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Sample records for surface spectroscopic techniques

  1. New Surface Brightness Fluctuations Spectroscopic Technique: NGC4449 and its Stellar Tidal Stream

    CERN Document Server

    Toloba, Elisa; Romanowsky, Aaron; Brodie, Jean; Martinez-Delgado, David; Arnold, Jacob; Ramachandran, Neel; Theakanath, Kuriakose

    2016-01-01

    We present a new spectroscopic technique based in part on targeting the upward fluctuations of the surface brightness for studying the internal stellar kinematics and metallicities of low surface brightness galaxies and streams beyond the Local Group. The distance to these systems makes them unsuitable for targeting individual red giant branch (RGB) stars (tip of RGB at $I\\gtrsim24$~mag) and their surface brightness is too low ($\\mu_r\\gtrsim 25$~mag~arcsec$^{-2}$) for integrated light spectroscopic measurements. This technique overcomes these two problems by targeting individual objects that are brighter than the tip of the RGB. We apply this technique to the star-forming dwarf galaxy NGC 4449 and its stellar stream. We use Keck/DEIMOS data to measure the line-of-sight radial velocity out to $\\sim7$~kpc in the East side of the galaxy and $\\sim8$~kpc along the stream. We find that the two systems are likely gravitationally bound to each other and have heliocentric radial velocities of $227.3\\pm10.7$~km/s and $...

  2. Planetary Surface Analysis Using Fast Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Combined Microscopic Raman, LIBS, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman, G. R.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ exploration of planetary surfaces has to date required multiple techniques that, when used together, yield important information about their formation histories and evolution. We present a time-resolved laser spectroscopic technique that could potentially collect complementary sets of data providing information on mineral structure, composition, and hydration state. Using a picosecond-scale pulsed laser and a fast time-resolved detector we can simultaneously collect spectra from Raman, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), and fluorescence emissions that are separated in time due to the unique decay times of each process. The use of a laser with high rep rate (40 KHz) and low pulse energy (1 μJ/pulse) allows us to rapidly collect high signal to noise Raman spectra while minimizing sample damage. Increasing the pulse energy by about an order of magnitude creates a microscopic plasma near the surface and enables the collection of LIBS spectra at an unusually high rep rate and low pulse energy. Simultaneously, broader fluorescence peaks can be detected with lifetimes varying from nanosecond to microsecond. We will present Raman, LIBS, and fluorescence spectra obtained on natural mineral samples such as sulfates, clays, pyroxenes and carbonates that are of interest for Mars mineralogy. We demonstrate this technique using a photocathode-based streak camera detector as well as a newly-developed solid state Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) sensor array based on Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. We will discuss the impact of system design and detector choice on science return of a potential planetary surface mission, with a specific focus on size, weight, power, and complexity. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  3. Analysis of corrosion layers in ancient Roman silver coins with high resolution surface spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keturakis, Christopher J. [Operando Molecular Spectroscopy and Catalysis Research Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Notis, Ben [Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 02453 (United States); Blenheim, Alex [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, College Park, PA 16802 (United States); Miller, Alfred C.; Pafchek, Rob [Zettlemoyer Center for Surface Studies, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Notis, Michael R., E-mail: mrn1@lehigh.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Wachs, Israel E., E-mail: iew0@lehigh.edu [Operando Molecular Spectroscopy and Catalysis Research Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Five ancient silver alloy coins (225 BCE–244 CE) were analyzed using surface characterization techniques. • Both destructive and non-destructive surface characterization methods were developed. • Alloying with copper, even in small amounts, leads to the formation of an outer Cu{sub 2}O corrosion layer. - Abstract: Determination of the microchemistry of surface corrosion layers on ancient silver alloy coins is important both in terms of understanding the nature of archaeological environmental conditions to which these ancient coins were exposed and also to help in their conservation. In this present study, five ancient silver alloy coins (225 BCE–244 CE) were used as test vehicles to measure their immediate surface microchemistry and evaluate the appropriateness and limitations of High Sensitivity-Low Energy Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (HS-LEIS, 0.3 nm depth analysis), High Resolution-X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HR-XPS, 1–3 nm depth analysis) and High Resolution-Raman Spectroscopy (HR-Raman, ∼1000 nm depth analysis). Additional information about the deeper corrosion layers, up to ∼300–1000 nm, was provided by dynamic HS-LEIS and HR-Raman spectroscopy. While not archeologically significant, the use of these coins of small commercial value provides data that is more representative of the weaker signals typically obtained from ancient corroded objects, which can be in stark contrast to pristine data often obtained from carefully prepared alloys of known composition. The oldest coins, from 225 to 214 BCE, possessed an outermost surface layer containing Cu{sub 2}O, Na, Al, Pb, and adsorbed hydrocarbons, while the more recent coins, from 98 to 244 CE, contained Cu{sub 2}O, Ag, N, F, Na, Al, S, Cl, and adsorbed hydrocarbons in similar corresponding surface layers. It thus appears that alloying with copper, even in small amounts, leads to the formation of an outer Cu{sub 2}O layer. Depth profiling revealed the presence of K, Na, Cl, and

  4. Structural and spectroscopic studies of surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Laitenberger, P

    1996-01-01

    and on a 10ML thick Ar spacer layer, a remarkable substrate dependence is revealed. A new STM-based technique for fabricating simple metal-structures with dimensions in the 10-100nm regime which are partially electrically isolated from their environment was developed in collaboration with Dr. L. A. Silva. This technique employs the STM tip as a mechanical nanofabrication tool to machine gaps into a thin metallic film deposited on an insulating substrate, which laterally confine and electrically isolate the desired metal regions. Several metal structures, such as nanoscale wires and pads, were successfully created. Finally, the conceptual basis and present stage of construction of a new surface analytical tool, the Scanning Probe Energy Loss Spectrometer (SPELS), is discussed. The SPELS offers the exciting prospect of collecting structural as well as spectroscopic information with a spatial resolution of a few nanometres. Once successfully developed, it will be ideally suited for spectroscopic studies of nanos...

  5. Immobilization of oligonucleotide probes on silicon surfaces using biotin–streptavidin system examined with microscopic and spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awsiuk, K., E-mail: kamil.awsiuk@uj.edu.pl [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Rysz, J. [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Petrou, P. [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety, NCSR “Demokritos”, End Patriarchou Gregoriou Str., Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece); Budkowski, A. [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Bernasik, A. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Kakabakos, S. [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety, NCSR “Demokritos”, End Patriarchou Gregoriou Str., Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece); Marzec, M.M. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, Kraków 30-059 (Poland); Raptis, I. [Institute for Advanced Materials, Physicochemical Processes, Nanotechnology and Microsystems, NCSR “Demokritos”, End Patriarchou Gregoriou Str., Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece)

    2014-01-30

    To immobilize effectively oligonucleotide probes on SiO{sub 2} modified with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, four procedures based on streptavidin–biotin system are compared with Atomic Force Microscopy, Angle-Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. The first approach involves: adsorption of biotinylated Bovine Serum Albumin, blocking free surface sites with BSA, binding of streptavidin and biotinylated oligonucleotide (b-oligo). Final steps are exchanged in the second procedure with immobilization of preformed streptavidin–b-oligo conjugate. The third approach consists of streptavidin adsorption, blocking with BSA and b-oligo binding. Finally, streptavidin–b-oligo conjugate is immobilized directly within the fourth method. Surface coverage with biomolecules, determined from ARXPS, accords with average AFM height, and is anti-correlated with the intensity of Si+ ions. Higher biomolecular coverage was achieved during the last steps of the first (2.45(±0.38) mg/m{sup 2}) and second (1.31(±0.22) mg/m{sup 2}) approach, as compared to lower surface density resulting from the third (0.58(±0.20) mg/m{sup 2}) and fourth (0.41(±0.11) mg/m{sup 2}) method. Phosphorus atomic concentration indicates effectiveness of oligonucleotide immobilization. Secondary ions intensities, characteristic for oligonucleotides, streptavidin, BSA, and proteins, allow additional insight into overlayer composition. These measurements verify the ARXPS results and show the superiority of the first two immobilization approaches in terms of streptavidin and oligonucleotide density achieved onto the surface.

  6. Surface science techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Gianangelo

    2013-01-01

    The book describes the experimental techniques employed to study surfaces and interfaces. The emphasis is on the experimental method. Therefore all chapters start with an introduction of the scientific problem, the theory necessary to understand how the technique works and how to understand the results. Descriptions of real experimental setups, experimental results at different systems are given to show both the strength and the limits of the technique. In a final part the new developments and possible extensions of the techniques are presented. The included techniques provide microscopic as well as macroscopic information. They cover most of the techniques used in surface science.

  7. A comparative study of the inhibition effects of benzotriazole and 6-aniline-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-dithiol monosodium salt on the corrosion of copper by potentiodynamic polarization, AC impedance and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guoding; Cai, Shengmin; Song, Liqun; Yang, Huaquan; Fujishima, A.; Ibrahim, A.; Lee, Y. G.; Loo, B. H.

    1991-11-01

    The inhibition effects of benzotriazole (BTA) and 6-aniline-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-dithiol (ATD) monosodium salt on copper corrosion have been studied by the potentiodynamic polarization, AC impedance and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic techniques. The polarization resistance Rp increases with the concentration of either BTA or ATD. From the plots of the phase shift θ versus logarithm of the frequency, it is found that θ is close to 90° after the copper electrode is immersed for a long period of time in BTA-containing solution which indicates the behavior of an ideal capacitor. In ATD-containing solutions, θ is close to 45 ° which shows the appearance of a Warburg impedance for a diffusion process. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of the competitive adsorption of BTA and ATD on copper surfaces indicate that BTA adsorbs better than ATD. Based on these results, it is concluded that the inhibition action of BTA is better than that of ATD.

  8. A Comparison of Galaxy Counting Techniques in Spectroscopically Undersampled Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specian, Mike A.; Szalay, Alex S.

    2016-11-01

    Accurate measures of galactic overdensities are invaluable for precision cosmology. Obtaining these measurements is complicated when members of one’s galaxy sample lack radial depths, most commonly derived via spectroscopic redshifts. In this paper, we utilize the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s Main Galaxy Sample to compare seven methods of counting galaxies in cells when many of those galaxies lack redshifts. These methods fall into three categories: assigning galaxies discrete redshifts, scaling the numbers counted using regions’ spectroscopic completeness properties, and employing probabilistic techniques. We split spectroscopically undersampled regions into three types—those inside the spectroscopic footprint, those outside but adjacent to it, and those distant from it. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that the preferred counting techniques are a function of region type, cell size, and redshift. We conclude by reporting optimal counting strategies under a variety of conditions.

  9. Surface science techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Walls, JM

    2013-01-01

    This volume provides a comprehensive and up to the minute review of the techniques used to determine the nature and composition of surfaces. Originally published as a special issue of the Pergamon journal Vacuum, it comprises a carefully edited collection of chapters written by specialists in each of the techniques and includes coverage of the electron and ion spectroscopies, as well as the atom-imaging methods such as the atom probe field ion microscope and the scanning tunnelling microscope. Surface science is an important area of study since the outermost surface layers play a crucial role

  10. Spectroscopic Measurement Techniques for Aerospace Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Craig T.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Hurley, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    The conditions that characterize aerospace flows are so varied, that a single diagnostic technique is not sufficient for its measurement. Fluid dynamists use knowledge of similarity to help categorize and focus on different flow conditions. For example, the Reynolds number represents the ratio of inertial to viscous forces in a flow. When the velocity scales, length scales, and gas density are large and the magnitude of the molecular viscosity is low, the Reynolds number becomes large. This corresponds to large scale vehicles (e.g Airbus A380), fast moving objects (e.g. artillery projectiles), vehicles in dense fluids (e.g. submarine in water), or flows with low dynamic viscosity (e.g. skydiver in air). In each of these cases, the inertial forces dominate viscous forces, and unsteady turbulent fluctuations in the flow variables are observed. In contrast, flows with small length scales (e.g. dispersion of micro-particles in a solid rocket nozzle), slow moving objects (e.g. micro aerial vehicles), flows with low density gases (e.g. atmospheric re-entry), or fluids with a large magnitude of viscosity (e.g. engine coolant flow), all have low Reynolds numbers. In these cases, viscous forces become very important and often the flows can be steady and laminar. The Mach number, which is the ratio of the velocity to the speed of sound in the medium, also helps to differentiate types of flows. At very low Mach numbers, acoustic waves travel much faster than the object, and the flow can be assumed to be incompressible (e.g. Cessna 172 aircraft). As the object speed approaches the speed of sound, the gas density can become variable (e.g. flow over wing of Learjet 85). When the object speed is higher than the speed of sound (Ma > 1), the presences of shock waves and other gas dynamic features can become important to the vehicle performance (e.g. SR-71 Blackbird). In the hypersonic flow regime (Ma > 5), large changes in temperature begin to affect flow properties, causing real

  11. An investigation of the chemical and physical properties of pristine, electrochromically damaged, and photochromically damaged KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) using surface analytical and optical spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quagliano, J.R.; Petrin, R.R.; Trujillo, T.C.; Cockroft, N.J.; Paffett, M.T.; Havrilla, G.; Maggiore, C.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jacco, J.C. [Philips Components, Saugerties, NY (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Single-crystal KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) is widely used as a nonlinear optical material in optics and lasers, but it can suffer irreversible damage from intense electric and electromagnetic fields; impurities, defects, vacancies, and electron/hole transfers are probably involved. This report shows results of surface and near-surface (bulk) studies using SIMS, Rutherford backscattering, PIXE, channeling, and XRF. The electrochromic damage may occur upon reduction of Ti{sup 4+} to Ti{sup 3+} by trapping electrons passing through the ion channels. Jahn-Teller distortions and Ti{sup 3+} absorption could produce the dark macroscopi damage. The claim that Ag ions could travel through the ion channels, is discounted by the RBS and SIMS data. RBS does suggest Ti ion migration, but this is not likely, according to the KTP structure and lack of Ti ion enhancement in the white residue. The 355 nm radiation could be absorbed into the UV band edge to inititate a photochemical process (gray tracking), which could be the charge transfer from the oxide ligand to Ti{sup 4+} to create Ti{sup 3+}.

  12. The Vegetation Red Edge Spectroscopic Feature as a Surface Biomarker

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S

    2002-01-01

    The search for Earth-like extrasolar planets is in part motivated by the potential detection of spectroscopic biomarkers. Spectroscopic biomarkers are spectral features that are either consistent with life, indicative of habitability, or provide clues to a planet's habitability. Most attention so far has been given to atmospheric biomarkers, gases such as O2, O3, H2O, CO, and CH4. Here we discuss surface biomarkers. Surface biomarkers that have large, distinct, abrupt changes in their spectra may be detectable in an extrasolar planet's spectrum at wavelengths that penetrate to the planetary surface. Earth has such a surface biomarker: the vegetation "red edge" spectroscopic feature. Recent interest in Earth's surface biomarker has motivated Earthshine observations of the spatially unresolved Earth and two recent studies may have detected the vegetation red edge feature in Earth's hemispherically integrated spectrum. A photometric time series in different colors should help in detecting unusual surface feature...

  13. Atmospheric trace gases monitoring by UV-vis spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Pinhua; Li, Ang; Wu, Fengcheng; Qin, Min; Hu, Rezhi; Xu, Jin; Si, Fuqi; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2016-04-01

    Due to rapidly economic development, air pollution has become an important issue in China. Phenomena such as regional haze in winter and high O3 concentration in summer are strongly related to increasing trace species. For better understanding the air pollution formation, it is necessary to know spatial and temporal distribution of trace species in the atmosphere. UV-vis spectroscopic techniques are of great advantages for trace species monitoring to meet several requirements, e.g. versatility, high sensitivity, good temporal resolution and field applicability. We have studied and developed various trace gases monitoring techniques and instruments based on UV-vis spectroscopic technique for in-situ measurements and remote sensing, e.g. LP-DOAS, IBBCEAS, CRDS, MAX-DOAS and mobile DOAS for NO2, SO2, HCHO, HONO, NO3, and N2O5 etc. The principle, instrumentation and inversion algorithm are presented. As typical applications of these techniques, investigation of the evolution of HONO and NO3 radicals over Beijing area, measurements of regional pollution in NCP and YRD are discussed in the aspects of HONO and nocturnal NO3 radical characteristics, trace gases (NO2, SO2 etc.) temporal and spatial distribution, pollution transport pathway, emission sources.

  14. Application of optical spectroscopic techniques for disease diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Anushree

    Optical spectroscopy, a truly non-invasive tool for remote diagnostics, is capable of providing valuable information on the structure and function of molecules. However, most spectroscopic techniques suffer from drawbacks, which limit their application. As a part of my dissertation work, I have developed theoretical and experimental methods to address the above mentioned issues. I have successfully applied these methods for monitoring the physical, chemical and biochemical parameters of biomolecules involved in some specific life threatening diseases like lead poisoning and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). I presented optical studies of melanosomes, which are one of the vital organelles in the human eye, also known to be responsible for a disease called age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a condition of advanced degeneration which causes progressive blindness. I used Raman spectroscopy, to first chemically identify the composition of melanosome, and then monitor the changes in its functional and chemical behavior due to long term exposure to visible light. The above study, apart from explaining the role of melanosomes in AMD, also sets the threshold power for lasers used in surgeries and other clinical applications. In the second part of my dissertation, a battery of spectroscopic techniques was successfully applied to explore the different binding sites of lead ions with the most abundant carrier protein molecule in our circulatory system, human serum albumin. I applied optical spectroscopic tools for ultrasensitive detection of heavy metal ions in solution which can also be used for lead detection at a very early stage of lead poisoning. Apart from this, I used Raman microspectroscopy to study the chemical alteration occurring inside a prostate cancer cell as a result of a treatment with a low concentrated aqueous extract of a prospective drug, Nerium Oleander. The experimental methods used in this study has tremendous potential for clinical

  15. Surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopic waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascola, Robert J; McWhorter, Christopher S; Murph, Simona H

    2015-04-14

    A waveguide for use with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is provided that includes a base structure with an inner surface that defines a cavity and that has an axis. Multiple molecules of an analyte are capable of being located within the cavity at the same time. A base layer is located on the inner surface of the base structure. The base layer extends in an axial direction along an axial length of an excitation section. Nanoparticles are carried by the base layer and may be uniformly distributed along the entire axial length of the excitation section. A flow cell for introducing analyte and excitation light into the waveguide and a method of applying nanoparticles may also be provided.

  16. Surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopic waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascola, Robert J; McWhorter, Christopher S; Murph, Simona H

    2015-04-14

    A waveguide for use with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is provided that includes a base structure with an inner surface that defines a cavity and that has an axis. Multiple molecules of an analyte are capable of being located within the cavity at the same time. A base layer is located on the inner surface of the base structure. The base layer extends in an axial direction along an axial length of an excitation section. Nanoparticles are carried by the base layer and may be uniformly distributed along the entire axial length of the excitation section. A flow cell for introducing analyte and excitation light into the waveguide and a method of applying nanoparticles may also be provided.

  17. New Developments of Broadband Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, A.; Zhao, D.; Linnartz, H.; Ubachs, W.

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, cavity enhanced spectroscopic techniques, such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), and broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS), have been widely employed as ultra-sensitive methods for the measurement of weak absorptions and in the real-time detection of trace species. In this contribution, we introduce two new cavity enhanced spectroscopic concepts: a) Optomechanical shutter modulated BBCEAS, a variant of BBCEAS capable of measuring optical absorption in pulsed systems with typically low duty cycles. In conventional BBCEAS applications, the latter substantially reduces the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), consequently also reducing the detection sensitivity. To overcome this, we incorporate a fast optomechanical shutter as a time gate, modulating the detection scheme of BBCEAS and increasing the effective duty cycle reaches a value close to unity. This extends the applications of BBCEAS into pulsed samples and also in time-resolved studies. b) Cavity enhanced self-absorption spectroscopy (CESAS), a new spectroscopic concept capable of studying light emitting matter (plasma, flames, combustion samples) simultaneously in absorption and emission. In CESAS, a sample (plasma, flame or combustion source) is located in an optically stable cavity consisting of two high reflectivity mirrors, and here it acts both as light source and absorbing medium. A high detection sensitivity of weak absorption is reached without the need of an external light source, such as a laser or broadband lamp. The performance is illustrated by the first CESAS result on a supersonically expanding hydrocarbon plasma. We expect CESAS to become a generally applicable analytical tool for real time and in situ diagnostics. A. Walsh, D. Zhao, W. Ubachs, H. Linnartz, J. Phys. Chem. A, {dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp310392n}, in press, 2013. A. Walsh, D. Zhao, H. Linnartz Rev. Sci. Instrum. {84}(2), 021608 2013. A. Walsh, D. Zhao

  18. 基于SERS光谱的银溶胶溶液中腺嘌呤的定量分析%Quantitative Analysis with Adenine in Silver Colloidal Sol by Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Spectroscopic Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯小平; 曹晓卫; 汪佳俐; 李玲; 张志学

    2012-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopic technique was used to perform quantitative analyses with adenine, an important basic group from nucleic acid, by using silver colloidal sol as the SERS substrate. Sodium polyacrylate was added into the silver colloidal sol in order to improve its stability. In addition, during different SERS measurements, pyridine was used an internal standard to eliminate the impact of the variations in laser power, optical alignment and focusing on the SERS signal intensity of the an-alyte. It reveals that a good linear relationship is presented between the concentration of adenine and the characteristic SERS signal intensity ratio of the analyte adenine (733 cm-1) to the internal standard pyridine (1003 cm-1) in the range of 1× 10-4~1× 10-3mol ·L-1.%碱基是构成核酸的物质基础.碱基的含量分析对于生物体的生理活动及新陈代谢过程研究具有重要意义.本文利用表面增强拉曼散射(SERS)光谱技术研究了腺嘌呤在相对稳定的银溶胶溶液中的SERS光谱信号强度与浓度的定量关系.研究表明添加聚合物作为稳定剂的银溶胶具有良好的稳定性.进一步研究表明,在1×10-4~1×10-2mol·L-1的浓度范围内,以吡啶作为内标,分析物腺嘌呤与内标物特征谱峰强度之比与腺嘌呤的浓度之间呈现良好的线性关系.

  19. Modern techniques of surface science

    CERN Document Server

    Woodruff, D Phil

    2016-01-01

    This fully revised, updated and reorganised third edition provides a thorough introduction to the characterisation techniques used in surface science and nanoscience today. Each chapter brings together and compares the different techniques used to address a particular research question, including how to determine the surface composition, surface structure, surface electronic structure, surface microstructure at different length scales (down to sub-molecular), and the molecular character of adsorbates and their adsorption or reaction properties. Readers will easily understand the relative strengths and limitations of the techniques available to them and, ultimately, will be able to select the most suitable techniques for their own particular research purposes. This is an essential resource for researchers and practitioners performing materials analysis, and for senior undergraduate students looking to gain a clear understanding of the underlying principles and applications of the different characterisation tec...

  20. Surface analysis the principal techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Vickerman, John C

    2009-01-01

    This completely updated and revised second edition of Surface Analysis: The Principal Techniques, deals with the characterisation and understanding of the outer layers of substrates, how they react, look and function which are all of interest to surface scientists. Within this comprehensive text, experts in each analysis area introduce the theory and practice of the principal techniques that have shown themselves to be effective in both basic research and in applied surface analysis. Examples of analysis are provided to facilitate the understanding of this topic and to show readers how they c

  1. Spectroscopic photothermal radiometry as a deep subsurface depth profilometric technique in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, D.; Mandelis, A.

    2003-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental aspects of spectroscopic photothermal radiometry (PTR) of semiconductors are presented and the potential of the technique for depth profilometry is established. A three-dimensional model of the PTR signal from a semiconductor excited by light of arbitrary optical penetration depth is presented. Numerical simulations of the PTR response to the electronic transport parameters and the optical penetration depth of the excitation source are presented. Intensity-modulated frequency scans and two-dimensional surface scans at fixed frequencies have been performed at several different absorption depths on a Si wafer with various degrees of mechanical damage introduced to either the front or the back surface. The electronic transport parameters obtained from fitting the frequency scans to the theoretical model and analysis of the experimental curves show that while the surface recombination velocities extracted from the fits do not vary significantly with excitation wavelength, the carrier recombination lifetime and the overall sensitivity of the photothermal radiometric signal to spatially localized damage is strongly influenced by the proximity of the injected excess carrier density centroid to the defect location. This correlation between the sensitivity of the PTR signal to a localized defect and the proximity of the injected carriers to the defect demonstrates the potential for spectroscopic PTR as a depth profilometric technique for semiconductors.

  2. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopic techniques as applied to Channelrhodopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglof eRitter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Among optogenetic tools, channelrhodopsins, the light gated ion channels of the plasma membrane from green algae, play the most important role. Properties like channel selectivity, timing parameters or color can be influenced by the exchange of selected amino acids. Although widely used, in the field of neurosciences for example, there is still little known about their photocycles and the mechanism of ion channel gating and conductance. One of the preferred methods for these studies is infrared spectroscopy since it allows observation of proteins and their function at a molecular level and in near-native environment. The absorption of a photon in channelrhodopsin leads to retinal isomerization within femtoseconds, the conductive states are reached in the microsecond time scale and the return into the fully dark-adapted state may take more than minutes. To be able to cover all these time regimes, a range of different spectroscopical approaches are necessary. This mini-review focuses on time-resolved applications of the infrared technique to study channelrhodopsins and other light triggered proteins. We will discuss the approaches with respect to their suitability to the investigation of channelrhodopsin and related proteins.

  3. Spectroscopic characterization of biological agents using FTIR, normal Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Pineda, Tatiana; Soto-Feliciano, Kristina; De La Cruz-Montoya, Edwin; Pacheco Londoño, Leonardo C.; Ríos-Velázquez, Carlos; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2007-04-01

    FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) requires a minimum of sample allows fast identification of microorganisms. The use of this technique for characterizing the spectroscopic signatures of these agents and their stimulants has recently gained considerable attention due to the fact that these techniques can be easily adapted for standoff detection from considerable distances. The techniques also show high sensitivity and selectivity and offer near real time detection duty cycles. This research focuses in laying the grounds for the spectroscopic differentiation of Staphylococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp., Salmonella spp., Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and E. coli, together with identification of their subspecies. In order to achieve the proponed objective, protocols to handle, cultivate and analyze the strains have been developed. Spectroscopic similarities and marked differences have been found for Spontaneous or Normal Raman spectra and for SERS using silver nanoparticles have been found. The use of principal component analysis (PCA), discriminate factor analysis (DFA) and a cluster analysis were used to evaluate the efficacy of identifying potential threat bacterial from their spectra collected on single bacteria. The DFA from the bacteria Raman spectra show a little discrimination between the diverse bacterial species however the results obtained from the SERS demonstrate to be high discrimination technique. The spectroscopic study will be extended to examine the spores produced by selected strains since these are more prone to be used as Biological Warfare Agents due to their increased mobility and possibility of airborne transport. Micro infrared spectroscopy as well as fiber coupled FTIR will also be used as possible sensors of target compounds.

  4. Spectroscopic ellipsometric and Raman spectroscopic investigations of pulsed laser treated glassy carbon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csontos, J., E-mail: jcsontos@titan.physx.u-szeged.hu [University of Szeged, Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Dóm tér 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Pápa, Z.; Gárdián, A. [University of Szeged, Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Dóm tér 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Füle, M. [University of Szeged, Department of Experimental Physics, Dóm tér 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Budai, J. [University of Szeged, Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Dóm tér 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Toth, Z. [University of Szeged, Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Dóm tér 9, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); University of Szeged, Department of Oral Biology and Experimental Dental Research, Tisza Lajos krt. 64, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Laser treatment modifies the top layer of glassy carbon as shown by ellipsometry. • Raman signal is composed from signals of the layer and the glassy carbon substrate. • Using volumetric fluence allows to compare the effects of different lasers. • Melting effects of glassy carbon was observed in case of Nd:YAG laser treatment. - Abstract: In this study spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and Raman spectroscopy are applied to study structural modification of glassy carbon, due to high intensity laser ablation. Two KrF lasers with different pulse durations (480 fs and 18 ns), an ArF (20 ns), and a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (8 ns) were applied to irradiate the surface of glassy carbon targets. The main characteristics of the different laser treatments are compared by introducing the volumetric fluence which takes into account the different absorption values at different wavelengths. SE showed the appearance of a modified layer on the ablated surfaces. In the case of the ns lasers the thickness of this layer was in the range of 10–60 nm, while in the case of fs laser it was less than 20 nm. In all cases the average refractive index (n) of the modified layers slightly decreased compared to the refractive index of glassy carbon. Increase in extinction coefficient (k) was observed in the cases of ArF and fs KrF laser treatment, while the k values decreased significantly in the cases of nanosecond pulse duration KrF and Nd:YAG laser treatments. In the Raman spectra of the ablated areas the characteristic D and G peaks were widened due to appearance of an amorphous phase. Both Raman spectroscopy and SE indicate that the irradiated areas show carbon nanoparticle formation in all cases.

  5. Remote Sensing of Grass Response to Drought Stress Using Spectroscopic Techniques and Canopy Reflectance Model Inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagher Bayat

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to follow the response to drought stress in a Poa pratensis canopy exposed to various levels of soil moisture deficit. We tracked the changes in the canopy reflectance (450–2450 nm and retrieved vegetation properties (Leaf Area Index (LAI, leaf chlorophyll content (Cab, leaf water content (Cw, leaf dry matter content (Cdm and senescent material (Cs during a drought episode. Spectroscopic techniques and radiative transfer model (RTM inversion were employed to monitor the gradual manifestation of drought effects in a laboratory setting. Plots of 21 cm × 14.5 cm surface area with Poa pratensis plants that formed a closed canopy were divided into a well-watered control group and a group subjected to water stress for 36 days. In a regular weekly schedule, canopy reflectance and destructive measurements of LAI and Cab were taken. Spectral analysis indicated the first sign of stress after 4–5 days from the start of the experiment near the water absorption bands (at 1930 nm, 1440 nm and in the red (at 675 nm. Spectroscopic techniques revealed plant stress up to 6 days earlier than visual inspection. Of the water stress-related vegetation indices, the response of Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI_1241 and Normalized Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI_norm were significantly stronger in the stressed group than the control. To observe the effects of stress on grass properties during the drought episode, we used the RTMo (RTM of solar and sky radiation model inversion by means of an iterative optimization approach. The performance of the model inversion was assessed by calculating R2 and the Normalized Root Mean Square Error (RMSE between retrieved and measured LAI (R2 = 0.87, NRMSE = 0.18 and Cab (R2 = 0.74, NRMSE = 0.15. All parameters retrieved by model inversion co-varied with soil moisture deficit. However, the first strong sign of water stress on the retrieved grass properties was detected as a change of Cw

  6. Chromate adsorption on selected soil minerals: Surface complexation modeling coupled with spectroscopic investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veselská, Veronika, E-mail: veselskav@fzp.czu.cz [Department of Environmental Geosciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcka 129, CZ-16521, Prague (Czech Republic); Fajgar, Radek [Department of Analytical and Material Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the CAS, v.v.i., Rozvojová 135/1, CZ-16502, Prague (Czech Republic); Číhalová, Sylva [Department of Environmental Geosciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcka 129, CZ-16521, Prague (Czech Republic); Bolanz, Ralph M. [Institute of Geosciences, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 10, DE-07745, Jena (Germany); Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph [ANKA Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, DE-76344, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Siddique, Jamal A.; Komárek, Michael [Department of Environmental Geosciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcka 129, CZ-16521, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Study of Cr(VI) adsorption on soil minerals over a large range of conditions. • Combined surface complexation modeling and spectroscopic techniques. • Diffuse-layer and triple-layer models used to obtain fits to experimental data. • Speciation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) was assessed. - Abstract: This study investigates the mechanisms of Cr(VI) adsorption on natural clay (illite and kaolinite) and synthetic (birnessite and ferrihydrite) minerals, including its speciation changes, and combining quantitative thermodynamically based mechanistic surface complexation models (SCMs) with spectroscopic measurements. Series of adsorption experiments have been performed at different pH values (3–10), ionic strengths (0.001–0.1 M KNO{sub 3}), sorbate concentrations (10{sup −4}, 10{sup −5}, and 10{sup −6} M Cr(VI)), and sorbate/sorbent ratios (50–500). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the surface complexes, including surface reactions. Adsorption of Cr(VI) is strongly ionic strength dependent. For ferrihydrite at pH <7, a simple diffuse-layer model provides a reasonable prediction of adsorption. For birnessite, bidentate inner-sphere complexes of chromate and dichromate resulted in a better diffuse-layer model fit. For kaolinite, outer-sphere complexation prevails mainly at lower Cr(VI) loadings. Dissolution of solid phases needs to be considered for better SCMs fits. The coupled SCM and spectroscopic approach is thus useful for investigating individual minerals responsible for Cr(VI) retention in soils, and improving the handling and remediation processes.

  7. Spectroscopic determination of optimal hydration time of zircon surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E. [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia R, G. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Division de Estudios del Posgrado, Av. Tecnologico s/n, Ex-Rancho La Virgen, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia G, N., E-mail: eduardo.ordonez@inin.gob.m [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Av. Colon y Av. Tollocan, 50180 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    When a mineral surface is immersed in an aqueous solution, it develops and electric charge produced by the amphoteric dissociation of hydroxyl groups created by the hydration of the solid surface. This is one influential surface property. The complete hydration process takes a time which is specific for each mineral species. The knowledge of the aqueous solution contact time for complete surface hydration is mandatory for further surface phenomena studies. This study deals with the optimal hydration time of the raw zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) surface comparing the classical potentiometric titrations with a fluorescence spectroscopy technique. The latter is easy and rea liable as it demands only one sample batch to determine the optimal time to ensure a total hydration of the zircon surface. The analytical results of neutron activation analysis showed the presence of trace quantities of Dy{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3} in the bulk of zircon. The Dy{sup 3+} is structured in the zircon crystalline lattice and undergoes the same chemical reactions as zircon. Furthermore, the Dy{sup 3+} has a good fluorescent response whose intensity is enhanced by hydration molecules. The results show that, according to the potentiometric analysis, the hydration process for each batch (at least 8 sample batches) takes around 2 h, while the spectrometric method indicates only 5 minutes from only one batch. Both methods showed that the zircon surface have a 16 h optimal hydration time. (Author)

  8. Nanoshell-based substrates for surface enhanced spectroscopic detection of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Carly S; Kundu, Janardan; Barhoumi, Aoune; Halas, Naomi J

    2009-09-01

    Nanoshells are optically tunable core-shell nanostructures with demonstrated uses in surface enhanced spectroscopies. Based on their ability to support surface plasmons, which give rise to strongly enhanced electromagnetic fields at their surface, nanoshells provide simple, scalable, high-quality substrates. In this article, we outline the development and use of nanoshell-based substrates for direct, spectroscopic detection of biomolecules. Recent advances in the use of these nanostructures lead to improved spectroscopic quality, selectivity, and reproducibility.

  9. Speciation, in the nuclear fuel cycle by spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colette, S.; Plancque, G.; Allain, F.; Lamouroux, C.; Steiner, V.; Amekraz, B.; Moulin, C. [CEA/Saclay, Dept, des Procedes d' Enrichissement (DPE), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2000-07-01

    New analytical techniques allowing to perform speciation in the framework of the nuclear fuel cycle are more and more needed. They have to be selective (since matrix encountered are very complex), sensitive (in order to work at representative concentration and below solubility limit), as well as non intrusive (in order to keep the image of the real solution). Among them, laser-based analytical techniques present these advantages together with the possibility to perform remote measurements via fiber optics. Hence, Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF) has been used for actinides/lanthanides interaction and speciation studies in inorganic and organic matrices from the reprocessing to waste storage. Moreover, new ion detection methods such as Electro-Spray - Mass Spectrometry (ES-MS) seems promising for speciation studies. Hence, it is the first time that it is possible to directly couple a liquid at atmospheric pressure to a mass detection working at reduced pressure with a soft mode of ionisation that should allow to give informations on chemical species present. Principle, advantages and limitations as well as results obtained with the use of TRLIF and ES-MS on different systems of interest including actinides, lanthanides, fission products in interaction with simple organic molecules to very complex structure will be presented and discussed. (authors)

  10. Characterization of Sorolla's gouache pigments by means of spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, Clodoaldo; Juanes, David; Ferrazza, Livio; Carballo, Jorgelina

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the characterization of the Joaquín Sorolla's gouache sketches for the oil on canvas series "Vision of Spain" commissioned by A. M. Huntington to decorate the library of the Hispanic Society of America in New York. The analyses were focused on the identification of the elemental composition of the gouache pigments by means of portable EDXRF spectrometry in a non-destructive mode. Additionally, SEM-EDX and FTIR analyses of a selected set of micro-samples were carried out to identify completely the pigments, the paint technique and the binding media. The obtained results have confirmed the identification of lead and zinc white, vermillion, earth pigments, ochre, zinc yellow, chrome yellow, ultramarine, Prussian blue, chromium based and copper-arsenic based green pigments, bone black and carbon based black pigments, and the use of gum arabic as binding media in the gouache pigments.

  11. Novel infrared spectroscopic techniques for the study of adsorbed proteins on photoactive thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angle, Taylor Allan

    Through the development of attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques, as well as biocompatible nanoporous gold film confining layers and photoactive nanocrystal cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films, a system capable of in situ study of adsorbed protein films on photoactive layers was created. Due to the oxygen intolerance of the enzyme of interest for this work (a [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Clostridium acetobutylicum), techniques were developed in a manner conducive to anaerobic environments. Solid-state ligand exchange processes were shown to have no detrimental effect on the continued ability of nanocrystal CdTe layers to reduce species via the transfer of photogenerated electrons. Nanoporous gold films were shown to effectively confine poorly bound surface species including nanocrystal CdTe layers and adsorbed protein films. An ATR "stack'' structure, consisting of a silicon wafer coupled to a zinc selenide ATR crystal by a high index optical coupling fluid, was designed and implemented, leading to a tunable optical structure for use with existing ATR setups. This ATR stack was shown to maintain resolution and signal intensity of traditional ATR configurations for both aqueous and solid-state samples. Through the use of coupled silicon wafers, we significantly increased both sample throughput and the number of available chemical processes by replacing the expensive ATR crystals as the default sample substrate. Shown herein to function as initially intended, these novel methods provide the groundwork for more complex experiments, such as an in situ monitoring of the photooxidation of surface-bound hydrogenases.

  12. Fast magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging techniques in human brain- applications in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Iedani, Oun; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Ribbons, Karen; Ramadan, Saadallah

    2017-02-28

    Multi voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is an important imaging tool that combines imaging and spectroscopic techniques. MRSI of the human brain has been beneficially applied to different clinical applications in neurology, particularly in neurooncology but also in multiple sclerosis, stroke and epilepsy. However, a major challenge in conventional MRSI is the longer acquisition time required for adequate signal to be collected. Fast MRSI of the brain in vivo is an alternative approach to reduce scanning time and make MRSI more clinically suitable.Fast MRSI can be categorised into spiral, echo-planar, parallel and turbo imaging techniques, each with its own strengths. After a brief introduction on the basics of non-invasive examination ((1)H-MRS) and localization techniques principles, different fast MRSI techniques will be discussed from their initial development to the recent innovations with particular emphasis on their capacity to record neurochemical changes in the brain in a variety of pathologies.The clinical applications of whole brain fast spectroscopic techniques, can assist in the assessment of neurochemical changes in the human brain and help in understanding the roles they play in disease. To give a good example of the utilities of these techniques in clinical context, MRSI application in multiple sclerosis was chosen. The available up to date and relevant literature is discussed and an outline of future research is presented.

  13. Breath analysis using laser spectroscopic techniques: breath biomarkers, spectral fingerprints, and detection limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuji; Sahay, Peeyush

    2009-01-01

    Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC) disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS). Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis.

  14. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeyush Sahay

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS, cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS, integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS, cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS, cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS, quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS, and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS. Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis.

  15. Studies on selected polymeric materials using the photoacoustic spectroscopic technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hukum Singh

    2011-01-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate-graft-polybisphenol-A-carbonate (PMMA-G-PC) with 50% grafting is synthesized. The acid (0.18 M, 100 ml) in air at (45±12) ℃ for 3.0 h. Condensation of (PMMA-G-PC) with N-[p-(carboxyl phenyl amino acetic acid)] hydrazide (PCPH) affords polybisphenol-A-carbonate-graft-polymethylmethacrylate hydrazide (PCGH).The photoacoustic (PA) spectra of (PCGH) are recorded in a wavelength range from 200 nm to 800 nm at a modulation frequency of 22 Hz, and compared with those of pure polybisphenol-A-carbonate (PC), (PMMA-G-PC) and (PCPH).In the present work, a non-destructive and non-contact analytical method, namely the photoacoustic technique, is successfully implemented for optical and thermal characterization of selected polymeric materials. The indigenous PA spectrometer used in the present study consists of a 300-W xenon arc lamp, a lock-in amplifier, a chopper, a (1/8)-m monochromator controlled by computer and a home-made PA cell.

  16. Structural analysis of irradiated crotoxin by spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Karina C. de; Fucase, Tamara M.; Silva, Ed Carlos S. e; Chagas, Bruno B.; Buchi, Alisson T.; Viala, Vincent L.; Spencer, Patrick J.; Nascimento, Nanci do, E-mail: kcorleto@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia

    2013-07-01

    Snake bites are a serious public health problem, especially in subtropical countries. In Brazil, the serum, the only effective treatment in case of snake bites, is produced in horses which, despite of their large size, have a reduced lifespan due to the high toxicity of the antigen. Ionizing radiation has been successfully employed to attenuate the biological activity of animal toxins. Crotoxin, the main toxic compound from Crotalus durissus terrificus (Cdt), is a heterodimeric protein composed of two subunits: crotapotin and phospholipase A{sub 2}. Previous data indicated that this protein, following irradiation process, undergoes unfolding and/or aggregation, resulting in a much lower toxic antigen. The exact mechanisms and structural modifications involved in aggregation process are not clear yet. This work investigates the effects of ionizing radiation on crotoxin employing Infrared Spectroscopy, Circular Dichroism and Dynamic Light Scattering techniques. The infrared spectrum of lyophilized crotoxin showed peaks corresponding to the vibrational spectra of the secondary structure of crotoxin, including β-sheet, random coil, α-helix and β-turns. We calculated the area of these spectral regions after adjusting for baseline and normalization using the amide I band (1590-1700 cm{sup -1}), obtaining the variation of secondary structures of the toxin following irradiation. The Circular Dichroism spectra of native and irradiated crotoxin suggests a conformational change within the molecule after the irradiation process. This data indicates structural changes between the samples, apparently from ordered conformation towards a random coil. The analyses by light scattering indicated that the irradiated crotoxin formed multimers with an average molecular radius 100 folds higher than the native toxin. (author)

  17. SPECTROSCOPIC PROBING OF POTENTIAL SURFACES IN REACTIVE COLLISIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Telle, H.

    1985-01-01

    For the investigation of unstable intermediates, ABC*, which constitute the "transition states" in some simple reactive collisions, spectroscopic methods are beginning to provide valuable results. In a (relatively) simple approach molecules are photodissociated, and the interaction potentials during the process of separation (half-collision) are mapped in either absorption or emission ; the method will be described exemplary for the photolysis of NaI, giving rise to emission from NaI≠*. For r...

  18. Non-Destructive and rapid evaluation of staple foods quality by using spectroscopic techniques: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wen-Hao; He, Hong-Ju; Sun, Da-Wen

    2017-03-24

    Staple foods, including cereals, legumes, and root/tuber crops, dominate the daily diet of humans by providing valuable proteins, starch, oils, minerals, and vitamins. Quality evaluation of staple foods is primarily carried out on sensory (e.g. external defect, color), adulteration (e.g. species, origin), chemical (e.g. starch, proteins), mycotoxin (e.g. Fusarium toxin, aflatoxin), parasitic infection (e.g. weevil, beetle), and internal physiological (e.g. hollow heart, black heart) aspects. Conventional methods for the quality assessment of staple foods are always laborious, destructive, and time-consuming. Requirements for online monitoring of staple foods have been proposed to encourage the development of rapid, reagentless, and noninvasive techniques. Spectroscopic techniques, such as visible-infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and spectral imaging, have been introduced as promising analytical tools and applied for the quality evaluation of staple foods. This review summarizes the recent applications and progress of such spectroscopic techniques in determining various qualities of staple foods. Besides, challenges and future trends of these spectroscopic techniques are also presented.

  19. FAST CARS Developing a Laser Spectroscopic Technique for Rapid Identification of Bacterial Spores

    CERN Document Server

    Scully, M O; Lucht, R P; Opatrny, T; Pilloff, H; Rebane, A; Sokolov, A V; Zubairy, M S

    2002-01-01

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time consuming microscopic, chemical and biological assays. Current research into real time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g. resonant Raman spectroscopy. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. The connection with previous studies based on "Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy" (CARS) is to be noted. However generating and utilizing maximally coherent oscillation in macromolecules having an enormous number of degrees of freedom is much more challenging. This extension of the CARS technique is called FAST CARS (Femtosecond Adaptive Spectroscopic Techniques for Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy), and the present paper proposes and analyses ways in which it could be used to rapidly identify pre-selected molecules in real time.

  20. Advanced in situ spectroscopic techniques and their applications in environmental biogeochemistry: introduction to the special section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombi, Enzo; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M; Scheckel, Kirk G

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the molecular-scale complexities and interplay of chemical and biological processes of contaminants at solid, liquid, and gas interfaces is a fundamental and crucial element to enhance our understanding of anthropogenic environmental impacts. The ability to describe the complexity of environmental biogeochemical reaction mechanisms relies on our analytical ability through the application and developmemnt of advanced spectroscopic techniques. Accompanying this introductory article are nine papers that either review advanced in situ spectroscopic methods or present original research utilizing these techniques. This collection of articles summarizes the challenges facing environmental biogeochemistry, highlights the recent advances and scientific gaps, and provides an outlook into future research that may benefit from the use of in situ spectroscopic approaches. The use of synchrotron-based techniques and other methods are discussed in detail, as is the importance to integrate multiple analytical approaches to confirm results of complementary procedures or to fill data gaps. We also argue that future direction in research will be driven, in addition to recent analytical developments, by emerging factors such as the need for risk assessment of new materials (i.e., nanotechnologies) and the realization that biogeochemical processes need to be investigated in situ under environmentally relevant conditions.

  1. Electrochemical and spectroscopic characterization of surface sol-gel processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohong; Wilson, George S

    2004-09-28

    (3-Mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MTS) forms a unique film on a platinum substrate by self-assembly and sol-gel cross-linking. The gelating and drying states of the self-assembled MTS sol-gel films were probed by use of electrochemical and spectroscopic methods. The thiol moiety was the only active group within the sol-gel network. Gold nanoparticles were employed to detect the availability of the thiol group and their interaction further indicated the physicochemical states of the sol-gel inner structure. It was found that the thiol groups in the open porous MTS aerogel matrix were accessible to the gold nanoparticles while thiol groups in the compact MTS xerogel network were not accessible to the gold nanoparticles. The characteristics of the sol-gel matrix change with time because of its own irreversible gelating and drying process. The present work provides direct evidence of gold nanoparticle binding with thiol groups within the sol-gel structures and explains the different permeability of "aerogel" and "xerogel" films of MTS on the basis of electrochemical and spectroscopic results. Two endogenous species, hydrogen peroxide and ascorbic acid, were used to test the permeability of the self-assembled sol-gel film in different states. The MTS xerogel film on the platinum electrode was extremely selective against ascorbic acid while maintaining high sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide in contrast to the relatively high permeability of ascorbic acid in the MTS aerogel film. This study showed the potential of the MTS sol-gel film as a nanoporous material in biosensor development.

  2. Novel Infrared Coherent Sources and Techniques for Spectroscopic Test of Fundamental Physics Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, P. Cancio; Galli, I.; Giusfredi, G.; Mazzotti, D.; De Natale, P.

    2013-06-01

    Recent achievements in high sensitivity and precision molecular spectroscopy in the mid-IR open new perspectives for experiments looking for possible violations of the basic postulates in quantum mechanics or quantum electro-dynamics in simple molecular systems. A new generation of hybrid infrared sources, including a direct link to optical frequency comb synthesizers (OFCSs) is under development. They provide metrological frequency precision and sensitivities that have achieved record levels of tens of parts-per-quadrillion when appropriate spectroscopic techniques are implemented. Such very recent developments will be reviewed. An example of possible application to the test of fundamental principles is attacking the symmetrization postulate (SP). Actually, the requirement of symmetry of the wave function under exchange of identical particles has a striking demonstration in the spectra of molecules including identical nuclei. The basic idea of the spectroscopic tests is to search with extremely high sensitivity for (weak) molecular lines involving the forbidden states. Since the early test of SP violation in bosonic particles, ^{12}C^{16}O_2 molecule has been considered a playground system. An upper limit of 10^{-11} to such violation was measured more than one decade ago by our group. The recent developed spectroscopic technique^{d,e} measured a minimum detected CO_2 gas pressures, in a 1-Hz bandwidth, of a few tens of femtobar, which could improve the previous test by more than two orders of magnitude. Progress in high sensitivity spectroscopic measurements in view of new violation tests will be reviewed, to investigate molecules with two and also three identical nuclei, like SO_3 and NH_3. I. Galli et al., Opt. Lett. 35, 3616 (2010). I. Ricciardi et al., Opt. Express 20, 9178 (2012). S. Borri, et al., Opt. Lett. 37, 1011 (2012). G. Giusfredi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 110801(2010). I. Galli et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 270802 (2011). D. Mazzotti et al

  3. The role of simulation chambers in the development of spectroscopic techniques: campaigns at EUPHORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ródenas, Milagros; Muñoz, Amalia; Euphore Team

    2016-04-01

    Simulation chambers represent a very useful tool for the study of chemical reactions and their products, but also to characterize instruments. The development of spectroscopic techniques throughout the last decades has benefited from tests and intercomparison exercises carried out in chambers. In fact, instruments can be exposed to various controlled atmospheric scenarios that account for different environmental conditions, eliminating the uncertainties associated to fluctuations of the air mass, which must be taken into account when extrapolating results to the real conditions. Hence, a given instrument can be characterized by assessing its precision, accuracy, detection limits, time response and potential interferences in the presence of other chemical compounds, aerosols, etc. This implies that the instrument can be calibrated and validated, which allows to enhance the features of the instrument. Moreover, chambers are also the scenario of intercomparison trials, permitting multiple instruments to sample from the same well-mixed air mass simultaneously. An overview of different campaigns to characterize and/or intercompare spectroscopic techniques that have taken place in simulation chambers will be given; in particular, those carried out at EUPHORE (two twin domes, 200 m3 each, Spain), where various intercomparison exercises have been deployed under the frame of European projects (e.g. TOXIC, FIONA, PSOA campaigns supported by EUROCHAMP-II). With the common aim of measuring given compounds (e.g. HONO, NO2, OH, glyoxal, m-glyoxal, etc), an important number of spectroscopic instruments and institutions have been involved in chamber experiments, having the chance to intercompare among them and also with other non-spectroscopic systems (e.g. monitors, cromatographs, etc) or model simulations.

  4. Application of spectroscopic techniques to the study of illuminated manuscripts: A survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessanha, S.; Manso, M.; Carvalho, M.L., E-mail: luisa@cii.fc.ul.pt

    2012-05-15

    This work focused on the application of the most relevant spectroscopic techniques used for the characterization of illuminated manuscripts. The historical value of these unique and invaluable artworks, together with the increased awareness concerning the conservation of cultural heritage, prompted the application of analytical techniques to the study of these illuminations. This is essential for the understanding of the artist's working methods, which aids conservation-restoration. The characterization of the pigments may also help assign a probable date to the manuscript. For these purposes, the spectroscopic techniques used so far include those that provide information on the elemental content: X-ray fluorescence, total reflection X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Complementary techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, reveal information regarding the compounds present in the samples. The techniques, suitability, technological evolution and development of high-performance detectors, as well as the possibility of microanalysis and the higher sensitivity of the equipment, will also be discussed. Furthermore, issues such as the necessity of sampling, the portability of the equipment and the overall advantages and disadvantages of different techniques will be analyzed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The techniques used for studying illuminated manuscripts are described and compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For in situ, non-destructive analysis the most suitable technique is EDXRF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For quantitative analysis TXRF is more appropriate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Raman spectroscopy is mostly used for pigments identification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FTIR was used for the characterization of binders and parchment.

  5. A COMPARISON OF SPECTROSCOPIC VERSUS IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR DETECTING CLOSE COMPANIONS TO KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTEREST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teske, Johanna K. [Carnegie DTM, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Everett, Mark E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Hirsch, Lea [Astronomy Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Furlan, Elise; Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, 770 South Wilson Ave., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Horch, Elliott P. [Department of Physics, Southern Connecticut State University, 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT 06515 (United States); Howell, Steve B. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Gonzales, Erica; Crepp, Justin R., E-mail: jteske@carnegiescience.edu [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Kepler planet candidates require both spectroscopic and imaging follow-up observations to rule out false positives and detect blended stars. Traditionally, spectroscopy and high-resolution imaging have probed different host star companion parameter spaces, the former detecting tight binaries and the latter detecting wider bound companions as well as chance background stars. In this paper, we examine a sample of 11 Kepler host stars with companions detected by two techniques—near-infrared adaptive optics and/or optical speckle interferometry imaging, and a new spectroscopic deblending method. We compare the companion effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) and flux ratios (F{sub B}/F{sub A}, where A is the primary and B is the companion) derived from each technique and find no cases where both companion parameters agree within 1σ errors. In 3/11 cases the companion T{sub eff} values agree within 1σ errors, and in 2/11 cases the companion F{sub B}/F{sub A} values agree within 1σ errors. Examining each Kepler system individually considering multiple avenues (isochrone mapping, contrast curves, probability of being bound), we suggest two cases for which the techniques most likely agree in their companion detections (detect the same companion star). Overall, our results support the advantage that the spectroscopic deblending technique has for finding very close-in companions (θ ≲ 0.″02–0.″05) that are not easily detectable with imaging. However, we also specifically show how high-contrast AO and speckle imaging observations detect companions at larger separations (θ ≥ 0.″02–0.″05) that are missed by the spectroscopic technique, provide additional information for characterizing the companion and its potential contamination (e.g., position angle, separation, magnitude differences), and cover a wider range of primary star effective temperatures. The investigation presented here illustrates the utility of combining the two techniques to reveal higher

  6. PHOTOGRAMMETRIC TECHNIQUES FOR ROAD SURFACE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Knyaz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The quality and condition of a road surface is of great importance for convenience and safety of driving. So the investigations of the behaviour of road materials in laboratory conditions and monitoring of existing roads are widely fulfilled for controlling a geometric parameters and detecting defects in the road surface. Photogrammetry as accurate non-contact measuring method provides powerful means for solving different tasks in road surface reconstruction and analysis. The range of dimensions concerned in road surface analysis can have great variation from tenths of millimetre to hundreds meters and more. So a set of techniques is needed to meet all requirements of road parameters estimation. Two photogrammetric techniques for road surface analysis are presented: for accurate measuring of road pavement and for road surface reconstruction based on imagery obtained from unmanned aerial vehicle. The first technique uses photogrammetric system based on structured light for fast and accurate surface 3D reconstruction and it allows analysing the characteristics of road texture and monitoring the pavement behaviour. The second technique provides dense 3D model road suitable for road macro parameters estimation.

  7. Photogrammetric Techniques for Road Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyaz, V. A.; Chibunichev, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    The quality and condition of a road surface is of great importance for convenience and safety of driving. So the investigations of the behaviour of road materials in laboratory conditions and monitoring of existing roads are widely fulfilled for controlling a geometric parameters and detecting defects in the road surface. Photogrammetry as accurate non-contact measuring method provides powerful means for solving different tasks in road surface reconstruction and analysis. The range of dimensions concerned in road surface analysis can have great variation from tenths of millimetre to hundreds meters and more. So a set of techniques is needed to meet all requirements of road parameters estimation. Two photogrammetric techniques for road surface analysis are presented: for accurate measuring of road pavement and for road surface reconstruction based on imagery obtained from unmanned aerial vehicle. The first technique uses photogrammetric system based on structured light for fast and accurate surface 3D reconstruction and it allows analysing the characteristics of road texture and monitoring the pavement behaviour. The second technique provides dense 3D model road suitable for road macro parameters estimation.

  8. Wettability Switching Techniques on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verplanck Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The wetting properties of superhydrophobic surfaces have generated worldwide research interest. A water drop on these surfaces forms a nearly perfect spherical pearl. Superhydrophobic materials hold considerable promise for potential applications ranging from self cleaning surfaces, completely water impermeable textiles to low cost energy displacement of liquids in lab-on-chip devices. However, the dynamic modification of the liquid droplets behavior and in particular of their wetting properties on these surfaces is still a challenging issue. In this review, after a brief overview on superhydrophobic states definition, the techniques leading to the modification of wettability behavior on superhydrophobic surfaces under specific conditions: optical, magnetic, mechanical, chemical, thermal are discussed. Finally, a focus on electrowetting is made from historical phenomenon pointed out some decades ago on classical planar hydrophobic surfaces to recent breakthrough obtained on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  9. A versatile setup using femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yujie, E-mail: styojm@physics.tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Voronine, Dmitri V.; Sokolov, Alexei V. [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Baylor University, Waco, Texas 76798 (United States); Scully, Marlan O. [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Baylor University, Waco, Texas 76798 (United States); Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We report a versatile setup based on the femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The setup uses a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire oscillator source and a folded 4f pulse shaper, in which the pulse shaping is carried out through conventional optical elements and does not require a spatial light modulator. Our setup is simple in alignment, and can be easily switched between the collinear single-beam and the noncollinear two-beam configurations. We demonstrate the capability for investigating both transparent and highly scattering samples by detecting transmitted and reflected signals, respectively.

  10. FAST CARS: engineering a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid identification of bacterial spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, M O; Kattawar, G W; Lucht, R P; Opatrny, T; Pilloff, H; Rebane, A; Sokolov, A V; Zubairy, M S

    2002-08-20

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical, and biological assays. Current research into real-time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g., resonance fluorescence. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. However, generating and using maximally coherent oscillation in macromolecules having an enormous number of degrees of freedom is challenging. In particular, the short dephasing times and rapid internal conversion rates are major obstacles. However, adiabatic fast passage techniques and the ability to generate combs of phase-coherent femtosecond pulses provide tools for the generation and utilization of maximal quantum coherence in large molecules and biopolymers. We call this technique FAST CARS (femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy), and the present article proposes and analyses ways in which it could be used to rapidly identify preselected molecules in real time.

  11. A Comparison of Spectroscopic versus Imaging Techniques for Detecting Close Companions to Kepler Objects of Interest

    CERN Document Server

    Teske, Johanna K; Hirsch, Lea; Furlan, Elise; Horch, Elliott P; Howell, Steve B; Ciardi, David R; Gonzales, Erica; Crepp, Justin R

    2015-01-01

    (Abbreviated) Kepler planet candidates require both spectroscopic and imaging follow-up observations to rule out false positives and detect blended stars. [...] In this paper, we examine a sample of 11 Kepler host stars with companions detected by two techniques -- near-infrared adaptive optics and/or optical speckle interferometry imaging, and a new spectroscopic deblending method. We compare the companion Teff and flux ratios (F_B/F_A, where A is the primary and B is the companion) derived from each technique, and find no cases where both companion parameters agree within 1sigma errors. In 3/11 cases the companion Teff values agree within 1sigma errors, and in 2/11 cases the companion F_B/F_A values agree within 1sigma errors. Examining each Kepler system individually considering multiple avenues (isochrone mapping, contrast curves, probability of being bound), we suggest two cases for which the techniques most likely agree in their companion detections (detect the same companion star). Overall, our results...

  12. Rhinoplasty: surface aesthetics and surgical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Bariş; Doğan, Teoman; Öreroğlu, Ali Riza; Daniel, Rollin K

    2013-03-01

    Surface aesthetics of the attractive nose are created by certain lines, shadows, and highlights, with specific proportions and breakpoints. Our evaluation of the nasal surface aesthetics is achieved using the concept of geometric polygons as aesthetic subunits, both to define the existing deformity and the aesthetic goals. Surgical techniques have been developed and modified to achieve the desired surface appearance, and those are detailed in this article. The principles of geometric polygons allow the surgeon to analyze the deformities of the nose, to define an operative plan to achieve specific goals, and to select the appropriate operative technique. These aesthetic concepts and surgical techniques were used in 257 consecutive rhinoplasties performed in the past 3 years by the principal author (B.Ç.).

  13. High Throughput Spectroscopic Catalyst Screening via Surface Plasmon Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-10

    transfer from the Pt to gold particles. Below we pictorially summarise how we have tried to use surface plasmon spectroscopy to study H2 interactions with...2014). 3. PI Mulvaney presented some of this work at an invied talk at the ACS Conference in Dallas in March 2014 and also to groups at

  14. Tablet surface characterisation by various imaging techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seitavuopio, Paulus; Rantanen, Jukka; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise tablet surfaces using different imaging and roughness analytical techniques including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The test materials compressed were potassium chloride (KCl......, but they do not provide quantitative information about surface roughness. Laser profilometry and AFM on the other hand provide quantitative roughness data from two different scales, laser profilometer from 1 mm and atomic force microscope from 90 microm scale. AFM is a powerful technique but other imaging...

  15. Spectroscopic investigations of surface deposited biological warfare simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, Stephen J.; Bird, Hilary; Hurst, Daniel; McIntosh, Alastair J. S.; Spencer, Phillippa; Pelfrey, Suzanne H.; Baker, Matthew J.

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports a proof-of-principle study aimed at discriminating biological warfare (BW) simulants from common environmental bacteria in order to differentiate pathogenic endospores in situ, to aid any required response for hazard management. We used FTIR spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis; FTIR is a versatile technique for the non-destructive analysis of a range of materials. We also report an evaluation of multiple pre-processing techniques and subsequent differences in cross-validation accuracy of two pattern recognition models (Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Principal Component - Linear Discriminant Analysis (PC-LDA)) for two classifications: a two class classification (Gram + ve spores vs. Gram -ve vegetative cells) and a six class classification (bacterial classification). Six bacterial strains Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki, Bacillus thuringiensis, Escherichia coli, Pantaeoa agglomerans and Pseudomonas fluorescens were analysed.

  16. High Throughput Spectroscopic Catalyst Screening via Surface Plasmon Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-15

    SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) AOARD-144064 l#14IOA060 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Distribution A: Approved for public...Techniques, Nanoparticles, Morphological Characterization, Defects 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF...11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) AOARD-144064 l#14IOA060 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution

  17. Studies on Nephrite and Jadeite Jades by Fourier Transform Infrared (ftir) and Raman Spectroscopic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, T. L.; Ng, L. L.; Lim, L. C.

    2013-10-01

    The mineralogical properties of black nephrite jade from Western Australia are studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy using both transmission and specular reflectance techniques in the 4000-400 cm-1 wavenumber region. The infrared absorption peaks in the 3700-3600 cm-1 region which are due to the O-H stretching mode provides a quantitative analysis of the Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratio in the mineral composition of jade samples. The Fe/(Fe+Mg) percentage in black nephrite is found to be higher than that in green nephrite, but comparable to that of actinolite (iron-rich nephrite). This implies that the mineralogy of black nephrite is closer to actinolite than tremolite. The jade is also characterized using Raman spectroscopy in the 1200-200 cm-1 region. Results from FTIR and Raman spectroscopic data of black nephrite jade are compared with those of green nephrite jade from New Zealand and jadeite jade from Myanmar. Black nephrite appears to have a slightly different chemical composition from green nephrite. Spectra from FTIR and Raman spectroscopic techniques were found to be useful in differentiating black nephrite, green nephrite, and green jadeite jades. Furthermore, data on refractive index, specific gravity, and hardness of black nephrite jade are measured and compared with those of green nephrite and of jadeite jade.

  18. Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic investigation on Lamiaceae plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösch, P.; Popp, J.; Kiefer, W.

    1999-05-01

    The essential oils of Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgaris are studied by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The containing monoterpenes can be identified by their Raman spectra. Further the essential oils are investigated in their natural environment, the so-called oil cells of these Lamiaceae plants, with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). This method has the advantage to enhance Raman signals and furthermore the SERS effect leads to fluorescence quenching.

  19. Spectroscopic link between adsorption site occupation and local surface chemical reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraldi, A.; Lizzit, S.; Comelli, G.;

    2004-01-01

    In this Letter we show that sequences of adsorbate-induced shifts of surface core level (SCL) x-ray photoelectron spectra contain profound information on surface changes of electronic structure and reactivity. Energy shifts and intensity changes of time-lapsed spectral components follow simple...... rules, from which adsorption sites are directly determined. Theoretical calculations rationalize the results for transition metal surfaces in terms of the energy shift of the d-band center of mass and this proves that adsorbate-induced SCL shifts provide a spectroscopic measure of local surface...... reactivity....

  20. Investigation of effect of annealing on thermally evaporated ZnSe thin films through spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesha, M. G.; Rashmitha; Meghana, N.; Padiyar, Meghavarsha

    2017-09-01

    ZnSe thin films have been grown on clean glass substrates by thermal evaporation technique and deposited films have been annealed at 473 K. William-Hall method has been adopted to extract information on crystallite size and internal strain in the film from X-ray diffractogram. Effect of annealing on ZnSe films has been analyzed by spectroscopic techniques which include optical absorption, Raman, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. From optical absorption, band gap has been estimated along with other optical parameters like refractive index and extinction coefficient. Also, Urbach tail, which originates near bad edge due to structural disorders, has been characterized. Raman spectra have been analyzed to get the information on the influence of crystallite size and strain effect on peak position, intensity and width. Photoluminescence spectra have been recorded and analyzed to get an insight on defect levels induced due to vacancies, interstadials, and impurity complexes.

  1. Applications of structural and spectroscopic techniques to the experimental and theoretical study of new luminescent materials

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro Ahumada, G A

    2001-01-01

    momentum:DELTA J = 6 is observed for this system. A declining cascade that can reasonably explain the unsuspected related spectral intensity, in the order of 10-9, is presented and suggested although a value was predicted for the electric dipolar force of lesser than 4 orders of magnitude what was observed. This problem is discussed and a mechanism is proposed for spectral intensities associated with two emissions characterized by DELTA J = 4 (electric hexadecapole) and DELTA J = 2 (electric cuadrupole). The laboratory tests made, include synthesis by solid state reactions of Dy sup 3 sup + and Ho sup 3 sup + , type elpasolites, structural characterization using the x-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and diffuse neutron scattering techniques, and Raman and electronic spectroscopic characterization. Results are presented for cubic systems with Cr sup 3 sup + (3d sup 3 ) and Mo sup 3 sup + (4d sup 3 ) ions, since these are privileged from a spectroscopic point of view and except for the hexacyano ion of Cr(...

  2. A TECHNIQUE OF DIGITAL SURFACE MODEL GENERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    It is usually a time-consuming process to real-time set up 3D digital surface mo del(DSM) of an object with complex sur face.On the basis of the architectural survey proje ct of“Chilin Nunnery Reconstruction",this paper investigates an easy and feasi ble way,that is,on project site,applying digital close range photogrammetry an d CAD technique to establish the DSM for simulating ancient architectures with c omplex surface.The method has been proved very effective in practice.

  3. Spectroscopic studies of UV irradiated erythrosine B thin films prepared by spin coating technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyada, H M; El-Mallah, H M; Atwee, T; El-Damhogi, D G

    2017-05-15

    The spectroscopic studies of erythrosine B thin films manufactured by the spin coating technique have been presented. The spectra of infrared absorption allow characterization of vibrational modes for erythrosine B in powder form, pristine and UV irradiated thin films. The absorption spectra recorded in UV-vis-NIR for pristine films of erythrosine B display two main bands. UV irradiation on erythrosine B films decreased absorbance over the spectra. Indirect allowed transition with optical energy gap of 2.57eV is observed in pristine films. UV irradiation introduced structural defects and decreased optical band gap. Some of the optical absorption parameters and their relation to UV irradiation times, namely molar extinction coefficient (ε), electronic dipole strength (q(2)), and oscillator strength (f), of the principal optical transitions have also been evaluated.

  4. Dielectric studies of boron sub phthalocyanine chloride thin films by admittance spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalia, Sameer; Neerja [Department of Physics, DAV College, Amritsar-143301 (India); Mahajan, Aman, E-mail: dramanmahajan@yahoo.co.in; Sharma, Anshul Kumar; Kumar, Sanjeev; Bedi, R. K. [Material Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar-143005 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The dielectric properties of Boron Sub Phthalocyanine Chloride (Cl-SubPc) thermally deposited on ITO substrate have been studied using admittance spectroscopic techniques. The I-V and capacitance –frequency (C-F) studies at various bias voltages reveal that the mobility of charge carriers decrease with bias voltage, however the conduction phenomenon still remain hopping in nature. From the differential susceptance curve, the contribution of the Schottky barrier contact in the charge carrier concentration was found to be absent. The mobility of charge carriers have been determined using differential susceptance variation and from the phase of admittance curve. The values obtained in two cases have been found to be in agreement with each other.

  5. Distinction of Metal Species of Phytate by Solid-State Spectroscopic Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He,Z.; Honeycutt, W.; Zhang, T.; Pellechia, P.; Caliebe, W.

    2007-01-01

    Solid-state {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies have provided knowledge on metal speciation of inorganic P. No effort has been made, however, to accurately assign speciated metal phytates (inositol hexaphosphoric acid salts) using these advanced techniques. Phytate is a predominant form of organic P in animal manure, soil, and other organic substances as each year 51 million Mg of phytate are formed in crops and fruits globally. Currently, the interactions and fate of phytate in the environment are poorly understood. Here we show the solid-state spectral characteristics of six metal phytates. Both spectra were affected by the metal species of the phytates, as significant differences were observed in the shape and position of spectra among the metal phytates. Reference spectra of these pure metal phytate compounds may help in identifying metal species of phytate in environmental samples by these advanced spectroscopic technologies.

  6. A computationally assisted spectroscopic technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients in radio frequency plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Daksha, M; Schuengel, E; Korolov, I; Derzsi, A; Koepke, M; Donko, Z; Schulze, J

    2016-01-01

    A Computationally Assisted Spectroscopic Technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients ($\\gamma$-CAST) in capacitively-coupled radio-frequency plasmas is proposed. This non-intrusive, sensitive diagnostic is based on a combination of Phase Resolved Optical Emission Spectroscopy and particle-based kinetic simulations. In such plasmas (under most conditions in electropositive gases) the spatio-temporally resolved electron-impact excitation/ionization rate features two distinct maxima adjacent to each electrode at different times within each RF period. While one maximum is the consequence of the energy gain of electrons due to sheath expansion, the second maximum is produced by secondary electrons accelerated towards the plasma bulk by the sheath electric field at the time of maximum voltage drop across the adjacent sheath. Due to these different excitation/ionization mechanisms, the ratio of the intensities of these maxima is very sensitive to the secondary electron emission coefficient $\\gamma$...

  7. Surface Wear Measurement Using Optical Correlation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acinger, Kresimir

    1983-12-01

    The coherent optical correlation technique was applied for measuring the surface wear of a tappet (part of car engine), worn by friction with the camshaft. It was found that maximum correlation intensity decays exponentially with the number of wear cycles (i.e. camshaft revolutions). Tappets of the same make have an identical rate of correlation decay. Tappets of different makes have different rates of correlation decay which are in agreement with observed long term wear.

  8. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect.

  9. Feasibility of measuring density and temperature of laser produced plasmas using spectroscopic techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edens, Aaron D.

    2008-09-01

    A wide variety of experiments on the Z-Beamlet laser involve the creation of laser produced plasmas. Having a direct measurement of the density and temperature of these plasma would an extremely useful tool, as understanding how these quantities evolve in space and time gives insight into the causes of changes in other physical processes, such as x-ray generation and opacity. We propose to investigate the possibility of diagnosing the density and temperature of laser-produced plasma using temporally and spatially resolved spectroscopic techniques that are similar to ones that have been successfully fielded on other systems. Various researchers have measured the density and temperature of laboratory plasmas by looking at the width and intensity ratio of various characteristic lines in gases such as nitrogen and hydrogen, as well as in plasmas produced off of solid targets such as zinc. The plasma conditions produce two major measurable effects on the characteristic spectral lines of that plasma. The 1st is the Stark broadening of an individual line, which depends on the electron density of the plasma, with higher densities leading to broader lines. The second effect is a change in the ratio of various lines in the plasma corresponding to different ionization states. By looking at the ratio of these lines, we can gain some understanding of the plasma ionization state and consequently its temperature (and ion density when coupled with the broadening measurement). The hotter a plasma is, the higher greater the intensity of lines corresponding to higher ionization states. We would like to investigate fielding a system on the Z-Beamlet laser chamber to spectroscopically study laser produced plasmas from different material targets.

  10. DNA-binding study of anticancer drug cytarabine by spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Falsafi, Monireh; Maghsudi, Maryam

    2017-01-02

    The interaction of anticancer drug cytarabine with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling study. The fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectroscopy indicated drug interacted with CT-DNA in a groove-binding mode, while the binding constant of UV-vis and the number of binding sites were 4.0 ± 0.2 × 10(4) L mol(-1) and 1.39, respectively. The fluorimetric studies showed that the reaction between the drugs with CT-DNA is exothermic. Circular dichroism spectroscopy was employed to measure the conformational change of DNA in the presence of cytarabine. Furthermore, the drug induces detectable changes in its viscosity for DNA interaction. The molecular modeling results illustrated that cytarabine strongly binds to groove of DNA by relative binding energy of docked structure -20.61 KJ mol(-1). This combination of multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods can be widely used in the investigation on the interaction of small molecular pollutants and drugs with biomacromolecules for clarifying the molecular mechanism of toxicity or side effect in vivo.

  11. Spectroscopic study of cystine adsorption on pyrite surface: From vacuum to solution conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Arenillas, M.; Mateo-Marti, E., E-mail: mateome@cab.inta-csic.es

    2015-09-08

    Highlights: • Successful adsorption of cystine on pyrite surface under several conditions. • Detailed XPS spectroscopic characterization of cystine adsorption on pyrite surface. • Spectroscopy evidence, oxidation and anoxic conditions adjust molecular adsorption. • Molecular chemistry on pyrite is driven depending on the surrounding conditions. • The cystine/pyrite(100) model is in good agreement with Wächtershäuser’s theory. - Abstract: We characterized the adsorption of cystine molecules on pyrite surface via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Anoxic conditions were simulated under ultra-high-vacuum conditions. In contrast, to simulate oxidation conditions, the molecules were adsorbed on pyrite surface from solution. A novel comparative analysis revealed remarkable differences with respect to molecular adsorption and surface chemistry induced by environmental conditions. Molecular adsorption under anoxic conditions was observed to be more favorable, concentrating a large number of molecules on the surface and two different chemical species. In contrast, the presence of oxygen induced an autocatalytic oxidation process on the pyrite surface, which facilitated water binding on pyrite surface and partially blocked molecular adsorption. Pyrite is a highly reactive surface and contains two crucial types of surface functional groups that drive molecular chemistry on the surface depending on the surrounding conditions. Therefore, the system explored in this study holds interesting implications for supporting catalyzed prebiotic chemistry reactions.

  12. Spectroscopic study on variations in illite surface properties after acid-base titration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    FT-IR, Raman microscopy, XRD, 29 Si and 27 Al MAS NMR, were used to investigate changes in surface properties of a natural illitesample after acid-base potentiometric titration. The characteristic XRD lines indicated the presence of surface Al-Si complexes, preferable to Al(OH)3 precipitates. In the microscopic Raman spectra, the vibration peaks of Si-O and Al-O bonds diminished as a result of treatment withacid, then increased after hydroxide back titration. The varied ratio of signal intensity between Ⅳ Al and Ⅵ At species in 27 Al MAS NMRspectra, together with the stable BET surface area after acidimetric titration, suggested that edge faces and basal planes in the layer structure ofillite participated in dissolution of structural components. The combined spectroscopic evidence demonstrated that the reactions between illitesurfaces and acid-leaching silicic acid and aluminum ions should be considered in the model description of surface acid-base properties of theaqueous illite.

  13. Mineralogical Characterization Studies on Unburnt Ceramic Product Made from Rock Residue Additives by Ft-Ir Spectroscopic Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaragavan, R.; Mullainathan, S.; Balachandramohan, M.; Krishnamoorthy, N.; Nithiyanantham, S.; Murugesan, S.; Vanathi, V.

    2013-10-01

    The usability of waste rock (rock residue) powder as an additive material in ceramic samples was investigated. Qualitative analysis was carried out to determine the major and minor constituent minerals present in ceramic bodies made from rock residue powder by using FT-IR spectroscopic technique. Further, the representative ceramic bodies are analyzed by FT-IR technique to yield more information about the functional groups and also to estimate the order or disorder of kaolinite structure.

  14. Spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques study of the interaction between oxymetholone and human serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh, E-mail: madrakian@basu.ac.ir; Bagheri, Habibollah; Afkhami, Abbas; Soleimani, Mohammad

    2014-11-15

    In this study, the binding of oxymetholone (OXM), a doping drug, to human serum albumin (HSA) was explored at pH 7.40 by spectroscopic methods including spectrofluorimetry, three dimensional excitation–emission matrix (3D EEM), UV–vis absorption, resonance rayleigh scattering (RRS) and molecular docking. The fluorescence results showed that there was a considerable quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA upon binding to OXM by static quenching mechanism. The Stern–Volmer quenching constants (K{sub SV}) between OXM and HSA at three different temperatures 295, 303, 308 K, were obtained as 4.63×10{sup 4}, 3.05×10{sup 4} and 1.49×10{sup 4} L mol{sup −1}, respectively. Furthermore this interaction was confirmed by UV–vis spectrophotometric and RRS techniques. The binding site number, n, apparent binding constant, K{sub b}, and corresponding thermodynamic parameters (ΔS, ΔH and ΔG) were measured at different temperatures. The Van der Waals and hydrogen-bond forces were found to stabilize OXM–HSA complex. The distance (r) between the donor and acceptor was obtained from Förster's theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and found to be 1.67 nm. The 3D EEM showed that OXM slightly changes the secondary structure of HSA. Furthermore, the molecular docking was employed for identification of drug binding sites and interaction of OXM with amino acid residues. - Highlights: • The binding of OXM as a doping drug with HSA was studied by different techniques. • The binding constant of HSA–OXM was calculated. • The binding site of OXM on HSA was characterized with molecular docking. • The thermodynamic parameters were calculated according to fluorescence technique.

  15. A computationally assisted spectroscopic technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients in technological rf plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Birk; Schulze, Julian; Daksha, Manaswi; Schuengel, Edmund; Koepke, Mark; Korolov, Ihor; Derzsi, Aranka; Donko, Zoltan

    2016-09-01

    A Computationally Assisted Spectroscopic Technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients (y-CAST) in capacitive rf plasmas is proposed. This non-intrusive, sensitive diagnostic is based on a combination of Phase Resolved Optical Emission Spectroscopy and PIC simulations. Under most conditions in electropositive plasmas the spatio-temporally resolved electron-impact excitation rate features two distinct maxima adjacent to each electrode at different times within one rf period. One maximum is the consequence of an energy gain of the electrons due to sheath expansion. The second maximum is produced by electrons accelerated towards the plasma bulk by the sheath electric field at the time of maximum voltage drop across the sheath. Due to the different excitation mechanisms the ratio of the intensities of these maxima is very sensitive to y, which allows for its determination via comparing the experimentally measured excitation profiles with corresponding simulation data obtained with various y-coefficients. This diagnostic is tested here in a geometrically symmetric reactor, for stainless steel electrodes and argon gas. An effective secondary electron emission coefficient of y = 0.067+-0.010 is obtained, which is in excellent agreement with previous experimental results.

  16. A computationally assisted spectroscopic technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients in radio frequency plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daksha, M.; Berger, B.; Schuengel, E.; Korolov, I.; Derzsi, A.; Koepke, M.; Donkó, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2016-06-01

    A computationally assisted spectroscopic technique to measure secondary electron emission coefficients (γ-CAST) in capacitively-coupled radio-frequency plasmas is proposed. This non-intrusive, sensitive diagnostic is based on a combination of phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy and particle-based kinetic simulations. In such plasmas (under most conditions in electropositive gases) the spatio-temporally resolved electron-impact excitation/ionization rate features two distinct maxima adjacent to each electrode at different times within each RF period. While one maximum is the consequence of the energy gain of electrons due to sheath expansion, the second maximum is produced by secondary electrons accelerated towards the plasma bulk by the sheath electric field at the time of maximum voltage drop across the adjacent sheath. Due to these different excitation/ionization mechanisms, the ratio of the intensities of these maxima is very sensitive to the secondary electron emission coefficient γ. This sensitvity, in turn, allows γ to be determined by comparing experimental excitation profiles and simulation data obtained with various γ-coefficients. The diagnostic, tested here in a geometrically symmetric argon discharge, yields an effective secondary electron emission coefficient of γ =0.066+/- 0.01 for stainless steel electrodes.

  17. Characterization of the binding of nevadensin to bovine serum albumin by optical spectroscopic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhaolian; Li, Daojin; Ji, Baoming; Chen, Jianjun

    2008-10-01

    Binding of nevadensin to bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been studied in detail at 298 and 310 K using spectrophotometric technique. The intrinsic fluorescence of BSA was strongly quenched by the addition of nevadensin and spectroscopic observations are mainly rationalized in terms of a static quenching process at lower concentration of nevadensin ( Cdrug/ CBSA drug/ CBSA > 1). The binding parameters for the reaction at a pH above (7.40) or below (3.40) the isoelectric point have been calculated according to the double logarithm regression curve. The thermodynamic parameters Δ H0, Δ G0, Δ S0 at different temperatures and binding mechanism of nevadensin to BSA at pH 7.40 and 3.40 were evaluated. The binding ability of nevadensin to BSA at pH 7.40 was stronger than that at pH 3.40. Steady fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) were applied to investigate protein conformation. A value of 2.15 nm for the average distance r between nevadensin (acceptor) and tryptophan residues (Trp) of BSA (donor) was derived from the fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Moreover, influence of pH on the interaction nevadensin with BSA was investigated.

  18. Studies on the interaction of salvianolic acid B with human hemoglobin by multi-spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tingting; Zhu, Shajun; Cao, Hui; Shang, Yanfang; Wang, Miao; Jiang, Guoqing; Shi, Yujun; Lu, Tianhong

    2011-04-01

    The interaction between salvianolic acid B (Sal B) and human hemoglobin (HHb) under physiological conditions was investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques. The experimental results indicate that the quenching mechanism of fluorescence of HHb by Sal B is a static quenching procedure, the binding reaction is spontaneous, and the hydrophobic interactions play a major role in binding of Sal B to HHb. Based on Förster's theory of non-radiative energy transfer, the binding distance between Sal B and the inner tryptophan residues of HHb was determined to be 2.64 nm. The synchronous fluorescence experiment revealed that Sal B can not lead to the microenvironmental changes around the Tyr and Trp residues of HHb, and the binding site of Sal B on HHb is located at α 1β 2 interface of HHb. Furthermore, the CD spectroscopy indicated the secondary structure of HHb is not changed in the presence of Sal B.

  19. Longitudinal follow-up of patients with mild traumatic brain injury by magnetic resonance spectroscopic technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Chen; Xiang-Jun Han; Zi-Yi Guo; Yin Zhang; Qi-Zhou Liang; Hai-Yan Liao; Wen-Rui Su; Qian-Yu Tang; Shui-Xi Fu; Cai-Xiang Chen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes in the concentrations of neural markers immediately or several months after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Methods: The metabolic markers of neurons in white matter tissues above the lateral ventricle were semi-quantitatively determined by employing 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic technique (1-H-MRS) in 30 clinically diagnosed cases of mTBI. At the same time, the neurological functions of the subjects, including ability to pay attention, memory, working memory and operational capacity etc were also assessed.Results:The patients were followed up for, on average, 13 days after mTBI and the results showed that Cre, PCre and Glx in the white matter tissues were significantly elevated in mTBI patients. 17 patients (57%) recovered from the injury during the follow-up (median was defined as the 40th post-trauma day). Comparison in terms of intelligence among groups revealed that the levels of neural markers of intelligence development was positively related with intelligence scores). Conclusions: Change in Glx concentrations is most sensitive during trauma or in ensuing repairing processes, and might be different from normal status in the following months and Glx level tends to be accompanied with change in Cre, another energy-related marker.

  20. Integrated Analysis of the Wood Oil from Xanthocyparis vietnamensis Farjon & Hiep. by Chromatographic and Spectroscopic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ophélie Bazzali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to get better knowledge about the volatiles produced by Xanthocyparis vietnamensis, a species recently discovered in Vietnam, its wood oil has been analyzed by a combination of chromatographic (GC, CC and spectroscopic (GC-MS, 13C-NMR techniques. Forty components that accounted for 87.9% of the oil composition have been identified. The composition is dominated by nootkatene (20.7%, 11,12,13-tri-nor-eremophil-1(10-en-7-one (17.2%, γ-eudesmol (5.1%, nootkatone (4.7%, valencene (3.5% and 13-nor-eremophil-1(10-en-11-one (2.6%. The structure of two new compounds—10-epi-nor-γ-eudesmen-11-one and 12-hydroxy-isodihydroagarofuran—has been elucidated, while 11,12,13-tri-nor-eremophil-1(10-en-7-ol is reported as a natural product for the first time. The composition of X. vietnamensis wood oil varied drastically from those of leaf oils, dominated by hedycaryol (34.4%, phyllocladene (37.8% or by pimara-6(14-15-diene (19.4%.

  1. Soil examination for a forensic trace evidence laboratory--Part 1: Spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Brenda; Lennard, Chris; Kirkbride, K Paul; Robertson, James

    2014-12-01

    In the past, forensic soil examination was a routine aspect of trace evidence examination in forensic science. However, in Australia, the apparent need for soil examinations has diminished and with it the capability of forensic science laboratories to carry out soil examination has been eroded. In recent years, due to soil examinations contributing to some high profile investigations, interest in soil examinations has been renewed. Routine soil examinations conducted in a forensic science laboratory by trace evidence scientists can be facilitated if the examinations are conducted using the instrumentation routinely used by these examiners. Spectroscopic techniques such as visible microspectrophotometry (MSP) and Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are routinely used by trace evidence analysts for the colour and compositional analysis, respectively, of forensic items, including paints, fibres, inks and toners, tapes, adhesives and other miscellaneous examinations. This article presents an examination of the feasibility of using MSP and ATR-FTIR as a first step in the forensic comparison of soils with particular reference to Australian soil samples. This initial study demonstrates MSP and ATR-FTIR can effectively be used as a screening test for the discrimination of "forensic-sized" soil samples prior to submission for more detailed analyses by a soil expert.

  2. Integrated Analysis of the Wood Oil from Xanthocyparis vietnamensis Farjon & Hiep. by Chromatographic and Spectroscopic Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzali, Ophélie; Thai, Tran Huy; Hoi, Tran Minh; Khang, Nguyen Sinh; Hien, Nguyen Thi; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange; Tomi, Félix

    2016-06-27

    In order to get better knowledge about the volatiles produced by Xanthocyparis vietnamensis, a species recently discovered in Vietnam, its wood oil has been analyzed by a combination of chromatographic (GC, CC) and spectroscopic (GC-MS, (13)C-NMR) techniques. Forty components that accounted for 87.9% of the oil composition have been identified. The composition is dominated by nootkatene (20.7%), 11,12,13-tri-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-7-one (17.2%), γ-eudesmol (5.1%), nootkatone (4.7%), valencene (3.5%) and 13-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-11-one (2.6%). The structure of two new compounds-10-epi-nor-γ-eudesmen-11-one and 12-hydroxy-isodihydroagarofuran-has been elucidated, while 11,12,13-tri-nor-eremophil-1(10)-en-7-ol is reported as a natural product for the first time. The composition of X. vietnamensis wood oil varied drastically from those of leaf oils, dominated by hedycaryol (34.4%), phyllocladene (37.8%) or by pimara-6(14)-15-diene (19.4%).

  3. Qualitative and quantitative changes in phospholipids and proteins investigated by spectroscopic techniques in animal depression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depciuch, J.; Sowa-Kucma, M.; Nowak, G.; Papp, M.; Gruca, P.; Misztak, P.; Parlinska-Wojtan, M.

    2017-04-01

    Depression becomes nowadays a high mortality civilization disease with one of the major causes being chronic stress. Raman, Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-vis) spectroscopies were used to determine the changes in the quantity and structure of phospholipids and proteins in the blood serum of rats subjected to chronic mild stress, which is a common animal depression model. Moreover, the efficiency of the imipramine treatment was evaluated. It was found that chronic mild stress not only damages the structure of the phospholipids and proteins, but also decreases their level in the blood serum. A 5 weeks imipramine treatment did increase slightly the quantity of proteins, leaving the damaged phospholipids unchanged. Structural information from phospholipids and proteins was obtained by UV-vis spectroscopy combined with the second derivative of the FTIR spectra. Indeed, the structure of proteins in blood serum of stressed rats was normalized after imipramine therapy, while the impaired structure of phospholipids remained unaffected. These findings strongly suggest that the depression factor, which is chronic mild stress, may induce permanent (irreversible) damages into the phospholipid structure identified as shortened carbon chains. This study shows a possible new application of spectroscopic techniques in the diagnosis and therapy monitoring of depression.

  4. Instrumental analysis of bacterial cells using vibrational and emission Moessbauer spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamnev, Alexander A. [Laboratory of Biochemistry of Plant-Bacterial Symbioses, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, 410049 Saratov (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: aakamnev@ibppm.sgu.ru; Tugarova, Anna V. [Laboratory of Biochemistry of Plant-Bacterial Symbioses, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, 410049 Saratov (Russian Federation); Antonyuk, Lyudmila P. [Laboratory of Biochemistry of Plant-Bacterial Symbioses, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, 410049 Saratov (Russian Federation); Tarantilis, Petros A. [Laboratory of Chemistry, Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, 11855 Athens (Greece); Kulikov, Leonid A. [Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry Techniques, Department of Radiochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Perfiliev, Yurii D. [Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry Techniques, Department of Radiochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Polissiou, Moschos G. [Laboratory of Chemistry, Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, 11855 Athens (Greece); Gardiner, Philip H.E. [Division of Chemistry, School of Science and Mathematics, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-28

    In biosciences and biotechnology, the expanding application of physicochemical approaches using modern instrumental techniques is an efficient strategy to obtain valuable and often unique information at the molecular level. In this work, we applied a combination of vibrational (Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), FT-Raman) spectroscopic techniques, useful in overall structural and compositional analysis of bacterial cells of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense, with {sup 57}Co emission Moessbauer spectroscopy (EMS) used for sensitive monitoring of metal binding and further transformations in live bacterial cells. The information obtained, together with ICP-MS analyses for metals taken up by the bacteria, is useful in analysing the impact of the environmental conditions (heavy metal stress) on the bacterial metabolism and some differences in the heavy metal stress-induced behaviour of non-endophytic (Sp7) and facultatively endophytic (Sp245) strains. The results show that, while both strains Sp7 and Sp245 take up noticeable and comparable amounts of heavy metals from the medium (0.12 and 0.13 mg Co, 0.48 and 0.44 mg Cu or 4.2 and 2.1 mg Zn per gram of dry biomass, respectively, at a metal concentration of 0.2 mM in the medium), their metabolic responses differ essentially. Whereas for strain Sp7 the FTIR measurements showed significant accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoates as storage materials involved in stress endurance, strain Sp245 did not show any major changes in cellular composition. Nevertheless, EMS measurements showed rapid binding of cobalt(II) by live bacterial cells (chemically similar to metal binding by dead bacteria) and its further transformation in the live cells within an hour.

  5. Micro-spectroscopic techniques applied to characterization of varnished archeological findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, G.; Ioppolo, S.; Majolino, D.; Migliardo, P.; Ponterio, R.

    2000-04-01

    This work reports an analysis on terracotta varnished finding recovered in east Sicily area (Messina). We have performed FTIR micro-spectroscopy and electronic microscopy (SEM)measurements in order to recognize the elemental constituents of the varnished surfaces. Furthermore, for all the samples, a study on the bulk has been performed by Fourier Transform Infrared Absorption. The analyzed samples consist of a number of pottery fragments belonging to archaic and classical ages, varnished in black and red colors. The obtained data furnished useful information about composition of decorated surfaces and bulk matrixes, about baking temperature, manufacture techniques and alteration mechanisms of findings due to the long burial.

  6. [Application of Raman spectroscopic technique to the identification and investigation of Chinese ancient jades and jade artifacts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong-Xia; Gan, Fu-Xi

    2009-11-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopic technique is one of the essential methods in scientific archaeological research, which belongs to the nondestructive analysis. As a very good nondestructive analysis approach, it has not been widely applied in the research of the Chinese ancient jade artifacts. First of all in the present paper the fundamentals of laser Raman spectroscopic technique and the new research progress in this field were reviewed. Secondly, the Raman spectra of five familiar jades including nephrite (mainly composed of tremolite), Xiuyan Jade (mainly composed of serpentine), Dushan Jade (mainly composed of anorthite and Zoisite), turquoise and lapis lazuli were summarized respectively. As for an example, the Raman spectra of the four Chinese ancient jade artifacts excavated from Liangzhu Site of Zhejiang Province and Yinxu Site of Anyang in Henan Province were compared with that of the nephrite sample in Hetian of Xinjiang Province. It was shown that the Raman spectroscopic technique is a good nondestructive approach to the identification and investigation of the structures and mineral composition of Chinese ancient jade artifacts. Finally, the limitations and the foreground of this technique were discussed.

  7. Evaluation of Mercaptobenzothiazole Anticorrosive Layer on Cu Surface by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Hideaki; Sugiura, Osamu; Matsumura, Yoshiyuki; Kinoshita, Masaharu

    2007-05-01

    Mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) anticorrosive layer on copper surface prepared in MBT solutions was analyzed by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). The results showed that MBT anticorrosive layer was formed on Cu2O layer in the MBT solution at temperatures higher than 50 °C. Additionally, it was confirmed that MBT anticorrosive layer was formed in the MBT solution at room temperature by adding about 20 wt % acetone to the solution. From polishing experiments of MBT anticorrosive layer and benzotriazole (BTA) layer, it was revealed that MBT anticorrosive layer was physically stronger than BTA layer. It is considered that dishing amount in Cu chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) can be reduced by using MBT. However, MBT anticorrosive layer was not formed in the MBT solution including Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) suggesting that slurry should be composed without H2O2 in order to use MBT for Cu CMP.

  8. Study of engineering surfaces using laser-scattering techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Babu Rao; Baldev Raj

    2003-06-01

    Surface roughness parameters are described. Various surface characterization techniques are reviewed briefly. Interaction of light with the surface is discussed. Laser-scattering methods to characterise the surface are detailed. Practical cases, where laser-scattering methods have provided useful information about surface characteristics, are illustrated.

  9. Spectroscopic microscopy can quantify the statistics of subdiffractional refractive-index fluctuations in media with random rough surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Di; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Capoglu, Ilker; Subramanian, Hariharan; Chandler, John; Thompson, Sebastian; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    We previously established that spectroscopic microscopy can quantify subdiffraction-scale refractive index (RI) fluctuations in a label-free dielectric medium with a smooth surface. However, to study more realistic samples, such as biological cells, the effect of rough surface should be considered. In this Letter, we first report an analytical theory to synthesize microscopic images of a rough surface, validate this theory by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solutions of Maxwell’s equatio...

  10. Infrared Spectroscopic Evidence of Surface Speciation of Amino Acids on Titanium Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, C. M.; Jonsson, C. L.; Parikh, S. J.; Sverjensky, D. A.; Cleaves, H. J.; Hazen, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    investigation of Glu and Asp interactions with the rutile surface using potentiometric titrations, adsorption experiments and FTIR spectroscopy. The spectroscopic evidence integrated with quantitative adsorption data and potentiometric titration data are used to describe the adsorption with surface complexation models. [1] Roddick-Lanzilotta A.D. and McQuillan A.J. (2000) J. Colloid & Interface Sci. 227, 48-54.

  11. Capturing latent fingerprints from metallic painted surfaces using UV-VIS spectroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrushin, Andrey; Scheidat, Tobias; Vielhauer, Claus

    2015-03-01

    In digital crime scene forensics, contactless non-destructive detection and acquisition of latent fingerprints by means of optical devices such as a high-resolution digital camera, confocal microscope, or chromatic white-light sensor is the initial step prior to destructive chemical development. The applicability of an optical sensor to digitalize latent fingerprints primarily depends on reflection properties of a substrate. Metallic painted surfaces, for instance, pose a problem for conventional sensors which make use of visible light. Since metallic paint is a semi-transparent layer on top of the surface, visible light penetrates it and is reflected off of the metallic flakes randomly disposed in the paint. Fingerprint residues do not impede light beams making ridges invisible. Latent fingerprints can be revealed, however, using ultraviolet light which does not penetrate the paint. We apply a UV-VIS spectroscope that is capable of capturing images within the range from 163 to 844 nm using 2048 discrete levels. We empirically show that latent fingerprints left behind on metallic painted surfaces become clearly visible within the range from 205 to 385 nm. Our proposed streakiness score feature determining the proportion of a ridge-valley pattern in an image is applied for automatic assessment of a fingerprint's visibility and distinguishing between fingerprint and empty regions. The experiments are carried out with 100 fingerprint and 100 non-fingerprint samples.

  12. Adaptive Response Surface Techniques in Reliability Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, I.; Faber, M. H.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1993-01-01

    Problems in connection with estimation of the reliability of a component modelled by a limit state function including noise or first order discontinuitics are considered. A gradient free adaptive response surface algorithm is developed. The algorithm applies second order polynomial surfaces deter...

  13. Surface Optimization Techniques for Deployable Reflectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under this and several other programs, CTD has developed TEMBOREG deployable solid-surface reflectors (TEMBOREG Reflectors) to provide future NASA and Air Force...

  14. FAST CARS: Engineering a Laser Spectroscopic Technique for Rapid Identification of Bacterial Spores

    OpenAIRE

    Scully, M. O.; Kattawar, G. W.; Lucht, R. P.; Opatrný, T.; Pilloff, H.; Rebane, A.; Sokolov, A.V.(Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia); Zubairy, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Airborne contaminants, e.g., bacterial spores, are usually analyzed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical, and biological assays. Current research into real-time laser spectroscopic detectors of such contaminants is based on e.g., resonance fluorescence. The present approach derives from recent experiments in which atoms and molecules are prepared by one (or more) coherent laser(s) and probed by another set of lasers. However, generating and using maximally coherent oscillation in macromole...

  15. Role of an Oxidant Mixture as Surface Modifier of Porous Silicon Microstructures Evaluated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-González, Zeuz; Escobar, Salvador; Nava, Rocío; del Río, J Antonio; Tagüeña-Martínez, Julia

    2016-04-21

    Current research on porous silicon includes the construction of complex structures with luminescent and/or photonic properties. However, their preparation with both characteristics is still challenging. Recently, our group reported a possible method to achieve that by adding an oxidant mixture to the electrolyte used to produce porous silicon. This mixture can chemically modify their microstructure by changing the thickness and surface passivation of the pore walls. In this work, we prepared a series of samples (with and without oxidant mixture) and we evaluated the structural differences through their scanning electron micrographs and their optical properties determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results showed that ellipsometry is sensitive to slight variations in the porous silicon structure, caused by changes in their preparation. The fitting process, based on models constructed from the features observed in the micrographs, allowed us to see that the mayor effect of the oxidant mixture is on samples of high porosity, where the surface oxidation strongly contributes to the skeleton thinning during the electrochemical etching. This suggests the existence of a porosity threshold for the action of the oxidant mixture. These results could have a significant impact on the design of complex porous silicon structures for different optoelectronic applications.

  16. Development and Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Czerwinski; Phil Weck; Frederic Poineau

    2010-12-29

    Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Visible) and Time Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line, real-time analysis of the actinide elements in a solvent extraction process. UV-Visible and TRLFS techniques have been used for measuring the speciation and concentration of the actinides under laboratory conditions. These methods are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques for GNEP applications, the fundamental speciation of the target actinides and the resulting influence on 3 spectroscopic properties must be determined. Through this effort detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be establish and utilized in a range of areas of interest to GNEP, especially in areas related to materials accountability and process control.

  17. Characterization techniques for surface-micromachined devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, W.P.; Smith, N.F.; Irwin, L.; Tanner, D.M.

    1998-08-01

    Using a microengine as the primary test vehicle, the authors have examined several aspects of characterization. Parametric measurements provide fabrication process information. Drive signal optimization is necessary for increased microengine performance. Finally, electrical characterization of resonant frequency and quality factor can be more accurate than visual techniques.

  18. Surface modification: advantages, techniques, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    2000-03-01

    Adequate performance of materials at elevated temperatures is a potential problem in many systems within the chemical, petroleum, process, and power-generating industries. Degradation of materials occurs because of interaction between the structural material and the exposure environment. These interactions are generally undesired chemical reactions that can lead to accelerated wastage and alter the functional requirements and/or structural integrity of the materials. Therefore, material selection for high-temperature applications must be based not only on a material strength properties but also on resistance to the complex environments prevalent in the anticipated exposure environment. As plants become larger, the satisfactory performance and reliability of components play a greater role in plant availability and economics. However, system designers are becoming increasingly concerned with finding the least expensive material that will satisfactorily perform the design function for the desired service life. This present paper addresses the benefits of surface modification and identified several criteria for selection and application of modified surfaces in the power sector. A brief review is presented on potential methods for modification of surfaces, with the emphasis on coatings. In the final section of the paper, several examples address the requirements of different energy systems and surface modification avenues that have been applied to resolve the issues.

  19. The Progress on Laser Surface Modification Techniques of Titanium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Cheng; PAN Lin; Al Ding-fei; TAO Xi-qi; XIA Chun-huai; SONG Yan

    2004-01-01

    Titanium alloy is widely used in aviation, national defence, automobile, medicine and other fields because of their advantages in lower density, corrosion resistance, and fatigue resistance etc. As titanium alloy is higher friction coefficients, weak wear resistance, bad high temperature oxidation resistance and lower biocompatibility, its applications are restricted. Using laser surface modification techniques can significantly improve the surface properties of titanium alloy. a review is given for progress on laser surface modification techniques of titanium alloy in this paper.

  20. Corrosion investigation of fire-gilded bronze involving high surface resolution spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, G.; Chiavari, C.; Avila, J.; Esvan, J.; Raffo, S.; Bignozzi, M. C.; Asensio, M. C.; Robbiola, L.; Martini, C.

    2016-03-01

    Gilded bronzes are often affected by severe corrosion, due to defects in the Au layer and Au/Cu alloy galvanic coupling, stimulated by large cathodic area of the gilded layer. Galvanic corrosion, triggered by gilding defects, leads to products growth at the Au/bronze interface, inducing blistering or break-up of the Au layer. In this context, fire-gilded bronze replicas prepared by ancient methods (use of spreadable Au-Hg paste) was specifically characterised by compiling complementary spectroscopic and imaging information before/after accelerated ageing with synthetic rain. Fire-gilded bronze samples were chemically imaged in cross-section at nano-metric scale (XPS). We have found a net surface enrichment in Zn and Sn after fire-gilding and presence of metallic Hg, Pb and Cu within the Au layer. Moreover, the composition distribution of the elements together with their oxidation has been determined. It was also revealed that metallic phases including Hg and Pb remain in the gilding after corrosion. Moreover, selective dissolution of Zn and Cu occurs in the crater due to galvanic coupling, which locally induces relative Sn species enrichment (decuprification). The feasibility advantages and disadvantages of chemical imaging using HR-SRPES to study artworks have been investigated on representative replicas.

  1. Mercury And The Moon: Mid-infrared Spectroscopic Measurements Of The Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson Hanna, Kerri L.; Sprague, A. L.; Kozlowski, R. W.; Boccafolo, K.; Helbert, J.; Maturilli, A.; Warell, J.

    2006-09-01

    Spectroscopic observations (7.5 - 13 μm) of Mercury and the Moon obtained with MIRSI (Mid-Infrared Spectrometer and Imager) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) are presented. The spectra were acquired at mercurian W. longitudes 172 - 282° covering north polar to south polar latitudes. Also acquired were lunar surface measurements of the Apollo 16 landing site and Grimaldi basin and highlands. Mercury measurements covered Caloris Basin, Basin S, and other regions on the side not imaged by Mariner 10. Lunar locations were chosen for their known surface compositions determined from near-infrared spectral telescopic observations and Apollo return samples. Spectra for both bodies were reduced with the same calibration star to minimize reduction differences. Spectral differences between the mercurian locations indicate a heterogeneous composition and differences between Mercury and lunar spectra indicate compositional differences between the two bodies. All collected spectra from Mercury and the Moon show distinct and recognizable features including the Christiansen emissivity maximum and one or more transmission minima. Other features have yet to be identified. True emission spectra of rock and mineral powders with varying grain sizes will be presented for comparison with the data. Acknowledgements: The authors of this paper were Visiting Astronomers at the Infrared Telescope Facility, which is operated by the University of Hawaii under Cooperative Agreement no. NCC 5-538 with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Science Mission Directorate, Planetary Astronomy Program. We are especially grateful to Alan Tokunaga and Eric Tollestrup for useful engineering time on the telescope and Don Hunten for helpful discussions. This work was supported by NSF grant AST-0406796.

  2. Tracer injection techniques in flowing surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörman, A.

    2009-04-01

    Residence time distributions for flowing water and reactive matter are commonly used integrated properties of the transport process for determining technical issues of water resource management and in eco-hydrological science. Two general issues for tracer techniques are that the concentration-vs-time relation following a tracer injection (the breakthrough curve) gives unique transport information in different parts of the curve and separation of hydromechanical and reactive mechanisms often require simultaneous tracer injections. This presentation discusses evaluation methods for simultaneous tracer injections based on examples of tracer experiments in small rivers, streams and wetlands. Tritiated water is used as a practically inert substance to reflect the actual hydrodynamics, but other involved tracers are Cr(III)-51, P-32 and N-15. Hydromechanical, in-stream dispersion is reflected as a symmetrical spreading of the spatial concentration distribution. This requires that the transport distance over water depth is larger than about five times the flow Peclet number. Transversal retention of both inert and reactive solutes is reflected in terms of the tail of the breakthrough curve. Especially, reactive solutes can have a substantial magnification of the tailing behaviour depending on reaction rates or partitioning coefficients. To accurately discriminate between the effects of reactions and hydromechanical mixing its is relevant to use simultaneous injections of inert and reactive tracers with a sequential or integrated evaluation procedure. As an example, the slope of the P-32 tailing is consistently smaller than that of a simultaneous tritium injection in Ekeby wetland, Eskilstuna. The same applies to N-15 injected in the same experiment, but nitrogen is affected also by a systematic loss due to denitrification. Uptake in stream-bed sediments can be caused by a pumping effect arising when a variable pressure field is created on the stream bottom due to bed

  3. Binding studies of lophirone B with bovine serum albumin (BSA): Combination of spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Otávio Augusto; da Silva, Veridiana A.; Sant'Anna, Carlos Maurício R.; Ferreira, Aurélio B. B.; Ribeiro, Tereza Auxiliadora N.; de Carvalho, Mário G.; Cesarin-Sobrinho, Dari; Netto-Ferreira, José Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between the transport protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the natural product lophirone B, was investigated by spectroscopic techniques combined with a computational method (molecular docking). From the KSV and kq values it was concluded that lophirone B quenches the fluorescence of BSA by dynamic and static mechanisms. The Ka values, of the order of 104 M-1, and the number of binding sites (n ≈ 1), indicate that the binding is moderate and there is just one main binding site in BSA for lophirone B. The negative ΔG° values are in accordance with the spontaneity of the process and the positive ΔH° and ΔS° values indicate that the binding is entropically driven; the main binding forces for the association BSA:lophirone B are probably lipophilic interactions. Circular dichroism (CD) studies show there is not a significant perturbation on the secondary structure of the albumin upon the binding process. In order to better understand the spectroscopic results, a computational method was applied: molecular docking suggests Trp-213 site, as the main binding site for the ligand. Lophirone B seems to be exposed to the aqueous media as well as accommodated inside the protein cavity, resulting in a moderate affinity for the albumin. The Arg-198, His-287, Lys-294 and Lys-439 residues are interacting via hydrogen bonding with lophirone B, whereas the interaction with Trp-213 residue occurs through a lipophilic interaction.

  4. Spectroscopic determination of ground and excited state vibrational potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laane, Jaan

    Far-infrared spectra, mid-infrared combination band spectra, Raman spectra, and dispersed fluorescence spectra of non-rigid molecules can be used to determine the energies of many of the quantum states of conformationally important vibrations such as out-of-plane ring modes, internal rotations, and molecular inversions in their ground electronic states. Similarly, the fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled molecules, together with electronic absorption spectra, provide the information for determining the vibronic energy levels of electronic excited states. One- or two-dimensional potential energy functions, which govern the conformational changes along the vibrational coordinates, can be determined from these types of data for selected molecules. From these functions the molecular structures, the relative energies between different conformations, the barriers to molecular interconversions, and the forces responsible for the structures can be ascertained. This review describes the experimental and theoretical methodology for carrying out the potential energy determinations and presents a summary of work that has been carried out for both electronic ground and excited states. The results for the out-of-plane ring motions of four-, five-, and six-membered rings will be presented, and results for several molecules with unusual properties will be cited. Potential energy functions for the carbonyl wagging and ring modes for several cyclic ketones in their S1(n,pi*) states will also be discussed. Potential energy surfaces for the three internal rotations, including the one governing the photoisomerization process, will be examined for trans-stilbene in both its S0 and S1(pi,pi*) states. For the bicyclic molecules in the indan family, the two-dimensional potential energy surfaces for the highly interacting ring-puckering and ring-flapping motions in both the S0 and S1(pi,pi*) states have also been determined using all of the spectroscopic methods mentioned above

  5. Multidisciplinary approach for the study of an Egyptian coffin (late 22nd/early 25th dynasty): Combining imaging and spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracci, S.; Caruso, O.; Galeotti, M.; Iannaccone, R.; Magrini, D.; Picchi, D.; Pinna, D.; Porcinai, S.

    2015-06-01

    This paper demonstrates that an educated methodology based on both non-invasive and micro invasive techniques in a two-step approach is a powerful tool to characterize the materials and stratigraphies of an Egyptian coffin, which was restored several times. This coffin, belonging to a certain Mesiset, is now located at the Museo Civico Archeologico of Bologna (inventory number MCABo EG 1963). Scholars attributed it to the late 22nd/early 25th dynasty by stylistic comparison. The first step of the diagnostic approach applied imaging techniques on the whole surface in order to select measurements spots and to unveil both original and restored areas. Images and close microscopic examination of the polychrome surface allowed selecting representative areas to be investigated in situ by portable spectroscopic techniques: X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Fiber Optic Reflectance Spectroscopy (FORS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). After the analysis of the results coming from the first step, very few selected samples were taken to clarify the stratigraphy of the polychrome layers. The first step, based on the combination of imaging and spectroscopic techniques in a totally non-invasive modality, is quite unique in the literature on Egyptian coffins and enabled us to reveal many differences in the ground layer's composition and to identify a remarkable number of pigments in the original and restored areas. This work offered also a chance to check the limitations of the non-invasive approach applied on a complex case, namely the right localization of different materials in the stratigraphy and the identification of binding media. Indeed, to dissolve any remaining doubts on superimposed layers belonging to different interventions, it was necessary to sample few micro-fragments in some selected areas and analyze them prepared as cross-sections. The original ground layer is made of calcite, while the restored areas show the presence of either a mixture of calcite

  6. Optical properties and surface characterization of pulsed laser-deposited Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crovetto, Andrea, E-mail: ancro@nanotech.dtu.dk [DTU Nanotech, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Cazzaniga, Andrea; Ettlinger, Rebecca B.; Schou, Jørgen [DTU Fotonik, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Hansen, Ole [DTU Nanotech, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); CINF, Center for Individual Nanoparticle Functionality, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-05-01

    Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} films prepared by pulsed laser deposition at different temperatures are characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The focus is on confirming results from direct measurement techniques, by finding appropriate models of the surface overlayer for data fitting, and extracting the dielectric function of the films. It is found that the surface overlayer changes with film thickness and deposition temperature. Adopting different ellipsometry measurements and modeling strategies for each film, dielectric functions are extracted and compared. As the deposition temperature is increased, the dielectric functions exhibit additional critical points related to optical transitions in the material other than absorption across the fundamental band gap. In the case of a thin film < 200 nm thick, surface features observed by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy are accurately reproduced by ellipsometry data fitting. - Highlights: • Inhomogeneous Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} films are prepared by pulsed laser deposition. • The film surface includes secondary phases and topographic structures. • We model a film surface layer that fits ellipsometry data. • Ellipsometry data fits confirm results from direct measurement techniques. • We obtain the dielectric function of inhomogeneous Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} films.

  7. A high throughput approach to quantify protein adsorption on combinatorial metal/metal oxide surfaces using electron microprobe and spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, T.; Lohstreter, L.; Filiaggi, M. J.; Bai, Zhijun; Dahn, J. R.

    2008-09-01

    Although metallic biomaterials are widely used, systematic studies of protein adsorption onto such materials are generally lacking. Combinatorial binary films of Al 1-xTi x and Al 1-xNb x (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1) and corresponding pure element films were produced on glass substrates using a unique magnetron sputtering technique. Fibrinogen and albumin adsorption amounts were measured by wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy (WDS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) equipment, both high throughput techniques with automated motion stage capabilities. X-ray diffraction revealed that the binary films have crystalline phases present near the ends of the compositional gradient with an amorphous region throughout the interior of the gradient. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy provided the surface chemistry along the binary films and showed that Al 2O 3 preferentially formed at the surface. Protein adsorption onto these films was found to be closely correlated to the alumina surface fraction, with high alumina content at the surface leading to low amounts of adsorbed fibrinogen and albumin. Protein adsorption amounts obtained with WDS and SE were in excellent agreement for all films. This suggests that this combinatorial materials approach combined with these state-of-the-art, automated high throughput instruments provides a novel way to accurately monitor protein adsorption taking place at the surfaces of these metal/metal oxide materials.

  8. Surface dielectric relaxation: probing technique and its application to thermal activation dynamics of polymer surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Masashi

    2010-09-01

    For dynamic analyses of a polymer surface, a dielectric relaxation measurement technique with parallel electrodes placed away from the surface was developed. In this technique, a liquid heating medium was filled in the space between the polymer surface and the electrodes. The construction that maintains the surface can clarify the physical interactions between the liquid and the bare surface and controlling the temperature of the liquid reveals the thermal activation property of the surface. The dielectric relaxation spectrum of the surface convoluted into the bulk and liquid spectra can be obtained by a reactance analysis and the surface spectrum is expressed with an equivalent resistance-capacitance parallel circuit. On the basis of the electromechanical analogy, the electric elements can be converted into mechanical elements that indicate the viscoelasticity of the polymer surface. Using these measurement and analysis techniques, the electric and mechanical properties of the surface of a gelatinized chloroprene rubber sample were analyzed.

  9. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B P; Saini, G S S

    2016-02-15

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B. P.; Saini, G. S. S.

    2016-02-01

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  11. Corrosion detection in steel-reinforced concrete using a spectroscopic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garboczi, E. J.; Stutzman, P. E.; Wang, S.; Martys, N. S.; Hassan, A. M.; Duthinh, D.; Provenzano, V.; Chou, S. G.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Surek, J. T.; Kim, S.; McMichael, R. D.; Stiles, M. D.

    2014-02-01

    Detecting the early corrosion of steel that is embedded in reinforced concrete (rebar) is a goal that would greatly facilitate the inspection and measurement of corrosion in the US physical infrastructure. Since 2010, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been working on a large project to develop an electromagnetic (EM) probe that detects the specific corrosion products via spectroscopic means. Several principal iron corrosion products, such as hematite and goethite, are antiferromagnetic at field temperatures. At a given applied EM frequency, which depends on temperature, these compounds undergo a unique absorption resonance that identifies the presence of these particular iron corrosion products. The frequency of the resonances tends to be on the order of 100 GHz or higher, so transmitting EM waves through the cover concrete and back out again at a detectable level has been challenging. NIST has successfully detected these two iron corrosion products, and is developing equipment and methodologies that will be capable of penetrating the typical 50 mm of cover concrete in the field. The novel part of this project is the detection of specific compounds, rather than only geometrical changes in rebar cross-section. This method has the potential of providing an early-corrosion probe for steel in reinforced concrete, and for other applications where steel is covered by various layers and coatings.

  12. Study on Superinsulating Surface by Heavy Ion Tracks Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A common problem in high voltage technique is the breakdown of insulator due to surfacecontamination with conducting material. For example, the metal ion is transported to the insulator surfaceby sparking of vapor metal. Usually, the conventional way to solve this problem is to produce anundulating shape of the insulation surface. However,the way to enlarge the insulation surface is not

  13. A novel surface-repairing technique for gun bore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Bing; YU Xu-dong; WU Bin; WANG Cheng-tao

    2005-01-01

    A novel surface-repairing technique for gun bore was investigated, which was combined with the merits such as anti-erosion wear, damage-repairing, and etc. It was accomplished by adhering a special rare earth nanocom posite evenly to the micro-surface of gun bore. The effectiveness of this technique was approved by the target-firing using a domestic automatic rifle with chromium-coated bore. Its characteristics were discussed based on the surface analyses of the rifle bore by secondary ion mass spectrometry(SIMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis.

  14. Development of a spectroscopic technique for simultaneous magnetic field, electron density, and temperature measurements in ICF-relevant plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, E. C.; Koch, J. A.; Presura, R.; Angermeier, W. A.; Darling, T.; Haque, S.; Mancini, R. C.; Covington, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Spectroscopic techniques in the visible range are often used in plasma experiments to measure B-field induced Zeeman splitting, electron densities via Stark broadening, and temperatures from Doppler broadening. However, when electron densities and temperatures are sufficiently high, the broadening of the Stark and Doppler components can dominate the emission spectra and obscure the Zeeman component. In this research, we are developing a time-resolved multi-axial technique for measuring the Zeeman, Stark, and Doppler broadened line emission of dense magnetized plasmas for Z-pinch and Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) accelerators. The line emission is used to calculate the electron densities, temperatures, and B-fields. In parallel, we are developing a line-shape modeling code that incorporates the broadening effects due to Stark, Doppler, and Zeeman effects for dense magnetized plasma. This manuscript presents the details of the experimental setup and line shape code, along with the results obtained from an Al iii doublet at the University of Nevada, Reno at Nevada Terawatt Facility. Future tests are planned to further evaluate the technique and modeling on other material wire array, gas puff, and DPF platforms.

  15. Coupling spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques for evaluation of the depositional history of hydrocarbons in a subtropical estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, César C; Doumer, Marta E; Gallice, Wellington C; Dauner, Ana Lúcia L; Cabral, Ana Caroline; Cardoso, Fernanda D; Dolci, Natiely N; Camargo, Luana M; Ferreira, Paulo A L; Figueira, Rubens C L; Mangrich, Antonio S

    2015-10-01

    Spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques can be used together to evaluate hydrocarbon inputs to coastal environments such as the Paranaguá estuarine system (PES), located in the SW Atlantic, Brazil. Historical inputs of aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed using two sediment cores from the PES. The AHs were related to the presence of biogenic organic matter and degraded oil residues. The PAHs were associated with mixed sources. The highest hydrocarbon concentrations were related to oil spills, while relatively low levels could be attributed to the decrease in oil usage during the global oil crisis. The results of electron paramagnetic resonance were in agreement with the absolute AHs and PAHs concentrations measured by chromatographic techniques, while near-infrared spectroscopy results were consistent with unresolved complex mixture (UCM)/total n-alkanes ratios. These findings suggest that the use of a combination of techniques can increase the accuracy of assessment of contamination in sediments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A comparison of reflectance and transmittance near-infrared spectroscopic techniques in determining drug content in intact tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thosar, S S; Forbess, R A; Ebube, N K; Chen, Y; Rubinovitz, R L; Kemper, M S; Reier, G E; Wheatley, T A; Shukla, A J

    2001-01-01

    Drug contents of intact tablets were determined using non-destructive near infrared (NIR) reflectance and transmittance spectroscopic techniques. Tablets were compressed from blends of Avicel PH-101 and 0.5% w/w magnesium stearate with varying concentrations of anhydrous theophylline (0, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20 and 40% w/w). Ten tablets from each drug content batch were randomly selected for spectral analysis. Both reflectance and transmittance NIR spectra were obtained from these intact tablets. Actual drug contents of the tablets were then ascertained using a UV-spectrophotometer at 268 nm. Multiple linear regression (MLR) models at 1116 nm and partial least squares (PLS) calibration models were generated from the second derivative spectral data of the tablets in order to predict drug contents of intact tablets. Both the reflectance and the transmittance techniques were able to predict the drug contents in intact tablets over a wide range. However, a comparison of the results of the study indicated that the lowest percent errors of prediction were provided by the PLS calibration models generated from spectral data obtained using the transmittance technique.

  17. Corrosion investigation of fire-gilded bronze involving high surface resolution spectroscopic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masi, G., E-mail: giulia.masi5@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Chimica, Ambientale e dei Materiali, Università di Bologna, via Terracini 28, 40131 Bologna (Italy); Chiavari, C., E-mail: cristina.chiavari@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Chimica, Ambientale e dei Materiali, Università di Bologna, via Terracini 28, 40131 Bologna (Italy); C.I.R.I. (Centro Interdipartimentale Ricerca Industriale) Meccanica Avanzata e Materiali, Università di Bologna, Bologna, via Terracini 28, 40131 Bologna (Italy); Avila, J., E-mail: jose.avila@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, 91190 Saint-Aubin (France); Esvan, J., E-mail: jerome.esvan@ensiacet.fr [Centre Interuniversitaire de Recherche et d’Ingénierie des Matériaux, Université de Toulouse, 4 allée Emile Monso, 31030 Toulouse (France); Raffo, S., E-mail: simona.raffo2@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Chimica Industriale “Toso Montanari”, Università di Bologna, viale Risorgimento 4, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Bignozzi, M.C., E-mail: maria.bignozzi@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Chimica, Ambientale e dei Materiali, Università di Bologna, via Terracini 28, 40131 Bologna (Italy); Asensio, M.C., E-mail: maria-carmen.asensio@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, 91190 Saint-Aubin (France); Robbiola, L., E-mail: robbiola@univ-tlse2.fr [TRACES Lab (CNRS UMR5608), Université Toulouse Jean-Jaurès, 5, allées Antonio-Machado, 31058 Toulouse (France); and others

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fire-gilded bronze prepared by ancient methods (Au–Hg layer on Cu–Sn–Zn–Pb–Sb). • Heating during gilding induces Sn and Znenrichment in the top part of the gilded layer. • SR-HRPES mapping of corrosion craters (cross-section) after accelerated ageing. • Selective dissolution of Cu and Zn in the craters induces Sn species enrichment. • The main species in the craters are related to hydroxi-oxide compounds. - Abstract: Gilded bronzes are often affected by severe corrosion, due to defects in the Au layer and Au/Cu alloy galvanic coupling, stimulated by large cathodic area of the gilded layer. Galvanic corrosion, triggered by gilding defects, leads to products growth at the Au/bronze interface, inducing blistering or break-up of the Au layer. In this context, fire-gilded bronze replicas prepared by ancient methods (use of spreadable Au–Hg paste) was specifically characterised by compiling complementary spectroscopic and imaging information before/after accelerated ageing with synthetic rain. Fire-gilded bronze samples were chemically imaged in cross-section at nano-metric scale (<200 nm) using high energy and lateral resolution synchrotron radiation photoemission (HR-SRPES) of core levels and valence band after conventional characterisation of the samples by Glow Discharge optical Emission Spectroscopy (GD-OES) and conventional X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We have found a net surface enrichment in Zn and Sn after fire-gilding and presence of metallic Hg, Pb and Cu within the Au layer. Moreover, the composition distribution of the elements together with their oxidation has been determined. It was also revealed that metallic phases including Hg and Pb remain in the gilding after corrosion. Moreover, selective dissolution of Zn and Cu occurs in the crater due to galvanic coupling, which locally induces relative Sn species enrichment (decuprification). The feasibility advantages and disadvantages of

  18. Structure and spectroscopic analysis of the graphene monolayer film directly grown on the quartz substrate via the HF-CVD technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Waleed E.; Al-Hazmi, Farag S.; Al-Ghamdi, A. A.; Shokr, F. S.; Beall, Gary W.; Bronstein, Lyudmila M.

    2016-08-01

    Direct growth of a monolayer graphene film on a quartz substrate by a hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique is reported. The monolayer graphene film prepared was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The optical properties were studied by spectroscopic elliposmetry. The experimental data were fitted by the Forouhi-Bloomer model to estimate the extinction coefficient and the refractive index of the monolayer graphene film. The refractive index spectrum in the visible region was studied based on the harmonic oscillator model. The lattice dielectric constant, real and imaginary dielectric constants and the ratio of the charge carrier number to the effective mass were determined. The surface and volume energy loss parameters were also found and showed that the value of the surface energy loss is greater than the volume energy loss. The determination of these optical constants will open new avenue for novel applications of graphene films in the field of wave plates, light modulators, ultrahigh-frequency signal processing and LCDs.

  19. Spectroscopic techniques as a diagnostic tool for early detection of osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Kanika; Lee, Kwang Sung; Lee, Dong Geun; Kim, Yong Ki; Kim, Kyung Chun [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Osteoporosis (OP) a kind of bone disease, is very serious in particular for old persons, and may lead them to immobility and death. Early detection of the diseases is the first consideration for the patients to have more options to live a healthy life. The biomarkers or bonemarkers provide a promising challenge in clinical proteomics for early disease detection. In this paper, optical techniques such as Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV/Visible spectroscopy are employed to find the bone markers and emphasis has been given on noninvasive modalities for early detection of osteoporosis. Blood plasma samples procured from two groups, patients and healthy persons were tested. Both of the optical techniques revealed obvious differences in the spectra: between two groups, for example, increase in intensity for OP persons. New peaks were found at 1646, 1540, 1456 and 1077 cm-1 in FTIR spectra. Except 1588 cm-1, we showed decrease in spectral intensity of OP persons. In UV/Visible spectroscopy results, new peaks appeared in the OP patients spectra at the wavelength of 279 nm and 414 nm. These differences in the spectra of the two types samples, allow rapid and cost-effective discrimination of the potential patients with the optical techniques which were verified by the bone densitometer in the hospitals. The new and novel technique is quick, reliable and effective

  20. A Spectroscopic Technique for Local Temperature Measurement in a Micro-Optofluidic System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, M.K.; Frijns, A.J.H.; Mandamparambil, R.; Smeulders, D.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a spectroscopy technique to measure temperature locally in a polydimethylsiloxane micro-optofluidic chip with integrated optical fibers and minimal optical components. The device was fabricated in one step with fiber coupler grooves followed by the manual integration of the optical fibers

  1. Improved LWR Cladding Performance by EPD Surface Modification Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, Michael; Sridharan, Kumar

    2012-11-26

    This project will utilize the electro-phoretic deposition technique (EPD) in conjunction with nanofluids to deposit oxide coatings on prototypic zirconium alloy cladding surfaces. After demonstrating that this surface modification is reproducible and robust, the team will subject the modified surface to boiling and corrosion tests to characterize the improved nucleate boiling behavior and superior corrosion performance. The scope of work consists of the following three tasks: The first task will employ the EPD surface modification technique to coat the surface of a prototypic set of zirconium alloy cladding tube materials (e.g. Zircaloy and advanced alloys such as M5) with a micron-thick layer of zirconium oxide nanoparticles. The team will characterize the modified surface for uniformity using optical microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy, and for robustness using standard hardness measurements. After zirconium alloy cladding samples have been prepared and characterized using the EPD technique, the team will begin a set of boiling experiments to measure the heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux (CHF) limit for each prepared sample and its control sample. This work will provide a relative comparison of the heat transfer performance for each alloy and the surface modification technique employed. As the boiling heat transfer experiments begin, the team will also begin corrosion tests for these zirconium alloy samples using a water corrosion test loop that can mimic light water reactor (LWR) operational environments. They will perform extended corrosion tests on the surface-modified zirconium alloy samples and control samples to examine the robustness of the modified surface, as well as the effect on surface oxidation

  2. Murillo's paintings revealed by spectroscopic techniques and dedicated laboratory-made micro X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, A; Siguenza, M B; Franquelo, M L; Jimenez de Haro, M C; Justo, A; Perez-Rodriguez, J L

    2010-06-25

    This paper describes one of the first case studies using micro-diffraction laboratory-made systems to analyse painting cross-sections. Pigments, such as lead white, vermilion, red ochre, red lac, lapis lazuli, smalt, lead tin yellow type I, massicot, ivory black, lamp black and malachite, were detected in cross-sections prepared from six Bartolomé Esteban Murillo paintings by micro-Raman and micro-XRD combined with complementary techniques (optical microscopy, SEM-EDS, and FT-IR). The use of micro-XRD was necessary due to the poor results obtained with conventional XRD. In some cases, pigment identification was only possible by combining results from the different analytical techniques utilised in this study.

  3. Innovative combination of spectroscopic techniques to reveal nanoparticle fate in a crop plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larue, Camille; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Stein, Ricardo J.; Fayard, Barbara; Pouyet, Emeline; Villanova, Julie; Magnin, Valérie; Pradas del Real, Ana-Elena; Trcera, Nicolas; Legros, Samuel; Sorieul, Stéphanie; Sarret, Géraldine

    2016-05-01

    Nanotechnology is the new industrial revolution of our century. Its development leads to an increasing use of nanoparticles and thus to their dissemination. Their fate in the environment is of great concern and especially their possible transfer in trophic chains might be an issue for food safety. However, so far our knowledge on this topic has been restricted by the lack of appropriate techniques to characterize their behavior in complex matrices. Here, we present in detail the use of cutting-edge beam-based techniques for nanoparticle in situ localization, quantification and speciation in a crop plant species (Lactuca sativa). Lettuce seedlings have been exposed to TiO2 and Ag nanoparticles and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry, micro-particle induced X-ray emission coupled to Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy on nuclear microprobe, micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The benefits and drawbacks of each technique are discussed, and the types of information that can be drawn, for example on the translocation to edible parts, change of speciation within the plant, detoxification mechanisms, or impact on the plant ionome, are highlighted. Such type of coupled approach would be an asset for nanoparticle risk assessment.

  4. Laser Spectroscopic Study on Oxygen Isotope Effects in Ozone Surface Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minissale, Marco; Boursier, Corinne; Elandaloussi, Hadj; Te, Yao; Jeseck, Pascal; Rouille, Christian; Zanon-Willette, Thomas; Janssen, Christof

    2016-04-01

    The isotope kinetics of ozone formation in the Chapman reaction [1] O + O2 + M → O3 + M (1) provides the primary example for a chemically induced oxygen isotope anomaly and is associated with large [2] and mass independent [3] oxygen isotope enrichments in the product molecule, linked to a symmetry selection in the ozone formation kinetics [4-5]. The isotopic composition of ozone and its transfer to other molecules is a powerful tracer in the atmospheric and biogeochemical sciences [6] and serves as a primary model for a possible explanation of the oxygen isotopic heterogeneity in the Solar system [7-8]. Recently, the isotope fractionation in the photolytic decomposition process O3 + hν → O2 + O (2) using visible light has been studied in detail [9-10]. Much less is currently known about the isotope fractionation in the dry deposition or in the gas phase thermal decomposition of ozone O3 + M → O2 + O +M. (3) Here we report on first spectroscopic studies of non-photolytic ozone decomposition using a cw-quantum cascade laser at 9.5 μm. The concentration of individual ozone isotopomers (16O3,16O16O17O, and 16O17O16O) in a teflon coated reaction cell is followed in real time at temperatures between 25 and 150 °C. Observed ozone decay rates depend on homogeneous (reaction (3)) processes in the gas phase and on heterogeneous reactions on the wall. A preliminary analysis reveals agreement with currently recommended ozone decay rates in the gas phase and the absence of a large symmetry selection in the surface decomposition process, indicating the absence of a mass independent fractionation effect. This result is in agreement with previous mass spectrometer (MS) studies on heterogeneous ozone formation on pyrex [11], but contradicts an earlier MS study [12] on ozone surface decomposition on pyrex and quartz. Implications for atmospheric chemistry will be discussed. [1] Morton, J., Barnes, J., Schueler, B. and Mauersberger, K. J. Geophys. Res. 95, 901 - 907 (1990

  5. Combined X-Ray and Raman Spectroscopic Techniques for the Characterization of Sea Spray Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, J. Y.; Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Charnawskas, J. C.; Gilles, M. K.; OBrien, R. E.; Moffet, R.; Radway, J.

    2014-12-01

    Sea spray aerosol along with mineral dust dominates the global mass flux of particles to the atmosphere. Marine aerosol particles are of particular interest because of their continual impact on cloud formation, precipitation, atmospheric chemical processes, and thus global climate. Here we report on the physical/chemical characteristics of sub-surface waters, aerosolized sea spray particles, and particles/organic species present in surface microlayer (SML) samples collected during oceanic field campaigns and generated during laboratory experiments, revealing a biogenic primary source of the organic fraction of airborne particles. We also report on ice nucleation experiments with aerosolized particles collected during the May 2014 WACS II North Atlantic cruise and with laboratory generated exudate material from diatom cultures with the potential to impact cirrus and mixed phase clouds. Physicochemical analyses using a multi-modal approach which includes Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy coupled with Near-Edge Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) and Raman spectroscopy confirm the presence and chemical similarity of polysaccharide-rich transparent exopolymer (TEP) material and proteins in both SML sea spray aerosol and ice forming aerosol particles, regardless of the extent of biological activity in surface waters. Our results demonstrate a direct relationship between the marine environment and composition of marine aerosol through primary particle emission.

  6. The analytical investigations of ancient pottery from Kaveripakkam, Vellore dist, Tamilnadu by spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravisankar, R.; Naseerutheen, A.; Raja Annamalai, G.; Chandrasekaran, A.; Rajalakshmi, A.; Kanagasabapathy, K. V.; Prasad, M. V. R.; Satpathy, K. K.

    2014-03-01

    Analytical investigations using Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD), Thermal Analysis (TG-DTA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRF) were carried out on ancient pottery fragments from Kaveripakkam, in order to outline manufacturing skills, technology information, firing condition and temperature of potteries. The whole set of data showed the firing temperature in the range of 800-900 °C. The analytical characterization of the potsherds, by different complimentary techniques has allowed to identifying the raw materials and technology applied by the ancient artisans.

  7. A novel in-situ measuring technique for aspheric surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan; Wang, Ping; Chen, Yaolong

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, a novel in-situ surface measuring technique for optical elements with aspheric surface is presented. It is a contact type probe, and can be used for measuring ground surfaces. The theory of this technique develops from coordinate measuring machine (CMM), and the measurement accuracy of this technique is depended on the accuracy of computer numerical controlled (CNC). By installing a special equipment with high accuracy measuring head in main spindle of CNC machine, and moving the probe along the path which is described by a mathematical aspheric expression precisely, we could get relative errors of sag height of any position in this path. With this technique, the repeat positioning error caused by traditional off-line measurement will be avoided. The author also has finished a special software with VC++ 6.0. With this software, the form error of ground work piece could be corrected rapidly. This software can calculate and handle the arrangement automatically with all parameters which are required to input in operation interface. In the correction stage, the software can analyze and process error data and generate a new NC program with corrected data for next grinding stage. After 2 or 3 times measuring and correction, the surface shape error of the aspheric optical element will be less than 1μm. The finished work piece has a very good surface finish and can be polished with high quality.

  8. Advancing the Frontiers in Nanocatalysis, Biointerfaces, and Renewable Energy Conversion by Innovations of Surface Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, G.A.; Frei, H.; Park, J.Y.

    2009-07-23

    The challenge of chemistry in the 21st century is to achieve 100% selectivity of the desired product molecule in multipath reactions ('green chemistry') and develop renewable energy based processes. Surface chemistry and catalysis play key roles in this enterprise. Development of in situ surface techniques such as high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, time-resolved Fourier transform infrared methods, and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy enabled the rapid advancement of three fields: nanocatalysts, biointerfaces, and renewable energy conversion chemistry. In materials nanoscience, synthetic methods have been developed to produce monodisperse metal and oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in the 0.8-10 nm range with controlled shape, oxidation states, and composition; these NPs can be used as selective catalysts since chemical selectivity appears to be dependent on all of these experimental parameters. New spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed that operate under reaction conditions and reveal the dynamic change of molecular structure of catalysts and adsorbed molecules as the reactions proceed with changes in reaction intermediates, catalyst composition, and oxidation states. SFG vibrational spectroscopy detects amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces and monitors the change of surface structure and interactions with coadsorbed water. Exothermic reactions and photons generate hot electrons in metal NPs that may be utilized in chemical energy conversion. The photosplitting of water and carbon dioxide, an important research direction in renewable energy conversion, is discussed.

  9. Analysis of the binding interaction in uric acid - Human hemoglobin system by spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2017-05-01

    The binding interaction between human hemoglobin and uric acid has been studied for the first time, by UV-vis absorption and steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence techniques. Characteristic effects observed for human hemoglobin intrinsic fluorescence during interaction with uric acid at neutral pH point at the formation of stacking non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes. All the calculated parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer parameters confirm the existence of static quenching. The results of synchronous fluorescence measurements indicate that the fluorescence quenching of human hemoglobin originates both from Trp and Tyr residues and that the addition of uric acid could significantly hinder the physiological functions of human hemoglobin.

  10. Measurement of refractive index of biaxial potassium titanyl phosphate crystal plate using reflection spectroscopic ellipsometry technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Chaudhary; A Molla; A Asfaw

    2009-10-01

    The paper reports the measurement of refractive indices and anisotropic absorption coefficients of biaxial potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystal in the form of thin plate using reflection ellipsometry technique. This experiment is designed in the Graduate Optics Laboratory of the Addis Ababa University and He–Ne laser ( = 632.8 nm), diode laser ( = 670.0 nm) and temperature-tuned diode laser ( = 804.4 and 808.4 nm), respectively have been employed as source. The experimental data for , are fitted to the Marquardt–Levenberg theoretical model of curve fitting. The obtained experimental data of refractive indices are compared with different existing theoretical and experimental values of KTP crystals and found to be in good agreement with them.

  11. Comparison of spectroscopic techniques for the determination of Kjeldahl and ammoniacal nitrogen content of farmyard manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemsley, E K; Tapp, H S; Scarlett, A J; Miles, S J; Hammond, R; Wilson, R H

    2001-02-01

    The feasibility of determining the nitrogen content of farmyard manure using infrared spectroscopy was investigated. Fifteen samples each of cattle, pig, and turkey manure were analyzed by three infrared techniques: Fourier transform mid-infrared (MIR), using attenuated total reflection (ATR); near-infrared reflectance (NIR-R); and near-infrared optothermal photoacoustic (NIR-OT). The near-infrared measurements were made at wavelengths determined respectively by four (NIR-OT) and five (NIR-R) band-pass filters. The total nitrogen (using the Kjeldahl method) and volatile (ammoniacal) nitrogen contents of all samples were measured by wet chemistry. Internally cross-validated (ICV) partial least-squares (PLS) regression was then used to obtain calibrations for the nitrogen content. The data sets obtained by each technique were treated separately. Within these sets, data from each manure type were treated both separately and combined: the best predictive ability was obtained by combining data from all three manure types. From the combined data set, the residual standard deviations and correlation coefficients for the ICV-predicted versus actual Kjeldahl nitrogen content were, respectively, 6772 mg/kg dry wt, 0.862 (MIR); 9434 mg/kg dry wt, 0.771 (NIR-OT); and 8943 mg/kg dry wt, 0.865 (NIR-R). For the ammoniacal nitrogen content, the residual standard deviations and correlation coefficients were 3869 mg/kg dry wt, 0.899 (MIR); 6079 mg/kg dry wt, 0.820 (NIR-OT); and 3498 mg/kg dry wt, 0.961 (NIR-R).

  12. Molecular characterization of the plant biopolyester cutin by AFM and spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, José J; Matas, Antonio J; Heredia, Antonio

    2004-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance have been used to improve our current knowledge on the molecular characteristics of the biopolyester cutin, the main component of the plant cuticle. After comparison of samples of cutin isolated from young and mature tomato fruit cuticles has been possible to establish different degrees of cross-linking in the biopolymer and that the polymer is mainly formed after esterification of secondary hydroxyl groups of the monomers that form this type of cutin. Atomic force microscopy gave useful structural information on the molecular topography of the outer surface of the isolated samples. The texture of these samples is a consequence of the cross-linking degree or chemical status of the polymer. Thus, the more dense and cross-linked cutin from ripe or mature tomato fruit is characterized by a flatter and more globular texture in addition to the development of elongated and orientated superstructures.

  13. Protective behaviour monitoring on wood photo-degradation by spectroscopic techniques coupled with chemometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capobianco, Giuseppe; Calienno, Luca; Pelosi, Claudia; Scacchi, Martina; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Agresti, Giorgia; Picchio, Rodolfo; Santamaria, Ulderico; Serranti, Silvia; Monaco, Angela Lo

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports the investigation on the effect of protective materials on poplar (Populus sp.) wood modifications as consequence of artificial photo-degradation in controlled environment. The novelty of this work is to try to understand what happens to wood surface under the protective layer. Shellac, beeswax and Linfoil® were tested to compare traditional and novel products generally used for wood. The samples, uncovered and covered by these protective layers, were artificially aged. Colour and chemical modifications due to ageing were investigated at different time intervals by reflectance spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging. The obtained data were elaborated by statistical and chemometric tools in order to verify their significance and to assess the relationship between groups of measurements. The results highlighted that shellac, beeswax and Linfoil® materials have a very low protective effect on wood photo-degradation for long times of exposure, by little reducing the changes of wood components.

  14. Applications of surface analytical techniques in Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Gujie; Li, Yubiao; Gerson, Andrea R.

    2015-03-01

    This review covers a wide range of surface analytical techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning photoelectron microscopy (SPEM), photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), dynamic and static secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), atomic force microscopy (AFM). Others that are relatively less widely used but are also important to the Earth Sciences are also included: Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). All these techniques probe only the very top sample surface layers (sub-nm to several tens of nm). In addition, we also present several other techniques i.e. Raman microspectroscopy, reflection infrared (IR) microspectroscopy and quantitative evaluation of minerals by scanning electron microscopy (QEMSCAN) that penetrate deeper into the sample, up to several μm, as all of them are fundamental analytical tools for the Earth Sciences. Grazing incidence synchrotron techniques, sensitive to surface measurements, are also briefly introduced at the end of this review. (Scanning) transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) is a special case that can be applied to characterisation of mineralogical and geological sample surfaces. Since TEM/STEM is such an important technique for Earth Scientists, we have also included it to draw attention to the capability of TEM/STEM applied as a surface-equivalent tool. While this review presents most of the important techniques for the Earth Sciences, it is not an all-inclusive bibliography of those analytical techniques. Instead, for each technique that is discussed, we first give a very brief introduction about its principle and background, followed by a short section on approaches to sample preparation that are important for researchers to appreciate prior to the actual sample analysis. We then use examples from publications (and also some of our known unpublished results) within the Earth Sciences

  15. Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectroscopy: A Versatile Technique in a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy is a powerful, label-free technique to monitor noncovalent molecular interactions in real time and in a noninvasive fashion. As a label-free assay, SPR does not require tags, dyes, or specialized reagents (e.g., enzymes-substrate complexes) to elicit a visible or a fluorescence signal. During the last…

  16. The Book of Kells: A non-invasive MOLAB investigation by complementary spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, B.; Daveri, A.; Clementi, C.; Romani, A.; Bioletti, S.; Brunetti, B.; Sgamellotti, A.; Miliani, C.

    2013-11-01

    This paper highlights the efficacy of non-invasive portable spectroscopy for assessing the execution technique and constituent materials in one of the most important medieval manuscripts, the Book of Kells. An aimed campaign of in situ measurements by the MObile LABoratory (MOLAB) has analyzed its elemental composition and vibrational and electronic molecular properties. The ample analytical toolbox has afforded complementary diagnostic information of the pigment palette permitting the characterization of both inorganic and organic materials as pigments and dyes in the white, purple, blue, red, orange, green and black areas. In particular, the novel widespread use of calcinated gypsum (anhydrite) as both a white pigment and in correlation to the organic dyes in this manuscript has been noted. The non-invasive identification of the organic dye orchil is significant considering its rare non invasive detection in medieval manuscripts. Finally the occurrence of particular alterations of the organic black areas giving rise to calcium carboxylate and calcium oxalate has been specifically highlighted. Importantly, this work elaborates complex aspects of the employed painting materials which have given rise to numerous significant points of interest for a more elaborate understanding of this Irish treasure.

  17. Measurement of the optical properties of skin using terahertz time-domain spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmink, Gerald J.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Tongue, Thomas; Schulkin, Brian; Peralta, Xomalin; Rivest, Benjamin D.; Haywood, Eric C.; Roach, William P.

    2010-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is increasingly being used in biomedical imaging and spectroscopy applications. These techniques show tremendous promise to provide new sophisticated tools for the improved detection of skin cancer. However, despite recent efforts to develop these applications, few studies have been conducted to characterize the optical properties of skin at THz frequencies. Such information is required to better understand THz-tissue interactions, and is critical for determining the feasibility of proposed applications. In this study, we have developed and tested a THz time-domain spectroscopy system. We used this system to acquire the optical properties for fresh and frozen/thawed excised porcine skin from 0.1 to 2.0 THz. Results show that the index of refraction (n) for both frozen and fresh skin decreases with frequency. For frozen skin, n equals 2.5 at 0.1 THz and 2.0 at 2.0 THz, and for fresh skin equals 2.0 at 0.1 THz and 1.7 at 2.0 THz. Values for the absorption coefficient (μa) increase with frequency for both frozen and fresh skin. Frozen skin exhibits μa values equal to 56 cm-1 at 0.1 THz and 550 cm-1 at 2.0 THz, whereas fresh skin exhibits values of 56 cm-1 at 0.1 THz and 300 cm-1 at 2.0 THz. Assuming the optical penetration depth (δ) is inversely proportional to μa (absorption-dominated interactions), THz radiation has limited δ in skin (200 μm at 0.1 THz to 40 μm at 2.0 THz). These results suggest that applications exploiting THz radiation show the most promise for investigating superficial tissues.

  18. Conformers of β-aminoisobutyric acid probed by jet-cooled microwave and matrix isolation infrared spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuş, N.; Sharma, A.; Peña, I.; Bermúdez, M. C.; Cabezas, C.; Alonso, J. L.; Fausto, R.

    2013-04-01

    β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) has been studied in isolation conditions: in the gas phase and trapped into a cryogenic N2 matrix. A solid sample of the compound was vaporized by laser ablation and investigated through their rotational spectra in a supersonic expansion using two different spectroscopic techniques: broadband chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and conventional molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Four conformers with structures of two types could be successfully identified by comparison of the experimental rotational and 14N nuclear quadruple coupling constants with those predicted theoretically: type A, bearing an OH⋯N intramolecular hydrogen bond and its carboxylic group in the trans geometry (H-O-C=O dihedral ˜180°), and type B, having an NH⋯O bond and the cis arrangement of the carboxylic group. These two types of conformers could also be trapped from the gas phase into a cryogenic N2 matrix and probed by Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. In situ irradiation of BAIBA isolated in N2 matrix of type B conformers using near-IR radiation tuned at the frequency of the O-H stretching 1st overtone (˜6930 cm-1) of these forms allowed to selectively convert them into type A conformers and into a new type of conformers of higher energy (type D) bearing an NH⋯O=C bond and a O-H "free" trans carboxylic group.

  19. Binding of caffeine with caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid using fluorescence quenching, UV/vis and FTIR spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belay, Abebe; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2016-03-01

    The interactions of caffeine (CF) with chlorogenic acid (CGA) and caffeic acid (CFA) were investigated by fluorescence quenching, UV/vis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques. The results of the study indicated that the fluorescence quenching between caffeine and hydroxycinnamic acids could be rationalized in terms of static quenching or the formation of non-fluorescent CF-CFA and CF-CGA complexes. From fluorescence quenching spectral analysis, the quenching constant (KSV), quenching rate constant (kq), number of binding sites (n), thermodynamic properties and conformational changes of the interaction were determined. The quenching constants (KSV) between CF and CGA, CFA are 1.84 × 10(4) and 1.04 × 10(4) L/mol at 298 K and their binding site n is ~ 1. Thermodynamic parameters determined using the Van't Hoff equation indicated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waal's forces have a major role in the reaction of caffeine with caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid. The 3D fluorescence, UV/vis and FTIR spectra also showed that the binding of CF with CFA and CGA induces conformational changes in CFA and CGA.

  20. Interaction of an antiepileptic drug, lamotrigine with human serum albumin (HSA): Application of spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poureshghi, Fatemeh; Ghandforoushan, Parisa; Safarnejad, Azam; Soltani, Somaieh

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine (an epileptic drug) interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by fluorescence, UV-Vis, FTIR, CD spectroscopic techniques, and molecular modeling methods. Binding constant (Kb) of 5.74×10(3) and number of binding site of 0.97 showed that there is a slight interaction between lamotrigine and HSA. Thermodynamic studies was constructed using the flourimetric titrations in three different temperatures and the resulted data used to calculate the parameters using Vant Hoff equation. Decreased Stern Volmer quenching constant by enhanced temperature revealed the static quenching mechanism. Negative standard enthalpy (ΔH) and standard entropy (ΔS) changes indicated that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds were dominant forces which facilitate the binding of Lamotrigine to HSA, the results were confirmed by molecular docking studies which showed no hydrogen binding. The FRET studies showed that there is a possibility of energy transfer between Trp214 and lamotrigine. Also the binding of lamotrigine to HSA in the studied concentrations was not as much as many other drugs, but the secondary structure of the HSA was significantly changed following the interaction in a way that α-helix percentage was reduced from 67% to 57% after the addition of lamotrigine in the molar ratio of 4:1 to HSA. According to the docking studies, lamotrigine binds to IB site preferably.

  1. Development and Experimental Testing of an Optical Micro-Spectroscopic Technique Incorporating True Line-Scan Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Biener

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiphoton micro-spectroscopy, employing diffraction optics and electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD cameras, is a suitable method for determining protein complex stoichiometry, quaternary structure, and spatial distribution in living cells using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET imaging. The method provides highly resolved spectra of molecules or molecular complexes at each image pixel, and it does so on a timescale shorter than that of molecular diffusion, which scrambles the spectral information. Acquisition of an entire spectrally resolved image, however, is slower than that of broad-bandwidth microscopes because it takes longer times to collect the same number of photons at each emission wavelength as in a broad bandwidth. Here, we demonstrate an optical micro-spectroscopic scheme that employs a laser beam shaped into a line to excite in parallel multiple sample voxels. The method presents dramatically increased sensitivity and/or acquisition speed and, at the same time, has excellent spatial and spectral resolution, similar to point-scan configurations. When applied to FRET imaging using an oligomeric FRET construct expressed in living cells and consisting of a FRET acceptor linked to three donors, the technique based on line-shaped excitation provides higher accuracy compared to the point-scan approach, and it reduces artifacts caused by photobleaching and other undesired photophysical effects.

  2. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Decesari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterized by a less dense urbanization. We present here the results obtained in San Pietro Capofiume, which is located in a sparsely inhabited sector of the Po Valley, Italy. The experiment was carried out in summer 2009 in the framework of the EUCAARI project ("European Integrated Project on Aerosol, Cloud Climate Aerosol Interaction". For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art techniques were used in parallel: (1 on-line TSI aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS, (2 on-line Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS, (3 soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS, (4 on-line high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer-thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (HR-ToFMS-TAG, (5 off-line twelve-hour resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR spectroscopy, and (6 chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS for the analysis of gas-phase precursors of secondary aerosol. Data from each aerosol spectroscopic method were analysed individually following ad-hoc tools (i.e. PMF for AMS, Art-2a for ATOFMS. The results obtained from each techniques are herein presented and compared. This allows us to clearly link the modifications in aerosol chemical composition to transitions in air mass origin and meteorological regimes. Under stagnant conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black

  3. Surface composites fabricated by vacuum infiltration casting technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guirong Yang; Yuan Hao; Wenming Song; Jinjun Lü; Ying Ma

    2005-01-01

    Alumina (Al2O3) particles reinforced copper matrix surface composites were fabricated on the bronze substrate using the vacuum infiltration casting technique. Three cases were obtained in the vacuum infiltration casting technique: no infiltration, partial infiltration and full infiltration (the thickness of preforms do not exceed 3.5 mm). The reason of no infiltration is that the vacuum degree is not enough so that the force acting on the liquid metal is lower than the resistance due to the surface tension. Partial infiltration is because of somewhat lower vacuum degree and pouring temperature. Full desired infiltration is on account of suitable infiltration casting conditions, such as vacuum degree, pouring temperature, grain size and preheating temperature of the preform. The most important factor of affecting formation of surface composites is the vacuum degree, then pouring temperature and particle size.The infiltration mechanism was discussed on the bases of different processing conditions. The surface composite up to 3.5 mm in thickness with uniformly distributed Al2O3 particles could be fabricated via the vacuum infiltration casting technique.

  4. Surface roughness estimation of MBE grown CdTe/GaAs(211)B by ex-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaya, Merve; Bilgilisoy, Elif; Arı, Ozan; Selamet, Yusuf

    2016-07-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) ranging from 1.24 eV to 5.05 eV is used to obtain the film thickness and optical properties of high index (211) CdTe films. A three-layer optical model (oxide/CdTe/GaAs) was chosen for the ex-situ ellipsometric data analysis. Surface roughness cannot be determined by the optical model if oxide is included. We show that roughness can be accurately estimated, without any optical model, by utilizing the correlation between SE data (namely the imaginary part of the dielectric function, or phase angle, ψ) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) roughness. and ψ values at 3.31 eV, which corresponds to E1 critical transition energy of CdTe band structure, are chosen for the correlation since E1 gives higher resolution than the other critical transition energies. On the other hand, due to the anisotropic characteristic of (211) oriented CdTe surfaces, SE data ( and ψ) shows varieties for different azimuthal angle measurements. For this reason, in order to estimate the surface roughness by considering these correlations, it is shown that SE measurements need to be taken at the same surface azimuthal angle. Estimating surface roughness in this manner is an accurate way to eliminate cumbersome surface roughness measurement by AFM.

  5. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Accardo, Angelo

    2014-06-10

    Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data. 2014 International Union of Crystallography.

  6. Surface Sensitive Techniques for Advanced Characterization of Luminescent Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Hendrik C

    2017-08-04

    The important role of surface sensitive characterization techniques such as Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight scanning ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) for the characterization of different phosphor materials is discussed in this short review by giving selective examples from previous obtained results. AES is used to monitor surface reactions during electron bombardment and also to determine the elemental composition of the surfaces of the materials, while XPS and TOF-SIMS are used for determining the surface chemical composition and valence state of the dopants. The role of XPS to determine the presence of defects in the phosphor matrix is also stated with the different examples. The role of HRTEM in combination with Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) for nanoparticle characterization is also pointed out.

  7. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies on aspirin : An experimental and theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, R.; Premkumar, S.; Rekha, T. N.; Parameswari, A.; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies on aspirin molecule adsorbed on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were investigated by experimental and density functional theory approach. The AgNPs were synthesized by the solution-combustion method and characterized by the X-ray diffraction and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy techniques. The averaged particle size of synthesized AgNPs was calculated as ˜55 nm. The normal Raman spectrum (nRs) and SERS spectrum of the aspirin were recorded. The molecular structure of the aspirin and aspirin adsorbed on silver cluster were optimized by the DFT/ B3PW91 method with LanL2DZ basis set. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation. The calculated nRs and SERS frequencies were correlated well with the observed frequencies. The flat-on orientation was predicted from the nRs and SERS spectra, when the aspirin adsorbed on the AgNPs. Hence, the present studies lead to the understanding of adsorption process of aspirin on the AgNPs, which paves the way for biomedical applications.

  8. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies on aspirin : An experimental and theoretical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premkumar, R.; Premkumar, S.; Parameswari, A.; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin, E-mail: miltonfranklin@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, N.M.S.S.V.N College, Madurai-625019, Tamilnadu, India. (India); Rekha, T. N. [PG and Research Department of Physics, Lady Doak College, Madurai-625 002, Tamilnadu, India. (India)

    2016-05-06

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies on aspirin molecule adsorbed on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were investigated by experimental and density functional theory approach. The AgNPs were synthesized by the solution-combustion method and characterized by the X-ray diffraction and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy techniques. The averaged particle size of synthesized AgNPs was calculated as ∼55 nm. The normal Raman spectrum (nRs) and SERS spectrum of the aspirin were recorded. The molecular structure of the aspirin and aspirin adsorbed on silver cluster were optimized by the DFT/ B3PW91 method with LanL2DZ basis set. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation. The calculated nRs and SERS frequencies were correlated well with the observed frequencies. The flat-on orientation was predicted from the nRs and SERS spectra, when the aspirin adsorbed on the AgNPs. Hence, the present studies lead to the understanding of adsorption process of aspirin on the AgNPs, which paves the way for biomedical applications.

  9. Spectroscopic study of binding of chlorogenic acid with the surface of ZnO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belay, Abebe; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the interaction properties of biological materials with ZnO NPs is fundamental interest in the field of biotechnological applications as well as in the formation of optoelectronic devices. In this research, the binding of ZnO NPs and chlorogenic acid (CGA) were investigated using fluorescence quenching, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (TEM), and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The study results indicated the fluorescence quenching between ZnO NPs and CGA rationalized in terms of static quenching mechanism or the formation of nonfluorescent CGA-ZnO. From fluorescence quenching spectral analysis the binding constant ( K a ), number of binding sites ( n), and thermodynamic properties, were determined. The quenching constants ( K sv) and binding constant ( K a ), decrease with increasing the temperature and their binding sites n are 2. The thermodynamic parameters determined using Van't Hoff equation indicated binding occurs spontaneously involving the hydrogen bond and van der Walls forces played the major role in the reaction of ZnO NPs with CGA. The Raman, SEM, DLS, and Zeta potential measurements were also indicated the differences in the structure, morphology and sizes of CGA, ZnO NPs, and their corresponding CGA-ZnO due to adsorption of CGA on the surface of ZnO NPs

  10. The Surface Laplacian Technique in EEG: Theory and Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalhaes, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review major theoretical and computational aspects of the surface Laplacian technique. Here we focus our attention on a few topics that are fundamental for a physical understanding of this technique and its efficient computational implementation. We highlight several issues that in our view deserve further research exploration, some of which we have attempted to address to the extent possible. We also included a set of approximations for the Laplacian on the border of a discrete grid and the description of an algorithm that accounts for the finite size of the measuring electrodes.

  11. Data Analysis Techniques for a Lunar Surface Navigation System Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmins, David; Sands, O. Scott; Swank, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    NASA is interested in finding new methods of surface navigation to allow astronauts to navigate on the lunar surface. In support of the Vision for Space Exploration, the NASA Glenn Research Center developed the Lunar Extra-Vehicular Activity Crewmember Location Determination System and performed testing at the Desert Research and Technology Studies event in 2009. A significant amount of sensor data was recorded during nine tests performed with six test subjects. This paper provides the procedure, formulas, and techniques for data analysis, as well as commentary on applications.

  12. High-pressure carbon dioxide uptake for porous organic cages: comparison of spectroscopic and manometric measurement techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasell, Tom; Armstrong, Jayne A; Jelfs, Kim E; Tay, Feng H; Thomas, K Mark; Kazarian, Sergei G; Cooper, Andrew I

    2013-10-21

    A chemoselective spectroscopic method for measuring CO2 sorption isotherms at pressures up to 14 MPa (140 bar) is validated against manometric measurements and molecular simulations, giving insights into the preferred sorption sites in various crystalline porous organic cages.

  13. Application of a New Non-Linear Least Squares Velocity Curve Analysis Technique for Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Karami, K; Soltanzadeh, M M

    2008-01-01

    Using measured radial velocity data of nine double lined spectroscopic binary systems NSV 223, AB And, V2082 Cyg, HS Her, V918 Her, BV Dra, BW Dra, V2357 Oph, and YZ Cas, we find corresponding orbital and spectroscopic elements via the method introduced by Karami & Mohebi (2007a) and Karami & Teimoorinia (2007). Our numerical results are in good agreement with those obtained by others using more traditional methods.

  14. A surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopic study of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} at trace concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzen, Carola [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes; Carstensen, Lale [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Firkala, T. [Helmholtz Institute Freiberg for Resource Technology, Freiberg (Germany); Steudtner, Robin [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2017-06-01

    Techniques for rapid screening of uranium in environmental samples are needed. This study entails the development of Surface-Enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy for analyzing uranium(VI) in aqueous media with improved sensitivity.

  15. Spectroscopic study of cystine adsorption on pyrite surface: From vacuum to solution conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Arenillas, M.; Mateo-Marti, E.

    2015-09-01

    We characterized the adsorption of cystine molecules on pyrite surface via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Anoxic conditions were simulated under ultra-high-vacuum conditions. In contrast, to simulate oxidation conditions, the molecules were adsorbed on pyrite surface from solution. A novel comparative analysis revealed remarkable differences with respect to molecular adsorption and surface chemistry induced by environmental conditions. Molecular adsorption under anoxic conditions was observed to be more favorable, concentrating a large number of molecules on the surface and two different chemical species. In contrast, the presence of oxygen induced an autocatalytic oxidation process on the pyrite surface, which facilitated water binding on pyrite surface and partially blocked molecular adsorption. Pyrite is a highly reactive surface and contains two crucial types of surface functional groups that drive molecular chemistry on the surface depending on the surrounding conditions. Therefore, the system explored in this study holds interesting implications for supporting catalyzed prebiotic chemistry reactions.

  16. Unconventional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques using nanostructured diamond surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Victor; Jarmola, Andrey; Budker, Dmitry; Santori, Charles; Huang, Zhihong; Beausoleil, Raymond

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies rely on obtaining high nuclear magnetization, motivating low operating temperatures and high magnetic fields. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) techniques traditionally require another superconducting magnet and THz optics. We seek to use chip-scale devices to polarize nuclei in liquids at room temperature. The technique relies on optical pumping of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers and subsequent transfer of polarization to nuclei via hyperfine interaction, spin diffusion, and heteronuclear polarization transfer. We expect efficient polarization transfer will be realized by maximizing the diamond surface area. We have fabricated densely-packed (50 % packing fraction), high-aspect-ratio (10+) nanopillars over mm2 regions of the diamond surface. Pillars designed to have a few-hundred-nanometer diameter act as optical antennas, reducing saturation intensity. We also report progress in using nanopillar arrays as sensitive optical detectors of nano-scale NMR by measuring NV center Zeeman shifts produced by nearby external nuclei. The enhanced surface area increases the effective density of NV centers which couple to external nuclei. Combining these techniques may enable, e.g., identification of trace analytes and molecular imaging.

  17. A comparison investigation of DNP-binding effects to HSA and HTF by spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfagharzadeh, Mahboobeh; Pirouzi, Maliheh; Asoodeh, Ahmad; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Chamani, Jamshidkhan

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the interaction between 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) with the two drug carrier proteins - human serum albumin (HSA) and human holo transferrin (HTF). Hence, binding characteristics of DNP to HSA and HTF were analyzed by spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques. Based on results obtained from fluorescence spectroscopy, DNP had a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA and HTF through a static quenching procedure. The binding constant and the number of binding sites were calculated as 2.3 × 10(11) M(-1) and .98 for HSA, and 1.7 × 10(11) M(-1) and 1.06 for HTF, respectively. In addition, synchronous fluorescence results showed that the microenvironment of Trp had a slight tendency of increasing its hydrophobicity, whereas the microenvironment of the Tyr residues of HSA did not change and that of HTF showed a significant trend (red shift of about 4 nm) of an increase in polarity. The distance between donor and acceptor was obtained by the Förster energy according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and was found to be 3.99 and 3.72 nm for HSA and HTF, respectively. The critical induced aggregation concentration (CCIAC) of the drug on both proteins was determined and confirmed by an inflection point of the zeta potential behavior. Circular dichroism data revealed that the presence of DNP caused a decrease of the α-helical content of HSA and HTF, and induced a remarkable mild denaturation of both proteins. The molecular modeling data confirmed our experimental results. This study is deemed useful for determining drug dosage.

  18. Application of phosphorus-31 and aluminum-27 NMR spectroscopic techniques to study aqueous and methanolic solutions of tetraphenylammonium aluminophosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Nasser; Amin, Amir H.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, aluminum-27 and phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopic techniques were used to investigate and characterize the distribution of aluminophosphate (AlPO) species soluble in the aqueous and methanolic solutions of tetraphenylammonium (TPhA) chloride. The reaction between hexaaquaaluminum cations, [A1(H2O)6]3+, and different phosphate ligands such as H3PO4, H2PO4-, and the acidic dimers H6P2O8 and H5P2O8- resulted in the formation of the soluble AlPO cations. The effective aluminum-27 and phosphorous-31 NMR spectroscopies can be employed to characterize the species present in a solution. Assignment of the peaks present in the aluminum-27 NMR spectra to the aluminate species or aluminate connectivities was done to acquire information about different AlPO complexes. Some resonance lines were observed in the phosphorus-31 {1H} NMR spectra, indicating the existence of different complexes in the AlPO solutions. Some peaks were observed in the methanolic solutions of AlPO at the chemical shifts of -0.41, -6.4, -7.5, -7.9, -13.1, -13.9, -16.6, -18.1, and -20.6 ppm. Four additional peaks were also observed in the phosphorus-31 {1H} NMR spectra of the methanolic solutions of AlPO, whose intensities changed with changes in the methanol:water volume ratio; they were observed in methanol but not in aqueous AlPO.

  19. A microfluidic surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic biosensor using aptamer functionalized nanopillars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, J.; Palla, M.; Bosco, F. G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a microchip incorporating an aptamer-functionalized nanopillar substrate, enabling the specific detection of low-abundance biomolecules using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). In a temperature controlled microchamber, aptamers immobilized on the nanostructure surface...

  20. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decesari, S.; Allan, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Williams, B. J.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Gietl, J. K.; Coe, H.; Giulianelli, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Lanconelli, C.; Carbone, C.; Worsnop, D.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Elste, T.; Gilge, S.; Zhang, Y.; Dall'Osto, M.

    2014-11-01

    The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterised by a less dense urbanisation. We present here the results obtained at a background site in the Po Valley, Italy, in summer 2009. For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art spectrometric techniques were used in parallel: aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), two aerosol mass spectrometers (high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer - HR-ToF-AMS and soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer - SP-AMS), thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography (TAG), chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS) and (offline) proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy. The results indicate that, under high-pressure conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black carbon (BC), secondary semivolatile compounds such as ammonium nitrate and amines and a class of monocarboxylic acids which correspond to the AMS cooking organic aerosol (COA) already identified in urban areas. In daytime, the entrainment of aged air masses in the mixing layer is responsible for the accumulation of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and also for the recycling of non-volatile primary species such as black carbon. According to organic aerosol source apportionment, anthropogenic aerosols accumulating in the lower layers overnight accounted for 38% of organic aerosol mass on average, another 21% was accounted for by aerosols recirculated in

  1. An effective noise-suppression technique for surface microseismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Willis, Mark; Haines, Seth S.; Batzle, Mike; Behura, Jyoti; Davidson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The presence of strong surface-wave noise in surface microseismic data may decrease the utility of these data. We implement a technique, based on the distinct characteristics that microseismic signal and noise show in the τ‐p domain, to suppress surface-wave noise in microseismic data. Because most microseismic source mechanisms are deviatoric, preprocessing is necessary to correct for the nonuniform radiation pattern prior to transforming the data to the τ‐p domain. We employ a scanning approach, similar to semblance analysis, to test all possible double-couple orientations to determine an estimated orientation that best accounts for the polarity pattern of any microseismic events. We then correct the polarity of the data traces according to this pattern, prior to conducting signal-noise separation in the τ‐p domain. We apply our noise-suppression technique to two surface passive-seismic data sets from different acquisition surveys. The first data set includes a synthetic microseismic event added to field passive noise recorded by an areal receiver array distributed over a Barnett Formation reservoir undergoing hydraulic fracturing. The second data set is field microseismic data recorded by receivers arranged in a star-shaped array, over a Bakken Shale reservoir during a hydraulic-fracturing process. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and preserves the waveforms at the individual traces. We illustrate that the enhancement in signal-to-noise ratio also results in improved imaging of the microseismic hypocenter.

  2. In situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of formic acid electrooxidation on spontaneously deposited platinum on gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Ranjani; McIntosh, Michael; Li, Xiao

    2013-06-28

    Present formic acid fuel cell efficiency is limited by low kinetics at the anode, indicating the need for effective catalysts to improve the formic acid oxidation. As a prerequisite, the nature of adsorbed species and specifically the reaction intermediates formed in this process needs to be examined. This work focuses on the electrooxidation of formic acid and the nature of the intermediates at a platinum-modified gold surface prepared through spontaneous deposition using a combination of electrochemistry and in situ surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). This Pt-modified gold electrode surface assists in oxidizing formic acid at potentials as low as 0.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl which is 0.15 V more negative than a bare Pt surface. The oxidation current obtained on the Pt-modified gold electrode is 72 times higher than on a bare Au surface and 5 times higher than on a bare Pt surface at the same potential. In situ SERS has revealed the involvement of formate at a low frequency as the primary intermediate in this electrooxidation process. While previous studies mainly focused on the formate mode at ca. 1322 cm(-1), it is the first time that a formate peak at ca. 300 cm(-1) was observed on a Pt or Pt-associated surface. A unique relationship has been observed between the formic acid oxidation currents and the SERS intensity of this formate adsorbate. Furthermore, the characteristic Stark effect of the formate proves the strong interaction between the adsorbate and the catalyst. Both electrochemical and spectroscopic results suggest that the formic acid electrooxidation takes place by the dehydrogenation pathway involving a low frequency formate intermediate on the Pt-modified gold electrode catalyst.

  3. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accardo, Angelo [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genova 16163 (Italy); Di Fabrizio, Enzo [KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); BIONEM Lab at University Magna Graecia, Campus Salvatore Venuta, Viale Europa 88100, Germaneto-Catanzaro (Italy); Limongi, Tania [KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Marinaro, Giovanni [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genova 16163 (Italy); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Riekel, Christian, E-mail: riekel@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2014-06-10

    A comprehensive review about the use of micro- and nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces as a tool for in situ X-ray scattering investigations of soft matter and biological materials. Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data.

  4. Testing a luminescence surface-exposure dating technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliganic, Luke A.; Meyer, Michael; Gehring, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Recent work has shown that the relationship between the luminescence signal (optically stimulated [OSL] and infra-red stimulated [IRSL]) and depth into a rock surface can be used to estimate the length of time since that rock surface has been exposed to sunlight (Sohbati et al., 2012), thus serving as a means for surface-exposure dating. Despite the potential of this new dating tool, few published studies have tested or used this technique. Here, we present the results of two tests of the method. First, we perform laboratory bleaching experiments using two unexposed bedrock samples of different lithologies (granite and quartzite). Sub-samples were bleached for various durations (0 to 100,000 s) in a solar simulator, and IRSL/OSL-depth profiles were measured and fitted using the model of Sohbati et al. (2012). Results of fitting for each sub-sample were then compared. Second, we used a granite boulder from a known age moraine (1850 CE) to test the reproducibility of bleaching depth curves. Multiple cores were collected from the same ~5 cm2 surface area of the boulder, and IRSL-depth profiles were measured and modelled. While our systematic tests confirm the general physical basis of luminescence surface-exposure dating method, we found unexpected scatter in both adjacent bleaching depth curves and the fitting parameters of isochronous rock surfaces for some of our samples. Potential sources of error, including small-scale lithological variabilities and implications for accuracy and precision of the method are discussed. Sohbati, R., Murray, A.S., Chapot, M.S., Jain, M., Pederson, J. (2012) Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) as a chronometer for surface exposure dating. Journal of Geophysical Research 117 (B9), B09202. doi.org/10.1029/2012JB009383.

  5. A surface-matching technique for robot-assisted registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glozman, D; Shoham, M; Fischer, A

    2001-01-01

    Successful implementation of robot-assisted surgery (RAS) requires coherent integration of spatial image data with sensing and actuating devices, each having its own coordinate system. Hence, accurate estimation of the geometric relationships between relevant reference frames, known as registration, is a crucial procedure in all RAS applications. The purpose of this paper is to present a new registration scheme, along with the results of an experimental evaluation of a robot-assisted registration method for RAS applications in orthopedics. The accuracy of the proposed registration is appropriate for specified orthopedic surgical applications such as Total Knee Replacement. The registration method is based on a surface-matching algorithm that does not require marker implants, thereby reducing surgical invasiveness. Points on the bone surface are sampled by the robot, which in turn directs the surgical tool. This technique eliminates additional coordinate transformations to an external device (such as a digitizer), resulting in increased surgical accuracy. The registration technique was tested on an RSPR six-degrees-of-freedom parallel robot specifically designed for medical applications. A six-axis force sensor attached to the robot's moving platform enables fast and accurate acquisition of positions and surface normal directions at sampled points. Sampling with a robot probe was shown to be accurate, fast, and easy to perform. The whole procedure takes about 2 min, with the robot performing most of the registration procedures, leaving the surgeon's hands free. Robotic registration was shown to provide a flawless link between preoperative planning and robotic assistance during surgery.

  6. Spectroscopic ellipsometry of SrTiO{sub 3} crystals applied to antiferrodistortive surface phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dejneka, Alexandr; Jastrabik, Lubomir [Institute of Physics ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Trepakov, Vladimir [Institute of Physics ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Ioffe Physiclal-Technical Institute RAS, 194 021 St-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-08-15

    This work is devoted to the ellipsometric study of antiferrodistortive (AFD) O{sub h}{sup 1}{yields} D{sub 4h}{sup 18} cubic-to-tetragonal phase transition (PT) of SrTiO{sub 3} surface. Strong influence of surface defect structure on magnitude and temperature evolutions of surface refractive index related to PT was found and investigated. It is shown that even small surface imperfections result in enhancement and strong changes of the surface refractive index when approaching the temperature of PT. This effect is caused by emergence and evolutions in the surface of the structural changes corresponding to order parameter at the temperatures sufficiently higher than transition temperature in the bulk. In the case of structurally perfect crystal surface, the features of the temperature dependence of surface refractive index appeared to be very small and visible at the temperatures a little smaller than transition temperature for bulk that agrees well with predictions of Kaganov-Omel'yanchuk theory. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Spectroscopic data

    CERN Document Server

    Melzer, J

    1976-01-01

    During the preparation of this compilation, many people contributed; the compilers wish to thank all of them. In particular they appreciate the efforts of V. Gilbertson, the manuscript typist, and those of K. C. Bregand, J. A. Kiley, and W. H. McPherson, who gave editorial assistance. They would like to thank Dr. J. R. Schwartz for his cooperation and encouragement. In addition, they extend their grati­ tude to Dr. L. Wilson of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, who gave the initial impetus to this project. v Contents I. I ntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. Organization ofthe Spectroscopic Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Methods of Production and Experimental Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Band Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2...

  8. Nondestructive and rapid concurrent estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form using raman spectroscopic technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargi R Lakhwani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid, nondestructive Raman spectroscopic method was developed for quantitative estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form. A Raman univariate calibration model was developed by measuring the peak intensities of paracetamol and nimesulide at 853 cm−1 and 1336 cm−1 , respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for in situ, concurrent estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage and method was also validated according to International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines. Thus, the developed Raman spectroscopic method can be applied for simultaneous estimation of paracetamol and nimesulide in their combined dosage form as a process analytical technology tool by pharmaceutical industries for routine quality control.

  9. Vaporization Studies from Slag Surfaces Using a Thin Film Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetharaman, Seshadri; Shyrokykh, Tetiana; Schröder, Christina; Scheller, Piotr R.

    2013-08-01

    The investigations of vanadium vaporization from CaO-SiO2-FeO-V2O5 thin film slags were conducted using the single hot thermocouple technique (SHTT) with air as the oxidizing atmosphere. The slag samples were analyzed after the experiments by SEM/EDX. The vanadium content was found to decrease as a function of time. The loss of vanadium from the slag film after 30 minutes of oxidation was approximately 18 pct and after 50 minutes, it was nearly 56 pct. The possible mechanism of vanadium loss would be the surface oxidation of vanadium oxide in the slag, VO x to V5+, followed by surface evaporation of V2O5, which has a high vapor pressure at the experimental temperature.

  10. Spectroscopic ellipsometry of Zn(1-x)Cu(x)O thin films based on a modified sol-gel dip-coating technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khanbashi, Hibah A; Shirbeeny, W; Al-Ghamdi, A A; Bronstein, Lyudmila M; Mahmoud, Waleed E

    2014-01-24

    Nanocrystalline Zn(1-x)Cu(x)O thin films (x=0, 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05) were synthesized by sol-gel dip-coating technique on a quartz substrate. These films were annealed at 350°C for 2 h. The X-ray diffraction showed a hexagonal crystal structure with high intensity peak for the (002) reflection plane indicating preferential growth along the c-axis of the crystal lattice. The peak position related to the (002) peak was shifted as a result of the copper ion incorporation, confirming the interstitial substitution of the zinc ions by the copper ions. This interstitial substitution leads to a decrease of an average crystallite size and lattice constants and an increase of the micro-strain up to 2 at.% of the copper amount. The surface morphology was explored by scanning electron microscopy which confirmed the homogenous distribution of nanoparticles in the deposited films along the quartz substrates. The energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy revealed absence of impurities in the as-deposited films. The high resolution electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction depicted that the films have polycrystalline nature. The film thickness and optical constants of the Zn(1-x)Cu(x)O thin films were estimated by fitting the spectroscopic ellipsometric data (ψ and Δ) using three different models. The refractive index was fitted using harmonic oscillator model from which the oscillator and the dispersive energies were found. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss, energy loss functions were also determined.

  11. A spectroscopic experimental and computer-assisted empirical model for the production and energetics of excited oxygen molecules formed by atom recombination on shuttle tile surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owan, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    A visible emission spectroscopic method was developed. The amounts of excited singlet and triplet oxygen molecules produced by recombination on the Space Shuttle Orbiter thermal protective tiles at elevated temperatures are determined. Rate constants and energetics of the extremely exothermic reaction are evaluated in terms of a chemical and mathematical model. Implications for potential contribution to Shuttle surface reentry heating fluxes are outlined.

  12. Identification of the Rayleigh surface waves for estimation of viscoelasticity using the surface wave elastography technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this Letter to the Editor is to demonstrate an effective method for estimating viscoelasticity based on measurements of the Rayleigh surface wave speed. It is important to identify the surface wave mode for measuring surface wave speed. A concept of start frequency of surface waves is proposed. The surface wave speeds above the start frequency should be used to estimate the viscoelasticity of tissue. The motivation was to develop a noninvasive surface wave elastography (SWE) technique for assessing skin disease by measuring skin viscoelastic properties. Using an optical based SWE system, the author generated a local harmonic vibration on the surface of phantom using an electromechanical shaker and measured the resulting surface waves on the phantom using an optical vibrometer system. The surface wave speed was measured using a phase gradient method. It was shown that different standing wave modes were generated below the start frequency because of wave reflection. However, the pure symmetric surface waves were generated from the excitation above the start frequency. Using the wave speed dispersion above the start frequency, the viscoelasticity of the phantom can be correctly estimated.

  13. Spectroscopic detection of atom-surface interactions in an atomic vapour layer with nanoscale thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Whittaker, K A; Hughes, I G; Sargsyan, A; Sarkisyan, D; Adams, C S

    2015-01-01

    We measure the resonance line shape of atomic vapor layers with nanoscale thickness confined between two sapphire windows. The measurement is performed by scanning a probe laser through resonance and collecting the scattered light. The line shape is dominated by the effects of Dicke narrowing, self-broadening, and atom-surface interactions. By fitting the measured line shape to a simple model we discuss the possibility to extract information about the atom-surface interaction.

  14. Synthesis, structural characterization, Hirshfeld surface analysis and spectroscopic studies of cadmium (II) chloride complex with 4-hydroxy-1-methylpiperidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudani, S.; Ferretti, V.; Jelsch, C.; Lefebvre, F.; Nasr, C. Ben

    2016-05-01

    The chemical preparation, crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis and spectroscopic characterization of the novel cadmium (II) 4-hydroxy-1-methylpiperidine complex, Cd4Cl10(C6H14NO)2·2H2O, have been reported. The atomic arrangement can be described as built up by an anionic framework, formed by edge sharing CdCl6 and CdCl5O octahedral linear chains spreading along the a-axis. These chains are interconnected by water molecules via O-H⋯Cl and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds to form layers parallel to (011) plane. The organic cations are inserted between layers through C-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. Investigation of intermolecular interactions and crystal packing via Hirshfeld surface analysis reveals that the HC⋯Cl and HC⋯HC intermolecular interactions are the most abundant contacts of the organic cation in the crystal packing. The statistical analysis of crystal contacts reveals the driving forces in the packing formation. The 13C and 15N CP-MAS NMR spectra are in agreement with the X-ray structure. The vibrational absorption bands were identified by infrared spectroscopy. DFT calculations allowed the attribution of the NMR peaks and of the IR bands.

  15. Synthesis, structural characterization, Hirshfeld surface analysis and spectroscopic studies of cadmium (II) chloride complex with 4-hydroxy-1-methylpiperidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soudani, S. [Université de Carthage, Laboratoire de Chimie des Matériaux, Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia); Ferretti, V. [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Center for Structural Diffractometry, via Fossato di Mortara 17, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Jelsch, C. [CRM2, CNRS, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, Vandoeuvre les Nancy CEDEX (France); Lefebvre, F. [Laboratoire de Chimie Organométallique de Surface (LCOMS), Ecole Supérieure de Chimie Physique Electronique, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Nasr, C. Ben, E-mail: cherif_bennasr@yahoo.fr [Université de Carthage, Laboratoire de Chimie des Matériaux, Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia)

    2016-05-15

    The chemical preparation, crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis and spectroscopic characterization of the novel cadmium (II) 4-hydroxy-1-methylpiperidine complex, Cd{sub 4}Cl{sub 10}(C{sub 6}H{sub 14}NO){sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O, have been reported. The atomic arrangement can be described as built up by an anionic framework, formed by edge sharing CdCl{sub 6} and CdCl{sub 5}O octahedral linear chains spreading along the a-axis. These chains are interconnected by water molecules via O–H⋯Cl and O–H⋯O hydrogen bonds to form layers parallel to (011) plane. The organic cations are inserted between layers through C–H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. Investigation of intermolecular interactions and crystal packing via Hirshfeld surface analysis reveals that the H{sub C}⋯Cl and H{sub C}⋯H{sub C} intermolecular interactions are the most abundant contacts of the organic cation in the crystal packing. The statistical analysis of crystal contacts reveals the driving forces in the packing formation. The {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N CP-MAS NMR spectra are in agreement with the X-ray structure. The vibrational absorption bands were identified by infrared spectroscopy. DFT calculations allowed the attribution of the NMR peaks and of the IR bands.

  16. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of 1H-indazole on silver sols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolese, B; Bigotto, A

    2001-05-01

    The SER spectra of 1H-indazole adsorbed on silver hydrosol were recorded in the 1800-100 cm(-1) and in the 3200-2800 cm(-1) regions. The SERS data were interpreted on the basis of previous vibrational assignments, with the help of the results of DFT calculations carried out using the 6-31G** basis. From the comparison of SER and normal Raman spectra it can be deduced that 1H-indazole is non-dissociatively adsorbed on metal surface and that it interacts with silver sol via nitrogen atoms and ring pi-system. The molecular plane assumes a tilted orientation with respect to the silver surface. The effect of varying the concentration of adsorbate was also evaluated. The observed changes of the relative intensities of some enhanced bands suggest that the molecule assumes a more tilted orientation upon lowering the concentration of the adsorbate.

  17. Facile fabrication of dendritic silver structures and their surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jisheng Yang; Zhengdong Jiang

    2015-01-01

    A simple and efficient approach was developed to fabricate silver dendrites by Cu reducing Ag+ in AgNO3 solution. The growth speed, morphologies and structures of the silver dendrites strongly depend on AgNO3 concentration and reaction time. The silver dendrites were formed from nanosheets and the crystal structure is face-centered cubic. Rhodamine 6G was used as probe molecule to show that the silver dendrites have high sensitivity to surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy response.

  18. THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT SURFACE TREATMENT TECHNIQUES ON THE SURFACE ROUGHNESS OF FELDSPATHIC PORCELAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidan ALAKUŞ-SABUNCUOĞLU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This in vitro study compared the effect of five different techniques on the surface roughness of feldspathic porcelain. Materials and Methods: 100 feldspathic porcelain disk samples mounted in acrylic resin blocks were divided into five groups (n=20 according to type of surface treatment: I, hydrofluoric acid (HFA; II, Deglazed surface porcelain treated with Neodymium:yttrium- aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG laser; III, Deglazed porcelain surface treated with Erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG laser; IV, Glazed porcelain surface treated with Neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG laser, V; Glazed porcelain surface treated with Erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG laser. The surface roughness of porcelain was measured with a noncontact optical profilometer. For each porcelain sample, two readings were taken across the sample, before porcelain surface treatment (T1 and after porcelain surface treatment (T2. The roughness parameter analyzed was the average roughness (Ra. Statistical analysis was performed using Kolmogorov–Smirnov and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: Mean Ra values for each group were as follows: I, 12.64±073; II, 11.91±0.74; III, 11.76±0.59; IV, 3.82 ±0.65; V, 2.77±0.57. For all porcelain groups, the lowest Ra values were observed in Group V. The highest Ra values were observed for Group I, with a significant difference with the other groups. Kolmogorov–Smirnov showed significant differences among groups (p<0.001. Conclusion: Surface treatment of porcelain with HFA resulted in significantly higher Ra than laser groups. Both Er:YAG laser or Nd:YAG laser on the deglaze porcelain surface can be recommended as viable treatment alternatives to acid etching.

  19. Spectroscopic study of surface enhanced Raman scattering of caffeine on borohydride-reduced silver colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaomin; Gu, Huaimin; Shen, Gaoshan; Dong, Xiao; Kang, Jian

    2010-06-01

    The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of caffeine on borohydride-reduced silver colloids system under different aqueous solution environment has been studied in this paper. The relative intensity of SERS of caffeine significantly varies with different concentrations of sodium chloride and silver particles. However, at too high or too low concentration of sodium chloride and silver particle, the enhancement of SERS spectra is not evident. The SERS spectra of caffeine suggest that the contribution of the charge transfer mechanism to SERS may be dominant. The chloride ions can significantly enhance the efficiency of SERS, while the enhancement is selective, as the efficiency in charge transfer enhancement is higher than in electromagnetic enhancement. Therefore, it can be concluded that the active site of chloride ion locates on the bond between the caffeine and the silver surface. In addition, the SERS spectra of caffeine on borohydride-reduced and citrate-reduced silver colloids are different, which may be due to different states caffeine adsorbed on silver surface under different silver colloids.

  20. A spectroscopic method for the evaluation of surface passivation treatments on metal–oxide–semiconductor structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Lee A., E-mail: lee.walsh36@mail.dcu.ie [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Hurley, Paul K.; Lin, Jun [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland); Cockayne, Eric [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithesburg, MD 20899 (United States); O’Regan, T.P. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Woicik, Joseph C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithesburg, MD 20899 (United States); Hughes, Greg [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Surface potential changes can be detected from HAXPES measurements. • Flat band voltage shifts can be detected from HAXPES measurements. • Agreement between HAXPES and C–V measurements in Si based MOS structures. • Agreement between HAXPES and C–V measurements in GaAs based MOS structures. - Abstract: Combined hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) and electrical characterisation measurements have been shown to provide complementary information on the electrical performance of Si and GaAs based metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS) structures. The results obtained indicate that surface potential changes at the semiconductor/dielectric interface due to the presence of different work function metals can be detected from HAXPES measurements. Changes in the semiconductor band bending at zero gate voltage and the flat band voltage values derived from C–V measurements are in agreement with the semiconductor core level shifts measured from the HAXPES spectra. These results highlight the potential application of this measurement approach in the evaluation of the efficacy of surface passivation treatments: HAXPES—hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; C–V—capacitance voltage; D{sub it}—interface state density; BE—binding energy, at reducing defect states densities in MOS structures.

  1. Spectroscopic constraints on Pluto's coupled surface and atmosphere: context for the New Horizons encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eliot F.

    2017-01-01

    Pluto's bright surface is a direct result of the transport of volatiles on seasonal timescales. Over the course of a Pluto year (248 years), nitrogen, CO and methane frosts migrate over different parts of Pluto's surface. Pluto's atmosphere is predominantly N2 gas, supported by the vapor pressure of nitrogen frost -- the most volatile of Pluto's surface constituents. New Horizons obtained spectral image cubes of Pluto's surface in the 2 - 2.5 µm range, where N2, CO, CH4 and other frosts have diagnostic features. Some of the surprising results from New Horizons were the inhomogeneity of N2 frost distribution (why is there "Tombaugh Regio," a concentration of bright N2 frost?) and CH4 frost features on certain topographic locations. Given that the vapor pressure of N2 frost is about five orders of magnitude higher than that of CH4 at a given temperature, one might expect Pluto's seasonal warming and cooling cycles to act as a massive distillery and separate N2 and CH4 frosts. Ground-based spectroscopy from Keck using NIRSPEC extends our spectroscopy of Pluto to the 2.8 - 3.5 µm range, beyond New Horizon's limit. We see that the 3.3 µm band of methane frost is nearly zero, ruling out any N2 frost on Pluto that does not have CH4 frost mixed in. Furthermore, the edge of the 3.3 µm feature is diagnostic of pure CH4 ice vs. CH4 that is mixed in an N2 matrix. The mixed state of N2 and CH4 ices, a surprise given their drastically different vapor pressures, has changed the paradigm of how Pluto's surface frosts and atmosphere are coupled. In particular, Keck spectra help us extend the snapshot of the New Horizons flyby to models of volatile transport that span an entire Pluto orbit. Certain scenarios are prohibited, such as the case where Pluto's atmosphere freezes out during aphelion. Some of the lessons learned for Pluto's seasonal atmospheric behavior can be applied to other frost-covered TNOs in highly eccentric orbits, like Eris or Makemake.

  2. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-05

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm(-1) and 1545 cm(-1), respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties.

  3. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm- 1 and 1545 cm- 1, respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties.

  4. Effect of mixing technique on surface characteristics of impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepe, X; Johnson, G H; Berg, J C; Aw, T C

    1998-05-01

    Previous studies have shown a relationship between the disinfection process, wettability, and mass change of impression materials. Hand-mixed high viscosity impression materials usually result in a material with numerous voids, which contribute to surface roughness and affect the surface characteristics of the material. This study evaluated the effect of mixing technique on advancing contact angle, receding contact angle, imbibition, and mass loss of various high and low viscosity polyether and polyvinyl siloxane materials. The null hypothesis tested was no differences exist between the different mixing systems. The Wilhelmy technique was used for deriving wetting properties of the materials used (Impregum F and Penta, Permadyne Syringe, Garant and Penta, Dimension Penta and Garant L, Aquasil). Conditions included no disinfection (0 hours) and 1, 5, and 18 hours of immersion disinfection in a full-strength solution of 2% acid glutaraldehyde disinfectant (Banicide). Weight changes before and after disinfection were measured to detect weight loss or mass increase over time. Weight loss in air was also measured to detect mass loss. Data were analyzed with a one-way analysis of variance at alpha = 0.05. All materials displayed some degree of imbibition of the disinfectant and experienced mass loss with polymerization, except the light viscosity polyvinyl that gained 0.18% at 5 hours. No significant differences were found in wettability among the polyether materials after 1 hour of disinfection. Less imbibition was observed for high viscosity mechanically mixed materials compared with the hand-mixed materials for both polyether and polyvinyl siloxane at 1-hour disinfection time. Polyether materials were more wettable than polyvinyl. Imbibition of high viscosity polyether and polyvinyl materials after 1 and 18 hours of disinfection were affected by the mixing system used.

  5. First fully ab initio potential energy surface of methane with a spectroscopic accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, A. V.; Rey, M.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.

    2016-09-01

    Full 9-dimensional ab initio potential energy surfaces for the methane molecule are constructed using extended electronic structure coupled-cluster calculations with various series of basis sets following increasing X cardinal numbers: cc-pVXZ (X = 3, 4, 5, 6), aug-cc-ACVXZ (X = 3, 4, 5), and cc-pCVXZ-F12 (X = 3, 4). High-order dynamic electron correlations including triple and quadrupole excitations as well as relativistic and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer breakdown corrections were accounted for. Analytical potential functions are parametrized as non-polynomial expansions in internal coordinates in irreducible tensor representation. Vibrational energy levels are reported using global variational nuclear motion calculations with exact kinetic energy operator and a full account of the tetrahedral symmetry of CH4. Our best ab initio surface including above-mentioned contributions provides the rms (obs.-calc.) errors of less than 0.11 cm-1 for vibrational band centers below 4700 cm-1, and ˜0.3 cm-1 for all 229 assigned experimentally determined vibrational levels up to the Icosad range <7900 cm-1 without empirically adjusted parameters. These results improve the accuracy of ab initio methane vibrational predictions by more than an order of magnitude with respect to previous works. This is an unprecedented accuracy of first-principles calculations of a five-atomic molecule for such a large data set. New ab initio potential results in significantly better band center predictions even in comparison with best available empirically corrected potential energy surfaces. The issues related to the basis set extrapolation and an additivity of various corrections at this level of accuracy are discussed.

  6. Entrance surface dose measurements in mammography using thermoluminescence technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, T. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada Unidad Legaria del IPM Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E [Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Azorin, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-lztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Gonzalez, P.R. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico Toluca, 52045 Salazar Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Full text: Of the various techniques that can be used for personnel dosimetry, thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) has emerged as a superior technique due to its manifold advantages over other methods of dose estimation. Various phosphors have been therefore investigated regarding their suitability for dosimetry. In this paper, a dosimetry system based on thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) from zirconium oxide phosphors embedded in polytetrafluorethylene (ZrO{sub 2}+PTFE) was developed for entrance surface doses (ES) measurements in mammography. Small ZrO{sub 2} pellets of 5 mm in diameter and 0.8 mm in thickness were used. The reproducibility of measurements and linearity of ZrO{sub 2} were also studied. The results were compared with those obtained from LiF:Mg,Cu,P usually used for the determination of absorbed dose in mammography. Measurements both per unit air kerma and In vivo were performed using a mammography unit model DMR (General Electric). The results showed that ZrO{sub 2} TLDs can be used for the same X-ray dosimetry applications as LiF:Mg,Cu,P, with each type having the disadvantage of a response dependent on energy, particularly at low energies. These results indicate a considerable potential for use in routine control and In vivo ES measurements in mammography. (Author)

  7. The surface Laplacian technique in EEG: Theory and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalhaes, Claudio; de Barros, J Acacio

    2015-09-01

    This paper reviews the method of surface Laplacian differentiation to study EEG. We focus on topics that are helpful for a clear understanding of the underlying concepts and its efficient implementation, which is especially important for EEG researchers unfamiliar with the technique. The popular methods of finite difference and splines are reviewed in detail. The former has the advantage of simplicity and low computational cost, but its estimates are prone to a variety of errors due to discretization. The latter eliminates all issues related to discretization and incorporates a regularization mechanism to reduce spatial noise, but at the cost of increasing mathematical and computational complexity. These and several other issues deserving further development are highlighted, some of which we address to the extent possible. Here we develop a set of discrete approximations for Laplacian estimates at peripheral electrodes. We also provide the mathematical details of finite difference approximations that are missing in the literature, and discuss the problem of computational performance, which is particularly important in the context of EEG splines where data sets can be very large. Along this line, the matrix representation of the surface Laplacian operator is carefully discussed and some figures are given illustrating the advantages of this approach. In the final remarks, we briefly sketch a possible way to incorporate finite-size electrodes into Laplacian estimates that could guide further developments.

  8. Functionalization of ceramic tile surface by sol-gel technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondioli, F; Taurino, R; Ferrari, A M

    2009-06-15

    The aim of this investigation was the surface functionalization of industrial ceramic tiles by sol-gel technique to improve at the same time the cleanability of unglazed surfaces. This objective was pursued through the design and preparation of nanostructured coating that was deposited on polished unglazed tiles by air-brushing. In particular TiO(2)-SiO(2) binary film with 1, 2 or 5wt% of titania were prepared by using tetraethoxysilane and titania nanoparticles as precursors. The obtained films were characterized by scratch tests to verify the adhesion of the coatings to the polished tiles. To mainly evaluate the effect of the thermal treatment (temperature range 100-600 degrees C) on the photocatalicity of the coatings, the films were studied under UV exposure by contact angle measurements and cleanability test. Particular attention has been paid to preserve the aesthetical aspect of the final product and the obtained hue variation was evaluated by means of UV-visible spectroscopy and colorimetric analysis.

  9. New surface treatment techniques against ice formation and growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megateli, R. [TechnoCentre eolien Gaspesie-les Iles, Murdochville, PQ (Canada). Centre CORUS

    2007-07-01

    The average wind speed in Murdochville, Quebec is 9 m/s, making it one of Canada's richest wind resource regions. As such, it is the site of a natural laboratory for the CORUS Center to study the North American climate and wind energy extraction. This presentation outlined research initiatives at CORUS, with particular reference to innovative treatments against ice accretion on wind turbine blades. Ice changes the aerodynamic profile of turbine blades, overloads the structure, increases vibrations and causes component wear. This results in loss of energy production, frequent failures, reduced service life and increased operating and maintenance costs. CORUS has been working on reducing ice accretion on blade surfaces without affecting the manufacturing process using ion implantation and UV rays irradiation. The ions used in the process are hydrogen, fluorine and argon. The technique modifies the surface chemical properties at the nano-scale depth level. This presentation provided details of the ion implantation procedure and the UV rays exposure procedure. An evaluation of wetting and water contact angles on blade samples was provided. Preliminary results showed that the high hysteresis of the non-treated samples had favourable conditions to ice adhesion. Argon implantation reduced the water contact angles and particularly hysteresis. Hydrogen implantation slightly increased the water contact angles and reduced the hysteresis. The process was beneficial in terms of service life. UV irradiation increased the hysteresis. figs.

  10. Near surface geophysical techniques on subsoil contamination: laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzoli, Luigi; Giampaolo, Valeria; Rizzo, Enzo

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocarbons contamination of soil and groundwater has become a serious environmental problem, because of the increasing number of accidental spills caused by human activities. The starting point of any studies is the reconstruction of the conceptual site model. To make valid predictions about the flow pathways following by hydrocarbons compound is necessary to make a correct reconstruction of their characteristics and the environment in which they move. Near-surface geophysical methods, based on the study of electrical and electromagnetic properties, are proved to be very useful in mapping spatial distribution of the organic contaminants in the subsurface. It is well known, in fact, that electrical properties of the porous media are significantly influenced by hydrocarbons because, when contaminants enter the rock matrix, surface reaction occur between the contaminant and the soil grain surface. The main aim of this work is to investigate the capability of near-surface geophysical methods in mapping and monitoring spatial distribution of contaminants in a controlled setting. A laboratory experiment has been performed at the Hydrogeosite Laboratory of CNR-IMAA (Marsico Nuovo, PZ) where a box-sand has been contaminated by diesel. The used contaminant is a LNAPL, added to the sand through a drilled pipe. Contaminant behaviour and its migration paths have been monitored for one year by Electrical Resistivity measurements. In details, a Cross Borehole Electrical Resistivity Tomography techniques were used to characterize the contamination dynamics after a controlled hydrocarbon spillage occurring in the vadose zone. The approach with cross-borehole resistivity imaging provide a great advantage compared to more conventional surface electrical resistivity tomography, due to the high resolution at high depth (obviously depending on the depth of the well instrumented for the acquisition). This method has been shown to provide good information on the distribution of

  11. Auger electron spectroscopic study of CO{sub 2} adsorption on Zircaloy-4 surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojilovic, N.; Farkas, N. [Institute for Teaching and Learning and Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-6236 (United States); Ramsier, R.D. [Institute for Teaching and Learning and Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-6236 (United States)], E-mail: rex@uakron.edu

    2008-02-28

    We investigate the adsorption of CO{sub 2} onto Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) surfaces at 150, 300 and 600 K using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Following CO{sub 2} adsorption at 150 K the graphitic form of carbon is detected, whereas upon chemisorption at 300 and 600 K we detect the carbidic phase. As the adsorption temperature is increased, the carbon Auger signal increases, whereas the oxygen signal decreases. Adsorption at all three temperatures results in a shift of the Zr Auger features, indicating surface oxidation. The effect of adsorbed CO{sub 2} on the Zr(MVV) and Zr(MNV) transitions depends on adsorption temperature and is less pronounced at higher temperatures. On the other hand, changes in the Zr(MNN) feature are similar for all three adsorption temperatures. The changes in the Zr Auger peak shapes and positions are attributed to oxygen from dissociated CO{sub 2}, with the differences observed at various temperatures indicative of the diffusion of oxygen into the subsurface region.

  12. Alternating current impedance spectroscopic analysis of biofunctionalized vertically-aligned silica nanospring surface for biosensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timalsina, Yukta P.

    In this dissertation, a process of vertically-aligned (silica) nanosprings (VANS) based biosensor development is presented. Alternating current (AC) impedance spectroscopy has been used to analyze sensor response as a function of saline phosphate (SP) buffer and biological solutions. The sensor is a parallel plate capacitor consisting of two glass substrates coated with indium tin oxide (ITO), where the VANS [or randomly-aligned nanosprings (RANS)] grown on one substrate serve as the dielectric spacer layer. The response of a VANS device as a function of ionic concentration in SP buffer was examined and an equivalent circuit model was developed. The results demonstrated that VANS sensors exhibited greater sensitivity to the changes in SP concentration relative to the ITO sensors, which serve as controls. The biofunctionalized VANS surface via physisorption and the cross-linker method demonstrates the repeatability, specificity, and selectivity of the binding. The physisorption of biotinylated immunoglobulin G (B-IgG) onto the VANS surface simplifies the whole sensing procedure for the detection of glucose oxidase, since the avidin-conjugated glucose oxidase (Av-GOx) can directly be immobilized on the B-IgG. The cross linker method involves the covalent attachment of antibodies onto the functionalized VANS surface via imine bond. The experiments revealed that the VANS sensor response is solely the result of the interaction of target molecule i.e. mouse IgG with the probe layer, i.e. goat antimouse IgG (GalphaM IgG). It was determined that VANS-based sensors exhibit a greater magnitude of change between successive bio-layers relative to the controls above 100 Hz, which indicates that the addition of biomolecules inhibits the diffusion of ions and changes the effective dielectric response of the VANS via biomolecular polarization. The study of ionic transport in nanosprings suggested that conductance follows a scaling law. It was demonstrated that a VANS-based device

  13. Colored grounds of gilt stucco surfaces as analyzed by a combined microscopic, spectroscopic and elemental analytical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansonetti, A; Striova, J; Biondelli, D; Castellucci, E M

    2010-08-01

    A survey of gilts applied to stucco surfaces that specifically focuses on the compositions of their colored grounds is reported. Gilt samples of a common geographical (Lombardy in Italy) and temporal provenance (17th-18th century) were studied in the form of polished cross-sections by optical and electron microscopy (SEM-EDS), micro-Raman (microRaman) spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy (microFTIR). Comparing samples with superimposed grounds and gilts enabled light to be shed on the choice of specific materials, their stratigraphic functions, decorative effects, and technological performances. Iron oxide pigments were found in the older grounds, sometimes in the presence of lead white (2PbCO(3).Pb(OH)(2)) or minium (Pb(3)O(4)). In more recent grounds, chrome yellow (PbCrO(4)), chrome orange (PbCrO(4).PbO), cinnabar (alpha-HgS) and barium white (BaSO(4)), invariably mixed with lead white, were encountered. Evidence for the use of organic mordants (colophony and wax, or siccative oil) was obtained by microFTIR. This combined microFTIR and microRaman spectroscopic and elemental (SEM-EDS) analytical approach enhances knowledge of the composition of gold grounds, their variability and their chronological evolution.

  14. Plasmonic Dimer-Like Nanoassemblies for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, Maria; Seo, Jaetae; Kim, Wan-Joong; Jung, Sungsoo; Hampton University Team; Etri Collaboration; Kriss Collaboration

    2011-05-01

    We report on the preparation of gold dimers in which the near-field coupling in their subwavelength gap is influenced by the individual gold nanoparticles size and the molecule's length used to assemble the dimers. The nano assemblies display plasmonic modes similar to those observed in rod-like nanoparticles. The longitudinal mode of the gold dimers shift as a function of gold nanoparticles size and concentration and it is influenced by the concentration of Rhodamine 6G (R6G), the molecule used as nanoparticle linker. We report large surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancements for R6G when using linked-gold nano-assemblies as a SERS substrate. A discussion about the main origins for the large enhancement of molecular vibrational modes is presented. This work at Hampton University was supported by the National Science Foundation (HRD-0734635 and HRD-0630372).

  15. Spectroscopic study on uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at the surface layer of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Thomas; Rossberg, Andre; Barkleit, Astrid; Steudtner, Robin; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja; Merroun, Mohamed L

    2015-02-14

    The complexation of U(vi) at the proteinaceous surface layer (S-layer) of the archaeal strain Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was investigated over a pH range from pH 1.5 to 6 at the molecular scale using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and U L(III)-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The S-layer, which represents the interface between the cell and its environment, is very stable against high temperatures, proteases, and detergents. This allowed the isolation and purification of S-layer ghosts (= empty cells) that maintain the size and shape of the cells. In contrast to many other microbial cell envelope compounds the studied S-layer is not phosphorylated, enabling the investigation of uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at microbial surfaces. The latter are usually masked by preferentially formed uranyl phosphate complexes. We demonstrated that at highly acidic conditions (pH 1.5 to 3) no uranium was bound by the S-layer. In contrast to that, at moderate acidic pH conditions (pH 4.5 and 6) a complexation of U(vi) at the S-layer via deprotonated carboxylic groups was stimulated. Titration studies revealed dissociation constants for the carboxylic groups of glutamic and aspartic acid residues of pK(a) = 4.78 and 6.31. The uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at the S-layer did not show luminescence properties at room temperature, but only under cryogenic conditions. The obtained luminescence maxima are similar to those of uranyl acetate. EXAFS spectroscopy demonstrated that U(vi) in these complexes is mainly coordinated to carboxylate groups in a bidentate binding mode. The elucidation of the molecular structure of these complexes was facilitated by the absence of phosphate groups in the studied S-layer protein.

  16. LixV2O5 - Analysis of surface reactions by spectroscopic quartz crystal mircogravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terwort, Jeroen; Berkemeier, Frank; Schmitz, Guido

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the electrochemical side reactions that occur during the cyclic lithiation/delithiation of sputter-deposited LixV2O5 films. For this purpose, the mass change of LixV2O5 films during lithiation/delithiation is measured by quartz crystal microgravimetry, while the electrical charge that is flowing during this reaction is measured by cyclic voltammetry. A time-resolved evaluation of the measurement data, in combination with an advanced type of data processing, finally allows us to calculate time-resolved quantitative mass spectra. These spectra provide information about the chemical species that take part during the electrochemical reactions. Based on this technique, we study the electrochemical side reactions between the LixV2O5 and the corresponding liquid electrolyte, i.e. we investigate the time-resolved formation of the solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer during long term cycling. We are able to identify several chemical species that are formed during cycling and moreover, we identify three different stages of SEI formation.

  17. Structural, Hirshfeld surface and spectroscopic studies of the noncentrosymmetric 1-ethylpiperazinediium pentachloroantimonate (III) monohydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudani, S.; Zeller, M.; Jelsch, C.; Lefebvre, F.; Ben Nasr, Cherif

    2016-08-01

    1-Ethylpiperazinediium pentachloroantimonate (III) monohydrate, C6H16N2SbCl5·H2O, has been synthesized by the reaction of antimony trioxide (Sb2O3) and 1-ethylpiperazine in an aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid. The structure crystallizes in orthorhombic system, in the non-centrosymmetric space group Pca21 and consists of isolated [C6H16N2]2+ cations, square pyramidal [SbCl5]2- anions and lattice water molecules. Osbnd H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds link the [SbCl5]2- anions and water molecules to form double chains stretching along the [101] direction. The chains in turn are linked to the organic cations via Nsbnd H⋯Cl, Csbnd H⋯Cl, Csbnd H⋯O and Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds to form a three-dimensional network. This structure presents an example of a general square pyramidal complex ion containing a stereo-chemically active lone pair of electrons. Solid state 13C and 15N CP-MAS NMR spectra are in agreement with the X-ray structure, and vibrational absorption bands were identified by infrared spectroscopy. DFT calculations allowed the attribution of the NMR peaks and IR absorption bands. The interactions variability of the two independent cations and ten chloride atoms is analyzed via Hirshfeld surface analysis.

  18. The innovative application of surface geophysical techniques for remedial investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, W.R. [OYO Geospace, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Smith, S. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Boston, MA (United States); Gilmore, P. [Fishbeck, Thomson, Carr and Huber, Aida, MI (United States); Cox, S. [Blasland, Bouck, and Lee, Edison, NJ (United States)

    1993-03-01

    When researchers are investigating potential subsurface contamination at hazardous waste landfills, the surface geophysical techniques they may use are often limited. Many geophysical surveys are concerned with areas next to and not directly within the landfill units. The highly variable properties of the materials within the landfill may result in geophysical data that are either difficult or impossible to interpret. Therefore, contamination at these sites may not be detected until substantial lateral migration away from the unit has occurred. In addition, because of the poor resolution of some techniques, the landfill as a whole must be considered as a source, where discrete disposal areas within landfill units may be the actual point sources of contaminants. In theory, if specific sources within the landfill are identified and isolated, then reduced time, effort, and expenditures will be required for remediation activities. In the summer of 1989, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) investigated a small potentially hazardous waste landfill to determine if contaminant hot spots could be identified within the landfill and to determine if significant vertical and lateral migration of contaminants was occurring away from these locations. Based on the present hydrogeologic conditions, researchers anticipated that subsurface flow would be primarily vertical, with the zone of saturation at a depth greater than 150 meters. This necessitated that the survey be performed, for the most part, directly on the capped portion of the landfill. Focused geophysical surveys conducted off the landfill would not have provided useful information concerning conditions directly beneath the landfill. This paper discusses the planning, application, and analysis of four combined sensing methods: two methods of electromagnetic induction [low induction (Em) and time domain (TEM)], ground penetrating radar (GPR), and soil gas.

  19. Assessment of natural radioactivity and function of minerals in soils of Yelagiri hills, Tamilnadu, India by Gamma Ray spectroscopic and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) techniques with statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, A; Ravisankar, R; Rajalakshmi, A; Eswaran, P; Vijayagopal, P; Venkatraman, B

    2015-02-01

    Gamma Ray and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques were used to evaluate the natural radioactivity due to natural radionuclides and mineralogical characterization in soils of Yelagiri hills, Tamilnadu, India. Various radiological parameters were calculated to assess the radiation hazards associated with the soil. The distribution pattern of activity due to natural radionuclides is explained by Kriging method of mapping. Using FTIR spectroscopic technique the minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, orthoclase feldspar, kaolinite, montmorillonite, illite, and organic carbon were identified and characterized. The extinction coefficient values were calculated to know the relative distribution of major minerals such as quartz, microcline feldspar, orthoclase feldspar and kaolinite. The calculated values indicate that the amount of quartz is higher than orthoclase feldspar, microcline feldspar and much higher than kaolinite. Crystallinity index was calculated to know the crystalline nature of quartz. The result indicates that the presence of disordered crystalline quartz in soils. The relation between minerals and radioactivity was assessed by multivariate statistical analysis (Pearson's correlation and cluster analysis). The statistical analysis confirms that the clay mineral kaolinite and non-clay mineral quartz is the major factor than other major minerals to induce the important radioactivity variables and concentrations of uranium and thorium.

  20. Electron spectroscopic study of electronic and morphological modifications of the WSe{sub 2} surface induced by Rb adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Jens

    2010-07-20

    The rubidium-covered surface of the semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide tungsten diselenide (WSe{sub 2}) is examined using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). Adsorbed Rb is known to induce a variety of effects in this system concerning electronic, structural, and mechanical properties. In this work, the surface potential created by charge transfer upon Rb deposition is examined in thermal equilibrium (band bending) and stationary non-equilibrium (surface photovoltage (SPV) effect), which is induced by the absorption of light. It is shown that combined measurements and numerical simulations of the SPV effect as a function of the photon flux can be exploited for the estimation of many material parameters of the system, especially of the unoccupied adsorbate state. Issues of extending a conventional photoelectron spectrometer setup by a secondary light source will be discussed in the context of simulations and calibration measurements. The customization of an existing theoretical model of the SPV effect for the WSe{sub 2}: Rb system is introduced, and a comprehensive validation of the obtained predictions is given in the context of experimental data. In addition, the self-organized formation of Rb domains at room temperature was examined by application of spatially resolved XPS spectroscopy using the PEEM setup at the end station of beamline UE49/PGMa at the BESSY II synchrotron facility. From the obtained results, the arrangement of Rb in surface lattices can be concluded. Furthermore, an X-Ray absorption study of self-organized nanostructure networks, aiming at the chemical characterization, is presented. Based on the interpretation of the examined structures as tension-induced cracks, a statistical approach to analyzing large-scale features was pursued. First accordance with the predictions made by a primitive, mechanical model of crack creation developed here gives gives some evidence for the validity of the

  1. MULTIPLE IMAGING TECHNIQUES DEMONSTRATE THE MANIPULATION OF SURFACES TO REDUCE BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface imaging techniques were combined to determine appropriate manipulation of technologically important surfaces for commercial applications. Stainless steel surfaces were engineered to reduce bacterial contamination, biofilm formation, and corrosion during product processing...

  2. Explaining the Cyclic Voltammetry of a Poly(1,4-phenylene-ethynylene)-alt-poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) Copolymer upon Oxidation by using Spectroscopic Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enengl, Christina; Enengl, Sandra; Bouguerra, Nassima; Havlicek, Marek; Neugebauer, Helmut; Egbe, Daniel A M

    2017-01-04

    Poly(1,4-phenylene-ethynylene)-alt-poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (PPE-PPV) copolymers have attracted quite a lot of attention in the last few years for electronic device applications owing to their enhanced fluorescence. In this work, we focus on one particular PPE-PPV copolymer with dissymmetrically substituted 1,4-phenylene-ethynylene and symmetrically substituted 1,4-phenylene-vinylene building units. Six successively performed cyclic voltammograms are presented, measured during the oxidation reactions. As the oxidation onset of the electrochemical reaction shifts to lower potentials in each cycle, this behavior is elucidated by using spectroscopic techniques ranging from UV/Vis/near-IR to mid-IR including spin-resonance techniques. Hence, these findings help to explain some of the copolymer's most advantageous properties in terms of possible oxidation products.

  3. Non-destructive Analysis of the Nuclei of Transgenic Living Cells Using Laser Tweezers and Near-infrared Raman Spectroscopic Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Tang; Ronald J. Newton; Chang-An Xie; Yong-Qing Li; Nicki Whitley

    2005-01-01

    Transgenic cell lines of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) were analyzed by a compact laser-tweezers-Raman-spectroscopy (LTRS) system in this investigation. A low power diode laser at 785 nm was used for both laser optical trapping of single transgenic cells and excitation for near-infrared Raman spectroscopy of the nuclei of synchronized cells, which were treated as single organic particles, at the S-phase of the cell cycle. Transgenic living cells with gfp and uidA genes were used as biological samples to test this LTRS technique. As expected, different Raman spectra were observed from the tested biological samples. This technique provides a high sensitivity and enables real-time spectroscopic measurements of transgenic cell lines. It could be a valuable tool for the study of the fundamental cell and molecular biological process by trapping single nucleus and by providing a wealth of molecular information about the nuclei of cells.

  4. Reliable structural, thermodynamic, and spectroscopic properties of organic molecules adsorbed on silicon surfaces from computational modeling: the case of glycine@Si(100).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnimeo, Ivan; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2011-10-06

    Chemisorption of glycine on Si(100) has been studied by an integrated computational strategy based on perturbative anharmonic computations employing geometries and harmonic force fields evaluated by hybrid density functionals coupled to purposely tailored basis sets. It is shown that such a strategy allows the prediction of spectroscopic properties of isolated and chemisorbed molecules with comparable accuracy, paving the route toward a detailed analysis of surface-induced changes of glycine vibrational spectra.

  5. Detection of Forgeries of Dutch and Flemish Paintings of the XVII-XVIII Centuries by means of Spectroscopic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabunya-Klyachkovskaya, E. V.; Kiris, V. V.; Shimko, A. N.; Belkov, M. V.; Raikov, S. N.

    2014-01-01

    Results of spectroscopic examinations of three paintings that by the formal and stylistic features can be attributed to the Dutch and Flemish schools of the XVII-XVIIIth centuries were presented. It was supposed that one of the paintings was created by David Teniers the Younger. The signature ″L. de Moni″ was found on the paint layer of another painting. Inorganic art pigments including those of the XIXth century were identified using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Fourier-transform IR spectroscopy was used to determine the paint binders, which allowed the lower limits of the creation time of these artworks to be defined. Results of a microscopic examination of the stratigraphic structure revealed that the creation technology of these artworks differed from that of Dutch and Flemish artists of the XVII-XVIIIth centuries. Thus, all three investigated paintings were XXth century stylistic forgeries of Dutch and Flemish paintings of the XVI-XVIIIth centuries.

  6. Recent Advances on Rotational Spectroscopy and Microwave Spectroscopic Techniques%转动光谱学与微波光谱技术研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李力; 孙铭; 李晓花; 赵镇文; 马会民; 甘海勇; 林镇辉; 史生才; Lucy M.Ziurys

    2014-01-01

    转动光谱学是以量子力学为基础,研究分子、自由基,以及离子的转动光谱的基础科学,在天文观测以及大气成分监测等领域有着重要的应用。本文综述了转动光谱学的一些基本理论,两种傅里叶变换微波光谱仪的搭建原理,以及几种典型的微波光谱实例分析,并对微波光谱技术的未来发展做了展望。%Based on quantum mechanics, rotational spectroscopy is a branch of fundamental science to study the rotational spectra of molecules, free radicals and ions, and has great applications on radio astronomy and many analytical fields such as atmospheric remote sensing. In this paper we reviewed the basic theory of rotational spectroscopy, two different types of Fourier transform microwave spectrometers, some typical spectroscopic analysis, and future prospect of the microwave spectroscopic techniques as well.

  7. 16-Channel surface coil for 13C-hyperpolarized spectroscopic imaging of cardiac metabolism in pig heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frijia, Francesca; Santarelli, Maria Filomena; Koellisch, Ulrich;

    2016-01-01

    both targets. In this study, a 16-channel receive surface coil was designed for 13C hyperpolarized studies of the pig heart with a clinical 3-T scanner. The coil performance was characterized by phantom experiments and compared with that of a birdcage coil used in transmit/receive mode. Segmental...... limitation due to the low molar concentration of certain metabolites as well as the low flux of conversion. Since 13C-MRS is essentially a semi-quantitative technique, the SNR of the spectra acquired in different myocardial segments should be homogeneous. MRS coil design plays an important role in achieving...... signal distribution in the left ventricle (LV) was assessed by experiments on six healthy mini pigs. The proposed coil showed a significant increase in SNR for the LV wall close to the coil surface with respect to that for the birdcage but also significant segmental inhomogeneity. Hence, the use...

  8. Investigation into the interaction of losartan with human serum albumin and glycated human serum albumin by spectroscopic and molecular dynamics simulation techniques: A comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeinpour, Farid; Mohseni-Shahri, Fatemeh S; Malaekeh-Nikouei, Bizhan; Nassirli, Hooriyeh

    2016-09-25

    The interaction between losartan and human serum albumin (HSA), as well as its glycated form (gHSA) was studied by multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular dynamics simulation under physiological conditions. The binding information, including the binding constants, effective quenching constant and number of binding sites showed that the binding partiality of losartan to HSA was higher than to gHSA. The findings of three-dimensional fluorescence spectra demonstrated that the binding of losartan to HSA and gHSA would alter the protein conformation. The distances between Trp residue and the binding sites of the drug were evaluated on the basis of the Förster theory, and it was indicated that non-radiative energy transfer from HSA and gHSA to the losartan happened with a high possibility. According to molecular dynamics simulation, the protein secondary and tertiary structure changes were compared in HSA and gHSA for clarifying the obtained results.

  9. Synthesis by coprecipitation technique and spectroscopic properties of some phosphates. [Yttrium or rare earth and potassium and alkaline earth metal phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbus, A.; Duranceau, C.; Zambon, D.; Cousseins, J.C. (Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (FR))

    1991-01-01

    The coprecipitation process has been used for the synthesis of some KBLn(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} compounds where B is an alkaline earth metal and Ln a lanthanide or yttrium. After the gel stage, an amorphous powder is obtained by drying, the thermal evolution of which is studied by X-ray diffraction. The temperature of calcination for the different powders is included in the 500-700{sup 0}C range, lower than that of the classical solid state synthesis, 800-1000{sup 0}C. The final phosphates crystallize with monoclinic or tetragonal symmetry. The spectroscopic properties of some Eu{sup 3+}-doped compounds prepared by coprecipitation technique are reported.

  10. Investigation on the interaction between isorhamnetin and bovine liver catalase by spectroscopic techniques under different pH conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yumin; Li, Daojin

    2016-08-01

    The binding of isorhamnetin to bovine liver catalase (BLC) was first investigated at 302, 310 and 318 K at pH 7.4 using spectroscopic methods including fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism (CD) and UV-vis absorption. Spectrophotometric observations are rationalized mainly in terms of a static quenching process. The binding constants and binding sites were evaluated by fluorescence quenching methods. Enzymatic activity of BLC in the absence and presence of isorhamnetin was measured using a UV/vis spectrophotometer. The result revealed that the binding of isorhamnetin to BLC led to a reduction in the activity of BLC. The positive entropy change and enthalpy change indicated that the interaction of isorhamnetin with BLC was mainly driven by hydrophobic forces. The distance r between the donor (BLC) and acceptor (isorhamnetin) was estimated to be 2.99 nm according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, and CD spectra showed no obvious change in the conformation of BLC upon the binding of isorhamnetin. In addition, the influence of pH on the binding of isorhamnetin to BLC was investigated and the binding ability of the drug to BLC deceased under other pH conditions (pH 9.0, 6.5, 5.0, 3.5, or 2.0) as compared with that at pH 7.4. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Determination of photocarrier density under continuous photoirradiation using spectroscopic techniques as applied to polymer: Fullerene blend films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanemoto, Katsuichi, E-mail: kkane@sci.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Nakatani, Hitomi; Domoto, Shinya [Department of Physics, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)

    2014-10-28

    We propose a method to determine the density of photocarrier under continuous photoirradiation in conjugated polymers using spectroscopic signals obtained by photoinduced absorption (PIA) measurements. The bleaching signals in the PIA measurements of polymer films and the steady-state absorption signals of oxidized polymer solution are employed to determine the photocarrier density. The method is applied to photocarriers of poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) in a blended film consisting of P3HT and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The photocarrier density under continuous photoirradiation of 580 mW/cm{sup 2} is determined to be 3.5 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −3}. Using a trend of the carrier density increasing in proportion to the square root of photo-excitation intensity, we provide a general formula to estimate the photocarrier density under simulated 1 sun solar irradiation for the P3HT: PCBM film of an arbitrary thickness. We emphasize that the method proposed in this study enables an estimate of carrier density without measuring a current and can be applied to films with no electrodes as well as to devices.

  12. Atmosphere–Surface Fluxes of CO2 using Spectral Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    2010-01-01

    Different flux estimation techniques are compared here in order to evaluate air–sea exchange measurement methods used on moving platforms. Techniques using power spectra and cospectra to estimate fluxes are presented and applied to measurements of wind speed and sensible heat, latent heat and CO2...

  13. SRF Cavity Surface Topography Characterization Using Replica Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Xu, M.J. Kelley, C.E. Reece

    2012-07-01

    To better understand the roll of topography on SRF cavity performance, we seek to obtain detailed topographic information from the curved practical cavity surfaces. Replicas taken from a cavity interior surface provide internal surface molds for fine Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and stylus profilometry. In this study, we confirm the replica resolution both on surface local defects such as grain boundary and etching pits and compare the surface uniform roughness with the aid of Power Spectral Density (PSD) where we can statistically obtain roughness parameters at different scales. A series of sampling locations are at the same magnetic field chosen at the same latitude on a single cell cavity to confirm the uniformity. Another series of sampling locations at different magnetic field amplitudes are chosen for this replica on the same cavity for later power loss calculation. We also show that application of the replica followed by rinsing does not adversely affect the cavity performance.

  14. Multistage bioassociation of uranium onto an extremely halophilic archaeon revealed by a unique combination of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, Miriam; Müller, Katharina; Foerstendorf, Harald; Drobot, Björn [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Schmidt, Matthias; Musat, Niculina [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZ, Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Swanson, Juliet S.; Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Repository Science and Operations, 1400 University Drive, Carlsbad, NM, 88220 (United States); Stumpf, Thorsten [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Cherkouk, Andrea, E-mail: a.cherkouk@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • First prolonged kinetics study of uranium to halophilic archaea was performed. • An atypical time-dependent bioassociation behavior of uranium was observed. • Unique combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods was used. • In situ ATR FT-IR showed association of U(VI) to phosphoryl and carboxylate groups. • Time-dependent changes of U(VI) localization could be monitored by SEM/EDX. - Abstract: The interactions of two extremely halophilic archaea with uranium were investigated at high ionic strength as a function of time, pH and uranium concentration. Halobacterium noricense DSM-15987 and Halobacterium sp. putatively noricense, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository, were used for these investigations. The kinetics of U(VI) bioassociation with both strains showed an atypical multistage behavior, meaning that after an initial phase of U(VI) sorption, an unexpected interim period of U(VI) release was observed, followed by a slow reassociation of uranium with the cells. By applying in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, the involvement of phosphoryl and carboxylate groups in U(VI) complexation during the first biosorption phase was shown. Differences in cell morphology and uranium localization become visible at different stages of the bioassociation process, as shown with scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate for the first time that association of uranium with the extremely halophilic archaeon is a multistage process, beginning with sorption and followed by another process, probably biomineralization.

  15. Study of hydrogen-bonding, vibrational dynamics and structure-activity relationship of genistein using spectroscopic techniques coupled with DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harshita; Singh, Swapnil; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Bharti, Purnima; Kumar, Sudhir; Dev, Kapil; Maurya, Rakesh

    2017-02-01

    The conformational and hydrogen bonding studies of genistein have been performed by combined spectroscopic and quantum chemical approach. The vibrational spectra (FT-IR and FT-Raman), UV-visible and 1H and 13C NMR absorption spectra of genistein have been recorded and examined. The vibrational wavenumbers of optimized geometry and total energy for isolated molecule and hydrogen-bonded dimers of genistein have been determined using the quantum chemical calculation (DFT/B3LYP) with extended 6-311++G (d,p) basis set. The vibrational assignments for the observed FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of genistein are provided by calculations on monomer and hydrogen-bonded dimer. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) is used for investigating the nature and strength of hydrogen-bonds. UV-visible spectrum of the genistein was recorded in methanol solvent and the electronic properties were calculated by using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The computed HOMO and LUMO energies predicted the type of transition as π → π*. The 1H and 13C NMR signals of the genistein were computed by the Gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) approach. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis predicted the stability of molecules due to charge delocalization and hyper conjugative interactions. NBO analysis shows that there is an Osbnd H⋯O inter and intramolecular hydrogen bond, and π → π* transition in the monomer and dimer, which is consistent with the conclusion obtained by the investigation of molecular structure and assignment of UV-visible spectra.

  16. Chemical reactions on solid surfaces using molecular beam techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, R. L.

    1980-07-01

    Thermal energy molecular beams have been used to study chemical interactions with metal surfaces. Chemisorption of simple molecules such as H2, O2, CH4, C2Hx and CO was investigated on single and polycrystalline surfaces of Pt, Ni, Co, and Ag. Kinetic parameters and reaction mechanisms were determined for model catalytic reactions including CO and C2Hx oxidation and methanation from H2/CO mixtures. Chemical reactions of NOx with CO and D2 on Pt(111) and other surfaces have been surveyed and the kinetics of NO and O2 chemisorption have been measured. The theory of adsorption/desorption kinetics is reviewed and certain deficiencies identified.

  17. Spectroscopic probes of vibrationally excited molecules at chemically significant energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, T.R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project involves the application of multiple-resonance spectroscopic techniques for investigating energy transfer and dissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. Two major goals of this work are: (1) to provide information on potential energy surfaces of combustion related molecules at chemically significant energies, and (2) to test theoretical modes of unimolecular dissociation rates critically via quantum-state resolved measurements.

  18. Co-GISAXS technique for investigating surface growth dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainville, Meliha G.; Hoskin, Christa; Ulbrandt, Jeffrey G.; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec R.; Zhou, Hua; Headrick, Randall L.; Ludwig, Jr., Karl F.

    2015-12-08

    Detailed quantitative measurement of surface dynamics during thin film growth is a major experimental challenge. Here X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy with coherent hard X-rays is used in a Grazing-Incidence Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (i.e. Co-GISAXS) geometry as a new tool to investigate nanoscale surface dynamics during sputter deposition of a-Si and a-WSi2 thin films. For both films, kinetic roughening during surface growth reaches a dynamic steady state at late times in which the intensity autocorrelation function g2(q,t) becomes stationary. The g2(q,t) functions exhibit compressed exponential behavior at all wavenumbers studied. The overall dynamics are complex, but the most surface sensitive sections of the structure factor and correlation time exhibit power law behaviors consistent with dynamical scaling.

  19. A simple technique to assess bacterial attachment to metal surfaces

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sonak, S.; Bhosle, N.B.

    There are several methods to assess bacterial adhesion to metal surfaces. Although these methods are sensitive, they are time consuming and need expensive chemicals and instruments. Hence, their use in assessing bacterial adhesion is limited...

  20. Surface properties of hard protective coatings studied by optical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaglarz, Janusz; Wolska, N.; Mitura, K.; Duraj, R.; Marszalek, K. W.; El Kouari, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The paper describes optical study of SiC, C and NiC layers deposited on Si substrates by double beam ion sputtering (DBIS) method. The following optical methods: ellipsometry, bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) and total integrated scattering (TIS) studies have been applied. The obtained results allowed us to determine the refractive indices, extinction coefficients and the roughness parameters of DBIS films. Also surface profiles of optical constants determined from scanning ellipsometric measurements have been presented. The power spectral density functions (PSD) of surface roughness for studied samples have been determined. The influence of the deposition technology on film topography has been discussed.

  1. Comprehensive analysis of TEM methods for LiFePO4/FePO4 phase mapping: spectroscopic techniques (EFTEM, STEM-EELS) and STEM diffraction techniques (ACOM-TEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, X; Kobler, A; Wang, D; Chakravadhanula, V S K; Schlabach, S; Szabó, D V; Norby, P; Kübel, C

    2016-11-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used intensively in investigating battery materials, e.g. to obtain phase maps of partially (dis)charged (lithium) iron phosphate (LFP/FP), which is one of the most promising cathode material for next generation lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries. Due to the weak interaction between Li atoms and fast electrons, mapping of the Li distribution is not straightforward. In this work, we revisited the issue of TEM measurements of Li distribution maps for LFP/FP. Different TEM techniques, including spectroscopic techniques (energy filtered (EF)TEM in the energy range from low-loss to core-loss) and a STEM diffraction technique (automated crystal orientation mapping (ACOM)), were applied to map the lithiation of the same location in the same sample. This enabled a direct comparison of the results. The maps obtained by all methods showed excellent agreement with each other. Because of the strong difference in the imaging mechanisms, it proves the reliability of both the spectroscopic and STEM diffraction phase mapping. A comprehensive comparison of all methods is given in terms of information content, dose level, acquisition time and signal quality. The latter three are crucial for the design of in-situ experiments with beam sensitive Li-ion battery materials. Furthermore, we demonstrated the power of STEM diffraction (ACOM-STEM) providing additional crystallographic information, which can be analyzed to gain a deeper understanding of the LFP/FP interface properties such as statistical information on phase boundary orientation and misorientation between domains.

  2. Murillo's paintings revealed by spectroscopic techniques and dedicated laboratory-made micro X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, A., E-mail: adrian@icmse.csic.es [Materials Science Institute of Seville, Avda Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Seville (Spain); Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France (C2RMF-CNRS), Palais du Louvre, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Siguenza, M.B.; Franquelo, M.L.; Haro, M.C. Jimenez de; Justo, A.; Perez-Rodriguez, J.L. [Materials Science Institute of Seville, Avda Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Seville (Spain)

    2010-06-25

    This paper describes one of the first case studies using micro-diffraction laboratory-made systems to analyse painting cross-sections. Pigments, such as lead white, vermilion, red ochre, red lac, lapis lazuli, smalt, lead tin yellow type I, massicot, ivory black, lamp black and malachite, were detected in cross-sections prepared from six Bartolome Esteban Murillo paintings by micro-Raman and micro-XRD combined with complementary techniques (optical microscopy, SEM-EDS, and FT-IR). The use of micro-XRD was necessary due to the poor results obtained with conventional XRD. In some cases, pigment identification was only possible by combining results from the different analytical techniques utilised in this study.

  3. On-line preferential solvation studies of polymers by coupled chromatographic-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic flow-cell technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanin, M; Eichhorn, K-J; Lederer, A; Treppe, P; Adam, G; Fischer, D; Voigt, D

    2009-12-18

    Qualitative and quantitative comparison between liquid chromatography (LC) and LC coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (LC-FTIR) to evaluate preferential solvation phenomenon of polymers in a mixed solvent has been performed. These studies show that LC-FTIR technique leads to detailed structural information without the requirement for determination of additional parameters for quantitative analysis except calibration. Appropriate experimental conditions for preferential solvation study have been established by variation of polymer concentration, molar mass and eluent content.

  4. Vibrational Spectroscopic Techniques for Analysis of Spatially Heterogeneous Materials%共振光谱技术在分析空间非均质物质上的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric; Y.Jiang; Forrest; J.; Weesener

    2005-01-01

    @@ This paper demonstrates three vibrational spectroscopic techniques andtheir applications in characterization of spatially heterogamous materials, namely step-scan phase modulation FTIR photoacoustic spectroscopy (S2φMPAS), visible (confocal) Raman microscopy (CRM) and FT-IR imaging. In addition, the applications of Raman spectroscopy in nanomaterials studies are also briefly discussed.

  5. The CoRoT-GES Collaboration: Improving red giants spectroscopic surface gravitity and abundances with asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, M.; Chiappini, C.; Miglio, A.; Montalbán, J.; Rodrigues, T.; Mosser, B.; Anders, F.; the CoRoT RG Group; GES Consortium, the

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays large spectroscopic surveys, like the Gaia-ESO Survey (GES), provide unique stellar databases for better investigating the formation and evolution of our Galaxy. Great attention must be paid to the accuracy of the basic stellar properties derived: large uncertainties in stellar parameters lead to large uncertainties in abundances, distances and ages. Asteroseismology has a key role in this context: when seismic information is combined with information derived from spectroscopic analysis, highly precise constraints on distances, masses, extinction and ages of red giants can be obtained. In the light of this promising joint action, we started the CoRoT-GES collaboration. We present a set of 1111 CoRoT stars, observed by GES from December 2011 to July 2014, these stars belong to the CoRoT field LRc01, pointing at the inner Galactic disk. Among these stars, 534 have reliable global seismic parameters. By combining seismic informations and spectroscopy, we derived precise stellar parameters, ages, kinematic and orbital parameters and detailed element abundances for this sample of stars. We also show that, thanks to asteroseismology, we are able to obtain a higher precision than what can be achieved by the standard spectroscopic means. This sample of CoRoT red giants, spanning Galactocentric distances from 5 to 8 kpc and a wide age interval (1-13 Gyr), provides us a representative sample for the inner disk population.

  6. Evaluation of structure-reactivity descriptors and biological activity spectra of 4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-2-butanone using spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Megha; Deval, Vipin; Gupta, Archana; Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy; Prabhu, S. S.

    2016-10-01

    The structure and several spectroscopic features along with reactivity parameters of the compound 4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-2-butanone (Nabumetone) have been studied using experimental techniques and tools derived from quantum chemical calculations. Structure optimization is followed by force field calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The vibrational spectra have been interpreted with the aid of normal coordinate analysis. UV-visible spectrum and the effect of solvent have been discussed. The electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energies have been determined by TD-DFT approach. In order to understand various aspects of pharmacological sciences several new chemical reactivity descriptors - chemical potential, global hardness and electrophilicity have been evaluated. Local reactivity descriptors - Fukui functions and local softnesses have also been calculated to find out the reactive sites within molecule. Aqueous solubility and lipophilicity have been calculated which are crucial for estimating transport properties of organic molecules in drug development. Estimation of biological effects, toxic/side effects has been made on the basis of prediction of activity spectra for substances (PASS) prediction results and their analysis by Pharma Expert software. Using the THz-TDS technique, the frequency-dependent absorptions of NBM have been measured in the frequency range up to 3 THz.

  7. Development of a low resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopic technique for the study of matrix mobility in fresh and freeze-thawed hen egg yolk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Carmen; Wang, Tong; Acevedo, Nuria C

    2016-08-01

    Three experiments were conducted in developing a low resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopic technique to study matrix mobility in fresh and freeze-thawed gelled yolk. The Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence was used to measure spin-spin relaxation times of proton pools representing major yolk constituents. A component identification test distinguished 3-4 pools. The least mobile pool was assigned to proteins, protein-lipid and protein-water interactions, and the most mobile to unbound water. The remaining pools were assigned to lipids, lipid-protein and lipid-water interactions. A stability test indicated that yolk had varied matrix mobility within the same sample across five days of refrigeration storage. A reproducibility test demonstrated high repeatability of fresh yolk measurements, but significant differences (p<0.05) were found within gelled yolk samples. This research determined that (1)H NMR spectroscopy, a non-destructive technique, can identify yolk components and detect changes in the matrix.

  8. Spectroscopic and Structural Studies of a Surface Active Porphyrin in Solution and in Langmuir-Blodgett Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Concepcion P; Araghi, Hessamaddin Younesi; Joshi, Neeraj K; Steer, Ronald P; Paige, Matthew F

    2015-12-22

    Controlling aggregation of the dual sensitizer-emitter (S-E) zinc tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP) is an important consideration in solid state noncoherent photon upconversion (NCPU) applications. The Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique is a facile means of preparing ordered assemblies in thin films to study distance-dependent energy transfer processes in S-E systems and was used in this report to control the aggregation of a functionalized ZnTPP on solid substrates. This was achieved by synthetic addition of a short polar tail to one of the pendant phenyl rings in ZnTPP in order to make it surface active. The surface active ZnTPP derivative formed rigid films at the air-water interface and exhibited mean molecular areas consistent with approximately vertically oriented molecules under appropriate film compression. A red shift in the UV-vis spectra as well as unquenched fluorescence emission of the LB films indicated formation of well-ordered aggregates. However, NCPU, present in the solution phase, was not observed in the LB films, suggesting that NCPU from ZnTPP as a dual S-E required not just a controlled aggregation but a specific orientation of the molecules with respect to each other.

  9. A Hirshfeld surface analysis, crystal structure and spectroscopic properties of new Zn(II) complex with N-aminoethylpiperazine ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Glaoui, Maroua; El Glaoui, Maher; Jelsch, Christian; Aubert, Emmanuel; Lefebvre, Frédéric; Ben Nasr, Chérif

    2017-04-01

    A new organic-inorganic hybrid material, 1-amonioethylpiperazine-1, 4-diium tetrachloridozincate(II) chloride, (C6H18N3)[ZnCl4]Cl, has been synthesized and characterized by various physicochemical techniques including UV-visible absorption, Infra-Red (IR), Raman and NMR spectroscopies. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system and P21 space group with Z = 2 and the following unit cell dimensions: a = 7.1728 (6), b = 12.4160 (11), c = 8.0278 (7) Å, β = 97.513 (1)°, V = 708.80 (11) Å3. In this structure, the Zn2+ ion, surrounded by four chlorides, adopts a distorted tetrahedral coordination geometry. The structure of this compound consists of monomeric 1-amonioethylpiperazine-1, 4-diium trications and monomeric [ZnCl4]2- and Cl- anions. These entities are interconnected by means of hydrogen bonding contacts [Nsbnd H⋯Cl, Csbnd H⋯Cl], forming a three-dimensional network. Intermolecular interactions were investigated by Hirshfeld surfaces. More than three quarters of the interaction surface in the crystal packing is constituted by attractive and favored H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. The 13C and 15N CP-MAS NMR spectra are discussed and the vibrational absorption bands were identified by infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

  10. Femtosecond laser surface structuring technique for making human enamel and dentin surfaces superwetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2013-12-01

    It is known that good wettability of enamel and dentin surfaces is a key factor in enhancing adhesion of restorative materials in dentistry. Here, we report on a femtosecond laser surface texturing approach that makes both the enamel and dentine surfaces superwetting. In contrast to the traditional chemical etching that yields random surface structures, this new approach produces engineered surface structures. The surface structure engineered and tested here is an array of femtosecond laser-produced parallel microgrooves that generates a strong capillary force. Due to the powerful capillary action, water is rapidly sucked into this engineered surface structure and spreads even on a vertical surface.

  11. Micro reflectance difference techniques: Optical probes for surface exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lastras-Martinez, L.F.; Del Pozo-Zamudio, O.; Herrera-Jasso, R.; Ulloa-Castillo, N.A.; Balderas-Navarro, R.E.; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Lastras-Martinez, A. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    Micro reflectance difference spectroscopy ({mu}-RDS) is a promising tool for the in-situ and ex-situ characterization of semiconductors surfaces and interfaces. We discuss and compare two different approaches used to measure {mu}-RD spectra. One is based on a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, while the other uses a laser and a XY translation stage. To show the performance of these systems, we have measured surface optical anisotropies of GaSb(001) sample on which anisotropic strains have been generated by preferential mechanical polishing along [110] and [1 anti 10] directions. The spectrometers are complementary and the selection of one of them depends on the sample to be investigated and on experimental conditions. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Comparative evaluation of surface and downhole steam-generation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, C.

    The application of heat to reservoirs containing high API gravity oils can substantially improve recovery. Although steam injection is currently the principal thermal recovery method, heat transmission losses associated with delivery of the steam from the surface generators to the oil bearing formation has limited conventional steam injection to shallow reservoirs. The objective of the Department of Energy's Project DEEP STEAM is to develop the technology required to economically produce heavy oil from deep reservoirs. The tasks included in this effort are the development and evaluation of thermally efficient delivery systems and downhole steam generation systems. The technical and economic performance of conventional surface steam drives, which are strongly influenced by heat losses are compared. The selection of a preferred technology based upon either total efficiency or cost is found to be strongly influenced by reservoir depth, steam mass flow rate, and sandface steam quality.

  13. A surface wave elastography technique for measuring tissue viscoelastic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming

    2017-04-01

    A surface wave elastography method is proposed to study the viscoelastic properties of skin by measuring the surface wave speed and attenuation on the skin. Experiments were carried out on porcine skin tissues. The surface wave speed is measured by the change of phase with distance. The wave attenuation is measured by the decay of wave amplitude with distance. The change of viscoelastic properties with temperature was studied at room and body temperatures. The wave speed was 1.83m/s at 22°C but reduced to 1.52m/s at 33°C. The viscoelastic ratio was almost constant from 22°C to 33°C. Fresh and decayed tissues were studied. The wave speed of the decayed tissue increased from 1.83m/s of fresh state to 2.73m/s. The viscoelastic ratio was 0.412/mm at the decayed state compared to 0.215/mm at the fresh state. More tissue samples are needed to study these viscoelastic parameters according to specific applications.

  14. Atomic and Nuclear Analytical Methods XRF, Mössbauer, XPS, NAA and Ion-Beam Spectroscopic Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, H R

    2007-01-01

    This book is a blend of analytical methods based on the phenomenon of atomic and nuclear physics. It comprises comprehensive presentations about X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Neutron- Activation Analysis (NAA), Particle Induced X-ray Emission Analysis (PIXE), Rutherford Backscattering Analysis (RBS), Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD), Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA), Particle Induced Gamma-ray Emission Analysis (PIGE), and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). These techniques are commonly applied in the fields of medicine, biology, environmental studies, archaeology or geology et al. and pursued in major international research laboratories.

  15. Surface reactivity of minerals illustrated by observations from surface analytical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stipp, S.L.S. [Copenhagen Univ., Copenhagen (Denmark). Interface Geochemistry, Geological Institute

    2000-07-01

    Over the decades that geochemists have been studying solution/solid interactions, the traditional geochemical and mineralogical methods have taught everyone a great deal about reactions that take place at mineral surfaces. Whether Earth Scientists are interested in the accumulation of precious elements to form an ore deposit or a hydrocarbon reservoir, or in the wide dispersal of contaminants throughout environmental systems, the chemical processes that control uptake and release of trace components during fluid transport are the same. Data describing bulk solid and solution composition have allowed to make conceptual models of molecular processes and to produce computer models where behaviour in reactive systems can be simulated. However, with traditional techniques alone, it can be difficult to unambiguously select a single model to fit a set of data because several individual processes may be masked by the averaging that is inherent in the macroscopic approach. The traditional bulk analytical methods, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Microprobe, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), potentiometry, chromatography and other wet chemistry methods give information about the identity and structure of minerals and the composition of solutions.

  16. Evaluating the abnormal ossification in tibiotarsi of developing chick embryos exposed to 1.0ppm doses of platinum group metals by spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahler, Adam C; Monahan, Jennifer L; Dagher, Jessica M; Baker, Joshua D; Markopoulos, Marjorie M; Iragena, Diane B; NeJame, Britney M; Slaughter, Robert; Felker, Daniel; Burggraf, Larry W; Isaac, Leon A C; Grossie, David; Gagnon, Zofia E; Sizemore, Ioana E Pavel

    2013-04-01

    Platinum group metals (PGMs), i.e., palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt) and rhodium (Rh), are found at pollutant levels in the environment and are known to accumulate in plant and animal tissues. However, little is known about PGM toxicity. Our previous studies showed that chick embryos exposed to PGM concentrations of 1mL of 5.0ppm (LD50) and higher exhibited severe skeletal deformities. This work hypothesized that 1.0ppm doses of PGMs will negatively impact the mineralization process in tibiotarsi. One milliliter of 1.0ppm of Pd(II), Pt(IV), Rh(III) aqueous salt solutions and a PGM-mixture were injected into the air sac on the 7th and 14th day of incubation. Control groups with no-injection and vehicle injections were included. On the 20th day, embryos were sacrificed to analyze the PGM effects on tibiotarsi using four spectroscopic techniques. 1) Micro-Raman imaging: Hyperspectral Raman data were collected on paraffin embedded cross-sections of tibiotarsi, and processed using in-house-written MATLAB codes. Micro-Raman univariate images that were created from the ν1(PO4(3-)) integrated areas revealed anomalous mineral inclusions within the bone marrow for the PGM-mixture treatment. The age of the mineral crystals (ν(CO3(2-))/ν1(PO4(3-))) was statistically lower for all treatments when compared to controls (p≤0.05). 2) FAAS: The percent calcium content of the chemically digested tibiotarsi in the Pd and Pt groups changed by ~45% with respect to the no-injection control (16.1±0.2%). 3) Micro-XRF imaging: Abnormal calcium and phosphorus inclusions were found within the inner longitudinal sections of tibiotarsi for the PGM-mixture treatment. A clear increase in the mineral content was observed for the outer sections of the Pd treatment. 4) ICP-OES: PGM concentrations in tibiotarsi were undetectable (<5ppb). The spectroscopic techniques gave corroborating results, confirmed the hypothesis, and explained the observed pathological (skeletal developmental abnormalities

  17. Observational and laboratory studies of optical properties of black and brown carbon particles in the atmosphere using spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tomoki; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    Light absorption and scattering by aerosols are as an important contributor to radiation balance in the atmosphere. Black carbon (BC) is considered to be the most potent light absorbing material in the visible region of the spectrum, although light absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon or BrC) and mineral dust may also act as sources of significant absorption, especially in the ultraviolet (UV) and shorter visible wavelength regions. The optical properties of such particles depend on wavelength, particle size and shape, morphology, coating, and complex refractive index (or chemical composition), and therefore accurate in situ measurements of the wavelength dependence of the optical properties of particles are needed. Recently, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) have been used for the direct measurements of extinction and absorption coefficients of particles suspended in air. We have applied these techniques to the observational studies of optical properties of BC and BrC in an urban site in Japan and to the laboratory studies of optical properties of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated from a variety of biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds and those of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). In the presentation, the basic principles of these techniques and the results obtained in our studies and in the recent literatures will be overviewed. References Guo, X. et al., Measurement of the light absorbing properties of diesel exhaust particles using a three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer, Atmos. Environ., 94, 428-437 (2014). Nakayama, T. et al., Measurements of aerosol optical properties in central Tokyo during summertime using cavity ring-down spectroscopy: Comparison with conventional techniques, Atmos. Environ., 44, 3034-3042 (2010). Nakayama, T. et al., Laboratory studies on optical properties of secondary organic aerosols generated during the photooxidation of toluene and the ozonolysis of alpha

  18. Use of radiocarbon and spectroscopic analyses to characterise soil organic matter pools isolated using different fractionation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gemma; Cloy, Joanna; Garnett, Mark; Sohi, Saran; Rees, Robert; Griffiths, Bryan

    2015-04-01

    Experimental division of soil organic matter (SOM) into functional pools has the potential to improve soil C modelling. Soil physical fractionation techniques seek to quantify these pools, however the fractions isolated vary in number, size, ecological role and composition. The use of different techniques to quantify soil C fractions in different studies presents a question - do similar fractions isolated by different methods fit the same conceptual definition? This study examined a sandy loam from the south-west of Scotland, sampled in summer, which had been under grassland management for at least 20 years. We compared average 14C ages of SOM fractions isolated using three published and frequently applied physical fractionation methods (1) a density separation technique isolating three fractions - free light (FLF) 1.8 g cm 3 (Sohi et al, 2001); (2) a combined physical and chemical separation isolating five fractions: sand and aggregates (S+A) > 63 µm and > 1.8 g cm-3, particulate organic matter (POM) > 63 µm and 45 µm, residual organic carbon (rSOC) the residue left after s+c is oxidised with NaOCl, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 4000 years BP for DOC and POM. Both Method 3 fractions were dominated by modern C. The average 14C ages of FLF, IALF, DOC and POM were surprisingly higher than the mineral bound fractions, although they made up a relatively small proportion of the total organic C (8.4 and 12.4 % for Methods 1 and 2 respectively). These results will be discussed alongside data from FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopy. The characterisation of physically separated organic matter pools is likely to provide improved opportunities for modelling the long term behaviour of SOM on the basis of defined chemical and physical properties. References Sohi, S.P., Mahieu, N., Arah, J.R.M., Powlson, D.S., Madari, B. and Gaunt J.L. (2001) A procedure for isolating soil organic matter fractions suitable for modelling. Soil Science Society of America Journal 65

  19. Nucleation and initial growth of atomic layer deposited titanium oxide determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry and the effect of pretreatment by surface barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, David C., E-mail: dccameron@mail.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Krumpolec, Richard, E-mail: richard.krumpolec@fmph.uniba.sk [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, 842 4 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ivanova, Tatiana V., E-mail: tatiana.ivanova@lut.fi [ASTRaL team, Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, 50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Homola, Tomáš, E-mail: tomas.homola@mail.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Černák, Mirko, E-mail: cernak@physics.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Spectroscopic ellipsometry shows initial nucleation and growth process in atomic layer deposited titanium dioxide. • Quantum confinement effects were used to measure evolution of crystallite size. • Crystallite surface density can be extracted from ellipsometric surface roughness data and crystallite size. • Pretreatment of silicon substrates by diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge has only minor effects on titanium dioxide film nucleation and growth. - Abstract: This paper reports on the use of spectroscopic ellipsometry to characterise the initial nucleation stage of the atomic layer deposition of the anatase phase of titanium dioxide on silicon substrates. Careful control and analysis of the ellipsometric measurements enables the determination of the evolution of crystallite diameter and surface density in the nucleation stage before a continuous film is formed. This growth behaviour is in line with atomic force microscopy measurements of the crystallite size. The crystallite diameter is a linear function of the number of ALD cycles with a slope of approximately 1.7 Å cycle{sup −1} which is equivalent to a layer growth rate of 0.85 Å cycle{sup −1} consistent with a ripening process which increases the crystallite size while reducing their density. The crystallite density decreases from ∼3 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3} in the initial nucleation stages to ∼3 × 10{sup 15} m{sup −3} before the film becomes continuous. The effect of exposing the substrate to a diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge in an air atmosphere before deposition was measured and only small differences were found: the plasma treated samples were slightly rougher in the initial stages and required a greater number of cycles to form a continuous film (∼80) compared to the untreated films (∼50). A thicker layer of native oxide was found after plasma treatment.

  20. Development of synchrotron x-ray micro-spectroscopic techniques and application to problems in low temperature geochemistry. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The focus of the technical development effort has been the development of apparatus and techniques for the utilization of X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopies in a microprobe mode. The present XRM uses white synchrotron radiation (3 to 30 keV) from a bending magnet for trace element analyses using the x-ray fluorescence technique Two significant improvements to this device have been recently implemented. Focusing Mirror: An 8:1 ellipsoidal mirror was installed in the X26A beamline to focus the incident synchrotron radiation and thereby increase the flux on the sample by about a factor of 30. Incident Beam Monochromator: The monochromator has been successfully installed and commissioned in the X26A beamline upstream of the mirror to permit analyses with focused monochromatic radiation. The monochromator consists of a channel-cut silicon (111) crystal driven by a Klinger stepping motor translator. We have demonstrated the operating range of this instrument is 4 and 20 keV with 0.01 eV steps and produces a beam with a {approximately}10{sup {minus}4} energy bandwidth. The primary purpose of the monochromator is for x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements but it is also used for selective excitation in trace element microanalysis. To date, we have conducted XANES studies on Ti, Cr, Fe, Ce and U, spanning the entire accessible energy range and including both K and L edge spectra. Practical detection limits for microXANES are 10--100 ppM for 100 {mu}m spots.

  1. Spectroscopic properties of MgH2, MgD2, and MgHD calculated from a new ab initio potential energy surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Le Roy, Robert J

    2007-07-19

    A three-dimensional potential energy surface for the ground electronic state of MgH2 has been constructed from 9030 symmetry-unique ab initio points calculated using the icMRCI+Q method with aug-cc-pVnZ basis sets for n=3, 4, and 5, with core-electron correlation calculated at the MR-ACPF level of theory using cc-pCVnZ basis sets, with both calculations being extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Calculated spectroscopic constants of MgH2 and MgD2 are in excellent agreement with recent experimental results: for four bands of MgH2 and one band of MgD2 the root-mean-square (rms) band origin discrepancies were only 0.44 and 0.06 cm(-1), respectively, and the rms relative discrepancies in the inertial rotational constants (B[v]) were only 0.0196% and 0.0058%, respectively. Spectroscopic constants for MgHD were predicted using the same potential surface.

  2. Surface tracking in polymers: a pattern discrimination technique using fractals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajini, V; Kumar, K Udaya [Department of High Voltage Engineering, College of Engineering Guindy, Anna University, Chennai-600025 (India)

    2006-08-21

    The geometrical patterns of dielectric breakdown like electrical trees, surface discharges and lightning are known to be fractal in nature. These fractal patterns can be analysed numerically using fractal dimensions and lacunarity. Surface tracking occurring in high voltage insulation systems is a very complex phenomenon and more so the shapes of tracking patterns. It has been fairly well established that the shapes and the underlying parameters causing tracking have a one-to-one correspondence and therefore methods to describe and quantify these patterns must be explored. This contribution reports preliminary results of such a study wherein two-dimensional (2D) tracking patterns of gamma irradiated ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) were analysed and found to possess fairly reasonable pattern discriminating abilities. This approach appears promising and further research is essential before any long-term predictions can be made. It is also interesting to note that the ac tracking resistance of EPDM decreases with an increase in the radiation dose. The erosion depth affected by radiation was also studied.

  3. Damage identification in beams by a response surface based technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teidj S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, identification of damage in uniform homogeneous metallic beams was considered through the propagation of non dispersive elastic torsional waves. The proposed damage detection procedure consisted of the following sequence. Giving a localized torque excitation, having the form of a short half-sine pulse, the first step was calculating the transient solution of the resulting torsional wave. This torque could be generated in practice by means of asymmetric laser irradiation of the beam surface. Then, a localized defect assumed to be characterized by an abrupt reduction of beam section area with a given height and extent was placed at a known location of the beam. Next, the response in terms of transverse section rotation rate was obtained for a point situated afterwards the defect, where the sensor was positioned. This last could utilize in practice the concept of laser vibrometry. A parametric study has been conducted after that by using a full factorial design of experiments table and numerical simulations based on a finite difference characteristic scheme. This has enabled the derivation of a response surface model that was shown to represent adequately the response of the system in terms of the following factors: defect extent and severity. The final step was performing the inverse problem solution in order to identify the defect characteristics by using measurement.

  4. Satellite techniques for determining the geopotential of sea surface elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisacane, V. L.

    1986-01-01

    Spaceborne altimetry with measurement accuracies of a few centimeters which has the potential to determine sea surface elevations necessary to compute accurate three-dimensional geostrophic currents from traditional hydrographic observation is discussed. The limitation in this approach is the uncertainties in knowledge of the global and ocean geopotentials which produce satellite and height uncertainties about an order of magnitude larger than the goal of about 10 cm. The quantitative effects of geopotential uncertainties on processing altimetry data are described. Potential near term improvements, not requiring additional spacecraft, are discussed. Even though there is substantial improvements at the longer wavelengths, the oceanographic goal will be achieved. The geopotential research mission (GRM) is described which should produce geopotential models that are capable of defining the ocean geoid to 10 cm and near-earth satellite position. The state of the art and the potential of spaceborne gravimetry is described as an alternative approach to improve our knowledge of the geopotential.

  5. Vibrational spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman) studies, Hirshfeld surfaces analysis, and quantum chemical calculations of m-acetotoluidide and m-thioacetotoluidide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śmiszek-Lindert, Wioleta Edyta; Chełmecka, Elżbieta; Góralczyk, Stefan; Kaczmarek, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of the m-acetotoluidide and m-thioacetotoluidide isolated molecules were performed by using density functional theory (DFT) method at B3LYP/6-311++G (d,p) and B3LYP/6-311++G (3df,2pd) basis set levels. The Hirshfeld surfaces analysis and FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy studies have been reported. The geometrical parameters of the title amide and thioamide are in a good agreement with the XRD experiment. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and scaled, and subsequently values have been compared with the experimental Infrared and Raman spectra. The observed and calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The analysis of the Hirshfeld surface has been well correlated to the spectroscopic studies. Additionally, the highest occupied molecular orbital energy (EHOMO), lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (ELUMO) and the energy gap between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔEHOMO-LUMO) have been calculated.

  6. X-ray spectroscopic technique for energetic electron transport studies in short-pulse laser/plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutt, T.E.

    1994-12-01

    When a solid target is irradiated by a laser beam, the material is locally heated to a high temperature and a plasma forms. The interaction of the laser with plasma can produce energetic electrons. By observing the behavior of these {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} electrons, we hope to obtain a better understanding of Laser/Plasma Interactions. In this work we employ a layered-fluorescer technique to study the transport, and therefore the energetics, of the electrons. The plasma forms on a thin foil of metallic Pd which is bonded to thin layer of metallic Sn. Electrons formed from the plasma penetrate first the Pd and then the Sn. In both layers the energetic electrons promote inner (K) shell ionization of the metallic atoms which leads to the emission of characteristic K{sub {alpha}} x-rays of the fluorescers. By recording the x-ray spectrum emitted by the two foils, we can estimate the energy-dependent range of the electrons and their numbers.

  7. Combined spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques to study interaction of Zn (II) DiAmsar with serum albumins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardajee, Ghasem Rezanejade, E-mail: rezanejad@pnu.ac.ir; Hooshyar, Zari; Shafagh, Pegah; Ghiasvand, Samira; Kakavand, Nahaleh

    2014-12-15

    Zinc (II) diamine-sarcophagine (Zn (II) DiAmsar) as a water soluble hexadentate ligand was synthesized and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and UV–visible (UV–vis) spectroscopy. The bindings of Zn (II) DiAmsar with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated under the simulative physiological conditions. To study this binding, the fluorescence spectra in combination with FT-IR, UV–vis, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and molecular docking techniques were used in the present work. The results indicate that Zn (II) DiAmsar quenched effectively the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA and BSA via a static quenching process. The fluorescence quenching data was also used to determine binding sites and binding constants at different temperatures. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (∆G°, ∆H°, and ∆S°) suggest that the binding process occurs spontaneously by involving hydrogen bond and van der Waals interactions. The distance between HSA (or BSA) as a donor and Zn (II) DiAmsar as an acceptor was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In addition, the docking results revealed the possible binding sites and assess the microenvironment around the bounded Zn (II) DiAmsar.

  8. A three-dimensional multivariate image processing technique for the analysis of FTIR spectroscopic images of multiple tissue sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Corey J

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three-dimensional (3D multivariate Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR image maps of tissue sections are presented. A villoglandular adenocarcinoma from a cervical biopsy with a number of interesting anatomical features was used as a model system to demonstrate the efficacy of the technique. Methods Four FTIR images recorded using a focal plane array detector of adjacent tissue sections were stitched together using a MATLAB® routine and placed in a single data matrix for multivariate analysis using Cytospec™. Unsupervised Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (UHCA was performed simultaneously on all 4 sections and 4 clusters plotted. The four UHCA maps were then stacked together and interpolated with a box function using SCIRun software. Results The resultant 3D-images can be rotated in three-dimensions, sliced and made semi-transparent to view the internal structure of the tissue block. A number of anatomical and histopathological features including connective tissue, red blood cells, inflammatory exudate and glandular cells could be identified in the cluster maps and correlated with Hematoxylin & Eosin stained sections. The mean extracted spectra from individual clusters provide macromolecular information on tissue components. Conclusion 3D-multivariate imaging provides a new avenue to study the shape and penetration of important anatomical and histopathological features based on the underlying macromolecular chemistry and therefore has clear potential in biology and medicine.

  9. Comparison Between MIR and NIR Spectroscopic Techniques for the Determination of Fat and Protein Contents in Milk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To compare mid-infrared (MIR) and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopies for the determination of the fat and protein contents in milk, the same sample sets with varying concentrations of fat and protein were measured in the MIR range of 3 200-700 cm-1 and NIR range of 9 000-4 000 cm- 1. The spectral features in the two regions were analyzed. The MIR spectra of milk were characteristic due to the MIR inherent molecular specificity, whereas the NIR spectra were relatively characterless due to the NIR low selectivity. Partial least squares (PLS) regression models for fat and protein were developed by using both MIR and NIR spectra. MIR data with no pretreatment gave better results than NIR data. The square correlation coefficient ( R2) and the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) were 0.98 and 0.10 g/dL for fat and 0.97 and 0.11 g/dL for protein. With NIR techniques, satisfactory results were not obtained with raw data. However, NIR data after pretreatment gave similarly good results to the ones using MIR method. This paper indicates that either of the MIR and NIR spectral methods is reliable for the determination of the fat and protein contents.

  10. Study on the interaction of the epilepsy drug, zonisamide with human serum albumin (HSA) by spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Khorshidi, Aref; Moghadam, Neda Hossinpour

    2013-10-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to study the interaction of zonisamide (ZNS) with the transport protein, human serum albumin (HSA) employing UV-Vis, fluorometric, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular docking techniques. The results indicated that binding of ZNS to HSA caused strong fluorescence quenching of HSA through static quenching mechanism, hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts are the major forces in the stability of protein ZNS complex and the process of the binding of ZNS with HSA was driven by enthalpy (ΔH = -193.442 kJ mol-1). The results of CD and UV-Vis spectroscopy showed that the binding of this drug to HSA induced conformational changes in HSA. Furthermore, the study of molecular docking also indicated that zonisamide could strongly bind to the site I (subdomain IIA) of HSA mainly by hydrophobic interaction and there were hydrogen bond interactions between this drug and HSA, also known as the warfarin binding site.

  11. Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopical technique to monitor cocrystal formation between piracetam and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yong; Xia, Yi; Zhang, Huili; Hong, Zhi

    2013-07-01

    Far-infrared vibrational absorption of cocrystal formation between 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHBA) and piracetam compounds under solvent evaporation and grinding methods have been investigated using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) at room temperature. The experimental results show large difference among absorption spectra of the formed cocrystals and the involved individual parent molecules in 0.20-1.50 THz region, which probably originated from the intra-molecular and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds due to the presence of two hydroxyl groups in 2,5-DHBA and amide moieties in piracetam compound. The THz absorption spectra of two formed cocrystals with different methods are almost identical. With grinding method, the reaction process can be monitored directly from both time-domain and frequency-domain spectra using THz-TDS technique. The results indicate that THz-TDS technology can absolutely offer us a high potential method to identify and characterize the formed cocrystals, and also provide the rich information about their reaction dynamic process involving two or more molecular crystals in situ to better know the corresponding reaction mechanism in pharmaceutical fields.

  12. Systematic investigation of the toxicity interaction of ZnSe@ZnS QDs on BSA by spectroscopic and microcalorimetry techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ling; Zhou, Peijiang; Zhan, Hongju; Zhao, Xiaohu; Chen, Chi; He, Zhenyu

    2013-08-01

    The interaction of ZnSe@ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by means of fluorescence (FL) spectrometry, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The fluorescence intensity of BSA decreased regularly with the increasing of QDs concentration. The decrease of BSA fluorescence intensity was proved to be a kind of static quenching. CD results show the helicity of BSA decreased from 38.04% to 26.51% with the addition of QDs, which suggests a stronger structural change that is related to a low degree of surface coverage. And also, both ion strength and pH value could affect the interaction between BSA and QDs, suggesting that both the static electronic attraction and H-bond contribute to the interaction between BSA and QDs. The thermodynamics of interaction between BSA and QDs were calculated from ITC data. Both enthalpy and entropy changes were favorable for the interaction in Tris-buffer, while only enthalpy change was favorable for the interaction in NaCl or HCl solution.

  13. Autonomous selection of PDE inpainting techniques vs. exemplar inpainting techniques for void fill of high resolution digital surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmes, Mark; Yates, J. Harlan; Allen, Josef DeVaughn; Kelley, Patrick

    2007-04-01

    High resolution Digital Surface Models (DSMs) may contain voids (missing data) due to the data collection process used to obtain the DSM, inclement weather conditions, low returns, system errors/malfunctions for various collection platforms, and other factors. DSM voids are also created during bare earth processing where culture and vegetation features have been extracted. The Harris LiteSite TM Toolkit handles these void regions in DSMs via two novel techniques. We use both partial differential equations (PDEs) and exemplar based inpainting techniques to accurately fill voids. The PDE technique has its origin in fluid dynamics and heat equations (a particular subset of partial differential equations). The exemplar technique has its origin in texture analysis and image processing. Each technique is optimally suited for different input conditions. The PDE technique works better where the area to be void filled does not have disproportionately high frequency data in the neighborhood of the boundary of the void. Conversely, the exemplar based technique is better suited for high frequency areas. Both are autonomous with respect to detecting and repairing void regions. We describe a cohesive autonomous solution that dynamically selects the best technique as each void is being repaired.

  14. An assessment of contemporary atomic spectroscopic techniques for the determination of lead in blood and urine matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Patrick J.; Geraghty, Ciaran; Verostek, Mary Frances

    2001-09-01

    The preparation and validation of a number of clinical reference materials for the determination of lead in blood and urine is described. Four candidate blood lead reference materials (Lots, 047-050), and four candidate urine lead reference materials (Lots, 034, 035, 037 and 038), containing physiologically-bound lead at clinically relevant concentrations, were circulated to up to 21 selected laboratories specializing in this analysis. Results from two interlaboratory studies were used to establish certified values and uncertainty estimates for these reference materials. These data also provided an assessment of current laboratory techniques for the measurement of lead in blood and urine. For the blood lead measurements, four laboratories used electrothermal atomization AAS, three used anodic stripping voltammetry and one used both ETAAS and ICP-MS. For the urine lead measurements, 11 laboratories used ETAAS (most with Zeeman background correction) and 10 used ICP-MS. Certified blood lead concentrations, ±S.D., ranged from 5.9±0.4 μg/dl (0.28±0.02 μmol/l) to 76.0±2.2 μg/dl (3.67±0.11 μmol/l) and urine lead concentrations ranged from 98±5 μg/l (0.47±0.02 μmol/l) to 641±36 μg/l (3.09±0.17 μmol/l). The highest concentration blood lead material was subjected to multiple analyses using ETAAS over an extended time period. The data indicate that more stringent internal quality control practices are necessary to improve long-term precision. While the certification of blood lead materials was accomplished in a manner consistent with established practices, the urine lead materials proved more troublesome, particularly at concentrations above 600 μg/l (2.90 μmol/l).

  15. Studying Iron Mineralogy to Understand Redox Conditions in the Mesoproterozoic Belt Basin, USA Using Complementary Microscopic, Spectroscopic, and Magnetic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotznick, S. P.; Webb, S.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Fischer, W. W.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of iron chemistry and mineralogy over time provide a valuable tool for studying paleoenvironments, but questions still remain as to the redox character of Proterozoic basins after the rise of oxygen. To evaluate the mechanisms of iron mineralization in Proterozoic samples, we developed an approach that pairs the microscale textural techniques of light microscopy, magnetic scanning microscopy, and (synchrotron-based) microprobe x-ray spectroscopy with sensitive bulk rock magnetic experiments. Samples were collected from stratigraphic sections across the ~1.4 Ga lower Belt Group, Belt Supergroup, MT and ID, USA with a focus on excellently preserved sedimentary rocks, but also including those altered by a variety of diagenetic, metamorphic, and metasomatic events. Results show that even in the best-preserved parts of the Belt Basin, late diagenetic and/or metasomatic fluids affected (in some cases very mildly) the primary iron phases as evidenced by prevalent post-depositional alterations such as rare base metal sulfides. In more heavily altered rocks, the appearance of pyrrhotite and other minerals signaled transformations in iron mineralogy through metamorphism and metasomatism. Despite these secondary phases crystallizing in an open fluid-rich system, primary records of redox chemistry were preserved in the recrystallized early diagenetic framboidal pyrite and (sub)micron-sized detrital magnetite grains. Detrital magnetite is not the most abundant iron-bearing phase in any of the samples (typically <0.01 wt%), but is widely observed in both proximal and deeper basin facies, illustrating an important detrital flux of iron to the basin and a highly reactive iron source for early diagenetic pyrite. Based on our analyses, we interpret the shallow waters of the Belt Basin to be oxic with sulfidic pore fluids and deeper waters in parts of the basin as likely euxinic, consistent with the results of some bulk geochemical proxies. This redox reconstruction also

  16. Studies on the interaction between promethazine and human serum albumin in the presence of flavonoids by spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ling-Ling; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Wang, Yong-Xia; Liu, Xian-Ping; Yang, Yan-Jie; Gao, Yan-Ping; Wang, Xin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence, absorption, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques as well as molecular modeling methods were used to study the binding characterization of promethazine (PMT) to human serum albumin (HSA) and the influence of flavonoids, rutin and baicalin, on their affinity. The results indicated that the fluorescence quenching mechanism of HSA by PMT is a static quenching due to the formation of complex. The reaction was spontaneous and mainly mediated by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The binding distance between the tryptophan residue of HSA and PMT is less than 8nm, which indicated that the energy transfer from the tryptophan residue of HSA to PMT occurred. The binding site of PMT on HSA was located in sites I and the presence of PMT can cause the conformational changes of HSA. There was the competitive binding to HSA between PMT and flavonoids because of the overlap of binding sites in HSA. The flavonoids could decrease the association constant and increase the binding distance. In addition, their synergistic effect can further change the conformation of HSA. The decrease in the affinities of PMT binding to HSA in the presence of flavonoids may lead to the increase of free drug in blood, which would affect the transportation or disposition of drug and evoke an adverse or toxic effect. Hence, rationalising dosage and diet regimens should be taken into account in clinical application of PMT.

  17. The CoRoT-GES Collaboration. Improving Red Giants spectroscopic surface gravity and abundances with asteroseismology

    CERN Document Server

    Valentini, M; Miglio, A; Montalbán, J; Rodrigues, T; Mosser, B; Anders, F

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays large spectroscopic surveys, like the Gaia-ESO Survey (GES), provide unique stellar databases for better investigating the formation and evolution of our Galaxy. Great attention must be paid to the accuracy of the basic stellar properties derived: large uncertainties in stellar parameters lead to large uncertainties in abundances, distances and ages. Asteroseismology has a key role in this context: when seismic information is combined with information derived from spectroscopic analysis, highly precise constraints on distances, masses, extinction and ages of Red Giants can be obtained. In the light of this promising joint-action, we started the CoRoT-GES collaboration. We present a set of 1,111 CoRoT stars, observed by GES from December 2011 to July 2014, these stars belong to the CoRoT field LRc01, pointing at the inner Galactic Disk. Among these stars, 534 have reliable global seismic parameters. By combining seismic informations and spectroscopy, we derived precise stellar parameters, ages, kinema...

  18. Differentiation of Salmonella enterica serovars and strains in cultures and food using infrared spectroscopic and microspectroscopic techniques combined with soft independent modeling of class analogy pattern recognition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Männig, Annegret; Baldauf, Nathan A; Rodriguez-Romo, Luis A; Yousef, Ahmed E; Rodríguez-Saona, Luis E

    2008-11-01

    Detection of pathogenic microorganisms in food is often a tedious and time-consuming exercise. Developing rapid and cost-effective techniques for identifying pathogens to subspecies is critical for tracking causes of foodborne disease outbreaks. The objective of this study was to develop a method for rapid identification and differentiation of Salmonella serovars and strains within these serovars through isolation on hydrophobic grid membrane filters (HGMFs), examination by infrared (IR) spectroscopy and microspectroscopy, and data analysis by multivariate statistical techniques. Salmonella serovars (Anatum, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Kentucky, Muenchen, and Typhimurium), most of which were represented by multiple strains, were grown in tryptic soy broth (24 h at 42 degrees C), diluted to 10(2) to 10(3) CFU/ml, and filtered using HGMFs. The membranes were incubated on Miller-Mallinson agar (24 h at 42 degrees C), and typical Salmonella colonies were sonicated in 50% acetonitrile and centrifuged. Resulting pellets were vacuum dried on a ZnSe crystal and analyzed using IR spectroscopy. Alternatively, the membranes containing Salmonella growth were removed from the agar, vacuum dried, and colonies were analyzed directly by IR microspectroscopy. Soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) models were developed from spectra. The method was validated by analyzing Salmonella-inoculated tomato juice, eggs, milk, and chicken. Salmonella serovars exhibited distinctive and reproducible spectra in the fingerprint region (1,200 to 900 cm(-1)) of the IR spectrum. SIMCA permitted distinguishing Salmonella strains from each other through differences in bacterial lipopolysaccharides and other membrane components. The model correctly predicted Salmonella in foods at serovar (100%) and strain (90%) levels. Isolation of Salmonella on HGMF and selective agar followed by IR spectroscopic analysis resulted in rapid and efficient isolation, identification, and differentiation of

  19. Microstructural evolution and surface properties of nanostructured Cu-based alloy by ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanov, Auezhan; Cho, In-Sik; Pyun, Young-Sik

    2016-12-01

    A nanostructured surface layer with a thickness of about 180 μm was successfully produced in Cu-based alloy using an ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification (UNSM) technique. Cu-based alloy was sintered onto low carbon steel using a powder metallurgy (P/M) method. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) characterization revealed that the severe plastic deformation introduced by UNSM technique resulted in nano-sized grains in the topmost surface layer and deformation twins. It was also found by atomic force microscope (AFM) observations that the UNSM technique provides a significant reduction in number of interconnected pores. The effectiveness of nanostructured surface layer on the tribological and micro-scratch properties of Cu-based alloy specimens was investigated using a ball-on-disk tribometer and micro-scratch tester, respectively. Results exhibited that the UNSM-treated specimen led to an improvement in tribological and micro-scratch properties compared to that of the sintered specimen, which may be attributed to the presence of nanostructured surface layer having an increase in surface hardness and reduction in surface roughness. The findings from this study are expected to be implemented to the automotive industry, in particular connected rod bearings and bushings in order to increase the efficiency and performance of internal combustion engines (ICEs).

  20. Surface Evaluation of Polishing Techniques for New Resilient CAD/CAM Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasbinder, Dennis J; Neiva, Gisele F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the surface roughness of milled chairside computer-assisted design/computer assisted machining (CAD/CAM) restorations using several contouring/polishing systems as to their effectiveness for creating a clinically acceptable surface. One hundred onlays were milled from monolithic CAD/CAM blocks with an MCXL milling chamber (Sirona Dental) as follows: 30 resin nano-ceramic (Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE), 30 hybrid ceramic (Enamic, Vita) and 40 leucite-reinforced ceramic (EmpressCAD, Ivoclar). A single group of EmpressCAD onlays was glazed-fired in a porcelain oven (Programat CS2, Ivoclar). Finishing and polishing systems consisted of either an abrasive-polish technique or a brush-polish technique. Roughness values were measured using a three-dimensional measuring laser microscope (OLS4000 LEXT by Olympus). There was a significant difference in the baseline surface roughness of the CAD/CAM materials (p ≤ 0.05), with the resin nano-ceramic (Lava Ultimate) being smoother than the hybrid ceramic (Enamic), and both being smoother than the leucite-reinforced ceramic (EmpressCAD). All polishing techniques resulted in a smoother surface compared with the baseline surface for the leucite-reinforced ceramic (p ≤ 0.05), with both techniques resulting in a significantly smoother surface than glazing in a porcelain oven (p ≤ 0.05). Both polishing techniques resulted in a smoother surface compared with the baseline surface for both the nano-ceramic and hybrid ceramic materials (p ≤ 0.05). It is possible to create an equally smooth surface for chairside CAD/CAM resilient materials compared with milled ceramics using several finishing and polishing techniques. In general, the polished ceramic surfaces were smoother than the glazed ceramic surfaces. The results of the study indicate that it is possible to create an equally smooth surface for chairside CAD/CAM resilient materials compared with milled ceramics using several

  1. Capturing the surface texture and shape of pollen: a comparison of microscopy techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayandi Sivaguru

    Full Text Available Research on the comparative morphology of pollen grains depends crucially on the application of appropriate microscopy techniques. Information on the performance of microscopy techniques can be used to inform that choice. We compared the ability of several microscopy techniques to provide information on the shape and surface texture of three pollen types with differing morphologies. These techniques are: widefield, apotome, confocal and two-photon microscopy (reflected light techniques, and brightfield and differential interference contrast microscopy (DIC (transmitted light techniques. We also provide a first view of pollen using super-resolution microscopy. The three pollen types used to contrast the performance of each technique are: Croton hirtus (Euphorbiaceae, Mabea occidentalis (Euphorbiaceae and Agropyron repens (Poaceae. No single microscopy technique provided an adequate picture of both the shape and surface texture of any of the three pollen types investigated here. The wavelength of incident light, photon-collection ability of the optical technique, signal-to-noise ratio, and the thickness and light absorption characteristics of the exine profoundly affect the recovery of morphological information by a given optical microscopy technique. Reflected light techniques, particularly confocal and two-photon microscopy, best capture pollen shape but provide limited information on very fine surface texture. In contrast, transmitted light techniques, particularly differential interference contrast microscopy, can resolve very fine surface texture but provide limited information on shape. Texture comprising sculptural elements that are spaced near the diffraction limit of light (~250 nm; NDL presents an acute challenge to optical microscopy. Super-resolution structured illumination microscopy provides data on the NDL texture of A. repens that is more comparable to textural data from scanning electron microscopy than any other optical

  2. Explosive Contamination from Substrate Surfaces: Differences and Similarities in Contamination Techniques using RDX and C-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.J. Miller; T.S. Yoder

    2010-06-01

    The amount of time that an explosive is present on the surface of a material is dependent upon the original amount of explosive on the surface, temperature, humidity, rain, etc. This laboratory study focused on looking at similarities and differences in three different surface contamination techniques that are used when performance testing explosive trace detection equipment in an attempt to determine how effective the techniques are at replicating actual field samples. The three techniques used were dry transfer deposition of solutions using the Transportation Security Laboratory (TSL) patented dry transfer techniques (US patent 6470730), direct deposition of explosive standards, and fingerprinting of actual explosives. Explosives were deposited on the surface of one of five substrates using one of the three different deposition techniques. The process was repeated for each surface type using each contamination technique. The surface types used were: 50% cotton/50% polyester as found in T-shirts, 100% cotton with a smooth surface such as that found in a cotton dress shirt, 100% cotton on a rough surface such as that found on canvas or denim, suede leather such as might be found on jackets, purses, or shoes, and metal obtained from a car hood at a junk yard. The samples were not pre-cleaned prior to testing and contained sizing agents, and in the case of the metal, oil and dirt. The substrates were photographed using a Zeiss Discover V12 stereoscope with Axiocam ICc1 3 megapixel digital camera to determine the difference in the crystalline structure and surface contamination in an attempt to determine differences and similarities associated with current contamination techniques.

  3. Transplant related ocular surface disorders: Advanced techniques for ocular surface rehabilitation after ocular complications secondary to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Erin D; Mahomed, Faheem; Hans, Amneet K; Dalal, Jignesh D

    2016-05-01

    HSCT has been linked to the development of an assortment of ocular surface complications with the potential to lead to permanent visual impairment if left untreated or if not treated early in the course of disease. Strategies for therapy include maintenance of lubrication and tear preservation, prevention of evaporation, decreasing inflammation, and providing epithelial support. The ultimate aim of treatment is to prevent permanent ocular sequelae through prompt ophthalmology consultation and the use of advanced techniques for ocular surface rehabilitation. We describe several rehabilitation options of ocular surface complications occurring secondarily during the post-HSCT course.

  4. Techniques for Down-Sampling a Measured Surface Height Map for Model Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2012-01-01

    This software allows one to down-sample a measured surface map for model validation, not only without introducing any re-sampling errors, but also eliminating the existing measurement noise and measurement errors. The software tool of the current two new techniques can be used in all optical model validation processes involving large space optical surfaces

  5. Techniques of surface optical breakdown prevention for low-depths femtosecond waveguides writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukharin, M. A.; Skryabin, N. N.; Ganin, D. V.; Khudyakov, D. V.; Vartapetov, S. K.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrated technique of direct femtosecond waveguide writing at record low depth (2-15 μm) under surface of lithium niobate, that play a key role in design of electrooptical modulators with low operating voltage. To prevent optical breakdown of crystal surface we used high numerical aperture objectives for focusing of light and non-thermal regime of inscription in contrast to widespread femtosecond writing technique at depths of tens micrometers or higher. Surface optical breakdown threshold was measured for both x- and z- cut crystals. Inscribed waveguides were examined for intrinsic microstructure. It also reported sharp narrowing of operating pulses energy range with writing depth under the surface of crystal, that should be taken in account when near-surface waveguides design. Novelty of the results consists in reduction of inscription depth under the surface of crystals that broadens applications of direct femtosecond writing technique to full formation of near-surface waveguides and postproduction precise geometry correction of near-surfaces optical integrated circuits produced with proton-exchanged technique.

  6. Use of Spectroscopic, Zeta Potential and Molecular Dynamic Techniques to Study the Interaction between Human Holo-Transferrin and Two Antagonist Drugs: Comparison of Binary and Ternary Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Saberi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, the binding of ropinirole hydrochloride (ROP and aspirin (ASA to human holo-transferrin (hTf has been investigated by spectroscopic approaches (fluorescence quenching, synchronous fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism, resonance light scattering, as well as zeta potential and molecular modeling techniques, under simulated physiological conditions. Fluorescence analysis was used to estimate the effect of the ROP and ASA drugs on the fluorescence of hTf as well as to define the binding and quenching properties of binary and ternary complexes. The synchronized fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra demonstrated some micro-environmental and conformational changes around the Trp and Tyr residues with a faint red shift. Thermodynamic analysis displayed the van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds interactions are the major acting forces in stabilizing the complexes. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching of complexes are static mechanism. The effect of the drugs aggregating on the hTf resulted in an enhancement of the resonance light scattering (RLS intensity. The average binding distance between were computed according to the forster non-radiation energy transfer theory. The circular dichroism (CD spectral examinations indicated that the binding of the drugs induced a conformational change of hTf. Measurements of the zeta potential indicated that the combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between ROP, ASA and hTf formed micelle-like clusters. The molecular modeling confirmed the experimental results. This study is expected to provide important insight into the interaction of hTf with ROP and ASA to use in various toxicological and therapeutic processes.

  7. Study of Titanizing the Surface of Copper Substrates by the Double Glow Discharge Plasma Surface Alloying Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yuefei; Chen Fei; Lü Junxia; Su Yongan; Xu Zhong

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses a study in which Ti surface alloying has been performed on copper substrates by means of a double glow discharge plasma surface alloying technique. The micro-structure, the phase structure, the micro-hardness and the distribution of Ti concentration of alloying layer were investigated in detail by XRD, SEM and so on. The effect of process parameters on the alloying layer was studied. The experimental results show that a Ti solid solution with the precipitation Cu4Ti alloying layer has been formed on the copper surface. The thickness of the alloying layer is about 120μm and the surface titanium concentration gradually decreases from w (Ti) = 87% to w (Ti) = 4%. The micro-hardness of the alloying layer is between 300 HV ~ 800 HV. Source sputtering, surface absorption, ion bombarding and high temperature diffusion are the major factors that affect the alloying layer.

  8. A quartz-crystal-microbalance technique to investigate ion-induced erosion of fusion relevant surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golczewski, A. [Institut fuer Allgemeine Physik, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10/E134, Association EURATOM-OAW, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: golczewski@iap.tuwien.ac.at; Dobes, K.; Wachter, G.; Schmid, M. [Institut fuer Allgemeine Physik, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10/E134, Association EURATOM-OAW, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Aumayr, F. [Institut fuer Allgemeine Physik, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10/E134, Association EURATOM-OAW, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: aumayr@iap.tuwien.ac.at

    2009-02-15

    We describe a highly sensitive quartz-crystal-microbalance technique capable of determining erosion as well as implantation and retention rates for fusion relevant surfaces under ion bombardment. Total sputtering yields obtained with this technique for Ar ion impact on polycrystalline gold and tungsten surfaces are presented. The results compare well with existing experimental data as well as theoretical predictions and thus demonstrate the feasibility of the developed technique. Our setup is capable of detecting mass-changes as small as 10{sup -5} {mu}g/s, which corresponds to a removal of only 10{sup -4} W monolayers/s.

  9. Spectroscopic analysis of optoelectronic semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with standard spectroscopic techniques which can be used to analyze semiconductor samples or devices, in both, bulk, micrometer and submicrometer scale. The book aims helping experimental physicists and engineers to choose the right analytical spectroscopic technique in order to get specific information about their specific demands. For this purpose, the techniques including technical details such as apparatus and probed sample region are described. More important, also the expected outcome from experiments is provided. This involves also the link to theory, that is not subject of this book, and the link to current experimental results in the literature which are presented in a review-like style. Many special spectroscopic techniques are introduced and their relationship to the standard techniques is revealed. Thus the book works also as a type of guide or reference book for people researching in optical spectroscopy of semiconductors.

  10. An Extrapolation Method of Vector Magnetic Field via Surface Integral Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hui; XIAO Chang-han; ZHOU Guo-hua

    2009-01-01

    According to the integral relationship between the vector magnetic flux density on a spatial point and that over a closed surface around magnetic sources, a technique for the extrapolation of vector magnetic field of a ferromagnetic object is given without computing scalar potential and its gradient. The vector magnetic flux density on a remote spatial point can be extrapolated by surface integral from the vector values over a closed measureed surface around the ferromagnetic object. The correctness of the technique testified by a special example and simulation. The experimented result shows that its accuracy is satisfying and the execution time is less than 1 second.

  11. Bacterial Adhesion and Surface Roughness for Different Clinical Techniques for Acrylic Polymethyl Methacrylate

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to assess the effect of different surface finishing and polishing protocols on the surface roughness and bacterial adhesion (S. sanguinis) to polymethyl methacrylates (PMMA). Fifty specimens were divided into 5 groups (n = 10) according to their fabrication method and surface finishing protocol: LP (3 : 1 ratio and laboratory polishing), NF (Nealon technique and finishing), NP (Nealon technique and manual polishing), MF (3 : 1 ratio and manual finishing), and MP (3 : 1 ratio...

  12. On-line monitoring of poly dimethylsiloxane surface modification using the photothermal deflection technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najmoddin, Najmeh, E-mail: najmoddin@iust.ac.ir; Khosroshahi, Mohammad E.

    2015-02-21

    Over the last decade, there has been particular interest in surface modification of biomaterials with regard to understanding the importance of surface characterization. This paper reports the use of photothermal deflection (PTD) technique to monitor modifications in poly dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface induced following laser treatments. The FTIR results are in agreement with PTD results, indicating that no structural changes occurred using Argon laser up to 180 s and 200 mW at 454, 488 and 514 nm wavelengths. However, with CO{sub 2} laser some physical and chemical changes occurred which are monitored by PTD technique and proved by SEM images.

  13. Retention of features on a mapped Drosophila brain surface using a Bézier-tube-based surface model averaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guan-Yu; Wu, Cheng-Chi; Shao, Hao-Chiang; Chang, Hsiu-Ming; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Chen, Yung-Chang

    2012-12-01

    Model averaging is a widely used technique in biomedical applications. Two established model averaging methods, iterative shape averaging (ISA) method and virtual insect brain (VIB) method, have been applied to several organisms to generate average representations of their brain surfaces. However, without sufficient samples, some features of the average Drosophila brain surface obtained using the above methods may disappear or become distorted. To overcome this problem, we propose a Bézier-tube-based surface model averaging strategy. The proposed method first compensates for disparities in position, orientation, and dimension of input surfaces, and then evaluates the average surface by performing shape-based interpolation. Structural features with larger individual disparities are simplified with half-ellipse-shaped Bézier tubes, and are unified according to these tubes to avoid distortion during the averaging process. Experimental results show that the average model yielded by our method could preserve fine features and avoid structural distortions even if only a limit amount of input samples are used. Finally, we qualitatively compare our results with those obtained by ISA and VIB methods by measuring the surface-to-surface distances between input surfaces and the averaged ones. The comparisons show that the proposed method could generate a more representative average surface than both ISA and VIB methods.

  14. Potentialities of some surface characterization techniques for the development of titanium biomedical alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S. Vanzillotta

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Bone formation around a metallic implant is a complex process that involves micro- and nanometric interactions. Several surface treatments, including coatings were developed in order to obtain faster osseointegration. To understand the role of these surface treatments on bone formation it is necessary to choose adequate characterization techniques. Among them, we have selected electron microscopy, profilometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS to describe them briefly. Examples of the potentialities of these techniques on the characterization of titanium for biomedical applications were also presented and discussed. Unfortunately more than one technique is usually necessary to describe conveniently the topography (scanning electron microsocopy, profilometry and/or AFM and the chemical state (XPS of the external layer of the material surface. The employment of the techniques above described can be useful especially for the development of new materials or products.

  15. Digital particle velocimetry technique for free-surface boundary layer measurements: Application to vortex pair interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsa, A.H.; Vogel, M.J.; Gayton, J.D. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2001-08-01

    A variation of the digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) technique was developed for the measurement of velocity at a free surface for low Froude number flows. The two-step process involves first determining the location of the free surface in the digital images of the seeded flow using the fast Fourier transform-based method of surface elevation mapping (SEM), which takes advantage of total internal reflection at the interface. The boundary-fitted DPIV code positions the interrogation windows below the computed location of the interface to allow for extrapolation of interfacial velocities. This technique was designed specifically to handle large surface-parallel vorticity which can occur when the Reynolds number is large and surface-active materials are present. The SEM technique was verified on capillary-gravity waves and the full boundary-fitted DPIV technique was applied to the interaction of vortex pairs with a free surface covered by an insoluble monolayer. The local rise and fall of the free surface as well as the passage and return of a contamination front was clearly observed in the DPIV data. (orig.)

  16. Synchrotron Spectroscopic Studies of the Reaction of Cleaved Pyrite ( {FeS2}) Surfaces with Cr(VI) Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, C. S.; Kendelewicz, T.; Bostick, B. C.; Brown, G. E.

    2002-12-01

    Pyrite is one of the most common sulfide ores, and the separation of valuable sulfide minerals from it has been an area of considerable interest for a long time. This extraction has led to a large quantity of pyrite waste, typically remaining in mine tailings piles which can interact with oxygen and surface water. The oxidation of pyrite under these conditions leads to the commonly known environmental problem of acid mine drainage, with acidification of surface waters, and the release of potentially toxic metals remaining within the pyrite matrix. A microscopic understanding of this oxidation process is extremely important and has been the aim of a number of studies. We apply the methods of synchrotron based surface science to this problem, utilizing surface sensitive photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy to study the surface species present on the pyrite surface at the initial stages of oxidation. We have reacted pyrite surfaces with solutions containing chromate. Chromium exists in solution in two principal valence states, trivalent Cr(III) and hexavalent Cr(VI). Hexavalent chromium is itself considered an environmental problem due to its high toxicity and solubility, and thus mobility, whilst trivalent chromium is much less toxic and relatively insoluble. Hexavalent chromate is a strong oxidizing agent, and will react rapidly with the pyrite surface allowing the identification of oxidized iron and sulfur surface species. The possibility of using pyrite as a means of reducing chromate, and at the same time using chromate to passivate the pyrite surface to further oxidation through the buildup of a non-reactive iron-chromium (oxy)hydroxide layer will be investigated. The work was performed on rods cut from a natural pyrite single crystal from the Logroño region of Spain. The rods were then fractured over a reaction vessel, producing a fresh (100) surface for each experiment. The pyrite surfaces were reacted with 50 μM Cr(VI) solutions for 5 minutes at

  17. Mobile depth profiling and sub-surface imaging techniques for historical paintings—A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfeld, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.alfeld@desy.de [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, Martin-Luther-King Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); University of Antwerp, Department of Chemistry, Groenenbrogerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Broekaert, José A.C., E-mail: jose.broekaert@chemie.uni-hamburg.de [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, Martin-Luther-King Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Hidden, sub-surface paint layers and features contain valuable information for the art-historical investigation of a painting's past and for its conservation for coming generations. The number of techniques available for the study of these features has been considerably extended in the last decades and established techniques have been refined. This review focuses on mobile non-destructive subsurface imaging and depth profiling techniques, which allow for the in-situ investigation of easel paintings, i.e. paintings on a portable support. Among the techniques discussed are: X-ray radiography and infrared reflectography, which are long established methods and are in use for several decades. Their capabilities of element/species specific imaging have been extended by the introduction of energy/wavelength resolved measurements. Scanning macro-X-ray fluorescence analysis made it for the first time possible to acquire elemental distribution images in-situ and optical coherence tomography allows for the non-destructive study the surface paint layers in virtual cross-sections. These techniques and their variants are presented next to other techniques, such as Terahertz imaging, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance depth profiling and established techniques for non destructive testing (thermography, ultrasonic imaging and laser based interference methods) applied in the conservation of historical paintings. Next to selected case studies the capabilities and limitations of the techniques are discussed. - Highlights: • All mobile sub-surface and depth-profiling techniques for paintings are reviewed. • The number of techniques available has increased considerably in the last years. • X-ray radiography and infrared reflectography are still the most used techniques. • Scanning macro-XRF and optical coherence tomography begin to establish. • Industrial non destructive testing techniques support the preservation of paintings.

  18. Study of surface modification of uranium and UFe{sub 2} by various surface analysis techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonino, O.; Dugne, O.; Merlet, C. E-mail: merlet@dstu.univ-montp2.fr; Gat, E.; Holliger, Ph.; Lahaye, M

    2001-04-01

    The surface modification of U, UFe{sub 2} by exposition in air at room temperature and at 63 deg. C was studied by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), time of flight-secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with variable detection angle. For the two systems, a first layer of carbon contamination, followed by complex oxide layer constitutes the surface. For U, the oxide layer is composed of a mixture of UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2+x} with x maximal at the surface. In UFe{sub 2}, the oxide layer is composed of a mixture of UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2+x}, oxidised iron in Fe2+ and Fe3+ chemical states (more probably FeO), a few percent of a ternary oxide UFeO{sub 4}, and less than 1% of uranium carbide. A surface segregation of uranium is shown in UFe{sub 2}.

  19. Sensitivity enhancement of surface thermal lens technique with a short-wavelength probe beam: Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaorong [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Key Laboratory of Optical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610209 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Bincheng [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Key Laboratory of Optical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610209 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Surface thermal lens is a highly sensitive photothermal technique to measure low absorption losses of various solid materials. In such applications, the sensitivity of surface thermal lens is a key parameter for measuring extremely low absorption. In this paper, we experimentally investigated the influence of probe beam wavelength on the sensitivity of surface thermal lens for measuring the low absorptance of optical laser components. Three probe lasers with wavelength 375 nm, 633 nm, and 1570 nm were used, respectively, to detect the surface thermal lens amplitude of a highly reflective coating sample excited by a cw modulated Gaussian beam at 1064 nm. The experimental results showed that the maximum amplitude of surface thermal lens signal obtained at corresponding optimized detection distance was inversely proportional to the wavelength of the probe beam, as predicted by previous theoretical model. The sensitivity of surface thermal lens could, therefore, be improved by detecting surface thermal lens signal with a short-wavelength probe beam.

  20. Spectroscopic measurements of the surface waters for evaluating the fresh-water transport to marine environments in the Southern Baltic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdowska, Violetta; Markuszewski, Piotr; Kowalczyk, Jakub; Makuch, Przemysław; Pakszyc, Paulina; Strzałkowska, Agata; Piskozub, Jacek; Petelski, Tomasz; Zieliński, Tymon; Gutowska, Dorota

    2014-05-01

    To asses concentration and spatial distribution of surface-active molecules (surfactants) the spectrophotometric and spectrofluorometric measurements of water samples taken from a surface film and a depth 0.5 m were carried out during three cruises of r/v Oceania in Springs' 2010-2011 and Autumn' 2012. Measurements were conducted along the transects from the river outlets to the open waters of the Southern Baltic Sea. Surfactants consist of polar molecules of marine dissolved organic matter and are chemically not entirely classified. However, fractions of dissolved organic matter having chromophores or fluorophores (CDOM or FDOM) are recognized through their specific absorption and fluorescence spectra. The sea surface is a layer of transition between the atmosphere and the sea, where there is a variety of biological, physical and chemical processes which contribute to the accumulation and exchange of surfactants, the chemical species concentrated in the surface layer (surface active agents). The main source of marine surfactants are remains of phytoplankton and its degradation products, created by bacterial activity, and as a result of condensation of molecules of low molecular weight to form of surface-active macromolecules. The presence of surfactants in the surface layers can significantly affect the access of solar energy into the sea as well as the air-sea interaction processes. The main objective of the research was to investigate the luminescent properties of surfactants, sampled in different regions of the Southern Baltic, and to find the differences between a surface film and a subsurface layer (of 50 cm). The next aim was to combine the differences in optical properties with the different dynamics for various river outlets. The results of spectrophotometric studies show the differences in the intensity of spectral bands, particularly between coastal (estuaries) and the open sea zones. Also, analysis of the spectra shows differences between areas of the

  1. Application of plasma surface modification techniques to improve hemocompatibility of vascular grafts: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solouk, Atefeh; Cousins, Brian G; Mirzadeh, Hamid; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2011-01-01

    Surface modification using plasma processing can significantly change the chemical and physical characteristics of biomaterial surfaces. When used in combination with additional modification techniques such as direct chemical or biochemical methods, it can produce novel biomaterial surfaces, which are anticoagulant, bioactive, and biomimetic in nature. This article reviews recent advances in improving hemocompatibility of biomaterials by plasma surface modification (PSM). The focus of this review is on PSM of the most commonly used polymers for vascular prostheses such as expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyethylene terephthalate (Dacron(®) ), and next generation of biomaterials, including polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanocomposite.

  2. Spectroscopic studies of surface-gas interactions and catalyst restructuring at ambient pressure: mind the gap{exclamation_point}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupprechter, Guenther; Weilach, Christian [Institute of Materials Chemistry, Vienna University of Technology, Veterinaerplatz 1, A-1210 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: grupp@imc.tuwien.ac.at

    2008-05-07

    Recent progress in the application of surface vibrational spectroscopy at ambient pressure allows us to monitor surface-gas interactions and heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions approaching those of technical catalysis. The surface specificity of photon-based methods such as polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) and sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy is utilized to monitor catalytically active surfaces while they function at high pressure and high temperature. Together with complementary information from high-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HP-XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), reaction mechanisms can be deduced on a molecular level. Well defined model catalysts, prepared under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), are typically employed in such studies, including smooth and stepped single crystals, thin oxide films, and oxide-supported nanoparticles. A number of studies on unsupported and supported noble metal (Pd, Rh) catalysts are presented, focusing on the transformation of the catalysts from the 'as-prepared' to the 'active state'. This often involves pronounced alterations in catalyst structure and composition, for example the creation of surface carbon phases, surface oxides or surface alloys, as well as nanoparticle restructuring. The reactivity studies include CH{sub 3}OH, CH{sub 4} and CO oxidation with gas phase analysis by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Differing results between studies under ultrahigh vacuum and ambient pressure, and between studies on single crystals and supported nanoparticles, demonstrate the importance of 'minding the gap' between idealized and realistic conditions.

  3. Physicochemical properties of surfaces of SBA-15 silicas, according to adsorption-static, gas-chromatographic, and IR spectroscopic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchina, T. M.; Shoniya, N. K.; Tegina, O. Ya.; Tkachenko, O. P.; Kustov, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Interaction between vapors of organic compounds and water with surfaces of mesoporous silica SBA-15 and silica SBA-15 modified with n-C6F13(CH2)2Si(CH3)2Cl via adsorption under static conditions is studied by means of gas chromatography and IR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. It is shown that modification notably reduces the energy of disperse and specific interactions, along with the acidity of adsorption centers. Even low concentrations of the grafted groups (0.76 nm-2) allows us to obtain highly hydrophobic coatings on SBA-15 surfaces.

  4. A Course in Heterogeneous Catalysis: Principles, Practice, and Modern Experimental Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Eduardo E.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines a multidisciplinary course which comprises fundamental, practical, and experimental aspects of heterogeneous catalysis. The course structure is a combination of lectures and demonstrations dealing with the use of spectroscopic techniques for surface analysis. (SK)

  5. Corrosion inhibition by leaves and stem extracts of Sida acuta for mild steel in 1 M H2SO4 solutions investigated by chemical and spectroscopic techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Umoren

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 1 M H2SO4 by leaves and stem extracts of Sida acuta was studied using chemical (weight loss and hydrogen evolution and spectroscopic (AAS, FTIR and UV-V techniques at 30–60 °C. It was found that the leaves and stem extracts of S. acuta inhibited the acid induced corrosion of mild steel. The inhibition efficiency increases with increase in concentration of the extracts but decrease with rise in temperature. Inhibitive effect was afforded by adsorption of the extracts’ components which was approximated by Freundlich adsorption isotherm. Inhibition mechanism is deduced from the temperature dependence of the inhibition efficiency and also from spectroscopic results.

  6. Single-step spatial rotation error separation technique for the ultraprecision measurement of surface profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Maosheng; Qiu, Lirong; Zhao, Weiqian; Wang, Fan; Liu, Entao; Ji, Lin

    2014-01-20

    To improve the measurement accuracy of the profilometer for large optical surfaces, a new single-step spatial rotation error separation technique (SSEST) is proposed to separate the surface profile error and spindle spatial rotation error, and a novel SSEST-based system for surface profile measurement is developed. In the process of separation, two sets of measured results at the ith measurement circle are obtained before and after the rotation of error separation table, the surface profile error and spatial rotation error of spindle can be determined using discrete Fourier-transform and harmonic analysis. Theoretical analyses and experimental results indicate that SSEST can accurately separate spatial rotation error of spindle from the measured surface profile results within the range of 1-100 upr and improve the accuracy of surface profile measurements.

  7. Investigation of Anti-Relaxation Coatings for Alkali-Metal Vapor Cells Using Surface Science Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Seltzer, S. J.; Michalak, D. J.; Donaldson, M. H.; Balabas, M. V.; Barber, S. K.; Bernasek, S. L.; Bouchiat, M. -A.; Hexemer, A.; Hibberd, A. M.; Kimball, D. F. Jackson; C. Jaye; Karaulanov, T.; Narducci, F. A.; Rangwala, S. A.; Robinson, H. G.

    2010-01-01

    Many technologies based on cells containing alkali-metal atomic vapor benefit from the use of anti-relaxation surface coatings in order to preserve atomic spin polarization. In particular, paraffin has been used for this purpose for several decades and has been demonstrated to allow an atom to experience up to 10,000 collisions with the walls of its container without depolarizing, but the details of its operation remain poorly understood. We apply modern surface and bulk techniques to the stu...

  8. Investigation of anti-Relaxation coatings for alkali-metal vapor cells using surface science techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Seltzer, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    Many technologies based on cells containing alkali-metal atomic vapor benefit from the use of antirelaxation surface coatings in order to preserve atomic spin polarization. In particular, paraffin has been used for this purpose for several decades and has been demonstrated to allow an atom to experience up to 10?000 collisions with the walls of its container without depolarizing, but the details of its operation remain poorly understood. We apply modern surface and bulk techniques to the stud...

  9. A simplified technique for fabricating esthetic cast metal occlusal surfaces for dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, W A; Ivanhoe, J R; Adrian, E D

    1990-06-01

    This article describes a simplified method for making esthetic cast metal occlusal surfaces. Monoplane posterior acrylic resin block teeth, cast in a nickel-chrome alloy, are coated with silane and an esthetic composite resin veneer is applied to the buccal surface. These veneered posterior metal teeth are incorporated in the wax setup and the dentures are processed and finished. The dentist's routine technique for delivering dentures to the patient can be followed.

  10. A Multi-Channel Salience Based Detail Exaggeration Technique for 3D Relief Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Wei Miao; Jie-Qing Feng; Jin-Rong Wang; Renato Pajarola

    2012-01-01

    Visual saliency can always persuade the viewer's visual attention to fine-scale mesostructure of 3D complex shapes.Owing to the multi-channel salience measure and salience-domain shape modeling technique,a novel visual saliency based shape depiction scheme is presented to exaggerate salient geometric details of the underlying relief surface.Our multi-channel salience measure is calculated by combining three feature maps,i.e.,the O-order feature map of local height distribution,the 1-order feature map of normal difference,and the 2-order feature map of mean curvature variation.The original relief surface is firstly manipulated by a salience-domain enhancement function,and the detail exaggeration surface can then be obtained by adjusting the surface normals of the original surface as the corresponding final normals of the manipulated surface.The advantage of our detail exaggeration technique is that it can adaptively alter the shading of the original shape to reveal visually salient features whilst keeping the desired appearance unimpaired.The experimental results demonstrate that our non-photorealistic shading scheme can enhance the surface mesostructure effectively and thus improving the shape depiction of the relief surfaces.

  11. A noncontacting scanning photoelectron emission technique for bonding surface cleanliness inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gause, Raymond L.

    1989-01-01

    Molecular contamination of bonding surfaces can drastically affect the bond strength that can be achieved and therefore the structural integrity and reliability of the bonded part. The presence of thin contaminant films on bonding surfaces can result from inadequate or incomplete cleaning methods, from oxide growth during the time between cleaning (such as grit blasting) and bonding, or from failure to properly protect cleaned surfaces from oils, greases, fingerprints, release agents, or deposition of facility airborne molecules generated by adjacent manufacturing or processing operations. Required cleanliness levels for desired bond performance can be determined by testing to correlate bond strength with contaminant type and quantity, thereby establishing the degree of contamination that can be tolerated based on the strength that is needed. Once the maximum acceptable contaminant level is defined, a method is needed to quantitatively measure the contaminant level on the bonding surface prior to bonding to verify that the surface meets the established cleanliness requirement. A photoelectron emission technique for the nondestructive inspection of various bonding surfaces, both metallic and nonmetallic, to provide quantitative data on residual contaminant levels is described. The technique can be used to scan surfaces at speeds of at least 30 ft/min using a servo system to maintain required sensor to surface spacing. The fundamental operation of the photoelectron emission sensor system is explained and the automated scanning system and computer data acquisition hardware and software are described.

  12. Accuracy of Implant Position Transfer and Surface Detail Reproduction with Different Impression Materials and Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Alikhasi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of implant position transfer and surface detail reproduction using two impression techniques and materials.Materials and Methods: A metal model with two implants and three grooves of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 mm in depth on the flat superior surface of a die was fabricated. Ten regular-body polyether (PE and 10 regular-body polyvinyl siloxane (PVS impressions with square and conical transfer copings using open tray and closed tray techniques were made for each group. Impressions were poured with type IV stone, and linear and angular displacements of the replica heads were evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM. Also, accurate reproduction of the grooves was evaluated by a video measuring machine (VMM. These measurements were compared with the measurements calculated on the reference model that served as control, and the data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and t-test at P= 0.05.Results: There was less linear displacement for PVS and less angular displacement for PE in closed-tray technique, and less linear displacement for PE in open tray technique (P<0.001. Also, the open tray technique showed less angular displacement with the use of PVS impression material. Detail reproduction accuracy was the same in all the groups (P>0.05(.Conclusion: The open tray technique was more accurate using PE, and also both closed tray and open tray techniques had acceptable results with the use of PVS. The choice of impression material and technique made no significant difference in surface detail reproduction.Keywords: Dental Implants; Dental Impression Materials, Dental Impression Technique

  13. Fabrication technique for the production of on- and off-axis conic surfaces of revolution (WAGNER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faehnle, Oliver W.; van Brug, Hedser H.; Frankena, Hans J.

    1997-11-01

    A new fabrication technique, derived from an earlier development to produce on- and off-axis optical surfaces of revolution is presented. Although based on a shape copying method, it is possible to generate different types of surfaces with the same machine tool. Load controlled point- contact machining is applied using a small tool which is guided along a pre-determined tool-path, not requiring an in-process tool-path control. This fabrication technique employs a self-correcting process and is characterized by an advantageous error propagation between tool and workpiece. The characteristics of this fabrication technique are discussed together with its application for the generation of on- and off-axis surfaces with conic sections as generators. The design of a first set-up for production of conic surfaces is presented with which it is possible to generate all kinds of conic surfaces on the same machine, featuring a pantograph enabling the production of different scales of the surfaces, together with the discussion of fist experimental data.

  14. Self-consistent Green’s-function technique for surfaces and interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Rosengaard, N. M.

    1991-01-01

    We have implemented an efficient self-consistent Green’s-function technique for calculating ground-state properties of surfaces and interfaces, based on the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method within the tight-binding representation. In this approach the interlayer interaction is extremely short ra...... surface energies in close agreement with values derived from surface tensions of the liquid metals, and work functions that deviate less than 10% from the experimental values.......We have implemented an efficient self-consistent Green’s-function technique for calculating ground-state properties of surfaces and interfaces, based on the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method within the tight-binding representation. In this approach the interlayer interaction is extremely short...... ranged, and only a few layers close to the interface need be treated self-consistently via a Dyson equation. For semi-infinite jellium, the technique gives work functions and surface energies that are in excellent agreement with earlier calculations. For the bcc(110) surface of the alkali metals, we find...

  15. Observation of the origin of d0 magnetism in ZnO nanostructures using X-ray-based microscopic and spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shashi B.; Wang, Yu-Fu; Shao, Yu-Cheng; Lai, Hsuan-Yu; Hsieh, Shang-Hsien; Limaye, Mukta V.; Chuang, Chen-Hao; Hsueh, Hung-Chung; Wang, Hsaiotsu; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Hung-Ming; Pao, Chih-Wen; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Wu, Chun-Te; Wu, Jih-Jen; Pong, Way-Faung; Ohigashi, Takuji; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Jigang; Regier, Tom; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2014-07-01

    Efforts have been made to elucidate the origin of d0 magnetism in ZnO nanocactuses (NCs) and nanowires (NWs) using X-ray-based microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. The photoluminescence and O K-edge and Zn L3,2-edge X-ray-excited optical luminescence spectra showed that ZnO NCs contain more defects than NWs do and that in ZnO NCs, more defects are present at the O sites than at the Zn sites. Specifically, the results of O K-edge scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and the corresponding X-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy demonstrated that the impurity (non-stoichiometric) region in ZnO NCs contains a greater defect population than the thick region. The intensity of O K-edge STXM-XANES in the impurity region is more predominant in ZnO NCs than in NWs. The increase in the unoccupied (occupied) density of states at/above (at/below) the conduction-band minimum (valence-band maximum) or the Fermi level is related to the population of defects at the O sites, as revealed by comparing the ZnO NCs to the NWs. The results of O K-edge and Zn L3,2-edge X-ray magnetic circular dichroism demonstrated that the origin of magnetization is attributable to the O 2p orbitals rather than the Zn d orbitals. Further, the local density approximation (LDA) + U verified that vacancies in the form of dangling or unpaired 2p states (due to Zn vacancies) induced a significant local spin moment in the nearest-neighboring O atoms to the defect center, which was determined from the uneven local spin density by analyzing the partial density of states of O 2p in ZnO.Efforts have been made to elucidate the origin of d0 magnetism in ZnO nanocactuses (NCs) and nanowires (NWs) using X-ray-based microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. The photoluminescence and O K-edge and Zn L3,2-edge X-ray-excited optical luminescence spectra showed that ZnO NCs contain more defects than NWs do and that in ZnO NCs, more defects are present at the O sites than at the Zn sites

  16. Grafting of functionalized [Fe(III)(salten)] complexes to Au(111) surfaces via thiolate groups: surface spectroscopic characterization and comparison of different linker designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Hanne; Kathirvel, Ketheeswari; Petersen, Finn; Strunskus, Thomas; Bannwarth, Alexander; Meyer, Sven; Tuczek, Felix

    2013-07-01

    Functionalization of surfaces with spin crossover complexes is an intensively studied topic. Starting from dinuclear iron(III)-salten complexes [Fe(salten)(pyS)]2(BPh4)2 and [Fe(thiotolylsalten)(NCS)]2 with disulfide-containing bridging ligands, corresponding mononuclear complexes [Fe(salten)(pyS)](+) and [Fe(thiotolylsalten)(NCS)] are covalently attached to Au(111) surfaces (pySH, pyridinethiol; salten, bis(3-salicylidene-aminopropyl)amine). The adsorbed monolayers are investigated by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) in combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Comparison of the surface vibrational spectra with bulk data allows us to draw conclusions with respect to the geometry of the adsorbed complexes. An anomaly is observed in the spectra of the surface-adsorbed monolayer of [Fe(salten)(pyS)](+), which suggests that the salten ligand is partially decoordinated from the Fe(III) center and one of its phenolate arms binds to the Au(111) surface. For complex [Fe(thiotolylsalten)(NCS)] that is bound to the Au(111) surface via a thiolate-functionalized salten ligand, this anomaly is not observed, which indicates that the coordination sphere of the complex in the bulk is retained on the surface. The implications of these results with respect to the preparation of surface-adsorbed monolayers of functional transition-metal complexes are discussed.

  17. Characterization and analysis of surface notches on Ti-alloy plates fabricated by additive manufacturing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwai S.

    2015-12-01

    Rectangular plates of Ti-6Al-4V with extra low interstitial (ELI) were fabricated by layer-by-layer deposition techniques that included electron beam melting (EBM) and laser beam melting (LBM). The surface conditions of these plates were characterized using x-ray micro-computed tomography. The depth and radius of surface notch-like features on the LBM and EBM plates were measured from sectional images of individual virtual slices of the rectangular plates. The stress concentration factors of individual surface notches were computed and analyzed statistically to determine the appropriate distributions for the notch depth, notch radius, and stress concentration factor. These results were correlated with the fatigue life of the Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloys from an earlier investigation. A surface notch analysis was performed to assess the debit in the fatigue strength due to the surface notches. The assessment revealed that the fatigue lives of the additively manufactured plates with rough surface topographies and notch-like features are dominated by the fatigue crack growth of large cracks for both the LBM and EBM materials. The fatigue strength reduction due to the surface notches can be as large as 60%-75%. It is concluded that for better fatigue performance, the surface notches on EBM and LBM materials need to be removed by machining and the surface roughness be improved to a surface finish of about 1 μm.

  18. Single-Cell Imaging and Spectroscopic Analyses of Cr(VI) Reduction on the Surface of Bacterial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuanmin; Sevinc, Papatya C.; Belchik, Sara M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-22

    We investigate single-cell reduction of toxic Cr(VI) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), an important bioremediation process, using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Our experiments indicate that the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) can be efficiently reduced to the less toxic and non-soluble Cr2O3 nanoparticles by MR-1. Cr2O3 is observed to emerge as nanoparticles adsorbed on the cell surface and its chemical nature is identified by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy. Co-localization of Cr2O3 and cytochromes by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy suggests a terminal reductase role for MR-1 surface-exposed cytochromes MtrC and OmcA. Our experiments revealed that the cooperation of surface proteins OmcA and MtrC makes the reduction reaction most efficient, and the sequence of the reducing reactivity of the MR-1 is: wild type > single mutant @mtrC or mutant @omcA > double mutant (@omcA-@mtrC). Moreover, our results also suggest that the direct microbial Cr(VI) reduction and Fe(II) (hematite)-mediated Cr(VI) reduction mechanisms may co-exist in the reduction processes.

  19. A surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopic study of pH dependent water adsorption on Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunwell, Marco; Yan, Yushan; Xu, Bingjun

    2016-08-01

    The potential dependent behavior of near-surface water on Au film electrodes in acidic and alkaline solutions is studied using a combination of attenuated total reflectance surface enhanced infrared spectroscopy and chronoamperometry. In acid, sharp νOH peaks appear at 3583 cm- 1 at high potentials attributed to non-H-bonded water coadsorbed in the hydration sphere of perchlorate near the electrode surface. Adsorbed hydronium bending mode at near 1680 cm- 1 is observed at low potentials in low pH solutions (1.4, 4.0, 6.8). At high pH (10.0, 12.3), a potential-dependent OH stretching band assigned to adsorbed hydroxide emerges from 3400-3506 cm- 1. The observation of adsorbed hydroxide, even on a weakly oxophilic metal such as Au, provides the framework for further studies of hydroxide adsorption on other electrodes to determine the role of adsorbed hydroxide on important reactions such as the hydrogen oxidation reaction.

  20. A 3D edge detection technique for surface extraction in computed tomography for dimensional metrology applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yagüe-Fabra, J.A.; Ontiveros, S.; Jiménez, R.

    2013-01-01

    Many factors influence the measurement uncertainty when using computed tomography for dimensional metrology applications. One of the most critical steps is the surface extraction phase. An incorrect determination of the surface may significantly increase the measurement uncertainty. This paper...... presents an edge detection method for the surface extraction based on a 3D Canny algorithm with sub-voxel resolution. The advantages of this method are shown in comparison with the most commonly used technique nowadays, i.e. the local threshold definition. Both methods are applied to reference standards...

  1. Electrochemical surface modification technique to impede mild steel corrosion using perfluorooctanoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubha H Natarj

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work demonstrated that corrosion inhibition efficiency of electrochemically generated organic coat is remarkably effective than self-assembled monolayer (SAM generated by dip coating technique. Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA is used to modify mild steel surface for effective protection. Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy and contact angle measurements substantiate the modification of mild steel surface and its effect on surface hydrophobicity. A comparison between electrochemical properties of PFOA SAM generated by dip coat method (DC-PFOA and PFOA coat generated by electrochemical method (EC-PFOA is presented. Electrochemical measurements reveal that the corrosion protection efficiency of EC-PFOA (91% is much superior to DC-PFOA (28%.

  2. Application of the Zisman Critical Surface Tension Technique to Textile Materials Using Contact Angle Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江红; 迟克栋; 吴慧莉

    2001-01-01

    This is the first one that applies the Zisman critical surface tension technique successfully to textile materials. It was accomplished by carefully determination of the contact angle of fabric. The deviation caused by the porous structure of the fabric will be taken into account. To do so, a Jens equation is applied, and the measured contact angles can be corrected. The surface porosity was determined by measurement and approximate calculation, and the chemical composition of the surface was characterized by means of attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared(FTIR/ATR).

  3. Review of the mathematical foundations of data fusion techniques in surface metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Leach, Richard K.; Jiang, X.

    2015-06-01

    The recent proliferation of engineered surfaces, including freeform and structured surfaces, is challenging current metrology techniques. Measurement using multiple sensors has been proposed to achieve enhanced benefits, mainly in terms of spatial frequency bandwidth, which a single sensor cannot provide. When using data from different sensors, a process of data fusion is required and there is much active research in this area. In this paper, current data fusion methods and applications are reviewed, with a focus on the mathematical foundations of the subject. Common research questions in the fusion of surface metrology data are raised and potential fusion algorithms are discussed.

  4. 4D photogrammetric technique to study free surface water in open channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubé, Damien; Berkaoui, Amine; Vinatier, Fabrice; Bailly, Jean-Stéphane; Belaud, Gilles

    2015-04-01

    Characteristics of three-dimensional surface water are considered as the most valuable information to understand hydrodynamic phenomena in open channel flow. An accurate and coherent description of the free water surface morphology improves the accuracy of hydraulic models which study river processes. However, amongst existing techniques to measure three-dimensional surface, stereo-photogrammetry is clearly the most effective technique to obtain an instantaneous and high accurate 3D free water surface and it's suitable to both flume and field condition. Our study aims at developing this technique in two controlled channels, one in interior with glass borders (length: 6 m, width: 0.3 m and depth: 0.5 m) and one outside with cement borders (length: 13 m, width: 0.7 m and depth: 0.4 m). A system consisting in three NIKON-D3200 cameras, mounted to an adjustable tripod head, which is fixed to an inverted aluminium T-bar with the center camera higher than the two side cameras. Each camera is fitted with a 28 mm lens and cameras are synchronized using a Phottix(R) system. The system was mounted at a downstream position from the channel with an oblique configuration. A series of pictures taken at a 3 s interval during the water weight bearing were reported and analyzed using the Photoscan Pro(R) software for image matching. Validation procedure of the technique was realized using an orthophotography of the lateral border of the interior channel to delimit the line of water surface, and using a video capture of a slide fixed inside the outside channel. A high resolution and dynamic elevation map of the surface water was constructed. Our study give encouraging results, with a good capture of water surface morphology and a limited occlusion issues. The confrontation of the results with the validation dataset highlight limitations that need to be discussed with the audience.

  5. Tensile bond strength of hydroxyethyl methacrylate dentin bonding agent on dentin surface at various drying techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Ismiyatin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are several dentin surface drying techniques to provide a perfect resin penetration on dentin. There are two techniques which will be compared in this study. The first technique was by rubbing dentin surface gently using cotton pellet twice, this technique is called blot dry technique. The second technique is by air blowing dentin surface for one second and continued by rubbing dentin surface gently using moist cotton. Purpose: This experiment was aimed to examine the best dentin surface drying techniques after 37% phosphoric acid etching to obtain the optimum tensile bond strength between hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA and dentin surface. Method: Bovine teeth was prepared flat to obtain the dentin surface and than was etched using 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. After etching the dentin was cleaned using 20 cc plain water and dried with blot dry techniques (group I, or dried with air blow for one second (group II, or dried with air blow for one second, and continued with rubbing gently using moist cotton pellet (group III, and without any drying as control group (group IV. After these drying, the dentin surfaces were applied with resin dentin bonding agent and put into plunger facing the composite mould. The antagonist plunger was filled with composite resin. After 24 hours, therefore bond strength was measured using Autograph. Result: Data obtained was analyzed using One-Way ANOVA with 95% confidence level and continued with LSD test on p≤0.05. The result showed that the highest tensile bond strength was on group I, while the lowest on group IV. Group II and IV, III and IV, II and III did not show signigicant difference (p>0.05. Conclusion: Dentin surface drying techniques through gentle rubbing using cotton pellet twice (blot dry technique gave the greatest tensile bond strength.Latar belakang masalah: Tehnik pengeringan permukaan dentin agar resin dapat penetrasi dengan sempurna adalah dengan cara pengusapan secara

  6. A new curvature technique calculation for surface tension contribution in PLIC-VOF method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J.-M.; Chesneau, X.; Zeghmati, B.

    2006-01-01

    The volume of fluid (VOF) methods have been used for numerous numerical simulations. Among these techniques used to define the moving interface, the piecewise linear interface reconstruction (PLIC-VOF) is one of the most accurate. A study of the superficial tension impact on two-phase flow with free surface is presented. A new method based on direct staggered grid is developped to include surface tension in PLIC-VOF. The new numerical curvature calculation method doesn't need smoothed colour function and leads to less “spurious current”. This technique is applied to the calculus of surface tension force in the case of the rise of air bubble in viscous liquid and the fall of liquid drop in the same liquid on free surface. Droplets, thin layer and capillarity waves are observed after the free surface rupture for different Bond number. The influence of surface tension calculus is then obvioused and when the drop hit the free surface, wavelets propagate toward the virtual boundaries imposed.

  7. Accuracy of Implant Position Transfer and Surface Detail Reproduction with Different Impression Materials and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alikhasi, Marzieh; Siadat, Hakimeh; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of implant position transfer and surface detail reproduction using two impression techniques and materials. Materials and Methods: A metal model with two implants and three grooves of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 mm in depth on the flat superior surface of a die was fabricated. Ten regular-body polyether (PE) and 10 regular-body polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions with square and conical transfer copings using open tray and closed tray techniques were made for each group. Impressions were poured with type IV stone, and linear and angular displacements of the replica heads were evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Also, accurate reproduction of the grooves was evaluated by a video measuring machine (VMM). These measurements were compared with the measurements calculated on the reference model that served as control, and the data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and t-test at P= 0.05. Results: There was less linear displacement for PVS and less angular displacement for PE in closed-tray technique, and less linear displacement for PE in open tray technique (Ptray technique showed less angular displacement with the use of PVS impression material. Detail reproduction accuracy was the same in all the groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: The open tray technique was more accurate using PE, and also both closed tray and open tray techniques had acceptable results with the use of PVS. The choice of impression material and technique made no significant difference in surface detail reproduction. PMID:27252761

  8. Towards convective heat transfer enhancement: surface modification, characterization and measurement techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.; Thakur, D.B.; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, heat transfer surface modification and heat transfer measurement technique is developed. Heat transfer investigation was aimed to study the effect of carbon nano fibers (extremely high thermal conductive material) on the enhancement level in heat transfer. Synthesis of these carbon nan

  9. The photoload sampling technique: estimating surface fuel loadings from downward-looking photographs of synthetic fuelbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Laura J. Dickinson

    2007-01-01

    Fire managers need better estimates of fuel loading so they can more accurately predict the potential fire behavior and effects of alternative fuel and ecosystem restoration treatments. This report presents a new fuel sampling method, called the photoload sampling technique, to quickly and accurately estimate loadings for six common surface fuel components (1 hr, 10 hr...

  10. Critique of Sikkink and Keane's comparison of surface fuel sampling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton S. Wright; Roger D. Ottmar; Robert E. Vihnanek

    2010-01-01

    The 2008 paper of Sikkink and Keane compared several methods to estimate surface fuel loading in western Montana: two widely used inventory techniques (planar intersect and fixed-area plot) and three methods that employ photographs as visual guides (photo load, photoload macroplot and photo series). We feel, however, that their study design was inadequate to evaluate...

  11. Towards convective heat transfer enhancement: surface modification, characterization and measurement techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.; Thakur, D.B.; Meer, van der T.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, heat transfer surface modification and heat transfer measurement technique is developed. Heat transfer investigation was aimed to study the effect of carbon nano fibers (extremely high thermal conductive material) on the enhancement level in heat transfer. Synthesis of these carbon nan

  12. Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion on composite resin surfaces after different finishing and polishing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, C A; Eskelson, E; Cavalli, V; Liporoni, P C S; Jorge, A O C; do Rego, M A

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion on the surface of three composite resins (nanofilled, Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; nanohybrid, Vit-1-escence, Ultradent Products, South Jordan, UT, USA; and microhybrid, Esthet X, Dentsply, Milford, DE, USA) following different finishing and polishing techniques. Sixty standardized samples (6 × 3 mm) of each composite were produced and randomly divided into three finishing and polishing treatments (n=20): 1) control group: composite resin surface in contact with Mylar matrix strips with no finishing or polishing performed, 2) Sof-Lex aluminum oxide disc technique (3M ESPE, and 3) carbide bur finishing and Astrobrush polishing technique (Ultradent). Half the samples of each group were incubated in human saliva for 1 hour, and all the samples were subjected to S mutans (ATCC 35688) biofilm development. The mean log of CFU/mL present in the S mutans biofilm was calculated, and data were statistically analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test (pcomposites' surfaces, regardless of the polishing treatment performed (pcomposite (Filtek Z350) had the lowest bacterial adherence with each of the finishing and polishing techniques despite the presence or absence of human saliva (padhesion on the surface of the microhybrid and nanofilled composites in the absence of human saliva.

  13. Modeling the acid-base properties of bacterial surfaces: A combined spectroscopic and potentiometric study of the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Laura; Ferri, Diego; Manfredi, Carla; Persson, Per; Shchukarev, Andrei; Sjöberg, Staffan; Loring, John

    2007-09-15

    In this study, macroscopic and spectroscopic data were combined to develop a surface complexation model that describes the acid-base properties of Bacillus subtilis. The bacteria were freeze-dried and then resuspended in 0.1 M NaCl ionic medium. Macroscopic measurements included potentiometric acid-base titrations and electrophoretic mobility measurements. In addition, ATR-FTIR spectra of wet pastes from suspensions of Bacillus subtilis at different pH values were collected. The least-squares program MAGPIE was used to generate a surface complexation model that takes into account the presence of three acid-base sites on the surface: tripple bond COOH, tripple bond NH+, and tripple bond PO-, which were identified previously by XPS measurements. Both potentiometric titration data and ATR-FTIR spectra were used quantitatively, and electrostatic effects at the charged bacterial surface were accounted for using the constant capacitance model. The model was calculated using two different approaches: in the first one XPS data were used to constrain the ratio of the total concentrations of all three surface sites. The capacitance of the double layer, the total buffer capacity, and the deprotonation constants of the tripple bond NH+, tripple bond POH, and tripple bond COOH species were determined in the fit. A second approach is presented in which the ratio determined by XPS of the total concentrations of tripple bond NH+ to tripple bond PO- sites is relaxed. The total concentration of tripple bond PO- sites was determined in the fit, while the deprotonation constant for tripple bond POH was manually varied until the minimization led to a model which predicted an isoelectric point that resulted in consistency with electrophoretic mobility data. The model explains well the buffering capacity of Bacillus subtilis suspensions in a wide pH range (between pH=3 and pH=9) which is of considerable environmental interest. In particular, a similar quantitative use of the IR data

  14. Comparison of optimization techniques for MRR and surface roughness in wire EDM process for gear cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.D. Mohapatra

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work is to use a suitable method that can optimize the process parameters like pulse on time (TON, pulse off time (TOFF, wire feed rate (WF, wire tension (WT and servo voltage (SV to attain the maximum value of MRR and minimum value of surface roughness during the production of a fine pitch spur gear made of copper. The spur gear has a pressure angle of 20⁰ and pitch circle diameter of 70 mm. The wire has a diameter of 0.25 mm and is made of brass. Experiments were conducted according to Taguchi’s orthogonal array concept with five factors and two levels. Thus, Taguchi quality loss design technique is used to optimize the output responses carried out from the experiments. Another optimization technique i.e. desirability with grey Taguchi technique has been used to optimize the process parameters. Both the optimized results are compared to find out the best combination of MRR and surface roughness. A confirmation test was carried out to identify the significant improvement in the machining performance in case of Taguchi quality loss. Finally, it was concluded that desirability with grey Taguchi technique produced a better result than the Taguchi quality loss technique in case of MRR and Taguchi quality loss gives a better result in case of surface roughness. The quality of the wire after the cutting operation has been presented in the scanning electron microscopy (SEM figure.

  15. [Effect of infiltration technique and polishing on the roughness of artificial carious enamel surfaces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chang-qing; Dou, Guo-wen; Deng, Jing; Geng, Guo-liang; Sun, Pei; Cao, Ying-xiu

    2013-08-01

    To study the surface roughness of early carious lesions which were treated with resin infiltration and polished with different materials, and to provide reference for selection of appropriate polishing system. Fifty-four labial surface specimens of mandibular incisors were created out of bovine teeth. They were randomly divided into 6 groups. One group was sound enamel group. Another group was early enamel carious group. Other specimens were treated with a partially saturated acidic buffer solution for preparation of initial artificial enamel caries. These initial artificial enamel caries were treated with resin infiltration. Then they were randomly divided into 4 groups according to polishing or not and type of polishing tool (rubber cups, polishing discs, HiLuster polishers). The surface roughness of specimens in all groups were measured with Form Talysurf PGI 800. Arithmetical mean deviation of the assessed profile (Ra) and the maximum height of the profile(Rz) were used as measurement parameter. SPSS 17.0 software package was used for data analysis. Comparison of sound enamel surfaces and early carious surfaces revealed no significant difference in surface roughness(P>0.05), but the mean value of the latter one was higher. After infiltration, the roughness of surfaces without polishing was significantly higher than that of early carious surfaces(P0.05). The roughness of polishing groups after infiltration was significantly smaller than that of group without polished after infiltration (Pcarious surfaces revealed no significant difference in surface roughness (P>0.05). After early caries being treated with infiltration technique, the roughness of teeth surfaces increases significantly. Those surfaces should be polished. Rubber cup and polishing discs with smaller granularity are more effective and reasonable as the surface polishing materials.

  16. Enhancing forensic science with spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Camilla; Kazarian, Sergei G.

    2006-09-01

    This presentation outlines the research we are developing in the area of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging with the focus on materials of forensic interest. FTIR spectroscopic imaging has recently emerged as a powerful tool for characterisation of heterogeneous materials. FTIR imaging relies on the ability of the military-developed infrared array detector to simultaneously measure spectra from thousands of different locations in a sample. Recently developed application of FTIR imaging using an ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection) mode has demonstrated the ability of this method to achieve spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit of infrared light in air. Chemical visualisation with enhanced spatial resolution in micro-ATR mode broadens the range of materials studied with FTIR imaging with applications to pharmaceutical formulations or biological samples. Macro-ATR imaging has also been developed for chemical imaging analysis of large surface area samples and was applied to analyse the surface of human skin (e.g. finger), counterfeit tablets, textile materials (clothing), etc. This approach demonstrated the ability of this imaging method to detect trace materials attached to the surface of the skin. This may also prove as a valuable tool in detection of traces of explosives left or trapped on the surfaces of different materials. This FTIR imaging method is substantially superior to many of the other imaging methods due to inherent chemical specificity of infrared spectroscopy and fast acquisition times of this technique. Our preliminary data demonstrated that this methodology will provide the means to non-destructive detection method that could relate evidence to its source. This will be important in a wider crime prevention programme. In summary, intrinsic chemical specificity and enhanced visualising capability of FTIR spectroscopic imaging open a window of opportunities for counter-terrorism and crime-fighting, with applications ranging

  17. X-ray, Hirshfeld surface analysis, spectroscopic and DFT studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Fluoranthene and acenaphthene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Śmiszek-Lindert Wioleta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The X-ray structure, theoretical calculation, Hirshfeld surfaces analysis, IR and Raman spectra of fluoranthene and acenaphthene were reported. Acenaphthene crystallizes in the orthorhombic crystal system and space group P21ma, with crystal parameters a = 7.2053 (9 Å, b = 13.9800 (15 Å, c = 8.2638 (8 Å, Z = 4 and V = 832.41 (16 Å3. In turn, the grown crystals of fluoranthene are in monoclinic system with space group P21/n. The unit cell parameters are a = 18.3490 (2 Å, b = 6.2273 (5 Å, c = 19.8610 (2 Å, β = 109.787 (13°, Z = 8 and unit cell volume is 2135.50 (4 Å3. Theoretical calculations of the title compounds isolated molecule have been carried out using DFT at the B3LYP level. The intermolecular interactions in the crystal structure, for both the title PAHs, were analyzed using Hirshfeld surfaces computational method.

  18. Density, viscosity, surface tension, and spectroscopic properties for binary system of 1,2-ethanediamine + diethylene glycol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lihua; Zhang, Jianbin, E-mail: tadzhang@pku.edu.cn; Li, Qiang; Guo, Bo; Zhao, Tianxiang; Sha, Feng

    2014-08-20

    Graphical abstract: Excess property of the binary system 1,2-ethanediamine (EDA) + diethylene glycol (DEG). - Highlights: • Densities and viscosities of EDA + DEG at 298.15–318.150 K were listed. • Thermodynamics data of EDA + DEG at 298.15–318.15 K were calculated. • Surface tension of EDA + DEG at 298.15 K was measured. • Intermolecular interaction of EDA with DEG was discussed. - Abstract: This paper reports density and viscosity data at T = 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, 313.15, and 318.15 K and surface tension data at 298.15 K for the binary system 1,2-ethanediamine (EDA) + diethylene glycol (DEG) as a function of composition under atmospheric pressure. From the experimental density and viscosity data, the excess molar volume and viscosity deviation were calculated, and the results were fitted to a Redlich–Kister equation to obtain the coefficients and to estimate the standard deviations between the experimental and calculated quantities. Based on the kinematic viscosity data, enthalpy of activation for viscous flow, entropy of activation for the viscous flow, and Gibbs energies of activation of viscous flow were calculated. In addition, based on Fourier transform infrared spectra, UV–vis spectra, and electrical conductivity for the system EDA + DEG with various concentrations, intermolecular interaction of EDA with DEG was discussed.

  19. Discovery of starspots on Vega - First spectroscopic detection of surface structures on a normal A-type star

    CERN Document Server

    Böhm, T; Lignières, F; Petit, P; Rainer, M; Paletou, F; Wade, G; Alecian, E; Carfantan, H; Blazère, A; Mirouh, G M

    2014-01-01

    The theoretically studied impact of rapid rotation on stellar evolution needs to be confronted with the results of high resolution spectroscopy-velocimetry observations. A weak surface magnetic field had recently been detected in the A0 prototype star Vega, potentially leading to a (yet undetected) structured surface. The goal of this article is to present a thorough analysis of the line profile variations and associated estimators in the early-type standard star Vega (A0) in order reveal potential activity tracers, exoplanet companions and stellar oscillations. Vega was monitored in high-resolution spectroscopy with the velocimeter Sophie/OHP. A total of 2588 high S/N spectra was obtained during 5 nights (August 2012) at R = 75000 and covering the visible domain. For each reduced spectrum, Least Square Deconvolved (LSD) equivalent photospheric profiles were calculated with a Teff = 9500 and logg = 4.0 spectral line mask. Several methods were applied to study the dynamic behavior of the profile variations (ev...

  20. Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of specific, small molecule activator of histone acetyltransferase p300

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Partha P.; Pavan Kumar, G. V.; Mantelingu, Kempegowda; Kundu, Tapas K.; Narayana, Chandrabhas

    2011-07-01

    We report for the first time, the Raman and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of N-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-2-ethoxy-benzamide (CTB). This molecule is specific activator of human histone acetyltransferase (HAT), p300, and serves as lead molecule to design anti-neoplastic therapeutics. A detailed Raman and SERS band assignments have been performed for CTB, which are compared with the density functional theory calculations. The observed red shift of N sbnd H stretching frequency from the computed wavenumber indicates the weakening of N sbnd H bond resulting from proton transfer to the neighboring oxygen atom. We observe Ag sbnd N vibrational mode at 234 cm -1 in SERS of CTB. This indicates there is a metal-molecule bond leading to chemical enhancement in SERS. We also observe, enhancement in the modes pertaining to substituted benzene rings and methyl groups. Based on SERS analysis we propose the adsorption sites and the orientation of CTB on silver surface.

  1. Towards convective heat transfer enhancement: surface modification, characterization and measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, T. J.; Thakur, D. B.; Van der Meer, T. H.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, heat transfer surface modification and heat transfer measurement technique is developed. Heat transfer investigation was aimed to study the effect of carbon nano fibers (extremely high thermal conductive material) on the enhancement level in heat transfer. Synthesis of these carbon nano structures is achieved using thermal catalytic chemical vapor deposition process (TCCVD) on a 50 μm pure nickel (Ni270) wire. The micro wire samples covered with CNF layers were subjected to a uniform flow from a nozzle. Heat transfer measurement was achieved by a controlled heat dissipation through the micro wire to attain a constant temperature during the flow. This measurement technique is adopted from hot wire anemometry calibration method. Synthesis of carbon nano structures, heat transfer surface characterization and measurement technique are evaluated. Preliminary results indicate that an average enhancement in Nusselt Number of 17% is achieved.

  2. Explosive Contamination from Substrate Surfaces: Differences and Similarities in Contamination Techniques Using RDX and C-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. J.; Yoder, T. S.

    2010-06-01

    Explosive trace detection equipment has been deployed to airports for more than a decade. During this time, the need for standardized procedures and calibrated trace amounts for ensuring that the systems are operating properly and detecting the correct explosive has been apparent but a standard representative of a fingerprint has been elusive. Standards are also necessary to evaluate instrumentation in the laboratories during development and prior to deployment to determine sample throughput, probability of detection, false positive/negative rates, ease of use by operator, mechanical and/or software problems that may be encountered, and other pertinent parameters that would result in the equipment being unusable during field operations. Since many laboratories do not have access to nor are allowed to handle explosives, the equipment is tested using techniques aimed at simulating the actual explosives fingerprint. This laboratory study focused on examining the similarities and differences in three different surface contamination techniques that are used to performance test explosive trace detection equipment in an attempt to determine how effective the techniques are at replicating actual field samples and to offer scenarios where each contamination technique is applicable. The three techniques used were dry transfer deposition of standard solutions using the Transportation Security Laboratory’s (TSL) patented dry transfer techniques (US patent 6470730), direct deposition of explosive standards onto substrates, and fingerprinting of actual explosives onto substrates. RDX was deposited on the surface of one of five substrates using one of the three different deposition techniques. The process was repeated for each substrate type using each contamination technique. The substrate types used were: 50% cotton/50% polyester as found in T-shirts, 100% cotton with a smooth surface such as that found in a cotton dress shirt, 100% cotton on a rough surface such as that

  3. Rotary bending fatigue properties of Inconel 718 alloys by ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Hyong Kim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the influence of ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM technique on fatigue properties of SAE AMS 5662 (solution treatment of Inconel 718 alloys. The fatigue properties of the specimens were investigated using a rotary bending fatigue tester. Results revealed that the UNSM-treated specimens showed longer fatigue life in comparison with those of the untreated specimens. The improvement in fatigue life of the UNSM-treated specimens is attributed mainly to the induced compressive residual stress, increased hardness, reduced roughness and refined grains at the top surface. Fractured surfaces were analysed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM in order to give insight into the effectiveness of UNSM technique on fracture mechanisms and fatigue life.

  4. Laser photoacoustic technique for ultrasonic surface acoustic wave velocity evaluation on porcelain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, K.; Tu, S. J.; Gao, L.; Xu, J.; Li, S. D.; Yu, W. C.; Liao, H. H.

    2016-10-01

    A laser photoacoustic technique has been developed to evaluate the surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity of porcelain. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm was focused by a cylindrical lens to initiate broadband SAW impulses, which were detected by an optical fiber interferometer with high spatial resolution. Multiple near-field surface acoustic waves were observed on the sample surface at various locations along the axis perpendicular to the laser line source as the detector moved away from the source in the same increments. The frequency spectrum and dispersion curves were obtained by operating on the recorded waveforms with cross-correlation and FFT. The SAW phase velocities of the porcelain of the same source are similar while they are different from those of different sources. The marked differences of Rayleigh phase velocities in our experiment suggest that this technique has the potential for porcelain identification.

  5. Comparison of two tooth-saving preparation techniques for one-surface cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimtoola, Salim; van Amerongen, Evert

    2002-01-01

    The atraumatic restorative treatment technique (ART) is based on removing infected tooth material using only hand instruments and filling the subsequently cleaned cavity with adhesive material such as glass ionomer. As its name suggests, the ART technique should be atraumatic during treatment, as well as for the tooth itself as for the patient. It was primarily developed for treating people living in underserved areas of the world where resources and facilities such as electricity and trained manpower are limited. Many studies have evaluated the ART technique and the results have supported its application. However, a very limited number of studies have compared ART with more conventional techniques. For that reason, a study was conducted in Pakistan, to compare the ART technique with another more conventional treatment technique. The results of this study show that the preparations with hand instruments resulted in smaller sized cavities and therefore may be less traumatic to the tooth. It was also associated with less pain reactions compared to the more conventional technique. Although preparations with hand instruments required more time, this did not seem to affect the survival of restorations. The survival of glass ionomer cement restorations made with hand instruments was comparable with single surface amalgam restorations made with a more conventional technique. Recurrent caries was not associated with any glass ionomer cement restorations made with hand instruments. The retention rate of glass ionomer sealants was low, however one dentist had a sealant retention rate of 81.5 percent that suggests that this procedure can be performed satisfactorily in conjunction with a glass ionomer cement restoration. Operator variances did seem to affect the restorations. Survival of glass ionomer restorations made with both hand and rotary instruments varied for different operators. Similarly, the retention of fissure sealant also varied amongst operators. Operator

  6. The very surface states on GaAs(001) surface by means of electronic and optical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placidi, Ernesto

    2004-03-01

    Until now, Reflectance-Anisotropy Spectroscopy (RAS) in the visible has been the most used technique to quantify the anisotropy of these surfaces [1]. Low-energy electrons are believed to perturb more than photons and have not been employed to this purpose, despite their shorter penetration depth. In our presentation we show experimental results of High-Resolution Electron-Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS) applied to investigate the anisotropy of the GaAs(001)-c(4x4) and beta2(2x4) surfaces. We demonstrate the higher surface sensitivity of HREELS compared to RAS. Measurements are performed on high-quality samples grown in situ by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). The loss spectra taken in the two orthogonal surface directions have different intensities, particularly close to the fundamental gap, where surface like resonances, involving dimers, are observed. We discuss our HREELS and RAS data to identify the source of the anisotropy close to the critical point transitions where surface and bulk like excitations coexist. Our data are in very good agreement with DFT-LDA calculations for loss energies up to 3.5 eV [2]. The exposure of the reconstructed surfaces to molecular oxygen affects strongly the spectral features. [1] D.E.Aspnes, J.P.Harbison, A.A.Studna, L.T.Florez, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59 (1987) 1687; I.Kamiya, D.E.Aspnes, L.T.Florez, and J.T.Harbison, Phys. Rev. B 46 (1992) 15894. [2] A.Balzarotti, F.Arciprete, M.Fanfoni, F.Patella, E. Placidi, G.Onida, R.Del Sole, Surf. Sci. Lett. 524, L71 (2003); A.Balzarotti, E.Placidi, F.Arciprete, M.Fanfoni, F.Patella, Physical Review B, 67 115332 (2003); F.Arciprete, C. Goletti, E. Placidi, M.Fanfoni, F.Patella, P. Chiaradia, C. Hogan and A. Balzarotti, Phys. Rev. B 68 125328 (2003).

  7. Refractive index dispersion of swift heavy ion irradiated BFO thin films using Surface Plasmon Resonance technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paliwal, Ayushi [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Sharma, Savita [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Delhi (India); Tomar, Monika [Physics Department, Miranda House, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Singh, Fouran [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110075 (India); Gupta, Vinay, E-mail: drguptavinay@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Investigated the optical properties of BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) thin films after irradiation using SPR. • Otto configuration has been used to excite the surface plasmons using gold metal thin film. • BFO thin films were prepared by sol–gel spin coating technique. • Examined the refractive index dispersion of pristine and irradiated BFO thin film. - Abstract: Swift heavy ion irradiation (SHI) is an effective technique to induce defects for possible modifications in the material properties. There is growing interest in studying the optical properties of multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) thin films for optoelectronic applications. In the present work, BFO thin films were prepared by sol–gel spin coating technique and were irradiated using the 15 UD Pelletron accelerator with 100 MeV Au{sup 9+} ions at a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 12} ions cm{sup −2}. The as-grown films became rough and porous on ion irradiation. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique has been identified as a highly sensitive and powerful technique for studying the optical properties of a dielectric material. Optical properties of BFO thin films, before and after irradiation were studied using SPR technique in Otto configuration. Refractive index is found to be decreasing from 2.27 to 2.14 on ion irradiation at a wavelength of 633 nm. Refractive index dispersion of BFO thin film (from 405 nm to 633 nm) before and after ion radiation was examined.

  8. Characterizing a New Surface-Based Shortwave Cloud Retrieval Technique, Based on Transmitted Radiance for Soil and Vegetated Surface Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. McBride

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach using the GEneralized Nonlinear Retrieval Analysis (GENRA tool and general inverse theory diagnostics including the maximum likelihood solution and the Shannon information content to investigate the performance of a new spectral technique for the retrieval of cloud optical properties from surface based transmittance measurements. The cumulative retrieval information over broad ranges in cloud optical thickness (τ, droplet effective radius (re, and overhead sun angles is quantified under two conditions known to impact transmitted radiation; the variability in land surface albedo and atmospheric water vapor content. Our conclusions are: (1 the retrieved cloud properties are more sensitive to the natural variability in land surface albedo than to water vapor content; (2 the new spectral technique is more accurate (but still imprecise than a standard approach, in particular for τ between 5 and 60 and re less than approximately 20 μm; and (3 the retrieved cloud properties are dependent on sun angle for clouds of  from 5 to 10 and re < 10 μm, with maximum sensitivity obtained for an overhead sun.

  9. Characterizing a New Surface-Based Shortwave Cloud Retrieval Technique, Based on Transmitted Radiance for Soil and Vegetated Surface Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, Odele; Pilewskie, Peter; Schmidt, K. Sebastian; McBride, Patrick J.; Vukicevic, Tomislava

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an approach using the GEneralized Nonlinear Retrieval Analysis (GENRA) tool and general inverse theory diagnostics including the maximum likelihood solution and the Shannon information content to investigate the performance of a new spectral technique for the retrieval of cloud optical properties from surface based transmittance measurements. The cumulative retrieval information over broad ranges in cloud optical thickness (tau), droplet effective radius (r(sub e)), and overhead sun angles is quantified under two conditions known to impact transmitted radiation; the variability in land surface albedo and atmospheric water vapor content. Our conclusions are: (1) the retrieved cloud properties are more sensitive to the natural variability in land surface albedo than to water vapor content; (2) the new spectral technique is more accurate (but still imprecise) than a standard approach, in particular for tau between 5 and 60 and r(sub e) less than approximately 20 nm; and (3) the retrieved cloud properties are dependent on sun angle for clouds of tau from 5 to 10 and r(sub e) less than 10 nm, with maximum sensitivity obtained for an overhead sun.

  10. Pyridine adsorption on NiSn/MgO-Al2O3: An FTIR spectroscopic study of surface acidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, Anna; Bobadilla, Luis F.; Romero-Sarria, Francisca; Centeno, Miguel A.; Odriozola, José A.

    2014-10-01

    The acid-base properties of MgO-Al2O3 supports and NiSn/MgO-Al2O3 catalysts were evaluated by IR spectroscopy using pyridine as a probe molecule. The results indicate that only Lewis acid sites were detected on the surface of the supports as well as on the catalysts. Nevertheless, Brønsted acid sites were not detected. In the support without MgO three kinds of coordinatively unsaturated acid sites were detected: Al3+ cations occupying octahedral, tetrahedral and tetrahedral with cationic vacancy in the neighbourhood. The last sites appear as the strongest. Moreover, they are able to activate the pyridine molecules leading to the formation of an intermediate α-pyridone complex. When MgO or NiO were added to the alumina, the number and strength of the Lewis acid sites decreased and significant changes were observed in the tetrahedral sites with adjoining cation vacancies. The incorporation of the Mg2+ cations into the alumina's structure takes place on the vacant tetrahedral positions, forming spinel MgAl2O4. As a result, the fraction of tetrahedral sites with adjoining cationic vacancy diminished and the intermediate α-pyridone complex in the support with the highest MgO loading was hardly detected. The addition of Ni2+ cations leads to the filling of the free octahedral positions, resulting in the formation of a NiAl2O4 spinel structure and the thermal stability of the α-pyridone species decreases. In the catalysts, the progressive reduction of the number and strength of the Lewis acid sites is due to a competitive formation of the two types of MgAl2O4 and NiAl2O4 spinels. In the catalyst NiSn/30MgO-Al2O3 no cationic vacancies were detected and the surface reaction with α-pyridone formation did not occur.

  11. Infrared and Fluorescence Spectroscopic Investigations of the Acyl Surface Modification of Hydrogel Beads for the Deposition of a Phospholipid Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossutti, Michael; Seenath, Ryan; Lipkowski, Jacek

    2015-10-27

    The scaffolded vesicle has been employed as an alternative means of developing natural model membranes and envisioned as a potential nutraceutical transporter. Furthering the research of the scaffolded vesicle system, a nucleophilic substitution reaction was implemented to form an ester linkage between palmitate and terminal hydroxyl groups of dextran in order to hydrophobically modify the hydrogel scaffold. An average tilt angle of 38° of the hydrophobic palmitate modifying layer on the surface of the hydrogel was determined from dichroic ratios obtained from infrared spectra collected in the attenuated total reflection (ATR) configuration. ATR-IR studies of the DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel demonstrated that the hydrocarbon chains of the DMPC coating was similar to those of the DMPC bilayers and that the underlying palmitate layer had a negligible effect on the average tilt angle (26°) of the DMPC coating. The permeability of this acylated hydrogel was investigated with fluorescence spectroscopy and the terbium/dipicolinic acid assay. The hydrophobic modification on the surface of the hydrogel bead allowed for an efficient deposition of a DMPC layer that served as an impermeable barrier to terbium efflux. About 72% of DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel beads showed ideal barrier properties. The remaining 28% were leaking, but the half-life of terbium efflux of the DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel was increasing, and the total amount of leaked terbium was decreasing with the incubation time. The half-life time and the retention were considered a marked improvement relative to past scaffolded vesicle preparations. The process of acylating hydrogel beads for efficient DMPC deposition has been identified as another viable method for controlling the permeability of the scaffolded vesicle.

  12. Surface properties and corrosion behavior of Co-Cr alloy fabricated with selective laser melting technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xian-zhen; Chen, Jie; Xiang, Nan; Wei, Bin

    2013-01-01

    We sought to study the corrosion behavior and surface properties of a commercial cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy which was fabricated with selective laser melting (SLM) technique. For this purpose, specimens were fabricated using different techniques, such as SLM system and casting methods. Surface hardness testing, microstructure observation, surface analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical corrosion test were carried out to evaluate the corrosion properties and surface properties of the specimens. We found that microstructure of SLM specimens was more homogeneous than that of cast specimens. The mean surface hardness values of SLM and cast specimens were 458.3 and 384.8, respectively; SLM specimens showed higher values than cast ones in hardness. Both specimens exhibited no differences in their electrochemical corrosion properties in the artificial saliva through potentiodynamic curves and EIS, and no significant difference via XPS. Therefore, we concluded that within the scope of this study, SLM-fabricated restorations revealed good surface properties, such as proper hardness, homogeneous microstructure, and also showed sufficient corrosion resistance which could meet the needs of dental clinics.

  13. A New Technique for System-to-system Transfer of Surface Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, M. W.; Lucius, M. E.; Gordon, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose is to describe a recently developed technique aimed at providing a universal interface between surface types. In brief, a software package was developed which functions a common denominator of CAD/CAM surface types. This software enable one to convert from any given surface representation to any other target representation. The tiles maintain the same slope continuity as the target surface gram, bicubic patches are used since they allow one to match point, slope, and twist vectors to the target surface. Thus, slopes can be continuous or discontinuous as they are on the target surface. The patches can be of lower order if desired. For example, if only point information is available, the patches produced will be bilinear; however, the number of patches required is likely to increase correspondingly. The patches can be of higher order although many systems will not accept patches of more than order four. The final result of the program is a rectangular grid of bicubic patches. The patches fit the target surface exactly at their corners. Also, the patch corners have the same tangent and twist vectors. Adjacent patches will have slope continuity, unless a discontinuity was indicated by the target surface.

  14. A Survey of Surface Modification Techniques for Next-Generation Shape Memory Polymer Stent Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Govindarajan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The search for a single material with ideal surface properties and necessary mechanical properties is on-going, especially with regard to cardiovascular stent materials. Since the majority of stent problems arise from surface issues rather than bulk material deficiencies, surface optimization of a material that already contains the necessary bulk properties is an active area of research. Polymers can be surface-modified using a variety of methods to increase hemocompatibilty by reducing either late-stage restenosis or acute thrombogenicity, or both. These modification methods can be extended to shape memory polymers (SMPs, in an effort to make these materials more surface compatible, based on the application. This review focuses on the role of surface modification of materials, mainly polymers, to improve the hemocompatibility of stent materials; additional discussion of other materials commonly used in stents is also provided. Although shape memory polymers are not yet extensively used for stents, they offer numerous benefits that may make them good candidates for next-generation stents. Surface modification techniques discussed here include roughening, patterning, chemical modification, and surface modification for biomolecule and drug delivery.

  15. FT-Raman spectroscopic characterization of enamel surfaces irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabi, Sima; Fekrazad, Reza; Johari, Maryam; Chiniforoush, Nasim; Rezaei, Yashar

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite recent advances in dental caries prevention, caries is common and remains a serious health problem. Laser irradiation is one of the most common methods in preventive measures in recent years. Raman spectroscopy technique is utilized to study the microcrystalline structure of dental enamel. In this study, FT-Raman spectroscopy was used to evaluate chemical changes in enamel structure irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers. Methods. We used 15 freshly-extracted, non-carious, human molars that were treated as follows: No treatment was carried out in group A (control group); Group B was irradiated with Er:YAG laser for 10 seconds under air and water spray; and Group C was irradiated with Nd:YAG laser for 10 seconds under air and water spray. After treatment, the samples were analyzed by FT-Raman spectroscopy. Results. The carbonate content evaluation with regard to the integrated area under the curve (1065/960 cm–1) exhibited a significant reduction in its ratio in groups B and C. The organic content (2935/960 cm-1) area exhibited a significant decrease after laser irradiation in group B and C. Conclusion. The results showed that the mineral and organic matrices of enamel structure were affected by laser irradiation; therefore, it might be a suitable method for caries prevention. PMID:28096945

  16. FT-Raman spectroscopic characterization of enamel surfaces irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Shahabi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite recent advances in dental caries prevention, caries is common and remains a serious health problem. Laser irradiation is one of the most common methods in preventive measures in recent years. Raman spectroscopy technique is utilized to study the microcrystalline structure of dental enamel. In this study, FT-Raman spectroscopy was used to evaluate chemical changes in enamel structure irradiated with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers. Methods. We used 15 freshly-extracted, non-carious, human molars that were treated as follows: No treatment was carried out in group A (control group; Group B was irradiated with Er:YAG laser for 10 seconds under air and water spray; and Group C was irradiated with Nd:YAG laser for 10 seconds under air and water spray. After treatment, the samples were analyzed by FT-Raman spectroscopy. Results. The carbonate content evaluation with regard to the integrated area under the curve (1065/960 cm–1 exhibited a significant reduction in its ratio in groups B and C. The organic content (2935/960 cm-1 area exhibited a significant decrease after laser irradiation in group B and C. Conclusion. The results showed that the mineral and organic matrices of enamel structure were affected by laser irradiation; therefore, it might be a suitable method for caries prevention.

  17. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of the Au-pentacene interface: A combined experimental and theoretical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, D.; Guha, S.

    2013-07-01

    It has recently been shown [D. Adil and S. Guha, J. Phys. Chem. C 116, 12779 (2012)], 10.1021/jp3031804 that a large enhancement in the Raman intensity due to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is observed from pentacene when probed through the Au contact in organic field-effect transistors (OFET) structures. Here, the SERS spectrum is shown to exhibit a high sensitivity to disorder introduced in the pentacene film by Au atoms. The Raman signature of the metal-semiconductor interface in pentacene OFETs is calculated with density-functional theory by explicitly considering the Au-pentacene interaction. The observed enhancement in the 1380 cm-1 and the 1560 cm-1 regions of the experimental Raman spectrum of pentacene is successfully modeled by Au-pentacene complexes, giving insights into the nature of disorder in the pentacene sp2 network. Finally, we extend our previous work on high-operating voltage pentacene OFETs to low-operating voltage pentacene OFETs. No changes in the SERS spectra before and after subjecting the OFETs to a bias stress are observed, concurrent with no degradation in the threshold voltage. This shows that bias stress induced performance degradation is, in part, caused by field-induced structural changes in the pentacene molecule. Thus, we confirm that the SERS spectrum can be used as a visualization tool for correlating transport properties to structural changes, if any, in organic semiconductor based devices.

  18. Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopic study on the adsorption structures of acrylonitrile on Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Naoki; Akita, Masato; Hiramoto, Shuji; Itoh, Koichi

    1999-06-01

    Infrared reflection-absorption spectra in CN stretching, CH 2 out-of-plane wagging and CH 2 twisting vibration regions were measured for acrylonitrile (CH 2CHCN) exposed to Ag(111) and Ag(110) in increasing amounts at 77 K. The adsorbate on Ag(111) takes on a series of discrete adsorption states; i.e., an isolated state, associated states, and ordered and amorphous multilayer states. The adsorbate on Ag(110) at lower exposures is in a state with the CN group weakly coordinated to a silver atom (or silver atoms). The adsorbate on Ag(110) takes the associated state and the amorphous multilayer at larger exposures. On raising the temperature to 96 K, the amorphous states on both Ag(111) and Ag(110) are converted to the ordered multilayer. The desorption temperature of the ordered multilayer is below 99 K for Ag(110), while the temperature is above 107 K for Ag(111); the result indicates the effect of the surface morphology on the stability of the ordered state.

  19. Three-dimensional surface measurement based on the projected defocused pattern technique using imaging fiber optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Escamilla, Geliztle A.; Kobayashi, Fumio; Otani, Yukitoshi

    2017-05-01

    We present a three-dimensional surface measurement system using imaging fiber endoscope and the measurement is based on the focus technique in uniaxial configuration. The surface height variation of the sample is retrieved by taking into account the contrast modulation change obtained from a projected fringe pattern on the sample. The technique takes into account the defocus change of the fringe pattern due to the height variation of the sample and by a Gaussian fitting process the height reconstruction can be retrieved. A baseline signal procedure was implemented to remove back reflection light coming from the two fiber-surfaces (inlet and outlet) and also a Fourier transform filter was used to remove the pixelated appearance of the images. The depth range of the system is 1.1 mm and a lateral range of 2 mm by 2 mm. The novelties of the implementation are that the system uses the same imaging fiber as illumination and measurement and offers the advantage of the transportability to the measurement to a confined space having potential application on medical or industrial endoscopes systems. We demonstrate the technique by showing the surface profile of a measured object.

  20. Evaluation of Select Surface Processing Techniques for In Situ Application During the Additive Manufacturing Build Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Book, Todd A.; Sangid, Michael D.

    2016-07-01

    Although additive manufacturing offers numerous performance advantages for different applications, it is not being used for critical applications due to uncertainties in structural integrity as a result of innate process variability and defects. To minimize uncertainty, the current approach relies on the concurrent utilization of process monitoring, post-processing, and non-destructive inspection in addition to an extensive material qualification process. This paper examines an alternative approach by evaluating the application of select surface process techniques, to include sliding severe plastic deformation (SPD) and fine particle shot peening, on direct metal laser sintering-produced AlSi10Mg materials. Each surface processing technique is compared to baseline as-built and post-processed samples as a proof of concept for surface enhancement. Initial results pairing sliding SPD with the manufacture's recommended thermal stress relief cycle demonstrated uniform recrystallization of the microstructure, resulting in a more homogeneous distribution of strain among the microstructure than as-built or post-processed conditions. This result demonstrates the potential for the in situ application of various surface processing techniques during the layerwise direct metal laser sintering build process.

  1. On-Line Life Monitoring Technique for Tube Bundles of Boiler High-Temperature Heating Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Dong; Wang Zhongyuan

    2005-01-01

    High-temperature heating surface such as superheater and reheater of large-sized utility boiler all experiences a relatively severe working conditions. The failure of boiler tubes will directly impact the safe and economic operation of boiler. An on-line life monitoring model of high-temperature heating surface was set up according to the well-known L-M formula of the creep damages. The tube wall metal temperature and working stress was measured by on-line monitoring, and with this model, the real-time calculation of the life expenditure of the heating surface tube bundles were realized. Based on the technique the on-line life monitoring and management system of high-temperature heating surface was developed for a 300 MW utility boiler. An effective device was thus suggested for the implementation of the safe operation and the condition-based maintenance of utility boilers.

  2. Comparison of two different plasma surface-modification techniques for the covalent immobilization of protein monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Anna; Borrós, Salvador

    2013-06-04

    The immobilization of biologically active species is crucial for the fabrication of smart bioactive surfaces. For this purpose, plasma polymerization is frequently used to modify the surface nature without affecting the bulk properties of the material. Thus, it is possible to create materials with surface functional groups that can promote the anchoring of all kinds of biomolecules. Different methodologies in protein immobilization have been developed in recent years, although some drawbacks are still not solved, such as the difficulties that some procedures involve and/or the denaturalization of the protein due to the immobilization process. In this work, two different strategies to covalently attach bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein are developed. Both techniques are compared in order to understand how the nature of the surface modification affects the conformation of the protein upon immobilization.

  3. Surface nanobubbles studied by atomic force microscopy techniques: Facts, fiction, and open questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönherr, Holger; Hain, Nicole; Walczyk, Wiktoria; Wesner, Daniel; Druzhinin, Sergey I.

    2016-08-01

    In this review surface nanobubbles, which are presumably gas-filled enclosures found at the solid-liquid interface, are introduced and discussed together with key experimental findings that suggest that these nanoscale features indeed exist and are filled with gas. The most prominent technique used thus far has been atomic force microscopy (AFM). However, due to its potentially invasive nature, AFM data must be interpreted with great care. Owing to their curved interface, the Laplace internal pressure of surface nanobubbles exceeds substantially the outside ambient pressure, and the experimentally observed long term stability is in conflict with estimates of gas transport rates and predicted surface nanobubble lifetimes. Despite recent explanations of both the stability and the unusual nanoscopic contact angles, the development of new co-localization approaches and the adequate analysis of AFM data of surface nanobubbles are important as a means to confirm the gaseous nature and correctly estimate the interfacial curvature.

  4. On the protonation of oxo- and hydroxo-groups of the goethite (α-FeOOH) surface: A FTIR spectroscopic investigation of surface O H stretching vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boily, Jean-François; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2008-07-01

    The O-H stretching region of goethite particles evaporated at different levels of acidity was investigated by Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR)-Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy. Two-dimensional IR Correlation Spectroscopy was used to identify correlations between different sets of discrete surface OH stretches and a Multivariate Curve Resolution analysis was used to resolve the predominant spectral components. Two dominant groups of hydroxyls were identified on the basis of their differences in proton affinity. Group I hydroxyls appear as two 3698/3541 and 3660/3490 cm -1 band pairs. Group II hydroxyls are manifested through the 3648 and 3578 cm -1 bands at greater levels of surface proton loading. There is consequently no correlation between O-H stretching frequencies and proton affinity. Groups I and II were assigned to mostly singly- (-OH) and doubly- (μ-OH) coordinated hydroxyls, respectively. Stretches arising from triply-coordinated (μ 3-OH) are proposed to be embedded within the dominant O-H band of bulk goethite. The possibility that these sites contribute to Group I and II hydroxyls should, however, not be entirely dismissed without further investigations. A reexamination of Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD)-FTIR data of one goethite sample evaporated from alkaline conditions [Boily J.-F., Szanyi J., Felmy A. R. (2006) A combined FTIR and TPD study on the bulk and surface dehydroxylation and decarbonation of synthetic goethite. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta70, 3613-3624] provided further constraints to this band assignment by providing clues to the network of surface hydrogen bonds. Important cooperative effects between hydrogen-bonded surface hydroxyls are suggested to play a crucial role on the variations of the position and intensity of discrete O-H stretching bands as a function of protonation level and temperature.

  5. On the protonation of oxo- and hydroxo- groups of the goethite (α-FeOOH) surface: A FTIR spectroscopic investigation of surface O-H stretching vibrations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boily, Jean F; Felmy, Andrew R

    2008-06-01

    The O–H stretching region of goethite particles evaporated at different levels of acidity was investigated by Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR)-Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy. Two-dimensional IR Correlation Spectroscopy was used to identify correlations between different sets of discrete surface OH stretches and a Multivariate Curve Resolution analysis was used to resolve the predominant spectral components. Two dominant groups of hydroxyls were identified on the basis of their differences in proton affinity. Group I hydroxyls appear as two 3698/3541 and 3660/3490 cm-1 band pairs. Group II hydroxyls are manifested through the 3648 and 3578 cm-1 bands at greater levels of surface proton loading. There is consequently no correlation between O–H stretching frequencies and proton affinity. Groups I and II were assigned to mostly singly- (–OH) and doubly- (μ-OH) coordinated hydroxyls, respectively. Stretches arising from triply-coordinated (μ3-OH) are proposed to be embedded within the dominant O–H band of bulk goethite. The possibility that these sites contribute to Group I and II hydroxyls should, however, not be entirely dismissed without further investigations. A reexamination of Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD)-FTIR data of one goethite sample evaporated from alkaline conditions [Boily J.-F., Szanyi J., Felmy A. R. (2006) A combined FTIR and TPD study on the bulk and surface dehydroxylation and decarbonation of synthetic goethite. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta70, 3613–3624] provided further constraints to this band assignment by providing clues to the network of surface hydrogen bonds. Important cooperative effects between hydrogen-bonded surface hydroxyls are suggested to play a crucial role on the variations of the position and intensity of discrete O–H stretching bands as a function of protonation level and temperature.

  6. Effect of polishing techniques and time on surface roughness, hardness and microleakage of resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Daniela; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Camacho, Guilherme Brião; Powers, John M

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of immediate and delayed polishing on the surface roughness, microhardness and microleakage of a microfilled (Filtek A110) and a hybrid (Filtek Z250) resin composite. Standardized preparations were made on the buccal surfaces of 256 bovine teeth; half were restored with each composite (128 teeth per composite). Immediately after curing, gross finishing was carried out with #280 sandpaper. The specimens restored with each composite were divided into two subgroups. The first group (IM) was polished immediately after gross finishing, using three different systems (n=16): Sequence A, Sof-Lex; Sequence B, Flexicups and Sequence C, Flexicups + Jiffy Polishing Brush + Flexibuffs. The specimens were then stored for three weeks in saline 37 degrees C. The second group (DE) was stored for two weeks, then polished with the same systems and stored for one additional week. The controls (n=16) were analyzed without polishing. Five readings per specimen were taken for surface roughness and hardness. After immersion in basic fuchsin, microleakage was evaluated (40x) using standardized scores. The data were analyzed at a significance level of 0.05, with analysis of variance and an SNK test (surface roughness and microhardness) or with Kruskal-Wallis (microleakage). In both composites, only for the sequential technique was there an influence of delay in polishing on roughness (Ra). Flexicups exhibited the highest Ra of the three systems. The IM and Filtek Z-250 groups showed higher hardness than the DE and Filtek A-110 groups, respectively. Dentin margins showed more leakage than enamel margins; the sequential technique produced more leakage than the other techniques in dentin (pcomposite, time and polishing technique--had a significant influence on surface roughness, hardness and microleakage. Generally, immediate polishing produced no detrimental effect compared to delayed polishing.

  7. Bacterial Adhesion and Surface Roughness for Different Clinical Techniques for Acrylic Polymethyl Methacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Costa de Medeiros Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the effect of different surface finishing and polishing protocols on the surface roughness and bacterial adhesion (S. sanguinis to polymethyl methacrylates (PMMA. Fifty specimens were divided into 5 groups (n=10 according to their fabrication method and surface finishing protocol: LP (3 : 1 ratio and laboratory polishing, NF (Nealon technique and finishing, NP (Nealon technique and manual polishing, MF (3 : 1 ratio and manual finishing, and MP (3 : 1 ratio and manual polishing. For each group, five specimens were submitted to bacterial adhesion tests and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Two additional specimens were subjected to surface topography analysis by SEM and the remaining three specimens were subjected to surface roughness measurements. Data were compared by one-way ANOVA. The mean bacterial counts were as follows: NF, 19.6±3.05; MP, 5.36±2.08; NP, 4.96±1.93; MF, 7.36±2.45; and LP, 1.56±0.62 (CFU. The mean surface roughness values were as follows: NF, 3.23±0.15; MP, 0.52±0.05; NP, 0.60±0.08; MF, 2.69±0.12; and LP, 0.07±0.02 (μm. A reduction in the surface roughness was observed to be directly related to a decrease in bacterial adhesion. It was verified that the laboratory processing of PMMA might decrease the surface roughness and consequently the adhesion of S. sanguinis to this material.

  8. Bacterial Adhesion and Surface Roughness for Different Clinical Techniques for Acrylic Polymethyl Methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Lucas Costa de Medeiros; da Silva-Neto, João Paulo; Dantas, Talita Souza; Naves, Lucas Zago; das Neves, Flávio Domingues; da Mota, Adérito Soares

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to assess the effect of different surface finishing and polishing protocols on the surface roughness and bacterial adhesion (S. sanguinis) to polymethyl methacrylates (PMMA). Fifty specimens were divided into 5 groups (n = 10) according to their fabrication method and surface finishing protocol: LP (3 : 1 ratio and laboratory polishing), NF (Nealon technique and finishing), NP (Nealon technique and manual polishing), MF (3 : 1 ratio and manual finishing), and MP (3 : 1 ratio and manual polishing). For each group, five specimens were submitted to bacterial adhesion tests and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two additional specimens were subjected to surface topography analysis by SEM and the remaining three specimens were subjected to surface roughness measurements. Data were compared by one-way ANOVA. The mean bacterial counts were as follows: NF, 19.6 ± 3.05; MP, 5.36 ± 2.08; NP, 4.96 ± 1.93; MF, 7.36 ± 2.45; and LP, 1.56 ± 0.62 (CFU). The mean surface roughness values were as follows: NF, 3.23 ± 0.15; MP, 0.52 ± 0.05; NP, 0.60 ± 0.08; MF, 2.69 ± 0.12; and LP, 0.07 ± 0.02 (μm). A reduction in the surface roughness was observed to be directly related to a decrease in bacterial adhesion. It was verified that the laboratory processing of PMMA might decrease the surface roughness and consequently the adhesion of S. sanguinis to this material.

  9. A wafer mapping technique for residual stress in surface micromachined films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavone, G.; Murray, J.; Smith, S.; Desmulliez, M. P. Y.; Mount, A. R.; Walton, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    The design of MEMS devices employing movable structures is crucially dependant on the mechanical behaviour of the deposited materials. It is therefore important to be able to fully characterize the micromachined films and predict with confidence the mechanical properties of patterned structures. This paper presents a characterization technique that enables the residual stress in MEMS films to be mapped at the wafer level by using microstructures released by surface micromachining. These dedicated MEMS test structures and the associated measurement techniques are used to extract localized information on the strain and Young’s modulus of the film under investigation. The residual stress is then determined by numerically coupling this data with a finite element analysis of the structure. This paper illustrates the measurement routine and demonstrates it with a case study using electrochemically deposited alloys of nickel and iron, particularly prone to develop high levels of residual stress. The results show that the technique enables wafer mapping of film non-uniformities and identifies wafer-to-wafer differences. A comparison between the results obtained from the mapping technique and conventional wafer bow measurements highlights the benefits of using a procedure tailored to films that are non-uniform, patterned and surface-micromachined, as opposed to simple standard stress extraction methods. The presented technique reveals detailed information that is generally unexplored when using conventional stress extraction methods such as wafer bow measurements.

  10. A pH dependent Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of citrazinic acid aided by theoretical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sougata; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Dutta, Soumen; Pal, Tarasankar

    2016-12-01

    A pH dependent normal Raman scattering (NRS) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectral patterns of citrazinic acid (CZA), a biologically important molecule, have been investigated. The acid, with different pKa values (~ 4 and ~ 11) for the two different functional groups (-COOH and -OH groups), shows interesting range of color changes (yellow at pH ~ 14 and brown at pH ~ 2) with the variation in solution pH. Thus, depending upon the pH of the medium, CZA molecule can exist in various protonated and/or deprotonated forms. Here we have prescribed the existence different possible forms of CZA at different pH (Forms "C", "H" and "Dprot" at pH ~ 14 and Forms "A", "D", and "P" at pH ~ 2 respectively). The NRS spectra of these solutions and their respective SERS spectra over gold nanoparticles were recorded. The spectra clearly differ in their spectral profiles. For example the SERS spectra recorded with the CZA solution at pH ~ 2 shows blue shift for different bands compared to its NRS window e.g. 406 to 450 cm- 1, 616 to 632 cm- 1, 1332 to 1343 cm- 1 etc. Again, the most enhanced peak at ~ 1548 cm- 1 in NRS while in the SERS window this appears at ~ 1580 cm- 1. Similar observation was also made for CZA at pH ~ 14. For example, the 423 cm- 1 band in the NRS profile experience a blue shift and appears at ~ 447 cm- 1 in the SERS spectrum as well as other bands at ~ 850, ~ 1067 and ~ 1214 cm- 1 in the SERS window are markedly enhanced. It is also worth noting that the SERS spectra at the different pH also differ from each other. These spectral differences indicate the existence of various adsorptive forms of the CZA molecule depending upon the pH of the solution. Therefore based on the experimental findings we propose different possible molecular forms of CZA at different pH (acidic and alkaline) conditions. For example forms 'A', 'D' and 'P' existing in acidic pH (pH ~ 2) and three other deprotonated forms 'C', 'H' and 'Dprot' in alkaline pH (pH ~ 14). The DFT

  11. Residual strain evaluation of curved surface by grating-transferring technique and GPA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates an advanced grating-transferring technique combined with geometric phase analysis (GPA) for residual strain evaluation of curved surface.A standard holographic grating is first transferred to a pre-produced epoxy resin film and then consolidated to a test region of curved surface.With a rubber mold and silicone rubber the deformed grating is replicated to a sheet metal after hole-drilling for release of residual stress.After that the grating is transferred from the sheet metal to the...

  12. Accuracy of Implant Position Transfer and Surface Detail Reproduction with Different Impression Materials and Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Marzieh Alikhasi; Hakimeh Siadat; Elaheh Beyabanaki; Mohammad Javad Kharazifard

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of implant position transfer and surface detail reproduction using two impression techniques and materials.Materials and Methods: A metal model with two implants and three grooves of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 mm in depth on the flat superior surface of a die was fabricated. Ten regular-body polyether (PE) and 10 regular-body polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions with square and conical transfer copings using open tray and closed tray ...

  13. Preparation of quercetin imprinted core-shell organosilicate microspheres using surface imprinting technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Yang; Wen Dan Hou; Hong Deng Qiu; Xia Liu; Sheng Xiang Jiang

    2012-01-01

    In this work,the quercetin imprinted core-shell microspheres were prepared using silica surface imprinting technique.A simple sol-gel procedure was used for the synthesis of the imprinted materials with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane as functional monomer and tetraethyl orthosilicate as crosslinker.The SEM images indicated that the MIPs shell was successfully grafted onto the silica surface.The characteristics of the molecularly imprinted polymers such as capacity,selectivity and absorption dynamic were investigated by rebinding experiments.The results showed that the prepared MIPs had good imprinting effect and adsorption amount of quercetin.

  14. TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINATION OF SURFACE FRACTAL DIMENSION AND MORPHOLOGY OF MESOPOROUS TITANIA USING DYNAMIC FLOW ADSORPTION AND ITS CHARACTERIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Tursiloadi, Silvester

    2010-01-01

    A technique to determine the surface fractal dimension of mesoporous TiO­2 using a dynamic flow adsorption instrument is described. Fractal dimension is an additional technique to characterize surface morphology. Surface fractal dimension, a quantitative measurement of surface ruggedness, can be determined by adsorbing a homologous series of adsorbates onto an adsorbent sample of mesoporous TiO­2. Titania wet gel prepared by hydrolysis of Ti-alkoxide was immersed in the flow of supercritical ...

  15. MaterialVis: material visualization tool using direct volume and surface rendering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyan, Erhan; Güdükbay, Uğur; Bulutay, Ceyhun; Heinig, Karl-Heinz

    2014-05-01

    Visualization of the materials is an indispensable part of their structural analysis. We developed a visualization tool for amorphous as well as crystalline structures, called MaterialVis. Unlike the existing tools, MaterialVis represents material structures as a volume and a surface manifold, in addition to plain atomic coordinates. Both amorphous and crystalline structures exhibit topological features as well as various defects. MaterialVis provides a wide range of functionality to visualize such topological structures and crystal defects interactively. Direct volume rendering techniques are used to visualize the volumetric features of materials, such as crystal defects, which are responsible for the distinct fingerprints of a specific sample. In addition, the tool provides surface visualization to extract hidden topological features within the material. Together with the rich set of parameters and options to control the visualization, MaterialVis allows users to visualize various aspects of materials very efficiently as generated by modern analytical techniques such as the Atom Probe Tomography.

  16. A technique to decrease surface roughness in overlapping laser shock peening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Fengze; Zhou, Jianzhong; Lu, Jinzhong; Luo, Xinmin

    2016-05-01

    A technique called elastic contact laser shock peening (ECLSP) is presented in this paper. In this technique, a metal foil with high dynamic yield strength is fixed between absorbing layer and workpiece, and the peak pressure of laser shock wave is a little less than the dynamic yield strength of metal foil, but higher than the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) of work piece. Surface roughness, microhardness and residual stress are investigated. Compared with regular laser shock peening (LSP), ECLSP can reduce the depth and area of secondary plastic deformation of overlapping region. This can effectively reduce surface roughness in overlapping LSP. Measurement of microhardness and residual stress shows that the work hardening effects and strengthening effect are similar as regular LSP.

  17. A Controlled Field Pilot for Testing Near Surface CO2 Detection Techniques and Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, L. H.; Dobeck, L.

    2007-12-01

    A field facility has been developed to allow controlled studies of near surface CO2transport and detection technologies. The key component of the facility is a shallow horizontal, well slotted over 70m of its length and divided into seven zones via packers with mass flow control in each individual zone. The scale and fluxes were designed to address large scale CO2 storage projects and desired retention rates for those projects and those design parameters will be discussed. A wide variety of detection techniques were deployed by collaborators from Los Alamos National Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, the National Energy Technology Lab, Pacific Northwest National Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab and West Virginia University. Techniques included eddy covariance, soil gas measurements, hyperspectral imaging for plant stress detection, differential absorption LIDAR (both free space atmospheric and below surface soil gas), tracer studies, water sampling, stable isotope studies, and soil flux chambers. An overview of these results will be presented.

  18. A New Technique for the Retrieval of Near Surface Water Vapor Using DIAL Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Syed; Kooi, Susan; Ferrare, Richard; Winker, David; Hair, Johnathan; Nehrir, Amin; Notari, Anthony; Hostetler, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the most important atmospheric trace gas species and influences radiation, climate, cloud formation, surface evaporation, precipitation, storm development, transport, dynamics, and chemistry. For improvements in NWP (numerical weather prediction) and climate studies, global water vapor measurements with higher accuracy and vertical resolution are needed than are currently available. Current satellite sensors are challenged to characterize the content and distribution of water vapor in the Boundary Layer (BL) and particularly near the first few hundred meters above the surface within the BL. These measurements are critically needed to infer surface evaporation rates in cloud formation and climate studies. The NASA Langley Research Center Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system, which uses the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, has demonstrated the capability to provide high quality water vapor measurements in the BL and across the troposphere. A new retrieval technique is investigated to extend these DIAL water vapor measurements to the surface. This method uses signals from both atmospheric backscattering and the strong surface returns (even over low reflectivity oceanic surfaces) using multiple gain channels to cover the large signal dynamic range. Measurements can be made between broken clouds and in presence of optically thin cirrus. Examples of LASE measurements from a variety of conditions encountered during NASA hurricane field experiments over the Atlantic Ocean are presented. Comparisons of retrieved water vapor profiles from LASE near the surface with dropsonde measurements show very good agreement. This presentation also includes a discussion of the feasibility of developing space-based DIAL capability for high resolution water vapor measurements in the BL and above and an assessment of the technology needed for developing this capability.

  19. Survey of Techniques for Deep Web Source Selection and Surfacing the Hidden Web Content

    OpenAIRE

    Khushboo Khurana; M.B. Chandak

    2016-01-01

    Large and continuously growing dynamic web content has created new opportunities for large-scale data analysis in the recent years. There is huge amount of information that the traditional web crawlers cannot access, since they use link analysis technique by which only the surface web can be accessed. Traditional search engine crawlers require the web pages to be linked to other pages via hyperlinks causing large amount of web data to be hidden from the crawlers. Enormous data is available in...

  20. Different imaging techniques for investigation of treatment effects on various substrate surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Chmela, O.

    2015-01-01

    The different imaging techniques were used for measurement of the properties changes on substrate surfaces. In this paper we report about testing various treatment on different substrates following investigation and characterization of the advantages/disadvantages of these methods for future applications. We usually used flexible materials such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and poly-carbonate (PC) for treatment. We also used glass substrate and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) to determine the ...

  1. Variation of surface water spectral response as a function of in situ sampling technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bruce A.; Hodgson, Michael E.

    1988-01-01

    Tests were carried out to determine the spectral variation contributed by a particular sampling technique. A portable radiometer was used to measure the surface water spectral response. Variation due to the reflectance of objects near the radiometer (i.e., the boat side) during data acquisition was studied. Consideration was also given to the variation due to the temporal nature of the phenomena (i.e., wave activity).

  2. Techniques for fingerprint recovery on vegetable and fruit surfaces used in Slovenia--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapecar, Matej; Vinkovic, Mojca Kern

    2008-12-01

    An examination was conducted to investigate whether certain dactyloscopic powders and reagents can recover latent fingerprints on vegetable and fruit surfaces (apple, banana, tomato and potato). Two fingerprint powders, Swedish Soot powder mixture (Swedish Black), Silver Special powder and cyanoacrylate fuming (CA), were investigated. The results have shown that detection with Swedish blackpowder is the most suitable procedure as the percentage finger marks which were of adequate quality for further examination, was higher than with any other technique examined.

  3. Survey of Techniques for Deep Web Source Selection and Surfacing the Hidden Web Content

    OpenAIRE

    Khushboo Khurana; M B Chandak

    2016-01-01

    Large and continuously growing dynamic web content has created new opportunities for large-scale data analysis in the recent years. There is huge amount of information that the traditional web crawlers cannot access, since they use link analysis technique by which only the surface web can be accessed. Traditional search engine crawlers require the web pages to be linked to other pages via hyperlinks causing large amount of web data to be hidden from the crawlers. Enormous data is available in...

  4. Surface plasmon effect in nanocrystalline copper/DLC composite films by electrodeposition technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Hussain; A K Pal

    2006-11-01

    Composite films of nanocrystalline copper embedded in DLC matrix prepared by electrodeposition technique were studied for their optical properties. Particle size and metal volume fractions were tailored by varying the amount of copper containing salt in the electrolyte. Blue-shift of the surface plasmon resonance peak in the absorbance spectra of the films was observed with the reduction in size and volume fraction of metal particles. Mie theory was found to describe the experimental spectra quite well.

  5. Phase-ratio technique as applied to the assessment of lunar surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaydash, Vadym; Videen, Gorden; Shkuratov, Yuriy

    Regoliths of atmosphereless celestial bodies demonstrate prominent light backscattering that is common for particulate surfaces. This occurs over a wide range of phase angles and can be seen in the phase function [1]. The slope of the function may characterize the complexity of planetary surface structure. Imagery of such a parameter suggests that information can be obtained about the surface, like variations of unresolved surface roughness and microtopography [2]. Phase-ratio imagery allows one to characterize the phase function slope. This imagery requires the ratio of two co-registered images acquired at different phase angles. One important advantage of the procedure is that the inherent albedo variations of the surface are suppressed, and, therefore, the resulting image is sensitive to the surface structure variation [2,3]. The phase-ratio image characterizes surface roughness variation at spatial scales on the order of the incident wavelengths to that of the image resolution. Applying the phase-ratio technique to ground-based telescope data has allowed us to find new lunar surface formations in the southern part of Oceanus Procellarum. These are suggested to be weak swirls [4]. We also combined the phase-ratio technique with the space-derived photometry data acquired from the NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter with high spatial resolution. Thus we exploited the method to analyze the sites of Apollo landings and Soviet sample-return missions. Phase-ratio imagery has revealed anomalies of the phase-curve slope indicating a smoothing of the surface microstructure at the sites caused by dust uplifted by the engine jets of the descent and ascent modules [5,6]. Analysis of phase-ratios helps to understand how the regolith properties have been affected by robotic and human activity on the Moon [7,8]. We have demonstrated the use of the method to search for fresh natural disturbances of surface structure, e.g., to detect areas of fresh slumps, accumulated material on

  6. Survey of Techniques for Deep Web Source Selection and Surfacing the Hidden Web Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushboo Khurana

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Large and continuously growing dynamic web content has created new opportunities for large-scale data analysis in the recent years. There is huge amount of information that the traditional web crawlers cannot access, since they use link analysis technique by which only the surface web can be accessed. Traditional search engine crawlers require the web pages to be linked to other pages via hyperlinks causing large amount of web data to be hidden from the crawlers. Enormous data is available in deep web that can be useful to gain new insight for various domains, creating need to access the information from the deep web by developing efficient techniques. As the amount of Web content grows rapidly, the types of data sources are proliferating, which often provide heterogeneous data. So we need to select Deep Web Data sources that can be used by the integration systems. The paper discusses various techniques that can be used to surface the deep web information and techniques for Deep Web Source Selection.

  7. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic Studies in Flotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been extensively employed in flotation research.The work done by the author and co-workers has been reported.A comparison has been made among the different FTIR spectroscopic techniques,e.g.,transmission FTIR spectroscopy,diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy,and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) FTIR spectroscopy.FTIR spectroscopy has been used to study the mechanism of interaction between the collector and the surfaces of different minerals,the mechanism of action of the depressant in improving the selectivity of flotation,and the mechanism of adsorption of the polymeric modifying reagent on mineral surfaces.The interaction between particles in mineral suspension has also been studied by FTIR spectroscopy.

  8. Laser surface annealing technique of aged Inconel 718 by laser beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liufa; Hirose, Akio; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.

    2003-03-01

    Laser was employed to anneal a thin surface layer of aged Inconel 718 by dissolving the strengthening phase, γ". The HE (Hydrogen Embrittlement) resistance of the alloy was improved via such laser surface annealing (LSA) processes. To establish a general LSA technique for engineer applications, experimental LSA processes were conducted to study the effects of the laser process parameters on the formation of the annealed surface layers, and applicable process parameter ranges were obtained. Next, a numerical method was developed for predicting the formation of the laser annealed surface layers in the following steps. Because only the γ" phase was dissolved in the LSA process, the dissolution kinetics of this phase was studied via thermal cycling experiments, and it was proved to follow an Avrami equation. FEM (Finite Element Method) simulations were conducted to calculate the thermal distribution in each laser annealed surface layer, and thermal history data were extracted every certain depth. The volume fractions of the γ" phase at these depths were calculated using these thermal history data based on the deduced Avrami equation. Using a developed relationship between the hardness variation of the alloy and the volume fraction variation of the γ" phase, the hardness distribution in the annealed surface layer and this layer's thickness were calculated. The predicted applicable laser process parameter ranges were obtained. These calculated results were compared with their corresponding experimental results. The good agreements between the calculated and measured results suggested that this numerical prediction approach is feasible for engineer applications.

  9. Multiscale analysis of replication technique efficiency for 3D roughness characterization of manufactured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivet, S.; Mezghani, S.; El Mansori, M.

    2016-09-01

    The replication of topography has been generally restricted to optimizing material processing technologies in terms of statistical and single-scale features such as roughness. By contrast, manufactured surface topography is highly complex, irregular, and multiscale. In this work, we have demonstrated the use of multiscale analysis on replicates of surface finish to assess the precise control of the finished replica. Five commercial resins used for surface replication were compared. The topography of five standard surfaces representative of common finishing processes were acquired both directly and by a replication technique. Then, they were characterized using the ISO 25178 standard and multiscale decomposition based on a continuous wavelet transform, to compare the roughness transfer quality at different scales. Additionally, atomic force microscope force modulation mode was used in order to compare the resins’ stiffness properties. The results showed that less stiff resins are able to replicate the surface finish along a larger wavelength band. The method was then tested for non-destructive quality control of automotive gear tooth surfaces.

  10. Impedance spectroscopy studies of surface engineered TiO2 nanoparticles using slurry technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sasidhar Siddabattuni; Sri Harsha Akella; Abilash Gangula; Sandeep Patnaik

    2015-09-01

    Dielectric analysis of nanometre range size ceramic particles like TiO2 is very important in the understanding of the performance and design of their polymer nanocomposites for energy storage and other applications. In recent times, impedance spectroscopy is shown to be a very powerful tool to investigate the dielectric characteristics of not only sintered and/or pelleted ceramic materials but also particulates/powders (both micron-sized and nano-sized) using the slurry technique. In the present work, impedance spectroscopy employing slurry methodology was extended to study the influence of various chemical groups on the nano-TiO2 surface on the electrical resistivity and the dielectric permittivity of nanoparticles. In this regard, different organophosphate ligands with linear, aromatic and extended aromatic nature of organic groups were employed to remediate the surface effects of nanoTiO2. It was observed that the type of chemical nature of surface engineered nanoparticles’ surface played significant role in controlling the surface electrical resistivity of nanoparticles. Surface passivated nanoTiO2 yielded dielectric permittivity of about 70–80, respectively.

  11. Rapid Detection of Melamine in Tap Water and Milk Using Conjugated "One-Step" Molecularly Imprinted Polymers-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopic Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaxi; Lu, Xiaonan

    2016-05-01

    An innovative "one-step" sensor conjugating molecularly imprinted polymers and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic-active substrate (MIPs-SERS) was investigated for simultaneous extraction and determination of melamine in tap water and milk. This sensor was fabricated by integrating silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with MIPs synthesized by bulk polymerization of melamine (template), methacrylic acid (functional monomer), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (cross-linking agent), and 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (initiator). Static and kinetic adsorption tests validated the specific affinity of MIPs-AgNPs to melamine and the rapid adsorption equilibration rate. Principal component analysis segregated SERS spectral features of tap water and milk samples with different melamine concentrations. Partial least squares regression models correlated melamine concentrations in tap water and skim milk with SERS spectral features. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of melamine in tap water were determined as 0.0019 and 0.0064 mmol/L, while the LOD and LOQ were 0.0165 and 0.055 mmol/L for the determination of melamine in skim milk. However, this sensor is not ideal to quantify melamine in tap water and skim milk. By conjugating MIPs with SERS-active substrate (that is, AgNPs), reproducibility of SERS spectral features was increased, resulting in more accurate detection. The time required to determine melamine in tap water and milk were 6 and 25 min, respectively. The low LOD, LOQ, and rapid detection confirm the potential of applying this sensor for accurate and high-throughput detection of melamine in tap water and milk.

  12. Acid-base titrations of functional groups on the surface of the thermophilic bacterium Anoxybacillus flavithermus: comparing a chemical equilibrium model with ATR-IR spectroscopic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Hannah T M; Bremer, Phil J; Daughney, Christopher J; McQuillan, A James

    2007-02-27

    Acid-base functional groups at the surface of Anoxybacillus flavithermus (AF) were assigned from the modeling of batch titration data of bacterial suspensions and compared with those determined from in situ infrared spectroscopic titration analysis. The computer program FITMOD was used to generate a two-site Donnan model (site 1: pKa = 3.26, wet concn = 2.46 x 10(-4) mol g(-1); site 2: pKa = 6.12, wet concn = 6.55 x 10(-5) mol g(-1)), which was able to describe data for whole exponential phase cells from both batch acid-base titrations at 0.01 M ionic strength and electrophoretic mobility measurements over a range of different pH values and ionic strengths. In agreement with information on the composition of bacterial cell walls and a considerable body of modeling literature, site 1 of the model was assigned to carboxyl groups, and site 2 was assigned to amino groups. pH difference IR spectra acquired by in situ attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the presence of carboxyl groups. The spectra appear to show a carboxyl pKa in the 3.3-4.0 range. Further peaks were assigned to phosphodiester groups, which deprotonated at slightly lower pH. The presence of amino groups could not be confirmed or discounted by IR spectroscopy, but a positively charged group corresponding to site 2 was implicated by electrophoretic mobility data. Carboxyl group speciation over a pH range of 2.3-10.3 at two different ionic strengths was further compared to modeling predictions. While model predictions were strongly influenced by the ionic strength change, pH difference IR data showed no significant change. This meant that modeling predictions agreed reasonably well with the IR data for 0.5 M ionic strength but not for 0.01 M ionic strength.

  13. In vitro study of microleakage of different techniques of surface preparation used in pits and fissures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Javadi Nejad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different techniques of surface preparation on the microleakage of a sealant applied with traditional acid etching and self-etched bonding agent. Study Design : A total of 60 extracted third molars were randomly assigned into six groups (n = 10/each. The occlusal surfaces were sealed with a sealant (Clinpro after one of the following pretreatments: (1 phosphoric acid etching; (2 Prompt L-Pop; (3 laser + etching; (4 laser + Prompt L-Pop; (5 air abrasion + etching; (6 air abrasion + Prompt L-Pop. The specimens were immersed in a 0.5% basic fuchsin solution. Buccolingual cuts parallel to the long axis of the tooth were made. The surfaces were scored 0--2 for extent of microleakage using a microscope and the data were analyzed statistically. Results : The poorest results were obtained with laser + Prompt L-Pop which showed a greater number of specimens with microleakage (80%. Air abrasion surface preparation + phosphoric acid etching showed less microleakage than the other groups (40%. Kruskal--Wallis and t-tests revealed no significant difference in microleakage between six groups. Conclusion : The self-etching adhesive studied seems an attractive alternative to the acid-etch technique for sealant application in young children where simplifications in the clinical procedure are warranted. No significant difference was noted between the different types of enamel preparation before fissure sealant.

  14. Cell-material interactions revealed via material techniques of surface patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiang; Peng, Rong; Ding, Jiandong

    2013-10-04

    Cell-material interactions constitute a key fundamental topic in biomaterials study. Various cell cues and matrix cues as well as soluble factors regulate cell behaviors on materials. These factors are coupled with each other as usual, and thus it is very difficult to unambiguously elucidate the role of each regulator. The recently developed material techniques of surface patterning afford unique ways to reveal the underlying science. This paper reviews the pertinent material techniques to fabricate patterns of microscale and nanoscale resolutions, and corresponding cell studies. Some issues are emphasized, such as cell localization on patterned surfaces of chemical contrast, and effects of cell shape, cell size, cell-cell contact, and seeding density on differentiation of stem cells. Material cues to regulate cell adhesion, cell differentiation and other cell events are further summed up. Effects of some physical properties, such as surface topography and matrix stiffness, on cell behaviors are also discussed; nanoscaled features of substrate surfaces to regulate cell fate are summarized as well. The pertinent work sheds new insight into the cell-material interactions, and is stimulating for biomaterial design in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and high-throughput detection, diagnosis, and drug screening. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Pursing Contamination Detection on Aircraft CFRP Surfaces By Artificial Olfaction Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito, Saverio; Massera, Ettore; Fattoruso, Grazia; Miglietta, Maria Lucia; Di Francia, Girolamo

    2011-09-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) structures can be easily bonded via adhesive assembly procedures but their cleanliness is of fundamental importance to ensure the strength of the adhesive bonding. Actually, surface contamination by several aeronautics fluids eventually results in weak or kissing bonds. The goal of our research work is to investigate solid state chemical sensors and artificial olfaction techniques (AO) for the detection of CFRP surface contamination by aeronautic fluids. This result will allow the implementation of an instrumental NDT procedure for CFRP surface cleanliness assessment prior to bonding. Herein, results of our first experimental setup, based on the use of an array of polymer sensors for the detection of aeronautic fluids contamination, are presented.

  16. Method for combining fast surface and exact volume visualization techniques in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Haubner, Michael; Foerterer, H. M.; Perzl, W.; Fink, B. K.; Fink, U.

    1994-05-01

    In order to enable the interaction with and manipulation of 3-D data sets in the realm of medical diagnosis and therapy planning we developed a modified Z-merging algorithm that includes transparency and texture mapping features. For this an extended shape based interpolation model creates isotropic grayscale data volume in case of spatial image sequences. Interesting anatomical regions such as soft tissue, organs, and bones are detected by automatic and interactive segmentation procedures. Following that, a fully automatic surface construction algorithm detects the 3-D object boundaries by fitting geometric primitives to the binary data. The surface representations support the user with a fast overview about the structure of the 3D scene. Texture mapping is implemented as the projection of the gray values of the isotropic voxels onto a polygonal surface. Adaptive refinement, Phong's normal interpolation, and transparency are the most important features of this raytracer. The described technique enables the simultaneous display of multimodal 3D image data.

  17. Testing photogrammetry-based techniques for three-dimensional surface documentation in forensic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanová, Petra; Hejna, Petr; Jurda, Mikoláš

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional surface technologies particularly close range photogrammetry and optical surface scanning have recently advanced into affordable, flexible and accurate techniques. Forensic postmortem investigation as performed on a daily basis, however, has not yet fully benefited from their potentials. In the present paper, we tested two approaches to 3D external body documentation - digital camera-based photogrammetry combined with commercial Agisoft PhotoScan(®) software and stereophotogrammetry-based Vectra H1(®), a portable handheld surface scanner. In order to conduct the study three human subjects were selected, a living person, a 25-year-old female, and two forensic cases admitted for postmortem examination at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic (both 63-year-old males), one dead to traumatic, self-inflicted, injuries (suicide by hanging), the other diagnosed with the heart failure. All three cases were photographed in 360° manner with a Nikon 7000 digital camera and simultaneously documented with the handheld scanner. In addition to having recorded the pre-autopsy phase of the forensic cases, both techniques were employed in various stages of autopsy. The sets of collected digital images (approximately 100 per case) were further processed to generate point clouds and 3D meshes. Final 3D models (a pair per individual) were counted for numbers of points and polygons, then assessed visually and compared quantitatively using ICP alignment algorithm and a cloud point comparison technique based on closest point to point distances. Both techniques were proven to be easy to handle and equally laborious. While collecting the images at autopsy took around 20min, the post-processing was much more time-demanding and required up to 10h of computation time. Moreover, for the full-body scanning the post-processing of the handheld scanner required rather time-consuming manual image alignment. In all instances the applied approaches

  18. Tracer techniques for the assessment of material migration and surface modification of plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, M., E-mail: rubel@kth.se [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Weckmann, A.; Ström, P.; Petersson, P.; Garcia-Carrasco, A. [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J.; Kreter, A.; Möller, S.; Wienhold, P. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Wauters, T. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Fortuna-Zaleśna, E. [Faculty of Materials Science, Warsaw University of Technology, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Tracer techniques were used in the TEXTOR tokamak to determine high-Z metal migration and the retention of species used for plasma edge cooling or wall cleaning under different operation conditions. • Volatile molybdenum hexa-fluoride, nitrogen-15 and oxygen-18 were used as markers in tokamak or ion cyclotron wall conditioning discharges (ICWC). • The objective was to obtain qualitative and quantitative of a global and local deposition pattern and material mixing effects. • The deposition and retention was studied on plasma-facing components, collector probes and test limiters. • Optical spectroscopy and ex-situ analysis techniques were used to determine the plasma response to tracer injection and surface composition modification. - Abstract: Tracer techniques were used in the TEXTOR tokamak to determine high-Z metal migration and the deposition of species used for plasma edge cooling or wall conditioning under different types of operation conditions. Volatile molybdenum hexa-fluoride, nitrogen-15 and oxygen-18 were used as markers in tokamak or ion cyclotron wall conditioning discharges (ICWC). The objective was to obtain qualitative and quantitative of a global and local deposition pattern and material mixing effects. The deposition and retention was studied on plasma-facing components, collector probes and test limiters. Optical spectroscopy and ex-situ analysis techniques were used to determine the plasma response to tracer injection and the modification of surface composition. Molybdenum and light isotopes were detected on all types of limiters and short-term probes retrieved from the vessel showing that both helium and nitrogen are trapped following wall conditioning and edge cooling. Only small amounts below 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −2} of {sup 18}O were detected on surfaces treated by oxygen-assisted ICWC.

  19. Refractive index dispersion of swift heavy ion irradiated BFO thin films using Surface Plasmon Resonance technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Ayushi; Sharma, Savita; Tomar, Monika; Singh, Fouran; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-07-01

    Swift heavy ion irradiation (SHI) is an effective technique to induce defects for possible modifications in the material properties. There is growing interest in studying the optical properties of multiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films for optoelectronic applications. In the present work, BFO thin films were prepared by sol-gel spin coating technique and were irradiated using the 15 UD Pelletron accelerator with 100 MeV Au9+ ions at a fluence of 1 × 1012 ions cm-2. The as-grown films became rough and porous on ion irradiation. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique has been identified as a highly sensitive and powerful technique for studying the optical properties of a dielectric material. Optical properties of BFO thin films, before and after irradiation were studied using SPR technique in Otto configuration. Refractive index is found to be decreasing from 2.27 to 2.14 on ion irradiation at a wavelength of 633 nm. Refractive index dispersion of BFO thin film (from 405 nm to 633 nm) before and after ion radiation was examined.

  20. A constant compliance force modulation technique for scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging of polymer surface elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup, E.W.; Pungor, A/

    2012-01-01

    A new method of force modulation scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging based on a constant compliance feedback loop is presented. The feedback adjusts the loading force applied by the SFM tip to the surface in order to maintain a constant compliance beneath the tip. The new method, constant compliance force modulation (CCFM), has the advantage of being able to quantify the loading force exerted by the tip onto the sample surface and thus to estimate the elastic modulus of the material probed by the SFM tip. Once the elastic modulus of one region is known, the elastic moduli of other surface regions can be estimated from the spatial map of loading forces using the Hertz model of deformation. Force vs. displacement measurements made on one surface locality could also be used to estimate the local modulus. Several model surfaces, including a rubber-toughened epoxy polymer blend which showed clearly resolved compliant rubber phases within the harder epoxy matrix, were analyzed with the CCFM technique to illustrate the method’s application. PMID:9195751

  1. Controlling the Adhesion of Superhydrophobic Surfaces Using Electrolyte Jet Machining Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xin; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Shining; Gao, Mingqian; Song, Jinlong; Xu, Wenji

    2016-04-01

    Patterns with controllable adhesion on superhydrophobic areas have various biomedical and chemical applications. Electrolyte jet machining technique (EJM), an electrochemical machining method, was firstly exploited in constructing dimples with various profiles on the superhydrophobic Al alloy surface using different processing parameters. Sliding angles of water droplets on those dimples firstly increased and then stabilized at a certain value with the increase of the processing time or the applied voltages of the EJM, indicating that surfaces with different adhesion force could be obtained by regulating the processing parameters. The contact angle hysteresis and the adhesion force that restricts the droplet from sliding off were investigated through experiments. The results show that the adhesion force could be well described using the classical Furmidge equation. On account of this controllable adhesion force, water droplets could either be firmly pinned to the surface, forming various patterns or slide off at designed tilting angles at specified positions on a superhydrophobic surface. Such dimples on superhydrophopbic surfaces can be applied in water harvesting, biochemical analysis and lab-on-chip devices.

  2. Controlling the Adhesion of Superhydrophobic Surfaces Using Electrolyte Jet Machining Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xin; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Shining; Gao, Mingqian; Song, Jinlong; Xu, Wenji

    2016-04-05

    Patterns with controllable adhesion on superhydrophobic areas have various biomedical and chemical applications. Electrolyte jet machining technique (EJM), an electrochemical machining method, was firstly exploited in constructing dimples with various profiles on the superhydrophobic Al alloy surface using different processing parameters. Sliding angles of water droplets on those dimples firstly increased and then stabilized at a certain value with the increase of the processing time or the applied voltages of the EJM, indicating that surfaces with different adhesion force could be obtained by regulating the processing parameters. The contact angle hysteresis and the adhesion force that restricts the droplet from sliding off were investigated through experiments. The results show that the adhesion force could be well described using the classical Furmidge equation. On account of this controllable adhesion force, water droplets could either be firmly pinned to the surface, forming various patterns or slide off at designed tilting angles at specified positions on a superhydrophobic surface. Such dimples on superhydrophopbic surfaces can be applied in water harvesting, biochemical analysis and lab-on-chip devices.

  3. Muscle surface pH: measurement technique and responses to acidosis and alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, G J

    1982-01-01

    The technique of muscle surface pH measurement used clinically was refined for application in animal experimentation. Guidelines for electrode utilization were developed, and sources of error were investigated. In pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized rabbits, during steady-state conditions, the surface pH of the medial gastrocnemius [7.39 +/- 0.05 (SD)] was equal to that of the soleus, and both were lower than femoral venous outflow pH (7.42 +/- 0.04, P less than 0.001), which was lower than arterial pH (7.46 +/- 0.05, P less than 0.001). With acid-base infusions, the same relationship found during steady-state control conditions (arterial greater than venous outflow greater than muscle surface pH) was observed despite large fluctuations in blood pH. Only during forced hypoventilation, when CO2 transiently moved into muscle, did the relationship reverse. In all experiments, muscle surface pH followed venous outflow pH more closely than it followed arterial pH, the soleus more rapidly than the medial gastrocnemius. Results were consistent with the physiological characteristics of the two muscles and demonstrated that muscle surface pH reflects the local pH of the interstitial compartment under the site of electrode placement.

  4. Generation of amphoteric surfaces via glow-discharge technique with single precursor and the behavior of bovine serum albumin at the surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdoğan, Ebru; Mutlu, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Amphoteric surfaces were generated on silicone substrates via plasma polymerization technique using a single monomer; diethyl allyl phosphate (DAP). Surface characterization was performed by the means of contact angle titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The surface of silicone was found to be slightly basic with an apparent basicity of 0.12 μmol/m(2) while plasma surface modification made the surfaces amphoteric with the surface acid/base concentration adjustable by varying plasma parameters. The adsorption of model protein; bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the surfaces was found to be correlated to the surface acid/base ratio. Percent reduction on modified surfaces compared to bare silicone surface was 32, 59 and 92% for 20 W 5 min, 60 W 5 min and 100 W 5 min modified surfaces respectively. Conformational change of BSA upon adsorption to the surfaces was investigated with FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. It has been shown that BSA preserves more of its secondary structure upon adsorption to plasma modified surfaces than the bare silicone surface. It has been concluded that DAP modified surfaces reduces the amount of protein adsorption on the surfaces due to the modified surfaces amphoteric nature and the ability of modified surfaces to preserve the secondary structure of adsorbed protein better than the bare silicone surface.

  5. Measurement and image processing evaluation of surface modifications of dental implants G4 pure titanium created by different techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulutsuz, A. G., E-mail: asligunaya@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yildiz Technical University, 34349 Besiktas, İstanbul (Turkey); Demircioglu, P., E-mail: pinar.demircioglu@adu.edu.tr; Bogrekci, I., E-mail: ismail.bogrekci@adu.edu.tr [Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aytepe, 09010, Aydin (Turkey); Durakbasa, M. N., E-mail: durakbasa@gmx.at [Department of Interchangeable Manufacturing and Industrial Metrology, Institute for Production Engineering and Laser Technology, Vienna University of Technology, Karlsplatz 13/3113 A-1040 Wien (Austria); Katiboglu, A. B., E-mail: abkatiboglu@hotmail.com [Istanbul University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-03-30

    Foreign substances and organic tissue interaction placed into the jaw in order to eliminate tooth loss involves a highly complex process. Many biological reactions take place as well as the biomechanical forces that influence this formation. Osseointegration denotes to the direct structural and functional association between the living bone and the load-bearing artificial implant's surface. Taking into consideration of the requirements in the manufacturing processes of the implants, surface characterizations with high precise measurement techniques are investigated and thus long-term success of dental implant is emphasized on the importance of these processes in this study. In this research, the detailed surface characterization was performed to identify the dependence of the manufacturing techniques on the surface properties by using the image processing methods and using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for morphological properties in 3D and Taylor Hobson stylus profilometer for roughness properties in 2D. Three implant surfaces fabricated by different manufacturing techniques were inspected, and a machined surface was included into the study as a reference specimen. The results indicated that different surface treatments were strongly influenced surface morphology. Thus 2D and 3D precise inspection techniques were highlighted on the importance for surface characterization. Different image analyses techniques such as Dark-light technique were used to verify the surface measurement results. The computational phase was performed using image processing toolbox in Matlab with precise evaluation of the roughness for the implant surfaces. The relationship between the number of black and white pixels and surface roughness is presented. FFT image processing and analyses results explicitly imply that the technique is useful in the determination of surface roughness. The results showed that the number of black pixels in the image increases with increase in

  6. Measurement and image processing evaluation of surface modifications of dental implants G4 pure titanium created by different techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulutsuz, A. G.; Demircioglu, P.; Bogrekci, I.; Durakbasa, M. N.; Katiboglu, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Foreign substances and organic tissue interaction placed into the jaw in order to eliminate tooth loss involves a highly complex process. Many biological reactions take place as well as the biomechanical forces that influence this formation. Osseointegration denotes to the direct structural and functional association between the living bone and the load-bearing artificial implant's surface. Taking into consideration of the requirements in the manufacturing processes of the implants, surface characterizations with high precise measurement techniques are investigated and thus long-term success of dental implant is emphasized on the importance of these processes in this study. In this research, the detailed surface characterization was performed to identify the dependence of the manufacturing techniques on the surface properties by using the image processing methods and using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for morphological properties in 3D and Taylor Hobson stylus profilometer for roughness properties in 2D. Three implant surfaces fabricated by different manufacturing techniques were inspected, and a machined surface was included into the study as a reference specimen. The results indicated that different surface treatments were strongly influenced surface morphology. Thus 2D and 3D precise inspection techniques were highlighted on the importance for surface characterization. Different image analyses techniques such as Dark-light technique were used to verify the surface measurement results. The computational phase was performed using image processing toolbox in Matlab with precise evaluation of the roughness for the implant surfaces. The relationship between the number of black and white pixels and surface roughness is presented. FFT image processing and analyses results explicitly imply that the technique is useful in the determination of surface roughness. The results showed that the number of black pixels in the image increases with increase in surface

  7. Determination of platinum-group metals and lead in vegetable environmental bio-monitors by voltammetric and spectroscopic techniques: critical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Clinio; Melucci, Dora; Torsi, Giancarlo

    2005-08-01

    This paper reports voltammetric sequential determination of Pt(II), Pd(II), and Rh(III), by square-wave adsorption stripping voltammetry (SWAdSV), and Pb(II), by square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV), in vegetable environmental matrices. Analytical procedures were verified by the analysis of the standard reference materials: Olive Leaves BCR-CRM 062 and Tomato Leaves NIST-SRM 1573a. Precision and accuracy, expressed as relative standard deviation and relative error, respectively, were always less than 6% and the limits of detection (LOD) for each element were below 0.096 mug g(-1). Once set up on the standard reference materials, the analytical procedure was transferred and applied to laurel leaves sampled in proximity to a superhighway and in the Po river mouth area. A critical comparison with spectroscopic measurements is discussed.

  8. Influence of polishing procedures on the surface roughness of dental ceramics made by different techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Junior, Osmir Batista; Buso, Leonardo; Fujiy, Fábio Hiroshi; Lombardo, Geraldo Henrique Leao; Campos, Fernanda; Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Souza, Rodrigo Othavio Assuncao

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2 different surface polishing procedures-glazing and manual polishing-on the roughness of ceramics processed by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and conventional systems (stratification technique). Eighty ceramic discs (diameter: 8 mm, thickness: 1 mm) were prepared and divided among 8 groups (n = 10) according to the type of ceramic disc and polishing method: 4 GZ and 4 MP. Specimens were glazed according to each manufacturer's recommendations. Two silicone polishing points were used on the ceramic surface for manual polishing. Roughness was measured using a surface roughness tester. The roughness measurements were made along a distance of 2 mm on the sample surface and the speed of reading was 0.1 mm/s. Three measurements were taken for each sample. The data (μm) were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Qualitative analysis was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mean (± SD) roughness values obtained for GZ were: 1.1 ± 0.40 μm; 1.0 ± 0.31 μm; 1.6 ± 0.31 μm; and 2.2 ± 0.73 μm. For MP, the mean values were: 0.66 ± 0.13 μm; 0.43 ± 0.14 μm; 1.6 ± 0.55 μm; and 2.0 ± 0.63 μm. The mean roughness values were significantly affected by the ceramic type (P = 0.0001) and polishing technique (P = 0.0047). The SEM images confirmed the roughness data. The manually polished glass CAD/CAM ceramics promoted lower surface roughness than did the glazed feldspathic dental ceramics.

  9. Characterization of the deterioration of bone black in the 17{sup th} century Oranjezaal paintings using electron-microscopic and micro-spectroscopic imaging techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loon, Annelies van [FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: vanloon@amolf.nl; Boon, Jaap J. [FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-10-08

    A whitish deterioration product was observed on the dark paint in a number of large-scale oil paintings that are part of the Oranjezaal interior decoration in the Royal Palace Huis ten Bosch (The Hague). The whitened areas of a painting by Pieter Soutman dating from 1648 were micro-sampled and compared with 'healthy' black paint using different analytical imaging techniques. The dark paint was identified as bone black in linseed oil with a lead drier added. Microscopic images of the cross-section revealed a white top layer of 10-20 {mu}m in the black paint layer. Imaging the cross-section surface with scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) and specular reflection Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) showed homogeneous distributions of phosphate, phosphorus and calcium over the black and the white degraded bone black. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the presence of calcium phosphate hydrate (Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}.xH{sub 2}O), monetite (CaHPO{sub 4}) with possibly some poorly crystalline or amorphous hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 5}(OH)(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}). The EDX maps of lead and carbon, however, showed some discontinuity between the degraded and non-degraded bone black. There was an increase in the lead concentration in the white top layer, and a slight decrease of carbon. Transmission FTIR demonstrated that aromatic network polymers from the carbon black are markedly diminished in the white deterioration product. It is proposed that the carbonized organic matter in the bone black is vulnerable to photo bleaching in the presence of a lead catalyst under these circumstances.

  10. Characterization of the deterioration of bone black in the 17 th century Oranjezaal paintings using electron-microscopic and micro-spectroscopic imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Annelies; Boon, Jaap J.

    2004-10-01

    A whitish deterioration product was observed on the dark paint in a number of large-scale oil paintings that are part of the Oranjezaal interior decoration in the Royal Palace Huis ten Bosch (The Hague). The whitened areas of a painting by Pieter Soutman dating from 1648 were micro-sampled and compared with "healthy" black paint using different analytical imaging techniques. The dark paint was identified as bone black in linseed oil with a lead drier added. Microscopic images of the cross-section revealed a white top layer of 10-20 μm in the black paint layer. Imaging the cross-section surface with scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) and specular reflection Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) showed homogeneous distributions of phosphate, phosphorus and calcium over the black and the white degraded bone black. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the presence of calcium phosphate hydrate (Ca 3(PO 4) 2· xH 2O), monetite (CaHPO 4) with possibly some poorly crystalline or amorphous hydroxyapatite (Ca 5(OH)(PO 4) 3). The EDX maps of lead and carbon, however, showed some discontinuity between the degraded and non-degraded bone black. There was an increase in the lead concentration in the white top layer, and a slight decrease of carbon. Transmission FTIR demonstrated that aromatic network polymers from the carbon black are markedly diminished in the white deterioration product. It is proposed that the carbonized organic matter in the bone black is vulnerable to photo bleaching in the presence of a lead catalyst under these circumstances.

  11. Structure, morphology and Raman and optical spectroscopic analysis of In1-xCuxP thin films grown by MOCVD technique for solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshahrie, Ahmed; Juodkazis, S.; Al-Ghamdi, A. A.; Hafez, M.; Bronstein, L. M.

    2017-10-01

    Nanocrystalline In1-xCuxP thin films (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) have been deposited on quartz substrates by a Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) technique. The effect of the copper ion content on the structural crystal lattice, morphology and optical behavior of the InP thin films was assessed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and spectrophotometry. All films exhibited a crystalline cubic zinc blende structure, inferring the solubility of the Cu atoms in the InP crystal structure. The XRD patterns demonstrated that the inclusion of Cu atoms into the InP films forced the nanoparticles in the films to grow along the (1 1 1) direction. The AFM topography showed that the Cu ions reduce the surface roughness of deposited films. The Raman spectra of the deposited films contain the first and second order anti-stoke ΓTO, ΓLO, ΧLO + ΧTO, 2ΓTO, and ΓLO + ΓTO bands which are characteristic of the InP crystalline structure. The intensities of these bands decreased with increasing the content of the Cu atoms in the InP crystals implying the creation of a stacking fault density in the InP crystal structure. The In1-xCuxP thin films have shown high optical transparency of 90%. An increase of the optical band gap from 1.38 eV to 1.6 eV was assigned to the increase of the amount of Cu ions in the InP films. The In0.5Cu0.5P thin film exhibited remarkable optical conductivity with very low dissipation factor which makes it a promising buffer window for solar energy applications.

  12. Characterization of Natural Dyes and Traditional Korean Silk Fabric by Surface Analytical Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonhee Lee

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS are well established surface techniques that provide both elemental and organic information from several monolayers of a sample surface, while also allowing depth profiling or image mapping to be carried out. The static TOF-SIMS with improved performances has expanded the application of TOF-SIMS to the study of a variety of organic, polymeric and biological materials. In this work, TOF-SIMS, XPS and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR measurements were used to characterize commercial natural dyes and traditional silk fabric dyed with plant extracts dyes avoiding the time-consuming and destructive extraction procedures necessary for the spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods previously used. Silk textiles dyed with plant extracts were then analyzed for chemical and functional group identification of their dye components and mordants. TOF-SIMS spectra for the dyed silk fabric showed element ions from metallic mordants, specific fragment ions and molecular ions from plant-extracted dyes. The results of TOF-SIMS, XPS and FTIR are very useful as a reference database for comparison with data about traditional Korean silk fabric and to provide an understanding of traditional dyeing materials. Therefore, this study shows that surface techniques are useful for micro-destructive analysis of plant-extracted dyes and Korean dyed silk fabric.

  13. Surface Modification of Graphene Oxides by Plasma Techniques and Their Application for Environmental Pollution Cleanup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangxue; Fan, Qiaohui; Chen, Zhongshan; Wang, Qi; Li, Jiaxing; Hobiny, Aatef; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Wang, Xiangke

    2016-02-01

    Graphene oxides (GOs) have come under intense multidisciplinary study because of their unique physicochemical properties and possible applications. The large amount of oxygen-containing functional groups on GOs leads to a high sorption capacity for the removal of various kinds of organic and inorganic pollutants from aqueous solutions in environmental pollution cleanup. However, the lack of selectivity results in difficulty in the selective removal of target pollutants from aqueous solutions in the presence of other coexisting pollutants. Herein, the surface grafting of GOs with special oxygen-containing functional groups using low-temperature plasma techniques and the application of the surface-modified GOs for the efficient removal of organic and inorganic pollutants in environmental pollution are reviewed. This paper gives an account of our research on the application of GO-based nanomaterials in environmental pollution cleanup, including: (1) the synthesis and surface grafting of functional groups on GOs, summarizing various types of low-temperature plasma techniques for the synthesis of graphene/GOs; and (2) the application of graphene/GOs and their composites for the efficient removal of organic and inorganic pollutants from aqueous solutions, including the interaction mechanism according to recently published results.

  14. Multiple sectioning and perforation techniques for TEM sub-surface studies. [4 MeV Ni/sup +2/ ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. H.; Rowcliffe, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques for preparing multiple electron transparent regions at several depth levels below the surface of a metal disk specimen are described. These techniques are relatively rapid and find application in many areas involving surface studies. Examples are shown of multiple thin areas produced at intervals of approximately 200 nm below the original surface of a stainless steel bombarded with 4 MeV Ni/sup +2/ ions for void swelling studies.

  15. Electrical properties of bilayer graphene synthesized using surface wave microwave plasma techniques at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Kato, Hiromitsu; Okigawa, Yuki; Ishihara, Masatou; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    Bilayer graphene was synthesized at low temperature using surface wave microwave plasma techniques where poly(methyl metacrylate) (PMMA) and methane (CH4) were used as carbon sources. Temperature-dependent Hall effect measurements were carried out in a helium atmosphere. Sheet resistance, sheet carrier density and mobility showed weak temperature dependence for graphene from PMMA, and the highest carrier mobility is 740 cm2 V-1 s-1. For graphene from CH4, tunneling of the domain boundary limited carrier transport. The difference in average domain size was determined by Raman signal maps. In addition, residuals of PMMA were detected on graphene from PMMA. The low sheet resistances of graphene synthesized at a temperature of 280 °C using plasma techniques were explained by the PMMA related residuals rather than the domain sizes.

  16. ABO Blood-Typing Using an Antibody Array Technique Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houngkamhang, Nongluck; Vongsakulyanon, Apirom; Peungthum, Patjaree; Sudprasert, Krisda; Kitpoka, Pimpun; Kunakorn, Mongkol; Sutapun, Boonsong; Amarit, Ratthasart; Somboonkaew, Armote; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2013-01-01

    In this study, readily available antibodies that are used in standard agglutination tests were evaluated for their use in ABO blood typing by a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPR imaging) technique. Five groups of antibodies, including mixed clones of anti-A, anti-B, and anti-AB, and single clones of anti-A and anti-B, were used to construct the five-line detection arrays using a multichannel flow cell in the SPR imager. The red blood cell (RBC) samples were applied to a multichannel flow cell that was orthogonal to the detection line arrays for blood group typing. We found that the blood samples were correctly grouped in less than 12 min by the SPR imaging technique, and the results were consistent with those of the standard agglutination technique for all 60 samples. We found that mixed clones of antibodies provided 33%–68% greater change in the SPR signal than the single-clone antibodies. Applying the SPR imaging technique using readily available antibodies may reduce the costs of the antibodies, shorten the measurement time, and increase the throughput. PMID:24021965

  17. Effects of different polishing techniques on the surface roughness of dental porcelains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işil Sarikaya

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different polishing techniques on the surface roughness of dental porcelains. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty-five cylindirical specimens (15x2 mm were prepared for each feldspathic (Vita VMK 95, Ceramco III and low-fusing dental porcelain (Matchmaker. Fifty-five specimens of machinable feldspathic porcelain blocks (Vitablocs Mark II, (12x14x18 mm were cut into 2-mm-thick slices (12x14 mm with low speed saw. The prepared specimens were divided into 11 groups (n=5 representing different polishing techniques including control ((C no surface treatment, glaze (G and other 9 groups that were finished and polished with polishing discs (Sof-Lex (Sl, two porcelain polishing kits (NTI (Pk, Dialite II (Di, a diamond polishing paste (Sparkle (Sp, a zirconium silicate based cleaning and polishing prophy paste (Zircate (Zr, an aluminum oxide polishing paste (Prisma Gloss (Pg, and combinations of them. The surface roughness of all groups was measured with a profilometer. The data were analyzed with a 2-way analysis of variance, and the mean values were compared by the Tukey Honestly Significant Difference test (a=0.05. RESULTS: For all porcelain material groups, the lowest Ra values were observed in Group Gl, Group Sl, Group Pk, and Group Di, which were not significantly different from each other (p>0.05.When comparing the 4 different porcelain materials, the machinable feldspathic porcelain block group (Mark II demonstrated statistically significantly less Ra values than the other porcelain materials tested (p<0.05. No significant difference was observed between the VMK 95 and Ceramco III porcelain groups (p=0.919, also these groups demonstrated the highest Ra values. CONCLUSION: Subjected to surface roughness, the surfaces obtained with polishing and/or cleaning-prophy paste materials used alone were rougher compared to the surfaces finished using Sof-lex, Dialite, and NTI polishing kit

  18. Investigation of Anti-Relaxation Coatings for Alkali-Metal Vapor Cells Using Surface Science Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Seltzer, S J; Donaldson, M H; Balabas, M V; Barber, S K; Bernasek, S L; Bouchiat, M -A; Hexemer, A; Hibberd, A M; Kimball, D F Jackson; Jaye, C; Karaulanov, T; Narducci, F A; Rangwala, S A; Robinson, H G; Voronov, D L; Yashchuk, V V; Pines, A; Budker, D

    2010-01-01

    Many technologies based on cells containing alkali-metal atomic vapor benefit from the use of anti-relaxation surface coatings in order to preserve atomic spin polarization. In particular, paraffin has been used for this purpose for several decades and has been demonstrated to allow an atom to experience up to 10,000 collisions with the walls of its container without depolarizing, but the details of its operation remain poorly understood. We present a survey of modern surface science techniques applied to the study of paraffin coatings, in order to characterize the properties that enable the effective preservation of alkali spin polarization. These methods include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Experimental results include the determination that crystallinity of the coating material is unnecessary, and the detection of C=C double bonds present with...

  19. Study of multilayer packaging delamination mechanisms using different surface analysis techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrido-Lopez, Alvaro [Department of Chemistry, University of La Rioja, C/Madre de Dios 51, E-26006 Logrono, La Rioja (Spain); Tena, Maria Teresa, E-mail: maria-teresa.tena@unirioja.es [Department of Chemistry, University of La Rioja, C/Madre de Dios 51, E-26006 Logrono, La Rioja (Spain)

    2010-04-01

    Multilayer packaging, consisting of different layers joined by using an adhesive or an extrusion process, is widely used to promote different products, such as food, cosmetics, etc. The main disadvantage in using this form of packaging is the delamination process. In this work, different surface techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) are used to analyse the delaminated surfaces in order to study the mechanisms that cause delamination of multilayer packaging. According to our results, the reaction of migrated molecules with adhesive-aluminium bonds is the main cause of the chemical delamination process. In contrast, the delamination of extruded materials would seem to be caused by the breaking of Van der Waals bonds.

  20. Source-model technique analysis of electromagnetic scattering by surface grooves and slits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotskovsky, Konstantin; Leviatan, Yehuda

    2011-04-01

    A computational tool, based on the source-model technique (SMT), for analysis of electromagnetic wave scattering by surface grooves and slits is presented. The idea is to use a superposition of the solution of the unperturbed problem and local corrections in the groove/slit region (the grooves and slits are treated as perturbations). In this manner, the solution is obtained in a much faster way than solving the original problem. The proposed solution is applied to problems of grooves and slits in otherwise planar or periodic surfaces. Grooves and slits of various shapes, both smooth ones as well as ones with edges, empty or filled with dielectric material, are considered. The obtained results are verified against previously published data.

  1. Laser interference lithography as a new and efficient technique for micropatterning of biopolymer surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fayou; Li, Ping; Shen, Hao; Mathur, Sanjay; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Bakowsky, Udo; Mücklich, Frank

    2005-05-01

    Laser interference lithography (LIL) is a straightforward technique to prepare linear micropatterns for regulating cellular adhesion behaviors on polymer substratum. This process is based on selective laser ablation directly duplicating the interference patterns of two or more coherent laser beams onto the polymer surface. Micropatterns prepared by LIL on poly(ethylene terephthalate) and Thermanox were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and white light interferometer while the chemical surface modification induced by laser was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The AFM photographs show that the micropatterns are well-defined and of great consistency. Polymer properties and laser parameters related to LIL as well as laser ablation mechanisms are discussed in this technical note.

  2. Determining Engineering Properties of the Shallow Lunar Subsurface using Seismic Surface Wave Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeluru, P. M.; Baker, G. S.

    2008-12-01

    The geology of Earth's moon has previously been examined via telescopic observations, orbiting spacecraft readings, lunar sample analysis, and also from some geophysical data. Previous researchers have examined layering of the moon and models exist explaining the velocity variations in the mantle and core. However, no studies (or datasets) currently exist regarding the engineering properties of the shallow (civil engineering works, as they characterize the mechanical behavior of geotechnical materials under various types of loading. Therefore, understanding the physical and engineering properties within the upper 30 m of the lunar subsurface will be critical for lunar exploration if deployment of large structures, large-scale excavation, and/or landing of large spacecraft on the surface is desired. Advances in near-surface geophysical techniques, such as Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Wave (MASW), has greatly increased our ability to map subsurface variations in physical properties. The MASW method involves deployment of multiple seismometers to acquire 1-D or 2-D shear wave velocity profiles that can be directly related to various engineering properties. The advantage of this technique over drilling boreholes or any other geophysical technique is that it is less intensive, non-invasive, more cost- effective, and more robust because strong surface-wave records are almost guaranteed. In addition, data processing and analysis is fairly straightforward, and the MASW method allows for analysis of a large area of interest as compared to drilling boreholes. A new scheme using randomly distributed geophones (likely deployed from a mortar-type device) instead of a conventional linear array will be presented. A random array is necessary for lunar exploration because of the logistical constraints involved in deploying a linear or circular array robotically or by astronaut. Initial results indicate that robust dispersion curves (and thus subsurface models of engineering

  3. Applications of surface analysis techniques to photovoltaic research: Grain and grain boundary studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmerski, L. L.

    Complementary surface analysis techniques (AES, SIMS, XPS) are applied to photovoltaic devices in order to assess the limiting factors of grain and grain boundary chemistry to the performance of polycrystalline solar cells. Results of these compositional and chemical studies are directly correlated with electrical measurements (EBIC) and with resulting device performance. Examples of grain boundary passivation in polycrystalline Si and GaAs solar cells are cited. The quality of the intragrain material used in these devices is shown to be equally important to the grain boundary activity in determining overall photovoltaic performance.

  4. A controlled field pilot for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, L.H.; Dobeck, L.M.; Repasky, K.; Nehrir, A.; Humphries, S.; Keith, C.; Shaw, J.; Rouse, J.; Cunningham, A.; Benson, S.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Lewicki, J.L.; Wells, A.; Diehl, R.; Strazisar, B.; Fessenden, J.; Rahn, Thomas; Amonette, J.; Barr, J.; Pickles, W.; Jacobson, J.; Silver, E.; Male, E.; Rauch, H.; Gullickson, K.; Trautz, R.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.; Wielopolski, L.

    2009-01-01

    A field facility has been developed to allow controlled studies of near surface CO2 transport and detection technologies. The key component of the facility is a shallow, slotted horizontal well divided into six zones. The scale and fluxes were designed to address large scale CO2 storage projects and desired retention rates for those projects. A wide variety of detection techniques were deployed by collaborators from 6 national labs, 2 universities, EPRI, and the USGS. Additionally, modeling of CO2 transport and concentrations in the saturated soil and in the vadose zone was conducted. An overview of these results will be presented. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of three surface conditioning techniques on repair bond strength of nanohybrid and nanofilled composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Nassoohi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Repair bond strength of different composite resins has been assessed in few studies. In addition, reports on the efficacy of surface treatments are debated. Therefore, this in vitro study was conducted to evaluate the effect of three surface treatments on two nanocomposites versus a microhybrid composite. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 135 composite blocks (45 specimens per composite of microhybrid (Filtek Supreme Z250, 3M ESPE, USA, nanohybrid (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE, and nanofilled (Filtek Supreme Z350, 3M ESPE were thermocycled (5000 rounds and then surface roughened (except in a control group of 9 specimens of three composite types. Each composite type was divided into three subgroups of surface treatments: (1 Bur abrading and phosphoric acid (PA etching, (2 sandblasting and PA etching, and (3 hydrofluoric etching and silane application (n = 15 × 9, complying with ISO TR11405. Composite blocks were repaired with the same composite type but of a different color. Microtensile bond strength and modes of failure were analyzed statistically using two-way analyses of variance, Tukey and Chi-square tests (α = 0.05. Results: There were significant differences between three composite resins (P < 0.0001 and treatment techniques (P < 0.0001. Their interaction was nonsignificant (P = 0.228. The difference between nanofilled and nanohybrid was not significant. However, the microhybrid composite showed a significantly higher bond strength (Tukey P < 0.05. Sandblasting was significantly superior to the other two methods, which were not different from each other. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it seems that microhybrid composite might have higher repair strengths than two evaluated nanocomposites. Among the assessed preparation techniques, sandblasting followed by PA etching might produce the highest bond strength.

  6. Simple equations guide high-frequency surface-wave investigation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Chen, C.; Kaufmann, R.D.; Luo, Y.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss five useful equations related to high-frequency surface-wave techniques and their implications in practice. These equations are theoretical results from published literature regarding source selection, data-acquisition parameters, resolution of a dispersion curve image in the frequency-velocity domain, and the cut-off frequency of high modes. The first equation suggests Rayleigh waves appear in the shortest offset when a source is located on the ground surface, which supports our observations that surface impact sources are the best source for surface-wave techniques. The second and third equations, based on the layered earth model, reveal a relationship between the optimal nearest offset in Rayleigh-wave data acquisition and seismic setting - the observed maximum and minimum phase velocities, and the maximum wavelength. Comparison among data acquired with different offsets at one test site confirms the better data were acquired with the suggested optimal nearest offset. The fourth equation illustrates that resolution of a dispersion curve image at a given frequency is directly proportional to the product of a length of a geophone array and the frequency. We used real-world data to verify the fourth equation. The last equation shows that the cut-off frequency of high modes of Love waves for a two-layer model is determined by shear-wave velocities and the thickness of the top layer. We applied this equation to Rayleigh waves and multi-layer models with the average velocity and obtained encouraging results. This equation not only endows with a criterion to distinguish high modes from numerical artifacts but also provides a straightforward means to resolve the depth to the half space of a layered earth model. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of three surface conditioning techniques on repair bond strength of nanohybrid and nanofilled composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassoohi, Negin; Kazemi, Haleh; Sadaghiani, Morad; Mansouri, Mona; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Repair bond strength of different composite resins has been assessed in few studies. In addition, reports on the efficacy of surface treatments are debated. Therefore, this in vitro study was conducted to evaluate the effect of three surface treatments on two nanocomposites versus a microhybrid composite. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 135 composite blocks (45 specimens per composite) of microhybrid (Filtek Supreme Z250, 3M ESPE, USA), nanohybrid (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE), and nanofilled (Filtek Supreme Z350, 3M ESPE) were thermocycled (5000 rounds) and then surface roughened (except in a control group of 9 specimens of three composite types). Each composite type was divided into three subgroups of surface treatments: (1) Bur abrading and phosphoric acid (PA) etching, (2) sandblasting and PA etching, and (3) hydrofluoric etching and silane application (n = 15 × 9, complying with ISO TR11405). Composite blocks were repaired with the same composite type but of a different color. Microtensile bond strength and modes of failure were analyzed statistically using two-way analyses of variance, Tukey and Chi-square tests (α = 0.05). Results: There were significant differences between three composite resins (P < 0.0001) and treatment techniques (P < 0.0001). Their interaction was nonsignificant (P = 0.228). The difference between nanofilled and nanohybrid was not significant. However, the microhybrid composite showed a significantly higher bond strength (Tukey P < 0.05). Sandblasting was significantly superior to the other two methods, which were not different from each other. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it seems that microhybrid composite might have higher repair strengths than two evaluated nanocomposites. Among the assessed preparation techniques, sandblasting followed by PA etching might produce the highest bond strength. PMID:26759592

  8. Groundwater and surface-water utilisation using a bank infiltration technique in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsuddin, Mohd Khairul Nizar; Sulaiman, Wan Nor Azmin; Suratman, Saim; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Samuding, Kamarudin

    2014-05-01

    Bank infiltration (BI) is one of the solutions to providing raw water for public supply in tropical countries. This study in Malaysia explores the use of BI to supplement a polluted surface-water resource with groundwater. Three major factors were investigated: (1) contribution of surface water through BI to the resulting abstraction, (2) input of local groundwater, and (3) water-quality characteristics of the resulting water supply. A geophysical method was employed to define the subsurface geology and hydrogeology, and isotope techniques were performed to identify the source of groundwater recharge and the interaction between surface water and groundwater. The physicochemical and microbiological parameters of the local surface-water bodies and groundwater were analyzed before and during water abstraction. Extracted water revealed a 5-98 % decrease in turbidity, as well as reductions in HCO3 -, Cl-, SO4 2-, NO3 -, Ca2+, Al3+ and As concentrations compared with those of Langat River water. In addition, amounts of E. coli, total coliform and Giardia were significantly reduced (99.9 %). However, water samples from test wells during pumping showed high concentrations of Fe2+ and Mn2+. Pumping test results indicate that the two wells used in the study were able to sustain yields.

  9. Thinning identification technique using stainless steel film heater and response surface method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Nagahisa; Yamada, Hiroyuki

    2011-05-01

    The infrared thermography has not been widely applied to nondestructive inspection for metals. It is because the metal emissivity is too low to be measured the temperature. To make up for this disadvantage, a new heating technique using a stainless steel film was proposed and a nondestructive inspection system with the response surface method was developed. The stainless film has a high electric resistance and generates large Joule heat. Its response is quick and the quantity of heat is easily controlled. Moreover, the film has a high enough thermal conductivity, therefore a black painted film can be a blackbody surface of metal structures. Consequently IR camera can easily measure the metal temperature accurately. The nondestructive inspection system that can quantitatively identify geometrical parameters of a local thinning was developed. The system consists of a forward analysis and an inverse analysis. In the forward analysis, the response surface that shows a relationship between geometrical parameters and characteristic values is built by experimental design method. In the inverse analysis, substituting the characteristic values into the response surface, the geometrical parameters are finally identified. The inspection system can identify the local thinning shape robustly by selecting the attribute for the shape parameters.

  10. Emerging surface characterization techniques for carbon steel corrosion: a critical brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, D.; Becker, T.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon steel is a preferred construction material in many industrial and domestic applications, including oil and gas pipelines, where corrosion mitigation using film-forming corrosion inhibitor formulations is a widely accepted method. This review identifies surface analytical techniques that are considered suitable for analysis of thin films at metallic substrates, but are yet to be applied to analysis of carbon steel surfaces in corrosive media or treated with corrosion inhibitors. The reviewed methods include time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray absorption spectroscopy methods, particle-induced X-ray emission, Rutherford backscatter spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, small-angle neutron scattering and neutron reflectometry, and conversion electron Moessbauer spectrometry. Advantages and limitations of the analytical methods in thin-film surface investigations are discussed. Technical parameters of nominated analytical methods are provided to assist in the selection of suitable methods for analysis of metallic substrates deposited with surface films. The challenges associated with the applications of the emerging analytical methods in corrosion science are also addressed. PMID:28413351

  11. Surface modification techniques for increased corrosion tolerance of zirconium fuel cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, James Patrick, IV

    Corrosion is a major issue in applications involving materials in normal and severe environments, especially when it involves corrosive fluids, high temperatures, and radiation. Left unaddressed, corrosion can lead to catastrophic failures, resulting in economic and environmental liabilities. In nuclear applications, where metals and alloys, such as steel and zirconium, are extensively employed inside and outside of the nuclear reactor, corrosion accelerated by high temperatures, neutron radiation, and corrosive atmospheres, corrosion becomes even more concerning. The objectives of this research are to study and develop surface modification techniques to protect zirconium cladding by the incorporation of a specific barrier coating, and to understand the issues related to the compatibility of the coatings examined in this work. The final goal of this study is to recommend a coating and process that can be scaled-up for the consideration of manufacturing and economic limits. This dissertation study builds on previous accident tolerant fuel cladding research, but is unique in that advanced corrosion methods are tested and considerations for implementation by industry are practiced and discussed. This work will introduce unique studies involving the materials and methods for accident tolerant fuel cladding research by developing, demonstrating, and considering materials and processes for modifying the surface of zircaloy fuel cladding. This innovative research suggests that improvements in the technique to modify the surface of zirconium fuel cladding are likely. Three elements selected for the investigation of their compatibility on zircaloy fuel cladding are aluminum, silicon, and chromium. These materials are also currently being investigated at other labs as alternate alloys and coatings for accident tolerant fuel cladding. This dissertation also investigates the compatibility of these three elements as surface modifiers, by comparing their microstructural and

  12. Protein conformational changes revealed by optical spectroscopic reflectometry in porous silicon multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Tommasi, Edoardo; Rea, Ilaria; Rendina, Ivo; Rotiroti, Lucia; Stefano, Luca De [National Council of Research, Institute for Microelectronic and Microsystems, Department of Naples, Via P Castellino 111, I-80131 Naples (Italy)], E-mail: edoardo.detommasi@na.imm.cnr.it

    2009-01-21

    The protein-ligand molecular interactions imply strong geometrical and structural rearrangements of the biological complex which are normally detected by high sensitivity optical techniques such as time-resolved fluorescence microscopy. In this work, we have measured, by optical spectroscopic reflectometry in the visible-near-infrared region, the interaction between a sugar binding protein (SBP), covalently bound on the surface of a porous silicon (PSi) microcavity, and glucose, at different concentrations and temperatures. Variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometric (VASE) characterization of protein-functionalized PSi layers confirms that the protein-ligand system has an overall volume smaller than the SBP alone.

  13. Bone-like apatite coating on functionalized poly(etheretherketone) surface via tailored silanization layers technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yanyan [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiong, Chengdong; Zhang, Shenglan [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Li, Xiaoyu [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhang, Lifang, E-mail: zhanglfcioc@163.com [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) is a rigid semi-crystalline polymer with outstanding mechanical properties, bone-like stiffness and suitable biocompatibility that has attracted much interest as a biomaterial for orthopedic and dental implants. However, the bio-inert surface of PEEK limits its biomedical applications when direct osteointegration between the implants and the host tissue is desired. In this work, –PO{sub 4}H{sub 2}, –COOH and –OH groups were introduced on the PEEK surface by further chemical treatments of the vinyl-terminated silanization layers formed on the hydroxylation-pretreated PEEK surface. Both the surface-functionalized and pristine specimens were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements. When placed in 1.5 strength simulated body fluid (SBF) solution, apatite was observed to form uniformly on the functionalized PEEK surface and firmly attach to the substrate. The characterized results demonstrated that the coating was constituted by poorly crystallized bone-like apatite and the effect of surface functional groups on coating formation was also discussed in detail. In addition, in vitro biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of pre-osteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1) attachment, spreading and proliferation, was remarkably enhanced by the bone-like apatite coating. Thus, this study provides a method to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK and expand its applications in orthopedic and dental implants. - Highlights: • –PO{sub 4}H{sub 2}, –COOH and –OH groups were successfully introduced onto PEEK surface via tailored silanization layer technique. • Bone-like apatite formed uniformly on surface-functionalized PEEK after immersion in SBF, and tightly adhered to the PEEK. • SEM, EDS, FTIR, XPS and XRD results showed that apatite layer is composed of low-crystalline bone-like apatite. • Bone-like apatite coating

  14. A shear wave ground surface vibration technique for the detection of buried pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Papandreou, B.

    2014-07-01

    A major UK initiative, entitled 'Mapping the Underworld' aims to develop and prove the efficacy of a multi-sensor device for accurate remote buried utility service detection, location and, where possible, identification. One of the technologies to be incorporated in the device is low-frequency vibro-acoustics; the application of this technology for detecting buried infrastructure, in particular pipes, is currently being investigated. Here, a shear wave ground vibration technique for detecting buried pipes is described. For this technique, shear waves are generated at the ground surface, and the resulting ground surface vibrations measured. Time-extended signals are employed to generate the illuminating wave. Generalized cross-correlation functions between the measured ground velocities and a reference measurement adjacent to the excitation are calculated and summed using a stacking method to generate a cross-sectional image of the ground. To mitigate the effects of other potential sources of vibration in the vicinity, the excitation signal can be used as an additional reference when calculating the cross-correlation functions. Measurements have been made at two live test sites to detect a range of buried pipes. Successful detection of the pipes was achieved, with the use of the additional reference signal proving beneficial in the noisier of the two environments.

  15. Fiber optic profenofos sensor based on surface plasmon resonance technique and molecular imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastav, Anand M; Usha, Sruthi P; Gupta, Banshi D

    2016-05-15

    A successful approach for the fabrication and characterization of an optical fiber sensor for the detection of profenofos based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and molecular imprinting is introduced. Molecular imprinting technology is used for the creation of three dimensional binding sites having complementary shape and size of the specific template molecule over a polymer for the recognition of the same. Binding of template molecule with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layer results in the change in the dielectric nature of the sensing surface (polymer) and is identified by SPR technique. Spectral interrogation method is used for the characterization of the sensing probe. The operating profenofos concentration range of the sensor is from 10(-4) to 10(-1)µg/L. A red shift of 18.7 nm in resonance wavelength is recorded for this profenofos concentration range. The maximum sensitivity of the sensor is 12.7 nm/log (µg/L) at 10(-4)µg/L profenofos concentration. Limit of detection (LOD) of the sensor is found to be 2.5×10(-6)µg/L. Selectivity measurements predict the probe highly selective for the profenofos molecule. Besides high sensitivity due to SPR technique and selectivity due to molecular imprinting, proposed sensor has numerous other advantages like immunity to electromagnetic interference, fast response, low cost and capability of online monitoring and remote sensing of analyte due to the fabrication of the probe on optical fiber.

  16. 3D precision measurements of meter sized surfaces using low cost illumination and camera techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, Peter; Daemi, Bita; Mattsson, Lars

    2017-04-01

    Using dedicated stereo camera systems and structured light is a well-known method for measuring the 3D shape of large surfaces. However the problem is not trivial when high accuracy, in the range of few tens of microns, is needed. Many error sources need to be handled carefully in order to obtain high quality results. In this study, we present a measurement method based on low-cost camera and illumination solutions combined with high-precision image analysis and a new approach in camera calibration and 3D reconstruction. The setup consists of two ordinary digital cameras and a Gobo projector as a structured light source. A matrix of dots is projected onto the target area. The two cameras capture the images of the projected pattern on the object. The images are processed by advanced subpixel resolution algorithms prior to the application of the 3D reconstruction technique. The strength of the method lays in a different approach for calibration, 3D reconstruction, and high-precision image analysis algorithms. Using a 10 mm pitch pattern of the light dots, the method is capable of reconstructing the 3D shape of surfaces. The precision (1σ repeatability) in the measurements is  cost of ~2% of available advanced measurement techniques. The expanded uncertainty (95% confidence level) is estimated to be 83 µm, with the largest uncertainty contribution coming from the absolute length of the metal ruler used as reference.

  17. Spectroscopic features of erbium-doped CaM{sub 2}O{sub 6} (M=Nb, Ta) single crystal fibers grown by the laser-heated pedestal growth technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, A.S.S. de [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), C.P. 369, CEP 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: andreasc@if.sc.usp.br; Ferrari, C.R.; Silva, R.A.; Nunes, L.A.O.; Hernandes, A.C.; Andreeta, J.P. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), C.P. 369, CEP 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2008-02-15

    Erbium-doped single crystal fibers, with low phonon energy and fairly high absorption and emission cross sections are interesting laser active media, for compact, near-infrared and/or upconversion lasers. In this work, high optical quality Er{sup 3+}-doped CaNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} and CaTa{sub 2}O{sub 6} single crystal fibers were successfully grown by the versatile laser-heated pedestal growth technique, and characterized from the structural and spectroscopic points of view. The results indicate that these crystal fiber compositions, which had not been explored so far, offer potential applications, not only as laser active media, but also in other optical devices.

  18. Comparison of the nature of interactions of two sialic acid specific lectins Saraca indica and Sambucus nigra with N-acetylneuraminic acid by spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singha, Shuvendu [Department of Natural Science, West Bengal University of Technology, Kolkata 700064 (India); Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Bose, Partha P. [Department of Biotechnology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), Hajipur 844101 (India); Ganguly, Tapan [School of Laser Science and Engineering, Jadavpur University, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Campana, Patricia T. [Escola de Artes, Ciências e Humanidades, Universidade de São Paulo, 03828-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Ghosh, Rina [Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Chatterjee, Bishnu P., E-mail: cbishnup@gmail.com [Department of Natural Science, West Bengal University of Technology, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2015-04-15

    The present paper deals with the isolation and purification of a new sialic acid binding lectin from the seed integument of Saraca indica (Ashok) and the purified lectin was designated Saracin II. Comparative studies on the interactions of saracin II and another sialic acid specific lectin Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) with N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) were made using UV–vis absorption, steady state and time resolved fluorescence along with circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to reveal the nature and mechanisms of binding of these two lectins with NANA. The experimental observations obtained from UV–vis, steady state and time resolved fluorescence measurements demonstrated that SNA–NANA system formed relatively stronger ground state complex than saracin II–NANA pair. CD measurements further substantiated the propositions made from steady state and time resolved spectroscopic investigations. It was inferred that during interaction of SNA with NANA, the lectin adopted a relatively looser conformation with the extended polypeptide structures leading to the exposure of the hydrophobic cavities which favoured stronger binding with NANA. - Highlights: • Of the two lectins, stronger binding of SNA with NANA is observed. • Full exposure of the hydrophobic cavities of SNA favors the stronger interactions. • Saracin II can be used for the new generation of lectin based-therapeutics.

  19. Structure analysis and spectroscopic characterization of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid with experimental (FT-IR, Raman, NMR and XRD) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alver, Özgür; Dikmen, Gökhan

    2016-03-01

    Possible stable conformers, geometrical molecular structures, vibrational properties as well as band assignments, nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of 2-Fluoro-3-Methylpyridine-5-Boronic Acid (2F3MP5BA) were studied experimentally and theoretically using FT-IR, Raman, (CP/MAS) NMR and XRD spectroscopic methods. FT-IR and Raman spectra were evaluated in the region of 3500-400 cm-1, and 3200-400 cm-1, respectively. The optimized geometric structures, vibrational wavenumbers and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors were examined using Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) hybrid density functional theory method with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. 1H, 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. 1H, 13C, APT and HETCOR NMR experiments of title molecule were carried out in DMSO solution. 13C CP/MAS NMR measurement was done with 4 mm zirconium rotor and glycine was used as an external standard. Single crystal of 2F3MP5BA was also prepared for XRD measurements. Assignments of vibrational wavenumbers were also strengthened by calculating the total energy distribution (TED) values using scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method.

  20. Development of CDMS-II Surface Event Rejection Techniques and Their Extensions to Lower Energy Thresholds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, Thomas James [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The CDMS-II phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, a dark matter direct-detection experiment, was operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory from 2003 to 2008. The full payload consisted of 30 ZIP detectors, totaling approximately 1.1 kg of Si and 4.8 kg of Ge, operated at temperatures of 50 mK. The ZIP detectors read out both ionization and phonon pulses from scatters within the crystals; channel segmentation and analysis of pulse timing parameters allowed e ective ducialization of the crystal volumes and background rejection su cient to set world-leading limits at the times of their publications. A full re-analysis of the CDMS-II data was motivated by an improvement in the event reconstruction algorithms which improved the resolution of ionization energy and timing information. The Ge data were re-analyzed using three distinct background-rejection techniques; the Si data from runs 125 - 128 were analyzed for the rst time using the most successful of the techniques from the Ge re-analysis. The results of these analyses prompted a novel \\mid-threshold" analysis, wherein energy thresholds were lowered but background rejection using phonon timing information was still maintained. This technique proved to have signi cant discrimination power, maintaining adequate signal acceptance and minimizing background leakage. The primary background for CDMS-II analyses comes from surface events, whose poor ionization collection make them di cult to distinguish from true nuclear recoil events. The novel detector technology of SuperCDMS, the successor to CDMS-II, uses interleaved electrodes to achieve full ionization collection for events occurring at the top and bottom detector surfaces. This, along with dual-sided ionization and phonon instrumentation, allows for excellent ducialization and relegates the surface-event rejection techniques of CDMS-II to a secondary level of background discrimination. Current and future SuperCDMS results hold great promise for mid- to low

  1. Self-consistent Green’s-function technique for bulk and surface impurity calculations: Surface core-level shifts by complete screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, M.; Abrikosov, I. A.; Johansson, B.

    1994-01-01

    We have implemented an efficient self-consistent Green's-function technique, based on the tight-binding linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method, for calculating the electronic structure and total energy of a substitutional impurity located either in the bulk or at the surface. The technique makes use...

  2. Surface-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry techniques for application in forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, Taryn; Kirkbride, Paul; Pigou, Paul E; Ronci, Maurizio; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is an excellent analytical technique for the rapid and sensitive analysis of macromolecules (>700 Da), such as peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, and synthetic polymers. However, the detection of smaller organic molecules with masses below 700 Da using MALDI-MS is challenging due to the appearance of matrix adducts and matrix fragment peaks in the same spectral range. Recently, nanostructured substrates have been developed that facilitate matrix-free laser desorption ionization (LDI), contributing to an emerging analytical paradigm referred to as surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) MS. Since SALDI enables the detection of small organic molecules, it is rapidly growing in popularity, including in the field of forensics. At the same time, SALDI also holds significant potential as a high throughput analytical tool in roadside, work place and athlete drug testing. In this review, we discuss recent advances in SALDI techniques such as desorption ionization on porous silicon (DIOS), nano-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) and nano assisted laser desorption ionization (NALDI™) and compare their strengths and weaknesses with particular focus on forensic applications. These include the detection of illicit drug molecules and their metabolites in biological matrices and small molecule detection from forensic samples including banknotes and fingerprints. Finally, the review highlights recent advances in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using SALDI techniques.

  3. Multivariate statistical techniques for the assessment of seasonal variations in surface water quality of pasture ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajorlo, Majid; Abdullah, Ramdzani B; Yusoff, Mohd Kamil; Halim, Ridzwan Abd; Hanif, Ahmad Husni Mohd; Willms, Walter D; Ebrahimian, Mahboubeh

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates the applicability of multivariate statistical techniques including cluster analysis (CA), discriminant analysis (DA), and factor analysis (FA) for the assessment of seasonal variations in the surface water quality of tropical pastures. The study was carried out in the TPU catchment, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The dataset consisted of 1-year monitoring of 14 parameters at six sampling sites. The CA yielded two groups of similarity between the sampling sites, i.e., less polluted (LP) and moderately polluted (MP) at temporal scale. Fecal coliform (FC), NO3, DO, and pH were significantly related to the stream grouping in the dry season, whereas NH3, BOD, Escherichia coli, and FC were significantly related to the stream grouping in the rainy season. The best predictors for distinguishing clusters in temporal scale were FC, NH3, and E. coli, respectively. FC, E. coli, and BOD with strong positive loadings were introduced as the first varifactors in the dry season which indicates the biological source of variability. EC with a strong positive loading and DO with a strong negative loading were introduced as the first varifactors in the rainy season, which represents the physiochemical source of variability. Multivariate statistical techniques were effective analytical techniques for classification and processing of large datasets of water quality and the identification of major sources of water pollution in tropical pastures.

  4. Mining for diagnostic information in body surface potential maps: A comparison of feature selection techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCullagh Paul J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In body surface potential mapping, increased spatial sampling is used to allow more accurate detection of a cardiac abnormality. Although diagnostically superior to more conventional electrocardiographic techniques, the perceived complexity of the Body Surface Potential Map (BSPM acquisition process has prohibited its acceptance in clinical practice. For this reason there is an interest in striking a compromise between the minimum number of electrocardiographic recording sites required to sample the maximum electrocardiographic information. Methods In the current study, several techniques widely used in the domains of data mining and knowledge discovery have been employed to mine for diagnostic information in 192 lead BSPMs. In particular, the Single Variable Classifier (SVC based filter and Sequential Forward Selection (SFS based wrapper approaches to feature selection have been implemented and evaluated. Using a set of recordings from 116 subjects, the diagnostic ability of subsets of 3, 6, 9, 12, 24 and 32 electrocardiographic recording sites have been evaluated based on their ability to correctly asses the presence or absence of Myocardial Infarction (MI. Results It was observed that the wrapper approach, using sequential forward selection and a 5 nearest neighbour classifier, was capable of choosing a set of 24 recording sites that could correctly classify 82.8% of BSPMs. Although the filter method performed slightly less favourably, the performance was comparable with a classification accuracy of 79.3%. In addition, experiments were conducted to show how (a features chosen using the wrapper approach were specific to the classifier used in the selection model, and (b lead subsets chosen were not necessarily unique. Conclusion It was concluded that both the filter and wrapper approaches adopted were suitable for guiding the choice of recording sites useful for determining the presence of MI. It should be noted however

  5. Low-cost, high performance surface plasmon resonance-compatible films characterized by the surface plasmon resonance technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Song-Quan; Ye Hong-An; Liu Chun-Yu; Dou Yin-Feng; Huang Yan

    2013-01-01

    A new analytical method based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique is presented,with which SPR curves for both wavelength and angular modulations can be obtained simultaneously via only a single scan of the incident angle.Using this method,the SPR responses of TiO2-coated Cu films are characterized in the wavelength range from 600 nm to 900 nm.For the first time,we determine the effective optical constants and the thicknesses of TiO2-coated Cu films using the SPR curves of wavelength modulation.The sensitivities of prism-based SPR refractive index sensors using TiO2-coated Cu films are investigated theoretically for both wavelength and angular modulations,the results show that in the case of sensitivity with wavelength modulation,TiO2-coated Cu films are not as good as the Au film,however,they are more suitable than the Au film for SPR refractive index sensors with angular modulation because a higher sensitivity can be achieved.

  6. Improvement of metal-semiconductor contact on silicon microstructured surface by electroless nickel technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Fei; Guo, Anran; Huang, Lieyun; Yu, Feng; Li, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Si micro-structures served as anti-reflection layer are widely employed in Si-based solar cells and detectors to enhance light harvesting. However, performance of these devices is suffered from the poor contact between the metal electrode and micro-structured surface. Conventional vacuum deposited metal electrode makes only superficial contact with the top of micro-structured surface and unable to fill the holes in the micro-structures. In this paper, instead, electroless nickel technique is applied to form low resistance ohmic contact. The surface micro-structures were fabricated by electrochemistry etching while the metal electrodes were deposited by sputtering and electroless pasting. Results show that only electroless nickel layer could fully fill the holes and achieve better ohmic contact than the sputtering ones before rapid annealing. Furthermore, a higher temperature rapid annealing process could improve the contact of all samples prepared by different ways. The specific contact resistance achieved by high alkalinity (pH=12) electroless nickel is 1.34×10-1Ω·cm2.

  7. Surface modification by cold-plasma technique for dental implants—Bio-functionalization with binding pharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao Yoshinari

    2011-08-01

    At the bone tissue/implant interface, a thin calcium phosphate coating and rapid heating with infrared radiation were effective in controlling the dissolution without cracking the coating. These thin calcium phosphate coatings may directly promote osteogenisis, but also enable immobilization and subsequent drug delivery system (DDS of bisphosphonates. Simvastatin is also an effective candidate that is reported to increase the expression of BMP-2. The thin-film of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO was plasma-polymerized onto titanium, and then HMDSO surface was activated by O2-plasma treatment. A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D technique demonstrated that simvastatin was immobilized on the plasma-treated surfaces due to introduction of O2-functional groups. At the soft tissue/implant interface, multi-grooved surface topographies and utilizing the adhesive proteins such as fibronectin or laminin-5 may help in providing a biological seal around the implant. At the oral fluid/implant interface, an alumina coating, F+-implantation and immobilization of anti-microbial peptides were responsible for inhibiting the biofilm accumulation.

  8. Global database of surface ocean particulate organic carbon export fluxes diagnosed from the 234Th technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. C. Le Moigne

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The oceanic biological carbon pump is an important factor in the global carbon cycle. Organic carbon is exported from the surface ocean mainly in the form of settling particles derived from plankton production in the upper layers of the ocean. The large variability in current estimates of the global strength of the biological carbon pump emphasises that our knowledge of a major planetary carbon flux remains poorly constrained. We present a database of 723 estimates of organic carbon export from the surface ocean derived from the 234Th technique. The dataset is archived on the data repository PANGEA® (www.pangea.de under doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.809717. Data were collected from tables in papers published between 1985 and early 2013 only. We also present sampling dates, publication dates and sampling areas. Most of the open ocean provinces are represented by several measurements. However, the Western Pacific, the Atlantic Arctic, South Pacific and the South Indian Ocean are not well represented. There is a variety of integration depths ranging from surface to 220 m. Globally the fluxes ranged from 0 to 1500 mg of C m−2 d−1.

  9. New technique to take samples from environmental surfaces using flocked nylon swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, G; Rynbäck, J; Loré, B

    2010-08-01

    Environmental surfaces near infected and/or colonised patients in hospitals are commonly contaminated with potentially pathogenic micro-organisms. At present, however, there is no standardised method for taking samples from surfaces in order to perform quantitative cultures. Usually contact plates or swabs are used, but these methods may give different results. The recovery rate of traditional swabbing, e.g. cotton or rayon, is poor. With a new type of swab utilising flocked nylon, the recovery may be enhanced up to three times compared with a rayon swab. In this study, we inoculated reference strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus hirae onto a bedside table and took samples 1h later when inocula were dry. Sequential samples were taken from the same surface. A new sampling technique using two sequential nylon swabs for each sample was validated. The efficiency of the sampling, percentage recovery of the inoculum and the variation of culture results obtained from repeated experiments are described. Enhanced efficiency and higher recovery of inoculum were demonstrated using two sequential flocked nylon swabs for sampling.

  10. Insights into the effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine-capped CdTe quantum dots on the structure and activity of human serum albumin by spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Haoyu; Yang, Xudan; Li, Meng; Han, Songlin; Liu, Yingxue [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China-America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong Province, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Tan, Xuejie [School of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Qilu University of Technology, Jinan, Shandong Province 250353 (China); Liu, Chunguang, E-mail: chunguangliu2013@sdu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China-America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong Province, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu, Rutao [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China-America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong Province, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) are a kind of nanostructured semiconductor crystals with the size range of 1–10 nm. Their unique photophysical properties and potential toxicity to human health have aroused wide concern of scientists and general public. However, the interaction mechanism of QDs on human serum albumin (HSA, the vital protein in human blood) from both structural and functional perspectives is rarely reported. In the present work, effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine-capped CdTe quantum dots with fluorescence emission peak at 612 nm (QDs-612) on the conformation and function of HSA were investigated by spectroscopic methods, molecular docking study and esterase activity assay. The hydrophobic interaction between HSA and QDs-612 was spontaneous with the binding constants calculated to be 6.85×10{sup 5} L mol{sup −1} (298 K) and 8.89×10{sup 5} L mol{sup −1} (308 K). The binding of QDs-612 to HSA induced the static quenching of fluorescence and the changes of secondary structure and microenvironment of Tyr-411 residue, which resulted in serious decrease on the hydrolysis of substrate p-nitrophenylacetate in esterase activity assay of HSA. This work confirms the possibility on direct interaction of QDs-612 with HSA and obtains a possible mechanism of relationship between conformation and function of HSA. - Highlights: • The interaction between CdTe QDs (QDs-612) and HSA is spontaneous. • The predominant force of the binding is hydrophobic interaction. • The interaction changes the secondary structure of HSA. • Tyr-411 residue of HSA expose to a hydrophilic environment. • The esterase activity of HSA decreases by adding QDs-612.

  11. Test of on-line alkali detector based on surface ionisation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiktorsson, L.-P.A.; Sjoestroem, L.K. [Chemical Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this project is to test on-line alkali metal measuring equipment in a reducing atmosphere. The equipment is based on surface ionisation (SI) technique. The tests have taken place in reactors of varying sizes, from mg per batch to continuous feeding of kg/h, non-pressurised and pressurised. On-line alkali metal detector prototypes have been tested in real gases at atmospheric and elevated pressure. The primary parts of the detector prototypes are a platinum filament and an ion collector. The first prototype (A) of the surface ionisation detector was tested in a mg-scale pyrolysis reactor, a so-called Pyrojector, by introducing the coal sample with a `pelletizer`. The generated detector signal, a current in the pA to {mu}A range, was directly proportional to the sample weight. The second prototype (B) of the surface ionisation detector was tested in a very tarry gas flow, 20 g tar/Nm{sup 3}, at atmospheric pressure in a continuously fed g/min-scale biomass pyrolysis apparatus. The generated detector signal, a current in the {mu}A range, was measured by a picoammeter and sampled on a computer. The feedstocks were pine and birch and straw. A third prototype (D) of the surface ionisation detector was tested during pressurised gasification in a fluidised bed reactor. The feedstock was birch. The prototype detected alkali in the gas, though the temperature was only 773-793 K in the vicinity of the detector. The filament temperature control has to be further developed and tested. 1 ref., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Statistical assessment of soil surface roughness for environmental applications using photogrammetric imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzahn, Philip; Rieke-Zapp, Dirk; Ludwig, Ralf

    2010-05-01

    Micro scale soil surface roughness is a crucial parameter in many environmental applications. Recent soil erosion studies have shown the impact of micro topography on soil erosion rates as well as overland flow generation due to soil crusting effects. Besides the above mentioned, it is widely recognized that the backscattered signal in SAR remote sensing is strongly influenced by soil surface roughness and by regular higher order tillage patterns. However, there is an ambiguity in the appropriate measurement technique and scale for roughness studies and SAR backscatter model parametrization. While different roughness indices depend on their measurement length, no satisfying roughness parametrization and measurement technique has been found yet, introducing large uncertainty in the interpretation of the radar backscatter. In the presented study, we computed high resolution digital elevation models (DEM) using a consumer grade digital camera in the frame of photogrammetric imaging techniques to represent soil micro topography from different soil surfaces (ploughed, harrowed, seedbed and crusted) . The retrieved DEMs showed sufficient accuracy, with an RMSE of a 1.64 mm compared to high accurate reference points,. For roughness characterization, we calculated different roughness indices (RMS height (s), autocorrelation length (l), tortuosity index (TB)). In an extensive statistical investigation we show the behaviour of the roughness indices for different acquisition sizes. Compared to results from profile measurements taken from literature and profiles generated out of the dataset, results indicate,that by using a three dimensional measuring device, the calculated roughness indices are more robust against outliers and even saturate faster with increasing acquisition size. Dependent on the roughness condition, the calculated values for the RMS-height saturate for ploughed fields at 2.3 m, for harrowed fields at 2.0 m and for crusted fields at 1.2 m. Results also

  13. Temperature variation on root surface with three root-end cavity preparation techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodrumlu Emre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Thermal changes can occur on the external root surface when root-end cavity preparation is performed, which may damage periodontal ligament cells and alveolar bone. Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temperature changes during preparation of the root-end cavities at 1 and 3 mm to the sectioned apical root surfaces when either tungsten carbide round bur, diamond round bur or ultrasonic diamond tip was used. Methods. Root-end resection was performed at 90° to the long axis of the root, 3 mm from the apex. Specimens were randomly divided into three groups of 12 teeth each for three different root-end cavity preparation techniques to be used, i.e. tungsten carbide bur, diamond bur and ultrasonic diamond retro tip. Thermocouples were used to measure temperature changes at 1 mm (T1 and 3 mm (T2 to the cutting plane during the preparations. Results. For T1, the lowest and the highest mean temperature increases of 3.53°C and 4.34°C were recorded for the carbide and diamond burs, respectively. For T2, the lowest and the highest mean temperature increases of 2.62°C and 4.39°C where recorded for the carbide and diamond burs, respectively. The mean temperatures with the ultrasonic tip were 3.68 and 3.04 ºC at T1 and T2 region, respectively. For root-end preparation, the ultrasonic preparation technique took the shortest preparation time (10.25 sec and the diamond bur took the longest time (28.17 sec. Conclusion. Ultrasonic retro tips and burs caused temperature to rise from 2.62° to 4.39°C, and these rises were within safety levels.

  14. Surface roughness classification using polarimetric radar data and ensemble learning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Mozos, Jesus; Peters, Jan; Larrañaga, Arantzazu; Gonzalez-Audicana, Maria; Verhoest, Niko E. C.; Casali, Javier

    2010-05-01

    The availability of space-borne radar sensors with polarimetric capabilities, such as RADARSAT-2, brings new expectations for the retrieval of soil moisture and roughness from remote sensing. The additional information provided by those sensors is expected to enable a separation of the confounding effects of soil moisture and roughness on the radar signal, resulting in more robust surface parameter retrievals. In this study we analyze two RADARSAT-2 Fine Quad-Pol scenes acquired during October 2008 over an agricultural area surrounding Pamplona (Spain). At that time of the year agricultural fields were bare and showed a variety of roughness conditions due to the different tillage operations performed. Approximately 50 agricultural fields were visited and their roughness condition was qualitatively evaluated. Fields were classified as rough, medium or smooth and their tillage direction was measured. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of different polarimetric variables to classify agricultural fields according to their roughness condition. With this aim a recently developed machine learning technique called ‘Random Forests' (RF) is used. RF is an ensemble learning technique that generates many classification trees and aggregates the individual results through majority vote. RF have been applied to a wide variety of phenomena, and in the recent years they have been used with success in several geoscience and remote sensing applications. In addition, RF can be used to estimate the importance of each predictive variable and to detect variable interactions. RF classification was applied at the pixel and at the field scale. Preliminary analyses showed better classification results for smooth and medium roughness fields than for rough ones. The research is ongoing and the influence of tillage direction and surface slope needs to be studied in detail.

  15. Tailoring liquid/solid interfacial energy transfer: fabrication and application of multiscale metallic surfaces with engineered heat transfer and electrolysis properties via femtosecond laser surface processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Troy P.; Wilson, Chris; Zuhlke, Craig A.; Kruse, Corey; Hassebrook, Anton; Somanas, Isra; Ndao, Sidy; Gogos, George; Alexander, Dennis

    2014-03-01

    Femtosecond Laser Surface Processing (FLSP) is a powerful technique for the fabrication of self-organized multiscale surface structures on metals that are critical for advanced control over energy transfer at a liquid/solid interface in applications such as electrolysis. The efficiency of the hydrogen evolution reaction on stainless steel 316 electrodes in a 1 molar potassium hydroxide solution is used to analyze the role of surface geometry to facilitate the phase conversion of the liquid to a gaseous state in the vicinity of the interface. It is found that the efficiency of the electrolysis process is directly related to the separation of micro-scale features on an electrode surface. The enhancement is attributed to the size of the valleys between microstructures controlling the contact between an evolving vapor bubble and the electrode surface. The results suggest an alternative pathway for the tailoring of interfacial energy transfer on structured surfaces separate from traditional benchmarks such as surface area and contact angle.

  16. Comparison of a novel surface laser scanning anthropometric technique to traditional methods for facial parameter measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Paula S; Ito, Yasushi; Shih, Alan M; Oestenstad, Riedar K; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning techniques could be used to collect accurate anthropometric measurements, compared with traditional methods. The use of an alternative 3D method would allow for quick collection of data that could be used to change the parameters used for facepiece design, improving fit and protection for a wider variety of faces. In our study, 10 facial dimensions were collected using both the traditional calipers and tape method and a Konica-Minolta Vivid9i laser scanner. Scans were combined using RapidForm XOR software to create a single complete facial geometry of the subject as a triangulated surface with an associated texture image from which to obtain measurements. A paired t-test was performed on subject means in each measurement by method. Nine subjects were used in this study: five males (one African-American and four Caucasian females) and four females displaying a range of facial dimensions. Five measurements showed significant differences (pLaser scanning measurements showed high precision and accuracy when compared with traditional methods. Significant differences found can be very small changes in measurements and are unlikely to present a practical difference. The laser scanning technique demonstrated reliable and quick anthropometric data collection for use in future projects in redesigning respirators.

  17. Manufacturing Techniques and Surface Engineering of Polymer Based Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery to Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichao Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of polymer based nanoparticles as a drug delivery carrier via pharmaceutical nano/microencapsulation has greatly promoted the development of nano- and micro-medicine in the past few decades. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA and chitosan, which are biodegradable and biocompatible polymers, have been approved by both the Food & Drug Administration (FDA and European Medicine Agency (EMA, making them ideal biomaterials that can be advanced from laboratory development to clinical oral and parental administrations. PLGA and chitosan encapsulated nanoparticles (NPs have successfully been developed as new oral drug delivery systems with demonstrated high efficacy. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the fabrication of PLGA and chitosan particulate systems using nano/microencapsulation methods, the current progress and the future outlooks of the nanoparticulate drug delivery systems. Especially, we focus on the formulations and nano/micro-encapsulation techniques using top-down techniques. It also addresses how the different phases including the organic and aqueous ones in the emulsion system interact with each other and subsequently influence the properties of the drug delivery system. Besides, surface modification strategies which can effectively engineer intrinsic physicochemical properties are summarised. Finally, future perspectives and potential directions of PLGA and chitosan nano/microencapsulated drug systems are outlined.

  18. Surface deformation of active volcanic areas retrieved with the SBAS-DInSAR technique: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zeni

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive overview of the surface deformation retrieval capability of the Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR algorithm, referred to as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS technique, in the context of active volcanic areas. In particular, after a brief description of the algorithm some experiments relevant to three selected case-study areas are presented. First, we concentrate on the application of the SBAS algorithm to a single-orbit scenario, thus considering a set of SAR data composed by images acquired on descending orbits by the European Remote Sensing (ERS radar sensors and relevant to the Long Valley caldera (eastern California area. Subsequently, we address the capability of the SBAS technique in a multipleorbit context by referring to Mt. Etna volcano (southern Italy test site, with respect to which two different ERS data set, composed by images acquired both on ascending and descending orbits, are available. Finally, we take advantage of the capability of the algorithm to work in a multi-platform scenario by jointly exploiting two different sets of SAR images collected by the ERS and the Environment Satellite (ENVISAT radar sensors in the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy area. The presented results demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm to investigate the deformation field in active volcanic areas and the potential of the DInSAR methodologies within routine surveillance scenario.

  19. Adaptive Neural Control of Pure-Feedback Nonlinear Time-Delay Systems via Dynamic Surface Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min Wang; Xiaoping Liu; Peng Shi

    2011-12-01

    This paper is concerned with robust stabilization problem for a class of nonaffine pure-feedback systems with unknown time-delay functions and perturbed uncertainties. Novel continuous packaged functions are introduced in advance to remove unknown nonlinear terms deduced from perturbed uncertainties and unknown time-delay functions, which avoids the functions with control law to be approximated by radial basis function (RBF) neural networks. This technique combining implicit function and mean value theorems overcomes the difficulty in controlling the nonaffine pure-feedback systems. Dynamic surface control (DSC) is used to avoid "the explosion of complexity" in the backstepping design. Design difficulties from unknown time-delay functions are overcome using the function separation technique, the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals, and the desirable property of hyperbolic tangent functions. RBF neural networks are employed to approximate desired virtual controls and desired practical control. Under the proposed adaptive neural DSC, the number of adaptive parameters required is reduced significantly, and semiglobal uniform ultimate boundedness of all of the signals in the closed-loop system is guaranteed. Simulation studies are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed design scheme.

  20. Techniques for Transition and Surface Temperature Measurements on Projectiles at Hypersonic Velocities- A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, M. C.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    A research effort to advance techniques for determining transition location and measuring surface temperatures on graphite-tipped projectiles in hypersonic flight in a ballistic range is described. Projectiles were launched at muzzle velocities of approx. 4.7 km/sec into air at pressures of 190-570 Torr. Most launches had maximum pitch and yaw angles of 2.5-5 degrees at pressures of 380 Torr and above and 3-6 degrees at pressures of 190-380 Torr. Arcjet-ablated and machined, bead-blasted projectiles were launched; special cleaning techniques had to be developed for the latter class of projectiles. Improved methods of using helium to remove the radiating gas cap around the projectiles at the locations where ICCD (intensified charge coupled device) camera images were taken are described. Two ICCD cameras with a wavelength sensitivity range of 480-870 nm have been used in this program for several years to obtain images. In the last year, a third camera, with a wavelength sensitivity range of 1.5-5 microns [in the infrared (IR)], has been added. ICCD and IR camera images of hemisphere nose and 70 degree sphere-cone nose projectiles at velocities of 4.0-4.7 km/sec are presented. The ICCD images clearly show a region of steep temperature rise indicative of transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Preliminary temperature data for the graphite projectile noses are presented.

  1. Thermal transport study across interface “nanostructured solid surface / fluid” by photoacoustic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitenko, K.; Isaiev, M.; Pastushenko, A.; Andrusenko, D.; Kuzmich, A.; Lysenko, V.; Burbelo, R.

    2017-01-01

    In the paper the experimental study of heat transport across the interface “porous silicon/liquid” by photoacoustic technique is reported. Two cases with and without liquid covering of porous silicon surface were considered. Thermal perturbations were excited at the surface of porous silicon as a result of absorption of the light with modulated intensity. The resulting thermal-elastic stresses arising in the system were registered with piezoelectric transducer. The amplitude-frequency dependencies of the voltage on the piezoelectric electrodes were measured. The presence of the liquid film leads to decreasing of the amplitude of photoacoustic signal as a result of the thermal energy evacuation from the porous silicon into the liquid. The experimental dependencies were fitted with the results of simulation that takes into account heat fluxes separation at the porous silicon/liquid interface. With the presented method one can precisely measure heat fluxes transferred from the solid into contacting fluid. Moreover, the presented approach can be easily adopted for the thermal conductivity study of the different nanofluids as well as thermal resistance at the interface nanostructured solid/fluid.

  2. Normal emission photoelectron diffraction: a new technique for determining surface structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevan, S.D.

    1980-05-01

    One technique, photoelectron diffraction (PhD) is characterized. It has some promise in surmounting some of the problems of LEED. In PhD, the differential (angle-resolved) photoemission cross-section of a core level localized on an adsorbate atom is measured as a function of some final state parameter. The photoemission final state consists of two components, one of which propagates directly to the detector and another which scatters off the surface and then propagates to the detector. These are added coherently, and interference between the two manifests itself as cross-section oscillations which are sensitive to the local structure around the absorbing atom. We have shown that PhD deals effectively with two- and probably also three-dimensionally disordered systems. Its non-damaging and localized, atom-specific nature gives PhD a good deal of promise in dealing with molecular overlayer systems. It is concluded that while PhD will never replace LEED, it may provide useful, complementary and possibly also more accurate surface structural information.

  3. Motor unit action potential conduction velocity estimated from surface electromyographic signals using image processing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Fabiano Araujo; Carvalho, João Luiz Azevedo; Miosso, Cristiano Jacques; de Andrade, Marcelino Monteiro; da Rocha, Adson Ferreira

    2015-09-17

    In surface electromyography (surface EMG, or S-EMG), conduction velocity (CV) refers to the velocity at which the motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) propagate along the muscle fibers, during contractions. The CV is related to the type and diameter of the muscle fibers, ion concentration, pH, and firing rate of the motor units (MUs). The CV can be used in the evaluation of contractile properties of MUs, and of muscle fatigue. The most popular methods for CV estimation are those based on maximum likelihood estimation (MLE). This work proposes an algorithm for estimating CV from S-EMG signals, using digital image processing techniques. The proposed approach is demonstrated and evaluated, using both simulated and experimentally-acquired multichannel S-EMG signals. We show that the proposed algorithm is as precise and accurate as the MLE method in typical conditions of noise and CV. The proposed method is not susceptible to errors associated with MUAP propagation direction or inadequate initialization parameters, which are common with the MLE algorithm. Image processing -based approaches may be useful in S-EMG analysis to extract different physiological parameters from multichannel S-EMG signals. Other new methods based on image processing could also be developed to help solving other tasks in EMG analysis, such as estimation of the CV for individual MUs, localization and tracking of innervation zones, and study of MU recruitment strategies.

  4. Efficacy of StaMPS technique for monitoring surface deformation in L'Aquila, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, A.; Dwivedi, R.; Narayan, A. B.; Dikshit, O.; Singh, A. K.

    2014-11-01

    This research work investigates the efficacy of the Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (StaMPS) in measuring the surface deformation over the L'Aquila region, Italy just before an event of earthquake of magnitude Mw 6.3 by using seven descending Envisat C-Band ASAR images. The results show that the StaMPS technique successfully extracted sufficient number of Persistent Scatterers (PS) to derive a one dimensional (1D) time series displacement map which shows the deformation rates up to 59 mm/year in the satellite Line of Sight (LOS) direction and 50.8 mm/year in the direction opposite to the satellite LOS. Further, several deformation gradients are also observed from this map which indicate the occurrence of multiple crustal movement mechanism. Another dataset of 14 ASAR images is processed covering a time period before and after the earthquake in the study area to validate the results obtained by the previous dataset. We observed that the generated displacement map follows the deformation characteristics of the earlier displacement map in terms of magnitude and surface movement. We conclude that the generated displacement maps validate the presence of a normal fault mechanism with a tectonic process stretching in a NW-SE direction as predicted by earlier research studies.

  5. Different surface preparation techniques of porcelain repaired with composite resin and fracture resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Helmy Khalid Abd Wahab

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Porcelain from prosthesis such as crown or bridge can be fractured if exposed to trauma; and, can be repaired at chairside using composite resin. Aim : To investigate the fracture resistance of few techniques of surface preparation in repairing fractured porcelain using composite resin. Materials and Methods : Eighty samples of porcelain blocks were divided into 4 groups for different surface preparations, such as, Cimara repairing kit; porcelain etch kit containing hydrofluoric acid; Panavia F resin cement; and, sandblasting using aluminium oxide, before composite resin (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE was bonded to the prepared porcelain blocks. Twenty others samples in the control group comprised of pure porcelain blocks. The fracture resistance of each sample was tested using Instron machine (UK. Results : With the exception of the group repaired using hydrofluoric acid (3.04±1.04 Mpa, all the other groups showed significant difference in the fracture resistance values when compared to the control group (3.05 ± 1.42 MPa at P<0.05. Conclusions : Etching of the porcelain blocks with hydrofluoric acid holds promise in the repair of fractured porcelain with composite resin at chairside.

  6. DISTINCTION OF MECHANICALLY PROCESSED WOOD SURFACES WITH SIMILAR QUALITIES USING SUNSET LASER TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Carolina de Almeida Andrade

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ASTM D 1666-11 (2011 norm classifies the quality of wood surface pieces after its mechanical processing. Although this classification is difficult to achieve visually, the use of some tools, such as solid state laser, can facilitate this classification. The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of sunset laser to qualify mechanically processed surfaces with similar visual qualities. We used a log from the base of a Khaya ivorensis tree and one from a K. senegalensis tree, both 11 years old. 22 specimens of dimensions 600x140x30 mm (CxLxE were made of each species. The specimens were flattened with speeds of 2400, 3600 and 4000 min-1 and advanced speeds were predetermined in 6 and 15 m.min-1. Then the samples were illuminated with sunset laser and photographed at high resolution, the images were transferred to the software Image J. To evaluate the sunset laser, areas of defects in wood that are classified as regular and bad by ASTM D 1666-11 (2011 were used. There was a difference in classification of wood defects between the two methods used, from the 31 specimens classified as regularly by visual analysis, 8 of them were classified as bad by the laser method. The use of solid-state laser in the sunset laser technique was more efficient in evaluating small differences in mechanically processed wood defects compared to visual evaluation.

  7. Investigation of anti-Relaxation coatings for alkali-metal vapor cells using surface science techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seltzer, S. J.; Michalak, D. J.; Donaldson, M. H.; Balabas, M. V.; Barber, S. K.; Bernasek, S. L.; Bouchiat, M.-A.; Hexemer, A.; Hibberd, A. M.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Jaye, C.; Karaulanov, T.; Narducci, F. A.; Rangwala, S. A.; Robinson, H. G.; Shmakov, A. K.; Voronov, D. L.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Pines, A.; Budker, D.

    2010-10-11

    Many technologies based on cells containing alkali-metal atomic vapor benefit from the use of antirelaxation surface coatings in order to preserve atomic spin polarization. In particular, paraffin has been used for this purpose for several decades and has been demonstrated to allow an atom to experience up to 10?000 collisions with the walls of its container without depolarizing, but the details of its operation remain poorly understood. We apply modern surface and bulk techniques to the study of paraffin coatings in order to characterize the properties that enable the effective preservation of alkali spin polarization. These methods include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also compare the light-induced atomic desorption yields of several different paraffin materials. Experimental results include the determination that crystallinity of the coating material is unnecessary, and the detection of C=C double bonds present within a particular class of effective paraffin coatings. Further study should lead to the development of more robust paraffin antirelaxation coatings, as well as the design and synthesis of new classes of coating materials.

  8. Multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehle, Jean-Louis [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Samartzis, Peter C., E-mail: sama@iesl.forth.gr [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Stamataki, Katerina [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, Voutes, 71003, Heraklion (Greece); Piel, Jean-Philippe [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Katsoprinakis, George E.; Papadakis, Vassilis [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Schimowski, Xavier [Sopralab, 7 rue du Moulin des Bruyeres, 92400 Courbevoie (France); Rakitzis, T. Peter [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, Voutes, 71003, Heraklion (Greece); Loppinet, Benoit [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton 71110, Heraklion Crete (Greece)

    2014-03-31

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is an established technique, particularly useful for thickness measurements of thin films. It measures polarization rotation after a single reflection of a beam of light on the measured substrate at a given incidence angle. In this paper, we report the development of multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry where the light beam reflects multiple times on the sample. We have investigated both theoretically and experimentally the effect of sample reflectivity, number of reflections (passes), angles of incidence and detector dynamic range on ellipsometric observables tanΨ and cosΔ. The multiple pass approach provides increased sensitivity to small changes in Ψ and Δ, opening the way for single measurement determination of optical thickness T, refractive index n and absorption coefficient k of thin films, a significant improvement over the existing techniques. Based on our results, we discuss the strengths, the weaknesses and possible applications of this technique. - Highlights: • We present multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry (MPSE), a multi-pass approach to ellipsometry. • Different detectors, samples, angles of incidence and number of passes were tested. • N passes improve polarization ratio sensitivity to the power of N. • N reflections improve phase shift sensitivity by a factor of N. • MPSE can significantly improve thickness measurements in thin films.

  9. Selective reflection technique as a probe to monitor the growth of a metallic thin film on dielectric surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, Weliton Soares; Chevrollier, Martine; de Silans, Thierry Passerat

    2013-01-01

    Controlling thin film formation is technologically challenging. The knowledge of physical properties of the film and of the atoms in the surface vicinity can help improve control over the film growth. We investigate the use of the well-established selective reflection technique to probe the thin film during its growth, simultaneously monitoring the film thickness, the atom-surface van der Waals interaction and the vapor properties in the surface vicinity.

  10. Textured surface structures formed using new techniques on transparent conducting Al-doped zinc oxide films prepared by magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, Tadatsugu [Optoelectronic Device System R& D Center, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Nonoichi, Ishikawa 921-8501 (Japan); Miyata, Toshihiro, E-mail: tmiyata@neptune.kanazawa-it.ac.jp [Optoelectronic Device System R& D Center, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Nonoichi, Ishikawa 921-8501 (Japan); Uozaki, Ryousuke [Optoelectronic Device System R& D Center, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Nonoichi, Ishikawa 921-8501 (Japan); Sai, Hitoshi; Koida, Takashi [Research Center for Photovoltaics, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2016-09-01

    Surface-textured Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films formed using two new techniques based on magnetron sputtering deposition were developed by optimizing the light scattering properties to be suitable for transparent electrode applications in thin-film silicon solar cells. Scrambled egg-like surface-textured AZO films were prepared using a new texture formation technique that post-etched pyramidal surface-textured AZO films prepared under deposition conditions suppressing c-axis orientation. In addition, double surface-textured AZO films were prepared using another new texture formation technique that completely removed, by post-etching, the pyramidal surface-textured AZO films previously prepared onto the initially deposited low resistivity AZO films; simultaneously, the surface of the low resistivity films was slightly etched. However, the obtained very high haze value in the range from the near ultraviolet to visible light in the scrambled egg-like surface-textured AZO films did not contribute significantly to the obtainable photovoltaic properties in the solar cells fabricated using the films. Significant light scattering properties as well as a low sheet resistance could be achieved in the double surface-textured AZO films. In addition, a significant improvement of external quantum efficiency in the range from the near ultraviolet to visible light was achieved in superstrate-type n-i-p μc-Si:H solar cells fabricated using a double surface-textured AZO film prepared under optimized conditions as the transparent electrode. - Highlights: • Double surface-textured AZO films prepared using a new texture formation technique • Extensive light scattering properties with low sheet resistance achieved in the double surface-textured AZO films • Improved external quantum efficiency of μc-Si:H solar cells using a double surface-textured AZO film.

  11. Infiltration Behaviour of Polymer-Modified Porous Concrete and Porous Asphalt Surfaces Used in SuDS Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Sañudo Fontaneda, Luis Ángel; Rodríguez Hernández, Jorge; Calzada Pérez, Miguel Ángel; Castro Fresno, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Permeable pavements are one of the world’s most widely applied techniques for source control in sustainable drainage systems. Porous concrete (PC) and porous asphalt (PA) are two of the most studied surfaces in terms of runoff reduction. Nevertheless, previous research has highlighted a lack of a comprehensive laboratory methodology for the analysis of the topographical variables, runoff surface length (RSL) and surface slope (SS), and their impact on the infiltration behaviour of these porou...

  12. Monte Carlo Technique Used to Model the Degradation of Internal Spacecraft Surfaces by Atomic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2004-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is one of the predominant constituents of Earth's upper atmosphere. It is created by the photodissociation of molecular oxygen (O2) into single O atoms by ultraviolet radiation. It is chemically very reactive because a single O atom readily combines with another O atom or with other atoms or molecules that can form a stable oxide. The effects of atomic oxygen on the external surfaces of spacecraft in low Earth orbit can have dire consequences for spacecraft life, and this is a well-known and much studied problem. Much less information is known about the effects of atomic oxygen on the internal surfaces of spacecraft. This degradation can occur when openings in components of the spacecraft exterior exist that allow the entry of atomic oxygen into regions that may not have direct atomic oxygen attack but rather scattered attack. Openings can exist because of spacecraft venting, microwave cavities, and apertures for Earth viewing, Sun sensors, or star trackers. The effects of atomic oxygen erosion of polymers interior to an aperture on a spacecraft were simulated at the NASA Glenn Research Center by using Monte Carlo computational techniques. A two-dimensional model was used to provide quantitative indications of the attenuation of atomic oxygen flux as a function of the distance into a parallel-walled cavity. The model allows the atomic oxygen arrival direction, the Maxwell Boltzman temperature, and the ram energy to be varied along with the interaction parameters of the degree of recombination upon impact with polymer or nonreactive surfaces, the initial reaction probability, the reaction probability dependence upon energy and angle of attack, degree of specularity of scattering of reactive and nonreactive surfaces, and the degree of thermal accommodation upon impact with reactive and non-reactive surfaces to be varied to allow the model to produce atomic oxygen erosion geometries that replicate actual experimental results from space. The degree of

  13. Technique for the estimation of surface temperatures from embedded temperature sensing for rapid, high energy surface deposition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Tyson R.; Schunk, Peter Randall; Roberts, Scott Alan

    2014-07-01

    Temperature histories on the surface of a body that has been subjected to a rapid, highenergy surface deposition process can be di cult to determine, especially if it is impossible to directly observe the surface or attach a temperature sensor to it. In this report, we explore two methods for estimating the temperature history of the surface through the use of a sensor embedded within the body very near to the surface. First, the maximum sensor temperature is directly correlated with the peak surface temperature. However, it is observed that the sensor data is both delayed in time and greatly attenuated in magnitude, making this approach unfeasible. Secondly, we propose an algorithm that involves tting the solution to a one-dimensional instantaneous energy solution problem to both the sensor data and to the results of a one-dimensional CVFEM code. This algorithm is shown to be able to estimate the surface temperature 20 C.

  14. Spectroscopic modeling and characterization of a collisionally confined laser-ablated plasma plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, M E; Mancini, R C; Bailey, J; Filuk, A; Clark, B; Lake, P; Abdallah, J

    2007-11-01

    Plasma plumes produced by laser ablation are an established method for manufacturing the high quality stoichiometrically complex thin films used for a variety of optical, photoelectric, and superconducting applications. The state and reproducibility of the plasma close to the surface of the irradiated target plays a critical role in producing high quality thin films. Unfortunately, this dense plasma has historically eluded quantifiable characterization. The difficulty in modeling the plume formation arises in the accounting for the small amount of energy deposited into the target when physical properties of these exotic target materials are not known. In this work we obtain the high density state of the plasma plume through the use of an experimental spectroscopic technique and a custom spectroscopic model. In addition to obtaining detailed temperature and density profiles, issues regarding line broadening and opacity for spectroscopic characterization will be addressed for this unique environment.

  15. Advancement of gamma-spectroscopic measuring systems of BfS and adaptation of measuring and evaluation techniques to the requirements of emergency response. Final report; Weiterentwicklung der aero-gammaspektrometrischen Messsysteme des BfS und Anpassung der Mess- und Auswerteverfahren an die Anforderungen des Notfallschutzes. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetz, Rainer; Mameghani, Raphael; Stuchels, Regina; Hummel, Lothar (comps.)

    2015-08-15

    The final report on advancement of gamma-spectroscopic measuring systems of BfS and adaptation of measuring and evaluation techniques to the requirements of emergency response covers the following issues: results of literature search, calculation of geometric factors, calibration for the helicopter, combination of geometric factors and calibration, measuring flights, detection limit and performance optimization, identification of activities in the air volume.

  16. Effect of different splint removal techniques on the surface roughness of human enamel: a three-dimensional optical profilometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cehreli, Zafer C; Lakshmipathy, Manas; Yazici, Ruya

    2008-04-01

    Because there is no standard protocol for the removal of resin-based materials that retain semi-rigid trauma splints on teeth, iatrogenic enamel damage caused by various splint removal techniques has remained unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of five different resin removal techniques (H6/H7 scaler, ultrafine diamond bur, ultrasonic scaler, 16-blade tungsten carbide bur, and Sof-Lex disks) on the surface roughness of human enamel. Three-dimensional white-light interferometry, a non-contact profilometry technique, was used to obtain qualitative and quantitative measurements of surface roughness both at baseline and after finishing procedures. Statistical analysis using Friedman test and Wilcoxon signed ranks test showed that the roughest enamel surface was obtained after splint removal with the hand scaler (P enamel surface was obtained after removal of resin with Sof-Lex disks and the 16-blade tungsten carbide bur (P < 0.05).

  17. COMPARISON OF INTERFACIAL SURFACE TENSION AND CAPILLARITY OF MAXILLARY COMPLETE DENTURES, FABRICATED BY CONVENTIONAL CUVETTE TECHNIQUE AND INJECTION MOLDING TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalina Georgieva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this in vivo study is to register the forces necessary to displace maxillary complete dentures fabricated by compression molding and injection molding techniques on one and the same patient and to compare the interfacial surface tension and capillarity which are achieved by both techniques. Material/Methods: Two maxillary complete dentures are made for each patient (total number of patients is 30 using both technologies. The magnitude of dislodging force is measured by a dynamometer. Results: Mean ± standard deviation for conventional cuvette technique is 17,53N ± 12,11N. Mean ± standard deviation for injection molding technique is 20,73N ± 13,89N. Analysis of variance (ANOVA revealed statistically significant differences in results achieved by conventional cuvette technique and injection molding technology. The results of injection technique were higher than those of compression molding technique (F=123,676, p< 0,001. Conclusions: Based on the results we suggest a standard for dislodging force of maxillary complete dentures fabricated by conventional cuvette technique- 13N, and by injection molding technology-15,5N. These values would guarantee good interfacial surface tension and capillarity. The injection molding technique was found to produce better fitting maxillary complete dentures when compared to compression molding technique. This would ensure better retention, less traumatic manifestations after insertion and higher patient’s comfort and satisfaction.

  18. Novel, near-infrared spectroscopic, label-free, techniques to assess bone abnormalities such as Paget's disease, osteoporosis and bone fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordillo, Diana C.; Sordillo, Laura A.; Shi, Lingyan; Budansky, Yury; Sordillo, Peter P.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-02-01

    Near- infrared (NIR) light with wavelengths from 650 nm to 950 nm (known as the first NIR window) has conventionally been used as a non-invasive technique that can reach deeper penetration depths through media than light at shorter wavelengths. Recently, several novel, NIR, label-free, techniques have been developed to assess Paget's disease of bone, osteoporosis and bone microfractures. We designed a Bone Optical Analyzer (BOA) which utilizes the first window to measure changes of Hb and HbO2. Paget's disease is marked by an increase in vascularization in bones, and this device can enable easy diagnosis and more frequent monitoring of the patient's condition, without exposing him to a high cumulative dose of radiation. We have also used inverse imaging algorithms to reconstruct 2D and 3D maps of the bone's structure. This device could be used to assess diseases such as osteoporosis. Using 800 nm femtosecond excitation with two-photon (2P) microscopy, we acquired 2PM images of the periosteum and spatial frequency spectra (based on emission of collagen) from the periosteal regions. This technique can provide information on the structure of the periosteum and can detect abnormalities which may be an indication of disease. Most recently, we showed that longer NIR wavelengths in the second and third NIR windows (1100 nm-1350 nm, 1600 nm-1870 nm), could be used to image bone microfractures. Use of NIR light could allow for repeated studies in patients with diseases such as Paget's and osteoporosis quickly and non-invasively, and could impact the current management for these diseases.

  19. The role of chromatographic and chiroptical spectroscopic techniques and methodologies in support of drug discovery for atropisomeric drug inhibitors of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jun; Wang, Chunlei; Traeger, Sarah C; Discenza, Lorell; Obermeier, Mary T; Tymiak, Adrienne A; Zhang, Yingru

    2017-03-03

    Atropisomers are stereoisomers resulting from hindered bond rotation. From synthesis of pure atropisomers, characterization of their interconversion thermodynamics to investigation of biological stereoselectivity, the evaluation of drug candidates subject to atropisomerism creates special challenges and can be complicated in both early drug discovery and later drug development. In this paper, we demonstrate an array of analytical techniques and systematic approaches to study the atropisomerism of drug molecules to meet these challenges. Using a case study of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor drug candidates at Bristol-Myers Squibb, we present the analytical strategies and methodologies used during drug discovery including the detection of atropisomers, the determination of their relative composition, the identification of relative chirality, the isolation of individual atropisomers, the evaluation of interconversion kinetics, and the characterization of chiral stability in the solid state and in solution. In vivo and in vitro stereo-stability and stereo-selectivity were investigated as well as the pharmacological significance of any changes in atropisomer ratios. Techniques applied in these studies include analytical and preparative enantioselective supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC), enantioselective high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), circular dichroism (CD), and mass spectrometry (MS). Our experience illustrates how atropisomerism can be a very complicated issue in drug discovery and why a thorough understanding of this phenomenon is necessary to provide guidance for pharmaceutical development. Analytical techniques and methodologies facilitate key decisions during the discovery of atropisomeric drug candidates by characterizing time-dependent physicochemical properties that can have significant biological implications and relevance to pharmaceutical development plans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Utilization of spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques to determine plasticizers in PVC; Utilizacao de tecnicas espectroscopicas e cromatograficas na determinacao de plastificantes em PVC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Marcos R.; Chinelatto, Marcelo A. [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Centro de Caracterizacao e Desenvolvimento de Materiais]. E-mails: monteiro@ccdm.ufscar.br; mchinelatto@ccdm.ufscar.br; Cordeiro, Paulo J.M. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Central de Analises Quimicas e Instrumentais]. E-mail: cordeiro@iqsc.usp.br

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this work was to identify plasticizers in soft PVC toys using gas chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance as combined techniques. After extraction procedure the results of GC/NMR allowed to determine the kind of plasticizers. The results showed that DOP was found in five commercial samples investigated. The use of this phthalate in toys and children's articles are forbidden in some countries. In the quantification of soluble heavy metals by atomic absorption the level of Pb and Cd are below 63,3 mg Kg{sup -1} and 2,0 mg Kg{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  1. Traditional Versus Congruent Arc Latarjet Technique: Effect on Surface Area for Union and Bone Width Surrounding Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Guillaume D; Vopat, Bryan G; Parada, Stephen; Cohn, Randy; Makani, Amun; Sanchez, George; Golijanin, Petar; Beaulieu-Jones, Brendin R; Sanchez, Anthony; Provencher, Matthew T

    2017-05-01

    To compare the surface area available for bony contact and the width of bone on each side of the Latarjet fixation screws in the traditional Latarjet technique versus the congruent arc modification of the Latarjet technique. Computed tomographic scans of 24 shoulders in patients with glenohumeral instability who underwent multiplanar reconstruction measurements with multiple dimensions of the coracoid. The surface area of the coracoid available for bony contact with the anterior glenoid and width of bone on each side of a 3.5-mm screw was compared for the traditional Latarjet technique versus the congruent arc modification. The surface area available for bony contact to the anterior glenoid was 5.65 ± 1.08 cm(2) using the traditional Latarjet technique compared with 3.64 ± 0.93 cm(2) using the congruent arc modification of the Latarjet technique (P Latarjet technique compared with 4.1 ± 1.0 mm using the congruent arc modification (P Latarjet technique has greater bony contact with the glenoid and greater bone width on each side of the screws compared with the congruent arc modification of the Latarjet technique. This potentially allows for a larger surface for healing in the traditional Latarjet technique. Moreover, because of smaller width of the bone around the screw, the congruent arc modification is potentially less tolerant of screw-positioning error compared with the traditional Latarjet technique. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Si(100)-Sb 2{times}1 and Ge(100) 2{times}1 surfaces: A multi-technique study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, M.

    1993-08-01

    The electronic and geometric structures of the clean and Sb terminated Si(100)2{times}1 and Ge(100)-2{times}1 surfaces have been investigated using a multi-technique approach. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), surface extended X-ray absorption fine structure (SEXAFS) spectroscopy and angle-integrated core-level photoemission electron spectroscopy (PES) were employed to measure the surface symmetry, defect structure, relevant bond lengths, atomic coordination and electronic structure. By employing a multi-technique approach, it is possible to correlate changes in the geometric structure to specific features of the core-level lineshape of the substrate. This allows for the assignment of components of the core-level lineshape to be assigned to specific surface and near-surface atoms.

  3. Comparison of surface roughness of nanofilled and nanohybrid composite resins after polishing with a multi-step technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itanto, B. S. H.; Usman, M.; Margono, A.

    2017-08-01

    To compare the surface roughness of nanofilled and nanohybrid composite resins after polishing using a multi-step technique. 40 composite resin specimens were divided into two groups (20 nanofilled specimens using Filtek Z350 XT [group A] and 20 nanohybrid specimens using Filtek Z250 XT [group B]), prepared, and then polished. After immersion in artificial saliva for 24 hours, the surface roughness was measured with a surface roughness tester. The mean surface roughness results along with the standard deviation of group A were 0.0967 μm ± 0.0174, while the results of group B were 0.1217 μm ± 0.0244. Statistically (with p = 0.05), there were significant differences between each group. The surface roughness of a nanofilled composite resin after polishing with a multi-step technique is better than that of a nanohybrid composite resin.

  4. A spectroscopic study of uranium(VI) interaction with magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Aamrani, S. [Chemical Engineering Department, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), ETSEIB-UPC H4, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gimenez, J. [Chemical Engineering Department, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), ETSEIB-UPC H4, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: francisco.javier.gimenez@upc.edu; Rovira, M. [Chemical Engineering Department, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), ETSEIB-UPC H4, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CTM Centre Tecnologic, Avda. Bases de Manresa 1, Manresa (Spain); Seco, F. [CTM Centre Tecnologic, Avda. Bases de Manresa 1, Manresa (Spain); Grive, M. [ENVIROS Spain SL, Passeig de Rubi 29-31, Valldoreix (Spain); Bruno, J. [ENVIROS Spain SL, Passeig de Rubi 29-31, Valldoreix (Spain); Duro, L. [ENVIROS Spain SL, Passeig de Rubi 29-31, Valldoreix (Spain); Pablo, J. de [Chemical Engineering Department, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), ETSEIB-UPC H4, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CTM Centre Tecnologic, Avda. Bases de Manresa 1, Manresa (Spain)

    2007-08-31

    The uranium sorbed onto commercial magnetite has been characterized by using two different spectroscopic techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Magnetite samples have been put in contact with uranium(VI) solutions in conditions in which a high uranium uptake is expected. After several days, the magnetite surface has been analysed by XPS and EXAFS. The XPS results obtained are not conclusive regarding the uranium oxidation state in the magnetite surface. On the other hand, the results obtained with the EXAFS technique show that the uranium-magnetite sample spectrum has characteristics from both the UO{sub 2} and schoepite spectra, e.g. a relatively high coordination number of equatorial oxygens and two axial oxygens, respectively. These results would indicate that the uranium sorbed onto magnetite would be a mixture of uranium(IV) and uranium(VI)

  5. A Simplified Technique to Measure Plaque on the Intaglio Surfaces of Complete Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almas, Khalid; Salameh, Ziad; Kutkut, Ahmad; Al Doubali, Ahmad

    2015-04-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a simplified quantitative denture plaque index that could help dentists to motivate denture patients to maintain optimal oral hygiene. The secondary aim was to assess specific areas of dentures more prone to accumulate plaque and subjects' oral hygiene habits related to their dentures. One hundred subjects who wore maxillary and/or mandibular complete dentures for at least one year were included in the study as a powered sample. Fifteen females and 85 males, age range 45-75 years, were recruited. The study was carried out at King Saud University (KSU), College of Dentistry. A plaque disclosing solution was used to assess the plaque covered areas of denture. A quantitative percentage (10 x 10%) score index was developed by assessing plaque scores from digital images of intaglio surfaces of the dentures. The weighted kappa method was used to assess inter-examiner agreement in the main study. The new denture plaque index was identified as ASKD-DPI (Almas, Salameh, Kutkut, and Doubali-Denture Plaque Index). It ranged from 0 - 100%, and reflected the percentage of the intaglio surfaces of maxillary and mandibular complete dentures that contained plaque. It also classified quantitative percentages: 30 subjects ranged from 0 - 30% (low DPI), 50 subjects ranged from 31 - 70% (moderate DPI), and 20 subjects ranged from 71 - 100% (high DPI) denture plaque score. A simplified denture plaque index (ASKD-DPI) technique was developed and tested in this study. ASKD-DPI may be used for evaluating denture plaque scores, monitoring denture hygiene, and measuring compliance of patients regarding plaque control for complete dentures.

  6. Spectroscopic and asteroseismic analysis of the remarkable main-sequence A star KIC 11145123

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takada-Hidai, Masahide; Kurtz, Donald W.; Shibahashi, Hiromoto

    2017-01-01

    A spectroscopic analysis was carried out to clarify the properties of KIC 11145123 - the first main-sequence star with a directly measured core-to-surface rotation profile - based on spectra observed with the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) of the Subaru telescope. The atmospheric parameters (T...... slow rotation. In particular, we show that there is no evidence of any secondary companion star, and we put stringent limits on the possible mass of any such purported companion through the phase modulation technique....

  7. Novel 3D imaging techniques for improved understanding of planetary surface geomorphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Jan-Peter

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the role of different planetary surface formation processes within our Solar System is one of the fundamental goals of planetary science research. There has been a revolution in planetary surface observations over the past decade for Mars and the Moon, especially in 3D imaging of surface shape (down to resolutions of 75cm) and subsequent correction for terrain relief of imagery from orbiting and co-registration of lander and rover robotic images. We present some of the recent highlights including 3D modelling of surface shape from the ESA Mars Express HRSC (High Resolution Stereo Camera), see [1], [2] at 30-100m grid-spacing; and then co-registered to HRSC using a resolution cascade of 20m DTMs from NASA MRO stereo-CTX and 0.75m DTMs from MRO stereo-HiRISE [3]. This has opened our eyes to the formation mechanisms of megaflooding events, such as the formation of Iani Vallis and the upstream blocky terrain, to crater lakes and receding valley cuts [4]. A comparable set of products is now available for the Moon from LROC-WA at 100m [5] and LROC-NA at 1m [6]. Recently, a very novel technique for the super-resolution restoration (SRR) of stacks of images has been developed at UCL [7]. First examples shown will be of the entire MER-A Spirit rover traverse taking a stack of 25cm HiRISE to generate a corridor of SRR images along the rover traverse of 5cm imagery of unresolved features such as rocks, created as a consequence of meteoritic bombardment, ridge and valley features. This SRR technique will allow us for ˜400 areas on Mars (where 5 or more HiRISE images have been captured) and similar numbers on the Moon to resolve sub-pixel features. Examples will be shown of how these SRR images can be employed to assist with the better understanding of surface geomorphology. Acknowledgements: The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under PRoViDE grant agreement n° 312377

  8. Spectroscopic detection of chemotherapeutics and antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latka, Ines; Grüner, Roman; Matthäus, Christian; Dietzek, Benjamin; Werncke, W.; Lademann, Jürgen; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    The hand-foot-syndrome presents a severe dermal side-effect of chemotherapeutic cancer treatment. The cause of this side-effect is the elimination of systemically administered chemotherapeutics with the sweat. Transported to the skin surface, the drugs subsequently penetrate into the skin in the manner of topically applied substances. Upon accumulation of the chemotherapeutics in the skin the drugs destroy cells and tissue - in the same way as they are supposed to act in cancer cells. Aiming at the development of strategies to illuminate the molecular mechanism underlying the handfoot- syndrome (and, in a second step, strategies to prevent this severe side-effect), it might be important to evaluate the concentration and distribution of chemotherapeutics and antioxidants in the human skin. The latter can be estimated by the carotenoid concentration, as carotenoids serve as marker substances for the dermal antioxidative status.Following the objectives outlined above, this contribution presents a spectroscopic study aiming at the detection and quantification of carotenoids and selected chemotherapeutics in human skin. To this end, spontaneous Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy are combined with two-photon excited fluorescence. While the latter technique is Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to your MySPIE To Do List at http://myspie.org and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval.restricted to the detection of fluorescent chemotherapeutics, e.g., doxorubicin, the vibrational spectroscopic techniques can - in principle - be applied to any type of analyte molecules. Furthermore, we will present the

  9. Exploiting biogeochemical and spectroscopic techniques to assess the geochemical distribution and release dynamics of chromium and lead in a contaminated floodplain soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinklebe, Jörg; Shaheen, Sabry M; Schröter, Felix; Rennert, Thilo

    2016-05-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) combined with a seven steps sequential extraction technique were used to assess the geochemical distribution of chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) in a contaminated floodplain soil. Total contents of Cr and Pb were 490.3 and 402.1 mg kg(-1), respectively. The residual fraction was 59.5 and 56.3% of total Cr and Pb. The crystalline iron (Fe) oxide was the dominant non-residual fraction of Cr (35.9% of total Cr). Considerable amounts of Pb were found in the organic fraction (35.4%). Using (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the soil organic matter was identified as 48.9% aromatic carbon, which indicated that a certain portion of Pb and Cr might be associated with aromatic compounds. The SEM-EDX images demonstrate a concomitant occurrence of Pb, manganese (Mn), Fe, and aluminum (Al) as well as a coexistence of Cr and Fe. The release dynamics of dissolved Cr and Pb as affected by redox potential (EH), pH, Fe, Mn, dissolved organic carbon, and sulfate was quantified using an automated biogeochemical microcosm apparatus. Soil pH decreased under oxic conditions. The release of Cr, Pb, Fe, and Mn increased under acidic oxic (pH = 3.7, EH = 521 mV) conditions due to the associated decrease of pH (7.1-3.7). The mobilization of Cr and Pb was affected by the Fe and Mn. In conclusion, our multi-technique approach identified the geochemical distribution of Cr and Pb and verified major factors that explain mobilization of Cr and Pb in floodplain soils.

  10. Critical evaluation of 13C natural abundance techniques to partition soil-surface CO2 efflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, H.; Midwood, A. J.; Robinson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Soil is the largest terrestrial store of carbon and the flux of CO2 from soils to the atmosphere is estimated at around 98 Pg (98 billion tonnes) of carbon per year. The CO2 efflux from the soil surface is derived from plant root and rhizosphere respiration (autotrophically fuelled) and microbial degradation of soil organic matter (heterotrophic respiration). Heterotrophic respiration is a key determinant of an ecosystem's long-term C balance, but one that is difficult to measure in the field. One approach involves partitioning the total soil-surface CO2 efflux between heterotrophic and autotrophic components; this can be done using differences in the natural abundance stable isotope ratios (δ13C) of autotrophic and heterotrophic CO2 as the end-members of a simple mixing model. In most natural, temperate ecosystems, current and historical vegetation cover (and therefore also plant-derived soil organic matter) is produced from C3 photosynthesis so the difference in δ13C between the autotrophic and heterotrophic CO2 sources is small. Successful partitioning therefore requires accurate and precise measurements of the δ13CO2 of the autotrophic and heterotrophic end-members (obtained by measuring the δ13CO2 of soil-free roots and root-free soil) and of total soil CO2 efflux. There is currently little consensus on the optimum measurement protocols. Here we systematically tested some of the most commonly used techniques to identify and minimise methodological errors. Using soil-surface chambers to sample total CO2 efflux and a cavity ring-down spectrometer to measure δ13CO2 in a partitioning study on a Scottish moorland, we found that: using soil-penetrating collars leads to a more depleted chamber measurement of total soil δ13CO2 as a result of severing roots and fungal hyphae or equilibrating with δ13CO2 at depth or both; root incubations provide an accurate estimate of in-situ root respired δ13CO2 provided they are sampled within one hour; the δ13CO2 from root

  11. Analysing surface plasmon resonance phase sensor based on Mach-Zehnder interferometer technique using glycerin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashif, Muhammad; Bakar, A. Ashrif A.; Hashim, Fazida Hanim

    2016-12-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) based on Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is a very accurate tool for the detection and analysis of molecular interactions. The performance of the proposed SPR phase sensor is dependent upon multiple performance parameters that include sensitivity, repeatability, drift and the induction speed of fluid into the flow cell. The SPR Mach-Zehnder interferometer is tested for different glycerin-water concentrations to check its performance based on the different parameters. This paper highlights the enhancement of the performance of SPR phase technique based on MZI that is influenced by different parameters, measured using glycerin solutions. These four performance parameters can affect the performance of SPR based on MZI and have a particular impact on the sensor output. It also provides us information about suitable working conditions for the SPR Mach-Zehnder interferometer sensor. The experiment data shows that the sensor's sensitivity is high for small concentrations of glycerin-water mixtures. Also, any change in drift as well as in induction speed of fluid can affect the performance of SPR Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The sensitivity of SPR phase sensor is high as it can measure glycerin concentration as low as 0.05%.

  12. Discrimination between biologically relevant calcium phosphate phases by surface-analytical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleine-Boymann, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.kleine-boymann@phys.chemie.uni-giessen.de; Rohnke, Marcus, E-mail: marcus.rohnke@phys.chemie.uni-giessen.de; Henss, Anja, E-mail: anja.henss@phys.chemie.uni-giessen.de; Peppler, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.peppler@phys.chemie.uni-giessen.de; Sann, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.sann@phys.chemie.uni-giessen.de; Janek, Juergen, E-mail: juergen.janek@phys.chemie.uni-giessen.de

    2014-08-01

    The spatially resolved phase identification of biologically relevant calcium phosphate phases (CPPs) in bone tissue is essential for the elucidation of bone remodeling mechanisms and for the diagnosis of bone diseases. Analytical methods with high spatial resolution for the discrimination between chemically quite close phases are rare. Therefore the applicability of state-of-the-art ToF-SIMS, XPS and EDX as chemically specific techniques was investigated. The eight CPPs hydroxyapatite (HAP), β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP), octacalcium phosphate (OCP), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), dicalcium phosphate (DCP), monocalcium phosphate (MCP) and amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) were either commercial materials in high purity or synthesized by ourselves. The phase purity was proven by XRD analysis. All of the eight CPPs show different mass spectra and the phases can be discriminated by applying the principal component analysis method to the mass spectrometric data. The Ca/P ratios of all phosphates were determined by XPS and EDX. With both methods some CPPs can be distinguished, but the obtained Ca/P ratios deviate systematically from their theoretical values. It is necessary in any case to determine a calibration curve, respectively the ZAF values, from appropriate standards. In XPS also the O(1s)-satellite signals are correlated to the CPPs composition. Angle resolved and long-term XPS measurements of HAP clearly prove that there is no phosphate excess at the surface. Decomposition due to X-ray irradiation has not been observed.

  13. Development of dynamic 3-D surface profilometry using stroboscopic interferometric measurement and vertical scanning techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, K-C [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Sec. 4 Roosevelt Rd, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, L-C [Graduate Institute of Automation Technology, National Taipei University of Technology, 1 Sec. 3 Chung-Hsiao East Rd, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Lin, C-D [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Sec. 4 Roosevelt Rd, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Calvin C [Industrial Technology Research Institute, Centre for Measurement Standards, 321 Sec. 2, Kuang Fu Rd, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 300 (China); Kuo, C-F [Industrial Technology Research Institute, Centre for Measurement Standards, 321 Sec. 2, Kuang Fu Rd, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 300 (China); Chou, J-T [Industrial Technology Research Institute, Centre for Measurement Standards, 321 Sec. 2, Kuang Fu Rd, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 300 (China)

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this technical advance is to provide a single optical interferometric framework and methodology to be capable of delivering both nano-scale static and dynamic surface profilometry. Microscopic interferometry is a powerful technique for static and dynamic characterization of micro (opto) electromechanical systems (M (O) EMS). In view of this need, a microscopic prototype based on white-light stroboscopic interferometry and the white light vertical scanning principle, was developed to achieve dynamic full-field profilometry and characterization of MEMS devices. The system primarily consists of an optical microscope, on which a Mirau interferometric objective embedded with a piezoelectric vertical translator, a high-power LED light module with dual operation modes and light synchronizing electronics unit are integrated. A micro cantilever beam used in AFM was measured to verify the system capability in accurate characterization of dynamic behaviours of the device. The full-field second-mode vibration at a vibratory frequency of 68.60 kHz can be fully characterized and 3-5 nm of vertical measurement resolution as well as tens of micrometers of vertical measurement range can be easily achieved.

  14. Surface Modification of a Titanium Alloy with a Phospholipid Polymer Prepared by a Plasma-Induced Grafting Technique to Improve Surface Thromboresistance

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Sang Ho; Johnson, Carl A.; Woolley, Joshua R.; Oh, Heung-Il; Gamble, Lara J.; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Wagner, William R.

    2009-01-01

    To improve the thromboresistance of a titanium alloy (TiAl6V4) <