WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface stable layer

  1. Stable water layers on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ying-Jhan; Tai, Lin-Ai; Chen, Hung-Jen; Chang, Pin; Yang, Chung-Shi; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2016-02-17

    Liquid layers adhered to solid surfaces and that are in equilibrium with the vapor phase are common in printing, coating, and washing processes as well as in alveoli in lungs and in stomata in leaves. For such a liquid layer in equilibrium with the vapor it faces, it has been generally believed that, aside from liquid lumps, only a very thin layer of the liquid, i.e., with a thickness of only a few nanometers, is held onto the surface of the solid, and that this adhesion is due to van der Waals forces. A similar layer of water can remain on the surface of a wall of a microchannel after evaporation of bulk water creates a void in the channel, but the thickness of such a water layer has not yet been well characterized. Herein we showed such a water layer adhered to a microchannel wall to be 100 to 170 nm thick and stable against surface tension. The water layer thickness was measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and the water layer structure was characterized by using a quantitative nanoparticle counting technique. This thickness was found for channel gap heights ranging from 1 to 5 μm. Once formed, the water layers in the microchannel, when sealed, were stable for at least one week without any special care. Our results indicate that the water layer forms naturally and is closely associated only with the surface to which it adheres. Our study of naturally formed, stable water layers may shed light on topics from gas exchange in alveoli in biology to the post-wet-process control in the semiconductor industry. We anticipate our report to be a starting point for more detailed research and understanding of the microfluidics, mechanisms and applications of gas-liquid-solid systems.

  2. Exploring Scintillometry in the Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to investigate observation methods of heat and momentum exchange and key variables that characterise turbulence in the atmospheric stable surface layer (SSL), a layer defined as the lower part of the stable boundary layer (SBL) where surface fluxes do not change

  3. Exploring Scintillometry in the Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to investigate observation methods of heat and momentum exchange and key variables that characterise turbulence in the atmospheric stable surface layer (SSL), a layer defined as the lower part of the stable boundary layer (SBL) where surface fluxes do not change

  4. Highly stable surface functionalization of microgas chromatography columns using layer-by-layer self-assembly of silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Shakeel, Hamza; Lovette, John; Rice, Gary W; Heflin, James R; Agah, Masoud

    2013-09-03

    A controllable and high-yield surface functionalization of silicon microchannels using layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly of SiO2 nanoparticles (SNPs) is presented. The application of SNPs (45 nm average diameter) coating as a stationary phase for chromatographic separation is also demonstrated with surface functionalization using chloroalkylsilanes. This method facilitates a simple, low-cost, and parallel processing scheme that also provides homogeneous and stable nanoparticle-based stationary phases with ease of control over the coating thickness. The SNP-functionalized microfabricated columns with either single capillary channels (1 m long, 150 μm wide, 240 μm deep) or very narrow multicapillary channels (25 cm long, 30 μm wide, 240 μm deep, 16 parallel channels) successfully separated a multicomponent gas mixture with a wide range of boiling points with high reproducibility.

  5. Variance Method to Determine Turbulent Fluxes of Momentum And Sensible Heat in The Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debruin, H.A.R.; Hartogensis, O.K.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is presented that in the stable atmospheric surface layer turbulent fluxes of heat and momentum can be determined from the standard deviations of longitudinal wind velocity and temperature, ¿u and ¿T respectively, measured at a single level. An attractive aspect of this method is that it yi

  6. A stable lithium-rich surface structure for lithium-rich layered cathode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangryun; Cho, Woosuk; Zhang, Xiaobin; Oshima, Yoshifumi; Choi, Jang Wook

    2016-11-01

    Lithium ion batteries are encountering ever-growing demand for further increases in energy density. Li-rich layered oxides are considered a feasible solution to meet this demand because their specific capacities often surpass 200 mAh g-1 due to the additional lithium occupation in the transition metal layers. However, this lithium arrangement, in turn, triggers cation mixing with the transition metals, causing phase transitions during cycling and loss of reversible capacity. Here we report a Li-rich layered surface bearing a consistent framework with the host, in which nickel is regularly arranged between the transition metal layers. This surface structure mitigates unwanted phase transitions, improving the cycling stability. This surface modification enables a reversible capacity of 218.3 mAh g-1 at 1C (250 mA g-1) with improved cycle retention (94.1% after 100 cycles). The present surface design can be applied to various battery electrodes that suffer from structural degradations propagating from the surface.

  7. A stable high-order perturbation of surfaces method for numerical simulation of diffraction problems in triply layered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Youngjoon; Nicholls, David P.

    2017-02-01

    The accurate numerical simulation of linear waves interacting with periodic layered media is a crucial capability in engineering applications. In this contribution we study the stable and high-order accurate numerical simulation of the interaction of linear, time-harmonic waves with a periodic, triply layered medium with irregular interfaces. In contrast with volumetric approaches, High-Order Perturbation of Surfaces (HOPS) algorithms are inexpensive interfacial methods which rapidly and recursively estimate scattering returns by perturbation of the interface shape. In comparison with Boundary Integral/Element Methods, the stable HOPS algorithm we describe here does not require specialized quadrature rules, periodization strategies, or the solution of dense non-symmetric positive definite linear systems. In addition, the algorithm is provably stable as opposed to other classical HOPS approaches. With numerical experiments we show the remarkable efficiency, fidelity, and accuracy one can achieve with an implementation of this algorithm.

  8. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar re

  9. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar re

  10. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar

  11. The role of snow-surface coupling, radiation, and turbulent mixing in modeling a stable boundary layer over Arctic sea ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    To enhance the understanding of the impact of small-scale processes in the polar climate, this study focuses on the relative role of snow-surface coupling, radiation and turbulent mixing in an Arctic stable boundary layer. We extend the GABLS1 (GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Study 1) model interco

  12. Highly stable hydrophilic surfaces of PDMS thin layer obtained by UV radiation and oxygen plasma treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes Atayde, Cleuson de; Doi, Ioshiaki [Center for Semiconductor Components, University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Campinas, SP (Brazil); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    Surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, Sylgard 184) was carried out by O{sub 2} plasma and UV in broadband mode/O{sub 2} plasma treatments with different exposure times, and studied in terms of hydrophilic stability. Water contact angle measurements, Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used for the analysis of the modified surface and hydrophilic stability of the PDMS films. The results show reasonably good hydrophilic stability in the range of a week with a contact angle of around 70 for O{sub 2} plasma treated samples, whereas a more high hydrophilic stability, with a low contact angle of 65 up to 15 days, was observed for UV/O{sub 2} plasma treated PDMS. FTIR analysis of the samples reveals significant oxidation noted by large presence of Si-O-Si, and Si-OH bonds on the PDMS surface, which improves the affinity with water molecules and increases the hydrophilicy. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Variance Method to Determine Turbulent Fluxes of Momentum And Sensible Heat in The Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, H. A. R.; Hartogensis, O. K.

    2005-08-01

    Evidence is presented that in the stable atmospheric surface layer turbulent fluxes of heat and momentum can be determined from the standard deviations of longitudinal wind velocity and temperature, σ u and σ T respectively, measured at a single level. An attractive aspect of this method is that it yields fluxes from measurements that can be obtained with two-dimensional sonic anemometers. These instruments are increasingly being used at official weather stations, where they replace the standard cup anemometer wind vane system. With methods such as the one described in this note, a widespread, good quality, flux network can be established, which would greatly benefit the modelling community. It is shown that a ‘variance’ dimensionless height (ζ σ) defined from σ u and σ T is highly related to the ‘conventional’ dimensionless stability parameter ζ=z/L, where z is height and L is the Obukhov length. Empirical functions for ζ σ are proposed that allow direct calculation of heat and momentum fluxes from σ u and σ T. The method performs fairly well also during a night of intermittent turbulence.

  14. Clear-sky stable boundary layers with low winds over snow-covered surfaces Part I: A WRF model evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Vihma, T.; Anderson, P.S.; Bosveld, F.C.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we evaluated the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale meteorological model for stable conditions at clear skies with low wind speeds. Three contrasting terrains with snow covered surfaces are considered, namely Cabauw (Netherlands, snow over grass), Sodankylä (Finland, snow

  15. PECVD-ONO: A New Deposited Firing Stable Rear Surface Passivation Layer System for Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hofmann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD stack layer system consisting of a-SiOx:H, a-SiNx:H, and a-SiOx:H is presented for silicon solar cell rear side passivation. Surface recombination velocities below 60 cm/s (after firing and below 30 cm/s (after forming gas anneal were achieved. Solar cell precursors without front and rear metallisation showed implied open-circuit voltages Voc values extracted from quasi-steady-state photoconductance (QSSPC measurements above 680 mV. Fully finished solar cells with up to 20.0% energy conversion efficiency are presented. A fit of the cell's internal quantum efficiency using software tool PC1D and a comparison to a full-area aluminium-back surface field (Al-BSF and thermal SiO2 is shown. PECVD-ONO was found to be clearly superior to Al-BSF. A separation of recombination at the metallised and the passivated area at the solar cell's rear is presented using the equations of Fischer and Kray. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA has been used to evaluate the hydrogen depth profile of the passivation layer system at different stages.

  16. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The properties of, and the processes that occur in, the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, making it difficult to represent adequately in numerical models. The nocturnal boundary layer often is characterized by a temperature inversion and, in the Southern Great Plains region, a low-level jet. To advance our understanding of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, high temporal and vertical resolution data on the temperature and wind properties are needed, along with both large-eddy simulation and cloud-resolving modeling.

  17. Preparation of stable silica surfaces for surface forces measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huai-Yin; Mizukami, Masashi; Kurihara, Kazue

    2017-09-01

    A surface forces apparatus (SFA) measures the forces between two surfaces as a function of the surface separation distance. It is regarded as an essential tool for studying the interactions between two surfaces. However, sample surfaces used for the conventional SFA measurements have been mostly limited to thin (ca. 2-3 μm) micas, which are coated with silver layers (ca. 50 nm) on their back, due to the requirement of the distance determination by transmission mode optical interferometry called FECO (fringes of equal chromatic order). The FECO method has the advantage of determining the absolute distance, so it should be important to increase the availability of samples other than mica, which is chemically nonreactive and also requires significant efforts for cleaving. Recently, silica sheets have been occasionally used in place of mica, which increases the possibility of surface modification. However, in this case, the silver layer side of the sheet is glued on a cylindrical quartz disc using epoxy resin, which is not stable in organic solvents and can be easily swollen or dissolved. The preparation of substrates more stable under severe conditions, such as in organic solvents, is necessary for extending application of the measurement. In this study, we report an easy method for preparing stable silica layers of ca. 2 μm in thickness deposited on gold layers (41 nm)/silica discs by sputtering, then annealed to enhance the stability. The obtained silica layers were stable and showed no swelling in organic solvents such as ethanol and toluene.

  18. Large-eddy simulation of the very stable boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinita, M. J.; Matheou, G.

    2016-12-01

    The stable boundary layer is ubiquitous and typically forms at night when the ground radiatively cools and in polar regions throughout the day. Stable stratification and the associated reduction in the energetic scales in combination with the large anisotropy of turbulent motions challenge numerical models. This modeling difficulty also affects large-eddy simulation (LES) methods leading to scarce LES results for very stable conditions. In contrast, the NWP of convective flows has greatly benefited from the ample availability of high quality LES data. In order to overcome these limitations, a novel LES model setup is developed to enable the modeling of very stable boundary layers. A series of Ekman layer-type boundary layers at various surface cooling rates, geotropic winds and latitudes (rotation rates) is presented. A temperature surface condition is applied in the LES. The surface heat flux is dynamically computed byresolving the surface layer since the often-used Monin-Obukhov similarity theory cannot represent very stable conditions. Depending on the conditions, the LES gracefully transitions to a direct numerical simulation (DNS) where the flow becomes fully resolved. Two stability regimes can be discerned based on vertical profiles of the Richardson number. Overall, the model predicts that turbulence is very resilient with respect to stability. Temperature and velocity fluctuations persist even at high Richardson numbers. The nature of the fluctuations, i.e., due to turbulence/overturning or waves, is discussed. Scaling relations and spectra are also presented and discussed.

  19. Are Vicinal Metal Surfaces Stable?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frenken, J. W. M.; Stoltze, Per

    1999-01-01

    We use effective medium theory to demonstrate that the energies of many metal surfaces are lowered when these surfaces are replaced by facets with lower-index orientations. This implies that the low-temperature equilibrium shapes of many metal crystals should be heavily faceted. The predicted ins...

  20. Stable discrete surface light bullets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, Dumitru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Lederer, Falk; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2007-01-22

    We analyze spatiotemporal light localization near the edge of a semi-infinite array of weakly coupled nonlinear optical waveguides and demonstrate the existence of a novel class of continuous-discrete spatiotemporal solitons, the so-called discrete surface light bullets. We show that their properties are strongly affected by the presence of the surface. To this end the crossover between surface and quasi-bulk bullets is studied by analyzing the families of solitons propagating at different distances from the edge of the waveguide array.

  1. Leidenfrost Vapor Layer Stabilization on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan; Patankar, Neelesh; Marston, Jeremy; Chan, Derek; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2012-11-01

    We have performed experiments to investigate the influence of the wettability of a superheated metallic sphere on the stability of a thin vapor layer during the cooling of a sphere immersed in water. For high enough sphere temperatures, a continuous vapor layer (Leidenfrost regime) is observed on the surface of non-superhydrophobic spheres, but below a critical sphere temperature the layer becomes unstable and explosively switches to nuclear boiling regime. In contrast, when the sphere surface is textured and superhydrophobic, the vapor layer is stable and gradually relaxes to the sphere surface until the complete cooling of the sphere, thus avoiding the nuclear boiling transition altogether. This finding could help in the development of heat exchange devices and of vapor layer based drag reducing technologies.

  2. Multipole surface solitons in layered thermal media

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Torner, Lluis

    2008-01-01

    We address the existence and properties of multipole solitons localized at a thermally insulating interface between uniform or layered thermal media and a linear dielectric. We find that in the case of uniform media, only surface multipoles with less than three poles can be stable. In contrast, we reveal that periodic alternation of the thermo-optic coefficient in layered thermal media makes possible the stabilization of higher order multipoles.

  3. Turbulence in the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Harindra; Kit, Eliezer; Conry, Patrick; Hocut, Christopher; Liberzon, Dan

    2016-11-01

    During the field campaigns of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program, fine-scale measurements of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) were made using a novel sonic and hot-film anemometer dyad (a combo probe). A swath of scales, from large down to Kolmogorov scales, was covered. The hot-film was located on a gimbal within the sonic probe volume, and was automated to rotate in the horizontal plane to align with the mean flow measured by sonic. This procedure not only helped satisfy the requirement of hot-film alignment with the mean flow, but also allowed in-situ calibration of hot-films. This paper analyzes a period of nocturnal flow that was similar to an idealized stratified parallel shear flow. Some new phenomena were identified, which included the occurrence of strong bursts in the velocity records indicative of turbulence generation at finer scales that are not captured by conventional sonic anemometers. The spectra showed bottleneck effect, but its manifestation did not fit into the framework of previous bottleneck-effect theories and was unequivocally related to bursts of turbulence. The measurements were also used to evaluate the energetics of stratified shear flows typical of the environment. ONR # N00014-11-1-0709; NSF # AGS-1528451; ISF 408/15.

  4. Stable surface solitons in truncated complex potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yingji; Mihalache, Dumitru; Zhu, Xing; Guo, Lina; Kartashov, Yaroslav V

    2012-07-01

    We show that surface solitons in the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation with truncated complex periodic potential can be stabilized by linear homogeneous losses, which are necessary to balance gain in the near-surface channel arising from the imaginary part of potential. Such solitons become stable attractors when the strength of homogeneous losses acquires values from a limited interval and they exist in focusing and defocusing media. The domains of stability of the surface solitons shrink with an increase in the amplitude of the imaginary part of complex potential.

  5. Stable surface solitons in truncated complex potentials

    CERN Document Server

    He, Yingji; Zhu, Xing; Guo, Lina; Kartashov, Yaroslav V

    2012-01-01

    We show that surface solitons in the one-dimensional nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation with truncated complex periodic potential can be stabilized by linear homogeneous losses, which are necessary to balance gain in the near-surface channel arising from the imaginary part of potential. Such solitons become stable attractors when the strength of homogeneous losses acquires values from a limited interval and they exist in focusing and defocusing media. The domains of stability of surface solitons shrink with increase of the amplitude of imaginary part of complex potential.

  6. Intermittent Turbulence in the Very Stable Ekman Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, James C.

    2001-01-05

    INTERMITTENT TURBULENCE IN THE VERY STABLE EKMAN LAYER This study describes a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a very stable Ekman layer in which a constant downward heat flux is applied at the lower boundary, thus cooling the fluid above. Numerical experiments were performed in which the strength of the imposed heat flux was varied. For downward heat fluxes above a certain critical value the turbulence becomes intermittent and, as the heat flux increases beyond this value, the flow tends to relaminarize because of the very strong ambient stratification. We adopt Mahrt?s (1999) definition of the very stable boundary layer as a boundary layer in which intermittent, rather than continuous turbulence, is observed. Numerical experiments were used to test various hypothesis of where in ?stability parameter space? the very stable boundary layer is found. These experiments support the findings of Howell and Sun (1999) that the boundary layer will exhibit intermittency and therefore be categorized as ?very stable?, when the stability parameter, z/L, exceeds unity. Another marker for the very stable boundary layer, Derbyshire?s (1990) maximum heat flux criterion, was also examined. Using a case study drawn from the simulations where turbulence intermittency was observed, the mechanism that causes the intermittence was investigated. It was found that patchy turbulence originates from a vigorous inflectional, Ekman-like instability -- a roll cell -- that lifts colder air over warmer air. The resulting convective instability causes an intense burst of turbulence. This turbulence is short-lived because the lifting motion of the roll cell, as well as the roll cell itself, is partially destroyed after the patchy turbulence is generated. Examples of intermittent turbulence obtained from the simulations appear to be consistent with observations of intermittency even though the Reynolds number of the DNS is relatively low (400).

  7. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Arabian Sea during winter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Ghosh, A.K.

    Surface layer temperature inversion in the south eastern Arabian Sea, during winter has been studied using Bathythermograph data collected from 1132 stations. It is found that the inversion in this area is a stable seasonal feature...

  8. Sensing the Stable Boundary Layer in a Towing Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeneveld, G. J.; Dobrovolschi, D.; Paci, A.; Eiff, O.; Lacaze, L.; Holtslag, A. A. M.

    2010-09-01

    Understanding and forecasting the stable atmospheric boundary layer (SBL) over land is a challenge for already several decades. Generally, the SBL covers two different regimes. The first regime is the weakly SBL, characterised by well defined wind driven turbulence. The second regime covers the very SBL with weak turbulence, and then additional processes become relevant, such as meandering motions, gravity waves, drainage flows, intermittent turbulence and radiation divergence. Especially in this regime this complexity limits the understanding of the SBL and its representation in numerical weather prediction, climate models and air pollution models. For calm conditions, these models typically overestimate near surface temperature and wind speed, with adverse effects for understanding polar climate and end users in agriculture, transportation, and air quality assessment. To improve our understanding of the SBL, we study SBL turbulence in the CNRM-GAME stratified water flume in Toulouse. This unique facility, particularly well suited for stratified flow and BL studies, provides novel laboratory observations that extend earlier efforts of field observations and wind tunnel studies. Among other things, laboratory observations have the advantage of statistical robustness due to repeatability of the experiment and provide access to an extensive set of data. Hence, a 3x3 m2 plate covered with LEGO of Lx=1.57 cm and Ly=3.57 cm, (roughness length = 0.0014 m, and roughness density =0.250, index of frontal area = 0.125) was towed at different velocities through the tank of 22 x 3 x 1.6 m. In this way we were able to achieve an SBL of ~10 cm with bulk Richardson numbers in the range between 0.05 and 0.25, and turbulence with a well-behaved inertial subrange. We focus on the estimation of the non-dimensional velocity and density profiles, on higher order turbulent statistics (important for plume dispersion), as well as on the turbulence spectral behaviour. Finally, we aim to

  9. Intermittent Turbulence in the Very Stable Ekman Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, James C [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This study describes a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a very stable Ekman layer in which a constant downward heat flux is applied at the lower boundary, thus cooling the fluid above. Numerical experiments were performed in which the strength of the imposed heat flux was varied. For downward heat fluxes above a certain critical value the turbulence becomes intermittent and, as the heat flux increases beyond this value, the flow tends to relaminarize because of the very strong ambient stratification. We adopt Mahrt?s (1999) definition of the very stable boundary layer as a boundary layer in which intermittent, rather than continuous turbulence, is observed. Numerical experiments were used to test various hypothesis of where in ?stability parameter space? the very stable boundary layer is found. These experiments support the findings of Howell and Sun (1999) that the boundary layer will exhibit intermittency and therefore be categorized as ?very stable?, when the stability parameter, z/L, exceeds unity. Another marker for the very stable boundary layer, Derbyshire?s (1990) maximum heat flux criterion, was also examined. Using a case study drawn from the simulations where turbulence intermittency was observed, the mechanism that causes the intermittence was investigated. It was found that patchy turbulence originates from a vigorous inflectional, Ekman-like instability -- a roll cell -- that lifts colder air over warmer air. The resulting convective instability causes an intense burst of turbulence. This turbulence is short-lived because the lifting motion of the roll cell, as well as the roll cell itself, is partially destroyed after the patchy turbulence is generated. Examples of intermittent turbulence obtained from the simulations appear to be consistent with observations of intermittency even though the Reynolds number of the DNS is relatively low (400).

  10. Uncertainties in Surface Layer Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergrass, W.

    2015-12-01

    A central problem for micrometeorologists has been the relationship of air-surface exchange rates of momentum and heat to quantities that can be predicted with confidence. The flux-gradient profile developed through Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) provides an integration of the dimensionless wind shear expression where is an empirically derived expression for stable and unstable atmospheric conditions. Empirically derived expressions are far from universally accepted (Garratt, 1992, Table A5). Regardless of what form of these relationships might be used, their significance over any short period of time is questionable since all of these relationships between fluxes and gradients apply to averages that might rarely occur. It is well accepted that the assumption of stationarity and homogeneity do not reflect the true chaotic nature of the processes that control the variables considered in these relationships, with the net consequence that the levels of predictability theoretically attainable might never be realized in practice. This matter is of direct relevance to modern prognostic models which construct forecasts by assuming the universal applicability of relationships among averages for the lower atmosphere, which rarely maintains an average state. Under a Cooperative research and Development Agreement between NOAA and Duke Energy Generation, NOAA/ATDD conducted atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) research using Duke renewable energy sites as research testbeds. One aspect of this research has been the evaluation of legacy flux-gradient formulations (the ϕ functions, see Monin and Obukhov, 1954) for the exchange of heat and momentum. At the Duke Energy Ocotillo site, NOAA/ATDD installed sonic anemometers reporting wind and temperature fluctuations at 10Hz at eight elevations. From these observations, ϕM and ϕH were derived from a two-year database of mean and turbulent wind and temperature observations. From this extensive measurement database, using a

  11. The Coupling State of an Idealized Stable Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Otávio C.; Costa, Felipe D.; Degrazia, Gervásio A.

    2012-10-01

    The coupling state between the surface and the top of the stable boundary layer (SBL) is investigated using four different schemes to represent the turbulent exchange. An idealized SBL is assumed, with fixed wind speed and temperature at its top. At the surface, two cases are considered, first a constant temperature, 20 K lower than the SBL top, and later a constant 2 K h-1 cooling rate is assumed for 10 h after a neutral initial condition. The idealized conditions have been chosen to isolate the influence of the turbulence formulations on the coupling state, and the intense stratification has the purpose of enhancing such a response. The formulations compared are those that solve a prognostic equation for turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and those that directly prescribe turbulence intensity as a function of atmospheric stability. Two TKE formulations are considered, with and without a dependence of the exchange coefficients on stability, while short and long tail stability functions (SFs) are also compared. In each case, the dependence on the wind speed at the SBL top is considered and it is shown that, for all formulations, the SBL experiences a transition from a decoupled state to a coupled state at an intermediate value of mechanical forcing. The vertical profiles of potential temperature, wind speed and turbulence intensity are shown as a function of the wind speed at the SBL top, both for the decoupled and coupled states. The formulation influence on the coupling state is analyzed and it is concluded that, in general, the simple TKE formulation has a better response, although it also tends to overestimate turbulent mixing. The consequences are discussed.

  12. Stable single-layer structure of group-V elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersan, F.; Aktürk, E.; Ciraci, S.

    2016-12-01

    In addition to stable single-layer buckled honeycomb and washboard structures of group-V elements (or pnictogens P, As, Sb, and Bi) we show that these elements can also form two-dimensional, single-layer structures consisting of buckled square and octagon rings. An extensive analysis comprising the calculation of mechanical properties, vibration frequencies, and finite-temperature ab initio molecular dynamics confirms that these structures are dynamically and thermally stable and suitable for applications at room temperature and above. All these structures are semiconductors with a fundamental band gap, which is wide for P but decreases with increasing row number. The effect of the spin-orbit coupling decreases the band gap and is found to be crucial for Sb and Bi. These results are obtained from first-principles calculations based on density functional theory.

  13. Thermally stable magnetic media based on antiferromagnetically coupled layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Eric E.

    2001-03-01

    The combination of signal-to-noise requirements, write field limitations, and thermal activation of small particles is thought to limit the potential areal density of longitudinal media and is commonly referred to as the "superparamagnetic limit". Recording media composed of antiferromagnetically coupled (AFC) magnetic recording layers is a promising approach to extend areal densities of longitudinal media beyond these perceived limits [1,2]. The recording medium is made up of two ferromagnetic recording layer separated by a nonmagnetic layer whose thickness is tuned to couple the layers antiferromagnetically. For such a structure, the effective areal moment density (Mrt) of the composite structure is given by the difference between the ferromagnetic layers allowing the effective magnetic thickness to scale independently of the physical thickness of the media. The resulting media appears magnetically thin while being physically thick and, thus, allows AFC media to maintain thermal stability even for low Mrt values. Experimental realization of this concept using CoPtCrB alloy layers that demonstrates thermally stable low-Mrt media suitable for high-density recording will be discussed. This work is done in collaboration with D. T. Margulies, M. E. Schabes,M. Doerner, M. Carey, B. Gurney, A. Moser, M. Best, G. Zeltzer, K. Rubin, and H. Rosen. [1]. Fullerton et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 77, 3806 (2000). [2]. Abarra et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 77, 2581 (2000).

  14. Tailored interfacial rheology for gastric stable adsorption layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuble, N; Geue, T; Windhab, E J; Fischer, P

    2014-08-11

    Human lipid digestion begins at the interface of oil and water by interfacial adsorption of lipases. Tailoring the available surface area for lipase activity can lead to specific lipid sensing in the body, thus, tailored satiety hormone release. In this study we present biopolymer layers at the MCT-oil/water interface with different stabilities under human gastric environment (37 °C, pH 2, pepsin). Physicochemical changes and enzymatic degradation of interfacial layers were monitored online by interfacial shear rheology. We show the weakening of β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) layers at body temperature and acidification and their hydrolysis by pepsin. If sufficient concentrations of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) are given to an existing β-lg layer, this weakening is buffered and the proteolysis delayed. A synergistic, composite layer is formed by adding methylated NCC to the β-lg layer. This layer thermogels at body temperature and resists hydrolysis by pepsin. Coexistence of these two emulsifiers at the air/water interface is evidenced by neutron reflectometry measurements, where morphological information are extracted. The utilized layers and their analysis provide knowledge of physicochemical changes during in vitro digestion of interfaces, which promote functional food formulations.

  15. Topologically stable gapped state in a layered superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, Mauro; Cariglia, Marco; Vargas-Paredes, Alfredo A.

    2014-03-01

    We show that a layered charged superconductor, described by a spinorial (two-component) order parameter, has a gapped state above the ground state, topologically protected from decay. This state is made of skyrmions, breaks the time reversal symmetry and produces a weak local magnetic field. This excited but stable state contains spontaneous circulating supercurrents, with flow and counter flow in the layers, even without the presence of an external magnetic field. We derive the order parameter and the local magnetic field of this skyrmion state from the Abrikosov-Bogomolny (first order) equations, instead of the second order variational equations. We find a gap density of the order of 0 . 1hmaxmeV.nm-3 , where hmax is the maximum local magnetic field between layers expressed in Gauss. The present threshold of detection, set by μSR and NMR/NQR, hmax ~ 0 . 01G , gives a gap density of the order 10-3meV.nm-3 for the single-layer cuprates (inter-layer distance d ~ 1 . 0 nm). We suggest that the pseudogap is a skyrmion state, and so, estimate that the density of carriers that condense in the pseudogap is of the order of 10-4nm-3 , or 0 . 01 % of the Cooper pair density in the cuprates. Acknowledge support from CNPq-Brazil.

  16. Highly stable superhydrophobic surfaces under flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moonchan; Yim, Changyong; Jeon, Sangmin

    2015-01-01

    We synthesized hydrophobic anodic aluminum oxide nanostructures with pore diameters of 35, 50, 65, and 80 nm directly on quartz crystal microresonators, and the stability of the resulting superhydrophobicity was investigated under flow conditions by measuring changes in the resonance frequency and dissipation factor. When the quartz substrates were immersed in water, their hydrophobic surfaces did not wet due to the presence of an air interlayer. The air interlayer was gradually replaced by water over time, which caused decreases in the resonance frequency (i.e., increases in mass) and increases in the dissipation factor (i.e., increases in viscous damping). Although the water contact angles of the nanostructures increased with increasing pore size, the stability of their superhydrophobicity increased with decreasing pore size under both static conditions (without flow) and dynamic conditions (with flow); this increase can be attributed to an increase in the solid surface area that interacts with the air layer above the nanopores as the pore size decreases. Further, the effects of increasing the flow rate on the stability of the superhydrophobicity were quantitatively determined.

  17. Scattering from Alpha-Stable Non-Gaussian Distributed Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Yu-Chao; GUO Li-Xin; WU Zhen-Sen

    2007-01-01

    @@ The scattering problem of alpha-stable non-Gaussian distributed rough surfaces is studied. The alpha-stable non-Gaussian distribution is used to describe the surfaces that exhibit sharp and sparse peaks, not usually seen in Gaussian distributed surfaces. Then a magnetic field integral equation is formulated to calculate the scattered field and the scattering coefficient. Numerical simulations show that the magnitude distribution of the scattered field is affected significantly by the probability distribution of the surface when the height of the surface changes in a random way. In addition, simulation results are presented as bistatic scattering coefficient for alpha-stable distributed surfaces.

  18. Stable Stratification Effects on Flow and Pollutant Dispersion in Boundary Layers Entering a Generic Urban Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, J. M.; Pourquie, M. J. B. M.; Jonker, H. J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) are used to investigate the effect of stable stratification on rural-to-urban roughness transitions. Smooth-wall turbulent boundary layers are subjected to a generic urban roughness consisting of cubes in an in-line arrangement. Two line sources of pollutant are added to investigate the effect on pollutant dispersion. Firstly, the LES method is validated with data from wind-tunnel experiments on fully-developed flow over cubical roughness. Good agreement is found for the vertical profiles of the mean streamwise velocity component and mean Reynolds stress. Subsequently, roughness transition simulations are done for both neutral and stable conditions. Results are compared with fully-developed simulations with conventional double-periodic boundary conditions. In stable conditions, at the end of the domain the streamwise velocity component has not yet reached the fully-developed state even though the surface forces are nearly constant. Moreover, the internal boundary layer is shallower than in the neutral case. Furthermore, an investigation of the turbulence kinetic energy budget shows that the buoyancy destruction term is reduced in the internal boundary layer, above which it is equal to the undisturbed (smooth wall) value. In addition, in stable conditions pollutants emitted above the urban canopy enter the canopy farther downstream due to decreased vertical mixing. Pollutants emitted below the top of the urban canopy are 85 % higher in concentration in stable conditions mostly due to decreased advection. If this is taken into account concentrations remain 17 % greater in stable conditions due to less rapid internal boundary-layer growth. Finally, it is concluded that in the first seven streets the vertical advective pollutant flux is significant, in contrast to the fully-developed case.

  19. A Note on Turbulence Stationarity and Wind Persistence Within the Stable Planetary Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappo, Carmen J.; Hiscox, April L.; Miller, David R.

    2010-07-01

    This note presents initial results of an analysis of the stationarity of turbulence kinetic energy and the persistence of winds within the stable boundary layer (SBL). Measurements were made at 1.5 and 11 m above ground level from 0100 to 0600 local time on five nights during the JORNADA field experiment. The average stationarity ranged from about 160 to about 570 s. Wind persistence ranged from about ± 40° (3-min average) to about ± 36° (30-min average) on a weakly stable night, and from about ± 40° (3-min average) to about ± 27° (30-min average) on an strongly stable night. It is shown that, at 1.5 m, which we take to be within the surface layer, the average duration of stationarity of turbulent kinetic energy tends to correlate with the kurtosis of the heat flux; however, at 11 m, which we take to be outside of the surface layer, this correlation is poorly approximated.

  20. Influences on the Height of the Stable Boundary Layer as seen in LES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosovic, B; Lundquist, J

    2004-06-15

    Climate models, numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, and atmospheric dispersion models often rely on parameterizations of planetary boundary layer height. In the case of a stable boundary layer, errors in boundary layer height estimation can result in gross errors in boundary-layer evolution and in prediction of turbulent mixing within the boundary layer.

  1. Plume meander and dispersion in a stable boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscox, April L.; Miller, David R.; Nappo, Carmen J.

    2010-11-01

    Continuous lidar measurements of elevated plume dispersion and corresponding micrometeorology data are analyzed to establish the relationship between plume behavior and nocturnal boundary layer dynamics. Contrasting nights of data from the JORNADA field campaign in the New Mexico desert are analyzed. The aerosol lidar measurements were used to separate the plume diffusion (plume spread) from plume meander (displacement). Mutiresolution decomposition was used to separate the turbulence scale (90 s). Durations of turbulent kinetic energy stationarity and the wind steadiness were used to characterize the local scale and submesoscale turbulence. Plume meander, driven by submesoscale wind motions, was responsible for most of the total horizontal plume dispersion in weak and variable winds and strong stability. This proportion was reduced in high winds (i.e., >4 m s-1), weakly stable conditions but remained the dominant dispersion mechanism. The remainder of the plume dispersion in all cases was accounted for by internal spread of the plume, which is a small eddy diffusion process driven by turbulence. Turbulence stationarity and the wind steadiness are demonstrated to be closely related to plume diffusion and plume meander, respectively.

  2. Water molecules orientation in surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingo, V. V.

    2000-08-01

    The water molecules orientation has been investigated theoretically in the water surface layer. The surface molecule orientation is determined by the direction of a molecule dipole moment in relation to outward normal to the water surface. Entropy expressions of the superficial molecules in statistical meaning and from thermodynamical approach to a liquid surface tension have been found. The molecules share directed opposite to the outward normal that is hydrogen protons inside is equal 51.6%. 48.4% water molecules are directed along to surface outward normal that is by oxygen inside. A potential jump at the water surface layer amounts about 0.2 volts.

  3. Area inequalities for stable marginally trapped surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Jaramillo, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    We discuss a family of inequalities involving the area, angular momentum and charges of stably outermost marginally trapped surfaces in generic non-vacuum dynamical spacetimes, with non-negative cosmological constant and matter sources satisfying the dominant energy condition. These inequalities provide lower bounds for the area of spatial sections of dynamical trapping horizons, namely hypersurfaces offering quasi-local models of black hole horizons. In particular, these inequalities represent particular examples of the extension to a Lorentzian setting of tools employed in the discussion of minimal surfaces in Riemannian contexts.

  4. Surface layer similarity in the nocturnal boundary layer: the application of Hilbert-Huang transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hong

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence statistics such as flux-variance relationship is critical information in measuring and modeling carbon, water, energy, and momentum exchanges at the biosphere-atmosphere interface. Using a recently proposed mathematical technique, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT, this study highlights its possibility to quantify impacts of non-turbulent flows on turbulence statistics in the stable surface layer. The HHT is suitable for the analysis of non-stationary and intermittent data and thus very useful for better understanding of the interplay of the surface layer similarity with complex nocturnal environment. Our analysis showed that the HHT can successfully sift non-turbulent components and be used as a tool to estimate the relationships between turbulence statistics and atmospheric stability in complex environment such as nocturnal stable boundary layer.

  5. Surface layer similarity in the nocturnal boundary layer: the application of Hilbert-Huang transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence statistics such as flux-variance relationship are critical information in measuring and modeling ecosystem exchanges of carbon, water, energy, and momentum at the biosphere-atmosphere interface. Using a recently proposed mathematical technique, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT, this study highlights its possibility to quantify impacts of non-turbulent flows on turbulence statistics in the stable surface layer. The HHT is suitable for the analysis of non-stationary and intermittent data and thus very useful for better understanding the interplay of the surface layer similarity with complex nocturnal environment. Our analysis showed that the HHT can successfully sift non-turbulent components and be used as a tool to estimate the relationships between turbulence statistics and atmospheric stability in complex environments such as nocturnal stable boundary layer.

  6. Layer-by-layer deposition of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes on the surface of condensed DNA particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, V S; Loomis, A; Hagstrom, J E; Budker, V G; Wolff, J A

    1999-08-01

    DNA can be condensed with an excess of poly-cations in aqueous solutions forming stable particles of submicron size with positive surface charge. This charge surplus can be used to deposit alternating layers of polyanions and polycations on the surface surrounding the core of condensed DNA. Using poly-L-lysine (PLL) and succinylated PLL (SPLL) as polycation and polyanion, respectively, we demonstrated layer-by-layer architecture of the particles. Polyanions with a shorter carboxyl/backbone distance tend to disassemble binary DNA/PLL complexes by displacing DNA while polyanions with a longer carboxyl/backbone distance effectively formed a tertiary complex. The zeta potential of such complexes became negative, indicating effective surface recharging. The charge stoichiometry of the DNA/PLL/SPLL complex was found to be close to 1:1:1, resembling poly-electrolyte complexes layered on macrosurfaces. Recharged particles containing condensed plasmid DNA may find applications as non-viral gene delivery vectors.

  7. Model castings with composite surface layer - application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of cast carbon steel 200–450, by put directly in foundingprocess a composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase inhardness and aberasive wear resistance of cast steel castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generallyapplied welding technology (surfacing by welding and thermal spraying. In range of studies was made cast steel test castings withcomposite surface layer, which usability for industrial applications was estimated by criterion of hardness and aberasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral and quality of joint cast steel – (Fe-Cr-C. Based on conducted studies a thesis, that composite surface layer arise from liquid state, was formulated. Moreover, possible is control of composite layer thickness and its hardness by suitable selection of parameters i.e. thickness of insert, pouring temperature and solidification modulus of casting. Possibility of technology application of composite surface layer in manufacture of cast steel slide bush for combined cutter loader is presented.

  8. Comparative study of the surface layer density of liquid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón, E.; Fernández, E. M.; Duque, D.; Delgado-Buscalioni, R.; Tarazona, P.

    2009-11-01

    Capillary wave fluctuations blur the inherent structure of liquid surfaces in computer simulations. The intrinsic sampling method subtracts capillary wave fluctuations and yields the intrinsic surface structure, leading to a generic picture of the liquid surface. The most relevant magnitude of the method is the surface layer density ns that may be consistently determined from different properties: the layering structure of the intrinsic density profiles, the turnover rate for surface layer particles, and the hydrodynamic damping rate of capillary waves. The good agreement among these procedures provides evidence for the physical consistency of the surface layering hypothesis, as an inherent physical property of the liquid surfaces. The dependence of the surface compactness, roughness, and exchange rate with temperature is analyzed for several molecular interaction models.

  9. Smear layer--materials surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, J D

    1992-01-01

    SEM and TEM photomicrographs were presented of the smear layer and several dentin-adhesive interfaces. It was shown that as the wetting and penetration of the dentin adhesive increased, the shear bond strength also increased. Three categories of dentin adhesives were presented. Category one included Scotchbond, Dentin Adhesit and Gluma, with shear bond strength values between 5 and 7 MPa; the second category, dentin adhesives based on Dr. Bowen's research, included Tenure and Mirage Bond, with shear bond strengths between 8 and 14 MPa; the third category included Superbond and Scotchbond 2, with shear bond strength values up to 20 MPa. Failures occurred at the interface or in the resin adhesive for materials in categories one and two; failures occurred through the dentin or composite for materials in category three.

  10. An Intercomparison of Large-Eddy Simulations of the Stable Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beare, R.J.; MacVean, M.K.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Cuxart, J.; Esau, I.; Golaz, J.C.; Jimenez, M.A.; Khairoutdinov, M.; Kosovic, B.; Lewellen, D.; Lund, T.S.; Lundquist, J.K.; McCabe, A.; Moene, A.F.; Noh, Y.; Raasch, S.; Sullivan, P.

    2006-01-01

    Results are presented from the first intercomparison of large-eddy simulation (LES) models for the stable boundary layer (SBL), as part of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Atmospheric Boundary Layer Study initiative. A moderately stable case is used, based on Arctic observations. All

  11. Highly Stable Silver Nanoplates for Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Chuanbo [University of California, Riverside; Lu, Zhenda [University of California, Riverside; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Liu, ying [University of California, Riverside; Cheng, Quan [University of California, Riverside; Yin, Yadong [University of California, Riverside

    2012-01-01

    An SPR biosensor was developed by employing highly stable Au-protected Ag nanoplates (NP) as enhancers (see picture). Superior performance was achieved by depositing a thin and uniform coating of Au on the Ag surface while minimizing disruptive galvanic replacement and retaining the strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the silver nanoplates.

  12. The stable moduli space of Riemann surfaces: Mumford's conjecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, I.; Weiss, Michael

    2007-01-01

    D. Mumford conjectured in "Towards an enumerative geometry of the moduli space of curves" that the rational cohomology of the stable moduli space of Riemann surfaces is a polynomial algebra generated by certain classes $\\kappa_i$ of dimension $2i$. For the purpose of calculating rational cohomology......, one may replace the stable moduli space of Riemann surfaces by $B\\Gamma_{\\infty}$, where $\\Gamma_\\infty$ is the group of isotopy classes of automorphisms of a smooth oriented connected surface of ``large'' genus. Tillmann's theorem that the plus construction makes $B\\Gamma_{\\infty}$ into an infinite...

  13. Surface-layer gusts for aircraft operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, G.S.; Kristensen, L.

    1992-01-01

    We use Monin-Obukhov similarity theory to extend the Kristensen et al. (1991) aviation gust estimation technique from the neutral to the diabatic surface layer. Example calculations demonstrate the importance of this correction. Simple stability class methods using only standard aviation surface ...

  14. Electrochemical layer-by-layer approach to fabricate mechanically stable platinum black microelectrodes using a mussel-inspired polydopamine adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Raeyoung; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Platinum black (PtBK) has long been used for microelectrode fabrication owing to its high recording performance of neural signals. The porous structure of PtBK enlarges the surface area and lowers the impedance, which results in background noise reduction. However, the brittleness of PtBK has been a problem in practice. In this work, we report mechanically stable PtBK microelectrodes using a bioinspired adhesive film, polydopamine (pDA), while maintaining the low impedance of PtBK. Approach. The pDA layer was incorporated into the PtBK structure through electrochemical layer-by-layer deposition. Varying the number of layers and the order of materials, multi-layered pDA-PtBK hybrids were fabricated and the electrical properties, both impedance and charge injection limit, were evaluated. Main results. Multilayered pDA-PtBK hybrids had electrical impedances as low as PtBK controls and charge injection limit twice larger than controls. For the 30 min-ultrasonication agitation test, impedance levels rarely changed for some of the pDA-PtBK hybrids indicating that the pDA improved the mechanical property of the PtBK structures. The pDA-PtBK hybrid microelectrodes readily recorded neural signals of cultured hippocampal neurons, where background noise levels and signal-to-noise were 2.43 ∼ 3.23 μVrms and 28.4 ∼ 69.1, respectively. Significance. The developed pDA-PtBK hybrid microelectrodes are expected to be applicable to neural sensors for neural prosthetic studies.

  15. Measuring Plume Meander in the Nighttime Stable Boundary Layer with Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscox, A.; Miller, D. R.; Nappo, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    Complex dynamics of the stable planetary boundary layer (PBL), such as the effects of density currents, intermittent turbulence, surface-layer decoupling, internal gravity waves, cold air pooling, and katabatic flows affect plume transport and diffusion. A better understanding of these effects is needed for nighttime transport model development. The JORNADA (Joint Observational Research on Nocturnal Atmospheric Dispersion of Aerosols) field campaign, conducted in the New Mexico desert during April 2005, sought to address some of these issues The JORNADA data set includes simultaneous micrometeorological measurements of the boundary layer structure, turbulence, and wave activity along with continuous lidar measurement of aerosol plume releases. What makes JORNADA unique is the real-time monitoring of an elevated plume with a lidar. The quantification of plume meander will be presented in this paper. The application of these techniques to the JORNADA data allows for a more complete understanding of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL). We will present an in-depth analysis of lidar measurements of plume meander and dispersion and their relationship to the complexities of NBL structure.

  16. A simple approach to fabricate stable superhydrophobic glass surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Haiyan; Chen, Gang; Yang, Jin; Hu, Jie; Song, Haojie; Zhao, Yutao

    2013-02-01

    We present a facile method to fabricate superhydrophobic glass surface via one-step hydrothermal method and chemical modification. The etched glass surface shows the hierarchical textured morphology as well as the multiple scales of roughness and large numbers of nanorods and pores. The formation mechanism of the hierarchically structured surface is discussed in detail. After surface modification with vinyltriethoxysilane, the glass surface exhibits stable superhydrophobicity with a high contact angle of 155° and a low sliding angle of 5°. A water droplet of 10 μL can bounce away from the surface when it vertically hit the superhydrophobic glass surface. Moreover, the contact angle of the superhydrophobic glass surface under different pH values and storage time are measured to study the stability of the superhydrophobic property.

  17. LES model intercomparisons for the stable atmospheric boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moene, A.F.; Baas, P.; Bosveld, F.C.; Basu, S.

    2011-01-01

    Model intercomparisons are one possible method to gain confidence in Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) as a viable tool to study turbulence in the atmospheric boundary-layer. This paper discusses the setup and some results of two intercomparison cases focussing on the stably stratified nocturnal boundary-

  18. Long-term stable surface modification of DLC coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotzmann Gaby

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of coatings based on diamond like carbon (DLC for medical applications was established during the last years. Main advantages of these coatings are its high hardness, good wear and friction behavior and its biocompatibility. Using low-energy electron-beam treatment, we addressed the surface modification of DLC coatings. The aim was to generate new biofunctional surface characteristics that are long-term stable.

  19. Atomic layer deposition encapsulated activated carbon electrodes for high voltage stable supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kijoo; Cho, Moonkyu; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-01-28

    Operating voltage enhancement is an effective route for high energy density supercapacitors. Unfortunately, widely used activated carbon electrode generally suffers from poor electrochemical stability over 2.5 V. Here we present atomic layer deposition (ALD) encapsulation of activated carbons for high voltage stable supercapacitors. Two-nanometer-thick Al2O3 dielectric layers are conformally coated at activated carbon surface by ALD, well-maintaining microporous morphology. Resultant electrodes exhibit excellent stability at 3 V operation with 39% energy density enhancement from 2.5 V operation. Because of the protection of surface functional groups and reduction of electrolyte degradation, 74% of initial voltage was maintained 50 h after full charge, and 88% of capacitance was retained after 5000 cycles at 70 °C accelerated test, which correspond to 31 and 17% improvements from bare activated carbon, respectively. This ALD-based surface modification offers a general method to enhance electrochemical stability of carbon materials for diverse energy and environmental applications.

  20. The stable moduli space of Riemann surfaces: Mumford's conjecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, I.; Weiss, Michael

    2007-01-01

    D. Mumford conjectured in "Towards an enumerative geometry of the moduli space of curves" that the rational cohomology of the stable moduli space of Riemann surfaces is a polynomial algebra generated by certain classes $\\kappa_i$ of dimension $2i$. For the purpose of calculating rational cohomolo...

  1. Areal-averaged trace gas emission rates from long-range open-path measurements in stable boundary layer conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schäfer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of land-surface emission rates of greenhouse and other gases at large spatial scales (10 000 m2 are needed to assess the spatial distribution of emissions. This can be readily done using spatial-integrating micro-meteorological methods like flux-gradient methods which were evaluated for determining land-surface emission rates of trace gases under stable boundary layers. Non-intrusive path-integrating measurements are utilized. Successful application of a flux-gradient method requires confidence in the gradients of trace gas concentration and wind, and in the applicability of boundary-layer turbulence theory; consequently the procedures to qualify measurements that can be used to determine the flux is critical. While there is relatively high confidence in flux measurements made under unstable atmospheres with mean winds greater than 1 m s−1, there is greater uncertainty in flux measurements made under free convective or stable conditions. The study of N2O emissions of flat grassland and NH3 emissions from a cattle lagoon involves quality-assured determinations of fluxes under low wind, stable or night-time atmospheric conditions when the continuous "steady-state" turbulence of the surface boundary layer breaks down and the layer has intermittent turbulence. Results indicate that following the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST flux-gradient methods that assume a log-linear profile of the wind speed and concentration gradient incorrectly determine vertical profiles and thus flux in the stable boundary layer. An alternative approach is considered on the basis of turbulent diffusivity, i.e. the measured friction velocity as well as height gradients of horizontal wind speeds and concentrations without MOST correction for stability. It is shown that this is the most accurate of the flux-gradient methods under stable conditions.

  2. Turbulent transitions in the stable boundary layer: Couette and Poiseuille flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Amber M.; Monahan, Adam H.

    2016-11-01

    The stable boundary layer (SBL) can be classified into two distinct regimes. The weakly stable regime (WSBL) which occurs in the presence of moderate to strong pressure gradients or cloudy skies and is characterized by continuous turbulent mixing, and the very stable regime (VSBL) which occurs in the presence of weak pressure gradients or clear skies and turbulence weakens to the point of collapse. Modelling and observational results indicate that transitions from the WSBL to the VSBL occur when the maximum sustainable heat flux (MSHF), or shear capacity, is exceeded. The collapse of turbulence in the SBL is investigated using a one dimensional model of Couette flow with a constant heat flux. We show that the MSHF framework for predicting turbulent collapse is qualitatively robust to the choice of turbulence parameterization and extend these earlier stability analyses by numerically determining the unstable modes along the unstable branch. To explore transitions between the VSBL and the WSBL we extend the model to include a horizontal pressure gradient and a surface radiation scheme. Analysis of the Poiseuille flow demonstrates how the idealized energy/momentum budget model with parameterized turbulence can reproduce the regime transitions present in atmospheric data. We acknowledge support from NSERC and the computing facilities of Westgrid and Compute Canada.

  3. Surface state and normal layer effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemm, R.A.; Ledvij, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Liu, S.H. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-08-01

    In addition to the conducting CuO{sub 2} (S) layers, most high-T{sub c} superconductors also contain other conducting (N) layers, which are only superconducting due to the proximity effect. The combination of S and N layers can give rise to complicated electronic densities of states, leading to quasilinear penetration depth and NMR relaxation rate behavior at low temperatures. Surface states can also complicate the analysis of tunneling and, photoemission measurements. Moreover, geometrical considerations and in homogeneously trapped flux axe possible explanations of the paramagnetic Meissner effect and of corner and ring SQUID experiments. Hence, all of the above experiments could be consistent with isotropic s-wave superconductivity within the S layers.

  4. Investigation of Si(001) stable surfaces in alternating current heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, T.; Koguchi, M.

    2016-11-01

    The topography of a Si(001) vicinal surface is investigated using reflection electron microscopy (REM) during alternating current (AC) heating of the surface in ultra-high vacuum. The normal direction of the surface is slightly tilted from the [001] direction at θx or θy on the x or y axis (they are orthogonal directions in the Si(001) surface), and the average widths of the terraces (a or b in x or y axis) are determined by θx or θy; the direction perpendicular to the incidence electron beam on the surface is selected as the x (horizontal) axis in each REM image. Alternating current heating changes each initial surface from stable to double-domain (DD), in which 2 × 1 and 1 × 2 terraces are arranged regularly with approximately equal width, at its transition temperature Tc; the dimer rows are parallel to the x or y axis in the 1 × 2 or 2 × 1 terraces. There are two types of stable surfaces in the vicinal surface. At temperatures below its Tc, the surface with horizontally (vertically) long terraces, where b a), changes to a 2 × 1 (1 × 2) surface with wide 2 × 1 (1 × 2) and narrow 1 × 2 (2 × 1) terraces. The terrace, the short side of which is parallel to its dimer row direction, grows to create a stable surface by thermal diffusion of Si atoms at temperatures below Tc. During AC heating, thermal diffusion plays a key role in analyzing the kinetics of the atoms on the surface because the thermal effect acts as the driving force for the atoms that have not yet evaporated from the surface. Then, by evaporating atoms from the vicinal surface, AC heating creates a DD surface at temperatures between its Tc and 1100 °C and a rugged surface consisting of small 2 × 1 and 1 × 2 terraces at temperatures above 1100 °C.

  5. Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98) : a report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuxart, J.; Yague, C.; Morales, G.; Terradelles, E.; Orbe, J.; Calvo, J.; Vilu-Guerau, de J.; Soler, M.R.; Infante, C.; Buenestado, P.; Espinalt, A.; Jorgensem, H.E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98), which took place over the northern Spanish plateau comprising relatively flat grassland, in September 1998. The main objectives of the campaign were to study the properties of the mid-latitude stable boundary

  6. Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98) : a report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuxart, J.; Yague, C.; Morales, G.; Terradelles, E.; Orbe, J.; Calvo, J.; Vilu-Guerau, de J.; Soler, M.R.; Infante, C.; Buenestado, P.; Espinalt, A.; Jorgensem, H.E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98), which took place over the northern Spanish plateau comprising relatively flat grassland, in September 1998. The main objectives of the campaign were to study the properties of the mid-latitude stable boundary

  7. Stable atmospheric boundary-layer experiment in Spain (SABLES 98): A report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuxart, J.; Yague, C.; Morales, G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98), which took place over the northern Spanish plateau comprising relatively flat grassland, in September 1998. The main objectives of the campaign were to study the properties of the mid-latitude stable bound...

  8. Efficient and stable perfectly matched layer for CEM

    KAUST Repository

    Duru, Kenneth

    2014-02-01

    An efficient unsplit perfectly matched layer for numerical simulation of electromagnetic waves in unbounded domains is derived via a complex change of variables. In order to surround a Cartesian grid with the PML, the time-dependent PML requires only one (scalar) auxiliary variable in two space dimensions and six (scalar) auxiliary variables in three space dimensions. It is therefore cheap and straightforward to implement. We use Fourier and energy methods to prove the stability of the PML. We extend the stability result to a semi-discrete PML approximated by central finite differences of arbitrary order of accuracy and to a fully discrete problem for the \\'Leap-Frog\\' schemes. This makes precise the usefulness of the derived PML model for longtime simulations. Numerical experiments are presented, illustrating the accuracy and stability of the PML. © 2013 IMACS.

  9. Polyethyleneimine High-Energy Hydrophilic Surface Interfacial Treatment toward Efficient and Stable Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengwei; Liang, Chao; Zhang, Yiqiang; Li, Fengyu; Song, Yanlin; Shao, Guosheng

    2016-11-30

    The interfacial contact is critical for the performance of perovskite solar cells (PSCs), leading to dense perovskite thin films and efficient charge transport. In this contribution, an effective interfacial treatment solution using polyethyleneimine (PEI) was developed to improve the performance and stability of PSCs. Inserting PEI between the s-VOx and perovskite layers can produce a high-energy hydrophilic surface to facilitate the formation of a high-quality perovskite layer by the solution method. Accordingly, the surface coverage of perovskite film on the s-VOx layer increased from 80% to 95%, and the PCE of the device improved from 12.06% (with an average of 10.16%) to 14.4% (with an average value of 12.8%) under an irradiance of 100 mW cm(-2) AM 1.5G sunlight. More importantly, the stability of PSCs was further improved after adding another PEI layer between the electron transport layer and LiF/Al layer, less than 10% decay in efficiency during a 10-days observation. Since all layers of the PSCs were fabricated at low temperature (<150 °C), these PEI-treated PSCs based on the amorphous VOx layer have the potential to contribute significantly toward the development of efficient and stable solar cells on flexible substrates.

  10. Macromolecular surface design: photopatterning of functional stable nitrile oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Ozcan; Glassner, Mathias; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Welle, Alexander; Trouillet, Vanessa; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2015-05-04

    The efficient trapping of photogenerated thioaldehydes with functional shelf-stable nitrile oxides in a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition is a novel and versatile photochemical strategy for polymer end-group functionalization and surface modification under mild and equimolar conditions. The modular ligation in solution was followed in detail by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to analyze the functionalized surfaces, whereas time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) confirmed the spatial control of the surface functionalization using a micropatterned shadow mask. Polymer brushes were grown from the surface in a spatially confined regime by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) as confirmed by TOF-SIMS, XPS as well as ellipsometry. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Stabilization of Leidenfrost vapour layer by textured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Patankar, Neelesh A; Marston, Jeremy O; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2012-09-13

    In 1756, Leidenfrost observed that water drops skittered on a sufficiently hot skillet, owing to levitation by an evaporative vapour film. Such films are stable only when the hot surface is above a critical temperature, and are a central phenomenon in boiling. In this so-called Leidenfrost regime, the low thermal conductivity of the vapour layer inhibits heat transfer between the hot surface and the liquid. When the temperature of the cooling surface drops below the critical temperature, the vapour film collapses and the system enters a nucleate-boiling regime, which can result in vapour explosions that are particularly detrimental in certain contexts, such as in nuclear power plants. The presence of these vapour films can also reduce liquid-solid drag. Here we show how vapour film collapse can be completely suppressed at textured superhydrophobic surfaces. At a smooth hydrophobic surface, the vapour film still collapses on cooling, albeit at a reduced critical temperature, and the system switches explosively to nucleate boiling. In contrast, at textured, superhydrophobic surfaces, the vapour layer gradually relaxes until the surface is completely cooled, without exhibiting a nucleate-boiling phase. This result demonstrates that topological texture on superhydrophobic materials is critical in stabilizing the vapour layer and thus in controlling--by heat transfer--the liquid-gas phase transition at hot surfaces. This concept can potentially be applied to control other phase transitions, such as ice or frost formation, and to the design of low-drag surfaces at which the vapour phase is stabilized in the grooves of textures without heating.

  12. Stabilization of Leidenfrost vapour layer by textured superhydrophobic surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2012-09-12

    In 1756, Leidenfrost observed that water drops skittered on a sufficiently hot skillet, owing to levitation by an evaporative vapour film. Such films are stable only when the hot surface is above a critical temperature, and are a central phenomenon in boiling. In this so-called Leidenfrost regime, the low thermal conductivity of the vapour layer inhibits heat transfer between the hot surface and the liquid. When the temperature of the cooling surface drops below the critical temperature, the vapour film collapses and the system enters a nucleate-boiling regime, which can result in vapour explosions that are particularly detrimental in certain contexts, such as in nuclear power plants. The presence of these vapour films can also reduce liquid-solid drag. Here we show how vapour film collapse can be completely suppressed at textured superhydrophobic surfaces. At a smooth hydrophobic surface, the vapour film still collapses on cooling, albeit at a reduced critical temperature, and the system switches explosively to nucleate boiling. In contrast, at textured, superhydrophobic surfaces, the vapour layer gradually relaxes until the surface is completely cooled, without exhibiting a nucleate-boiling phase. This result demonstrates that topological texture on superhydrophobic materials is critical in stabilizing the vapour layer and thus in controlling-by heat transfer-the liquid-gas phase transition at hot surfaces. This concept can potentially be applied to control other phase transitions, such as ice or frost formation, and to the design of low-drag surfaces at which the vapour phase is stabilized in the grooves of textures without heating. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  13. Early Warning Signals for Regime Transition in the Stable Boundary Layer: A Model Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooijdonk, I. G. S.; Moene, A. F.; Scheffer, M.; Clercx, H. J. H.; van de Wiel, B. J. H.

    2017-02-01

    The evening transition is investigated in an idealized model for the nocturnal boundary layer. From earlier studies it is known that the nocturnal boundary layer may manifest itself in two distinct regimes, depending on the ambient synoptic conditions: strong-wind or overcast conditions typically lead to weakly stable, turbulent nights; clear-sky and weak-wind conditions, on the other hand, lead to very stable, weakly turbulent conditions. Previously, the dynamical behaviour near the transition between these regimes was investigated in an idealized setting, relying on Monin-Obukhov (MO) similarity to describe turbulent transport. Here, we investigate a similar set-up, using direct numerical simulation; in contrast to MO-based models, this type of simulation does not need to rely on turbulence closure assumptions. We show that previous predictions are verified, but now independent of turbulence parametrizations. Also, it appears that a regime shift to the very stable state is signaled in advance by specific changes in the dynamics of the turbulent boundary layer. Here, we show how these changes may be used to infer a quantitative estimate of the transition point from the weakly stable boundary layer to the very stable boundary layer. In addition, it is shown that the idealized, nocturnal boundary-layer system shares important similarities with generic non-linear dynamical systems that exhibit critical transitions. Therefore, the presence of other, generic early warning signals is tested as well. Indeed, indications are found that such signals are present in stably stratified turbulent flows.

  14. Dynamic air layer on textured superhydrophobic surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2013-09-03

    We provide an experimental demonstration that a novel macroscopic, dynamic continuous air layer or plastron can be sustained indefinitely on textured superhydrophobic surfaces in air-supersaturated water by a natural gas influx mechanism. This type of plastron is an intermediate state between Leidenfrost vapor layers on superheated surfaces and the equilibrium Cassie-Baxter wetting state on textured superhydrophobic surfaces. We show that such a plastron can be sustained on the surface of a centimeter-sized superhydrophobic sphere immersed in heated water and variations of its dynamic behavior with air saturation of the water can be regulated by rapid changes of the water temperature. The simple experimental setup allows for quantification of the air flux into the plastron and identification of the air transport model of the plastron growth. Both the observed growth dynamics of such plastrons and millimeter-sized air bubbles seeded on the hydrophilic surface under identical air-supersaturated solution conditions are consistent with the predictions of a well-mixed gas transport model. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Dynamic air layer on textured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Chan, Derek Y C; Marston, Jeremy O; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2013-09-03

    We provide an experimental demonstration that a novel macroscopic, dynamic continuous air layer or plastron can be sustained indefinitely on textured superhydrophobic surfaces in air-supersaturated water by a natural gas influx mechanism. This type of plastron is an intermediate state between Leidenfrost vapor layers on superheated surfaces and the equilibrium Cassie-Baxter wetting state on textured superhydrophobic surfaces. We show that such a plastron can be sustained on the surface of a centimeter-sized superhydrophobic sphere immersed in heated water and variations of its dynamic behavior with air saturation of the water can be regulated by rapid changes of the water temperature. The simple experimental setup allows for quantification of the air flux into the plastron and identification of the air transport model of the plastron growth. Both the observed growth dynamics of such plastrons and millimeter-sized air bubbles seeded on the hydrophilic surface under identical air-supersaturated solution conditions are consistent with the predictions of a well-mixed gas transport model.

  16. Local scaling characteristics of Antarctic surface layer turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years, several studies have validated Nieuwstadt's local scaling hypothesis by utilizing turbulence observations from the mid-latitude, nocturnal stable boundary layers. In this work, we probe into the local scaling characteristics of polar, long-lived stable boundary layers by analyzing turbulence data from the South Pole region of the Antarctic Plateau.

  17. Stable water isotope and surface heat flux simulation using ISOLSM: Evaluation against in-situ measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Mick Y.

    2015-04-01

    The stable isotopes of water are useful tracers of water sources and hydrological processes. Stable water isotope-enabled land surface modeling is a relatively new approach for characterizing the hydrological cycle, providing spatial and temporal variability for a number of hydrological processes. At the land surface, the integration of stable water isotopes with other meteorological measurements can assist in constraining surface heat flux estimates and discriminate between evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). However, research in this area has traditionally been limited by a lack of continuous in-situ isotopic observations. Here, the National Centre for Atmospheric Research stable isotope-enabled Land Surface Model (ISOLSM) is used to simulate the water and energy fluxes and stable water isotope variations. The model was run for a period of one month with meteorological data collected from a coastal sub-tropical site near Sydney, Australia. The modeled energy fluxes (latent heat and sensible heat) agreed reasonably well with eddy covariance observations, indicating that ISOLSM has the capacity to reproduce observed flux behavior. Comparison of modeled isotopic compositions of evapotranspiration (ET) against in-situ Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measured bulk water vapor isotopic data (10. m above the ground), however, showed differences in magnitude and temporal patterns. The disparity is due to a small contribution from local ET fluxes to atmospheric boundary layer water vapor (~1% based on calculations using ideal gas law) relative to that advected from the ocean for this particular site. Using ISOLSM simulation, the ET was partitioned into E and T with 70% being T. We also identified that soil water from different soil layers affected T and E differently based on the simulated soil isotopic patterns, which reflects the internal working of ISOLSM. These results highlighted the capacity of using the isotope-enabled models to discriminate

  18. Surface roughness scattering in multisubband accumulation layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Han; Reich, K. V.; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation layers with very large concentrations of electrons where many subbands are filled became recently available due to ionic liquid and other new methods of gating. The low-temperature mobility in such layers is limited by the surface roughness scattering. However, theories of roughness scattering so far dealt only with the small-density single subband two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Here we develop a theory of roughness-scattering limited mobility for the multisubband large concentration case. We show that with growing 2D electron concentration n the surface dimensionless conductivity σ /(2 e2/h ) first decreases as ∝n-6 /5 and then saturates as ˜(d aB/Δ2)≫1 , where d and Δ are the characteristic length and height of the surface roughness and aB is the effective Bohr radius. This means that in spite of the shrinkage of the 2DEG thickness and the related increase of the scattering rate the 2DEG remains a good metal.

  19. Surface Properties of PEMFC Gas Diffusion Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WoodIII, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rulison, Christopher [Augustine Scientific; Borup, Rodney [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2010-01-01

    The wetting properties of PEMFC Gas Diffusion Layers (GDLs) were quantified by surface characterization measurements and modeling of material properties. Single-fiber contact-angle and surface energy (both Zisman and Owens-Wendt) data of a wide spectrum of GDL types is presented to delineate the effects of hydrophobic post-processing treatments. Modeling of the basic sessile-drop contact angle demonstrates that this value only gives a fraction of the total picture of interfacial wetting physics. Polar forces are shown to contribute 10-20 less than dispersive forces to the composite wetting of GDLs. Internal water contact angles obtained from Owens-Wendt analysis were measured at 13-19 higher than their single-fiber counterparts. An inverse relationship was found between internal contact angle and both Owens-Wendt surface energy and % polarity of the GDL. The most sophisticated PEMFC mathematical models use either experimentally measured capillary pressures or the standard Young-Laplace capillary-pressure equation. Based on the results of the Owens-Wendt analysis, an advancement to the Young-Laplace equation is proposed for use in these mathematical models, which utilizes only solid surface energies and fractional surface coverage of fluoropolymer. Capillary constants for the spectrum of analyzed GDLs are presented for the same purpose.

  20. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagesson, Torbern [Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    In the modelling of transport and accumulation of the radioactive isotope carbon-14 (C-14) in the case of a potential release from a future repository of radioactive waste, it is important to describe the transport of the isotope in the atmosphere. This report aims to describe the turbulent transport within the lower part of the atmosphere; the inertial surface layer and the roughness sublayer. Transport in the inertial surface layer is dependent on several factors, whereof some can be neglected under certain circumstances. Under steady state conditions, fully developed turbulent conditions, in flat and horizontal homogeneous areas, it is possible to apply an eddy diffusivity approach for estimating vertical transport of C. The eddy diffusivity model assumes that there is proportionality between the vertical gradient and the transport of C. The eddy diffusivity is depending on the atmospheric turbulence, which is affected by the interaction between mean wind and friction of the ground surface and of the sensible heat flux in the atmosphere. In this report, it is described how eddy diffusivity of the inertial surface layer can be estimated from 3-d wind measurements and measurements of sensible heat fluxes. It is also described how to estimate the eddy diffusivity in the inertial surface layer from profile measurements of temperature and wind speed. Close to the canopy, wind and C profiles are influenced by effects of the surface roughness; this section of the atmosphere is called the roughness sublayer. Its height is up to {approx}3 times the height of the plant canopy. When the mean wind interacts with the canopy, turbulence is not only produced by shear stress and buoyancy, it is additionally created by wakes, which are formed behind the plants. Turbulence is higher than it would be over a flat surface, and the turbulent transport is hereby more efficient. Above the plant canopy, but still within the roughness sublayer, a function that compensates for the effect

  1. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagesson, Torbern [Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    In the modelling of transport and accumulation of the radioactive isotope carbon-14 (C-14) in the case of a potential release from a future repository of radioactive waste, it is important to describe the transport of the isotope in the atmosphere. This report aims to describe the turbulent transport within the lower part of the atmosphere; the inertial surface layer and the roughness sublayer. Transport in the inertial surface layer is dependent on several factors, whereof some can be neglected under certain circumstances. Under steady state conditions, fully developed turbulent conditions, in flat and horizontal homogeneous areas, it is possible to apply an eddy diffusivity approach for estimating vertical transport of C. The eddy diffusivity model assumes that there is proportionality between the vertical gradient and the transport of C. The eddy diffusivity is depending on the atmospheric turbulence, which is affected by the interaction between mean wind and friction of the ground surface and of the sensible heat flux in the atmosphere. In this report, it is described how eddy diffusivity of the inertial surface layer can be estimated from 3-d wind measurements and measurements of sensible heat fluxes. It is also described how to estimate the eddy diffusivity in the inertial surface layer from profile measurements of temperature and wind speed. Close to the canopy, wind and C profiles are influenced by effects of the surface roughness; this section of the atmosphere is called the roughness sublayer. Its height is up to {approx}3 times the height of the plant canopy. When the mean wind interacts with the canopy, turbulence is not only produced by shear stress and buoyancy, it is additionally created by wakes, which are formed behind the plants. Turbulence is higher than it would be over a flat surface, and the turbulent transport is hereby more efficient. Above the plant canopy, but still within the roughness sublayer, a function that compensates for the effect

  2. The near-neutral atmospheric surface layer: turbulence and non-stationarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, M; McKeon, B J; Holmes, H

    2007-03-15

    The neutrally stable atmospheric surface layer is used as a physical model of a very high Reynolds number, canonical turbulent boundary layer. Challenges and limitations with this model are addressed in detail, including the inherent thermal stratification, surface roughness and non-stationarity of the atmosphere. Concurrent hot-wire and sonic anemometry data acquired in Utah's western desert provide insight to Reynolds number trends in the axial velocity statistics and spectra.

  3. Wear measurement by surface layer activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blatchley, C.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of these projects was to demonstrate the capability for precisely but remotely measuring small increments of wear, erosion or corrosion in utility components using detectors mounted outside the system to monitor the presence of radionuclide surface markers. These gamma ray emitting markers are produced by surface layer activation (SLA) using a high energy particle beam from a Van de Graaff or cyclotron particle accelerator. The work was divided into three major projects: (1) determination of the feasibility of applying SLA based surface monitoring techniques to key power plant systems; (2) a field demonstration of SLA monitoring in steam turbine components subject to severe solid particle erosion; and (3) a field demonstration of SLA wear or corrosion monitoring of components in boiler auxiliaries. In the field tests, surface material removal was successfully measured from both selected systems, demonstrating the feasibility of the technique for long term diagnostic condition monitoring. Three bearing components in a boiler circulation pump were monitored almost continuously for a period of over 5 months until the pump was stopped due to electrical problems unrelated to the wear measurements. Solid particle erosion from two stop valve bypass valves was measured during a series of nine startup cycles. Both test demonstrations confirmed the earlier feasibility estimates and showed how SLA markers can be used to provide valuable diagnostic information to plant operators. 22 refs., 63 figs., 29 tabs.

  4. Air-stable few-layer black phosphorus phototransistor for near-infrared detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Junhong; Park, Kichul; Kim, Jin Tae; Choi, Won Kook; Song, Yong-Won

    2017-02-24

    We have demonstrated a few-layer black phosphorus (BP) phototransistor of stable operation in ambient air environment and at near-infrared light (λ = 1550 nm). The air-stable electronic and optoelectronic properties of the few-layer BP phototransistor have been achieved by a proper Al2O3 passivation. The optical identification method and qualitative and quantitative electrical characterizations of the few-layer BP phototransistor in dark state confirmed that the device performance was robust in ambient air, to further chemical treatments, and storage of more than six months. In addition, the low-frequency noise characterizations had revealed that the noise spectral density related to the sensitivity of phototransistor was reduced. Owing to the suppression of interaction between few-layer BP and adsorbates arising from the Al2O3 passivation, a fast rise time of the few-layer BP phototransistor, less than 100 μs, had been observed, demonstrating the intrinsic photoresponse properties of few-layer BP. The low dark current of ∼4 nA at the operation bias and the reasonable responsivity of ∼6 mA W(-1) were obtained under the condition lacking adsorbates interactions. Internally, the dark current and responsivity level was tunable by changing the operation bias. Our results are close to the intrinsic properties of the few-layer BP phototransistor, implying that it can be a building block of functioned few-layer BP photodetectors.

  5. Air-stable few-layer black phosphorus phototransistor for near-infrared detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Junhong; Park, Kichul; Kim, Jin Tae; Choi, Won Kook; Song, Yong-Won

    2017-02-01

    We have demonstrated a few-layer black phosphorus (BP) phototransistor of stable operation in ambient air environment and at near-infrared light (λ = 1550 nm). The air-stable electronic and optoelectronic properties of the few-layer BP phototransistor have been achieved by a proper Al2O3 passivation. The optical identification method and qualitative and quantitative electrical characterizations of the few-layer BP phototransistor in dark state confirmed that the device performance was robust in ambient air, to further chemical treatments, and storage of more than six months. In addition, the low-frequency noise characterizations had revealed that the noise spectral density related to the sensitivity of phototransistor was reduced. Owing to the suppression of interaction between few-layer BP and adsorbates arising from the Al2O3 passivation, a fast rise time of the few-layer BP phototransistor, less than 100 μs, had been observed, demonstrating the intrinsic photoresponse properties of few-layer BP. The low dark current of ˜4 nA at the operation bias and the reasonable responsivity of ˜6 mA W-1 were obtained under the condition lacking adsorbates interactions. Internally, the dark current and responsivity level was tunable by changing the operation bias. Our results are close to the intrinsic properties of the few-layer BP phototransistor, implying that it can be a building block of functioned few-layer BP photodetectors.

  6. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadathil, Pankajakshan; Gopalakrishna, V. V.; Muraleedharan, P. M.; Reddy, G. V.; Araligidad, Nilesh; Shenoy, Shrikant

    2002-10-01

    Surface layer temperature inversion occurring in the Bay of Bengal has been addressed. Hydrographic data archived in the Indian Oceanographic Data Center are used to understand various aspects of the temperature inversion of surface layer in the Bay of Bengal, such as occurrence time, characteristics, stability, inter-annual variability and generating mechanisms. Spatially organized temperature inversion occurs in the coastal waters of the western and northeastern Bay during winter (November-February). Although the inversion in the northeastern Bay is sustained until February (with remnants seen even in March), in the western Bay it becomes less organized in January and almost disappears by February. Inversion is confined to the fresh water induced seasonal halocline of the surface layer. Inversions of large temperature difference (of the order of 1.6-2.4°C) and thin layer thickness (10-20 m) are located adjacent to major fresh water inputs from the Ganges, Brahmaputra, Irrawaddy, Krishna and Godavari rivers. The inversion is stable with a mean stability of 3600×10 -8 m -1. Inter-annual variability of the inversion is significantly high and it is caused by the inter-annual variability of fresh water flux and surface cooling in the northern Bay. Fresh water flux leads the occurrence process in association with surface heat flux and advection. The leading role of fresh water flux is understood from the observation that the two occurrence regions of inversion (the western and northeastern Bay) have proximity to the two low salinity (with values about 28-29‰) zones. In the western Bay, the East India Coastal Current brings less saline and cold water from the head of the Bay to the south-west Bay, where it advects over warm, saline water, promoting temperature inversion in this region in association with the surface heat loss. For inversion occurring in the northeastern Bay (where the surface water gains heat from atmosphere), surface advection of the less saline

  7. Stable high conductivity functionally gradient compositionally layered solid state electrolytes and membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachsman, E.D.; Jayaweera, P.; Lowe, D.M.; Pound, B.C.

    1997-11-06

    Stable high conductivity functionally gradient compositionally layered solid bodies suitable for use as electrolytes and membranes and providing improved oxygen-ion conductivity for electrolytes and improved mixed oxygen-ion and electronic conductivity for membranes. The electrolytes provide solid oxide fuel cells with high efficiency operation at 300{sup o}C to 800{sup o}C. (author) figs.

  8. Improving Stable Boundary-Layer Height Estimation Using a Stability-Dependent Critical Bulk Richardson Number

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, H.; Basu, S.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    For many decades, attempts have been made to find the universal value of the critical bulk Richardson number (Ri Bc ; defined over the entire stable boundary layer). By analyzing an extensive large-eddy simulation database and various published wind-tunnel data, we show that Ri Bc is not a constant,

  9. Towards a climatology of orographic induced wave drag in the stable boundary layer over real terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleczek, M.A.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Nappo, C.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The stable boundary layer (SBL) is of particular interest for numerous environmental issues as air quality, aviation, fog forecasting, wind energy engineering, and climate modelling. Unfortunately the current understanding of the SBL is still rather poor, and progress is slow. The relatively poor un

  10. Intermittent turbulence and oscillations in the stable boundary layer over land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, van de B.J.H.

    2002-01-01

    As the title of this thesis indicates, our main subject of interest is: "Intermittent turbulence and oscillation in the stable boundary layer over land". As such, this theme connects the different chapters. Here, intermittent turbulence is defined as a sequence of events were 'burst' of increased tu

  11. Organic light emitting diode with surface modification layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basil, John D.; Bhandari, Abhinav; Buhay, Harry; Arbab, Mehran; Marietti, Gary J.

    2017-09-12

    An organic light emitting diode (10) includes a substrate (12) having a first surface (14) and a second surface (16), a first electrode (32), and a second electrode (38). An emissive layer (36) is located between the first electrode (32) and the second electrode (38). The organic light emitting diode (10) further includes a surface modification layer (18). The surface modification layer (18) includes a non-planar surface (30, 52).

  12. X-ray lattice strain determination in surface layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.; Pantleon, Karen

    2002-01-01

    The present article describes several aspects of lattice strain determination in surface layers by means of X-ray diffraction analysis. Several possibilities and the origins of stress in surface layers are illustrated by the following three cases: 200 nm thick Mo layers on glass substrates; 5.5 m.......5 microns thick TiN layers on heat treatable steel and 21 microns thick gamma prime-Fe4N1-x layers on iron....

  13. Carbides composite surface layers produced by (PTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajoure, Meloud, E-mail: Tajoore2000@yahoo.com [MechanicalEng.,HIHM,Gharian (Libya); Tajouri, Ali, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com; Abuzriba, Mokhtar, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com [Materials and Metallurgical Eng., UOT, Tripoli (Libya); Akreem, Mosbah, E-mail: makreem@yahoo.com [Industrial Research Centre,Tripoli (Libya)

    2013-12-16

    The plasma transferred arc technique was applied to deposit a composite layer of nickel base with tungsten carbide in powder form on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hard facing process was successfully conducted by using Deloro alloy 22 plus tungsten carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 1489 HV and minimum dilution of 8.4 % were achieved by using an arc current of 60 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A and the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base deposit with tungsten carbide features uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with regular grain shape half - dissolved in the matrix.

  14. Duality and universality for stable pair invariants of surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kool, M

    2013-01-01

    Let $\\beta$ be a curve class on a surface $S$. The moduli space of stable pairs on $S$ with class $\\beta$ carries a natural reduced virtual cycle \\cite{KT1, KT2}. This cycle is defined when $h^2(L) = 0$ for any \\emph{effective} $L \\in \\mathrm{Pic}^\\beta(S)$ (weak assumption). When $h^2(L) = 0$ for \\emph{any} $L \\in \\mathrm{Pic}^{\\beta}(S)$ (strong assumption), the associated invariants are given by universal functions in $\\beta^2$, $\\beta.c_1(S)$, $c_1(S)^2$, $c_2(S)$, and certain invariants of the ring structure of $H^*(S,\\Z)$. In this paper, we show the following. (1) Universality \\emph{no longer} holds when just the weak assumption is satisfied. (2) For any $S,\\beta$ (no conditions), the BPS spectrum of the non-reduced stable pair invariants of $S,\\beta$ with maximal number of point insertions consists of a single number. This number is the Seiberg-Witten invariant of $S, \\beta$. (3) The GW/PT correspondence for $X = K_S$ implies Taubes' GW/SW correspondence in certain cases, e.g. when $\\beta$ is irreducib...

  15. Stable Approximations of a Minimal Surface Problem with Variational Inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zuhair Nashed

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop a new approach for the stable approximation of a minimal surface problem associated with a relaxed Dirichlet problem in the space BV(Ω of functions of bounded variation. The problem can be reformulated as an unconstrained minimization problem of a functional on BV(Ω defined by (u=(u+∫∂Ω|Tu−Φ|, where (u is the “area integral” of u with respect to Ω,T is the “trace operator” from BV(Ω into L i(∂Ω, and ϕ is the prescribed data on the boundary of Ω. We establish convergence and stability of approximate regularized solutions which are solutions of a family of variational inequalities. We also prove convergence of an iterative method based on Uzawa's algorithm for implementation of our regularization procedure.

  16. Facile synthesis of thermally stable poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-modified gold surfaces by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Sun, Kai; Wu, Zhaoqiang; Lu, Jianhong; Song, Bo; Tong, Weifang; Shi, Xiujuan; Chen, Hong

    2012-06-26

    Well-controlled polymerization of N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP) on Au surfaces by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) was carried out at room temperature by a silanization method. Initial attempts to graft poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) layers from initiators attached to alkanethiol monolayers yielded PVP films with thicknesses less than 5 nm. The combined factors of the difficulty in the controllable polymerization of NVP and the instability of alkanethiol monolayers led to the difficulty in the controlled polymerization of NVP on Au surfaces. Therefore, the silanization method was employed to form an adhesion layer for initiator attachment. This method allowed well-defined ATRP polymerization to occur on Au surfaces. Water contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and reflectance Fourier transform infrared (reflectance FTIR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the modified surfaces. The PVP-modified gold surface remained stable at 130 °C for 3 h, showing excellent thermal stability. Thus, postfunctionalization of polymer brushes at elevated temperatures is made possible. The silanization method was also applied to modify SPR chips and showed potential applications in biosensors and biochips.

  17. Acoustic tomography in the atmospheric surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ziemann

    Full Text Available Acoustic tomography is presented as a technique for remote monitoring of meteorological quantities. This method and a special algorithm of analysis can directly produce area-averaged values of meteorological parameters. As a result consistent data will be obtained for validation of numerical atmospheric micro-scale models. Such a measuring system can complement conventional point measurements over different surfaces. The procedure of acoustic tomography uses the horizontal propagation of sound waves in the atmospheric surface layer. Therefore, to provide a general overview of sound propagation under various atmospheric conditions a two-dimensional ray-tracing model according to a modified version of Snell's law is used. The state of the crossed atmosphere can be estimated from measurements of acoustic travel time between sources and receivers at different points. Derivation of area-averaged values of the sound speed and furthermore of air temperature results from the inversion of travel time values for all acoustic paths. Thereby, the applied straight ray two-dimensional tomographic model using SIRT (simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique is characterised as a method with small computational requirements, satisfactory convergence and stability properties as well as simple handling, especially, during online evaluation.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence; instruments and techniques.

  18. Layered bismuth selenide utilized as hole transporting layer for highly stable organic photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Zhongcheng

    2015-11-01

    Abstract Layered bismuth selenide (L-Bi2Se3) nanoplates were implemented as hole transporting layers (HTLs) for inverted organic solar cells. Device based on L-Bi2Se3 showed increasing power conversion efficiency (PCE) during ambient condition storage process. A PCE of 4.37% was finally obtained after 5 days storage, which outperformed the ones with evaporated-MoO3 using poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as donor material and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) as acceptor. The improved device efficiency can be attributed to the high conductivity and increasing work function of L-Bi2Se3. The work function of L-Bi2Se3 increased with the storage time in ambient condition due to the oxygen atom doping. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were conducted to verify the increased work function, which originated from the p-type doping process. The device based on L-Bi2Se3 exhibited excellent stability in ambient condition up to 4 months, which was much improved compared to the device based on traditional HTLs. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Investigation of Turbulence Behaviour in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Arbitrary-Order Hilbert Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, W.; Zhang, H. S.; Schmitt, F. G.; Huang, Y. X.; Cai, X. H.; Song, Y.; Huang, X.; Zhang, H.

    2017-01-01

    The CASES-99 experimental data are used to analyze turbulence behaviour under a range of stable conditions using an adaptive method based on Hilbert spectral analysis. The characteristic scales of intrinsic mode functions vary between different stratifications. The second-order Hilbert marginal spectra display clear separation between fine-scale turbulence and large-scale motions. After removing the large-scale motions, the statistical characteristics of the reconstructed signals confirm the distinction of different stratifications in the fine-scale range. The correlation coefficient analyses reveal that the Hilbert spectral analysis method separates turbulence from large-scale motions in the stable boundary layer.

  20. Preface: GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary-layer Study (GABLS) on Stable Boundary Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) is a program initiated by the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) to observe, understand and model the hydrological cycle and the related energy fluxes in the atmosphere, at the land surface and in the upper oceans. Consequently the atmospheri

  1. Color stable white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with red emissive electron transport layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wook Kim, Jin; Yoo, Seung Il; Sung Kang, Jin [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Eun Lee, Song; Kwan Kim, Young [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hwa Yu, Hyeong; Turak, Ayse [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Young Kim, Woo, E-mail: wykim@hoseo.edu [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2015-06-28

    We analyzed the performance of multi-emissive white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) in relation to various red emitting sites of hole and electron transport layers (HTL and ETL). The shift of the recombination zone producing stable white emission in PHOLEDs was utilized as luminance was increased with red emission in its electron transport layer. Multi-emissive white PHOLEDs including the red light emitting electron transport layer yielded maximum external quantum efficiency of 17.4% with CIE color coordinates (−0.030, +0.001) shifting only from 1000 to 10 000 cd/m{sup 2}. Additionally, we observed a reduction of energy loss in the white PHOLED via Ir(piq){sub 3} as phosphorescent red dopant in electron transport layer.

  2. In-induced stable ordering of stepped Si(553) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL) , Dr. K.S. KrishnanRoad, New Delhi -110012 (India); Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Niazi, Asad; Nair, Lekha [Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Gupta, Govind, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL) , Dr. K.S. KrishnanRoad, New Delhi -110012 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Control growth of In on step Si(553) & thermal stability of novel superstructure. • Influence of temperature on growth modes (SK,VB) under different growth conditions. • In-induced superstructure: (8 × 2), (8 × 4), mixed (553)-7 × 1 + (111)√3 × √3R30° phases. - Abstract: The growth mechanism and adsorbate-induced surface morphology of metal atoms on semiconducting surfaces crucially determines the electronic and physicochemical properties of these metal/semiconductor systems. In this study, we investigate the kinetically controlled growth of indium (In) atoms on the high index stepped Si(553)-7 × 7 surface and the thermal stability of various novel In-induced superstructural phases formed during adsorption/desorption process. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that In adsorption at room temperature (RT) and at 350 °C, with a controlled incident flux of 0.0016 ML/s, proceeds in the Stranski–Krastanov growth mode where two dimensional (2D)/three dimensional (3D) islands are formed on top of two complete monolayers. At higher substrate temperature up to 450 °C, the growth of In atoms occurs in the form of islands on the bare Si(553) surface, and In coverage is limited to the sub-monolayer regime. During the thermal desorption of the RT grown In/Si(553) system, the In clusters rearrange themselves and an unusual “cluster to layer” transformation occurs on top of the stable monolayer. In situ low energy electron diffraction analysis during adsorption and desorption shows the development of various coverage and temperature dependent In-induced superstructural phases on Si(553) surface, such as: (8 × 2) after annealing at 520 °C with coverage 0.5 ML, (8 × 4) after annealing at 580 °C (∼1 ML coverage) and (553)-7 × 1 + (111)-√3 × √3-R30° at 0.3 ML (630 °C). These adsorbate-induced superstructural phases could potentially be utilized as templates for pattern assisted growth of various exotic 1D/2D structures for

  3. The Lowest Atmosphere: Atmospheric Boundary Layer Including Atmospheric Surface Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    of motion of the atmosphere— "second order closure"—to such applications as the SCIPUFF -PC code for tracer dispersion (see Sykes, 1994). Now, for...Turbulence, Methuen, London, 2nd Ed., 1955. Sykes, R.I., "The SCIPUFF -PC Code," ARAP Draft Report, 1994. Tennekes, H., "The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

  4. Monin-Obukhov Similarity Functions of the Structure Parameter of Temperature and Turbulent Kinetic Energy Dissipation Rate in the Stable Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.; Debruin, H.A.R.

    2005-01-01

    The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) functions fepsi; and fT, of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), ¿, and the structure parameter of temperature, CT2, were determined for the stable atmospheric surface layer using data gathered in the context of CASES-99. These data cover

  5. Efficiency of eddy mixing in a stable stratified atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatskiy, A. F.; Kurbatskaya, L. I.

    2011-12-01

    Based on a mesoscale RANS model of turbulence, the behavior of turbulent eddy mixing parameters is found to agree with the latest data of laboratory and atmospheric measurements. Some problems of the description of turbulent eddy mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer are studied. When the flow transforms to an extremely stable state, in particular, it is found the flux Richardson number Ri f can change nonmonotonically: it increases with increasing gradient Richardson number Rig until the state of saturation is reached at Ri g ≃ 1 and then decreases. The behavior of the coefficients of eddy diffusion of momentum and heat agrees with the concept of momentum (but not heat) transfer by internal waves propagating in an extremely stable atmospheric boundary layer.

  6. Stable Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98): A Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuxart, J.; Yague, C.; Morales, G.; Terradellas, E.; Orbe, J.; Calvo, J.; Fernandez, A.; Soler, M.R.; Infante, C.; Buenestado, P.; Espinalt, A.; Joergensen, H.E.; Rees, J.M.; Vila, J.; Redondo, J.M.; Cantalapiedra, I.R.; Conangla, L.

    This paper describes the Stable AtmosphericBoundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98),which took place over the northern Spanish plateaucomprising relatively flat grassland,in September 1998. The main objectives of the campaign were to study the properties of themid-latitude stable boundary layer (SBL).Instrumentation deployed on two meteorologicalmasts (of heights 10 m and 100 m)included five sonic anemometers, 15 thermocouples,five cup anemometers and three propeller anemometers,humidity sensors and radiometers.A Sensitron mini-sodar and a tetheredballoon were also operated continuously. Atriangular array of cup anemometers wasinstalled to allow the detection ofwave events. Two nocturnal periods analysedon 14-15 and 20-21 September are used toillustrate the wide-ranging characteristics of the SBL.

  7. Topology-Scaling Identification of Layered Solids and Stable Exfoliated 2D Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Michael; Paul, Joshua; Sinnott, Susan B.; Hennig, Richard G.

    2017-03-01

    The Materials Project crystal structure database has been searched for materials possessing layered motifs in their crystal structures using a topology-scaling algorithm. The algorithm identifies and measures the sizes of bonded atomic clusters in a structure's unit cell, and determines their scaling with cell size. The search yielded 826 stable layered materials that are considered as candidates for the formation of two-dimensional monolayers via exfoliation. Density-functional theory was used to calculate the exfoliation energy of each material and 680 monolayers emerge with exfoliation energies below those of already-existent two-dimensional materials. The crystal structures of these two-dimensional materials provide templates for future theoretical searches of stable two-dimensional materials. The optimized structures and other calculated data for all 826 monolayers are provided at our database (https://materialsweb.org).

  8. Reply to comment by Igor Esau on “Do stable atmospheric layers exist?”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, S.; Tuck, A. F.; Schertzer, D.; Hovde, S. J.

    2009-06-01

    We would like to thank Esau (2009) for attempting to save the classical notion of stable layers; his argument is very close to one raised up by an anonymous reviewer of Lovejoy et al. (2008b). Since a similar argument is often invoked to justify atmospheric applications of linear gravity wave theories, it appears to be widespread in the community. We therefore hope this debate will clarify the issue.

  9. Large-Eddy Simulation of the Evolving Stable Boundary Layer Over Flat Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, R

    2002-01-02

    The stable boundary layer (SBL) in the atmosphere is of considerable interest because it is often the worse case scenario for air pollution studies and health effect assessments associated with the accidental release of toxic material. Traditional modeling approaches used in such studies do not simulate the non-steady character of the velocity field, and hence often overpredict concentrations while underpredicting spatial coverage of potentially harmful concentrations of airborne material. The challenge for LES is to be able to resolve the rather small energy-containing eddies of the SBL while still maintaining an adequate domain size. This requires that the subgrid-scale (SGS) parameterization of turbulence incorporate an adequate representation of turbulent energy transfer. Recent studies have shown that both upscale and downscale energy transfer can occur simultaneously, but that overall the net transfer is downscale. Including the upscale transfer of turbulent energy (energy backscatter) is particularly important near the ground and under stably-stratified conditions. The goal of this research is to improve the ability to realistically simulate the SBL. The large-eddy simulation (LES) approach with its subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence model does a better job of capturing the temporally and spatially varying features of the SBL than do Reynolds-averaging models. The scientific objectives of this research are: (1) to characterize features of the evolving SBL structure for a range of meteorological conditions (wind speed and surface cooling), (2) to simulate realistically the transfer of energy between resolved and subgrid scales, and (3) to apply results to improve simulation of dispersion in the SBL.

  10. Surface Instability of a Vertically Oscillating Granular Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Lei; MIAO Guo-Qing; WEI Rong-Jue

    2001-01-01

    In the study of the surface instability of a vertically oscillating granular layer, we obtained experimentally thephase diagram for the surface states of the layer in the driving frequency-acceleration plane, and measured thedispersion relation for the surface waves in a granular layer in comparison to that in viscous fluids. Our experiments show that the onset dimensionless acceleration increases with the driving frequency, and the wavelengthof the surface waves increases with the depth of granular layer. These experimental results are in agreement withour theoretical model qualitatively.

  11. Local flux-profile relationships of wind speed and temperature in a canopy layer in atmospheric stable conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G.; Leclerc, M. Y.; Karipot, A.

    2010-11-01

    The particularities of the physics of the canopy layer pose challenges to the determination and use of traditional universal functions so helpful in the atmospheric surface layer. Progress toward "universal-like functions" such as those provided by Monin-Obukhov similarity theory for the canopy layer has been modest. One of the challenges lies in that the assumptions underlying Monin-Obukhov similarity theory do not hold within a canopy layer. This paper thus examines the local flux-profile relations for wind (Φm) and for temperature (Φh). It uses three different stability parameters, i.e., h/L(h) at tree top, local z/L(z), and the local bulk Richardson number (Ri), within a tall forest canopy in nighttime stable (indicated by h/L(h) > 0) conditions. Results suggest that the in-canopy Φm can be described using the local Richardson number Ri. Furthermore, Φm is found to increase linearly with Ri in the upper canopy layer for |Ri| 1, |Φm| decreases with |Ri| in a power function, a result consistent for all levels of measurements within the canopy. When both local Φh and local Ri are positive, i.e., the local downward turbulent heat flux is consistent with the local temperature gradient, the local Φh increases with the local Ri when Ri 1. The relationship between local Φh and Ri disappears when counter-gradient heat transfer occurs in strongly stable conditions. A self-correlation analysis is used to examine the influence of self-correlation and the physical meaning of these relationships.

  12. Formation of stable nanocomposite clays from small peptides reacted with montmorillonite and illite-smectite mixed layer clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, K. A.; Katz, A.; LeBlanc, J.; Peña, S.; Gottlieb, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how organic compounds interact with clay minerals and which functional groups result in the strongest bonds is pivotal to achieving a better understanding of how mineral composition affects the residence time of carbon and nitrogen in soils. In this work, we describe how small peptides derived from tryptone casein digest are dissolved and suspended with clay minerals to examine the nature of OM adsorption to mineral surfaces and the resulting effect on clay mineral structure. XRD analyses indicate that peptides intercalation results in expansion of the d001 spacing of montmorillonite (Mt) and the smectite component of a 70-30 illite-smectite mixed layer clay (I-S) and poorer crystallinity overall as a result of exfoliation of tactoids. Peptide adsorption is concentration-dependent, however, surface adsorption appears to mediate interlayer adsorption in Mt reaching a maximum of 16% of the mass of the organoclay complex, indicating that at a critical concentration, peptide intercalation will supersede surface adsorption resulting in a more stable attachment. In I-S the degree of surface adsorption and intercalation is proportional to concentration, however, surface adsorption is not a priming mechanism for interlayer adsorption. Thermogravimetric analysis of the organoclay complexes determined by TGA coupled to GC-MS indicate that the most prominent product species measured was 1-(1-Trimethylsiloxyethenyl)-3-trimethylsiloxy-benzene, likely from tryptophan monomer decomposition. The compound was detected over a broad temperature range, greater than 300 oC, during pyrolysis and suggests a carbon-silicon covalent bond formed between the peptide and tetrahedral layers in the clay. An additional silicon-bearing VOC detected at lower pyrolysis temperature by GC was N,N-Diethyl-1-(trimethylsilyl)-9,10-didehydroergoline-8-carboxamide, likely derived from a lysine-bearing peptide derivative. We hypothesize that hydrophobic (non-ionic) peptides react with silanol

  13. Crystalline Structure of the Pb/Si(111)7x7 Stable Wetting Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramlich, M.; Hayden, S. T.; Chen, Yiyao; Kim, C.; Tringides, M. C.; Miceli, P. F.

    2012-02-01

    The wetting layer formation in the Pb/Si(111)7x7 system has attracted extensive interest because of anomalously fast kinetics, which enables the formation of quantum size effect (QSE) nanoislands [Jeffrey et al. PRL 96, 106105 (2006)]. However, previous studies of the wetting layer by x-ray diffraction and scanning-probes have led to inconsistent structural models; thus, the structure of this wetting layer has been unsolved. Furthermore, a recent investigation has revealed that the wetting layer is out-of-equilibrium over a surprisingly broad temperature range [Gramlich et al., PRB 84, 075433 (2011)]. Using in situ x-ray scattering methods, we have solved the stable, low temperature annealed structure of the wetting layer. It exhibits a strained atomic layer where Pb atoms are in transition, from Si-7x7 sites towards 8x8-sites, with some Pb-atoms vertically closer to the Si-7x7. Interestingly, the Si adatoms shift to the edges of the unit cell. Funding is acknowledged from NSF DMR-0706278 (PFM, MWG, STH, YC, and the Ministry of Knowledge Economy of Korea 2009-F014-01 (CK). The experiments were performed on the 6IDC beam line, supported by the US-DOE (through Ames Lab, W-7405-Eng-82), at the Advanced Photon Source (US-DOE, W-31-109-Eng-38) located at Argonne National Laboratory.

  14. Surface topology and electronic structure of layered strontium ruthenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienert, Robert; Klinke, Melanie; Waelsch, Michael; Mietke, Sebastian; Matzdorf, Rene [Experimentalphysik II, Universitaet Kassel (Germany); Peng, Jin; Mao, Zhiqiang [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans (United States)

    2012-07-01

    In complex materials the interplay of properties like crystal structure, electronic structure and magnetism results in very interesting physical phenomena. The Ruddlesden-Popper series of layered Strontium Ruthenates Sr{sub n+1}Ru{sub n}O{sub 3n+1} describes one class of these materials. The double and triple layer systems behave like a Fermi liquid up to the transition temperature of 15 K and 24 K, respectively. In both compounds the local density of states (LDOS) shows a peak within the dip-like feature around the Fermi energy E{sub F}. Using low-temperature (LT) STM and STS we studied the temperature dependence of the LDOS in the range from 4.7 to 35 K. By increasing the temperature the peak within the dip in the LDOS at E{sub F} is only affected by thermal broadening. The surface unit cell of the Strontium Ruthenates exhibits a c(2 x 2) super structure, which is stable from 4.7 K up to room temperature as shown by our atomically resolved LT STM images and room temperature LEED experiments.

  15. White Layer of Hard Turned Surface by Sharp CBN Tool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xue-ping; SONG He-chuan; C.Richard Liu

    2005-01-01

    White layers in hard turned surfaces were identified and measured as a function of turning parameters based on the Taguchi method. It reveals that white layers generate on the machine surface in the absence of tool flank wear, and white layer depth varies with the different combinations of hard turning parameters. Turning speed has the most important impact on white layer depth, feed rate follows, and cutting depth at last. The white layer generation consequently suggests a strong couple relation to the heat generation and thermal process of hard turning operation. White layer disappears under an optimal combination of turning parameters by Taguchi method. It suggests that a superior surface integrity without white layer is feasible under some selected combinations of turning parameters by a sharp CBN cutting tool.

  16. Diamond nucleation on surface of C60 thin layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国伟; 袁放成; 刘大军; 何金田; 张兵临

    1997-01-01

    Diamond nucleation on the surface of C60 thin layers and intermediate layer of Si substrates are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cross-section SEM images of diamond films show that diamond grains really nucleate on the surface of C60 thin layers. The SEM images of diamond nucleating sites show the nucleating aggregation of diamond on C60 surfaces. The preferential oriented diamond films are observed. The plasma pre-treatment of C60 sublimating layers is a key factor for diamond nucleation.

  17. Highly Stable Operation of Lithium Metal Batteries Enabled by the Formation of a Transient High Concentration Electrolyte Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Mei, Donghai; Engelhard, Mark H.; Cartmell, Samuel S.; Polzin, Bryant; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Xu, Wu

    2016-02-08

    Lithium (Li) metal has been extensively investigated as an anode for rechargeable battery applications due to its ultrahigh specific capacity and the lowest redox potential. However, significant challenges including dendrite growth and low Coulombic efficiency are still hindering the practical applications of rechargeable Li metal batteries. Here, we demonstrate that long-term cycling of Li metal batteries can be realized by the formation of a transient high concentration electrolyte layer near the surface of Li metal anode during high rate discharge process. The highly concentrated Li+ ions in this transient layer will immediately solvate with the available solvent molecules and facilitate the formation of a stable and flexible SEI layer composed of a poly(ethylene carbonate) framework integrated with other organic/inorganic lithium salts. This SEI layer largely suppresses the corrosion of Li metal anode by free organic solvents and enables the long-term operation of Li metal batteries. The fundamental findings in this work provide a new direction for the development and operation of Li metal batteries that could be operated at high current densities for a wide range of applications.

  18. Aspects of the atmospheric surface layers on Mars and Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Landberg, L.

    2002-01-01

    The structures of mean flow and turbulence in the atmospheric surface boundary layer have been extensively studied on Earth, and to a far less extent on Mars, where only the Viking missions and the Pathfinder mission have delivered in-situ data. Largely the behaviour of surface-layer turbulence a...

  19. Aluminum-Doped Zinc Oxide as Highly Stable Electron Collection Layer for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingyue; Shen, Heping; Zhang, Ye; Li, Xin; Zhao, Xiaochong; Tai, Meiqian; Li, Jingfeng; Li, Jianbao; Li, Xin; Lin, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Although low-temperature, solution-processed zinc oxide (ZnO) has been widely adopted as the electron collection layer (ECL) in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) because of its simple synthesis and excellent electrical properties such as high charge mobility, the thermal stability of the perovskite films deposited atop ZnO layer remains as a major issue. Herein, we addressed this problem by employing aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) as the ECL and obtained extraordinarily thermally stable perovskite layers. The improvement of the thermal stability was ascribed to diminish of the Lewis acid-base chemical reaction between perovskite and ECL. Notably, the outstanding transmittance and conductivity also render AZO layer as an ideal candidate for transparent conductive electrodes, which enables a simplified cell structure featuring glass/AZO/perovskite/Spiro-OMeTAD/Au. Optimization of the perovskite layer leads to an excellent and repeatable photovoltaic performance, with the champion cell exhibiting an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.94 V, a short-circuit current (Jsc) of 20.2 mA cm(-2), a fill factor (FF) of 0.67, and an overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 12.6% under standard 1 sun illumination. It was also revealed by steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence that the AZO/perovskite interface resulted in less quenching than that between perovskite and hole transport material.

  20. Layers of Porous Superhydrophobic Surfaces for Robust Water Repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Farzad; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team

    2015-11-01

    In nature, birds exhibit multiple layers of superhydrophobic feathers that repel water. Inspired by bird feathers, we utilize porous superhydrophobic surfaces and compare the wetting and dewetting characteristics of a single surface to stacks of multiple surfaces. The superhydrophobic surfaces were submerged in water in a closed chamber. Pressurized gas was regulated to measure the critical pressure for the water to fully penetrate through the surfaces. In addition to using duck feathers, two-tier porous superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated to serve as synthetic mimics with a controlled surface structure. The energy barrier for the wetting transition was modeled as a function of the number of layers and their orientations with respect to each other. Moreover, after partial impalement into a subset of the superhydrophobic layers, it was observed that a full dewetting transition was possible, which suggests that natural organisms can exploit their multiple layers to prevent irreversible wetting.

  1. Contact mechanics for layered materials with randomly rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, B N J

    2012-03-07

    The contact mechanics model of Persson is applied to layered materials. We calculate the M function, which relates the surface stress to the surface displacement, for a layered material, where the top layer (thickness d) has different elastic properties than the semi-infinite solid below. Numerical results for the contact area as a function of the magnification are presented for several cases. As an application, we calculate the fluid leak rate for laminated rubber seals.

  2. Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Scott B.; Zender, Charles S.

    2009-05-01

    Global ocean wind power has recently been assessed (W. T. Liu et al., 2008) using scatterometry-based 10 m winds. We characterize, for the first time, wind power at 80 m (typical wind turbine hub height) above the global ocean surface, and account for the effects of surface layer stability. Accounting for realistic turbine height and atmospheric stability increases mean global ocean wind power by +58% and -4%, respectively. Our best estimate of mean global ocean wind power is 731 W m-2, about 50% greater than the 487 W m-2 based on previous methods. 80 m wind power is 1.2-1.5 times 10 m power equatorward of 30° latitude, between 1.4 and 1.7 times 10 m power in wintertime storm track regions and >6 times 10 m power in stable regimes east of continents. These results are relatively insensitive to methodology as wind power calculated using a fitted Weibull probability density function is within 10% of power calculated from discrete wind speed measurements over most of the global oceans.

  3. The surface layer observed by a high-resolution sodar at DOME C, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Argentini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One year field experiment has started on December 2011 at the French - Italian station of Concordia at Dome C, East Antarctic Plateau. The objective of the experiment is the study of the surface layer turbulent processes under stable/very stable stratifications, and the mechanisms leading to the formation of the warming events. A sodar was improved to achieve the vertical/time resolution needed to study these processes. The system, named Surface Layer sodar (SL-sodar, may operate both in high vertical resolution (low range and low vertical resolution (high range modes. In situ turbulence and radiation measurements were also provided in the framework of this experiment. A few preliminary results, concerning the standard summer diurnal cycle, a summer warming event, and unusually high frequency boundary layer atmospheric gravity waves are presented.

  4. Boundary-layer flow and power output in large wind farms during transition from neutral to stable conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2016-11-01

    In wind farms, power deficits are directly related to ambient turbulence levels. Power deficits will therefore increase during the transition from a daytime, conventionally neutral boundary layer (CNBL) to the stable boundary layer (SBL) at night. Besides turbulent decay, a multitude of effects occurs during this transition. For instance, low-level jets may cause strong winds at high elevations, while the velocity near the surface generally decreases. Consequently, Coriolis forces induce a change in wind direction, which alters the apparent wind-farm layout in streamwise direction. In this study, we perform LES of a large onshore wind farm in the late-afternoon transition from an equilibrium CNBL to a surface-cooled SBL. The results of two different cooling rates are compared with the wind-farm performance in the CNBL. The power output decrease during the transition, with faster decrease for stronger surface cooling. However, the initial decrease is dominated by the reduction in wind speed, and the relative power deficits do not increase. Further, considerable wake deflection occurs, and a spatially heterogeneous distribution of temperature and heat flux is observed. The authors acknowledge support from the European Research Council (FP7-Ideas, Grant No. 306471).

  5. Stable evaluation of Green's functions in cylindrically stratified regions with uniaxial anisotropic layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, H., E-mail: haksu.moon@gmail.com [ElectroScience Laboratory, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43212 (United States); Donderici, B., E-mail: burkay.donderici@halliburton.com [Sensor Physics & Technology, Halliburton Energy Services, Houston, TX 77032 (United States); Teixeira, F.L., E-mail: teixeira@ece.osu.edu [ElectroScience Laboratory, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43212 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We present a robust algorithm for the computation of electromagnetic fields radiated by point sources (Hertzian dipoles) in cylindrically stratified media where each layer may exhibit material properties (permittivity, permeability, and conductivity) with uniaxial anisotropy. Analytical expressions are obtained based on the spectral representation of the tensor Green's function based on cylindrical Bessel and Hankel eigenfunctions, and extended for layered uniaxial media. Due to the poor scaling of these eigenfunctions for extreme arguments and/or orders, direct numerical evaluation of such expressions can produce numerical instability, i.e., underflow, overflow, and/or round-off errors under finite precision arithmetic. To circumvent these problems, we develop a numerically stable formulation through suitable rescaling of various expressions involved in the computational chain, to yield a robust algorithm for all parameter ranges. Numerical results are presented to illustrate the robustness of the formulation including cases of practical interest.

  6. Stable evaluation of Green's functions in cylindrically stratified regions with uniaxial anisotropic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, H.; Donderici, B.; Teixeira, F. L.

    2016-11-01

    We present a robust algorithm for the computation of electromagnetic fields radiated by point sources (Hertzian dipoles) in cylindrically stratified media where each layer may exhibit material properties (permittivity, permeability, and conductivity) with uniaxial anisotropy. Analytical expressions are obtained based on the spectral representation of the tensor Green's function based on cylindrical Bessel and Hankel eigenfunctions, and extended for layered uniaxial media. Due to the poor scaling of these eigenfunctions for extreme arguments and/or orders, direct numerical evaluation of such expressions can produce numerical instability, i.e., underflow, overflow, and/or round-off errors under finite precision arithmetic. To circumvent these problems, we develop a numerically stable formulation through suitable rescaling of various expressions involved in the computational chain, to yield a robust algorithm for all parameter ranges. Numerical results are presented to illustrate the robustness of the formulation including cases of practical interest.

  7. More stable hybrid organic solar cells deposited on amorphous Si electron transfer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samiee, Mehran; Modtland, Brian; Dalal, Vikram L., E-mail: vdalal@iastate.edu [Iowa State University, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Aidarkhanov, Damir [Nazarbayev University, Astana (Kazakhstan)

    2014-05-26

    We report on defect densities, performance, and stability of organic/inorganic hybrid solar cells produced using n-doped inorganic amorphous silicon-carbide layers as the electron transport layer (ETL). The organic material was poly-3-hexyl-thiophene (P3HT) and heterojunction was formed using phenyl-C{sub 71}-Butyric-Acid-Methyl Ester (PCBM). For comparison, inverted solar cells fabricated using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as ETL were fabricated. Defect densities and subgap quantum efficiency curves were found to be nearly identical for both types of cells. The cells were subjected to 2xsun illumination and it was found that the cells produced using doped a-Si as ETL were much more stable than the cells produced using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.

  8. Turbulence Fine Structure, Intermittency, and Large-Scale Interactions in the Stable Boundary Layer and Residual Layer: Correlative High-Resolution Measurements and Direct Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-06

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The research employed stable boundary layer measurements using the DataHawk UAV and high-resolution direct numerical...simulations ( DNS ) to examine the interactions and instabilities occurring in multi-scale flows that drive intermittent turbulence events in the stable...atmosphere. Both measurements and the DNS revealed the occurrence and persistence of sheet-and-layer structures in the temperature and velocity fields that

  9. Characterization and use of crystalline bacterial cell surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit; Pum, Dietmar; Schuster, Bernhard

    2001-10-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) are one of the most common outermost cell envelope components of prokaryotic organisms (archaea and bacteria). S-layers are monomolecular arrays composed of a single protein or glycoprotein species and represent the simplest biological membranes developed during evolution. S-layers as the most abundant of prokaryotic cellular proteins are appealing model systems for studying the structure, synthesis, genetics, assembly and function of proteinaceous supramolecular structures. The wealth of information existing on the general principle of S-layers have revealed a broad application potential. The most relevant features exploited in applied S-layer research are: (i) pores passing through S-layers show identical size and morphology and are in the range of ultrafiltration membranes; (ii) functional groups on the surface and in the pores are aligned in well-defined positions and orientations and accessible for chemical modifications and binding functional molecules in very precise fashion; (iii) isolated S-layer subunits from a variety of organisms are capable of recrystallizing as closed monolayers onto solid supports (e.g., metals, polymers, silicon wafers) at the air-water interface, on lipid films or onto the surface of liposomes; (iv) functional domains can be incorporated in S-layer proteins by genetic engineering. Thus, S-layer technologies particularly provide new approaches for biotechnology, biomimetics, molecular nanotechnology, nanopatterning of surfaces and formation of ordered arrays of metal clusters or nanoparticles as required for nanoelectronics.

  10. A study of the stable boundary layer in strong gap flows in northwest Greenland using a research aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Günther; Drüe, Clemens

    2016-04-01

    Gap flows and the stable boundary layer (SBL) were studied in northwest Greenland during the aircraft-based experiment IKAPOS (Investigation of Katabatic winds and Polynyas during Summer) in June 2010. The measurements were performed using the research aircraft POLAR 5 of Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI, Bremerhaven). Besides navigational and basic meteorological instrumentation, the aircraft was equipped with radiation and surface temperature sensors, two laser altimeters, and video and digital cameras. In order to determine turbulent heat and momentum fluxes, POLAR 5 was instrumented with a turbulence measurement system collecting data on a nose boom with a sampling rate of 100 Hz. In the area of the Nares Strait a stable, but fully turbulent boundary layer with strong winds of 15 m s-1 to 20 m s-1 was found during conditions of relatively warm synoptically induced northerly winds through the Nares Strait. Strong surface inversions were present in the lowest 100 m to 200 m. As a consequence of channeling effects a well-pronounced low-level jet (LLJ) system was documented. The channeling process is consistent with gap flow theory and can be shown to occur at the topographic gap between Greenland and Canada represented by the Smith Sound. While the flow through the gap and over the surrounding mountains leads to the lowering of isotropic surfaces and the acceleration of the flow, the strong turbulence associated with the LLJ leads to the development of an internal thermal SBL past the gap. Turbulence statistics in this fully turbulent SBL can be shown to follow the local scaling behaviour.

  11. Effects of Boundary Layer Height on the Model of Ground-Level PM2.5 Concentrations from AOD: Comparison of Stable and Convective Boundary Layer Heights from Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengliang Zang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol optical depth (AOD from satellites or ground-based sun photometer spectral observations has been widely used to estimate ground-level PM2.5 concentrations by regression methods. The boundary layer height (BLH is a popular factor in the regression model of AOD and PM2.5, but its effect is often uncertain. This may result from the structures between the stable and convective BLHs and from the calculation methods of the BLH. In this study, the boundary layer is divided into two types of stable and convective boundary layer, and the BLH is calculated using different methods from radiosonde data and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP reanalysis data for the station in Beijing, China during 2014–2015. The BLH values from these methods show significant differences for both the stable and convective boundary layer. Then, these BLHs were introduced into the regression model of AOD-PM2.5 to seek the respective optimal BLH for the two types of boundary layer. It was found that the optimal BLH for the stable boundary layer is determined using the method of surface-based inversion, and the optimal BLH for the convective layer is determined using the method of elevated inversion. Finally, the optimal BLH and other meteorological parameters were combined to predict the PM2.5 concentrations using the stepwise regression method. The results indicate that for the stable boundary layer, the optimal stepwise regression model includes the factors of surface relative humidity, BLH, and surface temperature. These three factors can significantly enhance the prediction accuracy of ground-level PM2.5 concentrations, with an increase of determination coefficient from 0.50 to 0.68. For the convective boundary layer, however, the optimal stepwise regression model includes the factors of BLH and surface wind speed. These two factors improve the determination coefficient, with a relatively low increase from 0.65 to 0.70. It is found that the

  12. Realization of Multi-Stable Ground States in a Nematic Liquid Crystal by Surface and Electric Field Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwag, Jin Seog; Kim, Young-Ki; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2015-06-01

    Owing to the significant price drop of liquid crystal displays (LCDs) and the efforts to save natural resources, LCDs are even replacing paper to display static images such as price tags and advertising boards. Because of a growing market demand on such devices, the LCD that can be of numerous surface alignments of directors as its ground state, the so-called multi-stable LCD, comes into the limelight due to the great potential for low power consumption. However, the multi-stable LCD with industrial feasibility has not yet been successfully performed. In this paper, we propose a simple and novel configuration for the multi-stable LCD. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that a battery of stable surface alignments can be achieved by the field-induced surface dragging effect on an aligning layer with a weak surface anchoring. The simplicity and stability of the proposed system suggest that it is suitable for the multi-stable LCDs to display static images with low power consumption and thus opens applications in various fields.

  13. On the coupling between a supersonic boundary layer and a flexible surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    The coupling between a two-dimensional, supersonic, laminar boundary layer and a flexible surface is studied using direct numerical computations of the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the plate equation. The flexible surface is forced to vibrate by plane acoustic waves at normal incidence emanated by a sound source located on the side of the flexible surface opposite to the boundary layer. The effect of the source excitation frequency on the surface vibration and boundary layer stability is analyzed. We find that, for frequencies near the fifth natural frequency of the surface or lower, large disturbances are introduced in the boundary layer which may alter its stability characteristics. The interaction between a stable two-dimensional disturbance of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) type with the vibrating surface is also studied. We find that the disturbance level is higher over the vibrating flexible surface than that obtained when the surface is rigid, which indicates a strong coupling between flow and structure. However, in the absence of the sound source the disturbance level over the rigid and flexible surfaces are identical. This result is due to the high frequency of the TS disturbance which does not couple with the flexible surface.

  14. Preservation of Archaeal Surface Layer Structure During Mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Adrienne; Miot, Jennyfer; Lombard, Carine; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bernard, Sylvain; Zirah, Séverine; Guyot, François

    2016-05-25

    Proteinaceous surface layers (S-layers) are highly ordered, crystalline structures commonly found in prokaryotic cell envelopes that augment their structural stability and modify interactions with metals in the environment. While mineral formation associated with S-layers has previously been noted, the mechanisms were unconstrained. Using Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a hyperthermophilic archaeon native to metal-enriched environments and possessing a cell envelope composed only of a S-layer and a lipid cell membrane, we describe a passive process of iron phosphate nucleation and growth within the S-layer of cells and cell-free S-layer "ghosts" during incubation in a Fe-rich medium, independently of metabolic activity. This process followed five steps: (1) initial formation of mineral patches associated with S-layer; (2) patch expansion; (3) patch connection; (4) formation of a continuous mineral encrusted layer at the cell surface; (5) early stages of S-layer fossilization via growth of the extracellular mineralized layer and the mineralization of cytosolic face of the cell membrane. At more advanced stages of encrustation, encrusted outer membrane vesicles are formed, likely in an attempt to remove damaged S-layer proteins. The S-layer structure remains strikingly well preserved even upon the final step of encrustation, offering potential biosignatures to be looked for in the fossil record.

  15. Preservation of Archaeal Surface Layer Structure During Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Adrienne; Miot, Jennyfer; Lombard, Carine; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bernard, Sylvain; Zirah, Séverine; Guyot, François

    2016-05-01

    Proteinaceous surface layers (S-layers) are highly ordered, crystalline structures commonly found in prokaryotic cell envelopes that augment their structural stability and modify interactions with metals in the environment. While mineral formation associated with S-layers has previously been noted, the mechanisms were unconstrained. Using Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a hyperthermophilic archaeon native to metal-enriched environments and possessing a cell envelope composed only of a S-layer and a lipid cell membrane, we describe a passive process of iron phosphate nucleation and growth within the S-layer of cells and cell-free S-layer “ghosts” during incubation in a Fe-rich medium, independently of metabolic activity. This process followed five steps: (1) initial formation of mineral patches associated with S-layer; (2) patch expansion; (3) patch connection; (4) formation of a continuous mineral encrusted layer at the cell surface; (5) early stages of S-layer fossilization via growth of the extracellular mineralized layer and the mineralization of cytosolic face of the cell membrane. At more advanced stages of encrustation, encrusted outer membrane vesicles are formed, likely in an attempt to remove damaged S-layer proteins. The S-layer structure remains strikingly well preserved even upon the final step of encrustation, offering potential biosignatures to be looked for in the fossil record.

  16. Interface modified thermally stable hole transporting layer for efficient organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grover, Rakhi, E-mail: grover.rakhi@gmail.com [Amity Institute of Advanced Research and Studies (Materials and Devices), Amity University, Noida, Uttar Pradesh 201303 (India); Srivastava, Ritu, E-mail: ritu@mail.nplindia.org; Dagar, Janardan; Kamalasanan, M. N. [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, CSIR-Network of Institute for Solar Energy (NISE), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Mehta, D. S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-08-14

    Electrical transport in thermally stable 2, 7-bis [N, N-bis (4-methoxy-phenyl) amino]-9, 9-spirobifluorene (MeO-Spiro-TPD) thin films has been investigated as a function of temperature and organic layer thickness. ITO/MeO-Spiro-TPD interface was found to be injection limited and has been studied in detail to find barrier height for hole injection. The thickness of tetra-fluoro-tetracyano-quinodimethane thin films were optimized to be used as hole injection buffer layer which resulted in switching of charge transport mechanism from injection limited to space charge limited conduction above a critical thickness of 3 nm. Hole mobility has been measured using transient space charge limited conduction (SCLC), field dependent SCLC, and top contact transistor characteristics. The charge carrier transport in interface modified hole only devices was analysed using Gaussian disorder model. The thermal stability of MeO-Spiro-TPD has been investigated by atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. The study indicates a thermally stable and highly efficient hole transport material for application in organic semiconductor based devices.

  17. Highly Stable Nanocontainer of APTES-Anchored Layered Titanate Nanosheet for Reliable Protection/Recovery of Nucleic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, In Young; Park, Dae-Hwan; Choy, Jin-Ho; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2016-02-01

    A universal technology for the encapsulative protection of unstable anionic species by highly stable layered metal oxide has been developed via the surface modification of a metal oxide nanosheet. The surface anchoring of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) on exfoliated titanate nanosheet yields a novel cationic metal oxide nanosheet, which can be universally used for the hybridization with various biological and inorganic anions. The encapsulation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the cationic APTES-anchored titanate lattice makes possible the reliable long-term protection of DNA against enzymatic, chemical, and UV-vis light corrosions. The encapsulated DNA can be easily released from the titanate lattice via sonication, underscoring the functionality of the cationic APTES-anchored titanate nanosheet as a stable nanocontainer for DNA. The APTES-anchored titanate nanosheet can be also used as an efficient CO2 adsorbent and a versatile host material for various inorganic anions like polyoxometalates, leading to the synthesis of novel intercalative nanohybrids with unexplored properties and useful functionalities.

  18. Improve oxidation resistance at high temperature by nanocrystalline surface layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Z X; Zhang, C; Huang, X F; Liu, W B; Yang, Z G

    2015-08-13

    An interesting change of scale sequence occurred during oxidation of nanocrystalline surface layer by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment. The three-layer oxide structure from the surface towards the matrix is Fe3O4, spinel FeCr2O4 and corundum (Fe,Cr)2O3, which is different from the typical two-layer scale consisted of an Fe3O4 outer layer and an FeCr2O4 inner layer in conventional P91 steel. The diffusivity of Cr, Fe and O is enhanced concurrently in the nanocrystalline surface layer, which causes the fast oxidation in the initial oxidation stage. The formation of (Fe,Cr)2O3 inner layer would inhabit fast diffusion of alloy elements in the nanocrystalline surface layer of P91 steel in the later oxidation stage, and it causes a decrease in the parabolic oxidation rate compared with conventional specimens. This study provides a novel approach to improve the oxidation resistance of heat resistant steel without changing its Cr content.

  19. The Critical Richardson Number and Limits of Applicability of Local Similarity Theory in the Stable Boundary Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Grachev, Andrey A; Fairall, Christopher W; Guest, Peter S; Persson, P Ola G

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric turbulence made over the Arctic pack ice during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean experiment (SHEBA) are used to determine the limits of applicability of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (in the local scaling formulation) in the stable atmospheric boundary layer. Based on spectral analysis of wind velocity and air temperature fluctuations, it is shown that when both gradient Richardson number, Ri, and flux Richardson number, Rf, exceed a 'critical value' about 0.20-0.25, the inertial subrange associated with the Kolmogorov cascade dies out and vertical turbulent fluxes become small. Some small-scale turbulence survives even in the supercritical regime, but this is non-Kolmogorov turbulence and it decays rapidly with further increasing stability. Similarity theory is based on the turbulent fluxes in the high-frequency part of the spectra that are associated with energy-containing/flux-carrying eddies. Spectral densities in this high-frequency band diminish as the Kolmogorov...

  20. Impedance of Surface Footings on Layered Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Clausen, Johan Christian

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally only the static bearing capacity and stiffness of the ground is considered in the design of wind turbine foundations. However, modern wind turbines are flexible structures with resonance frequencies as low as 0.2 Hz. Unfortunately, environmental loads and the passage of blades past...... the tower may lead to excitation with frequencies of the same order of magnitude. Therefore, dynamic soil-structure interaction has to be accounted for in order to get an accurate prediction of the structural response. In this paper the particular problem of a rigid foundation on a layered subsoil...

  1. Impedance of Surface Footings on Layered Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Clausen, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally only the static bearing capacity and stiffness of the ground is considered in the design of wind turbine foundations. However, modern wind turbines are flexible structures with resonance frequencies as low as 0.2 Hz. Unfortunately, environmental loads and the passage of blades past...... the tower may lead to excitation with frequencies of the same order of magnitude. Therefore, dynamic soilstructure interaction has to be accounted for in order to get an accurate prediction of the structural response. In this paper the particular problem of a rigid foundation on a layered subsoil...

  2. Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow over Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    Figure 1 were a highly viscous fluid, such as honey , the boundary layer would be thick while if the fluid were water, a low-viscosity fluid, the boundary...drag has become even more important. In response to this need, and with the benefit of modern technology, the drag-reduction field is replete with...manufactured with “riblets,” small ridges on the order of fractions of millimeters, built-into the hull or skin that seek to reduce frictional drag. The

  3. Laboratory investigation of a thermally stable boundary layer subject to a step change in wall temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buren, Tyler; Williams, Owen J.; Smits, Alexander J.

    2014-11-01

    Thermally stable boundary layers with a step change in boundary condition are seen in industrial applications (e.g. plate heat exchangers) as well as in nature (e.g. onshore breezes). Previous studies indicate that bulk indicators of stability are often insufficient to describe the local state of turbulence because the local flow strongly depends on its upstream history. Experiments were conducted to gain further insight into these flows. A low-speed wind tunnel was used to generate a rough-wall boundary layer at up to Reθ = 1500 . After a development length of approximately 22 δ , the downstream half of the tunnel wall was heated, creating a step change in wall temperature of up to 135° C . Particle image velocimetry and a thermocouple rake were used to measure the fluctuating velocity field and mean temperature profile at three locations downstream of the step change. We examine the rate of growth of the internal boundary layer and the corresponding evolution of the turbulent stresses in relation to changes in mean local stratification. This work was supported by the Princeton University Cooperative Institute for Climate Science.

  4. Marginally stable and turbulent boundary layers in low-curvature Taylor-Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Brauckmann, Hannes J

    2016-01-01

    Marginal stability arguments are used to describe the rotation-number dependence of torque in Taylor-Couette (TC) flow for radius ratios $\\eta \\geq 0.9$ and shear Reynolds number $Re_S=2\\times 10^4$. With an approximate representation of the mean profile by piecewise linear functions, characterized by the boundary-layer thicknesses at the inner and outer cylinder and the angular momentum in the center, profiles and torques are extracted from the requirement that the boundary layers represent marginally stable TC subsystems and that the torque at the inner and outer cylinder coincide. This model then explains the broad shoulder in the torque as a function of rotation number near $R_\\Omega\\approx 0.2$. For rotation numbers $R_\\Omega < 0.07$ the TC stability conditions predict boundary layers in which shear Reynolds numbers are very large. Assuming that the TC instability is bypassed by some shear instability, a second maximum in torque appears, in very good agreement with numerical simulations. The results s...

  5. Process Conditions of Forming the Surface Layer of Aluminum Powder Product by Layer-by-layer Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saprykina, N. A.; Saprykin, A. A.; Ibragimov, E. A.; Arkhipova, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents data on state of the art in selective laser sintering of products. Layer-by-layer sintering is shown to be a future-oriented technology, making it possible to synthesize products of metal powder materials. Factors, influencing the quality of a sintered product, are revealed in the paper. It presents outcomes of experiments, focused on the dependence of surface layer thickness of sintered aluminum powder PA-4 on laser processing conditions. Basic factors, influencing the quality of a sintered surface layer include laser power, speeds of scanning and moving the laser beam on the layer of powder. Thickness of the sintered layer varies from 0.74 to 1.55 mm, as the result of changing the laser processing conditions.

  6. Nanoscale Surface Modification of Layered Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Aaron

    2011-11-01

    A scanning electron microscope can magnify a sample many times greater than a standard microscope, down to nanoscale dimensions. It can also be used to form patterns on the surfaces of certain materials, a technique used to create microchips. We have developed a technique that simplifies and expedites this process using an unmodified scanning electron microscope. Using this technique, we are able to alter the surface chemistry in a controlled pattern on a special class of materials called transition metal dichalcogenides. These materials have many useful applications: industrial lubricants; high strength nanocomposites; advanced solar cells; and next generation electronics. Altering the surface chemistry of these materials at the nanoscale results in unusual quantum behavior, which is useful in nanotechnology.

  7. Effects of stratification on an ocean surface Ekman layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hieu; Sarkar, Sutanu

    2014-11-01

    Large-eddy simulations are used to investigate the effects of stratification on structural and turbulent dynamics of an upper-ocean Ekman layer that is driven by a constant wind stress (friction velocity u*) at low latitude with Coriolis parameter f. The surface layer evolves in the presence of interior stratification whose buoyancy frequency varies among cases, taking three values: N / f = 19 , 60 and 192. At quasi-steady state, a stratified turbulent Ekman layer forms with a surface current veering to the right of the wind direction. The thickness of the Ekman layer decreases with increasing N and is found to scale with u*, f, and N, similar to the neutral atmospheric boundary layer of Zilitinkevich & Esau (2002) that is capped by a stratified layer with buoyancy frequency, N. As N increases, the speed of the Ekman current increases but the Ekman transport is invariant. The surface veering angle also increases with larger N. The shear rate and buoyancy frequency are elevated at the base of the Ekman layer. The peak of down-wind Reynolds stress occurs near the surface and scales with u*2 in all cases while the peak of cross-wind Reynolds stress occurs in the middle of the Ekman layer and decreases with increasing N.

  8. Surface plasmon polariton modulator with optimized active layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    A multilayered waveguide, which supports surface plasmon polaritons, is considered as an absorption modulator. The waveguide core consists of a silicon nitride layer and ultrathin layer with the varied carrier density embedded between two silver plates, which also serve as electrodes. Under...

  9. Pinning and gas oversaturation imply stable single surface nanobubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohse, Detlef; Zhang, Xuehua

    2015-01-01

    Surface nanobubbles are experimentally known to survive for days at hydrophobic surfaces immersed in gas-oversaturated water. This is different from bulk nanobubbles, which are pressed out by the Laplace pressure against any gas oversaturation and dissolve in submilliseconds, as derived by Epstein a

  10. Accumulation-layer surface plasmons in transparent conductive oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardad, Shima; Alexander Ramos, E; Salandrino, Alessandro

    2017-05-15

    A rigorous analytical study of the eigenmodes supported by a charge accumulation layer within a transparent conductive oxide (TCO) is presented. The new class of surface plasmons termed accumulation-layer surface plasmons (ASPs) is introduced. Near resonance ASPs are tightly bound and display a vast effective index tunability that could be of great practical interest. The suppression of ASPs in the presence of epsilon-near zero regions is discussed.

  11. Surface layers on a borosilicate nuclear waste glass corroded in MgCl 2 solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Crovisier, Jean-Louis; Lutze, Werner; Grambow, Bernd; Dran, Jean-Claude; Müller, Regina

    1997-01-01

    Surface layers on the French borosilicate nuclear waste glass, R7T7, corroded in MgCl 2 solution were studied to determine the composition, structure and stability of crystalline phases. The characteristics of the phases constituting the surface layer varied with the parameter {S}/{V} × t , the glass surface area ( S) to solution volume ( V) ratio, times time ( t). At low {S}/{V} × t values (intermediate {S}/{V} × t value (2800 d/m; 5.5 y) the surface layer contained hydrotalcite-, chlorite- and saponite-type phases. At the highest {S}/{V} × t value (10 7 d/m; 463 d) the major phases were saponite, powellite, barite and cerianite solid solutions. About 95% of the uranium and > 98% of the neodymium released from the glass were precipitated in the surface layer. In the 463 day experiment, 86% of the neodymium in the surface layer was in solid solution with powellite, the rest with saponite. Uranium was contained exclusively in saponite. High {S}/{V} ratios, typical of disposal conditions for vitrified high-level radioactive waste, favor retention of actinides in fairly insoluble corrosion products. Observation of similar corrosion products on natural glasses as on nuclear waste glasses lend support to the hypothesis that the host phases for actinides observed in the laboratory are stable over geological periods of time.

  12. Local flux-profile relationships of wind speed and temperature in a canopy layer in atmospheric stable conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zhang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The particularities of the physics of the canopy layer pose challenges to the determination and use of traditional universal functions so helpful in the atmospheric surface layer. Progress toward "universal-like functions" such as those provided by Monin-Obukhov similarity theory for the canopy layer has been modest. One of the challenges lies in that the assumptions underlying Monin-Obukhov similarity theory do not hold within a canopy layer. This paper thus examines the local flux-profile relations for wind (Φm and for temperature (Φh. It uses three different stability parameters, i.e., h/L(h at tree top, local z/L(z, and the local bulk Richardson number (Ri, within a tall forest canopy in nighttime stable (indicated by h/L(h > 0 conditions. Results suggest that the in-canopy Φm can be described using the local Richardson number Ri. Furthermore, Φm is found to increase linearly with Ri in the upper canopy layer for |Ri| < 1. When local |Ri| > 1, |Φm| decreases with |Ri| in a power function, a result consistent for all levels of measurements within the canopy. When both local Φh and local Ri are positive, i.e., the local downward turbulent heat flux is consistent with the local temperature gradient, the local Φh increases with the local Ri when Ri < 1. However, Φh does not change with Ri (or much more scattered when Ri > 1. The relationship between local Φh and Ri disappears when counter-gradient heat transfer occurs in strongly stable conditions. A self-correlation analysis is used to examine the influence of self-correlation and the physical meaning of these relationships.

  13. Turbulence Structure of the Unstable Atmospheric Surface Layer and Transition to the Outer Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, K. G.

    We present a new model of the structure of turbulence in the unstable atmospheric surface layer, and of the structural transition between this and the outer layer. The archetypal element of wall-bounded shear turbulence is the Theodorsen ejection amplifier (TEA) structure, in which an initial ejection of air from near the ground into an ideal laminar and logarithmic flow induces vortical motion about a hairpin-shaped core, which then creates a second ejection that is similar to, but larger than, the first. A series of TEA structures form a TEA cascade. In real turbulent flows TEA structures occur in distorted forms as TEA-like (TEAL) structures. Distortion terminates many TEAL cascades and only the best-formed TEAL structures initiate new cycles. In an extended log layer the resulting shear turbulence is a complex, self-organizing, dissipative system exhibiting self-similar behaviour under inner scaling. Spectral results show that this structure is insensitive to instability. This is contrary to the fundamental hypothesis of Monin--Obukhov similarity theory. All TEAL cascades terminate at the top of the surface layer where they encounter, and are severely distorted by, powerful eddies of similar size from the outer layer. These eddies are products of the breakdown of the large eddies produced by buoyancy in the outer layer. When the outer layer is much deeper than the surface layer the interacting eddies are from the inertial subrange of the outer Richardson cascade. The scale height of the surface layer, zs, is then found by matching the powers delivered to the creation of emerging TEAL structures to the power passing down the Richardson cascade in the outer layer. It is zs = u* 3ks, where u*s friction velocity, k is the von Káán constant and s is the rate of dissipation of turbulence kinetic energy in the outer layer immediately above the surface layer. This height is comparable to the Obukhov length in the fully convective boundary layer. Aircraft and tower

  14. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika; Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas-solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin - even non-uniform - atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid.

  15. Stable isotope time-series in mammalian teeth: In situ δ18O from the innermost enamel layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Scott A.; Cerling, Thure E.; Chritz, Kendra L.; Bromage, Timothy G.; Kozdon, Reinhard; Valley, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in mammalian tooth enamel are commonly used to understand the diets and environments of modern and fossil animals. Isotope variation during the period of enamel formation can be recovered by intra-tooth microsampling along the direction of growth. However, conventional sampling of the enamel surface provides highly time-averaged records in part due to amelogenesis. We use backscattered electron imaging in the scanning electron microscope (BSE-SEM) to evaluate enamel mineralization in developing teeth from one rodent and two ungulates. Gray levels from BSE-SEM images suggest that the innermost enamel layer, <20 μm from the enamel-dentine junction, is highly mineralized early in enamel maturation and therefore may record a less attenuated isotopic signal than other layers. We sampled the right maxillary incisor from a woodrat subjected to an experimentally induced water-switch during the period of tooth development, and demonstrate that secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) can be used to obtain δ18O values with 4-5-μm spots from mammalian tooth enamel. We also demonstrate that SIMS can be used to discretely sample the innermost enamel layer, which is too narrow for conventional microdrilling or laser ablation. An abrupt δ18O switch of 16.0‰ was captured in breath CO2, a proxy for body water, while a laser ablation enamel surface intra-tooth profile of the left incisor captured a δ18O range of 12.1‰. The innermost enamel profile captured a δ18O range of 15.7‰, which approaches the full magnitude of δ18O variation in the input signal. This approach will likely be most beneficial in taxa such as large mammalian herbivores, whose teeth are characterized by less rapid mineralization and therefore greater attenuation of the enamel isotope signal.

  16. Coupled Mesoscale-Large-Eddy Modeling of Realistic Stable Boundary Layer Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yao; Manuel, Lance

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific flow and turbulence information are needed for various practical applications, ranging from aerodynamic/aeroelastic modeling for wind turbine design to optical diffraction calculations. Even though highly desirable, collecting on-site meteorological measurements can be an expensive, time-consuming, and sometimes a challenging task. In this work, we propose a coupled mesoscale-large-eddy modeling framework to synthetically generate site-specific flow and turbulence data. The workhorses behind our framework are a state-of-the-art, open-source atmospheric model called the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and a tuning-free large-eddy simulation (LES) model. Using this coupled framework, we simulate a nighttime stable boundary layer (SBL) case from the well-known CASES-99 field campaign. One of the unique aspects of this work is the usage of a diverse range of observations for characterization and validation. The coupled models reproduce certain characteristics of observed low-level jets....

  17. Erosion resistance of Fe-C-Cr weld surfacing layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fe-C-Cr weld surfacing layers with different compositions and microstructures can be obtained by submerged arc welding with welding wire of the low carbon steel and high alloy bonded flux. With the increase of Cr and C in the layers the microstructures are changed from hypoeutectoid steel, hypereutectoid steel to hypoeutectic iron and hypereutectic iron. When the weld surfacing layers belong to the alloyed cast irons the erosion resistance can be raised with the eutectic increase and the austenite decrease. Good erosion resistance can be obtained when the proportion of the primary carbides is within 10 %. The experimental results lay a foundation to make double-metal percussive plates by surfacing wear resistant layers on the substrates of the low carbon steels.

  18. The Critical Richardson Number and Limits of Applicability of Local Similarity Theory in the Stable Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, Andrey A.; Andreas, Edgar L.; Fairall, Christopher W.; Guest, Peter S.; Persson, P. Ola G.

    2013-04-01

    Measurements of atmospheric turbulence made over the Arctic pack ice during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean experiment (SHEBA) are used to determine the limits of applicability of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (in the local scaling formulation) in the stable atmospheric boundary layer. Based on the spectral analysis of wind velocity and air temperature fluctuations, it is shown that, when both the gradient Richardson number, Ri, and the flux Richardson number, Rf, exceed a `critical value' of about 0.20-0.25, the inertial subrange associated with the Richardson-Kolmogorov cascade dies out and vertical turbulent fluxes become small. Some small-scale turbulence survives even in this supercritical regime, but this is non-Kolmogorov turbulence, and it decays rapidly with further increasing stability. Similarity theory is based on the turbulent fluxes in the high-frequency part of the spectra that are associated with energy-containing/flux-carrying eddies. Spectral densities in this high-frequency band diminish as the Richardson-Kolmogorov energy cascade weakens; therefore, the applicability of local Monin-Obukhov similarity theory in stable conditions is limited by the inequalities Ri < Ri cr and Rf < Rf cr. However, it is found that Rf cr = 0.20-0.25 is a primary threshold for applicability. Applying this prerequisite shows that the data follow classical Monin-Obukhov local z-less predictions after the irrelevant cases (turbulence without the Richardson-Kolmogorov cascade) have been filtered out.

  19. Adsorption of hydrogen on stable and metastable Ir(100) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arman, Mohammad Alif; Klein, Andreas; Ferstl, Pascal; Valookaran, Abhilash; Gustafson, Johan; Schulte, Karina; Lundgren, Edvin; Heinz, Klaus; Schneider, Alexander; Mittendorfer, Florian; Hammer, Lutz; Knudsen, Jan

    2017-02-01

    Using the combination of high resolution core level spectroscopy and density functional theory we present a detailed spectroscopic study for all clean and hydrogen covered phases of Ir(100). The results are complemented by an investigation of the hydrogen desorption process from various phases using temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. In total, all experimentally determined core level shifts match very well with those predicted by density functional theory based on established structural models. In particular, we find for the (bridge site) adsorption on the unreconstructed 1×1 phase that the initial core level shift of surface Ir atoms is altered by +0.17 eV for each Ir-H bond formed. In the submonolayer regime we find evidence for island formation at low temperatures. For the H-induced deconstructed 5×1-H phase we identify four different surface core level shifts with two of them being degenerate. Finally, for the reconstructed 5×1-hex phase also four surface components are identified, which undergo a rather rigid core level shift of +0.15 eV upon hydrogen adsorption suggesting a similarly homogeneous charge transfer to all Ir surface atoms. Thermodesorption experiments for the 5×1-H phase reveal two different binding states for hydrogen independent of the total coverage. We conclude that the surface always separates into patches of fully covered deconstructed and uncovered reconstructed phases. We could also show by tunneling microscopy that with the desorption of the last hydrogen atom from the deconstructed unit cell the surface instantaneously reverts into the reconstructed state. Eventually, we could determine the saturation coverage upon molecular adsorption for all phases to be θmax1 × 1 - H = 1.0 ML , θmax5 × 1 - H = 0.8 ML , and θmax5 × 1 - hex - H ≥ 1.0 ML .

  20. Surface chemistry for stable and smart molecular and biomolecular interfaces via photochemical grafting of alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Landis, Elizabeth C; Franking, Ryan; Hamers, Robert J

    2010-09-21

    Many emerging fields such as biotechnology and renewable energy require functionalized surfaces that are "smart" and highly stable. Surface modification schemes developed previously have often been limited to simple molecules or have been based on weakly bound layers that have limited stability. In this Account, we report on recent developments enabling the preparation of molecular and biomolecular interfaces that exhibit high selectivity and unprecedented stability on a range of covalent materials including diamond, vertically aligned carbon nanofibers, silicon, and metal oxides. One particularly successful pathway to ultrastable interfaces involves the photochemical grafting of organic alkenes to the surfaces. Bifunctional alkenes with a suitable functional group at the distal end can directly impart functionality and can serve as attachment points for linking complex structures such as DNA and proteins. The successful application of photochemical grafting to a surprisingly wide range of materials has motivated researchers to better understand the underlying photochemical reaction mechanisms. The resulting studies using experimental and computational methods have provided fundamental insights into the electronic structure of the molecules and the surface control photochemical reactivity. Such investigations have revealed the important role of a previously unrecognized process, photoelectron emission, in initiating photochemical grafting of alkenes to surfaces. Molecular and biomolecular interfaces formed on diamond and other covalent materials are leading to novel types of molecular electronic interfaces. For example, electrical, optical, or electromechanical structures that convert biological information directly into analytical signals allow for direct label-free detection of DNA and proteins. Because of the preferential adherence of molecules to graphitic edge-plane sites, the grafting of redox-active species to vertically aligned carbon nanofibers leads to

  1. Stable non-covalent labeling of layered silicate nanoparticles for biological imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Gysell M; Jack, Kevin S; Musumeci, Anthony W; Martin, Darren J; Minchin, Rodney F

    2016-04-01

    Layered silicate nanoparticles (LSN) are widely used in industrial applications and consumer products. They also have potential benefits in biomedical applications such as implantable devices and for drug delivery. To study how nanomaterials interact with cells and tissues, techniques to track and quantify their movement through different biological compartments are essential. While radiolabels can be very sensitive, particularly for in vivo studies, fluorescent labeling has been preferred in recent years because of the array of methods available to image and quantify fluorescent nanoparticles. However, labeling can be problematic, especially if it alters the physical properties of the nanomaterial. Herein is described a novel non-covalent labeling technique for LSN using readily available fluorescent dimeric cyanine dyes without the need to use excess amounts of dye to achieve labeling, or the need for removal of unbound dye. The approach utilizes the cationic binding properties of layered silicate clays and the multiple quaternary nitrogens associated with the dyes. Preparation of YOYO-1 labeled LSN with optimal dispersion in aqueous media is presented. The utilization of the labeled particles is then demonstrated in cell binding and uptake studies using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The labeled LSN are highly fluorescent, stable and exhibit identical physical properties with respect to the unlabeled nanoparticles. The general approach described here is applicable to other cyanine dyes and may be utilized more widely for labeling nanoparticles that comprise a crystalline plate structure with a high binding capacity.

  2. Is bicarbonate stable in and on the calcite surface?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Rodriguez Blanco, Juan Diego; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2016-01-01

    We have used density functional theory with the COSMO-RS implicit solvent model to predict the pKa for the deprotonation of bicarbonate to carbonate, i.e. HCO3− CO32− + H+, when HCO3− is included in, and adsorbed on, a calcite surface. We have used cluster models (80–100 atoms) to represent...... the flat {10.4} surface, acute steps, obtuse steps, two types of kinks on the acute step and two types of kinks on the obtuse steps. Based on the predicted pKa values, which range from −6.0 to 2.4 depending on the surface site, we conclude that bicarbonate deprotonates to carbonate when it is in calcite...... even when pH in solution is very low. This is true for all surface sites, even for solutions where 2.4 calcite, the predicted pKa for deprotonation is 7.5, which is ∼3 pH units lower than in aqueous solution...

  3. Parabolic stable Higgs bundles over complete noncompact Riemann surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李嘉禹; 王友德

    1999-01-01

    Let M be an open Riemann surface with a finite set of punctures, a complete Poincar(?)-like metric is introduced near the punctures and the equivalence between the stability of an indecomposable parabolic Higgs bundle, and the existence of a Hermitian-Einstein metric on the bundle is established.

  4. Double Charged Surface Layers in Lead Halide Perovskite Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Sarmah, Smritakshi P.

    2017-02-01

    Understanding defect chemistry, particularly ion migration, and its significant effect on the surface’s optical and electronic properties is one of the major challenges impeding the development of hybrid perovskite-based devices. Here, using both experimental and theoretical approaches, we demonstrated that the surface layers of the perovskite crystals may acquire a high concentration of positively charged vacancies with the complementary negatively charged halide ions pushed to the surface. This charge separation near the surface generates an electric field that can induce an increase of optical band gap in the surface layers relative to the bulk. We found that the charge separation, electric field, and the amplitude of shift in the bandgap strongly depend on the halides and organic moieties of perovskite crystals. Our findings reveal the peculiarity of surface effects that are currently limiting the applications of perovskite crystals and more importantly explain their origins, thus enabling viable surface passivation strategies to remediate them.

  5. Formation of the Surface Space Charge Layer in Fair Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redin, Alexander; Kupovykh, Gennady; Boldyreff, Anton

    2014-05-01

    It is widely known that the positive space charge, caused by electrode effect action, is obtained near surface in fair weather. Space charge density depends on the different local features: meteorological conditions, aerosol particles concentration, convective transfer of the surface layer. Namely space charge determines the local variations of electric field. Space charge could be negative in condition of strong ionization rate in thin air layer near surface. The electrodynamic model, consisting of transfer equations of light ions and nucleuses, generated by interactions between lights ions and aerosol particles, and Poisson equation. The turbulent transfer members, electric field near the surface, the mobility of positive and negative ions, recombination coefficient, ionization rate, the number of elementary charges on the nuclei were took into account in the model equations. The time-space variations of positive and negative small and heavy ions, electric field, electrical conductivity, current density and space charge, depending on aerosol particles concentrations, turbulence and convective transfer ionization rate, aerosol particles size and number of charged on the particles are calculated. The mechanisms of turbulent and convection-turbulent surface layer electrodynamic structure forming in dependence of single and multi-charged aerosol particles for different physical and meteorological conditions are investigated. Increasing of turbulent mixing intensity leads to increasing of character electrode layer thickness, decreasing of space charge density value, decreasing of electric current conductivity value. The electrode effect of the whole layer remains constant. Increasing of aerosol particles concentration leads to decreasing of electrode effect within the whole electrode layer and increasing of electric field values, decreasing of space charge density values and current conductivity density. It was received that increasing of the aerosol particles

  6. A Tri-Layer Proton-Conducting Electrolyte for Chemically Stable Operation in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2013-10-07

    Two BaZr0.7Pr0.1Y0.2O3-δ (BZPY) layers were used to sandwich a BaCe0.8Y0.2O3-δ (BCY) layer to produce a tri-layer electrolyte consisting of BZPY/BCY/BZPY. The BZPY layers significantly improved the chemical stability of the BCY electrolyte layer, which was not stable when tested alone, suggesting that the BZPY layer effectively protected the BCY layer from CO2 reaction, which is the major problem of BCY-based materials. A fuel cell with this sandwiched electrolyte supported on a Ni-based composite anode showed a reasonable cell performance, reaching 185 mW cm-2 at 700 oC, in spite of the relatively large electrolyte thickness (about 65 µm).

  7. Laser alloying of the plain carbon steel surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Radziszewska

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available As an example of the types of features observed after laser alloying, the addition of Ta to mild carbon steel is described. The system is of interest because such alloying is beneficial in improving surface related properties. The paper describes the microstructure and properties (phase and chemical composition, microhardness of the laser alloyed surface layer. In the investigation the optical microscope, the scanning electron microscope (SEM, chemical (EDS microanalysis composition and microhardness testing methods have been used. Specimens of 0,17 %C plain steel were coated with Ta powder layers. The paints containing organic components were used as the binders during deposition of Ta powder layers on the sample surface. The thickness of Ta deposited layers amounted to 0,16 mm. The specimens were then swept through high power (of nominal power 2,5 kW CW CO2 laser radiation at different speeds.The surface alloyed layers varied in microstructure consisted of fiber like Ta2C + γ eutectics, chemical composition and microhardness. The EDS analyses revealed the enrichment of tantalum in the laser alloyed zone (LAZ. The changes of process parameters had an influence on the hardness of alloyed surface layers: by increasing scanning velocity (from 12 mm/s to 20 mm/s and decreasing laser power (from 1,8 kW to 1,35 kW, the hardness diminished. The wear tests were also carried out which showed that laser alloying of plain carbon steel surface layer led to improvement of their wear resistance.

  8. Method for producing functionally graded nanocrystalline layer on metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Oyelayo O.; Hershberger, Jeffrey G.

    2010-03-23

    An improved process for the creation or formation of nanocrystalline layers on substrates' surfaces is provided. The process involves "prescuffing" the surface of a substrate such as a metal by allowing friction to occur on the surface by a load-bearing entity making rubbing contact and moving along and on the substrate's surface. The "prescuffing" action is terminated when the coefficient of friction between the surface and the noise is rising significantly. Often, the significant rise in the coefficient of friction is signaled by a change in pitch of the scuffing action sound emanating from the buffeted surface. The "prescuffing" gives rise to a harder and smoother surface which withstands better any inadequate lubrication that may take place when the "prescuffed" surface is contacted by other surfaces.

  9. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko, E-mail: leena-sisko.johansson@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, PO Box 16100, FI‐00076 AALTO (Finland); Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland)

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO{sub 2}. • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt.

  10. Surface modes in sheared boundary layers over impedance linings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambley, E. J.

    2013-08-01

    Surface modes, being duct modes localized close to the duct wall, are analysed within a lined cylindrical duct with uniform flow apart from a thin boundary layer. As well as full numerical solutions of the Pridmore-Brown equation, simplified mathematical models are given where the duct lining and boundary layer are lumped together and modelled using a single boundary condition (a modification of the Myers boundary condition previously proposed by the author), from which a surface mode dispersion relation is derived. For a given frequency, up to six surface modes are shown to exist, rather than the maximum of four for uniform slipping flow. Not only is the different number and behaviour of surface modes important for frequency-domain mode-matching techniques, which depend on having found all relevant modes during matching, but the thin boundary layer is also shown to lead to different convective and absolute stability than for uniform slipping flow. Numerical examples are given comparing the predictions of the surface mode dispersion relation to full solutions of the Pridmore-Brown equation, and the accuracy with which surface modes are predicted is shown to be significantly increased compared with the uniform slipping flow assumption. The importance of not only the boundary layer thickness but also its profile (tanh or linear) is demonstrated. A Briggs-Bers stability analysis is also performed under the assumption of a mass-spring-damper or Helmholtz resonator impedance model.

  11. Stable isotope labeling of oligosaccharide cell surface antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III; Martinez, R.A. [and others

    1998-12-31

    The overall goal of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop new methods for synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides that are required for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of their solution conformation. Oligosaccharides are components of the cell`s outer surface and are involved in important processes such as cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Recently, Danishefsky and coworkers at Slone-Kettering Cancer Center developed a method for the solid-phase chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides. The specific goal of this LDRD project was to prepare uniform {sup 13}C-labeled aldohexose precursors required for the solid-phase synthesis of the Lewis blood-group antigenic determinants. We report the synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled D-glucal, D-galactal and Fucosyl precursors. We have been collaborating with the Danishefsky group on the synthesis of the Lewis oligosaccharides and the NMR analysis of their solution conformation.

  12. Water content distribution in the surface layer of Maoping slope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuewu; CHEN Huixin; LIU Qingquan; GONG Xin; ZHANG Dawei; LI Lianxiang

    2005-01-01

    The water content distribution in the surface layer of Maoping slope has been studied by testing the water content at 31 control sites. The water content profiles at these sites have also been determined. The water content distributions at different segments have been obtained by using the Kriging method of geostatistics. By comparing the water content distributions with the landform of the slope, it was shown that the water content is closely dependent on the landform of the slope. The water content distribution in the surface layer provided a fundamental basis for landslide predication and treatment.

  13. Wetting layer of copper on the tantalum (001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupraz, Maxime; Poloni, Roberta; Ratter, Kitti; Rodney, David; De Santis, Maurizio; Gilles, Bruno; Beutier, Guillaume; Verdier, Marc

    2016-12-01

    The heteroepitaxial interface formed by copper deposited onto the tantalum (001) surface is studied by surface x-ray diffraction and ab initio calculations. The analysis of the crystal truncation rods reveals the presence of a wetting layer of copper made of two atomic planes pseudomorphic to the tantalum substrate, with the upper most atomic planes significantly deformed. These findings are in total agreement with the results of density-functional-theory calculations. The presence of the wetting layer confirms a Stranski-Krastanov growth mode and is thought to explain the extremely fast atomic diffusion of copper during the dewetting process in the solid state at high temperature.

  14. Stress distribution and surface instability of an inclined granular layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng He-Peng; Jiang Yi-Min; Peng Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Static granular materials may avalanche suddenly under continuous quasi-static drives.This phenomenon,which is important in many engineering applications,can be explained by analyzing the stability of the elastic solutions.We show this for a granular layer driven by its inclination angle in gravity,where the elastic problem can be solved generally and analytically.It is found that a loss of stability may occur only at the free surface of the layer.This result is considered to be relevant for understanding surface avalanches and the flows observed experimentally.

  15. Chromized Layers Produced on Steel Surface by Means of CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KASPRZYCKA Ewa; BOGDA(N)SKI Bogdan; JEZIORSKI Leopold; JASI(N)SKI J(o)zef; TORBUS Roman

    2004-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposition of chromium on the surface of carbon steel has been investigated using a novel CVD method that combines the low cost of pack cementation method with advantages of vacuum technique. The processes have been performed in chromium chlorides atmosphere at a low pressure range from 1 to 800 hPa, the treatment temperature 800 to 950℃. Studies of the layers thickness, the phase composition, Cr, C and Fe depth profiles in diffusion zone have been conducted. The effect of the vacuum level during the process and the process parameters such as time and temperature on layer diffusion growth on the carbon steel surface has been investigated.

  16. Single-molecule force spectroscopy reveals the individual mechanical unfolding pathways of a surface layer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horejs, Christine; Ristl, Robin; Tscheliessnig, Rupert; Sleytr, Uwe B; Pum, Dietmar

    2011-08-05

    Surface layers (S-layers) represent an almost universal feature of archaeal cell envelopes and are probably the most abundant bacterial cell proteins. S-layers are monomolecular crystalline structures of single protein or glycoprotein monomers that completely cover the cell surface during all stages of the cell growth cycle, thereby performing their intrinsic function under a constant intra- and intermolecular mechanical stress. In gram-positive bacteria, the individual S-layer proteins are anchored by a specific binding mechanism to polysaccharides (secondary cell wall polymers) that are linked to the underlying peptidoglycan layer. In this work, atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy and a polyprotein approach are used to study the individual mechanical unfolding pathways of an S-layer protein. We uncover complex unfolding pathways involving the consecutive unfolding of structural intermediates, where a mechanical stability of 87 pN is revealed. Different initial extensibilities allow the hypothesis that S-layer proteins adapt highly stable, mechanically resilient conformations that are not extensible under the presence of a pulling force. Interestingly, a change of the unfolding pathway is observed when individual S-layer proteins interact with secondary cell wall polymers, which is a direct signature of a conformational change induced by the ligand. Moreover, the mechanical stability increases up to 110 pN. This work demonstrates that single-molecule force spectroscopy offers a powerful tool to detect subtle changes in the structure of an individual protein upon binding of a ligand and constitutes the first conformational study of surface layer proteins at the single-molecule level.

  17. Facile Fabrication and Characterization of a PDMS-Derived Candle Soot Coated Stable Biocompatible Superhydrophobic and Superhemophobic Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, R; Majhy, B; Sen, A K

    2017-09-13

    We report a simple, inexpensive, rapid, and one-step method for the fabrication of a stable and biocompatible superhydrophobic and superhemophobic surface. The proposed surface comprises candle soot particles embedded in a mixture of PDMS+n-hexane serving as the base material. The mechanism responsible for the superhydrophobic behavior of the surface is explained, and the surface is characterized based on its morphology and elemental composition, wetting properties, mechanical and chemical stability, and biocompatibility. The effect of %n-hexane in PDMS, the thickness of the PDMS+n-hexane layer (in terms of spin coating speed) and sooting time on the wetting property of the surface is studied. The proposed surface exhibits nanoscale surface asperities (average roughness of 187 nm), chemical compositions of soot particles, very high water and blood repellency along with excellent mechanical and chemical stability and excellent biocompatibility against blood sample and biological cells. The water contact angle and roll-off angle is measured as 160° ± 1° and 2°, respectively, and the blood contact angle is found to be 154° ± 1°, which indicates that the surface is superhydrophobic and superhemophobic. The proposed superhydrophobic and superhemophobic surface offers significantly improved (>40%) cell viability as compared to glass and PDMS surfaces.

  18. Self-surface charge exfoliation and electrostatically coordinated 2D hetero-layered hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min-Quan; Xu, Yi-Jun; Lu, Wanheng; Zeng, Kaiyang; Zhu, Hai; Xu, Qing-Hua; Ho, Ghim Wei

    2017-02-01

    At present, the technological groundwork of atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) hetero-layered structures realized by successive thin film epitaxial growth is in principle constrained by lattice matching prerequisite as well as low yield and expensive production. Here, we artificially coordinate ultrathin 2D hetero-layered metal chalcogenides via a highly scalable self-surface charge exfoliation and electrostatic coupling approach. Specifically, bulk metal chalcogenides are spontaneously exfoliated into ultrathin layers in a surfactant/intercalator-free medium, followed by unconstrained electrostatic coupling with a dissimilar transition metal dichalcogenide, MoSe2, into scalable hetero-layered hybrids. Accordingly, surface and interfacial-dominated photocatalysis reactivity is used as an ideal testbed to verify the reliability of diverse 2D ultrathin hetero-layered materials that reveal high visible-light photoreactivity, efficient charge transfer and intimate contact interface for stable cycling and storage purposes. Such a synthetic approach renders independent thickness and composition control anticipated to advance the development of `design-and-build' 2D layered heterojunctions for large-scale exploration and applications.

  19. Self-surface charge exfoliation and electrostatically coordinated 2D hetero-layered hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min-Quan; Xu, Yi-Jun; Lu, Wanheng; Zeng, Kaiyang; Zhu, Hai; Xu, Qing-Hua; Ho, Ghim Wei

    2017-01-01

    At present, the technological groundwork of atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) hetero-layered structures realized by successive thin film epitaxial growth is in principle constrained by lattice matching prerequisite as well as low yield and expensive production. Here, we artificially coordinate ultrathin 2D hetero-layered metal chalcogenides via a highly scalable self-surface charge exfoliation and electrostatic coupling approach. Specifically, bulk metal chalcogenides are spontaneously exfoliated into ultrathin layers in a surfactant/intercalator-free medium, followed by unconstrained electrostatic coupling with a dissimilar transition metal dichalcogenide, MoSe2, into scalable hetero-layered hybrids. Accordingly, surface and interfacial-dominated photocatalysis reactivity is used as an ideal testbed to verify the reliability of diverse 2D ultrathin hetero-layered materials that reveal high visible-light photoreactivity, efficient charge transfer and intimate contact interface for stable cycling and storage purposes. Such a synthetic approach renders independent thickness and composition control anticipated to advance the development of ‘design-and-build' 2D layered heterojunctions for large-scale exploration and applications. PMID:28146147

  20. A graded catalytic-protective layer for an efficient and stable water-splitting photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jing; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Ferrere, Suzanne; Steirer, K. Xerxes; Yan, Yong; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Young, James L.; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Neale, Nathan R.; Turner, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Achieving solar-to-hydrogen efficiencies above 15% is key for the commercial success of photoelectrochemical water-splitting devices. While tandem cells can reach those efficiencies, increasing the catalytic activity and long-term stability remains a significant challenge. Here we show that annealing a bilayer of amorphous titanium dioxide (TiOx) and molybdenum sulfide (MoSx) deposited onto GaInP2 results in a photocathode with high catalytic activity (current density of 11 mA cm‑2 at 0 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode under 1 sun illumination) and stability (retention of 80% of initial photocurrent density over a 20 h durability test) for the hydrogen evolution reaction. Microscopy and spectroscopy reveal that annealing results in a graded MoSx/MoOx/TiO2 layer that retains much of the high catalytic activity of amorphous MoSx but with stability similar to crystalline MoS2. Our findings demonstrate the potential of utilizing a hybridized, heterogeneous surface layer as a cost-effective catalytic and protective interface for solar hydrogen production.

  1. A graded catalytic–protective layer for an efficient and stable water-splitting photocathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Jing; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Ferrere, Suzanne; Steirer, K. Xerxes; Yan, Yong; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Young, James L.; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Neale, Nathan R.; Turner, John A.

    2017-01-09

    Achieving solar-to-hydrogen efficiencies above 15% is key for the commercial success of photoelectrochemical water splitting devices. While tandem cells can reach those efficiencies, increasing the catalytic activity and long-term stability remains a significant challenge. Here we show that annealing a bilayer of amorphous titanium dioxide (TiOx) and molybdenum sulfide (MoSx) deposited onto GaInP2 results in a photocathode with high catalytic activity (current density of 11 mA/cm2 at 0 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode under 1 sun illumination) and stability (retention of 80% of initial photocurrent density over a 20 h durability test) for the hydrogen evolution reaction. Microscopy and spectroscopy reveal that annealing results in a graded MoSx/MoOx/TiO2 layer that retains much of the high catalytic activity of amorphous MoSx but with stability similar to crystalline MoS2. Our findings demonstrate the potential of utilizing a hybridized, heterogeneous surface layer as a cost-effective catalytic and protective interface for solar hydrogen production.

  2. Thermal stability of nanocrystalline layer prepared by surface mechanical attrition in 0Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-bin; WU Xiao-chun; XU Ling-yun

    2004-01-01

    By means of surface mechanical attrition (SMA), a nanostructured surface layer was formed on a 0Cr18Ni9Ti austenite stainless steel plate. A strain-induced martensite transformation was observed during SMA treatment, and a single magnetic martensite phase layer with thickness of about 30 μm was gotten. The grain growth and phase transformations in the nanocrystalline layer are investigated during heating. The grain growth exponent for nanocrystalline polycrystalline steel is estimated. The kinetics mechanism governing the grain growth in the nanocrystalline layer is discussed. The martensite in the surface layer is quite stable and the temperature at which the reverse transformation of martensite to austenite starts during heating is about 500 ℃.

  3. Planetary boundary layer depth in Global climate models induced biases in surface climatology

    CERN Document Server

    Davy, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The Earth has warmed in the last century with the most rapid warming occurring near the surface in the arctic. This enhanced surface warming in the Arctic is partly because the extra heat is trapped in a thin layer of air near the surface due to the persistent stable-stratification found in this region. The warming of the surface air due to the extra heat depends upon the amount of turbulent mixing in the atmosphere, which is described by the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In this way the depth of the ABL determines the effective response of the surface air temperature to perturbations in the climate forcing. The ABL depth can vary from tens of meters to a few kilometers which presents a challenge for global climate models which cannot resolve the shallower layers. Here we show that the uncertainties in the depth of the ABL can explain up to 60 percent of the difference between the simulated and observed surface air temperature trends and 50 percent of the difference in temperature variability...

  4. Surface modification of layered zirconium phosphate with PNIPAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuezhen; Zhao, Di; Medina, Ilse B Nava; Diaz, Agustin; Wang, Huiliang; Clearfield, Abraham; Mannan, M Sam; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-04-04

    A new method was reported to modify layered zirconium phosphate (ZrP) with thermoresponsive polymer PNIPAM (poly N-isopropylacrylamide). PNIPAM was proved to be covalently grafted onto ZrP. (60)Co γ-rays irradiation produced peroxide groups on the surface which, upon heating, initiated free radical polymerization and subsequent attachment of PNIPAM.

  5. Body surface adaptations to boundary-layer dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    Evolutionary processes have adapted nektonic animals to interact efficiently with the water that surrounds them. Not all these adaptations serve the same purpose. This paper concentrates on reduction of drag due to friction in the boundary layer close to the body surface. Mucus, compliant skins, sca

  6. Removal of surface layers from plated materials: upgrading of scrap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dapper, G.; Sloterdijk, W.; Verbraak, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper a description is given of a method developed for the purpose of removing surface layers from plated materials. The principle of separation is based on the difference in vapour pressures and stabilities with the formation of metal chlorides. A series of pyrolytic experiments was carried

  7. DESIGN AND CALCULATION OF AERODROMECOAING WITH HEATED SURFACE LAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim G. Piskunov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available  The developed constructions with heated by surface layers for aerodromes and auto roads when developed composition of electroconductive concrete reinforced with chemical electrical conductive fibres being used was researched. The experimentally obtained characteristics of ended conductive concrete reinforced with fibers were presented. Calculation by developed heated construction of shell was made.

  8. Whirlwinds and hairpins in the atmospheric surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oncley, Steven P.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Tong, Chenning

    2016-01-01

    Vortices in the atmospheric surface layer are characterized using observations at unprecedented resolution from a fixed array of 31 turbulence sensors. During the day, these vortices likely are dust devils, though no visual observations are available for confirmation. At night, hairpin vortices

  9. Quantized layer growth at liquid-crystal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ocko, B. M.; Braslau, A.; Pershan, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    of the specular reflectivity is consistent with a sinusoidal density modulation, starting at the surface and terminating abruptly, after an integral number of bilayers. As the transition is approached the number of layers increases in quantized steps from zero to five before the bulk undergoes a first...

  10. Body surface adaptations to boundary-layer dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    Evolutionary processes have adapted nektonic animals to interact efficiently with the water that surrounds them. Not all these adaptations serve the same purpose. This paper concentrates on reduction of drag due to friction in the boundary layer close to the body surface. Mucus, compliant skins,

  11. Whirlwinds and hairpins in the atmospheric surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oncley, Steven P.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Tong, Chenning

    2016-01-01

    Vortices in the atmospheric surface layer are characterized using observations at unprecedented resolution from a fixed array of 31 turbulence sensors. During the day, these vortices likely are dust devils, though no visual observations are available for confirmation. At night, hairpin vortices appe

  12. Convective boundary layers driven by nonstationary surface heat fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Driel, R.; Jonker, H.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study the response of dry convective boundary layers to nonstationary surface heat fluxes is systematically investigated. This is relevant not only during sunset and sunrise but also, for example, when clouds modulate incoming solar radiation. Because the time scale of the associated change

  13. NMR of thin layers using a meanderline surface coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature meanderline sensor coil which extends the capabilities of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to provide analysis of thin planar samples and surface layer geometries. The sensor coil allows standard NMR techniques to be used to examine thin planar (or curved) layers, extending NMRs utility to many problems of modern interest. This technique can be used to examine contact layers, non-destructively depth profile into films, or image multiple layers in a 3-dimensional sense. It lends itself to high resolution NMR techniques of magic angle spinning and thus can be used to examine the bonding and electronic structure in layered materials or to observe the chemistry associated with aging coatings. Coupling this sensor coil technology with an arrangement of small magnets will produce a penetrator probe for remote in-situ chemical analysis of groundwater or contaminant sediments. Alternatively, the sensor coil can be further miniaturized to provide sub-micron depth resolution within thin films or to orthoscopically examine living tissue. This thin-layer NMR technique using a stationary meanderline coil in a series-resonant circuit has been demonstrated and it has been determined that the flat meanderline geometry has about he same detection sensitivity as a solenoidal coil, but is specifically tailored to examine planar material layers, while avoiding signals from the bulk.

  14. Bacterial surface layer proteins as a novel capillary coating material for capillary electrophoretic separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Gordaliza, Estefanía, E-mail: emorenog@ucm.es [Division of Analytical Biosciences, Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research, Universiteit Leiden, Einsteinweg 55, 2300, RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Stigter, Edwin C.A. [Division of Analytical Biosciences, Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research, Universiteit Leiden, Einsteinweg 55, 2300, RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Department of Molecular Cancer Research, Universitair Medisch Centrum Utrecht, Wilhelmina Kinder Ziekenhuis, Lundlaan 6, 3584, EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Lindenburg, Petrus W.; Hankemeier, Thomas [Division of Analytical Biosciences, Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research, Universiteit Leiden, Einsteinweg 55, 2300, RA, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-06-07

    A novel concept for stable coating in capillary electrophoresis, based on recrystallization of surface layer proteins on hydrophobized fused silica capillaries, was demonstrated. Surface layer protein A (SlpA) from Lactobacillus acidophilus bacteria was extracted, purified and used for coating pre-silanized glass substrates presenting different surface wettabilities (either hydrophobic or hydrophilic). Contact angle determination on SlpA-coated hydrophobic silica slides showed that the surfaces turned to hydrophilic after coating (53 ± 5°), due to a protein monolayer formation by protein-surface hydrophobic interactions. Visualization by atomic force microscopy demonstrated the presence of a SlpA layer on methylated silica slides displaying a surface roughness of 0.44 ± 0.02 nm. Additionally, a protein layer was visualized by fluorescence microscopy in methylated silica capillaries coated with SlpA and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled. The SlpA-coating showed an outstanding stability, even after treatment with 20 mM NaOH (pH 12.3). The electroosmotic flow in coated capillaries showed a partial suppression at pH 7.50 (3.8 ± 0.5 10{sup −9} m{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}) when compared with unmodified fused silica (5.9 ± 0.1 10{sup −8} m{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}). To demonstrate the potential of this novel coating, the SlpA-coated capillaries were applied for the first time for electrophoretic separation, and proved to be very suitable for the isotachophoretic separation of lipoproteins in human serum. The separations showed a high degree of repeatability (absolute migration times with 1.1–1.8% coefficient-of-variation (CV) within a day) and 2–3% CV inter-capillary reproducibility. The capillaries were stable for more than 100 runs at pH 9.40, and showed to be an exceptional alternative for challenging electrophoretic separations at long-term use. - Highlights: • New coating using recrystallized surface-layer proteins on

  15. Collaborative Research: Effects of Stability, Canopies, and Non-Stationarity on Dispersion in the Stable Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. University of Colorado - Boulder 3100 Marine...the Stable Boundary Layer Jeffrey C. Weil Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado , Boulder, Colorado Edward...modeled CWIC from the LPDM-PT (line) can be compared with Prairie Grass observations (points

  16. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets. Copyright © 2014

  17. A new first-order turbulence mixing model for the stable atmospheric boundary-layer: development and testing in large-eddy and single column models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Golaz, J.

    2011-12-01

    Parameterization of the stably-stratified atmospheric boundary-layer is of crucial importance to different aspects of numerical weather prediction at regional scales and climate modeling at global scales, such as land-surface temperature forecasts, fog and frost prediction, and polar climate. It is well-known that most operational climate models require excessive turbulence mixing of the stable boundary-layer to prevent decoupling of the atmospheric component from the land component under strong stability, but the performance of such a model is unlikely to be satisfactory under weakly and moderately stable conditions. In this study we develop and test a general turbulence mixing model of the stable boundary-layer which works under different stabilities and for steady as well as unsteady conditions. A-priori large-eddy simulation (LES) tests are presented to motivate and verify the new parameterization. Subsequently, an assessment of this model using the GFDL single-column model (SCM) is performed. Idealized test cases including continuously varying stability, as well as stability discontinuity, are used to test the new SCM against LES results. A good match of mean and flux profiles is found when the new parameterization is used, while other traditional first-order turbulence models using the concept of stability function perform poorly. SCM spatial resolution is also found to have little impact on the performance of the new turbulence closure, but temporal resolution is important and a numerical stability criterion based on the model time step is presented.

  18. Spectroscopic study on uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at the surface layer of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Thomas; Rossberg, Andre; Barkleit, Astrid; Steudtner, Robin; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja; Merroun, Mohamed L

    2015-02-14

    The complexation of U(vi) at the proteinaceous surface layer (S-layer) of the archaeal strain Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was investigated over a pH range from pH 1.5 to 6 at the molecular scale using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and U L(III)-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The S-layer, which represents the interface between the cell and its environment, is very stable against high temperatures, proteases, and detergents. This allowed the isolation and purification of S-layer ghosts (= empty cells) that maintain the size and shape of the cells. In contrast to many other microbial cell envelope compounds the studied S-layer is not phosphorylated, enabling the investigation of uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at microbial surfaces. The latter are usually masked by preferentially formed uranyl phosphate complexes. We demonstrated that at highly acidic conditions (pH 1.5 to 3) no uranium was bound by the S-layer. In contrast to that, at moderate acidic pH conditions (pH 4.5 and 6) a complexation of U(vi) at the S-layer via deprotonated carboxylic groups was stimulated. Titration studies revealed dissociation constants for the carboxylic groups of glutamic and aspartic acid residues of pK(a) = 4.78 and 6.31. The uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at the S-layer did not show luminescence properties at room temperature, but only under cryogenic conditions. The obtained luminescence maxima are similar to those of uranyl acetate. EXAFS spectroscopy demonstrated that U(vi) in these complexes is mainly coordinated to carboxylate groups in a bidentate binding mode. The elucidation of the molecular structure of these complexes was facilitated by the absence of phosphate groups in the studied S-layer protein.

  19. Surface layer ozone and nitric oxides in the Arctic: The inuence of boundary layer dynamics, snowpack chemistry, surface exchanges, and seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dam, Brie A.

    The snowpack is a region of active chemistry. Aqueous chemistry in a quasi-liquid layer on snow grains and gas-phase chemical reactions in snow interstitial air can lead to the production or destruction of important trace gases. Physical transport parameters such as wind pumping and diffusion affect the vertical distribution of gases within the snowpack. The resulting emission or uptake of trace gases at the atmosphere-snowpack interface can have significant in uence on the chemistry of the lower atmosphere. In this work the dynamic interactions between the snowpack and atmosphere are examined from multiple perspectives. The primary focus is on ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the Arctic, a region undergoing widespread environmental change. To investigate an ice-sheet location with year round snow cover, data from a two-year campaign at Summit, Greenland are implemented. At Summit this study examines (1) the processes contributing to vigorous chemistry in snow interstitial air, and (2) the role of the boundary layer over snow in determining surface layer NOx. Physical and chemical processes are shown to contribute to distinct seasonal and diurnal cycles of O3, NO, and NO2 in the snowpack. Boundary layer depths estimated from sonic anemometer turbulence quantities are used alongside sodar-derived values to show that the depth of the stable to weakly stable boundary layer at Summit was not a primary factor in determining NO x in early summer. Motivated by observations of an increase in the length of the snow-free season in the Arctic in recent decades, data from a one-year experiment at the seasonally-snow covered location of Toolik Lake, AK are also incorporated. This study shows the first observations of springtime ozone depletion events at a location over 200 km from the coast in the Arctic. FLEXPART analysis is used to illustrate that these inland events are linked to transport conditions. Lastly at this location, eddy-covariance O3 uxes were calculated to

  20. Layer-by-layer assembly surface modified microbial biomass for enhancing biorecovery of secondary gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Zhu, Nengwu; Kang, Naixin; Cao, Yanlan; Shi, Chaohong; Wu, Pingxiao; Dang, Zhi; Zhang, Xiaoping; Qin, Benqian

    2017-02-01

    Enhancement of the biosorption capacity for gold is highly desirable for the biorecovery of secondary gold resources. In this study, polyethylenimine (PEI) was grafted on Shewanella haliotis surface through layer-by-layer assembly approach so as to improve the biosorption capacity of Au(III). Results showed that the relative contribution of amino group to the biosorption of Au(III) was the largest one (about 44%). After successful grafting 1, 2 and 3-layer PEI on the surface of biomass, the biosorption capacity significantly enhanced from 143.8mg/g to 597.1, 559.1, and 536.8mg/g, respectively. Interestingly, the biomass modified with 1-layer PEI exhibited 4.2 times higher biosorption capacity than the untreated control. When 1-layer modified biomass was subjected to optimizing the various conditions by response surface methodology, the theoretical maximum adsorption capacity could reach up to 727.3mg/g. All findings demonstrated that PEI modified S. haliotis was effective for enhancing gold biorecovery.

  1. Body surface adaptations to boundary-layer dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videler, J J

    1995-01-01

    Evolutionary processes have adapted nektonic animals to interact efficiently with the water that surrounds them. Not all these adaptations serve the same purpose. This paper concentrates on reduction of drag due to friction in the boundary layer close to the body surface. Mucus, compliant skins, scales, riblets and roughness may influence the flow velocity gradient, the type of flow and the thickness of the boundary layer around animals, and may seriously affect their drag in a positive or negative way. The long-chain polymers found in mucus decrease the pressure gradient and considerably reduced drag due to friction. The effect is probably due to channelling of the flow particles in the direction of the main flow, resulting in a reduction of turbulence. Compliant surfaces could probably reduce drag by equalising and distributing pressure pulses. However, the existing evidence that drag reduction actually occurs is not convincing. There is no indication that instantaneous heating, reducing the viscosity in the boundary layer, is used by animals as a drag-reducing technique. Small longitudinal ridges on rows of scales on fish can reduce shear stress in the boundary by a maximum of 10% compared with the shear stress of a smooth surface. The mechanism is based on the impedance of cross flow under well-defined conditions. The effect has been visualized with the use of particle image velocimetry techniques. The function of the swords and spears of several fast, pelagic, predatory fish species is still enigmatic. The surface structure of the sword of a swordfish is shown to be both rough and porous. The height of the roughness elements on the tip of the sword is close to the critical value for the induction of a laminar-to-turbulent flow transition at moderate cruising speeds. A flow tank is described that is designed to visualize the effects of surface imperfections on flow in the boundary layer in direct comparison with a smooth flat wall. The flow in a 1 m long, 10 cm

  2. Observing the morphology of single-layered embedded silicon nanocrystals by using temperature-stable TEM membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Gutsch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We use high-temperature-stable silicon nitride membranes to investigate single layers of silicon nanocrystal ensembles by energy filtered transmission electron microscopy. The silicon nanocrystals are prepared from the precipitation of a silicon-rich oxynitride layer sandwiched between two SiO2 diffusion barriers and subjected to a high-temperature annealing. We find that such single layers are very sensitive to the annealing parameters and may lead to a significant loss of excess silicon. In addition, these ultrathin layers suffer from significant electron beam damage that needs to be minimized in order to image the pristine sample morphology. Finally we demonstrate how the silicon nanocrystal size distribution develops from a broad to a narrow log-normal distribution, when the initial precipitation layer thickness and stoichiometry are below a critical value.

  3. Efficient and stable proton acceleration by irradiating a two-layer target with a linearly polarized laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Chen, J. E.; He, X. T. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and Key Lab of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ma, W. J.; Bin, J. H.; Schreiber, J.; Tajima, T.; Habs, D. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 1, 85748 Garching (Germany) and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    We report an efficient and stable scheme to generate {approx}200 MeV proton bunch by irradiating a two-layer targets (near-critical density layer+solid density layer with heavy ions and protons) with a linearly polarized Gaussian pulse at intensity of 6.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Due to self-focusing of laser and directly accelerated electrons in the near-critical density layer, the proton energy is enhanced by a factor of 3 compared to single-layer solid targets. The energy spread of proton is also remarkably reduced. Such scheme is attractive for applications relevant to tumor therapy.

  4. Highly stable layered double hydroxide colloids: a direct aqueous synthesis route from hybrid polyion complex micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layrac, Géraldine; Destarac, Mathias; Gérardin, Corine; Tichit, Didier

    2014-08-19

    Aqueous suspensions of highly stable Mg/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoparticles were obtained via a direct and fully colloidal route using asymmetric poly(acrylic acid)-b-poly(acrylamide) (PAA-b-PAM) double hydrophilic block copolymers (DHBCs) as growth and stabilizing agents. We showed that hybrid polyion complex (HPIC) micelles constituted of almost only Al(3+) were first formed when mixing solutions of Mg(2+) and Al(3+) cations and PAA3000-b-PAM10000 due to the preferential complexation of the trivalent cations. Then mineralization performed by progressive hydroxylation with NaOH transformed the simple DHBC/Al(3+) HPIC micelles into DHBC/aluminum hydroxide colloids, in which Mg(2+) ions were progressively introduced upon further hydroxylation leading to the Mg-Al LDH phase. The whole process of LDH formation occurred then within the confined environment of the aqueous complex colloids. The hydrodynamic diameter of the DHBC/LDH colloids could be controlled: it decreased from 530 nm down to 60 nm when the metal complexing ratio R (R = AA/(Mg + Al)) increased from 0.27 to 1. This was accompanied by a decrease of the average size of individual LDH particles as R increased (for example from 35 nm at R = 0.27 down to 17 nm at R = 0.33), together with a progressive favored intercalation of polyacrylate rather than chloride ions in the interlayer space of the LDH phase. The DHBC/LDH colloids have interesting properties for biomedical applications, that is, high colloidal stability as a function of time, stability in phosphate buffered saline solution, as well as the required size distribution for sterilization by filtration. Therefore, they could be used as colloidal drug delivery systems, especially for hydrosoluble negatively charged drugs.

  5. Oxygen inhibition layer of composite resins: effects of layer thickness and surface layer treatment on the interlayer bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijelic-Donova, Jasmina; Garoushi, Sufyan; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-02-01

    An oxygen inhibition layer develops on surfaces exposed to air during polymerization of particulate filling composite. This study assessed the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer of short-fiber-reinforced composite in comparison with conventional particulate filling composites. The effect of an oxygen inhibition layer on the shear bond strength of incrementally placed particulate filling composite layers was also evaluated. Four different restorative composites were selected: everX Posterior (a short-fiber-reinforced composite), Z250, SupremeXT, and Silorane. All composites were evaluated regarding the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer and for shear bond strength. An equal amount of each composite was polymerized in air between two glass plates and the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer was measured using a stereomicroscope. Cylindrical-shaped specimens were prepared for measurement of shear bond strength by placing incrementally two layers of the same composite material. Before applying the second composite layer, the first increment's bonding site was treated as follows: grinding with 1,000-grit silicon-carbide (SiC) abrasive paper, or treatment with ethanol or with water-spray. The inhibition depth was lowest (11.6 μm) for water-sprayed Silorane and greatest (22.9 μm) for the water-sprayed short-fiber-reinforced composite. The shear bond strength ranged from 5.8 MPa (ground Silorane) to 36.4 MPa (water-sprayed SupremeXT). The presence of an oxygen inhibition layer enhanced the interlayer shear bond strength of all investigated materials, but its absence resulted in cohesive and mixed failures only with the short-fiber-reinforced composite. Thus, more durable adhesion with short-fiber-reinforced composite is expected.

  6. Influencing factors on elastic-plastic deformation of multi-layered surfaces under sliding contact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Li; PAN Xin-xiang; XU Jiu-jun; CHENG Dong

    2004-01-01

    Stress distribution in the gradient multi-layered surface under a sliding contact was investigated using finite element method(FEM). The main structure parameters of layered surface discussed are total layer thickness,layer number and elastic modulus ratio of layer to the substrate. A model of multi-layered surface contact with rough slider was studied. The effect of the surface structure parameters on the elastic-plastic deformation was analyzed.

  7. Surface properties of solids and surface acoustic waves: Application to chemical sensors and layer characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, V. V.

    1995-09-01

    A general phenomenological approach is given for the description of mechanical surface properties of solids and their influence on surface acoustic wave propogation. Surface properties under consideration may be changes of the stress distribution in subsurface atomic layers, the presence of adsorbed gas molecules, surface degradation as a result of impacts from an aggressive environment, damage due to mechanical manufacturing or polishing, deposition of thin films or liquid layers, surface corrugations, etc. If the characteristic thickness of the affected layers is much less than the wavelengths of the propagating surface waves, then the effects of all these irregularities can be described by means of non-classical boundary conditions incorporating the integral surface parameters such as surface tension, surface moduli of elasticity and surface mass density. The effect of surface properties on the propagation of Rayleigh surface waves is analysed in comparison with the results of traditional approaches, in particular with Auld's energy perturbation method. One of the important implications of the above-mentioned boudnary conditions is that they are adequate for the description of the effect of rarely distributed adsorbed atoms or molecules. This allows, in particular, to obtain a rigorous theoretical description of chemical sensors using surface acoustic waves and to derive analytical expressions for their sensitivity.

  8. Covalent and stable CuAAC modification of silicon surfaces for control of cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vutti, Surendra; Buch-Månson, Nina; Schoffelen, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    Stable primary functionalization of metal surfaces plays a significant role in reliable secondary attachment of complex functional molecules used for the interfacing of metal objects and nanomaterials with biological systems. In principle, this can be achieved through chemical reactions either......-transfer reaction. Subsequently, D-amino acid adhesion peptides could be immobilized on the surface by use of Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry. This enabled the study of cell adhesion to the metal surface. In contrast to unmodified surfaces, the peptide-modified surfaces were able to maintain cell adhesion during...

  9. Stable glass transformation to supercooled liquid via surface-initiated growth front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallen, Stephen F; Traynor, Katherine; McMahon, Robert J; Ediger, M D; Mates, Thomas E

    2009-02-13

    Highly stable glasses of tris-naphthylbenzene transform into a liquid when annealed above the glass transition temperature T_{g}. In contrast to the predictions of standard models, the observed transformation is spatially inhomogeneous. Secondary ion mass spectrometry experiments on isotopically labeled multilayer films show that the liquid grows into the stable glass with sharp growth fronts initiated at the free surface and at the interface with the substrate. For the free surface, the growth velocity is constant in time and has the same temperature dependence as self-diffusion in the equilibrium supercooled liquid. These stable glasses are packed so efficiently that surfaces and interfaces are required to initiate the transformation to the liquid even well above T_{g}.

  10. Layer-by-layer rose petal mimic surface with oleophilicity and underwater oleophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiu-chin; Zacharia, Nicole S

    2015-01-20

    Surfaces designed with specific wetting properties are still a key challenge in materials science. We present here a facile preparation of a surface assembled by the layer-by-layer technique, using a colloidal dispersion of ionomer particles and linear polyethylene imine. The colloidal ethylene-co-methacrylic acid (EMAA) particles are on the order of half a micron in size with surface features from 40 to 100 nm in width. The resultant surface has roughness on two length scales, one on the micron scale due to the packing of particles and one on the nanoscale due to these surface features on the EMAA particles. This hierarchical structure results in a hydrophobic surface with good water pinning properties (∼550 μN). We show that there is a balance between maximizing contact angle and water pinning force. Furthermore, this surface is oleophilic with regard to many organic solvents, also demonstrating underwater oleophobicity, and given the difference in wetting between aqueous and organic phases, this material may be a candidate material for oil/water separations.

  11. On alpha stable distribution of wind driven water surface wave slope

    CERN Document Server

    Joelson, Maminirina

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new formulation of the probability distribution function of wind driven water surface slope with an $\\alpha$-stable distribution probability. The mathematical formulation of the probability distribution function is given under an integral formulation. Application to represent the probability of time slope data from laboratory experiments is carried out with satisfactory results. We compare also the $\\alpha$-stable model of the water surface slopes with the Gram-Charlier development and the non-Gaussian model of Liu et al\\cite{Liu}. Discussions and conclusions are conducted on the basis of the data fit results and the model analysis comparison.

  12. Interaction between surface and atmosphere in a convective boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, Anirban

    Solar heating of the surface causes the near surface air to warm up and with sufficient buoyancy it ascends through the atmosphere as surface-layer plumes and thermals. The cold fluid from the upper part of the boundary layer descends as downdrafts. The downdrafts and thermals form streamwise roll vortices. All these turbulent coherent structures are important because they contribute most of the momentum and heat transport. While these structures have been studied in depth, their imprint on the surface through energy budget in a convective atmospheric boundary layer has received little attention. The main objective of the present study is to examine the turbulence-induced surface temperature fluctuations for different surface properties and stratification. Experiments were performed to measure atmospheric turbulence using sonic anemometers, fine wire thermocouples and LIDAR; and surface temperature using an infra-red camera over grass and artificial turf fields. The surface temperature fluctuations were found to be highly correlated to the turbulent coherent structures and follow the processes postulated in the surface renewal theory. The spatio-temporal scales and advection speed of the surface temperature fluctuation were found to match with those of turbulent coherent structures. A parametric direct numerical simulation (DNS) study was then performed by solving the solid-fluid heat transport mechanism numerically for varying solid thermal properties, solid thickness and strength of stratification. Even though there were large differences in the friction Reynolds and Richardson numbers between the experiments and numerical simulations, similar turbulent characteristics were observed. The ejection (sweep) events tend to be aligned with the streamwise direction to form roll vortices with unstable stratification. The solid-fluid interfacial temperature fluctuations increase with the decreases in solid thermal inertia; and with the increase in solid thickness to

  13. The studies of scale surface produced on outer diffusion layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Augustyn-Pieniążek

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study at attempt was made to examine the scale formed on ferritic-austenitic duplex type steel subjected to previous thermochemical treatment. The treatment consisted in diffusion aluminising in a metallising mixture composed of Fe-Al powder. As an activator, ammonium chloride (NH4Cl added in an amount of 2 wt.% was used. Then, both the base material and samples with the diffusiondeposited surface layers were oxidised at 1000°C in the air. Thus formed scales were identified by light microscopy, SEM and X-ray phase analysis. The aim of the oxidation tests carried out under isothermal conditions was to compare the scale morphology when obtained on untreated substrate material and on the surface layers rich in aluminium.

  14. Surface-plasmons lasing in double-graphene-layer structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinov, A. A. [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Institute for Physics of Microstructures of Russian Academy of Sciences, and Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Aleshkin, V. Ya. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of Russian Academy of Sciences, and Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Ryzhii, V. [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Center for Photonics and Infrared Engineering, Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Shur, M. S. [Department of Electrical, Electronics, and System Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Otsuji, T. [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-01-28

    We consider the concept of injection terahertz lasers based on double-graphene-layer (double-GL) structures with metal surface-plasmon waveguide and study the conditions of their operation. The laser under consideration exploits the resonant radiative transitions between GLs. This enables the double-GL laser room temperature operation and the possibility of voltage tuning of the emission spectrum. We compare the characteristics of the double-GL lasers with the metal surface-plasmon waveguides with those of such laser with the metal-metal waveguides.

  15. Studies of stability of blade cascade suction surface boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Xue-zhi; YAN Pei-gang; HAN Wan-jin

    2007-01-01

    Compressible boundary layers stability on blade cascade suction surface was discussed by wind tunnel experiment and numerical solution. Three dimensional disturbance wave Parabolized Stability Equations(PSE) of orthogonal Curvilinear Coordinates in compressible flow was deducted. The surface pressure of blade in wind tunnel experiment was measured. The Falkner-Skan equation was solved under the boundary conditions of experiment result, and velocity, pressure and temperature of average flow were obtained. Substituted this result for discretization of the PSE Eigenvalue Problem, the stability problem can be solved.

  16. Diffusion Carbide Layers, Formed on the Surface of Steel in the Vacuum Titanizing Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KASPRZYCKAEwa; SENATORSKIJan; NAKONIECZNYAleksander; BABULTomasz

    2004-01-01

    Diffusion layers produced on carbon steel surface in vacuum titanizing process were investigated. Studies of layers thickness, their morphology, titanium, carbon and iron concentration depth profiles in the diffusion zone of titanized layers were carried out. The effect of process parameters such as time and temperature on the kinetics of layer growth on steel surface was investigated. Tribocorrosion resistance of titanized layers was determined.

  17. IMMUNO-ELECTRON MICROSCOPE ANALYSIS OF THE SURFACE LAYERS OF THE UNFERTILISED SEA URCHIN EGG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxandall, Jane; Perlmann, P.; Afzelius, B. A.

    1964-01-01

    The response of unfertilised Paracentrotus lividus eggs to γ-globulin fractions of antisera against isolated homologous jelly coat substance or homologous homogenates of jellyless eggs has been studied at the ultrastructural level. The antijelly γ-globulin caused precipitation of the jelly layer, the density of precipitation varying between different eggs and being proportional to the γ-globulin concentration. Agglutination of the jelly substance of adjacent eggs, which is species specific, occurred frequently with higher γ-globulin concentrations. Antiegg γ-globulins (from antiserum against total homogenates of jelly-free eggs or the heat-stable fraction thereof) did not produce these effects. Instead, these γ-globulins caused various structural alterations mostly representing stages in parthenogenetic activation. This species-specific activation was induced by the reaction of antibodies with some heat-stable egg antigens different from those involved in jelly precipitation. Surface alterations included the formation of small papillae, membrane blisters, hyaline layer, and activation membrane, the release of material from the cell surface, and the breakdown of cortical granules. These alterations were dependent on both γ-globulin concentration and the variable reactivity among different females. Aster formation, found intracellularly, verified that the surface responses represented real parthenogenetic activation and were not the result of immune lysis. No such alterations appeared in the controls. PMID:14245438

  18. Surfactant-free carnauba wax dispersion and its use for layer-by-layer assembled protective surface coatings on wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozhechnikova, Alina; Bellanger, Hervé; Michen, Benjamin; Burgert, Ingo; Österberg, Monika

    2017-02-01

    Protection from liquid water and UV radiation are equally important, and a sophisticated approach is needed when developing surface coatings that preserve the natural and well-appreciated aesthetic appearance of wood. In order to prevent degradation and prolong the service life of timber, a protective coating was assembled using carnauba wax particles and zinc oxide nanoparticles via layer-by-layer deposition in water. For this purpose, a facile sonication route was developed to produce aqueous wax dispersion without any surfactants or stabilizers. The suspension was stable above pH 4 due to the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged wax particles. The particle size could be controlled by the initial wax concentration with average particle sizes ranging from 260 to 360 nm for 1 and 10 g/L, respectively. The deposition of wax particles onto the surface of spruce wood introduced additional roughness to the wood surface at micron level, while zinc oxide provided nano roughness and UV-absorbing properties. In addition to making wood superhydrophobic, this novel multilayer coating enhanced the natural moisture buffering capability of spruce. Moreover, wood surfaces prepared in this fashion showed a significant reduction in color change after exposure to UV light. A degradation of the wax through photocatalytic activity of the ZnO particles was measured by FTIR, indicating that further studies are required to achieve long-term stability. Nevertheless, the developed coating showed a unique combination of superhydrophobicity and excellent moisture buffering ability and some UV protection, all achieved using an environmentally friendly coating process, which is beneficial to retain the natural appearance of wood and improve indoor air quality and comfort.

  19. Efficient, air-stable colloidal quantum dot solar cells encapsulated using atomic layer deposition of a nanolaminate barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Ip, Alexander H.

    2013-12-23

    Atomic layer deposition was used to encapsulate colloidal quantum dot solar cells. A nanolaminate layer consisting of alternating alumina and zirconia films provided a robust gas permeation barrier which prevented device performance degradation over a period of multiple weeks. Unencapsulated cells stored in ambient and nitrogen environments demonstrated significant performance losses over the same period. The encapsulated cell also exhibited stable performance under constant simulated solar illumination without filtration of harsh ultraviolet photons. This monolithically integrated thin film encapsulation method is promising for roll-to-roll processed high efficiency nanocrystal solar cells. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  20. Effect of impurities in the description of surface nanobubbles: Role of nonidealities in the surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Siddhartha

    2011-01-01

    In a recent study [ S. Das, J. H. Snoeijer and D. Lohse Phys. Rev. E 82 056310 (2010)], we provided quantitative demonstration of the conjecture [ W. A. Ducker Langmuir 25 8907 (2009)] that the presence of impurities at the surface layer (or the air-water interface) of surface nanobubbles can substa

  1. Tailored surface engineering of pigments by layer-by-layer coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dähne, Lars; Schneider, Julia; Lewe, Dirk; Petersen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated the feasibility of layer-by-layer encapsulation technology for the improvement of dye pigments used for tattoos or permanent make-up. The formation of core-shell structures is possible by coating pigments with thin films of several different polyelectrolytes using this technology. The physicochemical surface properties, such as charge density and chemical functionality, can be reproducibly varied in a wide range. Tailoring the surface properties independently from the pigment core allows one to control the rheological behaviour of pigment suspensions, to prevent aggregation between different pigments, to reduce the cytotoxicity, and to influence the response of phagocytes in order to have similar or the same uptake and bioclearance for all pigments. These properties determine the durability and colour tone stability of tattoos and permanent make-up.

  2. Fabrication of stable electrode/diffusion barrier layers for thermoelectric filled skutterudite devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie, Qing; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Gang

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed are methods for the manufacture of n-type and p-type filled skutterudite thermoelectric legs of an electrical contact. A first material of CoSi.sub.2 and a dopant are ball-milled to form a first powder which is thermo-mechanically processed with a second powder of n-type skutterudite to form a n-type skutterudite layer disposed between a first layer and a third layer of the doped-CoSi.sub.2. In addition, a plurality of components such as iron, and nickel, and at least one of cobalt or chromium are ball-milled form a first powder that is thermo-mechanically processed with a p-type skutterudite layer to form a p-type skutterudite layer "second layer" disposed between a first and a third layer of the first powder. The specific contact resistance between the first layer and the skutterudite layer for both the n-type and the p-type skutterudites subsequent to hot-pressing is less than about 10.0 .mu..OMEGA.cm.sup.2.

  3. Fabrication of stable electrode/diffusion barrier layers for thermoelectric filled skutterudite devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie, Qing; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Gang

    2017-08-01

    Disclosed are methods for the manufacture of n-type and p-type filled skutterudite thermoelectric legs of an electrical contact. A first material of CoSi.sub.2 and a dopant are ball-milled to form a first powder which is thermo-mechanically processed with a second powder of n-type skutterudite to form a n-type skutterudite layer disposed between a first layer and a third layer of the doped-CoSi.sub.2. In addition, a plurality of components such as iron, and nickel, and at least one of cobalt or chromium are ball-milled form a first powder that is thermo-mechanically processed with a p-type skutterudite layer to form a p-type skutterudite layer "second layer" disposed between a first and a third layer of the first powder. The specific contact resistance between the first layer and the skutterudite layer for both the n-type and the p-type skutterudites subsequent to hot-pressing is less than about 10.0 .mu..OMEGA.cm.sup.2.

  4. Study of near-surface layers of Omerelu area using low velocity layer (LVL method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajani, O.O.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is important that we have good knowledge of the soil type so as to appreciate the enormous resources we are stepping on. It is more compelling for oil explorationists to know more as this will go a long way to determine the success or failure of search for minerals. Seismic methods give a good overview of a wide area though they involve greater logistics and operational requirements than some other geophysical methods. The purpose of present study is to determine the depth of the weathered layer and velocities of near-surface layers over the investigated area. Twelve sample points were picked with a grid system spread over a perimeter of approximately 4km x 4km. The in-house UpSphere computer program was utilised to analyse and display result in a way that makes final interpretation very easy. This program actually removed the burden of plotting the graphs and the contour maps manually. The depth of weathered layer in the study area varies between 12m and 13m. The velocities of the weathered layer and the consolidated layer vary between 500 m/s – 550 m/s and 1790 m/s – 1875 m/s respectively. Also the dip is in the north east – south west direction.

  5. Amorphous surface layers in Ti-implanted Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Picraux, S.T.

    1979-01-01

    Implanting Ti into high-purity Fe results in an amorphous surface layer which is composed of not only Fe and Ti, but also C. Implantations were carried out at room temperature over the energy range 90 to 190 keV and fluence range 1 to 2 x 10/sup 16/ at/cm/sup 2/. The Ti-implanted Fe system has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ion backscattering and channeling analysis, and (d,p) nuclear reaction analysis. The amorphous layer was observed to form at the surface and grow inward with increasing Ti fluence. For an implant of 1 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ at 180 keV the layer thickness was 150 A, while the measured range of the implanted Ti was approx. 550 A. This difference is due to the incorporation of C into the amorphous alloy by C being deposited on the surface during implantation and subsequently diffusing into the solid. Our results indicate that C is an essential constituent of the amorphous phase for Ti concentrations less than or equal to 10 at. %. For the 1 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ implant, the concentration of C in the amorphous phase was approx. 25 at. %, while that of Ti was only approx. 3 at. %. A higher fluence implant of 2 x 10/sup 17/ Ti/cm/sup 2/ produced an amorphous layer with a lower C concentration of approx. 10 at. % and a Ti concentration of approx. 20 at. %.

  6. MODIFICATION OF SURFACE LAYERS FOR SILICATE GLASSES BY ELECTRON IRRADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Brunov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research results of silicate glass surface layers modification by the influence of electron beams with 5-50 keV energies and 20-50 mC/cm2 doses are presented. It is shown that during the glasses exposure to an electron beam with 20-50 keV electron energies, a gradient optical waveguide with increased refractive index on waveguide axis Δn = 0.01-0.04 is formed in the surface layer. Сhemical etching rate is increased in the exposed area by up to two times which is related to glass grid destruction. Depending on irradiation dose thin film or silver nanoparticles with the size less than 20nm are formed on the surface of the silver containing glasses for electron energies less than 10 keV. Silver films drawn on the surface of the glass are dissolved into the glass bulk for electron energies 20-50 keV and 20-50 mC/cm2 dose. Basic mechanisms causing these effects are: chemical bonds breaking of spatial glass grid by high energy electrons, formation of negative volume charge inside the glass and field migration of positive metal ions into the volume charge region. Achieved results can be used in photonics, integral optics and nanoplasmonics device fabrication.

  7. Influence of Surface Energy Effects on Elastic Fields of a Layered Elastic Medium under Surface Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supakorn Tirapat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of a layered elastic half space under the action of axisymmetric surface loading and the influence of the surface energy effects. The boundary value problems for the bulk and the surface are formulated based on classical linear elasticity and a complete Gurtin-Murdoch constitutive relation. An analytical technique using Love’s representation and the Hankel integral transform is employed to derive an integral-form solution for both displacement and stress fields. An efficient numerical quadrature is then applied to accurately evaluate all involved integrals. Selected numerical results are presented to portray the influence of various parameters on elastic fields. Numerical results indicate that the surface stress displays a significant influence on both displacement and stress fields. It is also found that the layered half space becomes stiffer with the presence of surface stresses. In addition, unlike the classical elasticity solution, size-dependent behavior of elastic fields is noted. The present analytical solutions provide fundamental understanding of the influence of surface energy on layered elastic materials. It can also be used as a benchmark solution for the development of numerical techniques such as FEM and BEM, for analysis of more complex problems involving a layered medium under the influence of surface energy effects.

  8. In-situ surface hardening of cast iron by surface layer metallurgy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Sebastian F., E-mail: s.fischer@gi.rwth-aachen.de [Foundry Institute, RWTH Aachen University, Intzestraße 5, 52072 Aachen (Germany); Muschna, Stefan, E-mail: smuschna@yahoo.de [Foundry Institute, RWTH Aachen University, Intzestraße 5, 52072 Aachen (Germany); Bührig-Polaczek, Andreas, E-mail: sekretariat@gi.rwth-aachen.de [Foundry Institute, RWTH Aachen University, Intzestraße 5, 52072 Aachen (Germany); Bünck, Matthias, E-mail: m.buenck@access-techcenter.de [Access e.V., Intzestraße 5, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2014-10-06

    Abrasive wear is a serious problem in many cast iron castings used in industry. To minimize failure and repair of these components, different strategies exist to improve their surface microhardness thus enhancing their wear resistance. However, most of these methods lead to very brittle and/or expensive castings. In the current work a new method for surface hardening is presented which utilizes surface layer metallurgy to generate in-situ a boron-enriched white cast iron surface layer with a high microhardness on a gray cast iron casting. To do this, sand molds are coated with a ferroboron suspension and cast with a cast iron melt. After solidification, a 100–900 µm thick layer of boron-enriched ledeburite is formed on the surface of the casting which produces an increase in the average microhardness from 284 HV{sub 0.1}±52 HV{sub 0.1} to 505 HV{sub 0.1}±87 HV{sub 0.1}. Analyses of the samples' core reveal a typical cast iron microstructure which leads to the conclusion that the coating mainly affects the castings' surface. By varying the grain size of the ferroboron powder in the coatings, it is shown that a powder size ≤100 µm is most suitable to create a boron-enriched ledeburite surface layer possessing high hardness values.

  9. Study on tribological properties of multi-layer surface texture on Babbitt alloys surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongya; Zhao, Feifei; Li, Yan; Li, Pengyang; Zeng, Qunfeng; Dong, Guangneng

    2016-12-01

    To improve tribological properties of Babbitt alloys, multi-layer surface texture consisted of the main grooves and secondary micro-dimples are fabricated on the Babbitt substrate through laser pulse ablation. The tribological behaviors of multi-layer surface texture are investigated using a rotating type pin-on-disc tribo-meter under variation sliding speeds, and the film pressure distributions on the textured surfaces are simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method for elucidating the possible mechanisms. The results suggest that: (i) the multi-layer surface texture can reduce friction coefficient of Babbitt alloy, which has lowest friction coefficient of 0.03, in case of the groove parameter of 300 μm width and 15% of area density; (ii) the improvement effect may be more sensitive to the groove area density and the siding speed, and the textured surface with lower area density has lower friction coefficient under high sliding speed. Based on the reasons of (i) the secondary micro-dimples on Babbitt alloy possesses a hydrophobicity surface and (ii) the CFD analysis indicates that main grooves enhancing hydrodynamic effect, thus the multi-layer surface texture is regarded as dramatically improve the lubricating properties of the Babbitt alloy.

  10. Electrochemical Examination of the Structure of Thin Hydrogel Layers Anchored to Regular and Microelectrode Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniewska, Klaudia; Karbarz, Marcin; Ziach, Krzysztof; Siennicka, Alicja; Stojek, Zbigniew; Hyk, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    For the examination of hydrogel structure, thin layers of thermoresponsive gels based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPA) and copolymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-sodium acrylate) (p(NIPA-co-AS)) were successfully anchored to microelectrode and regular electrode surfaces using the electrochemically induced free radical polymerization. The obtained layers were stable and covered the entire surface of the electrodes. Electroactive probes 1,1'-ferrocenedimethanol (Fc(CH2OH)2) and synthesized derivatives of ferrocene modified with polyethylene glycol units (Fc-PEGn) of various length (n = 4, 9, 75, and 135) were employed for studying the volume phase transition of the thin hydrogel layers and for the determination of their structural parameters. The quantitative information on the structural parameters of the hydrogel layers was derived from the obstruction model for diffusion using the voltammetrically determined diffusion coefficients for the model redox probe Fc(CH2OH)2. An approach to the determination of the effective radii of the gel openings (channels) for pNIPA and p(NIPA-co-AS) microlayers was developed. The obtained results were matched with the experimental results and allowed derivation of quantitative conclusions. The voltammograms obtained with modified electrodes in solutions containing Fc-PEG4, Fc-PEG9, and Fc-PEG75 were well defined and of appropriate height. However, the voltammograms recorded for Fc-PEG135, the hydrodynamic radius of which exceeded the size of the gel channels, were at the baseline level.

  11. Early Warning Signals for Regime Transition in the Stable Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijdonk, van I.G.S.; Moene, A.F.; Scheffer, M.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Wiel, van de B.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    The evening transition is investigated in an idealized model for the nocturnal boundary layer. From earlier studies it is known that the nocturnal boundary layer may manifest itself in two distinct regimes, depending on the ambient synoptic conditions: strong-wind or overcast conditions typically

  12. Lightness constancy through transparency: internal consistency in layered surface representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manish

    2004-01-01

    Asymmetric lightness matching was employed to measure how the visual system assigns lightness to surface patches seen through partially-transmissive surfaces. Observers adjusted the luminance of a comparison patch seen through transparency, in order to match the lightness of a standard patch seen in plain view. Plots of matched-to-standard luminance were linear, and their slopes were consistent with Metelli's alpha. A control experiment confirmed that these matches were indeed transparency based. Consistent with recent results, however, when observers directly matched the transmittance of transparent surfaces, their matches deviated strongly and systematically from Metelli's alpha. Although the two sets of results appear to be contradictory, formal analysis reveals a deeper mutual consistency in the representation of the two layers. A ratio-of-contrasts model is shown to explain both the success of Metelli's model in predicting lightness through transparency, and its failure to predict perceived transmittance--and hence is seen to play the primary role in perceptual transparency.

  13. Nanoscale Structuring of Surfaces by Using Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Nicolas; Hess, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Controlled structuring of surfaces is interesting for a wide variety of areas, including microelectronic device fabrication, optical devices, bio(sensing), (electro-, photo)catalysis, batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, and sorption. A unique feature of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the possibility to form conformal uniform coatings on arbitrarily shaped materials with controlled atomic-scale thickness. In this Minireview, we discuss the potential of ALD for the nanoscale structuring of surfaces, highlighting its versatile application to structuring both planar substrates and powder materials. Recent progress in the application of ALD to porous substrates has even made the nanoscale structuring of high-surface-area materials now feasible, thereby enabling novel applications, such as those in the fields of catalysis and alternative energy.

  14. Surfaces with combined microscale and nanoscale structures: a route to mechanically stable superhydrophobic surfaces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groten, Jonas; Rühe, Jürgen

    2013-03-19

    Materials with superhydrophobic properties are usually generated by covering the surfaces with hydrophobic nanoscale rough features. A major problem, however, for any practical application of such strongly water-repellent surfaces is the mechanical fragility of the nanostructures. Even moderate forces caused by touching or rubbing the surfaces are frequently strong enough to destroy the nanostructures and lead to the loss of the superhydrophobic properties. In this article, we study the mechanical stability of superhydrophobic surfaces with three different topographies: nano- and microscale features and surfaces carrying a combination of both. The surfaces are generated by silicon etching and subsequent coating with a monolayer of a fluoropolymer (PFA). We perform controlled wear tests on the different surfaces and discuss the impact of wear on the wetting properties of the different surfaces.

  15. IMMUNO-ELECTRON MICROSCOPE ANALYSIS OF THE SURFACE LAYERS OF THE UNFERTILISED SEA URCHIN EGG. II. LOCALISATION OF SURFACE ANTIGENS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BAXANDALL, J; PERLMANN, P; AFZELIUS, B A

    1964-12-01

    The immunological properties of the surface layers of Paracentrotus lividus eggs have been studied further by using ferritin-labelled antibody to localise specific antigenic sites. In order to detect a wider spectrum of antigenic determinants, several antisera against egg and jelly substance have been employed in combination with absorption procedures using lyophilised antigen. This use of absorbed antisera was made feasible by adding ferritin label in a second antiserum layer of ferritin-anti-gamma-globulin. Eggs were treated with antibody for short periods to detect antigenic sites without incurring structural changes (shown in previous paper) resulting from long antibody treatment. Unspecific ferritin uptake, found in pinocytotic vesicles and yolk granules, is considered in relation to yolk formation. The jelly layer, found to be immunologically heterogeneous, included one component interacting with antijelly gamma-globulin and one with antiegg gamma-globulin. The vitelline membrane proved to be rich in egg antigens (heat-stable and heat-labile). The role of this layer in specificity of fertilisation, parthenogenetic activation, and the possibility of being analogous to a basement membrane are discussed. Few antigenic sites were found on the plasma membrane with antiegg gamma-globulin. This gamma-globulin resulted in some specific labelling of cortical granules and its action is considered in relation to the permeability properties of the egg.

  16. Combined surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance measurement of collagen and fibrinogen layer physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Friedt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We use an instrument combining optical (surface plasmon resonance and acoustic (Love mode surface acoustic wave device real-time measurements on a same surface for the identification of water content in collagen and fibrinogen protein layers. After calibration of the surface acoustic wave device sensitivity by copper electrodeposition and surfactant adsorption, the bound mass and its physical properties – density and optical index – are extracted from the complementary measurement techniques and lead to thickness and water ratio values compatible with the observed signal shifts. Such results are especially usefully for protein layers with a high water content as shown here for collagen on an hydrophobic surface. We obtain the following results: collagen layers include 70±20% water and are 16±3 to 19±3 nm thick for bulk concentrations ranging from 30 to 300 μg/ml. Fibrinogen layers include 50±10% water for layer thicknesses in the 6±1.5 to 13±2 nm range when the bulk concentration is in the 46 to 460 μg/ml range.

  17. Near-Surface Boundary Layer Turbulence Along a Horizontally-Moving, Surface-Piercing Vertical Wall

    CERN Document Server

    Washuta, Nathan; Duncan, James H

    2016-01-01

    The complex interaction between turbulence and the free surface in boundary layer shear flow created by a vertical surface-piercing wall is considered. A laboratory-scale device was built that utilizes a surface-piercing stainless steel belt that travels in a loop around two vertical rollers, with one length of the belt between the rollers acting as a horizontally-moving flat wall. The belt is accelerated suddenly from rest until reaching constant speed in order to create a temporally-evolving boundary layer analogous to the spatially-evolving boundary layer that would exist along a surface-piercing towed flat plate. Surface profiles are measured with a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence system and sub-surface velocity fields are recorded using a high-speed planar particle image velocimetry system. It is found that the belt initially travels through the water without creating any significant waves, before the free surface bursts with activity close to the belt surface. These free surface ripples travel away...

  18. Turbulent boundary layer measurements over high-porosity surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, Christoph; Luhar, Mitul

    2016-11-01

    Porous surfaces are ubiquitous across a variety of turbulent boundary layer flows of scientific and engineering interest. While turbulent flows over smooth and rough walls have been studied extensively, experimental measurements over porous walls have thus far focused on packed beds, which are limited in porosity (Φ = 0 . 3 - 0 . 5) by their geometry. The current project seeks to address this limitation. A two-component laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) is used to generate velocity measurements in turbulent boundary layer flows over commercially available reticulated foams and 3D-printed porous media at Reynolds number Reθ 3000 - 4000 . Smooth wall profiles for mean and turbulent quantities are compared to data over substrates with porosity Φ > 0 . 8 and average pore sizes in the range 0.4-2.5mm (corresponding to 8 - 50 viscous units). Previous analytical and simulation efforts indicate that the effects of porous substrates on boundary layer flows depend on a modified Reynolds number defined using the length scale √{ κ}, where κ is substrate permeability. A custom permeameter is currently being developed to estimate κ for the substrates tested in the boundary layer experiments.

  19. Durable superhydrophobic surfaces made by intensely connecting a bipolar top layer to the substrate with a middle connecting layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Jinghui; Zhang, Li-Zhi

    2017-08-30

    This study reported a simple fabrication method for a durable superhydrophobic surface. The superhydrophobic top layer of the durable superhydrophobic surface was connected intensely to the substrate through a middle connecting layer. Glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (KH-560) after hydrolysis was used to obtain a hydrophilic middle connecting layer. It could be adhered to the hydrophilic substrate by covalent bonds. Ring-open reaction with octadecylamine let the KH-560 middle layer form a net-like structure. The net-like sturcture would then encompass and station the silica particles that were used to form the coarse micro structures, intensely to increase the durability. The top hydrophobic layer with nano-structures was formed on the KH-560 middle layer. It was obtained by a bipolar nano-silica solution modified by hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS). This layer was connected to the middle layer intensely by the polar Si hydroxy groups, while the non-polar methyl groups on the surface, accompanied by the micro and nano structures, made the surface rather hydrophobic. The covalently interfacial interactions between the substrate and the middle layer, and between the middle layer and the top layer, strengthened the durability of the superhydrophobic surface. The abrasion test results showed that the superhydrophobic surface could bear 180 abrasion cycles on 1200 CW sandpaper under 2 kPa applied pressure.

  20. Surface ozone-aerosol behaviour and atmospheric boundary layer structure in Saharan dusty scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adame, Jose; Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Sorrribas, Mar; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel; Toledo, Daniel; Yela, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    A research campaign was performed for the AMISOC (Atmospheric Minor Species relevant to the Ozone Chemistry) project at El Arenosillo observatory (southwest Spain) in May-June 2012. The campaign focused on the impact of Saharan dust intrusions at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and ozone-aerosol interactions. In-situ and remote-sensing techniques for gases and aerosols were used moreover to modelling analyses. Meteorology features, ABL structures and evolution, aerosol profiling distributions and aerosol-ozone interactions on the surface were analysed. Two four-day periods were selected according to non-dusty (clean conditions) and dusty (Saharan dust) situations. In both scenarios, sea-land breezes developed in the lower atmosphere, but differences were found in the upper levels. Results show that surface temperatures were greater than 3°C and humidity values were lower during dusty conditions than non-dusty conditions. Thermal structures on the surface layer (estimated using an instrument on a 100 m tower) show differences, mainly during nocturnal periods with less intense inversions under dusty conditions. The mixing layer during dusty days was 400-800 m thick, less than observed on non-dusty days. Dust also disturbed the typical daily ABL evolution. Stable conditions were observed during the early evening during intrusions. Aerosol extinction on dusty days was 2-3 times higher, and the dust was confined between 1500 and 5500 m. Back trajectory analyses confirmed that the dust had an African origin. On the surface, the particle concentration was approximately 3.5 times higher during dusty events, but the local ozone did not exhibit any change. The arrival of Saharan dust in the upper levels impacted the meteorological surface, inhibited the daily evolution of the ABL and caused an increase in aerosol loading on the surface and at higher altitudes; however, no dust influence was observed on surface ozone.

  1. A highly stable nonbiofouling surface with well-packed grafted zwitterionic polysulfobetaine for plasma protein repulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yung; Liao, Shih-Chieh; Higuchi, Akon; Ruaan, Ruoh-Chyu; Chu, Chih-Wei; Chen, Wen-Yih

    2008-05-20

    An ideal nonbiofouling surface for biomedical applications requires both high-efficient antifouling characteristics in relation to biological components and long-term material stability from biological systems. In this study we demonstrate the performance and stability of an antifouling surface with grafted zwitterionic sulfobetaine methacrylate (SBMA). The SBMA was grafted from a bromide-covered gold surface via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization to form well-packed polymer brushes. Plasma protein adsorption on poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (polySBMA) grafted surfaces was measured with a surface plasmon resonance sensor. It is revealed that an excellent stable nonbiofouling surface with grafted polySBMA can be performed with a cycling test of the adsorption of three model proteins in a wide range of various salt types, buffer compositions, solution pH levels, and temperatures. This work also demonstrates the adsorption of plasma proteins and the adhesion of platelets from human blood plasma on the polySBMA grafted surface. It was found that the polySBMA grafted surface effectively reduces the plasma protein adsorption from platelet-poor plasma solution to a level superior to that of adsorption on a surface terminated with tetra(ethylene glycol). The adhesion and activation of platelets from platelet-rich plasma solution were not observed on the polySBMA grafted surface. This work further concludes that a surface with good hemocompatibility can be achieved by the well-packed surface-grafted polySBMA brushes.

  2. Mg-Fe-mixed oxides derived from layered double hydroxides: A study of the surface properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković-Nedučin Radmila P.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of surface properties on the selectivity of the synthesized catalysts was studied, considering that their selectivity towards particular hydrocarbons is crucial for their overall activity in the chosen Fischer- -Tropsch reaction. Magnesium- and iron-containing layered double hydroxides (LDH, with the general formula: [Mg1-xFex(OH2](CO3x/2?mH2O, x = = n(Fe/(n(Mg+n(Fe, synthesized with different Mg/Fe ratio and their thermally derived mixed oxides were investigated. Magnesium was chosen because of its basic properties, whereas iron was selected due to its well-known high Fischer-Tropsch activity, redox properties and the ability to form specific active sites in the layered LDH structure required for catalytic application. The thermally less stable multiphase system (synthesized outside the optimal single LDH phase range with additional Fe-phase, having a lower content of surface acid and base active sites, a lower surface area and smaller fraction of smaller mesopores, showed higher selectivity in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The results of this study imply that the metastability of derived multiphase oxides structure has a greater influence on the formation of specific catalyst surface sites than other investigated surface properties.

  3. Soil moisture sensor calibration for organic soil surface layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bircher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper's objective is to present generic calibration functions for organic surface layers derived for the soil moisture sensors Decagon ECH2O 5TE and Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x, using material from northern regions, mainly from the Finish Meteorological Institute's Arctic Research Center in Sodankylä and the study area of the Danish Center for Hydrology HOBE. For the Decagon 5TE sensor such a function is currently not reported in literature. Data were compared with measurements from underlying mineral soils including laboratory and field measurements. Shrinkage and charring during drying were considered. For both sensors all field and lab data showed consistent trends. For mineral layers with low soil organic matter (SOM content the validity of the manufacturer's calibrations was demonstrated. Deviating sensor outputs in organic and mineral horizons were identified: for the Decagon 5TE apparent relative permittivities at a given moisture content decreased for increased SOM content, which was attributed to an increase of bound water in organic materials with large surface areas compared to the studied mineral soils. ThetaProbe measurements from organic horizons showed stronger non-linearity in the sensor response and signal saturation in the high level data. The derived calibration fit functions between sensor response and volumetric water content hold for samples spanning a wide range of humus types with differing SOM characteristics. This strengthens confidence in their validity under various conditions, rendering them highly suitable for large-scale applications in remote sensing and land surface modeling studies. Agreement between independent Decagon 5TE and ThetaProbe time series from an organic surface layer at the Sodankylä site was significantly improved when the here proposed fit functions were used. Decagon 5TE data also well-reflected precipitation events. Thus, Decagon 5TE network data from organic surface layers at the Sodankyl

  4. Soil moisture sensor calibration for organic soil surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Simone; Andreasen, Mie; Vuollet, Johanna; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Jonard, François; Weihermüller, Lutz; Zakharova, Elena; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Kerr, Yann H.

    2016-04-01

    This paper's objective is to present generic calibration functions for organic surface layers derived for the soil moisture sensors Decagon ECH2O 5TE and Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x, using material from northern regions, mainly from the Finnish Meteorological Institute's Arctic Research Center in Sodankylä and the study area of the Danish Center for Hydrology (HOBE). For the Decagon 5TE sensor such a function is currently not reported in the literature. Data were compared with measurements from underlying mineral soils including laboratory and field measurements. Shrinkage and charring during drying were considered. For both sensors all field and lab data showed consistent trends. For mineral layers with low soil organic matter (SOM) content the validity of the manufacturer's calibrations was demonstrated. Deviating sensor outputs in organic and mineral horizons were identified. For the Decagon 5TE, apparent relative permittivities at a given moisture content decreased for increased SOM content, which was attributed to an increase of bound water in organic materials with large specific surface areas compared to the studied mineral soils. ThetaProbe measurements from organic horizons showed stronger nonlinearity in the sensor response and signal saturation in the high-level data. The derived calibration fit functions between sensor response and volumetric water content hold for samples spanning a wide range of humus types with differing SOM characteristics. This strengthens confidence in their validity under various conditions, rendering them highly suitable for large-scale applications in remote sensing and land surface modeling studies. Agreement between independent Decagon 5TE and ThetaProbe time series from an organic surface layer at the Sodankylä site was significantly improved when the here-proposed fit functions were used. Decagon 5TE data also well-reflected precipitation events. Thus, Decagon 5TE network data from organic surface layers at the Sodankylä and

  5. Evaluation of surface layer flux parameterizations using in-situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jeremy; Zhu, Ping

    2017-09-01

    Appropriate calculation of surface turbulent fluxes between the atmosphere and the underlying ocean/land surface is one of the major challenges in geosciences. In practice, the surface turbulent fluxes are estimated from the mean surface meteorological variables based on the bulk transfer model combined with the Monnin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS) theory. Few studies have been done to examine the extent to which such a flux parameterization can be applied to different weather and surface conditions. A novel validation method is developed in this study to evaluate the surface flux parameterization using in-situ observations collected at a station off the coast of Gulf of Mexico. The main findings are: (a) the theoretical prediction that uses MOS theory does not match well with those directly computed from the observations. (b) The largest spread in exchange coefficients is shown in strong stable conditions with calm winds. (c) Large turbulent eddies, which depend strongly on the mean flow pattern and surface conditions, tend to break the constant flux assumption in the surface layer.

  6. Processing and properties of electrodeposited layered surface coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    clacks and spalls off early on. For thick, non-compliant coatings, much thicker coatings can be formed. Fracture resistance must be considered in relation to both specimen and loading geometries. Since the inherent bending moment causes a maximum tensile stress at the coating surface, the loading......Hard chromium, produced by conventional dir ect curl ent (DC) electrodeposition, cannot be deposited to thicknesses gl enter than about 5 mu m because of the buildup of processing stresses which cause channel cracks in the coating. Much thicker chromium coatings map be produced by depositing...... a layered structure using alternate DC plating and periodic current reversal (PR). Such layering produces a through thickness stepped gradient in residual stresses. Most importantly a bending moment develops in the coating whenever the substrate is compliant. For thin, compliant substrates, the coating...

  7. Complete stable CMC surfaces with empty singular set in Sasakian sub-Riemannian 3-manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Rosales, César

    2010-01-01

    For constant mean curvature surfaces of class $C^2$ immersed inside Sasakian sub-Riemannian $3$-manifolds we obtain a formula for the second derivative of the area which involves horizontal analytical terms, the Webster scalar curvature of the ambient manifold, and the extrinsic shape of the surface. Then we prove classification results for complete surfaces with empty singular set which are stable, i.e., second order minima of the area under a volume constraint, inside the $3$-dimensional sub-Riemannian space forms. In the first Heisenberg group we show that such a surface is a vertical plane. In the sub-Riemannian hyperbolic $3$-space we give an upper bound for the mean curvature of such surfaces, and we characterize the horocylinders as the only ones with squared mean curvature $1$. Finally we deduce that any complete surface with empty singular set in the sub-Riemannian $3$-sphere is unstable.

  8. Stable superhydrophobic surface: fabrication of interstitial cottonlike structure of copper nanocrystals by magnetron sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxing Li, Bo Wang, Yi Liu, Tian Tan, Xuemei Song, Er Li and Hui Yan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A stable superhydrophobic copper surface was obtained by radio-frequency magnetic sputtering on Si (100 and quartz substrates. The water contact angle and sliding angle of the superhydrophobic copper surface were 160.5° and 3±1.9°, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM photos show that the superhydrophobic surface structure comprises many uniform nanocrystals with a diameter of about 100 nm. A brief explanation of the formation of this special microstructure and the mechanism of its wettability were proposed.

  9. Structure-phase states of the nickel surface layers after electroexplosive carburizing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Budovskikh; E.; A.; Bagautdinov; A.; Y.; Ivanov; Yu.; F.; Martusevich; E.; V.; Gromov; V.; E.

    2005-01-01

    The layer by layer study of the structure-phase states of the nickel surface layer carburizing with use the phenomena of the electrical explosion has conducted by the method TEM of the fine foils.……

  10. Highly stable perovskite solar cells with an all-carbon hole transport layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feijiu; Endo, Masaru; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohno, Yutaka; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene.

  11. Quantifying the Stable Boundary Layer Structure and Evolution during T-REX 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    and Other Related Tracers at High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in an Urban Environment, EGU General Assembly 2013. 12-APR-13, . : , TOTAL: 1 08...examining the sensitivity of planetary boundary layer schemes in association with landfalling hurricanes (e.g., Tropical Storm Fay 2008). The goal was...WRF model planetary boundary layer schemes were also conducted to study a downslope windstorm and rotors in Las Vegas valley. Two events (March 20

  12. Highly stable perovskite solar cells with an all-carbon hole transport layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feijiu; Endo, Masaru; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohno, Yutaka; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene.Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  13. Moored surface buoy observations of the diurnal warm layer

    KAUST Repository

    Prytherch, J.

    2013-09-01

    An extensive data set is used to examine the dynamics of diurnal warming in the upper ocean. The data set comprises more than 4700 days of measurements at five sites in the tropics and subtropics, obtained from surface moorings equipped to make comprehensive meteorological, incoming solar and infrared radiation, and high-resolution subsurface temperature (and, in some cases, velocity) measurements. The observations, which include surface warmings of up to 3.4°C, are compared with a selection of existing models of the diurnal warm layer (DWL). A simple one-layer physical model is shown to give a reasonable estimate of both the magnitude of diurnal surface warming (model-observation correlation 0.88) and the structure and temporal evolution of the DWL. Novel observations of velocity shear obtained during 346 days at one site, incorporating high-resolution (1 m) upper ocean (5-15 m) acoustic Doppler current profile measurements, are also shown to be in reasonable agreement with estimates from the physical model (daily maximum shear model-observation correlation 0.77). Physics-based improvements to the one-layer model (incorporation of rotation and freshwater terms) are discussed, though they do not provide significant improvements against the observations reported here. The simplicity and limitations of the physical model are used to discuss DWL dynamics. The physical model is shown to give better model performance under the range of forcing conditions experienced across the five sites than the more empirical models. ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Superior Stable and Long Life Sodium Metal Anodes Achieved by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Goncharova, Lyudmila V; Lushington, Andrew; Sun, Qian; Yadegari, Hossein; Wang, Biqiong; Xiao, Wei; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2017-03-03

    Na-metal batteries are considered as the promising alternative candidate for Li-ion battery beneficial from the wide availability and low cost of sodium, high theoretical specific capacity, and high energy density based on the plating/stripping processes and lowest electrochemical potential. For Na-metal batteries, the crucial problem on metallic Na is one of the biggest challenges. Mossy or dendritic growth of Na occurs in the repetitive Na stripping/plating process with an unstable solid electrolyte interphase layer of nonuniform ionic flux, which can not only lead to the low Coulombic efficiency, but also can create short circuit risks, resulting in possible burning or explosion. In this communication, the atomic layer deposition of Al2 O3 coating is first demonstrated for the protection of metallic Na anode for Na-metal batteries. By protecting Na foil with ultrathin Al2 O3 layer, the dendrites and mossy Na formation have been effectively suppressed and lifetime has been significantly improved. Furthermore, the thickness of protective layer has been further optimized with 25 cycles of Al2 O3 layer presenting the best performance over 500 cycles. The novel design of atomic layer deposition protected metal Na anode may bring in new opportunities to the realization of the next-generation high energy-density Na metal batteries.

  15. Aqueous oxidation reaction enabled layer-by-layer corrosion of semiconductor nanoplates into single-crystalline 2D nanocrystals with single layer accuracy and ionic surface capping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Muwei; Xu, Meng; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Jiatao

    2016-02-25

    A controllable aqueous oxidation reaction enabled layer-by-layer corrosion has been proposed to prepare high-quality two-dimensional (2D) semiconductor nanocrystals with single layer accuracy and well-retained hexagonal shapes. The appropriate oxidizing agent, such as H2O2, Fe(NO3)3, and HNO3, could not only corrode the layered-crystalline-structured Bi2Te3 nanoplates layer-by-layer to be a single quintuple layer, but also replace the organic barriers to be ionic ligands on the surface synergistically. AFM analysis was used to confirm the layer-by-layer exfoliation from the side to the center. Together with precise XRD, LRTEM and HRTEM characterizations, the controllable oxidation reaction enabled aqueous layer-by-layer corrosion mechanism has been studied.

  16. Monodisperse gold nanoparticles formed on bacterial crystalline surface layers (S-layers) by electroless deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieluweit, S. [Center for Nanobiotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU), Gregor Mendel-Strasse 33, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Pum, D. [Center for Nanobiotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU), Gregor Mendel-Strasse 33, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Sleytr, U.B. [Center for Nanobiotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU), Gregor Mendel-Strasse 33, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Kautek, W. [Department for Physical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: wolfgang.kautek@univie.ac.at

    2005-12-15

    The fabrication of patterned arrays of nanoparticles whose electronic, optical and magnetic properties will find technological applications, such as ultra-high-density memories, is currently one of the most important objectives of inorganic material research. In this study, the in situ electroless nucleation of ordered two-dimensional arrays of gold nanoparticles (5 nm in size) by using bacterial S-layers as molecular templates and their characterization by small spot X-ray photoelectron emission spectroscopy (XPS) is presented. This yielded the elemental composition of the nanoclusters, which consisted of almost entirely elemental gold, and possible side reactions on the cluster and protein surface. The preferential deposition of the gold nanoparticles on the S-layer suggests that topography and functional groups are important for superlattice formation.

  17. Formation of nanocrystalline surface layers in various metallic materials by near surface severe plastic deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Sato, Nobuhiro Tsuji, Yoritoshi Minamino and Yuichiro Koizumi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface of the various kinds of metallic materials sheets were severely deformed by wire-brushing at ambient temperature to achieve nanocrystalline surface layer. The surface layers of the metallic materials developed by the near surface severe plastic deformation (NS-SPD were characterized by means of TEM. Nearly equiaxed nanocrystals with grain sizes ranging from 30 to 200 nm were observed in the near surface regions of all the severely scratched metallic materials, which are Ti-added ultra-low carbon interstitial free steel, austenitic stainless steel (SUS304, 99.99 wt.%Al, commercial purity aluminum (A1050 and A1100, Al–Mg alloy (A5083, Al-4 wt.%Cu alloy, OFHC-Cu (C1020, Cu–Zn alloy (C2600 and Pb-1.5%Sn alloy. In case of the 1050-H24 aluminum, the depth of the surface nanocrystalline layer was about 15 μm. It was clarified that wire-brushing is an effective way of NS-SPD, and surface nanocrystallization can be easily achieved in most of metallic materials.

  18. Intermittency and energy fluxes in the surface layer of free-surface turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Troiani, Guido; Olivieri, Angelo; Casciola, Carlo Massimo

    2016-01-01

    By analyzing hot-wire velocity data taken in an open channel flow, an unambiguous definition of surface-layer thickness is here provided in terms of the cross-over scale between backward and forward energy fluxes. It is shown that the turbulence in the surface layer does not conform to the classical description of two-dimensional turbulence, since the direct energy cascade persists at scales smaller than the cross-over scale, comparable with the distance from the free-surface. The multifractal analysis of the one-dimensional surrogate of the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate in terms of generalized dimensions and singularity spectrum indicates that intermittency is strongly depleted in the surface layer, as shown by the singularity spectrum contracted to a single point. The combination of intermittency indicators and energy fluxes allowed to identify the specific nature of the surface layer as alternative to classical paradigms of three- and two-dimensional turbulence which cannot fully capture the gl...

  19. Design and Fabrication of a Hybrid Superhydrophobic-Hydrophilic Surface That Exhibits Stable Dropwise Condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Bikash; Mac Giolla Eain, Marc; Xu, QianFeng; Egan, Vanessa M; Punch, Jeff; Lyons, Alan M

    2015-10-28

    Condensation of water vapor is an essential process in power generation, water collection, and thermal management. Dropwise condensation, where condensed droplets are removed from the surface before coalescing into a film, has been shown to increase the heat transfer efficiency and water collection ability of many surfaces. Numerous efforts have been made to create surfaces which can promote dropwise condensation, including superhydrophobic surfaces on which water droplets are highly mobile. However, the challenge with using such surfaces in condensing environments is that hydrophobic coatings can degrade and/or water droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces transition from the mobile Cassie to the wetted Wenzel state over time and condensation shifts to a less-effective filmwise mechanism. To meet the need for a heat-transfer surface that can maintain stable dropwise condensation, we designed and fabricated a hybrid superhydrophobic-hydrophilic surface. An array of hydrophilic needles, thermally connected to a heat sink, was forced through a robust superhydrophobic polymer film. Condensation occurs preferentially on the needle surface due to differences in wettability and temperature. As the droplet grows, the liquid drop on the needle remains in the Cassie state and does not wet the underlying superhydrophobic surface. The water collection rate on this surface was studied using different surface tilt angles, needle array pitch values, and needle heights. Water condensation rates on the hybrid surface were shown to be 4 times greater than for a planar copper surface and twice as large for silanized silicon or superhydrophobic surfaces without hydrophilic features. A convection-conduction heat transfer model was developed; predicted water condensation rates were in good agreement with experimental observations. This type of hybrid superhydrophobic-hydrophilic surface with a larger array of needles is low-cost, robust, and scalable and so could be used for heat

  20. First-order chemistry in the surface-flux layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L.; Andersen, C.E.; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans

    1997-01-01

    process, The analytic flux solution showed a clear deviation from the constant flux, characterizing a conserved scalar in the surface-flux layer. It decreases with height and is reduced by an order of magnitude of the surface flux at a height equal to about the typical mean distance a molecule can travel...... before destruction. The predicted mean concentration profile, however, shows only a small deviation from the logarithmic behavior of a conserved scalar. The solution is consistent with assuming a flux-gradient relationship with a turbulent diffusivity corrected by the Damkohler ratio, the ratio...... of a characteristic turbulent time scale and the scalar mean lifetime. We show that if we use only first-order closure and neglect the effect of the Damkohler ratio on the turbulent diffusivity we obtain another analytic solution for the profiles of the flux and the mean concentration which, from an experimental...

  1. Fabricating an enhanced stable superhydrophobic surface on copper plates by introducing a sintering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinyi; Yuan, Wei; Yan, Zhiguo; Zhou, Bo; Tang, Yong; Li, Zongtao

    2015-11-01

    The superhydrophobic surface has the potential for use in functional applications. This study reports a novel method for coupling a sintering process with a traditional technique based on the solution-immersion method to prepare a stable superhydrophobic surface. The use of a sintering process aids in the enhancement of the adhesive strength and acid resistance of the surface structure. The advantage of using this method lies in its flexibility in regulating the processing parameters and functional behaviours. The influences of different processing parameters were experimentally investigated. The surface treated with a sintering process remains superhydrophobic with a contact angle of >150° after immersion in an acid solution for 120 h. The sintered surface maintains good integrity after experiencing ultrasonic vibration for 5 min. The results indicate that the sintering temperature must be optimized to increase the adhesive strength and maintain sufficient hydrophobicity. The modification time is an important factor related to the level of hydrophobicity.

  2. Physically and chemically stable ionic liquid-infused textured surfaces showing excellent dynamic omniphobicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Miranda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A fluorinated and hydrophobic ionic liquid (IL, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl imide, effectively served as an advantageous lubricating liquid for the preparation of physically and chemically stable omniphobic surfaces based on slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces. Here, we used particulate microstructures as supports, prepared by the chemical vapor deposition of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane and subsequent surface modification with (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. Confirmed by SEM and contact angle measurements, the resulting IL-infused microtextured surfaces are smooth and not only water but also various low surface tension liquids can easily slide off at low substrate tilt angles of <5°, even after exposure to high temperature, vacuum, and UV irradiation.

  3. Physically and chemically stable ionic liquid-infused textured surfaces showing excellent dynamic omniphobicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Daniel F.; Urata, Chihiro; Masheder, Benjamin; Dunderdale, Gary J.; Hozumi, Atsushi, E-mail: a.hozumi@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98, Anagahora, Shimo-Shidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 463-8560 (Japan); Yagihashi, Makoto [Nagoya Municipal Industrial Research Institute, Rokuban, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-0058 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    A fluorinated and hydrophobic ionic liquid (IL), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide, effectively served as an advantageous lubricating liquid for the preparation of physically and chemically stable omniphobic surfaces based on slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces. Here, we used particulate microstructures as supports, prepared by the chemical vapor deposition of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane and subsequent surface modification with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane. Confirmed by SEM and contact angle measurements, the resulting IL-infused microtextured surfaces are smooth and not only water but also various low surface tension liquids can easily slide off at low substrate tilt angles of <5°, even after exposure to high temperature, vacuum, and UV irradiation.

  4. Large-eddy simulation of stable atmospheric boundary layers to develop better turbulence closures for climate and weather models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Zeid, Elie; Huang, Jing; Golaz, Jean-Christophe

    2011-11-01

    A disconnect remains between our improved physical understanding of boundary layers stabilized by buoyancy and how we parameterize them in coarse atmospheric models. Most operational climate models require excessive turbulence mixing in such conditions to prevent decoupling of the atmospheric component from the land component, but the performance of such a model is unlikely to be satisfactory under weakly and moderately stable conditions. Using Large-eddy simulation, we revisit some of the basic challenges in parameterizing stable atmospheric boundary layers: eddy-viscosity closure is found to be more reliable due to an improved alignment of vertical Reynolds stresses and mean strains under stable conditions, but the dependence of the magnitude of the eddy viscosity on stability is not well represented by several models tested here. Thus, we propose a new closure that reproduces the different stability regimes better. Subsequently, tests of this model in the GFDL's single-column model (SCM) are found to yield good agreement with LES results in idealized steady-stability cases, as well as in cases with gradual and sharp changes of stability with time.

  5. A numerical model for chemical reaction on slag layer surface and slag layer behavior in entrained-flow gasifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns with slag layer accumulation, chemical reaction on slag layer surface, and slag layer flow, heat and mass transfer on the wall of entrained-flow coal gasifier. A slag layer model is developed to simulate slag layer behaviors in the coal gasifier. This 3-D model can predict temperature, slag particle disposition rate, disposition particle composition, and syngas distribution in the gasifier hearth. The model is used to evaluate the effects of O2/coal ratio on slag layer behaviors.

  6. Femtosecond pulsed laser textured titanium surfaces with stable superhydrophilicity and superhydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-jia; Li, Huang; Huang, Li-jing; Ren, Nai-fei; Kong, Xia

    2016-12-01

    A facile and highly-efficient laser scanning process coupled with a simple silanization modification was used to prepare textured titanium (Ti) surfaces with stable superhydrophilicity and superhydrophobicity. Femtosecond pulsed laser scanning along two mutually perpendicular directions led to the formation of binary structures featuring micrometer-scale spikes covered with nanometer-scale ripples. The period of the spikes significantly increased and the period of the ripples irregularly changed in the narrow range of 550-600 nm with the increase of laser fluence. The obtained laser-textured Ti surfaces were hydrophilic or even superhydrophilic, and the superhydrophilic laser-textured Ti surface using a laser fluence of 1.5 J/cm2 was observed to retain its wetting property after 30 days of storage in ambient atmosphere. After silanization, all the laser-textured Ti surfaces exhibited high hydrophobicity or superhydrophobicity, and the superhydrophobic laser-textured Ti surfaces using laser fluences of 1.5 and 1.8 J/cm2 remained stable when stored in air for over 30 days. The results imply the potential applications of these surfaces in a variety of fields.

  7. Plasma Nitriding of Austenitic Stainless Steel with Severe Surface Deformation Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Shi-jun; GAO Yu-zhou; WANG Liang; SUN Jun-cai; HEI Zu-kun

    2004-01-01

    The dc glow discharge plasma nitriding of austenite stainless steel with severe surface deformation layer is used to produce much thicker surface modified layer. This kind of layers has useful properties such as a high surface hardness of about 1500 Hv 0.1 and high resistance to frictional wear. This paper presents the structures and properties of low temperature plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel with severe surface deformation layer.

  8. A Study of stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer over highveld South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luhunga, P; Djolov, G [University of Pretoria (South Africa); Esau, I, E-mail: george.djolov@up.ac.z

    2010-08-15

    The study is part of the South African - Norwegian Programme for Research and Co-operation Phase II 'Analysis and Possibility for Control of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Processes to Facilitate Adaptation to Environmental Changes'. The research strategy of the project is based on 4 legged approach. 1) Application and further development of contemporary atmospheric boundary layer theory. 2) Use of modeling based on large eddy simulation techniques. 3) Experimental investigation of turbulent fluxes. 4) Training and developing academics capable of dealing with the present and new challenges. The paper presents some preliminary results on the micrometeorological variability of the basic meteorological parameters and turbulent fluxes.

  9. Experimental Study of Stable Surfaces for Anti-Slug Control in Multi-phase Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon; Løhndorf, Petar Durdevic; Stampe, Kasper;

    2016-01-01

    Severe slugging flow is always challenging in oil & gas production, especially for the current offshore based production. The slugging flow can cause a lot of problems, such as those relevant to production safety, fatigue as well as capability. As one typical phenomenon in multi-phase flow dynamics......, the slug can be avoided or eliminated by proper facility design or control of operational conditions. Based on a testing facility which can emulate a pipeline-riser or a gas-lifted production well in a scaled-down manner, this paper experimentally studies the correlations of key operational parameters...... that the capability, performance and efficiency of anti-slug control can be dramatically improved if these stable surfaces can be experimentally determined beforehand. The paper concludes that obtaining the stable surface on the new developed map can significantly improve the production rate in a control scheme. Even...

  10. Control of Colloid Surface Chemistry through Matrix Confinement: Facile Preparation of Stable Antibody Functionalized Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skewis, Lynell R.; Reinhard, Björn M.

    2010-01-01

    Here we describe a simple yet efficient gel matrix assisted preparation method which improves synthetic control over the interface between inorganic nanomaterials and biopolymers and yields stable biofunctionalized silver nanoparticles. Covalent functionalization of the noble metal surface is aided by the confinement of polyethylene glycol acetate functionalized silver nanoparticles in thin slabs of a 1% agarose gel. The gel confined nanoparticles can be transferred between reaction and washing media simply by immersing the gel slab in the solution of interest. The agarose matrix retains nanoparticles but is swiftly penetrated by the antibodies of interest. The antibodies are covalently anchored to the nanoparticles using conventional crosslinking strategies, and the resulting antibody functionalized nanoparticles are recovered from the gel through electroelution. We demonstrate the efficacy of this nanoparticle functionalization approach by labeling specific receptors on cellular surfaces with functionalized silver nanoparticles that are stable under physiological conditions. PMID:20161660

  11. Evolution of vortex-surface fields in transitional boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Zhao, Yaomin; Xiong, Shiying

    2016-11-01

    We apply the vortex-surface field (VSF), a Lagrangian-based structure-identification method, to the DNS database of transitional boundary layers. The VSFs are constructed from the vorticity fields within a sliding window at different times and locations using a recently developed boundary-constraint method. The isosurfaces of VSF, representing vortex surfaces consisting of vortex lines with different wall distances in the laminar stage, show different evolutionary geometries in transition. We observe that the vortex surfaces with significant deformation evolve from wall-parallel planar sheets through hairpin-like structures and packets into a turbulent spot with regeneration of small-scale hairpins. From quantitative analysis, we show that a small number of representative or influential vortex surfaces can contribute significantly to the increase of the drag coefficient in transition, which implies a reduced-order model based on VSF. This work has been supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11472015, 11522215 and 11521091), and the Thousand Young Talents Program of China.

  12. Study of stable atmospheric boundary layer characterization over highveld region of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Luhunga, P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available . Remote sensing data from LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) is also used to detect the Boundary Layer Height (BLH). There are three methods for determining the PBL height using LiDAR backscatter measurements: Gradient method, Standard deviation...

  13. Stable functionalization of germanium surface and its application in biomolecules immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Qi [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.19A, Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Baojian [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Ye, Lin [Sate Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.19A, Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Tang, Teng; Huang, Shanluo; Du, Xiaowei [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.19A, Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Bian, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jishen [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Di, Zengfeng, E-mail: zfdi@mail.sim.ac.cn [Sate Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Jin, Qinghui [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhao, Jianlong, E-mail: jlzhao@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • An effective method to immobilize biomolecules on the functionalized Ge surface. • The surface of Ge was functionalized with 11-Mercaptoundecanoic acid (11-MUA). • Stable and uniform SAMs was obtained on Ge surface after 11-MUA treatment. • The functionalized Ge was employed as substrate for protein immobilization. • Paving the way of Ge for further applications in bioelectronics field. - Abstract: As a typical semiconductor material, germanium (Ge) has the potential to be utilized in microelectronics and bioelectronics. Herein, we present a simple and effective method to immobilize biomolecules on the surface of functionalized Ge. The surface oxide of Ge was removed with the pretreatment of hydrochloric acid and the Cl-terminated Ge reacted with 11-Mercaptoundecanoic acid (11-MUA). The surface of Ge was coated with 11-MUA self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) due to the bonding reaction between the sulfhydryl group of 11-MUA and Cl-terminated Ge. Furthermore, typical biomolecule, a green fluorescent protein was chosen to be immobilized on the surface of the functionalized Ge. Contact angle analysis, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study the characteristics including wettability, stability, roughness and component of the functionalized Ge, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy was utilized to indicate the efficiency of protein immobilization on the surface of the functionalized Ge. With these studies, stable and uniform functionalized monolayer was obtained on the surface of Ge after 11-MUA treatment and the functionalized Ge was effectively applied in protein immobilization. Furthermore, this study may pave the way for further applications such as the integration of bioelectronics and biosensors with the attractive semiconductor material-Ge in future work.

  14. Bioinspired self-repairing slippery surfaces with pressure-stable omniphobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tak-Sing; Kang, Sung Hoon; Tang, Sindy K Y; Smythe, Elizabeth J; Hatton, Benjamin D; Grinthal, Alison; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2011-09-21

    Creating a robust synthetic surface that repels various liquids would have broad technological implications for areas ranging from biomedical devices and fuel transport to architecture but has proved extremely challenging. Inspirations from natural nonwetting structures, particularly the leaves of the lotus, have led to the development of liquid-repellent microtextured surfaces that rely on the formation of a stable air-liquid interface. Despite over a decade of intense research, these surfaces are, however, still plagued with problems that restrict their practical applications: limited oleophobicity with high contact angle hysteresis, failure under pressure and upon physical damage, inability to self-heal and high production cost. To address these challenges, here we report a strategy to create self-healing, slippery liquid-infused porous surface(s) (SLIPS) with exceptional liquid- and ice-repellency, pressure stability and enhanced optical transparency. Our approach-inspired by Nepenthes pitcher plants-is conceptually different from the lotus effect, because we use nano/microstructured substrates to lock in place the infused lubricating fluid. We define the requirements for which the lubricant forms a stable, defect-free and inert 'slippery' interface. This surface outperforms its natural counterparts and state-of-the-art synthetic liquid-repellent surfaces in its capability to repel various simple and complex liquids (water, hydrocarbons, crude oil and blood), maintain low contact angle hysteresis (<2.5°), quickly restore liquid-repellency after physical damage (within 0.1-1 s), resist ice adhesion, and function at high pressures (up to about 680 atm). We show that these properties are insensitive to the precise geometry of the underlying substrate, making our approach applicable to various inexpensive, low-surface-energy structured materials (such as porous Teflon membrane). We envision that these slippery surfaces will be useful in fluid handling and

  15. Crystalline Bacterial Surface Layer (S-Layer) Opens Golden Opportunities for Nanobiotechnology in Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Narges; Chand, Nima; Rassa, Mehdi

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on the successful recrystallization of bacterial S-layer arrays of the Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 at textile surfaces to create a novel method and material. Optimum bacterial growth was obtained at approximately 45 °C, pH 5.0, and 14 h pi. The cells were resuspended in guanidine hydrochloride and the 43 kDa S-protein was dialyzed and purified. The optimum reassembly on the polypropylene fabric surface in terms of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), reflectance, and uniformity (spectrophotometry) was obtained at 30 °C, pH 5.0 for 30 minutes in the presence of 2 gr/l (liquor ratio; 1:40) of the S-protein. Overall, our data showed that the functional aspects and specialty applications of the fabric would be very attractive for the textile and related sciences, and result in advanced technical textiles.

  16. Preparation of Stable Superhydrophobic Coatings on Wood Substrate Surfaces via Mussel-Inspired Polydopamine and Electroless Deposition Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaili Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA chemistry and electroless deposition approaches were used to prepare stable superhydrophobic coatings on wood surfaces. The as-formed PDA coating on a wood surface exhibited a hierarchical micro/nano roughness structure, and functioned as an “adhesive layer” between the substrate and a metallic film by the metal chelating ability of the catechol moieties on PDA, allowing for the formation of a well-developed micro/nanostructure hierarchical roughness. Additionally, the coating acted as a stable bridge between the substrate and hydrophobic groups. The morphology and chemical components of the prepared superhydrophobic wood surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The PDA and octadecylamine (OA modified surface showed excellent superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle (CA of about 153° and a rolling angle (RA of about 9°. The CA further increased to about 157° and RA reduced to about 5° with the Cu metallization. The superhydrophobic material exhibited outstanding stability in harsh conditions including ultraviolet aging, ultrasonic washing, strong acid-base and organic solvent immersion, and high-temperature water boiling. The results suggested that the PDA/OA layers were good enough to confer robust, degradation-resistant superhydrophobicity on wood substrates. The Cu metallization was likely unnecessary to provide significant improvements in superhydrophobic property. However, due to the amazing adhesive capacity of PDA, the electroless deposition technique may allow for a wide range of potential applications in biomimetic materials.

  17. Turbulent Structures and Coherence in the Atmospheric Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Träumner, K.; Damian, Th.; Stawiarski, Ch.; Wieser, A.

    2015-01-01

    Organized structures in turbulent flow fields are a well-known and still fascinating phenomenon. Although these so-called coherent structures are obvious from visual inspection, quantitative assessment is a challenge and many aspects e.g., formation mechanisms and contribution to turbulent fluxes, are discussed controversially. During the "High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for Advancing Climate Prediction" Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) from April to May 2013, an advanced dual Doppler lidar technique was used to image the horizontal wind field near the surface for approximately 300 h. A visual inspection method, as well as a two-dimensional integral length scale analysis, were performed to characterize the observations qualitatively and quantitatively. During situations with forcing due to shear, the wind fields showed characteristic patterns in the form of clearly bordered, elongated areas of enhanced or reduced wind speed, which can be associated with near-surface streaks. During calm situations with strong buoyancy forcing, open cell patterns in the horizontal divergence field were observed. The measurement technique used enables the calculation of integral length scales of both horizontal wind components in the streamwise and cross-stream directions. The individual length scales varied considerably during the observation period but were on average shorter during situations with compared to strongly stable situations. During unstable situations, which were dominated by wind fields with structures, the streamwise length scales increased with increasing wind speed, whereas the cross-stream length scales decreased. Consequently, the anisotropy increased from 1 for calm situations to values of 2-3 for wind speeds of 8-10. During neutral to stable situations, the eddies were on average quite isotropic in the horizontal plane.

  18. A Trimeric Surfactant: Surface Micelles, Hydration-Lubrication, and Formation of a Stable, Charged Hydrophobic Monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Nir; Wu, Chunxian; Wang, Yilin; Klein, Jacob

    2016-11-15

    The surface structure of the trimeric surfactant tri(dodecyldimethylammonioacetoxy)diethyltriamine trichloride (DTAD) on mica and the interactions between two such DTAD-coated surfaces were determined using atomic force microscopy and a surface force balance. In an aqueous solution of 3 mM, 5 times the critical aggregation concentration (CAC), the surfaces are coated with wormlike micelles or hemimicelles and larger (∼80 nm) bilayer vesicles. Repulsive normal interactions between the surfaces indicate a net surface charge and a solution concentration of ions close to that expected from the CAC. Moreover, this surface coating is strongly lubricating up to some tens of atmospheres, attributed to the hydration-lubrication mechanism acting at the exposed, highly hydrated surfactant headgroups. Upon replacement of the DTAD solution with surfactant-free water, the surface structures have changed on the DTAD monolayers, which then jump into adhesive contact on approach, both in water and following addition of 0.1 M NaNO3. This trimeric surfactant monolayer, which is highly hydrophobic, is found to be positively charged, which is evident from the attraction between the DTAD monolayer and negatively charged bare mica across water. These monolayers are stable over days even under a salt solution. The stability is attributed to the several stabilization pathways available to DTAD on the mica surface.

  19. The most stable mono-layers of (111)-Pt (fcc) on Graphene: A first-principles GGA study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otalora-Acevedo, J.; Rodríguez Martínez, J. A.; Moreno-Armenta, G.; Vera, E.; Takeuchi Tan, N.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate monolayers of planes (111) of Pt in the FCC structure located on graphene. The energy of formation showed that the most stable structure is √3×√3 — Pt on 2 × 2 — graphene. This system has a mismatch in the lattice constant of 0.45. The layers are completely flat, and its band structure shows that the new structure is metallic and the Dirac's cones are displaced 0.6eV above of the Fermi level. In this work we present the dependence of the enthalpy of formation of these structures and we calculated all structural parameters of their relaxation.

  20. Transition behavior of asymmetric polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) films: A stable hexagonally modulated layer structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sungmin; Koo, Kyosung; Kim, Kyunginn; Ahn, Hyungju; Lee, Byeongdu; Park, Cheolmin; Ryu, Du Yeol

    2015-03-09

    The phase transitions in the films of an asymmetric polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) were investigated by grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Compared with the sequential transitions in the bulk, hexagonally perforated layer (HPL) – gyroid (GYR) – disorder (DIS) upon heating, the transitions in film geometry were dramatically changed with decreasing thickness due to the growing preferential interactions from substrate, resulting in a thickness-dependent transition diagram including four different morphologies of hexagonally modulated layer (HML), coexisting (HML and GYR), GYR, and DIS. Particularly in the films ≤10Lo, where Lo is d-spacing at 150 °C, a stable HML structure was identified even above the order-to-disorder transition (ODT) temperature of the bulk, which was attributed to the suppressed compositional fluctuations by the enhanced substrate interactions.

  1. Surface modification of acetaminophen particles by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kääriäinen, Tommi O; Kemell, Marianna; Vehkamäki, Marko; Kääriäinen, Marja-Leena; Correia, Alexandra; Santos, Hélder A; Bimbo, Luis M; Hirvonen, Jouni; Hoppu, Pekka; George, Steven M; Cameron, David C; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2017-06-15

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) are predominantly organic solid powders. Due to their bulk properties many APIs require processing to improve pharmaceutical formulation and manufacturing in the preparation for various drug dosage forms. Improved powder flow and protection of the APIs are often anticipated characteristics in pharmaceutical manufacturing. In this work, we have modified acetaminophen particles with atomic layer deposition (ALD) by conformal nanometer scale coatings in a one-step coating process. According to the results, ALD, utilizing common chemistries for Al2O3, TiO2 and ZnO, is shown to be a promising coating method for solid pharmaceutical powders. Acetaminophen does not undergo degradation during the ALD coating process and maintains its stable polymorphic structure. Acetaminophen with nanometer scale ALD coatings shows slowed drug release. ALD TiO2 coated acetaminophen particles show cytocompatibility whereas those coated with thicker ZnO coatings exhibit the most cytotoxicity among the ALD materials under study when assessed in vitro by their effect on intestinal Caco-2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A Clustering Method to Characterize Intermittent Bursts of Turbulence and Submeso Motions Interaction in the Stable Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercauteren, N.; Klein, R.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric boundary layers with stable stratification include a variety of small-scale non-turbulent motions such as waves, microfronts and other complex structures. When the thermal stratification becomes strong, the presence of such submeso motions could affect the turbulent mixing to a large extent and common similarity theory that is used to describe weakly stable conditions may become unreliable. The scientific community clearly lacks understanding of what these motions are and of the extent to which they affect turbulent mixing in the stable boundary layer. We use a data-based approach to isolate regimes in which small-scale, non-turbulent motions are a main influencing parameter of turbulent mixing. We apply a clustering methodology derived for multidimensional nonstationary timeseries. The technique is based on a bounded variation, finite element method (FEM-BV) and we use it to characterize the interaction between small-scale non-turbulent motions and turbulence. Turbulence data are approximated by an optimal sequence of locally stationary multivariate autoregressive factor models (VARX) processes and some slow hidden process switching between them (FEM-BV-VARX (Horenko 2010, JAS)). The VARX processes that approximate the data include influence from external forcing. We perform prefiltering of the turbulence data to isolate submeso motions and use them as external forcing in the clustering strategy. Thus the strategy separates periods for which the influence of the external factors, i.e. non-turbulent motions on the turbulence differs. We use this strategy to derive a stochastic representation of the interactions between non-turbulent motions and turbulence under stable stratification. Our results show that submeso motions are a main forcing of turbulence in the most stable cases and not for the weakly stable cases. As these different influence regimes are isolated by the FEM-BV-VARX technique, a Markov transition matrix describes the probability of

  3. Fulleropyrrolidinium Iodide As an Efficient Electron Transport Layer for Air-Stable Planar Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiabin; Yu, Xuegong; Xie, Jiangsheng; Li, Chang-Zhi; Zhang, Yunhai; Xu, Dikai; Tang, Zeguo; Cui, Can; Yang, Deren

    2016-12-21

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have attracted great attention in recent years. But there are still a lot of unresolved issues related to the perovskite solar cells such as the phenomenon of anomalous hysteresis characteristics and long-term stability of the devices. Here, we developed a simple three-layered efficient perovskite device by replacing the commonly employed PCBM electrical transport layer with an ultrathin fulleropyrrolidinium iodide (C60-bis) in an inverted p-i-n architecture. The devices with an ultrathin C60-bis electronic transport layer yield an average power conversion efficiency of 13.5% and a maximum efficiency of 15.15%. Steady-state photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements show that the high performance is attributed to the efficient blocking of holes and high extraction efficiency of electrons by C60-bis, due to a favorable energy level alignment between the CH3NH3PbI3 and the Ag electrodes. The hysteresis effect and stability of our perovskite solar cells with C60-bis become better under indoor humidity conditions.

  4. Interfacial engineering of electron transport layer using Caesium Iodide for efficient and stable organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upama, Mushfika Baishakhi; Elumalai, Naveen Kumar; Mahmud, Md Arafat; Wright, Matthew; Wang, Dian; Xu, Cheng; Haque, Faiazul; Chan, Kah Howe; Uddin, Ashraf

    2017-09-01

    Polymer solar cells (PSCs) have gained immense research interest in the recent years predominantly due to low-cost, solution process-ability, and facile device fabrication. However, achieving high stability without compromising the power conversion efficiency (PCE) serves to be an important trade-off for commercialization. In line with this, we demonstrate the significance of incorporating a CsI/ZnO bilayer as electron transport layer (ETL) in the bulk heterojunction PSCs employing low band gap polymer (PTB7) and fullerene (PC71BM) as the photo-active layer. The devices with CsI/ZnO interlayer exhibited substantial enhancement of 800% and 12% in PCE when compared to the devices with pristine CsI and pristine ZnO as ETL, respectively. Furthermore, the UV and UV-ozone induced degradation studies revealed that the devices incorporating CsI/ZnO bilayer possess excellent decomposition stability (∼23% higher) over the devices with pristine ZnO counterparts. The incorporation of CsI between ITO and ZnO was found to favorably modify the energy-level alignment at the interface, contributing to the charge collection efficiency as well as protecting the adjacent light absorbing polymer layers from degradation. The mechanism behind the improvement in PCE and stability is analyzed using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and dark I-V characteristics.

  5. PEDOT:PSS Overcoating Layer for Mechanically and Chemically Stable Ag Nanowire Flexible Transparent Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byungil Hwang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene-poly(styrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS deposition on the chemical and mechanical stability of Ag nanowire flexible electrodes. A large number of bending cycles, up to 500,000 cycles, were imposed on the Ag nanowire electrodes with and without PEDOT:PSS overcoating layer. In situ resistance measurement during bending tests revealed that the Ag nanowire electrode with PEDOT:PSS overcoating layer was mechanically reliable, showing a 21.9% increase in resistance after 500,000 cycles of bending. Scanning electron microscope images revealed that the failure of the Ag nanowire network occurred along with cracks initiated in the PEDOT:PSS layer, which resulted in the increase in resistance under bending. Furthermore, the PEDOT:PSS deposition enhanced the chemical stability of Ag nanowire electrode, which showed no significant increase in resistance after exposure in air for 50 days. Our study underscored that PEDOT:PSS is effective in protecting the Ag nanowires, while maintaining the high mechanical stability.

  6. Exploring the bronzing effect at the surface of ink layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Mathieu; Mallet, Maxime; Deboos, Alexis; Chavel, Pierre; Kuang, Deng-Feng; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Besbes, Mondher; Cazier, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the optical phenomenon responsible for the colored shine that sometimes appears at the surface of ink layers in the specular direction, often called bronzing or gloss differential. It seems to come from the wavelength-dependent refractive index of the ink, which induces a wavelength-dependent reflectance of the ink-air interface. Our experiments on cyan and magenta inkjet inks confirm this theory. Complex refractive indices can be obtained from measurements of the spectral reflectance and transmittance of a transparency film coated with the ink. We propose a correction of the classical Clapper-Yule model in order to include the colored gloss in the prediction of the spectral reflectance of an inked paper. We also explored effects of scattering by the micrometric or nanometric roughness of the ink surface. The micrometric roughness, easy to model with a geometrical optics model, can predict the spreading of the colored gloss over a large cone. Electromagnetic models accounting for the effect of the nanometric roughness of the surface also predict the attenuation of short wavelengths observed under collimated illumination.

  7. Turbulent boundary layer over a divergent convergent superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalabadi, Razieh; Hwang, Jinyul; Nadeem, Muhammad; Yoon, Min; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2017-08-01

    A direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer over a divergent and convergent superhydrophobic surface (SHS) was performed over the range 800 < Reθ < 1200. The surface patterns were aligned along the streamwise direction. The SHS was modeled as a pattern of free-slip and no-slip surfaces. The gas fraction of the divergent and convergent SHS was the same as that for the straight SHS for a given slip area. The divergent and convergent SHS gave 21% more drag reduction than the straight SHS. Although the maximum value of the streamwise slip velocity was larger over the divergent and convergent SHS, the average slip velocity (Uslip/U∞) was larger over the straight SHS. The greater drag reduction was attributed to the manipulation of the secondary flow in the y-z plane and the changes in the turbulence structure. The streamwise vortices generated by the secondary flow over the divergent and convergent SHS were diminished which reduced drag relative to the flow over the straight SHS. The ejection and sweep motions were weak, and the vortical structure was attenuated near the wall over the divergent and convergent SHS. The skin friction contributions were explored using the velocity-vorticity correlation. The vortex stretching contribution dominated the skin friction budget. The reduced skin friction over the divergent and convergent SHS resulted mainly from reduced vortex stretching.

  8. Polydopamine as an intermediate layer for silver and hydroxyapatite immobilisation on metallic biomaterials surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidin, Syafiqah; Chevallier, Pascale; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Hermawan, Hendra; Mantovani, Diego

    2013-12-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) coated implant is more susceptible to bacterial infection as the micro-structure surface which is beneficial for osseointegration, could also become a reservoir for bacterial colonisation. The aim of this study was to introduce the antibacterial effect of silver (Ag) to the biomineralised HA by utilising a polydopamine film as an intermediate layer for Ag and HA immobilisation. Sufficient catechol groups in polydopamine were required to bind chemically stainless steel 316 L, Ag and HA elements. Different amounts of Ag nanoparticles were metallised on the polydopamine grafted stainless steel by varying the immersion time in silver nitrate solution from 12 to 24 h. Another polydopamine layer was then formed on the metallised film, followed by surface biomineralisation in 1.5 Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) solution for 3 days. Several characterisation techniques including X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Contact Angle showed that Ag nanoparticles and HA agglomerations were successfully immobilised on the polydopamine film through an element reduction process. The Ag metallisation at 24 h has killed the viable bacteria with 97.88% of bactericidal ratio. The Ag was ionised up to 7 days which is crucial to prevent bacterial infection during the first stage of implant restoration. The aged functionalised films were considered stable due to less alteration of its chemical composition, surface roughness and wettability properties. The ability of the functionalised film to coat complex and micro scale metal make it suitable for dental and orthopaedic implants application.

  9. Enhancing Color Purity and Stable Efficiency of White Organic Light Diodes by Using Hole-Blocking Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Jung Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The organic light-emitting diodes with triple hole-blocking layer (THBL formation sandwich structure which generate white emission were fabricated. The 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnapthacene (Rubrene, (4,4′-N,N′-dicarbazolebiphenyl (CBP, and 4,4′-bis(2,2′diphenylvinil-1,1′-biphenyl (DPVBi were used as emitting materials in the device. The function of CBP layer is not only an emitting layer but also a hole-blocking layer (HBL, and the Rubrene was doped into the CBP. The optimal configuration structure was indium tin oxide (ITO/Molybdenum trioxide (MoO3 (5 nm/[4,4-bis[N-(1-naphthyl-N-phenylamino]biphenyl (NPB (35 nm/CBP (HBL1 (5 nm/DPVBi (I (10 nm/CBP (HBL2 : Rubrene (4 : 1 (3 nm/DPVBi (II (30 nm/CBP (HBL3 (2 nm/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen (10 nm/Lithium fluoride (LiF/aluminum (Al. The result showed that the device with Rubrene doped in CBP (HBL2 exhibited a stable white emission with the color coordinates of (0.322, 0.368, and the coordinate with the slight shift of ±Δx,y = (0.001, 0.011 for applied voltage of 8–12 V was observed.

  10. Fabrication of hierarchical structures for stable superhydrophobicity on metallic planar and cylindrical inner surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiuqing; Wang, Li; Lv, Danhui; Wang, Quandai; Li, Liang; He, Ning; Lu, Bingheng

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the construction of stable superhydrophobicity on metallic wetting surfaces has gained increasing attention due to its potential wide applications. In this paper, we propose an economic fabricating method, which not only is suitable for metallic planar surfaces, but also could be applied onto cylindrical inner surfaces. It mainly involves two steps: etching micro-concaves by a movable mask electrochemical micromachining (EMM) technique and fabricating nanopillars of ZnO by a hydrothermal method. Then the influences of surface morphology on the static and dynamic behaviors of water droplets are investigated. The energy loss during impact on the surfaces is quantified in terms of the restitution coefficient for droplets bouncing off the surfaces. For hierarchical structures with excellent superhydrophobicity (contact angle ≈180° and sliding angle ≤1°), the droplet bounces off the surface several times, superior to the droplet's response on single nanopillars (contact angle ≈165.8° and sliding angle ≈6.29°) where droplet bounces off only for limited a number of times, and even far better than the dynamics of a liquid droplet impinging on microstructures (contact angle ≈132.1° and sliding angle >90°) where droplet does not rebound and remains pinned. The highest elasticity is obtained on the hierarchical surface, where the restitution coefficient can be as large as 0.94. The fabricating method is then applied onto the cylindrical inner surface and the wetting behavior is confirmed to be consistent with the planar surface. This method, which can be generalized to any kind of solid electroconductive metal or other surfaces with different shapes, could find wide practical applications in self-cleaning surfaces, chemical industry, microfluidic devices, mechanical engineering and aviation.

  11. A macromolecular model for the endothelial surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, James; Danova-Okpetu, Darina; Grest, Gary

    2006-03-01

    The endothelial surface layer (ESL) is a micron-scale macromolecular lining of the luminal side of blood vessels composed of proteoglycans, glycoproteins, polysaccharides and associated plasma proteins all in dynamic equilibrium. It has numerous physiological roles including the regulation of blood flow and microvascular permeability, and active participation in mechanotransduction and stress regulation, coagulation, cell adhesion, and inflammatory response. The dynamic structure and the mechanical properties of the ESL are crucial for many of its physiological properties. We present a topological model for the ESL composed of three basic macromolecular elements: branched proteoglycans, linear polysaccharide chains, and small plasma proteins. The model was studied using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and compared with scaling theories for associating tethered polymers. We discuss the observed dynamical and mechanical properties of the ESL captured by this model, and the possible physical insight it provides into the physiological behavior of the ESL.

  12. Thin hydroxyapatite surface layers on titanium produced by ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, H; Bilger, G; Jones, D; Symietz, I

    2002-01-01

    In medicine metallic implants are widely used as hip replacement protheses or artificial teeth. The biocompatibility is in all cases the most important requirement. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is frequently used as coating on metallic implants because of its high acceptance by the human body. In this paper a process is described by which a HAp surface layer is produced by ion implantation with a continuous transition to the bulk material. Calcium and phosphorus ions are successively implanted into titanium under different vacuum conditions by backfilling oxygen into the implantation chamber. Afterwards the implanted samples are thermally treated. The elemental composition inside the implanted region was determined by nuclear analysis methods as (alpha,alpha) backscattering and the resonant nuclear reaction sup 1 H( sup 1 sup 5 N,alpha gamma) sup 1 sup 2 C. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate the formation of HAp. In addition a first biocompatibility test was performed to compare the growing of m...

  13. Cone model for two surface foundations on layered soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Wenhua

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the cone model is applied to the vibration analysis of two foundations on a layered soil half space. In the analysis, the total stress field in the subsoil is divided into the free-field and the scattering field. Seed's simplified method is adopted for the free-field analysis,while the cone model is proposed for analyzing the dynamic scattering stress wave field.The shear stress field and the compressive stress field in the layered stratum with two scattering sources are calculated by shear cone and compressive cone, respectively. Furthermore, the stress fields in the subsoil with two foundations are divided into six zones, and the P wave and S wave are analyzed in each zone. Numerical results are provided to illustrate features of the added stress field for two surface foundations under vertical and horizontal sinusoidal force excitation. The proposed cone model may be useful in handling some of the complex problems associated with multi-scattering sources.

  14. Measurement of atmospheric surface layer turbulence using unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Brandon; Smith, Lorli; Schlagenhauf, Cornelia; Bailey, Sean

    2016-11-01

    We describe measurements of the turbulence within the atmospheric surface layer using highly instrumented and autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Results from the CLOUDMAP measurement campaign in Stillwater Oklahoma are presented including turbulence statistics measured during the transition from stably stratified to convective conditions. The measurements were made using pre-fabricated fixed-wing remote-control aircraft adapted to fly autonomously and carry multi-hole pressure probes, pressure, temperature and humidity sensors. Two aircraft were flown simultaneously, with one flying a flight path intended to profile the boundary layer up to 100 m and the other flying at a constant fixed altitude of 50 m. The evolution of various turbulent statistics was determined from these flights, including Reynolds stresses, correlations, spectra and structure functions. These results were compared to those measured by a sonic anemometer located on a 7.5 m tower. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through Grant #CBET-1351411 and by National Science Foundation award #1539070, Collaboration Leading Operational UAS Development for Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics (CLOUDMAP).

  15. Polydopamine as an intermediate layer for silver and hydroxyapatite immobilisation on metallic biomaterials surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidin, Syafiqah, E-mail: syafiqahsaidin@gmail.com [Medical Implant Technology Group, Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Chevallier, Pascale, E-mail: pascale.chevallier@crsfa.ulaval.ca [Laboratory for Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering and University Hospital Research Center, Laval University, Quebec City, QC, G1V 0A6 (Canada); Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq, E-mail: rafiq@biomedical.utm.my [Medical Implant Technology Group, Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Hermawan, Hendra, E-mail: hendra.hermawan@biomedical.utm.my [Medical Implant Technology Group, Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Mantovani, Diego, E-mail: Diego.Mantovani@gmn.ulaval.ca [Laboratory for Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering and University Hospital Research Center, Laval University, Quebec City, QC, G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2013-12-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) coated implant is more susceptible to bacterial infection as the micro-structure surface which is beneficial for osseointegration, could also become a reservoir for bacterial colonisation. The aim of this study was to introduce the antibacterial effect of silver (Ag) to the biomineralised HA by utilising a polydopamine film as an intermediate layer for Ag and HA immobilisation. Sufficient catechol groups in polydopamine were required to bind chemically stainless steel 316 L, Ag and HA elements. Different amounts of Ag nanoparticles were metallised on the polydopamine grafted stainless steel by varying the immersion time in silver nitrate solution from 12 to 24 h. Another polydopamine layer was then formed on the metallised film, followed by surface biomineralisation in 1.5 Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) solution for 3 days. Several characterisation techniques including X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Contact Angle showed that Ag nanoparticles and HA agglomerations were successfully immobilised on the polydopamine film through an element reduction process. The Ag metallisation at 24 h has killed the viable bacteria with 97.88% of bactericidal ratio. The Ag was ionised up to 7 days which is crucial to prevent bacterial infection during the first stage of implant restoration. The aged functionalised films were considered stable due to less alteration of its chemical composition, surface roughness and wettability properties. The ability of the functionalised film to coat complex and micro scale metal make it suitable for dental and orthopaedic implants application. - Highlights: • Successful immobilisation of Ag and HA on SS316L functionalised with polydopamine • Development of antibacterial film at 97.88% bactericidal ratio • The functionalised films were stable under ageing test at 7 days.

  16. Topography and Atomic Structure Investigations Of (100 Cleavage Surface of In4Se3 Layered Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.V. Galiy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The atomic microstructure and crystallography of (100 surfaces of In4Se3 layered crystals obtained by cleavage in situ were studied by the methods of scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopies (STM, AFM and low energy electron diffraction (LEED for reflection. The obtained results indicate the existence of periodic corrugated structures on the cleavage surface. It is shown that (100 In4Se3 cleavage surface is structurally stable and doesn't undergo reconstruction in a wide temperature range of 77-295 K. The anisotropy of thermal expansion along the main crystallography directions in the (100 In4Se3 cleavage plane has been shown. The evaluation of the two-dimensional lattice constant in the cleavage (100 surface plane of orthorhombic In4Se3 layered crystal was done. The calculated values of the lattice constants in consequence of LEED study, such as b  11,475 Å and c  3,734 Å, coincide well with those obtained by the AFM and STM (b  13-14 Å and c  4 Å, and correlate, within the errors limits, with the corresponding values obtained by X-ray diffraction (b  12,308(1 Å and c  4,0810(5 Å. Besides, the obtained results of cleavage surface structure studies show the correctness of filtering application concerning topography images and indicate the adequacy of the model used for calculations of the cleavage (100 surfaces lattice constants of In4Se3 in accordance with the LEED results. The influence of the LEED experimental module structure on the results has been considered.

  17. Modification of Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows by Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, James W.; Golovin, Kevin; Barros, Julio; Schultz, Michael P.; Tuteja, Anish; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of near zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer (TBL) flow over several superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) are presented and compared to those for a hydraulically smooth baseline. The surfaces were developed at the University of Michigan as part of an ongoing research thrust to investigate the feasibility of SHSs for skin-friction drag reduction in turbulent flow. The SHSs were previously evaluated in fully-developed turbulent channel flow and have been shown to provide meaningful drag reduction. The TBL experiments were conducted at the USNA in a water tunnel with a test section 2.0 m (L) x 0.2 m (W) x 0.2 m (H). The free-stream speed was set to 1.26 m/s which corresponded to a friction Reynolds number of 1,500. The TBL was tripped at the test section inlet with a 0.8 mm diameter wire. The upper and side walls provided optical access, while the lower wall was either the smooth baseline or a spray coated SHS. The velocity measurements were obtained with a TSI FSA3500 two-component Laser-Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) and custom-designed beam displacer operated in coincidence mode. The LDV probe volume diameter was 45 μm (approx. one wall-unit). The measurements were recorded 1.5 m downstream of the trip. When the measured quantities were normalized using the inner variables, the results indicated a significant reduction in the near wall viscous and total stresses with little effect on the flow outside the inner layer.

  18. Reconstruction of cylindrically layered media using an iterative algorithm with a stable solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Ji-zhen; NIU Zuo-yuan; CHENG Chong-hu

    2007-01-01

    The reconstruction of cylindrically layered media is investigated in this article. The inverse problem is modeled using a source-type integral equation with a series of cylindrical waves as incidences, and a conventional Born iterative procedure is modified for solving the integral equation. In the modified iterative procedure, a conventional single-point approximation for the calculation of the field inside media is replaced by a multi-points approximation to improve the numerical stability of its solution. Numerical simulations for different permittivity distributions are demon- strated in terms of artificial scattering data with the procedure. The result shows that the procedure enjoys both accuracy and stability in the numerical computation.

  19. High reliable and stable organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memory with a poly(4-vinyl phenol) charge trapping layer based on a pn-heterojunction active layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Lanyi; Ying, Jun; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Letian; Wang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate a high reliable and stable organic field-effect transistor (OFET) based nonvolatile memory (NVM) with a polymer poly(4-vinyl phenol) (PVP) as the charge trapping layer. In the unipolar OFETs, the inreversible shifts of the turn-on voltage (Von) and severe degradation of the memory window (ΔVon) at programming (P) and erasing (E) voltages, respectively, block their application in NVMs. The obstacle is overcome by using a pn-heterojunction as the active layer in the OFET memory, which supplied a holes and electrons accumulating channel at the supplied P and E voltages, respectively. Both holes and electrons transferring from the channels to PVP layer and overwriting the trapped charges with an opposite polarity result in the reliable bidirectional shifts of Von at P and E voltages, respectively. The heterojunction OFET exhibits excellent nonvolatile memory characteristics, with a large ΔVon of 8.5 V, desired reading (R) voltage at 0 V, reliable P/R/E/R dynamic endurance over 100 cycles and a long retention time over 10 years.

  20. Surface evolution in stable magnetic fields: the case of the fully convective dwarf V374 Peg

    CERN Document Server

    Vida, K; K\\Hovári, Zs

    2010-01-01

    We present BV(RI)_C photometric measurements of the dM4-type V374 Peg covering ~430 days. The star has a mass of ~0.28M_Sun, so it is supposed to be fully convective. Previous observations detected almost-rigid-body rotation and stable, axisymmetric poloidal magnetic field. Our photometric data agree well with this picture, one persistent active nest is found on the stellar surface. Nevertheless, the surface is not static: night-to-night variations and frequent flaring are observed. The flares seem to be concentrated on the brighter part of the surface. The short-time changes of the light curve could indicate emerging flux ropes in the same region, resembling to the active nests on the Sun. We have observed flaring and quiet states of V374 Peg changing on monthly timescale.

  1. Surface Roughness and Dislocation Distribution in Compositionally Graded Relaxed SiGe Buffer Layer with Inserted Strained Si Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Tae-Sik

    2005-03-01

    We report the experimental investigation of surface roughness and dislocation distribution of 1 μm-thick, compositionally graded, relaxed SiGe buffer layer with a final Ge surface content of 30%. Tensile-strained Si layers are inserted at various locations in the graded buffer during SiGe epitaxial growths. Slight reduction in surface roughness from about 10.3 nm to about 7.8 nm by inserting two 20 nm thick tensile-strained Si layers followed by SiGe growths. It turns out that majority of the residual surface roughness is developed during the SiGe growths on top of the topmost strain Si layer. The surface immediately after the growth of tensile strained Si is very flat with about 1.1 nm RMS roughness and without crosshatch morphology. Cross-sectional TEM shows clear signs of increased interaction between dislocation half-loops at the top surface of the strained Si layers. Our observation shows that although thin Si layers under tensile-strain are effective in reducing cross-hatch, they could in the meantime impede dislocation propagation leading to higher threading dislocation density. Considerations for an optimized scheme exploiting the flattening function of tensile-strained layers will be discussed.

  2. Effect of treatment time on characterization and properties of nanocrystalline surface layer in copper induced by surface mechanical attrition treatment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Farzad Kargar; M Laleh; T Shahrabi; A Sabour Rouhaghdam

    2014-08-01

    Nanocrystalline surface layers were synthesized on pure copper by means of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) at various treatment times. The microstructural features of the surface layers produced by SMAT were systematically characterized by optical microscopy (OM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Hardness and surface roughness measurements were also carried out. It is found that the thickness of the deformed layer increased from 50 to 500 m with increasing treatment time from 10 to 300 min, while the average grain size of the top surface layer decreased from 20 to 7 nm. Hardness of the all SMATed samples decreased with depth. Furthermore, the hardness of the top surface layer of the SMATed samples was at least two times higher than that of the un-treated counterpart. Surface roughness results showed different trend with treatment time. Amounts of PV and a values first sharply increased and then decreased.

  3. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoclusters: Aqueous, Concentrated, Stable, and Catalytically Active Colloids toward Green Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokudome, Yasuaki; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tarutani, Naoki; Vaz, Pedro D; Nunes, Carla D; Prevot, Vanessa; Stenning, Gavin B G; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-05-24

    Increasing attention has been dedicated to the development of nanomaterials rendering green and sustainable processes, which occur in benign aqueous reaction media. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of another family of green nanomaterials, layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoclusters, which are concentrated (98.7 g/L in aqueous solvent), stably dispersed (transparent sol for >2 weeks), and catalytically active colloids of nano LDHs (isotropic shape with the size of 7.8 nm as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering). LDH nanoclusters are available as colloidal building blocks to give access to meso- and macroporous LDH materials. Proof-of-concept applications revealed that the LDH nanocluster works as a solid basic catalyst and is separable from solvents of catalytic reactions, confirming the nature of nanocatalysts. The present work closely investigates the unique physical and chemical features of this colloid, the formation mechanism, and the ability to act as basic nanocatalysts in benign aqueous reaction systems.

  4. Thermally stable organically modified layered silicates based on alkyl imidazolium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Shailesh K; Ghosh, Smita; Mathias, Lon J

    2012-02-15

    A series of imidazolium salts having various substituents and functional groups were synthesized and characterized by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. Organic modification of natural and synthetic layered silicates involving montmorillonite (MMT), laponite (lap), and synthetic mica (mica) was carried out by ion-exchange reaction. The obtained organo-clays were characterized by FTIR and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. Results indicate that these organically modified clays have much higher thermal stabilities compared to their corresponding imidazolium halides. It was also observed from TGA analysis that thermal stability does not depend on the functional group present at the 3-position of the imidazolium salts. These studies strongly supports premise that the removal of halide is necessary to improve the thermal stability of the organo-clay produced.

  5. A stable finite difference method for the elastic wave equation on complex geometries with free surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelo, D; Petersson, N A

    2007-12-17

    The isotropic elastic wave equation governs the propagation of seismic waves caused by earthquakes and other seismic events. It also governs the propagation of waves in solid material structures and devices, such as gas pipes, wave guides, railroad rails and disc brakes. In the vast majority of wave propagation problems arising in seismology and solid mechanics there are free surfaces. These free surfaces have, in general, complicated shapes and are rarely flat. Another feature, characterizing problems arising in these areas, is the strong heterogeneity of the media, in which the problems are posed. For example, on the characteristic length scales of seismological problems, the geological structures of the earth can be considered piecewise constant, leading to models where the values of the elastic properties are also piecewise constant. Large spatial contrasts are also found in solid mechanics devices composed of different materials welded together. The presence of curved free surfaces, together with the typical strong material heterogeneity, makes the design of stable, efficient and accurate numerical methods for the elastic wave equation challenging. Today, many different classes of numerical methods are used for the simulation of elastic waves. Early on, most of the methods were based on finite difference approximations of space and time derivatives of the equations in second order differential form (displacement formulation), see for example [1, 2]. The main problem with these early discretizations were their inability to approximate free surface boundary conditions in a stable and fully explicit manner, see e.g. [10, 11, 18, 20]. The instabilities of these early methods were especially bad for problems with materials with high ratios between the P-wave (C{sub p}) and S-wave (C{sub s}) velocities. For rectangular domains, a stable and explicit discretization of the free surface boundary conditions is presented in the paper [17] by Nilsson et al. In summary

  6. Assessment of Gradient-Based Similarity Functions in the Stable Boundary Layer Derived from a Large-Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbjan, Zbigniew

    2017-02-01

    Gradient-based similarity functions, evaluated based on data generated by a large-eddy simulation model of the stably stratified boundary layer, are compared with analogous similarity functions, derived from field observations in the surface layer during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment in the Arctic. The comparison is performed in terms of explicit and implicit local scaling systems, for the temperature and momentum fluxes, standard deviations of the vertical velocity and of temperature, as well as dissipation rates for the turbulent kinetic energy and for the temperature variance. The comparison shows the best agreement of the SHEBA-based similarity functions with analogous functions evaluated using the large-eddy simulation data in the range of the Richardson number 0.01<{ Ri}< 0.1.

  7. Local environmental conditions and the stability of protective layers on steel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, J.P. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Bursik, A.

    1996-12-01

    Local environmental conditions determine whether the protective layers on steel surfaces are stable. With unfavorable local environmental conditions, the protective layers may be subject to damage. Taking the cation conductivity of all plant cycle streams <0.2 {mu}S/cm for granted, an adequate feed-water and - if applicable - boiler water conditioning is required to prevent such damage. Even if the mentioned conditions are met in a bulk, the local environmental conditions may be inadequate. The reasons for this may be the disregarding of interactions among material, design, and chemistry. The paper presents many possible mechanisms of protective layer damage that are directly influenced or exacerbated by plant cycle chemistry. Two items are discussed in more detail: First, the application of all volatile treatment for boiler water conditioning of drum boiler systems operating at low pressures and, second, the chemistry in the transition zone water/steam in the low pressure turbine. The latter is of major interest for the understanding and prevention of corrosion due to high concentration of impurities in the aqueous liquid phases. This is a typical example showing that local environmental conditions may fundamentally differ from the overall bulk chemistry. (au) 19 refs.

  8. INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE DETACHMENT OF DIFFERENTLY STRUCTURED DUST LAYERS FROM SURFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eberhard; Schmidt

    2005-01-01

    A technique is presented for creating surface-adhering dust layers under defined conditions, and characterizing and stressing the layers created. The procedure described is shown to be suitable for the quantitative evaluation of the effects of different parameters such as particle size, porosity and surface roughness etc. on the stability of particle layers.

  9. Surface oceanographic fronts influencing deep-sea biological activity: Using fish stable isotopes as ecological tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louzao, Maite; Navarro, Joan; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; de Sola, Luis Gil; Forero, Manuela G.

    2017-06-01

    Ecotones can be described as transition zones between neighbouring ecological systems that can be shaped by environmental gradients over a range of space and time scales. In the marine environment, the detection of ecotones is complex given the highly dynamic nature of marine systems and the paucity of empirical data over ocean-basin scales. One approach to overcome these limitations is to use stable isotopes from animal tissues since they can track spatial oceanographic variability across marine systems and, in turn, can be used as ecological tracers. Here, we analysed stable isotopes of deep-sea fishes to assess the presence of ecological discontinuities across the western Mediterranean. We were specifically interested in exploring the connection between deep-sea biological activity and particular oceanographic features (i.e., surface fronts) occurring in the pelagic domain. We collected samples for three different abundant deep-sea species in May 2004 from an experimental oceanographic trawling cruise (MEDITS): the Mictophydae jewel lanternfish Lampanyctus crocodilus and two species of the Gadidae family, the silvery pout Gadiculus argenteus and the blue whiting Micromesistius poutassou. The experimental survey occurred along the Iberian continental shelf and the upper and middle slopes, from the Strait of Gibraltar in the SW to the Cape Creus in the NE. The three deep-sea species were highly abundant throughout the study area and they showed geographic variation in their isotopic values, with decreasing values from north to south disrupted by an important change point around the Vera Gulf. Isotopic latitudinal gradients were explained by pelagic oceanographic conditions along the study area and confirm the existence of an ecotone at the Vera Gulf. This area could be considered as an oceanographic boundary where waters of Atlantic origin meet Mediterranean surface waters forming important frontal structures such as the Almeria-Oran front. In fact, our results

  10. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Constant Behavior: IV. Diffuse Layer Charge/Potential Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most current electrostatic surface complexation models describing ionic binding at the particle/water interface rely on the use of Poisson - Boltzmann (PB) theory for relating diffuse layer charge densities to diffuse layer electrostatic potentials. PB theory is known to contain ...

  11. The traceability of animal meals in layer diets as detected by stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses of eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JC Denadai

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to trace the inclusion of animal meals in layer diets by analyzing eggs and their fractions (yolk and albumen using the technique of carbon and nitrogen isotopes. Two-hundred and eighty-eight (288 73-week-old Shaver White layers, never fed animal ingredients, were randomly distributed in six treatments with six replicates each. The treatments were: control - corn and soybean meal based diet and five other experimental diets including bovine meat and bone meal (MBM; poultry offal meal (POM; feather meal (FM; feather meal and poultry offal meal (OFM, and poultry offal meal, feather meal, and meat and bone meal (MBOFM. The isotopic results were submitted to multivariate analysis of variance. Ellipses were determined through an error matrix (95% confidence to identify differences between treatments and the control group. In the albumen and yolk of all experimental treatments were significantly different from the control diet (p < 0.05. In summary, the stable isotope technique is able to trace the animal meals included in layer feeds in the final product under these experimental conditions.

  12. Characterization of Floating Surface Layers of Lipids and Lipopolymers by Surface-Sensitive Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Peter; Lösche, Mathias

    Nanotechnology and molecular (bio-)engineering are making ever deepening inroads into everybodys daily life. Physicochemical and biotechnological achievements in the design of physiologically active supramolecular assemblies have brought about the quest for their submolecular-level characterization. We employ surface-sensitive scattering techniques for the investigation of planar lipid membranes - floating monolayers on aqueous surfaces - to correlate structural, functional and dynamic aspects of biomembrane models. This chapter surveys recent work on the submolecular structure of floating phospholipid monolayers - where the advent of third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources has driven the development of realistic, submolecular-scale quasi-chemical models - as well as of more complex systems: cation binding to anionic lipid surfaces; conformational changes of lipopolymers undergoing phase transitions; the conformational organization of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositides, as examples of physiologically important lipids; and the adsorption of peptides (neuropeptide Y, NPY) or solvents (dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO) onto phospholipid surface layers.

  13. The role of energetic ions from plasma in the creation of nanostructured materials and stable polymer surface treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilek, M.M.M. [Department of Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)]. E-mail: mmmb@physics.usyd.edu.au; Newton-McGee, K. [Department of Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McKenzie, D.R. [Department of Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McCulloch, D.G. [Department of Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2006-01-15

    Plasma processes for the synthesis of new materials as thin films have enabled the production of a wide variety of new materials. These include meta-stable phases, which are not readily found in nature, and more recently, materials with structure on the nanoscale. Study of plasma synthesis processes at the fundamental level has revealed that ion energy, depositing flux and growth surface temperature are the critical parameters affecting the microstructure and the properties of the thin film materials formed. In this paper, we focus on the role of ion flux and impact energy in the creation of thin films with nanoscale structure in the form of multilayers. We describe three synthesis strategies, based on the extraction of ions from plasma sources and involving modulation of ion flux and ion energy. The microstructure, intrinsic stress and physical properties of the multilayered samples synthesized are studied and related back to the conditions at the growth surface during deposition. When energetic ions of a non-condensing species are used, it is possible to place active groups on the surfaces of materials such as polymers. These active groups can then be used as bonding sites in subsequent chemical attachment of proteins or other macromolecules. If the energy of the non-condensing ions is increased to a few keV then modified layers buried under the surface can be produced. Here we describe a method by which the aging effect, which is often observed in plasma surface modifications on polymers, can be reduced and even eliminated using high energy ion bombardment.

  14. Polyaniline hybridized surface defective ZnO nanorods with long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, Susanta; Khan, Hasmat [Sol-Gel Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CSIR-CGCRI), 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, P.O. Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, West Bengal (India); Biswas, Indranil [Materials Characterization and Instrumentation Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CSIR-CGCRI), 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, P.O. Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, West Bengal (India); Jana, Sunirmal, E-mail: sjana@cgcri.res.in [Sol-Gel Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CSIR-CGCRI), 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, P.O. Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, West Bengal (India)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Polyaniline (PANI) hybridized ZnO nanorods was synthesized by solution method. • Surface defects were found in the nanorods. • The hybrid material exhibited an enhancement in visible light absorption. • A long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity of the material was found. • Advancement in the properties would be PANI hybridization and surface defects. - Abstract: We report surfactant/template free precursor solution based synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) hybridized surface defective ZnO nanorods by a two-step process. Initially, ZnO nanorods have been prepared at 95 °C, followed by hybridization (coating) of PANI onto the ZnO via in situ polymerization of aniline monomer, forming ZnO-PANI nanohybrid (ZP). The structural properties of ZP have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. The presence of surface defects especially the oxygen vacancies in ZnO has been characterized by photoluminescence emission, high resolution TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman spectral measurements. The chemical interaction of PANI with ZnO has been examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and XPS analyses. A significant enhancement in visible absorption of ZP sample is found as evidenced from UV–vis diffused reflectance spectral study. BET nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm shows an improved textural property (pore size, pore volume) of ZP. Moreover, a long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity (PEC) of ZP is found compare to pristine ZnO. The synergic effect of PANI hybridization and the presence of surface defects in ZnO NRs can enhance the PEC by prolonging the recombination rate of photogenerated charge carriers. The effect can also provide large number of active sites to make electrolyte diffusion and mass transportation easier in the nanohybrid. This simple synthesis strategy can be adopted for PANI hybridization with different metal oxide semiconductors

  15. Towards the fourth GEWEX atmospheric boundary layer model intercomparison study (GABLS4): exploration of very stable conditions over an Antarctic ice shelf

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vihma, T.; Kilpeläinen, T.; Rontu, L.; Anderson, P.S.; Orr, A.; Phillips, T.; Finkele, K.; Rodrigo, I.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Svensson, G.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical weather prediction and climate models continue to have large errors for stable boundary layers (SBL). To understand and to improve on this, so far three atmospheric boundary layer model inter-comparison studies have been organised within the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX)

  16. Ordering layers of [bmim][PF6] ionic liquid on graphite surfaces: molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maolin, Sha; Fuchun, Zhang; Guozhong, Wu; Haiping, Fang; Chunlei, Wang; Shimou, Chen; Yi, Zhang; Jun, Hu

    2008-04-01

    Microscopic structures of room temperature ionic liquid (IL) [bmim][PF6] on hydrophobic graphite surfaces have been studied in detail by molecular dynamics simulation. It is clearly shown that both the mass and electron densities of the surface adsorbed ionic liquid are oscillatory, and the first peak adjacent to the graphite surface is considerably higher than others, corresponding to a solidlike IL bottom layer of 6 angstroms thick. Three IL layers are indicated between the graphite surface and the inner bulk IL liquid. The individually simulated properties of single-, double-, and triple-IL layers on the graphite surface are very similar to those of the layers between the graphite surface and the bulk liquid, indicating an insignificant effect of vapor-IL interface on the ordered IL layers. The simulation also indicates that the imidazolium ring and butyl tail of the cation (bmim+) of the IL bottom layer lie flat on the graphite surface.

  17. Dry Deposition, Surface Production and Dynamics of Aerosols in the Marine Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fairall, C.W.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    1984-01-01

    A model of downward aerosol panicle flux characterized by dry deposition velocity, Vd, due to Slinn and Slinn (1980) is generalized to the case of nonzero surface concentration (absorbing surface with a surface source). A more general expression for the flux at some reference height is developed...... which includes Vd and an effective surface source strength, Si, which is a function of the true surface source strength, Si, and the particle transport properties below the reference height. The general expression for the surface flux is incorporated into a dynamic mixed layer model of the type...... developed by Davidson et al. (1983). This three layer model (diffusion sublayer, turbulent surface layer and mixed layer) is applied to an open ocean marine regime where boundary layer advection is ignored. The aerosol concentration in the boundary layer is considered to consist of sea salt particles...

  18. Simulations of seasonal variations of stable water isotopes in land surface process model CLM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG XinPing; WANG XiaoYun; YANG ZongLiang; NIU GuoYue; Xie ZiChu

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we simulated and analyzed the monthly variations of stable water isotopes in different reservoirs at Manaus, Brazil, using the Community Land Model (CLM) that incorporates stable isotopic effects as a diagnostic tool for understanding stable water isotopic processes, filling the observational data gaps and predicting hydrometeorological processes. The simulation results show that the δO values in precipitation, vapor and surface runoff have distinct seasonality with the marked negative correlations with corresponding water amount. Compared with the survey results by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in co-operation with the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the simulations by CLM reveal the similar temporal distributions of the δO in precipitation. Moreover, the simulated amount effect between monthly δO and monthly precipitation amount, and MWL (meteoric water line) are all close to the measured values. However, the simulated seasonal difference in the δO in precipitation is distinctly smaller than observed one, and the simulated temporal distribution of the 8180 in precipitation displays the ideal bimodal seasonality rather than the observed single one. These mismatches are possibly related to the simulation capacity and the veracity in forcing data.

  19. Layered reduced graphene oxide with nanoscale interlayer gaps as a stable host for lithium metal anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dingchang; Liu, Yayuan; Liang, Zheng; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Sun, Jie; Wang, Haotian; Yan, Kai; Xie, Jin; Cui, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Metallic lithium is a promising anode candidate for future high-energy-density lithium batteries. It is a light-weight material, and has the highest theoretical capacity (3,860 mAh g-1) and the lowest electrochemical potential of all candidates. There are, however, at least three major hurdles before lithium metal anodes can become a viable technology: uneven and dendritic lithium deposition, unstable solid electrolyte interphase and almost infinite relative dimension change during cycling. Previous research has tackled the first two issues, but the last is still mostly unsolved. Here we report a composite lithium metal anode that exhibits low dimension variation (˜20%) during cycling and good mechanical flexibility. The anode is composed of 7 wt% ‘lithiophilic’ layered reduced graphene oxide with nanoscale gaps that can host metallic lithium. The anode retains up to ˜3,390 mAh g-1 of capacity, exhibits low overpotential (˜80 mV at 3 mA cm-2) and a flat voltage profile in a carbonate electrolyte. A full-cell battery with a LiCoO2 cathode shows good rate capability and flat voltage profiles.

  20. Toward Isolation of Salient Features in Stable Boundary Layer Wind Fields that Influence Loads on Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinkyoo Park

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Neutral boundary layer (NBL flow fields, commonly used in turbine load studies and design, are generated using spectral procedures in stochastic simulation. For large utility-scale turbines, stable boundary layer (SBL flow fields are of great interest because they are often accompanied by enhanced wind shear, wind veer, and even low-level jets (LLJs. The generation of SBL flow fields, in contrast to simpler stochastic simulation for NBL, requires computational fluid dynamics (CFD procedures to capture the physics and noted characteristics—such as shear and veer—that are distinct from those seen in NBL flows. At present, large-eddy simulation (LES is the most efficient CFD procedure for SBL flow field generation and related wind turbine loads studies. Design standards, such as from the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC, provide guidance albeit with simplifying assumptions (one such deals with assuming constant variance of turbulence over the rotor and recommend standard target turbulence power spectra and coherence functions to allow NBL flow field simulation. In contrast, a systematic SBL flow field simulation procedure has not been offered for design or for site assessment. It is instructive to compare LES-generated SBL flow fields with stochastic NBL flow fields and associated loads which we evaluate for a 5-MW turbine; in doing so, we seek to isolate distinguishing characteristics of wind shear, wind veer, and turbulence variation over the rotor plane in the alternative flow fields and in the turbine loads. Because of known differences in NBL-stochastic and SBL-LES wind fields but an industry preference for simpler stochastic simulation in design practice, this study investigates if one can reproduce stable atmospheric conditions using stochastic approaches with appropriate corrections for shear, veer, turbulence, etc. We find that such simple tuning cannot consistently match turbine target SBL load statistics, even though

  1. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by low-temperature atomic layer deposited titanium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Baochen; Hoex, Bram; Aberle, Armin G.; Chi, Dongzhi; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) titanium oxide (TiOx) films are able to provide a—up to now unprecedented—level of surface passivation on undiffused low-resistivity crystalline silicon (c-Si). The surface passivation provided by the ALD TiOx films is activated by a post-deposition anneal and subsequent light soaking treatment. Ultralow effective surface recombination velocities down to 2.8 cm/s and 8.3 cm/s, respectively, are achieved on n-type and p-type float-zone c-Si wafers. Detailed analysis confirms that the TiOx films are nearly stoichiometric, have no significant level of contaminants, and are of amorphous nature. The passivation is found to be stable after storage in the dark for eight months. These results demonstrate that TiOx films are also capable of providing excellent passivation of undiffused c-Si surfaces on a comparable level to thermal silicon oxide, silicon nitride, and aluminum oxide. In addition, it is well known that TiOx has an optimal refractive index of 2.4 in the visible range for glass encapsulated solar cells, as well as a low extinction coefficient. Thus, the results presented in this work could facilitate the re-emergence of TiOx in the field of high-efficiency silicon wafer solar cells.

  2. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by low-temperature atomic layer deposited titanium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Baochen, E-mail: liaobaochen@nus.edu.sg [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, 7 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Hoex, Bram [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, 7 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Aberle, Armin G.; Bhatia, Charanjit S., E-mail: elebcs@nus.edu.sg [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, 7 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Chi, Dongzhi [A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

    2014-06-23

    In this work, we demonstrate that thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) titanium oxide (TiO{sub x}) films are able to provide a—up to now unprecedented—level of surface passivation on undiffused low-resistivity crystalline silicon (c-Si). The surface passivation provided by the ALD TiO{sub x} films is activated by a post-deposition anneal and subsequent light soaking treatment. Ultralow effective surface recombination velocities down to 2.8 cm/s and 8.3 cm/s, respectively, are achieved on n-type and p-type float-zone c-Si wafers. Detailed analysis confirms that the TiO{sub x} films are nearly stoichiometric, have no significant level of contaminants, and are of amorphous nature. The passivation is found to be stable after storage in the dark for eight months. These results demonstrate that TiO{sub x} films are also capable of providing excellent passivation of undiffused c-Si surfaces on a comparable level to thermal silicon oxide, silicon nitride, and aluminum oxide. In addition, it is well known that TiO{sub x} has an optimal refractive index of 2.4 in the visible range for glass encapsulated solar cells, as well as a low extinction coefficient. Thus, the results presented in this work could facilitate the re-emergence of TiO{sub x} in the field of high-efficiency silicon wafer solar cells.

  3. New Material Development for Surface Layer and Surface Technology in Tribology Science to Improve Energy Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, R.; Tauviqirrahman, M.; Jamari, Jamari; Schipper, D. J.

    2009-09-01

    This paper reviews the development of new material and surface technology in tribology and its contribution to energy efficiency. Two examples of the economic benefits, resulted from the optimum tribology in the transportation sector and the manufacturing industry are discussed. The new materials are proposed to modify the surface property by laminating the bulk material with thin layer/coating. Under a suitable condition, the thin layer on a surface can provide a combination of good wear, a low friction and corrosion resistance for the mechanical components. The innovation in layer technology results molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), diamond like carbon (DLC), cubic boron nitride (CBN) and diamond which perform satisfactory outcome. The application of the metallic coatings to carbon fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites (CFRP) has the capacity to provide considerable weight and power savings for many engineering components. The green material for lubricant and additives such as the use of sunflower oil which possesses good oxidation resistance and the use of mallee leaves as bio-degradable solvent are used to answer the demand of the environmentally friendly material with good performance. The tribology research implementation for energy efficiency also touches the simple things around us such as: erasing the laser-print in a paper with different abrasion techniques. For the technology in the engineering surface, the consideration for generating the suitable surface of the components in running-in period has been discussed in order to prolong the components life and reduce the machine downtime. The conclusion, tribology can result in reducing manufacturing time, reducing the maintenance requirements, prolonging the service interval, improving durability, reliability and mechanical components life, and reducing harmful exhaust emission and waste. All of these advantages will increase the energy efficiency and the economic benefits.

  4. Surface modification of droplet polymeric microfluidic devices for the stable and continuous generation of aqueous droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Balamurugan; Kim, Namwon; Lee, Wonbae; Spivak, David A; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E; McCarley, Robin L; Soper, Steven A

    2011-06-21

    Droplet microfluidics performed in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic devices resulted in significant wall wetting by water droplets formed in a liquid-liquid segmented flow when using a hydrophobic carrier fluid such as perfluorotripropylamine (FC-3283). This wall wetting led to water droplets with nonuniform sizes that were often trapped on the wall surfaces, leading to unstable and poorly controlled liquid-liquid segmented flow. To circumvent this problem, we developed a two-step procedure to hydrophobically modify the surfaces of PMMA and other thermoplastic materials commonly used to make microfluidic devices. The surface-modification route involved the introduction of hydroxyl groups by oxygen plasma treatment of the polymer surface followed by a solution-phase reaction with heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl trichlorosilane dissolved in fluorocarbon solvent FC-3283. This procedure was found to be useful for the modification of PMMA and other thermoplastic surfaces, including polycyclic olefin copolymer (COC) and polycarbonate (PC). Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the fluorination of these polymers took place with high surface selectivity. This procedure was used to modify the surface of a PMMA droplet microfluidic device (DMFD) and was shown to be useful in reducing the wetting problem during the generation of aqueous droplets in a perfluorotripropylamine (FC-3283) carrier fluid and could generate stable segmented flows for hours of operation. In the case of PMMA DMFD, oxygen plasma treatment was carried out after the PMMA cover plate was thermally fusion bonded to the PMMA microfluidic chip. Because the appended chemistry to the channel wall created a hydrophobic surface, it will accommodate the use of other carrier fluids that are hydrophobic as well, such as hexadecane or mineral oils.

  5. Fungal surface protein mediated one-pot synthesis of stable and hemocompatible gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitching, Michael; Choudhary, Priyadarshani; Inguva, Saikumar; Guo, Yina; Ramani, Meghana; Das, Sujoy K; Marsili, Enrico

    2016-12-01

    Despite their large secretome and wide applications in bioprocesses, fungi remain underexplored in metal nanoparticles (MNP) biosynthesis. Previous studies have shown that cell surface proteins of Rhizopus oryzae play a crucial role in biomineralization of Au(III) to produce gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Therefore, it is hypothesized that purified cell surface protein may produce in vitro AuNPs with narrow size distribution for biomedical and biocatalytic applications. However, different protein extraction methods might affect protein stability and the AuNP biosynthesis process. Herein, we have explored the extraction of cell surface proteins from R. oryzae using common detergents and reducing agent (sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) Triton X-100, and 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT)) and their effect on the size and shape of the biosynthetic AuNPs. The surface proteins extracted with reducing agent (DTT) and non-ionic detergent (Triton X-100) produce spherical AuNPs with a mean particle size of 16±7nm, and 19±4nm, respectively, while the AuNPs produced by the surface protein extracted by ionic detergent (SDS) are flower-like AuNPs with broader size distribution of 43±19nm. This synthetic approach does not require use of any harsh chemicals, multistep preparation and separation process, favouring environmental sustainability. The biosynthetic AuNPs thus formed, are stable in different physiological buffers and hemocompatible, making them suitable for biomedical applications.

  6. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Muraleedharan, P.M.; Reddy, G.V.; Araligidad, N.

    distribution of the layer thickness, layer gradient, starting depth and their inter-annual variability, ii) static stability of the layer and iii) generating mechanism/s. It is seen that organized inversions in the bay occur during winter (from November...

  7. Electrostatic powder spraying process for the fabrication of stable superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Guotuan; Tian, Yuping; Li, Zhantie; Lu, Dongfang

    2011-03-01

    Nano-sized Al2O3 particles were modified by heptadecafluorodecyl trimethoxysilane and 2,3-epoxy propoxy propyl trimethoxysilicane to make it both hydrophobic and reactive. The reactive nano-particles were mixed with polyester resin containing curing agents and electrostatic sprayed on stainless steel substrates to obtain stable superhydrophobic coatings after curing. The water contact angle (WCA) on the hybrid coating is influenced by the content of Al2O3 particles in the coating. As the Al2O3 concentration in the coating was increased from 0% to 8%, WCA increased from 68° to 165°. Surface topography of the coatings was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nano-particles covered on the coating surface formed continuous film with greatly enhanced roughness, which was found to be responsible for the superhydrophobicity. The method is simple and cost effective and can be used for preparing self-cleaning superhydrophobic coating on large areas.

  8. Surface Electroelastic Love Waves in Layered System with a Piezoelectric Substrate and Two Isotropic Layers of Any Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danoyan Z.N.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article the existence and behaviour of electroelastic Love waves in three-layered system of a piezoelectric substrate of classes 6, 4, 6mm, 4mm and attached to her two isotropic layers (conductor-dielectric, conductor-conductor of any thickness is investigated, depending on the physicomechanical characteristics of layered system and relative thicknesses of layers. The characteristic equation of a required surface wave is investigated in case of a basic soft layer. The research is based on properties of the electromechanical factor of surface wave given in the work [1-5]. Existence of a Love wave of a gap type caused by extremely piezoelectric effect in particular is shown. The structure and behavior of modes of Love waves are investigated. The qualitative diagrams of “dispersive” curves of modes of Love waves are given . The relation between electroelastic Love waves, pure-elastic Love waves, and Bleustein-Gulyaev waves is discussed.

  9. Chemical Force Spectroscopy Evidence Supporting the Layer-by-Layer Model of Organic Matter Binding to Iron (oxy)Hydroxide Mineral Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Chassé, Alexander W.

    2015-08-18

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. The adsorption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to metal (oxy)hydroxide mineral surfaces is a critical step for C sequestration in soils. Although equilibrium studies have described some of the factors controlling this process, the molecular-scale description of the adsorption process has been more limited. Chemical force spectroscopy revealed differing adhesion strengths of DOM extracted from three soils and a reference peat soil material to an iron (oxy)hydroxide mineral surface. The DOM was characterized using ultrahigh-resolution negative ion mode electrospray ionization Fourier Transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The results indicate that carboxyl-rich aromatic and N-containing aliphatic molecules of DOM are correlated with high adhesion forces. Increasing molecular mass was shown to decrease the adhesion force between the mineral surface and the DOM. Kendrick mass defect analysis suggests that mechanisms involving two carboxyl groups result in the most stable bond to the mineral surface. We conceptualize these results using a layer-by-layer "onion" model of organic matter stabilization on soil mineral surfaces.

  10. Chemical Force Spectroscopy Evidence Supporting the Layer-by-Layer Model of Organic Matter Binding to Iron (oxy)Hydroxide Mineral Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassé, Alexander W; Ohno, Tsutomu; Higgins, Steven R; Amirbahman, Aria; Yildirim, Nadir; Parr, Thomas B

    2015-08-18

    The adsorption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to metal (oxy)hydroxide mineral surfaces is a critical step for C sequestration in soils. Although equilibrium studies have described some of the factors controlling this process, the molecular-scale description of the adsorption process has been more limited. Chemical force spectroscopy revealed differing adhesion strengths of DOM extracted from three soils and a reference peat soil material to an iron (oxy)hydroxide mineral surface. The DOM was characterized using ultrahigh-resolution negative ion mode electrospray ionization Fourier Transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The results indicate that carboxyl-rich aromatic and N-containing aliphatic molecules of DOM are correlated with high adhesion forces. Increasing molecular mass was shown to decrease the adhesion force between the mineral surface and the DOM. Kendrick mass defect analysis suggests that mechanisms involving two carboxyl groups result in the most stable bond to the mineral surface. We conceptualize these results using a layer-by-layer "onion" model of organic matter stabilization on soil mineral surfaces.

  11. Surface chemistry of the atomic layer deposition of metals and group III oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, David Nathan

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a thin-film growth technique offering precise control of film thickness and the ability to coat high-aspect-ratio features such as trenches and nanopowders. Unlike other film growth techniques, ALD does not require harsh processing conditions and is not limited by line-of-sight deposition. Emerging applications for ALD materials include semiconductor devices, gas sensors, and water-diffusion barriers. The chemistry behind ALD involves understanding how the precursors interact with surfaces to deposit the desired material. All ALD precursors need to be stable on the substrate to ensure self-limiting behavior yet reactive enough to be easily removed with the second reagent. Recent precursor development has provided many volatile organometallic compounds for most of the periodic table. As the number of precursors increases, proper precursor choice becomes crucial. This is because the film properties, growth rates, and growth temperature vary widely between the precursors. Many of the above traits can be predicted with knowledge of the precursor reaction mechanisms. This thesis aims to link surface reaction mechanisms to observed growth and nucleation trends in metal and oxide ALD systems. The first portion of this thesis explores the mechanisms of two ALD oxide systems. First, I examine the mechanism of ALD alumina with ozone. Ozone is used as an oxidant in the semiconductor industry because the deposited Al 2O3 films possess better insulating properties and ozone is easier to purge from a vacuum system. FT-IR analysis reveals a complicated array of surface intermediates such as formate, carbonate, and methoxy groups that form during Al2O3 growth with ozone. Next, a new method to deposit thin films of Ga2O3 is introduced. Gallium oxide is a transparent conducting oxide that needs expensive solid precursors to be deposited by ALD. I show that trimethylgallium is a good high-temperature ALD precursor that deposits films of Ga2O 3 with

  12. Rate of evolution of the specific surface area of surface snow layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanes, Axel; Legagneux, Loïc; Dominé, Florent

    2003-02-15

    The snowpack can impact atmospheric chemistry by exchanging adsorbed or dissolved gases with the atmosphere. Modeling this impact requires the knowledge of the specific surface area (SSA) of snow and its variations with time. We have therefore measured the evolution of the SSA of eight recent surface snow layers in the Arctic and the French Alps, using CH4 adsorption at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). The SSA of fresh snow layers was found to decrease with time, from initial values in the range 613-1540 cm2/g to values as low as 257 cm2/g after 6 days. This is explained by snow metamorphism, which causes modifications in crystal shapes, here essentially crystal rounding and the disappearance of microstructures. A parametrization of the rate of SSA decrease is proposed. We fit the SSA decrease to an exponential law and find that the time constant alpha(exp) (day(-1)) depends on temperature according to alpha(exp) = 76.6 exp (-1708/7), with Tin kelvin. Our parametrization predicts that the SSA of a snow layer evolving at -40 degrees C will decrease by a factor of 2 after 14 days, while a similar decrease at -1 degrees C will only require 5 days. Wind was found to increase the rate of SSA decrease, but insufficient data did not allow a parametrization of this effect.

  13. Amorphous Ultrathin SnO2 Films by Atomic Layer Deposition on Graphene Network as Highly Stable Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ming; Sun, Xiang; George, Steven M; Zhou, Changgong; Lian, Jie; Zhou, Yun

    2015-12-23

    Amorphous SnO2 (a-SnO2) thin films were conformally coated onto the surface of reduced graphene oxide (G) using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The electrochemical characteristics of the a-SnO2/G nanocomposites were then determined using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge curves. Because the SnO2 ALD films were ultrathin and amorphous, the impact of the large volume expansion of SnO2 upon cycling was greatly reduced. With as few as five formation cycles best reported in the literature, a-SnO2/G nanocomposites reached stable capacities of 800 mAh g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1) and 450 mAh g(-1) at 1000 mA g(-1). The capacity from a-SnO2 is higher than the bulk theoretical values. The extra capacity is attributed to additional interfacial charge storage resulting from the high surface area of the a-SnO2/G nanocomposites. These results demonstrate that metal oxide ALD on high surface area conducting carbon substrates can be used to fabricate high power and high capacity electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  14. Upper limit of applicability of the local similarity theory in the stable atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, A. A.; Andreas, E. L.; Fairall, C. W.; Guest, P. S.; Persson, P. O. G.

    2012-04-01

    The applicability of the classical Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (1954) has been limited by constant flux assumption, which is valid in a narrow range z/L Arctic pack ice during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean experiment (SHEBA) are used to clarify this issue. Based on spectral analysis of wind velocity and temperature fluctuations, it is shown that when both gradient Richardson number, Ri, and flux Richardson number, Rf, exceed a "critical value" about 0.2-0.25, inertial subrange associated with a Kolmogorov cascade dies out and vertical turbulent fluxes become small. Some small-scale turbulence survives even in the supercritical regime but this is non-Kolmogorov turbulence and it decays rapidly with further increasing stability. The similarity theory is based on the turbulent fluxes in the high frequency part of the spectra associated with energy-containing/flux-carrying eddies. Spectral densities in this high-frequency band collapse along with the Kolmogorov energy cascade. Therefore, applicability of the local Monin-Obukhov similarity theory in the SBL is limited by inequalities Ri < Ri_cr and Rf < Rf_cr (however, Rf_cr = 0.2-0.25 is a primary threshold). Application of this prerequisite shows that both the flux-profile and flux-variances relationships follow to the classical Monin-Obukhov local z-less predictions after the irrelevant cases have been filtered out.

  15. Methods of improvement in hardness of composite surface layer on cast steel

    OpenAIRE

    J. Szajnar; P. Wróbel; T. Wróbel

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of cast carbon steel 200–450, by put directly in founding process a composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy and next its remelting with use of welding technology TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase in hardness and abrasive wear resistance of cast steel castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generally applied welding te...

  16. Microstructure of Ni / WC Surface Composite Layer on Gray Iron Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guirong; SONG Wenming; MA Ying; LU Jinjun; HAO Yuan; LI Yuandong; WANG Haitang

    2011-01-01

    The surface infiltrated composite (Ni/WC) layers on gray iron substrate were fabricated through a vacuum infiltration casting technique (VICT) using Ni-based composite powder with different WC particles content as raw materials.The microstructures of surface infiltrated composite layer,the interface structures between surface composite layer and the substrate,the changes of macro-hardness with the increasing of WC content and the micro-hardness distribution are investigated.The infiltrated composite layer includes a surface composite layer and a transition layer,and the thickness of the transition layer decreases with the increasing content of WC.The thickness of transition layer with 20%WC content in the surface infiltrated composite layer was 170 μrn which was the thickest for all transition layers with different WC content.The surface composite layer was mainly composed of WC,W2C,FeB and NiB,along with Ni-Cr-Fe,Ni (Cr) solid solution,Ni (Si) solid solution and Ni (Fe) solid solution.The transition layer was composed of Ni (Cr) solid solution,Ni (Fe) solid solution,Ni (Si) solid solution,Fe (Ni) solid solution and eutectic.The surface macrohardness and micro-hardness of the infiltrated layer had been evaluated.The macro-hardness of the surface composite layer decreases with the WC content increasing,and the average macro-hardness is HRC60.The distribution of micro-hardness presents gradient change.The average micro-hardness of the infiltrated layer is about HV 1000.

  17. Surface reaction mechanisms during ozone and oxygen plasma assisted atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Vikrant R; Vandalon, Vincent; Agarwal, Sumit

    2010-09-07

    We have elucidated the reaction mechanism and the role of the reactive intermediates in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide from trimethyl aluminum in conjunction with O(3) and an O(2) plasma. In situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data show that both -OH groups and carbonates are formed on the surface during the oxidation cycle. These carbonates, once formed on the surface, are stable to prolonged O(3) exposure in the same cycle. However, in the case of plasma-assisted ALD, the carbonates decompose upon prolonged O(2) plasma exposure via a series reaction kinetics of the type, A (CH(3)) --> B (carbonates) --> C (Al(2)O(3)). The ratio of -OH groups to carbonates on the surface strongly depends on the oxidizing agent, and also the duration of the oxidation cycle in plasma-assisted ALD. However, in both O(3) and O(2) plasma cycles, carbonates are a small fraction of the total number of reactive sites compared to the hydroxyl groups.

  18. Cell surface hydrophobicity is conveyed by S-layer proteins - A study in recombinant lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, H.C. van der; Belt-Gritter, B. van de; Pouwels, P.H.; Martinez, B.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity is one of the most important factors controlling adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces. In this paper, cell surface properties of lactobacilli and recombinant lactobacilli with and without a surface layer protein (SLP) associated with cell surface hydrophobicity were det

  19. Cell surface hydrophobicity is conveyed by S-layer proteins - A study in recombinant lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, H.C. van der; Belt-Gritter, B. van de; Pouwels, P.H.; Martinez, B.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity is one of the most important factors controlling adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces. In this paper, cell surface properties of lactobacilli and recombinant lactobacilli with and without a surface layer protein (SLP) associated with cell surface hydrophobicity were det

  20. Accurate Sound Velocity Measurement in Ocean Near-Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarralde, D.; Xu, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate sound velocity measurement is essential in oceanography because sound is the only wave that can propagate in sea water. Due to its measuring difficulties, sound velocity is often not measured directly but instead calculated from water temperature, salinity, and depth, which are much easier to obtain. This research develops a new method to directly measure the sound velocity in the ocean's near-surface layer using multi-channel seismic (MCS) hydrophones. This system consists of a device to make a sound pulse and a long cable with hundreds of hydrophones to record the sound. The distance between the source and each receiver is the offset. The time it takes the pulse to arrive to each receiver is the travel time.The errors of measuring offset and travel time will affect the accuracy of sound velocity if we calculated with just one offset and one travel time. However, by analyzing the direct arrival signal from hundreds of receivers, the velocity can be determined as the slope of a straight line in the travel time-offset graph. The errors in distance and time measurement result in only an up or down shift of the line and do not affect the slope. This research uses MCS data of survey MGL1408 obtained from the Marine Geoscience Data System and processed with Seismic Unix. The sound velocity can be directly measured to an accuracy of less than 1m/s. The included graph shows the directly measured velocity verses the calculated velocity along 100km across the Mid-Atlantic continental margin. The directly measured velocity shows a good coherence to the velocity computed from temperature and salinity. In addition, the fine variations in the sound velocity can be observed, which is hardly seen from the calculated velocity. Using this methodology, both large area acquisition and fine resolution can be achieved. This directly measured sound velocity will be a new and powerful tool in oceanography.

  1. Growth, intermixing, and surface phase formation for zinc tin oxide nanolaminates produced by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hägglund, Carl, E-mail: carl.hagglund@angstrom.uu.se [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Engineering Sciences, Division of Solid State Electronics, Uppsala University, 75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Grehl, Thomas; Brongersma, Hidde H. [ION-TOF GmbH, Heisenbergstraße 15, 48149 Münster (Germany); Tanskanen, Jukka T.; Mullings, Marja N.; Mackus, Adriaan J. M.; MacIsaac, Callisto; Bent, Stacey Francine, E-mail: sbent@stanford.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Yee, Ye Sheng [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Clemens, Bruce M. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A broad and expanding range of materials can be produced by atomic layer deposition at relatively low temperatures, including both oxides and metals. For many applications of interest, however, it is desirable to grow more tailored and complex materials such as semiconductors with a certain doping, mixed oxides, and metallic alloys. How well such mixed materials can be accomplished with atomic layer deposition requires knowledge of the conditions under which the resulting films will be mixed, solid solutions, or laminated. The growth and lamination of zinc oxide and tin oxide is studied here by means of the extremely surface sensitive technique of low energy ion scattering, combined with bulk composition and thickness determination, and x-ray diffraction. At the low temperatures used for deposition (150 °C), there is little evidence for atomic scale mixing even with the smallest possible bilayer period, and instead a morphology with small ZnO inclusions in a SnO{sub x} matrix is deduced. Postannealing of such laminates above 400 °C however produces a stable surface phase with a 30% increased density. From the surface stoichiometry, this is likely the inverted spinel of zinc stannate, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}. Annealing to 800 °C results in films containing crystalline Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, or multilayered films of crystalline ZnO, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, and SnO{sub 2} phases, depending on the bilayer period.

  2. TGP, an extremely stable, non-aggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W.; Don Paul, Craig; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Traore, Daouda A.K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. PMID:25287913

  3. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Traore, Daouda A K; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C; Waldo, Geoffery S; Payne, Riley J; Rucker, Joseph B; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.

  4. Stable isotope composition of surface and groundwater in Baja California, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretzschmar, Thomas G. [CICESE, Carret. Ensenada-Tijuana No 3819, Ensenada 22860 (Mexico); Frommen, Theresa [FU Berlin Malteserstr. 74-100, 12249 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Based on a total of 135 stable isotope analysis (δ{sup 18}O, δD) carried out on surface and groundwater samples, as well as on rainwater samples between 2004 and 2011 in 5 different regions in Baja California, an isotopic evaluation of the region was established. The results showed a depletion gradient of -0.25 0/00 δ{sup 18}O per 100 m rise in elevation throughout the study area. Considering an unaltered δ{sup 18}O signature for the thermal springs, the recharge areas of these waters are at elevations over 1400 m outside of the present watersheds, indicating the presence of regional flow systems next to the local flow regime feeding the cold springs and wells. The Mesa de Andrade area has a completely different signature with values of -105 for δ{sup 18}O and -13 for δD. (authors)

  5. Stable isotope systematics of surface water bodies in the Himalayan and trans-Himalayan (Kashmir) region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kanchan Pandey; J T Padia; R Ramesh; K K Sharma

    2000-03-01

    Stable hydrogen (D) and oxygen (18O) isotope ratios of the headwaters of the Indus and its tributaries, surface ice in glaciers, saline and fresh water lakes and thermal springs in the Himalayan and Trans- Himalayan (Kashmir) region are reported. The D-18O relationship for the river samples shows a slope of 9.12 ± 0.29 which agrees well with the estimate of 8.99 ± 0.33 based on a simple Rayleigh fractionation model. The unique signature of a higher deuterium excess (d) of the `Western Disturbance' is preserved in these samples. An altitude effect of -0.9 per mil/km is observed in the 18O of Indus waters. At a lower altitude (Beas) the altitude effect is almost double, indicating that the altitude effect decreases with elevation in this region.

  6. Temperature and doping dependent changes in surface recombination during UV illumination of (Al)GaN bulk layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netzel, Carsten; Jeschke, Jörg; Brunner, Frank; Knauer, Arne; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Strasse 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-09-07

    We have studied the effect of continuous illumination with above band gap energy on the emission intensity of polar (Al)GaN bulk layers during the photoluminescence experiments. A temporal change in emission intensity on time scales from seconds to hours is based on the modification of the semiconductor surface states and the surface recombination by the incident light. The temporal behavior of the photoluminescence intensity varies with the parameters such as ambient atmosphere, pretreatment of the surface, doping density, threading dislocation density, excitation power density, and sample temperature. By means of temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements, we observed that at least two different processes at the semiconductor surface affect the non-radiative surface recombination during illumination. The first process leads to an irreversible decrease in photoluminescence intensity and is dominant around room temperature, and the second process leads to a delayed increase in intensity and becomes dominant around T = 150–200 K. Both processes become slower when the sample temperature decreases from room temperature. They cease for T < 150 K. Stable photoluminescence intensity at arbitrary sample temperature was obtained by passivating the analyzed layer with an epitaxially grown AlN cap layer.

  7. Investigation of the Surface Properties of Titanium Biomaterial with Oxide Layer of Rutile Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Nan; Chen Yuanru; Xiao Jing; Xue Zhennan; Liu Xianghuai

    1994-01-01

    Structural characteristics of titanium oxide layer on titanium matrix were investigated by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy(AES) and X-ray diffraction, It has been identified that the titanium oxide layers have rutile structure. The mechanical properties of its surface were ineasured by microhardness test, pin-on-disc wear experiment and scratch adhesion test. The blood-compatibility of the titanium oxide layers of different thickness was studied by blood clotting time measurement. It is shown that as the thickness of the titanium oxide layers increases, the surface mechanical properties and bloodcompatibility of these layers are obviously improved.

  8. Surface tension-driven convection patterns in two liquid layers

    CERN Document Server

    Juel, A; McCormick, W D; Swift, J B; Swinney, H L; Juel, Anne; Burgess, John M.; Swinney, Harry L.

    1999-01-01

    Two superposed liquid layers display a variety of convective phenomena that are inaccessible in the traditional system where the upper layer is a gas. We consider several pairs of immiscible liquids. Once the liquids have been selected, the applied temperature difference and the depths of the layers are the only independent control parameters. Using a perfluorinated hydrocarbon and silicone oil system, we have made the first experimental observation of convection with the top plate hotter than the lower plate. Since the system is stably stratified, this convective flow is solely due to thermocapillary forces. We also have found oscillatory convection at onset in an acetonitrile and n-hexane system heated from below.

  9. Metal nanoinks as chemically stable surface enhanced scattering (SERS) probes for the analysis of blue BIC ballpoint pens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyami, A; Saviello, D; McAuliffe, M A P; Mirabile, A; Lewis, L; Iacopino, D

    2017-06-07

    Metal nanoinks constituted by Ag nanoparticles and Au nanorods were employed as probes for the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) analysis of a blue BIC ballpoint pen. The dye components of the pen ink were first separated by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and subsequently analysed by SERS at illumination wavelengths of 514 nm and 785 nm. Compared to normal Raman conditions, enhanced spectra were obtained for all separated spots, allowing easy identification of phthalocyanine Blue 38 and triarylene crystal violet in the ink mixture. A combination of effects such as molecular resonance, electromagnetic and chemical effects were the contributing factors to the generation of spectra enhanced compared to normal Raman conditions. Enhancement factors (EFs) between 5 × 10(3) and 3 × 10(6) were obtained, depending on the combination of SERS probes and laser illumination used. In contrast to previous conflicting reports, the metal nanoinks were chemically stable, allowing the collection of reproducible spectra for days after deposition on TLC plates. In addition and in advance to previously reported SERS probes, no need for additional aggregating agents or correction of electrostatic charge was necessary to induce the generation of enhanced SERS spectra.

  10. Chemically stable Au nanorods as probes for sensitive surface enhanced scattering (SERS) analysis of blue BIC ballpoint pens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyami, Abeer; Saviello, Daniela; McAuliffe, Micheal A. P.; Cucciniello, Raffaele; Mirabile, Antonio; Proto, Antonio; Lewis, Liam; Iacopino, Daniela

    2017-08-01

    Au nanorods were used as an alternative to commonly used Ag nanoparticles as Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) probes for identification of dye composition of blue BIC ballpoint pens. When used in combination with Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC), Au nanorod colloids allowed identification of the major dye components of the BIC pen ink, otherwise not identifiable by normal Raman spectroscopy. Thanks to their enhanced chemical stability compared to Ag colloids, Au nanorods provided stable and reproducible SERS signals and allowed easy identification of phthalocyanine and triarylene dyes in the pen ink mixture. These findings were supported by FTIR and MALDI analyses, also performed on the pen ink. Furthermore, the self-assembly of Au nanorods into large area ordered superstructures allowed identification of BIC pen traces. SERS spectra of good intensity and high reproducibility were obtained using Au nanorod vertical arrays, due to the high density of hot spots and morphological reproducibility of these superstructures. These results open the way to the employment of SERS for fast screening analysis and for quantitative analysis of pens and faded pens which are relevant for the fields of forensic and art conservation sciences.

  11. Enhanced surface patterning of chalcogenide glass via imprinting process using a buffer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Byeong Kyou; Choi, Duk-Yong; Chung, Woon Jin; Choi, Yong Gyu

    2017-09-01

    In an effort to enhance transcriptability of quasi-three-dimensional patterns present in silicon stamp onto the surface of 'bulk' chalcogenide glass, a buffer layer was introduced during the replication process via imprinting. Dissimilar patterns with diverse depths along the surface normal direction were imprinted with or without the buffer layer, and the resulting patterns on the glass surface were compared with regard to the transcription quality in both the lateral and vertical directions. After assessing the processing conditions appropriate for imprinting bulk As2S3 glass especially in terms of temperature and duration, candidate materials suitable for the buffer layer were screened: Commercially available polydimethylsiloxane was then chosen, and impact of this buffer layer was elucidated. The imprinted patterns turned out to become more uniform over large surface areas when the buffer layer was inserted. This finding confirmed that the use of buffer layer conspicuously enhanced the transcriptability of imprinting process for bulk chalcogenide glass.

  12. Structural Changes of Surface Layers of Steel Plates in the Process of Explosive Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataev, I. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Mali, V. I.; Bataev, V. A.; Balaganskii, I. A.

    2014-01-01

    Structural changes developing in surface layers of plates from steel 20 in the process of explosive welding are studied with the help of light metallography and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Mathematical simulation is used to compute the depth of the action of severe plastic deformation due to explosive welding of steel plates on the structure of their surface layers.

  13. Solute leaching in a sandy soil with a water-repellent surface layer: a simulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, de G.H.; Vries, de P.

    1996-01-01

    Many sandy soils in the Netherlands have a water-repellent surface layer covering a wettable soil with a shallow groundwater table. Fingers form in the water-repellent surface layer and rapidly transport water and solutes to the wettable soil in which the streamlines diverge. Although several field

  14. Metallurgical investigations of dry sliding surface layer in phosphorous iron/steel friction pairs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Surface layer behaviors of composition concentration and micro-hardness were inves-tigated on phosphorous cast irons after dry sliding. The experimental results indicate that thehardness and chemical composition unevenly distribute in the surface layer. The sliding conditionand microstructure of the pin specimen have greatly effects on the distributions.

  15. EFFECT OF ELECTRIC FIELD STRENGTH ON SURFACE LAYER DESTRUCTION IN INSULATION CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.G. Gontar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of theoretical and experimental studies of surface layer destruction in electrical insulation under lightning surge pulses are given, their impact on the insulation construction durability shown. Causes of water treeing in the surface layers of polymer insulation are analyzed.

  16. Surface layer scintillometry for estimating the sensible heat flux component of the surface energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Savage

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The relatively recently developed scintillometry method, with a focus on the dual-beam surface layer scintillometer (SLS, allows boundary layer atmospheric turbulence, surface sensible heat and momentum flux to be estimated in real-time. Much of the previous research using the scintillometer method has involved the large aperture scintillometer method, with only a few studies using the SLS method. The SLS method has been mainly used by agrometeorologists, hydrologists and micrometeorologists for atmospheric stability and surface energy balance studies to obtain estimates of sensible heat from which evaporation estimates representing areas of one hectare or larger are possible. Other applications include the use of the SLS method in obtaining crucial input parameters for atmospheric dispersion and turbulence models. The SLS method relies upon optical scintillation of a horizontal laser beam between transmitter and receiver for a separation distance typically between 50 and 250 m caused by refractive index inhomogeneities in the atmosphere that arise from turbulence fluctuations in air temperature and to a much lesser extent the fluctuations in water vapour pressure. Measurements of SLS beam transmission allow turbulence of the atmosphere to be determined, from which sub-hourly, real-time and in situ path-weighted fluxes of sensible heat and momentum may be calculated by application of the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Unlike the eddy covariance (EC method for which corrections for flow distortion and coordinate rotation are applied, no corrections to the SLS measurements, apart from a correction for water vapour pressure, are applied. Also, path-weighted SLS estimates over the propagation path are obtained. The SLS method also offers high temporal measurement resolution and usually greater spatial coverage compared to EC, Bowen ratio energy balance, surface renewal and other sensible heat measurement methods. Applying the shortened surface

  17. Molecular layer deposition of APTES on silicon nanowire biosensors: Surface characterization, stability and pH response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yuchen [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States); Huang, Jie [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States); Zang, Pengyuan [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States); Kim, Jiyoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States); Hu, Walter, E-mail: walter.hu@utdallas.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: We report the use of molecular layer deposition (MLD) for depositing 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) on a silicon dioxide surface. The APTES monolayer was characterized using spectroscopic ellipsometry, contact angle goniometry, and atomic force microscopy. Effects of reaction time of repeating pulses and simultaneous feeding of water vapor with APTES were tested. The results indicate that the synergistic effects of water vapor and reaction time are significant for the formation of a stable monolayer. Additionally, increasing the number of repeating pulses improved the APTES surface coverage but led to saturation after 10 pulses. In comparing MLD with solution-phase deposition, the APTES surface coverage and the surface quality were nearly equivalent. The hydrolytic stability of the resulting films was also studied. The results confirmed that the hydrolysis process was necessary for MLD to obtain stable surface chemistry. Furthermore, we compared the pH sensing results of Si nanowire field effect transistors (Si NWFETs) modified by both the MLD and solution methods. The highly repeatable pH sensing results reflected the stability of APTES monolayers. The results also showed an improved pH response of the sensor prepared by MLD compared to the one prepared by the solution treatment, which indicated higher surface coverage of APTES.

  18. Molecular layer deposition of APTES on silicon nanowire biosensors: Surface characterization, stability and pH response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuchen; Huang, Jie; Zang, Pengyuan; Kim, Jiyoung; Hu, Walter

    2014-12-01

    We report the use of molecular layer deposition (MLD) for depositing 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) on a silicon dioxide surface. The APTES monolayer was characterized using spectroscopic ellipsometry, contact angle goniometry, and atomic force microscopy. Effects of reaction time of repeating pulses and simultaneous feeding of water vapor with APTES were tested. The results indicate that the synergistic effects of water vapor and reaction time are significant for the formation of a stable monolayer. Additionally, increasing the number of repeating pulses improved the APTES surface coverage but led to saturation after 10 pulses. In comparing MLD with solution-phase deposition, the APTES surface coverage and the surface quality were nearly equivalent. The hydrolytic stability of the resulting films was also studied. The results confirmed that the hydrolysis process was necessary for MLD to obtain stable surface chemistry. Furthermore, we compared the pH sensing results of Si nanowire field effect transistors (Si NWFETs) modified by both the MLD and solution methods. The highly repeatable pH sensing results reflected the stability of APTES monolayers. The results also showed an improved pH response of the sensor prepared by MLD compared to the one prepared by the solution treatment, which indicated higher surface coverage of APTES.

  19. Analysis of Laser Surface Hardened Layers of Automobile Engine Cylinder Liner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiu-bo; YU Gang; GUO Jian; SHANG Quan-yi; ZHANG Zhen-guo; GU Yi-jie

    2007-01-01

    Gray cast iron that is used for automobile engine cylinder liners was laser surface hardened using Nd∶YAG quasi-continuous and CO2 continuous wave laser, respectively. The macromorphology and microstructure of the laser surface hardened layers were investigated using an optical microscope. Geometric dimensions including depth and width and microhardness distribution of the hardened layers were also examined in order to evaluate the quality of the hardened layers.

  20. DEPTH MEASUREMENT OF DISRUPTED LAYER ON SILICON WAFER SURFACE USING AUGER SPECTROSCOPY METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Solodukha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a method for depth measurement of a disrupted layer on silicon wafer surface which is based on application of Auger spectroscopy with the precision sputtering of surface silicon layers and registration of the Auger electron yield intensity. In order to measure the disrupted layer with the help of Auger spectroscopy it is necessary to determine dependence of the released Auger electron amount on sputtering time (profile and then the dependence is analyzed. Silicon amount in the disrupted layer is less than in the volume. While going deeper the disruptive layer is decreasing that corresponds to an increase of atom density in a single layer. The essence of the method lies in the fact the disruptive layer is removed by ion beam sputtering and detection of interface region is carried out with the help of registration of the Auger electron yield intensity from the sputtered surface up to the moment when it reaches the value which is equal to the Auger electron yield intensity for single-crystal silicon. While removing surface silicon layers the registration of the Auger electron yield intensity from silicon surface makes it possible to control efficiently a presence of the disrupted layer on the silicon wafer surface. In this case depth control locality is about 1.0 nm due to some peculiarities of Auger spectroscopy method. The Auger electron yield intensity is determined automatically while using Auger spectrometer and while removing the disrupted layer the intensity is gradually increasing. Depth of the disrupted layer is determined by measuring height of the step which has been formed as a result of removal of the disrupted layer from the silicon wafer surface. Auger spectroscopy methods ensures an efficient depth control surface disruptions at the manufacturing stages of silicon wafers and integrated circuits. The depth measurement range of disruptions constitutes 0.001–1.000 um.

  1. Cu and Cu(Mn) films deposited layer-by-layer via surface-limited redox replacement and underpotential deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, J.S., E-mail: jsfang@nfu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Formosa University, Huwei 63201, Taiwan (China); Sun, S.L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Formosa University, Huwei 63201, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Y.L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Chi-Nan University, Nan-Tou 54561, Taiwan (China); Chen, G.S.; Chin, T.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: The present paper reports Cu and Cu(Mn) films prepared layer-by-layer using an electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ECALD) method. The structure and properties of the films were investigated to elucidate their suitability as Cu interconnects for microelectronics. Previous studies have used primarily a vacuum-based atomic layer deposition to form a Cu metallized film. Herein, an entirely wet chemical process was used to fabricate a Cu film using the ECALD process by combining underpotential deposition (UPD) and surface-limited redox replacement (SLRR). The experimental results indicated that an inadequate UPD of Pb affected the subsequent SLRR of Cu and lead to the formation of PbSO{sub 4}. A mechanism is proposed to explain the results. Layer-by-layer deposition of Cu(Mn) films was successfully performed by alternating the deposition cycle-ratios of SLRR-Cu and UPD-Mn. The proposed self-limiting growth method offers a layer-by-layer wet chemistry-based deposition capability for fabricating Cu interconnects.

  2. Cu and Cu(Mn) films deposited layer-by-layer via surface-limited redox replacement and underpotential deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, J. S.; Sun, S. L.; Cheng, Y. L.; Chen, G. S.; Chin, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    The present paper reports Cu and Cu(Mn) films prepared layer-by-layer using an electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ECALD) method. The structure and properties of the films were investigated to elucidate their suitability as Cu interconnects for microelectronics. Previous studies have used primarily a vacuum-based atomic layer deposition to form a Cu metallized film. Herein, an entirely wet chemical process was used to fabricate a Cu film using the ECALD process by combining underpotential deposition (UPD) and surface-limited redox replacement (SLRR). The experimental results indicated that an inadequate UPD of Pb affected the subsequent SLRR of Cu and lead to the formation of PbSO4. A mechanism is proposed to explain the results. Layer-by-layer deposition of Cu(Mn) films was successfully performed by alternating the deposition cycle-ratios of SLRR-Cu and UPD-Mn. The proposed self-limiting growth method offers a layer-by-layer wet chemistry-based deposition capability for fabricating Cu interconnects.

  3. Dynamics of altered surface layer formation on dissolving silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daval, Damien; Bernard, Sylvain; Rémusat, Laurent; Wild, Bastien; Guyot, François; Micha, Jean Sébastien; Rieutord, François; Magnin, Valérie; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro

    2017-07-01

    The extrapolation of mineral dissolution kinetics experiments to geological timescales has frequently been challenged by the observation that mineral dissolution rates decrease with time. In the present study, we report a detailed investigation of the early stages of wollastonite dissolution kinetics, linking time-resolved measurements of wollastonite dissolution rate as a function of crystallographic orientation to the evolution of physicochemical properties (i.e., diffusivity, density, and thickness) of amorphous silica-rich layers (ASSLs) that developed on each surface. Batch dissolution experiments conducted at room temperature and at far-from-equilibrium conditions revealed that the initial (i.e., ASSL-free) dissolution rate of wollastonite (R(hkl)) based on Ca release observe the following trend: R(010) ≈R(100) >R(101) >R(001) . A gradual decrease of the dissolution rate of some faces by up to one order of magnitude resulted in a modification of this trend after two days: R(010) ≫R(100) ⩾R(101) ≈R(001) . In parallel, the diffusivity of ASSLs developed on each face was estimated based on the measurement of the concentration profile of a conservative tracer (methylene blue) across the ASSL using nanoSIMS. The apparent diffusion coefficients of methylene blue as a function of the crystallographic orientation (Dapp(hkl)) observe the following trend: Dapp(010) ⩾Dapp(100) >Dapp(101) ≫Dapp(001) , and decreases as a function of time for the (1 0 0) and (1 0 1) faces. Finally, the density of ASSL was estimated based on the modeling of X-ray reflectivity patterns acquired as a function of time. The density of ASSLs developed on the (0 1 0) faces remains low and constant, whereas it increases for the ASSLs developed on the (0 0 1) faces. On the whole, our results suggest that the impact of the formation of ASSLs on the wollastonite dissolution rate is anisotropic: while some crystal faces are weakly affected by the formation of non-passivating ASSLs (e

  4. Layer-by-Layer Method for the Synthesis and Growth of Surface Mounted Metal-Organic Frameworks (SURMOFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Shekhah

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A layer-by-layer method has been developed for the synthesis of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs and their deposition on functionalized organic surfaces. The approach is based on the sequential immersion of functionalized organic surfaces into solutions of the building blocks of the MOF, i.e., the organic ligand and the inorganic unit. The synthesis and growth of different types of MOFs on substrates with different functionalization, like COOH, OH and pyridine terminated surfaces, were studied and characterized with different surface characterization techniques. A controlled and highly oriented growth of very homogenous films was obtained using this method. The layer-by-layer method offered also the possibility to study the kinetics of film formation in more detail using surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance. In addition, this method demonstrates the potential to synthesize new classes of MOFs not accessible by conventional methods. Finally, the controlled growth of MOF thin films is important for many applications like chemical sensors, membranes and related electrodes.

  5. Scale Properties of Anisotropic and Isotropic Turbulence in the Urban Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Yuan, Renmin; Mei, Jie; Sun, Jianning; Liu, Qi; Wang, Yu

    2017-06-01

    The scale properties of anisotropic and isotropic turbulence in the urban surface layer are investigated. A dimensionless anisotropic tensor is introduced and the turbulent tensor anisotropic coefficient, defined as C, where C = 3d3 + 1 (d3 is the minimum eigenvalue of the tensor) is used to characterize the turbulence anisotropy or isotropy. Turbulence is isotropic when C ≈ 1 , and anisotropic when C ≪ 1 . Three-dimensional velocity data collected using a sonic anemometer are analyzed to obtain the anisotropic characteristics of atmospheric turbulence in the urban surface layer, and the tensor anisotropic coefficient of turbulent eddies at different spatial scales calculated. The analysis shows that C is strongly dependent on atmospheric stability ξ = (z-zd)/L_{MO} , where z is the measurement height, zd is the displacement height, and L_{MO} is the Obukhov length. The turbulence at a specific scale in unstable conditions (i.e., ξ < 0 ) is closer to isotropic than that at the same scale under stable conditions. The maximum isotropic scale of turbulence is determined based on the characteristics of the power spectrum in three directions. Turbulence does not behave isotropically when the eddy scale is greater than the maximum isotropic scale, whereas it is horizontally isotropic at relatively large scales. The maximum isotropic scale of turbulence is compared to the outer scale of temperature, which is obtained by fitting the temperature fluctuation spectrum using the von Karman turbulent model. The results show that the outer scale of temperature is greater than the maximum isotropic scale of turbulence.

  6. Theoretical Analysis of Interference Nanolithography of Surface Plasmon Polaritons without a Match Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing-quan; LIANG Hui-Min; SHI Sha; DU Jing-Lei

    2009-01-01

    Interference nanolithography techniques based on long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPP) are hardly ever achieved by experiments at present.One key reason is that suitable liquid materials are difficult to find as the match layer connects the metal film and the resist.We redesign a Kretschmann-Raether structure for interference lithography.A polymer layer is coated under the metal film,and an air layer is placed between the polymer layer and the resist layer.This design not only avoids the above-mentioned question of the match layer,but also can form a soft contact between the polymer layer and the resist layer and can protect the exposure pattern.Simulation results confirm that a device with an appropriately thick polymer layer can form high intensity and contrast interference fringes with a critical dimension of about λ/7 in the resist.In addition,the fabrication of the device is very easy.

  7. Evaluation of Mercaptobenzothiazole Anticorrosive Layer on Cu Surface by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Hideaki; Sugiura, Osamu; Matsumura, Yoshiyuki; Kinoshita, Masaharu

    2007-05-01

    Mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) anticorrosive layer on copper surface prepared in MBT solutions was analyzed by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). The results showed that MBT anticorrosive layer was formed on Cu2O layer in the MBT solution at temperatures higher than 50 °C. Additionally, it was confirmed that MBT anticorrosive layer was formed in the MBT solution at room temperature by adding about 20 wt % acetone to the solution. From polishing experiments of MBT anticorrosive layer and benzotriazole (BTA) layer, it was revealed that MBT anticorrosive layer was physically stronger than BTA layer. It is considered that dishing amount in Cu chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) can be reduced by using MBT. However, MBT anticorrosive layer was not formed in the MBT solution including Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) suggesting that slurry should be composed without H2O2 in order to use MBT for Cu CMP.

  8. Effect of Surface Layer on Electromechanical Stability of Tweezers and Cantilevers Fabricated from Conductive Cylindrical Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keivani, Maryam; Koochi, Ali; Sedighi, Hamid M.; Abadyan, Mohamadreza; Farrokhabadi, Amin; Shahedin, Abed Moheb

    2016-12-01

    Herein, the impact of surface layer on the stability of nanoscale tweezers and cantilevers fabricated from nanowires with cylindrical cross section is studied. A modified continuum based on the Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity is applied for incorporating the presence of surface layer. Considering the cylindrical geometry of the nanowire, the presence of the Coulomb attraction and dispersion forces are incorporated in the derived formulations. Three different approaches, i.e. numerical differential quadrature method (DQM), an approximated homotopy perturbation method (HPM) and developing lumped parameter model (LPM) have been employed to solve the governing equations. The impact of surface layer on the instability of the system is demonstrated.

  9. Rough SERS substrate based on gold coated porous silicon layer prepared on the silicon backside surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dridi, H.; Haji, L.; Moadhen, A.

    2017-04-01

    We report in this paper a novel method to elaborate rough Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate. A single layer of porous silicon was formed on the silicon backside surface. Morphological characteristics of the porous silicon layer before and after gold deposition were influenced by the rough character (gold size). The reflectance measurements showed a dependence of the gold nano-grains size on the surface nature, through the Localized Surface Plasmon (LSP) band properties. SERS signal of Rhodamine 6G used as a model analyte, adsorbed on the rough porous silicon layer revealed a marked enhancement of its vibrational modes intensities.

  10. Stable water isotopes in the coupled atmosphere–land surface model ECHAM5-JSBACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Haese

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present first results of a new model development, ECHAM5-JSBACH-wiso, where we have incorporated the stable water isotopes H218O and HDO as tracers in the hydrological cycle of the coupled atmosphere–land surface model ECHAM5-JSBACH. The ECHAM5-JSBACH-wiso model was run under present-day climate conditions at two different resolutions (T31L19, T63L31. A comparison between ECHAM5-JSBACH-wiso and ECHAM5-wiso shows that the coupling has a strong impact on the simulated temperature and soil wetness. Caused by these changes of temperature and the hydrological cycle, the δ18O in precipitation also shows variations from −4.5‰ up to 4.5‰. One of the clearest anomalies is shown over North-East Asia where, depending on an increase of temperature, the δ18O in precipitation increases as well. In order to analyze the sensitivity of the fractionation processes over land, we compare a set of simulations with various implementations of water isotope fractionation processes over the land surface. The simulations allow us to distinguish between no fractionation, fractionation included in the evaporation flux (from bare soil and also fractionation included in both evaporation and transpiration (from water transport through plants fluxes. The simulated δ18O and δD in precipitation of these setups generally fit well with the observations and the best agreement between observation and simulation is given in the case where no fractionation over land surface is assumed.

  11. Polyaniline hybridized surface defective ZnO nanorods with long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Susanta; Khan, Hasmat; Biswas, Indranil; Jana, Sunirmal

    2016-10-01

    We report surfactant/template free precursor solution based synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) hybridized surface defective ZnO nanorods by a two-step process. Initially, ZnO nanorods have been prepared at 95 °C, followed by hybridization (coating) of PANI onto the ZnO via in situ polymerization of aniline monomer, forming ZnO-PANI nanohybrid (ZP). The structural properties of ZP have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. The presence of surface defects especially the oxygen vacancies in ZnO has been characterized by photoluminescence emission, high resolution TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman spectral measurements. The chemical interaction of PANI with ZnO has been examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and XPS analyses. A significant enhancement in visible absorption of ZP sample is found as evidenced from UV-vis diffused reflectance spectral study. BET nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm shows an improved textural property (pore size, pore volume) of ZP. Moreover, a long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity (PEC) of ZP is found compare to pristine ZnO. The synergic effect of PANI hybridization and the presence of surface defects in ZnO NRs can enhance the PEC by prolonging the recombination rate of photogenerated charge carriers. The effect can also provide large number of active sites to make electrolyte diffusion and mass transportation easier in the nanohybrid. This simple synthesis strategy can be adopted for PANI hybridization with different metal oxide semiconductors towards enhancing PEC activity of the hybrid materials.

  12. Layer-by-layer fabrication of supramolecular dyes on TiO2 surfaces for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiaoqing; Maguire, Shawn; Lye, Diane; Weck, Marcus; Lee, Stephanie

    We present a modular layer-by-layer approach based on metal coordination chemistry to assemble supramolecular dyes exhibiting increased absorption in the visible range on electrode surfaces. Specifically, palladiated bis-pincer complexes (Pd-BPCs) were employed as linkers between pyridyl-terminated organic molecules via dative bonding. By alternately immersing mesoporous TiO2-coated glass substrates in solutions containing dissolved zinc porphyin (ZnP) and Pd-BPCs, supramolecular dyes were assembled layer-by-layer on the TiO2 surfaces. UV-visible absorption spectra of these assembled structures revealed a linear increase in the Soret and Q bands of ZnP after each immersion of the substrate in the ZnP solution. Coordination of the ZnP layers with Pd-BPC resulted in a slight red shift (organic molecules in specific layers of the supramolecular assemblies. By assembling unique organic dyes that absorb different wavelengths of light, we expect to expand light absorption across the visible region of the solar spectrum for solar cell applications.

  13. Stable modification of PDMS surface properties by plasma polymerization: application to the formation of double emulsions in microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Valessa; Tatoulian, Michaël; Li, Hong; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh; Ajdari, Armand; Tabeling, Patrick

    2006-06-06

    We describe a method based on plasma polymerization for the modification and control of the surface properties of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surfaces. By depositing plasma polymerized acrylic acid coatings on PDMS, we succeeded to fabricate stable (several days) hydrophilic and patterned hydrophobic/hydrophilic surfaces. We used this approach to generate direct and (for the first time in this material) double emulsions in PDMS microchannels.

  14. Surface mass balance and water stable isotopes derived from firn cores on three ice rises, Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Carmen P.; Schlosser, Elisabeth; Divine, Dmitry V.; Kohler, Jack; Martma, Tõnu; Eichler, Anja; Schwikowski, Margit; Isaksson, Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    Three shallow firn cores were retrieved in the austral summers of 2011/12 and 2013/14 on the ice rises Kupol Ciolkovskogo (KC), Kupol Moskovskij (KM), and Blåskimen Island (BI), all part of Fimbul Ice Shelf (FIS) in western Dronning Maud Land (DML), Antarctica. The cores were dated back to 1958 (KC), 1995 (KM), and 1996 (BI) by annual layer counting using high-resolution oxygen isotope (δ18O) data, and by identifying volcanic horizons using non-sea-salt sulfate (nssSO42-) data. The water stable isotope records show that the atmospheric signature of the annual snow accumulation cycle is well preserved in the firn column, especially at KM and BI. We are able to determine the annual surface mass balance (SMB), as well as the mean SMB values between identified volcanic horizons. Average SMB at the KM and BI sites (0.68 and 0.70 mw. e. yr-1) was higher than at the KC site (0.24 mw. e. yr-1), and there was greater temporal variability as well. Trends in the SMB and δ18O records from the KC core over the period of 1958-2012 agree well with other previously investigated cores in the area, thus the KC site could be considered the most representative of the climate of the region. Cores from KM and BI appear to be more affected by local meteorological conditions and surface topography. Our results suggest that the ice rises are suitable sites for the retrieval of longer firn and ice cores, but that BI has the best preserved seasonal cycles of the three records and is thus the most optimal site for high-resolution studies of temporal variability of the climate signal. Deuterium excess data suggest a possible effect of seasonal moisture transport changes on the annual isotopic signal. In agreement with previous studies, large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns most likely provide the dominant influence on water stable isotope ratios preserved at the core sites.

  15. Stable carbon isotope characteristics of different plant species and surface soil in arid regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianying MA; Wei SUN; Huiwen ZHANG; Dunsheng XIA; Chengbang AN; Fahu CHEN

    2009-01-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition in surface soil organic matter (δ13Csoil) contains integrative information on the carbon isotope composition of the standing terrestrial plants (δ13Cleaf). In order to obtain valuable vegetation information from the δ13C of terrestrial sediment, it is necessary to understand the relationship between the δ13C value in modem surface soil and the standing vegetation. In this paper, we studied the δ13C value in modem surface soil organic matter and standing vegetation in arid areas in China, Australia and the United States. The isotopic discrepancy between δ13Csoil andδ13Cleaf of the standing dominant vegetation was examined in those different arid regions. The results show that the δ13Csoil values were consistently enriched compared to the δ13Cleaf. The δ13Cleaf values were positively correlated with δ13Csoil, which suggests that the interference of microorganisms and hydrophytes on the isotopic composition of surface soil organic matter during soil organic matter formation could be ignored in arid regions. The averaged discrepancy between δ13Csoil and δ13Cleaf is about 1.71%0 in Tamarix L. in the Tarim Basin in China, 1.50 ‰ in Eucalytus near Orange in Australia and 1.22 ‰ in Artemisia in Saratoga in the United States, which are different from the results of other studies. The results indicate that the discrepancies in the δ13C value between surface soil organic matter and standing vegetation were highly influenced by the differences in geophysical location and the dominant species of the studied ecosystems. We suggest that caution should be taken when organic matter δ13C in terrestrial sediment is used to extract paleovegetation information (C3/C4 vegetation composition), as the δ13C in soil organic matter is not only determined by the ratio of C3/C4 species, but also profoundly affected by climate change induced variation in the δ13C in dominant species.

  16. Turbulent boundary layer on perforated surfaces with vector injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroshenko, V. M.; Zaichik, L. I.; Klimov, A. A.; Ianovskii, L. S.; Kondratev, V. I.

    1980-10-01

    The paper presents an experimental investigation of a turbulent boundary layer on perforated plates with uniform vector injection at various angles to gas flow. It was shown that with strong injection at angles oriented in the flow direction the intensity of turbulent pulsation is decreased, while injection at angles in the opposite direction increase the intensity. A relationship was established between the critical parameters of the boundary layer injection angles; it was concluded that the asymptotic theory of Kutateladze and Leontiev can be used for determining the coefficient of friction of vector injection.

  17. Towards operational determination of boundary layer height using sodar/RASS soundings and surface heat flux data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirtzel, H.J. [METEK GmbH, Elmshorn (Germany); Hennemuth, B.

    2008-06-15

    A method for the derivation of boundary layer height from measurements of sodar, RASS and sonic anemometer-thermometer data is presented. Datasets of the years 2004 and 2005 measured at the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg (Germany) are used. The time resolution is 15 min. Special emphasis is laid on air pollution issues where mixing heights shallower than 500 m are important. A difference to the numerous methods already presented in the literature is twofold. Firstly, not only single vertical profiles of measured or derived parameters are used but also bulk information, e.g. histograms and boundary layer evolution over time intervals, is considered. Secondly, the presented method analyses sodar data and confirms or corrects the results by use of temperature profiles from RASS and by sonic surface heat flux data. The results are presented as frequency distributions for the whole period and for the four seasons, stratified by the hour of the day. The additional analysis of temperature profiles and surface heat flux is particularly helpful for the detection of stable boundary layers and increases the number of shallow boundary layers particularly in the evening. The comparison with radiosonde-derived boundary layer heights shows a good agreement, deviations are mostly due to a complicated boundary layer structure. Boundary layer depths derived after a formalism given in the German administrative regulation TA-Luft show - compared to the sodar/RASS-derived values - too many very small or partly very large values. The height range between 100 m and 300 m which is essential for pollutant dispersion issues is nearly missing. Requirements for a future operational use of the method are formulated. (orig.)

  18. Modifying of Cotton Fabric Surface with Nano-ZnO Multilayer Films by Layer-by-Layer Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarıışık Merih

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract ZnO nanoparticle–based multilayer nanocomposite films were fabricated on cationized woven cotton fabrics via layer-by-layer molecular self-assembly technique. For cationic surface charge, cotton fabrics were pretreated with 2,3-epoxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride (EP3MAC by pad-batch method. XPS and SEM were used to examine the deposited nano-ZnO multilayer films on the cotton fabrics. The nano-ZnO films deposited on cotton fabrics exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The results also showed that the coated fabrics with nano-ZnO multilayer films enhanced the protection of cotton fabrics from UV radiation. Physical tests (tensile strength of weft and warp yarns, air permeability and whiteness values were performed on the fabrics before and after the treatment with ZnO nanoparticles to evaluate the effect of layer-by-layer (LbL process on cotton fabrics properties.

  19. NUMERICAL MODELLING OF FREE-SURFACE FLOWS WITH BOTTOM AND SURFACE-LAYER PRESSURE TREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kun; JIN Sheng; LIU Gang

    2009-01-01

    A new non-hydrostatic numerical model with the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations on structured grids was constructed and discussed. The algorithm is based upon a staggered finite difference Crank-Nicholson scheme on a Cartesian grid. The eddy viscosity coefficient was calculated by the efficient k-ε turbulence model. A new surface-layer non-hydrostatic treatment and a local cell bottom treatment were introduced so that the three-dimensional model is fully non-hydrostatic and is free of any hydrostatic assumption. The developed model is second-order accuracy in both time and space when semi-implicit coefficient is set to 0.5. The validity of the present solution algorithm was demonstrated from its application to the three-dimension channel flow and the wave propagation over a submerged bar problems.

  20. Analyses of Composition and Structure on the Ancient Bronze Black Mirror“Hei-Qi-Gu”and Search Into the Treating Process of Its Surface Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范崇正; Suzuki Minoru; Inoue Miyoshi; Abe Tadahiro; Muraua Mitsuo; Asashi Ishikawa; 吴佑实; 李志超

    1994-01-01

    The Chinese ancient bronze black mirror"Hei-Qi-Gu"is famous for its black colour,brightsurface and anti-corroding property.In the present work,methods of SEM,IR,EPMA,Memhrane-XRD,and AFM were employed to detect the composition and structure of several pieces of Hei-Qi-Gu fragments.Itwas found that after casting,the surface of the bronze mirror was treated by a special process,and most ofCu was moved away while Sn and Si were rich in the surface layer.The oxides SnO2 and SiO2 on the surfacein a very small particle size are particularly stable and they protect the bronze alloy successfully.The surface layer and the transition layer have been dissected mainly,and some important informa-tion has been obtained.The special treating process of the mirror surface is searched and discussed.

  1. Electrical Double Layer and Charge Regulation for a Homotattic Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhmud; House

    1997-03-15

    The spatial distribution of the electrostatic potential near a charge-regulated homotattic surface containing zones with altering ionization ability is studied in the framework of the Debye approximation. In contrast to the constant-charge case traditionally discussed in the literature, charge regulation causes inhomogeneity of the surface charge distribution within each zone at the surface. Possible methods of solution of the charge regulation problem are outlined, and the results of a model calculation are reported.

  2. A model of the planetary boundary layer over a snow surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halberstam, I.; Melendez, R.

    1979-01-01

    A model of the planetary boundary layer over a snow surface has been developed. It contains the vertical heat exchange processes due to radiation, conduction, and atmospheric turbulence. Parametrization of the boundary layer is based on similarity functions developed by Hoffert and Sud (1976), which involve a dimensionless variable, dependent on boundary-layer height and a localized Monin-Obukhov length. The model also contains the atmospheric surface layer and the snowpack itself, where snowmelt and snow evaporation are calculated. The results indicate a strong dependence of surface temperatures, especially at night, on the bursts of turbulence which result from the frictional damping of surface-layer winds during periods of high stability, as described by Businger (1973). The model also shows the cooling and drying effect of the snow on the atmosphere, which may be the mechanism for air mass transformation in sub-Arctic regions.

  3. Surface structure of thin pseudomorphous GeSi layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, A. I.; Timofeev, V. F.; Pchelyakov, O. P.

    2015-11-01

    Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) was used to study the evolution of thin GexSi1-x film surface superstructures s in the course of molecular beam epitaxy. The (2 × N) superstructure of the epitaxial film surface at periodicity N from 14 to 8, the latter being characteristic of pure germanium at the Si(1 0 0) surface. The epitaxial film thickness that is required for the formation of the (2 × 8) superstructure depends on the deposition temperature and germanium content in the solid solution. The germanium segregation on the growing film surface is shown to be responsible for the observed superstructural changes.

  4. Thermal Stability of Surface Layer Microstructures of Commercially Pure Titanium Treated by High Energy Shot Peening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-juan; CHEN Chun-huan; REN Rui-ming

    2004-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium was treated by high energy shot peening, and annealed at a series of temperatures. The surface layers are characterized by means of scan electronic microscope, X-Ray diffraction, transmission electronic microscope and micro-hardness testing machine. The results showed that microhardness of surface layers decreases with anneal temperature, the tendency of microhardness is similar to unannealed one, in other words, the more close to the surface, the more rapidly the hardness decreases, after reaches the depth of 50 μm, the decrease becomes steadily. But the sub-surface microhardness decreased suddenly over 500 ℃, From 550 ℃ to 650 ℃, the microhardness of surface layers almost unchanged.Observing by TEM and SEM, the grain sizes of pure titanium surface layers have increased below 500 ℃; Deformation twins begin disappearing obviously at 550 ℃; The nano-scaled grains within about 10 micrometers from surface existed even at 550℃.Surface nanocrystallization is well known as one of important methods to improve surface properties. The thermal stability of nanocrystalline microstructures was related to their preparation and application. The commercial pure Ti thermal stability of nanocrystalline and deformed microstructures induced by high-energy-shot-peening (HESP) technique was investigated. The nanostructured surface and deformed sub-surface layers of specimens were prepared through HESP treatment. The thermal stability was characterized through XRD analyses of surface layers, SEM and TEM microstructure observation and microhardness measurement of specimens annealed in different temperature in the air after HESP treatments. The results showed that after HESP treatment, the microhardness of surface layers increased with treatment time, especially in the rang of about 40 micrometers from the surface, the microhardness increase was obvious. The surface microhardness decreased gradually with annealing temperature, but the sub-surface

  5. A transducing bacteriophage for Caulobacter crescentus uses the paracrystalline surface layer protein as a receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    P. Edwards; Smit, J

    1991-01-01

    The bacteriophage phi Cr30, a transducing phage for Caulobacter crescentus strains, required the paracrystalline surface (S) layer for infectivity. Wild-type strains were phage resistant when rsaA, the gene for the 130K S-layer protein, was interrupted with an antibiotic resistance cassette. Strains that had lost the S layer by mutation were phage resistant, as were mutants that produce an S layer but which do not attach the structure to the cell surface. Phage sensitivity was restored to 130...

  6. Electrical conductivity of reconstructed Si(111) surface with sodium-doped C60 layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, D. A.; Ryzhkova, M. V.; Borisenko, E. A.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical conductance of sodium-doped C60 ultra-thin layers (1-6 monolayers) grown on the Na-adsorbed Si(111)√3 × √3-Au surface has been studied in situ by four-point probe technique, combined with low-energy electron diffraction observations. Evidence of conductance channel formation through the C60 ultrathin layer is demonstrated as a result of Na dosing of 3 and 6 monolayers thick C60 layers. The observed changes in surface conductivity can be attributed to the formation of fulleride-like NaC60 and Na2C60 compound layers.

  7. Inverse method for the determination of elastic properties of coating layers by the surface ultrasonic waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Jun; YANG Zhen; XU Jin-quan

    2005-01-01

    As the coated materials are widely applied in engineering, estimation of the elastic properties of coating layers is of great practical importance. This paper presents an inversion algorithm for determining the elastic properties of coating layers from the given velocity dispersion of surface ultrasonic waves. Based on the dispersive equation of surface waves in layered half space,an objective function dependent on coating material parameters is introduced. The density and wave velocities, which make the object function minimum, are taken as the inversion results. Inverse analyses of two parameters (longitudinal and transverse velocities) and three parameters (the density, longitudinal and transverse velocities) of the coating layer were made.

  8. Characterization and Properties of Nanostructured Surface Layer in a Low Carbon Steel Subjected to Surface Mechanical Attrition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A nanostructured surface layer was synthesized on a Iow carbon steel by using surface mechanical attrition (SMA)technique. The refined microstructure of the surface layer was characterized by means of different techniques,and the hardness variation along the depth was examined. Experimental results show that the microstructure isinhomogeneous along the depth. In the region from top surface to about 40μm deep, the grain size increases fromabout 10 nm to 100 nm. In the adjacent region of about 40~80μm depth, the grain size increases from about 100nm to 1000 nm. The grain refinement can be associated with the activity of dislocations. After the SMA treatment,the hardness of the surface layer is enhanced significantly compared with that of the original sample, which canprimarily be attributed to the grain refinement.

  9. Stable water isotopes in the coupled atmosphere–land surface model ECHAM5-JSBACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Haese

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present first results of a new model development, ECHAM5-JSBACH-wiso, where we have incorporated the stable water isotopes H218O and HDO as tracers in the hydrological cycle of the coupled atmosphere–land surface model ECHAM5-JSBACH. The ECHAM5-JSBACH-wiso model was run under present-day climate conditions at two different resolutions (T31L19, T63L31. A comparison between ECHAM5-JSBACH-wiso and ECHAM5-wiso shows that the coupling has a strong impact on the simulated temperature and soil wetness. Caused by these changes of temperature and the hydrological cycle, the δ18O in precipitation also shows variations from −4‰ up to 4‰. One of the strongest anomalies is shown over northeast Asia where, due to an increase of temperature, the δ18O in precipitation increases as well. In order to analyze the sensitivity of the fractionation processes over land, we compare a set of simulations with various implementations of these processes over the land surface. The simulations allow us to distinguish between no fractionation, fractionation included in the evaporation flux (from bare soil and also fractionation included in both evaporation and transpiration (from water transport through plants fluxes. While the isotopic composition of the soil water may change for δ18O by up to +8&permil:, the simulated δ18O in precipitation shows only slight differences on the order of ±1‰. The simulated isotopic composition of precipitation fits well with the available observations from the GNIP (Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation database.

  10. Mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of the nitriding surface layer of Ti−6Al−7Nb using large pulsed electron beam (LPEB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jisoo; Lee, Woo Jin; Park, Hyung Wook, E-mail: hwpark@unist.ac.kr

    2016-09-15

    Large pulsed electron beam (LPEB) irradiation was used as a single surface finishing process for Ti−Al−7Nb. Nitrogen plasma gas and cathodic apparatus have been adopted to induce nitriding effect of Ti−6Al−7Nb during the electron beam irradiation. The atomic concentration of nitrogen atoms at the re-solidified layer could be t5achieved up to ∼18% by LPEB nitriding. Nano-hardness in the re-solidified layer was improved by ∼75% following the irradiation process, as a result of a phase transformation and the formation of TiN. The re-solidified layer induced by the LPEB nitriding, consisted of TiN, TiO{sub 2}, and TiO{sub x}N{sub y}, indicated significantly modified corrosion resistance showing a nobler corrosion potential, decreased corrosion current density, and improved charge transfer resistance. The increasing fraction of TiN at the re-solidified layer, induced by LPEB nitriding, was suggested as being responsible for remarkable improvement of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance, embedding uniformly noble and stable characteristics at the top surface. The corrosion-resistant surface layer with superior mechanical properties on Ti−6Al−7Nb has been successfully demonstrated by LPEB nitriding technique. - Highlights: • The nitrogen plasma source facilitated the formation of TiN at the re-solidified layer induced by LPEB. • The negative DC bias increased TiN fraction at the re-solidified layer. • The passivation of re-solidified layer enhanced corrosion resistance of Ti−6Al−7Nb. • The formation of uniformly stable oxy-nitride layer increased corrosion resistance. • Large pulsed electron beam irradiation with N{sub 2} plasma source generated surface hardening.

  11. Electrical double layer interactions in bacterial adhesion to surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortinga, A.T.; Bos, van den R.; Norde, W.; Busscher, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    The DLVO (Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeek) theory was originally developed to describe interactions between non-biological lyophobic colloids such as polystyrene particles, but is also used to describe bacterial adhesion to surfaces. Despite the differences between the surface of bacteria and

  12. Area inequalities for stable marginally outer trapped surfaces in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fajman, David

    2013-01-01

    We prove area inequalities for stable marginally outer trapped surfaces in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory. Our inspiration comes on the one hand from a corresponding recent upper bound for the area in terms of the charges obtained by Dain, Jaramillo and Reiris [1] in the pure Einstein-Maxwell case without symmetries, and on the other hand from Yazadjiev's inequality [2] in the axially symmetric Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton case. The common issue in these proofs and in the present one is a functional ${\\mathscr W}$ of the matter fields for which the stability condition readily yields an {\\it upper} bound. On the other hand, the step which crucially depends on whether or not a dilaton field is present is to obtain a {\\it lower} bound for ${\\mathscr W}$ as well. We obtain the latter by first setting up a variational principle for ${\\mathscr W}$ with respect to the dilaton field $\\phi$, then by proving existence of a minimizer $\\psi$ as solution of the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations and finally by estimating...

  13. Investigation of thermal processes during test operation of ingot mould with composite surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of grey cast iron EN-GJL-200 ingot mould, by put directly in founding process a composite surface layer on the basis of corundum Al2O3 and quartz sand SiO2. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase in hardness and abrasive wear resistance of cast steel and cast iron castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generally applied welding technology (surfacing by welding and thermal spraying. The results of studies show, that is positive influence of composite surface layer with ceramic particles on increase in life of cast iron ingot moulds.

  14. Formation and Characterization of Stacked Nanoscale Layers of Polymers and Silanes on Silicon Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Rosie; Davis, Brian; Conley, Hiram; Hurd, Katie; Linford, Matthew R.; Davis, Robert C.

    2008-10-01

    Chemical surface patterning at the nanoscale is a critical component of chemically directed assembly of nanoscale devices or sensitive biological molecules onto surfaces. Complete and consistent formation of nanoscale layers of silanes and polymers is a necessary first step for chemical patterning. We explored methods of silanizing silicon substrates for the purpose of functionalizing the surfaces. The chemical functionalization, stability, flatness, and repeatability of the process was characterized by use of ellipsometry, water contact angle, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). We found that forming the highest quality functionalized surfaces was accomplished through use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Specifically, surfaces were plasma cleaned and hydrolyzed before the silane was applied. A polymer layer less then 2 nm in thickness was electrostatically bound to the silane layer. The chemical functionalization, stability, flatness, and repeatability of the process was also characterized for the polymer layer using ellipsometry, water contact angle, and AFM.

  15. Fabrication of a nanometer thick nitrogen delta doped layer at the sub-surface region of (100) diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Maneesh; Michaelson, Shaul; Saguy, Cecile; Hoffman, Alon

    2016-11-01

    In this letter, we report on the proof of a concept of an innovative delta doping technique to fabricate an ensemble of nitrogen vacancy centers at shallow depths in (100) diamond. A nitrogen delta doped layer with a concentration of ˜1.8 × 1020 cm-3 and a thickness of a few nanometers was produced using this method. Nitrogen delta doping was realized by producing a stable nitrogen terminated (N-terminated) diamond surface using the RF nitridation process and subsequently depositing a thin layer of diamond on the N-terminated diamond surface. The concentration of nitrogen on the N-terminated diamond surface and its stability upon exposure to chemical vapor deposition conditions are determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The SIMS profile exhibits a positive concentration gradient of 1.9 nm/decade and a negative gradient of 4.2 nm/decade. The proposed method offers a finer control on the thickness of the delta doped layer than the currently used ion implantation and delta doping techniques.

  16. Surface-Engineered Fire Protective Coatings for Fabrics through Sol-Gel and Layer-by-Layer Methods: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Malucelli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fabric flammability is a surface-confined phenomenon: in fact, the fabric surface represents the most critical region, through which the mass and heat transfers, responsible for fueling the flame, are controlled and exchanged with the surroundings. More specifically, the heat the fabric surface is exposed to is transferred to the bulk, from which volatile products of thermal degradation diffuse toward the surface and the gas phase, hence feeding the flame. As a consequence, the chemical and physical characteristics of the fabric surface considerably affect the ignition and combustion processes, as the surface influences the flux of combustible volatile products toward the gas phase. In this context, it is possible to significantly modify (and improve the fire performance of textile materials by “simply” tailoring their surface: currently, one of the most effective approaches exploits the deposition of tailored coatings able to slow down the heat and mass transfer phenomena occurring during the fire stages. This paper reviews the current state of the art related to the design of inorganic, hybrid, or organic flame-retardant coatings suitable for the fire protection of different fabric substrates (particularly referring to cotton, polyester, and their blends. More specifically, the use of sol-gel and layer-by-layer (LbL methods is thoroughly discussed; then, some recent examples of flame retardant coatings are presented, showing their potential advances and their current limitations.

  17. Modeling Turbulence Generation in the Atmospheric Surface and Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    index. In the boundary layer, atmospheric temperature fluctuations are primarily responsible for the variations in refractive index at ultraviolet...parameterization of the atmospheric emissivity, in the early 1980s a parallel study of the SEB was conducted by the US Army Waterways Experiment Station...period of rotation of the atmosphere can be defined as TI = 2π/fc. At most mid- latitude locations this period is approximately 17 h. This quantity is

  18. Properties Evaluation of Thin Microhardened Surface Layer of Tool Steel after Wire EDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľuboslav Straka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes results of experimental research on the thin microhardened surface layer of a machined surface that occurs in materials using wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM with brass wire electrode. The direct influence of microhardened surface layer on resulting machined surface quality of tool steel EN X210Cr12 (W.-Nr. 1.2080 was examined. The aim of the experiment was to contribute to the knowledge of mutual interactions between main WEDM technological parameters, the influence of these parameters on the total affected depth, and on the variation of microhardness of sub-surface layers of machined surface. Based on the microhardness experimental measurements, mathematical models were established by the Least Square Method (LSM in order to simulate and predict final quality of machined surface after WEDM. Recommendations are given for setting the main technological parameters of the discharge process concerning minimization of total microhardened surface layer depth and microhardened surface layer homogeneity along the whole cross-section profile of the machined surface.

  19. In Situ Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Intermetallic Compound Layer during Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment of Zirconium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNCai-yun; XIEJi-jia; WUXiao-lei; HONGYou-shi; LIUGang; LUJian; LUKe

    2004-01-01

    The surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) technique was developed to synthesize a nanocrystalline (NC) layer on the surface of metallic materials for upgrading their overall properties and performance. In this paper, by means of SMAT to a pure zirconium plate at the room temperature, repetitive multidirectional peening of steel shots (composition (wt%): 1C, 1.5Cr, base Fe) severely deformed the surface layer. A NC surface layer consisting of the intermetallic compound FeCr was fabricated on the surface of the zirconium. The microstructure characterization of the surface layer was performed by using X-ray diffraction analysis, optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy observations. The NC surface layer was about 25μm thick and consisted of the intermetallic compound FeCr with an average grain size of 25+10 nm. The deformation-induced fast diffusion of Fe and Cr from the steel shots into Zr occurred during SMAT, leading to the formation of intermetallic compound. In addition, the NC surface layer exhibited an ultrahigh nanohardness of 10.2 GPa.

  20. Hard Surface Layers by Pack Boriding and Gaseous Thermo-Reactive Deposition and Diffusion Treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Bottoli, Federico; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2017-01-01

    subjected to TRD (chromizing and titanizing) and boriding treatments. For the steels with low carbon content, chromizing results in surface alloying with chromium, i.e., formation of a (soft) “stainless” surface zone. Steels containing higher levels of carbon form chromium carbide (viz. Cr23C6, Cr7C3......) layers with hardnesses up to 1800 HV. Titanizing of ARNE tool steel results in a surface layer consisting of TiC with a hardness of approximately 4000 HV. Duplex treatments, where boriding is combined with subsequent (TRD) titanizing, result in formation of hard TiB2 on top of a thick layer of Fe...

  1. Mass sensitivity of layered shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave devices for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Trinchi, Adrian; Wlodarski, Wojtek; Holland, Anthony; Galatsis, Kosmas

    2001-11-01

    Layered Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices that allow the propagation of Love mode acoustic waves will be studied in this paper. In these devices, the substrate allows the propagation of Surface Skimming Bulks Waves (SSBWs). By depositing layers, that the speed of Shear Horizontal (SH) acoustic wave propagation is less than that of the substrate, the propagation mode transforms to Love mode. Love mode devices which will be studied in this paper, have SiO2 and ZnO acoustic guiding layers. As Love mode of propagation has no movement of particles component normal to the active sensor surface, they can be employed for the sensing applications in the liquid media.

  2. Autowaves in near-surface layer of magnetic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, V.V. [Stavropol State University, 1 Pushkin st., Stavropol 355009 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: fmf@stavsu.ru; Iljuch, P.M. [Stavropol Branch of Moskow Apparatus Bilding and Informatics Academy, 25 Kulakova st., Stavropol 355000 (Russian Federation); Kandaurova, N.V. [Stavropol Branch of Moskow Apparatus Bilding and Informatics Academy, 25 Kulakova st., Stavropol 355000 (Russian Federation); Bondarenko, E.A. [Stavropol State University, 1 Pushkin st., Stavropol 355009 (Russian Federation)

    2005-03-15

    Autowaves processes in a magnetic fluids in an electric and magnetic fields has been investigated. Different type of autowaves in near-surface region of electrochemical cell has been found. Equation of autowave process has been described.

  3. Surface profile gradient in amorphous Ta2O5 semi conductive layers regulates nanoscale electric current stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefalas, A. C.; Kollia, Z.; Spyropoulos-Antonakakis, N.; Gavriil, V.; Christofilos, D.; Kourouklis, G.; Semashko, V. V.; Pavlov, V.; Sarantopoulou, E.

    2017-02-01

    A link between the morphological characteristics and the electric properties of amorphous layers is established by means of atomic, conductive, electrostatic force and thermal scanning microscopy. Using amorphous Ta2O5 (a-Ta2O5) semiconductive layer, it is found that surface profile gradients (morphological gradient), are highly correlated to both the electron energy gradient of trapped electrons in interactive Coulombic sites and the thermal gradient along conductive paths and thus thermal and electric properties are correlated with surface morphology at the nanoscale. Furthermore, morphological and electron energy gradients along opposite conductive paths of electrons intrinsically impose a current stability anisotropy. For either long conductive paths (L > 1 μm) or along symmetric nanodomains, current stability for both positive and negative currents i is demonstrated. On the contrary, for short conductive paths along non-symmetric nanodomains, the set of independent variables (L, i) is spanned by two current stability/intability loci. One locus specifies a stable state for negative currents, while the other locus also describes a stable state for positive currents.

  4. The influence of wind speed on surface layer stability and turbulent fluxes over southern Indian peninsula station

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M N Patil; R T Waghmare; T Dharmaraj; G R Chinthalu; Devendraa Siingh; G S Meena

    2016-10-01

    Surface to atmosphere exchange has received much attention in numerical weather prediction models. This exchange is defined by turbulent parameters such as frictional velocity, drag coefficient and heat fluxes, which have to be derived experimentally from high-frequency observations. High-frequency measurementsof wind speed, air temperature and water vapour mixing ratio (eddy covariance measurements), were made during the Integrated Ground Observation Campaign (IGOC) of Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) at Mahabubnagar, India (16◦44'N, 77◦59'E) in the south-west monsoon season. Using these observations, an attempt was made to investigatethe behaviour of the turbulent parameters, mentioned above, with respect to wind speed. We found that the surface layer stability derived from the Monin–Obukhov length scale, is well depicted by the magnitude of wind speed, i.e., the atmospheric boundary layer was under unstable regime for wind speeds greater than 4 m s−1; under stable regime for wind speeds less than 2 m s−1 and under neutral regime for wind speeds in the range of 2–3 m s$^{−1}$. All the three stability regimes were mixed for wind speeds 3–4 m s$^{−1}$. The drag coefficient shows scatter variation with wind speed in stable as well as unstable conditions.

  5. The influence of wind speed on surface layer stability and turbulent fluxes over southern Indian peninsula station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, M. N.; Waghmare, R. T.; Dharmaraj, T.; Chinthalu, G. R.; Siingh, Devendraa; Meena, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    Surface to atmosphere exchange has received much attention in numerical weather prediction models. This exchange is defined by turbulent parameters such as frictional velocity, drag coefficient and heat fluxes, which have to be derived experimentally from high-frequency observations. High-frequency measurements of wind speed, air temperature and water vapour mixing ratio (eddy covariance measurements), were made during the Integrated Ground Observation Campaign (IGOC) of Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) at Mahabubnagar, India (16∘44'N, 77∘59'E) in the south-west monsoon season. Using these observations, an attempt was made to investigate the behaviour of the turbulent parameters, mentioned above, with respect to wind speed. We found that the surface layer stability derived from the Monin-Obukhov length scale, is well depicted by the magnitude of wind speed, i.e., the atmospheric boundary layer was under unstable regime for wind speeds >4 m s-1; under stable regime for wind speeds <2 m s-1 and under neutral regime for wind speeds in the range of 2-3 m s-1. All the three stability regimes were mixed for wind speeds 3-4 m s-1. The drag coefficient shows scatter variation with wind speed in stable as well as unstable conditions.

  6. Characteristics of surface layer proteins from two new and native strains of Lactobacillus brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarak Qamsari, Elahe; Kasra Kermanshahi, Rouha; Erfan, Mohammad; Ghadam, Parinaz; Sardari, Soroush; Eslami, Neda

    2017-02-01

    In this work, some important characteristics of surface layer (S-layer) proteins extracted from two new and native Lactobacillus strains, L.brevis KM3 and L.brevis KM7, were investigated. The presence of S-layer on the external surface of L.brevis KM3 was displayed by thin sectioning and negative staining. SDS-PAGE analysis were shown same dominant protein bands approximately around 48kDa for both S-layer proteins. Moreover, the S-layer reappeared when LiCl treated cells were allowed to grow again. Protein secondary structure and thermal behavior were evaluated by using circular dichroism (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), respectively. Both S-layer proteins had high content of β-sheet and low amount of α-helix. The thermograms of lyophilized S-layer proteins of L.brevis KM3 and L.brevis KM7 showed one transition peak at 67.9°C and 59.14°C, respectively. To determine monodispersity of extracted S-layer proteins, dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used. The results indicated that the main population of S-layer molecules in two tested lactobacillus strains were composed of monomer with an expected diameter close to 10nm. Furthermore, Zeta potential measurements were showed positive potential for both S-layer proteins, as expected. Our results could be used as the basis for biotechnological applications of these two new S-layer proteins.

  7. Smooth-surface silver nanowire electrode with high conductivity and transparency on functional layer coated flexible film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Hee; Lim, Sooman; Kim, Haekyoung, E-mail: hkkim@ynu.ac.kr

    2015-08-31

    Transparent conductive electrode (TCE) with silver nanowires has been widely studied as an alternative of indium tin oxide for flexible electronic or optical devices such as organic light-emitting diodes, and solar cells. However, it has an issue of surface roughness due to nanowire's intrinsic properties. Here, to achieve a smooth electrode with high conductivity and transmittance on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates, a functional layer of poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) is utilized with a mechanical transfer process. The silver nanowire electrode on PVP-coated PET with low surface roughness of 9 nm exhibits the low sheet resistance of 18 Ω □{sup −1} and high transmittance of 87.6%. It is produced by transferring the silver nanowire electrode spin-coated on the glass to PVP-coated PET using a pressure of 10 MPa for 10 min. Silver nanowire electrode on PVP-coated PET demonstrates the stable sheet resistance of 18 Ω □{sup −1} after the mechanical taping test due to strong adhesion between PVP functional layer and silver nanowires. Smooth TCE with silver nanowires could be proposed as a transparent electrode for flexible electronic or optical devices, which consist of thin electrical active layers on TCE. - Highlights: • Silver nanowire (Ag NWs) transparent electrodes were fabricated on flexible film. • Flexible film was coated with poly N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP). • PVP layer plays roles as an adhesive layer and matrix in electrode. • Ag NWs electrode exhibited with low surface roughness of 9 nm. • Ag NWs electrode has a low resistance (18 Ω ☐{sup −1}) and high transmittance (87.6%)

  8. Theoretical investigation of magnetoelectric surface acoustic wave characteristics of ZnO/Metglas layered composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang; Lyu, Qingqing; Wen, Dandan; Zhong, Zhiyong; Zhang, Huaiwu; Bai, Feiming

    2016-01-01

    The surface acoustic wave properties of piezoelectric/magnetostrictive layered structures consisting of insulating ZnO and metallic Metglas with giant Δ E effect were studied based on a stable scattering matrix method. Only the first Rayleigh mode was found with phase velocity between 2200 m/s and 2650 m/s, and the maximum electro-mechanical coupling coefficient about 1%. It was found that the center frequency of ZnO/Metglas is highly sensitive on the change of magnetic field, up to 440 MHz/Oe. However, there is a cutoff Young's modulus of Metglas for different designs of SAW, below which the Rayleigh mode will disappear. For a magnetoelectric SAW design with the center frequency of 335 MHz and covering a full magnetic field range from -1.4 to +1.4 Oe, the frequency sensitivity is 212 MHz/Oe, equivalent to a magnetic field sensitivity of 5 × 10-12 Tesla. Unlike conventional magnetoelectric bulk laminates or film stacks, the detection of frequency shift instead of electrical charge allows not only shrinkage of device volume but also a broad frequency band detection of weak magnetic field.

  9. Synergistic antibacterial mechanism of the Lactobacillus crispatus surface layer protein and nisin on Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhilan; Li, Pengpeng; Liu, Fang; Bian, Huan; Wang, Daoying; Wang, Xiaomeng; Zou, Ye; Sun, Chong; Xu, Weimin

    2017-03-21

    SlpB, a surface layer protein isolated from Lactobacillus crispatus, has the potential to enhance the antimicrobial activity of nisin. Previous research indicated that, when combined with nisin, SlpB acted synergistically to inhibit Staphylococcus saprophyticus growth, thus extending the shelf life of chicken meat. In order to understand how SlpB enhances the antibacterial activity of nisin, electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, flow cytometry and transmembrane electrical potential analysis were used to study cell wall organization and cell membrane integrity. No remarkable bacteriolytic effects were observed, indicating that cell death could not be attributed to cell lysis, although SlpB caused dramatic modifications of cell wall, thereby altering cell shape. The combination of SlpB and nisin also induced the release of ATP or UV-absorbing materials, as well as sudden dissipation of the transmembrane electrical potential by compromising membrane integrity. Considering that SlpB led to structural disorganization of the cell wall, and nisin access is enhanced to form a stable pore, cell death is a predictable outcome. SlpB significantly enhanced the effect of nisin at half of the minimum inhibitory concentration, which resulted in cell death by destroying the cell wall and cell membrane, therefore providing a new, feasible approach in food preservation.

  10. Efficient and Air-Stable Planar Perovskite Solar Cells Formed on Graphene-Oxide-Modified PEDOT:PSS Hole Transport Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hui; Lin, Xuanhuai; Hou, Xian; Pan, Likun; Huang, Sumei; Chen, Xiaohong

    2017-10-01

    As a hole transport layer, PEDOT:PSS usually limits the stability and efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) due to its hygroscopic nature and inability to block electrons. Here, a graphene-oxide (GO)-modified PEDOT:PSS hole transport layer was fabricated by spin-coating a GO solution onto the PEDOT:PSS surface. PSCs fabricated on a GO-modified PEDOT:PSS layer exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 15.34%, which is higher than 11.90% of PSCs with the PEDOT:PSS layer. Furthermore, the stability of the PSCs was significantly improved, with the PCE remaining at 83.5% of the initial PCE values after aging for 39 days in air. The hygroscopic PSS material at the PEDOT:PSS surface was partly removed during spin-coating with the GO solution, which improves the moisture resistance and decreases the contact barrier between the hole transport layer and perovskite layer. The scattered distribution of the GO at the PEDOT:PSS surface exhibits superior wettability, which helps to form a high-quality perovskite layer with better crystallinity and fewer pin holes. Furthermore, the hole extraction selectivity of the GO further inhibits the carrier recombination at the interface between the perovskite and PEDOT:PSS layers. Therefore, the cooperative interactions of these factors greatly improve the light absorption of the perovskite layer, the carrier transport and collection abilities of the PSCs, and especially the stability of the cells.

  11. Facile fabrication of large-scale stable superhydrophobic surfaces with carbon sphere films by burning rapeseed oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mengnan; He, Jinmei; Cao, Biyun

    2010-10-01

    Stable anti-corrosive superhydrophobic surfaces were successfully prepared with the carbon nanosphere films by means of depositing the soot of burning rapeseed oil. The method is extremely cheap, facile, time-saving and avoided any of the special equipments, special reagents and complex process control. The method is suitable for the large-scale preparation of superhydrophobic surface and the substrate can be easily changed. The as-prepared surfaces showed stable superhydrophobicity and anti-corrosive property even in many corrosive solutions, such as acidic or basic solutions over a wide pH range. The as-prepared superhydrophobic surface was carefully characterized by the field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope to confirm the synergistic binary geometric structures at micro- and nanometer scale. This result will open a new avenue in the superhydrophobic paint research with these easily obtained carbon nanospheres in the near future.

  12. Surface structure and photoemission studies of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} layer/ITO coated glass interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleatu, Bidini Alade, E-mail: bdntaleatu@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, P Bag X01, Scottsville, 3209 Pietermaritzburg (South Africa); Omotoso, Ezekiel [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); Mola, Genene Tessema [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, P Bag X01, Scottsville, 3209 Pietermaritzburg (South Africa)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Titanium oxide thin film was grown on ITO glass substrate by electrodeposition technique. • The samples were charaterized and analysed by some surface studying facilities. • Photoemission studies were carried out befor and after annealing to understand possible interaction between the TiO{sub 2} layer and substrate as a result of postdeposition heat treatment. - Abstract: Room temperature growth of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} thin film was carried out by two-electrode cell. The film was characterized by surface probing techniques. Morphological studies revealed that film's grains are evenly distributed across substrate surface. Average height of grains distribution is below 64 nm. Post-deposition annealing aided film's particles’ orientation in a structure that resulted in compact layer. Average crystallite size was estimated as 19.5 nm. Quality and chemical states of film composition were observed by core level photoemission studies. From XPS studies, small shift (∼0.11 eV) observed in binding energy position of Ti 2p{sub 3/2} corroborated oxidation states of titanium species found in TiO{sub 2} structure. Peak broadening and formation of In−O−Sn linkage at oxygen valence band indicated interactions between substrate's atoms due to annealing. Apart from substrate's atoms interaction, chemical state of Ti profile remained stable implying no major chemical interaction between ITO atoms and film components. This study demonstrated TiO{sub 2} as a recipe for stable barrier layer capable of hindering charge trapping in nanostructured photonic devices.

  13. Structure of the surface layer of the methanogenic archaean Methanosarcina acetivorans

    OpenAIRE

    Arbing, Mark A.; Chan, Sum; Shin, Annie; Phan, Tung; Ahn, Christine J.; Rohlin, Lars; Gunsalus, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Archaea have a self-assembling proteinaceous surface (S-) layer as the primary and outermost boundary of their cell envelopes. The S-layer maintains structural rigidity, protects the organism from adverse environmental elements, and yet provides access to all essential nutrients. We have determined the crystal structure of one of the two “homologous” tandem polypeptide repeats that comprise the Methanosarcina acetivorans S-layer protein and propose a high-resolution model for a microbial S-la...

  14. Stormwater infiltration and surface runoff pollution reduction performance of permeable pavement layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhi-Guang; Lv, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Ying; Cui, Zhen-Zhen

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the laboratory-scale permeable pavement layers, including a surface permeable brick layer, coarse sand bedding layers (thicknesses = 2, 3.5, and 5 cm), and single-graded gravel sub-base layers (thicknesses = 15, 20, 25, and 30 cm), were built to evaluate stormwater infiltration and surface runoff pollution reduction performance. And, the infiltration rate (I) and concentrations of suspended solids (SS), total phosphorus (TP), chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen, and total nitrogen (TN) were measured under the simulated rainfall intensity of 72.4 mm/h over duration of 60 min. The results indicate that the thickness factor primarily influences the infiltration rate and pollutant removal rate. The highest steady infiltration rate was for surface brick layer 51.0 mm/h, for 5-cm sand bedding layer 32.3 mm/h, and for 30-cm gravel sub-base layer 42.3 mm/h, respectively. The SS average removal rate was relative higher (79.8 ∼ 98.6 %) for all layers due to the interception and filtration. The average removal rates of TP and COD were for surface layer 71.2 and 24.1 %, for 5-cm bedding layer 54.8 and 9.0 %, and for 20-cm sub-base layer 72.2 and 26.1 %. Ammonia nitrogen and TN cannot steadily be removed by layers according to the experiment results. The optimal thickness of bedding sands was 5 cm, and that of sub-base gravels was 20 ∼ 30 cm.

  15. Erosion of thin carbon layer on metal surface by hydrogen ion bombardment at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Hirotaka, Morita, Kenji, Horino, Yuji, Itoh, Noriaki

    1985-10-01

    In this letter, we report experimental results on the erosion of thin carbon layers segregated on nickel surfaces caused by hydrogen ion bombardements at elevated temperatures. The erosion yield of the segregated carbon layers at temperatures of around 900 K was found to depend on their thickness and for the layers with a thicknes less than 20 A the yield near the 900 K was found to be nearly the same as the physical sputtering yield. (orig./RK).

  16. Influence of magnetic field on microstructure and properties of Ni60 plasma surfacing layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhengjun; Sun Jinggang; Liu Duo; Wang Jibing; Zhang Guiqing

    2005-01-01

    In order to control the shape and distribution of hardening phase in plasma surfacing deposit, a longitudinal DC magnetic field was applied during plasma surfacing of nickel-based alloy Ni60. Hardness, wearing resistance, microstructure and phase constituent of the plasma surfacing layer were investigated. It was revealed that the hardness and wearing resistance of the Ni60 plasma surfacing layer could gotten significantly enhanced through introducing magnetic field. The mechanical properties of the surfacing deposit were optimal when magnetic field current is 1 A. The metallurgical analysis showed that the microstructure of the Ni60 plasma surfacing layer was mainly composed of γ solid solution and some hardening phase particles such as Cr7 C3 with an application of the magnetic field.

  17. Preparation of Stable Superhydrophobic Coatings on Wood Substrate Surfaces via Mussel-Inspired Polydopamine and Electroless Deposition Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Kaili Wang; Youming Dong; Wei Zhang; Shifeng Zhang; Jianzhang Li,

    2017-01-01

    Mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA) chemistry and electroless deposition approaches were used to prepare stable superhydrophobic coatings on wood surfaces. The as-formed PDA coating on a wood surface exhibited a hierarchical micro/nano roughness structure, and functioned as an “adhesive layer” between the substrate and a metallic film by the metal chelating ability of the catechol moieties on PDA, allowing for the formation of a well-developed micro/nanostructure hierarchical roughness. Additi...

  18. Surface band-gap narrowing in quantized electron accumulation layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, P D C; Veal, T D; McConville, C F; Zúñiga-Pérez, J; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V; Hopkinson, M; Rienks, E D L; Jensen, M Fuglsang; Hofmann, Ph

    2010-06-25

    An energy gap between the valence and the conduction band is the defining property of a semiconductor, and the gap size plays a crucial role in the design of semiconductor devices. We show that the presence of a two-dimensional electron gas near to the surface of a semiconductor can significantly alter the size of its band gap through many-body effects caused by its high electron density, resulting in a surface band gap that is much smaller than that in the bulk. Apart from reconciling a number of disparate previous experimental findings, the results suggest an entirely new route to spatially inhomogeneous band-gap engineering.

  19. Formation of Nanoscale Intermetallic Phases in Ni Surface Layer at High Intensity Implantation of Al Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.A.Bozhko; S.V.Fortuna; I.A.Kurzina; I.B.Stepanov; E.V.Kozlov; Yu.P. Sharkeev

    2004-01-01

    The results of experimental study of nanoscale intermetallic formation in surface layer of a metal target at ion implantation are presented. To increase the thickness of the ion implanted surface layer the high intensive ion implantation is used. Compared with the ordinary ion implantation, the high intensive ion implantation allows a much thicker modified surface layer. Pure polycrystalline nickel was chosen as a target. Nickel samples were irradiated with Al ions on the vacuum-arc ion beam and plasma flow source "Raduga-5". It was shown that at the high intensity ion implantation the fine dispersed particles of Ni3Al, NiAl intermetallic compounds and solid solution Al in Ni are formed in the nickel surface layer of 200 nm and thicker. The formation of phases takes place in complete correspondence with the Ni-Al phase diagram.

  20. Determination of elastic properties of surface layers and coatings by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Růžek, M.; Sedlák, P.; Seiner, H.; Landa, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with determination of in-plane elastic constants of thin layers deposited on substrates. Modified resonant ultrasound spectroscopy is used to measure resonant spectra before and after layer deposition . These two spectra are compared and changes in the position of the resonant peaks are associated with layer properties. It is shown that for thin layers either the elastic moduli or the surface mass density can be determined, providing the complementary information (the surface mass density for the determination of the moduli, the elastic moduli for the determination of the surface mass density) is known. As an experimental demonstration of this approach, the elastic moduli of diamond-like-carbon film deposited on a silicon substrate and the surface mass density of a thin spray paint on a silicon substrate are determined.

  1. FORMING A PARTING LAYER OF COATING ON THE SURFACE OF THE MOULD DURING DIE-CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pivovarchik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research on the study of the possibility of accumulation of the lubricating layer coating on the surface of the separation process of foundry equipment with high pressure die casting aluminum alloys.

  2. Investigation of Corrosion and Cathodic Protection in Reinforced Concrete. II: Properties of Steel Surface Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Van Breugel, K.; Lodhi, Z.F.; Ye, G.

    2007-01-01

    The present study explores the formation of corrosion products on the steel surface (using as-received low carbon construction steel) in reinforced concrete in conditions of corrosion and subsequent transformation of these layers in conditions of cathodic protection (CP).

  3. Rapid Melt and Resolidification of Surface Layers Using Intense, Pulsed Ion Beams Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renk, Timothy J.

    1998-10-02

    The emerging technology of pulsed intense ion beams has been shown to lead to improvements in surface characteristics such as hardness and wear resistance, as well as mechanical smoothing. We report hereon the use of this technology to systematically study improvements to three types of metal alloys - aluminum, iron, and titanium. Ion beam tieatment produces a rapid melt and resolidification (RMR) of the surface layer. In the case of a predeposited thin-fihn layer, the beam mixes this layer into the substrate, Ieading to improvements that can exceed those produced by treatment of the alloy alone, In either case, RMR results in both crystal refinement and metastable state formation in the treated surface layer not accessible by conventional alloy production. Although more characterization is needed, we have begun the process of relating these microstructural changes to the surface improvements we discuss in this report.

  4. Combined effects of surface conditions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on diurnal SOA evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.H.H.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Kabat, P.; Jimenez, J.L.; Farmer, D.K.; Heerwaarden, van C.C.; Mammarella, I.

    2012-01-01

    We study the combined effects of land surface conditions, atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on the diurnal evolution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer, using a model that contains the essentials of all these components. First, we evaluate the mod

  5. On inferring isoprene emission surface flux from atmospheric boundary layer concentration measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Dries, van den K.; Pino, D.

    2009-01-01

    We examine the dependence of the inferred isoprene surface emission flux from atmospheric concentration on the diurnal variability of the convective boundary layer (CBL). A series of systematic numerical experiments carried out using the mixed-layer technique enabled us to study the sensitivity of i

  6. Seasonal cyclogenesis and the role of near-surface stratified layer in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Sarma, M.S.S.; Tilvi, V.

    The role of the near-surface stratified layer developed due to the spread of low salinity waters under the influence of freshwater influx on the cyclogenesis over the Bay of Bengal is addressed. The seasonal variation of the Effective Oceanic Layer...

  7. Snow specific surface area simulation using the one-layer snow model in the Canadian LAnd Surface Scheme (CLASS)

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Snow grain size is a key parameter for modeling microwave snow emission properties and the surface energy balance because of its influence on the snow albedo, thermal conductivity and diffusivity. A model of the specific surface area (SSA) of snow was implemented in the one-layer snow model in the Canadian LAnd Surface Scheme (CLASS) version 3.4. This offline multilayer model (CLASS-SSA) simulates the decrease of SSA based on snow age, snow temperature and t...

  8. Controls on the stable isotopes in precipitation and surface waters across the southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Yao, Tandong; Xie, Shiyou; He, You

    2017-02-01

    Constraining temporal and spatial variability in water stable isotopes (δ18O and δD) is requested for interpreting proxy records of paleoclimate/paleoaltimetry. The southeastern Tibetan Plateau (TP) receives large amounts of precipitation in both summer (JJAS) and spring (MAM) and this makes it different from most other parts of the TP where annual precipitation concentrates only in summer. However, our knowledge of controls on precipitation and surface runoff generation in this region is still far from sufficient. In this study, the δ18O and δD of precipitation and stream waters across the southeastern TP were analyzed to investigate moisture sources and empirical isotope-elevation relationships. Herein, seasonal precipitation patterns, moisture trajectories and precipitation isotopes suggest this region is seasonally dominated by the monsoon in summer and the southerlies (from the Bay of Bengal) or a mix of southerlies and westerlies in spring. Spatially, vertical variations in precipitation seasonality exert profound influences on isotopic variability for stream waters. Larger contributions of spring precipitation (with higher δ18O and d-excess (d-excess = δD-8δ18O) compared to summer precipitation) vs. summer precipitation in the surface runoff generation at lower elevations account for the uncommon altitudinal decrease in streamwater d-excess. Such a cause also contributes to the slightly greater vertical lapse rates of streamwater δ18O (-0.28 to -0.48‰/100 m) relative to the Himalayan front. In addition, although a robust δ18O-elevation relationship is demonstrated based upon our measured and other published data on a broad spatial scale (over a 5200 m elevation range), this relationship is found to deviate from the empirical/theoretical pattern in the Himalayan front, which is also caused by the substantial spring precipitation in the southeastern TP. It is suggested that long-term changes in δ18O or δD of paleowater in this region actually

  9. Surface Phenomena During Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Etching of SiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasvoda, Ryan J; van de Steeg, Alex W; Bhowmick, Ranadeep; Hudson, Eric A; Agarwal, Sumit

    2017-09-13

    Surface phenomena during atomic layer etching (ALE) of SiO2 were studied during sequential half-cycles of plasma-assisted fluorocarbon (CFx) film deposition and Ar plasma activation of the CFx film using in situ surface infrared spectroscopy and ellipsometry. Infrared spectra of the surface after the CFx deposition half-cycle from a C4F8/Ar plasma show that an atomically thin mixing layer is formed between the deposited CFx layer and the underlying SiO2 film. Etching during the Ar plasma cycle is activated by Ar(+) bombardment of the CFx layer, which results in the simultaneous removal of surface CFx and the underlying SiO2 film. The interfacial mixing layer in ALE is atomically thin due to the low ion energy during CFx deposition, which combined with an ultrathin CFx layer ensures an etch rate of a few monolayers per cycle. In situ ellipsometry shows that for a ∼4 Å thick CFx film, ∼3-4 Å of SiO2 was etched per cycle. However, during the Ar plasma half-cycle, etching proceeds beyond complete removal of the surface CFx layer as F-containing radicals are slowly released into the plasma from the reactor walls. Buildup of CFx on reactor walls leads to a gradual increase in the etch per cycle.

  10. Research on synthetic aperture radar imaging technology of one-dimensional layered rough surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Wei-Jie; Tong Chuang-Ming

    2013-01-01

    A quick and exact imaging method for one-dimensional layered rough surfaces is proposed in this paper to study the scattering characteristics of a layered medium that exists widely in nature.The boundary integral equations of layered rough surfaces are solved by using the propagation-inside-layer expansion combined with the forward and backward spectral acceleration method (PILE+FB-SA),and the back scattering data are obtained.Then,a conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging procedure called back projection method is used to generate a two-dimensional (2D) image of the layered rough surfaces.Combined with the relative dielectric permittivity of realistic soil,the random rough surfaces with Gauss spectrum are used to simulate the layered medium with rough interfaces.Since the back scattering data are computed by using the fast numerical method,this method can be used to study layered rough surfaces with any parameter,which has a great application value in the detection and remote sensing areas.

  11. Site-specific immobilization of protein layers on gold surfaces via orthogonal sortases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeeszadeh-Sarmazdeh, Maryam; Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Boder, Eric T

    2015-04-01

    We report a site-specific, sortase-mediated ligation to immobilize proteins layer-by-layer on a gold surface. Recombinant fluorescent proteins with a Sortase A recognition tag at the C-terminus were immobilized on peptide-modified gold surfaces. We used two sortases with different substrate specificities (Streptococcus pyogenes Sortase A and Staphylococcus aureus Sortase A) to immobilize layers of GFP and mCherry site-specifically on the gold surface. Surfaces were characterized using fluorescence and atomic force microscopy after immobilizing each layer of protein. Fluorescent micrographs showed that both protein immobilization on the modified gold surface and protein oligomerization are sortase-dependent. AFM images showed that either homogenous protein monolayers or layers of protein oligomers can be generated using appropriately tagged substrate proteins. Using Sortase A variants with orthogonal peptide substrate specificities, site-specific immobilization of appropriately tagged GFP onto a layer of immobilized mCherry was achieved without disruption of the underlying protein layer.

  12. The surface layer of austempered ductile iron investment castings properties

    OpenAIRE

    D. Myszka; M. Kłębczyk; Zych, A.; L. Kwiatkowski

    2009-01-01

    The article presents a unique process of carbonnitriding and nitriding the precision casting surfaces of austempered ductile iron. The results of the research are pointing that adequate process parameters allow to obtain multiple increase of wear resistance and a significant increase of corrosion resistance. Also, changes of cast microstructure and hardness are presented.

  13. The surface layer of austempered ductile iron investment castings properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Myszka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a unique process of carbonnitriding and nitriding the precision casting surfaces of austempered ductile iron. The results of the research are pointing that adequate process parameters allow to obtain multiple increase of wear resistance and a significant increase of corrosion resistance. Also, changes of cast microstructure and hardness are presented.

  14. Boron Diffused Thermoluminescent Surface Layer in LiF TLDs for Skin Dose Assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul; Majborn, Benny

    1980-01-01

    A new high-temperature glow peak produced in a thin surface layer of LiF TLDs by diffusion of boron into the LiF material has been studied for skin dose assessments in personnel dosimetry.......A new high-temperature glow peak produced in a thin surface layer of LiF TLDs by diffusion of boron into the LiF material has been studied for skin dose assessments in personnel dosimetry....

  15. Understanding surface interactions in aqueous miscible organic solvent treated layered double hydroxides.

    OpenAIRE

    Erastova, Valentina; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; O'Hare, Dermot; Greenwell, H. Chris

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials are of interest for use in a wealth of technological applications, many of which require a high surface area for optimal properties and performance. Recently, an industrially scalable method to create high surface area layered double hydroxide (LDH) materials, which may be readily dispersed in non-polar solvents, has been developed. This method involves treatment of LDHs with aqueous miscible organic (AMO) solvents. Here, molecular modeling is exploited to elucidate the AMO ...

  16. Nanostructured Hardening of Hard Alloys Surface Layers Through Electron Irradiation in Heavy Inert Gas Plasma Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovcharenko, V. E.; Ivanov, Yu F.; Ivanov, K. V.; Mokhovikov, A. A.; Baohai, Yu; Hua, Xu Yun

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents research and experimental findings which prove that metal ceramic composite surface layer contains micro constituents’ hierarchies in the form of secondary nano sized inclusions inside ceramic phases. These inclusions have typical dimensions from several tens to several hundreds of nano meters. It has been shown that multi level structure-phase condition, developed in a nano sized area, effects physical and tribological properties of a metal ceramic composite surface layer.

  17. Enabling organosilicon chemistries on inert polymer surfaces with a vapor-deposited silica layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A; Ashurst, W R

    2009-10-06

    Given the large surface area-to-volume ratios commonly encountered in microfluidics applications, the ability to engineer the chemical properties of surfaces encountered in these applications is critically important. However, as various polymers are rapidly replacing glass and silicon as the chosen materials for microfluidics devices, the ability to easily modify the surface chemistry has been diminished by the relatively inert nature of some commonly employed polymer surfaces, such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polystyrene, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This paper describes the low-temperature, vapor-phase deposition of robust silica layers to PMMA, polystyrene, and PDMS surfaces, which enables the functionalization of these surfaces by standard organosilane chemistries. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy are used to characterize the silica layers that form on these surfaces. Aqueous immersion experiments indicate that the silica layer has excellent stability in aqueous environments, which is a prerequisite for microfluidics applications, but for PMMA surfaces, low adhesion of the silica layer to the underlying substrate is problematic. For PDMS substrates, the presence of the silica layer helps to slow the process of hydrophobic recovery, which is an additional advantage.

  18. Stable isotopes in the atmospheric marine boundary layer water vapour over the Atlantic Ocean, 2012–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Marion; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Reverdin, Gilles; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Árný Erla; Aloisi, Giovanni; Berkelhammer, Max B.; Bourlès, Bernard; Bourras, Denis; de Coetlogon, Gaëlle; Cosgrove, Ann; Faber, Anne-Katrine; Grelet, Jacques; Hansen, Steffen Bo; Johnson, Rod; Legoff, Hervé; Martin, Nicolas; Peters, Andrew J.; Popp, Trevor James; Reynaud, Thierry; Winther, Malte

    2017-01-01

    The water vapour isotopic composition (1H216O, H218O and 1H2H16O) of the Atlantic marine boundary layer has been measured from 5 research vessels between 2012 and 2015. Using laser spectroscopy analysers, measurements have been carried out continuously on samples collected 10–20 meter above sea level. All the datasets have been carefully calibrated against the international VSMOW-SLAP scale following the same protocol to build a homogeneous dataset covering the Atlantic Ocean between 4°S to 63°N. In addition, standard meteorological variables have been measured continuously, including sea surface temperatures using calibrated Thermo-Salinograph for most cruises. All calibrated observations are provided with 15-minute resolution. We also provide 6-hourly data to allow easier comparisons with simulations from the isotope-enabled Global Circulation Models. In addition, backwards trajectories from the HYSPLIT model are supplied every 6-hours for the position of our measurements. PMID:28094798

  19. Stable isotopes in the atmospheric marine boundary layer water vapour over the Atlantic Ocean, 2012-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Marion; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Reverdin, Gilles; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Árný Erla; Aloisi, Giovanni; Berkelhammer, Max B.; Bourlès, Bernard; Bourras, Denis; de Coetlogon, Gaëlle; Cosgrove, Ann; Faber, Anne-Katrine; Grelet, Jacques; Hansen, Steffen Bo; Johnson, Rod; Legoff, Hervé; Martin, Nicolas; Peters, Andrew J.; Popp, Trevor James; Reynaud, Thierry; Winther, Malte

    2017-01-01

    The water vapour isotopic composition (1H216O, H218O and 1H2H16O) of the Atlantic marine boundary layer has been measured from 5 research vessels between 2012 and 2015. Using laser spectroscopy analysers, measurements have been carried out continuously on samples collected 10-20 meter above sea level. All the datasets have been carefully calibrated against the international VSMOW-SLAP scale following the same protocol to build a homogeneous dataset covering the Atlantic Ocean between 4°S to 63°N. In addition, standard meteorological variables have been measured continuously, including sea surface temperatures using calibrated Thermo-Salinograph for most cruises. All calibrated observations are provided with 15-minute resolution. We also provide 6-hourly data to allow easier comparisons with simulations from the isotope-enabled Global Circulation Models. In addition, backwards trajectories from the HYSPLIT model are supplied every 6-hours for the position of our measurements.

  20. Investigation on electromagnetic scattering from rough soil surface of layered medium using the small perturbation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Xin-Cheng; Guo Li-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Electromagnetic scattering from a rough surface of layered medium is investigated, and the formulae of the scattering coefficients for different polarizations are derived using the small perturbation method. A rough surface with exponential correlation function is presented for describing a rough soil surface of layered medium, the formula of its scattering coefficient is derived by considering the spectrum of the rough surface with exponential correlation function; the curves of the bistatic scattering coefficient of HH polarization with variation of the scattering angle are obtained by numerical calculation. The influence of the permittivity of layered medium, the mean layer thickness of intermediate medium, the roughness surface parameters and the frequency of the incident wave on the bistatic scattering coefficient is discussed. Numerical results show that the influence of the permittivity of layered medium, the mean layer thickness of intermediate medium, the rms and the correlation length of the rough surface, and the frequency of the incident wave on the bistatic scattering coefficient is very complex.

  1. Formation of nanocrystalline layers by surface severe plastic deformation and pulsed plasma electrolytic carburizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliofkhazraei, M; Rouhaghdam, A Sabour

    2010-07-01

    Surfaces of various kinds of metallic materials spheres were treated by nanocrystalline surface severe plastic deformation and then pulsed nanocrystalline plasma electrolytic carburizing to study nanocrystalline substrate effect on formation and nano-hardness of hard nanocrystalline layer. The surface layers of the metallic materials developed by the nanocrystalline surface severe plastic deformation were characterized by means of high resolution scanning electron microscope. Nearly equiaxed nanocrystals with grain sizes ranging from 15 to 90 nm were observed in the near surface regions of all metallic materials, which are low carbon steel and commercially pure titanium. The effect of substrate nanocrystallization on growth kinetics and hardness of formed nanocrystalline carbide layer was studied with the means of figure analysis and nanohardness tests. Figure analysis show the length to diameter ratio and distribution curve of nanocrystals and it has been found that the achieved properties of hard layer (growth rate, nano-hardness, nanostructure...) are related to these factors. It was also clarified that these techniques and surface nanocrystallization can be easily achieved in most of metallic materials. Results indicate that the resultant hardened carburized layers exhibited excellent hardness profile. Investigation of the layer characteristics showed strong dependence followed from the treatment experimental parameters as well as the shape of nanocrystals.

  2. [Research on the Highly Stable White LED with CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dot as Light Conversion Layer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jin; Zhou, Jie; Xie, Jing-weil; Chen, An-ping; Zhang, Xuel; Yin, Lu-qiao; Zhang, Jian-hua

    2016-02-01

    In accordance with the one-step synthesis, in this paper, we synthesized 510, 550 and 630 nm three emission peaks CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots with high stability and high quantum yield whose quantum yield were 82%, 98% and 97%. We used the quantum dot material to replace the phosphor material, and mixed QDs with the silicone uniformly, then dispersed the QDs/silicone composites onto the blue InGaN LEDs to fabricate the QDs-WLEDs. By successively adding different colors of quantum dots for the preparation of quantum dot light converting layer, We investigated that how does the ratio of the three kind of quantum dots whose peaks were 510, 550 and 630 nm effect on the properties of the white LED devices. This paper also studied the mechanism of energy conversion between different colors of quantum dots. We also utilized the mechanism that the quantum dots effect on the white spectrum and color coordinates; we got the results of the optimization of the white device and the ratio of three-color quantum dots. The results show that when the quantum dot ratio is 24:7:10, white LED devices with high stability and high efficiency can be obtained, in the current range of 20-200 mA, the range of color temperature is from 4 607 to 5 920 K, the CIE-1931 coordinates is from (0.355 1,0.348 3) to (0.323 4, 0.336 1), the color rendering index is from 77. 6 to 84. 2, and the highest power efficiency of the devices achieves to 31.69 lm · W⁻¹ @ 20 mA. In addition, in order to further investigate the reason of stable device performance, We studied the effects of time, temperature, UV treatment on the stability of CdSe/ZnS QDs/silicone light conversion material, the results show that the excellent stability of the devices attributes to the stability of the one-step synthesis of core-shell structure of the quantum dot material, the final optimized device is a low-power high-quality white light source and the device has good application prospects in the field of standard white

  3. Solution-processed amorphous silicon surface passivation layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mews, Mathias, E-mail: mathias.mews@helmholtz-berlin.de; Sontheimer, Tobias; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Institute of Silicon Photovoltaics, Kekuléstraße 5, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Mader, Christoph; Traut, Stephan; Wunnicke, Odo [Evonik Industries AG, Creavis Technologies and Innovation, Paul-Baumann-Straße 1, D-45772 Marl (Germany)

    2014-09-22

    Amorphous silicon thin films, fabricated by thermal conversion of neopentasilane, were used to passivate crystalline silicon surfaces. The conversion is investigated using X-ray and constant-final-state-yield photoelectron spectroscopy, and minority charge carrier lifetime spectroscopy. Liquid processed amorphous silicon exhibits high Urbach energies from 90 to 120 meV and 200 meV lower optical band gaps than material prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Applying a hydrogen plasma treatment, a minority charge carrier lifetime of 1.37 ms at an injection level of 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3} enabling an implied open circuit voltage of 724 mV was achieved, demonstrating excellent silicon surface passivation.

  4. Properties of laser alloyed surface layers on magnesium base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galun, R.; Weisheit, A.; Mordike, B.L. (Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde und Werkstofftechnik)

    1998-01-01

    The investigations have shown that laser surface alloying is a promising process to improve the wear and corrosion properties of magnesium base alloys without affecting the initial bulk properties like the low density. With an alloying element combination of aluminium and nickel the wear rate in the scratch test was reduced by 90% compared to untreated pure magnesium. Additionally the corrosion resistance was improved by laser alloying with this element combination. Because of distortion or crack formation in the case of large area treatments, the laser alloying should be limited to the treatment of smaller areas. In the near future this process could be an interesting alternative to surface coating or to a partially reinforcement with ceramic fibres or particles. (orig.)

  5. Design of Matched Absorbing Layers for Surface Plasmon-Polaritons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio de la Cruz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a procedure for designing metal-metal boundaries for the strong attenuation of surface plasmon-polaritons without the introduction of reflections or scattering effects. Solutions associated with different sets of matching materials are found. To illustrate the results and the consequences of adopting different solutions, we present calculations based on an integral equation formulation for the scattering problem and the use of a nonlocal impedance boundary condition.

  6. Wear and Corrosion Properties of Mo Surface-modiifed Layer in TiNi Alloy Prepared by Plasma Surface Alloying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hongqian; WANG Zhenxia; YANG Hongyu; SHAN Xiaolin; LIU Xiaoping; YU Shengwang; HE Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance and restrain nickel release of TiNi alloys, the Mo modified layers on TiNi substrates were obtained using the double glow plasma surface alloying technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to investigate the morphology, composition and structure. Microhardness test and scratch test were performed to analyze the microhardness and coating/substrate adhesion. Tribological and electrochemical behaviors of the Mo modified layers on TiNi were tested by the reciprocating wear instrument and electrochemical measurement system. The Ni concentrations in Hanks’ solution where surface electrochemical tests took place were measured by mass spectrometry. The surface-modiifed layer contained a Mo deposition layer and a Mo diffusion layer. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the modiifed layers were composed of Mo, MoTi, MoNi, and Ti2Ni. The microhardnesses of the Mo modiifed layers treated at 900℃and 950℃ were 832.8 HV and 762.4 HV, respectively, which was about 3 times the microhardness of the TiNi substrate. Scratch tests indicated that the modified layers possessed good adhesion with the substrate. Compared with as-received TiNi alloy, the modiifed alloys exhibited signiifcant improvement of wear resistance against Si3N4 with low normal loads during the sliding tests. Mass spectrometry displayed that the Mo alloy layers had successfully inhibited the Ni release into the body.

  7. Remote sensing of Arctic boundary layer clouds above snow surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, André; Bierwirth, Eike; Wendisch, Manfred

    2015-04-01

    In the Arctic remote sensing of clouds using reflected solar radiation is mostly related to high uncertainties as the contrast between the bright sea ice and snow surface and the clouds is low. Additionally, uncertainties result from variation of the snow grain size which changes the absorption of solar radiation similarly to the size of cloud particles. This is a major issue for understanding the response of Arctic clouds to climate warming as the quantification of cloud properties in this remote region mostly relies on satellite observations. We used spectral radiation measurements of the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement sysTem (SMART-Albedometer) to improve common used cloud remote sensing algorithms in case of snow surfaces. The measurements were collected during the airborne research campaign Vertical distribution of ice in Arctic mixed-phase clouds (VERDI, April/May 2012) above the Canadian Beaufort where both sea ice covered and ice free ocean areas were present during the observation period. Based on the spectral absorption characteristics of snow and clouds (assuming to be dominated by the liquid fraction) a combination of wavelengths was found which allows to separate the impact of clouds and snow surface on the reflected radiation measured above the clouds. While snow grain size dominates the absorption at a wavelength of 1.0 μm, information on cloud optical thickness and cloud particle effective radius can be extracted at wavelengths of 1.7 μm and 2.1 μm, respectively. Based on radiative transfer simulations lookup tables for the retrieval algorithm were calculated and used to estimate the theoretical uncertainties of the retrieval. It was found that using ratios instead of absolute radiances reduces the uncertainties significantly. The new algorithm was applied to a specific case observed during the VERDI campaign where a stratocumulus clouds was located above an ice edge. It could be shown that the method works also over water

  8. Free surface simulation of a two-layer fluid by boundary element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weoncheol Koo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A two-layer fluid with free surface is simulated in the time domain by a two-dimensional potential-based Numerical Wave Tank (NWT. The developed NWT is based on the boundary element method and a leap-frog time integration scheme. A whole domain scheme including interaction terms between two layers is applied to solve the boundary integral equation. The time histories of surface elevations on both fluid layers in the respective wave modes are verified with analytic results. The amplitude ratios of upper to lower elevation for various density ratios and water depths are also compared.

  9. The mechanism of the surface alloy layer creation for cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Walasek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a detailed description of the process of creation of a surface alloy layer (using high-carbon ferrochromium on the cast steel casting. The mechanism of the surface alloy layer is based on the known theories [5,6]. The proposed course of formation of the layers has been extended to decarburization stage of steel. The research included proving the presence of carbon-lean zone. The experiment included the analysis of the distribution of elements and microhardness measurement.

  10. Anisotropy Characteristics of Magnetostatic Surface Wave Propagating in YIG/Dielectric/Metal Layered Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Hui Yang; Huai-Wu Zhang; Ying-Li Liu

    2007-01-01

    The anisotropy of magnetostatic surface wave (MSSW) propagating in finite width YIG/dielectric/metal layered structure is analyzed. This problem is solved by finding the rigorous solution of each layer from Maxwell equation and the appropriate transmission Green's function matrix (G). From the relationship of Green's function matrixes of dielectric layer and ferrite layer, the dispersion equation is obtained.The MSSW filter is designed to verify the dispersion characteristics. The experiment results are in good agreement with the calculating data from the model.

  11. Reflection of Electromagnetic Waves by a Nonuniform Plasma Layer Covering a Metal Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hong-Mei; FA Peng-Ting

    2008-01-01

    Reflection coefficients of electromagnetic waves in a nonuniform plasma layer with electrons, positive ions and negative ions, covering a metal surface are investigated by using the finite-difference-time-domain method. It is shown that the reflection coefficients are influenced greatly by the density gradient on the layer edge, layer thickness and electron proportion, i.e., the effect of the negative ions. It is also found that low reflection or high attenuation can be reached by properly choosing high electron proportion, thick plasma layer, and smooth density gradient in the low frequency regime, but sharp density gradient in the high frequency regime.

  12. Tribological Characteristic of Titanium Alloy Surface Layers Produced by Diode Laser Gas Nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiecki A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the tribological properties of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V composite surface layers Ti/TiN were produced during laser surface gas nitriding by means of a novel high power direct diode laser with unique characteristics of the laser beam and a rectangular beam spot. Microstructure, surface topography and microhardness distribution across the surface layers were analyzed. Ball-on-disk tests were performed to evaluate and compare the wear and friction characteristics of surface layers nitrided at different process parameters, base metal of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V and also the commercially pure titanium. Results showed that under dry sliding condition the commercially pure titanium samples have the highest coefficient of friction about 0.45, compared to 0.36 of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V and 0.1-0.13 in a case of the laser gas nitrided surface layers. The volume loss of Ti6Al4V samples under such conditions is twice lower than in a case of pure titanium. On the other hand the composite surface layer characterized by the highest wear resistance showed almost 21 times lower volume loss during the ball-on-disk test, compared to Ti6Al4V samples.

  13. Efficient and Air-Stable Mixed-Cation Lead Mixed-Halide Perovskite Solar Cells with n-Doped Organic Electron Extraction Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; McMeekin, David P; Sakai, Nobuya; van Reenen, Stephan; Wojciechowski, Konrad; Patel, Jay B; Johnston, Michael B; Snaith, Henry J

    2017-02-01

    Air-stable doping of the n-type fullerene layer in an n-i-p planar heterojunction perovskite device is capable of enhancing device efficiency and improving device stability. Employing a (HC(NH2 )2 )0.83 Cs0.17 Pb(I0.6 Br0.4 )3 perovskite as the photoactive layer, glass-glass laminated devices are reported, which sustain 80% of their "post burn-in" efficiency over 3400 h under full sun illumination in ambient conditions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Polyethylenimine surface layer for enhanced virus immobilization on cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiliket, Ghania; Ladam, Guy; Nguyen, Quang Trong; Lebrun, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    Thin regenerated cellulose films are prepared by hydrolysis of cellulose acetate (CA). A polycation, namely polyethylenimine (PEI), is then adsorbed onto the films. From QCM-D analysis, PEI readily adsorbs from a 0.1% w/v solution in NaCl 0.2 M (ca. 100 ng cm-2). Further PEI adsorption steps at higher PEI concentrations induce a linear growth of the PEI films, suggesting that free adsorption sites still exist after the initial adsorption. The adsorbed PEI chains are resistant to variations of the ionic strength up to NaCl 1 M. Promisingly, the adsorption of T4D bacteriophages are 15-fold more efficient onto the PEI-treated, compared to the native regenerated cellulose films, as measured by QCM-D. This confirms the strong affinity between the negatively charged viruses and PEI, even at low PEI concentration, probably governed by strong electrostatic attractive interactions. This result explains the remarkable improvement of the affinity of medical masks for virus droplets when one of their cellulose layers was changed by two-PEI-functionalized cellulose-based filters.

  15. Hematite Surface Activation by Chemical Addition of Tin Oxide Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Waldemir M; Souza, Flavio L

    2016-09-05

    In this study, the effect of tin (Sn(4+) ) modification on the surface of hematite electrodes synthesized by an aqueous solution route at different times (2, 5, 10, 18, and 24 h) is investigated. As confirmed from X-ray diffraction results, the as-synthesized electrode exhibits an oxyhydroxide phase, which is converted into a pure hematite phase after being subjected to additional thermal treatment at 750 °C for 30 min. The tin-modified hematite electrode is prepared by depositing a solution of Sn(4+) precursor on the as-synthesized electrode, followed by thermal treatment under the same abovementioned conditions. This modification results in an enhancement of the photocurrent response for all hematite electrodes investigated and attains the highest values of around 1.62 and 2.3 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 and 1.4 V versus RHE, respectively, for electrodes obtained in short synthesis times (2 h). Contact angle measurements suggest that the deposition of Sn(4+) on the hematite electrode provides a more hydrophilic surface, which favors a chemical reaction at the interface between the electrode and electrolyte. This result generates new perspectives for understanding the deposition of Sn(4+) on the hematite electrode surface, which is in contrast with several studies previously reported; these studies state that the enhancement in photocurrent density is related to either the induction of an increased donor charge density or shift in the flat-band potential, which favors charge separation.

  16. XPS study on water corrosion of fluorzirconate glasses and their protection by a layer of surface modified tin dioxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, P. [Sao Paulo State University, Institute of Chemistry, 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: peter@iq.unesp.br; Rizzato, A.P. [Rhodia Poliamida e Especialidades, Fazenda Sao Francisco, 07 13140-000 Paulinia, SP (Brazil); Pulcinelli, S.H.; Santilli, C.V. [Sao Paulo State University, Institute of Chemistry, 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2007-05-15

    The surface corrosion process associated with the hydrolysis of fluorozirconate glass, ZBLAN (53ZrF{sub 4}, 20BaF{sub 2}, 20NaF, 4LaF{sub 2}, 3AlF{sub 3}), and the corrosion protection efficiency of a nanocrystalline transparent SnO{sub 2} layer were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The tin oxide film was deposited by the sol-gel dip-coating process in the presence of Tiron as particle surface modifier agent. The chemical bonding structure and composition of the surface region of coated and non-coated ZBLAN were studied before water contact and after different immersion periods (5-30 min). In contrast to the effects occurring for non-coated glass, where the surface undergoes a rapid selective dissolution of the most soluble species inducing the formation of a new surface phase consisting of stable zirconium oxyfluoride, barium fluoride and lanthanum fluoride species, the results for the SnO{sub 2}-coated glass showed that the hydrolytic attack induces a filling of the film nanopores by dissolved glass material and the formation of tin oxyfluoride and zirconium oxyfluoride species. This process results in a modified film, which acts as a hermetic diffusion barrier protecting efficiently the glass surface.

  17. New surface layers with low rolling resistance tested in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettinari, Matteo; Schmidt, Bjarne; Jensen, Bjarne Bo

    2014-01-01

    Rolling Resistance coefficient that could improve energy efficiency of the roads. In particular, two new types of Split Mastic Asphalt (SMA) were developed and compared to a reference one; both mixtures have a relatively small maximum grain-size, 6 mm and 8 mm, respectively. Surface measurements...... such as Skid Resistance and Mean Depth Profile were appropriately verified in order to fulfill these essential texture values. Samples were taken and studied in the laboratory to analyze the volumetric characteristics. Rolling resistance measurements have shown that both new SMAs have a reduced Rolling...

  18. Trapping Surface Electrons on Graphene Layers and Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Niesner, D.; Fauster, Th.; Dadap, J. I.; Zaki, N.; Knox, K. R.; Yeh, P. -C.; Bhandari, R.; Osgood, R. M.; Petrović, M; Kralj, M.

    2011-01-01

    We report the use of time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission to map the bound, unoccupied electronic structure of the weakly coupled graphene/Ir(111) system. The energy, dispersion, and lifetime of the lowest three image-potential states are measured. In addition, the weak interaction between Ir and graphene permits observation of resonant transitions from an unquenched Shockley-type surface state of the Ir substrate to graphene/Ir image-potential states. The image-potential-state l...

  19. New surface layers with low rolling resistance tested in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettinari, Matteo; Schmidt, Bjarne; Jensen, Bjarne Bo

    2014-01-01

    The project ‘CO2 emission reduction by exploitation of rolling resistance modeling of pavements’ (COOEE) was started in 2011 to establish a scientific background for development of novel pavement types and asset management solutions that minimize the rolling resistance for cars and trucks...... Rolling Resistance coefficient that could improve energy efficiency of the roads. In particular, two new types of Split Mastic Asphalt (SMA) were developed and compared to a reference one; both mixtures have a relatively small maximum grain-size, 6 mm and 8 mm, respectively. Surface measurements...

  20. On stratification, barotropic tides, and secular changes in surface tidal elevations: Two-layer analytical models

    CERN Document Server

    Wetzel, Alfredo N; Cerovecki, Ivana; Hendershott, Myrl C; Karsten, Richard H; Miller, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    In this study the influence of stratification on surface tidal elevations in a two-layer analytical model is examined. The model assumes linearized, non-rotating, shallow-water dynamics in one dimension with astronomical forcing and allows for arbitrary topography. Both large scale (barotropic) and small scale (baroclinic) components of the surface tidal elevation are shown to be affected by stratification. It is also shown that the topography and basin boundaries affect the sensitivity of the barotropic surface tide to stratification significantly. In a companion paper it is shown that the barotropic tide in two-layer numerical models run in realistic global domains differs from its value in one-layer numerical models by amounts qualitatively consistent with analytic predictions from this paper. The analytical model also roughly predicts the sensitivity to perturbations in stratification in the two-layer domain model. Taken together, this paper and the companion paper therefore provide a framework to underst...

  1. Contribution of material’s surface layer on charge state distribution in laser ablation plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaki, Masafumi, E-mail: rogus@asagi.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Steski, Dannie; Kanesue, Takeshi [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Ikeda, Shunsuke [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Okamura, Masahiro [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Washio, Masakazu [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    To generate laser ablation plasma, a pulse laser is focused onto a solid target making a crater on the surface. However, not all the evaporated material is efficiently converted to hot plasma. Some portion of the evaporated material could be turned to low temperature plasma or just vapor. To investigate the mechanism, we prepared an aluminum target coated by thin carbon layers. Then, we measured the ablation plasma properties with different carbon thicknesses on the aluminum plate. The results showed that C{sup 6+} ions were generated only from the surface layer. The deep layers (over 250 nm from the surface) did not provide high charge state ions. On the other hand, low charge state ions were mainly produced by the deeper layers of the target. Atoms deeper than 1000 nm did not contribute to the ablation plasma formation.

  2. Identification and characterization of the surface-layer protein of Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Omar; Brailsford, Alan; Wright, Anne; Faraar, Jeremy; Campbell, Jim; Fairweather, Neil

    2007-09-01

    Many bacterial species produce a paracrystalline layer, the surface layer, which completely surrounds the exterior of the cell. In some bacteria, the surface layer is implicated in pathogenesis. Two proteins present in cell wall extracts from Clostridium tetani have been investigated and identified one of these has been unambiguously as the surface-layer protein (SLP). The gene, slpA, has been located in the genome of C. tetani E88 that encodes the SLP. The molecular mass of the protein as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is considerably larger than that predicted from the gene; however the protein does not appear to be glycosylated. Furthermore, analysis of five C. tetani strains, including three recent clinical isolates, shows considerable variation in the sizes of the SLP.

  3. Critical CuI buffer layer surface density for organic molecular crystal orientation change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kwangseok; Kim, Jong Beom; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lee, Hyun Hwi; Lee, Dong Ryeol

    2015-01-01

    We have determined the critical surface density of the CuI buffer layer inserted to change the preferred orientation of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) crystals grown on the buffer layer. X-ray reflectivity measurements were performed to obtain the density profiles of the buffer layers and out-of-plane and 2D grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction measurements were performed to determine the preferred orientations of the molecular crystals. Remarkably, it was found that the preferred orientation of the CuPc film is completely changed from edge-on (1 0 0) to face-on (1 1 -2) by a CuI buffer layer with a very low surface density, so low that a large proportion of the substrate surface is bare.

  4. CHARACTERIZING SURFACE LAYERS IN NITINOL USING X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopfel, R.; Mehta, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nitinol is a shape memory alloy whose properties allow for large reversible deformations and a return to its original geometry. This nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy has become a material used widely in the biomedical fi eld as a stent to open up collapsed arteries. Both ambient and biological conditions cause surface oxidation in these devices which in turn change its biocompatibility. The thickness of oxidized layers can cause fractures in the material if too large and can allow for penetration if too thin. Depending on the type and abundance of the chemical species on or near the surface, highly toxic metal ions can leak into the body causing cell damage or even cell death. Thus, biocompatibility of such devices is crucial. By using highly surface sensitive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to probe the surface of these structures, it is possible to decipher both layer composition and layer thickness. Two samples, both of which were mechanically polished, were investigated. Of the two samples, one was then exposed to a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution to mimic the chemical properties of blood, while the other remained unexposed. Although both samples were found to have oxide layers of appropriate thickness (on the order of a few nm), it was found that the sample exposed to the saline solution had a slightly thicker oxide layer and more signifi cantly, a phosphate layer very near the surface suggesting toxic metal components are well contained within the sample. These are considerable indications of a biocompatible device.

  5. Leaching and Redistribution of Nutrients in Surface Layer of Red Soils in Southeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The leaching and redistribution of nutrients in the surface layer of 4 types of red soils in Southeast China were studied with a lysimeter experiment under field conditions. Results showed that the leaching concentrated in the rainy season (from April to June). Generally, the leaching of soil nutrients from the surface layer of red soils was in the order of Ca > Mg > K > NO3-N. In fertilization treatment, the total amount of soil nutrients leached out of the surface layer in a red soil derived from granite was the highest in all soils. The uptake by grass decreased the leaching of fertilizer ions in surface layer, particularly for NO3-N. Soil total N and exchangeable K, Ca and Mg in the surface layer decreased with leaching and grass uptake during the 2 years without new fertilization of urea, Ca(H2PO4)2, KCl, CaCO3 and MgCO3. Ca moved from the application layer (0~5 cm) of fertilizer and accumulated in the 10~30 cm depth in the soils studied except that derived from Quaternary red clay. The deficiency of soil exchangeable K will become a serious degradation process facing the Southeast China.

  6. Parameterization of a surface drag coefficient in conventionally neutral planetary boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Esau

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern large-scale models (LSMs rely on surface drag coefficients to parameterize turbulent exchange between surface and the first computational level in the atmosphere. A classical parameterization in an Ekman boundary layer is rather simple. It is based on a robust concept of a layer of constant fluxes. In such a layer (log-layer, the mean velocity profile is logarithmic. It results in an universal dependence of the surface drag coefficient on a single internal non-dimensional parameter, namely the ratio of a height within this layer to a surface roughness length scale. A realistic near-neutral planetary boundary layer (PBL is usually much more shallow than the idealized Ekman layer. The reason is that the PBL is developing against a stably stratified free atmosphere. The ambient atmospheric stratification reduces the PBL depth and simultaneously the depth of the log-layer. Therefore, the first computational level in the LSMs may be placed above the log-layer. In such a case, the classical parameterization is unjustified and inaccurate.

    The paper proposes several ways to improve the classical parameterization of the surface drag coefficient for momentum. The discussion is focused on a conventionally neutral PBL, i.e. on the neutrally stratified PBL under the stably stratified free atmosphere. The analysis is based on large eddy simulation (LES data. This data reveals that discrepancy between drag coefficients predicted by the classical parameterization and the actual drag coefficients can be very large in the shallow PBL. The improved parameterizations provide a more accurate prediction. The inaccuracy is reduced to one-tenth of the actual values of the coefficients.

  7. Parameterization of a surface drag coefficient in conventionally neutral planetary boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esau, I.N. [Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center, Bergen (Norway)

    2004-07-01

    Modern large-scale models (LSMs) rely on surface drag coefficients to parameterize turbulent exchange between surface and the first computational level in the atmosphere. A classical parameterization in an Ekman boundary layer is rather simple. It is based on a robust concept of a layer of constant fluxes. In such a layer (log-layer), the mean velocity profile is logarithmic. It results in an universal dependence of the surface drag coefficient on a single internal non-dimensional parameter, namely the ratio of a height within this layer to a surface roughness length scale. A realistic near-neutral planetary boundary layer (PBL) is usually much more shallow than the idealized Ekman layer. The reason is that the PBL is developing against a stably stratified free atmosphere. The ambient atmospheric stratification reduces the PBL depth and simultaneously the depth of the log-layer. Therefore, the first computational level in the LSMs may be placed above the log-layer. In such a case, the classical parameterization is unjustified and inaccurate. The paper proposes several ways to improve the classical parameterization of the surface drag coefficient for momentum. The discussion is focused on a conventionally neutral PBL, i.e. on the neutrally stratified PBL under the stably stratified free atmosphere. The analysis is based on large eddy simulation (LES) data. This data reveals that discrepancy between drag coefficients predicted by the classical parameterization and the actual drag coefficients can be very large in the shallow PBL. The improved parameterizations provide a more accurate prediction. The inaccuracy is reduced to one-tenth of the actual values of the coefficients. (orig.)

  8. Characterization and cell behavior of titanium surfaces with PLL/DNA modification via a layer-by-layer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenli; Feng, Bo; Lu, Xiong; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie

    2012-08-01

    This study describes the fabrication of two types of multilayered films onto titanium by layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly, using poly-L-lysine (PLL) as the cationic polyelectrolyte and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) as the anionic polyelectrolyte. The assembling process of each component was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quartz crystal balance (QCM). Zeta potential of the LBL-coated microparticles was measured by dynamic light scattering. Titanium substrates with or without multilayered films were used in osteoblast cell culture experiments to study cell proliferation, viability, differentiation, and morphology. Results of AFM and QCM indicated the progressive build-up of the multilayered coatings. The surface morphology of three types of multilayered films showed elevations in the nanoscale range. The data of zeta potential showed that the surface terminated with PLL displayed positive charge while the surface terminated with DNA displayed negative charge. The proliferation of osteoblasts on modified titanium films was found to be greater than that on control (p PLL/DNA-modified films have higher cell viability (p PLL/DNA were successfully used to surface engineer titanium via LBL technique, and enhanced its cell biocompatibility. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Macrofauna under sea ice and in the open surface layer of the Lazarev Sea, Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flores, Hauke; van Franeker, Jan-Andries; Cisewski, Boris; Leach, Harry; Van de Putte, Anton P.; Meesters, Erik (H. W. G.); Bathmann, Ulrich; Wolff, Wirn J.

    2011-01-01

    A new fishing gear was used to sample the macrozooplankton and micronekton community in the surface layer (0-2 m) under ice and in open water, the Surface and Under Ice Trawl (SUIT). In total, 57 quantitative hauls were conducted in the Lazarev Sea (Southern Ocean) during 3 different seasons (autumn

  10. Macrofauna under sea ice and in the open surface layer of the Lazarev Sea, Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentino De Souza Silva, A.P.; Franeker, van J.A.; Cisewski, B.; Leach, H.; Putte, van de A.P.; Meesters, H.W.G.; Bathmann, U.; Wolff, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    A new fishing gear was used to sample the macrozooplankton and micronekton community in the surface layer (0–2 m) under ice and in open water, the Surface and Under Ice Trawl (SUIT). In total, 57 quantitative hauls were conducted in the Lazarev Sea (Southern Ocean) during 3 different seasons (autumn

  11. Measuring air layer volumes retained by submerged floating-ferns Salvinia and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias J. Mayser

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Some plants and animals feature superhydrophobic surfaces capable of retaining a layer of air when submerged under water. Long-term air retaining surfaces (Salvinia-effect are of high interest for biomimetic applications like drag reduction in ship coatings of up to 30%. Here we present a novel method for measuring air volumes and air loss under water. We recorded the buoyancy force of the air layer on leaf surfaces of four different Salvinia species and on one biomimetic surface using a highly sensitive custom made strain gauge force transducer setup. The volume of air held by a surface was quantified by comparing the buoyancy force of the specimen with and then without an air layer. Air volumes retained by the Salvinia-surfaces ranged between 0.15 and 1 L/m2 depending on differences in surface architecture. We verified the precision of the method by comparing the measured air volumes with theoretical volume calculations and could find a good agreement between both values. In this context we present techniques to calculate air volumes on surfaces with complex microstructures. The introduced method also allows to measure decrease or increase of air layers with high accuracy in real-time to understand dynamic processes.

  12. Derivation of the three-layer model for surface second-harmonic generation

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Sean M

    2016-01-01

    We develop explicit expressions for the surface second-harmonic radiation yield using the three layer model. We derive expressions that can be applied to systems without and symmetry considerations, and then reduce them for the (111), (110), and (100) surface symmetries.

  13. Preparation of lanthanum fluoride nanolayers by depositing ionic layers on silicon surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuchkov, B.S.; Tolstoi, V.P.; Murin, I.V.; Kirillov, S.N. [St. Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-10

    The kinetics of growth of LaF{sub 3} nanolayers on silicon surface was studied. Influences due to preparation conditions (the concentration and the pH values of the solution, the time of surface treatment, the number of cycles of ionic layer deposition) were evaluated.

  14. A mechanical model for surface layer formation on self-lubricating ceramic composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Jiupeng; Valefi, Mahdiar; Rooij, de Matthijn; Schipper, Dirk J.

    2010-01-01

    To predict the thickness of a self-lubricating layer on the contact surface of ceramic composite material containing a soft phase during dry sliding test, a mechanical model was built to calculate the material transfer of the soft second phase in the composite to the surface. The tribological test,

  15. Tunable Dipole Surface Plasmon Resonances of Silver Nanoparticles by Cladding Dielectric Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaotong; Li, Dabing; Sun, Xiaojuan; Li, Zhiming; Song, Hang; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Yiren

    2015-07-28

    The tunability of surface plasmon resonance can enable the highest degree of localised surface plasmon enhancement to be achieved, based on the emitting or absorbing wavelength. In this article, tunable dipole surface plasmon resonances of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are realized by modification of the SiO2 dielectric layer thicknesses. SiO2 layers both beneath and over the Ag NPs affected the resonance wavelengths of local surface plasmons (LSPs). By adjusting the SiO2 thickness beneath the Ag NPs from 5 nm to 20 nm, the dipole surface plasmon resonances shifted from 470 nm to 410 nm. Meanwhile, after sandwiching the Ag NPs by growing SiO2 before NPs fabrication and then overcoating the NPs with various SiO2 thicknesses from 5 nm to 20 nm, the dipole surface plasmon resonances changed from 450 nm to 490 nm. The SiO2 cladding dielectric layer can tune the Ag NP surface charge, leading to a change in the effective permittivity of the surrounding medium, and thus to a blueshift or redshift of the resonance wavelength. Also, the quadrupole plasmon resonances were suppressed by the SiO2 cladding layer because the dielectric SiO2 can suppress level splitting of surface plasmon resonances caused by the Ag NP coupling effect.

  16. Data-driven inversion of GPR surface reflection data for lossless layered media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slob, E.C.; Wapenaar, C.P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Two wavefields can be retrieved from the measured reflection response at the surface. One is the Green’s function at a chosen virtual receiver depth level in a layered model generated by a source at the surface. The other wavefield consists of the upgoing and downgoing parts of a wavefield that focu

  17. Land-surface and boundary layer processes in a semi-arid heterogeneous landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochum, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The European Field Experiment in a Desertification-threatened Area (EFEDA) provides a comprehensive land-surface dataset for a semiarid Mediterranean environment. It is used here to study heat and moisture transport processes in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), to derive grid-scale surface flux

  18. Influence of ultrathin water layer on the van der Waals/Casimir force between gold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.; Svetovoy, V. B.; van Zwol, P. J.

    In this paper we investigate the influence of ultrathin water layer (similar to 1-1.5 nm) on the van der Waals/Casimir force between gold surfaces. Adsorbed water is inevitably present on gold surfaces at ambient conditions as jump-up-to contact during adhesion experiments demonstrate. Calculations

  19. CONCENTRATION DEPENDENCE OF STERN LAYER CAPACITANCES AND SURFACE EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS IN SILICA-BASED NANOFLUIDIC CHANNELS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Frey, J.; Bruus, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    ]. The current models used to describe surface phenomena in nanofluidics can differ by orders of magnitude from experimentally measured values [2]. To mitigate the discrepancies, we hypothesize that the Stern-layer capacitance Cs and the surface equilibrium constants pKa, vary with the composition of the solid...

  20. Phosphonate molecular layers on TiO2 surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canepa P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the deposition of (HO2-PO-S-(CH215-COOH on TiO2. The phosphonate group has been chosen to serve as the anchoring moiety while the carboxylic group can be exploited for further coupling with antibacterial peptides. Native oxide-covered polished Ti samples were used as substrates for the molecular deposition. Previous to deposition, the substrates were plasma-cleaned in order to enrich their surfaces of hydroxyl groups, suitable for phosphonate coupling. The combined analysis of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and differential spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements indicates the formation of a submonolayer film made of irregular islands, one molecule thick.

  1. Laser-induced oxidation of titanium substrate: Analysis of the physicochemical structure of the surface and sub-surface layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antończak, Arkadiusz J., E-mail: arkadiusz.antonczak@pwr.edu.pl [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Skowroński, Łukasz; Trzcinski, Marek [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, University of Technology and Life Sciences, Kaliskiego 7, 85-789 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Kinzhybalo, Vasyl V. [Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, Stabłowicka 147, 54-066 Wrocław (Poland); Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Okólna 2, 50-422 Wrocław (Poland); Łazarek, Łukasz K.; Abramski, Krzysztof M. [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Chemical structure of the films induced by laser on titanium surface was analyzed. • It was shown that outer layer of this films consist of oxides doped with nitrogen. • The optical properties of the laser-induced oxynitride films were characterized. • We found that the films demonstrated significant absorption in the band of 300–580 nm. • The morphology of the layers as a function of the laser fluence was investigated. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of the analysis of the complex chemical structure of the layers made on titanium in the process of the heating of its surfaces in an atmospheric environment, by irradiating samples with a nanosecond-pulsed laser. The study was carried out for electroplated, high purity, polycrystalline titanium substrates using a Yb:glass fiber laser. All measurements were made for samples irradiated in a broad range of accumulated fluence, below the ablation threshold. It has been determined how the complex index of refraction of both the oxynitride layers and the substrate vary as a function of accumulated laser fluence. It was also shown that the top layer of the film produced on titanium, which is transparent, is not a pure TiO{sub 2} as had been supposed before. The XPS and XRD analyses confirmed the presence of nitrogen compounds and the existence of nonstoichiometric compounds. By sputtering of the sample's surface using an Ar{sup +} ion gun, the changes in the concentration of individual elements as a function of the layer's cross-section were determined. Lastly, an analysis of the surface morphology has also been carried out, explaining why the layers crack and exfoliate from their substrate.

  2. Experimental Study on Surface Characteristics of Laser Cladding Layer Regulated by High-Frequency Microforging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiang Fang; Zhou, Ju; Qiu, Chang Jun; He, Bin; Ye, Jiang; Yuan, Bo; Pi, Zhengqing

    2011-03-01

    High-frequency microforging technology is used to produce micrometer-scale plastic deformation on the surface of material out of the vibration impact of a forging punch, and the cumulative effect of its various frequencies on micrometer-scale plastic deformation can cause changes of surface microstructure and mechanical properties. This study used (1) a self-made machine to treat NiCrBSi alloy, (2) a mechanical comparator and optical microscopy (OM) to study the geometric characteristics of plastic deformation, (3) OM and scanning electric microscopy (SEM) to observe influence on surface microstructure and cracking behavior of the laser cladding layer under microforging, (4) x-ray diffractometer (XRD) to measure the surface residual stress of laser cladding layer before and after forging, and (5) microhardness tester and wearing experimental machine to study changes of microhardness, friction coefficient, and wear characteristics of laser cladding layer after microforging. The results have shown that high-frequency microforging could produce plastic deformation about 150 μm deep on the surface of NiCrBSi alloy clad by laser. Regular dendrite and eutectic crystallization microstructure, which is a peculiar characteristic of the laser cladding layer, was broken into pieces and formed residual compression residual stress on the surface. Resistance to cracking of laser cladding layer improved greatly, microhardness and wearability increased, and the friction coefficient did not under go a noticeable change.

  3. Spatially-dispersive surface modes on interfaces of layered hyperbolic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Vladislav; Novitsky, Andrey

    2017-09-01

    In this work we present the study of influence of spatial dispersion on the existence of surface modes on the interfaces with multilayered hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs). To that end we employ operator effective medium approximation correcting the Maxwell Garnett approximation. We find out the strong effect of the layer order on the dispersion of surface waves and reveal the dispersion curves missing in the Maxwell Garnett approximation. It is also shown that due to spatial dispersion layered HMMs can sustain TE-polarized surfaces modes.

  4. Effect of surface layer thickness on buckling and vibration of nonlocal nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Kai-Ming; Zhang, Wen-Ming, E-mail: wenmingz@sjtu.edu.cn; Zhong, Zuo-Yang; Peng, Zhi-Ke; Meng, Guang

    2014-01-31

    In this Letter, the buckling and vibration behavior of nonlocal nanowires by incorporating surface elasticity is investigated. A modified core–shell model is developed to depict the size effect of Young's modulus and validated by the reported experimental data. Our results show that the buckling load and natural frequency of nanowires increase when the effect of surface layer thickness is taken into account. Moreover, as the diameter of nanowires is smaller than 50 nm, the influence of surface layer thickness becomes obvious. This work can be helpful in characterizing and predicting the buckling and vibration behavior of NWs.

  5. Structure of the surface layer of the methanogenic archaean Methanosarcina acetivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbing, Mark A; Chan, Sum; Shin, Annie; Phan, Tung; Ahn, Christine J; Rohlin, Lars; Gunsalus, Robert P

    2012-07-17

    Archaea have a self-assembling proteinaceous surface (S-) layer as the primary and outermost boundary of their cell envelopes. The S-layer maintains structural rigidity, protects the organism from adverse environmental elements, and yet provides access to all essential nutrients. We have determined the crystal structure of one of the two "homologous" tandem polypeptide repeats that comprise the Methanosarcina acetivorans S-layer protein and propose a high-resolution model for a microbial S-layer. The molecular features of our hexameric S-layer model recapitulate those visualized by medium resolution electron microscopy studies of microbial S-layers and greatly expand our molecular view of S-layer dimensions, porosity, and symmetry. The S-layer model reveals a negatively charged molecular sieve that presents both a charge and size barrier to restrict access to the cell periplasmic-like space. The β-sandwich folds of the S-layer protein are structurally homologous to eukaryotic virus envelope proteins, suggesting that Archaea and viruses have arrived at a common solution for protective envelope structures. These results provide insight into the evolutionary origins of primitive cell envelope structures, of which the S-layer is considered to be among the most primitive: it also provides a platform for the development of self-assembling nanomaterials with diverse functional and structural properties.

  6. Structure of the surface layer of the methanogenic archaean Methanosarcina acetivorans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbing, Mark A.; Chan, Sum; Shin, Annie; Phan, Tung; Ahn, Christine J.; Rohlin, Lars; Gunsalus, Robert P. (UCLA)

    2012-09-05

    Archaea have a self-assembling proteinaceous surface (S-) layer as the primary and outermost boundary of their cell envelopes. The S-layer maintains structural rigidity, protects the organism from adverse environmental elements, and yet provides access to all essential nutrients. We have determined the crystal structure of one of the two 'homologous' tandem polypeptide repeats that comprise the Methanosarcina acetivorans S-layer protein and propose a high-resolution model for a microbial S-layer. The molecular features of our hexameric S-layer model recapitulate those visualized by medium resolution electron microscopy studies of microbial S-layers and greatly expand our molecular view of S-layer dimensions, porosity, and symmetry. The S-layer model reveals a negatively charged molecular sieve that presents both a charge and size barrier to restrict access to the cell periplasmic-like space. The {beta}-sandwich folds of the S-layer protein are structurally homologous to eukaryotic virus envelope proteins, suggesting that Archaea and viruses have arrived at a common solution for protective envelope structures. These results provide insight into the evolutionary origins of primitive cell envelope structures, of which the S-layer is considered to be among the most primitive: it also provides a platform for the development of self-assembling nanomaterials with diverse functional and structural properties.

  7. Analysis of the cell surface layer ultrastructure of the oral pathogen Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekot, Gerhard; Posch, Gerald; Oh, Yoo Jin; Zayni, Sonja; Mayer, Harald F; Pum, Dietmar; Messner, Paul; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Schäffer, Christina

    2012-06-01

    The Gram-negative oral pathogen Tannerella forsythia is decorated with a 2D crystalline surface (S-) layer, with two different S-layer glycoprotein species being present. Prompted by the predicted virulence potential of the S-layer, this study focused on the analysis of the arrangement of the individual S-layer glycoproteins by a combination of microscopic, genetic, and biochemical analyses. The two S-layer genes are transcribed into mRNA and expressed into protein in equal amounts. The S-layer was investigated on intact bacterial cells by transmission electron microscopy, by immune fluorescence microscopy, and by atomic force microscopy. The analyses of wild-type cells revealed a distinct square S-layer lattice with an overall lattice constant of 10.1 ± 0.7 nm. In contrast, a blurred lattice with a lattice constant of 9.0 nm was found on S-layer single-mutant cells. This together with in vitro self-assembly studies using purified (glyco)protein species indicated their increased structural flexibility after self-assembly and/or impaired self-assembly capability. In conjunction with TEM analyses of thin-sectioned cells, this study demonstrates the unusual case that two S-layer glycoproteins are co-assembled into a single S-layer. Additionally, flagella and pilus-like structures were observed on T. forsythia cells, which might impact the pathogenicity of this bacterium.

  8. Dynamics of cathode spots in low-pressure arc plasma removing oxide layer on steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Z. L.; Yang, K.; Liu, H. X.; Zhang, Y. C.; Li, H.; Zhu, X. D.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of cathode spots has been investigated in low-pressure arc plasma for removing oxide layer on low carbon steel surfaces. The motion of cathode spots was observed with a high speed camera, and the arc voltage was analyzed by fast Fourier transform. The spots move on clean steel surface as a random walk, and the low-frequency components dominated the voltage waveform. However, the spots on steel surfaces with oxide layer tend to burn on the rim of the eroded area formed in the previous arcing, and the low-frequency components decrease correspondingly. The "color" of the colored random noise for arc voltage varies from the approximate brown noise for clean steel surface to pink noise for thick oxide layer, where the edge effect of boundary is considered to play a significant role.

  9. Measurements of surface layer of the articular cartilage using microscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryniewicz, A. M; Ryniewicz, W. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Robotics, University of Mining and Metallurgy, A. Mickiewicz Av. 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Ryniewicz, A.; Gaska, A., E-mail: anna@ryniewicz.p, E-mail: andrzej@ryniewicz.p [Laboratory of Coordinate Metrology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cracow University of Technology, Jana Pawla II Av. 37, 31-864 Cracow (Poland)

    2010-07-01

    The articular cartilage is the structure that directly cooperates tribologically in biobearing. It belongs to the connective tissues and in the joints it assumes two basic forms: hyaline cartilage that builds joint surfaces and fibrocartilage which may create joint surfaces. From this fibrocartilage are built semilunar cartilage and joint disc are built as well. The research of articular cartilage have been done in macro, micro and nano scale. In all these measurement areas characteristic features occur which can identify biobearing tribology. The aim of the research was the identification of surface layer of articular cartilage by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atom force microscopy (AFM) and the analysis of topography of these layers. The material used in the research of surface layer was the animal articular cartilage: hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage.

  10. A New Approach in Designing Multi-Layer Frequency Selective Surfaces based on Tuning Pole-Zeros of Individual Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Fallah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new approach (not new technique is introduced for designing frequency selective surfaces (FSSs. We try to compose the desired frequency response using the frequency response of each constituent FSS. Also, a new dual-band miniaturized frequency selective surface is proposed. In contrast to the conventional FSS design technique, the presented structure takes advantage of non-resonance elements and has unit cells with a miniaturized dimension. The proposed FSS cells are composed of two complex and inductive planes that act as a dual-band filter through the pass of electromagnetic wave propagation. The performance of this structure toward various angles of incident waves and different polarizations is stable.

  11. Structural analysis of nitride layer formed on uranium metal by glow plasma surface nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Kezhao, E-mail: liukz@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Bin Ren [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Xiao Hong [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China); Long Zhong [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Hong Zhanglian, E-mail: hong_zhanglian@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yang Hui [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wu Sheng [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nitride layer was formed on uranium by glow plasma surface nitriding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four zones were observed in the nitride layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The chemical states of uranium, nitrogen, and oxygen were identified by AES. - Abstract: The nitride layer was formed on uranium metal by a glow plasma surface nitriding method. The structure and composition of the layer were investigated by X-ray diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. The nitride layer mainly consisted of {alpha}-phase U{sub 2}N{sub 3} nanocrystals with an average grain size about 10-20 nm. Four zones were identified in the layer, which were the oxide surface zone, the nitride mainstay zone, the oxide-existence interface zone, and the nitrogen-diffusion matrix zone. The gradual decrease of binding energies of uranium revealed the transition from oxide to nitride to metal states with the layer depth, while the chemical states of nitrogen and oxygen showed small variation.

  12. Surface deformation and geoid anomalies over single and double-layered convective systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, M.; Yuen, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Using a primitive variable formulation of the finite-element method, the differences in the surface observables, such as topography and geoid, produced by single- and double-layered thermal convection, were compared. Both constant and depth-dependent viscosities have been considered. For the same Rayleigh number, larger surface perturbations are produced by single-cell convection. For the same Nusselt number, the magnitudes of the surface observables are greater for double-layered convection. For the same surface heat-flux, surface topographies have similar magnitudes, but the relative amplitudes of geoid anomalies depend greatly on the style of viscosity stratification. This difference in the geoid between the two systems increases with greater surface heat-flow, regardless of viscosity structure.

  13. Seasonality of submesoscale flows in the ocean surface boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Christian E.; Naveira Garabato, Alberto C.; Thompson, Andrew F.; Brannigan, Liam; Lazar, Ayah; Marshall, David P.; George Nurser, A. J.; Damerell, Gillian; Heywood, Karen J.; Belcher, Stephen E.

    2016-03-01

    A signature of submesoscale flows in the upper ocean is skewness in the distribution of relative vorticity. Expected to result for high Rossby number flows, such skewness has implications for mixing, dissipation, and stratification within the upper ocean. An array of moorings deployed in the Northeast Atlantic for 1 year as part of the experiment of the Ocean Surface Mixing, Ocean Submesoscale Interaction Study (OSMOSIS) reveals that relative vorticity is positively skewed during winter even though the scale of the Rossby number is less than 0.5. Furthermore, this skewness is reduced to zero during spring and autumn. There is also evidence of modest seasonal variations in the gradient Rossby number. The proposed mechanism by which relative vorticity is skewed is that the ratio of lateral to vertical buoyancy gradients, as summarized by the inverse gradient Richardson number, restricts its range during winter but less so at other times of the year. These results support recent observations and model simulations suggesting that the upper ocean is host to a seasonal cycle in submesoscale turbulence.

  14. Thermocouple Rakes for Measuring Boundary Layer Flows Extremely Close to Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Martin, Lisa C.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    Of vital interest to aerodynamic researchers is precise knowledge of the flow velocity profile next to the surface. This information is needed for turbulence model development and the calculation of viscous shear force. Though many instruments can determine the flow velocity profile near the surface, none of them can make measurements closer than approximately 0.01 in. from the surface. The thermocouple boundary-layer rake can measure much closer to the surface than conventional instruments can, such as a total pressure boundary layer rake, hot wire, or hot film. By embedding the sensors (thermocouples) in the region where the velocity is equivalent to the velocity ahead of a constant thickness strut, the boundary-layer flow profile can be obtained. The present device fabricated at the NASA Glenn Research Center microsystem clean room has a heater made of platinum and thermocouples made of platinum and gold. Equal numbers of thermocouples are placed both upstream and downstream of the heater, so that the voltage generated by each pair at the same distance from the surface is indicative of the difference in temperature between the upstream and downstream thermocouple locations. This voltage differential is a function of the flow velocity, and like the conventional total pressure rake, it can provide the velocity profile. In order to measure flow extremely close to the surface, the strut is made of fused quartz with extremely low heat conductivity. A large size thermocouple boundary layer rake is shown in the following photo. The latest medium size sensors already provide smooth velocity profiles well into the boundary layer, as close as 0.0025 in. from the surface. This is about 4 times closer to the surface than the previously used total pressure rakes. This device also has the advantage of providing the flow profile of separated flow and also it is possible to measure simultaneous turbulence levels within the boundary layer.

  15. Surface roughness and dislocation density in InP/InGaAs layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Denis P.; Laframboise, Sylvain

    2004-12-01

    A subtle roughening of the surface of a buried 60 nm InGaAs epitaxial layer was detected using a combination of sample cleaving, selective chemical etching and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). In our technology, InGaAs is the photo-absorbing layer of Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) grown layers used in the monolithic integration of active photo detectors and a passive mux/demux. Conventional Photo-Luminescence (PL) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques used to monitor and optimize the growth of epitaxial layers did not show this microscopic surface roughness. The appearance of roughness in the InGaAs layer was linked to very large changes in the dislocation density of the layers grown over the rough surface. Increases of up to three orders of magnitude in the Etch Pit Density (EPD from 104 to 107 cm-2) were revealed using a standard Huber Etch. The Huber Etch also showed the preferred formation of "pairs" of dislocations threading out from a common point on the rough InGaAs surface. Changes in growth conditions resulted in the complete elimination of roughness and of excessive dislocation densities

  16. Bubbles & Turbulence in the Ocean Surface Layer & Topographic Interactions in Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    key factors we identify as crucial to an understanding of near surface turbulence and mixing in a wind driven sea : wave breaking frequency, bubble ... Bubbles & Turbulence in the Ocean Surface Layer & Topographic Interactions in Coastal Waters David Farmer Institute of Ocean Sciences 9860 West...near surface of the ocean, including the role of bubbles in mediating and serving as tracers of such processes; (ii) To elucidate the fluid dynamical

  17. Diffusion of C and Cr During Creation of Surface Layer on Cast Steel Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szajnar J.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In paper a method of improvement in utility properties of unalloyed cast steel casting in result of diffusion of C and Cr in process of creation of surface layer is presented. The aim of paper was determination of diffusion range of basic elements of alloyed surface layer. Moreover a quantitative analysis of carbides phase strengthens alloyed surface layer of casting was carried out. The results of studies shown that important factors of surface layer creation are maximal temperature Tmax on granular insert – cast steel boundary dependent of pouring temperature, granularity Zw of Fe-Cr-C alloy insert and thickness of casting wall gśo. On the basis of obtained results was affirmed that with increase of thickness of casting wall increases range of diffusion in solid state in Fe-Cr-C grains and in liquid state. Moreover the range of Tmax = 13001500oC favours creation of the proper alloyed surface layers on cast steel.

  18. Relevance of glycosylation of S-layer proteins for cell surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2015-06-01

    Elucidating the building principles and intrinsic features modulating certain water-associated processes (e.g., surface roughness in the nanometer scale, surface hydration and accompanied antifouling property, etc.) of surface structures from (micro)organisms is nowadays a highly challenging task in fields like microbiology, biomimetic engineering and (bio)material sciences. Here, we show for the first time the recrystallization of the wild-type S-layer glycoprotein wtSgsE from Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a and its recombinantly produced non-glycosylated form, rSgsE, on gold sensor surfaces. Whereas the proteinaceous lattice of the S-layer proteins is forming a rigid layer on the sensor surface, the glycan chains are developing an overall soft, highly dissipative film. Interestingly, to the wtSgsE lattice almost twice the amount of water is bound and/or coupled in comparison with the non-glycosylated rSgsE with the preferred region being the extending glycan residues. The present results are discussed in terms of the effect of the glycan residues on the recrystallization, the adjoining hydration layer, and the nanoscale roughness and fluidic behavior. The latter features may turn out to be one of the most general ones among bacterial and archaeal S-layer lattices.

  19. A quality-control procedure for surface temperature and surface layer inversion in the XBT data archive from the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Ghosh, A.K.; Pattanaik, J.; Ratnakaran, L.

    and surface layer temperature inversion. XBT surface temperatrues (XST) are compared with the surface temperature from simultaneous CTD observations from four cruises and the former were found to be erroneous in a number of stations. XSTs are usually corrected...

  20. Surface (S)-layer proteins of Deinococcus radiodurans and their utility as vehicles for surface localization of functional proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Chitra Seetharam; Basu, Bhakti; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The radiation resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans contains two major surface (S)-layer proteins, Hpi and SlpA. The Hpi protein was shown to (a) undergo specific in vivo cleavage, and (b) closely associate with the SlpA protein. Using a non-specific acid phosphatase from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, PhoN as a reporter, the Surface Layer Homology (SLH) domain of SlpA was shown to bind deinococcal peptidoglycan-containing cell wall sacculi. The association of SlpA with Hpi on one side and peptidoglycan on the other, localizes this protein in the 'interstitial' layer of the deinoccocal cell wall. Gene chimeras of hpi-phoN and slh-phoN were constructed to test efficacy of S-layer proteins, as vehicles for cell surface localization in D. radiodurans. The Hpi-PhoN protein localized exclusively in the membrane fraction, and displayed cell-based phosphatase activity in vivo. The SLH-PhoN, which localized to both cytosolic and membrane fractions, displayed in vitro activity but no cell-based in vivo activity. Hpi, therefore, emerged as an efficient surface localizing protein and can be exploited for suitable applications of this superbug.