on volumetric data sets with a GPU isosurface extraction algorithm and vertex-skinned animations. We present a graphics pipeline and CUDA implementation. Our curvature estimation is up to ~18x faster than a multithreaded CPU benchmark.

  12. Area Estimation of Deep-Sea Surfaces from Oblique Still Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Carvalho Dias

    Full Text Available Estimating the area of seabed surfaces from pictures or videos is an important problem in seafloor surveys. This task is complex to achieve with moving platforms such as submersibles, towed or remotely operated vehicles (ROV, where the recording camera is typically not static and provides an oblique view of the seafloor. A new method for obtaining seabed surface area estimates is presented here, using the classical set up of two laser devices fixed to the ROV frame projecting two parallel lines over the seabed. By combining lengths measured directly from the image containing the laser lines, the area of seabed surfaces is estimated, as well as the camera's distance to the seabed, pan and tilt angles. The only parameters required are the distance between the parallel laser lines and the camera's horizontal and vertical angles of view. The method was validated with a controlled in situ experiment using a deep-sea ROV, yielding an area estimate error of 1.5%. Further applications and generalizations of the method are discussed, with emphasis on deep-sea applications.

  13. The estimation of quantitative parameters of oligonucleotides immobilization on mica surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharipov, T. I.; Bakhtizin, R. Z.

    2017-05-01

    Immobilization of nucleic acids on the surface of various materials is increasingly being used in research and some practical applications. Currently, the DNA chip technology is rapidly developing. The basis of the immobilization process can be both physical adsorption and chemisorption. A useful way to control the immobilization of nucleic acids on a surface is to use atomic force microscopy. It allows you to investigate the topography of the surface by its direct imaging with high resolution. Usually, to fix the DNA on the surface of mica are used cations which mediate the interaction between the mica surface and the DNA molecules. In our work we have developed a method for estimation of quantitative parameter of immobilization of oligonucleotides is their degree of aggregation depending on the fixation conditions on the surface of mica. The results on study of aggregation of oligonucleotides immobilized on mica surface will be presented. The single oligonucleotides molecules have been imaged clearly, whereas their surface areas have been calculated and calibration curve has been plotted.

  14. A simple method for estimating the size of nuclei on fractal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang

    2017-10-01

    Determining the size of nuclei on complex surfaces remains a big challenge in aspects of biological, material and chemical engineering. Here the author reported a simple method to estimate the size of the nuclei in contact with complex (fractal) surfaces. The established approach was based on the assumptions of contact area proportionality for determining nucleation density and the scaling congruence between nuclei and surfaces for identifying contact regimes. It showed three different regimes governing the equations for estimating the nucleation site density. Nuclei in the size large enough could eliminate the effect of fractal structure. Nuclei in the size small enough could lead to the independence of nucleation site density on fractal parameters. Only when nuclei match the fractal scales, the nucleation site density is associated with the fractal parameters and the size of the nuclei in a coupling pattern. The method was validated by the experimental data reported in the literature. The method may provide an effective way to estimate the size of nuclei on fractal surfaces, through which a number of promising applications in relative fields can be envisioned.

  15. Estimating surface fluxes over middle and upper streams of the Heihe River Basin with ASTER imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Ma

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Land surface heat fluxes are essential measures of the strengths of land-atmosphere interactions involving energy, heat and water. Correct parameterization of these fluxes in climate models is critical. Despite their importance, state-of-the-art observation techniques cannot provide representative areal averages of these fluxes comparable to the model grid. Alternative methods of estimation are thus required. These alternative approaches use (satellite observables of the land surface conditions. In this study, the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS algorithm was evaluated in a cold and arid environment, using land surface parameters derived from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER data. Field observations and estimates from SEBS were compared in terms of net radiation flux (Rn, soil heat flux (G0, sensible heat flux (H and latent heat flux (λE over a heterogeneous land surface. As a case study, this methodology was applied to the experimental area of the Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (WATER project, located on the mid-to-upstream sections of the Heihe River in northwest China. ASTER data acquired between 3 May and 4 June 2008, under clear-sky conditions were used to determine the surface fluxes. Ground-based measurements of land surface heat fluxes were compared with values derived from the ASTER data. The results show that the derived surface variables and the land surface heat fluxes furnished by SEBS in different months over the study area are in good agreement with the observed land surface status under the limited cases (some cases looks poor results. So SEBS can be used to estimate turbulent heat fluxes with acceptable accuracy in areas where there is partial vegetation cover in exceptive conditions. It is very important to perform calculations using ground-based observational data for parameterization in SEBS in the future

  16. Estimating and Mapping Urban Impervious Surfaces: Reflection on Spectral, Spatial, and Temporal Resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Q.

    2007-12-01

    Impervious surface is a key indicator of urban environmental quality and urbanization degree. Therefore, estimation and mapping of impervious surfaces in urban areas has attracted more and more attention recently by using remote sensing digital images. In this paper, satellite images with various spectral, spatial, and temporal resolutions are employed to examine the effects of these remote sensing data characteristics on mapping accuracy of urban impervious surfaces. The study area was the city proper of Indianapolis (Marion County), Indiana, United States. Linear spectral mixture analysis was applied to generate high albedo, low albedo, vegetation, and soil fraction images (endmembers) from the satellite images, and impervious surfaces were then estimated by adding high albedo and low albedo fraction images. A comparison of EO-1 ALI (multispectral) and Hyperion (hyperspectral) images indicates that the Hyperion image was more effective in discerning low albedo surface materials, especially the spectral bands in the mid-infrared region. Linear spectral mixing modeling was found more useful for medium spatial resolution images, such as Landsat TM/ETM+ and ASTER images, due to the existence of a large amount of mixed pixels in the urban areas. The model, however, may not be suitable for high spatial resolution images, such as IKONOS images, because of less influence from the mixing pixel. The shadow problem in the high spatial resolution images, caused by tall buildings and large tree crowns, is a challenge in impervious surface extraction. Alternative image processing algorithms such as decision tree classifier may be more appropriate to achieve high mapping accuracy. For mid-latitude cities, seasonal vegetation phenology has a significant effect on the spectral response of terrestrial features, and therefore, image analysis must take into account of this environmental characteristic. Three ASTER images, acquired on April 5, 2004, June 16, 2001, and October 3, 2000

  17. Height estimate for special Weingarten surfaces of elliptic type in ${\\mathbb M}^2(c \\times \\mathbb {R}$

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Morabito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we provide a vertical height estimate for compact special Weingarten surfaces of elliptic type in ²(×ℝ, i.e. surfaces whose mean curvature ℍ and extrinsic Gauss curvature ₑ satisfy ℍ=(ℍ²-ₑ with 4(’(²<1, for all ∈[0,+∞. The vertical height estimate generalizes a result by Rosenberg and Sa Earp and applies only to surfaces verifying a height estimate condition. When <0, using also a horizontal height estimate, we show a non-existence result for properly embedded Weingarten surfaces of elliptic type in ℍ²(×ℝ with finite topology and one end.

  18. Method for estimating the stress field from seismic moment tensor data based on the flow rule in plasticity theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, S.

    2016-09-01

    The stress field is a key factor controlling earthquake occurrence and crustal evolution. In this study, we propose an approach for determining the stress field in a region using seismic moment tensors, based on the classical equation in plasticity theory. Seismic activity is a phenomenon that relaxes crustal stress and creates plastic strain in a medium because of faulting, which suggests that the medium could behave as a plastic body. Using the constitutive relation in plastic theory, the increment of the plastic strain tensor is proportional to the deviatoric stress tensor. Simple mathematical manipulation enables the development of an inversion method for estimating the stress field in a region. The method is tested on shallow earthquakes occurring on Kyushu Island, Japan.

  19. Refraction of the principal stress trajectories at a surface of discontinuity and related problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamediev, Shamil

    2014-05-01

    The principal stress trajectories (PST) obtainable from the inversion of data on various types of coeval natural stress indicators provide important information on the real stress fields of the Earth's crust. In particular, once the PST field has been obtained, the stress field can be calculated from equilibrium conditions without regard to the crust rheological properties. In the case under consideration the equilibrium conditions form a closed hyperbolic system of differential equations on unknown magnitudes of the principal stresses. The PST concept is significantly complicated in presence of faults, natural interfaces, and other surfaces of discontinuity where according to laboratory experiments and drilling results the stress trajectories are usually refracted. Unfortunately, the phenomenon of the PST refraction is poorly understood theoretically and often ignored in mathematical modelling which leads to unjustified conclusions. The full investigation of the phenomenon has been carried out for discontinuity surface D for which we distinguish "+" and "-" sides. Inclinations of axes of the extreme principal stresses T1 and T3 (T1 >T3, tension is positive) from both sides are different but should be potentially compatible which means existence of stress magnitudes ensuring equilibrium. To check the compatibility of axes at any point, they should be orthogonally projected in a special way onto the plane tangent to the surface. This yields the so-called shear sectors S+ and S- containing all the possible shear stress direction vectors p+ and p-, |p+| = |p-|=1, at a local point. The T1 and T3 axes from both sides are potentially compatible if and only if the intersection of S- and S+ is nonempty. Indeed, if the intersection is empty the necessary condition of equilibrium, p-=p+, cannot be fulfilled. Let now the S- sector with the central angle ϕ- be given at any point on the surface D. Then possible orientations of the T1 and T3 axes at this point from the "+" side

  20. Use of THz Reflectometry for Roughness Estimations of Archeological Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Siano, Salvatore

    2017-04-01

    In this work, using a time domain spectrometer, we have investigated the reflection of terahertz (THz) pulses from surfaces that exhibit a variable degree of roughness. The study was mainly aimed at assessing the influence of the surface texture on the amplitude and the shape of the pulses reflected by stratified materials and at exploring the potential of this technique for achieving quantitative information on the roughness of the material interfaces hit by the THz beam. The behavior of the reflected THz pulses was investigated by considering angular measurements on a set of suitable mock-ups. Measurements were carried out on an authentic archeological Roman coin that exhibited different corrosion situations. An electromagnetic model was used for estimating the roughness of outer and inner surfaces. The comparison of the results with those provided by other techniques made it possible to parameterize the surface texture such as the traditional contact micro-profilometry and the more recently used 3D digital microscopy.

  1. Use of THz Reflectometry for Roughness Estimations of Archeological Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Siano, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    In this work, using a time domain spectrometer, we have investigated the reflection of terahertz (THz) pulses from surfaces that exhibit a variable degree of roughness. The study was mainly aimed at assessing the influence of the surface texture on the amplitude and the shape of the pulses reflected by stratified materials and at exploring the potential of this technique for achieving quantitative information on the roughness of the material interfaces hit by the THz beam. The behavior of the reflected THz pulses was investigated by considering angular measurements on a set of suitable mock-ups. Measurements were carried out on an authentic archeological Roman coin that exhibited different corrosion situations. An electromagnetic model was used for estimating the roughness of outer and inner surfaces. The comparison of the results with those provided by other techniques made it possible to parameterize the surface texture such as the traditional contact micro-profilometry and the more recently used 3D digital microscopy.

  2. The influence of surface effect on vibration behaviors of carbon nanotubes under initial stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Fang, C. Q.; Wang, X.

    2017-01-01

    An analytical method is presented to solve the influence of surface effect on non-coaxial resonance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in matrix utilizing laminated structures model. Due to coupled van der Waals forces between adjacent tubes and surface effect exerted carbon nanotubes, the resonance frequencies and amplitude ratios of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under initial stresses show that the resonant characteristics of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes become complex and the numbers of vibrational modes do not keep increase under identical conditions after considering surface effects. The result obtained can be used as a beneficial reference for investigating the electronic and physical behaviors of carbon nanotubes.

  3. Sea ice-atmospheric interaction: Application of multispectral satellite data in polar surface energy flux estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Konrad; Key, J.; Maslanik, J.; Schweiger, A.

    1993-01-01

    This is the third annual report on: Sea Ice-Atmosphere Interaction - Application of Multispectral Satellite Data in Polar Surface Energy Flux Estimates. The main emphasis during the past year was on: radiative flux estimates from satellite data; intercomparison of satellite and ground-based cloud amounts; radiative cloud forcing; calibration of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) visible channels and comparison of two satellite derived albedo data sets; and on flux modeling for leads. Major topics covered are arctic clouds and radiation; snow and ice albedo, and leads and modeling.

  4. Effect of dielectric coating on the electron work function and the surface stress of a metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babich, A. V.; Pogosov, V. V.

    2009-08-01

    The electron work function, contact potential difference, and surface stress of the elastically deformed faces of the metal covered by a dielectric are calculated by using the Kohn-Sham method and stabilized jellium model. Our calculations demonstrate the opposite deformation dependencies of the work function and contact potential difference. Dielectric coating leads to a negative change in the work function and a positive change in the contact potential difference. It is shown that the measurements of the contact potential difference of a deformed face by the Kelvin method give only the change in the value of the one-electron effective potential in the plane of a virtual image behind the surface, rather than the value of the electron work function. The obtained values of the electron work function and surface stress for Al, Au, Cu, and Zn are in agreement with the results of experiments for polycrystals.

  5. Potential evaporation estimation through an unstressed surface energy balance and its sensitivity to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barella-Ortiz, A.; Polcher, J.; Tuzet, A.; Laval, K.

    2013-06-01

    Potential evaporation (ETP) is a basic input for hydrological and agronomic models, as well as a key variable in most actual evaporation estimations. It has been approached through several diffusive and energy balance methods, out of which the Penman-Monteith equation is recommended as the standard one. In order to deal with the diffusive approach, ETP must be estimated at a sub-diurnal frequency, as currently done in land surface models (LSM). This study presents an improved method, developed in the ORCHIDEE LSM, which consists in estimating ETP through an unstressed surface energy balance (USEB method). The results confirm the quality of the estimation which is currently implemented in the model (Milly, 1992). ETP has also been estimated using a reference equation (computed at a daily time step) provided by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). First, a comparison for a reference period under current climate conditions, shows that both formulations differ, specially in arid areas. However, they supply similar values when FAO's assumption of neutral stability conditions is relaxed, by replacing FAO's aerodynamic resistance by the model's one. Furthermore, if the vapour pressure deficit (VPD) estimated for FAO's equation, is substituted by ORCHIDEE's VPD or its humidity gradient, the daily mean estimate is further improved. In a second step, ETP's sensitivity to climate change is assessed comparing trends in both formulations for the 21st Century. It is found that the USEB method shows a higher sensitivity. Both VPD and the model's humidity gradient, as well as the aerodynamic resistance have been identified as key parameters in governing ETP trends. Finally, the sensitivity study is extended to three empirical approximations based on temperature, net radiation and mass transfer (Hargreaves, Priestley-Taylor and Rohwer, respectively). The sensitivity of these methods is compared to the USEB method's one to test if simplified equations are able to reproduce

  6. Potential evaporation estimation through an unstressed surface energy balance and its sensitivity to climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barella-Ortiz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Potential evaporation (ETP is a basic input for hydrological and agronomic models, as well as a key variable in most actual evaporation estimations. It has been approached through several diffusive and energy balance methods, out of which the Penman–Monteith equation is recommended as the standard one. In order to deal with the diffusive approach, ETP must be estimated at a sub-diurnal frequency, as currently done in land surface models (LSM. This study presents an improved method, developed in the ORCHIDEE LSM, which consists in estimating ETP through an unstressed surface energy balance (USEB method. The results confirm the quality of the estimation which is currently implemented in the model (Milly, 1992. ETP has also been estimated using a reference equation (computed at a daily time step provided by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO. First, a comparison for a reference period under current climate conditions, shows that both formulations differ, specially in arid areas. However, they supply similar values when FAO's assumption of neutral stability conditions is relaxed, by replacing FAO's aerodynamic resistance by the model's one. Furthermore, if the vapour pressure deficit (VPD estimated for FAO's equation, is substituted by ORCHIDEE's VPD or its humidity gradient, the daily mean estimate is further improved. In a second step, ETP's sensitivity to climate change is assessed comparing trends in both formulations for the 21st Century. It is found that the USEB method shows a higher sensitivity. Both VPD and the model's humidity gradient, as well as the aerodynamic resistance have been identified as key parameters in governing ETP trends. Finally, the sensitivity study is extended to three empirical approximations based on temperature, net radiation and mass transfer (Hargreaves, Priestley–Taylor and Rohwer, respectively. The sensitivity of these methods is compared to the USEB method's one to test if simplified equations are

  7. GIS-based Approach to Estimate Surface Runoff in Small Catchments: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtek Matej

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The issue of surface runoff assessment is one of the important and relevant topics of hydrological as well as geographical research. The aim of the paper is therefore to estimate and assess surface runoff on the example of Vyčoma catchment which is located in the Western Slovakia. For this purpose, SCS runoff curve number method, modeling in GIS and remote sensing were used. An important task was the creation of a digital elevation model (DEM, which enters the surface runoff modeling and affects its accuracy. Great attention was paid to the spatial interpretation of land use categories applying aerial imagery from 2013 and hydrological soil groups as well as calculation of maximum daily rainfall with N-year return periods as partial tasks in estimating surface runoff. From the methodological point of view, the importance of the paper can be seen in the use of a simple GIS-based approach to assess the surface runoff conditions in a small catchment.

  8. Evaluation of missing pellet surface geometry on cladding stress distribution and magnitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capps, Nathan [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Montgomery, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Sunderland, Dion [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); ANATECH Corp, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Pytel, Martin [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Stress concentrations are related to pellet defect geometries. • The presence of radial cracks cause increases in stress concentration. • Increasing the size of MPS causes an increase hoop stress concentrations. - Abstract: Missing pellet surface (MPS) defects are local geometric defects in nuclear fuel pellets that result from pellet mishandling or manufacturing. The presence of MPS defects can cause significant clad stress concentrations that can lead to through-wall cladding failure for certain combinations of fuel burnup, and reactor power level or power change. Consequently, the impact of MPS defects has limited the rate of power increase, or ramp rate, in both pressurized and boiling water reactors (PWRs and BWRs, respectively). Improved three-dimensional (3-D) fuel performance models of MPS defect geometry can provide better understanding of the probability for pellet clad mechanical interaction (PCMI), and correspondingly the available margin against cladding failure by stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The Consortium of Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) has been developing the Bison-CASL fuel performance code to consider the inherently multi-physics and multi-dimensional mechanisms that control fuel behavior, including cladding stress concentrations resulting from MPS defects. This paper evaluates the cladding hoop stress distributions as a function of MPS defect geometry with discrete pellet radial cracks for a set of typical operating conditions in a PWR fuel rod. The results provide a first step toward a probabilistic approach to assess cladding failure during power maneuvers. This analysis provides insight into how varying pellet defect geometries affect the distribution of the cladding stress, as well as the temperature distributions within the fuel and clad; and are used to develop stress concentration factors for comparing 2-D and 3-D models.

  9. Uncertainty in global groundwater storage estimates in a Total Groundwater Stress framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Alexandra S.; Thomas, Brian F.; Lo, Min‐Hui; Swenson, Sean; Rodell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Groundwater is a finite resource under continuous external pressures. Current unsustainable groundwater use threatens the resilience of aquifer systems and their ability to provide a long‐term water source. Groundwater storage is considered to be a factor of groundwater resilience, although the extent to which resilience can be maintained has yet to be explored in depth. In this study, we assess the limit of groundwater resilience in the world's largest groundwater systems with remote sensing observations. The Total Groundwater Stress (TGS) ratio, defined as the ratio of total storage to the groundwater depletion rate, is used to explore the timescales to depletion in the world's largest aquifer systems and associated groundwater buffer capacity. We find that the current state of knowledge of large‐scale groundwater storage has uncertainty ranges across orders of magnitude that severely limit the characterization of resilience in the study aquifers. Additionally, we show that groundwater availability, traditionally defined as recharge and redefined in this study as total storage, can alter the systems that are considered to be stressed versus unstressed. We find that remote sensing observations from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment can assist in providing such information at the scale of a whole aquifer. For example, we demonstrate that a groundwater depletion rate in the Northwest Sahara Aquifer System of 2.69 ± 0.8 km3/yr would result in the aquifer being depleted to 90% of its total storage in as few as 50 years given an initial storage estimate of 70 km3. PMID:26900184

  10. ASHMET: a computer code for estimating insolation incident on tilted surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkin, R.F.; Toelle, R.G.

    1980-05-01

    A computer code, ASHMET, has been developed by MSFC to estimate the amount of solar insolation incident on the surfaces of solar collectors. Both tracking and fixed-position collectors have been included. Climatological data for 248 US locations are built into the code. This report describes the methodology of the code, and its input and output. The basic methodology used by ASHMET is the ASHRAE clear-day insolation relationships modified by a clearness index derived from SOLMET-measured solar radiation data to a horizontal surface.

  11. A wafer mapping technique for residual stress in surface micromachined films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavone, G.; Murray, J.; Smith, S.; Desmulliez, M. P. Y.; Mount, A. R.; Walton, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    The design of MEMS devices employing movable structures is crucially dependant on the mechanical behaviour of the deposited materials. It is therefore important to be able to fully characterize the micromachined films and predict with confidence the mechanical properties of patterned structures. This paper presents a characterization technique that enables the residual stress in MEMS films to be mapped at the wafer level by using microstructures released by surface micromachining. These dedicated MEMS test structures and the associated measurement techniques are used to extract localized information on the strain and Young’s modulus of the film under investigation. The residual stress is then determined by numerically coupling this data with a finite element analysis of the structure. This paper illustrates the measurement routine and demonstrates it with a case study using electrochemically deposited alloys of nickel and iron, particularly prone to develop high levels of residual stress. The results show that the technique enables wafer mapping of film non-uniformities and identifies wafer-to-wafer differences. A comparison between the results obtained from the mapping technique and conventional wafer bow measurements highlights the benefits of using a procedure tailored to films that are non-uniform, patterned and surface-micromachined, as opposed to simple standard stress extraction methods. The presented technique reveals detailed information that is generally unexplored when using conventional stress extraction methods such as wafer bow measurements.

  12. On the modelling of semi-insulating GaAs including surface tension and bulk stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, W.; Duderstadt, F.

    2004-07-01

    Necessary heat treatment of single crystal semi-insulating Gallium Arsenide (GaAs), which is deployed in micro- and opto- electronic devices, generate undesirable liquid precipitates in the solid phase. The appearance of precipitates is influenced by surface tension at the liquid/solid interface and deviatoric stresses in the solid. The central quantity for the description of the various aspects of phase transitions is the chemical potential, which can be additively decomposed into a chemical and a mechanical part. In particular the calculation of the mechanical part of the chemical potential is of crucial importance. We determine the chemical potential in the framework of the St. Venant-Kirchhoff law which gives an appropriate stress/strain relation for many solids in the small strain regime. We establish criteria, which allow the correct replacement of the St. Venant-Kirchhoff law by the simpler Hooke law. The main objectives of this study are: (i) We develop a thermo-mechanical model that describes diffusion and interface motion, which both are strongly influenced by surface tension effects and deviatoric stresses. (ii) We give an overview and outlook on problems that can be posed and solved within the framework of the model. (iii) We calculate non-standard phase diagrams, i.e. those that take into account surface tension and non-deviatoric stresses, for GaAs above 786 C, and we compare the results with classical phase diagrams without these phenomena. (orig.)

  13. Estimating river discharge from earth observation measurement of river surface hydraulic variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Negrel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available River discharge is a key variable to quantify the water cycle, its fluxes and stocks at different scales, from local scale for the efficient management of water resource to global scale for the monitoring of climate change. Therefore, developing Earth observation (EO techniques for the measurement or estimation of river discharge is a major challenge. A key question deals with the possibility of deriving river discharge values from EO surface variables (width, level, slope, velocity the only one accessible through EO without any in situ measurement. Based on a literature study and original developments, the possibilities of estimating water surface variables using remote-sensing techniques have been explored, mainly RADAR altimetry as well as across-track and along-track interferometry.

  14. Estimation of evapotranspiration over heterogeneous surfaces based on HJ1B satellite data in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xiaozhou; Jiao, Jingjun

    2014-05-01

    The HJ1B satellite of China is equipped with two CCD cameras with 30m resolution and one infrared multispectral camera with 300m resolution. And the revisit period of HJ1B satellite is 4 days. Compared to MODIS or TM, HJ1B data has the advantage of high spatial-temporal resolution. Methodology based on the one-source energy balance model was developed for net radiation (Rn), soil heat flux (G), sensible heat flux (H) and latent heat flux (LE) estimation from HI1B data. The core procedure is a scheme that was designed for correcting the spatial scale error over heterogeneous surfaces by taking advantage of the HJ1B data characteristics, i.e., high resolution CCD data (30m) along with thermal data (300m). First of all, a regression relationship between Ts and NDVI was built up at 300m resolution based on the data of Ts and NDVI of the selected "pure" pixels. And then the relationship function was applied at 30m resolution to derive Ts at high resolution, i.e., at the subpixel level. Furthermore, the 30m land class data was also used in the parameterization of surface energy balance and surface aerodynamic transfer, which is important since significant error may be resulted by using one land class type to represent the whole mixed pixel. By using high resolution NDVI and land class data, we are able to mitigate the spatial scale error of the mixed pixels at 300m resolution. At last, the 300m surface energy fluxes were obtained by aggregation of the 30m estimation. HJ1B data at Hai river basin in north China in 2010 were used to verify this method. The eddy-correlation system data were used as validation. The results of the method were compared with the results of a simple method that estimates the fluxes at 300m by aggregating all of the input parameters to 300m. It is shown that the method proposed in this study shows higher agreement with in-suit measurement, and the fluxes maps also show much more details of the spatial variation. By using this method, it can be

  15. A 1-D Analytical Model for the Thermally Induced Stresses in the Mould Surface During Die Casting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper; Hansen, Preben

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an anlytically based method for predicting the normal stresses in a die mold surface exposed to a thermal load. A example of application of the method is the high-pressure di casting process where the surface stresses in critical cases lead to cracks. Expressions for the normal...

  16. High spatial resolution Land Surface Temperature estimation over urban areas with uncertainty indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitraka, Zina; Lazzarini, Michele; Doxani, Georgia; Del Frate, Fabio; Ghedira, Hosni

    2014-05-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key variable for studying land surface processes and interactions with the atmosphere and it is listed in the Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) identified by international organizations like Global Climate Observing System. It is a valuable source of information for a range of topics in earth sciences and essential for urban climatology studies. Detailed, frequent and accurate LST mapping may support various urban applications, like the monitoring of urban heat island. Currently, no spaceborne instruments provide frequent thermal imagery at high spatial resolution, thus there is a need for synergistic algorithms that combine different kinds of data for LST retrieval. Moreover, knowing the confidence level of any satellite-derived product is highly important to the users, especially when referred to the urban environment, which is extremely heterogenic. The developed method employs spatial-spectral unmixing techniques for improving the spatial resolution of thermal measurements, combines spectral library information for emissivity estimation and applies a split-window algorithm to estimate LST with an uncertainty estimation inserted in the final product. A synergistic algorithm that utilizes the spatial information provided by visible and near-infrared measurements with more frequent low resolution thermal measurements provides excellent means for high spatial resolution LST estimation. Given the low spatial resolution of thermal infrared sensors, the measured radiation is a combination of radiances of different surface types. High spatial resolution information is used to quantify the different surface types in each pixel and then the measured radiance of each pixel is decomposed. The several difficulties in retrieving LST from space measurements, mainly related to the temperature-emissivity coupling and the atmospheric contribution to the thermal measurements, and the measurements themselves, introduce uncertainties in the final

  17. Estimation of daily minimum land surface air temperature using MODIS data in southern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didari, Shohreh; Norouzi, Hamidreza; Zand-Parsa, Shahrokh; Khanbilvardi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    Land surface air temperature (LSAT) is a key variable in agricultural, climatological, hydrological, and environmental studies. Many of their processes are affected by LSAT at about 5 cm from the ground surface (LSAT5cm). Most of the previous studies tried to find statistical models to estimate LSAT at 2 m height (LSAT2m) which is considered as a standardized height, and there is not enough study for LSAT5cm estimation models. Accurate measurements of LSAT5cm are generally acquired from meteorological stations, which are sparse in remote areas. Nonetheless, remote sensing data by providing rather extensive spatial coverage can complement the spatiotemporal shortcomings of meteorological stations. The main objective of this study was to find a statistical model from the previous day to accurately estimate spatial daily minimum LSAT5cm, which is very important in agricultural frost, in Fars province in southern Iran. Land surface temperature (LST) data were obtained using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard Aqua and Terra satellites at daytime and nighttime periods with normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data. These data along with geometric temperature and elevation information were used in a stepwise linear model to estimate minimum LSAT5cm during 2003-2011. The results revealed that utilization of MODIS Aqua nighttime data of previous day provides the most applicable and accurate model. According to the validation results, the accuracy of the proposed model was suitable during 2012 (root mean square difference (RMSD) = 3.07 °C, {R}_{adj}^2 = 87 %). The model underestimated (overestimated) high (low) minimum LSAT5cm. The accuracy of estimation in the winter time was found to be lower than the other seasons (RMSD = 3.55 °C), and in summer and winter, the errors were larger than in the remaining seasons.

  18. Prevalence estimates of combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder: critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Lisa K; Frueh, B Christopher; Acierno, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to provide a critical review of prevalence estimates of combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among military personnel and veterans, and of the relevant factors that may account for the variability of estimates within and across cohorts, including methodological and conceptual factors accounting for differences in prevalence rates across nations, conflicts/wars, and studies. MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases were examined for literature on combat-related PTSD. The following terms were used independently and in combinations in this search: PTSD, combat, veterans, military, epidemiology, prevalence. The point prevalence of combat-related PTSD in US military veterans since the Vietnam War ranged from approximately 2% to 17%. Studies of recent conflicts suggest that combat-related PTSD afflicts between 4% and 17% of US Iraq War veterans, but only 3-6% of returning UK Iraq War veterans. Thus, the prevalence range is narrower and tends to have a lower ceiling among combat veterans of non-US Western nations. Variability in prevalence is likely due to differences in sampling strategies; measurement strategies; inclusion and measurement of the DSM-IV clinically significant impairment criterion; timing and latency of assessment and potential for recall bias; and combat experiences. Prevalence rates are also likely affected by issues related to PTSD course, chronicity, and comorbidity; symptom overlap with other psychiatric disorders; and sociopolitical and cultural factors that may vary over time and by nation. The disorder represents a significant and costly illness to veterans, their families, and society as a whole. Further carefully conceptualized research, however, is needed to advance our understanding of disorder prevalence, as well as associated information on course, phenomenology, protective factors, treatment, and economic costs.

  19. Model Estimation of Volatilization of Ammonia Applied with Surface Film—Forming Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANGSHUNYAO; YINBIN; 等

    1999-01-01

    Greenhouse experiments were conducted to determine the ammonia volatilization loss with of without application of surface film-forming material (SFFM),Ammonia volatilization loss was estimated by the model developed by Jayaweera and Mikkelsen,The results showed that the model could estimated by the model developed by Jayaweera and Mikkelsen,The results showed that the model could estimate and predict well ammonia volatilization loss also in case of SFFM addition,There was an emended factor B introduced to the model calculation when SFFM was used ,Simulated calculation showed that the effect of factor B on NH3 loss was obvious,The value of B was overned by SFFM and the environtal conditions.Sensitivity analysis suggested that pH was the main factor contronlling NH3 volatilization loss from the floodwater.

  20. Using Landsat Vegetation Indices to Estimate Impervious Surface Fractions for European Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Per Skougaard; Fensholt, Rasmus; Drews, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Impervious surfaces (IS) are a key indicator of environmental quality, and mapping of urban IS is important for a wide range of applications including hydrological modelling, water management, urban and environmental planning and urban climate studies. This paper addresses the accuracy...... and applicability of vegetation indices (VI), from Landsat imagery, to estimate IS fractions for European cities. The accuracy of three different measures of vegetation cover is examined for eight urban areas at different locations in Europe. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Soil Adjusted...... Vegetation Index (SAVI) are converted to IS fractions using a regression modelling approach. Also, NDVI is used to estimate fractional vegetation cover (FR), and consequently IS fractions. All three indices provide fairly accurate estimates (MAEs ≈ 10%, MBE’s

  1. Initial rotor position estimation and sliding preventing for elevators with surface-mounted PMSMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Shen, Anwen; Tang, Qipeng; Xu, Jinbang

    2016-03-01

    Improved methods of initial rotor position estimation and sliding prevention are presented in this paper for elevators with surface-mounted permanent magnet synchronous machines (SPMSMs). In contrast to most of the existing literature, in this paper, estimation errors caused by stator resistance and dead time are analysed in detail. The improved estimation method can reduce the errors greatly without dead-time compensations and knowledge of motor parameters. Besides, an observer-based feedforward compensation of load torque is introduced to elevator applications to prevent sliding during the starting process. Since the torque observer is widely used in other motor applications, we focus on the impact caused by the change in inertia. Finally, a series of experiments are performed on a testing system with two 13.4 kW SPMSMs and drivers to illustrate the effectiveness and improvement of the method.

  2. Initial position estimation strategy for a surface permanent magnet synchronous motor used in hybrid electric vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing TIAN; Qun-tao AN; Li SUN‡; Dong-yang SUN; Jian-dong DUAN

    2016-01-01

    A novel nonlinear model for surface permanent magnet synchronous motors (SPMSMs) is adopted to estimate the initial rotor position for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Usually, the accuracy of initial rotor position estimation for SPMSMs relies on magnetic saturation. To verify the saturation effect, the transient finite element analysis (FEA) model is presented first. Hybrid injection of a static voltage vector (SVV) superimposed with a high-frequency rotating voltage is proposed. The magnetic polarity is roughly identified with the aid of the saturation evaluation function, based on which an estimation of the position is performed. During this procedure, a special demodulation is suggested to extract signals of iron core saturation and rotor position. A Simulink/MATLAB platform for SPMSMs at standstill is constituted, and the effectiveness of the proposed strategy is verified. The proposed method is also validated by experimental results of an SPMSM drive.

  3. Estimation and correction of different flavors of surface observation biases in ensemble Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente-Plazas, Raquel; Hacker, Josua P.; Collins, Nancy; Lee, Jared A.

    2017-04-01

    The impact of assimilating surface observations has been shown in several publications, for improving weather prediction inside of the boundary layer as well as the flow aloft. However, the assimilation of surface observations is often far from optimal due to the presence of both model and observation biases. The sources of these biases can be diverse: an instrumental offset, errors associated to the comparison of point-based observations and grid-cell average, etc. To overcome this challenge, a method was developed using the ensemble Kalman filter. The approach consists on representing each observation bias as a parameter. These bias parameters are added to the forward operator and they extend the state vector. As opposed to the observation bias estimation approaches most common in operational systems (e.g. for satellite radiances), the state vector and parameters are simultaneously updated by applying the Kalman filter equations to the augmented state. The method to estimate and correct the observation bias is evaluated using observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. OSSEs are constructed for the conventional observation network including radiosondes, aircraft observations, atmospheric motion vectors, and surface observations. Three different kinds of biases are added to 2-meter temperature for synthetic METARs. From the simplest to more sophisticated, imposed biases are: (1) a spatially invariant bias, (2) a spatially varying bias proportional to topographic height differences between the model and the observations, and (3) bias that is proportional to the temperature. The target region characterized by complex terrain is the western U.S. on a domain with 30-km grid spacing. Observations are assimilated every 3 hours using an 80-member ensemble during September 2012. Results demonstrate that the approach is able to estimate and correct the bias when it is spatially invariant (experiment 1). More

  4. Estimation of the Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance during 20th and 21st centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Fettweis

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Results from a regional climate simulation (1970–2006 over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS reveals that more than 97% of the interannual variability of the modelled Surface Mass Balance (SMB can be explained by the GrIS summer temperature anomaly and the GrIS annual precipitation anomaly. This multiple regression is then used to empirically estimate the GrIS SMB since 1900 from climatological time series. The projected SMB changes in the 21st century are investigated with the set of simulations performed with atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs of the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR4. These estimates show that the high surface mass loss rates of recent years are not unprecedented in the GrIS history of the last hundred years. The minimum SMB rate seems to have occurred earlier in the 1930s. The AOGCMs project that the SMB rate of the 1930s would be common at the end of 2100. The temperature would be higher than in the 1930s but the increase of accumulation in the 21st century would partly offset the acceleration of surface melt due to the temperature increase. However, these assumptions are based on an empirical multiple regression only validated for recent/current climatic conditions, and the accuracy and time homogeneity of the data sets and AOGCM results used in these estimations constitute a large uncertainty.

  5. Estimating Turbulent Surface Fluxes from Small Unmanned Aircraft: Evaluation of Current Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, G.; Lawrence, D.; Elston, J.; Cassano, J. J.; Mack, J.; Wildmann, N.; Nigro, M. A.; Ivey, M.; Wolfe, D. E.; Muschinski, A.

    2014-12-01

    Heat transfer between the atmosphere and Earth's surface represents a key component to understanding Earth energy balance, making it important in understanding and simulating climate. Arguably, the oceanic air-sea interface and Polar sea-ice-air interface are amongst the most challenging in which to measure these fluxes. This difficulty results partially from challenges associated with infrastructure deployment on these surfaces and partially from an inability to obtain spatially representative values over a potentially inhomogeneous surface. Traditionally sensible (temperature) and latent (moisture) fluxes are estimated using one of several techniques. A preferred method involves eddy-correlation where cross-correlation between anomalies in vertical motion (w) and temperature (T) or moisture (q) is used to estimate heat transfer. High-frequency measurements of these quantities can be derived using tower-mounted instrumentation. Such systems have historically been deployed over land surfaces or on ships and buoys to calculate fluxes at the air-land or air-sea interface, but such deployments are expensive and challenging to execute, resulting in a lack of spatially diverse measurements. A second ("bulk") technique involves the observation of horizontal windspeed, temperature and moisture at a given altitude over an extended time period in order to estimate the surface fluxes. Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) represent a unique platform from which to derive these fluxes. These sUAS can be small ( 1 m), lightweight ( 700 g), low cost ( $2000) and relatively easy to deploy to remote locations and over inhomogeneous surfaces. We will give an overview of the ability of sUAS to provide measurements necessary for estimating surface turbulent fluxes. This discussion is based on flights in the vicinity of the 1000 ft. Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) tower, and over the US Department of Energy facility at Oliktok Point, Alaska. We will present initial comparisons

  6. Estimation of the radius of a star based on its effective temperature and surface gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichevskij, S. G.

    2016-06-01

    Amethod for determining the radius of a star using its effective temperature and surface gravity is proposed. The method assumes that the relationship between the radius, effective temperature, and surface gravity can be approximated using models for the internal structure and evolution of the star. The method is illustrated using the Geneva-Toulouse evolutionary computations for two metal abundances—solar and one-tenth of solar. Analysis of the systematic errors shows that the accuracy of the method is better than 10% over most part of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, and is about 5% for main-sequence stars. The maximum relative systematic error due to the simplifications underlying the method is about 15%. A test using eclipsing binaries confirms the viability of the proposed method for estimating stellar radii. In the region of the main sequence, systematic deviations do not exceed 2%, and the relative standard deviation is ≤4.7%. It is expected that th maximum relative error over the rest of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram will likewise be close to the systematic error, about 15-20%. The method is applied to estimate the radii of model stellar atmospheres. Such estimates can be used to synthesize the color index and luminosity of a star. The method can be used whenever accuracies of about 10% in the estimated stellar radius and luminosity are acceptable.

  7. Motor unit action potential conduction velocity estimated from surface electromyographic signals using image processing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Fabiano Araujo; Carvalho, João Luiz Azevedo; Miosso, Cristiano Jacques; de Andrade, Marcelino Monteiro; da Rocha, Adson Ferreira

    2015-09-17

    In surface electromyography (surface EMG, or S-EMG), conduction velocity (CV) refers to the velocity at which the motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) propagate along the muscle fibers, during contractions. The CV is related to the type and diameter of the muscle fibers, ion concentration, pH, and firing rate of the motor units (MUs). The CV can be used in the evaluation of contractile properties of MUs, and of muscle fatigue. The most popular methods for CV estimation are those based on maximum likelihood estimation (MLE). This work proposes an algorithm for estimating CV from S-EMG signals, using digital image processing techniques. The proposed approach is demonstrated and evaluated, using both simulated and experimentally-acquired multichannel S-EMG signals. We show that the proposed algorithm is as precise and accurate as the MLE method in typical conditions of noise and CV. The proposed method is not susceptible to errors associated with MUAP propagation direction or inadequate initialization parameters, which are common with the MLE algorithm. Image processing -based approaches may be useful in S-EMG analysis to extract different physiological parameters from multichannel S-EMG signals. Other new methods based on image processing could also be developed to help solving other tasks in EMG analysis, such as estimation of the CV for individual MUs, localization and tracking of innervation zones, and study of MU recruitment strategies.

  8. Maximum Stress Estimation Model for Multi-Span Waler Beams with Deflections at the Supports Using Average Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Woo Park

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The safety of a multi-span waler beam subjected simultaneously to a distributed load and deflections at its supports can be secured by limiting the maximum stress of the beam to a specific value to prevent the beam from reaching a limit state for failure or collapse. Despite the fact that the vast majority of accidents on construction sites occur at waler beams in retaining wall systems, no safety monitoring model that can consider deflections at the supports of the beam is available. In this paper, a maximum stress estimation model for a waler beam based on average strains measured from vibrating wire strain gauges (VWSGs, the most frequently used sensors in construction field, is presented. The model is derived by defining the relationship between the maximum stress and the average strains measured from VWSGs. In addition to the maximum stress, support reactions, deflections at supports, and the magnitudes of distributed loads for the beam structure can be identified by the estimation model using the average strains. Using simulation tests on two multi-span beams, the performance of the model is evaluated by estimating maximum stress, deflections at supports, support reactions, and the magnitudes of distributed loads.

  9. The Effect of Heterogeneous Lithospheric Structure on Surface Stress and Tectonics on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenburg, M. A.; Williams, J.; Aharonson, O.

    2008-12-01

    Observations of Mercury's surface from the Mariner 10 and MESSENGER spacecraft reveal a planet-wide distribution of lobate scarps, which are interpreted to be the surface expression of thrust faults due to global contraction. Statistical analysis of scarps mapped in images from both missions suggests that the orientations of these features are not consistent with a uniform distribution, the expected outcome for a contracting lithosphere of constant thickness. One possible explanation for this observation considers Mercury's thermal state, which is driven by the insolation pattern. Mercury's 3:2 spin-orbit resonance, in concert with its substantial orbital eccentricity of e = 0.20, causes long-wavelength surface temperature variations of more than 130 K. Corresponding variations in lithospheric thickness are hence expected. If the contraction occurred while Mercury was in this dynamical state, the resulting stress distribution recorded on the surface during global cooling and inner core solidification may reflect this heterogeneity. We seek to determine whether contraction of a lithosphere with lateral thickness variations can explain the observed lobate scarp orientations on Mercury's surface. We employ the three-dimensional, viscoelastic, finite element model CitcomSVE along with a thermal evolution model to study Mercury's response to cooling, inner core formation, and lithosphere growth and to track the accumulation of stress in the lithosphere. The resulting stress pattern can then be compared to the orientations and distribution of scarps mapped on the surface of Mercury. Preliminary results indicate systematic variations between the expected orientation of faults in the "cold poles," where the lithosphere is thicker and the "hot poles," where the lithosphere is weaker. As MESSENGER returns more data, comparisons between model results and surface features will be refined.

  10. Analytical Modeling of Surface Roughness, Hardness and Residual Stress Induced by Deep Rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Frederico C.; Abrão, Alexandre M.; Denkena, Berend; Breidenstein, Bernd; Mörke, Tobias

    2016-12-01

    Deep rolling is a mechanical surface treatment that can significantly alter the features of metallic components and despite the fact that it has been used for a long time, to date the influence of the interaction among the principal process parameters has not been thoroughly understood. Aiming to fulfill this gap, this work addresses the effect of deep rolling on surface finish and mechanical properties from the analytical and experimental viewpoints. More specifically, the influence of deep rolling pressure and number of passes on surface roughness, hardness and residual stress induced on AISI 1060 steel is investigated. The findings indicate that the surface roughness after deep rolling is closely related to the yield strength of the work material and the available models can satisfactorily predict the former parameter. Better agreement between the mathematical and experimental hardness values is achieved when a single deep rolling pass is employed, as well as when the yield strength of the work material increases. Compressive residual stress is generally induced after deep rolling, irrespectively of the selected heat treatment and deep rolling parameters. Finally, the model proposed to predict residual stress provides results closest to the experimental data especially when the annealed material is considered.

  11. Surface Wind Stresses and Triggering of Global Dust Storms on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischna, Michael A.; Shirley, James H.

    2016-10-01

    Global dust storms on Mars occur during summer in the southern hemisphere, but their occurrence in some years and not in others has stubbornly eluded explanation. Shirley (2016, in review, and at arxiv.org/abs/1605.02707) and Mischna and Shirley (2016, in revision, and at arxiv.org/abs/1602.09137) have demonstrated the role of a so-called "coupling term acceleration" (CTA) in modifying the Mars global circulation through potential exchange of Mars' orbital and rotational momenta. The CTA has been incorporated into the MarsWRF general circulation model (GCM), which reveals distinct changes to the circulation due to the CTA, leading to conditions favorable to GDS formation in all years in which perihelion season GDS were observed, and conditions unfavorable in nearly all other years. These circulation changes reveal themselves, in part, through changes in surface wind stress, which is a strong function of near-surface wind speed. We present additional analysis of these results for the past years with perihelion season GDS (7 in total) showing commonalities in the evolution of surface stresses in the season leading up to GDS initiation. Specifically, the enhancement of surface stress during this pre-storm season, arising from the orbit-spin coupling in years with perihelion season storms, presents some common patterns. Among these are the rate and duration of increase of wind stress, and the minimum level of enhancement from the CTA that is apparently required in these years prior to initiation of a GDS. Previously we assessed changes in surface stress using a simple, dust-free model atmosphere. Here, further, we perform parallel simulations for MY 24-27 using realistic dust profiles from TES limb observations. The inclusion of dust in the GCM modifies atmospheric opacity and will alter global atmospheric temperatures leading to a markedly different atmospheric state. We find that the inclusion of dust in the atmosphere reduces the magnitude of surface stresses as

  12. Effect of Laser Shock Peening on surface properties and residual stress of Al6061-T6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimianrizi, A.; Foroozmehr, E.; Badrossamay, M.; Farrokhpour, H.

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of Laser Shock Peening (LSP) on Al 6061-T6. The confined LSP regime using Nd: YAG laser with 1200 mJ of energy per pulse and 8 ns of pulse width were applied. The treated specimens were evaluated by means of surface integrity with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope, microhardness, surface roughness and induced residual stress using an X-ray diffraction method. Results showed that by the use of LSP, compressive residual stress could effectively be induced on the surface of treated material. It was also revealed that the hardened depth of the material, up to a maximum depth of 1875 μm, could be achieved due to work hardening and grain refinement. In addition, surface roughness measurements showed that the LSP could deteriorate surface quality depending on the LSP parameters. The influences of beam overlap rates, number of laser shots and scanning pattern on microhardness as well as surface roughness are discussed.

  13. Method for estimating `K` value for a case where concentrated load acts upon a crack surface; Kiretsumen ni shuchu kaju ga sayosuru baai no K chi suiteiho ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyosada, M.; Goto, K.; Niwa, T.; Maki, M. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    A proposal was made on a method to estimate simply the `K` value where concentrated load acts upon a crack surface by utilizing results of stress analysis for the crack-free problem against one external load, and `K` value analysis against different crack lengths. If a `K` value is known when concentrated load acts upon a crack surface, `K` values due to each external load and remaining stress can be estimated. This is possible by using the superposition principle with which stress distribution and remaining stress distribution for the crack-free problem are given on a case where each external load acts upon, and the `K` value for the case when concentrated load acts upon a crack surface is integrated by considering the above distributions. For the case where concentrated load acts upon a crack surface of CT test pieces, the crack length and the position on which the concentrated load acts upon are varied, and the `K` value for the case where concentrated load acts upon a crack surface is derived by BEM, whereas the derived `K` value-related expression was expressed by a polynomial approximation. From these results, it was found that the `K` value can be estimated easily for the case where the concentrated load acts upon a crack surface at accuracy presenting no problems in practical use. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Estimating thyroid dose in pediatric CT exams from surface dose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Senan, Rani; Mueller, Deborah L.; Hatab, Mustapha R.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of estimating pediatric thyroid doses from CT using surface neck doses. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters were used to measure the neck surface dose of 25 children ranging in ages between one and three years old. The neck circumference for each child was measured. The relationship between obtained surface doses and thyroid dose was studied using acrylic phantoms of various sizes and with holes of different depths. The ratios of hole-to-surface doses were used to convert patients' surface dose to thyroid dose. ImPACT software was utilized to calculate thyroid dose after applying the appropriate age correction factors. A paired t-test was performed to compare thyroid doses from our approach and ImPACT. The ratio of thyroid to surface dose was found to be 1.1. Thyroid doses ranged from 20 to 80 mGy. Comparison showed no statistical significance (p = 0.18). In addition, the average of surface dose variation along the z-axis in helical scans was studied and found to range between 5% (in 10 cm diameter phantom/24 mm collimation/pitch 1.0) and 8% (in 16 cm diameter phantom/12 mm collimation/pitch 0.7). We conclude that surface dose is an acceptable predictor for pediatric thyroid dose from CT. The uncertainty due to surface dose variability may be reduced if narrower collimation is used with a pitch factor close to 1.0. Also, the results did not show any effect of thyroid depth on the measured dose.

  15. Estimation of Thermal Contact Conductance between Blank and Tool Surface in Hot Stamping Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Zahari; Hanafiah Shaharudin, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    In hot stamping, the determination of the thermal contact conductance values between the blank and tool surface during the process is crucial for the purpose of simulating the blank rapid cooling inside the tool using finite element analysis (FEA). The thermal contact conductance value represents the coefficient of the heat transfer at the surface of two solid bodies in contact and is known to be influenced greatly by the applied pressure. In order to estimate the value and its dependency on applied pressure, the process of hot stamping was replicated and simplified into a process of compression of heated flat blank in between the tool at different applied pressure. The temperature of the blank and tool surface were measured by means of thermocouples installed inside the tool. Based on the measured temperature, the thermal contact conductance between the surfaces was calculated using Newton's cooling law equation. The calculated value was then used to simulate the blank cooling inside the tool using FEA commercial software. This paper describes an experimental approach to estimate the thermal contact conductance between a blank made of Boron Steel (USIBOR 1500) and tool made of Tool Steel (STAVAX). Its dependency on applied pressure is also studied and the experimental results were then compared with FEA simulations.

  16. Error estimates for density-functional theory predictions of surface energy and work function

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Sam; Lejaeghere, Kurt; Sluydts, Michael; Cottenier, Stefaan

    2016-12-01

    Density-functional theory (DFT) predictions of materials properties are becoming ever more widespread. With increased use comes the demand for estimates of the accuracy of DFT results. In view of the importance of reliable surface properties, this work calculates surface energies and work functions for a large and diverse test set of crystalline solids. They are compared to experimental values by performing a linear regression, which results in a measure of the predictable and material-specific error of the theoretical result. Two of the most prevalent functionals, the local density approximation (LDA) and the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof parametrization of the generalized gradient approximation (PBE-GGA), are evaluated and compared. Both LDA and GGA-PBE are found to yield accurate work functions with error bars below 0.3 eV, rivaling the experimental precision. LDA also provides satisfactory estimates for the surface energy with error bars smaller than 10%, but GGA-PBE significantly underestimates the surface energy for materials with a large correlation energy.

  17. New method and uncertainty estimation for plate dimensions and surface measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Salah H. R.; Buajarern, Jariya

    2014-03-01

    Dimensional and surface quality for tile plate manufacturing control is facing difficult engineering challenges. One of these challenges being that plates in large-scale mass production contain geometrically uneven surfaces. There is a traditional measurement method used to assess the tile plate dimensions and surface quality based on standard specifications: ISO-10545-2: 1995, EOS-3168-2: 2007 and TIS 2398-2:2008. A new measurement method of the dimensions and surface quality for ceramic oblong large-scale tile plate has been developed compared to the traditional method. The strategy of the proposed method is based on CMM straightness measurement strategy instead of the centre point in the traditional method. Expanded uncertainties budgets in the measurements of each method have been estimated in detail. The capability of accurate estimations of real actual results of centre of curvature (CC), centre of edge (CE), warpage (W) and edge crack defects parameters has been achieved according to standards. Moreover, the obtained results showed not only a more accurate method but also improved the quality of tile plate products significantly.

  18. New Measurement Method and Uncertainty Estimation for Plate Dimensions and Surface Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah H. R. Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dimensional and surface quality for plate production control is facing difficult engineering challenges. One of these challenges is that plates in large-scale mass production contain geometric uneven surfaces. There is a traditional measurement method used to assess the tile plate dimensions and surface quality based on standard specifications: ISO-10545-2: 1995, EOS-3168-2: 2007, and TIS 2398-2: 2008. A proposed measurement method of the dimensions and surface quality for ceramic oblong large-scale tile plate has been developed compared to the traditional method. The strategy of new method is based on CMM straightness measurement strategy instead of the centre point in the traditional method. Expanded uncertainties budgets in the measurements of each method have been estimated in detail. The capability of accurate estimations of real actual results for centre of curvature (CC, centre of edge (CE, warpage (W, and edge crack defects parameters has been achieved according to standards. Moreover, the obtained results not only showed better accurate new method but also improved the quality of plate products significantly.

  19. Estimating cultural benefits from surface water status improvements in freshwater wetland ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebeling, Peter; Abrantes, Nelson; Ribeiro, Sofia; Almeida, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Freshwater wetlands provide crucial ecosystem services, though are subject to anthropogenic/natural stressors that provoke negative impacts on these ecosystems, services and values. The European Union Water Framework Directive aims to achieve good status of surface waters by 2015, through implementation of Catchment Management Plans. Implementation of Catchment Management Plans is costly, though associated benefits from improvements in surface water status are less well known. This paper establishes a functional relationship between surface water status and cultural ecosystem service values of freshwater systems. Hence, we develop a bio-economic valuation approach in which we relate ecological status and chemical status of surface waters (based on local physio-chemical and benthic macro-invertebrates survey data) to willingness-to-pay (using benefit-function transfer). Results for the Pateira de Fermentelos freshwater wetland (Portugal) show that the current status of surface waters is good from a chemical though only moderate from an ecological perspective. The current cultural ecosystem service value of the wetland is estimated at 1.54 m€/yr- increasing to 2.02 m€/yr in case good status of surface waters is obtained. Taking into account ecosystem services and values in decision making is essential to avoid costs from externalities and capture benefits from spill-overs--leading to more equitable, effective and efficient water resources management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Estimation of Solar Radiation Incident on Horizontal and Tilted Surfaces For 7 Colombian Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corredor, L.M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a procedure that was adopted for the development of a linear regression model for estimating solar radiation on horizontal surfaces for 7 Colombian zones. The correlations, the simulated global solar radiation on tilted surface and the simulated diffuse solar radiation on a horizontal surface for each zone are shown. The values of sunshine-hours and the solar radiation were taken from January 2012 to January 2013. The solar radiation values obtained were compared with the measured values. The obtained mean absolute percentage error was below 5%. The results of the global solarradiation show that the areas of greatest solar potential areTibú> Baranoa> ICP> GRB> Morichal> Castilla> Guamues and the months of the year with the highest solar radiation are June, July and August.

  1. Local surface sampling step estimation for extracting boundaries of planar point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brie, David; Bombardier, Vincent; Baeteman, Grégory; Bennis, Abdelhamid

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new approach to estimate the surface sampling step of planar point clouds acquired by Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) which is varying with the distance to the surface and the angular positions. The local surface sampling step is obtained by doing a first order Taylor expansion of planar point coordinates. Then, it is shown how to use it in Delaunay-based boundary point extraction. The resulting approach, which is implemented in the ModiBuilding software, is applied to two facade point clouds of a building. The first is acquired with a single station and the second with two stations. In both cases, the proposed approach performs very accurately and appears to be robust to the variations of the point cloud density.

  2. Estimating Surface Area of Sponges and Marine Gorgonians as Indicators of Habitat Availability on Caribbean Coral Reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface area and topographical complexity are fundamental attributes of shallow tropical coral reefs and can be used to estimate habitat for fish and invertebrates. This study presents empirical methods for estimating surface area provided by sponges and gorgonians in the Central...

  3. Estimating Surface Area of Sponges and Marine Gorgonians as Indicators of Habitat Availability on Caribbean Coral Reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface area and topographical complexity are fundamental attributes of shallow tropical coral reefs and can be used to estimate habitat for fish and invertebrates. This study presents empirical methods for estimating surface area provided by sponges and gorgonians in the Central...

  4. Modelling bulk surface resistance from MODIS time series data to estimate actual regional evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autovino, Dario; Minacapilli, Mario; Provenzano, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Estimation of actual evapotraspiration by means of Penman-Monteith (P-M) equation requires the knowledge of the so-called 'bulk surface resistance', rc,act, representing the vapour flow resistance through the transpiring crop and evaporating soil surface. The accurate parameterization of rc,act still represents an unexploited topic, especially in the case of heterogeneous land surface. In agro-hydrological applications, the P-M equation commonly used to evaluate reference evapotranspiration (ET0) of a well-watered 'standardized crop' (grass or alfalfa), generally assumes for the bulk surface resistance a value of 70 s m-1. Moreover, specific crop coefficients have to be used to estimate maximum and/or actual evapotranspiration based on ET0. In this paper, a simple procedure for the indirect estimation of rc,act as function of a vegetation index computed from remote acquisition of Land Surface Temperature (LST), is proposed. An application was carried out in an irrigation district located near Castelvetrano, in South-West of Sicily, mainly cultivated with olive groves, in which actual evapotranspiration fluxes were measured during two years (2010-2011) by an Eddy Covariance flux tower (EC). Evapotranspiration measurements allowed evaluating rc,actbased on the numerical inversion of the P-M equation. In the same study area, a large time series of MODIS LST data, characterized by a spatial resolution of 1x1 km and a time step of 8-days, was also acquired for the period from 2000 to 2014. A simple Vegetation Index Temperatures (VTI), with values ranging from 0 to 1, was computed using normalized LST values. Evapotranspiration fluxes measured in 2010 were used to calibrate the relationship between rc,act and VTI, whereas data from 2011 were used for its validation. The preliminary results evidenced that, for the considered crop, an almost constant value of rc,act, corresponding to about 250 s m-1, can be considered typical of periods in which the crop is well

  5. Using pan-sharpened high resolution satellite data to improve impervious surfaces estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ru; Zhang, Hongsheng; Wang, Ting; Lin, Hui

    2017-05-01

    Impervious surface is an important environmental and socio-economic indicator for numerous urban studies. While a large number of researches have been conducted to estimate the area and distribution of impervious surface from satellite data, the accuracy for impervious surface estimation (ISE) is insufficient due to high diversity of urban land cover types. This study evaluated the use of panchromatic (PAN) data in very high resolution satellite image for improving the accuracy of ISE by various pan-sharpening approaches, with a further comprehensive analysis of its scale effects. Three benchmark pan-sharpening approaches, Gram-Schmidt (GS), PANSHARP and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to WorldView-2 in three spots of Hong Kong. The on-screen digitization were carried out based on Google Map and the results were viewed as referenced impervious surfaces. The referenced impervious surfaces and the ISE results were then re-scaled to various spatial resolutions to obtain the percentage of impervious surfaces. The correlation coefficient (CC) and root mean square error (RMSE) were adopted as the quantitative indicator to assess the accuracy. The accuracy differences between three research areas were further illustrated by the average local variance (ALV) which was used for landscape pattern analysis. The experimental results suggested that 1) three research regions have various landscape patterns; 2) ISE accuracy extracted from pan-sharpened data was better than ISE from original multispectral (MS) data; and 3) this improvement has a noticeable scale effects with various resolutions. The improvement was reduced slightly as the resolution became coarser.

  6. The role of cold work and applied stress on surface oxidation of 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano-Perez, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.lozano-perez@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Rd., Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Kruska, Karen [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Rd., Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Iyengar, Ilya [Winchester College, College Street, Winchester SO23 9LX (United Kingdom); Terachi, Takumi; Yamada, Takuyo [Institute of Nuclear Safety System (INSS), 64 Sata, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FIB 3D sequential sectioning is an ideal technique to characterize surface oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3D models of the oxide can be produced with nanometre resolution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of stress and cold work in grain boundary oxidation have been analysed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At least three different oxidation modes are observed when stress is applied. - Abstract: FIB 3-dimensional (3D) sequential sectioning has been used to characterize environmental degradation of 304 stainless steels in pressurized water reactor (PWR) simulated primary water. In particular, the effects of cold work and applied stress on oxidation have been studied in detail. It was found that a description of the oxidation behaviour of this alloy is only complete if it is treated statistically, since it can suffer from high variability depending on the feature described.

  7. Comparing potential recharge estimates from three Land Surface Models across the western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niraula, Rewati; Meixner, Thomas; Ajami, Hoori; Rodell, Matthew; Gochis, David; Castro, Christopher L.

    2017-02-01

    Groundwater is a major source of water in the western US. However, there are limited recharge estimates in this region due to the complexity of recharge processes and the challenge of direct observations. Land surface Models (LSMs) could be a valuable tool for estimating current recharge and projecting changes due to future climate change. In this study, simulations of three LSMs (Noah, Mosaic and VIC) obtained from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS-2) are used to estimate potential recharge in the western US. Modeled recharge was compared with published recharge estimates for several aquifers in the region. Annual recharge to precipitation ratios across the study basins varied from 0.01% to 15% for Mosaic, 3.2% to 42% for Noah, and 6.7% to 31.8% for VIC simulations. Mosaic consistently underestimates recharge across all basins. Noah captures recharge reasonably well in wetter basins, but overestimates it in drier basins. VIC slightly overestimates recharge in drier basins and slightly underestimates it for wetter basins. While the average annual recharge values vary among the models, the models were consistent in identifying high and low recharge areas in the region. Models agree in seasonality of recharge occurring dominantly during the spring across the region. Overall, our results highlight that LSMs have the potential to capture the spatial and temporal patterns as well as seasonality of recharge at large scales. Therefore, LSMs (specifically VIC and Noah) can be used as a tool for estimating future recharge in data limited regions.

  8. A Simple Statistical Model to Estimate Incident Solar Radiation at the Surface from NOAA AVHRR Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mst. Ashrafunnahar Hena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Processing of meteorological satellite image data provides a wealth of information useful in earth surface and environmental applications. Particularly, it is important for the estimation of different parameters of surface energy budget. In this work, a method has been developed to estimation of hourly incoming solar radiation on the surface of Bangladesh using NOAA-AVHRR satellite digital images. The model is based on the statistical regressions between the ground truth and satellite estimated values. Hundreds of full resolution images (1.1 km for two months of the year have been processed using ERDAS IMAGINE software. Ground solar global irradiation for one place has been estimated for two months through this application. The efficiency of this method for calculating surface insolation has been checked by estimating the relative deviation between the estimated Irradiation and measured Irradiation. The method can be used for calculation of hourly irradiation over areas in a tropical environment.

  9. Development of Estimating Equation of Machine Operational Skill by Utilizing Eye Movement Measurement and Analysis of Stress and Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suzuki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For an establishment of a skill evaluation method for human support systems, development of an estimating equation of the machine operational skill is presented. Factors of the eye movement such as frequency, velocity, and moving distance of saccade were computed using the developed eye gaze measurement system, and the eye movement features were determined from these factors. The estimating equation was derived through an outlier test (to eliminate nonstandard data and a principal component analysis (to find dominant components. Using a cooperative carrying task (cc-task simulator, the eye movement and operational data of the machine operators were recorded, and effectiveness of the derived estimating equation was investigated. As a result, it was confirmed that the estimating equation was effective strongly against actual simple skill levels (r=0.56–0.84. In addition, effects of internal condition such as fatigue and stress on the estimating equation were analyzed. Using heart rate (HR and coefficient of variation of R-R interval (Cvrri. Correlation analysis between these biosignal indexes and the estimating equation of operational skill found that the equation reflected effects of stress and fatigue, although the equation could estimate the skill level adequately.

  10. Estimation and Modelling of Land Surface Temperature Using Landsat 7 ETM+ Images and Fuzzy System Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, K.; Dodamani, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    Modelling of Land Surface Temperature is essential for short term and long term management of environmental studies and management activities of the Earth's resources. The objective of this research is to estimate and model Land Surface Temperatures (LST). For this purpose, Landsat 7 ETM+ images period from 2007 to 2012 were used for retrieving LST and processed through MATLAB software using Mamdani fuzzy inference systems (MFIS), which includes pre-monsoon and post-monsoon LST in the fuzzy model. The Mangalore City of Karnataka state, India has been taken for this research work. Fuzzy model inputs are considered as the pre-monsoon and post-monsoon retrieved temperatures and LST was chosen as output. In order to develop a fuzzy model for LST, seven fuzzy subsets, nineteen rules and one output are considered for the estimation of weekly mean air temperature. These are very low (VL), low (L), medium low (ML), medium (M), medium high (MH), high (H) and very high (VH). The TVX (Surface Temperature Vegetation Index) and the empirical method have provided estimated LST. The study showed that the Fuzzy model M4/7-19-1 (model 4, 7 fuzzy sets, 19 rules and 1 output) which developed over Mangalore City has provided more accurate outcomes than other models (M1, M2, M3, M5). The result of this research was evaluated according to statistical rules. The best correlation coefficient (R) and root mean squared error (RMSE) between estimated and measured values for pre-monsoon and post-monsoon LST found to be 0.966 - 1.607 K and 0.963- 1.623 respectively.

  11. Stress vs sputtering effects in the propagation of surface ripples produced by ion-beam sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Barrado, A. [Instituto de Investigación Tecnológica (IIT) and Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC), Universidad Pontificia Comillas, E-28015 Madrid (Spain); Castro, M. [GISC and Grupo de Dinámica No Lineal (DNL), Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería (ICAI), Universidad Pontificia Comillas, E-28015 Madrid (Spain); Muñoz-García, J. [Departamento de Matemáticas and GISC, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganés (Spain); Cuerno, R., E-mail: cuerno@math.uc3m.es [Departamento de Matemáticas and GISC, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganés (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    Under low energy ion irradiation, periodic features (ripples) can develop on the surfaces of semiconductor materials, with typical sizes in the nanometric range. Recently, a theory of pattern formation has been able to account for the variability with the ion/target combination of the critical angle value separating conditions on ion incidence that induce the presence or the absence of ripples. Such a theory is based in the accumulation of stress in the damaged irradiated layer and its relaxation via surface-confined viscous flow. Here we explore the role of stress, and its competition with purely erosive mechanisms, to determine the sign of the velocity with which the ripple pattern moves across the target plane. Based on this theory, we discuss different situations and make specific testable predictions for the change of sign in that velocity.

  12. Potential evaporation estimation through an unstressed surface-energy balance and its sensitivity to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barella-Ortiz, A.; Polcher, J.; Tuzet, A.; Laval, K.

    2013-11-01

    Potential evaporation (ETP) is a basic input for many hydrological and agronomic models, as well as a key variable in most actual evaporation estimations. It has been approached through several diffusive and energy balance methods, out of which the Penman-Monteith equation is recommended as the standard one. In order to deal with the diffusive approach, ETP must be estimated at a sub-diurnal frequency, as currently done in land surface models (LSMs). This study presents an improved method, developed in the ORCHIDEE LSM, which consists of estimating ETP through an unstressed surface-energy balance (USEB method). The results confirm the quality of the estimation which is currently implemented in the model (Milly, 1992). The ETP underlying the reference evaporation proposed by the Food and Agriculture Organization, FAO, (computed at a daily time step) has also been analysed and compared. First, a comparison for a reference period under current climate conditions shows that USEB and FAO's ETP estimations differ, especially in arid areas. However, they produce similar values when the FAO's assumption of neutral stability conditions is relaxed, by replacing FAO's aerodynamic resistance by that of the model's. Furthermore, if the vapour pressure deficit (VPD) estimated for the FAO's equation, is substituted by ORCHIDEE's VPD or its humidity gradient, the agreement between the daily mean estimates of ETP is further improved. In a second step, ETP's sensitivity to climate change is assessed by comparing trends in these formulations for the 21st century. It is found that the USEB method shows a higher sensitivity than the FAO's. Both VPD and the model's humidity gradient, as well as the aerodynamic resistance have been identified as key parameters in governing ETP trends. Finally, the sensitivity study is extended to two empirical approximations based on net radiation and mass transfer (Priestley-Taylor and Rohwer, respectively). The sensitivity of these ETP estimates is

  13. Seed set, pollen morphology and pollen surface composition response to heat stress in field pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunfei; Lahlali, Rachid; Karunakaran, Chithra; Kumar, Saroj; Davis, Arthur R; Bueckert, Rosalind A

    2015-11-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is a major legume crop grown in a semi-arid climate in Western Canada, where heat stress affects pollination, seed set and yield. Seed set and pod growth characteristics, along with in vitro percentage pollen germination, pollen tube growth and pollen surface composition, were measured in two pea cultivars (CDC Golden and CDC Sage) subjected to five maximum temperature regimes ranging from 24 to 36 °C. Heat stress reduced percentage pollen germination, pollen tube length, pod length, seed number per pod, and the seed-ovule ratio. Percentage pollen germination of CDC Sage was greater than CDC Golden at 36 °C. No visible morphological differences in pollen grains or the pollen surface were observed between the heat and control-treated pea. However, pollen wall (intine) thickness increased due to heat stress. Mid-infrared attenuated total reflectance (MIR-ATR) spectra revealed that the chemical composition (lipid, proteins and carbohydrates) of each cultivar's pollen grains responded differently to heat stress. The lipid region of the pollen coat and exine of CDC Sage was more stable compared with CDC Golden at 36 °C. Secondary derivatives of ATR spectra indicated the presence of two lipid types, with different amounts present in pollen grains from each cultivar.

  14. Experimental Determination of Surface Stress Changes in Electrochemical Systems – Possibilities and Pitfalls

    OpenAIRE

    G. G. Láng; Sas, N. S.; Vesztergom, S.

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, the different techniques used for the determination of changes of surface stress of solid electrodes, as well as the kind and quality of information that can be achieved using these methods are discussed. The most important methods are briefly reviewed and advantages/drawbacks highlighted. Special attention is paid to issues related to the use of the “bending beam” (“bending cantilever”, “laser beam deflection”, “wafer curvature”, etc.) methods. Recent dev...

  15. Surface Chemistry and Structural Effects in the Stress Corrosion of Glass and Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-15

    the strength and fatigue characteristics of ZBLAN (zirconium barium-lanthanum-aluminum-sodium fluoride) optical glass fiber obtained from British...Surface Chemistry and Structural Effects in the Stress Corrosion of Glass and Ceramic Materlals 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Carlo G. Pantano 13a. TYPE OF...fluorozirconate glasses . °. DTICS ELEC T E DEC 09 I 20. DISTRIBUTION/ AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 21.-A% RACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION [BUNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED

  16. Interfacial stress balances in structured continua and free surface flows in ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaves, Arlex [School of Chemical Engineering, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9 Cra. 27, Edificio 24, Bucaramanga, Santander (Colombia); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Interfacial linear and internal angular momentum balances are obtained for a structured continuum and for the special case of a ferrofluid, a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles in a Newtonian fluid. The interfacial balance equations account for the effects of surface tension and surface tension gradient, magnetic surface excess forces, antisymmetric stresses, and couple stresses in driving interfacial flows in ferrofluids. Application of the interfacial balance equations is illustrated by obtaining analytical expressions for the translational and spin velocity profiles in a thin film of ferrofluid on an infinite flat plate when a rotating magnetic field is applied with axis of rotation parallel to the ferrofluid/air interface. The cases of zero and non-zero spin viscosity are considered for small applied magnetic field amplitude. Expressions for the maximum translational velocity, slope of the translational velocity profile at the ferrofluid/air interface, and volumetric flow rate are obtained and their use to test the relevance of spin viscosity and couple stresses in the flow situation under consideration is discussed.

  17. Deposition of Low Stress Silicon Nitride Thin Film and Its Application in Surface Micromachining Device Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beirong Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface machining processes are responsible for creating microstructures that reside near the surfaces of a substrate and are characterized by the fabrication of micromechanical structures from deposited thin films. These films can be selectively removed to build three-dimensional structures whose functionality typically requires that they should be freed from the planar substrate. Silicon nitride thin film is one of these important materials. In this paper, by adjusting the SiH2Cl2/NH3 gaseous ratio, low stress silicon nitride (LS SiN is deposited by the low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD process. The internal stress generally in 135 MPa has been detected using an FLX-2320 film stress tester. Based on the wide application in surface micromachining devices, the mechanical properties of LS SiN are measured by nanoindentation, giving the value of Young’s modulus of 224 GPa and the hardness of 22.5 GPa, respectively. Dry etching and wet etching are utilized to fabricate the LS SiN thin film for structural layers. The etching rate compared with normal Si3N4 film by LPCVD is demonstrated for silicon chip manufacture.

  18. Water stress indices for the sugarcane crop on different irrigated surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo G. Brunini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. is a crop of vital importance to Brazil, in the production of sugar and ethanol, power generation and raw materials for various purposes. Strategic information such as topography and canopy temperature can provide management technologies accessible to farmers. The objective of this study was to determine water stress indices for sugarcane in irrigated areas, with different exposures and slopes. The daily water stress index of the plants and the water potential in the soil were evaluated and the production system was analyzed. The experiment was carried out in an “Experimental Watershed”, using six surfaces, two horizontal and the other ones with 20 and 40% North and South exposure slopes. Water stress level was determined by measuring the temperatures of the vegetation cover and the ambient air. Watering was carried out using a drip irrigation system. The results showed that water stress index of sugarcane varies according to exposure and slope of the terrain, while areas whose water stress index was above 5.0 oC had lower yield values.

  19. Automatic estimation of lake ice cover and lake surface temperature using ENVISAT MERIS and AATSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudjord, Ø.; Due Trier, Ø.; Solberg, R.

    2012-04-01

    Lake ice plays an important role in the understanding of the processes of cold region freshwater. On northern latitudes lakes form a major part of atmospheric and hydrologic systems, and a proper understanding of the water and energy budget of lakes is necessary to be able to forecast weather, climate and river flows. We will here present two algorithms for automatic estimation of lake ice cover and lake surface temperature using optical and thermal data, well suited for evaluating large time series of data. The method for estimating the lake surface temperature (LST) from measurements of thermal radiation is based on the well-known algorithm developed by Key (1997). We make use of the thermal (11μm and 12 μm) bands of the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) sensor on board ENVISAT. AATSR consists of two identical sensors, one pointing towards nadir and one pointing slightly forward. Both sensors are used for temperature retrieval. For estimating lake ice cover (LIC) we make use of the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) sensor, also carried by ENVISAT. The method for estimating the lake ice cover is based on linear spectral unmixing, allowing estimation of endmember contribution at sub-pixel resolution. Open water, snow and ice all have distinct spectra, which makes them well suited for spectral unmixing methods. The ice cover within a pixel is based on the estimated presence of ice and snow on the lake surface. Both algorithms are integrated in a common software framework, with geo-correction, mosaicking and mask generation. Simultaneous AATSR images are used for cloud detection for both products. Since the spectral unmixing algorithm is sensitive to spectral variation, atmospheric correction is applied to the MERIS data. For this purpose we use the SMAC processor in the BEAM software. Both algorithms are compared to in situ point measurements. Additionally, visual interpretation of MERIS image data is done for further evaluation of the

  20. Bayesian Maximum Entropy space/time estimation of surface water chloride in Maryland using river distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jat, Prahlad; Serre, Marc L

    2016-12-01

    Widespread contamination of surface water chloride is an emerging environmental concern. Consequently accurate and cost-effective methods are needed to estimate chloride along all river miles of potentially contaminated watersheds. Here we introduce a Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME) space/time geostatistical estimation framework that uses river distances, and we compare it with Euclidean BME to estimate surface water chloride from 2005 to 2014 in the Gunpowder-Patapsco, Severn, and Patuxent subbasins in Maryland. River BME improves the cross-validation R(2) by 23.67% over Euclidean BME, and river BME maps are significantly different than Euclidean BME maps, indicating that it is important to use river BME maps to assess water quality impairment. The river BME maps of chloride concentration show wide contamination throughout Baltimore and Columbia-Ellicott cities, the disappearance of a clean buffer separating these two large urban areas, and the emergence of multiple localized pockets of contamination in surrounding areas. The number of impaired river miles increased by 0.55% per year in 2005-2009 and by 1.23% per year in 2011-2014, corresponding to a marked acceleration of the rate of impairment. Our results support the need for control measures and increased monitoring of unassessed river miles.

  1. Estimating the amount and distribution of radon flux density from the soil surface in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Weihai; Guo, Qiuju; Chen, Bo; Cheng, Guan

    2008-07-01

    Based on an idealized model, both the annual and the seasonal radon ((222)Rn) flux densities from the soil surface at 1099 sites in China were estimated by linking a database of soil (226)Ra content and a global ecosystems database. Digital maps of the (222)Rn flux density in China were constructed in a spatial resolution of 25 km x 25 km by interpolation among the estimated data. An area-weighted annual average (222)Rn flux density from the soil surface across China was estimated to be 29.7+/-9.4 mBq m(-2)s(-1). Both regional and seasonal variations in the (222)Rn flux densities are significant in China. Annual average flux densities in the southeastern and northwestern China are generally higher than those in other regions of China, because of high soil (226)Ra content in the southeastern area and high soil aridity in the northwestern one. The seasonal average flux density is generally higher in summer/spring than winter, since relatively higher soil temperature and lower soil water saturation in summer/spring than other seasons are common in China.

  2. Estimating seepage flux from ephemeral stream channels using surface water and groundwater level data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorduijn, Saskia L.; Shanafield, Margaret; Trigg, Mark A.; Harrington, Glenn A.; Cook, Peter G.; Peeters, L.

    2014-02-01

    Seepage flux from ephemeral streams can be an important component of the water balance in arid and semiarid regions. An emerging technique for quantifying this flux involves the measurement and simulation of a flood wave as it moves along an initially dry channel. This study investigates the usefulness of including surface water and groundwater data to improve model calibration when using this technique. We trialed this approach using a controlled flow event along a 1387 m reach of artificial stream channel. Observations were then simulated using a numerical model that combines the diffusion-wave approximation of the Saint-Vénant equations for streamflow routing, with Philip's infiltration equation and the groundwater flow equation. Model estimates of seepage flux for the upstream segments of the study reach, where streambed hydraulic conductivities were approximately 101 m d-1, were on the order of 10-4 m3 d-1 m-2. In the downstream segments, streambed hydraulic conductivities were generally much lower but highly variable (˜10-3 to 10-7 m d-1). A Latin Hypercube Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis showed that the flood front timing, surface water stage, groundwater heads, and the predicted streamflow seepage were most influenced by specific yield. Furthermore, inclusion of groundwater data resulted in a higher estimate of total seepage estimates than if the flood front timing were used alone.

  3. Surface Dynamic Deformation Estimates From Seismicity Near the Itoiz Reservoir, Northern Spain

    CERN Document Server

    Santoyo, Miguel A; García-Jerez, Antonio; Luzón, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the ground motion time histories due to the local seismicity near the Itoiz reservoir, in order to estimate the surface 3D displacement-gradients and dynamic deformations. The seismic data were obtained by a semi-permanent broadband and accelerometric network installed by the University of Almeria during 2008 and 2009. Seismic sensors were located on surface and at underground sites in the vicinity of the dam. The dynamic deformation field was calculated by two different methods. On one hand, by the Seismo-Geodetic method using the data from a three-station micro-array. On the other hand, by Single-Station estimates of displacement gradients, assuming the incidence of body wave fields propagating through the recording site. The dynamic deformations obtained from both methods were compared and analyzed in the context of the local effects near the dam. The shallow 1D velocity structure was estimated from seismic data by modeling the body-wave travel times. After the comparison of the dynamic displac...

  4. Film Thickness Estimation for the Oil Applied to the Inner Surface of Slim Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Svetlík

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the approximation of the results of experimental measurement of coating of the inner surface of slim pipes with special oil, using a dispersion oil fraction. The reason for such treatment of the inner surface of the tubes is the anti-corrosion protection or various other requirements. The oil manufacturer prescribes the minimum required layer to guarantee the anti-corrosion protection parameters. Therefore, it is advisable to know the most exact coating parameters for different pipe diameters. The measured results give us an assumption of how much oil is sufficient to coat the inside of a pipe. The main idea lies in the correct estimation of coefficients in the three-parameter exponential dependence. For the initial estimates, Nelder–Mead’s minimization method was used. The condition for meeting the lower estimate of the minimum thickness of the oil layer was determined. Following graphic processing of minimization of individual pipe diameters, in some cases, the coefficients were adjusted manually. The result is that the oil thickness depends on the distance of the investigated point from the beginning of the tube, or on the point of entry of the dispersion oil fraction.

  5. Estimation of Supersonic Stage Separation Aerodynamics of Winged-Body Launch Vehicles Using Response Surface Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Response surface methodology was used to estimate the longitudinal stage separation aerodynamic characteristics of a generic, bimese, winged multi-stage launch vehicle configuration at supersonic speeds in the NASA LaRC Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The Mach 3 staging was dominated by shock wave interactions between the orbiter and booster vehicles throughout the relative spatial locations of interest. The inference space was partitioned into several contiguous regions within which the separation aerodynamics were presumed to be well-behaved and estimable using central composite designs capable of fitting full second-order response functions. The underlying aerodynamic response surfaces of the booster vehicle in belly-to-belly proximity to the orbiter vehicle were estimated using piecewise-continuous lower-order polynomial functions. The quality of fit and prediction capabilities of the empirical models were assessed in detail, and the issue of subspace boundary discontinuities was addressed. Augmenting the central composite designs to full third-order using computer-generated D-optimality criteria was evaluated. The usefulness of central composite designs, the subspace sizing, and the practicality of fitting lower-order response functions over a partitioned inference space dominated by highly nonlinear and possibly discontinuous shock-induced aerodynamics are discussed.

  6. Estimation of surface UV levels based on Meteor-3/TOMS ozone data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisov, Y.A. [Central Aerological Observatory, Moscow (Russian Federation); Geogdzhaev, I.V. [Moscow Inst. of Physics and Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Khattatov, V.U. [Central Aerological Observatory, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The major consequence of ozone layer depletion for the environment is an increase of harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the Earth surface and in the upper ocean. This implies the importance of environmental UV monitoring. Since the direct global monitoring is not currently possible, indirect estimations of surface UV levels may be used based on satellite ozone data (Madronich, S. 1992). Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) on board the METEOR-3 satellite provided regular set of data for such estimates. During the time of its operation (August, 1991 - December, 1994) the instrument registered several ozone hole events over Antarctica, when ozone levels dropped by as much as 60 % from their unperturbed values. Probably even more alarming ozone depletions were observed over highly populated regions of middle latitudes of northern hemisphere. Radiative transfer modeling was used to convert METEOR-3/TOMS daily ozone values into regional and global maps of biologically active UV. Calculations demonstrate the effect on surface UV levels produced by ozone hole over Antarctica and ozone depletions over the territory of Russia (March, 1994). UV contour lines deviate from the normal appearance which is determined by growing southward solar elevation. UV contour lines are almost perpendicular to the ozone ones in the ozone depletions areas. The 30 % ozone depletion, over Siberia caused more than 30 % increase in noontime erythemal UV levels, which is equivalent to 10-15 degrees southward latitude displacement. Higher UV radiation increases were found in ozone hole over South America (October 1992) equivalent to about 20 degrees southward displacement

  7. Three-dimensional pose estimation model for object with complex surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronghua Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The proposed three-dimensional pose estimation model for object with complex surface, which primarily absorbs the essence of scale-invariant feature transform and iterative closest point algorithm, includes two steps, off-line and online. At first, two kinds of feature databases are established in the off-line operations. Then, the online process mainly has three steps. The first one is two-dimensional edge extraction from red–green–blue (RGB information based on scale-invariant feature transform algorithm. The second one is three-dimensional surface reconstruction from the previous two-dimensional edge and the depth information obtained from depth camera. The last one is three-dimensional pose estimation based on camera calibration and iterative closest point algorithm. The Kinect camera is selected as the information acquisition device which can produce red–green–blue information and depth information. In the experiment, the container twist-lock with complex surface is taken as the object. The result shows that the accuracy of the proposed model is very high.

  8. Tectonic significance of paleobotanically estimated climate and altitude of the late Eocene erosion surface, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kathryn M.; Chase, Clement G.

    1992-07-01

    Erosion beveled the Laramide Front Range uplift in Colorado to a surface of low relief by the end of the Eocene. This study uses J. A. Wolfe's new multivariate climate analysis techniques to determine the paleoelevation of this regional surface by examining the overlying 35 Ma Florissant flora. A multiple regression model explaining 93.3% of the variance in mean annual temperature was developed using Wolfe's dataset of 31 leaf physiognomic character states for 86 modern vegetation sites. These character states were scored on 29 species collected from one facies of the Florissant Lake Beds. The paleotemperature estimate of mean annual temperature (10.7 ±1.5 °C) derived from these data, when combined with sea-level temperature and terrestrial lapse rate, implies a late Eocene paleoelevation of 2.4-2.7 km. Pliocene uplift is thus not required to explain the present elevation of 2.5 km. It is unclear when and why the southern Rocky Mountains achieved this elevation. Magmatic crustal thickening can explain the late Eocene high elevation of the southern Rockies, but neither this mechanism nor compressive thickening explains why the Great Plains, which are tied to the Florissant elevation by the Wall Mountain Tuff, were also high. This paleoelevation estimate indicates that regional surfaces of planation could be formed at high elevation in the Eocene, probably because of peculiarities of the Eocene climate.

  9. Filtering and parameter estimation of surface-NMR data using singular spectrum analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanati, Reza; Kazem Hafizi, Mohammad; Mahmoudvand, Rahim; Fallahsafari, Mahdi

    2016-07-01

    Ambient electromagnetic interferences at the site of investigation often degrade the signal quality of the Surface-NMR measurements leading to inaccurate estimation of the signal parameters. This paper proposes a new powerful de-noising method based on singular spectrum analysis (SSA), which is a nonparametric method for analyzing time series. SSA is a relatively simple method and can be understood using basic algebra notations. Singular value decomposition (SVD) plays a crucial role in SSA. As the length of recordings increases, the computational time required for computing SVD raises which restricts the usage of SSA in long-term time series. In order to overcome this drawback, we propose a randomized version of the singular value decomposition to accelerate the decomposition step of the algorithm. To evaluate the performance of the proposed strategy, the method is tested on synthetic signals corrupted by both simulated noise (including Gaussian white noise, spiky events and harmonic noise) and real noise recordings obtained from surface-NMR field surveys and a real data set. Our results show that the proposed algorithm can enhance the signal to noise ratio significantly, and gives an improvement in estimation of the surface-NMR signal parameters.

  10. Correction of Sampling Errors in Ocean Surface Cross-Sectional Estimates from Nadir-Looking Weather Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caylor, I. Jeff; Meneghini, R.; Miller, L. S.; Heymsfield, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    The return from the ocean surface has a number of uses for airborne meteorological radar. The normalized surface cross section has been used for radar system calibration, estimation of surface winds, and in algorithms for estimating the path-integrated attenuation in rain. However, meteorological radars are normally optimized for observation of distributed targets that fill the resolution volume, and so a point target such as the surface can be poorly sampled, particularly at near-nadir look angles. Sampling the nadir surface return at an insufficient rate results in a negative bias of the estimated cross section. This error is found to be as large as 4 dB using observations from a high-altitude airborne radar. An algorithm for mitigating the error is developed that is based upon the shape of the surface echo and uses the returned signal at the three range gates nearest the peak surface echo.

  11. A Useful Tool for Atmospheric Correction and Surface Temperature Estimation of Landsat Infrared Thermal Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivalland, Vincent; Tardy, Benjamin; Huc, Mireille; Hagolle, Olivier; Marcq, Sébastien; Boulet, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    Land Surface temperature (LST) is a critical variable for studying the energy and water budgets at the Earth surface, and is a key component of many aspects of climate research and services. The Landsat program jointly carried out by NASA and USGS has been providing thermal infrared data for 40 years, but no associated LST product has been yet routinely proposed to community. To derive LST values, radiances measured at sensor-level need to be corrected for the atmospheric absorption, the atmospheric emission and the surface emissivity effect. Until now, existing LST products have been generated with multi channel methods such as the Temperature/Emissivity Separation (TES) adapted to ASTER data or the generalized split-window algorithm adapted to MODIS multispectral data. Those approaches are ill-adapted to the Landsat mono-window data specificity. The atmospheric correction methodology usually used for Landsat data requires detailed information about the state of the atmosphere. This information may be obtained from radio-sounding or model atmospheric reanalysis and is supplied to a radiative transfer model in order to estimate atmospheric parameters for a given coordinate. In this work, we present a new automatic tool dedicated to Landsat thermal data correction which improves the common atmospheric correction methodology by introducing the spatial dimension in the process. The python tool developed during this study, named LANDARTs for LANDsat Automatic Retrieval of surface Temperature, is fully automatic and provides atmospheric corrections for a whole Landsat tile. Vertical atmospheric conditions are downloaded from the ERA Interim dataset from ECMWF meteorological organization which provides them at 0.125 degrees resolution, at a global scale and with a 6-hour-time step. The atmospheric correction parameters are estimated on the atmospheric grid using the commercial software MODTRAN, then interpolated to 30m resolution. We detail the processing steps

  12. Estimation of effective geostress parameters driven by anisotropic stress and rock-physics models with orthorhombic symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xinpeng; Zhang, Guangzhi; Yin, Xingyao

    2017-10-01

    Estimation of effective geostress parameters is fundamental to the trajectory design and hydraulic fracturing in shale-gas reservoirs. Considering the shale characteristics of excellent stratification, well-developed cracks or fractures and small-scale pores, an effective or suitable shale anisotropic rock-physics model contributes to achieving the accurate prediction of effective geostress parameters in shale-gas reservoirs. In this paper, we first built a shale anisotropic rock-physics model with orthorhombic symmetry, which helps to calculate the anisotropic and geomechanical parameters under the orthorhombic assumption. Then, we introduced an anisotropic stress model with orthorhombic symmetry compared with an isotropic stress model and a transversely isotropic stress model. Combining the effective estimation of the pore pressure and the vertical stress parameters, we finally obtained the effective geostress parameters including the minimum and maximum horizontal stress parameters, providing a useful guide for the exploration and development in shale-gas reservoirs. Of course, ultimately the optimal choice of the hydraulic-fracturing area may also take into consideration other multi-factors such as the rock brittleness, cracks or fractures, and hydrocarbon distribution.

  13. Comparison of regression models for estimation of isometric wrist joint torques using surface electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Carlo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several regression models have been proposed for estimation of isometric joint torque using surface electromyography (SEMG signals. Common issues related to torque estimation models are degradation of model accuracy with passage of time, electrode displacement, and alteration of limb posture. This work compares the performance of the most commonly used regression models under these circumstances, in order to assist researchers with identifying the most appropriate model for a specific biomedical application. Methods Eleven healthy volunteers participated in this study. A custom-built rig, equipped with a torque sensor, was used to measure isometric torque as each volunteer flexed and extended his wrist. SEMG signals from eight forearm muscles, in addition to wrist joint torque data were gathered during the experiment. Additional data were gathered one hour and twenty-four hours following the completion of the first data gathering session, for the purpose of evaluating the effects of passage of time and electrode displacement on accuracy of models. Acquired SEMG signals were filtered, rectified, normalized and then fed to models for training. Results It was shown that mean adjusted coefficient of determination (Ra2 values decrease between 20%-35% for different models after one hour while altering arm posture decreased mean Ra2 values between 64% to 74% for different models. Conclusions Model estimation accuracy drops significantly with passage of time, electrode displacement, and alteration of limb posture. Therefore model retraining is crucial for preserving estimation accuracy. Data resampling can significantly reduce model training time without losing estimation accuracy. Among the models compared, ordinary least squares linear regression model (OLS was shown to have high isometric torque estimation accuracy combined with very short training times.

  14. Time evolving bed shear stress due the passage of gravity currents estimated with ADVP velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zordan, Jessica; Schleiss, Anton J.; Franca, Mário J.

    2016-04-01

    Density or gravity currents are geophysical flows driven by density gradients between two contacting fluids. The physical trigger mechanism of these phenomena lays in the density differences which may be caused by differences in the temperature, dissolved substances or concentration of suspended sediments. Saline density currents are capable to entrain bed sediments inducing signatures in the bottom of sedimentary basins. Herein, saline density currents are reproduced in laboratory over a movable bed. The experimental channel is of the lock-exchange type, it is 7.5 m long and 0.3 m wide, divided into two sections of comparable volumes by a sliding gate. An upstream reach serves as a head tank for the dense mixture; the current propagates through a downstream reach where the main measurements are made. Downstream of the channel a tank exist to absorb the reflection of the current and thus artifacts due to the limited length of the channel. High performance thermoplastic polyurethane simulating fine sediments forms the movable bed. Measures of 3D instantaneous velocities will be made with the use of the non-intrusive technique of the ADV (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler). With the velocity measurements, the evolution in time of the channel-bed shear stress due the passage of gravity currents is estimated. This is in turn related to the observed erosion and to such parameters determinant for the dynamics of the current as initial density difference, lock length and channel slope. This work was funded by the ITN-Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN under REA grant agreement n_607394-SEDITRANS.

  15. Residual compressive surface stress increases the bending strength of dental zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokoshi, Masanao; Zhang, Fei; Vanmeensel, Kim; De Munck, Jan; Minakuchi, Shunsuke; Naert, Ignace; Vleugels, Jozef; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2017-04-01

    To assess the influence of surface treatment and thermal annealing on the four-point bending strength of two ground dental zirconia grades. Fully-sintered zirconia specimens (4.0×3.0×45.0mm(3)) of Y-TZP zirconia (LAVA Plus, 3M ESPE) and Y-TZP/Al2O3 zirconia (ZirTough, Kuraray Noritake) were subjected to four surface treatments: (1) 'GROUND': all surfaces were ground with a diamond-coated grinding wheel on a grinding machine; (2) 'GROUND+HEAT': (1) followed by annealing at 1100°C for 30min; (3) 'GROUND+Al2O3 SANDBLASTED': (1) followed by sandblasting using Al2O3; (4) 'GROUND+CoJet SANDBLASTED': (1) followed by tribochemical silica (CoJet) sandblasting. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the zirconia-phase composition and potentially induced residual stress. The four-point bending strength was measured using a universal material-testing machine. Weibull analysis revealed a substantially higher Weibull modulus and slightly higher characteristic strength for ZirTough (Kuraray Noritake) than for LAVA Plus (3M ESPE). For both zirconia grades, the 'GROUND' zirconia had the lowest Weibull modulus in combination with a high characteristic strength. Sandblasting hardly changed the bending strength but substantially increased the Weibull modulus of the ground zirconia, whereas a thermal treatment increased the Weibull modulus of both zirconia grades but resulted in a significantly lower bending strength. Micro-Raman analysis revealed a higher residual compressive surface stress that correlated with an increased bending strength. Residual compressive surface stress increased the bending strength of dental zirconia. Thermal annealing substantially reduced the bending strength but increased the consistency (reliability) of 'GROUND' zirconia. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Extreme air-sea surface turbulent fluxes in mid latitudes - estimation, origins and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulev, Sergey; Natalia, Tilinina

    2014-05-01

    Extreme turbulent heat fluxes in the North Atlantic and North Pacific mid latitudes were estimated from the modern era and first generation reanalyses (NCEP-DOE, ERA-Interim, MERRA NCEP-CFSR, JRA-25) for the period from 1979 onwards. We used direct surface turbulent flux output as well as reanalysis state variables from which fluxes have been computed using COARE-3 bulk algorithm. For estimation of extreme flux values we analyzed surface flux probability density distribution which was approximated by Modified Fisher-Tippett distribution. In all reanalyses extreme turbulent heat fluxes amount to 1500-2000 W/m2 (for the 99th percentile) and can exceed 2000 W/m2 for higher percentiles in the western boundary current extension (WBCE) regions. Different reanalyses show significantly different shape of MFT distribution, implying considerable differences in the estimates of extreme fluxes. The highest extreme turbulent latent heat fluxes are diagnosed in NCEP-DOE, ERA-Interim and NCEP-CFSR reanalyses with the smallest being in MERRA. These differences may not necessarily reflect the differences in mean values. Analysis shows that differences in statistical properties of the state variables are the major source of differences in the shape of PDF of fluxes and in the estimates of extreme fluxes while the contribution of computational schemes used in different reanalyses is minor. The strongest differences in the characteristics of probability distributions of surface fluxes and extreme surface flux values between different reanalyses are found in the WBCE extension regions and high latitudes. In the next instance we analyzed the mechanisms responsible for forming surface turbulent fluxes and their potential role in changes of midlatitudinal heat balance. Midlatitudinal cyclones were considered as the major mechanism responsible for extreme turbulent fluxes which are typically occur during the cold air outbreaks in the rear parts of cyclones when atmospheric conditions

  17. Muscle force estimation with surface EMG during dynamic muscle contractions: a wavelet and ANN based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Fengjun; Chew, Chee-Meng

    2013-01-01

    Human muscle force estimation is important in biomechanics studies, sports and assistive devices fields. Therefore, it is essential to develop an efficient algorithm to estimate force exerted by muscles. The purpose of this study is to predict force/torque exerted by muscles under dynamic muscle contractions based on continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and artificial neural networks (ANN) approaches. Mean frequency (MF) of the surface electromyography (EMG) signals power spectrum was calculated from CWT. ANN models were trained to derive the MF-force relationships from the subset of EMG signals and the measured forces. Then we use the networks to predict the individual muscle forces for different muscle groups. Fourteen healthy subjects (10 males and 4 females) were voluntarily recruited in this study. EMG signals were collected from the biceps brachii, triceps, hamstring and quadriceps femoris muscles to evaluate the proposed method. Root mean square errors (RMSE) and correlation coefficients between the predicted forces and measured actual forces were calculated.

  18. A general model for estimating actual evaporation from non-saturated surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on energy balance equation and mass transfer equation, a general model to estimateactual evaporation from non-saturated surfaces was derived. Making use of two concepts, "relativeevaporation" and "relative drying power", a relationship was established to account for the departurefrom saturated conditions. Using this model, the actual evaporation (evapotranspiration) can becalculated without the need of potential evaporation estimation. Furthermore, the model requires onlya few meteorological parameters that are readily and routinely obtainable at standard weather stations.Based on nearly 30 years data of 432 meteorological stations and 512 hydrological stations in China,in combined with GIS, nine typical river basins were selected. Using the data of the selected riverbasins, the model was tested. The results show that the actual evaporation rate can be estimated withan error of less than 10% in most areas of China, except few years in the Yellow River Basin.

  19. A simple tool for estimating city-wide annual electrical energy savings from cooler surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomerantz, Melvin; Rosado, Pablo J.; Levinson, Ronnen

    2015-12-01

    We present a simple method to estimate the maximum possible electrical energy saving that might be achieved by increasing the albedo of surfaces in a large city. We restrict this to the “indirect effect”, the cooling of outside air that lessens the demand for air conditioning (AC). Given the power demand of the electric utilities and data about the city, we can use a single linear equation to estimate the maximum savings. For example, the result for an albedo change of 0.2 of pavements in a typical warm city in California, such as Sacramento, is that the saving is less than about 2 kWh per m2 per year. This may help decision makers choose which heat island mitigation techniques are economical from an energy-saving perspective.

  20. Spatial Scaling Assessment of Surface Soil Moisture Estimations Using Remotely Sensed Data for Precision Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan Esfahani, L.; Torres-Rua, A. F.; Jensen, A.; McKee, M.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne and Landsat remote sensing are promising technologies for measuring the response of agricultural crops to variations in several agricultural inputs and environmental conditions. Of particular significance to precision agriculture is surface soil moisture, a key component of the soil water balance, which addresses water and energy exchanges at the surface/atmosphere interface and affects vegetation health. Its estimation using the spectral reflectance of agricultural fields could be of value to agricultural management decisions. While top soil moisture can be estimated using radiometric information from aircraft or satellites and data mining techniques, comparison of results from two different aerial platforms might be complicated because of the differences in spatial scales (high resolution of approximately 0.15m versus coarser resolutions of 30m). This paper presents a combined modeling and scale-based approach to evaluate the impact of spatial scaling in the estimation of surface soil moisture content derived from remote sensing data. Data from Landsat 7 ETM+, Landsat 8 OLI and AggieAirTM aerial imagery are utilized. AggieAirTM is an airborne remote sensing platform developed by Utah State University that includes an autonomous Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) which captures radiometric information at visual, near-infrared, and thermal wavebands at spatial resolutions of 0.15 m or smaller for the optical cameras and about 0.6 m or smaller for the thermal infrared camera. Top soil moisture maps for AggieAir and Landsat are developed and statistically compared at different scales to determine the impact in terms of quantitative predictive capability and feasibility of applicability of results in improving in field management.

  1. Estimating Temporal Redistribution of Surface Melt Water into Upper Stratigraphy of the Juneau Icefield, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilner, J.; Smith, B.; Moore, T.; Campbell, S. W.; Slavin, B. V.; Hollander, J.; Wolf, J.

    2015-12-01

    The redistribution of winter accumulation from surface melt into firn or deeper layers (i.e. internal accumulation) remains a poorly understood component of glacier mass balance. Winter accumulation is usually quantified prior to summer melt, however the time window between accumulation and the onset of melt is minimal so this is not always possible. Studies which are initiated following the onset of summer melt either neglect sources of internal accumulation or attempt to estimate melt (and therefore winter accumulation uncertainty) through a variety of modeling methods. Here, we used ground-penetrating radar (GPR) repeat common midpoint (CMP) surveys with supporting common offset surveys, mass balance snow pits, and probing to estimate temporal changes in water content within the winter accumulation and firn layers of the southern Juneau Icefield, Alaska. In temperate glaciers, radio-wave velocity is primarily dependent on water content and snow or firn density. We assume density changes are temporally slow relative to water flow through the snow and firn pack, and therefore infer that changing radio-wave velocities measured by successive CMP surveys result from flux in surface melt through deeper layers. Preliminary CMP data yield radio-wave velocities of 0.15 to 0.2 m/ns in snowpack densities averaging 0.56 g cm-3, indicating partially to fully saturated snowpack (4-9% water content). Further spatial-temporal analysis of CMP surveys is being conducted. We recommend that repeat CMP surveys be conducted over a longer time frame to estimate stratigraphic water redistribution between the end of winter accumulation and maximum melt season. This information could be incorporated into surface energy balance models to further understanding of the influence of internal accumulation on glacier mass balance.

  2. On the sensitivity of Land Surface Temperature estimates in arid irrigated lands using MODTRAN

    KAUST Repository

    Rosas, Jorge

    2015-11-29

    Land surface temperature (LST) derived from thermal infrared (TIR) satellite data has been reliably used as a remote indicator of evapotranspiration (ET) and surface moisture status. However, in order to retrieve the ET with an accuracy approaching 10%, LST should be retrieved to within 1 ◦C or better, disregarding other elements of uncertainty. The removal of atmospheric effects is key towards achieving a precise estimation of LST and it requires detailed information on water vapor. The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) onboard Landsat 8 captures data in two long wave thermal bands with 100-meter resolution. However, the US Geological Survey has reported a calibration problem of TIRS bands caused by stray light, resulting in a higher bias in one of its two bands (4% in band 11, 2% in band 10). Therefore, split-window algorithms for the estimation of LST might not be reliable. Our work will focus on the impact of using different atmospheric profiles (e.g. weather prediction models, satellite) for the estimation of LST derived from MODTRAN by using one of the TIRS bands onboard Landsat 8 (band 10). Sites with in-situ measurements of LST are used as evaluation sources. Comparisons between the measured LST and LST derived based on different atmospheric profile inputs to MODTRAN are carried out from 2 Landsat-overpass days (DOY 153 and 160 2015). Preliminary results show a mean absolute error of around 3 ◦C between in-situ and estimated LST over two different crops (alfalfa and carrot) and bare soil.

  3. Using gravity data to estimate the density of surface rocks of Taiwan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Y. T.; Horng-Yen, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Surface rock density within terrain correction step is one of the important parameters for obtaining Bouguer anomaly map. In the past study, we obtain the Bouguer anomaly map considering the average density correction of a wide range of the study area. In this study, we will be the better estimate for the correction of the density of each observation point. A correction density that coincides with surface geology is in order to improve the accuracy of the cloth cover anomaly map. The main idea of estimating correction of the density using gravity data statistics are two method, g-H relationship and Nettleton density profile method, respectively. The common advantages of these methods are in the following: First, density estimating is calculated using existing gravity observations data, it may be avoided the trouble of directly measure the rock density. Second, after the establishment the measuring point s of absolute gravity value, latitude, longitude and elevation into the database, you can always apply its database of information and terrain data with the value to calculate the average rock density on any range. In addition, each measuring point and numerical data of each terrain mesh are independent, if found to be more accurate gravity or terrain data, simply update a document data alone, without having to rebuild the entire database. According the results of estimating density distribution map, the trends are broadly distributed close to Taiwan Geology Division. The average density of the backbone mountain region is about 2.5 to 2.6 g/cm^3, the average density of east Central Mountain Range and Hsuehshan Range are about 2.3 to 2.5 g/cm^3, compared with the western foothills of 2.1-2.3 g/cm^3, the western plains is from 1.8 to 2.0 g/cm^3.

  4. Application of least square method for muscular strength estimation in hand motion recognition using surface EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Takemi; Nagata, Kentaro; Yamada, Masafumi; Magatani, Kazushige

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we describe the application of least square method for muscular strength estimation in hand motion recognition based on surface electromyogram (SEMG). Although the muscular strength can consider the various evaluation methods, a grasp force is applied as an index to evaluate the muscular strength. Today, SEMG, which is measured from skin surface, is widely used as a control signal for many devices. Because, SEMG is one of the most important biological signal in which the human motion intention is directly reflected. And various devices using SEMG are reported by lots of researchers. Those devices which use SEMG as a control signal, we call them SEMG system. In SEMG system, to achieve high accuracy recognition is an important requirement. Conventionally SEMG system mainly focused on how to achieve this objective. Although it is also important to estimate muscular strength of motions, most of them cannot detect power of muscle. The ability to estimate muscular strength is a very important factor to control the SEMG systems. Thus, our objective of this study is to develop the estimation method for muscular strength by application of least square method, and reflecting the result of measured power to the controlled object. Since it was known that SEMG is formed by physiological variations in the state of muscle fiber membranes, it is thought that it can be related with grasp force. We applied to the least-squares method to construct a relationship between SEMG and grasp force. In order to construct an effective evaluation model, four SEMG measurement locations in consideration of individual difference were decided by the Monte Carlo method.

  5. Using Microwave Observations to Estimate Land Surface Temperature during Cloudy Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, T. R.; Crow, W. T.; Hain, C.; Anderson, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST), a key ingredient for physically-based retrieval algorithms of hydrological states and fluxes, remains a poorly constrained parameter for global scale studies. The main two observational methods to remotely measure T are based on thermal infrared (TIR) observations and passive microwave observations (MW). TIR is the most commonly used approach and the method of choice to provide standard LST products for various satellite missions. MW-based LST retrievals on the other hand are not as widely adopted for land applications; currently their principle use is in soil moisture retrieval algorithms. MW and TIR technologies present two highly complementary and independent means of measuring LST. MW observations have a high tolerance to clouds but a low spatial resolution, and TIR has a high spatial resolution with temporal sampling restricted to clear skies. The nature of the temperature at the very surface layer of the land makes it difficult to combine temperature estimates between different methods. The skin temperature is characterized by a strong diurnal cycle that is dependant in timing and amplitude on the exact sensing depth and thermal properties of the vegetation. This paper builds on recent progress in characterizing the main structural components of the DTC that explain differences in TIR and MW estimates of LST. Spatial patterns in DTC timing (phase lag with solar noon) and DTC amplitude have been calculated for TIR, MW and compared to weather prediction estimates. Based on these comparisons MW LST can be matched to the TIR record. This paper will compare in situ measurements of LST with satellite estimates from (downscaled) TIR and (reconciled) MW products. By contrasting the validation results of clear sky days with those of cloudy days the expected tolerance to clouds of the MW observations will be tested. The goal of this study is to determine the weather conditions in which MW can supplement the TIR LST record.

  6. Effects of surface properties on the impact process of a yield stress fluid drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidi, Alireza [UMR 5518 CNRS-Grenoble Institut Polytechnique (Grenoble INP), Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Graphic Arts (LGP2), St Martin d' Heres (France); Martin, Celine [UMR 5518 CNRS-Grenoble Institut Polytechnique (Grenoble INP), Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Graphic Arts (LGP2), St Martin d' Heres (France); Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble I, CNRS, Laboratoire de Rheologie, CNRS UMR 5520, Grenoble Institut Polytechnique, BP 53, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Magnin, Albert [Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble I, CNRS, Laboratoire de Rheologie, CNRS UMR 5520, Grenoble Institut Polytechnique, BP 53, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-07-15

    The impact of a yield stress fluid drop onto a solid surface with diversified interface properties has been experimentally investigated. Two smooth substrates with distinct surface energies and three similar substrates with different roughnesses have been used. The bulk shear rheological behaviour of Carbopol gels, concentrated suspensions of swollen micro-gels, has been measured. Wall friction has also been characterized on each substrate. Slip effects of gels proved to be greater on a more hydrophobic substrate. They decreased with an increase in roughness. The drop hydrodynamics during the impact was correlated with the wall friction of the gels on all substrates and with the ratio of surface roughness to size of the swollen micro-gels. At very low impact velocities, the gravitational subsidence amplitude depends greatly on surface properties. At higher impact velocities, no significant difference is observed during the spreading phase. The drop behaviour differs during the retraction depending on the substrate. Interface effects during the retraction stage proved to diminish when the yield stress value increases. (orig.)

  7. A Software Tool for Atmospheric Correction and Surface Temperature Estimation of Landsat Infrared Thermal Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Tardy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature (LST is an important variable involved in the Earth’s surface energy and water budgets and a key component in many aspects of environmental research. The Landsat program, jointly carried out by NASA and the USGS, has been recording thermal infrared data for the past 40 years. Nevertheless, LST data products for Landsat remain unavailable. The atmospheric correction (AC method commonly used for mono-window Landsat thermal data requires detailed information concerning the vertical structure (temperature, pressure and the composition (water vapor, ozone of the atmosphere. For a given coordinate, this information is generally obtained through either radio-sounding or atmospheric model simulations and is passed to the radiative transfer model (RTM to estimate the local atmospheric correction parameters. Although this approach yields accurate LST data, results are relevant only near this given coordinate. To meet the scientific community’s demand for high-resolution LST maps, we developed a new software tool dedicated to processing Landsat thermal data. The proposed tool improves on the commonly-used AC algorithm by incorporating spatial variations occurring in the Earth’s atmosphere composition. The ERA-Interim dataset (ECMWFmeteorological organization was used to retrieve vertical atmospheric conditions, which are available at a global scale with a resolution of 0.125 degrees and a temporal resolution of 6 h. A temporal and spatial linear interpolation of meteorological variables was performed to match the acquisition dates and coordinates of the Landsat images. The atmospheric correction parameters were then estimated on the basis of this reconstructed atmospheric grid using the commercial RTMsoftware MODTRAN. The needed surface emissivity was derived from the common vegetation index NDVI, obtained from the red and near-infrared (NIR bands of the same Landsat image. This permitted an estimation of LST for the entire

  8. Estimating a patient surface model for optimizing the medical scanning workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek; Chang, Yao-Jen; Ma, Kai; Wels, Michael; Soza, Grzegorz; Chen, Terrence

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present the idea of equipping a tomographic medical scanner with a range imaging device (e.g. a 3D camera) to improve the current scanning workflow. A novel technical approach is proposed to robustly estimate patient surface geometry by a single snapshot from the camera. Leveraging the information of the patient surface geometry can provide significant clinical benefits, including automation of the scan, motion compensation for better image quality, sanity check of patient movement, augmented reality for guidance, patient specific dose optimization, and more. Our approach overcomes the technical difficulties resulting from suboptimal camera placement due to practical considerations. Experimental results on more than 30 patients from a real CT scanner demonstrate the robustness of our approach.

  9. Estimate solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafetta, N.; West, B. J.

    2005-12-01

    We study, by using a wavelet decomposition methodology, the solar signature on global surface temperature data using the ACRIM total solar irradiance satellite composite by Willson and Mordvinov. These data present a +0.047% per decade trend between minima during solar cycles 21-23 (1980-2002). By using the phenomenological climate sensitivity to a 22-year cycle, we estimate that the ACRIM upward trend might have contributed 10-30% of the global surface temperature warming over the period 1980-2002. Moreover, by comparing the phenomenological climate sensitivity to the 11-year solar cycle with those hypothesized by some energy balance models we conclude that the former is 1.5-3 times stronger than the latter. Finally, we study the climate sensitivity in different regions of the Earth.

  10. A practical algorithm for estimating surface soil moisture using combined optical and thermal infrared data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Pei; Song, Xiaoning; Duan, Si-Bo; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2016-10-01

    Surface soil moisture (SSM) is a critical variable for understanding the energy and water exchange between the land and atmosphere. A multi-linear model was recently developed to determine SSM using ellipse variables, namely, the center horizontal coordinate (x0), center vertical coordinate (y0), semi-major axis (a) and rotation angle (θ), derived from the elliptical relationship between diurnal cycles of land surface temperature (LST) and net surface shortwave radiation (NSSR). However, the multi-linear model has a major disadvantage. The model coefficients are calculated based on simulated data produced by a land surface model simulation that requires sufficient meteorological measurements. This study aims to determine the model coefficients directly using limited meteorological parameters rather than via the complicated simulation process, decreasing the dependence of the model coefficients on meteorological measurements. With the simulated data, a practical algorithm was developed to estimate SSM based on combined optical and thermal infrared data. The results suggest that the proposed approach can be used to determine the coefficients associated with all ellipse variables based on historical meteorological records, whereas the constant term varies daily and can only be determined using the daily maximum solar radiation in a prediction model. Simulated results from three FLUXNET sites over 30 cloud-free days revealed an average root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.042 m3/m3 when historical meteorological records were used to synchronously determine the model coefficients. In addition, estimated SSM values exhibited generally moderate accuracies (coefficient of determination R2 = 0.395, RMSE = 0.061 m3/m3) compared to SSM measurements at the Yucheng Comprehensive Experimental Station.

  11. Estimates of radiance reflected towards the zenith at the surface of the sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Aas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing of water colour by ship-mounted sensors represents an important tool for the validation of satellite products and the monitoring of water quality. The recorded radiance from the sea has to be corrected for the surface-reflected radiance from sun and sky in order to obtain the water-leaving radiance. Here the simple case of radiance reflected towards the zenith is studied. A set of observed sky radiance and solar irradiance data from Oslo has been used together with a Gaussian slope distribution for the sea surface in order to estimate the reflected radiance. The spectral range studied is 405–650 nm, the solar zenith angles are in the range 37°–76°, and the wind speeds are up to 10 m s−1. The analysis of the results show that the reflected radiance has to be separated into three contributions: sky radiance and sun rays reflected at the foam-free surface and irradiance reflected by whitecaps and foam. It is then demonstrated that by using four input values, namely the downward irradiance, the sky radiance from the zenith, the solar zenith angle and the wind speed, it is possible to obtain by simple expressions estimates of the reflected radiance that only differ from the former calculated values by relative errors of less than 5%. The analysis also indicates that for the spectral range studied neither the water-leaving radiance nor the surface-reflected radiance can be disregarded relative to the other one in the Case 2 waters of the Oslofjord-Skagerrak area. The results form a first step towards the study of reflected radiance in viewing angles differing from the nadir direction.

  12. Source estimation with surface-related multiples—fast ambiguity-resolved seismic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Ning; Aravkin, Aleksandr; van Leeuwen, Tristan; Lin, Tim; Herrmann, Felix J.

    2016-06-01

    We address the problem of obtaining a reliable seismic image without prior knowledge of the source wavelet, especially from data that contain strong surface-related multiples. Conventional reverse-time migration requires prior knowledge of the source wavelet, which is either technically or computationally challenging to accurately determine; inaccurate estimates of the source wavelet can result in seriously degraded reverse-time migrated images, and therefore wrong geological interpretations. To solve this problem, we present a `wavelet-free' imaging procedure that simultaneously inverts for the source wavelet and the seismic image, by tightly integrating source estimation into a fast least-squares imaging framework, namely compressive imaging, given a reasonably accurate background velocity model. However, this joint inversion problem is difficult to solve as it is plagued with local minima and the ambiguity with respect to amplitude scalings because of the multiplicative, and therefore nonlinear, appearance of the source wavelet in the otherwise linear formalism. We have found a way to solve this nonlinear joint-inversion problem using a technique called variable projection, and a way to overcome the scaling ambiguity by including surface-related multiples in our imaging procedure following recent developments in surface-related multiple prediction by sparse inversion. As a result, we obtain without prior knowledge of the source wavelet high-resolution seismic images, comparable in quality to images obtained assuming the true source wavelet is known. By leveraging the computationally efficient compressive-imaging methodology, these results are obtained at affordable computational costs compared with conventional processing work flows that include surface-related multiple removal and reverse-time migration.

  13. Estimates of radiance reflected towards the zenith at the surface of the sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Aas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing of water colour by ship-mounted sensors represents an important tool for the validation of satellite products and the monitoring of water quality. The recorded radiance from the sea has to be corrected for the surface-reflected radiance from sun and sky in order to obtain the water-leaving radiance. Here the simple case of radiance reflected towards the zenith is studied. A set of observed sky radiance and solar irradiance data from Oslo has been used together with a Gaussian slope distribution for the sea surface in order to estimate the reflected radiance. The spectral range studied is 405–650 nm, the solar zenith angles are in the range 37°–76°, and the wind speeds are up to 10 m s−1. The analysis of the results show that the reflected radiance has to be separated into three contributions: sky radiance and sun rays reflected at the foam-free surface and irradiance reflected by whitecaps and foam. It is then demonstrated that by using four input values, namely the downward irradiance, the sky radiance from the zenith, the solar zenith angle and the wind speed, it is possible to obtain by simple expressions estimates of the reflected radiance that only differ from the former calculated values by relative errors of 4% or less. The analysis also indicates that for the spectral range studied neither the water-leaving radiance nor the surface-reflected radiance can be disregarded relative to the other one in the Case 2 waters of the Oslofjord-Skagerrak area. The results form a first step towards the study of reflected radiance in viewing angles differing from the nadir direction.

  14. Fate factors and emission flux estimates for emerging contaminants in surface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoa T. Trinh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceuticals, personal care products, hormones, and wastewater products are emerging environmental concerns for manifold reasons, including the potential of some compounds found in these products for endocrine disruption at a very low chronic exposure level. The environmental occurrences and sources of these contaminants in the water, soil, sediment and biota in European nations and the United States are well documented. This work reports a screening-level emission and fate assessment of thirty compounds, listed in the National Reconnaissance of the United States Geological Survey (USGS, 1999–2000 as the most frequently detected organic wastewater contaminants in U.S. streams and rivers. Estimations of the surface water fate factors were based on Level II and Level III multimedia fugacity models for a 1000 km2 model environment, the size of a typical county in the eastern United States. The compounds are categorized into three groups based upon the sensitivity of their predicted surface water fate factors to uncertainties in their physicochemical property values and the landscape parameters. The environmental fate factors, mass distributions, and loss pathways of all of the compounds are strongly affected by their assumed modes of entry into the environment. It is observed that for thirteen of the thirty organic wastewater contaminants most commonly detected in surface waters, conventional treatment strategies may be ineffective for their removal from wastewater effluents. The surface water fate factors predicted by the fugacity models were used in conjunction with the surface water concentrations measured in the USGS reconnaissance to obtain emission flux estimates for the compounds into U.S. streams and rivers. These include estimated fluxes of 6.8 × 10−5 to 0.30 kg/h km2 for the biomarker coprostanol; 1.7 × 10−5 to 6.5 × 10−5 kg/h km2 for the insect repellent N,N-diethyltoluamide; and 4.3 × 10−6 to 3.1 × 10−5 kg/h km2 for

  15. Estimation Source Parameters of Large-Scale Chemical Surface Explosions and Recent Underground Nuclear Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitterman, Y.; Kim, S.; Hofstetter, R.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale surface explosions were conducted by the Geophysical Institute of Israel at Sayarim Military Range (SMR), Negev desert: 82 tons of strong HE explosives in August 2009, and 10&100 tons of ANFO explosives in January 2011. The main goal was to provide strong controlled sources in different wind conditions, for calibration of IMS infrasound stations. Numerous dense observations of blast waves were provided by high-pressure, acoustic and seismic sensors at near-source ( 2000 tons) ANFO surface shots at White Sands Military Range (WSMR) were analyzed for SS time delay. The Secondary Shocks were revealed on the records in the range 1.5-60 km and showed consistency with the SMR data, thus extending the charge and distance range for the developed SS delay relationship. Obtained results suggest that measured SS delays can provide important information about an explosion source character, and can be used as a new simple cost-effective yield estimator for explosions with known type of explosives. The new results are compared with analogous available data of surface nuclear explosions. Special distinctions in air-blast waves are revealed and analyzed, resulting from the different source phenomenology (energy release). Two underground nuclear explosions conducted by North Korea in 2009 and 2013 were recorded by several stations of Israel Seismic Network. Pronounced minima (spectral nulls) at 1.2-1.3 Hz were revealed in the spectra of teleseismic P-waves. For a ground-truth explosion with a shallow source depth (relatively to an earthquake), this phenomenon can be interpreted in terms of the interference between the down-going P-wave energy and the pP phase reflected from the Earth's surface. A similar effect was observed before at ISN stations for the Pakistan explosion (28.05.98) at a different frequency 1.7 Hz indicating the source- and not site-effect. Based on the null frequency dependency on the near-surface acoustic velocity and the source depth, the depth of

  16. New model for estimating the relationship between surface area and volume in the human body using skeletal remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasabova, Boryana E; Holliday, Trenton W

    2015-04-01

    A new model for estimating human body surface area and body volume/mass from standard skeletal metrics is presented. This model is then tested against both 1) "independently estimated" body surface areas and "independently estimated" body volume/mass (both derived from anthropometric data) and 2) the cylindrical model of Ruff. The model is found to be more accurate in estimating both body surface area and body volume/mass than the cylindrical model, but it is more accurate in estimating body surface area than it is for estimating body volume/mass (as reflected by the standard error of the estimate when "independently estimated" surface area or volume/mass is regressed on estimates derived from the present model). Two practical applications of the model are tested. In the first test, the relative contribution of the limbs versus the trunk to the body's volume and surface area is compared between "heat-adapted" and "cold-adapted" populations. As expected, the "cold-adapted" group has significantly more of its body surface area and volume in its trunk than does the "heat-adapted" group. In the second test, we evaluate the effect of variation in bi-iliac breadth, elongated or foreshortened limbs, and differences in crural index on the body's surface area to volume ratio (SA:V). Results indicate that the effects of bi-iliac breadth on SA:V are substantial, while those of limb lengths and (especially) the crural index are minor, which suggests that factors other than surface area relative to volume are driving morphological variation and ecogeographical patterning in limb prorportions.

  17. A hidden state space modeling approach for improving glacier surface velocity estimates using remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, D.; Schubert, A.; Small, D.; Meier, E.; Lüthi, M. P.; Vieli, A.

    2014-12-01

    A new method for glacier surface velocity (GSV) estimates is proposed here which combines ground- and space-based measurements with hidden state space modeling (HSSM). Examples of such a fusion of physical models with remote sensing (RS) observations were described in (Henke & Meier, Hidden State Space Models for Improved Remote Sensing Applications, ITISE 2014, p. 1242-1255) and are currently adapted for GSV estimation. GSV can be estimated using in situ measurements, RS methods or numerical simulations based on ice-flow models. In situ measurements ensure high accuracy but limited coverage and time consuming field work, while RS methods offer regular observations with high spatial coverage generally not possible with in situ methods. In particular, spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) can obtain useful images independent of daytime and cloud cover. A ground portable radar interferometer (GPRI) is useful for investigating a particular area in more detail than is possible from space, but provides local coverage only. Several processing methods for deriving GSV from radar sensors have been established, including interferometry and offset tracking (Schubert et al, Glacier surface velocity estimation using repeat TerraSAR-X images. ISPRS Journal of P&RS, p. 49-62, 2013). On the other hand, it is also possible to derive glacier parameters from numerical ice-flow modeling alone. Given a well-parameterized model, GSV can in theory be derived and propagated continuously in time. However, uncertainties in the glacier flow dynamics and model errors increase with excessive propagation. All of these methods have been studied independently, but attempts to combine them have only rarely been made. The HSSM we propose recursively estimates the GSV based on 1) a process model making use of temporal and spatial interdependencies between adjacent states, and 2) observations (RS and optional in situ). The in situ and GPRI images currently being processed were acquired in the

  18. Distribution of near-surface permafrost in Alaska: estimates of present and future conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastick, Neal J.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Wylie, Bruce K.; Nield, Shawn J.; Johnson, Kristofer D.; Finley, Andrew O.

    2015-01-01

    High-latitude regions are experiencing rapid and extensive changes in ecosystem composition and function as the result of increases in average air temperature. Increasing air temperatures have led to widespread thawing and degradation of permafrost, which in turn has affected ecosystems, socioeconomics, and the carbon cycle of high latitudes. Here we overcome complex interactions among surface and subsurface conditions to map nearsurface permafrost through decision and regression tree approaches that statistically and spatially extend field observations using remotely sensed imagery, climatic data, and thematic maps of a wide range of surface and subsurface biophysical characteristics. The data fusion approach generated medium-resolution (30-m pixels) maps of near-surface (within 1 m) permafrost, active-layer thickness, and associated uncertainty estimates throughout mainland Alaska. Our calibrated models (overall test accuracy of ~85%) were used to quantify changes in permafrost distribution under varying future climate scenarios assuming no other changes in biophysical factors. Models indicate that near-surface permafrost underlies 38% of mainland Alaska and that near-surface permafrost will disappear on 16 to 24% of the landscape by the end of the 21st Century. Simulations suggest that near-surface permafrost degradation is more probable in central regions of Alaska than more northerly regions. Taken together, these results have obvious implications for potential remobilization of frozen soil carbon pools under warmer temperatures. Additionally, warmer and drier conditions may increase fire activity and severity, which may exacerbate rates of permafrost thaw and carbon remobilization relative to climate alone. The mapping of permafrost distribution across Alaska is important for land-use planning, environmental assessments, and a wide-array of geophysical studies.

  19. An empirical method for estimating surface area of aggregates in hot mix asphalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P. Panda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bitumen requirement in hot mix asphalt (HMA is directly dependent on the surface area of the aggregates in the mix, which in turn has effect on the asphalt film thickness and the flow characteristics. The surface area of aggregate blend in HMA is calculated using the specific surface area factors assigned to percentage passing through some specific standard sieve sizes and the imaging techniques. The first process is less capital intensive, but purely manual and labour intensive and prone to human errors. Imaging techniques though eliminating the human errors, still have limited use due to capital intensiveness and requirement of well-established laboratories with qualified technicians. Most of the developing countries like India are shortage of well-equipped laboratories and qualified technicians. To overcome these difficulties, the present mathematical model has been developed to estimate the surface area of aggregate blend of HMA from physical properties of aggregates evaluated using simple laboratory equipment. This model has been validated compared with the existing established methods of calculations and can be used as one of the tools in different developing and under developed countries for proper design of HMA.

  20. Residual stress and electromagnetic characteristics in loop type frequency selective surface embedded hybrid structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyung Mi; Seo, Yun Seok; Chun, Heoung Jae [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ik Pyo [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong Bae [Ajoo University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yoon Jae [Agency for defense development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Residual stresses occur in frequency-selective surface (FSS)-embedded composite structures after co-curing due to differences between the coefficients of thermal expansion between composite skins and FSSs. Furthermore, the electromagnetic characteristics may be affected by the deformation of the FSS pattern by residual stresses. Therefore, we studied the changes in electromagnetic characteristics due to the deformation of FSS, using residual stresses to deform loop-type FSS-embedded hybrid composites. We considered the effects of loop-type FSS patterns of equal dimension as well as the stacking sequences of composite laminates on the electromagnetic characteristics of FSSs: Square loop, triangular loop and circular loop. The stacking sequences of composite laminates considered in this study were [0]{sub 8}, [0/90]{sub 4}, [+-45]{sub 4} and [0/+-45/90]{sub 2}. The FSS was located between composite laminates in the middle plane. To determine the residual stresses and deformations in the FSS embedded laminate structures, the thermal loading condition in the finite element analysis was induced by cooling the hybrid structures from 125 .deg. C to 20 .deg. C based on the cure cycle of the composite. Also, the electromagnetic reflection characteristics of the hybrid structures were predicted using deformed models by residual stresses, considering the effects of stacking sequence of composite laminates. The results showed that the maximum residual stresses and deformations were produced in the [0]{sub 8} composites with all three loop-types of FSS pattern. However, the maximum resonance frequency shifts occurred in the square and triangle loop-types with stacking sequence of [0]{sub 8} , while the maximum resonance frequency shift occurred in the circular loop-type with stacking sequence of [0/+-45/90]{sub 2}.

  1. Evaluation of Stress Intensity Factors for Multiple Cracked Circular Disks Under Crack Surface Tractions with SBFEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun-yu; LIN Gao; LI Xiao-chuan; XU Feng-lin

    2013-01-01

    Stress intensity factors (SIFs) for the cracked circular disks under different distributing surface tractions are evaluated with the scaled boundary finite element method (SBFEM).In the SBFEM,the analytical advantage of the solution in the radial direction allows SIFs to be directly determined from its definition,therefore no special crack-tip treatment is necessary.Furthermore anisotropic material behavior can be treated easily.Different distributions of surface tractions are considered for the center and double-edge-cracked disks.The benchmark examples are modeled and an excellent agreement between the results in the present study and those in published literature is found.It shows that SBFEM is effective and possesses high accuracy.The SIFs of the cracked orthotropic material circular disks subjected to different surface tractions are also evaluated.The technique of substructure is applied to handle the multiple cracks problem.

  2. Effects of Surface State and Applied Stress on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 690TT in Lead-containing Caustic Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiming Zhang; Jianqiu Wang; En-Hou Han; Wei Ke

    2012-01-01

    The effects of surface state and applied stress on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors of thermally treated (TT) Alloy 690 in 10 wt% NaOH solution with 100 mg/L litharge at 330 ℃ were investigated using C-ring samples with four kinds of surface states and two different stress levels. Sample outer surfaces of the first three kinds were ground to 400 grit (ground), shot-peened (SP) and electro-polished (EP) and the last one was used as the as-received state. Two samples of every kind were stressed to 100% and 200% yield stress of Alloy 690TT, respectively. The results showed that the oxide film consisted of three layers whereas continuous layer rich in Cr was not found. The poor adhesive ability indicated that the oxide film could not protect the matrix from further corrosion. Lead was found in the oxide film and the oxides at the crack paths and accelerated the dissolution of thermodynamically unstable Cr in these locations and also in the matrix. The crack initiation and propagation on Alloy 690TT were effectively retarded by SP and EP treatments but were enhanced by grinding treatment, compared with the cracks on the as-received surface. The cracking severity was also enhanced by increasing the externally applied stress. The accelerated dissolution of Cr and the local tensile stress concentration in the near-surface layer caused by cold-working and higher applied stress reduced the SCC-resistance of Alloy 690TT in the studied solution.

  3. CO2 laser scribe of chemically strengthened glass with high surface compressive stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinghua; Vaddi, Butchi R.

    2011-03-01

    Chemically strengthened glass is finding increasing use in handheld, IT and TV cover glass applications. Chemically strengthened glass, particularly with high (>600MPa) compressive stress (CS) and deeper depth of layer (DOL), enable to retain higher strength after damage than non-strengthened glass when its surface is abraded. Corning Gorilla® Glass has particularly proven to be advantageous over competition in this attribute. However, due to high compressive stress (CS) and Central Tension (CT) cutting ion-exchanged glass is extremely difficult and often unmanageable where ever the applications require dicing the chemically strengthened mother glass into smaller parts. We at Corning have developed a CO2 laser scribe and break method (LSB) to separate a single chemically strengthened glass sheet into plurality of devices. Furthermore, CO2 laser scribe and break method enables debris-free separation of glass with high edge strength due to its mirror-like edge finish. We have investigated laser scribe and break of chemically strengthened glass with surface compressive stress greater than 600 MPa. In this paper we present the results of CO2 scribe and break method and underlying laser scribing mechanisms. We demonstrated cross-scribe repetitively on GEN 2 size chemically strengthened glass substrates. Specimens for edge strength measurements of different thickness and CS/DOL glass were prepared using the laser scribe and break technique. The specimens were tested using the standard 4-point bend method and the results are presented.

  4. 3-D description of fracture surfaces and stress-sensitivity analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.Q.; Jioa, D.; Meng, Y.F.; Fan, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Three kinds of reservoir cores (limestone, sandstone, and shale with natural fractures) were used to study the effect of morphology of fracture surfaces on stress sensitivity. The cores, obtained from the reservoirs with depths of 2170 to 2300 m, have fractures which are mated on a large scale, but unmated on a fine scale. A specially designed photoelectric scanner with a computer was used to describe the topography of the fracture surfaces. Then, theoretical analysis of the fracture closure was carried out based on the fracture topography generated. The scanning results show that the asperity has almost normal distributions for all three types of samples. For the tested samples, the fracture closure predicted by the elastic-contact theory is different from the laboratory measurements because plastic deformation of the aspirates plays an important role under the testing range of normal stresses. In this work, the traditionally used elastic-contact theory has been modified to better predict the stress sensitivity of reservoir fractures. Analysis shows that the standard deviation of the probability density function of asperity distribution has a great effect on the fracture closure rate.

  5. Effect of initial stress on reflection at the free surface of anisotropic elastic medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M D Sharma

    2007-12-01

    The propagation of plane waves is considered in a general anisotropic elastic medium in the presence of initial stress. The Christoffel equations are solved into a polynomial of degree six. The roots of this polynomial represent the vertical slowness values for the six quasi-waves resulting from the presence of a discontinuity in the medium. Three of these six values are identified with the three quasi-waves traveling in the medium but away from its boundary. Reflection at the free plane surface is studied for partition of energy among the three reflected waves. For post-critical incidence, the reflected waves are inhomogeneous (evanescent) waves. Numerical examples are considered to exhibit the effects of initial stress on the phase direction, attenuation and reflection coefficients of the reflected waves. The phase velocities and energy shares of the reflected waves change significantly with initial stress as well as anisotropic symmetry. The presence of initial stress, however, has a negligible effect on the phase directions of reflected waves.

  6. Evaluation of Missing Pellet Surface Geometry on Cladding Stress Distribution and Magnitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capps, Nathan A.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Sunderland, Dion J.; Spencer, Ben; Pytel, Martin; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-10-01

    Missing pellet surface (MPS) defects are local geometric defects that periodically occur in nuclear fuel pellets, usually as a result of the mishandling during the manufacturing process. The presences of these defects can lead to clad stress concentrations that are substantial enough to cause a through wall failure for certain conditions of power level, burnup, and power increase. Consequently, the impact of potential MPS defects has limited the rate of power increase or ramp rates in both PWR and BWR systems. Improved 3D MPS models that consider the effect of the MPS geometry can provide better understanding of the margins against PCMI clad failure. The Peregrine fuel performance code has been developed as a part the Consortium of Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) to consider the inherently multi-physics and multi-dimensional mechanisms that control fuel behavior, including cladding failure by the presence of MPS defects. This paper presents an evaluation of the cladding stress concentrations as a function of MPS defect geometry. The results are the first step in a probabilistic approach to assess cladding failure during power maneuvers. This analysis provides insight into how varying pellet defect geometries affect the distribution of the cladding stress and fuel and cladding temperature and will be used to develop stress concentration factors for 2D and 3D models.

  7. Variability in the coupling between sea surface temperature and wind stress in the global coastal ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuntao; Castelao, Renato M.

    2016-08-01

    Mesoscale ocean-atmosphere interaction between sea surface temperature (SST) and wind stress throughout the global coastal ocean was investigated using 7 years of satellite observations. Coupling coefficients between crosswind SST gradients and wind stress curl and between downwind SST gradients and wind stress divergence were used to quantify spatial and temporal variability in the strength of the interaction. The use of a consistent data set and standardized methods allow for direct comparisons between coupling coefficients in the different coastal regions. The analysis reveals that strong coupling is observed in many mid-latitude regions throughout the world, especially in regions with strong fronts like Eastern and Western Boundary Currents. Most upwelling regions in Eastern Boundary Currents are characterized by strong seasonal variability in the strength of the coupling, which generally peaks during summer in mid latitudes and during winter at low latitudes. Seasonal variability in coastal regions along Western Boundary Currents is comparatively smaller. Intraseasonal variability is especially important in regions of strong eddy activity (e.g., Western Boundary Currents), being particularly relevant for the coupling between crosswind SST gradients and wind stress curl. Results from the analysis can be used to guide modeling studies, since it allows for the a priori identification of regions in which regional models need to properly represent the ocean-atmosphere interaction to accurately represent local variability.

  8. Fatigue life estimation procedures for the endurance of a cardiac valve prosthesis: stress/life and damage-tolerant analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, R O; Lubock, P

    1986-05-01

    Projected fatigue life analyses are performed to estimate the endurance of a cardiac valve prosthesis under physiological environmental and mechanical conditions. The analyses are conducted using both the classical stress-strain/life and the fracture mechanics-based damage-tolerant approaches, and provide estimates of expected life in terms of initial flaw sizes which may pre-exist in the metal prior to the valve entering service. The damage-tolerant analysis further is supplemented by consideration of the question of "short cracks," which represents a developing area in metal fatigue research, not commonly applied to data in standard engineering design practice.

  9. Global Assessment of Land Surface Temperature From Geostationary Satellites and Model Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Liu, Q.; Minnis, P.; daSilva, A. M., Jr.; Palikonda, R.; Yost, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    Land surface (or 'skin') temperature (LST) lies at the heart of the surface energy balance and is a key variable in weather and climate models. In this research we compare two global and independent data sets: (i) LST retrievals from five geostationary satellites generated at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and (ii) LST estimates from the quasi-operational NASA GEOS-5 global modeling and assimilation system. The objective is to thoroughly understand both data sets and their systematic differences in preparation for the assimilation of the LaRC LST retrievals into GEOS-5. As expected, mean differences (MD) and root-mean-square differences (RMSD) between modeled and retrieved LST vary tremendously by region and time of day. Typical (absolute) MD values range from 1-3 K in Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude regions to near 10 K in regions where modeled clouds are unrealistic, for example in north-eastern Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, and southern Brazil. Typically, model estimates of LST are higher than satellite retrievals during the night and lower during the day. RMSD values range from 1-3 K during the night to 2-5 K during the day, but are larger over the 50-120 W longitude band where the LST retrievals are derived from the FY2E platform

  10. Mantle potential temperature estimates of basalt from the surface of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellnutt, J. Gregory

    2016-10-01

    The crater density and distribution of Venus indicates the average surface age is younger (≤1 Ga) than most terrestrial planets and satellites in the Solar System. The type and rate (i.e. equilibrium, catastrophic or differential) of volcanism associated with the stagnant lid tectonic system of Venus is a first order problem that has yet to be resolved but is directly related to the thermal conditions of the mantle. The calculated primary melt composition of basalt at the Venera 14 landing site is high-Mg basalt to picrite with a mantle potential temperature estimate similar to terrestrial ambient mantle (1370 ± 70 °C). The calculated accumulated fractional melting curves indicate the olivine compositions from the melt have Mg# of 89-91. The results show that the thermal regime required to generate the primary melt composition of the Venera 14 basalt was not anomalously high (i.e. mantle-plume system) but rather consistent with a lithospheric tensional rift system. The juxtaposition of high thermal regime structures (e.g. Beta Regio) and 'ambient' mantle potential temperature estimates of the Venera 14 basalt suggests that the relatively young surface of Venus is the result of volcanism from a combination of thermal systems that resurfaced the planet at variable rates.

  11. Using Landsat Vegetation Indices to Estimate Impervious Surface Fractions for European Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Per Skougaard; Fensholt, Rasmus; Drews, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Impervious surfaces (IS) are a key indicator of environmental quality, and mapping of urban IS is important for a wide range of applications including hydrological modelling, water management, urban and environmental planning and urban climate studies. This paper addresses the accuracy and applic......Impervious surfaces (IS) are a key indicator of environmental quality, and mapping of urban IS is important for a wide range of applications including hydrological modelling, water management, urban and environmental planning and urban climate studies. This paper addresses the accuracy...... Vegetation Index (SAVI) are converted to IS fractions using a regression modelling approach. Also, NDVI is used to estimate fractional vegetation cover (FR), and consequently IS fractions. All three indices provide fairly accurate estimates (MAEs ≈ 10%, MBE’s ... to be applicable for cities with dissimilar climatic and vegetative conditions. The VI/IS relationship across cities is examined by quantifying the MAEs and MBEs between all combinations of models and urban areas. Also, regional regression models are developed by compiling data from multiple cities to examine...

  12. Estimating yields of salt- and water-stressed forages with remote sensing in the visible and near infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poss, J A; Russell, W B; Grieve, C M

    2006-01-01

    In arid irrigated regions, the proportion of crop production under deficit irrigation with poorer quality water is increasing as demand for fresh water soars and efforts to prevent saline water table development occur. Remote sensing technology to quantify salinity and water stress effects on forage yield can be an important tool to address yield loss potential when deficit irrigating with poor water quality. Two important forages, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and tall wheatgrass (Agropyron elongatum L.), were grown in a volumetric lysimeter facility where rootzone salinity and water content were varied and monitored. Ground-based hyperspectral canopy reflectance in the visible and near infrared (NIR) were related to forage yields from a broad range of salinity and water stress conditions. Canopy reflectance spectra were obtained in the 350- to 1000-nm region from two viewing angles (nadir view, 45 degrees from nadir). Nadir view vegetation indices (VI) were not as strongly correlated with leaf area index changes attributed to water and salinity stress treatments for both alfalfa and wheatgrass. From a list of 71 VIs, two were selected for a multiple linear-regression model that estimated yield under varying salinity and water stress conditions. With data obtained during the second harvest of a three-harvest 100-d growing period, regression coefficients for each crop were developed and then used with the model to estimate fresh weights for preceding and succeeding harvests during the same 100-d interval. The model accounted for 72% of the variation in yields in wheatgrass and 94% in yields of alfalfa within the same salinity and water stress treatment period. The model successfully predicted yield in three out of four cases when applied to the first and third harvest yields. Correlations between indices and yield increased as canopy development progressed. Growth reductions attributed to simultaneous salinity and water stress were well characterized, but the

  13. Stress history influence on sedimentary rock porosity estimates: Implications for geological CO2 storage in Northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jie Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We established a stress-history-dependent porosity model of potential target rocks for CO2 geosequestration based on rock sample porosity measurements under various effective stresses (5 - 120 MPa. The measured samples were collected from shallow boreholes (< 300 m depth drilled at the frontal fold in northern Taiwan. The lithology, density, and the stress-history-dependent porosity derived from shallow boreholes enabled us to predict the porosity-depth relationship of given rock formations at (burial depths of approximately 3170 - 3470 m potential sites for CO2 geosequestration located near the Taoyuan Tableland coastline. Our results indicate that the porosity of samples derived from laboratory tests under atmospheric pressure is significantly greater than the porosity measured under stress caused by sediment burial. It is therefore strongly recommended that CO2 storage capacity assessment not be estimated from the porosity measured under atmospheric pressure. Neglecting the stress history effect on the porosity of compacted and uplifted rocks may induce a percentage error of 7.7% at a depth of approximately 1000 m, where the thickness of the eroded, formerly overlying formation is 2.5 km in a synthetic case. The CO2 injection pressure effect on the porosity was also evaluated using the stress-history-dependent porosity model. As expected, the pore pressure buildup during CO2 injection will induce an increase in the rock porosity. For example, a large injection pressure of 13 MPa at a depth of approximately 1000 m will increase the rock porosity by a percentage error of 6.7%. Our results have implications for CO2 storage capacity injection pressure estimates.

  14. Estimating Biomass of Barley Using Crop Surface Models (CSMs Derived from UAV-Based RGB Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Bendig

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Crop monitoring is important in precision agriculture. Estimating above-ground biomass helps to monitor crop vitality and to predict yield. In this study, we estimated fresh and dry biomass on a summer barley test site with 18 cultivars and two nitrogen (N-treatments using the plant height (PH from crop surface models (CSMs. The super-high resolution, multi-temporal (1 cm/pixel CSMs were derived from red, green, blue (RGB images captured from a small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV. Comparison with PH reference measurements yielded an R2 of 0.92. The test site with different cultivars and treatments was monitored during “Biologische Bundesanstalt, Bundessortenamt und CHemische Industrie” (BBCH Stages 24–89. A high correlation was found between PH from CSMs and fresh biomass (R2 = 0.81 and dry biomass (R2 = 0.82. Five models for above-ground fresh and dry biomass estimation were tested by cross-validation. Modelling biomass between different N-treatments for fresh biomass produced the best results (R2 = 0.71. The main limitation was the influence of lodging cultivars in the later growth stages, producing irregular plant heights. The method has potential for future application by non-professionals, i.e., farmers.

  15. Estimates of Median Flows for Streams on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2004-01-01

    The Kansas State Legislature, by enacting Kansas Statute KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., mandated the criteria for determining which Kansas stream segments would be subject to classification by the State. One criterion for the selection as a classified stream segment is based on the statistic of median flow being equal to or greater than 1 cubic foot per second. As specified by KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., median flows were determined from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging-station data by using the most-recent 10 years of gaged data (KSA) for each streamflow-gaging station. Median flows also were determined by using gaged data from the entire period of record (all-available hydrology, AAH). Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating median flows for uncontrolled stream segments. The drainage area of the gaging stations on uncontrolled stream segments used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. A logarithmic transformation of the data was needed to develop the best linear relation for computing median flows. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. Tobit analyses of KSA data yielded a model standard error of prediction of 0.285 logarithmic units, and the best equations using Tobit analyses of AAH data had a model standard error of prediction of 0.250 logarithmic units. These regression equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute median flows for the uncontrolled stream segments on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. Measured median flows from gaging stations were incorporated into the regression-estimated median flows along the stream segments where available. The segments that were uncontrolled were interpolated using gaged data weighted according to the drainage area and the bias between the

  16. MLAA-based RF surface coil attenuation estimation in hybrid PET/MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heußer, Thorsten; Rank, Christopher M.; Freitag, Martin T.; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Attenuation correction (AC) for both patient and hardware attenuation of the 511 keV annihilation photons is required for accurate PET quantification. In hybrid PET/MR imaging, AC for stationary hardware components such as patient table and MR head coil is performed using CT{derived attenuation templates. AC for flexible hardware components such as MR radiofrequency (RF) surface coils is more challenging. Registration{based approaches, aligning scaled CT{derived attenuation templates with the current patient position, have been proposed but are not used in clinical routine. Ignoring RF coil attenuation has been shown to result in regional activity underestimation values of up to 18 %. We propose to employ a modified version of the maximum{ likelihood reconstruction of attenuation and activity (MLAA) algorithm to obtain an estimate of the RF coil attenuation. Starting with an initial attenuation map not including the RF coil, the attenuation update of MLAA is applied outside the body outline only, allowing to estimate RF coil attenuation without changing the patient attenuation map. Hence, the proposed method is referred to as external MLAA (xMLAA). In this work, xMLAA for RF surface coil attenuation estimation is investigated using phantom and patient data acquired with a Siemens Biograph mMR. For the phantom data, average activity errors compared to the ground truth was reduced from -8:1% to +0:8% when using the proposed method. Patient data revealed an average activity underestimation of -6:1% for the abdominal region and -5:3% for the thoracic region when ignoring RF coil attenuation.

  17. Soil Surface Sealing Effect on Soil Moisture at a Semiarid Hillslope: Implications for Remote Sensing Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Sela

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Robust estimation of soil moisture using microwave remote sensing depends on extensive ground sampling for calibration and validation of the data. Soil surface sealing is a frequent phenomenon in dry environments. It modulates soil moisture close to the soil surface and, thus, has the potential to affect the retrieval of soil moisture from microwave remote sensing and the validation of these data based on ground observations. We addressed this issue using a physically-based modeling approach that accounts explicitly for surface sealing at the hillslope scale. Simulated mean soil moisture at the respective layers corresponding to both the ground validation probe and the radar beam’s typical effective penetration depth were considered. A cyclic pattern was found in which, as compared to an unsealed profile, the seal layer intensifies the bias in validation during rainfall events and substantially reduces it during subsequent drying periods. The analysis of this cyclic pattern showed that, accounting for soil moisture dynamics at the soil surface, the optimal time for soil sampling following a rainfall event is a few hours in the case of an unsealed system and a few days in the case of a sealed one. Surface sealing was found to increase the temporal stability of soil moisture. In both sealed and unsealed systems, the greatest temporal stability was observed at positions with moderate slope inclination. Soil porosity was the best predictor of soil moisture temporal stability, indicating that prior knowledge regarding the soil texture distribution is crucial for the application of remote sensing validation schemes.

  18. Estimating spatially distributed monthly evapotranspiration rates by linear transformations of MODIS daytime land surface temperature data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szilagyi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Under simplifying conditions catchment-scale vapor pressure at the drying land surface can be calculated as a function of its watershed-representative temperature (<Ts> by the wet-surface equation (WSE, similar to the wet-bulb equation in meteorology for calculating the dry-bulb thermometer vapor pressure of the Complementary Relationship of evaporation. The corresponding watershed ET rate, , is obtained from the Bowen ratio with the help of air temperature, humidity and percent possible sunshine data. The resulting (<Ts>, pair together with the wet-environment surface temperature (<Tws> and ET rate (ETw, obtained by the Priestley-Taylor equation, define a linear transformation on a monthly basis by which spatially distributed ET rates can be estimated as a sole function of MODIS daytime land surface temperature, Ts, values within the watershed. The linear transformation preserves the mean which is highly desirable. <Tws>, in the lack of significant open water surfaces within the study watershed (Elkhorn, Nebraska, was obtained as the mean of the smallest MODIS Ts values each month. The resulting period-averaged (2000–2007 catchment-scale ET rate of 624 mm/yr is very close to the water-balance derived ET rate of about 617 mm/yr. The latter is a somewhat uncertain value due to the effects of (a observed groundwater depletion of about 1m over the study period caused by extensive irrigation, and; (b the uncertain rate of net regional groundwater supply toward the watershed. The spatially distributed ET rates correspond well with soil/aquifer properties and the resulting land use type (i.e. rangeland versus center-pivot irrigated crops.

  19. Revisiting the paper “Using radiometric surface temperature for surface energy flux estimation in Mediterranean drylands from a two-source perspective”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kustas, William P.; Nieto, Hector; Morillas, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The recent paper by Morillas et al. [Morillas, L. et al. Using radiometric surface temperature for surface energy flux estimation in Mediterranean drylands from a two-source perspective, Remote Sens. Environ. 136, 234–246, 2013] evaluates the two-source model (TSM) of Norman et al. (1995) with re...

  20. Interpreting aerosol lidar profiles to better estimate surface PM2.5 for columnar AOD measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, D. Allen; Tsai, Tzu-Chin; Chen, Jen-Ping; Chang, Shuenn-Chin; Jeng, Yung-Jyh; Chiang, Wei-Li; Lin, Neng-Hui

    2013-11-01

    Satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products have been used to estimate surface PM2.5 in different parts of the world. However, some revealed good but some relatively poorer relationship between AOD and PM2.5. The increasingly available lidar-based aerosol extinction profiles provide insights into the boundary layer as well as residual above it. Here we report a study in Taiwan using four-year (2006-2009) MPLNet data to characterize aerosol vertical distribution. We derived haze layer height (HLH) from MPLNet aerosol extinction profiles and classified profile differences by mean PBL extinction (MPE) and near-surface extinction (NSE). The former represents the mean extinction within boundary layer and the latter the closest extinction to surface. The comparison of MPE versus NSE leads to three distinct classifications of aerosol profiles to help interpret the relationship between AOD and PM2.5. The approximation of normalizing AODAERONET by HLH closely follows MPE in correlating with PM2.5 (≥0.8 with respect to season or ≥0.85 with respect to profile classification). The correlation resulted from AODMODIS/HLH is systematically lower than that derived by AODAERONET/HLH. PM2.5 values are overall better estimated by profile classification than those derived by season. Better performance of PM2.5 is obtained with the approximation (i.e., normalizing AOD by HLH) than that using AOD only. The performance metrics used in quantifying the relationship reveal improvements in uncertainty by 2.9 μg m-3 (or 20%) with AODAERONET/HLH and 2.3 μg m-3 (or 15%) with AODMODIS/HLH in comparison to using AOD only.

  1. X-ray measurement of residual stresses in laser surface melted Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, J.M.; van Brussel, B.A.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Reed, R.C.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the residual stresses in laser surface melted Ti-6Al-4V, determined using X-ray diffraction methods. The principal result is that there is an increase in the transverse residual stress with each successive, overlapping laser track. The result can be used to explain the ob

  2. Diffraction analysis of nonuniform stresses in surface layers : Application to cracked TiN coatings chemically vapor deposited on Mo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, W.G.; Kooi, B.J.; Delhez, R.; Keijser, Th.H. de; Mittemeijer, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Variations of residual stresses in layers on substrates can occur in directions parallel and perpendicular to the surface as a result of compositional inhomogeneity and/or porosity or cracks. Diffraction methods to evaluate such stress variations are presented. Comparison of the experimental value f

  3. Global analysis of ocean surface wind and wind stress using a general circulation model and Seasat scatterometer winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnay, E.; Atlas, R.

    1986-01-01

    Instantaneous and 15-day time-averaged fields of surface wind, wind stress, curl of the wind stress, and wind divergence are presented. These fields are derived from the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres four-dimensional analysis/forecast cycle, for the period September 6-30, 1978, using conventional data, satellite temperature soundings, cloud-track winds, and subjectively dealiased Seasat scatterometer winds.

  4. Estimation of Regional Evapotranspiration Using Remotely Sensed Land Surface Temperature. Part 2: Application of Equilibrium Evaporation Model to Estimate Evapotranspiration by Remote Sensing Technique. [Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotoda, K.; Nakagawa, S.; Kai, K.; Yoshino, M. M.; Takeda, K.; Seki, K.

    1985-01-01

    In a humid region like Japan, it seems that the radiation term in the energy balance equation plays a more important role for evapotranspiration then does the vapor pressure difference between the surface and lower atmospheric boundary layer. A Priestley-Taylor type equation (equilibrium evaporation model) is used to estimate evapotranspiration. Net radiation, soil heat flux, and surface temperature data are obtained. Only temperature data obtained by remotely sensed techniques are used.

  5. Improving the spatial estimation of evapotranspiration by assimilating land surface temperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Matthias; Samaniego, Luis; Cuntz, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    A combined investigation of the water and energy balance in hydrologic models might lead to a more accurate estimation of hydrological fluxes and state variables, such as evapotranspiration ET and soil moisture. Hydrologic models are usually calibrated against discharge measurements, and thus are only trained on the integrated signal at few points within a catchment. This procedure does not take into account any spatial variability of fluxes or state variables. Satellite data are a useful source of information to incorporate spatial information into hydrologic models. The objective of this study is to improve the estimation of evapotranspiration in the spatial domain by using satellite derived land surface temperature Ts for the calibration of the distributed hydrological model mHM. The satellite products are based on data of Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) and are provided by the Land Surface Analysis - Satellite Application Facility (LSA-SAF). mHM simulations of Ts are obtained by solving the energy balance wherein evapotranspiration is determined by closing the water balance. Net radiation is calculated by using incoming short- and longwave radiation, albedo and emissivity data provided by LSA-SAF. The Multiscale Parameter Regionalization technique (MPR, Samaniego et al. 2010) is applied to determine the aerodynamic resistance among other parameters. The optimization is performed for the year 2009 using three objective functions that consider (1) only discharge, (2) only Ts, and (3) both discharge and Ts. For the spatial comparison of satellite derived and estimated Ts fields, a new measure accounting for local spatial variabilities is introduced. The proposed method is applied to seven major German river basins, i.e. Danube, Ems, Main, Mulde, Neckar, Saale, and Weser. The results of the Ts simulations show a bias of 4.1 K compared to the satellite data. We hypothesize that this bias is inherent to the satellite data rather than to the model simulations. This

  6. Fuel moisture content estimation: a land-surface modelling approach applied to African savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, D.; Spessa, A.; Kaduk, J.; Balzter, H.

    2009-04-01

    Despite the importance of fire to the global climate system, in terms of emissions from biomass burning, ecosystem structure and function, and changes to surface albedo, current land-surface models do not adequately estimate key variables affecting fire ignition and propagation. Fuel moisture content (FMC) is considered one of the most important of these variables (Chuvieco et al., 2004). Biophysical models, with appropriate plant functional type parameterisations, are the most viable option to adequately predict FMC over continental scales at high temporal resolution. However, the complexity of plant-water interactions, and the variability associated with short-term climate changes, means it is one of the most difficult fire variables to quantify and predict. Our work attempts to resolve this issue using a combination of satellite data and biophysical modelling applied to Africa. The approach we take is to represent live FMC as a surface dryness index; expressed as the ratio between the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and land-surface temperature (LST). It has been argued in previous studies (Sandholt et al., 2002; Snyder et al., 2006), that this ratio displays a statistically stronger correlation to FMC than either of the variables, considered separately. In this study, simulated FMC is constrained through the assimilation of remotely sensed LST and NDVI data into the land-surface model JULES (Joint-UK Land Environment Simulator). Previous modelling studies of fire activity in Africa savannas, such as Lehsten et al. (2008), have reported significant levels of uncertainty associated with the simulations. This uncertainty is important because African savannas are among some of the most frequently burnt ecosystems and are a major source of greenhouse trace gases and aerosol emissions (Scholes et al., 1996). Furthermore, regional climate model studies indicate that many parts of the African savannas will experience drier and warmer conditions in future

  7. High yield stress associated with capillary attraction between alumina surfaces in the presence of low molecular weight dicarboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, E-Jen; Leong, Yee-Kwong; Liu, Yinong; Craig, Vincent S J; Walsh, Rick B; Howard, Shaun C

    2010-03-02

    Adsorbed low molecular weight charged molecules are known to give rise to a range of surface forces that affect the rheological behavior of oxide dispersions. The behavior of dicarboxylic acid bolaform compounds in alumina slurry was investigated to determine the influence of the molecular structure on the nanoscale interactions between alumina surfaces and on the macroscopic properties of the slurry. The surface forces in dispersions and between a single particle and a flat surface were characterized by yield stress and atomic force microscopy (AFM) respectively. Absorbed muconic acid increased the yield stress of the alumina system, which indicates an additional attractive interaction between the particles. Adsorbed trans,trans (TT) muconic acid resulted in a much higher yield stress than cis,cis (CC) muconic acid. Force-distance data obtained via AFM displayed features indicating the presence of a capillary force attraction at low pH between the alumina surfaces when TT and CC muconic acids were adsorbed at high surface coverage. This force appeared to explain the high yield stress at low pH (pH 3.6), but the absence of a net attractive force at higher pH (pH 5) did not correlate with the yield stress results. At low pH, the muconic acids become less soluble in the confined space between the interacting surfaces resulting in the formation of an "oily" muconic acid phase located between the interacting surfaces. The nanosized "oil" phase is the source of the capillary force.

  8. New estimations of precipitation and surface sublimation in East Antarctica from snow accumulation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frezzotti, Massimo; Gragnani, Roberto; Proposito, Marco [l' Energia e l' Ambiente, ' Progetto Clima Globale' , Ente per le Nuove Tecnologie, Rome (Italy); Pourchet, Michel; Gay, Michel; Vincent, Christian; Fily, Michel [CNRS, Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Geophysique de l' Environnement, Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Flora, Onelio [University of Trieste, Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, Ambientali e Marine, Trieste (Italy); Gandolfi, Stefano [University of Bologna, Dipartimento di Ingegneria delle Strutture, dei Trasporti, delle Acque, del Rilevamento, del Territorio, Bologna (Italy); Urbini, Stefano [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome (Italy); Becagli, Silvia; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita; Udisti, Roberto [University of Florence, Dipartimento di Chimica, Florence (Italy)

    2004-12-01

    Surface mass balance (SMB) distribution and its temporal and spatial variability is an essential input parameter in mass balance studies. Different methods were used, compared and integrated (stake farms, ice cores, snow radar, surface morphology, remote sensing) at eight sites along a transect from Terra Nova Bay (TNB) to Dome C (DC) (East Antarctica), to provide detailed information on the SMB. Spatial variability measurements show that the measured maximum snow accumulation (SA) in a 15 km area is well correlated to firn temperature. Wind-driven sublimation processes, controlled by the surface slope in the wind direction, have a huge impact (up to 85% of snow precipitation) on SMB and are significant in terms of past, present and future SMB evaluations. The snow redistribution process is local and has a strong impact on the annual variability of accumulation. The spatial variability of SMB at the kilometre scale is one order of magnitude higher than its temporal variability (20-30%) at the centennial time scale. This high spatial variability is due to wind-driven sublimation. Compared with our SMB calculations, previous compilations generally over-estimate SMB, up to 65% in some areas. (orig.)

  9. New constraints on the rupture process of the 1999 August 17 Izmit earthquake deduced from estimates of stress glut rate moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clévédé, E.; Bouin, M.-P.; Bukchin, B.; Mostinskiy, A.; Patau, G.

    2004-12-01

    This paper illustrates the use of integral estimates given by the stress glut rate moments of total degree 2 for constraining the rupture scenario of a large earthquake in the particular case of the 1999 Izmit mainshock. We determine the integral estimates of the geometry, source duration and rupture propagation given by the stress glut rate moments of total degree 2 by inverting long-period surface wave (LPSW) amplitude spectra. Kinematic and static models of the Izmit earthquake published in the literature are quite different from one another. In order to extract the characteristic features of this event, we calculate the same integral estimates directly from those models and compare them with those deduced from our inversion. While the equivalent rupture zone and the eastward directivity are consistent among all models, the LPSW solution displays a strong unilateral character of the rupture associated with a short rupture duration that is not compatible with the solutions deduced from the published models. With the aim of understand this discrepancy, we use simple equivalent kinematic models to reproduce the integral estimates of the considered rupture processes (including ours) by adjusting a few free parameters controlling the western and eastern parts of the rupture. We show that the joint analysis of the LPSW solution and source tomographies allows us to elucidate the scattering of source processes published for this earthquake and to discriminate between the models. Our results strongly suggest that (1) there was significant moment released on the eastern segment of the activated fault system during the Izmit earthquake; (2) the apparent rupture velocity decreases on this segment.

  10. Using Landsat Vegetation Indices to Estimate Impervious Surface Fractions for European Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Skougaard Kaspersen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Impervious surfaces (IS are a key indicator of environmental quality, and mapping of urban IS is important for a wide range of applications including hydrological modelling, water management, urban and environmental planning and urban climate studies. This paper addresses the accuracy and applicability of vegetation indices (VI, from Landsat imagery, to estimate IS fractions for European cities. The accuracy of three different measures of vegetation cover is examined for eight urban areas at different locations in Europe. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI are converted to IS fractions using a regression modelling approach. Also, NDVI is used to estimate fractional vegetation cover (FR, and consequently IS fractions. All three indices provide fairly accurate estimates (MAEs ≈ 10%, MBE’s < 2% of sub-pixel imperviousness, and are found to be applicable for cities with dissimilar climatic and vegetative conditions. The VI/IS relationship across cities is examined by quantifying the MAEs and MBEs between all combinations of models and urban areas. Also, regional regression models are developed by compiling data from multiple cities to examine the potential for developing and applying a single regression model to estimate IS fractions for numerous urban areas without reducing the accuracy considerably. Our findings indicate that the models can be applied broadly for multiple urban areas, and that the accuracy is reduced only marginally by applying the regional models. SAVI is identified as a superior index for the development of regional quantification models. The findings of this study highlight that IS fractions, and spatiotemporal changes herein, can be mapped by use of simple regression models based on VIs from remote sensors, and that the method presented enables simple, accurate and resource efficient quantification of IS.

  11. Potential crop evapotranspiration and surface evaporation estimates via a gridded weather forcing dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Clayton S.; Allen, L. Niel

    2017-03-01

    Absent local weather stations, a gridded weather dataset can provide information useful for water management in irrigated areas including potential crop evapotranspiration calculations. In estimating crop irrigation requirements and surface evaporation in Utah, United States of America, methodology and software were developed using the ASCE Standardized Penman-Monteith Reference Evapotranspiration equation with input climate drivers from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) gridded weather forcing dataset and a digital elevation model. A simple procedure was devised to correct bias in NLDAS relative humidity and air temperature data based on comparison to weather data from ground stations. Potential evapotranspiration was calculated for 18 crops (including turfgrass), wetlands (large and narrow), and open water evaporation (deep and shallow) by multiplying crop coefficient curves to reference evapotranspiration with annual curve dates set by summation of Hargreaves evapotranspiration, cumulative growing degree days, or number of days. Net potential evapotranspiration was calculated by subtracting effective precipitation estimates from the Daymet gridded precipitation dataset. Analysis of the results showed that daily estimated potential crop evapotranspiration from the model compared well with estimates from electronic weather stations (1980-2014) and with independently calculated potential crop evapotranspiration in adjacent states. Designed for this study but open sourced for other applications, software entitled GridET encapsulated the GIS-based model that provided data download and management, calculation of reference and potential crop evapotranspiration, and viewing and analysis tools. Flexible features in GridET allows a user to specify grid resolution, evapotranspiration equations, cropping information, and additional datasets with the output being transferable to other GIS software.

  12. The Contribution of Io-Raised Tides to Europa's Diurnally-Varying Surface Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose; Hurford, Terry A,; Manga, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Europa's icy surface records a rich history of geologic activity, Several features appear to be tectonic in origin and may have formed in response to Europa's daily-varying tidal stress [I]. Strike-slip faults and arcuate features called cycloids have both been linked to the patterns of stress change caused by eccentricity and obliquity [2J[3]. In fact, as Europa's obliquity has not been directly measured, observed tectonic patterns arc currently the best indicators of a theoretically supported [4] non-negligible obliquity. The diurnal tidal stress due to eccentricity is calculated by subtracting the average (or static) tidal shape of Europa generated by Jupiter's gravitational field from the instantaneous shape, which varies as Europa moves through its eccentric orbit [5]. In other words, it is the change of shape away from average that generates tidal stress. One might expect tidal contributions from the other large moons of Jupiter to be negligible given their size and the height of the tides they raise on Europa versus Jupiter's mass and the height of the tide it raises on Europa, However, what matters for tidally-induced stress is not how large the lo-raised bulge is compared to the Jupiter-raised bulge but rather the differences bet\\Veen the instantaneous and static bulges in each case. For example, when Europa is at apocenter, Jupiter raises a tide 30m lower than its static tide. At the same time, 10 raises a tide about 0.5m higher than its static tide. Hence, the change in Io's tidal distortion is about 2% of the change in the Jovian distortion when Europa is at apocenter

  13. Towards scale-independent land-surface flux estimates in Noah-MP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thober, Stephan; Mizukami, Naoki; Samaniego, Luis; Attinger, Sabine; Clark, Martyn; Cuntz, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Land-surface models use a variety of process representations to calculate terrestrial energy, water and biogeochemical fluxes. These process descriptions are usually derived from point measurements which are, in turn, scaled to much larger resolutions ranging from 1 km in catchment hydrology to 100 km in climate modelling. Both, hydrologic and climate models are nowadays run on different spatial resolutions, using the exactly same land surface representations. A fundamental criterion for the physical consistency of land-surface simulations across scales is that a flux estimated over a given area is independent of the spatial model resolution (i.e., the flux-matching criterion). The Noah-MP land surface model considers only one soil and land cover type per model grid cell without any representation of their subgrid variability, implying a weak flux-matching. A fractional approach simulates the subgrid variability but it requires a higher computational demand than using effective parameters and it is used only for land cover in current land surface schemes. A promising approach to derive scale-independent parameters is the Multiscale Parameter Regionalization (MPR) technique, which consists of two steps: first, it applies transfer functions directly to high-resolution data (such as 100 m soil maps) to derive high-resolution model parameter fields, acknowledging the full subgrid variability. Second, it upscales these high-resolution parameter fields to the model resolution by using appropriate upscaling operators. MPR has shown to improve substantially the scalability of the mesoscale Hydrologic Models mHM (Samaniego et al., 2010 WRR). Here, we apply the MPR technique to the Noah-MP land-surface model for a large sample of basins distributed across the contiguous USA. Specifically, we evaluate the flux-matching criterion for several hydrologic fluxes such as evapotranspiration and drainage at scales ranging from 3 km to 48 km. We investigate the impact of different

  14. Estimation of the stress related to conservative scoliosis therapy: an analysis based on BSSQ questionnaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szulc Andrzej

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescent girls treated with a brace for scoliosis are submitted to prolonged stress related to both the disease and the therapy. Currently proposed quality of life questionnaires are focused on the outcome of therapy. Bad Sobernheim Stress Questionnaire (BSSQ enables monitoring of patients being under treatment with a brace or exercises. The aim of the study was to assess the stress level in conservatively managed scoliotic girls using BSSQ. Materials and methods 111 girls, aged 14,2 ± 2,2 years, mean Cobb angle of the primary curve 42,8° ± 17,0° and mean Bunnell angle of 11,4° ± 4,5° were examined with two versions of BSSQ (Deformity and Brace. The analysis considered the type of treatment, curve location, correlation of the total score with age, Cobb angle and Bunnell rotation angle. Results The BSSQ Deformity revealed the median of 17 points in patients managed with exercises (from 4 to 24 points, 18 in patients managed with a brace (from 8 to 24 points and 12 in patients before surgery (from 3 to 21 points. Braced patients who completed both questionnaires (n = 50 revealed significantly higher score with BSSQ Deformity (median = 18 comparing to BSSQ Brace (median = 9. There was a correlation between the total score of BSSQ Deformity and the Cobb angle (r = -0,34, Bunnell primary curve rotation (r = -0,34 and Bunnell sum of rotation (r = -0,33 but not with the age of patients. Conclusion Scoliotic adolescents managed with exercises and brace suffered little stress from the deformity. The brace increased the level of stress over the stress induced by the deformity. The stress level correlated with clinical deformity (Bunnell angle, radiological deformity (Cobb angle and the type of treatment (exercises, bracing, surgery. Bad Sobernheim Stress Questionnaires are simple and helpful in the management of girls treated conservatively for idiopathic scoliosis.

  15. Real-Time Personalized Monitoring to Estimate Occupational Heat Stress in Ambient Assisted Working

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo Pancardo; Acosta, Francisco D.; José Adán Hernández-Nolasco; Miguel A. Wister; Diego López-de-Ipiña

    2015-01-01

    Ambient Assisted Working (AAW) is a discipline aiming to provide comfort and safety in the workplace through customization and technology. Workers’ comfort may be compromised in many labor situations, including those depending on environmental conditions, like extremely hot weather conduces to heat stress. Occupational heat stress (OHS) happens when a worker is in an uninterrupted physical activity and in a hot environment. OHS can produce strain on the body, which leads to discomfort and eve...

  16. Estimating Sea Surface Salinity in Coastal Waters of the Gulf of Mexico Using Visible Channels on SNPP-VIIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    surface salinity estimates for the Northern Gulf of Mexico . In situ salinity data collected from six coastal moorings were compared to calibrated, geo...34Geographic and hydrodynamic characteristics of shallow coastal lagoons ," Marine Geology 88, 187-199 (1989) [3] Gordon, H.R., and Wang, M., "Retrieval...1. HEPORJ OI\\JE (DD-MM-YYYY) 30-07-2014 REPORT TYPE Conference Proceeding 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Estimating Sea Surface Salinity in Coastal

  17. Estimating ecological water stress caused by anthropogenic uses in the US Great Lakes region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alian, S.; Mayer, A. S.; Maclean, A.; Watkins, D. W., Jr.; Gyawali, R.; Mirchi, A.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropocentric water resources management that prioritizes socio-economic growth can cause harmful ecological water stress by depriving aquatic ecosystems of the water needed to sustain habitats. It is important to better understand the impacts of water withdrawal by different economic sectors (e.g., agriculture, power utilities, manufacturing, etc.), withdrawal sources, and extent of return flow (i.e., return of water to river system) at different spatial and temporal scales in order to characterize potentially harmful streamflow disturbances, and to inform water management. Herein, GIS technology is used to characterize and map ecological water stress in the Great Lakes region by compiling and analyzing water withdrawal data for different use categories. An integrative geospatial method is developed to quantify catchment scale streamflow disturbance as the sum of flow depletion and return flow, and propagate it along the stream network in order to calculate water stress index as function of consumptive use and impacted streamflow. Results for the Kalamazoo River Watershed, Michigan, illustrate that although average annual and July water stress is generally relatively low, protective management actions may be necessary in a significant number of catchments, especially in urban catchments with very high water stress. Water stress is significantly higher under low flow conditions, indicating the need to adjust withdrawals to reduce adverse resource impacts on sensitive streams.

  18. Microstructuring of thermo-mechanically highly stressed surfaces final report of the DFG research group 576

    CERN Document Server

    Rienäcker, Adrian; Knoll, Gunter; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Maier, Hans; Reithmeier, Eduard; Dinkelacker, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    This contributed volume presents the final research results of the DFG Research Group 576, which is a joint initiative of five different institutes of the Leibniz Universität Hannover and the Universität Kassel, Germany. The research of the DFG Research Group 576 focuses on improving the tribological behavior of thermomechanically highly stressed surfaces, particularly on cylinder liner for combustion engines. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students who want to specialize in the field.

  19. Developing first time-series of land surface temperature from AATSR with uncertainty estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, Darren; Remedios, John

    2013-04-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is the radiative skin temperature of the land, and is one of the key parameters in the physics of land-surface processes on regional and global scales. Earth Observation satellites provide the opportunity to obtain global coverage of LST approximately every 3 days or less. One such source of satellite retrieved LST has been the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR); with LST retrieval being implemented in the AATSR Instrument Processing Facility in March 2004. Here we present first regional and global time-series of LST data from AATSR with estimates of uncertainty. Mean changes in temperature over the last decade will be discussed along with regional patterns. Although time-series across all three ATSR missions have previously been constructed (Kogler et al., 2012), the use of low resolution auxiliary data in the retrieval algorithm and non-optimal cloud masking resulted in time-series artefacts. As such, considerable ESA supported development has been carried out on the AATSR data to address these concerns. This includes the integration of high resolution auxiliary data into the retrieval algorithm and subsequent generation of coefficients and tuning parameters, plus the development of an improved cloud mask based on the simulation of clear sky conditions from radiance transfer modelling (Ghent et al., in prep.). Any inference on this LST record is though of limited value without the accompaniment of an uncertainty estimate; wherein the Joint Committee for Guides in Metrology quote an uncertainty as "a parameter associated with the result of a measurement that characterizes the dispersion of the values that could reasonably be attributed to the measurand that is the value of the particular quantity to be measured". Furthermore, pixel level uncertainty fields are a mandatory requirement in the on-going preparation of the LST product for the upcoming Sea and Land Surface Temperature (SLSTR) instrument on-board Sentinel-3

  20. Molecular statics calculations of proton binding to goethite surfaces: A new approach to estimation of stability constants for multisite surface complexation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, James R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    1996-05-01

    A new approach to estimating stability constants for proton binding in multisite surface complexation models is presented. The method is based on molecular statics computation of energies for the formation of proton vacancies and interstitials in ideal periodic slabs representing the (100), (110), (010), (001), and (021) surfaces of goethite. Gas-phase energies of clusters representing the hydrolysis products of ferric iron are calculated using the same potential energy functions used for the surface. These energies are linearly related to the hydrolysis constants for ferric iron in aqueous solution. Stability constants for proton binding at goethite surfaces are estimated by assuming the same log K- Δ E relationship for goethite surface protonation reactions. These stability constants predict a pH of zero charge of 8.9, in adequate agreement with measurements on CO 2-free goethite. The estimated stability constants differ significantly from previous estimations based on Pauling bond strength. We find that nearly all the surface oxide ions are reactive; nineteen of the twenty-six surface sites investigated have log Kint between 7.7 and 9.4. This implies a site density between fifteen and sixteen reactive sites/nm for crystals dominated by (110) and (021) crystal faces.

  1. Estimation of surface curvature from full-field shape data using principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sameer; Vinuchakravarthy, S.; Subramanian, S. J.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional digital image correlation (3D-DIC) is a popular image-based experimental technique for estimating surface shape, displacements and strains of deforming objects. In this technique, a calibrated stereo rig is used to obtain and stereo-match pairs of images of the object of interest from which the shapes of the imaged surface are then computed using the calibration parameters of the rig. Displacements are obtained by performing an additional temporal correlation of the shapes obtained at various stages of deformation and strains by smoothing and numerically differentiating the displacement data. Since strains are of primary importance in solid mechanics, significant efforts have been put into computation of strains from the measured displacement fields; however, much less attention has been paid to date to computation of curvature from the measured 3D surfaces. In this work, we address this gap by proposing a new method of computing curvature from full-field shape measurements using principal component analysis (PCA) along the lines of a similar work recently proposed to measure strains (Grama and Subramanian 2014 Exp. Mech. 54 913-33). PCA is a multivariate analysis tool that is widely used to reveal relationships between a large number of variables, reduce dimensionality and achieve significant denoising. This technique is applied here to identify dominant principal components in the shape fields measured by 3D-DIC and these principal components are then differentiated systematically to obtain the first and second fundamental forms used in the curvature calculation. The proposed method is first verified using synthetically generated noisy surfaces and then validated experimentally on some real world objects with known ground-truth curvatures.

  2. Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes. Shopdiabetes.org: Your Stress-Free System for Family Dinners! - 2017-03-book-oclock-scramble.html Shopdiabetes.org Your Stress-Free System for Family Dinners! A year of delicious meals to help prevent ...

  3. Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or illness Traumatic stress, which happens when you ... stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  4. J-Integral Estimate for Circumferential Cracked Pipes Under Primary and Secondary Stress in R, RBC-MR A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Hyun Suk; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    This paper provides a comparison of the J-integral estimation method under combined primary and secondary stress in the R, RBC-MR A code. The comparisons of each code are based on finite element analysis using Abacus with regard to the crack shape, crack depth, and magnitude of secondary load. The estimate of the R code is conservative near L{sub r} = 1, and that of the RBC-MR A code is conservative near L{sub r} = 0. As a result, this paper proposes a modified method of J-integral estimation in the R, RCC{sub M}R A code. The J-integral using the modified method corresponds to the finite element analysis result.

  5. Enhanced surface recombination in a-Si:H solar cells caused by light stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusian, W.; Pfleiderer, H.

    1991-08-01

    The change of the spectral photocurrent characteristics of amorphous silicon pin solar cells with light induced degradation is compared with the effect of slightly doping the ``i-layer''. Both treatments yield similar results. Light stress lets the primary photocurrent, measured with blue light, decrease and the secondary photocurrent, measured with red light, increased. The similar change occurs when a slight n-doping of the ``i-layer'' is replaced by a slight p-doping. A simple interpretation in terms of unfirom fields and preponderant surface recombination is possible and will be outlined. We additionally resort to numerical similations. Degradation is to be simulated by the introduction of stronger recombination. The crombination rate will be distributed in space. We indeed find that enhanced surface recombination plays the key role in guiding the simulation towards our experiment.

  6. Dissimilarity between temperature-humidity in the atmospheric surface layer and implications for estimates of evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancelli, D. M.; Dias, N. L.; Chamecki, M.

    2012-12-01

    In several methods used in water resources to estimate evaporation from land and water surfaces, a fundamental assumption is that temperature (T) and specific humidity (q) fluctuations behave similarly in the atmospheric surface layer (ASL). In the Energy-Budget Bowen Ratio method it is assumed that both eddy diffusivities are equal, while in the variance method it is often assumed that all the Monin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS) functions for the two scalars are equal. However, it is well-known that the T-q similarity does not always hold and that the dissimilarity found in practice can significantly impact the estimates of evaporation. Given the frequent dissimilarity between temperature and humidity, two important problems arise. The first one is related to the choice of the function used to characterize scalar similarity, given that not all commonly used functions are equally capable of identifying scalar dissimilarity. The second problem is associated with the identification of the physical mechanisms behind scalar dissimilarity in each particular case: local advection, nonstationarity, surface heterogeneity, active/passive roles of the scalars, entrainment fluxes at the top of the atmospheric boundary layer are typically cited as possible causes, but seldom a convincing argument is presented. In this work we combine experimental data and numerical simulations to study similarity between T and q in the ASL. Data measured over a lake in Brazil suggests a strong relationship between scalar similarity and the balance between local production and dissipation of scalar variance, which is in practice related to the strength of the surface forcing. Scalar variance and covariance budgets are used to derive a set of dimensionless Scalar Flux numbers that are capable of diagnosing the balance between gradient production and molecular dissipation of scalar variance and covariance. Experimental data shows that these Scalar Flux numbers are good predictors of scalar (dis

  7. Estimation of Land Surface Energy Balance Using Satellite Data of Spatial Reduced Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vintila, Ruxandra; Radnea, Cristina; Savin, Elena; Poenaru, Violeta

    2010-12-01

    The paper presents preliminary results concerning the monitoring at national level of several geo-biophysical variables retrieved by remote sensing, in particular those related to drought or aridisation. The study, which is in progress, represents also an exercise for to the implementation of a Land Monitoring Core Service for Romania, according to the Kopernikus Program and in compliance with the INSPIRE Directive. The SEBS model has been used to retrieve land surface energy balance variables, such as turbulent heat fluxes, evaporative fraction and daily evaporation, based on three information types: (1) surface albedo, emissivity, temperature, fraction of vegetation cover (fCover), leaf area index (LAI) and vegetation height; (2) air pressure, temperature, humidity and wind speed at the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height; (3) downward solar radiation and downward longwave radiation. AATSR and MERIS archived reprocessed images have provided several types of information. Thus, surface albedo, emissivity, and land surface temperature have been retrieved from AATSR, while LAI and fCover have been estimated from MERIS. The vegetation height has been derived from CORINE Land Cover and PELCOM Land Use databases, while the meteorological information at the height of PBL have been estimated from the measurements provided by the national weather station network. Other sources of data used during this study have been the GETASSE30 digital elevation model with 30" spatial resolution, used for satellite image orthorectification, and the SIGSTAR-200 geographical information system of soil resources of Romania, used for water deficit characterisation. The study will continue by processing other AATSR and MERIS archived images, complemented by the validation of SEBS results with ground data collected on the most important biomes for Romania at various phenological stages, and the transformation of evaporation / evapotranspiration into a drought index using the soil texture

  8. Accelerometer-based estimation and modal velocity feedback vibration control of a stress-ribbon bridge with pneumatic muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohan; Schauer, Thomas; Goldack, Arndt; Bleicher, Achim; Schlaich, Mike

    2016-09-01

    Lightweight footbridges are very elegant but also prone to vibration. By employing active vibration control, smart footbridges could accomplish not only the architectural concept but also the required serviceability and comfort. Inertial sensors such as accelerometers allow the estimation of nodal velocities and displacements. A Kalman filter together with a band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC) is applied to enable a drift-free estimation of these signals for the quasi-periodic motion under pedestrian excitation without extra information from other kinds of auxiliary sensors. The modal velocities of the structure are determined by using a second Kalman filter with the known applied actuator forces as inputs and the estimated nodal displacement and velocities as measurements. The obtained multi-modal velocities are then used for feedback control. An ultra-lightweight stress-ribbon footbridge built in the Peter-Behrens- Halle at the Technische Universitat Berlin served as the research object. Using two inertial sensors in optimal points we can estimate the dominant modal characteristics of this bridge. Real-time implementation and evaluation results of the proposed estimator will be presented in comparison to signals derived from classical displacement encoders. The real-time estimated modal velocities were applied in a multi-modal velocity feedback vibration control scheme with lightweight pneumatic muscle actuators. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of using inertial sensors for active vibration control of lightweight footbridges.

  9. Analysis of distribution rule of surface stress on cross wedge rolling contact zone by finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xuedao; Li, Lianpeng; Hu, Zhenghuan

    2005-12-01

    Contact surface of cross-wedge rolling is a complicated space surface and distribution rule of contact surface stress is very complicated. So far, its analyzed result was still based on slippery line method. Designing mould and actual production mainly depend on experiential factor. Application and development of cross-wedge rolling was baffled seriously. Based on the forming characteristics of cross-wedge rolling with flat wedge-shape, the ANSYS/DYNA software was developed secondly on the basis of itself, and the corresponding command program was compiled. Rolling process of cross-wedge rolling with flat wedge-shape was simulated successfully. Through simulation, space surface shape of contact surface was achieved, and distribution rule of contact surface stress was analyzed detailed and obtained. The results provide important theoretical foundation for avoiding appearing bug on surface of rolled part, instructing to design cross-wedge mould and confirming force and energy parameter.

  10. Estimation of annual actual evapotranspiration from nonsaturated land surfaces with conventional meteorological data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU; Xinfa; ZENG; Yan; MIAO; Qilong; YU; Qiang

    2004-01-01

    Views diverge greatly on the relationship between actual evapotranspiration (AE) and potential evapotranspiration (PE). Penman showed that AE is determined in intensity by PE and changes proportionally as a function of PE. In contrast, Bouchet indicated that AE determines PE and varies inversely with PE. Based on nearly 30 years data from 432 weather stations and 512 hydrological stations in China, the two different theories, Penman's assumption and Bouchet's complementary relationship between AE and PE, were tested on nine river basins. With data integration technique, the complementary relationship between AE and PE was displayed entirely. A general model to estimate the actual evapotranspiration from nonsaturated surfaces by routine meteorological observations has been established on the basis of thorough analysis of the concept of PE. The results show that the calculations are all in error control of <10%, except for a few years over the Yellow River Basin.

  11. Elasticity estimates from images of crawling waves generated by miniature surface sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partin, Alexander; Hah, Zaegyoo; Barry, Christopher T; Rubens, Deborah J; Parker, Kevin J

    2014-04-01

    We describe a surface-based approach to the generation of shear wave interference patterns, called crawling waves (CrW), within a medium and derive local estimates of biomechanical properties of tissue. In previous experiments, elongated bars operating as vibration sources were used to generate CrW propagation in samples. In the present study, however, a pair of miniature circular vibration sources was applied to the overlying skin to generate the CrW within the medium. The shape and position of the miniature sources make this configuration more applicable for in vivo implementation. A modified ultrasound imaging system is used to display the CrW propagation. A shear speed mapping algorithm is developed using a detailed analysis of the CrW. The proposed setup is applied to several biomaterials including a homogeneous phantom, an inhomogeneous phantom and an ex vivo human liver. The data are analyzed using the mapping algorithm to reveal the biomechanical properties of the biomaterials.

  12. Comparing and evaluating model estimates of background ozone in surface air over North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberman, J.; Fiore, A. M.; Lin, M.; Zhang, L.; Jacob, D. J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone adversely affects human health and vegetation, and is thus a criteria pollutant regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). Ozone is produced in the atmosphere via photo-oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbon monoxide (CO) in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NOx). The present EPA approach considers health risks associated with exposure to ozone enhancement above the policy-relevant background (PRB), which is currently defined as the surface concentration of ozone that would exist without North American anthropogenic emissions. PRB thus includes production by natural precursors, production by precursors emitted on foreign continents, and transport of stratospheric ozone into surface air. As PRB is not an observable quantity, it must be estimated using numerical models. We compare PRB estimates for the year 2006 from the GFDL Atmospheric Model 3 (AM3) chemistry-climate model (CCM) and the GEOS-Chem (GC) chemical transport model (CTM). We evaluate the skill of the models in reproducing total surface ozone observed at the U.S. Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet), dividing the stations into low-elevation ( 1.5 km in altitude, all western) subgroups. At the low-elevation sites AM3 estimates of PRB (38±9 ppbv in spring, 27±9 ppbv in summer) are higher than GC (27±7 ppbv in spring, 21±8 ppbv in summer) in both seasons. Analysis at these sites is complicated by a positive bias in AM3 total ozone with respect to the observed total ozone, the source of which is yet unclear. At high-elevation sites, AM3 PRB is higher in the spring (47±8 ppbv) than in the summer (33±8 ppbv). In contrast, GC simulates little seasonal variation at high elevation sites (39±5 ppbv in spring vs. 38±7 ppbv in summer). Seasonal average total ozone at these sites was within 4 ppbv of the observations for both spring and summer in both models. The high elevation springtime

  13. Yield stress of duplex stainless steel specimens estimated using a compound Hall–Petch equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriaki Hirota, Fuxing Yin, Tsukasa Azuma and Tadanobu Inoue

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the 0.2% yield stress of duplex stainless steel was evaluated using a compound Hall–Petch equation. The compound Hall–Petch equation was derived from four types of duplex stainless steel, which contained 0.2–64.4 wt% δ-ferrite phase, had different chemical compositions and were annealed at different temperatures. Intragranular yield stress was measured with an ultra-microhardness tester and evaluated with the yield stress model proposed by Dao et al. Grain size, volume fraction and texture were monitored by electron backscattering diffraction measurement. The kγ constant in the compound equation for duplex stainless steel agrees well with that for γ-phase SUS316L steel in the temperature range of 1323–1473 K. The derived compound Hall–Petch equation predicts that the yield stress will be in good agreement with the experimental results for the Cr, Mn, Si, Ni and N solid-solution states. We find that the intragranular yield stress of the δ-phase of duplex stainless steel is rather sensitive to the chemical composition and annealing conditions, which is attributed to the size misfit parameter.

  14. Prediction of tablet characteristics from residual stress distribution estimated by the finite element method.