WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface state density

  1. Photon density of states for deformed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emig, T

    2006-01-01

    A new approach to the Helmholtz spectrum for arbitrarily shaped boundaries and a rather general class of boundary conditions is introduced. We derive the boundary induced change of the density of states in terms of the free Green's function from which we obtain both perturbative and non-perturbative results for the Casimir interaction between deformed surfaces. As an example, we compute the lateral electrodynamic Casimir force between two corrugated surfaces over a wide parameter range. Universal behaviour, fixed only by the largest wavelength component of the surface shape, is identified at large surface separations. This complements known short distance expansions which are also reproduced

  2. Tunneling spectroscopy on semiconductors with a low surface state density

    OpenAIRE

    Sommerhalter, Christof; Matthes, Thomas W.; Boneberg, Johannes; Leiderer, Paul; Lux-Steiner, Martha Christina

    1997-01-01

    A detailed study of tunneling spectroscopy concerning semiconductors with a low surface state density is presented. For this purpose, I V curves under dark conditions and under illumination were measured on the (0001) van der Waals surface of a p-type WS2 single crystal, which is known to be free of intrinsic surface states. The measurements are interpreted by an analytical one-dimensional metal-insulator-semiconductor model, which shows that the presence of the finite tunneling current has ...

  3. Nitride surface passivation of GaAs nanowires: impact on surface state density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, Prokhor A; Dunaevskiy, Mikhail S; Ulin, Vladimir P; Lvova, Tatiana V; Filatov, Dmitriy O; Nezhdanov, Alexey V; Mashin, Aleksander I; Berkovits, Vladimir L

    2015-01-14

    Surface nitridation by hydrazine-sulfide solution, which is known to produce surface passivation of GaAs crystals, was applied to GaAs nanowires (NWs). We studied the effect of nitridation on conductivity and microphotoluminescence (μ-PL) of individual GaAs NWs using conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) and confocal luminescent microscopy (CLM), respectively. Nitridation is found to produce an essential increase in the NW conductivity and the μ-PL intensity as well evidence of surface passivation. Estimations show that the nitride passivation reduces the surface state density by a factor of 6, which is of the same order as that found for GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires. The effects of the nitride passivation are also stable under atmospheric ambient conditions for six months.

  4. Evaluating effect of surface state density at the interfaces in degraded bulk heterojunction organic solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Swati; Singh, Vinamrita; Arora, Manoj; Pal Tandon, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Degradation and short shelf life have been observed experimentally in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT): 6,6-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) based blend solar cells. Both dark and illuminated current-voltage characteristics could be explained quantitatively with a proposed single model for a typical degraded organic solar cell-glass/ITO/PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PCBM/Al. It has been found that surface state density, interface thickness, tunneling coefficient and occupation probabilities of the interface states becomes important with the passage of time. To look into the problem the activity at ITO/PEDOT:PSS and P3HT:PCBM/Al interfaces are studied using realistic values of the interfaces. The experimental J-V characteristics is well explained with the inclusion of tunneling current through these surface states and becomes the dominant current component for the degraded cell. It is also found that surface state density increases to 10 12 -10 13 cm -2 eV -1 , which has been verified with C-V measurements and also is in agreement with our proposed model for BHJ solar cell after 150 h of fabrication.

  5. Evaluating effect of surface state density at the interfaces in degraded bulk heterojunction organic solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Swati, E-mail: drswatia@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Zakir Husain College, University of Delhi, Delhi 110002 (India); Singh, Vinamrita [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Arora, Manoj [Department of Physics, Ramjas College, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Pal Tandon, Ram [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2012-08-01

    Degradation and short shelf life have been observed experimentally in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT): 6,6-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) based blend solar cells. Both dark and illuminated current-voltage characteristics could be explained quantitatively with a proposed single model for a typical degraded organic solar cell-glass/ITO/PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PCBM/Al. It has been found that surface state density, interface thickness, tunneling coefficient and occupation probabilities of the interface states becomes important with the passage of time. To look into the problem the activity at ITO/PEDOT:PSS and P3HT:PCBM/Al interfaces are studied using realistic values of the interfaces. The experimental J-V characteristics is well explained with the inclusion of tunneling current through these surface states and becomes the dominant current component for the degraded cell. It is also found that surface state density increases to 10{sup 12}-10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}, which has been verified with C-V measurements and also is in agreement with our proposed model for BHJ solar cell after 150 h of fabrication.

  6. Modulation of electromagnetic local density of states by coupling of surface phonon-polariton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Zhang, Chao-Jie; Wang, Tong-Biao; Liu, Jiang-Tao; Yu, Tian-Bao; Liao, Qing-Hua; Liu, Nian-Hua

    2017-02-01

    We studied the electromagnetic local density of state (EM-LDOS) near the surface of a one-dimensional multilayer structure (1DMS) alternately stacked by SiC and Si. EM-LDOS of a semi-infinite bulk appears two intrinsic peaks due to the resonance of surface phonon-polariton (SPhP) in SiC. In contrast with that of SiC bulk, SPhP can exist at the interface of SiC and Si for the 1DMS. The SPhPs from different interfaces can couple together, which can lead to a significant modulation of EM-LDOS. When the component widths of 1DMS are large, the spectrum of EM-LDOS exhibits oscillation behavior in the frequency regime larger than the resonance frequency of SPhP. While the component widths are small, due to the strong coupling of SPhPs, another peak appears in the EM-LDOS spectrum besides the two intrinsic ones. And the position of the new peak move toward high frequency when the width ratio of SiC and Si increases. The influences of distance from the surfaces and period of 1DMS on EM-LDOS have also been studied in detail. The results are helpful in studying the near-field radiative heat transfer and spontaneous emission.

  7. Effect of argon implantation on solid-state dewetting: control of size and surface density of silicon nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadori, Y; Borowik, Ł; Chevalier, N; Barbé, J-C

    2017-01-27

    Thermally induced solid-state dewetting of ultra-thin films on insulators is a process of prime interest, since it is capable of easily forming nanocrystals. If no particular treatment is performed to the film prior to the solid-state dewetting, it is already known that the size, the shape and the density of nanocrystals is governed by the initial film thickness. In this paper, we report a novel approach to control the size and the surface density of silicon nanocrystals based on an argon-implantation preliminary surface treatment. Using 7.5 nm thin layers of silicon, we show that increasing the implantation dose tends to form smaller silicon nanocrystals with diameter and height lower than 50 nm and 30 nm, respectively. Concomitantly, the surface density is increased by a factor greater than 20, going from 5 μm -2 to values over 100 μm -2 .

  8. Micro-strain, dislocation density and surface chemical state analysis of multication thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaram, P., E-mail: jayarampnair@gmail.com [Department of Physics, MES Ponnani College Ponnani, Kerala (India); Pradyumnan, P.P. [Department of Physics, University of Calicut, Kerala 673 635 (India); Karazhanov, S.Zh. [Department for Solar Energy, Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller (Norway)

    2016-11-15

    Multication complex metal oxide thin films are rapidly expanding the class of materials with many technologically important applications. Herein this work, the surface of the pulsed laser deposited thin films of Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} and multinary compounds obtained by substitution/co-substitution of Sn{sup 4+} with In{sup 3+} and Ga{sup 3+} are studied by X-ray photoelectron emission spectroscopy (X-PES) method. Peaks corresponding to the elements of Zn, Sn, Ga, In and O on the film surface has been identified and contribution of the elements has been studied by the computer aided surface analysis (CASA) software. Binding energies, full-width at half maximum (FWHM), spin-orbit splitting energies, asymmetric peak-shape fitting parameters and quantification of elements in the films are discussed. Studies of structural properties of the films by x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique showed inverse spinel type lattice with preferential orientation. Micro-strain, dislocation density and crystallite sizes in the film surface have been estimated.

  9. Response of the Shockley surface state to an external electrical field: A density-functional theory study of Cu(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, K.; Einstein, T. L.; Hyldgaard, P.

    2012-01-01

    The response of the Cu(111) Shockley surface state to an external electrical field is characterized by combining a density-functional theory calculation for a slab geometry with an analysis of the Kohn-Sham wave functions. Our analysis is facilitated by a decoupling of the Kohn-Sham states via a rotation in Hilbert space. We find that the surface state displays isotropic dispersion, quadratic until the Fermi wave vector but with a significant quartic contribution beyond. We calculate the shift in energetic position and effective mass of the surface state for an electrical field perpendicular to the Cu(111) surface; the response is linear over a broad range of field strengths. We find that charge transfer occurs beyond the outermost copper atoms and that accumulation of electrons is responsible for a quarter of the screening of the electrical field. This allows us to provide well converged determinations of the field-induced changes in the surface state for a moderate number of layers in the slab geometry.

  10. Response of the Shockley surface state on Cu(111) to an external electrical field: A density-functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Kristian; Hyldgaard, Per; Einstein, T. L.

    2011-03-01

    We study the response of the Cu(111) Shockley surface state to an external electrical field E by combining a density-functional theory calculation for a finite slab geometry with an analysis of the Kohn-Sham wavefunctions to obtain a well-converged characterization. We find that the surface state displays isotropic dispersion, quadratic until the Fermi wave vector but with a significant quartic contribution beyond. We find that the shift in band minimum and effective mass depend linearly on E. Most change in electrostatic potential profile, and charge transfer occurs outside the outermost copper atoms, and most of the screening is due to bulk electrons. Our analysis is facilitated by a method used to decouple the Kohn-Sham states due to the finite slab geometry, using a rotation in Hilbert space. We discuss applications to tuning the Fermi wavelength and so the many patterns attributed to metallic surface states. Supported by (KB and PH) Swedish Vetenskapsrådet VR 621-2008-4346 and (TLE) NSF CHE 07-50334 & UMD MRSEC DMR 05-20471.

  11. Discrete density of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, Alhun; Sisman, Altug

    2016-01-01

    By considering the quantum-mechanically minimum allowable energy interval, we exactly count number of states (NOS) and introduce discrete density of states (DOS) concept for a particle in a box for various dimensions. Expressions for bounded and unbounded continua are analytically recovered from discrete ones. Even though substantial fluctuations prevail in discrete DOS, they're almost completely flattened out after summation or integration operation. It's seen that relative errors of analytical expressions of bounded/unbounded continua rapidly decrease for high NOS values (weak confinement or high energy conditions), while the proposed analytical expressions based on Weyl's conjecture always preserve their lower error characteristic. - Highlights: • Discrete density of states considering minimum energy difference is proposed. • Analytical DOS and NOS formulas based on Weyl conjecture are given. • Discrete DOS and NOS functions are examined for various dimensions. • Relative errors of analytical formulas are much better than the conventional ones.

  12. Discrete density of states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, Alhun; Sisman, Altug, E-mail: sismanal@itu.edu.tr

    2016-03-22

    By considering the quantum-mechanically minimum allowable energy interval, we exactly count number of states (NOS) and introduce discrete density of states (DOS) concept for a particle in a box for various dimensions. Expressions for bounded and unbounded continua are analytically recovered from discrete ones. Even though substantial fluctuations prevail in discrete DOS, they're almost completely flattened out after summation or integration operation. It's seen that relative errors of analytical expressions of bounded/unbounded continua rapidly decrease for high NOS values (weak confinement or high energy conditions), while the proposed analytical expressions based on Weyl's conjecture always preserve their lower error characteristic. - Highlights: • Discrete density of states considering minimum energy difference is proposed. • Analytical DOS and NOS formulas based on Weyl conjecture are given. • Discrete DOS and NOS functions are examined for various dimensions. • Relative errors of analytical formulas are much better than the conventional ones.

  13. Method of measuring surface density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregor, J.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described of measuring surface density or thickness, preferably of coating layers, using radiation emitted by a suitable radionuclide, e.g., 241 Am. The radiation impinges on the measured material, e.g., a copper foil and in dependence on its surface density or thickness part of the flux of impinging radiation is reflected and part penetrates through the material. The radiation which has penetrated through the material excites in a replaceable adjustable backing characteristic radiation of an energy close to that of the impinging radiation (within +-30 keV). Part of the flux of the characteristic radiation spreads back to the detector, penetrates through the material in which in dependence on surface density or thickness of the coating layer it is partly absorbed. The flux of the penetrated characteristic radiation impinging on the face of the detector is a function of surface density or thickness. Only that part of the energy is evaluated of the energy spectrum which corresponds to the energy of characteristic radiation. (B.S.)

  14. Passivation of surface states of α-Fe2O3(0001) surface by deposition of Ga2O3 overlayers: A density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulman, Kanchan; Nguyen, Manh-Thuong; Seriani, Nicola; Gebauer, Ralph

    2016-03-07

    There is a big debate in the community regarding the role of surface states of hematite in the photoelectrochemical water splitting. Experimental studies on non-catalytic overlayers passivating the hematite surface states claim a favorable reduction in the overpotential for the water splitting reaction. As a first step towards understanding the effect of these overlayers, we have studied the system Ga2O3 overlayers on hematite (0001) surfaces using first principles computations in the PBE+U framework. Our computations suggest that stoichiometric terminations of Ga2O3 overlayers are energetically more favored than the bare surface, at ambient oxygen chemical potentials. Energetics suggest that the overlayers prefer to grow via a layer-plus-island (Stranski-Krastanov) growth mode with a critical layer thickness of 1-2 layers. Thus, a complete wetting of the hematite surface by an overlayer of gallium oxide is thermodynamically favored. We establish that the effect of deposition of the Ga2O3 overlayers on the bare hematite surface is to passivate the surface states for the stoichiometric termination. For the oxygen terminated surface which is the most stable termination under photoelectrochemical conditions, the effect of deposition of the Ga2O3 overlayer is to passivate the hole-trapping surface state.

  15. Scattered surface charge density: A tool for surface characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Naydenov, Borislav; Mantega, Mauro; Rungger, Ivan; Sanvito, Stefano; Boland, John J.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of nonlocal scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements to characterize the local structure of adspecies in their states where they are significantly less perturbed by the probe, which is accomplished by mapping the amplitude and phase of the scattered surface charge density. As an example, we study single-H-atom adsorption on the n-type Si(100)-(4 × 2) surface, and demonstrate the existence of two different configurations that are distinguishable using the nonlocal approach and successfully corroborated by density functional theory. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  16. Scattered surface charge density: A tool for surface characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Naydenov, Borislav

    2011-11-28

    We demonstrate the use of nonlocal scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements to characterize the local structure of adspecies in their states where they are significantly less perturbed by the probe, which is accomplished by mapping the amplitude and phase of the scattered surface charge density. As an example, we study single-H-atom adsorption on the n-type Si(100)-(4 × 2) surface, and demonstrate the existence of two different configurations that are distinguishable using the nonlocal approach and successfully corroborated by density functional theory. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  17. Effect of physisorbed molecules and an external external fields on the metallic Shockley surface state of Cu(111): A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Kristian; Einstein, T. L.; Hyldgaard, Per

    2012-02-01

    To manipulate the Cu(111) partially-filled Shockley surface state, we study its response to an external fieldootnotetextKB, TLE, PH; arXiv 1109:6706 E and physisorbed PAHs and quinone molecules. We use density-functional theory calculations with periodic-boundary conditions. The van der Waals density functional version vdW-DF2 accounts for the molecular adsorption. The issue that the Kohn-Sham wave functions couple to both sides of the Cu slab is handled with a decoupling scheme based on a rotation in Hilbert space. A convergence study reveals that to obtain a proper Shockley surface state, 6 Cu layers is sufficient, while 15 is optimal. We use 6 layers for the response to the molecules and 15 to external field. We find that the surface state displays isotropic dispersion (up to order k^6), free-electron like until the Fermi wave vector but with a significant quartic component beyond. The shift in band minimum and effective mass depend linearly on E, with a smaller fractional change in the latter. Charge transfer occurs beyond the outermost copper atoms, and most of the screening is due to bulk electrons. We find that the molecular physisorption increases the band minimum, with the effect the of a quinone being much stronger than the corresponding PAH.

  18. Manipulation of the surface density of states of Ag(111) by means of resonators: Experiment and theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fernández, J.; Moro-Lagares, María; Serrate, D.; Aligia, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 7 (2016), s. 1-8, č. článku 075408. ISSN 2469-9950 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scanning tunneling spectroscopy * quantum corrals * mirages Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  19. Novel Metal-Sulfur-Based Air-Stable Passivation of GaAs with Very Low Surface State Densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, Carol I.H.; Baca, Albert G.; Chang, P.-C; Hafich, M.J.; Hammons, B.E.; Zavadil, Kevin R.

    1999-08-09

    A new air-stable electronic surface passivation for GaAs and other III-V compound semiconductors that employs sulfur and a suitable metal ion, e.g., Zn, and that is robust towards plasma dielectric deposition has been developed. Initial improvements in photoluminescence are twice that of S-only treatments and have been preserved for >11 months with SiO{sub x}N{sub y} dielectric encapsulation. Photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies indicate that the passivation consists of two major components with one being stable for >2 years in air. This process improves heterojunction bipolar transistor current gain for both large and small area devices.

  20. Surface current density K: an introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1991-01-01

    The author discusses the vector surface of current density K used in electrical insulation studies. K is related to the vector tangential electric field Kt at the surface of a body by the vector equation K=ΓE t where Γ represents the surface conductivity. The author derives a surface continuity...

  1. A density gradient theory based method for surface tension calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Xiaodong; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    The density gradient theory has been becoming a widely used framework for calculating surface tension, within which the same equation of state is used for the interface and bulk phases, because it is a theoretically sound, consistent and computationally affordable approach. Based on the observation...... that the optimal density path from the geometric mean density gradient theory passes the saddle point of the tangent plane distance to the bulk phases, we propose to estimate surface tension with an approximate density path profile that goes through this saddle point. The linear density gradient theory, which...... assumes linearly distributed densities between the two bulk phases, has also been investigated. Numerical problems do not occur with these density path profiles. These two approximation methods together with the full density gradient theory have been used to calculate the surface tension of various...

  2. Does low surface brightness mean low density?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBlok, WJG; McGaugh, SS

    1996-01-01

    We compare the dynamical properties of two galaxies at identical positions on the Tully-Fisher relation, but with different surface brightnesses. We find that the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 128 has a higher mass-to-light ratio, and yet has lower mass densities than the high surface brightness

  3. Density and surface tension of ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbeck, C; Lehmann, J; Lovelock, K R J; Cremer, T; Paape, N; Wasserscheid, P; Fröba, A P; Maier, F; Steinrück, H-P

    2010-12-30

    We measured the density and surface tension of 9 bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([Tf(2)N](-))-based and 12 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium ([C(8)C(1)Im](+))-based ionic liquids (ILs) with the vibrating tube and the pendant drop method, respectively. This comprehensive set of ILs was chosen to probe the influence of the cations and anions on density and surface tension. When the alkyl chain length in the [C(n)C(1)Im][Tf(2)N] series (n = 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12) is increased, a decrease in density is observed. The surface tension initially also decreases but reaches a plateau for alkyl chain lengths greater than n = 8. Functionalizing the alkyl chains with ethylene glycol groups results in a higher density as well as a higher surface tension. For the dependence of density and surface tension on the chemical nature of the anion, relations are only found for subgroups of the studied ILs. Density and surface tension values are discussed with respect to intermolecular interactions and surface composition as determined by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). The absence of nonvolatile surface-active contaminants was proven by ARXPS.

  4. In-surface confinement of topological insulator nanowire surface states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Fan W.; Jauregui, Luis A.; Tan, Yaohua; Manfra, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard; Chen, Yong P.; Kubis, Tillmann

    2015-01-01

    The bandstructures of [110] and [001] Bi 2 Te 3 nanowires are solved with the atomistic 20 band tight binding functionality of NEMO5. The theoretical results reveal: The popular assumption that all topological insulator (TI) wire surfaces are equivalent is inappropriate. The Fermi velocity of chemically distinct wire surfaces differs significantly which creates an effective in-surface confinement potential. As a result, topological insulator surface states prefer specific surfaces. Therefore, experiments have to be designed carefully not to probe surfaces unfavorable to the surface states (low density of states) and thereby be insensitive to the TI-effects

  5. In-surface confinement of topological insulator nanowire surface states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fan W., E-mail: fanchen@purdue.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Network for Computational Nanotechnology, Purdue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Jauregui, Luis A. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Tan, Yaohua [Network for Computational Nanotechnology, Purdue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Manfra, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Klimeck, Gerhard [Network for Computational Nanotechnology, Purdue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Chen, Yong P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Kubis, Tillmann [Network for Computational Nanotechnology, Purdue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    The bandstructures of [110] and [001] Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires are solved with the atomistic 20 band tight binding functionality of NEMO5. The theoretical results reveal: The popular assumption that all topological insulator (TI) wire surfaces are equivalent is inappropriate. The Fermi velocity of chemically distinct wire surfaces differs significantly which creates an effective in-surface confinement potential. As a result, topological insulator surface states prefer specific surfaces. Therefore, experiments have to be designed carefully not to probe surfaces unfavorable to the surface states (low density of states) and thereby be insensitive to the TI-effects.

  6. In-surface confinement of topological insulator nanowire surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fan W.; Jauregui, Luis A.; Tan, Yaohua; Manfra, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard; Chen, Yong P.; Kubis, Tillmann

    2015-09-01

    The bandstructures of [110] and [001] Bi2Te3 nanowires are solved with the atomistic 20 band tight binding functionality of NEMO5. The theoretical results reveal: The popular assumption that all topological insulator (TI) wire surfaces are equivalent is inappropriate. The Fermi velocity of chemically distinct wire surfaces differs significantly which creates an effective in-surface confinement potential. As a result, topological insulator surface states prefer specific surfaces. Therefore, experiments have to be designed carefully not to probe surfaces unfavorable to the surface states (low density of states) and thereby be insensitive to the TI-effects.

  7. Density of states functions for photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPhedran, R.C.; McOrist, J.; Sterke, C.M. de; Nicorovici, N.A.; Botten, L.C.; Asatryan, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss density of states functions for photonic crystals, in the context of the two-dimensional problem for arrays of cylinders of arbitrary cross section. We introduce the mutual density of states (MDOS), and show that this function can be used to calculate both the local density of states (LDOS), which gives position information for emission of radiation from photonic crystals, and the spectral density of states (SDOS), which gives angular information. We establish the connection between MDOS, LDOS, SDOS and the conventional density of states, which depends only on frequency. We relate all four functions to the band structure and propagating states within the crystal, and give numerical examples of the relation between band structure and density of states functions

  8. DETERMINATION OF SURFACE CHARGE DENSITY OF α ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    The whole set up was interfaced with a computer for easy data acquisition. It was observed that ... parameters. KEY WORDS: Alumina, Surface charge density, Acid-base titration, Point of zero charge ... For instance, Al2(SO4)3 is used in water ...

  9. Exact analytical density profiles and surface tension

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. May 2005 physics pp. 785–801. Classical charged fluids at equilibrium near ... is provided by the excess surface tension for an air–water interface, which is determined ... the potential drop created by the electric layer which appears as soon as the fluid has ...... radii, by symmetry, the charge density profile is flat,.

  10. Surface states and spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaksic, V.; Last, Y.; California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA

    2001-01-01

    Let Z + d+1 =Z d x Z + , let H 0 be the discrete Laplacian on the Hilbert space l 2 (Z + d+1 ) with a Dirichlet boundary condition, and let V be a potential supported on the boundary ∂Z + d+1 . We introduce the notions of surface states and surface spectrum of the operator H=H 0 +V and explore their properties. Our main result is that if the potential V is random and if the disorder is either large or small enough, then in dimension two H has no surface spectrum on σ(H 0 ) with probability one. To prove this result we combine Aizenman-Molchanov theory with techniques of scattering theory. (orig.)

  11. States of high energy density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.

    1988-02-01

    The transverse energy, E/sub tau/ spectra for O 16 and S 32 incident for various elements at 200 GeVnucleon are shown. The target and projectile dependencies of the data are discussed. The energy density achieved is estimated. For O 16 on Tungsten the multiplicity spectrum is also presented as well as the pseudorapidity spectra as a function of the transverse energy. The multiplicity cross section dσdN as measured in the backward hemisphere (0.9 < /eta/ < 2.9/ is found to be very similar in shape to the transverse energy distribution dσdE/tau/ reflecting the particular geometry of nucleus nucleus nucleus collisions. The dependence on the atomic mass of the target, A/sub tau/ and projectile A/sub p/ is not what one would expect from naive considerations

  12. Theory of quasiparticle surface states in semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybertsen, M.S.; Louie, S.G.

    1988-01-01

    A first-principles theory of the quasiparticle surface-state energies on semiconductor surfaces is developed. The surface properties are calculated using a repeated-slab geometry. Many-body effects due to the electron-electron interaction are represented by the electron self-energy operator including the full surface Green's function and local fields and dynamical screening effects in the Coulomb interaction. Calculated surface-state energies for the prototypical Si(111):As and Ge(111):As surfaces are presented. The calculated energies and dispersions for the occupied surface states (resonances) are in excellent agreement with recent angle-resolved photoemission data. Predictions are made for the position of empty surface states on both surfaces which may be experimentally accessible. The resulting surface state gap at Gamma-bar for Si(111):As agrees with recent scanning-tunneling-spectroscopy measurements. Comparison of the present results to eigenvalues from the local-density-functional calculation reveals substantial corrections for the gaps between empty and occupied surface states. This correction is found to depend on the character of the surface states involved

  13. Excited-state density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbola, Manoj K; Hemanadhan, M; Shamim, Md; Samal, P

    2012-01-01

    Starting with a brief introduction to excited-state density functional theory, we present our method of constructing modified local density approximated (MLDA) energy functionals for the excited states. We show that these functionals give accurate results for kinetic energy and exchange energy compared to the ground state LDA functionals. Further, with the inclusion of GGA correction, highly accurate total energies for excited states are obtained. We conclude with a brief discussion on the further direction of research that include the construction of correlation energy functional and exchange potential for excited states.

  14. NEW CONCEPTS AND TEST METHODS OF CURVE PROFILE AREA DENSITY IN SURFACE: ESTIMATION OF AREAL DENSITY ON CURVED SPATIAL SURFACE

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Shen

    2011-01-01

    The concepts of curve profile, curve intercept, curve intercept density, curve profile area density, intersection density in containing intersection (or intersection density relied on intersection reference), curve profile intersection density in surface (or curve intercept intersection density relied on intersection of containing curve), and curve profile area density in surface (AS) were defined. AS expressed the amount of curve profile area of Y phase in the unit containing surface area, S...

  15. Excited-state potential-energy surfaces of metal-adsorbed organic molecules from linear expansion Δ-self-consistent field density-functional theory (ΔSCF-DFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Reinhard J; Reuter, Karsten

    2013-07-07

    Accurate and efficient simulation of excited state properties is an important and much aspired cornerstone in the study of adsorbate dynamics on metal surfaces. To this end, the recently proposed linear expansion Δ-self-consistent field method by Gavnholt et al. [Phys. Rev. B 78, 075441 (2008)] presents an efficient alternative to time consuming quasi-particle calculations. In this method, the standard Kohn-Sham equations of density-functional theory are solved with the constraint of a non-equilibrium occupation in a region of Hilbert-space resembling gas-phase orbitals of the adsorbate. In this work, we discuss the applicability of this method for the excited-state dynamics of metal-surface mounted organic adsorbates, specifically in the context of molecular switching. We present necessary advancements to allow for a consistent quality description of excited-state potential-energy surfaces (PESs), and illustrate the concept with the application to Azobenzene adsorbed on Ag(111) and Au(111) surfaces. We find that the explicit inclusion of substrate electronic states modifies the topologies of intra-molecular excited-state PESs of the molecule due to image charge and hybridization effects. While the molecule in gas phase shows a clear energetic separation of resonances that induce isomerization and backreaction, the surface-adsorbed molecule does not. The concomitant possibly simultaneous induction of both processes would lead to a significantly reduced switching efficiency of such a mechanism.

  16. Effects of rational surface density on resistive g turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beklemishev, A.D.; Sugama, H.; Horton, W.

    1993-01-01

    The Beklemishev-Horton theory states that the anomalous transport coefficient is proportional to the density of rational surfaces provided that the interaction between the modes localized around different rational surfaces is weak compared with modes of the same helicity. The authors examine the effects of the density of states ρ using resistive g turbulence in 2D (single-helicity) and 3D (multi-helicity) simulations. They find that the modes with different helicities do not equipartition the available energy, but rather the coalescence or inverse cascade effect is strong so that a few low order mode rational surfaces receive most of the energy. The quasilinear flattening at the surfaces is a strong effect and they use bifurcation theory to derive that the effective diffusivity increases as χ eff = χ 0 ρ/(1 - Cρ) where C is a constant determined by interaction integrals. For a sufficiently high density of states Cρ ≤ 1, the higher order nonlinear interaction must be taken into account

  17. Engineering photonic density of states using metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Z.; Kim, J.Y.; Naik, G.V.

    2010-01-01

    The photonic density of states (PDOS), like its electronic counterpart, is one of the key physical quantities governing a variety of phenomena and hence PDOS manipulation is the route to new photonic devices. The PDOS is conventionally altered by exploiting the resonance within a device such as a......The photonic density of states (PDOS), like its electronic counterpart, is one of the key physical quantities governing a variety of phenomena and hence PDOS manipulation is the route to new photonic devices. The PDOS is conventionally altered by exploiting the resonance within a device...... such as a microcavity or a bandgap structure like a photonic crystal. Here we show that nanostructured metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion can dramatically enhance the photonic density of states paving the way for metamaterial-based PDOS engineering....

  18. Coherent states and rational surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brody, Dorje C; Graefe, Eva-Maria

    2010-01-01

    The state spaces of generalized coherent states associated with special unitary groups are shown to form rational curves and surfaces in the space of pure states. These curves and surfaces are generated by the various Veronese embeddings of the underlying state space into higher dimensional state spaces. This construction is applied to the parameterization of generalized coherent states, which is useful for practical calculations, and provides an elementary combinatorial approach to the geometry of the coherent state space. The results are extended to Hilbert spaces with indefinite inner products, leading to the introduction of a new kind of generalized coherent states.

  19. Spin-density wave state in simple hexagonal graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosoyan, K. S.; Rozhkov, A. V.; Sboychakov, A. O.; Rakhmanov, A. L.

    2018-02-01

    Simple hexagonal graphite, also known as AA graphite, is a metastable configuration of graphite. Using tight-binding approximation, it is easy to show that AA graphite is a metal with well-defined Fermi surface. The Fermi surface consists of two sheets, each shaped like a rugby ball. One sheet corresponds to electron states, another corresponds to hole states. The Fermi surface demonstrates good nesting: a suitable translation in the reciprocal space superposes one sheet onto another. In the presence of the electron-electron repulsion, a nested Fermi surface is unstable with respect to spin-density-wave ordering. This instability is studied using the mean-field theory at zero temperature, and the spin-density-wave order parameter is evaluated.

  20. Statistical density of nuclear excited states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Kolomietz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A semi-classical approximation is applied to the calculations of single-particle and statistical level densities in excited nuclei. Landau's conception of quasi-particles with the nucleon effective mass m* < m is used. The approach provides the correct description of the continuum contribution to the level density for realistic finite-depth potentials. It is shown that the continuum states does not affect significantly the thermodynamic calculations for sufficiently small temperatures T ≤ 1 MeV but reduce strongly the results for the excitation energy at high temperatures. By use of standard Woods - Saxon potential and nucleon effective mass m* = 0.7m the A-dependency of the statistical level density parameter K was evaluated in a good qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  1. Surface states in photonic crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtíšek P.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Among many unusual and interesting physical properties of photonic crystals (PhC, in recent years, the propagation of surface electromagnetic waves along dielectric PhC boundaries have attracted considerable attention, also in connection to their possible applications. Such surfaces states, produced with the help of specialized defects on PhC boundaries, similarly to surfaces plasmons, are localized surfaces waves and, as such, can be used in various sensing applications. In this contribution, we present our recent studies on numerical modelling of surface states (SS for all three cases of PhC dimensionality. Simulations of these states were carried out by the use of plane wave expansion (PWE method via the MIT MPB package.

  2. Surface Tension of Binary Mixtures Including Polar Components Modeled by the Density Gradient Theory Combined with the PC-SAFT Equation of State

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vinš, Václav; Planková, Barbora; Hrubý, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 5 (2013), s. 792-812 ISSN 0195-928X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200760905; GA ČR(CZ) GPP101/11/P046; GA ČR GA101/09/1633 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : chemical polarity * gradient theory * surface tension Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 0.623, year: 2013 http://www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=article&id=doi:10.1007/s10765-012-1207-z

  3. Versatile Density Functionals for Computational Surface Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorff, Jess

    Density functional theory (DFT) emerged almost 50 years ago. Since then DFT has established itself as the central electronic structure methodology for simulating atomicscale systems from a few atoms to a few hundred atoms. This success of DFT is due to a very favorable accuracy-to-computational c......Density functional theory (DFT) emerged almost 50 years ago. Since then DFT has established itself as the central electronic structure methodology for simulating atomicscale systems from a few atoms to a few hundred atoms. This success of DFT is due to a very favorable accuracy...... resampling techniques, thereby systematically avoiding problems with overfitting. The first ever density functional presenting both reliable accuracy and convincing error estimation is generated. The methodology is general enough to be applied to more complex functional forms with higher-dimensional fitting...

  4. Reduction in the interface-states density of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors fabricated on high-index Si (114) surfaces by using an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, J.; De La Hidalga, J.; Gutierrez, E.

    2014-01-01

    After fabrication of Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices on high-index silicon (114) surfaces, their threshold voltage (Vth) and interface-states density (Dit) characteristics were measured under the influence of an externally applied magnetic field of B = 6 μT at room temperature. The electron flow of the MOSFET's channel presents high anisotropy on Si (114), and this effect is enhanced by using an external magnetic field B, applied parallel to the Si (114) surface but perpendicular to the electron flow direction. This special configuration results in the channel electrons experiencing a Lorentzian force which pushes the electrons closer to the Si (114)-SiO 2 interface and therefore to the special morphology of the Si (114) surface. Interestingly, Dit evaluation of n-type MOSFETs fabricated on Si (114) surfaces shows that the Si (114)-SiO 2 interface is of high quality so that Dit as low as ∼10 10  cm −2 ·eV −1 are obtained for MOSFETs with channels aligned at specific orientations. Additionally, using both a small positive Vds ≤ 100 mV and B = 6 μT, the former Dit is reduced by 35% in MOSFETs whose channels are aligned parallel to row-like nanostructures formed atop Si (114) surfaces (channels having a 90° rotation), whereas Dit is increased by 25% in MOSFETs whose channels are aligned perpendicular to these nanostructures (channels having a 0° rotation). From these results, the special morphology of a high-index Si (114) plane having nanochannels on its surface opens the possibility to reduce the electron-trapping characteristics of MOSFET devices having deep-submicron features and operating at very high frequencies

  5. A comparison of UV surface brightness and HI surface densities for spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federman, S.R.; Strom, C.

    1990-01-01

    Shaya and Federman (1987) suggested that the ambient ultraviolet flux at 1000 A permeating a spiral galaxy controls the neutral hydrogen (HI) surface density in the galaxy. They found that the atomic envelopes surrounding small molecular clouds, because of their great number, provide the major contribution to the HI surface density over the stellar disk. The increase in HI surface density with later Hubble types was ascribed to the stronger UV fields from more high-mass stars in later Hubble types. These hypotheses are based on the observations of nearby diffuse interstellar clouds, which show a sharp atomic-to-molecular transition (Savage et al. 1977), and on the theoretical framework introduced by Federman, Glassgold, and Kwan (1979). Atomic envelopes around interstellar clouds in the solar neighborhood arise when a steady state is reached between photodissociation of H2 and the formation of H2 on grains. The photodissociation process involves photons with wavelengths between 912 A and 1108 A. Shaya and Federman used H-alpha flux as an approximate measure for the far UV flux and made their comparisons based on averages over Hubble type. Here, researchers compare, on an individual basis, UV data obtained with space-borne and balloon-borne instruments for galaxies with measurements of HI surface density (Warmels 1988a, b). The comparisons substantiate the conclusion of Shaya and Federman that the far UV field controls the HI content of spiral galaxies

  6. Biofilm Surface Density Determines Biocide Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available High resistance of biofilms for chemical challenges is a serious industrial and medical problem. In this work a gradient of surface covered with biofilm has been produced and correlated to the effectiveness of different commercially available oxidative biocides. The results for thin Escherichia coli biofilms grown in rich media supplemented with glucose or lactose on glass or poly methyl methacrylate surfaces indicate that the effectiveness of hydrogen peroxide or chlorine dioxide and quaternary ammonium compounds is inversely proportional to the fraction of the surface covered with the biofilm. In areas where biofilm covered more than 90% of the available surface the biocide treatment was inefficient after 60 min of incubation. The combined effect of oxidant and surfactant increased the effectiveness of the biocide. On the other hand, the increased biofilm viscoelasticity reduced biocide effectiveness. The results emphasize differential biocide effectiveness depending on the fraction of the attached bacterial cells. The results suggest that biofilm biocide resistance is an acquired property that increases with biofilm maturation. The more dense sessile structures present lower log reductions compared to less dense ones.

  7. Ground state of high-density matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, ED; Kolb, Edward W.; Lee, Kimyeong

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that if an upper bound to the false vacuum energy of the electroweak Higgs potential is satisfied, the true ground state of high-density matter is not nuclear matter, or even strange-quark matter, but rather a non-topological soliton where the electroweak symmetry is exact and the fermions are massless. This possibility is examined in the standard SU(3) sub C tensor product SU(2) sub L tensor product U(1) sub Y model. The bound to the false vacuum energy is satisfied only for a narrow range of the Higgs boson masses in the minimal electroweak model (within about 10 eV of its minimum allowed value of 6.6 GeV) and a somewhat wider range for electroweak models with a non-minimal Higgs sector.

  8. Dependence of Excited State Potential Energy Surfaces on the Spatial Overlap of the Kohn-Sham Orbitals and the Amount of Nonlocal Hartree-Fock Exchange in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plötner, Jürgen; Tozer, David J; Dreuw, Andreas

    2010-08-10

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with standard GGA or hybrid exchange-correlation functionals is not capable of describing the potential energy surface of the S1 state of Pigment Yellow 101 correctly; an additional local minimum is observed at a twisted geometry with substantial charge transfer (CT) character. To investigate the influence of nonlocal exact orbital (Hartree-Fock) exchange on the shape of the potential energy surface of the S1 state in detail, it has been computed along the twisting coordinate employing the standard BP86, B3LYP, and BHLYP xc-functionals as well as the long-range separated (LRS) exchange-correlation (xc)-functionals LC-BOP, ωB97X, ωPBE, and CAM-B3LYP and compared to RI-CC2 benchmark results. Additionally, a recently suggested Λ-parameter has been employed that measures the amount of CT in an excited state by calculating the spatial overlap of the occupied and virtual molecular orbitals involved in the transition. Here, the error in the calculated S1 potential energy curves at BP86, B3LYP, and BHLYP can be clearly related to the Λ-parameter, i.e., to the extent of charge transfer. Additionally, it is demonstrated that the CT problem is largely alleviated when the BHLYP xc-functional is employed, although it still exhibits a weak tendency to underestimate the energy of CT states. The situation improves drastically when LRS-functionals are employed within TDDFT excited state calculations. All tested LRS-functionals give qualitatively the correct potential energy curves of the energetically lowest excited states of P. Y. 101 along the twisting coordinate. While LC-BOP and ωB97X overcorrect the CT problem and now tend to give too large excitation energies compared to other non-CT states, ωPBE and CAM-B3LYP are in excellent agreement with the RI-CC2 results, with respect to both the correct shape of the potential energy curve as well as the absolute values of the calculated excitation energies.

  9. RZP 202 - a modular system for surface density measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, L.; Merinsky, J.

    The sensing element is an ionization chamber of the type that has maximum sensitivity to beta radiation of the used radionuclide ( 147 Pm, 85 Kr, 90 Sr- 90 Y) or to gamma radiation of radionuclide 241 Am. Collimation shields were developed for the said sources. Measurement of the ionization currents is made with an electrometer with a vibration capacitor. Invariable configuration is secured by a measuring arm. The modular units are of the CAMAC system design. The surface density meters measure deviations from the rated surface density. The scale for inputting surface density is linear. The configuration, functional continuity of the individual parts and the possibility of variant designs of surface density meters are described and the technical parameters of RZP 202 and its configuration and design are given

  10. Silicon surface barrier detectors used for liquid hydrogen density measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, D. T.; Milam, J. K.; Winslett, H. B.

    1968-01-01

    Multichannel system employing a radioisotope radiation source, strontium-90, radiation detector, and a silicon surface barrier detector, measures the local density of liquid hydrogen at various levels in a storage tank. The instrument contains electronic equipment for collecting the density information, and a data handling system for processing this information.

  11. Molecular surface mesh generation by filtering electron density map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giard, Joachim; Macq, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Bioinformatics applied to macromolecules are now widely spread and in continuous expansion. In this context, representing external molecular surface such as the Van der Waals Surface or the Solvent Excluded Surface can be useful for several applications. We propose a fast and parameterizable algorithm giving good visual quality meshes representing molecular surfaces. It is obtained by isosurfacing a filtered electron density map. The density map is the result of the maximum of Gaussian functions placed around atom centers. This map is filtered by an ideal low-pass filter applied on the Fourier Transform of the density map. Applying the marching cubes algorithm on the inverse transform provides a mesh representation of the molecular surface.

  12. Molecular Surface Mesh Generation by Filtering Electron Density Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Giard

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioinformatics applied to macromolecules are now widely spread and in continuous expansion. In this context, representing external molecular surface such as the Van der Waals Surface or the Solvent Excluded Surface can be useful for several applications. We propose a fast and parameterizable algorithm giving good visual quality meshes representing molecular surfaces. It is obtained by isosurfacing a filtered electron density map. The density map is the result of the maximum of Gaussian functions placed around atom centers. This map is filtered by an ideal low-pass filter applied on the Fourier Transform of the density map. Applying the marching cubes algorithm on the inverse transform provides a mesh representation of the molecular surface.

  13. Nonspherical atomic ground-state densities and chemical deformation densities from x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruedenberg, K.; Schwarz, W.H.E.

    1990-01-01

    Presuming that chemical insight can be gained from the difference between the molecular electron density and the superposition of the ground-state densities of the atoms in a molecule, it is pointed out that, for atoms with degenerate ground states, an unpromoted ''atom in a molecule'' is represented by a specific ensemble of the degenerate atomic ground-state wave functions and that this ensemble is determined by the anisotropic local surroundings. The resulting atomic density contributions are termed oriented ground state densities, and the corresponding density difference is called the chemical deformation density. The constraints implied by this conceptual approach for the atomic density contributions are formulated and a method is developed for determining them from x-ray scattering data. The electron density of the appropriate promolecule and its x-ray scattering are derived, the determination of the parameters of the promolecule is outlined, and the chemical deformation density is formulated

  14. Hot-electron-assisted femtochemistry at surfaces: A time-dependent density functional theory approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, Jeppe; Rubio, Angel; Olsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Using time-evolution time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the adiabatic local-density approximation, we study the interactions between single electrons and molecular resonances at surfaces. Our system is a nitrogen molecule adsorbed on a ruthenium surface. The surface is modele...... resonance and the lowering of the resonance energy due to an image charge effect. Finally we apply the TDDFT procedure to only consider the decay of molecular excitations and find that it agrees quite well with the width of the projected density of Kohn-Sham states....

  15. Current Density and Plasma Displacement Near Perturbed Rational Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.; Pomphrey, N.

    2010-01-01

    The current density in the vicinity of a rational surface of a force-free magnetic field subjected to an ideal perturbation is shown to be the sum of both a smooth and a delta-function distribution, which give comparable currents. The maximum perturbation to the smooth current density is comparable to a typical equilibrium current density and the width of the layer in which the current flows is shown to be proportional to the perturbation amplitude. In the standard linearized theory, the plasma displacement has an unphysical jump across the rational surface, but the full theory gives a continuous displacement.

  16. Information geometry of density matrices and state estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brody, Dorje C

    2011-01-01

    Given a pure state vector |x) and a density matrix ρ-hat, the function p(x|ρ-hat)= defines a probability density on the space of pure states parameterised by density matrices. The associated Fisher-Rao information measure is used to define a unitary invariant Riemannian metric on the space of density matrices. An alternative derivation of the metric, based on square-root density matrices and trace norms, is provided. This is applied to the problem of quantum-state estimation. In the simplest case of unitary parameter estimation, new higher-order corrections to the uncertainty relations, applicable to general mixed states, are derived. (fast track communication)

  17. Continuity of integrated density of states – independent randomness

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper we discuss the continuity properties of the integrated density ... Density of states; Wegner estimate; Hölder continuous. 1. Introduction ..... and inverse spectral theory (Goa, 2000), Proc. Indian Acad. Sci. (Math. Sci.) 112(1).

  18. Excitation of high density surface plasmon polariton vortex array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chun-Fu; Chu, Shu-Chun

    2018-06-01

    This study proposes a method to excite surface plasmon polariton (SPP) vortex array of high spatial density on metal/air interface. A doughnut vector beam was incident at four rectangularly arranged slits to excite SPP vortex array. The doughnut vector beam used in this study has the same field intensity distribution as the regular doughnut laser mode, TEM01* mode, but a different polarization distribution. The SPP vortex array is achieved through the matching of both polarization state and phase state of the incident doughnut vector beam with the four slits. The SPP field distribution excited in this study contains stable array-distributed time-varying optical vortices. Theoretical derivation, analytical calculation and numerical simulation were used to discuss the characteristics of the induced SPP vortex array. The period of the SPP vortex array induced by the proposed method had only half SPPs wavelength. In addition, the vortex number in an excited SPP vortex array can be increased by enlarging the structure.

  19. Surface Relaxation and Electronic States of Pt(111) Surface with Varying Slab Thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushal, Ashok K.; Mullick, Shanta; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2011-01-01

    Surface relaxation and electronic DOS's of Pt(111) surface have been studied with varying slab thickness using ab-initio SIESTA method. We found the expansion in the top layer and contraction in the subsurface layers of Pt(111) surface. Our results match with the experimental results. Also observing electronic density of states we found that as we increase the thickness of slab, the PDOS of Pt(111) surface goes towards the bulk density of states and Fermi energy shifts towards the bulk fermi energy.

  20. Wireless Sensor Node for Surface Seawater Density Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Saletti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An electronic meter to measure surface seawater density is presented. It is based on the measurement of the difference in displacements of a surface level probe and a weighted float, which according to Archimedes’ law depends on the density of the water. The displacements are simultaneously measured using a high-accuracy magnetostrictive sensor, to which a custom electronic board provides a wireless connection and power supply so that it can become part of a wireless sensor network. The electronics are designed so that different kinds of wireless networks can be used, by simply changing the wireless module and the relevant firmware of the microcontroller. Lastly, laboratory and at-sea tests are presented and discussed in order to highlight the functionality and the performance of a prototype of the wireless density meter node in a Bluetooth radio network. The experimental results show a good agreement of the values of the calculated density compared to reference hydrometer readings.

  1. Wireless sensor node for surface seawater density measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronti, Federico; Fantechi, Gabriele; Roncella, Roberto; Saletti, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    An electronic meter to measure surface seawater density is presented. It is based on the measurement of the difference in displacements of a surface level probe and a weighted float, which according to Archimedes' law depends on the density of the water. The displacements are simultaneously measured using a high-accuracy magnetostrictive sensor, to which a custom electronic board provides a wireless connection and power supply so that it can become part of a wireless sensor network. The electronics are designed so that different kinds of wireless networks can be used, by simply changing the wireless module and the relevant firmware of the microcontroller. Lastly, laboratory and at-sea tests are presented and discussed in order to highlight the functionality and the performance of a prototype of the wireless density meter node in a Bluetooth radio network. The experimental results show a good agreement of the values of the calculated density compared to reference hydrometer readings.

  2. Improved density functional calculations for atoms, molecules and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, B.; Anton, J.; Fritzsche, S.; Sarpe-Tudoran, C.

    2005-01-01

    The non-collinear and collinear descriptions within relativistic density functional theory is described. We present results of both non-collinear and collinear calculations for atoms, diatomic molecules, and some surface simulations. We find that the accuracy of our density functional calculations for the smaller systems is comparable to good quantum chemical calculations, and thus this method provides a sound basis for larger systems where no such comparison is possible. (author)

  3. Zinc surface complexes on birnessite: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kideok D.; Refson, Keith; Sposito, Garrison

    2009-01-05

    Biogeochemical cycling of zinc is strongly influenced by sorption on birnessite minerals (layer-type MnO2), which are found in diverse terrestrial and aquatic environments. Zinc has been observed to form both tetrahedral (Zn{sup IV}) and octahedral (Zn{sup VI}) triple-corner-sharing surface complexes (TCS) at Mn(IV) vacancy sites in hexagonal birnessite. The octahedral complex is expected to be similar to that of Zn in the Mn oxide mineral, chalcophanite (ZnMn{sub 3}O{sub 7} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O), but the reason for the occurrence of the four-coordinate Zn surface species remains unclear. We address this issue computationally using spin-polarized Density Functional Theory (DFT) to examine the Zn{sub IV}-TCS and Zn{sup VI}-TCS species. Structural parameters obtained by DFT geometry optimization were in excellent agreement with available experimental data on Zn-birnessites. Total energy, magnetic moments, and electron-overlap populations obtained by DFT for isolated Zn{sup IV}-TCS revealed that this species is stable in birnessite without a need for Mn(III) substitution in the octahedral sheet and that it is more effective in reducing undersaturation of surface O at a Mn vacancy than is Zn{sub VI}-TCS. Comparison between geometry-optimized ZnMn{sub 3}O{sub 7} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O (chalcophanite) and the hypothetical monohydrate mineral, ZnMn{sub 3}O{sub 7} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, which contains only tetrahedral Zn, showed that the hydration state of Zn significantly affects birnessite structural stability. Finally, our study also revealed that, relative to their positions in an ideal vacancy-free MnO{sub 2}, Mn nearest to Zn in a TCS surface complex move toward the vacancy by 0.08-0.11 {angstrom}, while surface O bordering the vacancy move away from it by 0.16-0.21 {angstrom}, in agreement with recent X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses.

  4. State densities and spectrum fluctuations: Information propagation in complex nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.; Kota, V.K.B.

    1988-01-01

    At excitation energies in nuclei where the state density is unambiguously defined there is a sharp separation between the smoothed spectrum (which defines the density) and fluctuations about it which have recently been studied with a view to understanding some aspects of quantum chaos. We briefly review these two complementary subjects, paying special attention to: the role of the effective interaction in determining the density; the calculation of interacting-particle state and level densities, and of expectation values of interesting operators; the information about the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction which is carried both by the density and the fluctuations. 28 refs., 1 fig

  5. Power Spectral Density Evaluation of Laser Milled Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul-Amadeus Lorbeer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ablating surfaces with a pulsed laser system in milling processes often leads to surface changes depending on the milling depth. Especially if a constant surface roughness and evenness is essential to the process, structural degradation may advance until the process fails. The process investigated is the generation of precise thrust by laser ablation. Here, it is essential to predict or rather control the evolution of the surfaces roughness. Laser ablative milling with a short pulse laser system in vacuum (≈1 Pa were performed over depths of several 10 µm documenting the evolution of surface roughness and unevenness with a white light interference microscope. Power spectral density analysis of the generated surface data reveals a strong influence of the crystalline structure of the solid. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate that this effect could be suppressed for gold.

  6. Local density approximation for exchange in excited-state density functional theory

    OpenAIRE

    Harbola, Manoj K.; Samal, Prasanjit

    2004-01-01

    Local density approximation for the exchange energy is made for treatment of excited-states in density-functional theory. It is shown that taking care of the state-dependence of the LDA exchange energy functional leads to accurate excitation energies.

  7. Electron density measurement for steady state plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Yasunori; Chiba, Shinichi; Inoue, Akira

    2000-01-01

    Electron density of a large tokamak has been measured successfully by the tangential CO 2 laser polarimeter developed in JT-60U. The tangential Faraday rotation angles of two different wavelength of 9.27 and 10.6 μm provided the electron density independently. Two-color polarimeter concept for elimination of Faraday rotation at vacuum windows is verified for the first time. A system stability for long time operation up to ∼10 hours is confirmed. A fluctuation of a signal baseline is observed with a period of ∼3 hours and an amplitude of 0.4 - 0.7deg. In order to improve the polarimeter, an application of diamond window for reduction of the Faraday rotation at vacuum windows and another two-color polarimeter concept for elimination of mechanical rotation component are proposed. (author)

  8. Density functional theory in surface science and heterogeneous catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Scheffler, M.; Toulhoat, H.

    2006-01-01

    Solid surfaces are used extensively as catalysts throughout the chemical industry, in the energy sector, and in environmental protection. Recently, density functional theory has started providing new insight into the atomic-scale mechanisms of heterogeneous catalysis, helping to interpret the large...

  9. The local density of optical states of a metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunnemann, Per; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2016-02-01

    While metamaterials are often desirable for near-field functions, such as perfect lensing, or cloaking, they are often quantified by their response to plane waves from the far field. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of the local density of states near lattices of discrete magnetic scatterers, i.e., the response to near field excitation by a point source. Based on a pointdipole theory using Ewald summation and an array scanning method, we can swiftly and semi-analytically evaluate the local density of states (LDOS) for magnetoelectric point sources in front of an infinite two-dimensional (2D) lattice composed of arbitrary magnetoelectric dipole scatterers. The method takes into account radiation damping as well as all retarded electrodynamic interactions in a self-consistent manner. We show that a lattice of magnetic scatterers evidences characteristic Drexhage oscillations. However, the oscillations are phase shifted relative to the electrically scattering lattice consistent with the difference expected for reflection off homogeneous magnetic respectively electric mirrors. Furthermore, we identify in which source-surface separation regimes the metasurface may be treated as a homogeneous interface, and in which homogenization fails. A strong frequency and in-plane position dependence of the LDOS close to the lattice reveals coupling to guided modes supported by the lattice.

  10. Phonon density of states in nanocrystalline Fe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the range of 2 to 10 nm through molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that in the interior of the clusters large capillary pressure is built up and the surface .... Since the data of the bulk and nanophase are analyzed in the same model, it is ...

  11. Surface tension and density of Si-Ge melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Enrica; Amore, Stefano; Giuranno, Donatella; Novakovic, Rada; Tuissi, Ausonio; Sobczak, Natalia; Nowak, Rafal; Korpala, Bartłomiej; Bruzda, Grzegorz

    2014-06-01

    In this work, the surface tension and density of Si-Ge liquid alloys were determined by the pendant drop method. Over the range of measurements, both properties show a linear temperature dependence and a nonlinear concentration dependence. Indeed, the density decreases with increasing silicon content exhibiting positive deviation from ideality, while the surface tension increases and deviates negatively with respect to the ideal solution model. Taking into account the Si-Ge phase diagram, a simple lens type, the surface tension behavior of the Si-Ge liquid alloys was analyzed in the framework of the Quasi-Chemical Approximation for the Regular Solutions model. The new experimental results were compared with a few data available in the literature, obtained by the containerless method.

  12. Rydberg energies using excited state density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.-L.; Wu Qin; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2008-01-01

    We utilize excited state density functional theory (eDFT) to study Rydberg states in atoms. We show both analytically and numerically that semilocal functionals can give quite reasonable Rydberg energies from eDFT, even in cases where time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) fails catastrophically. We trace these findings to the fact that in eDFT the Kohn-Sham potential for each state is computed using the appropriate excited state density. Unlike the ground state potential, which typically falls off exponentially, the sequence of excited state potentials has a component that falls off polynomially with distance, leading to a Rydberg-type series. We also address the rigorous basis of eDFT for these systems. Perdew and Levy have shown using the constrained search formalism that every stationary density corresponds, in principle, to an exact stationary state of the full many-body Hamiltonian. In the present context, this means that the excited state DFT solutions are rigorous as long as they deliver the minimum noninteracting kinetic energy for the given density. We use optimized effective potential techniques to show that, in some cases, the eDFT Rydberg solutions appear to deliver the minimum kinetic energy because the associated density is not pure state v-representable. We thus find that eDFT plays a complementary role to constrained DFT: The former works only if the excited state density is not the ground state of some potential while the latter applies only when the density is a ground state density.

  13. Surface determinants of low density lipoprotein uptake by endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeroeg, P.; Pearson, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    The surface sialic acid content of aortic endothelial cells in vitro was substantially lower in sparse cultures than at confluence. Binding of LDL to endothelial cells did not change at different culture densities and was unaffected by brief pretreatment with neuraminidase to partially remove surface sialic acid residues. In contrast, internalisation of LDL declined by a factor of 3 between low density cell cultures and confluent monolayers; neuraminidase pretreatment increased LDL uptake and the effect was most marked (>10-fold) at confluence. Pretreatment with cationised ferritin, which removed most of the surface sialic acid residues as well as glycosaminoglycans, increased LDL internalisation by up to 20-fold, again with most effect on confluent monolayers. Thus LDL uptake is inversely correlated with sialic acid content. We conclude that changes in the surface density of sialic acid (and possibly other charged) residues significantly modulate endothelial LDL uptake, and suggest that focal increases in LDL accumulation during atherogenesis may be related to alterations in endothelial endocytic properties at sites of increased cell turnover or damage. (author)

  14. Density of Ni-Cr Alloy in the Mushy State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The density of Ni-Cr alloy in the mushy state has been measured using the modified sessile drop method. The density of Ni-Cr alloy in the mushy state was found to decrease with increasing temperature and Cr concentration in alloy.The molar volume of Ni-Cr alloy in the mushy state therefore increases with increasing the Cr concentration in alloy.The ratio of the difference of density divided by the temperature difference between liquidus and solidus temperatures decreases with increasing Cr concentration. The density of the alloy increased with the precipitation of a solid phase in alloy during the solidification process. The temperature dependence of the density of alloy in the mushy state was not linear but biquadratic.

  15. Surface states in an external electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steslicka, M.

    1975-10-01

    Under conditions typical for field ion microscopy, true surface states can exist. Their shift towards higher energies can be quite significant and, moreover, additional surface levels at still higher energies can appear. The latter can play an important role in the process of tunneling of image gas electrons into surface states

  16. Ultralow energy ion beam surface modification of low density polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenton, Martyn J; Bradley, James W; van den Berg, Jaap A; Armour, David G; Stevens, Gary C

    2005-12-01

    Ultralow energy Ar+ and O+ ion beam irradiation of low density polyethylene has been carried out under controlled dose and monoenergetic conditions. XPS of Ar+-treated surfaces exposed to ambient atmosphere show that the bombardment of 50 eV Ar+ ions at a total dose of 10(16) cm(-2) gives rise to very reactive surfaces with oxygen incorporation at about 50% of the species present in the upper surface layer. Using pure O+ beam irradiation, comparatively low O incorporation is achieved without exposure to atmosphere (approximately 13% O in the upper surface). However, if the surface is activated by Ar+ pretreatment, then large oxygen contents can be achieved under subsequent O+ irradiation (up to 48% O). The results show that for very low energy (20 eV) oxygen ions there is a dose threshold of about 5 x 10(15) cm(-2) before surface oxygen incorporation is observed. It appears that, for both Ar+ and O+ ions in this regime, the degree of surface modification is only very weakly dependent on the ion energy. The results suggest that in the nonequilibrium plasma treatment of polymers, where the ion flux is typically 10(18) m(-2) s(-1), low energy ions (<50 eV) may be responsible for surface chemical modification.

  17. Single-particle energies and density of states in density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aggelen, H.; Chan, G. K.-L.

    2015-07-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is commonly used as the foundation to obtain neutral excited states and transition weights in DFT, but does not allow direct access to density of states and single-particle energies, i.e. ionisation energies and electron affinities. Here we show that by extending TD-DFT to a superfluid formulation, which involves operators that break particle-number symmetry, we can obtain the density of states and single-particle energies from the poles of an appropriate superfluid response function. The standard Kohn- Sham eigenvalues emerge as the adiabatic limit of the superfluid response under the assumption that the exchange- correlation functional has no dependence on the superfluid density. The Kohn- Sham eigenvalues can thus be interpreted as approximations to the ionisation energies and electron affinities. Beyond this approximation, the formalism provides an incentive for creating a new class of density functionals specifically targeted at accurate single-particle eigenvalues and bandgaps.

  18. Low density lipoprotein sensor based on surface plasmon resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matharu, Zimple; Sumana, G.; Pandey, M.K.; Gupta, Vinay; Malhotra, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Biotinylated heparin has been immobilized onto self-assembled monolayer of 4-aminothiophenol using avidin-biotin specific binding. The modified electrodes have been characterized using surface plasmon resonance technique (SPR), cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle (CA) measurements. The interaction of immobilized biotinylated heparin with low density lipoprotein (LDL) has been studied using surface plasmon resonance technique. The biotinylated heparin modified electrode can be used to detect LDL in the range of 20 to 100 mg/dl with the sensitivity of 513.3 m o /μM.

  19. Low density lipoprotein sensor based on surface plasmon resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matharu, Zimple [Department of Science and Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India); Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, New Delhi-110007 (India); Sumana, G.; Pandey, M.K. [Department of Science and Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India); Gupta, Vinay [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, New Delhi-110007 (India); Malhotra, B.D., E-mail: bansi.malhotra@gmail.co [Department of Science and Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India)

    2009-11-30

    Biotinylated heparin has been immobilized onto self-assembled monolayer of 4-aminothiophenol using avidin-biotin specific binding. The modified electrodes have been characterized using surface plasmon resonance technique (SPR), cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle (CA) measurements. The interaction of immobilized biotinylated heparin with low density lipoprotein (LDL) has been studied using surface plasmon resonance technique. The biotinylated heparin modified electrode can be used to detect LDL in the range of 20 to 100 mg/dl with the sensitivity of 513.3 m{sup o}/{mu}M.

  20. Surface interactions involved in flashover with high density electronegative gases.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, Keith Conquest; Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Wallace, Zachariah Red; Lehr, Jane Marie

    2010-01-01

    This report examines the interactions involved with flashover along a surface in high density electronegative gases. The focus is on fast ionization processes rather than the later time ionic drift or thermalization of the discharge. A kinetic simulation of the gas and surface is used to examine electron multiplication and includes gas collision, excitation and ionization, and attachment processes, gas photoionization and surface photoemission processes, as well as surface attachment. These rates are then used in a 1.5D fluid ionization wave (streamer) model to study streamer propagation with and without the surface in air and in SF6. The 1.5D model therefore includes rates for all these processes. To get a better estimate for the behavior of the radius we have studied radial expansion of the streamer in air and in SF6. The focus of the modeling is on voltage and field level changes (with and without a surface) rather than secondary effects, such as, velocities or changes in discharge path. An experiment has been set up to carry out measurements of threshold voltages, streamer velocities, and other discharge characteristics. This setup includes both electrical and photographic diagnostics (streak and framing cameras). We have observed little change in critical field levels (where avalanche multiplication sets in) in the gas alone versus with the surface. Comparisons between model calculations and experimental measurements are in agreement with this. We have examined streamer sustaining fields (field which maintains ionization wave propagation) in the gas and on the surface. Agreement of the gas levels with available literature is good and agreement between experiment and calculation is good also. Model calculations do not indicate much difference between the gas alone versus the surface levels. Experiments have identified differences in velocity between streamers on the surface and in the gas alone (the surface values being larger).

  1. SURFACE SYMMETRY ENERGY OF NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolov, N; Schunck, N; Nazarewicz, W; Bender, M; Pei, J

    2010-12-20

    We study the bulk deformation properties of the Skyrme nuclear energy density functionals. Following simple arguments based on the leptodermous expansion and liquid drop model, we apply the nuclear density functional theory to assess the role of the surface symmetry energy in nuclei. To this end, we validate the commonly used functional parametrizations against the data on excitation energies of superdeformed band-heads in Hg and Pb isotopes, and fission isomers in actinide nuclei. After subtracting shell effects, the results of our self-consistent calculations are consistent with macroscopic arguments and indicate that experimental data on strongly deformed configurations in neutron-rich nuclei are essential for optimizing future nuclear energy density functionals. The resulting survey provides a useful benchmark for further theoretical improvements. Unlike in nuclei close to the stability valley, whose macroscopic deformability hangs on the balance of surface and Coulomb terms, the deformability of neutron-rich nuclei strongly depends on the surface-symmetry energy; hence, its proper determination is crucial for the stability of deformed phases of the neutron-rich matter and description of fission rates for r-process nucleosynthesis.

  2. Effect of vibrational states on nuclear level density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plujko, V. A.; Gorbachenko, O. M.

    2007-01-01

    Simple methods to calculate a vibrational enhancement factor of a nuclear level density with allowance for damping of collective state are considered. The results of the phenomenological approach and the microscopic quasiparticle-phonon model are compared. The practical method of calculation of a vibrational enhancement factor and level density parameters is recommended

  3. Experimental surface charge density of the Si (100)-2x1H surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciston, J.; Marks, L.D.; Feidenhans'l, R.

    2006-01-01

    We report a three-dimensional charge density refinement from x-ray diffraction intensities of the Si (100) 2x1H surface. By paying careful attention to parameterizing the bulk Si bonding, we are able to locate the hydrogen atoms at the surface, which could not be done previously. In addition, we...

  4. Density of states, Poisson's formula of summation and Walfisz's formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fucho, P.

    1980-06-01

    Using Poisson's formula for summation, we obtain an expression for density of states of d-dimensional scalar Helmoholtz's equation under various boundary conditions. Likewise, we also obtain formulas of Walfisz's type. It becomes evident that the formulas obtained by Pathria et al. in connection with ideal bosons in a finite system are exactly the same as those obtained by utilizing the formulas for density of states. (author)

  5. Shape transition of state density for bosonic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... while the shape of the state density for EGOE(2) with m ≫ 2, is close to Gaussian. The change in shape of the state density, from semicircle to Gaussian for EGOE(k), as m increases from k to m ≫ k for fermions, has been explained mathematically by Mon and French [4] and also by Benet. Pramana – J. Phys., Vol. 81, No.

  6. High-Density Infrared Surface Treatments of Refractories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiegs, T.N.

    2005-03-31

    Refractory materials play a crucial role in all energy-intensive industries and are truly a crosscutting technology for the Industries of the Future (IOF). One of the major mechanisms for the degradation of refractories and a general decrease in their performance has been the penetration and corrosion by molten metals or glass. Methods and materials that would reduce the penetration, wetting, and corrosive chemistry would significantly improve refractory performance and also maintain the quality of the processed liquid, be it metal or glass. This report presents the results of an R&D project aimed at investigating the use of high-density infrared (HDI) heating to surface treat refractories to improve their performance. The project was a joint effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR). HDI is capable of heating the near-surface region of materials to very high temperatures where sintering, diffusion, and melting can occur. The intended benefits of HDI processing of refractories were to (1) reduce surface porosity (by essentially sealing the surface to prevent liquid penetration), (2) allow surface chemistry changes to be performed by bonding an adherent coating onto the underlying refractory (in order to inhibit wetting and/or improve corrosion resistance), and (3) produce noncontact refractories with high-emissivity surface coatings.

  7. Power Spectral Density Specification and Analysis of Large Optical Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2009-01-01

    The 2-dimensional Power Spectral Density (PSD) can be used to characterize the mid- and the high-spatial frequency components of the surface height errors of an optical surface. We found it necessary to have a complete, easy-to-use approach for specifying and evaluating the PSD characteristics of large optical surfaces, an approach that allows one to specify the surface quality of a large optical surface based on simulated results using a PSD function and to evaluate the measured surface profile data of the same optic in comparison with those predicted by the simulations during the specification-derivation process. This paper provides a complete mathematical description of PSD error, and proposes a new approach in which a 2-dimentional (2D) PSD is converted into a 1-dimentional (1D) one by azimuthally averaging the 2D-PSD. The 1D-PSD calculated this way has the same unit and the same profile as the original PSD function, thus allows one to compare the two with each other directly.

  8. Simultaneous solution of the geoid and the surface density anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardalan, A. A.; Safari, A.; Karimi, R.; AllahTavakoli, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The main application of the land gravity data in geodesy is "local geoid" or "local gravity field" modeling, whereas the same data could play a vital role for the anomalous mass-density modeling in geophysical explorations. In the realm of local geoid computations based on Geodetic Boundary Value Problems (GBVP), it is needed that the effect of the topographic (or residual terrain) masses be removed via application of the Newton integral in order to perform the downward continuation in a harmonic space. However, harmonization of the downward continuation domain may not be perfectly possible unless accurate information about the mass-density of the topographic masses be available. On the other hand, from the exploration point of view the unwanted topographical masses within the aforementioned procedure could be regarded as the signal. In order to overcome the effect of the remaining masses within the remove step of the GBVP, which cause uncertainties in mathematical modeling of the problem, here we are proposing a methodology for simultaneous solution of the geoid and residual surface density modeling In other words, a new mathematical model will be offered which both provides the needed harmonic space for downward continuation and at the same time accounts for the non-harmonic terms of gravitational field and makes use of it for residual mass density modeling within the topographic region. The presented new model enjoys from uniqueness of the solution, opposite to the inverse application of the Newton integral for mass density modeling which is non-unique, and only needs regularization to remove its instability problem. In this way, the solution of the model provides both the incremental harmonic gravitational potential on surface of the reference ellipsoid as the gravity field model and the lateral surface mass-density variations via the second derivatives of the non harmonic terms of gravitational field. As the case study and accuracy verification, the proposed

  9. Topological surface states scattering in antimony

    KAUST Repository

    Narayan, Awadhesh; Rungger, Ivan; Sanvito, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    In this work we study the topologically protected states of the Sb(111) surface by using ab initio transport theory. In the presence of a strong surface perturbation we obtain standing-wave states resulting from the superposition of spin-polarized surface states. By Fourier analysis, we identify the underlying two dimensional scattering processes and the spin texture. We find evidence of resonant transmission across surface barriers at quantum well state energies and evaluate their lifetimes. Our results are in excellent agreement with experimental findings. We also show that despite the presence of a step edge along a different high-symmetry direction, the surface states exhibit unperturbed transmission around the Fermi energy for states with near to normal incidence. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  10. Topological surface states scattering in antimony

    KAUST Repository

    Narayan, Awadhesh

    2012-11-05

    In this work we study the topologically protected states of the Sb(111) surface by using ab initio transport theory. In the presence of a strong surface perturbation we obtain standing-wave states resulting from the superposition of spin-polarized surface states. By Fourier analysis, we identify the underlying two dimensional scattering processes and the spin texture. We find evidence of resonant transmission across surface barriers at quantum well state energies and evaluate their lifetimes. Our results are in excellent agreement with experimental findings. We also show that despite the presence of a step edge along a different high-symmetry direction, the surface states exhibit unperturbed transmission around the Fermi energy for states with near to normal incidence. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  11. Electron Density in Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Surface Wave Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasinski, M.; Zakrzewski, Z.; Mizeraczyk, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present results of the spectroscopic measurements of the electron density in a microwave surface wave sustained discharges in Ar and Ne at atmospheric pressure. The discharge in the form of a plasma column was generated inside a quartz tube cooled with a dielectric liquid. The microwave power delivered to the discharge via rectangular waveguide was applied in the range of 200-1500 W. In all investigations presented in this paper, the gas flow rate was relatively low (0.5 l/min), so the plasma column was generated in the form of a single filament, and the lengths of the upstream and downstream plasma columns were almost the same. The electron density in the plasma columns was determined using the method based on the Stark broadening of H β spectral line, including plasma region inside the waveguide which was not investigated earlier

  12. Density functional calculation of electronic surface structure and Fe adsorption on ZnO (0001) and (000 anti 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Sougata; Jasper-Toennies, Torben; Hack, Michael; Pehlke, Eckhard [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Kiel (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The structure and electronic properties of the ZnO(0001) and ZnO(000 anti 1) surfaces as studied by density functional calculations are presented. The stability of the surface has already been investigated by various groups. The electronic surface band structure, however, in particular the existence of surface states and the differences between experimental band dispersion for both terminations, still appears to pose open problems. To address these issues, we compare Kohn Sham band structures and electrostatic potentials close to the surface for the relaxed (1 x 1)-surface, (2 x 2) vacancy reconstructions, and surfaces with pits. In particular the effect of the bending of the electrostatic potential at the surface on the eigenstates is quantified. Comparing the adsorption energies of Fe atoms for various adsorption sites on ZnO(000 anti 1), the fcc hollow position turned out to be energetically favorable. The oxidation state of the Fe atom is derived from the projected density of states.

  13. Decay of autoionizing states in time-dependent density functional and reduced density matrix functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Varun; Brics, Martins; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Autoionizing states are inaccessible to time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using known, adiabatic Kohn-Sham (KS) potentials. We determine the exact KS potential for a numerically exactly solvable model Helium atom interacting with a laser field that is populating an autoionizing state. The exact single-particle density of the population in the autoionizing state corresponds to that of the energetically lowest quasi-stationary state in the exact KS potential. We describe how this exact potential controls the decay by a barrier whose height and width allows for the density to tunnel out and decay with the same rate as in the ab initio time-dependent Schroedinger calculation. However, devising a useful exchange-correlation potential that is capable of governing such a scenario in general and in more complex systems is hopeless. As an improvement over TDDFT, time-dependent reduced density matrix functional theory has been proposed. We are able to obtain for the above described autoionization process the exact time-dependent natural orbitals (i.e., the eigenfunctions of the exact, time-dependent one-body reduced density matrix) and study the potentials that appear in the equations of motion for the natural orbitals and the structure of the two-body density matrix expanded in them.

  14. On the density of states of disordered epitaxial graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydov, S. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    The study is concerned with two types of disordered epitaxial graphene: (i) graphene with randomly located carbon vacancies and (ii) structurally amorphous graphene. The former type is considered in the coherent potential approximation, and for the latter type, a model of the density of states is proposed. The effects of two types of substrates, specifically, metal and semiconductor substrates are taken into account. The specific features of the density of states of epitaxial graphene at the Dirac point and the edges of the continuous spectrum are analyzed. It is shown that vacancies in epitaxial graphene formed on the metal substrate bring about logarithmic nulling of the density of states of graphene at the Dirac point and the edges of the continuous spectrum. If the Dirac point corresponds to the middle of the band gap of the semiconductor substrate, the linear trend of the density of states to zero in the vicinity of the Dirac point in defect-free graphene transforms into a logarithmic decrease in the presence of vacancies. In both cases, the graphene-substrate interaction is assumed to be weak (quasi-free graphene). In the study of amorphous epitaxial graphene, a simple model of free amorphous graphene is proposed as the initial model, in which account is taken of the nonzero density of states at the Dirac point, and then the interaction of the graphene sheet with the substrate is taken into consideration. It is shown that, near the Dirac point, the quadratic behavior of the density of states of free amorphous graphene transforms into a linear dependence for amorphous epitaxial graphene. In the study, the density of states of free graphene corresponds to the low-energy approximation of the electron spectrum

  15. Improving Frozen Precipitation Density Estimation in Land Surface Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, K.; Fall, G. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Office of Water Prediction (OWP) produces high-value water supply and flood risk planning information through the use of operational land surface modeling. Improvements in diagnosing frozen precipitation density will benefit the NWS's meteorological and hydrological services by refining estimates of a significant and vital input into land surface models. A current common practice for handling the density of snow accumulation in a land surface model is to use a standard 10:1 snow-to-liquid-equivalent ratio (SLR). Our research findings suggest the possibility of a more skillful approach for assessing the spatial variability of precipitation density. We developed a 30-year SLR climatology for the coterminous US from version 3.22 of the Daily Global Historical Climatology Network - Daily (GHCN-D) dataset. Our methods followed the approach described by Baxter (2005) to estimate mean climatological SLR values at GHCN-D sites in the US, Canada, and Mexico for the years 1986-2015. In addition to the Baxter criteria, the following refinements were made: tests were performed to eliminate SLR outliers and frequent reports of SLR = 10, a linear SLR vs. elevation trend was fitted to station SLR mean values to remove the elevation trend from the data, and detrended SLR residuals were interpolated using ordinary kriging with a spherical semivariogram model. The elevation values of each station were based on the GMTED 2010 digital elevation model and the elevation trend in the data was established via linear least squares approximation. The ordinary kriging procedure was used to interpolate the data into gridded climatological SLR estimates for each calendar month at a 0.125 degree resolution. To assess the skill of this climatology, we compared estimates from our SLR climatology with observations from the GHCN-D dataset to consider the potential use of this climatology as a first guess of frozen precipitation density in an operational land surface model. The difference in

  16. Accuracy of the calculations of the ionization-state densities in a steady-state plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzmann, D.

    1980-01-01

    A quantitative definition is given to the accuracy of the computation of the partial densities of the ionization states in a steady-state plasma when there is an inaccuracy in the rate coefficients used in the rate equation. It is found that the partial density of the most abundant ion species is almost independent of the exact form of the rate coefficients, but large errors may occur for the rare species. The effect of the variation of the total ion density on the partial densities is also calculated. For low-ion densities the partial ionization-state densities grow proportionally to the change of the total density, but at high densities there is an alteration of the charge-state distribution as well

  17. Influence of particle flux density and temperature on surface modifications of tungsten and deuterium retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzi, Luxherta, E-mail: l.buzi@fz-juelich.de [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS UMR 7198, Bvd. des Aiguillettes, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Temmerman, Greg De [FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Unterberg, Bernhard; Reinhart, Michael; Litnovsky, Andrey; Philipps, Volker [Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Oost, Guido Van [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Möller, Sören [Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Systematic study of deuterium irradiation effects on tungsten was done under ITER – relevant high particle flux density, scanning a broad surface temperature range. Polycrystalline ITER – like grade tungsten samples were exposed in linear plasma devices to two different ranges of deuterium ion flux densities (high: 3.5–7 · 10{sup 23} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} s and low: 9 · 10{sup 21} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} s). Particle fluence and ion energy, respectively 10{sup 26} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} and ∼38 eV were kept constant in all cases. The experiments were performed at three different surface temperatures 530 K, 630 K and 870 K. Experimental results concerning the deuterium retention and surface modifications of low flux exposure confirmed previous investigations. At temperatures 530 K and 630 K, deuterium retention was higher at lower flux density due to the longer exposure time (steady state plasma operation) and a consequently deeper diffusion range. At 870 K, deuterium retention was found to be higher at high flux density according to the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements. While blisters were completely absent at low flux density, small blisters of about 40–50 nm were formed at high flux density exposure. At the given conditions, a relation between deuterium retention and blister formation has been found which has to be considered in addition to deuterium trapping in defects populated by diffusion.

  18. Influence of particle flux density and temperature on surface modifications of tungsten and deuterium retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzi, Luxherta; Temmerman, Greg De; Unterberg, Bernhard; Reinhart, Michael; Litnovsky, Andrey; Philipps, Volker; Oost, Guido Van; Möller, Sören

    2014-01-01

    Systematic study of deuterium irradiation effects on tungsten was done under ITER – relevant high particle flux density, scanning a broad surface temperature range. Polycrystalline ITER – like grade tungsten samples were exposed in linear plasma devices to two different ranges of deuterium ion flux densities (high: 3.5–7 · 10 23 D + /m 2 s and low: 9 · 10 21 D + /m 2 s). Particle fluence and ion energy, respectively 10 26 D + /m 2 and ∼38 eV were kept constant in all cases. The experiments were performed at three different surface temperatures 530 K, 630 K and 870 K. Experimental results concerning the deuterium retention and surface modifications of low flux exposure confirmed previous investigations. At temperatures 530 K and 630 K, deuterium retention was higher at lower flux density due to the longer exposure time (steady state plasma operation) and a consequently deeper diffusion range. At 870 K, deuterium retention was found to be higher at high flux density according to the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements. While blisters were completely absent at low flux density, small blisters of about 40–50 nm were formed at high flux density exposure. At the given conditions, a relation between deuterium retention and blister formation has been found which has to be considered in addition to deuterium trapping in defects populated by diffusion

  19. K-correlation power spectral density and surface scatter model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittman, Michael G.

    2006-08-01

    The K-Correlation or ABC model for surface power spectral density (PSD) and BRDF has been around for years. Eugene Church and John Stover, in particular, have published descriptions of its use in describing smooth surfaces. The model has, however, remained underused in the optical analysis community partially due to the lack of a clear summary tailored toward that application. This paper provides the K-Correlation PSD normalized to σ(λ) and BRDF normalized to TIS(σ,λ) in a format intended to be used by stray light analysts. It is hoped that this paper will promote use of the model by analysts and its incorporation as a standard tool into stray light modeling software.

  20. Protection of surface states in topological nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siroki, Gleb; Haynes, Peter D.; Lee, Derek K. K.; Giannini, Vincenzo

    2017-07-01

    Topological insulators host protected electronic states at their surface. These states show little sensitivity to disorder. For miniaturization one wants to exploit their robustness at the smallest sizes possible. This is also beneficial for optical applications and catalysis, which favor large surface-to-volume ratios. However, it is not known whether discrete states in particles share the protection of their continuous counterparts in large crystals. Here we study the protection of the states hosted by topological insulator nanoparticles. Using both analytical and tight-binding simulations, we show that the states benefit from the same level of protection as those on a planar surface. The results hold for many shapes and sustain surface roughness which may be useful in photonics, spectroscopy, and chemistry. They complement past studies of large crystals—at the other end of possible length scales. The protection of the nanoparticles suggests that samples of all intermediate sizes also possess protected states.

  1. Electron spectroscopy of nanodiamond surface states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belobrov, P.I.; Bursill, L.A.; Maslakov, K.I.; Dementjev, A.P

    2003-06-15

    Electronic states of nanodiamond (ND) were investigated by PEELS, XPS and CKVV Auger spectra. Parallel electron energy loss spectra (PEELS) show that the electrons inside of ND particles are sp{sup 3} hybridized but there is a surface layer containing distinct hybridized states. The CKVV Auger spectra imply that the HOMO of the ND surface has a shift of 2.5 eV from natural diamond levels of {sigma}{sub p} up to the Fermi level. Hydrogen (H) treatment of natural diamond surface produces a chemical state indistinguishable from that of ND surfaces using CKVV. The ND electronic structure forms {sigma}{sub s}{sup 1}{sigma}{sub p}{sup 2}{pi}{sup 1} surface states without overlapping of {pi}-levels. Surface electronic states, including surface plasmons, as well as phonon-related electronic states of the ND surface are also interesting and may also be important for field emission mechanisms from the nanostructured diamond surface.

  2. Density-dependent phonoriton states in highly excited semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Hong Quang; Nguyen Minh Khue; Nguyen Que Huong

    1995-09-01

    The dynamical aspects of the phonoriton state in highly-photoexcited semiconductors is studied theoretically. The effect of the exciton-exciton interaction and nonbosonic character of high-density excitons are taken into account. Using Green's function method and within the Random Phase Approximation it is shown that the phonoriton dispersion and damping are very sensitive to the exciton density, characterizing the excitation degree of semiconductors. (author). 18 refs, 3 figs

  3. Interfacial Tension and Surface Pressure of High Density Lipoprotein, Low Density Lipoprotein, and Related Lipid Droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, O. H. S.; Lamberg, A.; Lehtivaara, M.

    2012-01-01

    ) are essentially lipid droplets surrounded by specific proteins, their main function being to transport cholesterol. Interfacial tension and surface pressure of these particles are of great interest because they are related to the shape and the stability of the droplets and to protein adsorption at the interface....... Here we use coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations to consider a number of related issues by calculating the interfacial tension in protein-free lipid droplets, and in HDL and LDL particles mimicking physiological conditions. First, our results suggest that the curvature dependence......Lipid droplets play a central role in energy storage and metabolism on a cellular scale. Their core is comprised of hydrophobic lipids covered by a surface region consisting of amphiphilic lipids and proteins. For example, high and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL, respectively...

  4. Numerical simulation of SU(2)c high density state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroya, Shin; Nakamura, Atsushi; Nonaka, Chiho

    2003-01-01

    We report a study of the high baryon number density system with use of the two-color lattice QCD with Wilson fermions[1]. First we investigate thermodynamical quantities such as the Polyakov line, gluon energy density, and baryon number density in the (κ, μ) plane, where κ and μ are the hopping parameter and chemical potential, respectively. Then we calculate propagators of meson (q-barΓq) and baryon (qΓq) states in addition to the potential between quark lines. (author)

  5. Rashba split surface states in BiTeBr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremeev, S V; Rusinov, I P; Nechaev, I A; Chulkov, E V

    2013-01-01

    Within density functional theory, we study the bulk band structure and surface states of BiTeBr. We consider both ordered and disordered phases, which differ in atomic order in the Te–Br sublattice. On the basis of relativistic ab initio calculations, we show that the ordered BiTeBr is energetically preferable as compared with the disordered one. We demonstrate that both Te- and Br-terminated surfaces of the ordered BiTeBr hold surface states with a giant spin–orbit splitting. The Te-terminated surface-state spin splitting has Rashba-type behavior with the coupling parameter α R ∼ 2 eVÅ. (paper)

  6. Topological surface states in nodal superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnyder, Andreas P; Brydon, Philip M R

    2015-06-24

    Topological superconductors have become a subject of intense research due to their potential use for technical applications in device fabrication and quantum information. Besides fully gapped superconductors, unconventional superconductors with point or line nodes in their order parameter can also exhibit nontrivial topological characteristics. This article reviews recent progress in the theoretical understanding of nodal topological superconductors, with a focus on Weyl and noncentrosymmetric superconductors and their protected surface states. Using selected examples, we review the bulk topological properties of these systems, study different types of topological surface states, and examine their unusual properties. Furthermore, we survey some candidate materials for topological superconductivity and discuss different experimental signatures of topological surface states.

  7. Density of states in an optical speckle potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falco, G. M.; Fedorenko, A. A.; Giacomelli, J.; Modugno, M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the single-particle density of states of a one-dimensional speckle potential, which is correlated and non-Gaussian. We consider both the repulsive and the attractive cases. The system is controlled by a single dimensionless parameter determined by the mass of the particle, the correlation length, and the average intensity of the field. Depending on the value of this parameter, the system exhibits different regimes, characterized by the localization properties of the eigenfunctions. We calculate the corresponding density of states using the statistical properties of the speckle potential. We find good agreement with the results of numerical simulations.

  8. Mapping surface charge density of lipid bilayers by quantitative surface conductivity microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Fuhs, Thomas; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Local surface charge density of lipid membranes influences membrane-protein interactions leading to distinct functions in all living cells, and it is a vital parameter in understanding membrane-binding mechanisms, liposome design and drug delivery. Despite the significance, no method has so far...

  9. Stratified turbulent Bunsen flames : flame surface analysis and flame surface density modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaekers, W.J.S.; Oijen, van J.A.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper it is investigated whether the Flame Surface Density (FSD) model, developed for turbulent premixed combustion, is also applicable to stratified flames. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent stratified Bunsen flames have been carried out, using the Flamelet Generated Manifold

  10. Surface-bound states in nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peng; Antonov, Denis; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Bester, Gabriel

    2017-05-01

    We show via ab initio calculations and an electrostatic model that the notoriously low, but positive, electron affinity of bulk diamond becomes negative for hydrogen passivated nanodiamonds and argue that this peculiar situation (type-II offset with a vacuum level at nearly midgap) and the three further conditions: (i) a surface dipole with positive charge on the outside layer, (ii) a spherical symmetry, and (iii) a dielectric mismatch at the surface, results in the emergence of a peculiar type of surface state localized just outside the nanodiamond. These states are referred to as "surface-bound states" and have consequently a strong environmental sensitivity. These type of states should exist in any nanostructure with negative electron affinity. We further quantify the band offsets of different type of nanostructures as well as the exciton binding energy and contrast the results with results for "conventional" silicon quantum dots.

  11. Lowering the density of electronic defects on organic-functionalized Si(100) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Weina; DeBenedetti, William J. I.; Kim, Seonjae; Chabal, Yves J.; Hines, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    The electrical quality of functionalized, oxide-free silicon surfaces is critical for chemical sensing, photovoltaics, and molecular electronics applications. In contrast to Si/SiO 2 interfaces, the density of interface states (D it ) cannot be reduced by high temperature annealing because organic layers decompose above 300 °C. While a reasonable D it is achieved on functionalized atomically flat Si(111) surfaces, it has been challenging to develop successful chemical treatments for the technologically relevant Si(100) surfaces. We demonstrate here that recent advances in the chemical preparation of quasi-atomically-flat, H-terminated Si(100) surfaces lead to a marked suppression of electronic states of functionalized surfaces. Using a non-invasive conductance-voltage method to study functionalized Si(100) surfaces with varying roughness, a D it as low as 2.5 × 10 11  cm −2 eV −1 is obtained for the quasi-atomically-flat surfaces, in contrast to >7 × 10 11  cm −2 eV −1 on atomically rough Si(100) surfaces. The interfacial quality of the organic/quasi-atomically-flat Si(100) interface is very close to that obtained on organic/atomically flat Si(111) surfaces, opening the door to applications previously thought to be restricted to Si(111)

  12. Ground-state densities from the Rayleigh-Ritz variation principle and from density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvaal, Simen; Helgaker, Trygve

    2015-11-14

    The relationship between the densities of ground-state wave functions (i.e., the minimizers of the Rayleigh-Ritz variation principle) and the ground-state densities in density-functional theory (i.e., the minimizers of the Hohenberg-Kohn variation principle) is studied within the framework of convex conjugation, in a generic setting covering molecular systems, solid-state systems, and more. Having introduced admissible density functionals as functionals that produce the exact ground-state energy for a given external potential by minimizing over densities in the Hohenberg-Kohn variation principle, necessary and sufficient conditions on such functionals are established to ensure that the Rayleigh-Ritz ground-state densities and the Hohenberg-Kohn ground-state densities are identical. We apply the results to molecular systems in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. For any given potential v ∈ L(3/2)(ℝ(3)) + L(∞)(ℝ(3)), we establish a one-to-one correspondence between the mixed ground-state densities of the Rayleigh-Ritz variation principle and the mixed ground-state densities of the Hohenberg-Kohn variation principle when the Lieb density-matrix constrained-search universal density functional is taken as the admissible functional. A similar one-to-one correspondence is established between the pure ground-state densities of the Rayleigh-Ritz variation principle and the pure ground-state densities obtained using the Hohenberg-Kohn variation principle with the Levy-Lieb pure-state constrained-search functional. In other words, all physical ground-state densities (pure or mixed) are recovered with these functionals and no false densities (i.e., minimizing densities that are not physical) exist. The importance of topology (i.e., choice of Banach space of densities and potentials) is emphasized and illustrated. The relevance of these results for current-density-functional theory is examined.

  13. Gravitational states of antihydrogen near material surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voronin, Alexei Yu., E-mail: dr.a.voronin@gmail.com [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Froelich, Piotr [Uppsala University, Department of Quantum Chemistry (Sweden); Nesvizhevsky, Valery V. [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) (France)

    2012-12-15

    We present a theoretical study of the motion of antihydrogen atoms in the Earth's gravitational field near a material surface. We predict the existence of long-living quasistationary states of antihydrogen in a superposition of the gravitational and Casimir-van der Waals potentials of the surface. We suggest an interferometric method of measuring the energy difference between such gravitational states, hence the gravitational mass of antihydrogen.

  14. Gaussian density matrices: Quantum analogs of classical states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, A.; Revzen, M.

    1993-01-01

    We study quantum analogs of clasical situations, i.e. quantum states possessing some specific classical attribute(s). These states seem quite generally, to have the form of gaussian density matrices. Such states can always be parametrized as thermal squeezed states (TSS). We consider the following specific cases: (a) Two beams that are built from initial beams which passed through a beam splitter cannot, classically, be distinguished from (appropriately prepared) two independent beams that did not go through a splitter. The only quantum states possessing this classical attribute are TSS. (b) The classical Cramer's theorem was shown to have a quantum version (Hegerfeldt). Again, the states here are Gaussian density matrices. (c) The special case in the study of the quantum version of Cramer's theorem, viz. when the state obtained after partial tracing is a pure state, leads to the conclusion that all states involved are zero temperature limit TSS. The classical analog here are gaussians of zero width, i.e. all distributions are δ functions in phase space. (orig.)

  15. Density of states of colloidal glasses and supercooled liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, A.; Mari, R.; Chikkadi, V.; Schall, P.; Kurchan, J.; Bonn, D.

    2010-01-01

    The glass transition is perhaps the greatest unsolved problem in condensed matter physics: the main question is how to reconcile the liquid-like structure with solid-like mechanical properties. In solids, structure and mechanics are related directly through the vibrational density of states of the

  16. Smoothness of density of states for random decaying interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    to the book of Carmona and Lacroix [1], Figotin–Pastur [3] for the results and ... We however take a definition of the integrated density of states, based on the spectral ...... Schrödinger operators with unbounded potentials, Commun. Math. Phys.

  17. Density of states in Mo-Ru amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyakawa, W.

    1985-01-01

    The density of states is calculated for several compositions of amorphous Mo 1-x Ru x . In order to simulate amorphous clusters, the structures (atomic positions) utilized in the calculations were built from a small dense randomly packed unit of hard spheres with periodic boundary conditions. The density of states is calculated from a tight-binding Hamiltonian with hopping integrals parametrized in terms of the ddσ, ddΠ and ddδ molecular integrals. The results for pure Mo and pure Ru, compared in the canonical band aproximation, agree well with the literature. For binary alloys, the comparison of the calculated density of states with the rigid band aproximation results indicates that a more complex approach than the rigid band model must be used, even when the two atoms have similar bands, with band centers at nearly the same energy. The results also indicate that there is no relation between the peak in the superconducting critical temperature as a function of the number of valence eletrons per atom (e/a) in the region near Mo(e/a=6) and the peak of the density of states at the Fermi level in the same region, as has been sugested by some authors. (Author) [pt

  18. Continuity of Integrated Density of States - Independent Randomness

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we discuss the continuity properties of the integrated density of states for random models based on that of the single site distribution. Our results are valid for models with independent randomness with arbitrary free parts. In particular in the case of the Anderson type models (with stationary, growing, decaying ...

  19. The electronic density of states of disordered compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geertsma, W.; Dijkstra, J.

    1984-11-01

    Recently, the electronic properties of liquid alkali (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs)-group IV (Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) alloys have been discussed by the present authors using a tight-binding model. Only anion orbitals (= group IV) are taken into account. Disorder is described by a pseudo lattice, which takes into account local coordination in one of the sublattices (cation or anion) only. In the first part of this paper it is shown that this approximation is consistent with the usual valence rules used by structural chemists for crystalline structures. In the second part of the paper the solutions for the density of states of the tight-binding Hamiltonian are studied for a number of pseudolattices. The infinite set of Green function equations is solved by using the effective transfer method, which replaces the famous Block condition. It is shown that such a model can explain the formation of bandgaps in disordered systems. By choosing the proper smallest cluster(s) of transfer loops to model the real structure by a pseudolattice, a density of states is obtained which represents properly that of the corresponding crystalline structure. Structures reminiscent to those caused by van Hove singularities already appear in the electronic density of states when relatively small cluster(s) of transfer loops are used. The approach outlined in this paper is capable of describing the electronic density of states due to various degrees of local order in a sublattice. Some of the peculiarities occurring in the solution of the density of states of certain pseudolattices, such as poles outside the band, are discussed in an appendix. (author)

  20. Deformation and stability of surface states in Dirac semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargarian, Mehdi; Lu, Yuan-Ming; Randeria, Mohit

    2018-04-01

    The unusual surface states of topological semimetals have attracted a lot of attention. Recently, we showed [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 113, 8648 (2016), 10.1073/pnas.1524787113] that for a Dirac semimetal (DSM) arising from band inversion, such as Na3Bi and Cd3As2 , the expected double Fermi arcs on the surface are not topologically protected. Quite generally, the arcs deform into states similar to those on the surface of a strong topological insulator. Here we address two questions related to deformation and stability of surface states in DSMs. First, we discuss why certain perturbations, no matter how large, are unable to destroy the double Fermi arcs. We show that this is related to a certain extra (particle-hole) symmetry, which is nongeneric in materials. Second, we discuss situations in which the surface states are completely destroyed without breaking any symmetry or impacting the bulk Dirac nodes. We are not aware of any experimental or density functional theory (DFT) candidates for a material which is a bulk DSM without any surface states, but our results clearly show that this is possible.

  1. Surface flux density distribution characteristics of bulk high-T c superconductor in external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, H.; Torii, S.; Yuasa, K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the measured results of the two-dimensional flux density distribution of a YBCO bulk under applied AC magnetic fields with various frequency. Melt-processed oxide superconductors have been developed in order to obtain strong pinning forces. Various electric mechanical systems or magnetic levitation systems use those superconductors. The major problem is that cracks occur because the bulk superconductors are brittle. The bulk may break in magnetizing process after cracks make superconducting state instable. The trapped flux density and the permanent current characteristics of bulk superconductors have been analyzed, so as to examine the magnetizing processes or superconducting states of the bulk. In those studies, the two-dimensional surface flux density distributions of the bulk in static fields are discussed. On the other hand, the distributions in dynamic fields are little discussed. We attempted to examine the states of the bulk in the dynamic fields, and made a unique experimental device which has movable sensors synchronized with AC applied fields. As a result, the two-dimensional distributions in the dynamic fields are acquired by recombining the one-dimensional distributions. The dynamic states of the flux of the bulk and the influences of directions of cracks are observed from the distributions. In addition, a new method for measuring two-dimensional flux density distribution under dynamic magnetic fields is suggested

  2. Local density approximation for a perturbative equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrakharchik, G. E.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of a series expansion of the equation of state provides a deep insight into the physical nature of a quantum system. Starting from a generic 'perturbative' equation of state of a homogeneous ultracold gas we make predictions for the properties of the gas in the presence of harmonic confinement. The local density approximation is used to obtain the chemical potential, total and release energies, Thomas-Fermi size, and density profile of a trapped system in three-, two-, and one-dimensional geometries. The frequencies of the lowest breathing modes are calculated using scaling and sum-rule approaches and could be used in an experiment as a high-precision tool for obtaining the expansion terms of the equation of state. The derived formalism is applied to dilute Bose and Fermi gases in different dimensions and to integrable one-dimensional models. The physical meaning of the expansion terms in a number of systems is discussed

  3. A Snow Density Dataset for Improving Surface Boundary Conditions in Greenland Ice Sheet Firn Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    S. Fausto, Robert; E. Box, Jason; Vandecrux, Baptiste Robert Marcel

    2018-01-01

    The surface snow density of glaciers and ice sheets is of fundamental importance in converting volume to mass in both altimetry and surface mass balance studies, yet it is often poorly constrained. Site-specific surface snow densities are typically derived from empirical relations based...... on temperature and wind speed. These parameterizations commonly calculate the average density of the top meter of snow, thereby systematically overestimating snow density at the actual surface. Therefore, constraining surface snow density to the top 0.1 m can improve boundary conditions in high-resolution firn......-evolution modeling. We have compiled an extensive dataset of 200 point measurements of surface snow density from firn cores and snow pits on the Greenland ice sheet. We find that surface snow density within 0.1 m of the surface has an average value of 315 kg m−3 with a standard deviation of 44 kg m−3, and has...

  4. Influence of tracks densities in solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes O, S.; Hadler N.; Lunes, P.; Saenz T, C.

    1996-01-01

    When Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTD) is employed to measure nuclear tracks produced mainly by fission fragments and alpha particles, it is considered that the tracks observation work is performed under an efficiency, ε 0 , which is independent of the track density (number of tracks/area unit). There are not published results or experimental data supporting such an assumption. In this work the dependence of ε 0 with track density is studied basing on experimental data. To perform this, pieces of CR-39 cut from a sole 'mother sheet' were coupled to thin uranium films for different exposition times and the resulting ratios between track density and exposition time were compared. Our results indicate that ε 0 is constant for track densities between 10 3 and 10 5 cm -2 . At our etching conditions track overlapping makes impossible the counting for densities around 1.7 x 10 5 cm -2 . For track densities less than 10 3 cm -2 , ε 0 , was not observed to be constant. (authors). 4 refs., 2 figs

  5. Electromagnetic local density of states in graphene-covered porous silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ting [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wang, Tong-Biao, E-mail: tbwang@ncu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Liao, Qing-Hua; Liu, Jiang-Tao; Yu, Tian-Bao [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Liu, Nian-Hua [Institute for Advanced Study, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China)

    2017-06-21

    Surface phonon polariton supported by silicon carbide (SiC) can be strongly coupled with graphene plasmon in the graphene-covered SiC bulk. The spectrum of the electromagnetic local density of states exhibits two peaks whose positions can be tuned by the chemical potential of graphene. In this work, we study the electromagnetic local density of states in the proximity of a graphene-covered SiC with periodic hole arrays. The well-known peak from the coupling of surface polariton supported by SiC and graphene plasmon splits into two. With increased volume ratio of holes, one of the split peak shifts towards high frequencies, whereas the other moves towards low frequencies. The dependence of split-peak positions on the chemical potential and permittivity of filling materials in the holes are also investigated. This study offers another method of modulating the electromagnetic local density of states. - Highlights: • The electromagnetic local density of states in the proximity of graphene-covered anisotropic SiC is firstly studied. • The peak from resonance of surface phonon polaritons in the EM-LDOS spectrum can be split into two. • The split peaks can be tuned by chemical potential, filling factor, and filling materials. • Our results provide a new method to modulate the EM-LDOS.

  6. Morphological features of the copper surface layer under sliding with high density electric current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadin, V. V., E-mail: fvv@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Aleutdinova, M. I., E-mail: aleut@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Seversk Technological Institute, Branch of State Autonomous Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education “National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Seversk, 636036 (Russian Federation); Rubtsov, V. Ye., E-mail: rvy@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Aleutdinova, V. A., E-mail: valery-aleut@yandex.ru [National Research St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, St. Petersburg, 195251 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    Conductivity and wear intensity of copper under the influence of dry friction and electric current with contact density higher 100 A/cm{sup 2} are presented. It is shown that an increase in hardness and heat outflow from a friction zone leads to the reduction of wear intensity and current contact density increase corresponding to the beginning of catastrophic wear. Structural changes, such as the formation of FeO oxide and α-Fe particles in the copper surface layer, have also been found. It is observed that a worn surface is deformed according to a viscous liquid mechanism. Such singularity is explained in terms of appearance of high-excited atomic states in deforming micro-volumes near contact spots that lead to easy stress relaxation by local plastic shears in the vicinity of stress concentrators. In common this effect allows to achieve high wear resistance.

  7. Topological surface states in nodal superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnyder, Andreas P; Brydon, Philip M R

    2015-01-01

    Topological superconductors have become a subject of intense research due to their potential use for technical applications in device fabrication and quantum information. Besides fully gapped superconductors, unconventional superconductors with point or line nodes in their order parameter can also exhibit nontrivial topological characteristics. This article reviews recent progress in the theoretical understanding of nodal topological superconductors, with a focus on Weyl and noncentrosymmetric superconductors and their protected surface states. Using selected examples, we review the bulk topological properties of these systems, study different types of topological surface states, and examine their unusual properties. Furthermore, we survey some candidate materials for topological superconductivity and discuss different experimental signatures of topological surface states. (topical review)

  8. Density of photonic states in cholesteric liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolganov, P. V.

    2015-04-01

    Density of photonic states ρ (ω ) , group vg, and phase vph velocity of light, and the dispersion relation between wave vector k , and frequency ω (k ) were determined in a cholesteric photonic crystal. A highly sensitive method (measurement of rotation of the plane of polarization of light) was used to determine ρ (ω ) in samples of different quality. In high-quality samples a drastic increase in ρ (ω ) near the boundaries of the stop band and oscillations related to Pendellösung beatings are observed. In low-quality samples photonic properties are strongly modified. The maximal value of ρ (ω ) is substantially smaller, and density of photonic states increases near the selective reflection band without oscillations in ρ (ω ) . Peculiarities of ρ (ω ) , vg, and ω (k ) are discussed. Comparison of the experimental results with theory was performed.

  9. Density of phonon states on NiO polycrystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, I.A.; Makovetskij, G.I.; Pashkovskij, Yu.L.; Semencheva, O.P.; Smolik, Ch.K.

    1984-01-01

    The density of phonon states g(epsilon) of nickel monoxide polycrystal was investigated by the method of inelastic scattering of cold neutrons with E 0 =4.43 MeV initial energy E 0 =4.43 MeV on the time-of-flight spectrometer at T=293 K. The obtained data are compared with existing results of calculations on the base of the simple shell model and the model, taking into account the deformation of bond angles

  10. State and level densities for 23<=A<=40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckerman, M.

    1975-01-01

    State and level density parameters are deduced for nuclei in the mass range 23<=A<=40 by combining low energy experimental data with high energy numerical calculations. Low energy experimental information is obtained from direct level counting, s and p-wave neutron resonance measurements, charged particle resonance measurements and stripping and pickup reaction data. Numerical calculations are performed for excitation energies of from 45 to 50 MeV using realistic single particle energies deduced from experimental data. (author)

  11. Real space renormalization group for spectra and density of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiecko, C.; Roman, E.

    1984-09-01

    We discuss the implementation of the Real Space Renormalization Group Decimation Technique for 1-d tight-binding models with long range interactions with or without disorder and for the 2-d regular square lattice. The procedure follows the ideas developed by Southern et al. Some new explicit formulae are included. The purpose of this study is to calculate spectra and densities of states following the procedure developed in our previous work. (author)

  12. Pair breaking and density of states in disordered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinkauf, A.; Zittartz, J.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that pair breaking occurs in a disordered superconductor due to spatial variations of the order parameter, although the system is time reversal invariant. The pair breaking effect is reflected by the occurence of some interesting fine structure in the one particle density of states. Discrete bound states and split-off impurity bands show up in the single impurity case and for very dilute alloys, respectively. For finite alloy concentrations the calculations are done within the CPA. Although principally important, the fine structure is concentrated in an energy range too narrow to be detected experimentally. (orig.) [de

  13. Definition and density operator for unpolarized fermion state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, H.

    1981-04-01

    The unpolarized state of fermions is defined as one which does not change in rotations in the spin space. It is shown that, for a fermion field with a specified value of momentum of particles, the density operator is of the form, rho = (1-2a-b)|0,0> 1 , n 2 > is the occupation number state having occupancies n 1 and n 2 in the two spin modes, and a and b are positive quantities which are less than one and give 1-2a-b>=0. (author)

  14. A Snow Density Dataset for Improving Surface Boundary Conditions in Greenland Ice Sheet Firn Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Fausto

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The surface snow density of glaciers and ice sheets is of fundamental importance in converting volume to mass in both altimetry and surface mass balance studies, yet it is often poorly constrained. Site-specific surface snow densities are typically derived from empirical relations based on temperature and wind speed. These parameterizations commonly calculate the average density of the top meter of snow, thereby systematically overestimating snow density at the actual surface. Therefore, constraining surface snow density to the top 0.1 m can improve boundary conditions in high-resolution firn-evolution modeling. We have compiled an extensive dataset of 200 point measurements of surface snow density from firn cores and snow pits on the Greenland ice sheet. We find that surface snow density within 0.1 m of the surface has an average value of 315 kg m−3 with a standard deviation of 44 kg m−3, and has an insignificant annual air temperature dependency. We demonstrate that two widely-used surface snow density parameterizations dependent on temperature systematically overestimate surface snow density over the Greenland ice sheet by 17–19%, and that using a constant density of 315 kg m−3 may give superior results when applied in surface mass budget modeling.

  15. Surface states in crystals with low-index surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hui-Ping; Tao Rui-Bao

    2015-01-01

    For most of the conventional crystals with low-index surfaces, the hopping between the nearest neighbor (1NN) crystal planes (CPs) is dominant and the ones from the nNN (2 ≤ n < ∞) CPs are relatively weak, considered as small perturbations. The recent theoretical analysis [1] has demonstrated the absence of surface states at the level of the hopping approximation between the 1NN CPs when the original infinite crystal has the geometric reflection symmetry (GRS) for each CP. Meanwhile, based on the perturbation theory, it has also been shown that small perturbations from the hopping between the nNN (2 ≤ n < ∞) CPs and surface relaxation have no impact on the above conclusion. However, for the crystals with strong intrinsic spin-orbit coupling (SOC), the dominant terms of intrinsic SOC associate with two 1NN bond hoppings. Thus SOC will significantly contribute the hoppings from the 1NN and/or 2NN CPs except the ones within each CP. Here, we will study the effect of the hopping between the 2NN CPs on the surface states in model crystals with three different type structures (Type I: “···–P–P–P–P–···”, Type II: “···–P–Q–P–Q–···” and Type III: “···–P=Q–P=Q–···” where P and Q indicate CPs and the signs “−” and “=” mark the distance between the 1NN CPs). In terms of analytical and numerical calculations, we study the behavior of surface states in three types after the symmetric/asymmetric hopping from the 2NN CPs is added. We analytically prove that the symmetric hopping from the 2NN CPs cannot induce surface states in Type I when each CP has only one electron mode. The numerical calculations also provide strong support for the conclusion, even up to 5NN. However, in general, the coupling from the 2NN CPs (symmetric and asymmetric) is favorable to generate surface states except Type I with single electron mode only. (paper)

  16. Surface study of liquid 3He using surface state electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirahama, K.; Ito, S.; Suto, H.; Kono, K.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured the mobility of surface state electrons (SSE) on liquid 3 He, μ 3 , aiming to study the elementary surface excitations of the Fermi liquid. A gradual increase of μ 3 below 300 mK is attributed to the scattering of electrons by ripplons. Ripplons do exist in 3 He down to 100 mK. We observe an abrupt decrease of μ 3 , due to the transition to the Wigner solid (WS). The dependences of the WS conductivity and mobility on temperature and magnetic field differ from the SSE behavior on liquid 4 He

  17. Preserving half-metallic surface states in Cr O2 : Insights into surface reconstruction rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bei; Shi, X. Q.; Chen, L.; Tong, S. Y.

    2018-04-01

    The issue of whether the half-metallic (HM) nature of Cr O2 could be retained at its surface has been a standing problem under debate for a few decades, but until now is still controversial. Here, based on the density functional theory calculations we show, in startling contrast to the previous theoretical understandings, that the surfaces of Cr O2 favorably exhibit a half-metallic-semiconducting (SmC) transition driven by means of a surface electronic reconstruction largely attributed to the participation of the unexpected local charge carriers (LCCs), which convert the HM double exchange surface state into a SmC superexchange state and in turn, stabilize the surface as well. On the basis of the LCCs model, a new insight into the surface reconstruction rules is attained. Our novel finding not only provided an evident interpretation for the widely observed SmC character of Cr O2 surface, but also offered a novel means to improve the HM surface states for a variety of applications in spintronics and superconductors, and promote the experimental realization of the quantum anomalous Hall effect in half-metal based systems.

  18. XES studies of density of states of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiolek, Gabriel

    1991-01-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopic studies concerning the superconducting crystals, thin films, and ceramics of the Y-Ba-Cu-O, Tm-Ba-Cu-O, Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O, Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O, and Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O types are presented. The contributions of the 13d(9)L, 13d(10)L, 13d(10)LL, and 13d(10)L(2) configurations, where L denotes a ligand hole at the oxygen orbitals in the spectroscopic pattern of these superconductors are discussed. An attempt to connect the x-ray 'as registered' Cu L(alpha) emission spectra with the density of states close to the Fermi level, considering an influence of the CuL3 absorption edge, is presented. The corrected intensity distributions below the Fermi level are found to correspond to the theoretical density of states. Furthermore, an approach to the average valence of copper basing on the account of the self-absorption and fluorescence effects and on the configurations listed above is shown. The average valence of copper in the materials investigated is estimated to lie in the range of +2.10 to 2.32 when the formal trivalent copper is considered as that characterized by the 13d(9)L configuration. The density of states at the Fermi level was estimated to be 2.4 states/eV-cell for a Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O crystal and 3.6 states/eV-cell for a Tl-Ba-Ca-CU-O ceramic.

  19. Investigation of surface charge density on solid–liquid interfaces by modulating the electrical double layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jong Kyun; Song, Myung Won; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    2015-01-01

    A solid surface in contact with water or aqueous solution usually carries specific electric charges. These surface charges attract counter ions from the liquid side. Since the geometry of opposite charge distribution parallel to the solid–liquid interface is similar to that of a capacitor, it is called an electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC). Therefore, there is an electrical potential difference across an EDLC in equilibrium. When a liquid bridge is formed between two conducting plates, the system behaves as two serially connected EDLCs. In this work, we propose a new method for investigating the surface charge density on solid–liquid interfaces. By mechanically modulating the electrical double layers and simultaneously applying a dc bias voltage across the plates, an ac electric current can be generated. By measuring the voltage drop across a load resistor as a function of bias voltage, we can study the surface charge density on solid–liquid interfaces. Our experimental results agree very well with the simple equivalent electrical circuit model proposed here. Furthermore, using this method, one can determine the polarity of the adsorbed state on the solid surface depending on the material used. We expect this method to aid in the study of electrical phenomena on solid–liquid interfaces. (paper)

  20. MEASURING PROTOPLANETARY DISK GAS SURFACE DENSITY PROFILES WITH ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Jonathan P.; McPartland, Conor, E-mail: jpw@ifa.hawaii.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2016-10-10

    The gas and dust are spatially segregated in protoplanetary disks due to the vertical settling and radial drift of large grains. A fuller accounting of the mass content and distribution in disks therefore requires spectral line observations. We extend the modeling approach presented in Williams and Best to show that gas surface density profiles can be measured from high fidelity {sup 13}CO integrated intensity images. We demonstrate the methodology by fitting ALMA observations of the HD 163296 disk to determine a gas mass, M {sub gas} = 0.048 M {sub ⊙}, and accretion disk characteristic size R {sub c} = 213 au and gradient γ = 0.39. The same parameters match the C{sup 18}O 2–1 image and indicate an abundance ratio [{sup 12}CO]/[C{sup 18}O] of 700 independent of radius. To test how well this methodology can be applied to future line surveys of smaller, lower mass T Tauri disks, we create a large {sup 13}CO 2–1 image library and fit simulated data. For disks with gas masses 3–10 M {sub Jup} at 150 pc, ALMA observations with a resolution of 0.″2–0.″3 and integration times of ∼20 minutes allow reliable estimates of R {sub c} to within about 10 au and γ to within about 0.2. Economic gas imaging surveys are therefore feasible and offer the opportunity to open up a new dimension for studying disk structure and its evolution toward planet formation.

  1. SURFACE DENSITY EFFECTS IN QUENCHING: CAUSE OR EFFECT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-12-10

    There are very strong observed correlations between the specific star formation rates (sSFRs) of galaxies and their mean surface mass densities, Σ, as well as other aspects of their internal structure. These strong correlations have often been taken to argue that the internal structure of a galaxy must play a major physical role, directly or indirectly, in the control of star formation. In this paper we show by means of a very simple toy model that these correlations can arise naturally without any such physical role once the observed evolution of the size–mass relation for star-forming galaxies is taken into account. In particular, the model reproduces the sharp threshold in Σ between galaxies that are star-forming and those that are quenched and the evolution of this threshold with redshift. Similarly, it produces iso-quenched-fraction contours in the f {sub Q}( m , R {sub e}) plane that are almost exactly parallel to lines of constant Σ for centrals and shallower for satellites. It does so without any dependence on quenching on size or Σ and without invoking any differences between centrals and satellites, beyond the different mass dependences of their quenching laws. The toy model also reproduces several other observations, including the sSFR gradients within galaxies and the appearance of inside-out build-up of passive galaxies. Finally, it is shown that curvature in the main-sequence sSFR–mass relation can produce curvature in the apparent B / T ratios with mass. Our analysis therefore suggests that many of the strong correlations that are observed between galaxy structure and sSFR may well be a consequence of things unrelated to quenching and should not be taken as evidence of the physical processes that drive quenching.

  2. Surface States and Effective Surface Area on Photoluminescent P-Type Porous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, S. Z.; Porras, A. Ramirez; Resto, O.; Goldstein, Y.; Many, A.; Savir, E.

    1997-01-01

    The present study is motivated by the possibility of utilizing porous silicon for spectral sensors. Pulse measurements on the porous-Si/electrolyte system are employed to determine the surface effective area and the surface-state density at various stages of the anodization process used to produce the porous material. Such measurements were combined with studies of the photoluminescence spectra. These spectra were found to shift progressively to the blue as a function of anodization time. The luminescence intensity increases initially with anodization time, reaches a maximum and then decreases with further anodization. The surface state density, on the other hand, increases with anodization time from an initial value of about 2 x 10(exp 12)/sq cm surface to about 1013 sq cm for the anodized surface. This value is attained already after -2 min anodization and upon further anodization remains fairly constant. In parallel, the effective surface area increases by a factor of 10-30. This behavior is markedly different from the one observed previously for n-type porous Si.

  3. Adsorption properties of AlN on Si(111) surface: A density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yinmei; Zuo, Ran; Mao, Keke; Tang, Binlong; Zhang, Zhou; Liu, Jun; Zhong, Tingting

    2018-04-01

    In the process of preparing GaN on Si substrate by MOCVD, an AlN buffer layer is very important. In this study, we conducted density functional theory calculations on the adsorption of AlN molecule on Si(111)-(2 × 2) surface, with the AlN molecule located horizontally or vertically above Si(111) surface at different adsorption sites. The calculations revealed that the lowest adsorption energy was at the N-top-Al-bridge site in the horizontal configuration, with the narrowest band gap, indicating that it was the most preferential adsorption growth status of AlN. In the vertical configurations, N adatom was more reactive and convenient to form bonds with the topmost Si atoms than Al adatom. When the N-end of the AlN molecule was located downward, the hollow site was the preferred adsorption site; when the Al-end was located downward, the bridge site was the most energetically favorable. Moreover, we investigated some electronic properties such as partial density of states, electron density difference, Mulliken populations, etc., revealing the microscale mechanism for AlN adsorption on Si(111) surface and providing theoretical support for adjusting the processing parameters during AlN or GaN production.

  4. Local density approach to surfaces and adsorbed layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmer, E.; Freeman, A.J.; Weinert, M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors show that the local density problem for the thin film geometry can be solved with high accuracy by employing the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave method. This is achieved by removing all shape approximations in the charge density and the potential and by using a highly flexible variational basis set. Also demonstrated is the fact that for a graphite monolayer, local density total energies give excellent descriptions of equilibrium geometries and discuss the overestimation of local-density cohesive energies due to an incomplete treatment of correlation effects in the free atom

  5. Characterization of the intrinsic density profiles for liquid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon, Enrique; Tarazona, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents recent advances in the characterization of the intrinsic structures in computer simulations of liquid surfaces. The use of operational definitions for the intrinsic surface, associated with each molecular configuration of a liquid slab, gives direct access to the intrinsic profile and to the wavevector dependent surface tension. However, the characteristics of these functions depend on the definition used for the intrinsic surface. We discuss the pathologies associated with a local Gibbs dividing surface definition, and consider the alternative definition of a minimal area surface, going though a set of surface pivots, self-consistently chosen to represent the first liquid layer

  6. A local leaky-box model for the local stellar surface density-gas surface density-gas phase metallicity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangtun Ben; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Yan, Renbin; Brinkmann, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the relation between the stellar surface density, the gas surface density and the gas-phase metallicity of typical disc galaxies in the local Universe with the SDSS-IV/MaNGA survey, using the star formation rate surface density as an indicator for the gas surface density. We show that these three local parameters form a tight relationship, confirming previous works (e.g. by the PINGS and CALIFA surveys), but with a larger sample. We present a new local leaky-box model, assuming star-formation history and chemical evolution is localized except for outflowing materials. We derive closed-form solutions for the evolution of stellar surface density, gas surface density and gas-phase metallicity, and show that these parameters form a tight relation independent of initial gas density and time. We show that, with canonical values of model parameters, this predicted relation match the observed one well. In addition, we briefly describe a pathway to improving the current semi-analytic models of galaxy formation by incorporating the local leaky-box model in the cosmological context, which can potentially explain simultaneously multiple properties of Milky Way-type disc galaxies, such as the size growth and the global stellar mass-gas metallicity relation.

  7. Extreme states of matter high energy density physics

    CERN Document Server

    Fortov, Vladimir E

    2016-01-01

    With its many beautiful colour pictures, this book gives fascinating insights into the unusual forms and behaviour of matter under extremely high pressures and temperatures. These extreme states are generated, among other things, by strong shock, detonation and electric explosion waves, dense laser beams,electron and ion beams, hypersonic entry of spacecraft into dense atmospheres of planets, and in many other situations characterized by extremely high pressures and temperatures.Written by one of the world's foremost experts on the topic, this book will inform and fascinate all scientists dealing with materials properties and physics, and also serve as an excellent introduction to plasma-, shock-wave and high-energy-density physics for students and newcomers seeking an overview. This second edition is thoroughly revised and expanded, in particular with new material on high energy-density physics, nuclear explosions and other nuclear transformation processes.

  8. High-density equation of state for helium and its application to bubbles in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfer, W.G.

    1980-06-01

    Helium, produced by transmutations or injected, causes bubble formation in solids at elevated temperatures. For small bubbles, the gas pressure required to balance the surface tension reaches values which far exceed those obtainable in experiments to measure the equation of state for helium gas. Therefore, empirical gas laws cannot be considered applicable to the fluid-like densities existing in small bubbles. In order to remedy this situation, an equation of state for helium was developed from the theory of the liquid state. At very low densities, this theoretically derived equation of state agrees with experimental results. For high densities, however, gas pressures are predicted which are significantly higher than those derived from the ideal gas law, but also significantly lower than pressures obtained with the van der Waals law. When applied to equilibrium bubbles in solids, it is found that the high-density equation of state leads to less bubble swelling than the van der Waals law, but more than the ideal gas law. Furthermore, the number of helium atoms in equilibrium bubbles is nearly independent of temperature

  9. Density of states and tunneling characteristics of layered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, S.H.; Klemm, R.A.

    1993-04-01

    We have studied the structure of the density-of-states (DOS) curves and tunneling characteristics of layered superconductors with two distinct layers in a unit cell. In general, the peaks of the DOS curves do not correspond to energy gaps of each layer, but depend on the gaps and the interlayer hopping strengths in a complex manner. This makes the interpretation of tunneling data of layered superconductors much less straightforward than isotropic superconductors. Our simulated tunneling characteristics bear certain resemblance to experimental results

  10. High Density Periodic Metal Nanopyramids for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Mingliang

    2012-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is focused on two areas. First, a new type of nanotextured noble-metal surface has been developed. The new nanotextured surface is demonstrated to enhance inelastic (Raman) scattering, called surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), from molecules adsorbed on the

  11. Localized end states in density modulated quantum wires and rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangadharaiah, Suhas; Trifunovic, Luka; Loss, Daniel

    2012-03-30

    We study finite quantum wires and rings in the presence of a charge-density wave gap induced by a periodic modulation of the chemical potential. We show that the Tamm-Shockley bound states emerging at the ends of the wire are stable against weak disorder and interactions, for discrete open chains and for continuum systems. The low-energy physics can be mapped onto the Jackiw-Rebbi equations describing massive Dirac fermions and bound end states. We treat interactions via the continuum model and show that they increase the charge gap and further localize the end states. The electrons placed in the two localized states on the opposite ends of the wire can interact via exchange interactions and this setup can be used as a double quantum dot hosting spin qubits. The existence of these states could be experimentally detected through the presence of an unusual 4π Aharonov-Bohm periodicity in the spectrum and persistent current as a function of the external flux.

  12. Hydrogen atom addition to the surface of graphene nanoflakes: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto, E-mail: hiroto@eng.hokudai.ac.jp

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The reaction pathway of the hydrogen addition to graphene surface was determined by the DFT method. • Binding energies of atomic hydrogen to graphene surface were determined. • Absorption spectrum of hydrogenated graphene was theoretically predicted. • Hyperfine coupling constant of hydrogenated graphene was theoretically predicted. - Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) provide a 2-dimensional (2D) reaction surface in 3-dimensional (3D) interstellar space and have been utilized as a model of graphene surfaces. In the present study, the reaction of PAHs with atomic hydrogen was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) to systematically elucidate the binding nature of atomic hydrogen to graphene nanoflakes. PAHs with n = 4–37 were chosen, where n indicates the number of benzene rings. Activation energies of hydrogen addition to the graphene surface were calculated to be 5.2–7.0 kcal/mol at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, which is almost constant for all PAHs. The binding energies of hydrogen atom were slightly dependent on the size (n): 14.8–28.5 kcal/mol. The absorption spectra showed that a long tail is generated at the low-energy region after hydrogen addition to the graphene surface. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphenes were discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  13. Density functional theory of simple polymers in a slit pore. III. Surface tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, Justin B.; McCoy, John D.; Curro, John G.; Swol, Frank van

    2000-01-01

    In a previous study of tangent hard-site chains near a surface, the inhomogeneous density profiles were found through density functional theory. In the current study, the surface tensions of these systems are found from the results of the previous study through a thermodynamic integration. The calculated surface tensions are then compared to those found directly through computer simulation. Both the surface tension and surface excess for polymeric systems are shown to differ qualitatively from those of atomic systems, although certain similarities are seen at high densities. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  14. Self-Consistent Optimization of Excited States within Density-Functional Tight-Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Tim; Le, Khoa; Irle, Stephan

    2016-01-12

    We present an implementation of energies and gradients for the ΔDFTB method, an analogue of Δ-self-consistent-field density functional theory (ΔSCF) within density-functional tight-binding, for the lowest singlet excited state of closed-shell molecules. Benchmarks of ΔDFTB excitation energies, optimized geometries, Stokes shifts, and vibrational frequencies reveal that ΔDFTB provides a qualitatively correct description of changes in molecular geometries and vibrational frequencies due to excited-state relaxation. The accuracy of ΔDFTB Stokes shifts is comparable to that of ΔSCF-DFT, and ΔDFTB performs similarly to ΔSCF with the PBE functional for vertical excitation energies of larger chromophores where the need for efficient excited-state methods is most urgent. We provide some justification for the use of an excited-state reference density in the DFTB expansion of the electronic energy and demonstrate that ΔDFTB preserves many of the properties of its parent ΔSCF approach. This implementation fills an important gap in the extended framework of DFTB, where access to excited states has been limited to the time-dependent linear-response approach, and affords access to rapid exploration of a valuable class of excited-state potential energy surfaces.

  15. Characterization of lacunae density in pictorial surfaces using GIS software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Henriques

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the application of simple image-processing techniques, in a geographic information system (GIS environment, on a detailed digital photography of a retabular painting. The aim is to register semi-automatically the lacunae density, through reclassification, and point density estimation. The digital photography image used on the exercise displays a detail of a 16th century panel painting named "Resurrection of Lazarus", from the Rotunda of Christ Convent, in Tomar, Portugal. The final result is a thematic pathology map of lacunae type.

  16. Flamelet Surface Density and Burning Rate Integral in Premixed Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gouldin, F

    1999-01-01

    We have developed, tested and applied in V-flames and a spark ignition engine a new experimental method, crossed-plane laser imaging, for measuring flamelet surface normals in premixed turbulent flames...

  17. The semiclassical density of states for the quantum asymmetric top

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnew, Alfonso; Bourget, Alain

    2008-01-01

    In the quantization of a rotating rigid body, a top, one is concerned with the Hamiltonian operator L α = α 2 0 L 2 x + α 2 1 L 2 y + α 2 2 L 2 z , where α 0 ≤ α 1 ≤ α 2 . An explicit formula is known for the eigenvalues of L α in the case of the spherical top (α 1 = α 2 = α 3 ) and symmetrical top (α 1 = α 2 ≠ α 3 ) (Landau and Lifshitz 1981 Quantum Mechanics: Non-Relativistic Theory 3rd edn (Portsmouth, NH: Butterworth-Heinemann)). However, for the asymmetrical top, no such explicit expression exists, and the study of the spectrum is much more complex. In this paper, we compute the semiclassical density of states for the eigenvalues of the family of operators L α = α 2 0 L 2 x + α 2 1 L 2 y + α 2 2 L 2 z for any α 0 1 2

  18. Entropy and density of states from isoenergetic nonequilibrium processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, Artur B.

    2005-05-01

    Two identities in statistical mechanics involving entropy differences (or ratios of densities of states) at constant energy are derived. The first provides a nontrivial extension of the Jarzynski equality to the microcanonical ensemble [C. Jarzynski, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 2690 (1997)], which can be seen as a “fast-switching” version of the adiabatic switching method for computing entropies [M. Watanabe and W. P. Reinhardt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 3301 (1990)]. The second is a thermodynamic integration formula analogous to a well-known expression for free energies, and follows after taking the quasistatic limit of the first. Both identities can be conveniently used in conjunction with a scaling relation (herein derived) that allows one to extrapolate measurements taken at a single energy to a wide range of energy values. Practical aspects of these identities in the context of numerical simulations are discussed.

  19. Resonant transducers for solid-state plasma density modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallock, Gary A., E-mail: hallock@ece.utexas.edu [The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78701 (United States); Meier, Mark A., E-mail: mark.a.meier@exxonmobil.com [ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, Texas 77389 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    We have developed transducers capable of modulating the plasma density and plasma density gradients in indium antimonide. These transducers make use of piezoelectric drivers to excite acoustic pressure resonance at 3λ/2, generating large amplitude standing waves and plasma density modulations. The plasma density has been directly measured using a laser diagnostic. A layered media model shows good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  20. Lactoperoxidase catalyzed radioiodination of cell surface immunoglobulin: incorporated radioactivity may not reflect relative cell surface Ig density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, R.L.; Yuen, C.C.; Mage, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Rabbit and mouse splenic lymphocytes were radioiodinated by the lactoperoxidase technique, extracted with non-ionic detergent, immunoprecipitated with high titered rabbit anti-kappa antisera, and compared by SDS-PAGE. Mouse sIg peaks were reproducibly larger in size than rabbit sIg peaks (often greater than 10 times). Neither differences in incorporation of label into the rabbit cell surface, nor differences in average sIg density explain this result. Total TCA-precipitable radioactivity was similar in each species. Estimation of the relative amounts of sIg in the mouse and rabbit showed similar average sIg densities. Differences in detergent solubility, proteolytic lability, or antisera used also do not adequately account for this difference. Thus, these data indicate that radioactivity incorporated after lactoperoxidase catalyzed cell surface radioiodination may not reflect cell surface Ig density. Conclusions about cell surface density based upon relative incorporation of radioactivity should be confirmed by other approaches

  1. Experimental study on magnetically insulated transmission line electrode surface evolution process under MA/cm current density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, PengFei; Qiu, Aici [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulse Radiation of Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China); Hu, Yang; Yang, HaiLiang; Sun, Jiang; Wang, Liangping; Cong, Peitian [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulse Radiation of Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China)

    2016-03-15

    The design of high-current density magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) is a difficult problem of current large-scale Z-pinch device. In particular, a thorough understanding of the MITL electrode surface evolution process under high current density is lacking. On the “QiangGuang-I” accelerator, the load area possesses a low inductance short-circuit structure with a diameter of 2.85 mm at the cathode, and three reflux columns with a diameter of 3 mm and uniformly distributed circumference at the anode. The length of the high density MITL area is 20 mm. A laser interferometer is used to assess and analyze the state of the MITL cathode and anode gap, and their evolution process under high current density. Experimental results indicate that evident current loss is not observed in the current density area at pulse leading edge, and peak when the surface current density reaches MA/cm. Analysis on electrode surface working conditions indicates that when the current leading edge is at 71.5% of the peak, the total evaporation of MITL cathode structure can be realized by energy deposition caused by ohmic heating. The electrode state changes, and diffusion conditions are reflected in the laser interferometer image. The MITL cathode area mainly exists in metal vapor form. The metal vapor density in the cathode central region is higher than the upper limit of laser penetration density (∼4 × 10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3}), with an expansion velocity of ∼0.96 km/s. The metal vapor density in the electrode outer area may lead to evident distortion of fringes, and its expansion velocity is faster than that in the center area (1.53 km/s).

  2. Review of Global Ocean Intermediate Water Masses: 1.Part A,the Neutral Density Surface (the 'McDougall Surface') as a Study Frame for Water-Mass Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuzhu You

    2006-01-01

    This review article commences with a comprehensive historical review of the evolution and application of various density surfaces in atmospheric and oceanic studies.The background provides a basis for the birth of the neutral density idea.Attention is paid to the development of the neutral density surface concept from the nonlinearity of the equation of state of seawater.The definition and properties of neutral density surface are described in detail as developed from the equations of state of seawater and the buoyancy frequency when the squared buoyancy frequency N2 is zero, a neutral state of stability.In order to apply the neutral density surface to intermediate water-mass analysis, this review also describes in detail its practical oceanographic application.The mapping technique is focused for the first time on applying regularly gridded data in this review.It is reviewed how a backbone and ribs framework was designed to flesh out from a reference cast and first mapped the global neutral surfaces in the world's oceans.Several mapped neutral density surfaces are presented as examples for each world ocean.The water-mass property is analyzed in each ocean at mid-depth.The characteristics of neutral density surfaces are compared with those of potential density surfaces.

  3. Formation of Surface and Quantum-Well States in Ultra Thin Pt Films on the Au(111 Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V. Silkin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The electronic structure of the Pt/Au(111 heterostructures with a number of Pt monolayers n ranging from one to three is studied in the density-functional-theory framework. The calculations demonstrate that the deposition of the Pt atomic thin films on gold substrate results in strong modifications of the electronic structure at the surface. In particular, the Au(111 s-p-type Shockley surface state becomes completely unoccupied at deposition of any number of Pt monolayers. The Pt adlayer generates numerous quantum-well states in various energy gaps of Au(111 with strong spatial confinement at the surface. As a result, strong enhancement in the local density of state at the surface Pt atomic layer in comparison with clean Pt surface is obtained. The excess in the density of states has maximal magnitude in the case of one monolayer Pt adlayer and gradually reduces with increasing number of Pt atomic layers. The spin–orbit coupling produces strong modification of the energy dispersion of the electronic states generated by the Pt adlayer and gives rise to certain quantum states with a characteristic Dirac-cone shape.

  4. Ion bombardment effect on surface state of metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaulin, E.P.; Georgieva, N.E.; Martynenko, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of slow argon ion bombardment on the surface microstructure of polycrystalline copper as well as the effect of surface state on sputtering of D-16 polycrystalline alloy are experimentally studied. Reduction of copper surface roughness is observed. It is shown that the D-16 alloy sputtering coefficient is sensitive to the surface state within the limits of the destructed surface layer

  5. Density-functional calculations of the surface tension of liquid Al and Na

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, D.; Grimson, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    Calculations of the surface tensions of liquid Al and Na are described using the full ionic density functional formalism of Wood and Stroud (1983). Surface tensions are in good agreement with experiment in both cases, with results substantially better for Al than those found previously in the gradient approximation. Preliminary minimization with respect to surface profile leads to an oscillatory profile superimposed on a nearly steplike ionic density disribution; the oscillations have a wavellength of about a hardsphere diameter.

  6. Density functional theory in surface chemistry and catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Studt, Felix

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of reactivity trends for chemistry at transition-metal surfaces have enabled in silico design of heterogeneous catalysts in a few cases. The current status of the field is discussed with an emphasis on the role of coupling theory and experiment and future...

  7. Hydrogen atom addition to the surface of graphene nanoflakes: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2017-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) provide a 2-dimensional (2D) reaction surface in 3-dimensional (3D) interstellar space and have been utilized as a model of graphene surfaces. In the present study, the reaction of PAHs with atomic hydrogen was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) to systematically elucidate the binding nature of atomic hydrogen to graphene nanoflakes. PAHs with n = 4-37 were chosen, where n indicates the number of benzene rings. Activation energies of hydrogen addition to the graphene surface were calculated to be 5.2-7.0 kcal/mol at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, which is almost constant for all PAHs. The binding energies of hydrogen atom were slightly dependent on the size (n): 14.8-28.5 kcal/mol. The absorption spectra showed that a long tail is generated at the low-energy region after hydrogen addition to the graphene surface. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphenes were discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  8. Density and Phase State of a Confined Nonpolar Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, Daniel F.; Kuhl, Tonya L.

    2016-07-01

    Measurements of the mean refractive index of a spherelike nonpolar fluid, octamethytetracylclosiloxane (OMCTS), confined between mica sheets, demonstrate direct and conclusive experimental evidence of the absence of a first-order liquid-to-solid phase transition in the fluid when confined, which has been suggested to occur from previous experimental and simulation results. The results also show that the density remains constant throughout confinement, and that the fluid is incompressible. This, along with the observation of very large increases (many orders of magnitude) in viscosity during confinement from the literature, demonstrate that the molecular motion is limited by the confining wall and not the molecular packing. In addition, the recently developed refractive index profile correction method, which enables the structural perturbation inherent at a solid-liquid interface and that of a liquid in confinement to be determined independently, was used to show that there was no measurable excess or depleted mass of OMCTS near the mica surface in bulk films or confined films of only two molecular layers.

  9. Stratified turbulent Bunsen flames: flame surface analysis and flame surface density modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaekers, W. J. S.; van Oijen, J. A.; de Goey, L. P. H.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper it is investigated whether the Flame Surface Density (FSD) model, developed for turbulent premixed combustion, is also applicable to stratified flames. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent stratified Bunsen flames have been carried out, using the Flamelet Generated Manifold (FGM) reduction method for reaction kinetics. Before examining the suitability of the FSD model, flame surfaces are characterized in terms of thickness, curvature and stratification. All flames are in the Thin Reaction Zones regime, and the maximum equivalence ratio range covers 0.1⩽φ⩽1.3. For all flames, local flame thicknesses correspond very well to those observed in stretchless, steady premixed flamelets. Extracted curvature radii and mixing length scales are significantly larger than the flame thickness, implying that the stratified flames all burn in a premixed mode. The remaining challenge is accounting for the large variation in (subfilter) mass burning rate. In this contribution, the FSD model is proven to be applicable for Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of stratified flames for the equivalence ratio range 0.1⩽φ⩽1.3. Subfilter mass burning rate variations are taken into account by a subfilter Probability Density Function (PDF) for the mixture fraction, on which the mass burning rate directly depends. A priori analysis point out that for small stratifications (0.4⩽φ⩽1.0), the replacement of the subfilter PDF (obtained from DNS data) by the corresponding Dirac function is appropriate. Integration of the Dirac function with the mass burning rate m=m(φ), can then adequately model the filtered mass burning rate obtained from filtered DNS data. For a larger stratification (0.1⩽φ⩽1.3), and filter widths up to ten flame thicknesses, a β-function for the subfilter PDF yields substantially better predictions than a Dirac function. Finally, inclusion of a simple algebraic model for the FSD resulted only in small additional deviations from DNS data

  10. Identification of Raman peaks of high-Tc cuprates in normal state through density of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishoyi, K.C.; Rout, G.C.; Behera, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    We present a microscopic theory to explain and identify the Raman spectral peaks of high-T c cuprates R 2-x M x CuO 4 in the normal state. We used electronic Hamiltonian prescribed by Fulde in presence of anti-ferromagnetism. Phonon interaction to the hybridization between the conduction electrons of the system and the f-electrons has been incorporated in the calculation. The phonon spectral density is calculated by the Green's function technique of Zubarev at zero wave vector and finite (room) temperature limit. The four Raman active peaks (P 1 -P 4 ) representing the electronic states of the atomic sub-systems of the cuprate system are identified by the calculated quasi-particle energy bands and electron density of states (DOS). The effect of interactions on these peaks are also explained

  11. Numerical Calculation of Distribution of Induced Carge Density on Planar Confined Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolotov, V.; Druzhchenko, R.; Karazin, V.; Lominadze, J.; Kharadze, F.

    2007-01-01

    The calculation method of distribution of induced charge density on planar surfaces, including fractal structures of Sierpinski carpet type, is propesed. The calculation scheme is based on the fact that simply connected conducting surface of arbitrary geometry is an equipotential surface. (author)

  12. Surface tension and density of fusible metal melt with sulphur and selenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najdich, Yu.V.; Krasovskij, Yu.P.; Chuvashov, Yu.N.

    1990-01-01

    Surface tension and density at 970 K have been determined for melts of Ga, In, Sn and Pb with S and Se. High surface activity of chalcogens in the melts has been found. A maximal adsorption of the active components and their ultimate surface activity that correlate with thermodinamical strength of the corresponding sulfides and selenides have been calculated

  13. Surface regulated arsenenes as Dirac materials: From density functional calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Junhui; Xie, Qingxing; Yu, Niannian; Wang, Jiafu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The presence of Dirac cones in chemically decorated buckled arsenene AsX (X = CN, NC, NCO, NCS, and NCSe) has been revealed. • First-principles calculations show that all these chemically decorated arsenenes are kinetically stable in defending thermal fluctuations in room temperature. - Abstract: Using first principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), we have systematically investigated the structure stability and electronic properties of chemically decorated arsenenes, AsX (X = CN, NC, NCO, NCS and NCSe). Phonon dispersion and formation energy analysis reveal that all the five chemically decorated buckled arsenenes are energetically favorable and could be synthesized. Our study shows that wide-bandgap arsenene would turn into Dirac materials when functionalized by -X (X = CN, NC, NCO, NCS and NCSe) groups, rendering new promises in next generation high-performance electronic devices.

  14. Scanning tunnelling microscope imaging of nanoscale electron density gradients on the surface of GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, B; Jacobs, J; Missous, M

    2003-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the scanning tunnelling microscope tunnelling conditions needed to produce constant current images dominated either by surface topology or by electronic effects. A model experimental structure was produced by cleaving a GaAs multiδ-doped layer in UHV and so projecting a spatially varying electron gas density onto the (110) surface. This cross sectional electron density varies on a nanometre scale in the [100] growth direction. The electronic structure and tunnelling properties of this system were modelled, and the tunnelling conditions favouring sensitivity to the surface electron gas density determined

  15. Decay rates of resonance states at high level density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, E.; Technische Univ. Dresden; Gorin, T.; Technische Univ. Dresden; Rotter, I.; Technische Univ. Dresden

    1996-05-01

    The time dependent Schroedinger equation of an open quantum mechanical system is solved by using the stationary bi-orthogonal eigenfunctions of the non-Hermitean time independent Hamilton operator. We calculate the decay rates at low and high level density in two different formalism. The rates are, generally, time dependent and oscillate around an average value due to the non-orthogonality of the wavefunctions. The decay law is studied disregarding the oscillations. In the one-channel case, it is proportional to t -b with b∼3/2 in all cases considered, including the critical region of overlapping where the non-orthogonality of the wavefunctions is large. Starting from the shell model, we get b∼2 for 2 and 4 open decay channels and all coupling strengths to the continuum. When the closed system is described by a random matrix, b∼1+K/2 for K=2 and 4 channels. This law holds in a limited time interval. The distribution of the widths is different in the two models when more than one channel are open. This leads to the different exponents b in the power law. Our calculations are performed with 190 and 130 states, respectively, most of them in the critical region. The theoretical results should be proven experimentally by measuring the time behaviour of de-excitation of a realistic quantum system. (orig.)

  16. Optical excitation and electron relaxation dynamics at semiconductor surfaces: a combined approach of density functional and density matrix theory applied to the silicon (001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecking, N

    2007-11-05

    In this work a new theoretical formalism is introduced in order to simulate the phononinduced relaxation of a non-equilibrium distribution to equilibrium at a semiconductor surface numerically. The non-equilibrium distribution is effected by an optical excitation. The approach in this thesis is to link two conventional, but approved methods to a new, more global description: while semiconductor surfaces can be investigated accurately by density-functional theory, the dynamical processes in semiconductor heterostructures are successfully described by density matrix theory. In this work, the parameters for density-matrix theory are determined from the results of density-functional calculations. This work is organized in two parts. In Part I, the general fundamentals of the theory are elaborated, covering the fundamentals of canonical quantizations as well as the theory of density-functional and density-matrix theory in 2{sup nd} order Born approximation. While the formalism of density functional theory for structure investigation has been established for a long time and many different codes exist, the requirements for density matrix formalism concerning the geometry and the number of implemented bands exceed the usual possibilities of the existing code in this field. A special attention is therefore attributed to the development of extensions to existing formulations of this theory, where geometrical and fundamental symmetries of the structure and the equations are used. In Part II, the newly developed formalism is applied to a silicon (001)surface in a 2 x 1 reconstruction. As first step, density-functional calculations using the LDA functional are completed, from which the Kohn-Sham-wave functions and eigenvalues are used to calculate interaction matrix elements for the electron-phonon-coupling an the optical excitation. These matrix elements are determined for the optical transitions from valence to conduction bands and for electron-phonon processes inside the

  17. Surface density profile and surface tension of the one-component classical plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballone, P.; Senatore, G.; Trieste Univ.; Tosi, M.P.; Oxford Univ.

    1982-08-01

    The density profile and the interfacial tension of two classical plasmas in equilibrium at different densities are evaluated in the square-density-gradient approximation. For equilibrium in the absence of applied external voltage, the profile is oscillatory in the higher-density plasma and the interfacial tension is positive. The amplitude and phase of these oscillations and the magnitude of the interfacial tension are related to the width of the background profile. Approximate representations of the equilibrium profile by matching of its asymptotic forms are analyzed. A comparison with computer simulation data and a critical discussion of a local-density theory are also presented. (author)

  18. Influence of surface conditions in nucleate boiling--the concept of bubble flux density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoukri, M.; Judd, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    A study of the influence of surface conditions in nucleate pool boiling is presented. The surface conditions are represented by the number and distribution of the active nucleation sites as well as the size and size distribution of the cavities that constitute the nucleation sites. The heat transfer rate during nucleate boiling is shown to be influenced by the surface condition through its effect on the number and distribution of the active nucleation sites as well as the frequency of bubble departure from each of these different size cavities. The concept of bubble flux density, which is a function of both the active site density and frequency of bubble departure, is introduced. A method of evaluating the bubble flux density is proposed and a uniform correlation between the boiling heat flux and the bubble flux density is found to exist for a particular solid-liquid combination irrespective of the surface finish within the region of isolated bubbles

  19. Surface Snow Density of East Antarctica Derived from In-Situ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y.; Zhang, S.; Du, W.; Chen, J.; Xie, H.; Tong, X.; Li, R.

    2018-04-01

    Models based on physical principles or semi-empirical parameterizations have used to compute the firn density, which is essential for the study of surface processes in the Antarctic ice sheet. However, parameterization of surface snow density is often challenged by the description of detailed local characterization. In this study we propose to generate a surface density map for East Antarctica from all the filed observations that are available. Considering that the observations are non-uniformly distributed around East Antarctica, obtained by different methods, and temporally inhomogeneous, the field observations are used to establish an initial density map with a grid size of 30 × 30 km2 in which the observations are averaged at a temporal scale of five years. We then construct an observation matrix with its columns as the map grids and rows as the temporal scale. If a site has an unknown density value for a period, we will set it to 0 in the matrix. In order to construct the main spatial and temple information of surface snow density matrix we adopt Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) method to decompose the observation matrix and only take first several lower-order modes, because these modes already contain most information of the observation matrix. However, there are a lot of zeros in the matrix and we solve it by using matrix completion algorithm, and then we derive the time series of surface snow density at each observation site. Finally, we can obtain the surface snow density by multiplying the modes interpolated by kriging with the corresponding amplitude of the modes. Comparative analysis have done between our surface snow density map and model results. The above details will be introduced in the paper.

  20. Neutron transition densities for the 2+-8+ multiplet of states in 90Zr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onegin, M.S.; Plavko, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron transition densities for the 2 + -8 + levels in 90 Zr were extracted in the process of analyzing (p,p ' ) scattering at 400 MeV. They were compared with the calculated neutron transition densities and with the experimental proton transition densities. Radial distributions of the experimental neutron and proton transition densities for each state were found to be different. (orig.)

  1. Simulating measures of wood density through the surface by Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penna, Rodrigo; Oliveira, Arno H.; Braga, Mario R.M.S.S.; Vasconcelos, Danilo C.; Carneiro, Clemente J.G.; Penna, Ariane G.C.

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo code (MCNP-4C) was used to simulate a nuclear densimeter for measuring wood densities nondestructively. An Americium source (E = 60 keV) and a NaI (Tl) detector were placed on a wood block surface. Results from MCNP shown that scattered photon fluxes may be used to determining wood densities. Linear regressions between scattered photons fluxes and wood density were calculated and shown correlation coefficients near unity. (author)

  2. Understanding the Effect of Atmospheric Density on the Cosmic Ray Flux Variations at the Earth Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Dayananda, Mathes; Zhang, Xiaohang; Butler, Carola; He, Xiaochun

    2013-01-01

    We report in this letter for the first time the numerical simulations of muon and neutron flux variations at the surface of the earth with varying air densities in the troposphere and stratosphere. The simulated neutron and muon flux variations are in very good agreement with the measured neutron flux variation in Oulu and the muon flux variation in Atlanta. We conclude from this study that the stratosphere air density variation dominates the effects on the muon flux changes while the density...

  3. GAS SURFACE DENSITY, STAR FORMATION RATE SURFACE DENSITY, AND THE MAXIMUM MASS OF YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN A DISK GALAXY. II. THE GRAND-DESIGN GALAXY M51

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González-Lópezlira, Rosa A.; Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass and surface densities of total gas (Σ gas ), molecular gas (Σ H 2 ), neutral gas (Σ H I ), and star formation rate (Σ SFR ) in the grand-design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. By comparing the two-dimensional distribution of cluster masses and gas surface densities, we find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M 3rd ∝Σ H I 0.4±0.2 , whereM 3rd is the median of the five most massive clusters. There is no correlation withΣ gas ,Σ H2 , orΣ SFR . For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M 3rd ∝Σ H I 0.6±0.1 and M 3rd ∝Σ gas 0.5±0.2 ; there is no correlation with either Σ H 2 orΣ SFR . The results could hardly be more different from those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but we have determined M 3rd ∝Σ gas 3.8±0.3 , M 3rd ∝Σ H 2 1.2±0.1 , and M 3rd ∝Σ SFR 0.9±0.1 . For the older sample in M51, the lack of tight correlations is probably due to the combination of strong azimuthal variations in the surface densities of gas and star formation rate, and the cluster ages. These two facts mean that neither the azimuthal average of the surface densities at a given radius nor the surface densities at the present-day location of a stellar cluster represent the true surface densities at the place and time of cluster formation. In the case of the younger sample, even if the clusters have not yet traveled too far from their birth sites, the poor resolution of the radio data compared to the physical sizes of the clusters results in measuredΣ that are likely quite diluted compared to the actual densities relevant for the formation of the clusters.

  4. Phonon density of states and anharmonicity of UO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Judy W. L.; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Larson, Bennett C.; Buyers, William J. L.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2014-03-01

    Phonon density of states (PDOS) measurements have been performed on polycrystalline UO2 at 295 and 1200 K using time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering to investigate the impact of anharmonicity on the vibrational spectra and to benchmark ab initio PDOS simulations performed on this strongly correlated Mott insulator. Time-of-flight PDOS measurements include anharmonic linewidth broadening, inherently, and the factor of ˜7 enhancement of the oxygen spectrum relative to the uranium component by the increased neutron sensitivity to the oxygen-dominated optical phonon modes. The first-principles simulations of quasiharmonic PDOS spectra were neutron weighted and anharmonicity was introduced in an approximate way by convolution with wave-vector-weighted averages over our previously measured phonon linewidths for UO2, which are provided in numerical form. Comparisons between the PDOS measurements and the simulations show reasonable agreement overall, but they also reveal important areas of disagreement for both high and low temperatures. The discrepancies stem largely from a ˜10 meV compression in the overall bandwidth (energy range) of the oxygen-dominated optical phonons in the simulations. A similar linewidth-convoluted comparison performed with the PDOS spectrum of Dolling et al. obtained by shell-model fitting to their historical phonon dispersion measurements shows excellent agreement with the time-of-flight PDOS measurements reported here. In contrast, we show by comparisons of spectra in linewidth-convoluted form that recent first-principles simulations for UO2 fail to account for the PDOS spectrum determined from the measurements of Dolling et al. These results demonstrate PDOS measurements to be stringent tests for ab inito simulations of phonon physics in UO2 and they indicate further the need for advances in theory to address the lattice dynamics of UO2.

  5. Obtaining Hartree-Fock and density functional theory doubly excited states with Car-Parrinello density matrix search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenkel; Isborn, Christine M.; Li, Xiaosong

    2009-11-01

    The calculation of doubly excited states is one of the major problems plaguing the modern day excited state workhorse methodology of linear response time dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and density function theory (TDDFT). We have previously shown that the use of a resonantly tuned field within real-time TDHF and TDDFT is able to simultaneously excite both the α and β electrons to achieve the two-electron excited states of minimal basis H2 and HeH+ [C. M. Isborn and X. Li, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 204107 (2008)]. We now extend this method to many electron systems with the use of our Car-Parrinello density matrix search (CP-DMS) with a first-principles fictitious mass method for wave function optimization [X. Li, C. L. Moss, W. Liang, and Y. Feng, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 234115 (2009)]. Real-time TDHF/TDDFT is used during the application of the laser field perturbation, driving the electron density toward the doubly excited state. The CP-DMS method then converges the density to the nearest stationary state. We present these stationary state doubly excited state energies and properties at the HF and DFT levels for H2, HeH+, lithium hydride, ethylene, and butadiene.

  6. Density functional study of TaSin (n = 1-3, 12) clusters adsorbed to graphene surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Ping; Zheng Lin; Zheng Jiming; Zhang Ruizhi; Yang Luna; Ren, Zhaoyu

    2011-01-01

    A plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to investigate structural and electronic properties of TaSi n (n = 1-3, 12) clusters supported by graphene surface. The resulting adsorption structures are described and discussed in terms of stability, bonding, and electron transfer between the cluster and the graphene. The TaSi n clusters on graphene surface favor their free-standing ground-state structures. Especially in the cases of the linear TaSi 2 and the planar TaSi 3 , the graphene surface may catalyze the transition of the TaSi n clusters from an isomer of lower dimensionality into the ground-state structure. The adsorption site and configuration of TaSi n on graphene surface are dominated by the interaction between Ta atom and graphene. Ta atom prefers to adsorb on the hollow site of graphene, and Si atoms tend to locate on the bridge site. Further, the electron transfer is found to proceed from the cluster to the surface for n = 1 and 2, while its direction reverses as n > 2. For the case of TaSi, chemisorption is shown to prevail over physisorption as the dominant mode of surface-adsorbate interaction by charge density analysis.

  7. Origin of the quasiparticle peak in the spectral density of Cr(001) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, L.; Jacob, D.; Karolak, M.; Lichtenstein, A. I.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2017-12-01

    In the spectral density of Cr(001) surfaces, a sharp resonance close to the Fermi level is observed in both experiment and theory. For the physical origin of this peak, two mechanisms were proposed: a single-particle dz2 surface state renormalized by electron-phonon coupling and an orbital Kondo effect due to the degenerate dx z/dy z states. Despite several experimental and theoretical investigations, the origin is still under debate. In this work, we address this problem by two different approaches of the dynamical mean-field theory: first, by the spin-polarized T -matrix fluctuation exchange approximation suitable for weakly and moderately correlated systems; second, by the noncrossing approximation derived in the limit of weak hybridization (i.e., for strongly correlated systems) capturing Kondo-type processes. By using recent continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo calculations as a benchmark, we find that the high-energy features, everything except the resonance, of the spectrum are captured within the spin-polarized T -matrix fluctuation exchange approximation. More precisely, the particle-particle processes provide the main contribution. For the noncrossing approximation, it appears that spin-polarized calculations suffer from spurious behavior at the Fermi level. Then, we turned to non-spin-polarized calculations to avoid this unphysical behavior. By employing two plausible starting hybridization functions, it is observed that the characteristics of the resonance are crucially dependent on the starting point. It appears that only one of these starting hybridizations could result in an orbital Kondo resonance in the presence of a strong magnetic field like in the Cr(001) surface. It is for a future investigation to first resolve the unphysical behavior within the spin-polarized noncrossing approximation and then check for an orbital Kondo resonance.

  8. Electron density in reasonably real metallic surfaces, including interchange and correlation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraga, L.A.; Martinez, G.

    1981-01-01

    By means of a new method, the electron density in a jellium surface is calculated taking in account interchange and correlation effects; reproducing, in this way, the Lang and Kohn results. The new method is self-consistent but not iterative and hence is possible extend it to the solution of the same problem in more reasonably real metallic surfaces. (L.C.) [pt

  9. Density Functional Calculations of Solid State Heats of Formation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Politzer, Peter

    1999-01-01

    It is now feasible to compute quite accurate gas phase heats of formation for relatively small molecules by means of ab initio or density functional techniques and one of several possible approaches...

  10. Selection of conformational states in surface self-assembly for a molecule with eight possible pairs of surface enantiomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nuermaimaiti, Ajiguli; Schultz-Falk, Vickie; Lind Cramer, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of a molecule with many distinct conformational states, resulting in eight possible pairs of surface enantiomers, is investigated on a Au(111) surface under UHV conditions. The complex molecule is equipped with alkyl and carboxyl moieties to promote controlled self-assembly of lamel......Self-assembly of a molecule with many distinct conformational states, resulting in eight possible pairs of surface enantiomers, is investigated on a Au(111) surface under UHV conditions. The complex molecule is equipped with alkyl and carboxyl moieties to promote controlled self......-assembly of lamellae structures. From statistical analysis of Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM) data we observe a clear selection of specific conformational states after self-assembly. Using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations we rationalise how this selection is correlated to the orientation of the alkyl...

  11. Photonic density of states in the vicinity of a single-wall finite-length carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemilentsau, A; Ya Slepyan, G; Maksimenko, S A

    2009-01-01

    Photonic density of states in the vicinity of a single-wall finite-length carbon nanotube (CNT) is investigated theoretically in this paper. The analysis is based on the fluctuation-dissipative theorem in the Callen-Welton form. The Dyson equation for the Green dyadic of the electromagnetic field in the presence of CNT is formulated and a method for its numerical solution is elaborated. We show that the photonic density of states spectrum has a nontrivial resonant structure in the terahertz range in the vicinity of the metallic single-wall CNT. The origin of these resonances is the surface plasmon resonances on the CNT's edges.

  12. Influence of additive laser manufacturing parameters on surface using density of partially melted particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Benoit; Brient, Antoine; Samper, Serge; Hascoët, Jean-Yves

    2016-12-01

    Mastering the additive laser manufacturing surface is a real challenge and would allow functional surfaces to be obtained without finishing. Direct Metal Deposition (DMD) surfaces are composed by directional and chaotic textures that are directly linked to the process principles. The aim of this work is to obtain surface topographies by mastering the operating process parameters. Based on experimental investigation, the influence of operating parameters on the surface finish has been modeled. Topography parameters and multi-scale analysis have been used in order to characterize the DMD obtained surfaces. This study also proposes a methodology to characterize DMD chaotic texture through topography filtering and 3D image treatment. In parallel, a new parameter is proposed: density of particles (D p). Finally, this study proposes a regression modeling between process parameters and density of particles parameter.

  13. Self-consistent density functional calculation of the image potential at a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J; Alvarellos, J E; Chacon, E; GarcIa-Gonzalez, P

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the exchange-correlation (XC) potential at a metal surface has an image-like asymptotic behaviour given by -1/4(z-z 0 ), where z is the coordinate perpendicular to the surface. Using a suitable fully non-local functional prescription, we evaluate self-consistently the XC potential with the correct image behaviour for simple jellium surfaces in the range of metallic densities. This allows a proper comparison between the corresponding image-plane position, z 0 , and other related quantities such as the centroid of an induced charge by an external perturbation. As a by-product, we assess the routinely used local density approximation when evaluating electron density profiles, work functions, and surface energies by focusing on the XC effects included in the fully non-local description

  14. Simulation of flame surface density and burning rate of a premixed turbulent flame using contour advection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, B.H.Y.; Chan, C.K. [Department of Applied Mathematics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2006-10-15

    In this paper, a 2-dimensional rod-stabilized V-shaped flame is simulated using contour advection with surgery as well as the random vortex method. Effects of turbulence on various quantities, such as flame brush thickness and flame surface density, are investigated. The flame surface density S is estimated using the Bray-Moss-Libby formulation, which involves the use of a mean orientation factor {sigma}{sub c}. As a comparison, values of S are also obtained using Shepherd's model, which employs the values of mean flame surface area and mean flame length. Local flame structure is characterized in terms of turbulent flame brush, orientation factor, and flame surface density. Profiles of S obtained using the two different models are compared and show that discrepancy is more evident with increasing turbulence intensity. (author)

  15. Self-consistent density functional calculation of the image potential at a metal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain); Alvarellos, J E [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain); Chacon, E [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); GarcIa-Gonzalez, P [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-04

    It is well known that the exchange-correlation (XC) potential at a metal surface has an image-like asymptotic behaviour given by -1/4(z-z{sub 0}), where z is the coordinate perpendicular to the surface. Using a suitable fully non-local functional prescription, we evaluate self-consistently the XC potential with the correct image behaviour for simple jellium surfaces in the range of metallic densities. This allows a proper comparison between the corresponding image-plane position, z{sub 0}, and other related quantities such as the centroid of an induced charge by an external perturbation. As a by-product, we assess the routinely used local density approximation when evaluating electron density profiles, work functions, and surface energies by focusing on the XC effects included in the fully non-local description.

  16. Temperature-dependent surface density of alkylthiol monolayers on gold nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuepeng; Lu, Pin; Zhai, Hua; Wu, Yucheng

    2018-03-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study the surface density of passivating monolayers of alkylthiol chains on gold nanocrystals at temperatures ranging from 1 to 800 K. The results show that the surface density of alkylthiol monolayer reaches a maximum value at near room temperature (200-300 K), while significantly decreases with increasing temperature in the higher temperature region (> 300 {{K}}), and slightly decreases with decreasing temperature at low temperature (< 200 {{K}}). We find that the temperature dependence of surface ligand density in the higher temperature region is attributed to the substantial ligand desorption induced by the thermal fluctuation, while that at low temperature results from the reduction in entropy caused by the change in the ordering of passivating monolayer. These results are expected helpful to understand the temperature-dependent surface coverage of gold nanocrystals.

  17. Topological surface states on Bi$_{1-x}$Sb$_x$

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xie-Gang; Hofmann, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Topological insulators support metallic surface states whose existence is protected by the bulk band structure. It has been predicted early that the topology of the surface state Fermi contour should depend on several factors, such as the surface orientation and termination and this raises the qu...

  18. Density-matrix-functional calculations for matter in strong magnetic fields: Ground states of heavy atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kristinn; Yngvason, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    We report on a numerical study of the density matrix functional introduced by Lieb, Solovej, and Yngvason for the investigation of heavy atoms in high magnetic fields. This functional describes exactly the quantum mechanical ground state of atoms and ions in the limit when the nuclear charge Z...... and the electron number N tend to infinity with N/Z fixed, and the magnetic field B tends to infinity in such a way that B/Z4/3→∞. We have calculated electronic density profiles and ground-state energies for values of the parameters that prevail on neutron star surfaces and compared them with results obtained...... by other methods. For iron at B=1012 G the ground-state energy differs by less than 2% from the Hartree-Fock value. We have also studied the maximal negative ionization of heavy atoms in this model at various field strengths. In contrast to Thomas-Fermi type theories atoms can bind excess negative charge...

  19. State of the Art in Photon-Density Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hachisuka, Toshiya; Jarosz, Wojciech; Georgiev, Iliyan

    2013-01-01

    scattering. Since its introduction, photon-density estimation has been significantly extended in computer graphics with the introduction of: specialized techniques that intelligently modify the positions or bandwidths to reduce visual error using a small number of photons, approaches that eliminate error...

  20. State of the Art in Photon Density Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hachisuka, Toshiya; Jarosz, Wojciech; Bouchard, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    scattering. Since its introduction, photon-density estimation has been significantly extended in computer graphics with the introduction of: specialized techniques that intelligently modify the positions or bandwidths to reduce visual error using a small number of photons, approaches that eliminate error...

  1. Diffuse Surface Scattering in the Plasmonic Resonances of Ultralow Electron Density Nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monreal, R Carmina; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Apell, S Peter

    2015-05-21

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) have recently been identified in extremely diluted electron systems obtained by doping semiconductor quantum dots. Here, we investigate the role that different surface effects, namely, electronic spill-out and diffuse surface scattering, play in the optical properties of these ultralow electron density nanosystems. Diffuse scattering originates from imperfections or roughness at a microscopic scale on the surface. Using an electromagnetic theory that describes this mechanism in conjunction with a dielectric function including the quantum size effect, we find that the LSPRs show an oscillatory behavior in both position and width for large particles and a strong blue shift in energy and an increased width for smaller radii, consistent with recent experimental results for photodoped ZnO nanocrystals. We thus show that the commonly ignored process of diffuse surface scattering is a more important mechanism affecting the plasmonic properties of ultralow electron density nanoparticles than the spill-out effect.

  2. Evolution of Mars’ Northern Polar Seasonal CO2 deposits: variations in surface brightness and bulk density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Christopher P.; Titus, Timothy N.

    2015-01-01

    Small scale variations of seasonal ice are explored at different geomorphic units on the Northern Polar Seasonal Cap (NPSC). We use seasonal rock shadow measurements, combined with visible and thermal observations, to calculate density over time. The coupling of volume density and albedo allows us to determine the microphysical state of the seasonal CO2 ice. We find two distinct endmembers across the NPSC: 1) Snow deposits may anneal to form an overlying slab layer that fractures. These low density deposits maintain relatively constant densities over springtime. 2) Porous slab deposits likely anneal rapidly in early spring and fracture in late spring. These high density deposits dramatically increase in density over time. The endmembers appear to be correlated with latitude.

  3. Benchmarks for electronically excited states: Time-dependent density functional theory and density functional theory based multireference configuration interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva-Junior, Mario R.; Schreiber, Marko; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and DFT-based multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations are reported for a recently proposed benchmark set of 28 medium-sized organic molecules. Vertical excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state dipole...

  4. Surface states in thin versus thick organic quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Ba An; Hanamura, E.

    1995-08-01

    Surface states are studied in dependence on thickness or organic quantum wells within the nearest layer approximation. It is shown that there is a material-dependent critical thickness. Structures, that have thickness thinner or thicker than the critical one, exhibit qualitatively different characteristics of surface states. Criteria for existence and sign rules for location of energy levels of surface states are established which are general and contain the results of the previous works as particular cases. (author). 18 refs, 3 figs

  5. In-situ determination of electronic surface and volume defect density of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and silicon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebke, F.

    1992-07-01

    The density of localized gap states in the bulk and in the near-surface region of amorphous hydrogenated silicon (a-Si:H) was measured for non oxidized undoped, B-doped and P-doped samples as well as for films with low carbon (C) and germanium (Ge) content. Also the influence of light soaking on the bulk and surface density of states was investigated. The samples were prepared by rf glow discharge in an UHV-system at substrate temperatures between 100degC and 400degC and transferred to the analysis chamber by a vacuum lock. We combined the constant photocurrent method (CPM) and the total-yield photoelectron spectroscopy (TY) to obtain in-situ information about the defect densities. While the first method yields information about the density of states in the bulk, the other method obtains the density of occupied states in the near-surface region. The mean information depth of the TY-measurements is limited by the escape lenght of photoelectrons and can be estimated to 5 nm. In addition to the defect density the position of the Fermi energy was determined for the bulk by dark conductivity measurements and at the surface using a calibrated Kelvin probe. (orig.)

  6. Full charge-density calculation of the surface energy of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Kollár, J..; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1994-01-01

    of a spherically symmetrized charge density, while the Coulomb and exchange-correlation contributions are calculated by means of the complete, nonspherically symmetric charge density within nonoverlapping, space-filling Wigner-Seitz cells. The functional is used to assess the convergence and the accuracy......We have calculated the surface energy and the work function of the 4d metals by means of an energy functional based on a self-consistent, spherically symmetric atomic-sphere potential. In this approach the kinetic energy is calculated completely within the atomic-sphere approximation (ASA) by means...... of the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals (LMTO) method and the ASA in surface calculations. We find that the full charge-density functional improves the agreement with recent full-potential LMTO calculations to a level where the average deviation in surface energy over the 4d series is down to 10%....

  7. Minimal model for spoof acoustoelastic surface states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Christensen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Similar to textured perfect electric conductors for electromagnetic waves sustaining artificial or spoof surface plasmons we present an equivalent phenomena for the case of sound. Aided by a minimal model that is able to capture the complex wave interaction of elastic cavity modes and airborne sound radiation in perfect rigid panels, we construct designer acoustoelastic surface waves that are entirely controlled by the geometrical environment. Comparisons to results obtained by full-wave simulations confirm the feasibility of the model and we demonstrate illustrative examples such as resonant transmissions and waveguiding to show a few examples of many where spoof elastic surface waves are useful.

  8. Surface radiant flux densities inferred from LAC and GAC AVHRR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, F.; Klaes, D.

    To infer surface radiant flux densities from current (NOAA-AVHRR, ERS-1/2 ATSR) and future meteorological (Envisat AATSR, MSG, METOP) satellite data, the complex, modular analysis scheme SESAT (Strahlungs- und Energieflüsse aus Satellitendaten) could be developed (Berger, 2001). This scheme allows the determination of cloud types, optical and microphysical cloud properties as well as surface and TOA radiant flux densities. After testing of SESAT in Central Europe and the Baltic Sea catchment (more than 400scenes U including a detailed validation with various surface measurements) it could be applied to a large number of NOAA-16 AVHRR overpasses covering the globe.For the analysis, two different spatial resolutions U local area coverage (LAC) andwere considered. Therefore, all inferred results, like global area coverage (GAC) U cloud cover, cloud properties and radiant properties, could be intercompared. Specific emphasis could be made to the surface radiant flux densities (all radiative balance compoments), where results for different regions, like Southern America, Southern Africa, Northern America, Europe, and Indonesia, will be presented. Applying SESAT, energy flux densities, like latent and sensible heat flux densities could also be determined additionally. A statistical analysis of all results including a detailed discussion for the two spatial resolutions will close this study.

  9. A thermodynamic perturbation theory for the surface tension and ion density profile of a liquid metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.; Kumaravadivel, R.

    1976-01-01

    A simple scheme for determining the ion density profile and the surface tension of a liquid metal is described. Assuming that the interaction between metallic pseudo-ions is of the form introduced by Evans, an approximate expression for the excess free energy of the system is derived using the thermodynamic perturbation theory of Weeks, Chandler and Anderson. This excess free energy is then minimized with respect to a parameter which specifies the ion density profile, and the surface tension is given directly. From a consideration of the dependence of the interionic forces on the electron density it is predicted that the ions should take up a very steep density profile at the liquid metal surface. This behaviour is contrasted with that to be expected for rare-gas fluids in which the interatomic forces are density-independent. The values of the surface tension calculated for liquid Na, K and Al from a simplified version of the theory are in reasonable agreement with experiment. (author)

  10. X-Ray Fluorescence Determination of the Surface Density of Chromium Nanolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashin, N. I.; Chernjaeva, E. A.; Tumanova, A. N.; Ershov, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    An auxiliary system consisting of thin-film layers of chromium deposited on a polymer film substrate is used to construct calibration curves for the relative intensities of the K α lines of chromium on bulk substrates of different elements as functions of the chromium surface density in the reference samples. Correction coefficients are calculated to take into account the absorption of primary radiation from an x-ray tube and analytical lines of the constituent elements of the substrate. A method is developed for determining the surface density of thin films of chromium when test and calibration samples are deposited on substrates of different materials.

  11. Particle-hole state densities for statistical multi-step compound reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblozinsky, P.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical relation is derived for the density of particle-hole bound states applying the equidistant-spacing approximation and the Darwin-Fowler statistical method. The Pauli exclusion principle as well as the finite depth of the potential well are taken into account. The set of densities needed for calculations of multi-step compound reactions is completed by deriving the densities of accessible final states for escape and damping. (orig.)

  12. Analysis of the surface density and reactivity of perfluorophenylazide and the impact on ligand immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorn, Gilad, E-mail: zorn@ge.com; Castner, David G. [National ESCA and Surface Analysis Center for Biomedical Problems, Departments of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Box 351653, Seattle, Washington 98195-1653 (United States); Tyagi, Anuradha; Wang, Xin; Wang, Hui; Yan, Mingdi, E-mail: Mingdi-Yan@uml.edu [Department of Chemistry, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon 97207-0751 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Perfluorophenylazide (PFPA) chemistry is a novel method for tailoring the surface properties of solid surfaces and nanoparticles. It is general and versatile, and has proven to be an efficient way to immobilize graphene, proteins, carbohydrates, and synthetic polymers. The main thrust of this work is to provide a detailed investigation on the chemical composition and surface density of the PFPA tailored surface. Specifically, gold surfaces were treated with PFPA-derivatized (11-mercaptoundecyl)tetra(ethylene glycol) (PFPA-MUTEG) mixed with 2-[2-(2-mercaptoethoxy)ethoxy]ethanol (MDEG) at varying solution mole ratios. Complementary analytical techniques were employed to characterize the resulting films including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to detect fingerprints of the PFPA group, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ellipsometry to study the homogeneity and uniformity of the films, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structures to study the electronic and chemical structure of the PFPA groups. Results from these studies show that the films prepared from 90:10 and 80:20 PFPA-MUTEG/MDEG mixed solutions exhibited the highest surface density of PFPA and the most homogeneous coverage on the surface. A functional assay using surface plasmon resonance with carbohydrates covalently immobilized onto the PFPA-modified surfaces showed the highest binding affinity for lectin on the PFPA-MUTEG/MDEG film prepared from a 90:10 solution.

  13. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Outperforms Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory and Multireference Perturbation Theory for Ground-State and Excited-State Charge Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Sonnenberger, Andrew L; Hoyer, Chad E; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-08-11

    The correct description of charge transfer in ground and excited states is very important for molecular interactions, photochemistry, electrochemistry, and charge transport, but it is very challenging for Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT). KS-DFT exchange-correlation functionals without nonlocal exchange fail to describe both ground- and excited-state charge transfer properly. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory with a new type of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here we have used MC-PDFT to study challenging ground- and excited-state charge-transfer processes by using on-top density functionals obtained by translating KS exchange-correlation functionals. For ground-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT performs better than either the PBE exchange-correlation functional or CASPT2 wave function theory. For excited-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT (unlike KS-DFT) shows qualitatively correct behavior at long-range with great improvement in predicted excitation energies.

  14. Adsorption and oxidation of oxalic acid on anatase TiO2 (001) surface: A density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Porun; Zhao, Huijun

    2015-09-15

    Anatase TiO2 (001) surfaces have attracted great interest for photo-degradation of organic species recently due to their high reactivity. In this work, adsorption properties and oxidation mechanisms of oxalic acid on the anatase TiO2 (001) surface have been theoretically investigated using the first-principles density functional theory. Various possible adsorption configurations are considered by diversifying the connectivity of carboxylic groups with the surface. It is found that the adsorption of oxalic acid on the anatase (001) surface prefer the dissociative states. A novel double-bidentate configuration has been found due to the structural match between oxalic acid and the (001) surface. More charge is transferred from the adsorbed oxalic acid to the surface with the double-bidentate configuration when comparing with other adsorption structures. Thus, there is a positive correlation relationship between the transferred charge amount and the interfacial bond numbers when oxalic acid adsorbs on the anatase TiO2 (001) surface. The adsorption energies with dispersion corrections have demonstrated that the van der Waals interactions play an important role in the adsorption, especially when adsorbates are close to the surface. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Single-Step Fabrication of High-Density Microdroplet Arrays of Low-Surface-Tension Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenqian; Li, Linxian; Du, Xin; Welle, Alexander; Levkin, Pavel A

    2016-04-01

    A facile approach for surface patterning that enables single-step fabrication of high-density arrays of low-surface-tension organic-liquid microdroplets is described. This approach enables miniaturized and parallel high-throughput screenings in organic solvents, formation of homogeneous arrays of hydrophobic nanoparticles, polymer micropads of specific shapes, and polymer microlens arrays. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Effect of the ground state correlations in the density distribution and zero point fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, F.; Broglia, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The existence of collective vibrations in the spectrum implies that the description of the ground state in an independent particle model must be corrected. This is because of the zero point fluctuations induced by the collective vibrations, so that ground state correlations have to be included. These are taken into account via the diagrammatic expansion of the Nuclear Field Theory, giving place to a renormalization in the different properties of the ground state. As far as the density distribution is concerned, in a NFT consistent calculation, the largest contributions arise from diagrams that cannot be expressed in terms of backward going amplitudes of the phonon RPA wave function. For a given multipolarity the main correction comes from the low lying state. The giant resonance is of smaller relevance since it lies at larger energies in the response function. The octupole modes give the dominant contribution, and the effect in average becomes smaller as the multipolarity increases. These results agree quite well with those obtained taking into account the zero point fluctuations of the nuclear surface in the collective model with the Esbensen and Bertsch prescription, which the authors use to explain the anomalous behaviour of the mean square radii of the Calcium isotopes

  17. Surface State Capture Cross-Section at the Interface between Silicon and Hafnium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Chien Chiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial properties between silicon and hafnium oxide (HfO2 are explored by the gated-diode method and the subthreshold measurement. The density of interface-trapped charges, the current induced by surface defect centers, the surface recombination velocity, and the surface state capture cross-section are obtained in this work. Among the interfacial properties, the surface state capture cross-section is approximately constant even if the postdeposition annealing condition is changed. This effective capture cross-section of surface states is about 2.4 × 10−15 cm2, which may be an inherent nature in the HfO2/Si interface.

  18. Surface Casimir densities and induced cosmological constant on parallel branes in AdS spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saharian, Aram A.

    2004-01-01

    Vacuum expectation value of the surface energy-momentum tensor is evaluated for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter subject to Robin boundary conditions on two parallel branes located on (D+1)-dimensional anti-de Sitter bulk. The general case of different Robin coefficients on separate branes is considered. As a regularization procedure the generalized zeta function technique is used, in combination with contour integral representations. The surface energies on the branes are presented in the form of the sums of single brane and second brane-induced parts. For the geometry of a single brane both regions, on the left (L-region) and on the right (R-region), of the brane are considered. The surface densities for separate L- and R-regions contain pole and finite contributions. For an infinitely thin brane taking these regions together, in odd spatial dimensions the pole parts cancel and the total surface energy is finite. The parts in the surface densities generated by the presence of the second brane are finite for all nonzero values of the interbrane separation. It is shown that for large distances between the branes the induced surface densities give rise to an exponentially suppressed cosmological constant on the brane. In the Randall-Sundrum braneworld model, for the interbrane distances solving the hierarchy problem between the gravitational and electroweak mass scales, the cosmological constant generated on the visible brane is of the right order of magnitude with the value suggested by the cosmological observations

  19. Density functional studies: First principles and semiempirical calculations of clusters and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinnott, S.B.

    1993-01-01

    In the research presented here, various theoretical electronic structure techniques are utilized to analyze widely different systems from silicon clusters to transition metal solids and surfaces. For the silicon clusters, first principles density functional methods are used to investigate Si N for N = 2-8. The goal is to understand the different types of bonding that can occur in such small clusters where the coordination of the atoms differs substantially from that of the stable bulk tetrahedral bonding. Such uncoordinated structures can provide a good test of more approximate theories that can be used eventually to model silicon surfaces, of obvious technological importance. For the transition metal systems, non-self-consistent electronic structure methods are used to provide an understanding of the driving force for surface relaxations. An in-depth analysis of the results is presented and the physical basis of surface relaxation within the theory is discussed. In addition, the limitations inherent in calculations of metal surface relaxation are addressed. Finally, in an effort to increase understanding of approximate methods, a novel non-self-consistent density functional electronic structure method is developed that is ∼1000 times faster computationally than more sophisticated methods. This new method is tested for a variety of systems including diatomics, mixed clusters, surfaces and bulk lattices. The strengths and weaknesses of the new theory are discussed in detail, leading to greater understanding of non-self-consistent density functional theories as a whole

  20. Molecular adsorbates on HOPG: Toward modulation of graphene density of states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groce, Michelle; Einstein, Theodore; Cullen, William

    2013-03-01

    Ordered molecular superlattices, particularly those made of planar aromatics with their attendant pi orbitals, have the potential to break the graphene sublattice degeneracy and create a band gap. Trimesic acid (TMA) is a promising candidate due to its self-assembly into symmetry-breaking superlattices nearly commensurate with that of graphene. We have used the graphite (0001) surface as a model system to explore the impact of TMA thin films on band structure. By examining correlations between STM topography and STS maps of corresponding regions, we are able to investigate the effects of TMA on the local density of states. Work supported by the University of Maryland NSF-MRSEC, DMR 0520471 and Shared Experimental Facilities.

  1. Surface effects on mean inner potentials studied using density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, Robert S., E-mail: robert.pennington@uni-ulm.de [Institute for Experimental Physics, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Boothroyd, Chris B.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre and Peter Grüneberg Institute, Forschungzentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Quantitative materials characterization using electron holography frequently requires knowledge of the mean inner potential, but reported experimental mean inner potential measurements can vary widely. Using density functional theory, we have simulated the mean inner potential for materials with a range of different surface conditions and geometries. We use both “thin-film” and “nanowire” specimen geometries. We consider clean bulk-terminated surfaces with different facets and surface reconstructions using atom positions from both structural optimization and experimental data and we also consider surfaces both with and without adsorbates. We find that the mean inner potential is surface-dependent, with the strongest dependency on surface adsorbates. We discuss the outlook and perspective for future mean inner potential measurements. - Highlights: • Density functional theory (DFT) is used to simulate mean inner potentials (MIP). • Applications for MIP electron holography measurements are considered. • MIPs are found to be surface-dependent, for thin-film and nanowire geometries. • The DFT simulation precision is extensively tested for multiple materials. • Surface adsorbates can create a strong positive or negative effect.

  2. Estimating the amount and distribution of radon flux density from the soil surface in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuo Weihai; Guo Qiuju; Chen Bo; Cheng Guan

    2008-01-01

    Based on an idealized model, both the annual and the seasonal radon ( 222 Rn) flux densities from the soil surface at 1099 sites in China were estimated by linking a database of soil 226 Ra content and a global ecosystems database. Digital maps of the 222 Rn flux density in China were constructed in a spatial resolution of 25 km x 25 km by interpolation among the estimated data. An area-weighted annual average 222 Rn flux density from the soil surface across China was estimated to be 29.7 ± 9.4 mBq m -2 s -1 . Both regional and seasonal variations in the 222 Rn flux densities are significant in China. Annual average flux densities in the southeastern and northwestern China are generally higher than those in other regions of China, because of high soil 226 Ra content in the southeastern area and high soil aridity in the northwestern one. The seasonal average flux density is generally higher in summer/spring than winter, since relatively higher soil temperature and lower soil water saturation in summer/spring than other seasons are common in China

  3. Surface density: a new parameter in the fundamental metallicity relation of star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Tetsuya; Goto, Tomotsugu; Momose, Rieko

    2018-04-01

    Star-forming galaxies display a close relation among stellar mass, metallicity, and star formation rate (or molecular-gas mass). This is known as the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) (or molecular-gas FMR), and it has a profound implication on models of galaxy evolution. However, there still remains a significant residual scatter around the FMR. We show here that a fourth parameter, the surface density of stellar mass, reduces the dispersion around the molecular-gas FMR. In a principal component analysis of 29 physical parameters of 41 338 star-forming galaxies, the surface density of stellar mass is found to be the fourth most important parameter. The new 4D fundamental relation forms a tighter hypersurface that reduces the metallicity dispersion to 50 per cent of that of the molecular-gas FMR. We suggest that future analyses and models of galaxy evolution should consider the FMR in a 4D space that includes surface density. The dilution time-scale of gas inflow and the star-formation efficiency could explain the observational dependence on surface density of stellar mass.

  4. Surface of Maximums of AR(2 Process Spectral Densities and its Application in Time Series Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Ivanov

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions. The obtained formula of surface of maximums of noise spectral densities gives an opportunity to realize for which values of AR(2 process characteristic polynomial coefficients it is possible to look for greater rate of convergence to zero of the probabilities of large deviations of the considered estimates.

  5. Density, viscosity and surface tension of liquid phase Beckmann rearrangement mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidhof, K.T.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Schouten, J.C.; Tinge, J.T.

    2015-01-01

    We have determined the density, dynamic viscosity, and surface tension of liquid phase Beckmann rearrangement mixtures, consisting of e-caprolactam and fuming oleum. These important properties have been measured in wide ranges of both temperature and molar ratios of acid and e-caprolactam, covering

  6. Inversion of gravity and gravity gradiometry data for density contrast surfaces using Cauchy-type integrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhdanov, Michael; Cai, Hongzhu

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new method of modeling and inversion of potential field data generated by a density contrast surface. Our method is based on 3D Cauchy-type integral representation of the potential fields. Traditionally, potential fields are calculated using volume integrals of the domains occupied...

  7. Covalent Coupling of Nanoparticles with Low-Density Functional Ligands to Surfaces via Click Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rianasari, I.; de Jong, Machiel Pieter; Huskens, Jurriaan; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (“click‿ reaction) to couple gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) functionalized with low densities of functional ligands. The ligand coverage on the citrate-stabilized Au NPs was adjusted by the ligand:Au surface atom ratio, while maintaining

  8. Role of physisorption states in molecular scattering: a semilocal density-functional theory study on O2/Ag(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goikoetxea, I; Meyer, J; Juaristi, J I; Alducin, M; Reuter, K

    2014-04-18

    We simulate the scattering of O2 from Ag(111) with classical dynamics simulations performed on a six-dimensional potential energy surface calculated within semilocal density-functional theory. The enigmatic experimental trends that originally required the conjecture of two types of repulsive walls, arising from a physisorption and chemisorption part of the interaction potential, are fully reproduced. Given the inadequate description of the physisorption properties in semilocal density-functional theory, our work casts severe doubts on the prevalent notion to use molecular scattering data as indirect evidence for the existence of such states.

  9. State tomography for two qubits using reduced densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petz, D; Hangos, K M; Szanto, A; Szoellosi, F

    2006-01-01

    The optimal state determination (or tomography) is studied for a composite system of two qubits when measurements can be performed on one of the qubits and interactions of the two qubits can be implemented. The goal is to minimize the number of interactions to be implemented. The algebraic method used in the paper leads to an extension of the concept of mutually unbiased measurements

  10. Surface density mapping of natural tissue by a scanning haptic microscope (SHM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, Takeshi; Oie, Tomonori; Takamizawa, Keiichi; Murayama, Yoshinobu; Fukuda, Toru; Omata, Sadao; Nakayama, Yasuhide

    2013-02-01

    To expand the performance capacity of the scanning haptic microscope (SHM) beyond surface mapping microscopy of elastic modulus or topography, surface density mapping of a natural tissue was performed by applying a measurement theory of SHM, in which a frequency change occurs upon contact of the sample surface with the SHM sensor - a microtactile sensor (MTS) that vibrates at a pre-determined constant oscillation frequency. This change was mainly stiffness-dependent at a low oscillation frequency and density-dependent at a high oscillation frequency. Two paragon examples with extremely different densities but similar macroscopic elastic moduli in the range of natural soft tissues were selected: one was agar hydrogels and the other silicon organogels with extremely low (less than 25 mg/cm(3)) and high densities (ca. 1300 mg/cm(3)), respectively. Measurements were performed in saline solution near the second-order resonance frequency, which led to the elastic modulus, and near the third-order resonance frequency. There was little difference in the frequency changes between the two resonance frequencies in agar gels. In contrast, in silicone gels, a large frequency change by MTS contact was observed near the third-order resonance frequency, indicating that the frequency change near the third-order resonance frequency reflected changes in both density and elastic modulus. Therefore, a density image of the canine aortic wall was subsequently obtained by subtracting the image observed near the second-order resonance frequency from that near the third-order resonance frequency. The elastin-rich region had a higher density than the collagen-rich region.

  11. Test data on electrical contacts at high surface velocities and high current densities for homopolar generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, M.; Tolk, K.M.; Weldon, W.F.; Rylander, H.G.; Woodson, H.H.

    1977-01-01

    Test data is presented for one grade of copper graphite brush material, Morganite CMlS, over a wide range of surface velocities, atmospheres, and current densities that are expected for fast discharge (<100 ms) homopolar generators. The brushes were run on a copper coated 7075-T6 aluminum disk at surface speeds up to 277 m/sec. One electroplated copper and three flame sprayed copper coatings were used during the tests. Significant differences in contact voltage drops and surface mechanical properties of the copper coatings were observed

  12. Processes of H{sub 2} adsorption on Fe(1 1 0) surface: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Weiwei; Peng, Liang; Peng, Daoling [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Gu, Feng Long, E-mail: gu@scnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Liu, Jun [Material Design and Simulation Technology Co. Ltd., Room 1716, V-Faction, 10 Vanke, 2 Ring Road of North Section, Chengdu (China)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • The hydrogen coverages for H{sub 2} adsorption on Fe(1 1 0) surface ranging from 0.125 to 1.000 are prepared by using different surface supercells. • With the reduction of coverage, the average iron atomic energy is increased and the adsorption energy is decreased, leading to the system more stable; while coverage has little effect on the Fe(1 1 0) surface structure and the hydrogen adsorption process. • The most stable absorption site is found to be the on-top site. • DFT calculations show that it is a weak adsorption and the adsorption energy barriers under 4.4 kcal/mol. • The final state is H{sub 2} molecule dissociated into two hydrogen atoms interacting with surface iron atoms to form stable Fe-H bonds. - Abstract: Processes of H{sub 2} adsorption on Fe(1 1 0) surface have been studied by the density functional theory, properties such as surface structure, adsorption position, and adsorption energies are discussed as well. To investigate the atomic geometries and stability under different hydrogen coverages for this adsorption, the hydrogen coverages ranging from 0.125 to 1.000 are prepared by using different surface supercells. It is found that with the reduction of coverage, the average iron atomic energy and the adsorption energy are increased, leading to the system more stable; while coverage has little effect on the Fe(1 1 0) surface structure and the hydrogen adsorption process. The most stable absorption site is found to be the on-top site. Our calculations show that it is a weak adsorption and the adsorption energy barriers under 4.4 kcal/mol. The final state is H{sub 2} molecule dissociated into two hydrogen atoms and interacting with surface iron atoms to form stable Fe-H bonds.

  13. Adsorption of SF6 decomposed gas on anatase (101) and (001) surfaces with oxygen defect: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Chen, Qinchuan; Tang, Ju; Hu, Weihua; Zhang, Jinbin

    2014-01-01

    The detection of partial discharge by analyzing the components of SF6 gas in gas-insulated switchgears is important to the diagnosis and assessment of the operational state of power equipment. A gas sensor based on anatase TiO2 is used to detect decomposed gases in SF6. In this paper, first-principle density functional theory calculations are adopted to analyze the adsorption of SO2, SOF2, and SO2F2, the primary decomposition by-products of SF6 under partial discharge, on anatase (101) and (001) surfaces. Simulation results show that the perfect anatase (001) surface has a stronger interaction with the three gases than that of anatase (101), and both surfaces are more sensitive and selective to SO2 than to SOF2 and SO2F2. The selection of a defect surface to SO2, SOF2, and SO2F2 differs from that of a perfect surface. This theoretical result is corroborated by the sensing experiment using a TiO2 nanotube array (TNTA) gas sensor. The calculated values are analyzed to explain the results of the Pt-doped TNTA gas sensor sensing experiment. The results imply that the deposited Pt nanoparticles on the surface increase the active sites of the surface and the gas molecules may decompose upon adsorption on the active sites. PMID:24755845

  14. Surface tension and density of liquid In-Sn-Zn alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pstruś, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Using the dilatometric method, measurements of the density of liquid alloys of the ternary system In-Sn-Zn in four sections with a constant ratio Sn:In = 24:1, 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, for various Zn additions (5, 10, 14, 20, 3 5, 50 and 75 at.% Zn) were performed at the temperature ranges of 500-1150 K. Density decreases linearly for all compositions. The molar volume calculated from density data exhibits close to ideal dependence on composition. Measurements of the surface tension of liquid alloys have been conducted using the method of maximum pressure in the gas bubbles. There were observed linear dependences on temperature with a negative gradients dσ/dT. Generally, with two exceptions, there was observed the increase of surface tension with increasing content of zinc. Using the Butler's model, the surface tension isotherms were calculated for temperatures T = 673 and 1073 K. Calculations show that only for high temperatures and for low content of zinc (up to about 35 at.%), the modeling is in very good agreement with experiment. Using the mentioned model, the composition of the surface phase was defined at two temperatures T = 673 and 973 K. Regardless of the temperature and of the defined section, the composition of the bulk is very different in comparison with the composition of the surface.

  15. Deposition of thin films and surface modification by pulsed high energy density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Pengxun; Yang Size

    2002-01-01

    The use of pulsed high energy density plasma is a new low temperature plasma technology for material surface treatment and thin film deposition. The authors present detailed theoretical and experimental studies of the production mechanism and physical properties of the pulsed plasma. The basic physics of the pulsed plasma-material interaction has been investigated. Diagnostic measurements show that the pulsed plasma has a high electron temperature of 10-100 eV, density of 10 14 -10 16 cm -3 , translation velocity of ∼10 -7 cm/s and power density of ∼10 4 W/cm 2 . Its use in material surface treatment combines the effects of laser surface treatment, electron beam treatment, shock wave bombardment, ion implantation, sputtering deposition and chemical vapor deposition. The metastable phase and other kinds of compounds can be produced on low temperature substrates. For thin film deposition, a high deposition ratio and strong film to substrate adhesion can be achieved. The thin film deposition and material surface modification by the pulsed plasma and related physical mechanism have been investigated. Thin film c-BN, Ti(CN), TiN, DLC and AlN materials have been produced successfully on various substrates at room temperature. A wide interface layer exists between film and substrate, resulting in strong adhesion. Metal surface properties can be improved greatly by using this kind of treatment

  16. Estimation of Nanodiamond Surface Charge Density from Zeta Potential and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yi

    2017-04-20

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly used to study their interactions with various biological macromolecules. Such simulations generally require detailed knowledge of the surface composition of the NP under investigation. Even for some well-characterized nanoparticles, however, this knowledge is not always available. An example is nanodiamond, a nanoscale diamond particle with surface dominated by oxygen-containing functional groups. In this work, we explore using the harmonic restraint method developed by Venable et al., to estimate the surface charge density (σ) of nanodiamonds. Based on the Gouy-Chapman theory, we convert the experimentally determined zeta potential of a nanodiamond to an effective charge density (σ eff ), and then use the latter to estimate σ via molecular dynamics simulations. Through scanning a series of nanodiamond models, we show that the above method provides a straightforward protocol to determine the surface charge density of relatively large (> ∼100 nm) NPs. Overall, our results suggest that despite certain limitation, the above protocol can be readily employed to guide the model construction for MD simulations, which is particularly useful when only limited experimental information on the NP surface composition is available to a modeler.

  17. Pressure and surface tension of solid-liquid interface using Tara zona density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradi, M.; Kavosh Tehrani, M.

    2001-01-01

    The weighted density functional theory proposed by Tara zona is applied to study the solid-liquid interface. In the last two decades the weighted density functional became a useful tool to consider the properties of inhomogeneous liquids. In this theory, the role of the size of molecules or the particles of which the matter is composed, was found to be important. In this research we study a hard sphere fluid beside a hard wall. For this study the liquid is an inhomogeneous system. We use the definition of the direct correlation function as a second derivative of free energy with respect to the density. We use this definition and the definition of the weighting function, then we minimize the grand potential with respect to the density to get the Euler Lagrange equation and we obtain an integral equation to find the inhomogeneous density profile. The obtained density profile as a function of the distance from the wall, for different bulk density is pitted in three dimensions. We also calculate the pressure and compare it with the Carnahan-Starling results, and finally we obtained the surface tension at liquid-solid interface and compared it with the results of Monte Carlo simulation

  18. Pressure and surface tension of soild-liquid interface using Tarazona density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available   The weighted density functional theory proposed by Tarazona is applied to study the solid-liquid interface. In the last two decades the weighted density functional became a useful tool to consider the properties of inhomogeneous liquids. In this theory, the role of the size of molecules or the particles of which the matter is composed, was found to be important. In this resarch we study a hard sphere fluid beside a hard wall. For this study the liquid is an inhomogeneous system. We use the definition of the direct correlation function as a second derivative of free energy with respect to the density. We use this definition and the definition of the weighting function, then we minimize the grand potential with respect to the density to get the Euler Lagrange equation and we obtain an integral equation to find the inhomogeneous density profile. The obtained density profile as a function of the distance from the wall, for different bulk density is plotted in three dimensions. We also calculate the pressure and compare it with the Carnahan-starling results, and finally we obtained the surface tension at liquid-solid interface and compared it with the results of Monte Carlo simulation.

  19. Density and surface tension of melts of zirconium and hafnium fluorides with lithium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katyshev, S.F.; Artemov, V.V.; Desyatnik, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the temperature dependence of the density and surface tension of melts of LiF-ZrF 4 and LiF-HfF 4 . Density and surface tension were determined by the method of maximum pressure in an argon bubble. On the basis of experimental data over the entire concentration range the molar volumes and their relative deviations from the additive molar volumes were calculated for 1100 0 K. The positive deviations of the molar volumes from additivity in the LiF-HfF 4 system (22.45%) were greater than in the LiF-ZrF 4 system (15.75%). This indicated that the reaction with lithium fluoride is intensified with the switch to the hafnium fluoride. Results also demonstrated that the fluorides are surface-active components in the molten mixtures

  20. Another way of looking at bonding on bimetallic surfaces: the role of spin polarization of surface metal d states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escano, M C; Nguyen, T Q; Nakanishi, H; Kasai, H

    2009-01-01

    The nature of electronic and chemical properties of an unstrained Pt monolayer on a 3d transition metal substrate, M (M = Cr, Mn, Fe), is studied using spin-polarized density functional theory calculations. High spin polarization of Pt d states is noted, verifying the magnetization induced on Pt, which is observed to be responsible for redirecting the analysis of bond formation on a metal surface towards a different perspective. While the shift in the Pt d band center (the average energy of the Pt d band, commonly used to predict the reactivity of surfaces) does give the expected trend in adsorbate (oxygen) chemisorption energy across the bimetallic surfaces in this work, our results show that for spin-polarized Pt d states, the variation in strength of adsorption with respect to the Fermi level density of states is more predictive of Pt chemisorption properties. Hence, this study introduces a scheme for analyzing trends in reactivity of bimetallic surfaces where adsorption energies are used as reactivity parameters and where spin polarization effects cannot be neglected. (fast track communication)

  1. Density Functional Theory Study of Leaching Performance of Different Acids on Pyrochlore (100) Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiuli; Fang, Qing; Ouyang, Hui

    2018-06-01

    Pyrochlore leaching using hydrofluoric, sulfuric, and hydrochloric acids has been studied via experimental methods for years, but the interactions between niobium atoms on the pyrochlore surface and different acids have not been investigated. In this work, first-principles calculations based on density functional theory were used to elucidate the leaching performance of these three acids from the viewpoint of geometrical and electronic structures. The calculation results indicate that sulfate, chloride, and fluoride anions influence the geometric structure of pyrochlore (100) to different extents, decreasing in the order: sulfate, fluoride, chloride. Orbitals of O1 and O2 atoms of sulfate hybridized with those of surface niobium atom. Fluorine orbitals hybridized with those of surface niobium atoms. However, no obvious overlap exists between any orbitals of chlorine and surface niobium, revealing that chlorine does not interact chemically with surface niobium atoms.

  2. A density functional theory study of the TMG adsorption on the GaN surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptasinska, Maria; Soltys, Jakub; Piechota, Jacek [Interdisciplinary Centre for Materials Modelling, University of Warsaw, ul. Pawinskiego 5a, 02-106 Warszawa (Poland); Krukowski, Stanislaw [Interdisciplinary Centre for Materials Modelling, University of Warsaw, ul. Pawinskiego 5a, 02-106 Warszawa (Poland); Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-07-01

    TMG (trimetylogallium) and NH{sub 3} (ammonia) are widely used reactants in the metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique used in the growth of the GaN thin films. We have recently examined theoretically, with the help of the density functional theory (DFT), TMG adsorption on the GaN(0001) surface in order to study formation of bonds between Ga and N. Dangling bonds on the GaN(0001) surface were saturated with the hydrogen atoms. The slab polarization, which is due to the dangling bonds present on the GaN(0001) surface, and energy of the system in the vicinity of TMG was computed for different distances between the surface atoms and TMG. We also studied TMG diffusion on the GaN surface. As a result, the energy path for diffusion from Top N to Hollow was obtained.

  3. Analysis of surface states in ZnO nanowire field effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Ye; Yoon, Jongwon; Kim, Hyeongnam; Lee, Takhee; Lu, Wu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The electron transport in ZnO nanowire FETs is space charged limited below a trap temperature. • Metallic contacts to ZnO nanowires exhibit non-linear behavior with a Schottky barrier height of ∼0.35 eV. • The surface state density is in the range of 1.04 × 10 10 –1.24 × 10 10 /cm 2 . • The trap activation energy is ∼0.26 eV. - Abstract: Nanowires (NWs) have attracted considerable interests for scaled electronic and optoelectronic device applications. However, NW based semiconductor devices normally suffer from surface states due to the existence of dangling bonds or surface reconstruction. Because of their large surface-to-volume ratio, surface states in NWs can easily affect the metallic contacts to NWs and electron transport in NW. Here, we present ZnO NW surface analysis by performing current–voltage characterization on ZnO NW Schottky barrier field effect transistors with different metal contacts (Ti, Al, Au) at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature. Our results show that three metal contacts are all Schottky contacts to ZnO NWs due to surface states. Our further study reveals: (a) the surface states related Schottky barrier height (SBH) can be extracted from a back to back Schottky diodes model and the SBH values are in the range of 0.34–0.37 eV for three metal contacts; (b) the trap activation energy determined from the Arrhenius plots of different Schottky metal contacts is in the range of 0.23–0.29 eV, which is oxygen vacancies related; and (c) based on the space-charge-limited model, the surface state density of ZnO NW is in the range of 1.04 × 10 10 –1.24 × 10 10 /cm 2

  4. Dynamical simulation of electron transfer processes in self-assembled monolayers at metal surfaces using a density matrix approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prucker, V.; Bockstedte, M.; Thoss, M.; Coto, P. B.

    2018-03-01

    A single-particle density matrix approach is introduced to simulate the dynamics of heterogeneous electron transfer (ET) processes at interfaces. The characterization of the systems is based on a model Hamiltonian parametrized by electronic structure calculations and a partitioning method. The method is applied to investigate ET in a series of nitrile-substituted (poly)(p-phenylene)thiolate self-assembled monolayers adsorbed at the Au(111) surface. The results show a significant dependence of the ET on the orbital symmetry of the donor state and on the molecular and electronic structure of the spacer.

  5. Dynamical simulation of electron transfer processes in self-assembled monolayers at metal surfaces using a density matrix approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prucker, V; Bockstedte, M; Thoss, M; Coto, P B

    2018-03-28

    A single-particle density matrix approach is introduced to simulate the dynamics of heterogeneous electron transfer (ET) processes at interfaces. The characterization of the systems is based on a model Hamiltonian parametrized by electronic structure calculations and a partitioning method. The method is applied to investigate ET in a series of nitrile-substituted (poly)(p-phenylene)thiolate self-assembled monolayers adsorbed at the Au(111) surface. The results show a significant dependence of the ET on the orbital symmetry of the donor state and on the molecular and electronic structure of the spacer.

  6. State promotion and neutralization of ions near metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinoviev, A.N.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Multiply charged ion and the charge induced in the metal form a dipole. → Dipole states are promoted into continuum with decreasing ion-surface distance. → These states cross the states formed from metal atom. → Proposed model explains the dominant population of deep bound states. → Observed spectra of emitted Auger electrons prove this promotion model. -- Abstract: When a multiply charged ion with charge Z approaches the metal surface, a dipole is formed by the multiply charged ion and the charge induced in the metal. The states for such a dipole are promoted into continuum with decreasing ion-surface distance and cross the states formed from metal atom. The model proposed explains the dominant population of deep bound states in collisions considered.

  7. Influence of short range chemical order on density of states in α-ZrNi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Junior, J.

    1986-01-01

    Calculations of the density of electronic states for amorphous alloys of ZrNi and ZrCu with different chemical order degrees, in order to verify the effect of chemical ordering on this property, are presented. The results obtained for ZrCu shown that the density of states at Fermi level do not vary significantly with the ordering. The results for ZrNi shown that the introduction of short range chemical order can decrease significantly the density of states at Fermi level, leading to better agreement with experimental results. (M.C.K.) [pt

  8. Theoretical studies of positron states and annihilation characteristics at the oxidized Cu(100) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazleev, N. G. [Department of Physics, Box 19059, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington Texas 76019 (United States) and Institute of Physics, Kazan Federal University, Kremlevskaya18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Weiss, A. H. [Department of Physics, Box 19059, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington Texas 76019 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    In this work we present the results of theoretical studies of positron surface and bulk states and annihilation probabilities of surface-trapped positrons with relevant core electrons at the oxidized Cu(100) surface under conditions of high oxygen coverage. An ab-initio study of the electronic properties of the Cu(100) missing row reconstructed surface at various on surface and sub-surface oxygen coverages has been performed on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT) using the Dmol3 code and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Surface structures in calculations have been constructed by adding oxygen atoms to various surface hollow and sub-surface octahedral sites of the 0.5 monolayer (ML) missing row reconstructed phase of the Cu(100) surface with oxygen coverages ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 ML. The charge redistribution at the surface and variations in atomic structure and chemical composition of the topmost layers associated with oxidation and surface reconstruction have been found to affect the spatial extent and localization of the positron surface state wave function and annihilation probabilities of surface trapped positrons with relevant core electrons. Theoretical results are compared with experimental data obtained from studies of oxidation of the Cu(100) surface using positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy (PAES). It has been shown that positron annihilation probabilities with Cu 3s and 3p core electrons decrease when total (on-surface and sub-surface) oxygen coverage of the Cu(100) surface increases up to 1 ML. The calculations show that for high oxygen coverage when total oxygen coverage is 1. 5 ML the positron is not bound to the surface.

  9. Elastic-plastic stresses in a thin rotating disk with shafthaving density variation parameter under steady-state temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Thakur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Steady thermal stresses in a rotating disc with shaft having density variation parameter subjected to thermal load have been derived by using Seth's transition theory. Neither the yields criterion nor the associated flow rule is assumed here. Results are depicted graphically. It has been seen that compressible material required higher percentage increased angular speed to become fully-plastic as compare to rotating disc made of incompressible material. Circumferential stresses are maximal at the outer surface of the rotating disc. With the introduction of thermal effect it decreases the value of radial and circumferential stresses at inner and outer surface for fully-plastic state.

  10. Near-surface bulk densities of asteroids derived from dual-polarization radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkki, A.; Taylor, P. A.; Zambrano-Marin, L. F.; Howell, E. S.; Nolan, M. C.; Lejoly, C.; Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Aponte, B. A.

    2017-09-01

    We present a new method to constrain the near-surface bulk density and surface roughness of regolith on asteroid surfaces using planetary radar measurements. The number of radar observations has increased rapidly during the last five years, allowing us to compare and contrast the radar scattering properties of different small-body populations and compositional types. This provides us with new opportunities to investigate their near-surface physical properties such as the chemical composition, bulk density, porosity, or the structural roughness in the scale of centimeters to meters. Because the radar signal can penetrate into a planetary surface up to a few decimeters, radar can reveal information that is hidden from other ground-based methods, such as optical and infrared measurements. The near-surface structure of asteroids and comets in centimeter-to-meter scale is essential information for robotic and human space missions, impact threat mitigation, and understanding the history of these bodies as well as the formation of the whole Solar System.

  11. Recent state report: Groundwater programmes of variable density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fein, E.

    1991-12-01

    This report summarises basic facts and data that may be helpful in decisions about the development of a groundwater programme for the calculation of saline groundwater movements. Generally accepted requirements of a rapid groundwater programme for the assessment of flow mechanisms above salt domes are defined. It also describes the possibilities offered by similar programmes already in progress on a national and international basis and discusses state-of-the-art numerical methods and hardware in respect of speed and efficiency of the relevant computer programmes. The availability of a rapid groundwater programme would make it possible for model calculations in connection with long-term safety analyses to take account of the influence of salinity on groundwater movements in extended and complex model regions. (orig./DG) [de

  12. On the atomic state densities of plasmas produced by the "torch a injection axiale"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, J.; Vos, H.P.C.; Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.; Timmermans, E.A.H.

    1996-01-01

    The atomic state densities of helium and argon plasmas produced by the microwave driven plasma torch called the "torche à injection axiale" are presented. They are obtained by absolute line intensity measurements of the excited states and by applying the ideal gas law to the ground state. It will be

  13. Novel method for the simultaneous estimation of density and surface tension of liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirunavukkarasu, G.; Srinivasan, G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The conventional Hare's apparatus generally used for the determination of density of liquids has been modified by replacing its vertical arms (glass tubes) with capillary tubes of 30 cm length and 0.072 cm diameter. When the columns of liquids are drawn through the capillary tubes with reduced pressure at the top of the liquid columns and kept at equilibrium with the atmospheric pressure acting on the liquid surface outside the capillary tubes, the downward pressure due to gravity of the liquid columns has to be coupled with the pressure arising due to the effect of surface tension of the liquids. A fresh expression for the density and surface tension of liquids has been arrived at while equating the pressure balancing system for the two individual liquid columns of the modified Hare's apparatus. The experimental results showed that the proposed method is precise and accurate in the simultaneous estimation of density and surface tension of liquids, with an error of less than 5%

  14. Fermiology and Superconductivity of Topological Surface States in PdTe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, O. J.; Neat, M. J.; Okawa, K.; Bawden, L.; Marković, I.; Mazzola, F.; Feng, J.; Sunko, V.; Riley, J. M.; Meevasana, W.; Fujii, J.; Vobornik, I.; Kim, T. K.; Hoesch, M.; Sasagawa, T.; Wahl, P.; Bahramy, M. S.; King, P. D. C.

    2018-04-01

    We study the low-energy surface electronic structure of the transition-metal dichalcogenide superconductor PdTe2 by spin- and angle-resolved photoemission, scanning tunneling microscopy, and density-functional theory-based supercell calculations. Comparing PdTe2 with its sister compound PtSe2 , we demonstrate how enhanced interlayer hopping in the Te-based material drives a band inversion within the antibonding p -orbital manifold well above the Fermi level. We show how this mediates spin-polarized topological surface states which form rich multivalley Fermi surfaces with complex spin textures. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy reveals type-II superconductivity at the surface, and moreover shows no evidence for an unconventional component of its superconducting order parameter, despite the presence of topological surface states.

  15. Relativistic analysis of nuclear ground state densities at 135 to 200 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    fitting of differential cross-section and analyzing power, and the appearance of wine-bottle- ... So, the effect of different nuclear density distributions is quite conspicuous in the relativistic ap- proach. Hence, we have analyzed five different nuclear ground state .... The NEG and FNEG densities have been used to see the effect.

  16. High Energy Density Solid State Li-ion Battery with Enhanced Safety, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop an all solid state Li-ion battery which is capable of delivering high energy density, combined with high safety over a wide operating...

  17. Molecular simulation insights on the in vacuo adsorption of amino acids on graphene oxide surfaces with varying surface oxygen densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmani, Farzin; Nouranian, Sasan, E-mail: sasan@olemiss.edu; Mahdavi, Mina [University of Mississippi, Department of Chemical Engineering (United States); Al-Ostaz, Ahmed [University of Mississippi, Department of Civil Engineering (United States)

    2016-11-15

    In this fundamental study, a series of molecular dynamics simulations were performed in vacuo to investigate the energetics and select geometries of 20 standard amino acids (AAs) on pristine graphene (PG) and graphene oxide (GO) surfaces as a function of graphene surface oxygen density. These interactions are of key interest to graphene/biomolecular systems. Our results indicate that aromatic AAs exhibit the strongest total interactions with the PG surfaces due to π-π stacking. Tryptophan (Trp) has the highest aromaticity due to its indole side chain and, hence, has the strongest interaction among all AAs (−16.66 kcal/mol). Aliphatic, polar, and charged AAs show various levels of affinity to the PG sheets depending on the strength of their side chain hydrophobic interactions. For example, arginine (Arg) with its guanidinium side chain exhibits the strongest interaction with the PG sheets (−13.81 kcal/mol) following aromatic AAs. Also, glycine (Gly; a polar AA) has the weakest interaction with the PG sheets (−7.29 kcal/mol). When oxygen-containing functional groups are added to the graphene sheets, the π-π stacking in aromatic AAs becomes disrupted and perfect parallelism of the aromatic rings is lost. Moreover, hydrogen bonding and/or electrostatic interactions become more pronounced. Charged AAs exhibit the strongest interactions with the GO surfaces. In general, the AA-GO interactions increase with increasing surface oxygen density, and the effect is more pronounced at higher O/C ratios. This study provides a quantitative measure of AA-graphene interactions for the design and tuning of biomolecular systems suitable for biosensing, drug delivery, and gene delivery applications.

  18. Calculation of gamma-ray flux density above the Venus and Earth surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surkov, Yu.A.; Manvelyan, O.S.

    1987-01-01

    Calculational results of dependence of flux density of nonscattered gamma-quanta on the height above the Venus and Earth planet surfaces are presented in the paper. Areas, where a certain part of gamma quanta is accumulated, are calaculted for each height. Spectra of scattered gamma quanta and their integral fluxes at different heights above the Venera planet surface are calculated. Effect of the atmosphere on gamma radiation recorded is considered. The results obtained allow to estimate optimal conditions for measuring gamma-fields above the Venus and Earth planet surfaces, to determine the area of the planet surface investigated. They are also necessary to determine the elementary composition of the rock according to the characteristic gamma radiation spectrum recorded

  19. Exploring the surface reactivity of 3d metal endofullerenes: a density-functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Salas, Rubén E; Valladares, Ariel A

    2009-09-24

    Changes in the preferential sites of electrophilic, nucleophilic, and radical attacks on the pristine C60 surface with endohedral doping using 3d transition metal atoms were studied via two useful reactivity indices, namely the Fukui functions and the molecular electrostatic potential. Both of these were calculated at the density functional BPW91 level of theory with the DNP basis set. Our results clearly show changes in the preferential reactivity sites on the fullerene surface when it is doped with Mn, Fe, Co, or Ni atoms, whereas there are no significant changes in the preferential reactivity sites on the C60 surface upon endohedral doping with Cu and Zn atoms. Electron affinities (EA), ionization potentials (IP), and HOMO-LUMO gaps (Eg) were also calculated to complete the study of the endofullerene's surface reactivity. These findings provide insight into endofullerene functionalization, an important issue in their application.

  20. Simultaneous measurements of work function and H‒ density including caesiation of a converter surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofaro, S.; Friedl, R.; Fantz, U.

    2017-08-01

    Negative hydrogen ion sources rely on the surface conversion of neutral atomic hydrogen and positive hydrogen ions to H-. The efficiency of this process depends on the actual work function of the converter surface. By introducing caesium into the source the work function decreases, enhancing the negative ion yield. In order to study the impact of the work function on the H- surface production at similar conditions to the ones in ion sources for fusion devices like ITER and DEMO, fundamental investigations are performed in a flexible laboratory experiment. The work function of the converter surface can be absolutely measured by photoelectric effect, while a newly installed cavity ring-down spectroscopy system (CRDS) measures the H- density. The CRDS is firstly tested and characterized by investigations on H- volume production. Caesiation of a stainless steel sample is then performed in vacuum and the plasma effect on the Cs layer is investigated also for long plasma-on times. A minimum work function of (1.9±0.1) eV is reached after some minutes of plasma treatment, resulting in a reduction by a value of 0.8 eV compared to vacuum measurements. The H- density above the surface is (2.1±0.5)×1015 m-3. With further plasma exposure of the caesiated surface, the work function increases up to 3.75 eV, due to the impinging plasma particles which gradually remove the Cs layer. As a result, the H- density decreases by a factor of at least 2.

  1. Spectra of random operators with absolutely continuous integrated density of states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rio, Rafael del, E-mail: delrio@iimas.unam.mx, E-mail: delriomagia@gmail.com [Departamento de Fisica Matematica, Instituto de Investigaciones en Matemáticas Aplicadas y en Sistemas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, C.P. 04510, México D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-04-15

    The structure of the spectrum of random operators is studied. It is shown that if the density of states measure of some subsets of the spectrum is zero, then these subsets are empty. In particular follows that absolute continuity of the integrated density of states implies singular spectra of ergodic operators is either empty or of positive measure. Our results apply to Anderson and alloy type models, perturbed Landau Hamiltonians, almost periodic potentials, and models which are not ergodic.

  2. Spectra of random operators with absolutely continuous integrated density of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rio, Rafael del

    2014-01-01

    The structure of the spectrum of random operators is studied. It is shown that if the density of states measure of some subsets of the spectrum is zero, then these subsets are empty. In particular follows that absolute continuity of the integrated density of states implies singular spectra of ergodic operators is either empty or of positive measure. Our results apply to Anderson and alloy type models, perturbed Landau Hamiltonians, almost periodic potentials, and models which are not ergodic

  3. Dynamics of Spontaneous Emission Controlled by Local Density of States in Photonic Crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, Peter; Nikolaev, Ivan S.; van Driel, A. Floris

    2006-01-01

    We have measured time-resolved spontaneous emission from quantum dots in 3D photonic crystals. Due to the spatially dependent local density of states, the distribution of decay rates varies strongly with the photonic crystal lattice parameter.......We have measured time-resolved spontaneous emission from quantum dots in 3D photonic crystals. Due to the spatially dependent local density of states, the distribution of decay rates varies strongly with the photonic crystal lattice parameter....

  4. Engineering the size and density of silicon agglomerates by controlling the initial surface carbonated contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Ł., E-mail: Lukasz.Borowik@cea.fr [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Chevalier, N.; Mariolle, D.; Martinez, E.; Bertin, F.; Chabli, A.; Barbé, J.-C. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2013-04-01

    Actually, thermally induced thin-films dewetting silicon in the silicon-on-insulator is a way to obtain silicon agglomerates with a size and a density fixed by the silicon film thickness. In this paper we report a new method to monitor both the size and the density of the Si agglomerates thanks to the deposition of a carbon-like layer. We show that using a 5-nm thick layer of silicon and additional ≤1-nm carbonated layer; we obtain agglomerates sizes ranging from 35 nm to 60 nm with respectively an agglomerate density ranging from 38 μm{sup −2} to 18 μm{sup −2}. Additionally, for the case of strained silicon films an alternative dewetting mechanism can be induced by monitoring the chemical composition of the sample surface.

  5. Surface flux density distribution characteristics of bulk high-Tc superconductor in external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, S.; Yuasa, K.

    2004-01-01

    Various magnetic levitation systems using oxide superconductors are developed as strong pinning forces are obtained in melt-processed bulk. However, the trapped flux of superconductor is moved by flux creep and fluctuating magnetic field. Therefore, to examine the internal condition of superconductor, the authors measure the dynamic surface flux density distribution of YBCO bulk. Flux density measurement system has a structure with the air-core coil and the Hall sensors. Ten Hall sensors are arranged in series. The YBCO bulk, which has 25 mm diameter and 13 mm thickness, is field cooled by liquid nitrogen. After that, magnetic field is changed by the air-core coil. This paper describes about the measured results of flux density distribution of YBCO bulk in the various frequencies of air-core coils currents

  6. Surface flux density distribution characteristics of bulk high- Tc superconductor in external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, S.; Yuasa, K.

    2004-10-01

    Various magnetic levitation systems using oxide superconductors are developed as strong pinning forces are obtained in melt-processed bulk. However, the trapped flux of superconductor is moved by flux creep and fluctuating magnetic field. Therefore, to examine the internal condition of superconductor, the authors measure the dynamic surface flux density distribution of YBCO bulk. Flux density measurement system has a structure with the air-core coil and the Hall sensors. Ten Hall sensors are arranged in series. The YBCO bulk, which has 25 mm diameter and 13 mm thickness, is field cooled by liquid nitrogen. After that, magnetic field is changed by the air-core coil. This paper describes about the measured results of flux density distribution of YBCO bulk in the various frequencies of air-core coils currents.

  7. Surface density of spacetime degrees of freedom from equipartition law in theories of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmanabhan, T.

    2010-01-01

    I show that the principle of equipartition, applied to area elements of a surface ∂V which are in equilibrium at the local Davies-Unruh temperature, allows one to determine the surface number density of the microscopic spacetime degrees of freedom in any diffeomorphism invariant theory of gravity. The entropy associated with these degrees of freedom matches with the Wald entropy for the theory. This result also allows one to attribute an entropy density to the spacetime in a natural manner. The field equations of the theory can then be obtained by extremizing this entropy. Moreover, when the microscopic degrees of freedom are in local thermal equilibrium, the spacetime entropy of a bulk region resides on its boundary.

  8. Density functionals for surface science: Exchange-correlation model development with Bayesian error estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorff, Jess; Lundgård, Keld Troen; Møgelhøj, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    A methodology for semiempirical density functional optimization, using regularization and cross-validation methods from machine learning, is developed. We demonstrate that such methods enable well-behaved exchange-correlation approximations in very flexible model spaces, thus avoiding the overfit......A methodology for semiempirical density functional optimization, using regularization and cross-validation methods from machine learning, is developed. We demonstrate that such methods enable well-behaved exchange-correlation approximations in very flexible model spaces, thus avoiding...... the energetics of intramolecular and intermolecular, bulk solid, and surface chemical bonding, and the developed optimization method explicitly handles making the compromise based on the directions in model space favored by different materials properties. The approach is applied to designing the Bayesian error...... sets validates the applicability of BEEF-vdW to studies in chemistry and condensed matter physics. Applications of the approximation and its Bayesian ensemble error estimate to two intricate surface science problems support this....

  9. Surface-plasmon dispersion relation for the inhomogeneous charge-density medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsh, O.K.; Agarwal, B.K.

    1989-01-01

    The surface-plasmon dispersion relation is derived for the plane-bounded electron gas when there is an inhomogeneous charge-density distribution in the plasma. The hydrodynamical model is used. Both cphi and dcphi/dx are taken to be continuous at the surface of the slab, where cphi is the scalar potential. The dispersion relation is compared with the theoretical works of Stern and Ferrell and of Harsh and Agarwal. It is also compared with the observations of Kunz. A dispersion relation for the volume-plasmon oscillations is derived which resembles the well-known relation of Bohm and Pines

  10. Positron study of electron momentum density and Fermi surface in titanium and zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ryoichi; Osawa, Makoto; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Matsumoto, Makoto; Shiotani, Nobuhiro.

    1989-01-01

    The three dimensional electron-positron momentum densities have been obtained on Ti and Zr from measurements of two dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation followed by an image reconstruction technique based on direct Fourier transformation. Augmented-plane wave band structure calculations have been carried out and the results are compared with the experiments. Agreement between the experiment and the theory leads to a conclusion that both Ti and Zr have electron surface sheets which are centered at H and hole surface sheets which are running along the Γ-A axis. (author)

  11. Clean Os(0001) electronic surface states: A first-principle fully relativistic investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urru, Andrea; Dal Corso, Andrea

    2018-05-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of the Os(0001) surface by means of first-principle calculations based on Fully Relativistic (FR) Density Functional Theory (DFT) and a Projector Augmented-Wave (PAW) approach. We investigate surface states and resonances analyzing their spin-orbit induced energy splitting and their spin polarization. The results are compared with previously studied surfaces Ir(111), Pt(111), and Au(111). We do not find any surface state in the gap similar to the L-gap of the (111) fcc surfaces, but find Rashba split resonances that cross the Fermi level and, as in the recently studied Ir(111) surface, have a characteristic downward dispersion. Moreover, for some selected surface states we study the spin polarization with respect to k∥, the wave-vector parallel to the surface. In some cases, such as the Rashba split resonances, the spin polarization shows a smooth behavior with slow rotations, in others the rotation is faster, due to mixing and anti-crossing of the states.

  12. A new temperature and humidity dependent surface site density approach for deposition ice nucleation

    OpenAIRE

    I. Steinke; C. Hoose; O. Möhler; P. Connolly; T. Leisner

    2014-01-01

    Deposition nucleation experiments with Arizona Test Dust (ATD) as a surrogate for mineral dusts were conducted at the AIDA cloud chamber at temperatures between 220 and 250 K. The influence of the aerosol size distribution and the cooling rate on the ice nucleation efficiencies was investigated. Ice nucleation active surface site (INAS) densities were calculated to quantify the ice nucleation efficiency as a function of temperature, humidity and the aerosol ...

  13. Radial Surface Density Profiles of Gas and Dust in the Debris Disk around 49 Ceti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, A. Meredith; Lieman-Sifry, Jesse; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Daley, Cail M. [Department of Astronomy, Van Vleck Observatory, Wesleyan University, 96 Foss Hill Drive, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Roberge, Aki [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kóspál, Ágnes; Moór, Attila; Ábrahám, Peter [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 67, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Kamp, Inga [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Postbus 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Wilner, David J.; Andrews, Sean M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kastner, Joel H., E-mail: amhughes@astro.wesleyan.edu [Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2017-04-20

    We present ∼0.″4 resolution images of CO(3–2) and associated continuum emission from the gas-bearing debris disk around the nearby A star 49 Ceti, observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). We analyze the ALMA visibilities in tandem with the broadband spectral energy distribution to measure the radial surface density profiles of dust and gas emission from the system. The dust surface density decreases with radius between ∼100 and 310 au, with a marginally significant enhancement of surface density at a radius of ∼110 au. The SED requires an inner disk of small grains in addition to the outer disk of larger grains resolved by ALMA. The gas disk exhibits a surface density profile that increases with radius, contrary to most previous spatially resolved observations of circumstellar gas disks. While ∼80% of the CO flux is well described by an axisymmetric power-law disk in Keplerian rotation about the central star, residuals at ∼20% of the peak flux exhibit a departure from axisymmetry suggestive of spiral arms or a warp in the gas disk. The radial extent of the gas disk (∼220 au) is smaller than that of the dust disk (∼300 au), consistent with recent observations of other gas-bearing debris disks. While there are so far only three broad debris disks with well characterized radial dust profiles at millimeter wavelengths, 49 Ceti’s disk shows a markedly different structure from two radially resolved gas-poor debris disks, implying that the physical processes generating and sculpting the gas and dust are fundamentally different.

  14. Application of response surface methodology to optimize uranium biological leaching at high pulp density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatemi, Faezeh; Arabieh, Masoud; Jahani, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to carry out uranium bioleaching via optimization of the leaching process using response surface methodology. For this purpose, the native Acidithiobacillus sp. was adapted to different pulp densities following optimization process carried out at a high pulp density. Response surface methodology based on Box-Behnken design was used to optimize the uranium bioleaching. The effects of six key parameters on the bioleaching efficiency were investigated. The process was modeled with mathematical equation, including not only first and second order terms, but also with probable interaction effects between each pair of factors.The results showed that the extraction efficiency of uranium dropped from 100% at pulp densities of 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10% to 68% at 12.5% of pulp density. Using RSM, the optimum conditions for uranium bioleaching (12.5% (w/v)) were identified as pH = 1.96, temperature = 30.90 C, stirring speed = 158 rpm, 15.7% inoculum, FeSO 4 . 7H 2 O concentration at 13.83 g/L and (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 concentration at 3.22 g/L which achieved 83% of uranium extraction efficiency. The results of uranium bioleaching experiment using optimized parameter showed 81% uranium extraction during 15 d. The obtained results reveal that using RSM is reliable and appropriate for optimization of parameters involved in the uranium bioleaching process.

  15. Application of response surface methodology to optimize uranium biological leaching at high pulp density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatemi, Faezeh; Arabieh, Masoud; Jahani, Samaneh [NSTRI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research School

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to carry out uranium bioleaching via optimization of the leaching process using response surface methodology. For this purpose, the native Acidithiobacillus sp. was adapted to different pulp densities following optimization process carried out at a high pulp density. Response surface methodology based on Box-Behnken design was used to optimize the uranium bioleaching. The effects of six key parameters on the bioleaching efficiency were investigated. The process was modeled with mathematical equation, including not only first and second order terms, but also with probable interaction effects between each pair of factors.The results showed that the extraction efficiency of uranium dropped from 100% at pulp densities of 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10% to 68% at 12.5% of pulp density. Using RSM, the optimum conditions for uranium bioleaching (12.5% (w/v)) were identified as pH = 1.96, temperature = 30.90 C, stirring speed = 158 rpm, 15.7% inoculum, FeSO{sub 4} . 7H{sub 2}O concentration at 13.83 g/L and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration at 3.22 g/L which achieved 83% of uranium extraction efficiency. The results of uranium bioleaching experiment using optimized parameter showed 81% uranium extraction during 15 d. The obtained results reveal that using RSM is reliable and appropriate for optimization of parameters involved in the uranium bioleaching process.

  16. Metal-like Band Structures of Ultrathin Si {111} and {112} Surface Layers Revealed through Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chih-Shan; Huang, Michael H

    2017-09-04

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed on Si (100), (110), (111), and (112) planes with tunable number of planes for evaluation of their band structures and density of states profiles. The purpose is to see whether silicon can exhibit facet-dependent properties derived from the presence of a thin surface layer having different band structures. No changes have been observed for single to multiple layers of Si (100) and (110) planes with a consistent band gap between the valence band and the conduction band. However, for 1, 2, 4, and 5 Si (111) and (112) planes, metal-like band structures were obtained with continuous density of states going from the valence band to the conduction band. For 3, 6, and more Si (111) planes, as well as 3 and 6 Si (112) planes, the same band structure as that seen for Si (100) and (110) planes has been obtained. Thus, beyond a layer thickness of five Si (111) planes at ≈1.6 nm, normal semiconductor behavior can be expected. The emergence of metal-like band structures for the Si (111) and (112) planes are related to variation in Si-Si bond length and bond distortion plus 3s and 3p orbital electron contributions in the band structure. This work predicts possession of facet-dependent electrical properties of silicon with consequences in FinFET transistor design. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Scanning tunneling microscopy study of the possible topological surface states in BiTeCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Y J; Ren, M Q; Liu, X; Huang, Z C; Jiang, J; Fan, Q; Miao, J; Xie, B P; Zhang, T; Feng, D L; Xiang, F; Wang, X

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the non-centrosymmetric bismuth tellurohalides such as BiTeCl are being studied as possible candidates for topological insulators. While some photoemission studies showed that BiTeCl is an inversion asymmetric topological insulator, others showed that it is a normal semiconductor with Rashba splitting. Meanwhile, first-principle calculations have failed to confirm the existence of topological surface states in BiTeCl so far. Therefore, the topological nature of BiTeCl requires further investigation. Here we report a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy study on the surface states of BiTeCl single crystals. On the tellurium (Te) -terminated surfaces with relatively low defect density, evidence for topological surface states is observed in the quasi-particle interference patterns, both in the anisotropy of the scattering vectors and the fast decay of the interference near the step edges. Meanwhile, on the samples with much higher defect densities, we observed surface states that behave differently. Our results may help to resolve the current controversy on the topological nature of BiTeCl. (paper)

  18. Improving energy conversion efficiency for triboelectric nanogenerator with capacitor structure by maximizing surface charge density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xianming; Guo, Hengyu; Yue, Xule; Gao, Jun; Xi, Yi; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-02-07

    Nanogenerators with capacitor structures based on piezoelectricity, pyroelectricity, triboelectricity and electrostatic induction have been extensively investigated. Although the electron flow on electrodes is well understood, the maximum efficiency-dependent structure design is not clearly known. In this paper, a clear understanding of triboelectric generators with capacitor structures is presented by the investigation of polydimethylsiloxane-based composite film nanogenerators, indicating that the generator, in fact, acts as both an energy storage and output device. Maximum energy storage and output depend on the maximum charge density on the dielectric polymer surface, which is determined by the capacitance of the device. The effective thickness of polydimethylsiloxane can be greatly reduced by mixing a suitable amount of conductive nanoparticles into the polymer, through which the charge density on the polymer surface can be greatly increased. This finding can be applied to all the triboelectric nanogenerators with capacitor structures, and it provides an important guide to the structural design for nanogenerators. It is demonstrated that graphite particles with sizes of 20-40 nm and 3.0% mass mixed into the polydimethylsiloxane can reduce 34.68% of the effective thickness of the dielectric film and increase the surface charges by 111.27% on the dielectric film. The output power density of the triboelectric nanogenerator with the composite polydimethylsiloxane film is 3.7 W m(-2), which is 2.6 times as much as that of the pure polydimethylsiloxane film.

  19. Pairing correction of particle-hole state densities for two kinds of Fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, C.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Pairing corrections in particle-hole (exciton) state-density formulas used in precompound nuclear reaction theories are, strictly speaking, dependent on the nuclear excitation energy U and the exciton number n. A general formula for (U,n)-dependent pairing corrections has been derived in an earlier paper for exciton state-density formulas for one kind of Fermion. In the present paper, a similar derivation is made for two kinds of Fermions. It is shown that the constant-pairing-energy correction used in standard level-density formulas, such as U 0 in Gilbert and Cameron, is a limiting case of the present general (U,n)-dependent results

  20. Probability density of tunneled carrier states near heterojunctions calculated numerically by the scattering method.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampler, William R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Myers, Samuel M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Modine, Normand A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The energy-dependent probability density of tunneled carrier states for arbitrarily specified longitudinal potential-energy profiles in planar bipolar devices is numerically computed using the scattering method. Results agree accurately with a previous treatment based on solution of the localized eigenvalue problem, where computation times are much greater. These developments enable quantitative treatment of tunneling-assisted recombination in irradiated heterojunction bipolar transistors, where band offsets may enhance the tunneling effect by orders of magnitude. The calculations also reveal the density of non-tunneled carrier states in spatially varying potentials, and thereby test the common approximation of uniform- bulk values for such densities.

  1. Analysis of plasma equilibrium based on orbit-driven current density profile in steady-state plasma on QUEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K., E-mail: nakamura@triam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [RIAM, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Alam, M.M. [IGSES, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Jiang, Y.Z. [Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Mitarai, O. [Tokai University, Kumamoto 862-8652 (Japan); Kurihara, K.; Kawamata, Y.; Sueoka, M.; Takechi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Hasegawa, M.; Tokunaga, K.; Araki, K.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Idei, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Nagata, T. [RIAM, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); and others

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • High energy particle guiding center orbit is calculated as a contour plot of conserved variable. • Current density profile is analyzed based on the orbit-driven current. • Plasma equilibrium is reconstructed by considering the hollow current profile. - Abstract: In the present RF-driven (ECCD) steady-state plasma on QUEST (B{sub t} = 0.25 T, R = 0.68 m, a = 0.40 m), plasma current seems to flow in the open magnetic surface outside of the closed magnetic surface in the low-field region according to plasma current fitting (PCF) method. We consider that the current in the open magnetic surface is due to orbit-driven current by high-energy particles in RF-driven plasma. So based on the analysis of current density profile based on the orbit-driven current, plasma equilibrium is to be calculated. We calculated high energy particles guiding center orbits as a contour plot of conserved variable in Hamiltonian formulation and considered particles initial position with different levels of energy and pitch angles that satisfy resonance condition. Then the profile of orbit-driven current is estimated by multiplying the particle density on the resonance surface and the velocity on the orbits. This analysis shows negative current near the magnetic axis and hollow current profile is expected even if pressure driven current is considered. Considering the hollow current profile shifted toward the low-field region, the equilibrium is fitted by J-EFIT coded by MATLAB.

  2. Dirac-Screening Stabilized Surface-State Transport in a Topological Insulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Brüne

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report magnetotransport studies on a gated strained HgTe device. This material is a three-dimensional topological insulator and exclusively shows surface-state transport. Remarkably, the Landau-level dispersion and the accuracy of the Hall quantization remain unchanged over a wide density range (3×10^{11}  cm^{−2}densities, the transport is surface-state dominated, where bulk transport would have been expected to coexist already. Moreover, the density dependence of the Dirac-type quantum Hall effect allows us to identify the contributions from the individual surfaces. A k·p model can describe the experiments but only when assuming a steep band bending across the regions where the topological surface states are contained. This steep potential originates from the specific screening properties of Dirac systems and causes the gate voltage to influence the position of the Dirac points rather than that of the Fermi level.

  3. Decay of hollow states in time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Varun; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Wismarsche Str. 43-45, Universitaet Rostock, Rostock-18051 (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Hollow or multiply excited states are inaccessible in time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using adiabatic Kohn-Sham potentials. We determine the exact Kohn Sham (KS) potential for doubly excited states in an exactly solvable model Helium atom. The exact single-particle density corresponds to the energetically lowest quasi-stationary state in the exact KS potential. We describe how this exact potential controls the decay by a barrier whose origin is traced back to phase of the exact KS orbital. The potential controls the barrier height and width in order for the density to tunnel out and decay with the same rate as the doubly excited state in the ab initio time-dependent Schroedinger calculation. Instead, adiabatic KS potentials only show direct photoionization but no autoionization. A frequency-dependent linear response kernel would be necessary in order to capture the decay of autoionizing states.

  4. Surface Casimir densities and induced cosmological constant in higher dimensional braneworlds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saharian, Aram A.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the vacuum expectation value of the surface energy-momentum tensor for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter obeying the Robin boundary conditions on two codimension one parallel branes in a (D+1)-dimensional background spacetime AdS D 1 +1 xΣ with a warped internal space Σ. These vacuum densities correspond to a gravitational source of the cosmological constant type for both subspaces of the branes. Using the generalized zeta function technique in combination with contour integral representations, the surface energies on the branes are presented in the form of the sum of single-brane and second-brane-induced parts. For the geometry of a single brane both regions, on the left and on the right of the brane, are considered. At the physical point the corresponding zeta functions contain pole and finite contributions. For an infinitely thin brane taking these regions together, in odd spatial dimensions the pole parts cancel and the total zeta function is finite. The renormalization procedure for the surface energies and the structure of the corresponding counterterms are discussed. The parts in the surface densities generated by the presence of the second brane are finite for all nonzero values of the interbrane separation and are investigated in various asymptotic regions of the parameters. In particular, it is shown that for large distances between the branes the induced surface densities give rise to an exponentially suppressed cosmological constant on the brane. The total energy of the vacuum including the bulk and boundary contributions is evaluated by the zeta function technique and the energy balance between separate parts is discussed

  5. Ice nucleation on nanotextured surfaces: the influence of surface fraction, pillar height and wetting states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metya, Atanu K; Singh, Jayant K; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2016-09-29

    In this work, we address the nucleation behavior of a supercooled monatomic cylindrical water droplet on nanoscale textured surfaces using molecular dynamics simulations. The ice nucleation rate at 203 K on graphite based textured surfaces with nanoscale roughness is evaluated using the mean fast-passage time method. The simulation results show that the nucleation rate depends on the surface fraction as well as the wetting states. The nucleation rate enhances with increasing surface fraction for water in the Cassie-Baxter state, while contrary behavior is observed for the case of Wenzel state. Based on the spatial histogram distribution of ice formation, we observed two pathways for ice nucleation. Heterogeneous nucleation is observed at a high surface fraction. However, the probability of homogeneous ice nucleation events increases with decreasing surface fraction. We further investigate the role of the nanopillar height in ice nucleation. The nucleation rate is enhanced with increasing nanopillar height. This is attributed to the enhanced contact area with increasing nanopillar height and the shift in nucleation events towards the three-phase contact line associated with the nanotextured surface. The ice-surface work of adhesion for the Wenzel state is found to be 1-2 times higher than that in the Cassie-Baxter state. Furthermore, the work of adhesion of ice in the Wenzel state is found to be linearly dependent on the contour length of the droplet, which is in line with that reported for liquid droplets.

  6. Tritium contaminated surface monitoring with a solid - state device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culcer, Mihai; Iliescu, Mariana; Curuia, Marian; Enache, Adrian; Stefanescu, Ioan; Ducu, Catalin; Malinovschi, Viorel

    2004-01-01

    The low energy of betas makes tritium difficult to detect. However, there are several methods used in tritium detection, such as liquid scintillation and ionization chambers. Tritium on or near a surface can be also detected using proportional counters and, recently, solid state devices. The paper presents our results in the design and achievement of a surface tritium monitor using a PIN photodiode as a solid state charged particle detector to count betas emitted from the surface. That method allows continuous, real-time and non-destructively measuring of tritium. (authors)

  7. Study of Surface States at the Semiconductor/electrolyte Interface of Liquid-Junction Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siripala, Withana P.

    The existence of surface states at the semiconductor electrolyte interface of photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells plays a major role in determining the performance of the device in regard to the potential distribution and transport mechanisms of photogenerated carriers at the interface. We have investigated the n-TiO(,2)/electrolyte interface using three experimental techniques: relaxation spectrum analysis, photocurrent spectroscopy, and electrolyte electroreflectance (EER) spectroscopy. The effect of Fermi level pinning at the CdIn(,2)SE(,4)/aqueous-polysulfide interface was also studied using EER. Three distinct surface states were observed at the n-TiO(,2)/aqueous-electrolyte interface. The dominant state, which tails from the conduction band edge, is primarily responsible for the surface recombination of photocarriers at the interface. The second surface state, observed at 0.8 eV below the conduction band of TiO(,2), originates in the dark charge transfer intermediates (TiO(,2)-H). It is proposed that the sub-bandgap (SBG) photocurrent-potential behavior is a result of the mechanism of dynamic formation and annihilation of these surface states. The third surface state was at 1.3 eV below the conduction band of TiO(,2), and the SBG EER measurements show this state is "intrinsic" to the surface. These states were detected with SBG EER and impedance measurements in the presence of electrolytes that can adsorb on the surface of TiO(,2). Surface concentration of these states was evaluated with impedance measurements. EER measurements on a CdIn(,2)Se(,4)/polysulfide system have shown that the EER spectrum is sensitive to the surface preparation of the sample. The EER signal was quenched as the surface was driven to strong depletion, owing to Fermi level pinning at the interface in the presence of a high density of surface states. The full analysis of this effect enables us to measure the change in the flatband potential, as a function of the electrode potential, and

  8. Calculation of the flux density of gamma rays above the surface of Venus and the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surkov, Yu.A.; Manvelyan, O.S.

    1987-01-01

    In this article the authors present the results of calculating the flux density of unscattered gamma rays as a function of height above the surfaces of Venus and the Earth. At each height they calculate the areas which will collect a certain fraction of the gamma rays. The authors calculate the spectra of scattered gamma rays, as well as their integrated fluxes at various heights above the surface of Venus. They consider how the atmosphere will affect the recording of gamma rays. Their results enable them to evaluate the optimal conditions for measuring the gamma-ray fields above the surfaces of Venus and the Earth and to determine the area of the planet which can be investigated in this way. These results are also necessary if they are to determine the elemental composition of the rock from the characteristic recorded spectrum of gamma radiation

  9. Methyl Butanoate Adsorption on MoS2 Surface: A Density Functional Theory Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabowo Wahyu Aji Eko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl butanoate is one of the compound which is obtained from triglyceride molecule. It has hydrocarbon components and hence may produce hydrocarbon through hydrodeoxygenation (HDO or decarbonylation (DCO processes. The first step to uncover the underlying mechanism of HDO or DCO is to find the active site of methyl butanoate adsorption over the catalyst. This study attempts to investigate the active site of methyl butanoate adsorption on MoS2 surface. Stable bonding configuration for methyl butanoate adsorption on MoS2 is investigated by using density functional theory (DFT. This investigation consists of geometry optimisation and adsorption energy calculations. The stable configuration of methyl butanoate adsorption on MoS2 surface is found to be on top of Mo atom in Mo-edge surface.

  10. Density Functional Theory Calculations Revealing Metal-like Band Structures for Ultrathin Ge {111} and {211} Surface Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chih-Shan; Huang, Michael Hsuan-Yi

    2018-05-21

    To find out if germanium should also possess facet-dependent electrical conductivity properties, surface state density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed on 1-6 layers of Ge (100), (110), (111), and (211) planes. Tunable Ge (100) and (110) planes always present the same semiconducting band structure with a band gap of 0.67 eV expected of bulk germanium. In contrast, 1, 2, 4, and 5 layers of Ge (111) and (211) plane models show metal-like band structures with continuous density of states (DOS) throughout the entire band. For 3 and 6 layers of Ge (111) and (211) plane models, the normal semiconducting band structure was obtained. The plane layers with metal-like band structures also show Ge-Ge bond length deviations and bond distortions, as well as significantly different 4s and 4p frontier orbital electron count and their relative percentages integrated over the valence and conduction bands from those of the semiconducting state. These differences should contribute to strikingly dissimilar band structures. The calculation results suggest observation of facet-dependent electrical conductivity properties of germanium materials, and transistors made of germanium may also need to consider the facet effects with shrinking dimensions approaching 3 nm. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Exotic Paired States with Anisotropic Spin-Dependent Fermi Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feiguin, Adrian E.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a model for realizing exotic paired states in cold Fermi gases by using a spin-dependent optical lattice to engineer mismatched Fermi surfaces for each hyperfine species. The BCS phase diagram shows a stable paired superfluid state with coexisting pockets of momentum space with gapless unpaired carriers, similar to the Sarma state in polarized mixtures, but in our case the system is unpolarized. We propose the possible existence of an exotic 'Cooper-pair Bose-metal' phase, which has a gap for single fermion excitations but gapless and uncondensed 'Cooper-pair' excitations residing on a 'Bose surface' in momentum space.

  12. Determination of density of band-gap states of hydrogenated amorphous silicon suboxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacioglu, A.

    2005-01-01

    Variation of density of gap states of PECVD silicon suboxide films with different oxygen concentrations was evaluated through electrical and optical measurements. Optical transmission and constant photocurrent method (CPM) were used to determine absorption coefficient as a function of photon energy. From these measurements the localized density of states between the valance band mobility edge and Fermi level has been determined. To determine the variation of conduction band edge, steady state photoconductivity (SSPC), photoconductivity response time (PCRT) and transient photoconductivity (TPC) measurements were utilized. Results indicate that the conduction and valance band edges, both, widen monotonically with oxygen content

  13. Near Surface Stoichiometry in UO2: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of oxygen stoichiometry variation in UO2 at different temperature and oxygen partial pressure are important for understanding the dynamics of microstructure in these crystals. However, very limited experimental studies have been performed to understand the atomic structure of UO2 near surface and defect effects of near surface on stoichiometry in which the system can exchange atoms with the external reservoir. In this study, the near (110 surface relaxation and stoichiometry in UO2 have been studied with density functional theory (DFT calculations. On the basis of the point-defect model (PDM, a general expression for the near surface stoichiometric variation is derived by using DFT total-energy calculations and atomistic thermodynamics, in an attempt to pin down the mechanisms of oxygen exchange between the gas environment and defected UO2. By using the derived expression, it is observed that, under poor oxygen conditions, the stoichiometry of near surface is switched from hyperstoichiometric at 300 K with a depth around 3 nm to near-stoichiometric at 1000 K and hypostoichiometric at 2000 K. Furthermore, at very poor oxygen concentrations and high temperatures, our results also suggest that the bulk of the UO2 prefers to be hypostoichiometric, although the surface is near-stoichiometric.

  14. Equation of state at finite net-baryon density using Taylor coefficients up to sixth order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huovinen, Pasi; Petreczky, Péter; Schmidt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We employ the lattice QCD data on Taylor expansion coefficients up to sixth order to construct an equation of state at finite net-baryon density. When we take into account how hadron masses depend on lattice spacing and quark mass, the coefficients evaluated using the p4 action are equal to those of hadron resonance gas at low temperature. Thus the parametrised equation of state can be smoothly connected to the hadron resonance gas equation of state. We see that the equation of state using Taylor coefficients up to second order is realistic only at low densities, and that at densities corresponding to s/n B ≳40, the expansion converges by the sixth order term

  15. Color ferromagnetic vacuum states in QCD and two-loop energy densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Ninomiya, M.

    1979-12-01

    Two-loop energy densities of color ferromagnetic states are obtained using the β-function calculated to two-loop approximation and the exact formula for the energy density of such a state. This is used to derive bounds on the MIT bag constant correcting the previous bound in one-loop approximation. For a constant field color ferromagnetic ansatz state the bound on the QCD scale parameter Λsub(p) 3 -vacuum ansatz with two-loop and instanton correction gives Λsub(p)<= 0.16 GeV. Tt is stressed that the 'perturbative vacuum', which is identified with the inside bag state is a somewhat ill defined concept due to a path-dependence in the integral giving the energy density. (Auth.)

  16. Effect of reacting surface density on the overall graphite oxidation rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chang; Kim, Eung; Lim, Jong; Schultz, Richard; Petti, David

    2009-01-01

    Graphite oxidation in an air-ingress accident is presently a very important issue for the reactor safety of the very high temperature gas cooled-reactor (VHTR), the concept of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) because of its potential problems such as mechanical degradation of the supporting graphite in the lower plenum of the VHTR might lead to core collapse if the countermeasure is taken carefully. The oxidation process of graphite has known to be affected by various factors, including temperature, pressure, oxygen concentration, types of graphite, graphite shape and size, flow distribution, etc. However, our recent study reveals that the internal pore characteristics play very important roles in the overall graphite oxidation rate. One of the main issues regarding graphite oxidation is the potential core collapse problem that may occur following the degradation of graphite mechanical strength. In analyzing this phenomenon, it is very important to understand the relationship between the degree of oxidization and strength degradation. In addition, the change of oxidation rate by graphite oxidation degree characterization by burn-off (ratio of the oxidized graphite density to the original density) should be quantified because graphite strength degradation is followed by graphite density decrease, which highly affects oxidation rates and patterns. Because the density change is proportional to the internal pore surface area, they should be quantified in advance. In order to understand the above issues, the following experiments were performed: (1) Experiment on the fracture of the oxidized graphite and validation of the previous correlations, (2) Experiment on the change of oxidation rate using graphite density and data collection, (3) Measure the BET surface area of the graphite. The experiments were performed using H451 (Great Lakes Carbon Corporation) and IG-110 (Toyo Tanso Co., Ltd) graphite. The reason for the use of those graphite materials is because

  17. Dispersal, density dependence, and population dynamics of a fungal microbe on leaf surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Scott T; Ives, Anthony R; Nordheim, Erik V; Andrews, John H

    2007-06-01

    Despite the ubiquity and importance of microbes in nature, little is known about their natural population dynamics, especially for those that occupy terrestrial habitats. Here we investigate the dynamics of the yeast-like fungus Aureobasidium pullulans (Ap) on apple leaves in an orchard. We asked three questions. (1) Is variation in fungal population density among leaves caused by variation in leaf carrying capacities and strong density-dependent population growth that maintains densities near carrying capacity? (2) Do resident populations have competitive advantages over immigrant cells? (3) Do Ap dynamics differ at different times during the growing season? To address these questions, we performed two experiments at different times in the growing season. Both experiments used a 2 x 2 factorial design: treatment 1 removed fungal cells from leaves to reveal density-dependent population growth, and treatment 2 inoculated leaves with an Ap strain engineered to express green fluorescent protein (GFP), which made it possible to track the fate of immigrant cells. The experiments showed that natural populations of Ap vary greatly in density due to sustained differences in carrying capacities among leaves. The maintenance of populations close to carrying capacities indicates strong density-dependent processes. Furthermore, resident populations are strongly competitive against immigrants, while immigrants have little impact on residents. Finally, statistical models showed high population growth rates of resident cells in one experiment but not in the other, suggesting that Ap experiences relatively "good" and "bad" periods for population growth. This picture of Ap dynamics conforms to commonly held, but rarely demonstrated, expectations of microbe dynamics in nature. It also highlights the importance of local processes, as opposed to immigration, in determining the abundance and dynamics of microbes on surfaces in terrestrial systems.

  18. Surface grafting density analysis of high anti-clotting PU-Si-g-P(MPC) films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Chunyan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Function Materials, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Zhou Ninglin, E-mail: ninglinzhou@yahoo.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Function Materials, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Jiangsu Technological Research Center for Interfacial Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xiao Yinghong; Tang Yida; Jin Suxing; Wu Yue [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Function Materials, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Zhang Jun; Shen Jian [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Function Materials, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210097 (China); Jiangsu Technological Research Center for Interfacial Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2012-02-01

    Well-defined zwitterionic polymer brushes with good blood compatibility were studied, grafted from polyurethane (PU) substrate (PU-Si-g-P(MPC)) by surface-initiated reverse atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-RATRP). We found that the structure of polymer brushes and hence their properties greatly depend on the grafting density. To solve the problems of the normal method for grafting density measurement, i.e., more requirements for qualified and proficient instrument operator, we established an effective and feasible way instead of the conventional method of spectroscopic ellipsometer combined with gel permeation chromatograph (ELM/GPC) to calculate the grafting density of PU-Si-g-P(MPC) films by using a software named ImageJ 1.44e in combination with scanning electronic microscope (SEM) or atomic microscope (AFM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), SEM and AFM were employed to analyze the surface topography and changes of elements before and after graft modification of the synthetic PU-Si-g-P(MPC) biofilms.

  19. PEGylation on mixed monolayer gold nanoparticles: Effect of grafting density, chain length, and surface curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiaqi; Zhang, Heng; Morovati, Vahid; Dargazany, Roozbeh

    2017-10-15

    PEGylation on nanoparticles (NPs) is widely used to prevent aggregation and to mask NPs from the fast clearance system in the body. Understanding the molecular details of the PEG layer could facilitate rational design of PEGylated NPs that maximize their solubility and stealth ability without significantly compromising the targeting efficiency and cellular uptake. Here, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to understand the structural and dynamic the PEG coating of mixed monolayer gold NPs. Specifically, we modeled gold NPs with PEG grafting densities ranging from 0-2.76chain/nm 2 , chain length with 0-10 PEG monomers, NP core diameter from 5nm to 500nm. It is found that the area accessed by individual PEG chains gradually transits from a "mushroom" to a "brush" conformation as NP surface curvature become flatter, whereas such a transition is not evident on small NPs when grafting density increases. It is shown that moderate grafting density (∼1.0chain/nm 2 ) and short chain length are sufficient enough to prevent NPs from aggregating in an aqueous medium. The effect of grafting density on solubility is also validated by dynamic light scattering measurements of PEGylated 5nm gold NPs. With respect to the shielding ability, simulations predict that increase either grafting density, chain length, or NP diameter will reduce the accessibility of the protected content to a certain size molecule. Interestingly, reducing NP surface curvature is estimated to be most effective in promoting shielding ability. For shielding against small molecules, increasing PEG grafting density is more effective than increasing chain length. A simple model that includes these three investigated parameters is developed based on the simulations to roughly estimate the shielding ability of the PEG layer with respect to molecules of different sizes. The findings can help expand our current understanding of the PEG layer and guide rational design of PEGylated gold NPs for a particular

  20. Possibilities of new materials surface sensibility express determination based on ZnSe-CdS system by pH isoelectric state measurements of the surface state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirovskaya, I. A.; Mironova, E. V.; Ushakov, O. V.; Nor, P. E.; Yureva, A. V.; Matyash, Yu I.

    2018-01-01

    A method for determining the hydrogen index of the surfaces isoelectric state (pHiso) at various gases pressures -possible components of the surrounding and technological media has been developed. With its use, changes in pH of binary and more complex semiconductors-components of the new system-ZnSe-CdS under the influence of nitrogen dioxide-have been found. The limiting sensitivity of surfaces - minimum PNO2, causing a change in pH has been estimated. The most active components of ZnSe-CdS system, recommended as materials for measuring cells of NO2, have been revealed. The relationship between the changing patterns with the composition of surface (acid-base) and bulk (in particular, theoretical calculated crystal density) properties has been established, allowing to find the most effective materials for sensor technology and for semiconductor analysis.

  1. Charge Dynamics in near-Surface, Variable-Density Ensembles of Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhomkar, Siddharth; Jayakumar, Harishankar; Zangara, Pablo R; Meriles, Carlos A

    2018-06-13

    Although the spin properties of superficial shallow nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers have been the subject of extensive scrutiny, considerably less attention has been devoted to studying the dynamics of NV charge conversion near the diamond surface. Using multicolor confocal microscopy, here we show that near-surface point defects arising from high-density ion implantation dramatically increase the ionization and recombination rates of shallow NVs compared to those in bulk diamond. Further, we find that these rates grow linearly, not quadratically, with laser intensity, indicative of single-photon processes enabled by NV state mixing with other defect states. Accompanying these findings, we observe NV ionization and recombination in the dark, likely the result of charge transfer to neighboring traps. Despite the altered charge dynamics, we show that one can imprint rewritable, long-lasting patterns of charged-initialized, near-surface NVs over large areas, an ability that could be exploited for electrochemical biosensing or to optically store digital data sets with subdiffraction resolution.

  2. Theoretical study of the density of states and magnetic properties of LaCoO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Min; Zhang, Weiyi; Hu, Cheng; Ming, Naiben

    1998-05-01

    The density of states and magnetic properties of low-spin, high-spin, and mixing states of LaCoO3 have been studied within the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation. The real-space recursion method is adopted for computing the electronic structure of the disordered system. The paramagnetic high-spin state is dealt with using the usual binary alloy coherent potential approximation (CPA); an extended trinary alloy CPA approximation is developed to describe the mixing state. In agreement with experiments, our results show that the main features of the quasiparticle spectra in the mixing state are not a sensitive function of the high-spin component, but the spectrum does get broadened due to spin scattering. The increasing of the high-spin component also results in a pileup of the density of states at the Fermi energy which indicates an insulator to metal phase transition. Some limitations of the present approach are also discussed.

  3. Probing Surface-Adlayer Conjugation on Organic-Modified Si(111) Surfaces with Microscopy, Scattering, Spectroscopy, and Density Functional Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellar, Joshua A.; Lin, Jui-Ching; Kim, Jun-Hyun; Yoder, Nathan L.; Bevan, Kirk H.; Stokes, Grace Y.; Geiger, Franz M.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; Bedzyk, Michael J.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    Highly conjugated molecules bound to silicon are promising candidates for organosilicon electronic devices and sensors. In this study, 1-bromo-4-ethynylbenzene was synthesized and reacted with a hydrogen-passivated Si(111) surface via ultraviolet irradiation. Through an array of characterization and modeling tools, the binding configuration and morphology of the reacted molecule were thoroughly analyzed. Atomic force microscopy confirmed an atomically flat surface morphology following reaction, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy verified reaction to the surface via the terminal alkyne moiety. In addition, synchrotron X-ray characterization, including X-ray reflectivity, X-ray fluorescence, and X-ray standing wave measurements, enabled sub-angstrom determination of the position of the bromine atom with respect to the silicon lattice. This structural characterization was quantitatively compared with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, thus enabling the π-conjugation of the terminal carbon atoms to be deduced. The X-ray and DFT results were additionally corroborated with the vibrational spectrum of the organic adlayer, which was measured with sum frequency generation. Overall, these results illustrate that the terminal carbon atoms in 1-bromo-4-ethynylbenzene adlayers on Si(111) retain π-conjugation, thus revealing alkyne molecules as promising candidates for organosilicon electronics and sensing.

  4. Studies of surface states in zinc oxide nanopowders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Raul Mugabe

    The surface of ZnO semiconductor nanosystems is a key performance-defining factor in numerous applications. In this work we present experimental results for the surface defect-related properties of ZnO nanoscale systems. Surface photovoltage spectroscopy was used to determine the defect level energies within the band gap, the conduction vs. valence band nature of the defect-related transitions, and to probe key dynamic parameters of the surface on a number of commercially available ZnO nanopowders. In our experimental setup, surface photovoltage characterization is conducted in high vacuum in tandem with in situ oxygen remote plasma treatments. Surface photovoltage investigations of the as-received and plasma-processed samples revealed a number of common spectral features related to surface states. Furthermore, we observed significant plasma-induced changes in the surface defect properties. Ex situ positron annihilation and photoluminescence measurements were performed on the studied samples and correlated with surface photovoltage results. The average positron lifetimes were found to be substantially longer than in a bulk single crystalline sample, which is consistent with the model of grains with defect-rich surface and subsurface layers. Compression of the powders into pellets yielded reduction of the average positron lifetimes. Surface photovoltage, positron annihilation, and photoluminescence spectra consistently showed sample-to-sample differences due to the variation in the overall quality of the nanopowders, which partially obscures observation of the scaling effects. However, the results demonstrated that our approach is efficient in detecting specific surface states in nanoscale ZnO specimens and in elucidating their nature.

  5. Surface-electronic-state effects in electron emission from the Be(0001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archubi, C. D.; Gravielle, M. S.; Silkin, V. M.

    2011-01-01

    We study the electron emission produced by swift protons impinging grazingly on a Be(0001) surface. The process is described within a collisional formalism using the band-structure-based (BSB) approximation to represent the electron-surface interaction. The BSB model provides an accurate description of the electronic band structure of the solid and the surface-induced potential. Within this approach we derive both bulk and surface electronic states, with these latter characterized by a strong localization at the crystal surface. We found that such surface electronic states play an important role in double-differential energy- and angle-resolved electron emission probabilities, producing noticeable structures in the electron emission spectra.

  6. Surface-electronic-state effects in electron emission from the Be(0001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archubi, C. D. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, casilla de correo 67, sucursal 28, C1428EGA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gravielle, M. S. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, casilla de correo 67, sucursal 28, C1428EGA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Silkin, V. M. [Donostia International Physics Center, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 1072, E-20080 San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, E-48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    We study the electron emission produced by swift protons impinging grazingly on a Be(0001) surface. The process is described within a collisional formalism using the band-structure-based (BSB) approximation to represent the electron-surface interaction. The BSB model provides an accurate description of the electronic band structure of the solid and the surface-induced potential. Within this approach we derive both bulk and surface electronic states, with these latter characterized by a strong localization at the crystal surface. We found that such surface electronic states play an important role in double-differential energy- and angle-resolved electron emission probabilities, producing noticeable structures in the electron emission spectra.

  7. Nuclear level densities with pairing and self-consistent ground-state shell effects

    CERN Document Server

    Arnould, M

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear level density calculations are performed using a model of fermions interacting via the pairing force, and a realistic single particle potential. The pairing interaction is treated within the BCS approximation with different pairing strength values. The single particle potentials are derived in the framework of an energy-density formalism which describes self-consistently the ground states of spherical nuclei. These calculations are extended to statistically deformed nuclei, whose estimated level densities include rotational band contributions. The theoretical results are compared with various experimental data. In addition, the level densities for several nuclei far from stability are compared with the predictions of a back-shifted Fermi gas model. Such a comparison emphasizes the possible danger of extrapolating to unknown nuclei classical level density formulae whose parameter values are tailored for known nuclei. (41 refs).

  8. Low- and high-density nuclear equation of state and the hyperon puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colucci, Giuseppe; Sedrakian, Armen [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2013-07-01

    The measurements of the unusually high mass of the millisecond pulsar PSR J1614-2230 (1.97 ± 0.04 M {sub CircleDot}) imposes a strong constraint on the nuclear Equation of State (EoS), in particular for what concerns the finite density behaviour of nuclear and neutron matter. In my talk I first discuss a model for the low-density part of the EoS, based on chiral one-pion exchange. I consider a self-consistent approach at finite temperature and density and show that even in a fully-relativistic theory the one-pion exchange contribution is dominated by a contact interaction. Then, a relativistic mean-field approach is used to discuss the high-density part of the EoS, including the presence of hyperons. In the latter, a density dependent parametrization is used and a parameter study on the hyperon-scalar meson coupling is performed.

  9. Local equivalence, surface-code states, and matroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarvepalli, Pradeep; Raussendorf, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Recently, Ji et al. disproved the local-unitary-local Clifford (LU-LC) conjecture and showed that the local unitary (LU) and local Clifford (LC) equivalence classes of the stabilizer states are not always the same. Despite the fact that this settles the LU-LC conjecture, a sufficient condition for stabilizer states that violate the LU-LC conjecture is not known. In this paper, we investigate further the properties of stabilizer states with respect to local equivalence. Our first result shows that there exist infinitely many stabilizer states that violate the LU-LC conjecture. In particular, we show that for all numbers of qubits n≥28, there exist distance-two stabilizer states which are counterexamples to the LU-LC conjecture. We prove that, for all odd n≥195, there exist stabilizer states with distance greater than two that are LU equivalent but not LC equivalent. Two important classes of stabilizer states that are of great interest in quantum computation are the cluster states and stabilizer states of the surface codes. We show that, under some minimal restrictions, both these classes of states preclude any counterexamples. In this context, we also show that the associated surface codes do not have any encoded non-Clifford transversal gates. We characterize the Calderbank-Shor-Steane (CSS) surface-code states in terms of a class of minor closed binary matroids. In addition to making a connection to an important open problem in binary matroid theory, this characterization does in some cases provide an efficient test for CSS states that are not counterexamples.

  10. High Density Aerial Image Matching: State-Of and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haala, N.; Cavegn, S.

    2016-06-01

    Ongoing innovations in matching algorithms are continuously improving the quality of geometric surface representations generated automatically from aerial images. This development motivated the launch of the joint ISPRS/EuroSDR project "Benchmark on High Density Aerial Image Matching", which aims on the evaluation of photogrammetric 3D data capture in view of the current developments in dense multi-view stereo-image matching. Originally, the test aimed on image based DSM computation from conventional aerial image flights for different landuse and image block configurations. The second phase then put an additional focus on high quality, high resolution 3D geometric data capture in complex urban areas. This includes both the extension of the test scenario to oblique aerial image flights as well as the generation of filtered point clouds as additional output of the respective multi-view reconstruction. The paper uses the preliminary outcomes of the benchmark to demonstrate the state-of-the-art in airborne image matching with a special focus of high quality geometric data capture in urban scenarios.

  11. Local density of states in two-dimensional topological superconductors under a magnetic field: Signature of an exterior Majorana bound state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shu-Ichiro; Kawaguchi, Yuki; Tanaka, Yukio

    2018-04-01

    We study quasiparticle states on a surface of a topological insulator (TI) with proximity-induced superconductivity under an external magnetic field. An applied magnetic field creates two Majorana bound states: a vortex Majorana state localized inside a vortex core and an exterior Majorana state localized along a circle centered at the vortex core. We calculate the spin-resolved local density of states (LDOS) and demonstrate that the shrinking of the radius of the exterior Majorana state, predicted in R. S. Akzyanov et al., Phys. Rev. B 94, 125428 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.94.125428, under a strong magnetic field can be seen in LDOS without smeared out by nonzero-energy states. The spin-resolved LDOS further reveals that the spin of the exterior Majorana state is strongly spin-polarized. Accordingly, the induced odd-frequency spin-triplet pairs are found to be spin-polarized as well. In order to detect the exterior Majorana states, however, the Fermi energy should be closed to the Dirac point to avoid contributions from continuum levels. We also study a different two-dimensional topological-superconducting system where a two-dimensional electron gas with the spin-orbit coupling is sandwiched between an s -wave superconductor and a ferromagnetic insulator. We show that the radius of an exterior Majorana state can be tuned by an applied magnetic field. However, on the contrary to the results at a TI surface, neither the exterior Majorana state nor the induced odd-frequency spin-triplet pairs are spin-polarized. We conclude that the spin polarization of the Majorana state is attributed to the spin-polarized Landau level, which is characteristic for systems with the Dirac-like dispersion.

  12. The law of corresponding states and surface tension of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digilov, R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Surface tension of liquid metals is one of fundamental and most important quantities in theory and practice of material processing and its temperature dependence leads to the well-known Marangoni convection. Although currently methods are sufficiently precise to measure the surface tension, there are uncertainties in experimental data and its temperature dependence mainly due to impurity, which even a trace of it strongly affects the results of measurements. The theoretical treatment from the first principles is unwieldy and not always permits one to calculate the surface tension with certainty. Another active research field deals with empirical correlation between the surface tension and bulk thermodynamic properties, which we interpret as a simple consequence of the law of corresponding states. In order to relate the surface tension and to bulk properties of liquid metals the reduced formula is derived by scaling with the melting point T m (0) at p = 0 and atomic volume Ω 0 2/3 at T = 0 K as macroscopic parameters for scaling ε and a characterizing the interatomic potential in metals. The reduced surface tension and the reduced surface entropy obtained in high temperature limit are discussed and compared with the experiment. The reduced temperature coefficient of the surface tension found is a universal constant for the metals of the same structure. It is shown that pressure dependence of the surface tension, so called baric coefficient of the surface tension, can be described by pressure dependence of scaling parameters T m (p) and Ω 0 (p). (author)

  13. Droplet and bubble nucleation modeled by density gradient theory – cubic equation of state versus saft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrubý Jan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The study presents some preliminary results of the density gradient theory (GT combined with two different equations of state (EoS: the classical cubic equation by van der Waals and a recent approach based on the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT, namely its perturbed-chain (PC modification. The results showed that the cubic EoS predicted for a given surface tension the density profile with a noticeable defect. Bulk densities predicted by the cubic EoS differed as much as by 100 % from the reference data. On the other hand, the PC-SAFT EoS provided accurate results for density profile and both bulk densities in the large range of temperatures. It has been shown that PC-SAFT is a promising tool for accurate modeling of nucleation using the GT. Besides the basic case of a planar phase interface, the spherical interface was analyzed to model a critical cluster occurring either for nucleation of droplets (condensation or bubbles (boiling, cavitation. However, the general solution for the spherical interface will require some more attention due to its numerical difficulty.

  14. The Effect of Density and Floor Types on Performance, Physiological State and Immune Response of Broilers

    OpenAIRE

    Sunarti, D; Haryono, H; Soedarsono, S

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effect of density and floor types on performance,physiological state and immune response of broilers. The research involved 368 male broilers of theNew Lohman strain aged 8 days which were raised up to 35 days at different densities and floor types.Floor types consisted of rice hull litter and bamboo slat were used as the main plot; while densities of 7,10, 13 and 16 birds/m2 applied as the sub-plot. The results showed that the final body weight g...

  15. Feedback control of plasma density and heating power for steady state operation in LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamio, Shuji, E-mail: kamio@nifs.ac.jp; Kasahara, Hiroshi; Seki, Tetsuo; Saito, Kenji; Seki, Ryosuke; Nomura, Goro; Mutoh, Takashi

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • We upgraded a control system for steady state operation in LHD. • This system contains gas fueling system and ICRF power control system. • Automatic power boost system is also attached for stable operation. • As a result, we achieved the long pulse up to 48 min in the electron density of more than 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. - Abstract: For steady state operation, the feedback control of plasma density and heating power system was developed in the Large Helical Device (LHD). In order to achieve a record of the long pulse discharge, stable plasma density and heating power are needed. This system contains the radio frequency (RF) heating power control, interlocks, gas fueling, automatic RF phase control, ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna position control, and graphical user interface (GUI). Using the density control system, the electron density was controlled to the target density and using the RF heating power control system, the RF power injection could be stable. As a result of using this system, we achieved the long pulse up to 48 min in the electron density of more than 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. Further, the ICRF hardware experienced no critical accidents during the 17th LHD experiment campaign in 2013.

  16. Selective Laser Sintering of PA2200: Effects of print parameters on density, accuracy, and surface roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajric, Sendin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-12

    Additive manufacturing needs a broader selection of materials for part production. In order for the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to investigate new materials for selective laser sintering (SLS), this paper reviews research on the effect of print parameters on part density, accuracy, and surface roughness of polyamide 12 (PA12, PA2200). The literature review serves to enhance the understanding of how changing the laser powder, scan speed, etc. will affect the mechanical properties of a commercial powder. By doing so, this understanding will help the investigation of new materials for SLS.

  17. Density functional theory prediction for diffusion of lithium on boron-doped graphene surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shuanghong; Ren Zhaoyu; Wan Lijuan; Zheng Jiming; Guo Ping; Zhou Yixuan

    2011-01-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) investigation shows that graphene has changed from semimetal to semiconductor with the increasing number of doped boron atoms. Lithium and boron atoms acted as charge contributors and recipients, which attracted to each other. Further investigations show that, the potential barrier for lithium diffusion on boron-doped graphene is higher than that of intrinsic graphene. The potential barrier is up to 0.22 eV when six boron atoms doped (B 6 C 26 ), which is the lowest potential barrier in all the doped graphene. The potential barrier is dramatically affected by the surface structure of graphene.

  18. Critical current density of BiSrCaCuO superconductors: effect of surface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konczykowski, M.; Chikumoto, N.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of surface barriers on vortex motion in BiSrCaCuO-2212 high-temperature superconducting crystals is summarized. Characteristic features of this phenomenon appear in the hysteresis loop (shape of its ascending and descending branches), in the effect of 2.5 MeV electron irradiation, and in flux creep measurements (magnetization dependence to the crystal lateral dimension, size of the flux-creep barrier and the crossover as a function of temperature and time persistent current density). (A.B.). 25 refs., 3 figs

  19. Charge state of ions scattered by metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishinevsky, L.M.; Parilis, E.S.; Verleger, V.K.

    1976-01-01

    A model for description of charge distributions for scattering of heavy ions in the keV region, on metal surfaces developing and improving the method of Van der Weg and Bierman, and taking into account the connection between the ion charge state and scattering kinematics, is proposed. It is shown that multiple charged particles come from ions with a vacancy in the inner shell while the outer shell vacancies give only single charged ions and neutrals. The approximately linear increase of degree of ionization with normal velocity, and the non-monotonic charge dependence of the energy spectrum established by Chicherov and Buck et al is explained by considering irreversible neutralization in the depth of the metal, taking into account the connection of the charge state with the shape of trajectory and its location relative to the metal surface. The dependence of charge state on surface structure is discussed. Some new experiments are proposed. (author)

  20. Adsorption-induced gap states of h-BN on metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preobrajenski, A. B.; Krasnikov, S. A.; Vinogradov, A. S.; Ng, May Ling; Käämbre, T.; Cafolla, A. A.; Mårtensson, N.

    2008-02-01

    The formation of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) monolayers on Ni(111), Rh(111), and Pt(111) has been studied by a combination of x-ray emission, angle-resolved valence band photoemission, and x-ray absorption in search for interface-induced gap states of h-BN . A significant density of both occupied and unoccupied gap states with N2p and B2p characters is observed for h-BN/Ni(111) , somewhat less for h-BN/Rh(111) and still less for h-BN/Pt(111) . X-ray emission shows that the h-BN monolayer is chemisorbed strongly on Ni(111) and very weakly on Pt(111). We associate the gap states of h-BN adsorbed on the transition metal surfaces with the orbital mixing and electron sharing at the interface because their density increases with the growing strength of chemisorption.

  1. Density of states and magnetotransport in Weyl semimetals with long-range disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesin, D. A.; Mishchenko, E. G.; Levchenko, A.

    2015-11-01

    We study the density of states and magnetotransport properties of disordered Weyl semimetals, focusing on the case of a strong long-range disorder. To calculate the disorder-averaged density of states close to nodal points, we treat exactly the long-range random potential fluctuations produced by charged impurities, while the short-range component of disorder potential is included systematically and controllably with the help of a diagram technique. We find that, for energies close to the degeneracy point, long-range potential fluctuations lead to a finite density of states. In the context of transport, we discuss that a self-consistent theory of screening in magnetic field may conceivably lead to nonmonotonic low-field magnetoresistance.

  2. Effect of density of state on isotope effect exponent of two-band superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udomsamuthirun, P.; Kumvongsa, C.; Burakorn, A.; Changkanarth, P.; Yoksan, S.

    2005-01-01

    The exact formula of T c 's equation and the isotope effect exponent of two-band s-wave superconductors in weak-coupling limit are derived by considering the influence of two kinds of density of state: constant and van Hove singularity. The paring interaction in each band consisted of two parts: the electron-phonon interaction and non-electron-phonon interaction are included in our model. We find that the interband interaction of electron-phonon show more effect on isotope exponent than the intraband interaction and the isotope effect exponent with constant density of state can fit to experimental data, MgB 2 and high-T c superconductor, better than van Hove singularity density of state

  3. Self-assembled monolayer structures of hexadecylamine on Cu surfaces: density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Hsien; Balankura, Tonnam; Fichthorn, Kristen A

    2016-12-07

    We used dispersion-corrected density-functional theory to probe possible structures for adsorbed layers of hexadecylamine (HDA) on Cu(100) and Cu(111). HDA forms self-assembled layers on these surfaces, analogous to alkanethiols on various metal surfaces, and it binds by donating electrons in the amine group to the Cu surface atoms, consistent with experiment. van der Waals interactions between the alkyl tails of HDA molecules are stronger than the interaction between the amine group and the Cu surfaces. Strong HDA-tail interactions lead to coverage-dependent tilting of the HDA layers, such that the tilt angle is larger for lower coverages. At full monolayer coverage, the energetically preferred binding configuration for HDA on Cu(100) is a (5 × 3) pattern - although we cannot rule out incommensurate structures - while the pattern is preferred on Cu(111). A major motivation for this study is to understand the experimentally observed capability of HDA as a capping agent for producing {100}-faceted Cu nanocrystals. Consistent with experiment, we find that HDA binds more strongly to Cu(100) than to Cu(111). This strong binding stems from the capability of HDA to form more densely packed layers on Cu(100), which leads to stronger HDA-tail interactions, as well as the stronger binding of the amine group to Cu(100). We estimate the surface energies of HDA-covered Cu(100) and Cu(111) surfaces and find that these surfaces are nearly isoenergetic. By drawing analogies to previous theoretical work, it seems likely that HDA-covered Cu nanocrystals could have kinetic shapes that primarily express {100} facets, as is seen experimentally.

  4. Surface tension of droplets and Tolman lengths of real substances and mixtures from density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehner, Philipp; Gross, Joachim

    2018-04-01

    The curvature dependence of interfacial properties has been discussed extensively over the last decades. After Tolman published his work on the effect of droplet size on surface tension, where he introduced the interfacial property now known as Tolman length, several studies were performed with varying results. In recent years, however, some consensus has been reached about the sign and magnitude of the Tolman length of simple model fluids. In this work, we re-examine Tolman's equation and how it relates the Tolman length to the surface tension and we apply non-local classical density functional theory (DFT) based on the perturbed chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) to characterize the curvature dependence of the surface tension of real fluids as well as mixtures. In order to obtain a simple expression for the surface tension, we use a first-order expansion of the Tolman length as a function of droplet radius Rs, as δ(Rs) = δ0 + δ1/Rs, and subsequently expand Tolman's integral equation for the surface tension, whereby a second-order expansion is found to give excellent agreement with the DFT result. The radius-dependence of the surface tension of increasingly non-spherical substances is studied for n-alkanes, up to icosane. The infinite diameter Tolman length is approximately δ0 = -0.38 Å at low temperatures. For more strongly non-spherical substances and for temperatures approaching the critical point, however, the infinite diameter Tolman lengths δ0 turn positive. For mixtures, even if they contain similar molecules, the extrapolated Tolman length behaves strongly non-ideal, implying a qualitative change of the curvature behavior of the surface tension of the mixture.

  5. Calculating the Maximum Density of the Surface Packing of Ions in Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislenko, S. A.; Moroz, Yu. O.; Karu, K.; Ivaništšev, V. B.; Fedorov, M. V.

    2018-05-01

    The maximum density of monolayer packing on a graphene surface is calculated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) for ions of characteristic size and symmetry: 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium [BMIM]+, tetrabutylammonium [TBA]+, tetrafluoroborate [BF4]-, dicyanamide [DCA]-, and bis(trifluoromethane) sulfonimide [TFSI]-. The characteristic orientations of ions in a closely packed monolayer are found. It is shown that the formation of a closely packed monolayer is possible for [DCA]- and [BF4]- anions only at surface charges that exceed the limit of the electrochemical stability of the corresponding ionic liquids. For the [TBA]+ cation, a monolayer structure can be observed at the charge of nearly 30 μC/cm2 attainable in electrochemical experiment.

  6. Goethite surface reactivity: III. Unifying arsenate adsorption behavior through a variable crystal face - Site density model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Camacho, Carlos; Villalobos, Mario

    2010-04-01

    We developed a model that describes quantitatively the arsenate adsorption behavior for any goethite preparation as a function of pH and ionic strength, by using one basic surface arsenate stoichiometry, with two affinity constants. The model combines a face distribution-crystallographic site density model for goethite with tenets of the Triple Layer and CD-MUSIC surface complexation models, and is self-consistent with its adsorption behavior towards protons, electrolytes, and other ions investigated previously. Five different systems of published arsenate adsorption data were used to calibrate the model spanning a wide range of chemical conditions, which included adsorption isotherms at different pH values, and adsorption pH-edges at different As(V) loadings, both at different ionic strengths and background electrolytes. Four additional goethite-arsenate systems reported with limited characterization and adsorption data were accurately described by the model developed. The adsorption reaction proposed is: lbond2 FeOH +lbond2 SOH +AsO43-+H→lbond2 FeOAsO3[2-]…SOH+HO where lbond2 SOH is an adjacent surface site to lbond2 FeOH; with log K = 21.6 ± 0.7 when lbond2 SOH is another lbond2 FeOH, and log K = 18.75 ± 0.9, when lbond2 SOH is lbond2 Fe 2OH. An additional small contribution of a protonated complex was required to describe data at low pH and very high arsenate loadings. The model considered goethites above 80 m 2/g as ideally composed of 70% face (1 0 1) and 30% face (0 0 1), resulting in a site density for lbond2 FeOH and for lbond2 Fe 3OH of 3.125/nm 2 each. Below 80 m 2/g surface capacity increases progressively with decreasing area, which was modeled by considering a progressively increasing proportion of faces (0 1 0)/(1 0 1), because face (0 1 0) shows a much higher site density of lbond2 FeOH groups. Computation of the specific proportion of faces, and thus of the site densities for the three types of crystallographic surface groups present in

  7. Biredox ionic liquids with solid-like redox density in the liquid state for high-energy supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Eléonore; Coustan, Laura; Lannelongue, Pierre; Zigah, Dodzi; Mehdi, Ahmad; Vioux, André; Freunberger, Stefan A; Favier, Frédéric; Fontaine, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Kinetics of electrochemical reactions are several orders of magnitude slower in solids than in liquids as a result of the much lower ion diffusivity. Yet, the solid state maximizes the density of redox species, which is at least two orders of magnitude lower in liquids because of solubility limitations. With regard to electrochemical energy storage devices, this leads to high-energy batteries with limited power and high-power supercapacitors with a well-known energy deficiency. For such devices the ideal system should endow the liquid state with a density of redox species close to the solid state. Here we report an approach based on biredox ionic liquids to achieve bulk-like redox density at liquid-like fast kinetics. The cation and anion of these biredox ionic liquids bear moieties that undergo very fast reversible redox reactions. As a first demonstration of their potential for high-capacity/high-rate charge storage, we used them in redox supercapacitors. These ionic liquids are able to decouple charge storage from an ion-accessible electrode surface, by storing significant charge in the pores of the electrodes, to minimize self-discharge and leakage current as a result of retaining the redox species in the pores, and to raise working voltage due to their wide electrochemical window.

  8. Metastable states of plasma particles close to a charged surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shavlov, A. V., E-mail: shavlov@ikz.ru [The Institute of the Earth Cryosphere, RAS Siberian branch, 625000, P.O. 1230, Tyumen (Russian Federation); Tyumen State Oil and Gas University, 38, Volodarskogo St., 625000, Tyumen (Russian Federation); Dzhumandzhi, V. A. [The Institute of the Earth Cryosphere, RAS Siberian branch, 625000, P.O. 1230, Tyumen (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    The free energy of the plasma particles and the charged surface that form an electroneutral system is calculated on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. It is shown that, owing to correlation of light plasma particles near the charged surface and close to heavy particles of high charge, there can be metastable states in plasma. The corresponding phase charts of metastable states of the separate components of plasma, and plasma as a whole, are constructed. These charts depend on temperature, the charge magnitude, the size of the particles, and the share of the charge of the light carriers out of the total charge of the plasma particles.

  9. Effect of particle surface area on ice active site densities retrieved from droplet freezing spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Beydoun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous ice nucleation remains one of the outstanding problems in cloud physics and atmospheric science. Experimental challenges in properly simulating particle-induced freezing processes under atmospherically relevant conditions have largely contributed to the absence of a well-established parameterization of immersion freezing properties. Here, we formulate an ice active, surface-site-based stochastic model of heterogeneous freezing with the unique feature of invoking a continuum assumption on the ice nucleating activity (contact angle of an aerosol particle's surface that requires no assumptions about the size or number of active sites. The result is a particle-specific property g that defines a distribution of local ice nucleation rates. Upon integration, this yields a full freezing probability function for an ice nucleating particle. Current cold plate droplet freezing measurements provide a valuable and inexpensive resource for studying the freezing properties of many atmospheric aerosol systems. We apply our g framework to explain the observed dependence of the freezing temperature of droplets in a cold plate on the concentration of the particle species investigated. Normalizing to the total particle mass or surface area present to derive the commonly used ice nuclei active surface (INAS density (ns often cannot account for the effects of particle concentration, yet concentration is typically varied to span a wider measurable freezing temperature range. A method based on determining what is denoted an ice nucleating species' specific critical surface area is presented and explains the concentration dependence as a result of increasing the variability in ice nucleating active sites between droplets. By applying this method to experimental droplet freezing data from four different systems, we demonstrate its ability to interpret immersion freezing temperature spectra of droplets containing variable particle concentrations. It is shown

  10. Effects of nonlocal response on the density of states of hyperbolic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2012-01-01

    . By expanding the Green function in a plane-wave basis and using the transfer matrix method to calculate the reflection coefficients, we study the local density of states (LDOS) of hyperbolic metamaterials. We show that the nonlocal response of the electron gas in the metal removes the singularity of both...... radiative and non-radiative local density of states, and also sets up a finite maximal value. We also briefly discuss the effects of the nonlocal response on other plasmonic structures, such as a metallic semi-infinite substrate and a metallic slab....

  11. Isotope effect with energy-dependent density of states and impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.J.; Carbotte, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    We have calculated the total isotope coefficient β in a model where there is energy-dependent structure in the electronic density of states. We model the structure with a simple Lorentzian. In our calculation, doping has the effect of shifting the Fermi level and broadening the structure in the density of states. We have treated the dopants both as normal and as magnetic impurities. The asymmetry observed in the experimental data is found in our results. However, the complete range of values observed is difficult to reproduce. We question also whether the shifts in Fermi level required in such models are reasonable

  12. Mapping the Local Density of Optical States of a Photonic Crystal with Single Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qin; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We use single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots as internal probes to map the local density of optical states of photonic crystal membranes. The employed technique separates contributions from nonradiative recombination and spin-flip processes by properly accounting for the role of the exciton...... fine structure. We observe inhibition factors as high as 70 and compare our results to local density of optical states calculations available from the literature, thereby establishing a quantitative understanding of photon emission in photonic crystal membranes. © 2011 American Physical Society....

  13. Ground-state properties of third-row elements with nonlocal density functionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagno, P.; Jepsen, O.; Gunnarsson, O.

    1989-01-01

    The cohesive energy, the lattice parameter, and the bulk modulus of third-row elements are calculated using the Langreth-Mehl-Hu (LMH), the Perdew-Wang (PW), and the gradient expansion functionals. The PW functional is found to give somewhat better results than the LMH functional and both are found to typically remove half the errors in the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation, while the gradient expansion gives worse results than the local-density approximation. For Fe both the LMH and PW functionals correctly predict a ferromagnetic bcc ground state, while the LSD approximation and the gradient expansion predict a nonmagnetic fcc ground state

  14. Analytic solution of the BCS gap equation with a logarithmic singularity in the density of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Muthu, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    The Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) gap equation is solved analytically for a density of states function with a logarithmic singularity. It is an extension of our earlier work where we had assumed a constant density of states. We continue to work in the weak-coupling limit and consider both phononic and non-phononic pairings. Expressions are obtained for T c , Δ 0 (the gap at T=0), and the jump in the electronic specific heat at T=T c . We also calculate the isotope exponent and show that it is possible to reproduce the broad features of the experimental results in this framework. (orig.)

  15. Calculation of the phonon density of states and related thermodynamic properties for trigonal selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Alldredge, G. P.; McMurry, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    The phonon density of states for trigonal selenium has been calculated on the basis of a short range force model giving good overall agreement with experimental room temperature phonon dispersion data. A qualitative comparison with an experimental determination of the phonon density of states shows...... similarities in the gross features, but the experimental data lacks many of the finer details shown by the theoretical results due to resolution effects. The lattice dynamical contribution to the heat capacity CV is calculated and is found to be in good agreement with experimental determinations of Cp after...

  16. Density of states measurements in a p-i-n solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, R.S.; Wang, Q. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The authors describe results of density of states (DOS) profiling in p-i-n solar-cell devices using drive-level capacitance (DLC) techniques. Near the p-i interface the defect density is high, decreasing rapidly into the interior, reaching low values in the central region of the cell, and rising rapidly again at the n-i interface. They show that the states in the central region are neutral dangling-bond defects, whereas those near the interfaces with the doped layers are charged dangling bonds.

  17. Surface crack testing - state of technique and trends in development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Seminar contains 12 lectures on the following subjects: State of technique in magnetic powder testing (K. Goebbels); Recognisability of faults and probability of faults in surface crack testing (W. Morgner); Requirements for picture processing systems for proving and assessing crack indications (M. Stadthaus); Possibilities and limits of automatic crack recognition in magnetic powder testing (V. Deutsch); Development of equipment for eddy current testing (M. Junger); Signal processing - a way of improving the recognisability of faults in eddy current testing (R. Becker); Methods of testing steel products for surface faults and their practical limits of fault recognisability (D. Thiery); Surface crack testing in pipe manufacture (R. Pawelletz); Surface crack testing in powerstation construction (L. v. Bernus); Trends in automation in surface crack testing (G. Maier); Eddy current testing in engine construction (E. Dickhaut); Eddy current testing in aircraft repair (F. Schur). (orig.) [de

  18. Density Functional Theory and Atomic Force Microscopy Study of Oleate Functioned on Siderite Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiently discovering the interaction of the collector oleate and siderite is of great significance for understanding the inherent function of siderite weakening hematite reverse flotation. For this purpose, investigation of the adsorption behavior of oleate on siderite surface was performed by density functional theory (DFT calculations associating with atomic force microscopy (AFM imaging. The siderite crystal geometry was computationally optimized via convergence tests. Calculated results of the interaction energy and the Mulliken population verified that the collector oleate adsorbed on siderite surface and the covalent bond was established as a result of electrons transferring from O1 atoms (in oleate molecule to Fe1 atoms (in siderite lattice. Therefore, valence-electrons’ configurations of Fe1 and O1 changed into 3d6.514s0.37 and 2s1.832p4.73 from 3d6.214s0.31 and 2s1.83p4.88 correspondingly. Siderite surfaces with or without oleate functioned were examined with the aid of AFM imaging in PeakForce Tapping mode, and the functioned siderite surface was found to be covered by vesicular membrane matters with the average roughness of 16.4 nm assuring the oleate adsorption. These results contributed to comprehending the interaction of oleate and siderite.

  19. The influence of land surface parameters on energy flux densities derived from remote sensing data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tittebrand, A.; Schwiebus, A. [Inst. for Hydrology und Meteorology, TU Dresden (Germany); Berger, F.H. [Observatory Lindenberg, German Weather Service, Lindenberg (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    Knowledge of the vegetation properties surface reflectance, normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI) and leaf area index (LAI) are essential for the determination of the heat and water fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Remote sensing data can be used to derive spatial estimates of the required surface properties. The determination of land surface parameters and their influence on radiant and energy flux densities is investigated with data of different remote sensing systems. Sensitivity studies show the importance of correctly derived land surface properties to estimate the key quantity of the hydrological cycle, the evapotranspiration (L.E), most exactly. In addition to variable parameters like LAI or NDVI there are also parameters which are can not be inferred from satellite data but needed for the Penman-Monteith approach. Fixed values are assumed for these variables because they have little influence on L.E. Data of Landsat-7 ETM+ and NOAA-16 AVHRR are used to show results in different spatial resolution. The satellite derived results are compared with ground truth data provided by the Observatory Lindenberg of the German Weather Service. (orig.)

  20. QCD equation of state of hot deconfined matter at finite baryon density. A quasiparticle perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluhm, Marcus

    2008-01-01

    The quasiparticle model, based on quark and gluon degrees of freedom, has been developed for the description of the thermodynamics of a hot plasma of strongly interacting matter which is of enormous relevance in astrophysics, cosmology and for relativistic heavy-ion collisions as well. In the present work, this phenomenological model is extended into the realm of imaginary chemical potential and towards including, in general, different and independent quark flavour chemical potentials. In this way, nonzero net baryon-density effects in the equation of state are selfconsistently attainable. Furthermore, a chain of approximations based on formal mathematical manipulations is presented which outlines the connection of the quasiparticle model with the underlying gauge field theory of strong interactions, QCD, putting the model on firmer ground. The applicability of the model to extrapolate the equation of state known from lattice QCD at zero baryon density to nonzero baryon densities is shown. In addition, the ability of the model to extrapolate results to the chiral limit and to asymptotically large temperatures is illustrated by confrontation with available first-principle lattice QCD results. Basing on these successful comparisons supporting the idea that the hot deconfined phase can be described in a consistent picture by dressed quark and gluon degrees of freedom, a reliable QCD equation of state is constructed and baryon-density effects are examined, also along isentropic evolutionary paths. Scaling properties of the equation of state with fundamental QCD parameters such as the number of active quark flavour degrees of freedom, the entering quark mass parameters or the numerical value of the deconfinement transition temperature are discussed, and the robustness of the equation of state in the regions of small and large energy densities is shown. Uncertainties arising in the transition region are taken into account by constructing a family of equations of state

  1. In Situ Evaluation of Density, Viscosity and Thickness of Adsorbed Soft Layers by Combined Surface Acoustic Wave and Surface Plasmon Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, L.; Friedt, J. -M.; Zhou, C.; Bertrand, P.

    2003-01-01

    We show the theoretical and experimental combination of acoustic and optical methods for the in situ quantitative evaluation of the density, the viscosity and the thickness of soft layers adsorbed on chemically tailored metal surfaces. For the highest sensitivity and an operation in liquids, a Love mode surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor with a hydrophobized gold coated sensing area is the acoustic method, while surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on the same gold surface as the optical method is...

  2. The Surface Density Profile of the Galactic Disk from the Terminal Velocity Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaugh, Stacy S.

    2016-01-01

    The mass distribution of the Galactic disk is constructed from the terminal velocity curve and the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation. Mass models numerically quantifying the detailed surface density profiles are tabulated. For R0 = 8 kpc, the models have stellar mass 5 spiral galaxy that obeys scaling relations like the Tully-Fisher relation, the size-mass relation, and the disk maximality-surface brightness relation. The stellar disk is maximal, and the spiral arms are massive. The bumps and wiggles in the terminal velocity curve correspond to known spiral features (e.g., the Centaurus arm is a ˜50% overdensity). The rotation curve switches between positive and negative over scales of hundreds of parsecs. The rms amplitude { }1/2≈ 14 {km} {{{s}}}-1 {{kpc}}-1, implying that commonly neglected terms in the Jeans equations may be nonnegligible. The spherically averaged local dark matter density is ρ0,DM ≈ 0.009 {M}⊙ {{pc}}-3 (0.34 {GeV} {{cm}}-3). Adiabatic compression of the dark matter halo may help reconcile the Milky Way with the c-V200 relation expected in ΛCDM while also helping to mitigate the too-big-to-fail problem, but it remains difficult to reconcile the inner bulge/bar-dominated region with a cuspy halo. We note that NGC 3521 is a near twin to the Milky Way, having a similar luminosity, scale length, and rotation curve.

  3. Quantum beats from the coherent interaction of hole states with surface state in near-surface quantum well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Salahuddin; Jayabalan, J., E-mail: jjaya@rrcat.gov.in; Chari, Rama; Pal, Suparna [Laser Physics Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Porwal, Sanjay; Sharma, Tarun Kumar; Oak, S. M. [Semiconductor Physics and Devices Lab., Solid State Laser Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2014-08-18

    We report tunneling assisted beating of carriers in a near-surface single GaAsP/AlGaAs quantum well using transient reflectivity measurement. The observed damped oscillating signal has a period of 120 ± 6 fs which corresponds to the energy difference between lh1 and hh2 hole states in the quantum well. Comparing the transient reflectivity signal at different photon energies and with a buried quantum well sample, we show that the beating is caused by the coherent coupling between surface state and the hole states (lh1 and hh2) in the near-surface quantum well. The dependence of decay of coherence of these tunneling carriers on the excitation fluence is also reported. This observation on the coherent tunneling of carrier is important for future quantum device applications.

  4. Quantum beats from the coherent interaction of hole states with surface state in near-surface quantum well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Salahuddin; Jayabalan, J.; Chari, Rama; Pal, Suparna; Porwal, Sanjay; Sharma, Tarun Kumar; Oak, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report tunneling assisted beating of carriers in a near-surface single GaAsP/AlGaAs quantum well using transient reflectivity measurement. The observed damped oscillating signal has a period of 120 ± 6 fs which corresponds to the energy difference between lh1 and hh2 hole states in the quantum well. Comparing the transient reflectivity signal at different photon energies and with a buried quantum well sample, we show that the beating is caused by the coherent coupling between surface state and the hole states (lh1 and hh2) in the near-surface quantum well. The dependence of decay of coherence of these tunneling carriers on the excitation fluence is also reported. This observation on the coherent tunneling of carrier is important for future quantum device applications.

  5. Optimized surface-slab excited-state muffin-tin potential and surface core level shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundgren, J.

    2003-01-01

    An optimized muffin-tin (MT) potential for surface slabs with preassigned surface core-level shifts (SCLS's) is presented. By using the MT radii as adjustable parameters the model is able to conserve the definition of the SCLS with respect to the bulk and concurrently to generate a potential that is continuous at the MT radii. The model is conceived for elastic electron scattering in a surface slab with exchange-correlation interaction described by the local density approximation. The model employs two data bases for the self-energy of the signal electron (after Hedin and Lundqvist or Sernelius). The potential model is discussed in detail with two surface structures Be(101-bar0), for which SCLS's are available, and Cu(111)p(2x2)Cs, in which the close-packed radii of the atoms are extremely different. It is considered plausible that tensor LEED based on an optimized MT potential can be used for determining SCLS's

  6. Identification of Raman peaks of high-T{sub c} cuprates in normal state through density of states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishoyi, K.C. [P.G. Department of Physics, F.M. College (Auto.), Balasore 756 001 (India)]. E-mail: bishoyi@iopb.res.in; Rout, G.C. [Condensed Matter Physics Group, Govt. Science College, Chatrapur 761 020, Orissa (India); Behera, S.N. [Physics Enclave, H.I.G.-23/1, Housing Board Phase-I, Chandrasekharpur, Bhubaneswar 7510016 (India)

    2007-05-31

    We present a microscopic theory to explain and identify the Raman spectral peaks of high-T{sub c} cuprates R{sub 2-x}M{sub x}CuO{sub 4} in the normal state. We used electronic Hamiltonian prescribed by Fulde in presence of anti-ferromagnetism. Phonon interaction to the hybridization between the conduction electrons of the system and the f-electrons has been incorporated in the calculation. The phonon spectral density is calculated by the Green's function technique of Zubarev at zero wave vector and finite (room) temperature limit. The four Raman active peaks (P{sub 1}-P{sub 4}) representing the electronic states of the atomic sub-systems of the cuprate system are identified by the calculated quasi-particle energy bands and electron density of states (DOS). The effect of interactions on these peaks are also explained.

  7. Density profile evolution and nonequilibrium effects in partial and full spreading measurements of surface diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikunen, P.; Vattulainen, Ilpo Tapio; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2001-01-01

    in D-C(theta) depend on the initial density gradient and the initial state from which the spreading starts. To this end, we carry out extensive Monte Carlo simulations for a lattice-gas model of the O/W(110) system. Studies of submonolayer spreading from an initially ordered p(2x1) phase at theta = 1....../2 reveal that the spreading and diffusion rates in directions parallel and perpendicular to rows of oxygen atoms are significantly different within the ordered phase. Aside from this effect, we find that the degree of ordering in the initial phase has a relatively small impact on the overall behavior of D...

  8. Probing spin helical surface states in topological HgTe nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, J.; Kozlovsky, R.; Gorini, C.; Liu, M.-H.; Weishäupl, S.; Maier, H.; Fischer, R.; Kozlov, D. A.; Kvon, Z. D.; Mikhailov, N.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Richter, K.; Weiss, D.

    2018-01-01

    Nanowires with helical surface states represent key prerequisites for observing and exploiting phase-coherent topological conductance phenomena, such as spin-momentum locked quantum transport or topological superconductivity. We demonstrate in a joint experimental and theoretical study that gated nanowires fabricated from high-mobility strained HgTe, known as a bulk topological insulator, indeed preserve the topological nature of the surface states, that moreover extend phase-coherently across the entire wire geometry. The phase-coherence lengths are enhanced up to 5 μ m when tuning the wires into the bulk gap, so as to single out topological transport. The nanowires exhibit distinct conductance oscillations, both as a function of the flux due to an axial magnetic field and of a gate voltage. The observed h /e -periodic Aharonov-Bohm-type modulations indicate surface-mediated quasiballistic transport. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis of the scaling of the observed gate-dependent conductance oscillations reveals the topological nature of these surface states. To this end we combined numerical tight-binding calculations of the quantum magnetoconductance with simulations of the electrostatics, accounting for the gate-induced inhomogeneous charge carrier densities around the wires. We find that helical transport prevails even for strongly inhomogeneous gating and is governed by flux-sensitive high-angular momentum surface states that extend around the entire wire circumference.

  9. Real-space Mapping of Surface Trap States in CIGSe Nanocrystals using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Bose, Riya

    2016-05-26

    Surface trap states in semiconductor copper indium gallium selenide nanocrystals (NCs) which serve as undesirable channels for non-radiative carrier recombination, remain a great challenge impeding the development of solar and optoelectronics devices based on these NCs. In order to design efficient passivation techniques to minimize these trap states, a precise knowledge about the charge carrier dynamics on the NCs surface is essential. However, selective mapping of surface traps requires capabilities beyond the reach of conventional laser spectroscopy and static electron microscopy; it can only be accessed by using a one-of-a-kind, second-generation four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscope (4D S-UEM) with sub-picosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolutions. Here, we precisely map the surface charge carrier dynamics of copper indium gallium selenide NCs before and after surface passivation in real space and time using S-UEM. The time-resolved snapshots clearly demonstrate that the density of the trap states is significantly reduced after zinc sulfide (ZnS) shelling. Furthermore, removal of trap states and elongation of carrier lifetime are confirmed by the increased photocurrent of the self-biased photodetector fabricated using the shelled NCs.

  10. Real-space Mapping of Surface Trap States in CIGSe Nanocrystals using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Bose, Riya; Bera, Ashok; Parida, Manas R.; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Shaheen, Basamat; Alarousu, Erkki; Sun, Jingya; Wu, Tao; Bakr, Osman; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-01-01

    Surface trap states in semiconductor copper indium gallium selenide nanocrystals (NCs) which serve as undesirable channels for non-radiative carrier recombination, remain a great challenge impeding the development of solar and optoelectronics devices based on these NCs. In order to design efficient passivation techniques to minimize these trap states, a precise knowledge about the charge carrier dynamics on the NCs surface is essential. However, selective mapping of surface traps requires capabilities beyond the reach of conventional laser spectroscopy and static electron microscopy; it can only be accessed by using a one-of-a-kind, second-generation four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscope (4D S-UEM) with sub-picosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolutions. Here, we precisely map the surface charge carrier dynamics of copper indium gallium selenide NCs before and after surface passivation in real space and time using S-UEM. The time-resolved snapshots clearly demonstrate that the density of the trap states is significantly reduced after zinc sulfide (ZnS) shelling. Furthermore, removal of trap states and elongation of carrier lifetime are confirmed by the increased photocurrent of the self-biased photodetector fabricated using the shelled NCs.

  11. A new equation of state for porous materials with ultra-low densities

    CERN Document Server

    Geng Hua Yun; Wu Qiang

    2002-01-01

    A thermodynamic equation of state is derived which is appropriate for investigating the thermodynamic variations along isobaric paths to predict compression behaviours of porous materials. This equation-of-state model is tested on porous iron, copper, lead and tungsten with different initial densities. The calculated Hugoniots are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data published previously. This shows that this model can satisfactorily predict the Hugoniots of porous materials with wide porosity and pressure ranges.

  12. Ground-state energy for 1D (t,U,X)-model at low densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzatu, F.D.

    1992-09-01

    In describing the properties of quasi-1D materials with a highly-screened interelectronic potential, an attractive hopping term has to be added to the Hubbard Hamiltonian. The effective interaction and the ground-state energy in ladder approximation are analyzed. At low electronic densities, the attractive part of the interaction, initially smaller than the repulsive term, can become more effective, the ground-state energy decreasing below the unperturbed value. (author). 12 refs, 4 figs

  13. Effective Density and Mixing State of Aerosol Particles in a Near-Traffic Urban Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rissler, Jenny; Nordin, Erik Z; Eriksson, Axel C

    2014-01-01

    -range transport from polluted continental areas. The effective density of each group was relatively stable over time, especially of the soot aggregates, which had effective densities similar to those observed in laboratory studies of fresh diesel exhaust emissions. When heated to 300 °C, the soot aggregate......In urban environments, airborne particles are continuously emitted, followed by atmospheric aging. Also, particles emitted elsewhere, transported by winds, contribute to the urban aerosol. We studied the effective density (mass-mobility relationship) and mixing state with respect to the density...... and more dense particles. Both groups were present at each size in varying proportions. Two types of temporal variability in the relative number fraction of the two groups were found: soot correlated with intense traffic in a diel pattern and dense particles increased during episodes with long...

  14. Large optical conductivity of Dirac semimetal Fermi arc surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li-kun; Song, Justin C. W.

    2017-08-01

    Fermi arc surface states, a hallmark of topological Dirac semimetals, can host carriers that exhibit unusual dynamics distinct from that of their parent bulk. Here we find that Fermi arc carriers in intrinsic Dirac semimetals possess a strong and anisotropic light-matter interaction. This is characterized by a large Fermi arc optical conductivity when light is polarized transverse to the Fermi arc; when light is polarized along the Fermi arc, Fermi arc optical conductivity is significantly muted. The large surface spectral weight is locked to the wide separation between Dirac nodes and persists as a large Drude weight of Fermi arc carriers when the system is doped. As a result, large and anisotropic Fermi arc conductivity provides a novel means of optically interrogating the topological surfaces states of Dirac semimetals.

  15. Toward accurate prediction of potential energy surfaces and the spectral density of hydrogen bonded systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekik, Najeh

    2014-01-01

    Despite the considerable progress made in quantum theory and computational methods, detailed descriptions of the potential energy surfaces of hydrogen-bonded systems have not yet been achieved. In addition, the hydrogen bond (H-bond) itself is still so poorly understood at the fundamental level that it remains unclear exactly what geometry constitutes a “real” H-bond. Therefore, in order to investigate features essential for hydrogen bonded complexes, a simple, efficient, and general method for calculating matrix elements of vibrational operators capable of describing the stretching modes and the H-bond bridges of hydrogen-bonded systems is proposed. The derived matrix elements are simple and computationally easy to evaluate, which makes the method suitable for vibrational studies of multiple-well potentials. The method is illustrated by obtaining potential energy surfaces for a number of two-dimensional systems with repulsive potentials chosen to be in Gaussian form for the stretching mode and of the Morse-type for the H-bond bridge dynamics. The forms of potential energy surfaces of weak and strong hydrogen bonds are analyzed by varying the asymmetry of the Gaussian potential. Moreover, the choice and applicability of the selected potential for the stretching mode and comparison with other potentials used in the area of hydrogen bond research are discussed. The approach for the determination of spectral density has been constructed in the framework of the linear response theory for which spectral density is obtained by Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function of the dipole moment operator of the fast mode. The approach involves anharmonic coupling between the high frequency stretching vibration (double well potential) and low-frequency donor-acceptor stretching mode (Morse potential) as well as the electrical anharmonicity of the dipole moment operator of the fast mode. A direct relaxation mechanism is incorporated through a time decaying exponential

  16. Composition dependence of density of states in a-Se100−xSnx thin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    genide glassy semiconductors [5–15] and the results have been interpreted in terms of space charge limited conduction or Poole–Frenkel conduction. One of the most direct methods for the determination of the density of the localised states g0 in the mobility gap involves the measurements of SCLC, which can be easily ...

  17. Optical spectroscopy of the density of gap states in ETP-deposited a-Si:H

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willekens, J.; Brinza, M.; Güngör, T.; Adriaenssens, G.J.; Nesladek, M.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Smets, A.H.M.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The distribution and density of localized states in the band gap of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, as deposited by the expanding thermal plasma technique, were studied by means of a combined use of the constant photocurrent method (CPM), photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS) and time-of-flight

  18. Theoretical model of the density of states of random binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zekri, N.; Brezini, A.

    1991-09-01

    A theoretical formulation of the density of states for random binary alloys is examined based on a mean field treatment. The present model includes both diagonal and off-diagonal disorder and also short-range order. Extensive results are reported for various concentrations and compared to other calculations. (author). 22 refs, 6 figs

  19. The decay of a false vacuum and the density of states in a random, repulsive potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuberger, H.

    1982-01-01

    The replica method is applied to a disordered system built out of randomly distributed, purely repulsive scattering centers. The emerging field theoretical model has a classical solution, a bounce, which gives both the leading form of the level density and the typical ground-state wave function. (orig.)

  20. Densities of accessible final states for multi-step compound reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maoming De; Guo Hua

    1993-01-01

    The densities of accessible final states for calculations of multi-step compound reactions are derived. The Pauli exclusion principle is taken into account in the calculations. The results are compared with a previous author's results and the effect of the Pauli exclusion principle is investigated. (Author)

  1. Rendering high charge density of states in ionic liquid-gated MoS 2 transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Y.; Lee, J.; Kim, S.; Park, H.S.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated high charge density of states (DOS) in the bandgap of MoS2 nanosheets with variable temperature measurements on ionic liquid-gated MoS2 transistors. The thermally activated charge transport indicates that the electrical current in the two-dimensional MoS 2 nanosheets under high

  2. arXiv Ergodicity of the LLR method for the Density of States

    CERN Document Server

    Cossu, Guido; Pellegrini, Roberto; Rago, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    The LLR method is a novel algorithm that enables us to evaluate the density of states in lattice gauge theory. We present our study of the ergodicity properties of the LLR algorithm for the model of Yang Mills SU(3). We show that the use of the replica exchange method alleviates significantly the topological freeze-out that severely affects other algorithms.

  3. Determination of the electronic density of states near buried interfaces: Application to Co/Cu multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, A.; Sthör, J.; Wiell, T.

    1996-01-01

    High-resolution L(3) x-ray absorption and emission spectra of Co and Cu in Co/Cu multilayers are shown to provide unique information on the occupied and unoccupied density of d states near buried interfaces. The d bands of both Co and Cu interfacial layers are shown to be considerably narrowed...

  4. Neutron star models with realistic high-density equations of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, R.C.; Johnson, M.B.; Bethe, H.A.

    1975-01-01

    We calculate neutron star models using four realistic high-density models of the equation of state. We conclude that the maximum mass of a neutron star is unlikely to exceed 2 M/sub sun/. All of the realistic models are consistent with current estimates of the moment of inertia of the Crab pulsar

  5. Increasing plant density in eastern United States broccoli production systems to maximize marketable head yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased demand for fresh market broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) has led to increased production along the eastern seaboard of the United States. Maximizing broccoli yields is a primary concern for quickly expanding eastern commercial markets. Thus, a plant density study was carried ...

  6. The Wegner Estimate and the Integrated Density of States for some ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The integrated density of states (IDS) for random operators is an important function describing many physical characteristics of a random system. Properties of the IDS are derived from the Wegner estimate that describes the influence of finite-volume perturbations on a background system. In this paper, we present a simple ...

  7. Sea surface density gradients in the Nordic Seas during the Holocene as revealed by paired microfossil and isotope proxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Nieuwenhove, Nicolas; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Bauch, Henning A.

    2016-01-01

    We attempt to assess the Holocene surface-subsurface seawater density gradient on millennial time-scale based on the reconstruction of potential density (σθ) by combining data from dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and planktic foraminiferal (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (s)) stable oxygen isotopes (δ...

  8. Accounting for surface reflectance in the derivation of vertical column densities of NO2 from airborne imaging DOAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Andreas Carlos; Schönhardt, Anja; Richter, Andreas; Bösch, Tim; Seyler, André; Constantin, Daniel Eduard; Shaiganfar, Reza; Merlaud, Alexis; Ruhtz, Thomas; Wagner, Thomas; van Roozendael, Michel; Burrows, John. P.

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides, NOx (NOx = NO + NO2) play a key role in tropospheric chemistry. In addition to their directly harmful effects on the respiratory system of living organisms, they influence the levels of tropospheric ozone and contribute to acid rain and eutrophication of ecosystems. As they are produced in combustion processes, they can serve as an indicator for anthropogenic air pollution. In the late summers of 2014 and 2015, two extensive measurement campaigns were conducted in Romania by several European research institutes, with financial support from ESA. The AROMAT / AROMAT-2 campaigns (Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases) were dedicated to measurements of air quality parameters utilizing newly developed instrumentation at state-of-the-art. The experiences gained will help to calibrate and validate the measurements taken by the upcoming Sentinel-S5p mission scheduled for launch in 2016. The IUP Bremen contributed to these campaigns with its airborne imaging DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) instrument AirMAP (Airborne imaging DOAS instrument for Measurements of Atmospheric Pollution). AirMAP allows retrieving spatial distributions of trace gas columns densities in a stripe below the aircraft. The measurements have a high spatial resolution of approximately 30 x 80 m2 (along x across track) at a typical flight altitude of 3000 m. Supported by the instrumental setup and the large swath, gapless maps of trace gas distributions above a large city, like Bucharest or Berlin, can be acquired within a time window of approximately two hours. These properties make AirMAP a valuable tool for the validation of trace gas measurements from space. DOAS retrievals yield the density of absorbers integrated along the light path of the measurement. The light path is altered with a changing surface reflectance, leading to enhanced / reduced slant column densities of NO2 depending on surface properties. This effect must be considered in

  9. GAMA/H-ATLAS: THE DUST OPACITY-STELLAR MASS SURFACE DENSITY RELATION FOR SPIRAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grootes, M. W.; Tuffs, R. J.; Andrae, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Popescu, C. C.; Pastrav, B. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Gunawardhana, M.; Taylor, E. N. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 206 (Australia); Kelvin, L. S.; Driver, S. P. [Scottish Universities' Physics Alliance (SUPA), School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Liske, J. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Seibert, M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Graham, Alister W. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Baes, M. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Baldry, I. K. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Bourne, N. [Centre for Astronomy and Particle Theory, The School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham University, University Park Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Brough, S. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 296, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Dariush, A. [Physics Department, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); De Zotti, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Dunne, L., E-mail: meiert.grootes@mpi-hd.mpg.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); and others

    2013-03-20

    We report the discovery of a well-defined correlation between B-band face-on central optical depth due to dust, {tau}{sup f}{sub B}, and the stellar mass surface density, {mu}{sub *}, of nearby (z {<=} 0.13) spiral galaxies. This relation was derived from a sample of spiral galaxies taken from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, which were detected in the FIR/submillimeter (submm) in the Herschel-ATLAS science demonstration phase field. Using a quantitative analysis of the NUV attenuation-inclination relation for complete samples of GAMA spirals categorized according to stellar mass surface density, we demonstrate that this correlation can be used to statistically correct for dust attenuation purely on the basis of optical photometry and Sersic-profile morphological fits. Considered together with previously established empirical relationships of stellar mass to metallicity and gas mass, the near linearity and high constant of proportionality of the {tau}{sub B}{sup f} - {mu}{sub *} relation disfavors a stellar origin for the bulk of refractory grains in spiral galaxies, instead being consistent with the existence of a ubiquitous and very rapid mechanism for the growth of dust in the interstellar medium. We use the {tau}{sub B}{sup f} - {mu}{sub *} relation in conjunction with the radiation transfer model for spiral galaxies of Popescu and Tuffs to derive intrinsic scaling relations between specific star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, and stellar surface density, in which attenuation of the UV light used for the measurement of SFR is corrected on an object-to-object basis. A marked reduction in scatter in these relations is achieved which we demonstrate is due to correction of both the inclination-dependent and face-on components of attenuation. Our results are consistent with a general picture of spiral galaxies in which most of the submm emission originates from grains residing in translucent structures, exposed to UV in the diffuse interstellar

  10. Final state effects in photoemission studies of Fermi surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, Richard L; Browne, Dana A; Mankey, Gary J

    2007-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is one of the most important methods for extracting information about the Fermi surface (FS) of materials. An electron photoexcited from the FS is emitted from the crystal conserving the parallel momentum, k parallel , while the perpendicular momentum k perpendicular is reduced due to the surface potential barrier. A simple interpretation of the process assumes the final state is free-electron-like allowing one to 'map' the detected photoelectron back to its initial k momentum. There are multiple final state effects that can complicate the interpretation of photoelectron data and these effects are reviewed here. These can involve both energy and k broadening, which can give rise to shadow or ghost FS contours, scattering and final state diffraction effects that modify intensities, and matrix element effects which reflect the symmetries of the states involved and can be highly dependent on photon polarization. These matrix elements result in contours of photoelectron intensity that follow the dispersion in k-space of the initial state, the FS, and the final state. Locations where intensities go to zero due to matrix element and symmetry effects can result in gaps where FS contours 'disappear'. Recognition that these effects can play a significant role in determining the measured angular distributions is crucial in developing an informed model of where the FS contours actually lie in relation to measured intensity contours

  11. Magnetic edge states in MoS2 characterized using density-functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Hinnemann, B.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2009-01-01

    It is known that the edges of a two-dimensional slab of insulating MoS2 exhibit one-dimensional metallic edge states, the so-called "brim states." Here, we find from density-functional theory calculations that several edge structures, which are relevant for the hydrodesulfurization process......, are magnetic. The magnetism is an edge phenomenon associated with certain metallic edge states. Interestingly, we find that among the two low-index edges, only the S edge displays magnetism under hydrodesulfurization conditions. In addition, the implications of this on the catalytic activity are investigated...

  12. Multireference Density Functional Theory with Generalized Auxiliary Systems for Ground and Excited States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zehua; Zhang, Du; Jin, Ye; Yang, Yang; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao

    2017-09-21

    To describe static correlation, we develop a new approach to density functional theory (DFT), which uses a generalized auxiliary system that is of a different symmetry, such as particle number or spin, from that of the physical system. The total energy of the physical system consists of two parts: the energy of the auxiliary system, which is determined with a chosen density functional approximation (DFA), and the excitation energy from an approximate linear response theory that restores the symmetry to that of the physical system, thus rigorously leading to a multideterminant description of the physical system. The electron density of the physical system is different from that of the auxiliary system and is uniquely determined from the functional derivative of the total energy with respect to the external potential. Our energy functional is thus an implicit functional of the physical system density, but an explicit functional of the auxiliary system density. We show that the total energy minimum and stationary states, describing the ground and excited states of the physical system, can be obtained by a self-consistent optimization with respect to the explicit variable, the generalized Kohn-Sham noninteracting density matrix. We have developed the generalized optimized effective potential method for the self-consistent optimization. Among options of the auxiliary system and the associated linear response theory, reformulated versions of the particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) and the spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory (SF-TDDFT) are selected for illustration of principle. Numerical results show that our multireference DFT successfully describes static correlation in bond dissociation and double bond rotation.

  13. Polystyrene sphere monolayer assisted electrochemical deposition of ZnO nanorods with controlable surface density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, D., E-mail: daniel.ramirez@ucv.c [Laboratorio de Electroquimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Gomez, H. [Laboratorio de Electroquimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Lincot, D. [Institute de Recherche et Developpement sur l' Energie Photovoltaique-IRDEP, 6 Quai Watier 78401, Chatou Cedex (France)

    2010-02-15

    In this paper we report the zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs) growth by electrochemical deposition onto polycrystalline gold electrodes modified with assemblies of polystyrene sphere monolayers (PSSMs). Growth occurs through the interstitial spaces between the hexagonally close packed spheres. ZnO NRs nucleate in the region where three adjacent spheres leave a space, being able to grow and projected over the PSSMs. The nanorod surface density (N{sub NR}) shows a linear dependence with respect to a PS sphere diameter selected. XRD analysis shows these ZnO NRs are highly oriented along the (0 0 2) plane (c-axis). This open the possibility to have electronic devices with mechanically supported nanometric materials.

  14. Effect of Ar ion on the surface properties of low density polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, M. F.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, low-density polyethylene (LDPE) was irradiated by argon ion with different fluences up to 1015ions/cm2. The optical, chemical and hardness properties have been investigated using UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and micro-indentation tester, respectively. The results showed the ion beam bombardment induced decreases in the transmittance of the irradiated polymer samples. This change in transmittance can be attributed to the formation of conjugated bonds i.e. possible formation of defects and/or carbon clusters. The indirect optical band gap decreased from 3.0 eV for the pristine sample to 2.3 eV for that sample irradiated with the highest fluence of the Ar ion beam. Furthermore, the number of carbon atoms and clusters increased with increasing Ar ion fluences. FTIR spectra showed the formation of new bands of the bombarded polymer samples. Furthermore, polar groups were created on the surface of the irradiated samples which refer to the increase of the hydrophilic nature of the surface of the irradiated samples. The Vicker's hardness increased from 4.9 MPa for the pristine sample to 17.9 MPa for those bombarded at the highest fluence. This increase is attributed to the increase in the crosslinking and alterations of the bombarded surface into hydrogenated amorphous carbon, which improves the hardness of the irradiated samples. The bombarded LDPE surfaces may be used in special applications to the field of the micro-electronic devices and shock absorbers.

  15. A photoemission moments model using density functional and transfer matrix methods applied to coating layers on surfaces: Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kevin L.; Finkenstadt, Daniel; Shabaev, Andrew; Lambrakos, Samuel G.; Moody, Nathan A.; Petillo, John J.; Yamaguchi, Hisato; Liu, Fangze

    2018-01-01

    Recent experimental measurements of a bulk material covered with a small number of graphene layers reported by Yamaguchi et al. [NPJ 2D Mater. Appl. 1, 12 (2017)] (on bialkali) and Liu et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 110, 041607 (2017)] (on copper) and the needs of emission models in beam optics codes have lead to substantial changes in a Moments model of photoemission. The changes account for (i) a barrier profile and density of states factor based on density functional theory (DFT) evaluations, (ii) a Drude-Lorentz model of the optical constants and laser penetration depth, and (iii) a transmission probability evaluated by an Airy Transfer Matrix Approach. Importantly, the DFT results lead to a surface barrier profile of a shape similar to both resonant barriers and reflectionless wells: the associated quantum mechanical transmission probabilities are shown to be comparable to those recently required to enable the Moments (and Three Step) model to match experimental data but for reasons very different than the assumption by conventional wisdom that a barrier is responsible. The substantial modifications of the Moments model components, motivated by computational materials methods, are developed. The results prepare the Moments model for use in treating heterostructures and discrete energy level systems (e.g., quantum dots) proposed for decoupling the opposing metrics of performance that undermine the performance of advanced light sources like the x-ray Free Electron Laser. The consequences of the modified components on quantum yield, emittance, and emission models needed by beam optics codes are discussed.

  16. Eta products, BPS states and K3 surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yang-Hui [Department of Mathematics, City University,London, EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom); School of Physics, NanKai University,Tianjin, 300071 (China); Merton College, University of Oxford,Oxford, OX14JD (United Kingdom); McKay, John [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Concordia University,1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. West, Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1M8 (Canada)

    2014-01-22

    Inspired by the multiplicative nature of the Ramanujan modular discriminant, Δ, we consider physical realizations of certain multiplicative products over the Dedekind eta-function in two parallel directions: the generating function of BPS states in certain heterotic orbifolds and elliptic K3 surfaces associated to congruence subgroups of the modular group. We show that they are, after string duality to type II, the same K3 surfaces admitting Nikulin automorphisms. In due course, we will present identities arising from q-expansions as well as relations to the sporadic Mathieu group M{sub 24}.

  17. A surface structural model for ferrihydrite I: Sites related to primary charge, molar mass, and mass density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Tjisse; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H.

    2009-08-01

    A multisite surface complexation (MUSIC) model for ferrihydrite (Fh) has been developed. The surface structure and composition of Fh nanoparticles are described in relation to ion binding and surface charge development. The site densities of the various reactive surface groups, the molar mass, the mass density, the specific surface area, and the particle size are quantified. As derived theoretically, molecular mass and mass density of nanoparticles will depend on the types of surface groups and the corresponding site densities and will vary with particle size and surface area because of a relatively large contribution of the surface groups in comparison to the mineral core of nanoparticles. The nano-sized (˜2.6 nm) particles of freshly prepared 2-line Fh as a whole have an increased molar mass of M ˜ 101 ± 2 g/mol Fe, a reduced mass density of ˜3.5 ± 0.1 g/cm 3, both relatively to the mineral core. The specific surface area is ˜650 m 2/g. Six-line Fh (5-6 nm) has a molar mass of M ˜ 94 ± 2 g/mol, a mass density of ˜3.9 ± 0.1 g/cm 3, and a surface area of ˜280 ± 30 m 2/g. Data analysis shows that the mineral core of Fh has an average chemical composition very close to FeOOH with M ˜ 89 g/mol. The mineral core has a mass density around ˜4.15 ± 0.1 g/cm 3, which is between that of feroxyhyte, goethite, and lepidocrocite. These results can be used to constrain structural models for Fh. Singly-coordinated surface groups dominate the surface of ferrihydrite (˜6.0 ± 0.5 nm -2). These groups can be present in two structural configurations. In pairs, the groups either form the edge of a single Fe-octahedron (˜2.5 nm -2) or are present at a single corner (˜3.5 nm -2) of two adjacent Fe octahedra. These configurations can form bidentate surface complexes by edge- and double-corner sharing, respectively, and may therefore respond differently to the binding of ions such as uranyl, carbonate, arsenite, phosphate, and others. The relatively low PZC of

  18. Constraining self-interacting dark matter with scaling laws of observed halo surface densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, Kyrylo; Boyarsky, Alexey; Bringmann, Torsten; Sokolenko, Anastasia

    2018-04-01

    The observed surface densities of dark matter halos are known to follow a simple scaling law, ranging from dwarf galaxies to galaxy clusters, with a weak dependence on their virial mass. Here we point out that this can not only be used to provide a method to determine the standard relation between halo mass and concentration, but also to use large samples of objects in order to place constraints on dark matter self-interactions that can be more robust than constraints derived from individual objects. We demonstrate our method by considering a sample of about 50 objects distributed across the whole halo mass range, and by modelling the effect of self-interactions in a way similar to what has been previously done in the literature. Using additional input from simulations then results in a constraint on the self-interaction cross section per unit dark matter mass of about σ/mχlesssim 0.3 cm2/g. We expect that these constraints can be significantly improved in the future, and made more robust, by i) an improved modelling of the effect of self-interactions, both theoretical and by comparison with simulations, ii) taking into account a larger sample of objects and iii) by reducing the currently still relatively large uncertainties that we conservatively assign to the surface densities of individual objects. The latter can be achieved in particular by using kinematic observations to directly constrain the average halo mass inside a given radius, rather than fitting the data to a pre-selected profile and then reconstruct the mass. For a velocity-independent cross-section, our current result is formally already somewhat smaller than the range 0.5‑5 cm2/g that has been invoked to explain potential inconsistencies between small-scale observations and expectations in the standard collisionless cold dark matter paradigm.

  19. Strong orientation dependence of surface mass density profiles of dark haloes at large scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osato, Ken; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Oguri, Masamune; Takada, Masahiro; Okumura, Teppei

    2018-06-01

    We study the dependence of surface mass density profiles, which can be directly measured by weak gravitational lensing, on the orientation of haloes with respect to the line-of-sight direction, using a suite of N-body simulations. We find that, when major axes of haloes are aligned with the line-of-sight direction, surface mass density profiles have higher amplitudes than those averaged over all halo orientations, over all scales from 0.1 to 100 Mpc h-1 we studied. While the orientation dependence at small scales is ascribed to the halo triaxiality, our results indicate even stronger orientation dependence in the so-called two-halo regime, up to 100 Mpc h-1. The orientation dependence for the two-halo term is well approximated by a multiplicative shift of the amplitude and therefore a shift in the halo bias parameter value. The halo bias from the two-halo term can be overestimated or underestimated by up to {˜ } 30 per cent depending on the viewing angle, which translates into the bias in estimated halo masses by up to a factor of 2 from halo bias measurements. The orientation dependence at large scales originates from the anisotropic halo-matter correlation function, which has an elliptical shape with the axis ratio of ˜0.55 up to 100 Mpc h-1. We discuss potential impacts of halo orientation bias on other observables such as optically selected cluster samples and a clustering analysis of large-scale structure tracers such as quasars.

  20. Kernel density surface modelling as a means to identify significant concentrations of vulnerable marine ecosystem indicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Kenchington

    Full Text Available The United Nations General Assembly Resolution 61/105, concerning sustainable fisheries in the marine ecosystem, calls for the protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems (VME from destructive fishing practices. Subsequently, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO produced guidelines for identification of VME indicator species/taxa to assist in the implementation of the resolution, but recommended the development of case-specific operational definitions for their application. We applied kernel density estimation (KDE to research vessel trawl survey data from inside the fishing footprint of the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO Regulatory Area in the high seas of the northwest Atlantic to create biomass density surfaces for four VME indicator taxa: large-sized sponges, sea pens, small and large gorgonian corals. These VME indicator taxa were identified previously by NAFO using the fragility, life history characteristics and structural complexity criteria presented by FAO, along with an evaluation of their recovery trajectories. KDE, a non-parametric neighbour-based smoothing function, has been used previously in ecology to identify hotspots, that is, areas of relatively high biomass/abundance. We present a novel approach of examining relative changes in area under polygons created from encircling successive biomass categories on the KDE surface to identify "significant concentrations" of biomass, which we equate to VMEs. This allows identification of the VMEs from the broader distribution of the species in the study area. We provide independent assessments of the VMEs so identified using underwater images, benthic sampling with other gear types (dredges, cores, and/or published species distribution models of probability of occurrence, as available. For each VME indicator taxon we provide a brief review of their ecological function which will be important in future assessments of significant adverse impact on these habitats here

  1. Dynamics of two-phase interfaces and surface tensions: A density-functional theory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsyshin, Petr; Sibley, David N.; Duran-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) is a statistical mechanical framework for the description of fluids at the nanoscale, where the inhomogeneity of the fluid structure needs to be carefully accounted for. By expressing the grand free-energy of the fluid as a functional of the one-body density, DFT offers a theoretically consistent and computationally accessible way to obtain two-phase interfaces and respective interfacial tensions in a ternary solid-liquid-gas system. The dynamic version of DFT (DDFT) can be rigorously derived from the Smoluchowsky picture of the dynamics of colloidal particles in a solvent. It is generally agreed that DDFT can capture the diffusion-driven evolution of many soft-matter systems. In this context, we use DDFT to investigate the dynamic behaviour of two-phase interfaces in both equilibrium and dynamic wetting and discuss the possibility of defining a time-dependent surface tension, which still remains in debate. We acknowledge financial support from the European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031 and from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council of the UK via Grants No. EP/L027186 and EP/L020564.

  2. Band mapping of surface states vs. adsorbate coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotenberg, E.; Kevan, S.D.; Denlinger, J.D.; Chung, Jin-Wook

    1997-01-01

    The theory of electron bands, which arises from basic quantum mechanical principles, has been the cornerstone of solid state physics for over 60 years. Simply put, an energy band is an electron state in a solid whose energy varies with its momentum (similar to, but with a more complicated dependence than, how a free electron's energy is proportional to its momentum squared). Much attention over the last 15 years has been given to the study of band structure of surfaces and interfaces, especially as the applications of these two-dimensional systems have become increasingly important to industry and science. The ultraESCA endstation at beamline 7.01 at the Advanced Light Source was developed for very high-energy - (∼50 meV) and angular - ( 12 photons/sec) makes the detailed study of the evolution of bands possible. The authors are interested in learning how, when one forms a chemical bond between a metal and an overlaying atom or molecule, the resulting charge transfer to or from the adsorbate affects the surface bands. In some cases of interest, intermediate coverages lead to different band structure than at the extremes of clean and saturated surfaces. Surfaces of tungsten are particularly interesting, as their atomic geometry has been shown to be exquisitely sensitive to both the surface vibrational and electronic properties. In this study, the authors looked at the surface bands of tungsten ((110) surface), as a function both of coverage and mass of overlaying atoms. The adsorbed atoms were hydrogen and the alkali atoms lithium and cesium

  3. Escape from the competence state in Streptococcus mutans is governed by the bacterial population density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, D; Villemin, C; Perry, J A; Lévesque, C M

    2016-12-01

    Horizontal gene transfer through natural DNA transformation is an important evolutionary mechanism among bacteria. Transformation requires that the bacteria are physiologically competent to take and incorporate free DNA directly from the environment. Although natural genetic transformation is a remarkable feature of many naturally competent bacteria, the process is energetically expensive for the cells. Consequently, a tight control of the competence state is necessary. The objective of the present work was to help decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating the escape from the competence state in Streptococcus mutans, the principal etiological agent responsible for tooth decay in humans. Our results showed that the cessation of competence in S. mutans was abrupt, and did not involve the accumulation of a competence inhibitor nor the depletion of a competence activator in the extracellular environment. The competence state was repressed at high cell population density via concomitant repression of sigX gene encoding the master regulator of the competence regulon. Co-culture experiments performed with oral and non-oral bacteria showed that S. mutans assesses its own population density and also the microbial density of its surroundings to regulate its competence escape. Interestingly, neither the intra-species and extra-species quorum-sensing systems nor the other 13 two-component regulatory systems identified in S. mutans were involved in the cell-density-dependent escape of the competence state. Altogether, our results suggest a complex mechanism regulating the competence shut-off involving cell-density-dependent repression of sigX through an as yet undefined system, and possibly SigX protein stability. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Influence of current density on surface morphology and properties of pulse plated tin films from citrate electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Das, Siddhartha; Das, Karabi, E-mail: karabi@metal.iitkgp.ernet.in

    2014-01-30

    Bulk polycrystalline tin films have been processed by pulse electrodeposition technique from a simple solution containing triammonium citrate and stannous chloride. The cathodic investigations have been carried out by galvanostatic methods. As deposited samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD analysis of the deposited films shows microcrystalline grains having β-Sn form. The surface morphology is very rough at lower current density, but becomes smooth at higher current density, and exhibits pyramid type morphology at all the current densities. The effect of current density on microhardness, melting behavior, and electrical resistivity are also reported here.

  5. Evolution effects of the copper surface morphology on the nucleation density and growth of graphene domains at different growth pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedayat, Seyed Mahdi [Transport Phenomena & Nanotechnology Lab., School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi-Sabet, Javad, E-mail: j_karimi@alum.sharif.edu [NFCRS, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shariaty-Niassar, Mojtaba, E-mail: mshariat@ut.ac.ir [Transport Phenomena & Nanotechnology Lab., School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • Manipulation of the Cu surface morphology in a wide range by electropolishing treatment. • Comparison of the nucleation density of graphene at low pressure and atmospheric pressure CVD processes. • Controlling the evolution of the Cu surface morphology inside a novel confined space. • Growth of large-size graphene domains. - Abstract: In this work, we study the influence of the surface morphology of the catalytic copper substrate on the nucleation density and the growth rate of graphene domains at low and atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD and APCVD) processes. In order to obtain a wide range of initial surface morphology, precisely controlled electropolishing methods were developed to manipulate the roughntreess value of the as-received Cu substrate (RMS = 30 nm) to ultra-rough (RMS = 130 nm) and ultra-smooth (RMS = 2 nm) surfaces. The nucleation and growth of graphene domains show obviously different trends at LPCVD and APCVD conditions. In contrast to APCVD condition, the nucleation density of graphene domains is almost equal in substrates with different initial roughness values at LPCVD condition. We show that this is due to the evolution of the surface morphology of the Cu substrate during the graphene growth steps. By stopping the surface sublimation of copper substrate in a confined space saturated with Cu atoms, the evolution of the Cu surface was impeded. This results in the reduction of the nucleation density of graphene domains up to 24 times in the pre-smoothed Cu substrates at LPCVD condition.

  6. Evolution effects of the copper surface morphology on the nucleation density and growth of graphene domains at different growth pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedayat, Seyed Mahdi; Karimi-Sabet, Javad; Shariaty-Niassar, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Manipulation of the Cu surface morphology in a wide range by electropolishing treatment. • Comparison of the nucleation density of graphene at low pressure and atmospheric pressure CVD processes. • Controlling the evolution of the Cu surface morphology inside a novel confined space. • Growth of large-size graphene domains. - Abstract: In this work, we study the influence of the surface morphology of the catalytic copper substrate on the nucleation density and the growth rate of graphene domains at low and atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD and APCVD) processes. In order to obtain a wide range of initial surface morphology, precisely controlled electropolishing methods were developed to manipulate the roughntreess value of the as-received Cu substrate (RMS = 30 nm) to ultra-rough (RMS = 130 nm) and ultra-smooth (RMS = 2 nm) surfaces. The nucleation and growth of graphene domains show obviously different trends at LPCVD and APCVD conditions. In contrast to APCVD condition, the nucleation density of graphene domains is almost equal in substrates with different initial roughness values at LPCVD condition. We show that this is due to the evolution of the surface morphology of the Cu substrate during the graphene growth steps. By stopping the surface sublimation of copper substrate in a confined space saturated with Cu atoms, the evolution of the Cu surface was impeded. This results in the reduction of the nucleation density of graphene domains up to 24 times in the pre-smoothed Cu substrates at LPCVD condition.

  7. Effects of surface states on device and interconnect isolation in GaAs MESFET and InP MISFET integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, H.; Kitagawa, T.; Masuda, H.; Yano, H.; Ohno, H.

    1985-01-01

    Surface electrical breakdown and side-gating which cause failure of device and interconnect isolation are investigated for GaAs MESFET and InP MISFET integrated circuit structures. Striking differences in behavior are observed between GaAs and InP as regards to the surface conduction, surface breakdown and side-gating. These differences are shown to be related to the surface state properties of the insulator-semiconductor interface. In GaAs, high density of surface states rather than bulk trap states control the surface I-V characteristics and side-gating, causing serious premature avalanche breakdown and triggering side-gating at a low nominal field intensity of 1-3 kV/cm. On the other hand, InP MISFET integrated circuits are virtually free from these premature breakdown and side-gating effect under normal dark operating condition because of very low surface state density

  8. Relations between sinkhole density and anthropogenic contaminants in selected carbonate aquifers in the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Bruce D.; Katz, Brian G.; Berndt, Marian P.; Ardis, Ann F.; Skach, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    The relation between sinkhole density and water quality was investigated in seven selected carbonate aquifers in the eastern United States. Sinkhole density for these aquifers was grouped into high (>25 sinkholes/100 km2), medium (1–25 sinkholes/100 km2), or low (2) categories using a geographical information system that included four independent databases covering parts of Alabama, Florida, Missouri, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee. Field measurements and concentrations of major ions, nitrate, and selected pesticides in samples from 451 wells and 70 springs were included in the water-quality database. Data were collected as a part of the US Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Areas with high and medium sinkhole density had the greatest well depths and depths to water, the lowest concentrations of total dissolved solids and bicarbonate, the highest concentrations of dissolved oxygen, and the lowest partial pressure of CO2 compared to areas with low sinkhole density. These chemical indicators are consistent conceptually with a conduit-flow-dominated system in areas with a high density of sinkholes and a diffuse-flow-dominated system in areas with a low density of sinkholes. Higher cave density and spring discharge in Pennsylvania also support the concept that the high sinkhole density areas are dominated by conduit-flow systems. Concentrations of nitrate-N were significantly higher (p sinkhole density than in low sinkhole-density areas; when accounting for the variations in land use near the sampling sites, the high sinkhole-density area still had higher concentrations of nitrate-N than the low sinkhole-density area. Detection frequencies of atrazine, simazine, metolachlor, prometon, and the atrazine degradate deethylatrazine indicated a pattern similar to nitrate; highest pesticide detections were associated with high sinkhole-density areas. These patterns generally persisted when analyzing the detection frequency by land

  9. Radial distributions of surface mass density and mass-to-luminosity ratio in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2018-03-01

    We present radial profiles of the surface mass density (SMD) in spiral galaxies directly calculated using rotation curves of two approximations of flat-disk (SMD-F) and spherical mass distribution (SMD-S). The SMDs are combined with surface brightness using photometric data to derive radial variations of the mass-to-luminosity ratio (ML). It is found that the ML generally has a central peak or a plateau, and decreases to a local minimum at R ˜ 0.1-0.2 h, where R is the radius and h is the scale radius of optical disk. The ML, then, increases rapidly until ˜0.5 h, and is followed by gradual rise till ˜2 h, remaining at around ˜2 [M_{⊙} L^{-1}_{⊙}] in the w1 band (infrared λ3.4 μm) and ˜ 10 [M_⊙ L_⊙ ^{-1}] in the r band (λ6200-7500 Å). Beyond this radius, the ML increases steeply with approaching the observed edges at R ˜ 5 h, attaining to as high values as ˜20 in w1 and ˜ 10^2 [M_⊙ L_⊙ ^{-1}] in the r band, which are indicative of dominant dark matter. The general properties of the ML distributions will be useful for constraining cosmological formation models of spiral galaxies.

  10. Density functional theory study for the enhanced sulfur tolerance of Ni catalysts by surface alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Bohyun; Kwon, Hyunguk; Ko, Jeonghyun; Kim, Byung-Kook; Han, Jeong Woo

    2018-01-01

    Sulfur compounds in fuels deactivate the surface of anode materials in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), which adversely affect the long-term durability. To solve this issue, it is important to design new SOFC anode materials with high sulfur tolerance. Unfortunately, it is difficult to completely replace the traditional Ni anode owing to its outstanding reactivity with low cost. As an alternative, alloying Ni with transition metals is a practical strategy to enhance the sulfur resistance while taking advantage of Ni metal. Therefore, in this study, we examined the effects of transition metal (Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Pt, and Au) doping into a Ni catalyst on not only the adsorption of H2S, HS, S, and H but also H2S decomposition using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The dopant metals were selected rationally by considering the stability of the Ni-based binary alloys. The interactions between sulfur atoms produced by H2S dissociation and the surface are weakened by the dopant metals at the topmost layer. In addition, the findings show that H2S dissociation can be suppressed by doping transition metals. It turns out that these effects are maximized in the Au-doped Ni catalyst. Our DFT results will provide useful insights into the design of sulfur-tolerant SOFC anode materials.

  11. Predicting Ligand Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces by 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jhih-Wei; Elumalai, Pavadai; Pitti, Thejkiran; Wu, Chih Yuan; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Peng, Hung-Pin; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Predicting ligand binding sites (LBSs) on protein structures, which are obtained either from experimental or computational methods, is a useful first step in functional annotation or structure-based drug design for the protein structures. In this work, the structure-based machine learning algorithm ISMBLab-LIG was developed to predict LBSs on protein surfaces with input attributes derived from the three-dimensional probability density maps of interacting atoms, which were reconstructed on the query protein surfaces and were relatively insensitive to local conformational variations of the tentative ligand binding sites. The prediction accuracy of the ISMBLab-LIG predictors is comparable to that of the best LBS predictors benchmarked on several well-established testing datasets. More importantly, the ISMBLab-LIG algorithm has substantial tolerance to the prediction uncertainties of computationally derived protein structure models. As such, the method is particularly useful for predicting LBSs not only on experimental protein structures without known LBS templates in the database but also on computationally predicted model protein structures with structural uncertainties in the tentative ligand binding sites. PMID:27513851

  12. Surface heat flow density at the Phlegrean Fields caldera (southern Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corrado, Gennardo [Naples Univ., Dept. of Geophysics and Volcanology, Naples (Italy); De Lorenzo, Salvatore; Mongelli, Francesco; Tramacere, Antonio; Zito, Gianmaria [Bari Univ., Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, Bari (Italy)

    1998-08-01

    The Phlegrean Fields areas is a Holocene caldera located west of Naples, southern Italy. The recent post caldera activity is characterised by several eruptive centers inside the collapsed areas. In order to investigate the still active volcanic processes, surface heat flow measurement were carried out in 1995 in 30 sites of the Phlegrean Fields and a heat flow map compiled. Filtering of the map reveals some well-defined anomalies superimposed on a general southward-increasing trend. Local anomalies are related to small magma bodies, whereas the observed general trend has been attributed to the effect of ground-water flow. This effect was calculated and removed. The undisturbed mean value of the surface heat flow density in the eastern sector is 149mW/m{sup 2}, which is above the regional value of 85mW/m{sup 2} assigned to the eastern part of the Tyrrhenian Sea, and which is probably influenced by a very large, deep magmatic body. (Author)

  13. Magnetic fields produced by rotating symmetrical bodies with homogeneous surface charge density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espejel-Morales, R; Murguía-Romero, G; Calles, A; Cabrera-Bravo, E; Morán-López, J L

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical calculation for the stationary magnetic field produced by different rotating bodies with homogeneous and constant surface charge density. The calculation is done by superposing the magnetic field produced by a set of loops of current which mimic the magnetic field produced by belts of current defined by slices of fixed width. We consider the cases of a sphere, ellipsoids, open and closed cylinders and a combination of these in a dumbbell -like shell. We also plot their magnetic field lines using a technique that make use of the Runge–Kutta fourth-order method. Up to our knowledge, the case of closed cylinders was not calculated before. In contrast to previous results, we find that the magnetic field inside finite hollow bodies is homogeneous only in the case of a sphere. This is consequence of the fact that, for the sphere, the surface of any slice taken perpendicularly to the rotation axis, depends only on its thickness, like in the case of an infinite cylinder. (paper)

  14. Free energy surfaces in the superconducting mixed state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnemore, D. K.; Fang, M. M.; Bansal, N. P.; Farrell, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    The free energy surface for Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O1O has been measured as a function of temperature and magnetic field to determine the fundamental thermodynamic properties of the mixed state. The change in free energy, G(H)-G(O), is found to be linear in temperature over a wide range indicating that the specific heat is independent of field.

  15. Investigation of series resistance and surface states in Au/n - GaP structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiymaz, A.; Onal, B.; Ozer, M.; Acar, S.

    2009-01-01

    The variation in series resistance and surface state density of Au/n - GaP Schottky diodes have been systematically investigated at room temperature by using capacitance-voltage C-V and conductance-voltage G/w-V measurements techniques. The C-V and G/w-V characteristics of these devices were investigated by considering series resistance effects in a wide frequency range. It is shown that the capacitance of the Au/n - GaP Schottky diode decreases with increasing frequency. It is assumed that the surface states were responsible for this behaviour. The distribution profile of Rs-V gives a peak in the depletion region at low frequencies and disappears with increasing frequencies

  16. Reliability of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on low dislocation density bulk GaN substrate: Implications of surface step edges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killat, N., E-mail: Nicole.Killat@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk; Montes Bajo, M.; Kuball, M., E-mail: Nicole.Killat@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability (CDTR), H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Paskova, T. [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Evans, K. R. [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States); Leach, J. [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States); Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Li, X.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Chabak, K. D.; Crespo, A.; Gillespie, J. K.; Fitch, R.; Kossler, M.; Walker, D. E.; Trejo, M.; Via, G. D.; Blevins, J. D. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2013-11-04

    To enable gaining insight into degradation mechanisms of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors, devices grown on a low-dislocation-density bulk-GaN substrate were studied. Gate leakage current and electroluminescence (EL) monitoring revealed a progressive appearance of EL spots during off-state stress which signify the generation of gate current leakage paths. Atomic force microscopy evidenced the formation of semiconductor surface pits at the failure location, which corresponds to the interaction region of the gate contact edge and the edges of surface steps.

  17. A study of the rates of heat transfer and bubble site density for nucleate boiling on an inclined heating surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonamy, S.E.; Symons, J.G.

    1974-08-01

    Nucleate pool boiling of distilled water from an electrically heated surface at atmospheric pressure is studied for varying heating surface inclinations. The constants of the accepted boiling equation phi = K Tsup(B) and the Rohsenow Correlation Coefficient are found to be dependent on surface orientation. Convection cooling is observed to play a major role in pool boiling phenomena and causes large changes in the heat transfer rates for a given excess of temperature of the heated surface. Active nucleation site density is studied and found to be independent of surface inclination. Empirical relations are presented to provide an understanding of the effects of inclination on other boiling parameters. (author)

  18. Concentration Dependences of the Surface Tension and Density of Solutions of Acetone-Ethanol-Water Systems at 293 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadashev, R. Kh.; Dzhambulatov, R. S.; Mezhidov, V. Kh.; Elimkhanov, D. Z.

    2018-05-01

    Concentration dependences of the surface tension and density of solutions of three-component acetone-ethanol-water systems and the bounding binary systems at 273 K are studied. The molar volume, adsorption, and composition of surface layers are calculated. Experimental data and calculations show that three-component solutions are close to ideal ones. The surface tensions of these solutions are calculated using semi-empirical and theoretical equations. Theoretical equations qualitatively convey the concentration dependence of surface tension. A semi-empirical method based on the Köhler equation allows us to predict the concentration dependence of surface tension within the experimental error.

  19. Stable Weyl points, trivial surface states, and particle-hole compensation in WP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzoli, E.; Zwartsenberg, B.; Michiardi, M.; Boschini, F.; Day, R. P.; Elfimov, I. S.; Denlinger, J. D.; Süss, V.; Felser, C.; Damascelli, A.

    2018-05-01

    A possible connection between extremely large magnetoresistance and the presence of Weyl points has garnered much attention in the study of topological semimetals. Exploration of these concepts in transition-metal diphosphides WP2 has been complicated by conflicting experimental reports. Here we combine angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to disentangle surface and bulk contributions to the ARPES intensity, the superposition of which has plagued the determination of the band structure in WP2. Our results show that while the hole- and electronlike Fermi surface sheets originating from surface states have different areas, the bulk-band structure of WP2 is electron-hole compensated in agreement with DFT. Furthermore, the ARPES band structure is compatible with the presence of at least four temperature-independent Weyl points, confirming the topological nature of WP2 and its stability against lattice distortions.

  20. Unambiguous state discrimination of two density matrices in quantum information theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynal, P.

    2008-01-01

    Quantum state discrimination is a fundamental task in quantum information theory. The signals are usually nonorthogonal quantum states, which implies that they can not be perfectly distinguished. One possible discrimination strategy is the so-called Unambiguous State Discrimination (USD) where the states are successfully identified with non-unit probability, but without error. The optimal USD measurement has been extensively studied in the case of pure states, especially for any pair of pure states. Recently, the problem of unambiguously discriminating mixed quantum states has attracted much attention. In the case of a pair of generic mixed states, no complete solution is known. In this thesis, we first present reduction theorems for optimal unambiguous discrimination of two generic density matrices. We show that this problem can be reduced to that of two density matrices that have the same rank r in a 2r-dimensional Hilbert space. These reduction theorems also allow us to reduce USD problems to simpler ones for which the solution might be known. As an application, we consider the unambiguous comparison of n linearly independent pure states with a simple symmetry. Moreover, lower bounds on the optimal failure probability have been derived. For two mixed states they are given in terms of the fidelity. Here we give tighter bounds as well as necessary and sufficient conditions for two mixed states to reach these bounds. We also construct the corresponding optimal measurement. With this result, we provide analytical solutions for unambiguously discriminating a class of generic mixed states. This goes beyond known results which are all reducible to some pure state case. We however show that examples exist where the bounds cannot be reached. Next, we derive properties on the rank and the spectrum of an optimal USD measurement. This finally leads to a second class of exact solutions. Indeed we present the optimal failure probability as well as the optimal measurement for

  1. Surface density and volume density measurements of chloroplast thylakoids in maize ( Zea mays L.) under chilling conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubínová, Lucie; Kutík, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (2007), s. 481-488 ISSN 0300-3604 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100110502; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA522/01/0846 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : stereology * surface area * thylakoid membranes Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 0.976, year: 2007

  2. Catalytic hydrolysis of COS over CeO_2 (110) surface: A density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Xin; Ning, Ping; Wang, Chi; Li, Kai; Tang, Lihong; Sun, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: CeO_2 decreases the maximum energy barrier by 76.15 kcal/mol. H_2O plays a role as a bridge in the process of joint adsorption. Catalytic effect of CeO_2 in the hydrolysis of COS is mainly reflected on the C−O channel. - Highlights: • H_2O is easier adsorbed on the CeO_2 (110) surface than COS. • When COS and H_2O jointly adsorb on the CeO_2 (110) surface, the H_2O molecule plays a role as a bridge. • Ce−O−H bond can enhance the adsorption effect. • Catalytic effect of CeO_2 in the hydrolysis of COS is mainly reflected on the C−O channel. - Abstract: Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate the reaction pathways for catalytic hydrolysis of COS over CeO_2 (110) surface using Dmol"3 model. The thermodynamic stability analysis for the suggested routes of COS hydrolysis to CO_2 and H_2S was evaluated. The absolute values of adsorption energy of H_2O-CeO_2 are higher than that of COS-CeO_2. Meanwhile, the adsorption energy and geometries show that H_2O is easier adsorbed on the surface of CeO_2 (110) than COS. H_2O plays a role as a bridge in the process of joint adsorption. H_2O forms more Ce−O−H groups on the CeO_2 (110) surface. CeO_2 decreases the maximum energy barrier by 76.15 kcal/mol. The migration of H from H_2O to COS is the key for the hydrolysis reaction. C−O channel is easier to occur than C−S channel. Experimental result shows that adding of CeO_2 can increase COS removal rate and prolong the 100% COS removal rate from 180 min to 210 min. The difference between Fe_2O_3 and CeO_2 for the hydrolysis of COS is characterized in the atomic charge transfer and the formation of H−O bond and H−S bond. The transfer effect of H in H_2O to S in COS over CeO_2 decreases the energy barriers of hydrolysis reaction, and enhances the reaction activity of COS hydrolysis.

  3. dc Resistivity of Quantum Critical, Charge Density Wave States from Gauge-Gravity Duality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoretti, Andrea; Areán, Daniel; Goutéraux, Blaise; Musso, Daniele

    2018-04-01

    In contrast to metals with weak disorder, the resistivity of weakly pinned charge density waves (CDWs) is not controlled by irrelevant processes relaxing momentum. Instead, the leading contribution is governed by incoherent, diffusive processes which do not drag momentum and can be evaluated in the clean limit. We compute analytically the dc resistivity for a family of holographic charge density wave quantum critical phases and discuss its temperature scaling. Depending on the critical exponents, the ground state can be conducting or insulating. We connect our results to dc electrical transport in underdoped cuprate high Tc superconductors. We conclude by speculating on the possible relevance of unstable, semilocally critical CDW states to the strange metallic region.

  4. dc Resistivity of Quantum Critical, Charge Density Wave States from Gauge-Gravity Duality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoretti, Andrea; Areán, Daniel; Goutéraux, Blaise; Musso, Daniele

    2018-04-27

    In contrast to metals with weak disorder, the resistivity of weakly pinned charge density waves (CDWs) is not controlled by irrelevant processes relaxing momentum. Instead, the leading contribution is governed by incoherent, diffusive processes which do not drag momentum and can be evaluated in the clean limit. We compute analytically the dc resistivity for a family of holographic charge density wave quantum critical phases and discuss its temperature scaling. Depending on the critical exponents, the ground state can be conducting or insulating. We connect our results to dc electrical transport in underdoped cuprate high T_{c} superconductors. We conclude by speculating on the possible relevance of unstable, semilocally critical CDW states to the strange metallic region.

  5. Optimization of anisotropic photonic density of states for Raman cooling of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin-Chung; Ghosh, Indronil; Schleife, André; Carney, P. Scott; Bahl, Gaurav

    2018-04-01

    Optical refrigeration of solids holds tremendous promise for applications in thermal management. It can be achieved through multiple mechanisms including inelastic anti-Stokes Brillouin and Raman scattering. However, engineering of these mechanisms remains relatively unexplored. The major challenge lies in the natural unfavorable imbalance in transition rates for Stokes and anti-Stokes scattering. We consider the influence of anisotropic photonic density of states on Raman scattering and derive expressions for cooling in such photonically anisotropic systems. We demonstrate optimization of the Raman cooling figure of merit considering all possible orientations for the material crystal and two example photonic crystals. We find that the anisotropic description of the photonic density of states and the optimization process is necessary to obtain the best Raman cooling efficiency for systems having lower symmetry. This general result applies to a wide array of other laser cooling methods in the presence of anisotropy.

  6. Density of states model for the lattice transformation in A-15 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrass, B.; Handstein, A.; Behr, G.

    1980-01-01

    The cubic-tetragonal lattice transformation in A-15 compounds is described by an empirical model in which the density of states function near the Fermi energy is characterized by a two-parametric peak in addition to the constant part. Two types of peak splitting under tetragonal deformation are considered, leading to qualitatively different results about the phase transition. Results are given for the order parameter, the phase stability, the soft elastic modulus, and the paramagnetic spin susceptibility. Comparing with measurements of the magnetic susceptibility of V 3 Si single crystals near the phase transition a better agreement is obtained for a twofold degenerate density of states peak than for a threefold degenerate one. (author)

  7. THE EFFECT OF DENSITY AND FLOOR TYPES ON PERFORMANCE, PHYSIOLOGICAL STATE AND IMMUNE RESPONSE OF BROILERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sunarti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to study the effect of density and floor types on performance,physiological state and immune response of broilers. The research involved 368 male broilers of theNew Lohman strain aged 8 days which were raised up to 35 days at different densities and floor types.Floor types consisted of rice hull litter and bamboo slat were used as the main plot; while densities of 7,10, 13 and 16 birds/m2 applied as the sub-plot. The results showed that the final body weight gain of the35-day Lohmann broilers at densities of 7, 10 and 13 birds/m2 were 28.22, 24.43 and 19.27 kgrespectively, compared to 16 birds/m2 at 13.53 kg (P>0.05. Broilers in the bamboo slats floor hadlymph weight at 3.73 g compared to the litter floor at 2.55 g (P<0.05. Also, broilers in the bambooslats had average RHL (0.65 lower than broilers in the litter floor (0.79. It could be concluded thatbamboo slats best being used for broilers up to a density of 13 broilers/m2.

  8. Method of observation of low density interface states by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under bias and passivation by cyanide ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Sakurai, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Kubota, T.; Maida, O.; Takahashi, M.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements under bias can observe low density interface states for metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) diodes with low densities. This method can give energy distribution of interface states for ultrathin insulating layers for which electrical measurements cannot be performed due to a high density leakage current. During the XPS measurements, a bias voltage is applied to the rear semiconductor surface with respect to the ∼3 nm-thick front platinum layer connected to the ground, and the bias voltage changes the occupation of interface states. Charges accumulated in the interface states shift semiconductor core levels at the interface, and thus the analysis of the bias-induced shifts of the semiconductor core levels measured as a function of the bias voltage gives energy distribution of interface states. In the case of Si-based MOS diodes, the energy distribution and density of interface states strongly depend on the atomic density of silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ) layers and the interfacial roughness, respectively. All the observed interface state spectra possess peaked-structures, indicating that they are due to defect states. An interface state peak near the Si midgap is attributable to isolated Si dangling bonds at the interface, while those above and below the midgap to Si dangling bonds interacting weakly with Si or oxygen atoms in the SiO 2 layers. A method of the elimination of interface states and defect states in Si using cyanide solutions has been developed. The cyanide method simply involves the immersion of Si in KCN solutions. Due to the high Si-CN bond energy of ∼4.5 eV, the bonds are not ruptured at 800 deg. C and upon irradiation. The cyanide treatment results in the improvement of the electrical characteristics of MOS diodes and solar cells

  9. Triplet state photochemistry and the three-state crossing of acetophenone within time-dependent density-functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huix-Rotllant, Miquel, E-mail: miquel.huix@gmail.com; Ferré, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.ferre@univ-amu.fr [Institut de Chimie Radicalaire (UMR-7273), Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2014-04-07

    Even though time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) works generally well for describing excited states energies and properties in the Franck-Condon region, it can dramatically fail in predicting photochemistry, notably when electronic state crossings occur. Here, we assess the ability of TDDFT to describe the photochemistry of an important class of triplet sensitizers, namely, aromatic ketones. We take acetophenone as a test molecule, for which accurate ab initio results exist in the literature. Triplet acetophenone is generated thanks to an exotic three-state crossing involving one singlet and two triplets states (i.e., a simultaneous intersystem crossing and triplet conical intersection), thus being a stringent test for approximate TDDFT. We show that most exchange-correlation functionals can only give a semi-qualitative picture of the overall photochemistry, in which the three-state crossing is rather represented as a triplet conical intersection separated from the intersystem crossing. The best result overall is given by the double hybrid functional mPW2PLYP, which is even able to reproduce quantitatively the three-state crossing region. We rationalize this results by noting that double hybrid functionals include a larger portion of double excitation character to the excited states.

  10. Density of states of adsorbed sulphur atoms on pristine and defective graphene layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arellano, J S

    2017-01-01

    The density of states for adsorbed sulphur atom on a graphene layer system is discussed for pristine graphene layer and for mono and divacancies on the graphene layer. To our knowledge this is the first time that an entire adsorption of the sulphur atom is reported at the plane of the carbon atoms, when there is a pair of closer vacancies at the graphene layer. (paper)

  11. Sub-micrometer-thick all-solid-state supercapacitors with high power and energy densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Fanhui [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, and School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Ding, Yi [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, and School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Shandong Applied Research Center for Gold Technology (Au-SDARC), Yantai 264005 (China)

    2011-09-15

    A sub-micrometer-thick, flexible, all-solid-state supercapacitor is fabricated. Through simultaneous realization of high dispersity of pseudocapacitance materials and quick electrode response, the hybrid nanostructures show enhanced volumetric capacitance and excellent stability, as well as very high power and energy densities. This suggests their potential as next-generation, high-performance energy conversion and storage devices for wearable electronics. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Maximum entropy reconstruction of the configurational density of states from microcanonical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    In this work we develop a method for inferring the underlying configurational density of states of a molecular system by combining information from several microcanonical molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations at different energies. This method is based on Jaynes' Maximum Entropy formalism (MaxEnt) for Bayesian statistical inference under known expectation values. We present results of its application to measure thermodynamic entropy and free energy differences in embedded-atom models of metals.

  13. Density of phonon states in the light-harvesting complex II of green plants

    CERN Document Server

    Pieper, J K; Irrgang, K D; Renger, G

    2002-01-01

    In photosynthetic antenna complexes, the coupling of electronic transitions to low-frequency vibrations of the protein matrix (phonons) plays an essential role in light absorption and ultra-fast excitation energy transfer (EET). The model calculations presented here indicate that inelastic neutron scattering experiments provide invaluable information on the phonon density of states for light-harvesting complex II, which may permit a consistent interpretation of contradictory results from high-resolution optical spectroscopy. (orig.)

  14. A Quasi-Solid-State Sodium-Ion Capacitor with High Energy Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Faxing; Wang, Xiaowei; Chang, Zheng; Wu, Xiongwei; Liu, Xiang; Fu, Lijun; Zhu, Yusong; Wu, Yuping; Huang, Wei

    2015-11-18

    A quasi-solid-state sodium-ion capacitor is demonstrated with nanoporous disordered carbon and macroporous graphene as the negative and positive electrodes, respectively, using a sodium-ion-conducting gel polymer electrolyte. It can operate at a cell voltage as high as 4.2 V with an energy density of record high 168 W h kg(-1). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Electron density of states in a one-dimensional distorted system with impurities: Coherent potential approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulka, B.R.

    1982-04-01

    A tight-binding one-dimensional distorted system with impurities is considered and the electron density of states is calculated in the coherent potential approximation. It is shown that two types of impurities, an impurity built in a chain and a domain wall (a soliton), play the essential role and a drastic reduction of the energy gap is observed for a few per cent of impurities. The experimental situation in polyacetylene is also discussed. (author)

  16. Renormalization-group decimation technique for spectra, wave-functions and density of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiecko, C.; Roman, E.

    1983-09-01

    The Renormalization Group decimation technique is very useful for problems described by 1-d nearest neighbour tight-binding model with or without translational invariance. We show how spectra, wave-functions and density of states can be calculated with little numerical work from the renormalized coefficients upon iteration. The results of this new procedure are verified using the model of Soukoulis and Economou. (author)

  17. Unraveling surface and bulk trap states in lead halide perovskite solar cells using impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Changfeng; Wang, Kai; Zhu, Xixiang; Yu, Haomiao; Sun, Xiaojuan; Yang, Qin; Hu, Bin

    2018-03-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites (OIHPs) have been widely recognized as an excellent candidate for next-generation photovoltaic materials because of their highly efficient power conversion. Acquiring a complete understanding of trap states and dielectric properties in OIHP-based solar cells at the steady state is highly desirable in order to further explore and improve their optoelectronic functionalities and properties. We report CH3NH3PbI3-x Cl x -based planar solar cells with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 15.8%. The illumination intensity dependence of the current density-voltage (J-V) revealed the presence of trap-assisted recombination at low fluences. Non-destructive ac impedance spectroscopy (ac-IS) was applied to characterize the device at the steady state. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) spectra exhibited some distinct variations at a wide range of ac modulation frequencies with and without photo-excitations. Since the frequency-dependent chemical capacitance ({{C}μ }) is concerned with the surface and bulk related density of states (DOS) in CH3NH3PbI3-x Cl x , we verified this by fitting the corresponding DOS by a Gaussian distribution function. We ascertained that the electronic sub-gap trap states present in the solution processed CH3NH3PbI3-x Cl x and their distribution differs from the surface to the bulk. In fact, we demonstrated that both surfaces that were adjacent to the electron and hole transport layers featured analogous DOS. Despite this, photo- and bias-induced giant dielectric responses (i.e. both real and imaginary parts) were detected. A remarkable reduction of {{C}μ } at higher frequencies (i.e. more than 100 kHz) was ascribed to the effect of dielectric loss in CH3NH3PbI3-x Cl x .

  18. Measuring the effective phonon density of states of a quantum dot in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Høeg; Nielsen, Per Kær; Kreiner-Møller, Asger

    2013-01-01

    We employ detuning-dependent decay-rate measurements of a quantum dot in a photonic-crystal cavity to study the influence of phonon dephasing in a solid-state quantum-electrodynamics experiment. The experimental data agree with a microscopic non-Markovian model accounting for dephasing from...... longitudinal acoustic phonons, and the analysis explains the difference between nonresonant cavity feeding in different nanocavities. From the comparison between experiment and theory we extract the effective phonon density of states experienced by the quantum dot in the nanocavity. This quantity determines...

  19. Renormalization techniques applied to the study of density of states in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Ibanez, J.

    1985-01-01

    A general scheme for real space renormalization of formal scattering theory is presented and applied to the calculation of density of states (DOS) in some finite width systems. This technique is extended in a self-consistent way, to the treatment of disordered and partially ordered chains. Numerical results of moments and DOS are presented in comparison with previous calculations. In addition, a self-consistent theory for the magnetic order problem in a Hubbard chain is derived and a parametric transition is observed. Properties of localization of the electronic states in disordered chains are studied through various decimation averaging techniques and using numerical simulations. (author) [pt

  20. Atomic-partial vibrational density of states of i-AlCuFe quasicrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parshin, P.P.; Zemlyanov, M.; Brand, R.A.; Dianoux, A.J.; Calvayrac, Y.

    2002-01-01

    We present new results on the separation of the atomic-partial vibrational density of states for the ternary quasicrystal i-Al 62 Cu 25.5 Fe 12.5 . The decomposition into three atomic-partial functions, Al-, Cu- and Fe-g(E), has been performed self-consistently with the calculation of the multi-phonon contributions. The results show the surprising result that both Cu- and Fe-g(E) are strongly peaked. The low-energy regions of Al- and Cu-g(E) show strong deviations from Debye behaviour due to the presence of non-propagating low-energy vibrational states. (orig.)

  1. Surface modification of TC4 titanium alloy by high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) with different pulsed energy densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Yu-kui

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The hardness changes were determined by nanoindention method. •The surface integrity changes were investigated by different techniques. •The mechanism was analyzed based on AFM and TEM investigations. -- Abstract: Surface changes including surface topography and nanohardness distribution along surface layer were investigated for TC4 titanium alloy by different energy densities of high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB). The surface topography was characterized by SEM and AFM, and cross-sectional TEM observation was performed to reveal the surface modification mechanism of TC4 titanium alloy by HCPEB. The surface roughness was modified by HCPEB and the polishing mechanism was analyzed by studying the cross section microstructure of electron beam treated specimens by SEM. The fine grain structure inherited from the rapid solidification of the melted layer as well as the strain hardening of the sub-surface are two of the factors responsible the increase in nanohardness

  2. Joint density of states of wide-band-gap materials by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, X.D.; Peng, J.L.; Bursill, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    Kramers-Kronig analysis for parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (PEELS) data is developed as a software package. When used with a JEOL 4000EX high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) operating at 100 keV this allows us to obtain the dielectric function of relatively wide band gap materials with an energy resolution of approx 1.4 eV. The imaginary part of the dielectric function allows the magnitude of the band gap to be determined as well as the joint-density-of-states function. Routines for obtaining three variations of the joint-density of states function, which may be used to predict the optical and dielectric response for angle-resolved or angle-integration scattering geometries are also described. Applications are presented for diamond, aluminum nitride (AlN), quartz (SiO 2 ) and sapphire (Al 2 O 3 ). The results are compared with values of the band gap and density of states results for these materials obtained with other techniques. (authors)

  3. Analysis of the trajectory surface hopping method from the Markov state model perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, Alexey V.; Wang, Linjun; Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Trivedi, Dhara

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the applicability of the seminal fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) method of Tully to modeling quantum transitions between electronic states that are not coupled directly, in the processes such as Auger recombination. We address the known deficiency of the method to describe such transitions by introducing an alternative definition for the surface hopping probabilities, as derived from the Markov state model perspective. We show that the resulting transition probabilities simplify to the quantum state populations derived from the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, reducing to the rapidly switching surface hopping approach of Tully and Preston. The resulting surface hopping scheme is simple and appeals to the fundamentals of quantum mechanics. The computational approach is similar to the FSSH method of Tully, yet it leads to a notably different performance. We demonstrate that the method is particularly accurate when applied to superexchange modeling. We further show improved accuracy of the method, when applied to one of the standard test problems. Finally, we adapt the derived scheme to atomistic simulation, combine it with the time-domain density functional theory, and show that it provides the Auger energy transfer timescales which are in good agreement with experiment, significantly improving upon other considered techniques. (author)

  4. Self-interaction corrected density functional calculations of molecular Rydberg states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudmundsdóttir, Hildur; Zhang, Yao; Weber, Peter M.; Jónsson, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the wave function and energy of Rydberg excited states of molecules. A good estimate of the Rydberg state orbital is obtained using ground state density functional theory including Perdew-Zunger self-interaction correction and an optimized effective potential. The total energy of the excited molecule is obtained using the Delta Self-Consistent Field method where an electron is removed from the highest occupied orbital and placed in the Rydberg orbital. Results are presented for the first few Rydberg states of NH 3 , H 2 O, H 2 CO, C 2 H 4 , and N(CH 3 ) 3 . The mean absolute error in the energy of the 33 molecular Rydberg states presented here is 0.18 eV. The orbitals are represented on a real space grid, avoiding the dependence on diffuse atomic basis sets. As in standard density functional theory calculations, the computational effort scales as NM 2 where N is the number of orbitals and M is the number of grid points included in the calculation. Due to the slow scaling of the computational effort with system size and the high level of parallelism in the real space grid approach, the method presented here makes it possible to estimate Rydberg electron binding energy in large molecules

  5. Photo-crystallography: from the structure towards the electron density of metastable states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legrand, V [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et de Modelisation des Materiaux Mineraux et Biologiques, CNRS UMR 7036, UHP Nancy 1, Faculte des sciences, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Carbonera, C [Institut de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Bordeaux, UPR CNRS 9048, Universite de Bordeaux 1, Groupe de Sciences Moleculaires, 87 Avenue du Docteur Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac cedex (France); Pillet, S [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et de Modelisation des Materiaux Mineraux et Biologiques, CNRS UMR 7036, UHP Nancy 1, Faculte des sciences, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Souhassou, M [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et de Modelisation des Materiaux Mineraux et Biologiques, CNRS UMR 7036, UHP Nancy 1, Faculte des sciences, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Letard, J F [Institut de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Bordeaux, UPR CNRS 9048, Universite de Bordeaux 1, Groupe de Sciences Moleculaires, 87 Avenue du Docteur Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac cedex (France); Guionneau, P [Institut de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Bordeaux, UPR CNRS 9048, Universite de Bordeaux 1, Groupe de Sciences Moleculaires, 87 Avenue du Docteur Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac cedex (France); Lecomte, C [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et de Modelisation des Materiaux Mineraux et Biologiques, CNRS UMR 7036, UHP Nancy 1, Faculte des sciences, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)

    2005-01-01

    A photo-crystallographic study of Fe(btr){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O was performed in order to describe the modification of structures and charge densities on going from the ground low spin (LS) state to the metastable high spin (HS) state during the LIESST phenomenon at 15 K. Related photo-magnetic and spectroscopic measurements are also described. We show that at 15 K, the thermally quenched and photo-induced structures of the metastable HS state are identical. For comparison, we also derived the structure of the HS and LS states at 130 K in the hysteresis loop; the thermal spin transition and the LIESST spin transition exhibit similar structural behaviours.

  6. A histogram-free multicanonical Monte Carlo algorithm for the construction of analytical density of states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenbach, Markus [ORNL; Li, Ying Wai [ORNL

    2017-06-01

    We report a new multicanonical Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm to obtain the density of states (DOS) for physical systems with continuous state variables in statistical mechanics. Our algorithm is able to obtain an analytical form for the DOS expressed in a chosen basis set, instead of a numerical array of finite resolution as in previous variants of this class of MC methods such as the multicanonical (MUCA) sampling and Wang-Landau (WL) sampling. This is enabled by storing the visited states directly in a data set and avoiding the explicit collection of a histogram. This practice also has the advantage of avoiding undesirable artificial errors caused by the discretization and binning of continuous state variables. Our results show that this scheme is capable of obtaining converged results with a much reduced number of Monte Carlo steps, leading to a significant speedup over existing algorithms.

  7. Density functional study of NO adsorption on undefected and oxygen defective Au–BaO(1 0 0) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Añez, Rafael, E-mail: ranez@ivic.gob.ve [Laboratorio de Química Física y Catálisis Computacional, Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado, 21827 Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Sierraalta, Aníbal; Bastardo, Anelisse [Laboratorio de Química Física y Catálisis Computacional, Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado, 21827 Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Coll, David [Laboratorio de Físico Química Teórica de Materiales, Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado, 21827 Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Garcia, Belkis [Instituto Universitario de Tecnología de Valencia IUTVAL, Valencia, Edo. Carabobo (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    A periodic density functional approach has been used in order to explore the interaction of NO with undoped and Au doped BaO(1 0 0) surface. Due to oxygen vacancies increase the interaction between the doping metal and the surface, F{sub S} and F{sub S}{sup +} vacancies were studied and compared with the results obtained on the undefected doped BaO(1 0 0). Our results indicate that the high basicity of the BaO surface, besides the electron density changes produced by the oxygen vacancies, modify considerably how the Au atom interacts with the surface increasing the ionic character of the interaction. F{sub S} vacancy shows to be a promise center to activate de NO bond on the BaO(1 0 0) surface.

  8. Cassie state robustness of plasma generated randomly nano-rough surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Mundo, Rosa, E-mail: rosa.dimundo@poliba.it; Bottiglione, Francesco; Carbone, Giuseppe

    2014-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Superhydrophobic randomly rough surfaces are generated by plasma etching. • Statistical analysis of roughness allows calculation of theWenzel roughness factor, r{sub W.} • A r{sub W} threshold is theoretically determined, above which superhydrophobicity is “robust”. • Dynamic wetting, e.g. with high speed impacting drops, confirms this prediction. - Abstract: Superhydrophobic surfaces are effective in practical applications provided they are “robust superhydrophobic”, i.e. able to retain the Cassie state, i.e. with water suspended onto the surface protrusions, even under severe conditions (high pressure, vibrations, high speed impact, etc.). We show that for randomly rough surfaces, given the Young angle, Cassie states are robust when a threshold value of the Wenzel roughness factor, r{sub W}, is exceeded. In particular, superhydrophobic nano-textured surfaces have been generated by self-masked plasma etching. In view of their random roughness, topography features, acquired by Atomic Force Microscopy, have been statistically analyzed in order to gain information on statistical parameters such as power spectral density, fractal dimension and Wenzel roughness factor (r{sub W}), which has been used to assess Cassie state robustness. Results indicate that randomly rough surfaces produced by plasma at high power or long treatment duration, which are also fractal self-affine, have a r{sub W} higher than the theoretical threshold, thus for them a robust superhydrophobicity is predicted. In agreement with this, under dynamic wetting conditionson these surfaces the most pronounced superhydrophobic character has been appreciated: they show the lowest contact angle hysteresis and result in the sharpest bouncing when hit by drops at high impact velocity.

  9. Comparisons of multilayer H2O adsorption onto the (110) surfaces of alpha-TiO2 and SnO2 as calculated with density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Andrei V; Kubicki, James D; Sofo, Jorge O

    2008-09-18

    Mono- and bilayer adsorption of H2O molecules on TiO2 and SnO 2 (110) surfaces has been investigated using static planewave density functional theory (PW DFT) simulations. Potential energies and structures were calculated for the associative, mixed, and dissociative adsorption states. The DOS of the bare and hydrated surfaces has been used for the analysis of the difference between the H2O interaction with TiO2 and SnO 2 surfaces. The important role of the bridging oxygen in the H2O dissociation process is discussed. The influence of the second layer of H2O molecules on relaxation of the surface atoms was estimated.

  10. THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AND THE SURFACE DENSITY PROFILE OF NGC 6231

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Hwankyung [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Sejong University, 98, Kunja-dong, Kwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Sana, Hugues [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekeok' , Amsterdam University, Science Park 904, 1098-XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bessell, Michael S., E-mail: sungh@sejong.ac.kr, E-mail: H.Sana@uva.nl, E-mail: bessell@mso.anu.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, MSO, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2013-02-01

    We have performed new wide-field photometry of the young open cluster NGC 6231 to study the shape of the initial mass function (IMF) and mass segregation. We also investigated the reddening law toward NGC 6231 from optical to mid-infrared color excess ratios, and found that the total-to-selective extinction ratio is R{sub V} = 3.2, which is very close to the normal value. But many early-type stars in the cluster center show large color excess ratios. We derived the surface density profiles of four member groups, and found that they reach the surface density of field stars at about 10', regardless of stellar mass. The IMF of NGC 6231 is derived for the mass range 0.8-45 M{sub Sun }. The slope of the IMF of NGC 6231 ({Gamma} = -1.1 {+-} 0.1) is slightly shallower than the canonical value, but the difference is marginal. In addition, the mass function varies systematically, and is a strong function of radius-it is very shallow at the center, and very steep at the outer ring suggesting the cluster is mass segregated. We confirm the mass segregation for the massive stars (m {approx}> 8 M{sub Sun }) by a minimum spanning tree analysis. Using a Monte Carlo method, we estimate the total mass of NGC 6231 to be about 2.6 ({+-} 0.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun }. We constrain the age of NGC 6231 by comparison with evolutionary isochrones. The age of the low-mass stars ranges from 1 to 7 Myr with a slight peak at 3 Myr. However, the age of the high-mass stars depends on the adopted models and is 3.5 {+-} 0.5 Myr from the non-rotating or moderately rotating models of Brott et al. as well as the non-rotating models of Ekstroem et al. But the age is 4.0-7.0 Myr if the rotating models of Ekstroem et al. are adopted. This latter age is in excellent agreement with the timescale of ejection of the high-mass runaway star HD 153919 from NGC 6231, albeit the younger age cannot be entirely excluded.

  11. Anti-IL-5 attenuates activation and surface density of β2-integrins on circulating eosinophils after segmental antigen challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Mats W.; Gunderson, Kristin A.; Kelly, Elizabeth A. B.; Denlinger, Loren C.; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Mosher, Deane F.

    2013-01-01

    Background IL-5 activates αMβ2 integrin on blood eosinophils in vitro. Eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) following segmental antigen challenge have activated β2-integrins. Objective To identify roles for IL-5 in regulating human eosinophil integrins in vivo. Methods Blood and BAL eosinophils were analyzed by flow cytometry in ten subjects with allergic asthma who underwent a segmental antigen challenge protocol before and after anti-IL-5 administration. Results Blood eosinophil reactivity with monoclonal antibody (mAb) KIM-127, which recognizes partially activated β2-integrins, was decreased after anti-IL-5. Before anti-IL-5, surface densities of blood eosinophil β2, αM, and αL integrin subunits increased modestly post-challenge. After anti-IL-5, such increases did not occur. Before or after anti-IL-5, surface densities of β2,αM, αL, and αD and reactivity with KIM-127 and mAb CBRM1/5, which recognizes high-activity αMβ2, were similarly high on BAL eosinophils 48 h post-challenge. Density and activation state of β1-integrins on blood and BAL eosinophils were not impacted by anti-IL-5, even though anti-IL-5 ablated a modest post-challenge increase on blood or BAL eosinophils of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), a receptor for P-selectin that causes activation of β1-integrins. Forward scatter of blood eosinophils post-challenge was less heterogeneous and on the average decreased after anti-IL-5; however, anti-IL-5 had no effect on the decreased forward scatter of eosinophils in post-challenge BAL compared to eosinophils in blood. Blood eosinophil KIM-127 reactivity at the time of challenge correlated with the percentage of eosinophils in BAL post-challenge. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance IL-5 supports a heterogeneous population of circulating eosinophils with partially activated β2-integrins and is responsible for upregulation of β2-integrins and PSGL-1 on circulating eosinophils following segmental antigen challenge but has

  12. Growth and decay of surface charges in grafts of Teflon in electrets states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinelli, I.M.M.

    1971-01-01

    The greatest problem founded in a cardiovascular implant is the thrombus formation. Teflon grafts were used in electret state for prothesis in vena cava of dogs. To put these grafts in an electret state a corona discharge in air was used and homocharge was formed predominantly. To measure the formed surface charge the oscillating capacitor technique was used. In the electret state the grafts have showed an initial density of charge of 10- 8 C/cm 2 and the charge decay and time decay of the samples were measured under many conditions. We found two activation energies, E 2 =0.17 e V and E 3 =1.12 e V, due to rapid and slow decay, respectively. The charged grafts were sterilized with ethilene gas oxide and this process apparently did not influence the charges

  13. Atomic hydrogen and argon ground state density determination in a recombining plasma using visible light absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otorbaev, D.K.; Buuron, A.J.M.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.; Meulenbroeks, R.F.G.; Schram, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    The atomic radical density in the first excited state, obtained by the technique of optical absorption spectroscopy, and a simple kinetic model are used to determine the radical ground state density in a recombining expanding plasma. The kinetic model used does not require knowledge of the shape of

  14. Localization of endocardial ectopic activity by means of noninvasive endocardial surface current density reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai Dakun; Liu Chenguang; Eggen, Michael D; He Bin [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, MN (United States); Iaizzo, Paul A, E-mail: binhe@umn.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, MN (United States)

    2011-07-07

    Localization of the source of cardiac ectopic activity has direct clinical benefits for determining the location of the corresponding ectopic focus. In this study, a recently developed current-density (CD)-based localization approach was experimentally evaluated in noninvasively localizing the origin of the cardiac ectopic activity from body-surface potential maps (BSPMs) in a well-controlled experimental setting. The cardiac ectopic activities were induced in four well-controlled intact pigs by single-site pacing at various sites within the left ventricle (LV). In each pacing study, the origin of the induced ectopic activity was localized by reconstructing the CD distribution on the endocardial surface of the LV from the measured BSPMs and compared with the estimated single moving dipole (SMD) solution and precise pacing site (PS). Over the 60 analyzed beats corresponding to ten pacing sites (six for each), the mean and standard deviation of the distance between the locations of maximum CD value and the corresponding PSs were 16.9 mm and 4.6 mm, respectively. In comparison, the averaged distance between the SMD locations and the corresponding PSs was slightly larger (18.4 {+-} 3.4 mm). The obtained CD distribution of activated sources extending from the stimulus site also showed high consistency with the endocardial potential maps estimated by a minimally invasive endocardial mapping system. The present experimental results suggest that the CD method is able to locate the approximate site of the origin of a cardiac ectopic activity, and that the distribution of the CD can portray the propagation of early activation of an ectopic beat.

  15. Combining density functional and incremental post-Hartree-Fock approaches for van der Waals dominated adsorbate-surface interactions: Ag2/graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara-Castells, María Pilar de; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O.; Stoll, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    A combined density functional (DFT) and incremental post-Hartree-Fock (post-HF) approach, proven earlier to calculate He-surface potential energy surfaces [de Lara-Castells et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141, 151102 (2014)], is applied to describe the van der Waals dominated Ag 2 /graphene interaction. It extends the dispersionless density functional theory developed by Pernal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] by including periodic boundary conditions while the dispersion is parametrized via the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)]. Starting with the elementary cluster unit of the target surface (benzene), continuing through the realistic cluster model (coronene), and ending with the periodic model of the extended system, modern ab initio methodologies for intermolecular interactions as well as state-of-the-art van der Waals-corrected density functional-based approaches are put together both to assess the accuracy of the composite scheme and to better characterize the Ag 2 /graphene interaction. The present work illustrates how the combination of DFT and post-HF perspectives may be efficient to design simple and reliable ab initio-based schemes in extended systems for surface science applications

  16. Combining density functional and incremental post-Hartree-Fock approaches for van der Waals dominated adsorbate-surface interactions: Ag{sub 2}/graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara-Castells, María Pilar de, E-mail: Pilar.deLara.Castells@csic.es [Instituto de Física Fundamental (C.S.I.C.), Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O. [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Stoll, Hermann [Institut für Theoretische Chemie, Universität Stuttgart, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-09-14

    A combined density functional (DFT) and incremental post-Hartree-Fock (post-HF) approach, proven earlier to calculate He-surface potential energy surfaces [de Lara-Castells et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141, 151102 (2014)], is applied to describe the van der Waals dominated Ag{sub 2}/graphene interaction. It extends the dispersionless density functional theory developed by Pernal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] by including periodic boundary conditions while the dispersion is parametrized via the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)]. Starting with the elementary cluster unit of the target surface (benzene), continuing through the realistic cluster model (coronene), and ending with the periodic model of the extended system, modern ab initio methodologies for intermolecular interactions as well as state-of-the-art van der Waals-corrected density functional-based approaches are put together both to assess the accuracy of the composite scheme and to better characterize the Ag{sub 2}/graphene interaction. The present work illustrates how the combination of DFT and post-HF perspectives may be efficient to design simple and reliable ab initio-based schemes in extended systems for surface science applications.

  17. Nuclear matter at high density: Phase transitions, multiquark states, and supernova outbursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivoruchenko, M. I.; Nadyozhin, D. K.; Rasinkova, T. L.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Trusov, M. A.; Yudin, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    Phase transition from hadronic matter to quark-gluon matter is discussed for various regimes of temperature and baryon number density. For small and medium densities, the phase transition is accurately described in the framework of the Field Correlation Method, whereas at high density predictions are less certain and leave room for the phenomenological models. We study formation of multiquark states (MQS) at zero temperature and high density. Relevant MQS components of the nuclear matter can be described using a previously developed formalism of the quark compound bags (QCB). Partialwave analysis of nucleon-nucleon scattering indicates the existence of 6QS which manifest themselves as poles of P matrix. In the framework of the QCB model, we formulate a self-consistent system of coupled equations for the nucleon and 6QS propagators in nuclear matter and the G matrix. The approach provides a link between high-density nuclear matter with the MQS components and the cumulative effect observed in reactions on the nuclei, which requires the admixture of MQS in the wave functions of nuclei kinematically. 6QS determines the natural scale of the density for a possible phase transition into theMQS phase of nuclear matter. Such a phase transition can lead to dynamic instability of newly born protoneutron stars and dramatically affect the dynamics of supernovae. Numerical simulations show that the phase transition may be a good remedy for the triggering supernova explosions in the spherically symmetric supernovamodels. A specific signature of the phase transition is an additional neutrino peak in the neutrino light curve. For a Galactic core-collapse supernova, such a peak could be resolved by the present neutrino detectors. The possibility of extracting the parameters of the phase of transition from observation of the neutrino signal is discussed also.

  18. Nuclear matter at high density: Phase transitions, multiquark states, and supernova outbursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivoruchenko, M. I.; Nadyozhin, D. K.; Rasinkova, T. L.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Trusov, M. A., E-mail: trusov@itep.ru; Yudin, A. V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-15

    Phase transition from hadronic matter to quark-gluon matter is discussed for various regimes of temperature and baryon number density. For small and medium densities, the phase transition is accurately described in the framework of the Field Correlation Method, whereas at high density predictions are less certain and leave room for the phenomenological models. We study formation of multiquark states (MQS) at zero temperature and high density. Relevant MQS components of the nuclear matter can be described using a previously developed formalism of the quark compound bags (QCB). Partialwave analysis of nucleon-nucleon scattering indicates the existence of 6QS which manifest themselves as poles of P matrix. In the framework of the QCB model, we formulate a self-consistent system of coupled equations for the nucleon and 6QS propagators in nuclear matter and the G matrix. The approach provides a link between high-density nuclear matter with the MQS components and the cumulative effect observed in reactions on the nuclei, which requires the admixture of MQS in the wave functions of nuclei kinematically. 6QS determines the natural scale of the density for a possible phase transition into theMQS phase of nuclear matter. Such a phase transition can lead to dynamic instability of newly born protoneutron stars and dramatically affect the dynamics of supernovae. Numerical simulations show that the phase transition may be a good remedy for the triggering supernova explosions in the spherically symmetric supernovamodels. A specific signature of the phase transition is an additional neutrino peak in the neutrino light curve. For a Galactic core-collapse supernova, such a peak could be resolved by the present neutrino detectors. The possibility of extracting the parameters of the phase of transition from observation of the neutrino signal is discussed also.

  19. Critic: a new program for the topological analysis of solid-state electron densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-de-la-Roza, A.; Blanco, M. A.; Pendás, A. Martín; Luaña, Víctor

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we introduce CRITIC, a new program for the topological analysis of the electron densities of crystalline solids. Two different versions of the code are provided, one adapted to the LAPW (Linear Augmented Plane Wave) density calculated by the WIEN2K package and the other to the ab initio Perturbed Ion ( aiPI) density calculated with the PI7 code. Using the converged ground state densities, CRITIC can locate their critical points, determine atomic basins and integrate properties within them, and generate several graphical representations which include topological atomic basins and primary bundles, contour maps of ρ and ∇ρ, vector maps of ∇ρ, chemical graphs, etc. Program summaryProgram title: CRITIC Catalogue identifier: AECB_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECB_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPL, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 206 843 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12 648 065 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77 and 90 Computer: Any computer capable of compiling Fortran Operating system: Unix, GNU/Linux Classification: 7.3 Nature of problem: Topological analysis of the electron density in periodic solids. Solution method: The automatic localization of the electron density critical points is based on a recursive partitioning of the Wigner-Seitz cell into tetrahedra followed by a Newton search from significant points on each tetrahedra. Plotting of and integration on the atomic basins is currently based on a new implementation of Keith's promega algorithm. Running time: Variable, depending on the task. From seconds to a few minutes for the localization of critical points. Hours to days for the determination of the atomic basins shape and properties. Times correspond to a typical 2007 PC.

  20. 3He impurity states on liquid 4He: From thin films to the bulk surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavloff, N.; Treiner, J.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of the states accessible to 3 He impurities in films of liquid 4 He on Nuclepore is investigated using a density functional approach with a finite-range effective interaction. In thick films, one finds that the two lowest states are localized in the surface region. For thinner films, the variation with film thickness of the first three states results from a delicate balance between the attractive tail of the substrate potential and the quantum finite-size effect. The existence of states localized in the second layer of the films is discussed. The energy difference between the ground state and the first excited state agrees with the recent determination of Higley, Sprague, and Hallock from magnetization measurements. The effective mass of the ground state has a structure similar to that obtained by Krotscheck and coworkers and exhibits a maximum for a 4 He coverage of 0.15 angstrom -2 , in agreement with the data of Gasparini and coworkers. A similar behavior is predicted for the effective mass of the first, second, and third excited states. The structure of the energy spectrum may also explain former results on third-sound measurements in thin mixture films by Laheurte et al. and by Hallock

  1. Characterization of Silicon Nanocrystal Surfaces by Multidimensional Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanrahan, Michael P.; Fought, Ellie L.; Windus, Theresa L.; Wheeler, Lance M.; Anderson, Nicholas C.

    2017-01-01

    The chemical and photophysical properties of silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) are strongly dependent on the chemical composition and structure of their surfaces. Here we use fast magic angle spinning (MAS) and proton detection to enable the rapid acquisition of dipolar and scalar 2D 1 H– 29 Si heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) solid-state NMR spectra and reveal a molecular picture of hydride-terminated and alkyl-functionalized surfaces of Si NCs produced in a nonthermal plasma. 2D 1 H– 29 Si HETCOR and dipolar 2D 1 H– 1 H multiple-quantum correlation spectra illustrate that resonances from surface mono-, di-, and trihydride groups cannot be resolved, contrary to previous literature assignments. Instead the 2D NMR spectra illustrate that there is large distribution of 1 H and 29 Si chemical shifts for the surface hydride species in both the as-synthesized and functionalized Si NCs. However, proton-detected 1 H– 29 Si refocused INEPT experiments can be used to unambiguously differentiate NMR signals from the different surface hydrides. Varying the 29 Si evolution time in refocused INEPT experiments and fitting the oscillation of the NMR signals allows for the relative populations of the different surface hydrides to be estimated. This analysis confirms that monohydride species are the predominant surface species on the as-synthesized Si NCs. A reduction in the populations of the di- and trihydrides is observed upon functionalization with alkyl groups, consistent with our previous hypothesis that the trihydride, or silyl (*SiH 3 ), group is primarily responsible for initiating surface functionalization reactions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to obtain quantum chemical structural models of the Si NC surface and reproduce the observed 1 H and 29 Si chemical shifts. Furthermore, the approaches outlined here will be useful to obtain a more detailed picture of surface structures for Si NCs and other hydride-passivated nanomaterials.

  2. Density of Electronic States in Impurity-Doped Quantum Well Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Ortega, J.; Mikhailov, I. D.

    2003-03-01

    We analyze the electronic states in a cylindrical quantum well-wire (QWW) with randomly distributed neutral, D^0 and negatively charged D^- donors. In order to calculate the ground state energies of the off-center donors D^0 and D^- as a function of the distance from the axis of the QWW, we use the recently developed fractal dimension method [1]. There the problems are reduced to those similar for a hydrogen-like atom and a negative-hydrogen-like ion respectively, in an isotropic effective space with variable fractional dimension. The numerical trigonometric sweep method [2] and the three-parameter Hylleraas-type trial function are used to solve these problems. Novel curves for the density of impurity states in cylindrical QWWs with square-well, parabolic and soft-edge barrier potentials are present. Additionally we analyze the effect of the repulsive core on the density of the impurity states. [1] I.D. Mikhailov, F. J. Betancur, R. Escorcia and J. Sierra-Ortega, Phys. Stat. Sol., 234(b), 590 (2002) [2] F. J. Betancur, I. D. Mikhailov and L. E. Oliveira, J. Appl. Phys. D, 31, 3391(1998)

  3. Partial differential equation for the idempotent Dirac density matrix characterized solely by the exact non-relativistic ground-state electron density for spherical atomic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    2009-08-01

    In this Journal, March and Suhai have earlier set up a first-order Dirac idempotent density matrix theory for one- and two-level occupancy in which the only input required is the nonrelativistic ground-state electron density. Here, an analytic generalization is provided for the case of spherical electron densities for arbitrary level occupancy. Be-like atomic ions are referred to as an example, but 'almost spherical' molecules like SiH 4 and GeH 4 also become accessible. (author)

  4. Surface charge density determines the efficiency of cationic gemini surfactant based lipofection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryhänen, Samppa J; Säily, Matti J; Paukku, Tommi; Borocci, Stefano; Mancini, Giovanna; Holopainen, Juha M; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2003-01-01

    The efficiencies of the binary liposomes composed of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and cationic gemini surfactant, (2S,3R)-2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-bis(N-hexadecyl-N,N-dimethylammonium)butane dibromide as transfection vectors, were measured using the enhanced green fluorescent protein coding plasmid and COS-1 cells. Strong correlation between the transfection efficiency and lipid stoichiometry was observed. Accordingly, liposomes with X(SR-1) > or = 0.50 conveyed the enhanced green fluorescent protein coding plasmid effectively into cells. The condensation of DNA by liposomes with X(SR-1) > 0.50 was indicated by static light scattering and ethidium bromide intercalation assay, whereas differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence anisotropy of diphenylhexatriene revealed stoichiometry dependent reorganization in the headgroup region of the liposome bilayer, in alignment with our previous Langmuir-balance study. Surface charge density and the organization of positive charges appear to determine the mode of interaction of DNA with (2S,3R)-2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-bis(N-hexadecyl-N,N-dimethylammonium)butane dibromide/1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, only resulting in DNA condensation when X(SR-1) > 0.50. Condensation of DNA in turn seems to be required for efficient transfection.

  5. Determination of surface charge density of α-alumina by acid-base titration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W. Ntalikwa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The surface charge density (σo of colloidal alpha alumina suspended in various 1:1 electrolytes was measured using acid-base titration. An autotitrator capable of dispensing accurately 25 plus or minus 0.1 μL of titrant was used. The pH and temperature in the titration cell were monitored using single junction electrodes and platinum resistance thermometers, respectively. A constant supply of nitrogen gas in the cell was used to maintain inert conditions. The whole set up was interfaced with a computer for easy data acquisition. It was observed that the material exhibits a point of zero charge (PZC, this occurred at pH of 7.8 plus or minus 0.1, 7.6 plus or minus 0.2, 8.5 plus or minus 0.1, 8.3 plus or minus 0.1 for NaCl, NaNO3, CsCl and CsNO3 systems, respectively. It was also observed that below PZC, σo increases with increase in electrolyte concentration (Co whereas above PZC, σo decreases with increase in Co. It was concluded that σo of this material is a function of pH and Co and that its polarity can be varied through zero by varying these parameters.

  6. Density wave induced star formation: The optical surface brightness of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bash, F.N.

    1979-01-01

    A model for the galactic orbits of molecular clouds has been devised. The molecular clouds are assumed to be launched from the two-armed spiral-shock wave, to orbit in the Galaxy like ballistic particles with gravitational perturbations due to the density-wave spiral-potential, and each cloud is assumed to produce a cluster of stars. Each cloud radiates detectable 12 C 16 O (J=0→1) spectral line radiation from birth for 40 million years. Stars are seen in the cloud about 25 million years after birth, and the star cluster is assumed to continue in ballistic orbit around the Galaxy.The model has been tested by comparing its predicted velocity-longitude diagram for CO against that observed for the Galaxy and by comparing the model's predicted distribution of light in the UBV photometric bands against observed surface photometry for Sb and SC galaxies. The interpolation of the initial velocities in the model was corrected, and the model was examined to see whether preshock or postshock initial velocities better fit the observations. The model gives very good general agreement and reproduces many of the features observed in the CO velocity-longitude diagram

  7. Impact of land cover and population density on land surface temperature: case study in Wuhan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Tan, Yongbin; Ying, Shen; Yu, Zhonghai; Li, Zhen; Lan, Honghao

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of urbanization, the standard of living has improved, but changes to the city thermal environment have become more serious. Population urbanization is a driving force of residential expansion, which predominantly influences the land surface temperature (LST). We obtained the land covers and LST maps of Wuhan from Landsat-5 images in 2000, 2002, 2005, and 2009, and discussed the distribution of land use/cover change and LST variation, and we analyzed the correlation between population distribution and LST values in residential regions. The results indicated massive variation of land cover types, which was shown as a reduction in cultivatable land and the expansion of building regions. High-LST regions concentrated on the residential and industrial areas with low vegetation coverage. In the residential region, the population density (PD) had effects on the LST values. Although the area or variation of residential regions was close, lower PD was associated with lower mean LST or LST variation. Thus, decreasing the high-LST regions concentration by reducing the PD may alleviate the urban heat island effect on the residential area. Taken together, these results can provide supports for urban planning projects and studies on city ecological environments.

  8. Effects of Cu intercalation on the graphene/Ni(111) surface: density-functional calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Se Gab; Kang, Myung Ho

    2012-01-01

    The Cu-intercalated graphene/Ni(111) surface has been studied by using density-functional theory calculations. We find that (1) the intercalation-induced decoupling between graphene and the Ni(111) substrate begins sharply at a Cu coverage of about 0.75 ML, (2) at the optimal Cu coverage of 1 ML, graphene recovers an almost ideal Dirac-cone band structure with no band gap, and (3) the Dirac point is located at 0.17 eV below the Fermi level, indicating a small charge transfer from the substrate. Cu thus plays essentially the same role as Au in realizing quasi-free-standing graphene by intercalation. Our charge character analysis shows that the Dirac-cone bands near the Fermi level reveal a weakening of their π character when crossing the Ni d bands, suggesting that the resulting low Dirac-cone intensity could possibly be the origin of the recent photoemission report of a relatively large band gap of 0.18 eV.

  9. Adsorption and activation of methane and methanol on Pt(100) surface: a density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussounda, P.S.

    2006-11-01

    The activation of methane (CH 4 ) and methanol (CH 3 OH) on Pt(100) surface has been investigated using density functional theory calculations based on plane-wave basis and pseudo-potential. We optimised CH 4 /Pt(100) system. The calculated adsorption energies over the top, bridge and hollow sites are small, weakly dependent on the molecular orientation. The nature of the CH 4 -Pt interaction was examined through the electronic structure changes. The adsorption of methyl (CH 3 ) and hydrogen (H) and the co-adsorption of CH 3 +H were also calculated. From these results, we examined the dissociation of CH 4 to CH 3 +H, and the activation energies found are in good agreement with the experimental and theoretical values. The activation of CH 3 OH/Pt(100) has been studied. All the sites have almost the same adsorption energy. The adsorption of oxygen (O) and the co-adsorption of CH 4 and O were also examined. In addition, the formation of CH 3 OH assuming a one-step mechanism step via the co-adsorption of CH 4 +O has been studied and the barrier height was found to be high. (authors)

  10. Normalised Mutual Information of High-Density Surface Electromyography during Muscle Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Bingham

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study has developed a technique for identifying the presence of muscle fatigue based on the spatial changes of the normalised mutual information (NMI between multiple high density surface electromyography (HD-sEMG channels. Muscle fatigue in the tibialis anterior (TA during isometric contractions at 40% and 80% maximum voluntary contraction levels was investigated in ten healthy participants (Age range: 21 to 35 years; Mean age = 26 years; Male = 4, Female = 6. HD-sEMG was used to record 64 channels of sEMG using a 16 by 4 electrode array placed over the TA. The NMI of each electrode with every other electrode was calculated to form an NMI distribution for each electrode. The total NMI for each electrode (the summation of the electrode’s NMI distribution highlighted regions of high dependence in the electrode array and was observed to increase as the muscle fatigued. To summarise this increase, a function, M(k, was defined and was found to be significantly affected by fatigue and not by contraction force. The technique discussed in this study has overcome issues regarding electrode placement and was used to investigate how the dependences between sEMG signals within the same muscle change spatially during fatigue.

  11. Controlling the surface density of DNA on gold by electrically induced desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinaga, Kenji; Rant, Ulrich; Knezević, Jelena; Pringsheim, Erika; Tornow, Marc; Fujita, Shozo; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Yokoyama, Naoki

    2007-10-31

    We report on a method to control the packing density of sulfur-bound oligonucleotide layers on metal electrodes by electrical means. In a first step, a dense nucleic acid layer is deposited by self-assembly from solution; in a second step, defined fractions of DNA molecules are released from the surface by applying a series of negative voltage cycles. Systematic investigations of the influence of the applied electrode potentials and oligonucleotide length allow us to identify a sharp desorption onset at -0.65 V versus Ag/AgCl, which is independent of the DNA length. Moreover, our results clearly show the pronounced influence of competitive adsorbents in solution on the desorption behavior, which can prevent the re-adsorption of released DNA molecules, thereby enhancing the desorption efficiency. The method is fully bio-compatible and can be employed to improve the functionality of DNA layers. This is demonstrated in hybridization experiments revealing almost perfect yields for electrically "diluted" DNA layers. The proposed control method is extremely beneficial to the field of DNA-based sensors.

  12. Fluorescence properties of dansyl groups covalently bonded to the surface of oxidatively functionalized low-density polyethylene film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes-Farley, S. R.; Whitesides, G. M.

    1985-12-01

    Brief oxidation of low-density polyethylene film with chromic acid in aqueous sulfuric acid introduced carboxylic acid and ketone and/or aldehyde groups onto the surface of the film. The carboxylic acid moieties can be used to attach more complex functionality to the polymer surface. We are developing this surface-functionalized polyethylene (named polyethylene carboxylic acid, PE-CO2H, to emphasize the functional group that dominates its surface properties) as a substrate with which to study problems in organic surface chemistry--especially wetting, polymer surface reconstruction, and adhesion--using physical-organic techniques. This document describes the preparation, characterization, and fluorescence properties of derivatives of PE-CO2H in which the Dansyl (5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl) group has been covalently attached by amide links to the surface carbonyl moieties.

  13. Infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory investigation of calcite, chalk, and coccoliths-do we observe the mineral surface?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Hem, Caroline Piper; Schultz, Logan Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    broadening from macroscopic dielectric effects. We detect water adsorbed on the high surface area synthetic calcite, which permits observation of the chemistry of thin liquid films on calcite using transmission infrared spectroscopy. The combination of infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory also...... asymmetric for the coccoliths and the synthetic calcite prepared using the carbonation method. It can be very well fitted by two peaks: a narrow Lorenzian at lower frequency and a broader Gaussian at higher frequency. These two samples both have a high specific surface area. Density functional theory...

  14. The use of surface power for characterisation of structure-borne sound sources of low modal density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlrich, Mogens

    1996-01-01

    The use of the surface power methods for source characterisaiton of vibrating machinery of low modal density is investigated in this paper. It was demonstrated by Ohlrich and Larsen that this relatively simple, but very useful measurement technique for quantifying the vibratory strength of machin......The use of the surface power methods for source characterisaiton of vibrating machinery of low modal density is investigated in this paper. It was demonstrated by Ohlrich and Larsen that this relatively simple, but very useful measurement technique for quantifying the vibratory strength...

  15. Calculation of the local optical density of states in absorbing and gain media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Stefano, O; Fina, N; Savasta, S; Girlanda, R; Pieruccini, M

    2010-01-01

    The local optical density of states plays a key role in a wide range of phenomena. Near to structures displaying optical absorption or gain, the definition of the photonic local density of states needs to be revised. In this case two operative different definitions can be adopted to characterize photonic structures. The first (ρ A (r, ω)) describes the light intensity at a point r when the material system is illuminated isotropically and corresponds to what can be measured by a near-field microscope. The second (ρ B (r, ω)) gives a measure of vacuum fluctuations and coincides with ρ A (r, ω) in systems with real susceptibility. Scattering calculations in the presence of dielectric and metallic nanostructures show that these two definitions can give rather different results, the difference being proportional to the thermal emission power of the photonic structure. We present a detailed derivation of this result and numerical calculations for nanostructures displaying optical gain. In the presence of amplifying media, ρ B (r, ω) displays regions with negative photon densities, thus failing in describing a power signal. In contrast, ρ A (r, ω), positive definite, properly describes the near-field optical properties of these structures.

  16. Sociodemographic Factors, Population Density, and Bicycling for Transportation in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehme, Eileen K; Pérez, Adriana; Ranjit, Nalini; Amick, Benjamin C; Kohl, Harold W

    2016-01-01

    Transportation bicycling is a behavior with demonstrated health benefits. Population-representative studies of transportation bicycling in United States are lacking. This study examined associations between sociodemographic factors, population density, and transportation bicycling and described transportation bicyclists by trip purposes, using a US-representative sample. This cross-sectional study used 2009 National Household Travel Survey datasets. Associations among study variables were assessed using weighted multivariable logistic regression. On a typical day in 2009, 1% of Americans older than 5 years of age reported a transportation bicycling trip. Transportation cycling was inversely associated with age and directly with being male, with being white, and with population density (≥ 10,000 vs transportation. Twenty-one percent of transportation bicyclists reported trips to work, whereas 67% reported trips to social or other activities. Transportation bicycling in the United States is associated with sociodemographic characteristics and population density. Bicycles are used for a variety of trip purposes, which has implications for transportation bicycling research based on commuter data and for developing interventions to promote this behavior.

  17. Internal state distributions of molecules scattering and desorbing from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Attempts are made to interpret scattering experiments of NO molecules on Ag(111) where a (rotational) state-specific detector has been used. A model using an anisotropic potential is proposed to explain the observed incoming energy- and angle dependence. The so-called rotational rainbows are explained. It is concluded, that in this way information on intermolecular potentials and the transfer of translational to rotational energy in the dynamics of trapping and sticking of molecules on surfaces can be extracted. (G.Q.)

  18. Surface acoustic wave solid-state rotational micromotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilton, Richie J.; Langelier, Sean M.; Friend, James R.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2012-01-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are used to drive a 1 mm diameter rotor at speeds exceeding 9000 rpm and torque of nearly 5 nNm. Unlike recent high-speed SAW rotary motors, however, the present design does not require a fluid coupling layer but interestingly exploits adhesive stiction as an internal preload, a force usually undesirable at these scales; with additional preloads, smaller rotors can be propelled to 15 000 rpm. This solid-state motor has no moving parts except for the rotor and is sufficiently simple to allow integration into miniaturized drive systems for potential use in microfluidic diagnostics, optical switching and microrobotics.

  19. Chemical equilibrium model for high- Tc and heavy fermion superconductors: the density of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallio, A.; Hissa, J.; Hayrynen, T.; Braysy, V.; Sakkinen, T.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical equilibrium model is based on the idea of correlated electron pairs, which in singlet state can exist as quasimolecules in the superfluid and normal states of a superconductor. These preformed pairs are bosons which can undergo a Bose-Einstein condensation in analogy with the superfluidity of 4 He+ 3 He-mixture. The bosons (B ++ ) and the fermions (h + ) are in chemical equilibrium with respect to the reaction B ++ ↔ 2h + , at any temperature. The mean densities of bosons and fermions (quasiholes) n B (T) and n h (T) are determined from the thermodynamics of the equilibrium reaction in terms of a single function f(T). By thermodynamics the function f(T) is connected to equilibrium constant φ(T) by 1-f(T) = [1 + φ(T)] -1/2 . Using a simple power law, known to be valid near T = 0, for the chemical constant φ(T) α/t 2γ , t = T/T*, the mean density of quasiholes is given in closed form. This enables one to calculate the corresponding density of states (DOS) D(E) N s /N(0), by solving an integral equation. The NIS- tunneling conductivity near T = 0, given by D(E) compares well with the most recent experiments: D(E) ∼ E γ , for small E and a finite maximum of right size, corresponding to 'finite quasiparticle lifetime'. The corresponding SIS-tunneling conductivity is obtained from a simple convolution and is also in agreement with recent break junction experiments of Hancotte et al. The position of the maximum can be used to obtain the scaling temperature T*, which comes close to the one measured by Hall coefficient in the normal state. A simple explanation for the spingap effect in NMR is given. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  20. Au-Nano-particle Deposition on alumina surfaces for environmental application-a density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Abhijit

    2009-01-01

    Full text: It has been found that nanometer size gold particles on different oxide supports can act as catalysts, suggestions include quantum size effects, availability of low coordinated sites, and strain or combined effects of the gold particles and the oxide support. From photo dissociation spectroscopy and theory it has been inferred that the 2D / 3D structural transition occurs between five and seven atoms depending on charge state neutrals and singly positively charged ions. Here we will look into the interaction of gold particles over different sites of the aluminum -oxide surface to tune the catalytic activity of the novel material using first principle periodic calculations and compare them with the reactivity index to formulate a priori rule for metal cluster interaction. The catalytic application is aimed to CO adsorption type reactions for a greener environment. (author)

  1. Some features of excited states density matrix calculation and their pairing relations in conjugated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambiagi, M.S. de; Giambiagi, M.

    1982-01-01

    Direct PPP-type calculations of self-consistent (SC) density matrices for excited states are described and the corresponding 'thawn' molecular orbitals (MO) are discussed. Special attention is addressed to particular solutions arising in conjugated systems of a certain symmetry, and to their chemical implications. The U(2) and U(3) algebras are applied respectively to the 4-electron and 6-electron cases: a natural separation of excited states in different cases follows. A simple approach to the convergence problem for excited states is given. The complementarity relations, an alternative formulation of the pairing theorem valid for heteromolecules and non-alternant systems, allow some fruitful experimental applications. Together with the extended pairing relations shown here, they may help to rationalize general trends. (Author) [pt

  2. Organic semiconductor density of states controls the energy level alignment at electrode interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehzelt, Martin; Koch, Norbert; Heimel, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Minimizing charge carrier injection barriers and extraction losses at interfaces between organic semiconductors and metallic electrodes is critical for optimizing the performance of organic (opto-) electronic devices. Here, we implement a detailed electrostatic model, capable of reproducing the alignment between the electrode Fermi energy and the transport states in the organic semiconductor both qualitatively and quantitatively. Covering the full phenomenological range of interfacial energy level alignment regimes within a single, consistent framework and continuously connecting the limiting cases described by previously proposed models allows us to resolve conflicting views in the literature. Our results highlight the density of states in the organic semiconductor as a key factor. Its shape and, in particular, the energy distribution of electronic states tailing into the fundamental gap is found to determine both the minimum value of practically achievable injection barriers as well as their spatial profile, ranging from abrupt interface dipoles to extended band-bending regions. PMID:24938867

  3. Terrestrial Ecosystems - Land Surface Forms of the Conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Jill J.; Sayre, Roger G.; Comer, Patrick; Warner, Harumi

    2009-01-01

    As part of an effort to map terrestrial ecosystems, the U.S. Geological Survey has generated land surface form classes to be used in creating maps depicting standardized, terrestrial ecosystem models for the conterminous United States, using an ecosystems classification developed by NatureServe . A biophysical stratification approach, developed for South America and now being implemented globally, was used to model the ecosystem distributions. Since land surface forms strongly influence the differentiation and distribution of terrestrial ecosystems, they are one of the key input layers in this biophysical stratification. After extensive investigation into various land surface form mapping methodologies, the decision was made to use the methodology developed by the Missouri Resource Assessment Partnership (MoRAP). MoRAP made modifications to Hammond's land surface form classification, which allowed the use of 30-meter source data and a 1-km2 window for analyzing the data cell and its surrounding cells (neighborhood analysis). While Hammond's methodology was based on three topographic variables, slope, local relief, and profile type, MoRAP's methodology uses only slope and local relief. Using the MoRAP method, slope is classified as gently sloping when more than 50 percent of the area in a 1-km2 neighborhood has slope less than 8 percent, otherwise the area is considered moderately sloping. Local relief, which is the difference between the maximum and minimum elevation in a neighborhood, is classified into five groups: 0-15 m, 16-30 m, 31-90 m, 91-150 m, and >150 m. The land surface form classes are derived by combining slope and local relief to create eight landform classes: flat plains (gently sloping and local relief = 90 m), low hills (not gently sloping and local relief = 150 m). However, in the USGS application of the MoRAP methodology, an additional local relief group was used (> 400 m) to capture additional local topographic variation. As a result, low

  4. KKR-CPA calculations of density of states and soft X-ray emission from disordered Li-Mg alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, S.S.; Singru, R.M.; Prasad, R.

    1994-01-01

    The density of states (DOS) and soft X-ray spectra from disordered Li 1-x Mg x alloys have been calculated by using the charge self-consistent KKR-CPA method. We find that the DOS at the Fermi energy (E F ) shows an interesting behaviour as a function of x; it first increases in the range x=0.0 to 0.14, then shows a flat behaviour in the range x approx. 0.14 to 0.20 and finally decreases smoothly from x=0.20 to 0.60. We show that this behaviour of the DOS is related to the development of a neck in the Fermi surface and its smearing due to disorder scattering. Theoretical results for the soft X-ray emission spectra are compared with experimental results and are found to be in good accord. (author). 14 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  5. Quantitative measurements of ground state atomic oxygen in atmospheric pressure surface micro-discharge array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Kong, M. G.; Britun, N.; Snyders, R.; Leys, C.; Nikiforov, A.

    2017-06-01

    The generation of atomic oxygen in an array of surface micro-discharge, working in atmospheric pressure He/O2 or Ar/O2 mixtures, is investigated. The absolute atomic oxygen density and its temporal and spatial dynamics are studied by means of two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence. A high density of atomic oxygen is detected in the He/O2 mixture with up to 10% O2 content in the feed gas, whereas the atomic oxygen concentration in the Ar/O2 mixture stays below the detection limit of 1013 cm-3. The measured O density near the electrode under the optimal conditions in He/1.75% O2 gas is 4.26  ×  1015 cm-3. The existence of the ground state O (2p 4 3 P) species has been proven in the discharge at a distance up to 12 mm away from the electrodes. Dissociative reactions of the singlet O2 with O3 and deep vacuum ultraviolet radiation, including the radiation of excimer \\text{He}2\\ast , are proposed to be responsible for O (2p 4 3 P) production in the far afterglow. A capability of the surface micro-discharge array delivering atomic oxygen to long distances over a large area is considered very interesting for various biomedical applications.

  6. Areal density evolution of isolated surface perturbations at the onset of x-ray ablation Richtmyer-Meshkov growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, E. N.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Braun, D.; Sorce, C.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 95281 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Isolated defects on inertial confinement fusion ignition capsules are a concern as defects taller than a few hundred nanometers are calculated to form jets of high-Z material, which enter the main fuel. If this mixing of high-Z material is not controlled, a serious degradation in thermonuclear burn can occur. A path towards controlling the growth of defects on the outer surface of plastic capsules is currently under development, but requires accurate predictions of defect evolution driven by the early time ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) effect. The chief uncertainty is the Equation of State (EOS) for polystyrene and its effect on ablative RM. We report on measurements of the growth of isolated defects made at the onset of ablative RM oscillations driven by x-ray ablation to differentiate between EOS models used in design calculations. Experiments at the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] used on-axis area backlighting radiography and x-ray framing cameras to determine bump areal densities at discrete times. Bumps 12 and 14 {mu}m tall and 33 {mu}m FWHM were found to grow to 2 x their initial areal density by 3 ns after the start of the drive laser pulse. Shock speed measurements established target conditions resulting from the ablation process. The tabular LEOS 5310 [D. Young and E. Corey, J. Appl. Phys. 78, 3748 (1995)] model shows good agreement with measured shock speeds and bump growth whereas the QEOS model [R. More et al., Phys. Fluids 31, 3059 (1988)] over predicts shock speed and under predicts bump growth by 6x. Differences in ablative RM behavior were also found for x-ray ablation compared to laser ablation, which result in an overestimation (or non-existence) of oscillation frequency for x-ray ablation as predicted by theory.

  7. Ultra-High Density Holographic Memory Module with Solid-State Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Vladimir B.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's terrestrial. space, and deep-space missions require technology that allows storing. retrieving, and processing a large volume of information. Holographic memory offers high-density data storage with parallel access and high throughput. Several methods exist for data multiplexing based on the fundamental principles of volume hologram selectivity. We recently demonstrated that a spatial (amplitude-phase) encoding of the reference wave (SERW) looks promising as a way to increase the storage density. The SERW hologram offers a method other than traditional methods of selectivity, such as spatial de-correlation between recorded and reconstruction fields, In this report we present the experimental results of the SERW-hologram memory module with solid-state architecture, which is of particular interest for space operations.

  8. Low trap-state density and long carrier diffusion in organolead trihalide perovskite single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Dong

    2015-01-29

    The fundamental properties and ultimate performance limits of organolead trihalide MAPbX3(MA = CH3NH3 +; X = Br- or I- ) perovskites remain obscured by extensive disorder in polycrystalline MAPbX3 films. We report an antisolvent vapor-assisted crystallization approach that enables us to create sizable crack-free MAPbX3 single crystals with volumes exceeding 100 cubic millimeters. These large single crystals enabled a detailed characterization of their optical and charge transport characteristics.We observed exceptionally low trap-state densities on the order of 109 to 1010 per cubic centimeter in MAPbX3 single crystals (comparable to the best photovoltaic-quality silicon) and charge carrier diffusion lengths exceeding 10 micrometers. These results were validated with density functional theory calculations.

  9. Equation-of-state for fluids at high densities-hydrogen isotope measurements and thermodynamic derivations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebenberg, D.H.; Mills, R.L.; Bronson, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes play an important role in energy technologies, in particular, the compression to high densities for initiation of controlled thermonuclear fusion energy. At high densities the properties of the compressed hydrogen isotopes depart drastically from ideal thermodynamic predictions. The measurement of accurate data including the author's own recent measurements of n-H 2 and n-D 2 in the range 75 to 300 K and 0.2 to 2.0 GPa (2 to 20 kbar) is reviewed. An equation-of-state of the Benedict type is fit to these data with a double-process least-squares computer program. The results are reviewed and compared with existing data and with a variety of theoretical work reported for fluid hydrogens. A new heuristic correlation is presented for simplicity in predicting volumes and sound velocity at high pressures. 9 figures, 1 table

  10. Low trap-state density and long carrier diffusion in organolead trihalide perovskite single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Dong; Adinolfi, Valerio; Comin, Riccardo; Yuan, Mingjian; Alarousu, Erkki; Buin, Andrei K.; Chen, Yin; Hoogland, Sjoerd H.; Rothenberger, Alexander; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Losovyj, Yaroslav B.; Zhang, Xin; Dowben, Peter A.; Mohammed, Omar F.; Sargent, E. H.; Bakr, Osman

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental properties and ultimate performance limits of organolead trihalide MAPbX3(MA = CH3NH3 +; X = Br- or I- ) perovskites remain obscured by extensive disorder in polycrystalline MAPbX3 films. We report an antisolvent vapor-assisted crystallization approach that enables us to create sizable crack-free MAPbX3 single crystals with volumes exceeding 100 cubic millimeters. These large single crystals enabled a detailed characterization of their optical and charge transport characteristics.We observed exceptionally low trap-state densities on the order of 109 to 1010 per cubic centimeter in MAPbX3 single crystals (comparable to the best photovoltaic-quality silicon) and charge carrier diffusion lengths exceeding 10 micrometers. These results were validated with density functional theory calculations.

  11. Angular studies of the magnetoresistance in the density wave state of the quasi-two-dimensional purple bronze KMo6O17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyot, H.; Dumas, J.; Kartsovnik, M. V.; Marcus, J.; Schlenker, C.; Sheikin, I.; Vignolles, D.

    2007-07-01

    The purple molybdenum bronze KMo6O17 is a quasi-two-dimensional compound which shows a Peierls transition towards a commensurate metallic charge density wave (CDW) state. High magnetic field measurements have revealed several transitions at low temperature and have provided an unusual phase diagram “temperature-magnetic field”. Angular studies of the interlayer magnetoresistance are now reported. The results suggest that the orbital coupling of the magnetic field to the CDW is the most likely mechanism for the field induced transitions. The angular dependence of the magnetoresistance is discussed on the basis of a warped quasi-cylindrical Fermi surface and provides information on the geometry of the Fermi surface in the low temperature density wave state.

  12. Variational minimization of atomic and molecular ground-state energies via the two-particle reduced density matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazziotti, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Atomic and molecular ground-state energies are variationally determined by constraining the two-particle reduced density matrix (2-RDM) to satisfy positivity conditions. Because each positivity condition corresponds to correcting the ground-state energies for a class of Hamiltonians with two-particle interactions, these conditions collectively provide a new approach to many-body theory that, unlike perturbation theory, can capture significantly correlated phenomena including the multireference effects of potential-energy surfaces. The D, Q, and G conditions for the 2-RDM are extended through generalized lifting operators inspired from the formal solution of N-representability. These lifted conditions agree with the hierarchy of positivity conditions presented by Mazziotti and Erdahl [Phys. Rev. A 63, 042113 (2001)]. The connection between positivity and the formal solution explains how constraining higher RDMs to be positive semidefinite improves the N representability of the 2-RDM and suggests using pieces of higher positivity conditions that computationally scale like the D condition. With the D, Q, and G conditions as well as pieces of higher positivity the electronic energies for Be, LiH, H 2 O, and BH are computed through a primal-dual interior-point algorithm for positive semidefinite programming. The variational method produces potential-energy surfaces that are highly accurate even far from the equilibrium geometry where single-reference perturbation-based methods often fail to produce realistic energies

  13. Adsorption of selenium atoms at the Si(1 1 1)-7 x 7 surface: A combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional theory studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.Q.; Zhou Yinghui; Wu Qihui; Pakes, C.I.; Zhu Zizhong

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A selenium atom, which adsorbs at site close to a Si adatom and bonds with this Si adatom and one of its backbonding Si atoms on the Si(1 1 1)-7 x 7 surface, will break the Si-Si bond and consequently disorder the Si reconstruction surface. Research highlights: → STM and DFT are used to study the adsorption properties of Se atoms on a Si surface. → The adsorption site of Se atom on the Si surface has been identified. → The electronic effect of Se atom on the adsorbed Si surface has been ivestigaed. → The Se atom weakens the bond between two Si atom bonding with the Se atom. - Abstract: The adsorption of selenium (Se) atoms at the Si(1 1 1)-7 x 7 surface has been investigated using both scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory calculations. A single Se atom prefers to adsorb at sites close to a Si adatom and bonds with this Si adatom and one of its backbonding Si atoms. The adsorption sites are referred to as A*-type sites in this article. The density of the conduction band (empty states) of the Si adatom increases as a result of the adsorption of a Se atom, which causes the Si adatom to become brighter in the empty state STM images. At the same time, the adsorption of the Se atom weakens the bonding between the Si adatom and its backbonding Si atom due to the charge transfer from them to the Se atom, and consequently destructs the ordered Si(1 1 1)-7 x 7 surface with increasing Se coverage.

  14. Excited State Charge Transfer reaction with dual emission from 5-(4-dimethylamino-phenyl)-penta-2,4-dienenitrile: Spectral measurement and theoretical density functional theory calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Sankar; Dalapati, Sasanka; Ghosh, Shalini; Kar, Samiran; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2011-07-01

    The excited state intramolecular charge transfer process in donor-chromophore-acceptor system 5-(4-dimethylamino-phenyl)-penta-2,4-dienenitrile (DMAPPDN) has been investigated by steady state absorption and emission spectroscopy in combination with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. This flexible donor acceptor molecule DMAPPDN shows dual fluorescence corresponding to emission from locally excited and charge transfer state in polar solvent. Large solvatochromic emission shift, effect of variation of pH and HOMO-LUMO molecular orbital pictures support excited state intramolecular charge transfer process. The experimental findings have been correlated with the calculated structure and potential energy surfaces based on the Twisted Intramolecular Charge Transfer (TICT) model obtained at DFT level using B3LYP functional and 6-31+G( d, p) basis set. The theoretical potential energy surfaces for the excited states have been generated in vacuo and acetonitrile solvent using Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) and Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Polarized Continuum Model (TDDFT-PCM) method, respectively. All the theoretical results show well agreement with the experimental observations.

  15. Advanced density profile reflectometry; the state-of-the-art and measurement prospects for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, E. J.

    2006-10-01

    Dramatic progress in millimeter-wave technology has allowed the realization of a key goal for ITER diagnostics, the routine measurement of the plasma density profile from millimeter-wave radar (reflectometry) measurements. In reflectometry, the measured round-trip group delay of a probe beam reflected from a plasma cutoff is used to infer the density distribution in the plasma. Reflectometer systems implemented by UCLA on a number of devices employ frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FM-CW), ultrawide-bandwidth, high-resolution radar systems. One such system on DIII-D has routinely demonstrated measurements of the density profile over a range of electron density of 0-6.4x10^19,m-3, with ˜25 μs time and ˜4 mm radial resolution, meeting key ITER requirements. This progress in performance was made possible by multiple advances in the areas of millimeter-wave technology, novel measurement techniques, and improved understanding, including: (i) fast sweep, solid-state, wide bandwidth sources and power amplifiers, (ii) dual polarization measurements to expand the density range, (iii) adaptive radar-based data analysis with parallel processing on a Unix cluster, (iv) high memory depth data acquisition, and (v) advances in full wave code modeling. The benefits of advanced system performance will be illustrated using measurements from a wide range of phenomena, including ELM and fast-ion driven mode dynamics, L-H transition studies and plasma-wall interaction. The measurement capabilities demonstrated by these systems provide a design basis for the development of the main ITER profile reflectometer system. This talk will explore the extent to which these reflectometer system designs, results and experience can be translated to ITER, and will identify what new studies and experimental tests are essential.

  16. STIR Proposal For Research Area 2.1.2 Surface Energy Balance: Transient Soil Density Impacts Land Surface Characteristics and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-22

    al., 2008; Logsdon, 2012; Liu et al., 2014). Freeze-thaw processes alter surface density and arrangement seasonally (Staricka and Benoit , 1995... Ma , L., L.R. Ahuja, B.T. Nolan, R.W. Malone, T.J. Trout, and Z. Qi. 2012. Root zone water quality model (RZWQM2): model use, calibration, and

  17. Extraction of the defect density of states in microcrystalline silicon from experimental results and simulation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibermacine, T.; Ledra, M.; Ouhabab, N.; Merazga, A.

    2015-01-01

    The constant photocurrent method in the ac-mode (ac-CPM) is used to determine the defect density of states (DOS) in hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) prepared by very high frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF-PECVD). The absorption coefficient spectrum (ac-α(hv)), is measured under ac-CPM conditions at 60 Hz. The measured ac-α(hv) is converted by the CPM spectroscopy into a DOS distribution covering a portion in the lower energy range of occupied states. We have found that the density of valence band-tail states falls exponentially towards the gap with a typical band-tail width of 63 meV. Independently, computer simulations of the ac-CPM are developed using a DOS model that is consistent with the measured ac-α(hv) in the present work and a previously measured transient photocurrent (TPC) for the same material. The DOS distribution model suggested by the measurements in the lower and in the upper part of the energy-gap, as well as by the numerical modelling in the middle part of the energy-gap, coincide reasonably well with the real DOS distribution in hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon because the computed ac-α(hv) is found to agree satisfactorily with the measured ac-α(hv). (paper)

  18. Adsorption and ring-opening of lactide on the chiral metal surface Pt(321){sup S} studied by density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, J.-H.; Kosov, D. S. [Department of Physics, Campus Plaine - CP 231, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-01-28

    We study the adsorption and ring-opening of lactide on the naturally chiral metal surface Pt(321){sup S}. Lactide is a precursor for polylactic acid ring-opening polymerization, and Pt is a well known catalyst surface. We study, here, the energetics of the ring-opening of lactide on a surface that has a high density of kink atoms. These sites are expected to be present on a realistic Pt surface and show enhanced catalytic activity. The use of a naturally chiral surface also enables us to study potential chiral selectivity effects of the reaction at the same time. Using density functional theory with a functional that includes the van der Waals forces in a first-principles manner, we find modest adsorption energies of around 1.4 eV for the pristine molecule and different ring-opened states. The energy barrier to be overcome in the ring-opening reaction is found to be very small at 0.32 eV and 0.30 eV for LL- and its chiral partner DD-lactide, respectively. These energies are much smaller than the activation energy for a dehydrogenation reaction of 0.78 eV. Our results thus indicate that (a) ring-opening reactions of lactide on Pt(321) can be expected already at very low temperatures, and Pt might be a very effective catalyst for this reaction; (b) the ring-opening reaction rate shows noticeable enantioselectivity.

  19. Role of the oxidation state of cerium on the ceria surfaces for silicate adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jihoon [WCD Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Jinok [WCD Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Clean/CMP Technology Team, Memory, Samsung Electronics, Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joo Hyun; Lee, Kangchun [WCD Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Junha [WCD Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Materials R& D Center, K.C.Tech, Anseong (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Heesung [WCD Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Dong Kee, E-mail: vitalis@mju.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Myongji University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Ungyu, E-mail: upaik@hanyang.ac.kr [WCD Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • We investigated the role of Ce oxidation state (Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+}) on the CeO{sub 2} surfaces for the silicate adsorption. • As the Ce{sup 3+} concentration increased from 19.3 to 27.6%, the surface density of −OH group increased from 0.34 to 0.72 OH/nm{sup 2}. • The Freundlich constant for the relative adsorption capacity (K{sub F}) and adsorption intensity (1/n) indicated that CeO{sub 2} NPs with high Ce{sup 3+} concentration show higher adsorption affinity with silicate ions. - Abstract: In this study, we have investigated the role of the Ce oxidation state (Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+}) on the CeO{sub 2} surfaces for silicate adsorption. In aqueous medium, the Ce{sup 3+} sites lead to the formation of −OH groups at the CeO{sub 2} surface through H{sub 2}O dissociation. Silicate ions can adsorb onto the CeO{sub 2} surface through interaction with the −OH groups (−Ce−OH− + −Si−O{sup −} ↔ −Ce−O−Si− + OH{sup −}). As the Ce{sup 3+} concentration increased from 19.3 to 27.6%, the surface density of −OH group increased from 0.34 to 0.72 OH/nm{sup 2}. To evaluate the adsorption behaviors of silicate ions onto CeO{sub 2} NPs, we carried out an adsorption isothermal analysis, and the adsorption isotherm data followed the Freundlich model. The Freundlich constant for the relative adsorption capacity (K{sub F}) and adsorption intensity (1/n) indicated that CeO{sub 2} NPs with high Ce{sup 3+} concentration show higher adsorption affinity with silicate ions. As a result, we have demonstrated that the Ce oxidation state (Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+}) on the CeO{sub 2} surface can have a significant influence on the silicate adsorption.

  20. Insertion torques influenced by bone density and surface roughness of HA–TiO{sub 2} coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, T.; Chen, Y.; Nie, X., E-mail: xnie@uwindsor.ca

    2013-12-31

    Bio-ceramic TiO{sub 2} coatings containing calcium (Ca) and phosphorous (P) were deposited onto Ti–6Al–4V alloy screws using plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) processes in an alkaline electrolyte with hydroxyapatite (HA) suspension. Coating on each screw had different surface roughness and morphology. Insertion torque (IT) of the coated screws in low (10 pcf, pounds per cubic feet), medium–high (20 pcf), and high (40 pcf) density of artificial bones was measured in comparison with that of the uncoated and sandblasted screws having similar surface roughness. Higher insertion torques and final seating torques were obtained in the coated screws which may result in less micro-movement during the primary implantation stage and thus lower the risk of implant failure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis indicated that all coatings still adhesively remained on the screw surfaces after inserted into the bones with different densities. The relationship between coefficient of friction and surface roughness was also addressed to better understand the results of insertion torque. It was found that a lower density bone (similar to aged bone) would need a surface-rougher coated screw to achieve a high torque while a high density bone can have a wide range of selections for surface roughness of the screw. - Highlights: • The insertion torque of PEO-coated screws is higher than machined and sandblasting implants. • Lower density bone needs a rougher coated implant to increase the insertion torque. • The composite HA–TiO{sub 2} coating could benefit dental implants in both primary and secondary stability stages.

  1. Electronic excited states as a probe of surface adsorbate structure and dynamics in liquid xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, E.S.

    1992-08-01

    A combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and a simple dipole-dipole interaction model is presented as a new technique for determining adsorbate geometries on surfaces. The polarization dependence of SHG is used to define possible geometries of the adsorbate about the surface normal. Absorption band shifts using geometry constraints imposed by SHG data are derived for a dimer constructed from two arbitrarily placed monomers on the surface using the dipole-dipole interaction potential. These formulae can be used to determine the orientation of the two monomers relative to each other. A simplified version of this formalism is used to interpret absorption band shifts for rhodamine B adsorbed on fused silica. A brief history of the exciton is given with particular detail to Xe. Data are presented for transient absorption at RT in liquid xenon on the picosecond time scale. These are observations of both tunneling through the barrier that separates the free and trapped exciton states and the subsequent trapping of the exciton. In high densities both of these processes are found to occur within 2 to 6 picoseconds in agreement with theories of Kmiecik and Schreiber and of Martin. A threshold density is observed that separates relaxation via single binary collisions and relaxation that proceeds via Martin's resonant energy transfer hopping mechanism.

  2. Electronic excited states as a probe of surface adsorbate structure and dynamics in liquid xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Eric Scott [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-08-01

    A combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and a simple dipole-dipole interaction model is presented as a new technique for determining adsorbate geometries on surfaces. The polarization dependence of SHG is used to define possible geometries of the adsorbate about the surface normal. Absorption band shifts using geometry constraints imposed by SHG data are derived for a dimer constructed from two arbitrarily placed monomers on the surface using the dipole-dipole interaction potential. These formulae can be used to determine the orientation of the two monomers relative to each other. A simplified version of this formalism is used to interpret absorption band shifts for rhodamine B adsorbed on fused silica. A brief history of the exciton is given with particular detail to Xe. Data are presented for transient absorption at RT in liquid xenon on the picosecond time scale. These are observations of both tunneling through the barrier that separates the free and trapped exciton states and the subsequent trapping of the exciton. In high densities both of these processes are found to occur within 2 to 6 picoseconds in agreement with theories of Kmiecik and Schreiber and of Martin. A threshold density is observed that separates relaxation via single binary collisions and relaxation that proceeds via Martin`s resonant energy transfer hopping mechanism.

  3. Interface state density evaluation of high quality hetero-epitaxial 3C–SiC(0 0 1) for high-power MOSFET applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzalone, R., E-mail: ruggero.anzalone@imm.cnr.it; Privitera, S.; Camarda, M.; Alberti, A.; Mannino, G.; Fiorenza, P.; Di Franco, S.; La Via, F.

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Figure shows the normalized capacitance (C/C{sub OX}) versus voltage (V) for the MOS capacitors on 3 μm, 7 μm thick 3C–SiC films and silicon (as reference), respectively. The shift of the curve respect to the reference is due to the presence of fixed and/or trapped charge in the oxide and interface trapped charge, due to the presence of interface states of density D{sub it}, located at the semiconductor/oxide interface. - Highlights: • We analyzed the flat-band voltage shift for different semiconductor epi-thickness. • The interface state density as a function of epi-defects was evaluated. • We observed the relationship between XRD and C–V results. • Epitaxial thickness influence on interface state density was evaluated. - Abstract: The effects of the crystal quality and surface morphology on the electrical properties of MOS capacitors have been studied in devices manufactured on 3C–SiC epitaxial layers grown on silicon (1 0 0) substrate. The interface state density, which represents one of the most important parameters, has been determined through capacitance measurements. A cross-correlation between high resolution X-ray diffraction, AFM analysis and electrical conductance measurements has allowed to determine the relationship between the crystalline quality and the interface state density. A decrease of the interface state density down to about 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} was observed with improving the crystalline quality.

  4. Numerical generalized vibration density of states evaluation for inelastic neutron scattering in solid matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kazmianec, V; Aranghel, D

    2002-01-01

    A computational method for improved evaluation of the generalized vibration density of states (GVDS) is proposed. It is based on Fast Fourier Transform (FPT) technique and gives the possibility for more precise analyses of the neutron double differential scattering cross section. The method was applied to zirconium hydride investigation. The results were presented for ZrH sub 1 sub . sub 6 U sub 0 sub . sub 3 sub 2 sample at various temperatures on time-of-flight (TOF) Spectrometry at IBR-2 reactor of JINR-Dubna and were compared to GVDS values obtained by traditional single-phonon approximation method

  5. Towards novel organic high-Tc superconductors: Data mining using density of states similarity search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geilhufe, R. Matthias; Borysov, Stanislav S.; Kalpakchi, Dmytro; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2018-02-01

    Identifying novel functional materials with desired key properties is an important part of bridging the gap between fundamental research and technological advancement. In this context, high-throughput calculations combined with data-mining techniques highly accelerated this process in different areas of research during the past years. The strength of a data-driven approach for materials prediction lies in narrowing down the search space of thousands of materials to a subset of prospective candidates. Recently, the open-access organic materials database OMDB was released providing electronic structure data for thousands of previously synthesized three-dimensional organic crystals. Based on the OMDB, we report about the implementation of a novel density of states similarity search tool which is capable of retrieving materials with similar density of states to a reference material. The tool is based on the approximate nearest neighbor algorithm as implemented in the ANNOY library and can be applied via the OMDB web interface. The approach presented here is wide ranging and can be applied to various problems where the density of states is responsible for certain key properties of a material. As the first application, we report about materials exhibiting electronic structure similarities to the aromatic hydrocarbon p-terphenyl which was recently discussed as a potential organic high-temperature superconductor exhibiting a transition temperature in the order of 120 K under strong potassium doping. Although the mechanism driving the remarkable transition temperature remains under debate, we argue that the density of states, reflecting the electronic structure of a material, might serve as a crucial ingredient for the observed high Tc. To provide candidates which might exhibit comparable properties, we present 15 purely organic materials with similar features to p-terphenyl within the electronic structure, which also tend to have structural similarities with p

  6. Excess vibrational density of states and the brittle to ductile transition in crystalline and amorphous solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Jeetu S; Mondal, Chandana; Sengupta, Surajit; Karmakar, Smarajit

    2016-01-28

    The conditions which determine whether a material behaves in a brittle or ductile fashion on mechanical loading are still elusive and comprise a topic of active research among materials physicists and engineers. In this study, we present the results of in silico mechanical deformation experiments from two very different model solids in two and three dimensions. The first consists of particles interacting with isotropic potentials and the other has strongly direction dependent interactions. We show that in both cases, the excess vibrational density of states is one of the fundamental quantities which characterizes the ductility of the material. Our results can be checked using careful experiments on colloidal solids.

  7. Angular dependences of the luminescence and density of photon states in a chiral liquid crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umanskii, B A; Blinov, L M; Palto, S P [A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federaion (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-30

    Luminescence spectra of a laser dye-doped chiral liquid crystal have been studied in a wide range of angles (up to 60°) to the axis of its helical structure using a semicylindrical quartz prism, which made it possible to observe the shift and evolution of the photonic band gap in response to changes in angle. Using measured spectra and numerical simulation, we calculated the spectral distributions of the density of photon states in such a cholesteric crystal for polarised and unpolarised light, which characterise its structure as that of a chiral one-dimensional photonic crystal. (optics of liquid crystals)

  8. Density of states controls Anderson localization in disordered photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Fernández, David; Smolka, Stephan; Stobbe, Søren

    2010-01-01

    We prove Anderson localization in a disordered photonic crystal waveguide by measuring the ensemble-averaged extinction mean-free path, ℓe, which is controlled by the dispersion in the photon density of states (DOS) of the photonic crystal waveguide. Except for the very low DOS case, where out......-of-plane losses are non-negligible, ℓe can be approximated to be the localization length ξ. The extinction mean-free path shows a fivefold variation between the low- and the high-DOS regime, and it becomes shorter than the sample length thus giving rise to strongly confined modes. The dispersive behavior of ℓe...

  9. STM imaging of electronic waves on the surface of Bi2Te3: topologically protected surface states and hexagonal warping effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alpichshev, Zhanybek; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Analytis, J.G.; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Chen, Y.L.; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Shen, Z.X.; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Fang, A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Kapitulnik, A.; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2010-06-02

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy studies on high-quality Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} crystals exhibit perfect correspondence to ARPES data, hence enabling identification of different regimes measured in the local density of states (LDOS). Oscillations of LDOS near a step are analyzed. Within the main part of the surface band oscillations are strongly damped, supporting the hypothesis of topological protec- tion. At higher energies, as the surface band becomes concave, oscillations appear which disperse with a particular wave-vector that may result from an unconventional hexagonal warping term.

  10. Fasciculations and their F-response revisited: High-density surface EMG in ALS and benign fasciculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleine, B.U.; Boekestein, W.A.; Arts, I.M.; Zwarts, M.J.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Stegeman, D.F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the prevalence of fasciculation potentials (FPs) with F-responses between patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and patients with benign fasciculations. Methods: In seven patients with ALS and seven patients with benign fasciculations, high-density surface EMG was

  11. Motor unit properties of biceps brachii in chronic stroke patients assessed with high-density surface EMG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, L.A.C.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate motor unit (MU) characteristics of the biceps brachii in post-stroke patients, using high-density surface electromyography (sEMG). Eighteen chronic hemiparetic stroke patients took part. The Fugl-Meyer score for the upper extremity was assessed. Subjects

  12. A Method for Absolute Determination of the Surface Areal Density of Functional Groups in Organic Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Hyegeun; Son, Jin Gyeong; Kim, Jeong Won; Yu, Hyunung; Lee, Tae Geol; Moon, Dae Won [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    To develop a methodology for absolute determination of the surface areal density of functional groups on organic and bio thin films, medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) spectroscopy was utilized to provide references for calibration of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) or Fourier transformation-infrared (FT-IR) intensities. By using the MEIS, XPS, and FT-IR techniques, we were able to analyze the organic thin film of a Ru dye compound (C{sub 58}H{sub 86}O{sub 8}N{sub 8}S{sub 2}Ru), which consists of one Ru atom and various stoichiometric functional groups. From the MEIS analysis, the absolute surface areal density of Ru atoms (or Ru dye molecules) was determined. The surface areal densities of stoichiometric functional groups in the Ru dye compound were used as references for the calibration of XPS and FT-IR intensities for each functional group. The complementary use of MEIS, XPS, and FT-IR to determine the absolute surface areal density of functional groups on organic and bio thin films will be useful for more reliable development of applications based on organic thin films in areas such as flexible displays, solar cells, organic sensors, biomaterials, and biochips.

  13. Hydrodeoxygenation of Phenol to Benzene and Cyclohexane on Rh(111) and Rh(211) Surfaces: Insights from Density Functional Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Pintos, Delfina; Voss, Johannes; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2016-01-01

    Herein we describe the C-O cleavage of phenol and cyclohexanol over Rh (111) and Rh (211) surfaces using density functional theory calculations. Our analysis is complemented by a microkinetic model of the reactions, which indicates that the C-O bond cleavage of cyclohexanol is easier than that of...

  14. Catalyst-Free Conjugation and In Situ Quantification of Nanoparticle Ligand Surface Density Using Fluorogenic Cu-Free Click Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Sun, Honghao; Berg, Rolf Henrik

    2011-01-01

    A highly efficient method for functionalizing nanoparticles and directly quantifying conjugation efficiency and ligand surface density has been developed. Attachment of 3-azido-modifed RGD-peptides to PEGylated liposomes was achieved by using Cu-free click conditions. Upon coupling a fluorophore ...

  15. Effects of post heat-treatment on surface characteristics and adhesive bonding performance of medium density fiberboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir Ayrilimis; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2009-01-01

    A series of commercially manufactured medium density fiberboard (MDF) panels were exposed to a post-manufacture heat-treatment at various temperatures and durations using a hot press and just enough pressure to ensure firm contact between the panel and the press platens. Post-manufacture heat-treatment improved surface roughness of the exterior MDF panels. Panels...

  16. Density, viscosity, and surface tension of synthesis grade imidazolium,pyridinium, and pyrrolidinium based room temperature ionic liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galan Sanchez, L.M.; Espel, J.R.; Onink, S.A.F.; Meindersma, G.W.; Haan, de A.B.

    2009-01-01

    Density, viscosity, and surface tension data sets of 13 ionic liquids formed by imidazolium, pyridinium, or pyrrolidinium cations paired with dicyanamide (DCA), tetrafluoroborate (BF4¯), thiocyanate (SCN¯),methylsulfate (MeSO4¯), and trifluoroacetate (TFA) anions are reported. The properties were

  17. Prediction of viscosities and surface tensions of fuels using a new corresponding states model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queimada, A.J.; Rolo, L.I.; Caco, A.I.

    2006-01-01

    While some properties of diesels are cheap, easy and fast to measure, such as densities, others such as surface tensions and viscosities are expensive and time consuming. A new approach that uses some basic information such as densities to predict viscosities and surface tensions is here proposed......) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  18. Energy spectrum and density of states for a graphene quantum dot in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern Horing, Norman J; Liu, S Y

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we determine the spectrum and density of states of a graphene quantum dot in a normal quantizing magnetic field. To accomplish this, we employ the retarded Green function for a magnetized, infinite-sheet graphene layer to describe the dynamics of a tightly confined graphene quantum dot subject to Landau quantization. Considering a δ (2) (r) potential well that supports just one subband state in the well in the absence of a magnetic field, the effect of Landau quantization is to 'splinter' this single energy level into a proliferation of many Landau-quantized states within the well. Treating the graphene sheet and dot as a closed system subject to a fully Hermitian Hamiltonian (including boundary conditions), there is no indication of decay of the Landau-quantized graphene dot states into the quantized states of the host graphene sheet for 'tight' confinement by the δ (2) (r) potential well, notwithstanding extension of the dot Green function (and eigenfunctions) outside the δ (2) (r) potential well.

  19. Molecularly Engineered Azobenzene Derivatives for High Energy Density Solid-State Solar Thermal Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eugene N; Zhitomirsky, David; Han, Grace G D; Liu, Yun; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2017-03-15

    Solar thermal fuels (STFs) harvest and store solar energy in a closed cycle system through conformational change of molecules and can release the energy in the form of heat on demand. With the aim of developing tunable and optimized STFs for solid-state applications, we designed three azobenzene derivatives functionalized with bulky aromatic groups (phenyl, biphenyl, and tert-butyl phenyl groups). In contrast to pristine azobenzene, which crystallizes and makes nonuniform films, the bulky azobenzene derivatives formed uniform amorphous films that can be charged and discharged with light and heat for many cycles. Thermal stability of the films, a critical metric for thermally triggerable STFs, was greatly increased by the bulky functionalization (up to 180 °C), and we were able to achieve record high energy density of 135 J/g for solid-state STFs, over a 30% improvement compared to previous solid-state reports. Furthermore, the chargeability in the solid state was improved, up to 80% charged from 40% charged in previous solid-state reports. Our results point toward molecular engineering as an effective method to increase energy storage in STFs, improve chargeability, and improve the thermal stability of the thin film.

  20. Broadband enhancement of local density of states using silicon-compatible hyperbolic metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu; Inampudi, Sandeep; Capretti, Antonio [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Photonics Center, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Sugimoto, Hiroshi [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Photonics Center, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Fujii, Minoru [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Dal Negro, Luca, E-mail: dalnegro@bu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Photonics Center, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University, 15 Saint Mary' s Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Light emitting silicon quantum dots by colloidal synthesis were uniformly spin-coated into a 20 nm-thick film and deposited atop a hyperbolic metamaterial of alternating TiN and SiO{sub 2} sub-wavelength layers. Using steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy as a function of the emission wavelength in partnership with rigorous electromagnetic modeling of dipolar emission, we demonstrate enhanced Local Density of States and coupling to high-k modes in a broad spectral range. These findings provide an alternative approach for the engineering of novel Si-compatible broadband sources that leverage the control of radiative transitions in hyperbolic metamaterials and the flexibility of the widespread Si platform.