WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface soil wetness

  1. Operational assimilation of ASCAT surface soil wetness at the Met Office

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dharssi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, no extensive global soil moisture observation network exists. Therefore, the Met Office global soil moisture analysis scheme has instead used observations of screen temperature and humidity. A number of new space-borne remote sensing systems, operating at microwave frequencies, have been developed that provide a more direct retrieval of surface soil moisture. These systems are attractive since they provide global data coverage and the horizontal resolution is similar to weather forecasting models. Several studies show that measurements of normalised backscatter (surface soil wetness from the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT on the meteorological operational (MetOp satellite contain good quality information about surface soil moisture. This note describes methods to convert ASCAT surface soil wetness measurements to volumetric surface soil moisture together with bias correction and quality control. A computationally efficient nudging scheme is used to assimilate the ASCAT volumetric surface soil moisture data into the Met Office global soil moisture analysis. This ASCAT nudging scheme works alongside a soil moisture nudging scheme that uses observations of screen temperature and humidity. Trials, using the Met Office global Unified Model, of the ASCAT nudging scheme show a positive impact on forecasts of screen temperature and humidity for the tropics, North America and Australia. A comparison with in-situ soil moisture measurements from the US also indicates that assimilation of ASCAT surface soil wetness improves the soil moisture analysis. Assimilation of ASCAT surface soil wetness measurements became operational during July 2010.

  2. Wetting of real surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bormashenko, Edward Yu

    2013-01-01

    The problem of wetting and drop dynamics on various surfaces is very interesting from both the scientificas well as thepractical viewpoint, and subject of intense research.The results are scattered across papers in journals, sothis workwill meet the need for a unifying, comprehensive work.

  3. Wetting patterns and bacterial distributions in different soils from a surface point source applying eflfuents with varyingEscherichia coliconcentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Jie; LI Jiu-sheng; LI Yan-feng

    2016-01-01

    Understanding bacterial transportation in unsaturated soil is helpful for reducing and avoiding pathogenic contamination that may be induced by irrigation with reclaimed waste water and for developing better irrigation management practic-es. Experiments were conducted to study the transport of a typical bacterium,Escherichia coli (E. coli), in a sandy and a sandy loam soil under different application rates and input concentrations. A 30° wedge-shaped plexiglass container was used to represent one twelfth of the complete cylinder in the experiments. The apparent cylindrical application rate varied from 1.05 to 5.76 L h–1 and the input concentration ofE. coli from magnitude of 102 to 107 colony-forming unit (CFU) mL–1. For a given volume of water applied, an increase in application rate resulted in an increase in the wetted radius and a decrease in the wetted depth. In the sandy loam soil, the water spread out in a circular-arc shaped saturated zone on the surface, and the ultimate saturated entry radius increased with the application rate. An increasing application rate of water suspended bacteria alowed a more rapid transport of bacteria, thus acceleratingE. coli transport rate and resulting in a larger distributed volume ofE. coli for both soil types. For the sandy soil, more than 70% of theE. coli that was de-tected within the entire wetted volume concentrated in the range of 10 cm from the point source, and the concentration of E. colidecreased greatly as the distance from the point source increased. More than 98% of theE. coli was detected in a range of 5 cm around the saturated wetted zone for the sandy loam soil. For both soil types tested, an extremely high concentration ofE. coli was observed in the proximity of the point source, and the peak value increased with an increased input concentration. In principle, using an emitter with relative lower application rate would be effective to restrictE. coli transport. To reduce bacterial concentration in the

  4. Development, calibration, and performance of a novel biocrust wetness probe (BWP) measuring the water content of biological soil crusts and surface soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bettina; Berkemeier, Thomas; Ruckteschler, Nina; Caesar, Jennifer; Ritter, Holger; Heintz, Henno; Brass, Henning

    2015-04-01

    The surface layer of soils as transition zone between pedosphere and atmosphere plays a crucial role in exchange processes of nutrients, atmospheric gases and water. In arid and semiarid regions, this uppermost soil layer is commonly colonized by biological soil crusts (biocrusts), which cover about 46 million km2 worldwide being highly relevant in the global terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycles. Their water status is of major concern, as activity of these poikilohydric organisms is directly controlled by their water content. On-site analyses of both bare and crusted soils thus are urgently needed to correctly model exchange processes of water, nutrients and trace gases at the soil surface. In this study we present the biocrust wetness probe (BWP), which is the first low-cost sensor to reliably measure the water content within biocrusts or the uppermost 5 mm of the substrate. Using a weak alternating current, the electrical conductivity is assessed and an automatic calibration routine allows calculating the water content and precipitation equivalent of the surface layer over time. During one year of continuous field measurements, 60 BWPs were installed in different types of biocrusts and bare soil to measure at 5-minute intervals in the Succulent Karroo, South Africa. All sensors worked reliably and responded immediately and individually upon precipitation events. Upon completion of field measurements, soil and biocrust samples were collected from all measurement spots to compile calibration curves in the lab. In most soil and biocrust samples the water content rose linearly with increasing electrical conductivity values and only for few samples an exponential relationship was observed. Measurements revealed characteristic differences in biocrust and soil wetness patterns, which affect both the water regime and physiological processes in desert regions. Thus BWPs turned out to be well suited sensors for spatio-temporal monitoring of soil water content, allowing

  5. Wetting and Minimal Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bachas, C; Wiese, K J; Bachas, Constantin; Doussal, Pierre Le; Wiese, Kay Joerg

    2006-01-01

    We study minimal surfaces which arise in wetting and capillarity phenomena. Using conformal coordinates, we reduce the problem to a set of coupled boundary equations for the contact line of the fluid surface, and then derive simple diagrammatic rules to calculate the non-linear corrections to the Joanny-de Gennes energy. We argue that perturbation theory is quasi-local, i.e. that all geometric length scales of the fluid container decouple from the short-wavelength deformations of the contact line. This is illustrated by a calculation of the linearized interaction between contact lines on two opposite parallel walls. We present a simple algorithm to compute the minimal surface and its energy based on these ideas. We also point out the intriguing singularities that arise in the Legendre transformation from the pure Dirichlet to the mixed Dirichlet-Neumann problem.

  6. Fingerlike wetting patterns in two water-repellent loam soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.; Ritsema, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    In soils with fingered flow, surface-applied solutes can reach the groundwater more rapidly than in the case of homogeneous wetting. This study was undertaken to demonstrate the occurrence of finger-like wetting patterns in a silt loam soil and a silty clay loam soil, and to investigate the

  7. Joint inversion of multi-configuration electromagnetic induction measurements to estimate soil wetting patterns during surface drip irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadoon, Khan Z.; Moghadas, Davood; Jadoon, Aurangzeb; Missimer, Thomas M.; McCabe, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions, development of precise information on the soil wetting pattern is important to optimize drip irrigation system design for sustainable agricultural water management. Usually mathematical models are commonly used to describe infiltration from a point source to design and manage drip irrigation systems. The extent to which water migrates laterally and vertically away from the drip emitter depends on many factors, including dripper discharge rate, the frequency of water application, duration of drip emission, the soil hydraulic characteristics, initial conditions, evaporation, root water uptake and root distribution patterns. However, several simplified assumptions in the mathematical models affect their utility to provide useful design information. In this respect, non-invasive geophysical methods, i.e., low frequency electromagnetic induction (EMI) systems are becoming powerful tools to map spatial and temporal soil moisture patterns due to fast measurement capability and sensitivity to soil water content and salinity. In this research, a new electromagnetic system, the CMD mini-Explorer, is used for soil characterization to measure the wetting patterns of drip irrigation systems using joint inversion of multi-configuration EMI measurements. Six transects of EMI measurements were carried out in a farm where Acacia trees are irrigated with brackish water using a drip irrigation system. EMI reference data (ground-truths) were calculated using vertical soil electrical conductivity recorded in different trenches along one of the measurement transects. Reference data is used for calibration to minimize the instrumental shifts which often occur in EMI data. Global and local optimization algorithms are used sequentially, to minimize the misfit between the measured and modeled apparent electrical conductivity (δa) to reconstruct the vertical electrical conductivity profile. The electromagnetic forward model based on full solution of Maxwell

  8. Phoenix Carries Soil to Wet Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the lander's Robotic Arm scoop positioned over the Wet Chemistry Lab delivery funnel on Sol 29, the 29th Martian day after landing, or June 24, 2008. The soil will be delivered to the instrument on Sol 30. This image has been enhanced to brighten the scene. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Wetting properties of nanostructured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos-Canut, S. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee et Nanostructures (UMR CNRS 5586), Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: ramos@lpmcn.univ-lyon1.fr

    2006-04-15

    Swift heavy ion irradiation is a powerful tool to tailor surfaces under controlled conditions at a nanometric scale. The growing importance of nanostructured surfaces for a wide variety of applications and fundamental investigations is now well established. In this paper I will mainly discuss the interest of such surfaces for investigations concerning solid-liquid interfaces. The role played by topographical defects on wetting properties of solid surfaces, and both the dissipative and the confinement effects on the interface will be demonstrated by simple examples.

  10. Assimilation of Soil Wetness Index and Leaf Area Index into the ISBA-A-gs land surface model: grassland case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Barbu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the joint assimilation in a land surface model of a Soil Wetness Index (SWI product provided by an exponential filter together with Leaf Area Index (LAI is investigated. The data assimilation is evaluated with different setups using the SURFEX modeling platform, for a period of seven years (2001–2007, at the SMOSREX grassland site in southwestern France. The results obtained with a Simplified Extended Kalman Filter demonstrate the effectiveness of a joint data assimilation scheme when both SWI and Leaf Area Index are merged into the ISBA-A-gs land surface model. The assimilation of a retrieved Soil Wetness Index product presents several challenges that are investigated in this study. A significant improvement of around 13% of the root-zone soil water content is obtained by assimilating dimensionless root-zone SWI data. For comparison, the assimilation of in situ surface soil moisture is considered as well. A lower impact on the root zone is noticed. Under specific conditions, the transfer of the information from the surface to the root zone was found not accurate. Also, our results indicate that the assimilation of in situ LAI data may correct a number of deficiencies in the model, such as low LAI values in the senescence phase by using a seasonal-dependent error definition for background and observations. In order to verify the specification of the errors for SWI and LAI products, a posteriori diagnostics are employed. This approach highlights the importance of the assimilation design on the quality of the analysis. The impact of data assimilation scheme on CO2 fluxes is also quantified by using measurements of net CO2 fluxes gathered at the SMOSREX site from 2005 to 2007. An improvement of about 5% in terms of rms error is obtained.

  11. Dynamic effects of wet-dry cycles and crust formation on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of surface soils in the constructed Hühnerwasser ("Chicken Creek") catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Christoph; Schümberg, Sabine; Kubitz, Anita; Frank, Franzi; Cheng, Zhang; Nanu Frechen, Tobias; Pohle, Ina

    2016-04-01

    Highly disturbed soils and substrates used in land rehabilitation undergo rapid changes after the first wetting events which in turn can lead to ecosystem degradation. Such changes were detected during the early development of the constructed Hühnerwasser ("Chicken Creek") catchment in Lusatia, Germany. Surface substrates consisting of quaternary sandy sediments formed surface seals during the first rainfall events leading to reduced infiltration and substantially increased surface runoff. Subsequently biological soil crusts formed and stabilised the surface. The aim of this study is to investigate the factors that cause the hydraulic conductivity to decrease using undisturbed and disturbed soil samples. Based on the hypothesis that physical and biological crusts lower the hydraulic conductivity, the first set of experiments with undisturbed soil cores from the Hühnerwasser catchment were carried out to measure the saturated hydraulic conductivity using the constant head method. Measurements were done with intact cores and repeated after the surface crust was removed. As the quaternary glacial sediments tend to display hard setting behaviour, we further hypothesised that the mobilisation of fine particles within the cores lead to pore clogging and that wet-dry cycles will therefore decrease hydraulic conductivity. A second set of experiments using the same methodology consisted of five repeated measurements of hydraulic conductivity after each drying cycle. These measurements were done with undisturbed core samples as well as repacked cores in order to assess how dry packing affects the dynamics of the hydraulic conductivity somewhat similar to the situation during the first wetting after completion of the catchment construction. For all experiments, the temporal evolution of hydraulic conductivity was measured and the turbidity of the effluent was recorded. The results clearly demonstrated that the substrate is highly unstable. The first set of experiments

  12. Wetting and phase separation at surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanjay Puri; Kurt Binder

    2005-06-01

    We study the problem of surface-directed spinodal decomposition, viz., the dynamical interplay of wetting and phase separation at surfaces. In particular, we focus on the kinetics of wetting-layer growth in a semi-infinite geometry for arbitrary surface potentials and mixture compositions. We also present representative results for phase separation in confined geometries, e.g., cylindrical pores, thin films, etc.

  13. Forced wetting of a reactive surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, T D

    2012-11-01

    The dynamic wetting of water on gelatin-coated poly(ethylene terephthalate) (GC-PET) has been investigated by forced wetting over a wide speed range and compared with earlier data obtained with unmodified PET. The results were analysed according to the molecular-kinetic theory of dynamic wetting (MKT). Both substrates show complex behaviour, with separate low- and high-speed modes. For the GC-PET, this is attributed to a rapid change in the wettability of the substrate on contact with water, specifically a surface molecular transformation from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. This results in a smooth wetting transition from one mode to the other. For the PET, the bimodal behaviour is attributed to surface heterogeneity, with the low-speed dynamics dominated by interactions with polar sites on the substrate that become masked at higher speeds. In this case, the transition is discontinuous. The study has general ramifications for the investigation of any wetting processes in which a physicochemical transformation takes place at the solid surface on contact with the liquid. In particular, it shows how forced wetting, combined with the MKT, can reveal subtle details of the processes involved. It is unlikely that similar insight could be gained from spontaneous wetting studies, such as spreading drops.

  14. Wetting failure of hydrophilic surfaces promoted by surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng-Hua; Chen, Xiao-Peng; Wang, Qing

    2014-06-01

    Wetting failure is of vital importance to many physical phenomena, such as industrial coating and drop emission. Here we show when and how the surface roughness promotes the destabilization of a moving contact line on a hydrophilic surface. Beyond the balance of the driving force and viscous resistance where a stable wetting interface is sustained, wetting failure occurs and is modified by the roughness of the surface. The promoting effect arises only when the wetting velocity is high enough to create a gas-liquid-solid composite interface in the vicinity of the moving contact line, and it is a function of the intrinsic contact angle and proportion of solid tops. We propose a model to explain splashes of rough solid spheres impacting into liquids. It reveals a novel concept that dynamic wetting on hydrophilic rough surfaces can be similar to that on hydrophobic surfaces, and brings a new way to design surfaces with specific wetting properties.

  15. Wetting properties of molecularly rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Martin; Malijevský, Alexandr; Lísal, Martin

    2015-09-01

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wettability of nanoscale rough surfaces in systems governed by Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. We consider both smooth and molecularly rough planar surfaces. Solid substrates are modeled as a static collection of LJ particles arranged in a face-centered cubic lattice with the (100) surface exposed to the LJ fluid. Molecularly rough solid surfaces are prepared by removing several strips of LJ atoms from the external layers of the substrate, i.e., forming parallel nanogrooves on the surface. We vary the solid-fluid interactions to investigate strongly and weakly wettable surfaces. We determine the wetting properties by measuring the equilibrium droplet profiles that are in turn used to evaluate the contact angles. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to Wenzel's law, suggest that surface roughness always amplifies the wetting properties of a lyophilic surface. However, our results indicate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., surface roughness deteriorates the substrate wettability. Adding the roughness to a strongly wettable surface shrinks the surface area wet with the liquid, and it either increases or only marginally affects the contact angle, depending on the degree of liquid adsorption into the nanogrooves. For a weakly wettable surface, the roughness changes the surface character from lyophilic to lyophobic due to a weakening of the solid-fluid interactions by the presence of the nanogrooves and the weaker adsorption of the liquid into the nanogrooves.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Predicting Surface Wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of wetting of a solid surface by a liquid provides important insights; the contact angle of a liquid droplet on a surface provides a quantitative measurement of this interaction and the degree of attraction or repulsion of that liquid type by the solid surface. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations are a useful way to examine the behavior of liquids on solid surfaces on a nanometer scale. Thus, we surveyed the state of this field, beginning with the fundamentals of wetting calculations to an examination of the different MD methodologies used. We highlighted some of the advantages and disadvantages of the simulations, and look to the future of computer modeling to understand wetting and other liquid-solid interaction phenomena.

  17. Microbial community composition of transiently wetted Antarctic Dry Valley soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas D. Neiderberger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During the summer months, wet (hyporheic soils associated with ephemeral streams and lake edges in the Antarctic Dry Valleys (DV become hotspots of biological activity and are hypothesized to be an important source of carbon and nitrogen for arid DV soils. Recent research in the DV has focused on the geochemistry and microbial ecology of lakes and arid soils, with substantially less information being available on hyporheic soils. Here we determined the unique properties of hyporheic microbial communities, resolved their relationship to environmental parameters and to compared them to archetypal arid DV soils. Generally, pH increased and chlorophyll a concentrations decreased along transects from wet to arid soils (9.0 to ~7.0 for pH and ~0.8 to ~ 5 µg/cm3 for chlorophyll a, respectively. Soil water content decreased to below ~3% in the arid soils. Community fingerprinting-based principle component analyses revealed that bacterial communities formed distinct clusters specific to arid and wet soils; however, eukaryotic communities that clustered together did not have similar soil moisture content nor did they group together based on sampling location. Collectively, rRNA pyrosequencing indicated a considerably higher abundance of Cyanobacteria in wet soils and a higher abundance of Acidobacterial, Actinobacterial, Deinococcus/Thermus, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospira and Planctomycetes in arid soils. The two most significant differences at the genus level were Gillisia signatures present in arid soils and chloroplast signatures related to Streptophyta that were common in wet soils. Fungal dominance was observed in arid soils and Viridplantae were more common in wet soils. This research represents an in-depth characterization of microbial communities inhabiting wet DV soils. Results indicate that the repeated wetting of hyporheic zones has a profound impact on the bacterial and eukaryotic communities inhabiting in these areas.

  18. Effect of wetting-drying cycles on soil desiccation cracking behaviour

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    Tang Chao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Better understanding the desiccation cracking process is essential in analysing drought effects on soil hydraulic and mechanical properties through consideration of the atmosphere-ground interaction. Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the consequence of wetting-drying cycles on the initiation and propagation characteristics of desiccation cracks on soil surface. Initially saturated slurry specimens were prepared and subjected to five subsequent wetting-drying cycles. Image processing technique was employed to quantitatively analyze the morphology characteristics of crack patterns formed during each drying path. The results show that the desiccation cracking behaviour of soil is significantly affected by the wetting-drying cycles. Before the third wetting-drying cycle is reached, the surface crack ratio and the average crack width increases while the average clod area decreases with increasing the number of wetting-drying cycles. The number of intersections and crack segments per unit area reaches the peak values after the second wetting-drying cycle. After the third wetting-drying cycle is reached, the effect of increasing wetting-drying cycles on crack patterns is insignificant. Moreover, it is observed that the applied wetting-drying cycles are accompanied by a continual reconstruction of soil structure. The initial homogenous slurry structure is completely replaced with aggregated structure after the third cycles, and a significant increase in the inter-aggregate porosity can be observed.

  19. Phoenix Again Carries Soil to Wet Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the lander's Robotic Arm scoop positioned over the Wet Chemistry Lab Cell 1 delivery funnel on Sol 41, the 42nd Martian day after landing, or July 6, 2008, after a soil sample was delivered to the instrument. The instrument's Cell 1 is second one from the foreground of the image. The first cell, Cell 0, received a soil sample two weeks earlier. This image has been enhanced to brighten the scene. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  20. Wenzel Wetting on Slippery Rough Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogin, Birgitt; Dai, Xianming; Wong, Tak-Sing

    2015-11-01

    Liquid repellency is an important surface property used in a wide range of applications including self-cleaning, anti-icing, anti-biofouling, and condensation heat transfer, and is characterized by apparent contact angle (θ*) and contact angle hysteresis (Δθ*). The Wenzel equation (1936) predicts θ* of liquids in the Wenzel state, and is one of the most fundamental equations in the wetting field. However, droplets in the Wenzel state on conventional rough surfaces exhibit large Δθ* , making it difficult to experimentally verify the model with precision. As a result, precise verification of the Wenzel wetting model has remained an open scientific question for the past 79 years. Here we introduce a new class of liquid-infused surfaces called slippery rough surfaces -- surfaces with significantly reduced Δθ* compared to conventional rough surfaces--and use them to experimentally assess the Wenzel equation with the highest precision to date. We acknowledge the funding support by National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award #: 1351462 and Office of Navy Research MURI Award #: N00014-12-1-0875. Stogin acknowledges the support from the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (Grant No. DGE1255832).

  1. The physical origins of rapid soil CO2 release following wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, Stanislaus; Grahm, Lina; Or, Dani

    2017-04-01

    A rainfall event after an extended dry period is known to produce large spikes in CO2 release from soil, a phenomenon referred to as the "Birch effect". The Birch effect is commonly attributed to biological factors, such as the rapid activation of dormant microbial populations and stimulation of soil organic carbon turnover. Evidence suggests that CO2 emissions set in at time scales too short for microbial activation and growth (seconds to minutes after onset of wetting). We conducted controlled wetting experiments on sterilized soil in the lab showing CO2 efflux dynamics that are consistent in magnitude with those reported in field studies (up to 4 mmol m-2 s-1 per mm of precipitation). The explanation proposed is purely physical, involving desorption of CO2 from soil surfaces as it is replaced by the more polar water during wetting. We present experimental results and a CO2 adsorption and desorption model that lend credence to the notion that a large fraction of the early soil CO2 emission during wetting (minutes to an hour) is associated with physical processes independent of microbial activity. This suggests that a significant amount of atmospheric CO2 becomes bound to soil surfaces during dry seasons and is rapidly released at the onset of wet seasons world-wide, irrespective of the soil organic carbon cycle.

  2. Influence of surface charge on wetting kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puah, Lee San; Sedev, Rossen; Fornasiero, Daniel; Ralston, John; Blake, Terry

    2010-11-16

    The wettability of a titania surface, partially covered with octadecyltrihydrosilane, has been investigated as a function of solution pH. The results show that surface charge affects both static wettability and wetting kinetics. The static contact angle decreases above and below the point of zero charge of the titania surface in a Lippman-like manner as the pH is altered. The dependence of dynamic contact angle on velocity is also affected by pH. The molecular-kinetic theory (MKT) is used to interpret the dynamic contact angle data. The frequency of molecular displacement κ(0) strongly varies with surface charge, whereas the mean molecular displacement length λ is essentially unaffected. There is an exponential dependence of contact-line friction upon work of adhesion, which is varied simply by altering the pH.

  3. Effect of Porous Pipe Characteristics on Soil Wetting Pattern in a Negative Pressure Difference Irrigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurun Nahar Khan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sub-surface irrigation has been widely used to reduce conveyance, evaporation and percolation losses. This system involves the application of water directly into the root zone of crops. Negative Pressure Difference Irrigation (NPDI is one kind of subsurface irrigation which is effective in management of irrigation water. The efficiency of this system is dependent on the soil wetting pattern as well as the characteristics of porous pipe. To examine the effect of characteristics of six different porous pipes on soil wetting pattern using NPDI system, experiments were done in laboratory at a negative pressure (Pn of -3 cm. That Pn was generated by placing water reservoir in a lower level than porous pipe, which was installed vertically at the center of soil column. The water was supplied for four hours and after removing dry soil from the column wetted soil was observed. The experimental results show that the soil wetting pattern varies for each type of porous pipe. The study reveals that the shape of the wetted soil is roughly truncated sphere. The maximum vertical expansion and maximum radial expansion vary with the change in diameter and length of porous pipes. With the change in diameter of 128.6%, the maximum radial expansion differs from 24.1% and 34.48% for X and Y axis respectively. Since the water use efficiency is in the range of 0.94 to 0.97, this advanced method can be used as alternative of other traditional methods

  4. Estimating soil wetting patterns for drip irrigation using genetic programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samadianfard, S.; Sadraddini, A. A.; Nazemi, A. H.; Provenzano, G.; Kisi, O.

    2012-07-01

    Drip irrigation is considered as one of the most efficient irrigation systems. Knowledge of the soil wetted perimeter arising from infiltration of water from drippers is important in the design and management of efficient irrigation systems. To this aim, numerical models can represent a powerful tool to analyze the evolution of the wetting pattern during irrigation, in order to explore drip irrigation management strategies, to set up the duration of irrigation, and finally to optimize water use efficiency. This paper examines the potential of genetic programming (GP) in simulating wetting patterns of drip irrigation. First by considering 12 different soil textures of USDA-SCS soil texture triangle, different emitter discharge and duration of irrigation, soil wetting patterns have been simulated by using HYDRUS 2D software. Then using the calculated values of depth and radius of wetting pattern as target outputs, two different GP models have been considered. Finally, the capability of GP for simulating wetting patterns was analyzed using some values of data set that were not used in training. Results showed that the GP method had good agreement with results of HYDRUS 2D software in the case of considering full set of operators with R{sup 2} of 0.99 and 0.99 and root mean squared error of 2.88 and 4.94 in estimation of radius and depth of wetting patterns, respectively. Also, field experimental results in a sandy loam soil with emitter discharge of 4 L h{sup -}1 showed reasonable agreement with GP results. As a conclusion, the results of the study demonstrate the usefulness of the GP method for estimating wetting patterns of drip irrigation. (Author) 40 refs.

  5. Wetting Characteristics of Insect Wing Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Doyoung Byun; Jongin Hong; Saputra; Jin Hwan Ko; Young Jong Lee; Hoon Cheol Park; Bong-Kyu Byun; Jennifer R. Lukes

    2009-01-01

    Biological tiny structures have been observed on many kinds of surfaces such as lotus leaves, which have an effect on the coloration of Morpho butterflies and enhance the hydrophobicity of natural surfaces. We investigated the micro-scale and nano-scale structures on the wing surfaces of insects and found that the hierarchical multiple roughness structures help in enhancing the hydrophobicity. After examining 10 orders and 24 species of flying Pterygotan insects, we found that micro-scale and nano-scale structures typically exist on both the upper and lower wing surfaces of flying insects. The tiny structures such as denticle or setae on the insect wings enhance the hydrophobicity, thereby enabling the wings to be cleaned more easily. And the hydrophobic insect wings undergo a transition from Cassie to Wenzel states at pitch/size ratio of about 20. In order to examine the wetting characteristics on a rough surface, a biomimetic surface with micro-scale pillars is fabricated on a silicon wafer,which exhibits the same behavior as the insect wing, with the Cassie-Wenzel transition occurring consistently around a pitch/width value of 20.

  6. Wetting hysteresis of nanodrops on nanorough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Chung; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2016-10-01

    Nanodrops on smooth or patterned rough surfaces are explored by many-body dissipative particle dynamics to demonstrate the influence of surface roughness on droplet wetting. On a smooth surface, nanodrops exhibit the random motion and contact angle hysteresis is absent. The diffusivity decays as the intrinsic contact angle (θY) decreases. On a rough surface, the contact line is pinned and the most stable contact angle (θY') is acquired. The extent of contact angle hysteresis (Δ θ ) is determined by two approaches, which resemble the inflation-deflation method and inclined plane method for experiments. The hysteresis loop is acquired and both approaches yield consistent results. The influences of wettability and surface roughness on θY' and Δ θ are examined. θY' deviates from that estimated by the Wenzel or Cassie-Baxter models. This consequence can be explained by the extent of impregnation, which varies with the groove position and wettability. Moreover, contact angle hysteresis depends more on the groove width than the depth.

  7. Wetting hysteresis of nanodrops on nanorough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Chung; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2016-10-01

    Nanodrops on smooth or patterned rough surfaces are explored by many-body dissipative particle dynamics to demonstrate the influence of surface roughness on droplet wetting. On a smooth surface, nanodrops exhibit the random motion and contact angle hysteresis is absent. The diffusivity decays as the intrinsic contact angle (θ_{Y}) decreases. On a rough surface, the contact line is pinned and the most stable contact angle (θ_{Y}^{'}) is acquired. The extent of contact angle hysteresis (Δθ) is determined by two approaches, which resemble the inflation-deflation method and inclined plane method for experiments. The hysteresis loop is acquired and both approaches yield consistent results. The influences of wettability and surface roughness on θ_{Y}^{'} and Δθ are examined. θ_{Y}^{'} deviates from that estimated by the Wenzel or Cassie-Baxter models. This consequence can be explained by the extent of impregnation, which varies with the groove position and wettability. Moreover, contact angle hysteresis depends more on the groove width than the depth.

  8. Contribution of the Global Soil Wetness Project 2 for PUB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, T.; Dirmeyer, P. A.

    2003-04-01

    The Second Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP-2) is the principal element of the large-scale uncoupled land surface modeling action in the Global Land-Atmosphere System Study (GLASS; Polcher et al. 2000) and a major element of the International Satellite Land-Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP), both contributing projects of GEWEX. The overarching goal of GSWP is to produce as a community effort the best model estimates of the global land-surface water and energy cycles. This will entail an evaluation of the uncertainties linked to the land surface schemes (LSSs), their parameters, the forcing variables which drive them, and the spatial and temporal scales to run the numerical simulations. The original pilot phase of GSWP covered the two-year period of the ISLSCP initiative I data set (1987-1988), and proved the utility of model comparison and sensitivity studies of the land surface at the global scale (Dirmeyer et al. 1999). GSWP-2 will take advantage of the 10-year (1986-1995) ISLSCP Initiative II data set (http://islscp2.sesda.com/) and LSS simulations will be conducted at a spatial resolution of 1o, sans Antarctica. LSSs calculate runoff and it can be compared with river discharge with applying runoff routing models. Therefore GSWP can be considered as PUB on global scales. Regional scales should be more focused in PUB as hydrological science, nevertheless studies on global scale is also relevant since there are many places in the world where global datasets of precipitation, landuse, soil types, etc., are the only sources available for simulation and prediction of river runoff. Numerical experiments under GSWP2 is well designed to examine the uncertainties associated with the global offline simulations, and the outcomes should contribute for PUB studies very much. GSWP2 in PUB is also expected to identify to what extent of temporal and spatial resolution predicting river runoff can be estimated from global approach.

  9. Advance of Wetting Front in Silt Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahmood

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Under drip irrigation , the plant's root is concentrated inside the wetted bulb (region. Thus, the development of these roots and the plant production are greatly affected by the wetting pattern. Therefore, the wetting pattern of soil under drip irrigation must be taken into consideration in the design of drip irrigation system for both single dripping source or multi-overlapping wetting patterns of dripping water sources.2The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of initial water content of the soil and spacing between two adjacent dripping sources with different flow rate on the movement of the wetting front.This study included 16 tests for monitoring the advancement of the wetting front with time during and after the water application phase. The water advance and water distribution measurement are carried out for two cases of the soil profile: for the first case with initial volumetric water content of 4.08% and for the second case with initial volumetric water content of 12.24%. Two spacing between the emitter were tested 25cm and 50 cm using application flow rates of 0.606, 1.212, 1.818, and 2.424 cm3 /min/cm to show the combined effect of spacing and flow rate on the performance of two adjacent emitter.The study proposed a method for determining the spacing between the two emitting sources , the water application rate and watering time. The proposed method depends on a wetted zone whose depth is equal to the root zone depth with a values equals to the maximum vertical advance of the wetting front underneath the drip line at time when this depth is equal to the depth of wetting at mid­point between the drip line. the study revealed that both the vertical water advance in soil underneath the emitter and the horizontal advance of the wetting front is larger than those in the case of single emitter.Furthermore, the vertical water advance increases with the decrease spacing between the two drip lines. Also, the horizontal advance of the

  10. Dynamics of digging in wet soil

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Sunghwan; Hosoi, A E

    2010-01-01

    Numerous animals live in, and locomote through, subsea soils. To move in a medium dominated by frictional interactions, many of these animals have adopted unique burrowing strategies. This paper presents a burrowing model inspired by the Atlantic razor clam ({\\it Ensis directus}), which uses deformations of its body to cyclically loosen and re-pack the surrounding soil in order to locally manipulate burrowing drag. The model reveals how an anisotropic body -- composed of a cylinder and sphere varying sinusoidally in size and relative displacement -- achieves unidirectional motion through a medium with variable frictional properties. This net displacement is attained even though the body kinematics are reciprocal and inertia of both the model organism and the surrounding medium are negligible. Our results indicate that body aspect ratio has a strong effect on burrowing velocity and efficiency, with a well-defined maximum for given kinematics and soil material properties.

  11. Influence of pH on wetting kinetics of a pine forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Ahmad; Schaumann, Gabriele; Diehl, Dörte

    2014-05-01

    wetting process in dependence of artificially altered soil pH. References: Bayer, J. V. and G. E. Schaumann (2007). Hydrol. Processes 21(17): 2266 - 2275. Diehl, D., J. V. Bayer, et al. (2010). Geoderma 158(3-4): 375-384. Diehl, D. and G. E. Schaumann (2007). Hydrol. Processes 21(17): 2255 - 2265. Duval, J. F. L., K. J. Wilkinson, et al. (2005). Environ Sci Technol 39(17): 6435-6445. Karnok, K. A., E. J. Rowland, et al. (1993). Agron J 85(5): 983-986. Roper, M. M. (2005). Aust J Soil Res 43: 803-810. Terashima, M., M. Fukushima, et al. (2004). Colloids and Surfaces, A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects 247(1-3): 77-83.

  12. Strongly anisotropic wetting on one-dimensional nanopatterned surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Deying; Brueck, S R J

    2008-09-01

    This communication reports strongly anisotropic wetting behavior on one-dimensional nanopatterned surfaces. Contact angles, degree of anisotropy, and droplet distortion are measured on micro- and nanopatterned surfaces fabricated with interference lithography. Both the degree of anisotropy and the droplet distortion are extremely high as compared with previous reports because of the well-defined nanostructural morphology. The surface is manipulated to tune with the wetting from hydrophobic to hydrophilic while retaining the structural wetting anisotropy with a simple silica nanoparticle overcoat. The wetting mechanisms are discussed. Potential applications in microfluidic devices and evaporation-induced pattern formation are demonstrated.

  13. Spatial patterns of wetting characteristics in grassland sandy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orfánus Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In grasslands where organic and inorganic resources are alternating at scales of individual plants, the transient character is given to certain wetting properties of soil, which then become highly variable both in space and in time. The objective of presented study was to study wetting pattern within two soil horizons at 5-cm and 10-cm depths respectively and to examine how the wetting patterns relate to hydraulic conductivity determined by Minidisc infiltrometer at suction −2 cm, K(−2 cm. This characteristics is implicitly independent on antecedent soil water content (SWC since it relates to steady infiltration phase but can be influenced by present soil water repellency (SWR. Field measurements were performed on July 27–28, 2010 on the grassland experimental site located near the village Sekule in Southwest Slovakia. The water drop penetration time (WDPT, SWC and tension Minidisc infiltration measurements were carried out on the 0.64 m2 plot in a regular 8 × 8 grid. The results showed that SWR and SWC influence each other and cause correlation between spatial patterns of studied soil wetting characteristics and between characteristics measured at the two soil depths. Further, it was found out, that calculation of K(−2 cm according to Zhang may cause apparent correlation of K(−2 cm with antecedent SWC, which is the artificial effect of sorptivity parameter in the equation on steady stage of infiltration process. This pseudocorrelation has disappeared after adopting of Minasny and McBratney (2000 approaches by calculation of K(−2 cm.

  14. Wetting and evaporation studies on molecularly modified surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Soolaman, Dinah Michele

    2007-01-01

    Wetting and evaporation of liquid microdroplets on solid surfaces are ubiquitous in nature. Two of the many important factors that influence how a droplet wets and “escapes”, are the chemical composition and roughness of the solid surface. In order to gain a better understanding of these processes as a whole, a systematic study on the factors that influence wetting/evaporation behaviour, including the liquid’s composition, the liquid-solid interface, and the substrate morphology has been carr...

  15. Soil aeration status in a lowland wet grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, K. R.; Leeds-Harrison, P. B.; Lawson, C. S.; Gowing, D. J. G.

    2004-02-01

    The maintenance or development of plant community diversity in species-rich wet grasslands has been a focus of water management considerations in the UK for the past 20 years. Much attention has been given to the control of water levels in the ditch systems within these wet grassland systems. In this paper we report measurements of aeration status and water-table fluctuation made on a peat soil site at Tadham Moor in Somerset, UK, where water management has focused on the maintenance of wet conditions that often result in flooding in winter and wet soil conditions in the spring and summer. Measurement and modelling of the water-table fluctuation indicates the possibility of variability in the aeration of the root environment and anoxic conditions for much of the winter period and for part of the spring and summer. We have used water content and redox potential measurements to characterize the aeration status of the peat soil. We find that air-filled porosity is related to water-table depth in these situations. Redox potentials in the spring were generally found to be low, implying a reducing condition for nitrate and iron. A significant relationship (p < 0.01) between redox potential and water-table depth exists for data measured at 0.1 m depth, but no relationship could be found for data from 0.4 m depth.

  16. Wetting characteristics of 3-dimensional nanostructured fractal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ethan; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Lijia; Lu, Yongfeng; Ndao, Sidy

    2017-01-01

    This article reports the fabrication and wetting characteristics of 3-dimensional nanostructured fractal surfaces (3DNFS). Three distinct 3DNFS surfaces, namely cubic, Romanesco broccoli, and sphereflake were fabricated using two-photon direct laser writing. Contact angle measurements were performed on the multiscale fractal surfaces to characterize their wetting properties. Average contact angles ranged from 66.8° for the smooth control surface to 0° for one of the fractal surfaces. The change in wetting behavior was attributed to modification of the interfacial surface properties due to the inclusion of 3-dimensional hierarchical fractal nanostructures. However, this behavior does not exactly obey existing surface wetting models in the literature. Potential applications for these types of surfaces in physical and biological sciences are also discussed.

  17. Wetting Patterns and Nitrate Distributions in Layered-Textural Soils Under Drip Irrigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jiu-sheng; JI Hong-yan; LI Bei; LIU Yu-chun

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted in different sequence and thickness of the soil layers to investigate the effects of layered-textural soils on wetting patterns and water and nitrate distributions from a surface point source under various combinations of application rate and applied volume. Three layered soils, including a sandy-over-sandy loam (SL), a sandy loam-over-sandy (LS), and a sandy loam-sandy-sandy loam (LSL), and two uniform soils (a uniform sandy loam and a uniform sandy soil) were tested. In the experiments, the application rate was varied from 0.69 to 3.86 L h-1 and the applied volume from 5.7 to 12.1 L. The experimental results demonstrated that the wetting patterns and water and nitrate distributions were greatly affected by the sequence and thickness of soil layers as well as the application rate and volume applied. An interface existing in the layered soils, whether a fine-over-coarse or a coarse-over-fine, had a common feature of limiting downward water movement and of increasing horizontal water movement. For the fine-over-coarse layered soils of LS and LSL, water and nitrate were uniformly distributed at a given depth in the top layer soil. For a coarse-over-fine layered soil of SL, however, water accumulated in the sublayer soil underneath the interface and a zone of lower nitrate concentration was observed. The effect of application rate on water distribution pattern was dependent upon soil layering. A minor influence of application rate on water distribution for the fine-over-coarse layered soils (LS and LSL) than for the uniform soils was found. To obtain a greater wetted depth through selecting the emitters having a smaller application rate, which is a common method in the system design for a uniform soil, may not be necessarily applied for the layered soils.Measurements of nitrate distribution showed that nitrate accumulated toward the boundary of the wetted volume for both the uniform and the layered soils. This suggests the

  18. Wetting theory for small droplets on textured solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donggyu; Pugno, Nicola M.; Ryu, Seunghwa

    2016-11-01

    Conventional wetting theories on rough surfaces with Wenzel, Cassie-Baxter, and Penetrate modes suggest the possibility of tuning the contact angle by adjusting the surface texture. Despite decades of intensive study, there are still many experimental results that are not well understood because conventional wetting theory, which assumes an infinite droplet size, has been used to explain measurements of finite-sized droplets. Here, we suggest a wetting theory applicable to a wide range of droplet size for the three wetting modes by analyzing the free energy landscape with many local minima originated from the finite size. We find that the conventional theory predicts the contact angle at the global minimum if the droplet size is about 40 times or larger than the characteristic scale of the surface roughness, regardless of wetting modes. Furthermore, we obtain the energy barrier of pinning which can induce the contact angle hysteresis as a function of geometric factors. We validate our theory against experimental results on an anisotropic rough surface. In addition, we discuss the wetting on non-uniformly rough surfaces. Our findings clarify the extent to which the conventional wetting theory is valid and expand the physical understanding of wetting phenomena of small liquid drops on rough surfaces.

  19. The effect of pH modification on wetting kinetics of a naturally water repellent coniferous soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Ahmad; Diehl, Dörte; Schaumann, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    The interfacial dynamics of soil-water interactions are significantly affected by the hydrophobic properties of organic matter. The underlying mechanisms responsible for the development of soil water repellency (SWR) are still under discussion. Various environmental factors control the appearance and degree of SWR. The wetting of soil greatly depends on the physicochemical characteristics of soil surfaces which in turn depends on pH. In this contribution, we propose a mechanism for the change in SWR that is observed upon the artificial change in soil pH. Wetting kinetics were studied by the time dependent sessile drop measurements (TISED) of the contact angle, the work of spreading and the drop base diameter as time elapsed under controlled relative humidity. Modification of pH strongly affected the wetting kinetics, suggesting maximum wetting resistance at the control pH (3.60) and with decreased wetting resistance as pH was changed in either direction. The enhancement of the wetting kinetics by artificial modification of soil pH can be attributed to the chemical modification in organic materials coating soil particles based on the magnitude of spreading activation energy and the hydrophilic/hydrophobic moieties ratio of treated soil samples measured by (XPS & MIR spectroscopy). On the basis of our current state of knowledge, we propose that acid and base catalyzed hydrolysis-condensation reactions as dominant processes responsible for the chemical nature of SWR.

  20. Patterned nonadhesive surfaces: superhydrophobicity and wetting regime transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosonovsky, Michael; Bhushan, Bharat

    2008-02-19

    Nonadhesive and water-repellent surfaces are required for many tribological applications. We study mechanisms of wetting of patterned superhydrophobic Si surfaces, including the transition between various wetting regimes during microdroplet evaporation in environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and for contact angle and contact angle hysteresis measurements. Wetting involves interactions at different scale levels: macroscale (water droplet size), microscale (surface texture size), and nanoscale (molecular size). We propose a generalized formulation of the Wenzel and Cassie equations that is consistent with the broad range of experimental data. We show that the contact angle hysteresis involves two different mechanisms and how the transition from the metastable partially wetted (Cassie) state to the homogeneously wetted (Wenzel) state depends upon droplet size and surface pattern parameters.

  1. Monitoring soil wetness variations by means of satellite passive microwave observations: the HYDROPTIMET study cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lacava

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture is an important component of the hydrological cycle. In the framework of modern flood warning systems, the knowledge of soil moisture is crucial, due to the influence on the soil response in terms of infiltration-runoff. Precipitation-runoff processes, in fact, are related to catchment's hydrological conditions before the precipitation. Thus, an estimation of these conditions is of significant importance to improve the reliability of flood warning systems. Combining such information with other weather-related satellite products (i.e. rain rate estimation might represent a useful exercise in order to improve our capability to handle (and possibly mitigate or prevent hydro-geological hazards. Remote sensing, in the last few years, has supported several techniques for soil moisture/wetness monitoring. Most of the satellite-based techniques use microwave data, thanks to the all-weather and all-time capability of these data, as well as to their high sensitivity to water content in the soil. On the other hand, microwave data are unfortunately highly affected by the presence of surface roughness or vegetation coverage within the instantaneous satellite field of view (IFOV. Those problems, consequently, strongly limit the efficiency and the reliability of traditional satellite techniques. Recently, using data coming from AMSU (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit, flying aboard NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellites, a new methodology for soil wetness estimation has been proposed. The proposed index, called Soil Wetness Variation Index (SWVI, developed by a multi-temporal analysis of AMSU records, seems able to reduce the problems related to vegetation and/or roughness effects. Such an approach has been tested, with promising results, on the analysis of some flooding events which occurred in Europe in the past. In this study, results achieved for the HYDROPTIMET test cases will be analysed and discussed in detail

  2. Soil Spectroscopy: An Alternative to Wet Chemistry for Soil Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nocita, M.; Stevens, A.; van Wesemael, Bas

    2015-01-01

    The soil science community is facing a growing demand of regional, continental, and worldwide databases in order to monitor the status of the soil. However, the availability of such data is very scarce. Cost-effective tools to measure soil properties for large areas (e.g., Europe) are required...... in analytical costs, and an increased comparability of results between laboratories. This ambitious project will materialize only through (1) the establishment of local and regional partnerships among existent institutions able to generate the necessary technical competence, and (2) the support of international...

  3. Surface wrinkling on polydimethylsiloxane microspheres via wet surface chemical oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jian; Han, Xue; Cao, Yanping; Lu, Conghua

    2014-07-16

    Here we introduce a simple low-cost yet robust method to realize spontaneously wrinkled morphologies on spherical surfaces. It is based on surface chemical oxidation of aqueous-phase-synthesized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microspheres in the mixed H2SO4/HNO3/H2O solution. Consequently, curvature and overstress-sensitive wrinkles including dimples and labyrinth patterns are successfully induced on the resulting oxidized PDMS microspheres. A power-law dependence of the wrinkling wavelength on the microsphere radius exists. The effects of experimental parameters on these tunable spherical wrinkles have been systematically investigated, when the microspheres are pre-deposited on a substrate. These parameters include the radius and modulus of microspheres, the mixed acid solution composition, the oxidation duration, and the water washing post-treatment. Meanwhile, the complicated chemical oxidation process has also been well studied by in-situ optical observation via the microsphere system, which represents an intractable issue in a planar system. Furthermore, we realize surface wrinkled topographies on the whole microspheres at a large scale, when microspheres are directly dispersed in the mixed acid solution for surface oxidation. These results indicate that the introduced wet surface chemical oxidation has the great potential to apply to other complicated curved surfaces for large-scale generation of well-defined wrinkling patterns, which endow the solids with desired physical properties.

  4. Wetting, prewetting and surface transitions in type-I superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indekeu, J. O.; van Leeuwen, J. M. J.

    1995-02-01

    Within the Ginzburg-Landau theory, which is quantitatively correct for classical superconductors, it is shown that a type-I superconductor can display an interface delocalization or “wetting” transition, in which a macroscopically thick superconducting layer intrudes from the surface into the bulk normal phase. The condition for this transition to occur is that the superconducting order parameter | ψ| 2 is enhanced at the surface. This corresponds to a negative surface extrapolation length b. The wetting transition takes place at bulk two-phase coexistence of normal and superconducting phases, at a temperature TD below the critical temperature Tc, and at magnetic field HD = Hc( TD). The field is applied parallel to the surface. Surprisingly, the order of the wetting transition is controlled by a bulk material constant, the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ. This is very unusual, since in other systems (fluids, Ising magnets,…) the order of the wetting transition depends on surface parameters that are difficult to determine or control. For superconductors, first-order wetting is predicted for 0 ≤ κ wetting for 0.374 wetting, the prewetting extension is also found. Unlike in standard wetting problems, the prewetting line does not terminate at a critical point but changes from first to second order at a tricritical point. Twinning-plane superconductivity (TPS) is reinterpreted as a prewetting phenomenon. The possibility of critical wetting in superconductors is especially interesting because this phenomenon has largely eluded experimental verification in any system until now. Furthermore, superconductors provide a realization of wetting in systems with short-range (exponentially decaying) interactions. This is very different from the usual long-range (algebraically decaying) interactions, such as van der Waals forces, and has important consequences for the wetting characteristics.

  5. Wetting of soap bubbles on hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Arscott, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Wetting of sessile bubbles on solid and liquid surfaces has been studied. A model is presented for the contact angle of a sessile bubble based on a modified Young equation - the experimental results agree with the model. A hydrophilic surface results in a bubble contact angle of 90 deg whereas on a superhydrophobic surface one observes 134 deg. For hydrophilic surfaces, the bubble angle diminishes with bubble radius - whereas on a superhydrophobic surface, the bubble angle increases. The size of the Plateau borders governs the bubble contact angle - depending on the wetting of the surface.

  6. Soil carbon changes in a wetness-prone perennial grass bioenergy field of Northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S.; Thomas, R. E.; Steenhuis, T. S.; Walter, M. F.; Richards, B. K.

    2015-12-01

    In Northeastern United States, fallow marginal lands are being cited as a resource base for the perennial bioenergy sector. Many soils in this region are unsuitable (hence marginal) for row crop agriculture due to seasonal water saturation or near-saturation. Potential carbon (C) sequestration is a key ecosystem service of perennial bioenergy systems. The research site is a 16 acre field (42N28.20', 76W25.94') with predominantly Canaseraga-Dalton-Madalin soils, which was fallow for more than 50 years before establishment in 2011. Quadruplicate treatments have been established on test strips (~1 acre) in which soil moisture conditions vary naturally from moderately well-drained to poorly drained. 16 strip plots consist of the treatments: switchgrass, switchgrass +fertilizer N, reed canarygrass +N, and pre-existing grass as control. The N fertilization rate is 66 lb/ac. 5 permanent sampling subplots were established along the natural moisture gradient of each plot, based on initial water content measurements at the soil surface (0-12 cm) by time-domain reflectometry (TDR). Thus, 80 permanent sampling points have been established, where soil C and health parameters viz soil aggregate stability, permanganate-oxidizable (POX) carbon etc and biomass yields are sampled yearly. Frequent TDR measurements have been normalized to determine relative wetness of all 80 subplots, which have been grouped under five wetness quintiles. The driest subplots are approximately 0.8 times the field mean, whereas the wettest subplots are 1.3 times of that. After four years of establishment, the yields, % SOC (combustion method) and C/N ratios have been plotted. The decrease in % organic matter (loss on ignition) over this time for control soils, wetness quintiles 1 through 5 ranged from 2.05 ( std dev 1.9) to 1.24 (0.39), for reed canary grass soils, from3.37(1.33) to 1.59 (1.03), for switchgrass soils, from 2.67 (0.43) to 1.28 (0.91) and for switchgrass+N soils, from 2.63(0.47) to 2

  7. Stability of Cassie-Baxter wetting states on microstructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hao-Yuan; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2016-10-01

    A stable Cassie-Baxter (CB) wetting state is indispensable for the superhydrophobicity of solid surfaces. In this paper, we analyze the equilibrium and stability of CB wetting states. Using an energy approach, the stability criteria of CB wetting states are established for solid surfaces with either two- or three-dimensional symmetric microstructures. A generic method is presented to calculate the critical pressure at which the CB state on a microstructured solid surface collapses. The method holds for microstructures with arbitrary generatrix, and explicit solutions are derived for a few representative microstructures with a straight or circular generatrix. In addition, some possible strategies are proposed to design surface structures with stable CB wetting states from the viewpoints of geometry and chemistry.

  8. Topographical Anisotropy and Wetting of Ground Stainless Steel Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Bellmann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic and physico-chemical methods were used for a comprehensive surface characterization of different mechanically modified stainless steel surfaces. The surfaces were analyzed using high-resolution confocal microscopy, resulting in detailed information about the topographic properties. In addition, static water contact angle measurements were carried out to characterize the surface heterogeneity of the samples. The effect of morphological anisotropy on water contact angle anisotropy was investigated. The correlation between topography and wetting was studied by means of a model of wetting proposed in the present work, that allows quantifying the air volume of the interface water drop-stainless steel surface.

  9. Threshold friction velocity influenced by wetness of soils within the Columbia Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharratt, B. S.; Vaddella, V. K.; Feng, G.

    2013-06-01

    Windblown dust impacts air quality in the Columbia Plateau of the US Pacific Northwest. Wind erosion of agricultural lands, which is the predominate source of windblown dust in the region, occurs when the friction velocity exceeds the threshold friction velocity (u∗t) of the surface. Soil moisture influences the u∗t, but the u∗t of variably wet soils is virtually unknown in the region. The relationship between u∗t and water content was ascertained for five silt loams collected from field sites in eastern Washington. After moistening the soils to predetermined water contents, u∗t was assessed from wind velocity and PM10 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter ⩽10 μm) and TSP (total suspended particulate matter) concentration profiles above the soil surface inside a wind tunnel. Soil water content appeared to have little influence on u∗t until gravimetric water content rose to 6-14% (depending on the soil). Trends in the relationship between u∗t and soil matric potential (Ψ) suggested moistening soils had little influence on u∗t until the Ψ was in the range of -25 to -1 MPa. The u∗t rose sharply with an increase in Ψ above -1 MPa. The results of this study suggest that u∗t is significantly influenced by adsorption and capillary forces that comprise the matric potential of soils.

  10. Bio-Inspired Extreme Wetting Surfaces for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sera Shin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological creatures with unique surface wettability have long served as a source of inspiration for scientists and engineers. More specifically, materials exhibiting extreme wetting properties, such as superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic surfaces, have attracted considerable attention because of their potential use in various applications, such as self-cleaning fabrics, anti-fog windows, anti-corrosive coatings, drag-reduction systems, and efficient water transportation. In particular, the engineering of surface wettability by manipulating chemical properties and structure opens emerging biomedical applications ranging from high-throughput cell culture platforms to biomedical devices. This review describes design and fabrication methods for artificial extreme wetting surfaces. Next, we introduce some of the newer and emerging biomedical applications using extreme wetting surfaces. Current challenges and future prospects of the surfaces for potential biomedical applications are also addressed.

  11. INFLUENCE OF SURFACE-ROUGHNESS ON THE WETTING ANGLE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, X.B; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the influence of surface roughness on contact angles in the system of liquid Al wetting solid surfaces of Al2O3 has been studied. It was observed that contact angles of liquid Al vary significantly on different rough surfaces of Al2O3 A model is proposed to correlate contact angles wit

  12. Effect of wetting and drying on the bioavailability of organic compounds sequestered in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, J.C.; Quinones-Rivera, A.; Alexander, M. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1998-12-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether cycles of wetting and drying alter the availability of organic compounds that have aged in soil. Subjecting soil to wetting-and drying cycles during periods of aging <60 d decreased the biodegradability, extractability, and uptake by earthworms of phenanthrene and reduced the extractability of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) sequestered in soil compared with soil aged at constant moisture. The mineralization of sequestered DEHP was greater in soil that was wet and dried during a 41-d period of aging than in soil incubated at constant moisture. Wetting and drying soil during periods of aging of 100 or more days had no effect on the biodegradability or assimilation by Eisenia foetida of sequestered phenanthrene and DEHP. Subjecting soil containing previously sequestered phenanthrene to one, three, or four wetting-and-drying cycles increased the biodegradability of the compound. The extractability of sequestered phenanthrene was greater in soil that was wet and dried once after aging than in soil maintained at constant moisture, but three wetting-and-drying cycles did not affect extractability. The biodegradability of sequestered DEHP was unaffected by wetting and drying. The authors suggest that wetting and drying may be useful in the remediation of contaminated soils.

  13. Robust non-wetting PTFE surfaces by femtosecond laser machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fang; Lehr, Jorge; Danielczak, Lisa; Leask, Richard; Kietzig, Anne-Marie

    2014-08-08

    Nature shows many examples of surfaces with extraordinary wettability,which can often be associated with particular air-trapping surface patterns. Here,robust non-wetting surfaces have been created by femtosecond laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The laser-created surface structure resembles a forest of entangled fibers, which support structural superhydrophobicity even when the surface chemistry is changed by gold coating. SEM analysis showed that the degree of entanglement of hairs and the depth of the forest pattern correlates positively with accumulated laser fluence and can thus be influenced by altering various laser process parameters. The resulting fibrous surfaces exhibit a tremendous decrease in wettability compared to smooth PTFE surfaces; droplets impacting the virgin or gold coated PTFE forest do not wet the surface but bounce off. Exploratory bioadhesion experiments showed that the surfaces are truly air-trapping and do not support cell adhesion. Therewith, the created surfaces successfully mimic biological surfaces such as insect wings with robust anti-wetting behavior and potential for antiadhesive applications. In addition, the fabrication can be carried out in one process step, and our results clearly show the insensitivity of the resulting non-wetting behavior to variations in the process parameters,both of which make it a strong candidate for industrial applications.

  14. Robust Non-Wetting PTFE Surfaces by Femtosecond Laser Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nature shows many examples of surfaces with extraordinary wettability, which can often be associated with particular air-trapping surface patterns. Here, robust non-wetting surfaces have been created by femtosecond laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE. The laser-created surface structure resembles a forest of entangled fibers, which support structural superhydrophobicity even when the surface chemistry is changed by gold coating. SEM analysis showed that the degree of entanglement of hairs and the depth of the forest pattern correlates positively with accumulated laser fluence and can thus be influenced by altering various laser process parameters. The resulting fibrous surfaces exhibit a tremendous decrease in wettability compared to smooth PTFE surfaces; droplets impacting the virgin or gold coated PTFE forest do not wet the surface but bounce off. Exploratory bioadhesion experiments showed that the surfaces are truly air-trapping and do not support cell adhesion. Therewith, the created surfaces successfully mimic biological surfaces such as insect wings with robust anti-wetting behavior and potential for antiadhesive applications. In addition, the fabrication can be carried out in one process step, and our results clearly show the insensitivity of the resulting non-wetting behavior to variations in the process parameters, both of which make it a strong candidate for industrial applications.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of wetting on modified amorphous silica surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jingchun; Liu, Shuyan; Yang, Xiaoning

    2009-08-01

    The microscopic wetting of water on amorphous silica surfaces has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Different degrees of surface hydroxylation/silanization were considered. It was observed that the hydrophobicity becomes enhanced with an increase in the degree of surface silanization. A continuous transformation from hydrophilicity to hydrophobicity can be attained for the amorphous silica surfaces through surface modification. From the simulation result, the contact angle can exceed 90° when surface silanization percentage is above 50%, showing a hydrophobic character. It is also found that when the percentage of surface silanization is above 70% on the amorphous silica surface, the water contact angle almost remains unchanged (110-120°). This phenomenon is a little different from the wetting behavior on smooth quartz plates in previous experimental report. This change in the wettability on modified amorphous silica surfaces can be interpreted in terms of the interaction between water molecules and the silica surfaces.

  16. Contact angles of wetting and water stability of soil structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodov, V. A.; Yaroslavtseva, N. V.; Yashin, M. A.; Frid, A. S.; Lazarev, V. I.; Tyugai, Z. N.; Milanovskiy, E. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    From the soddy-podzolic soils and typical chernozems of different texture and land use, dry 3-1 mm aggregates were isolated and sieved in water. As a result, water-stable aggregates and water-unstable particles composing dry 3-1 mm aggregates were obtained. These preparations were ground, and contact angles of wetting were determined by the static sessile drop method. The angles varied from 11° to 85°. In most cases, the values of the angles for the water-stable aggregates significantly exceeded those for the water-unstable components. In terms of carbon content in structural units, there was no correlation between these parameters. When analyzing the soil varieties separately, the significant positive correlation between the carbon content and contact angle of aggregates was revealed only for the loamy-clayey typical chernozem. Based on the multivariate analysis of variance, the value of contact wetting angle was shown to be determined by the structural units belonging to water-stable or water-unstable components of macroaggregates and by the land use type. In addition, along with these parameters, the texture has an indirect effect.

  17. Wetting transition on patterned surfaces: transition states and energy barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weiqing

    2014-03-18

    We study the wetting transition on microstructured hydrophobic surfaces. We use the string method [J. Chem. Phys. 2007, 126, 164103; J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 134105] to accurately compute the transition states, the energy barriers, and the minimum energy paths for the wetting transition from the Cassie-Baxter state to the Wenzel state. Numerical results are obtained for the wetting of a hydrophobic surface textured with a square lattice of pillars. It is found that the wetting of the solid substrate occurs via infiltration of the liquid in a single groove, followed by lateral propagation of the liquid front. The propagation of the liquid front proceeds in a stepwise manner, and a zipping mechanism is observed during the infiltration of each layer. The minimum energy path for the wetting transition goes through a sequence of intermediate metastable states, whose wetted areas reflect the microstructure of the patterned surface. We also study the dependence of the energy barrier on the drop size and the gap between the pillars.

  18. Transcriptional response of nitrifying communities to wetting of dry soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placella, Sarah A; Firestone, Mary K

    2013-05-01

    The first rainfall following a severe dry period provides an abrupt water potential change that is both an acute physiological stress and a defined stimulus for the reawakening of soil microbial communities. We followed the responses of indigenous communities of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, ammonia-oxidizing archaea, and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria to the addition of water to laboratory incubations of soils taken from two California annual grasslands following a typically dry Mediterranean summer. By quantifying transcripts for a subunit of bacterial and archaeal ammonia monooxygenases (amoA) and a bacterial nitrite oxidoreductase (nxrA) in soil from 15 min to 72 h after water addition, we identified transcriptional response patterns for each of these three groups of nitrifiers. An increase in quantity of bacterial amoA transcripts was detectable within 1 h of wet-up and continued until the size of the ammonium pool began to decrease, reflecting a possible role of transcription in upregulation of nitrification after drought-induced stasis. In one soil, the pulse of amoA transcription lasted for less than 24 h, demonstrating the transience of transcriptional pools and the tight coupling of transcription to the local soil environment. Analysis of 16S rRNA using a high-density microarray suggested that nitrite-oxidizing Nitrobacter spp. respond in tandem with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria while nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospina spp. and Nitrospira bacteria may not. Archaeal ammonia oxidizers may respond slightly later than bacterial ammonia oxidizers but may maintain elevated transcription longer. Despite months of desiccation-induced inactivation, we found rapid transcriptional response by all three groups of soil nitrifiers.

  19. Doubly Reentrant Cavities Prevent Catastrophic Wetting Transitions on Intrinsically Wetting Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Domingues, Eddy

    2017-06-05

    Omniphobic surfaces, i.e. which repel all known liquids, have proven of value in applications ranging from membrane distillation to underwater drag reduction. A limitation of currently employed omniphobic surfaces is that they rely on perfluorinated coatings, increasing cost and environmental impact, and preventing applications in harsh environments. There is, thus, a keen interest in rendering conventional materials, such as plastics, omniphobic by micro/nano-texturing rather than via chemical make-up, with notable success having been achieved for silica surfaces with doubly reentrant micropillars. However, we found a critical limitation of microtextures comprising of pillars that they undergo catastrophic wetting transitions (apparent contact angles, θr → 0° from θr > 90°) in the presence of localized physical damages/defects or on immersion in wetting liquids. In response, a doubly reentrant cavity microtexture is introduced, which can prevent catastrophic wetting transitions in the presence of localized structural damage/defects or on immersion in wetting liquids. Remarkably, our silica surfaces with doubly reentrant cavities could exhibited apparent contact angles, θr ≈ 135° for mineral oil, where the intrinsic contact angle, θo ≈ 20°. Further, when immersed in mineral oil or water, doubly reentrant microtextures in silica (θo ≈ 40° for water) were not penetrated even after several days of investigation. Thus, microtextures comprising of doubly reentrant cavities might enable applications of conventional materials without chemical modifications, especially in scenarios that are prone to localized damages or immersion in wetting liquids, e.g. hydrodynamic drag reduction and membrane distillation.

  20. Doubly Reentrant Cavities Prevent Catastrophic Wetting Transitions on Intrinsically Wetting Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Eddy M; Arunachalam, Sankara; Mishra, Himanshu

    2017-06-28

    Omniphobic surfaces, that is, which repel all known liquids, have proven of value in applications ranging from membrane distillation to underwater drag reduction. A limitation of currently employed omniphobic surfaces is that they rely on perfluorinated coatings, increasing cost and environmental impact and preventing applications in harsh environments. Thus, there is a keen interest in rendering conventional materials, such as plastics, omniphobic by micro/nanotexturing rather than via chemical makeup, with notable success having been achieved for silica surfaces with doubly reentrant micropillars. However, we found a critical limitation of microtextures comprising pillars that they undergo catastrophic wetting transitions (apparent contact angles, θr → 0° from θr > 90°) in the presence of localized physical damages/defects or on immersion in wetting liquids. In response, a doubly reentrant cavity microtexture is introduced, which can prevent catastrophic wetting transitions in the presence of localized structural damage/defects or on immersion in wetting liquids. Remarkably, our silica surfaces with doubly reentrant cavities could exhibit apparent contact angles, θr ≈ 135° for mineral oil, where the intrinsic contact angle, θo ≈ 20°. Further, when immersed in mineral oil or water, doubly reentrant microtextures in silica (θo ≈ 40° for water) were not penetrated even after several days of investigation. Thus, microtextures comprising doubly reentrant cavities might enable applications of conventional materials without chemical modifications, especially in scenarios that are prone to localized damages or immersion in wetting liquids, for example, hydrodynamic drag reduction and membrane distillation.

  1. Wetting theory for small droplets on textured solid surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Donggyu; Ryu, Seunghwa

    2016-01-01

    Conventional wetting theories on rough surfaces with Wenzel, Cassie-Baxter, and Penetrate modes suggest the possibility of tuning the contact angle by adjusting the surface texture. Despite decades of intensive study, there are still many experimental results that are not well understood because conventional wetting theory, which assume an infinite droplet size, has been used to explain measurements of finite-sized droplets. In this study, we suggest a wetting theory that is applicable to any droplet size based on the free energy landscape analysis of various wetting modes of finite-sized droplets on a 2D textured surface. The key finding of our study is that there are many quantized wetting angles with local free energy minima; the implication of this is remarkable. We find that the conventional theories can predict the contact angle at the global free energy minimum if the droplet size is 40 times or larger than the characteristic scale of the surface roughness. Furthermore, we confirm that the pinning orig...

  2. The contact angle of wetting of the solid phase of soil before and after chemical modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyugai Zemfira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wettability of soil affects a wide variety of processes including infiltration, preferential flow and surface runoff. Wettability of surface is usually expressed in terms of contact angle (CA measurement. If the CA between liquid and solid surface is less than 90°, the surface is called hydrophilic, otherwise the surface is called hydrophobic. If the CA of water droplet on hydrophilic surface is in a range of 0-30° this surface is called superhydrophilic. In case of superhydrophobic surfaces the CA exceeds 150° that means that these surfaces are extremely difficult to wet. CA of wetting of mineral soil particles depends on the overlying organic and iron compounds. The object of study is a sample of the humus-accumulative horizon of typical chernozem (Kursk, Russia and two samples (horizons A1, B2 of red ferrallitic soils (Fr. Norfolk, NE Oceania. The soil samples were analyzed for organic carbon, forms of non-silicate iron and hydrophobic-hydrophilic composition of humic substances. CA of wetting was determined in the intact samples and after removal of organic matter (H2O2 treatment, amorphous and crystallized forms of iron. Static contact angles were determined with the sessile drop method using a digital goniometer (Drop Shape Analysis System, DSA100, Krüss GmbH, Hamburg, Germany. The contact angle was calculated by the Young–Laplace method (fitting of Young–Laplace equation to the drop shape. The measurements were repeated 10-15 times for every sample. Oxidation of organic matter (H2O2 treatment causes an increase in the values of CA of wetting (in chernozem from 9.3 to 28,0-29.5º, in ferrallitic soil from 18.0 − 27.3 to 22.4 − 33.4º. CA remained constant for chernozem and slightly decreased in the case of ferrallitic soil, when the removal of amorphous and crystallized forms of iron was performed on samples pretreated with H2O2. CA increase occurs after successive removal of nonsilicate forms of iron from soil samples of

  3. Wetting layer of copper on the tantalum (001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupraz, Maxime; Poloni, Roberta; Ratter, Kitti; Rodney, David; De Santis, Maurizio; Gilles, Bruno; Beutier, Guillaume; Verdier, Marc

    2016-12-01

    The heteroepitaxial interface formed by copper deposited onto the tantalum (001) surface is studied by surface x-ray diffraction and ab initio calculations. The analysis of the crystal truncation rods reveals the presence of a wetting layer of copper made of two atomic planes pseudomorphic to the tantalum substrate, with the upper most atomic planes significantly deformed. These findings are in total agreement with the results of density-functional-theory calculations. The presence of the wetting layer confirms a Stranski-Krastanov growth mode and is thought to explain the extremely fast atomic diffusion of copper during the dewetting process in the solid state at high temperature.

  4. Non-wetting droplets on hot superhydrophilic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adera, Solomon; Raj, Rishi; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2013-09-01

    Controlling wettability by varying surface chemistry and roughness or by applying external stimuli is of interest for a wide range of applications including microfluidics, drag reduction, self-cleaning, water harvesting, anti-corrosion, anti-fogging, anti-icing and thermal management. It has been well known that droplets on textured hydrophilic, that is superhydrophilic, surfaces form thin films with near-zero contact angles. Here we report an unexpected behaviour where non-wetting droplets are formed by slightly heating superhydrophilic microstructured surfaces beyond the saturation temperature (>5 °C). Although such behaviour is generally not expected on superhydrophilic surfaces, an evaporation-induced pressure in the structured region prevents wetting. In particular, the increased thermal conductivity and decreased vapour permeability of the structured region allows this behaviour to be observed at such low temperatures. This phenomenon is distinct from the widely researched Leidenfrost and offers an expanded parametric space for fabricating surfaces with desired temperature-dependent wettability.

  5. Wetting transitions on textured hydrophilic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishino, C.; Okumura, K.

    2008-04-01

    We consider the quasi-static energy of a drop on a textured hydrophilic surface, with taking the contact angle hysteresis (CAH) into account. We demonstrate how energy varies as the contact state changes from the Cassie state (in which air is trapped at the drop bottom) to the Wenzel state (in which liquid fills the texture at the drop bottom) assuming that the latter state nucleates from the center of the drop bottom. When the textured substrate is hydrophilic enough to allow spontaneous penetration of liquid film of the texture thickness, the present theory asserts that the drop develops into an experimentally observed state in which a drop looks like an egg fried without flipped over (sunny-side up) with a well-defined radius of “the egg yolk.” Otherwise, the final contact state of the drop becomes like a Wenzel state, but with the contact circle smaller than the original Wenzel state due to the CAH. We provide simple analytical estimations for the yolk radius of the “sunny-side-up” state and for the final radius of the contact circle of the pseudo-Wenzel state.

  6. Dynamic Wetting on Graphene-Coated Surface: Molecular Dynamics Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Shih-Wei; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-11-01

    Wettability of graphene-coated surface gained significant attention recently due to discussion on the ``transparency'' (whether the wetting characteristics follow that of graphene or the underlying surface) and practical applications of graphene. In terms of static contact angle, the wettability of graphene-coated surfaces have been widely studied by experiments, simulations, and theory in recent years. However, the studies of dynamic wetting on graphene-coated surfaces are limited. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to study the dynamic wetting of water droplet on graphene-coated surfaces from a microscopic point of view. The results show that the degree of similarity between the spreading behavior on graphene-coated surface and that on pure graphene (or that on the underlying surface) depends on time, i.e. how nonequilibrium the interface dynamics is. We also found that this feature can be altered by introducing defects into graphene. The work is partially supported by Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows 26-04364 and JST CREST.

  7. Contrasting radiation and soil heat fluxes in Arctic shrub and wet sedge tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszak, Inge; Eugster, Werner; Heijmans, Monique M. P. D.; Schaepman-Strub, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    Vegetation changes, such as shrub encroachment and wetland expansion, have been observed in many Arctic tundra regions. These changes feed back to permafrost and climate. Permafrost can be protected by soil shading through vegetation as it reduces the amount of solar energy available for thawing. Regional climate can be affected by a reduction in surface albedo as more energy is available for atmospheric and soil heating. Here, we compared the shortwave radiation budget of two common Arctic tundra vegetation types dominated by dwarf shrubs (Betula nana) and wet sedges (Eriophorum angustifolium) in North-East Siberia. We measured time series of the shortwave and longwave radiation budget above the canopy and transmitted radiation below the canopy. Additionally, we quantified soil temperature and heat flux as well as active layer thickness. The mean growing season albedo of dwarf shrubs was 0.15 ± 0.01, for sedges it was higher (0.17 ± 0.02). Dwarf shrub transmittance was 0.36 ± 0.07 on average, and sedge transmittance was 0.28 ± 0.08. The standing dead leaves contributed strongly to the soil shading of wet sedges. Despite a lower albedo and less soil shading, the soil below dwarf shrubs conducted less heat resulting in a 17 cm shallower active layer as compared to sedges. This result was supported by additional, spatially distributed measurements of both vegetation types. Clouds were a major influencing factor for albedo and transmittance, particularly in sedge vegetation. Cloud cover reduced the albedo by 0.01 in dwarf shrubs and by 0.03 in sedges, while transmittance was increased by 0.08 and 0.10 in dwarf shrubs and sedges, respectively. Our results suggest that the observed deeper active layer below wet sedges is not primarily a result of the summer canopy radiation budget. Soil properties, such as soil albedo, moisture, and thermal conductivity, may be more influential, at least in our comparison between dwarf shrub vegetation on relatively dry patches and

  8. Static and Dynamic Wetting Behavior of Triglycerides on Solid Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski; Saramago

    2000-07-15

    Triglyceride wetting properties on solid surfaces of different hydro-phobicities were investigated using three different methods, namely, the sessile drop method for static contact angle measurements, the Wilhelmy method for dynamic contact angle measurements, and the captive bubble method to investigate thin triglyceride film stability. For solid surfaces having a surface free energy higher than the surface tension of triglycerides (tributyrin, tricaprylin, and triolein), a qualitative correlation was observed between wetting and solid/triglyceride relative hydrophobicities. On surfaces presenting extreme hydrophobic or hydrophilic properties, medium-chain triglycerides had a behavior similar to that of long-chain unsaturated ones. On a high-energy surface (glass), tricaprylin showed an autophobic effect subsequent to molecular adsorption in trident conformation on the solid, observed with the three methods. Thin triglyceride films between an air bubble and a solid surface were stable for a short time, for solids with a surface free energy larger than the triglyceride surface tension. If the solid surface had a lower surface free energy, the thin film collapsed after a time interval which increased with triglyceride viscosity. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  9. Kinetics of wetting of liquid on a solid surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    To consider a sessile drop on an ideal solid surface in equilibrium with a vapor phase, the classic Young equation was given. The derivation of the Young equation was based on both the mechanics and the energy knowledge. According to the constant volume of the liquid in the wetting process of the liquid on a smooth and homogeneous solid surface and the low energy law, Young equation was ob-tained through the mathematic method in this paper. The previous work indicated that the contact angle θ was a function of time, but the coefficient can be obtained only through experiments. It was assumed that the liquid was steady Newtonian flow. Then the relationships between the dynamic contact angles and the wetting time were found in terms of the equilibrium of the spreading force and the restoring force. An immediate theoretical justification for the dependence of contact angles and the time was given. It was assumed that the effect of the gravity on wetting was negligible in the investigation. Under what conditions was the gravity negligible? The criterion of the gravity on the wetting process of the liquid was proposed when contact angles were greater than 90°. If the criterion, I, was much smaller than 1, the effect of the gravity on the wetting process could be ignored. If the criterion, I, was equal to or larger than 1, the effect of the gravity on the wetting process could not be ignored. On mercury-mica systems, the gravity may be considered only when the equilibrium contact radius reached 1.5 mm.

  10. Kinetics of wetting of liquid on a solid surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chuang; LI BangSheng; REN MingXing; FU HengZhi

    2009-01-01

    To consider a sessile drop on an ideal solid surface In equilibrium with a vapor phase,the classic Young equation was given.The derivation of the Young equation was based on both the mechanics and the energy knowledge.According to the constant volume of the liquid in the wetting process of the liquid on a smooth and homogeneous solid surface and the low energy law,Young equation was obtained through the mathematic method in this paper.The previous work indicated that the contact angle θ was a function of time,but the coefficient can be obtained only through experiments.It was assumed that the liquid was steady Newtonian flow.Then the relationships between the dynamic contact angles and the wetting time were found in terms of the equilibrium of the spreading force and the restoring force.An immediate theoretical justification for the dependence of contact angles and the time was given.It was assumed that the effect of the gravity on wetting was negligible in the investigation.Under what conditions was the gravity negligible? The criterion of the gravity on the wetting process of the liquid was proposed when contact angles were greater than 90°.If the criterion,Ⅰ,was much smaller than 1,the effect of the gravity on the wetting process could be ignored.If the criterion,Ⅰ,was equal to or larger than 1,the effect of the gravity on the wetting process could not be ignored.On mercury-mica systems,the gravity may be considered only when the equilibrium contact radius reached 1.5 mm.

  11. HONO fluxes from soil surfaces: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dianming; Sörgel, Matthias; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodriguez-Caballero, Emilio; Cheng, Yafang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) contributes up to 80% of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) radicals and is also linked to health risks through reactions with tobacco smoke forming carcinogens. Field and modeling results suggested a large unknown HONO source in the troposphere during daytime. By measuring near ground HONO mixing ratio, up to 30% of HONO can be released from forest, rural and urban ground as well as snow surfaces. This source has been proposed to heterogeneous reactions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on humic acid surfaces or nitric acid photolysis. Laboratory studies showed that HONO emissions from bulk soil samples can reach 258 ng m-2 s-1 (in term of nitrogen), which corresponding to 1.1 × 1012 molecules cm-2 s-1and ˜ 100 times higher than most of the field studies, as measured by a dynamic chamber system. The potential mechanisms for soil HONO emissions include chemical equilibrium of acid-base reaction and gas-liquid partitioning between soil nitrite and HONO, but the positive correlation of HONO fluxes with pH (largest at neutral and slightly alkaline) points to the dominance of the formation process by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In general soil surface acidity, nitrite concentration and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria mainly regulate the HONO release from soil. A recent study showed that biological soil crusts in drylands can also emit large quantities of HONO and NO, corresponding to ˜20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. Due to large concentrations of microorganisms in biological soil crusts, particularly high HONO and NO emissions were measured after wetting events. Considering large areas of arid and arable lands as well as peatlands, up to 70% of global soils are able to emitting HONO. However, the discrepancy between large soil HONO emissions measured in lab and low contributions of HONO flux from ground surfaces in field as well as the role of microorganisms should be further investigated.

  12. Surface Modification of Textured Dielectrics and Their Wetting Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijay; Dhillon, Ajaypal Singh; Sharma, Niti Nipun

    2017-02-01

    Controlling the wettability on dielectric materials is a classical topic in surface engineering. Surface texturing and deposition of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are major approaches to achieve lower or higher water contact angle ( θ c) and thereby making surface less or more wettable (more hydrophobic). Dielectric surfaces wetting has been engineered by surface modification and has been shown to achieve θ c to a maximum of 120° ± 5°. Further improvement in θ c to an extent greater than 150° ± 5° is desired to render the surface superhydrophobic. We report in this work an achievement of θ c > 150° ± 5° by combining the plasma-treated surface and octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) SAMs deposition on dielectrics, and this had been shown on dielectric ranging from low- k to high- k values. The improvement in wetting behavior and quality of dielectric surface with monolayer on plasma-treated surfaces are (is) investigated and characterized using atomic-force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), contact angle goniometer, and Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and are compared with untreated dielectric surface with OTS monolayers.

  13. Surface Modification of Textured Dielectrics and Their Wetting Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijay; Dhillon, Ajaypal Singh; Sharma, Niti Nipun

    2017-01-01

    Controlling the wettability on dielectric materials is a classical topic in surface engineering. Surface texturing and deposition of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are major approaches to achieve lower or higher water contact angle (θ c) and thereby making surface less or more wettable (more hydrophobic). Dielectric surfaces wetting has been engineered by surface modification and has been shown to achieve θ c to a maximum of 120° ± 5°. Further improvement in θ c to an extent greater than 150° ± 5° is desired to render the surface superhydrophobic. We report in this work an achievement of θ c > 150° ± 5° by combining the plasma-treated surface and octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) SAMs deposition on dielectrics, and this had been shown on dielectric ranging from low-k to high-k values. The improvement in wetting behavior and quality of dielectric surface with monolayer on plasma-treated surfaces are (is) investigated and characterized using atomic-force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), contact angle goniometer, and Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and are compared with untreated dielectric surface with OTS monolayers.

  14. Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Graham, Alan Lyman (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Noble, David F. (David Frederick) (.; )); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James (Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2007-06-01

    As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

  15. Preliminary Evaluation of Cesium Distribution for Wet Sieving Process Planned for Soil Decontamination in Japan - 13104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enokida, Y.; Tanada, Y.; Hirabayashi, D. [Graduate School of Engineering, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan); Sawada, K. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    For the purpose of decontaminating radioactive cesium from a huge amount of soil, which has been estimated to be 1.2x10{sup 8} m{sup 3} by excavating to a 5-cm depth from the surface of Fukushima Prefecture where a severe nuclear accident occurred at TEPCO's power generating site and has emitted a significant amount of radioactive materials, mainly radioactive cesium, a wet sieving process was selected as one of effective methods available in Japan. Some private companies have demonstrated this process for soil treatment in the Fukushima area by testing at their plants. The results were very promising, and a full-fledged application is expected to follow. In the present study, we spiked several aqueous samples containing soil collected from an industrial wet sieving plant located near our university for the recycling of construction wastes with non-radioactive cesium hydroxide. The present study provides scientific data concerning the effectiveness in volume reduction of the contaminated soil by a wet sieving process as well as the cesium distribution between the liquid phase and clay minerals for each sub-process of the full-scale one, but a simulating plant equipped with a process of coagulating sedimentation and operational safety fundamentals for the plant. Especially for the latter aspect, the study showed that clay minerals of submicron size strongly bind a high content of cesium, which was only slightly removed by coagulation with natural sedimentation (1 G) nor centrifugal sedimentation (3,700 G) and some of the cesium may be transferred to the effluent or recycled water. By applying ultracentrifugation (257,000 G), most of submicron clay minerals containing cesium was removed, and the cesium amount which might be transferred to the effluent or recycled water, could be reduced to less than 2.3 % of the original design by the addition of a cesium barrier consisting of ultracentrifugation or a hollow fiber membrane. (authors)

  16. Fast and Slow Wetting Dynamics on nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandyala, Dhiraj; Rahmani, Amir; Cubaud, Thomas; Colosqui, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This talk will present force-displacement and spontaneous drop spreading measurements on diverse nanostructured surfaces (e.g., mesoporous titania thin films, nanoscale pillared structures, on silica or glass substrates). Experimental measurements are performed for water-air and water-oil systems. The dynamics of wetting observed in these experiments can present remarkable crossovers from fast to slow or arrested dynamics. The emergence of a slow wetting regime is attributed to a multiplicity of metastable equilibrium states induced by nanoscale surface features. The crossover point can be dramatically advanced or delayed by adjusting specific physical parameters (e.g., viscosity of the wetting phases) and geometric properties of the surface nanostructure (e.g., nanopore/pillar radius and separation). Controlling the crossover point to arrested dynamics can effectively modify the degree of contact angle hysteresis and magnitude of liquid adhesion forces observed on surfaces of different materials. This work is supported by a SEED Award from The Office of Brookhaven National Laboratory Affairs at Stony Brook University.

  17. Modified Wenzel and Cassie equations for wetting on rough surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xianmin

    2016-01-01

    We study a stationary wetting problem on rough and inhomogeneous solid surfaces. We derive a new formula for the apparent contact angle by asymptotic two-scale homogenization method. The formula reduces to a modified Wenzel equation for geometrically rough surfaces and a modified Cassie equation for chemically inhomogeneous surfaces. Unlike the classical Wenzel and Cassie equations, the modified equations correspond to local minimizers of the total interface energy in the solid-liquid-air system, so that they are consistent with experimental observations. The homogenization results are proved rigorously by a variational method.

  18. Surface tension and reactive wetting in solder connections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedi, Andre; Schmitz, Guido [Institut fuer Materialphysik, Westf. Wilhelms-Universitaet, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Wetting is an important pre-requisite of a reliable solder connection. However, it is only an indirect measure for the important specific energy of the reactive interface between solder and base metallization. In order to quantify this energy, we measured wetting angles of solder drops as well as surface tension of SnPb solders under systematic variation of composition and gaseous flux at different reflow temperatures. For the latter, we used the sessile drop method placing a solder drop on a glas substrate. From the two independent data sets, the important energy of the reactive interface is evaluated based on Young's equation. Remarkably, although both, the tension between the solder and flux and the wetting angle, reveal significant dependence on solder composition. So the adhesion energy reveals distinguished plateaus which are related to different reaction products in contact to the solder. TEM analysis and calculations of phase stabilities show that there is no Cu6Sn5 for high lead concentrations. The experiments confirm a model of reactive wetting by Eustathopoulos.

  19. Dynamic wetting of ro1ling oil on aluminum surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ya-jun; ZHOU Hong-hui

    2007-01-01

    Static and dynamic contact angles of stock oil and its solutions with additives(fatty acid, fatty alcohol, fatty methyl ester usually used in rolling aluminum) were measured on aluminum surface (Alloy 1145) by sessile drop technique on an OCA35 dynamic contact angle tester. The effect of additive on the drop spreading was investigated as well. It is shown that the drop spreads very quickly in the first 500 ms after the lubricant contacts with the aluminum surface, and then does slowly later. The dynamic contact angle decreases exponentially with time. In contrast to the stock oil, although addition of polarity additive of long chain alkyl into stock oil is able to decrease the surface tension of solutions, it weakens the wetting dynamic, which results from the adsorption at the expanding solid/liquid interface. Among the same long chain polarity organic compounds used, dynamic wetting decreases in the order of fatty acid, fatty alcohol and fatty ester. The blend of fatty alcohol and fatty methyl ester can improve the oil wetting dynamics and promote the lubricant spreading.

  20. The role of leaf cutter ants on soil organic carbon dynamics in a wet tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendenmann, L.; Meredyth-Young, M.; Dierick, D.; Allen, M. F.; Harmon, T. C.; Oberbauer, S. F.; Rundel, P.; Trahan, N. A.; Zelikova, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical forest ecosystems play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle. Neotropical forests are significantly influenced by leaf cutter ants (LCA) which are the most important herbivore in these systems. LCA cut fresh leaves and bring large amounts of plant biomass into their nests to grow their fungus gardens. The excavation and continual maintenance of their large nests modifies soil characteristics and biogeochemistry with direct and indirect impacts on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics. The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of LCA (Atta cephalotes) on soil C mineralization, carbon degrading enzymes (β-glucosidase and α-glucosidase), and labile soil C (hot water extractable carbon) across a 1 m soil depth profile and comparing between two different soils (residual and alluvial) and forest types (primary and secondary) in a wet tropical rainforest in Costa Rica. We hypothesized that C mineralization rates will be higher inside LCA nests due to continual input of fresh organic matter, as evidenced by higher microbial biomass and carbon degrading enzymes. Similarly, we expected more labile C inside nests. All soil C parameters were highly variable among sites and between nests and controls. Carbon mineralization rates ranged from 0.02 to 0.2 µmol C h-1 g soil-1 during the initial decay phase which lasted approximately 6 days during soil incubation. The highest respiration rates were measured in the top 20 cm of the primary forest residual soil. Contrary to our expectations, C mineralization rates were higher in control soils, where C degrading enzymes were in higher concentrations (around 250 µmol). The labile soil C concentrations were variable across sites (2-25 mg C g soil-1) and higher in the upper soil profiles, but no significant differences were found between controls and nests. Our results indicate greater heterogeneity inside the nests than previously expected. We explain our findings in terms of the removal of leaf and organic

  1. Undulatory locomotion of {\\it C. elegans} on wet surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Xiao N; Krajacic, P; Lamitina, T; Arratia, P E

    2011-01-01

    The physical and bio-mechanical principles that govern undulatory movement on wet surfaces have important applications in physiology, physics, and engineering. The nematode {\\it C. elegans}, with its highly stereotypical and functionally distinct sinusoidal locomotory gaits, is an excellent system in which to dissect these properties. Measurements of the main forces governing the {\\it C. elegans} crawling gait on lubricated surfaces have been scarce, primarily due to difficulties in estimating the physical features at the nematode-gel interface. Using kinematic data and a hydrodynamic model based on lubrication theory, we calculate both the surface drag forces and the nematode's bending force while crawling on the surface of agar gels. We find that the normal and tangential surface drag force coefficients during crawling are approximately 220 and 22, respectively, and the drag coefficient ratio is approximately 10. During crawling, the calculated internal bending force is time-periodic and spatially complex, ...

  2. An efficient threshold dynamics method for wetting on rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianmin; Wang, Dong; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2017-02-01

    The threshold dynamics method developed by Merriman, Bence and Osher (MBO) is an efficient method for simulating the motion by mean curvature flow when the interface is away from the solid boundary. Direct generalization of MBO-type methods to the wetting problem with interfaces intersecting the solid boundary is not easy because solving the heat equation in a general domain with a wetting boundary condition is not as efficient as it is with the original MBO method. The dynamics of the contact point also follows a different law compared with the dynamics of the interface away from the boundary. In this paper, we develop an efficient volume preserving threshold dynamics method for simulating wetting on rough surfaces. This method is based on minimization of the weighted surface area functional over an extended domain that includes the solid phase. The method is simple, stable with O (Nlog ⁡ N) complexity per time step and is not sensitive to the inhomogeneity or roughness of the solid boundary.

  3. Wet meadow ecosystems contribute the majority of overwinter soil respiration from snow-scoured alpine tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, John F.; Blanken, Peter D.; Williams, Mark W.

    2016-04-01

    We measured soil respiration across a soil moisture gradient ranging from dry to wet snow-scoured alpine tundra soils throughout three winters and two summers. In the absence of snow accumulation, soil moisture variability was principally determined by the combination of mesotopographical hydrological focusing and shallow subsurface permeability, which resulted in a patchwork of comingled ecosystem types along a single alpine ridge. To constrain the subsequent carbon cycling variability, we compared three measures of effective diffusivity and three methods to calculate gradient method soil respiration from four typical vegetation communities. Overwinter soil respiration was primarily restricted to wet meadow locations, and a conservative estimate of the rate of overwinter soil respiration from snow-scoured wet meadow tundra was 69-90% of the maximum carbon dioxide (CO2) respired by seasonally snow-covered soils within this same catchment. This was attributed to higher overwinter soil temperatures at wet meadow locations relative to fellfield, dry meadow, and moist meadow communities, which supported liquid water and heterotrophic respiration throughout the winter. These results were corroborated by eddy covariance-based measurements that demonstrated an average of 272 g C m-2 overwinter carbon loss during the study period. As a result, we updated a conceptual model of soil respiration versus snow cover to express the potential for soil respiration variability from snow-scoured alpine tundra.

  4. Effects of drying-wetting and freezing-thawing cycle on leachability of metallic elements in mine soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, H.; Kim, J.; Hyun, S.

    2016-12-01

    Mine leachate derived from contaminated mine sites with metallic elements can pose serious risks on human society and environment. Only labile fraction of metallic elements in mine soils is subject to leaching and movement by rainfall. Lability of metallic element in soil is a function of bond strengths between metal and soil surfaces, which is influenced by environmental condition (e.g., rainfall intensity, duration, temperature, etc.) The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of various climate conditions on the leaching patterns and lability of metallic elements in mine soils. To do this, two mine soils were sampled from two abandoned mine sites located in Korea. Leaching test were conducted using batch decant-refill method. Various climatic conditions were employed in leaching test such as (1) oven drying (40oC) - wetting cycles, (2) air drying (20oC) - wetting cycle, and (3) freezing (-40oC) - thawing cycles. Duration of drying and freezing were varied from 4 days to 2 weeks. Concentration of metallic elements, pH, Eh and concentration of dissolved iron and sulfate in leachate from each leaching process was measured. To identify the changes of labile fraction in mine soils after each of drying or freezing period, sequential extraction procedure (five fraction) was used to compare labile fraction (i.e., F1 + F2) of metallic elements. The concentration of metallic elements in mine leachate was increased after drying and freezing procedure. The amounts of released metallic element from mine soils was changed depending on their drying or freezing period. In addition, labile fraction of metallic elements in soil was also changed after drying and freezing. The changes in labile fraction after drying and freezing might be due to the increased soil surface area by pore water volume expansion. Further study is therefore needed to evaluate the impact of altered physical properties of soils such as hydration of soil surface area and shrinking by drying and

  5. Sustained impact of drought on wet shrublands mediated by soil physical changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Maria T.; Smith, Andrew; Robinson, David; van Baarsel, Susie; Mills, Robert; Marshall, Miles; Koller, Eva; Lebron, Inma; Hall, Jane; Emmett, Bridget

    2015-04-01

    Projected warming, and increasingly frequent extreme events such as drought, may substantially enhance soil organic matter decomposition in wet organic soils, contributing to the positive feedback between the terrestrial carbon cycle and climate change. Evidence suggests that, as wet organic soils contain large organic C stocks, acclimation to warming might occur more slowly in comparison to mineral soils. The long-term response of wet organic soils to drought remains however uncertain. Ecosystems with organo-mineral soils might be more vulnerable to drought events than peatlands, because of a limited soil moisture pool being available to buffer drying events. We investigated the long-term (14 years) impact of warming and repeated summer droughts on soil respiration from podzolic (organo-mineral) soils in a wet shrubland, using a whole-ecosystem climate-change experiment in North Wales, UK. The experimental drought aimed to emulate the UK summer drought of 1995, considered to be the most recent significant drought year prior to treatment initiation. The impact of drought (average respiration stimulation of 22 % for all seasons and years) was enhanced over the years, which was linked to major changes in soil structure that led to a 54 % reduction in water holding capacity. Bryophyte abundance was found to buffer soil moisture losses. After a bryophyte expansion in 2005 the impact of warming on soil efflux was attenuated; this suggests that bryophytes might have a key role in the resilience these soils to warming despite their relatively small contribution to total aboveground biomass. Plant productivity was very resilient to warming or drought, indicating that the increases in soil respiration have not been balanced by increases in C inputs to soil. The results indicate the potentially critical role that changes in sub-dominant vegetation and in soil physical properties may have in determining climate change impacts on soil C dynamics.

  6. Effect of surface thickness on the wetting front velocity during jet impingement surface cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Chitranjan; Gotherwal, Deepesh; Singh, Chandradeep; Singh, Charan

    2017-02-01

    A hot stainless steel (SS-304) surface of 450 ± 10 °C initial temperature is cooled with a normally impinging round water jet. The experiments have been performed for the surface of different thickness e.g. 1, 2, 3 mm and jet Reynolds number in the range of Re = 26,500-48,000. The cooling performance of the hot test surface is evaluated on the basis of wetting front velocity. The wetting front velocity is determined for 10-40 mm downstream spatial locations away from the stagnation point. It has been observed that the wetting front velocity increase with the rise in jet flow rate, however, diminishes towards the downstream spatial location and with the rise in surface thickness. The proposed correlation for the dimensionless wetting front velocity predicts the experimental data well within the error band of ±30 %, whereas, 75 % of experimental data lies within the range of ±20 %.

  7. Wetting behavior of lightly sulfonated polystyrene ionomers on silica surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiaowen; Weiss, R A

    2008-11-18

    The wetting/dewetting behavior of thin films of lightly sulfonated low molecular weight polystyrene (SPS) ionomers spin-coated onto silica surfaces were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle measurements, and electron microscopy. The effects of the sulfonation level, the choice of the cation, the solvent used to spin-coat the films, and the molecular weight of the ionomer were investigated. Small angle X-ray scattering was used to determine the bulk microstructure of the films. The addition of the sulfonate groups suppressed the dewetting behavior of the PS above its glass transition temperature, e.g. no dewetting occurred even after 240 h of annealing at 120 degrees C. Increasing the sulfonation level led to more homogeneous and smoother surfaces. The choice of the cation used affected the wetting properties, but not in a predictable manner. When tetrahydrofuran (THF) or a THF/methanol mixed solvent was used for spin-casting, a submicron-textured surface morphology was produced, which may be a consequence of spinodal decomposition of the film surface during casting. Upon annealing for long times, the particles coalesced into a coherent, nonwetted film.

  8. Condensation and Wetting Dynamics on Micro/Nano-Structured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olceroglu, Emre

    Because of their adjustable wetting characteristics, micro/nanostructured surfaces are attractive for the enhancement of phase-change heat transfer where liquid-solid-vapor interactions are important. Condensation, evaporation, and boiling processes are traditionally used in a variety of applications including water harvesting, desalination, industrial power generation, HVAC, and thermal management systems. Although they have been studied by numerous researchers, there is currently a lack of understanding of the underlying mechanisms by which structured surfaces improve heat transfer during phase-change. This PhD dissertation focuses on condensation onto engineered surfaces including fabrication aspect, the physics of phase-change, and the operational limitations of engineered surfaces. While superhydrophobic condensation has been shown to produce high heat transfer rates, several critical issues remain in the field. These include surface manufacturability, heat transfer coefficient measurement limitations at low heat fluxes, failure due to surface flooding at high supersaturations, insufficient modeling of droplet growth rates, and the inherent issues associated with maintenance of non-wetted surface structures. Each of these issues is investigated in this thesis, leading to several contributions to the field of condensation on engineered surfaces. A variety of engineered surfaces have been fabricated and characterized, including nanostructured and hierarchically-structured superhydrophobic surfaces. The Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is used here as a biological template for the fabrication of nickel nanostructures, which are subsequently functionalized to achieve superhydrophobicity. This technique is simple and sustainable, and requires no applied heat or external power, thus making it easily extendable to a variety of common heat transfer materials and complex geometries. To measure heat transfer rates during superhydrophobic condensation in the presence of non

  9. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagow, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  10. Differential response of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria to the wetting of salty arid soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Yonatan; Ronen, Zeev; Nejidat, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria (AOA, AOB) catalyze the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification. To examine their differential responses to the wetting of dry and salty arid soil, AOA and AOB amoA genes (encoding subunit A of the ammonia monooxygenase) and transcripts were enumerated in dry (summer) and wet (after the first rainfall) soil under the canopy of halophytic shrubs and between the shrubs. AOA and AOB were more abundant under shrub canopies than between shrubs in both the dry and wetted soil. Soil wetting caused a significant decrease in AOB abundance under the canopy and an increase of AOA between the shrubs. The abundance of the archaeal amoA gene transcript was similar for both the wet and dry soil, and the transcript-to-gene ratios were water content. In contrast, the bacterial amoA transcript-to-gene ratios were between 78 and 514. The lowest ratio was in dry soil under the canopy and the highest in the soil between the shrubs. The results suggest that the AOA are more resilient to stress conditions and maintain a basic activity in arid ecosystems, while the AOB are more responsive to changes in the biotic and abiotic conditions.

  11. Surface Reactivity in Tropical Highly Weathered Soils and Implications for Rational Soil Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. MOREAU; J. PETARD

    2004-01-01

    Highly weathered soils are distributed in the humid and wet-dry tropics, as well as in the humid subtropics. As a result of strong weathering, these soils are characterized by low activity clays, which develop variable surface charge and related specific properties. Surface reactions regarding base exchange and soil acidification, heavy metal sorption and mobility, and phosphorus sorption and availability of the tropical highly weathered soils are reviewed in this paper.Factors controlling surface reactivity towards cations and anions, including ion exchange and specific adsorption processes, are discussed with consideration on practical implications for rational management of these soils. Organic matter content and pH value are major basic factors that should be controlled through appropriate agricultural practices, in order to optimise favorable effects of colloid surface properties on soil fertility and environmental quality.

  12. Effects of Revolution on soil wetting, turf performance and nitrogen efficiency of a fairway prone to soil water repellency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostindie, K.; Dekker, L.W.; Geissen, V.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on the effects of applications of the surfactant Revolution on soil wetting and turf performance of fairway 10 of the Rosendaelsche Golfclub, located near Arnhem, The Netherlands. In addition, the influence of Revolution on soil water repellency and the nitrogen contents in grass

  13. Coffee-stain growth dynamics on dry and wet surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Boulogne, François; Stone, Howard A

    2016-01-01

    The drying of a drop containing particles often results in the accumulation of the particles at the contact line. In this work, we investigate the drying of an aqueous colloidal drop surrounded by a hydrogel that is also evaporating. We combine theoretical and experimental studies to understand how the surrounding vapor concentration affects the particle deposit during the constant radius evaporation mode. In addition to the common case of evaporation on an otherwise dry surface, we show that in a configuration where liquid is evaporating from a flat surface around the drop, the singularity of the evaporative flux at the contact line is suppressed and the drop evaporation is homogeneous. For both conditions, we derive the velocity field and we establish the temporal evolution of the number of particles accumulated at the contact line. We predict the growth dynamics of the stain and the drying timescales. Thus, dry and wet conditions are compared with experimental results and we highlight that only the dynamic...

  14. Undulatory locomotion of Caenorhabditis elegans on wet surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, X N; Sznitman, J; Krajacic, P; Lamitina, T; Arratia, P E

    2012-06-20

    The physical and biomechanical principles that govern undulatory movement on wet surfaces have important applications in physiology, physics, and engineering. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, with its highly stereotypical and functionally distinct sinusoidal locomotory gaits, is an excellent system in which to dissect these properties. Measurements of the main forces governing the C. elegans crawling gait on lubricated surfaces have been scarce, primarily due to difficulties in estimating the physical features at the nematode-gel interface. Using kinematic data and a hydrodynamic model based on lubrication theory, we calculate both the surface drag forces and the nematode's bending force while crawling on the surface of agar gels within a preexisting groove. We find that the normal and tangential surface drag coefficients during crawling are ∼222 and 22, respectively, and the drag coefficient ratio is ∼10. During crawling, the calculated internal bending force is time-periodic and spatially complex, exhibiting a phase lag with respect to the nematode's body bending curvature. This phase lag is largely due to viscous drag forces, which are higher during crawling as compared to swimming in an aqueous buffer solution. The spatial patterns of bending force generated during either swimming or crawling correlate well with previously described gait-specific features of calcium signals in muscle. Further, our analysis indicates that one may be able to control the motility gait of C. elegans by judiciously adjusting the magnitude of the surface drag coefficients. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Wetting of two-dimensional physically patterned surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Michael Scott

    An understanding of wetting phenomena is important, in part, due to the many practical applications of controlled wetting. Some of the most exciting applications involve superhydrophobic surfaces, on which water droplets exhibit contact angles larger than 150° and contact angle hysteresis less than 10°. These surfaces are notable for their low-drag, antifouling, and self-cleaning properties, among others. Wetting is known to be affected by both the chemistry and the physical patterning of a surface, with the chemistry affecting what is called the intrinsic contact angle, which is the contact angle displayed by a droplet on a smooth flat surface made of the given material. To date, the largest intrinsic contact angle observed for any material is only about 120°, which does not confer superhydrophobicity. Thus, physical patterning is a crucial component of any superhydrophobic surface. Interestingly, many natural examples of superhydrophobic surfaces exist, with one of the most notable being the lotus leaf. In designing such surfaces, scientists have turned to the natural examples for inspiration, and have found that most natural examples have multiple (usually two) scales of roughness, commonly referred to as hierarchical roughness. Though hierarchical roughness is ubiquitous in the superhydrophobic surfaces of the natural world, its precise role in conferring superhydrophobicity has so far remained elusive. In this work, we develop a thermodynamic model to study the wetting of two-dimensional physically patterned surfaces. Past models that have been developed for this purpose often make several assumptions: the drop must be much larger than the surface features while simultaneously being small enough that the effects of gravity are negligible. Many of these models ultimately rely on the older Cassie and Wenzel models, which themselves make assumptions about the drop size relative to the surface features--namely that the drop is again much larger than the surface

  16. A study of soil formation rates using 10Be in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tims S.G.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A catchment level study to obtain soil formation rates using beryllium-10 (10Be tracers has been undertaken in the Daly River Basin in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia. Three soil cores have been collected to bedrock, with depths ranging from ~1-3.5 m. Due to agricultural practices, modern soil loss rates can be significantly higher than long-term soil formation rates, but establishing soil formation rates has proved to be a difficult problem. At long-term equilibrium, however, soil formation from the underlying rock is balanced by soil loss from the surface. This long-term rate at which soil is being lost can be determined using the cosmogenic tracer 10Be, created in spallation of atmospheric nitrogen and oxygen by cosmic rays. Since the annual fallout rate of 10Be is known, the complete 10Be inventory over the depth of the top soil can be used to establish the soil formation rates.

  17. The Investigation of the Cavitation Phenomenon in the Laval Nozzle with Full and Partial Surface Wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jablonská Jana

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the cavitation phenomenon affected by full and partial wetting of the wall. For the numerical computation of flow in the Laval nozzle the Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model was tested and was used for cavitation research of flow within the nozzle considering partial surface wetting. The coefficient of wetting for various materials was determined using experimental, theoretical and numerical methods of fluid flow due to partial surface wetting.

  18. Gamma ray computed tomography to evaluate wetting/drying soil structure changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Luiz F. [Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, USP, Soil Physics, Av. Centenrio, 303, C.P. 96, C.E.P. 13.400-970 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: lfpires@cena.usp.br; Bacchi, Osny O.S. [Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, USP, Soil Physics, Av. Centenrio, 303, C.P. 96, C.E.P. 13.400-970 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Reichardt, Klaus [Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, USP, Soil Physics, Av. Centenrio, 303, C.P. 96, C.E.P. 13.400-970 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2005-04-01

    Wetting and drying (W-D) cycles can cause strong modifications of the structure of a soil, especially in pore distribution, which reflects the temporal and spatial distribution of soil water and, consequently, these processes can affect soil water and nutrient retention and movement. These alterations have important practical consequences when calculating soil water storages and matric potentials, widely used in irrigation management. The present paper has as objective to use gamma ray computed tomography (GCT) as a tool to investigate possible modifications in soil structure induced by W-D cycles and to analyze how these alterations can affect soil water retention. The GCT scanner used was a first generation system with a fixed source-detector arrangement, with a radioactive gamma ray source of {sup 241}Am. Soil samples were taken from profiles of three different soils characterized as Xanthic Ferralsol (Fx), Eutric Nitosol (Ne) and Rhodic Ferralsol (Fr). Eighteen samples (50 cm{sup 3}), six from each soil, were submitted to none (T{sub 0}), three (T{sub 1}) and nine (T{sub 2}) wetting/drying cycles. Based on image analysis it was possible to detect modifications in soil structure in all samples after wetting/drying cycles for all treatments. Tomographic unit profiles of the samples permitted to identify an increase on soil porosity with the increase in the number of wetting/drying cycles and it was also possible to quantify the average porosity values. The statistical test (Duncan test) indicates that there are significant differences between treatments for all samples at the 5% significance level.

  19. Calculating Soil Wetness, Evapotranspiration and Carbon Cycle Processes Over Large Grid Areas Using a New Scaling Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Piers

    2012-01-01

    Soil wetness typically shows great spatial variability over the length scales of general circulation model (GCM) grid areas (approx 100 km ), and the functions relating evapotranspiration and photosynthetic rate to local-scale (approx 1 m) soil wetness are highly non-linear. Soil respiration is also highly dependent on very small-scale variations in soil wetness. We therefore expect significant inaccuracies whenever we insert a single grid area-average soil wetness value into a function to calculate any of these rates for the grid area. For the particular case of evapotranspiration., this method - use of a grid-averaged soil wetness value - can also provoke severe oscillations in the evapotranspiration rate and soil wetness under some conditions. A method is presented whereby the probability distribution timction(pdf) for soil wetness within a grid area is represented by binning. and numerical integration of the binned pdf is performed to provide a spatially-integrated wetness stress term for the whole grid area, which then permits calculation of grid area fluxes in a single operation. The method is very accurate when 10 or more bins are used, can deal realistically with spatially variable precipitation, conserves moisture exactly and allows for precise modification of the soil wetness pdf after every time step. The method could also be applied to other ecological problems where small-scale processes must be area-integrated, or upscaled, to estimate fluxes over large areas, for example in treatments of the terrestrial carbon budget or trace gas generation.

  20. Quantification of hysteresis effects on a soil subjected to drying and wetting cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafraf, Samia; Guellouz, Lamia; Guiras, Houda; Bouhlila, Rachida

    2016-10-01

    A quantitative description of soil hysteretic response during drying-wetting cycles is required to improve prediction of the soil water retention model. The objective of the study is to quantify the degree of hysteresis, which is helpful to evaluate the precision of soil water flow calculation. A new procedure to quantify the degree of hysteresis is presented. The Arya-Paris model allows assessment of hysteresis effects from initial drying curves, dynamic contact angles, degree of hysteresis value, and maximum difference value between drying and subsequent wetting curves. The experimental results show that the degree of hysteresis varies with the particle size, bulk density, void ratio, initial water content, and contact angle of the soil. The new findings can be very useful in modelling soil water flows.

  1. Solder wetting behavior enhancement via laser-textured surface microcosmic topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyan; Peng, Jianke; Fu, Li; Wang, Xincheng; Xie, Yan

    2016-04-01

    In order to reduce or even replace the use of Sn-Pb solder in electronics industry, the laser-textured surface microstructures were used to enhance the wetting behavior of lead free solder during soldering. According to wetting theory and Sn-Ag-Cu lead free solder performance, we calculated and designed four microcosmic structures with the similar shape and different sizes to control the wetting behavior of lead free solder. The micro-structured surfaces with different dimensions were processed on copper plates by fiber femtosecond laser, and the effect of microstructures on wetting behavior was verified experimentally. The results showed that the wetting angle of Sn-Ag-Cu solder on the copper plate with microstructures decreased effectively compared with that on the smooth copper plate. The wetting angles had a sound fit with the theoretical values calculated by wetting model. The novel method provided a feasible route for adjusting the wetting behavior of solders and optimizing solders system.

  2. Dynamic wetting and de-wetting of thin films of water under the influence of MHz surface acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Altshuler, Gennady

    2015-01-01

    We use both theory and experiment to study the response of partially wetting films of water and surfactant solutions to a propagating MHz vibration in the solid substrate in the form of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (SAW). The SAW invokes a drift of mass in the liquid film that, balanced by capillary stress, may support dynamic wetting and de-wetting along the path of the SAW. The motion of the film is governed by a non-dimensional parameter, $\\theta^3/{\\rm We}$, where $\\theta$ is the three phase contact angle and ${\\rm We}\\equiv \\rho U^2H/\\gamma$; $\\rho,~\\gamma$, $H$, and $U$ are the liquid density, liquid/vapour surface tension, film thickness, and the intensity of the SAW at the solid surface, respectively. We show partially wetting films of water and surfactant solutions atop a lithium niobate substrate, for which $\\theta^3/{\\rm We}>1$, undergo qualitatively different dynamics to fully wetting films of silicon oil, for which $\\theta^3/{\\rm We}\\ll1$, and further explore an intermediate parameter region ...

  3. A Simple Runoff Model Based on Topographic Wetness Indices and Soil Moisture for Central New York Agricultural Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, K.; Georgakakos, C.; Walter, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Nonpoint source (NPS) pollution continues to be a leading cause of surface water degradation, especially in agricultural areas. In humid regions where variable source area (VSA) hydrology dominates, such as the Northeastern US, topographic wetness indices (TWI) are good approximations of relative soil moisture patterns. Mapping areas of the landscape likely to generate saturation-excess runoff and carry NPS pollution to surface waters could allow for more efficient, targeted best management practices in agricultural fields. Given the relationship between saturation excess runoff and soil water storage, we used volumetric water content (VWC) measured in five agricultural fields in central New York over two years (2012-2014) to develop runoff probability maps based on a soil topographic index (STI). The relationship between VWC and STI was strongest during the fall season after leaf fall at all sites except one. We calculated the probability of runoff occurring based on soil moisture and precipitation distributions during the sampling period. The threshold for runoff occurs when the depth of soil water and rainfall reach saturation of the soil, and appears to be at the average porosity of the soil at all sites. Counter to our initial hypothesis of a higher probability of saturation excess runoff during the spring when conditions are wetter, some sites showed higher frequencies of runoff during the fall season.

  4. Seedling growth responses to soil resources in the understory of a wet tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holste, Ellen K; Kobe, Richard K; Vriesendorp, Corine F

    2011-09-01

    Plant growth responses to resources may be an important mechanism that influences species' distributions, coexistence, and community structure. Irradiance is considered the most important resource for seedling growth in the understory of wet tropical forests, but multiple soil nutrients and species have yet to be examined simultaneously with irradiance under field conditions. To identify potentially limiting resources, we modeled tree seedling growth as a function of irradiance and soil nutrients across five sites, spanning a soil fertility gradient in old-growth, wet tropical forests at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. We measured an array of soil nutrients including total nitrogen (total N), inorganic N (nitrate [NO3-] and ammonium [NH4+]), phosphate (PO4-), and sum of base cations (SBC; potassium, magnesium, and calcium). Shade in the forest understory did not preclude seedling growth correlations with soil nutrients. Irradiance was a significant predictor of growth in 52% of the species, inorganic N in 54% (NO3- in 32%; NH4+ in 34%), total N in 47%, SBC in 39%, and PO4- in 29%. Overall, growth was correlated with both irradiance and soil nutrients in 45% of species and with soil nutrients only in an additional 48%; rarely was irradiance alone correlated with growth. Contrary to expectations, the magnitudes of growth effects, assessed as the maximum growth response to significant resources for each species, were similar for irradiance and most soil nutrients. Among species whose growth correlated with soil nutrients, the rank importance of nutrient effects was SBC, followed by N (total N, NO3-, and/or NH4+) and PO4-. Species' growth responsiveness (i.e., magnitudes of effect) to irradiance and soil nutrients was negatively correlated with species' shade tolerance (survival under 1% full sun). In this broad survey of species and resources, the nearly ubiquitous effects of soil nutrients on seedling growth challenge the idea that soil nutrients are less

  5. Wetting of the (0001) α-Al2O3 Sapphire Surface by Molten Aluminum: Effect of Surface Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Santillan, Joaquin

    2010-03-01

    The wetting of molten aluminum on the “ c”-plane (0001) of single-crystal α-Al2O3 (sapphire) was studied by the sessile drop technique from 800 °C (1073 K) to 1200 °C (1473 K). Systematically increasing the (0001) surface roughness by SiC abrasion increased the wetting contact angle, resulting in reduced wetting. The surface roughness factor R originally defined by Wenzel, was determined as a function of the abrasion, temperature, and time. The wetting decreases as the surface roughness increases. Rough surfaces also create time and temperature effects on wetting, changing those for a smoothly polished surface. The existence of a high-temperature surface structural transition for (0001) of α-Al2O3, which has been previously suggested, was confirmed. Increased roughness R accents the effect of the surface structural transition, increasing the wetting contact angle changes during the transition.

  6. Soil wetting patterns of vegetation and inter-patches following single and repeated wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Óscar; Malvar, Maruxa; van den Elsen, Erik; Hosseini, mohammadreza; Coelho, Celeste; Ritsema, Coen; Bautista, Susana; Keizer, Jan Jacob; Cerdà, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    Although wildfires spread in Mediterranean areas are considered a natural processes, the expected increase in fire frequency has raised concerns about the systems' future resilience (Pausas, 2004). Besides more frequent, future wildfires can become more severe and produce more pronounced changes in topsoil properties, vegetation and litter (Cerdá and Mataix-Solera, 2009). To deal with challenges, the EU funded CASCADE and RECARE projects, which are currently assessing soil threats and tipping-points for land degradation in a climatic gradient across Europe. The present research was developed in Portugal and aims to find relationships between fire frequency and soil wetting patterns following single versus repeated wildfires. In September 2012, a wildfire burnt 3000 ha. of Pine stands and shrub vegetation in the vicinity of Viseu district, North-Central Portugal. Analyses according to the available burnt-area maps (1975-2012), discriminated areas that has been burned 1x (called SD) and 4x (called D) times. In order to evaluate the post-fire soil surface moisture patterns, 6 slopes (3 in SD and 3 in D) were selected and a balanced experimental design with 72 soil moisture sensors (EC5 and GS3, from Decagon devices) was implemented under shrubs (n=18) and on bare (n=18) soil environments, at 2.5 cm and 7.5 cm soil depth each. The spatio-temporal occurrence of soil water repellence (SWR) (Keizer et al., 2008; Prats et al., 2013; Santos et al., 2014) was monthly assessed through the MED test at 2.5 cm and 7.5 cm soil depth into 5 sampling points located at regular distances along a transect running from the top to bottom of a selected slope in SD and D. Automatic and totalize rainfall gauges were also installed across the study area. Preliminary results showed that soil wetting patterns and SWR occurrence differs between SD, D sites and, between soil environment (under shrubs and on bare soil areas). SWR were more pronounced on the SD than in D, affecting soil wetting

  7. Coffee-stain growth dynamics on dry and wet surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulogne, François; Ingremeau, François; Stone, Howard A.

    2017-02-01

    The drying of a drop containing particles often results in the accumulation of the particles at the contact line. In this work, we investigate the drying of an aqueous colloidal drop surrounded by a hydrogel that is also evaporating. We combine theoretical and experimental studies to understand how the surrounding vapor concentration affects the particle deposit during the constant radius evaporation mode. In addition to the common case of evaporation on an otherwise dry surface, we show that in a configuration where liquid is evaporating from a flat surface around the drop, the singularity of the evaporative flux at the contact line is suppressed and the drop evaporation is homogeneous. For both conditions, we derive the velocity field and we establish the temporal evolution of the number of particles accumulated at the contact line. We predict the growth dynamics of the stain and the drying timescales. Thus, dry and wet conditions are compared with experimental results and we highlight that only the dynamics is modified by the evaporation conditions, not the final accumulation at the contact line.

  8. Changes in microbial communities along redox gradients in polygonized Arctic wet tundra soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipson, David A.; Raab, Theodore K.; Parker , Melanie; Kelley , Scott T.; Brislawn, Colin J.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2015-08-01

    Summary This study investigated how microbial community structure and diversity varied with depth and topography in ice wedge polygons of wet tundra of the Arctic Coastal Plain in northern Alaska and what soil variables explain these patterns. We observed strong changes in community structure and diversity with depth, and more subtle changes between areas of high and low topography, with the largest differences apparent near the soil surface. These patterns are most strongly correlated with redox gradients (measured using the ratio of reduced Fe to total Fe in acid extracts as a proxy): conditions grew more reducing with depth and were most oxidized in shallow regions of polygon rims. Organic matter and pH also changed with depth and topography but were less effective predictors of the microbial community structure and relative abundance of specific taxa. Of all other measured variables, lactic acid concentration was the best, in combination with redox, for describing the microbial community. We conclude that redox conditions are the dominant force in shaping microbial communities in this landscape. Oxygen and other electron acceptors allowed for the greatest diversity of microbes: at depth the community was reduced to a simpler core of anaerobes,

  9. Changes in microbial communities along redox gradients in polygonized Arctic wet tundra soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipson, David A.; Raab, Theodore K.; Parker , Melanie; Kelley , Scott T.; Brislawn, Colin J.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2015-07-21

    This study investigated how microbial community structure and diversity varied with depth and topography in ice wedge polygons of wet tundra of the Arctic Coastal Plain in northern Alaska, and what soil variables explain these patterns. We observed strong changes in community structure and diversity with depth, and more subtle changes between areas of high and low topography, with the largest differences apparent near the soil surface. These patterns are most strongly correlated with redox gradients (measured using the ratio of reduced Fe to total Fe in acid extracts as a proxy): conditions grew more reducing with depth and were most oxidized in shallow regions of polygon rims. Organic matter and pH also changed with depth and topography, but were less effective predictors of the microbial community structure and relative abundance of specific taxa. Of all other measured variables, lactic acid concentration was the best, in combination with redox, for describing the microbial community. We conclude that redox conditions are the dominant force in shaping microbial communities in this landscape. Oxygen and other electron acceptors allowed for the greatest diversity of microbes: at depth the community was reduced to a simpler core of anaerobes, dominated by fermenters (Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes).

  10. Determinants of spatial variability of methane emissions from wet grasslands on peat soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol-Van Dasselaar, van den A.; Beusichem, van M.L.; Oenema, O.

    1999-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emissions from soils, representing the consequence of CH4 production, CH4 consumption and CH4 transport, are poorly characterised and show a large spatial variability. This study aimed to assess the determinants of field-scale spatial variability of CH4 emissions from wet grasslands on

  11. Solid surface wetting and the deployment of drops in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.; Depew, J.

    1994-02-01

    The complete or partial deployment of liquid samples in low gravity is primarily influenced by the interfacial properties of the specific liquid and solid materials used because the overwhelming bias of the Earth gravitational acceleration is removed. This study addresses the engineering aspects of injecting and deploying drops of prescribed volume into an acoustic positioning chamber in microgravity. The specific problems of interest are the design, testing, and implementation of injector tips to be used in a simultaneously retracting dual-injector system in the Drop Physics Module microgravity experiment facility. Prior to release, the liquid to be deployed must be retained within a restricted area at the very end of the injectors under dynamic stimuli from the continuous injection flow as well as from the stepped motion of the injectors. The final released drop must have a well determined volume and negligible residual linear or angular momentum. The outcome of Earth-based short-duration low gravity experiments had been the selection of two types of injector tips which were flown as back-up parts. They were successfully utilized during the USML-1 Spacelab mission as the primary tips. The combination of a larger contact surface, liquid pinning with a sharp edge, and selective coating of strategic tip surfaces with a non-wetting compound has allowed a significant increase in the success rate of deployment of simple and compound drops of aqueous solutions of glycerol and silicone oil. The diameter of the samples studied in the Drop Physics Module range between 0.3 and 2.7 cm. The tests conducted on-orbit with a manually operated small device have allowed the calibration of the volume deployed for a few drop sizes. The design for improved tips to be used during the next USML flight is based on these results.

  12. Surface Characterization of a Paper Web at the Wet End

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abidi, B.R.; Goddard, J.S.; Sari-Sarraf, H.

    1999-06-23

    We present an algorithm for the detection and representation of structures and non-uniformities on the surface of a paper web at the wet end (slurry). This image processing/analysis algorithm is developed as part of a complete on-line web characterization system. Images of the slurry, carried by a fast moving table, are obtained using a stroboscopic light and a CCD camera. The images have very poor contrast and contain noise from a variety of sources. Those sources include the acquisition system itself, the lighting, the vibrations of the moving table being imaged, and the scattering water from the same table's movement. After many steps of enhancement, conventional edge detection methods were still inconclusive and were discarded. The facet model algorithm, is applied to the images and is found successful in detecting the various topographic characteristics of the surface of the slurry. Pertinent topographic elements are retained and a filtered image is computed based on the general appearance and characteristics of the structures in question. Morphological operators are applied to detect and segment regions of interest. Those regions are then filtered according to their size, elongation, and orientation.Their bounding rectangles are computed and superimposed on the original image. Real time implementation of this algorithm for on-line use is also addressed in this paper. The algorithm is tested on over 500 images of slurry and is found to detect nonuniformities on all 500 images. Locating and characterizing all different size structures is also achieved on all 500 images of the web.

  13. Shakedown modeling of unsaturated expansive soils subjected to wetting and drying cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowamooz Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to model the behavior of unsaturated expansive soils subjected to wetting and drying cycles because they alter significantly their hydro-mechanical behavior and therefore cause a huge differential settlement on shallow foundations of the structure. A simplified model based on the shakedown theory (Zarka method has been developed in this study for unsaturated expansive soils subjected to wetting and drying cycles. This method determines directly the stabilized limit state and consequently saves the calculation time. The parameters of the proposed shakedown-based model are calibrated by the suction-controlled oedometer tests obtained for an expansive soil compacted at loose and dense initial states, and then validated for the same soil compacted at intermediate initial state by comparing the model predictions with the experimental results. Finally, the finite element equations for the proposed shakedown model are developed and these equations are implemented in the finite element code CAST3M to carry out the full-scale calculations. A 2D geometry made up of the expansive soil compacted at the intermediate state is subjected to successive extremely dry and wet seasons for the different applied vertical loads. The results show the swelling plastic deformations for the lower vertical stresses and the shrinkage deformations for the higher vertical stresses.

  14. Quantification of activated carbon contents in soils and sediments using chemothermal and wet oxidation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändli, Rahel C; Bergsli, Anders; Ghosh, Upal; Hartnik, Thomas; Breedveld, Gijs D; Cornelissen, Gerard

    2009-12-01

    Activated carbon (AC) strongly sorbs organic pollutants and can be used for remediation of soils and sediments. A method for AC quantification is essential to monitor AC (re)distribution. Since AC is black carbon (BC), two methods for BC quantification were tested for AC mixed in different soils and sediments: i) chemothermal oxidation (CTO) at a range of temperatures and ii) wet-chemical oxidation with a potassium dichromate/sulfuric acid solution. For three soils, the amount of AC was accurately determined by CTO at 375 degrees C. For two sediments, however, much of the AC disappeared during combustion at 375 degrees C, which could probably be explained by catalytic effects by sediment constituents. CTO at lower temperatures (325-350 degrees C) was a feasible alternative for one of the sediments. Wet oxidation effectively functioned for AC quantification in sediments, with almost complete AC recovery (81-92%) and low remaining amounts of native organic carbon (5-16%).

  15. Review of collapse triggering mechanism of collapsible soils due to wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Loess soil deposits are widely distributed in arid and semi-arid regions and constitute about 10% of land area of the world. These soils typically have a loose honeycomb-type meta-stable structure that is susceptible to a large reduction in total volume or collapse upon wetting. Collapse characteristics contribute to various problems to infrastructures that are constructed on loess soils. For this reason, collapse triggering mechanism for loess soils has been of significant interest for researchers and practitioners all over the world. This paper aims at providing a state-of-the-art review on collapse mechanism with special reference to loess soil deposits. The collapse mechanism studies are summarized under three different categories, i.e. traditional approaches, microstructure approach, and soil mechanics-based approaches. The traditional and microstructure approaches for interpreting the collapse behavior are comprehensively summarized and critically reviewed based on the experimental results from the literature. The soil mechanics-based approaches proposed based on the experimental results of both compacted soils and natural loess soils are reviewed highlighting their strengths and limitations for estimating the collapse behavior. Simpler soil mechanics-based approaches with less parameters or parameters that are easy-to-determine from conventional tests are suggested for future research to better understand the collapse behavior of natural loess soils. Such studies would be more valuable for use in conventional geotechnical engineering practice applications.

  16. Wetting property of smooth and textured hydrophobic surfaces under condensation condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, PengFei; Lv, CunJing; Yao, ZhaoHui; Niu, FengLei

    2014-11-01

    Static and dynamic wetting behaviors of sessile droplet on smooth, microstructured and micro/nanostructured surface under condensation condition are systematically studied. In contrast to the conventional droplet wetting on such natural materials by dropping, we demonstrate here that when dropwise condensation occurs, the sessile droplet will transit from the Cassie-Baxter wetting state to the Wenzel wetting state or partial Cassie-Baxter wetting state on the microstructured surface or the micro/nanostructured surface, which leads to a strong adhesion between the droplet and the substrate. In contrast, the apparent contact angle and the sliding angle on the smooth surface changes a little before and after the condensation because of small roughness. Theoretical analysis shows that the roughness factor controls the adhesion force of the droplet during condensation, and a theoretical model is constructed which will be helpful for us to understand the relationship between the adhesion force and the geometry of the surface.

  17. Surface and Wetting Properties of Embiopteran (Webspinner) Nanofiber Silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn Popp, Thomas M; Addison, J Bennett; Jordan, Jacob S; Damle, Viraj G; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Chang, Shery L Y; Stokes, Grace Y; Edgerly, Janice S; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2016-05-10

    Insects of the order Embioptera, known as embiopterans, embiids, or webspinners, weave silk fibers together into sheets to make shelters called galleries. In this study, we show that silk galleries produced by the embiopteran Antipaluria urichi exhibit a highly hydrophobic wetting state with high water adhesion macroscopically equivalent to the rose petal effect. Specifically, the silk sheets have advancing contact angles above 150°, but receding contact angle approaching 0°. The silk sheets consist of layered fiber bundles with single strands spaced by microscale gaps. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) images of silk treated with organic solvent and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of the organic extract support the presence of a lipid outer layer on the silk fibers. We use cryogenic SEM to demonstrate that water drops reside on only the first layer of the silk fibers. The area fraction of this sparse outer silk layers is 0.1 to 0.3, which according to the Cassie-Baxter equation yields an effective static contact angle of ∼130° even for a mildly hydrophobic lipid coating. Using high magnification optical imaging of the three phase contact line of a water droplet receding from the silk sheet, we show that the high adhesion of the drop stems from water pinning along bundles of multiple silk fibers. The bundles likely form when the drop contact line is pinned on individual fibers and pulls them together as it recedes. The dynamic reorganization of the silk sheets during the droplet movement leads to formation of "super-pinning sites" that give embiopteran silk one of the strongest adhesions to water of any natural hydrophobic surface.

  18. The microbiology of arable soil surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffery, Simon

    2007-01-01

    Whilst much is known about the physics and erosion of soil surfaces on a millimetre scale, little is known about the associated microbiology, particularly in temperate arable systems. The vast majority of research regarding microbial interactions at soil surfaces has concerned microbiotic crusts. However, such surface crusts take many years to form and then only in relatively undisturbed soil systems. Arable soil surfaces are subject to relatively extreme environmental conditio...

  19. Fog-drip contributions to soil moisture as determined through passive fog collector measurements, leaf wetness data, and soil moisture at Pepperwood Preserve, Sonoma County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, L.; Dodge, C.; Fernandez, D.; Weiss, P. L.; Flint, L. E.; Flint, A. L.; Torregrosa, A.

    2016-12-01

    Summertime coastal fog advects from the ocean and transports water inland in the form of fog droplets to forests and grasslands. The amount of fog water delivered to the soil through fog drip from foliage and other surfaces that have captured and accumulated the droplets is often difficult to quantify due to many challenges including the difficulty of measuring the relatively small variations in soil moisture that accompany fog events. This study details summer season records collected from 4 sites at the Pepperwood Preserve in Santa Rosa, CA. Fog drip volumes were measured using 1 m2 standard fog collectors located at a grassland site for the past three summers. Soil moisture measurements were collected for portions of the three summer seasons from three sites: two oak woodland understory sites and a grassland site on the edge of a forest. One oak woodland site was within 400 m of the standard fog collector grassland site. Leaf wetness sensors (LWS) were co-located at all soil moisture sites. We observe a much higher frequency of wet periods at the grassland site than at the nearby oak woodland site during the summer fog season. One hypothesis is that the oak canopy acts to protect the LWS at the oak woodland site from nocturnal radiative cooling, thereby reducing condensation and dew formation. Another hypothesis is that the oak woodland canopy tends sheltered the understory during light fog events, resulting in edge effects that may tend to reduce fog deposition within the canopy. Leaf and soil moisture measurements both during fog events and during periods without fog but when dew point is reached may provide a more complete picture of non-rain mechanisms of moisture delivery to the foliage and the soil. Investigations are on-going to include corresponding meteorological data (wind speed and direction, relative humidity and temperature) to understand relative contributions to the soil associated with both fog and dew and to better distinguish between fog and

  20. Release of aged 14C-atrazine residues from soil facilitated by dry-wet cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonowski, N. D.; Yu, K.; Koeppchen, S.; Burauel, P.

    2012-04-01

    Intermittent dry-wet cycles may have an important effect on soil structure and aged pesticide residues release (1). A laboratory study was conducted to assess the maximum potential of water extractable aged atrazine residues influenced by soil drying and wetting. The used soil was obtained from an outdoor lysimeter (gleyic cambisol; Corg: 1.45%), containing environmentally aged (22 years) 14C-atrazine residues. For the experiment, soil from 0-10 cm depth was used since most residual 14C activity was previously found in this layer (2,3). Triplicate soil samples with a residual water content of approx. 8% were either dried (45° C) prior water addition or directly mixed with distilled water (soil+water: 1+2, w:w). The samples were shaken (150 rmp, 60 min, at 21° C), centrifuged (approx. 2000 g), and the supernatants were filtered. Water-extracted residual 14C activity was detected via liquid scintillation counter. The total water-extracted 14C activity (the amount of residual 14C activity in a sample equals 100%) was significantly higher (p

  1. The effects of redox fluctuation on iron-organic matter interactions in wet tropical soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Campbell, A.; Lin, Y.; Nico, P. S.; Silver, W. L.; Pett-Ridge, J.

    2016-12-01

    Two-thirds of the C in the terrestrial biosphere is stored as soil organic C, and much of this is stabilized via iron (Fe) mineral-organic matter (OM) associations that are susceptible to redox effects. The rapid C cycling typical of wet tropical ecosystems- driven by ample moisture and temperature- may also be fueled by a characteristically dynamic redox environment. Yet the net result of altered tropical soil climate and fluctuating soil redox regimes on Fe-organic matter associations is poorly understood. In this study, we hypothesized that the timing of redox transitions (frequency of O2 introduction and ferrous iron (Fe2+) generation) will lead to differences in Fe (oxyhydr)oxide mineral crystallinity and C degradation rates and alter the proportion of organic C associated with iron minerals. Surface soils from a humid tropical forest in Puerto Rico were incubated for 44 days under four redox regimes: (1) static anoxic, (2) static oxic, (3) 4 days anoxic, 4 days oxic, and (4) 4 days anoxic, 8 days oxic. Replicate microcosms were harvested at multiple time points, including before and after a redox switch (oxic to anoxic or vice versa). Selective chemical extractions, bulk Fe K-edge EXAFS and STXM/NEXAFS spectromicroscopy were used to comprehensively probe treatment effects on Fe and C speciation. Static redox conditions had a significant effect on Fe2+ and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, and prolonged anoxia promoted reductive dissolution of Fe-oxides and an increase in amorphous or short-range ordered (SRO) Fe oxides. Preferential dissolution of this less-crystalline Fe pool was more prominent during rapid redox switches from oxic to anoxic conditions, and coincided with increased DOC. Bulk Fe K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy identified Fe3+ as the dominant Fe species in all treatments and indicated O/N atoms in the first Fe co-ordination sphere and features similar to SRO Fe-oxide phases (e.g. ferrihydrite or nano-goethite) in the second co

  2. Retention mechanisms and the flow wetted surface - implications for safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elert, M. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the state-of-the-art concerning the flow wetted surface, its importance for radionuclide transport in the geosphere and review various suggestions on how to increase the present knowledge. Definitions are made of the various concepts used for the flow wetted surface as well as the various model parameters used. In the report methods proposed to assess the flow wetted surface are reviewed and discussed, tracer tests, tunnel and borehole investigations, geochemical studies, heat transport studies and theoretical modelling. Furthermore, a review is made of how the flow wetted surface has been treated in various safety analyses. Finally, an overall discussion with recommendations is presented, where it is concluded that at present no individual method for estimating the flow wetted surface can be selected that satisfies all requirements concerning giving relevant values, covering relevant distances and being practical to apply. Instead a combination of methods must be used. In the long-term research as well as in the safety assessment modelling focus should be put on assessing the ratio between flow wetted surface and water flux. The long-term research should address both the detailed flow within the fractures and the effective flow wetted surface along the flow paths. 55 refs.

  3. Biochar effects on wet and dry regions of the soil water retention curve of a sandy loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Moldrup, Per; Sun, Zhencai;

    2014-01-01

    Reported beneficial effects of biochar on soil physical properties and processes include decreased soil density, and increased soil water transport, water holding capacity and retention (mainly for the wet region). Research is limited on biochar effects on the full soil water retention curve (wet...... and dry regions) for a given soil and biochar amendment scenarios. This study evaluates how biochar applied to a sandy loam field at rates from 0 to 50 Mg ha−1 yr–1 in 2011, 2012, or both years (2011+2012) influences the full water retention curve. Inorganic fertilizer and pig slurry were added to all...... region-water retention curve increased with increasing biochar rates....

  4. Inversion of dielectric constant and moisture of bare soil surface from backscattering coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宗谦; 冯孔豫

    1997-01-01

    An inverse method of dielectric constant and moisture of bare wet soil surface from backscattering coefficients is presented, which is based upon the small perturbation model of electromagnetic wave scattering from rough surfaces and the empirical and dielectric mixing models of wet soil. Some sets of curves which describe the relation between the moisture of soil and the ratio of like polarization backscattering coefficients σvv and σhh are obtained, and some principles on how to choose the incident frequencies and the incident angles of the electromagnetic wave are given Analysis and calculation show that the mam advantage of this inverse method is its efficiency and simplicity.

  5. Mechanistic study of wettability alteration of oil-wet sandstone surface using different surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Bao-feng, E-mail: hbf370283@163.com; Wang, Ye-fei; Huang, Yong

    2015-03-01

    Graphical abstract: Zeta potential of oil-wet quartz powder treated with different surfactants at different concentrations. - Highlights: • Mechanisms of wettability alteration during surfactant flooding were studied. • Different analytical instruments were used to study sandstone wettability alteration. • Surfactants’ structure plays a great role in wettability alteration of solid surface. • CTAB irreversibly desorbs carboxylic acid from solid surface by ionic interaction. • Cationic surfactant is more effective in wettability alteration of sandstone surface. - Abstract: Different analytical methods including Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), zeta potential measurements, contact angle measurements and spontaneous imbibition tests were utilized to make clear the mechanism for wettability alteration of oil-wet sandstone surface using different surfactants. Results show that among three types of surfactants including cationic surfactants, anionic surfactants and nonionic surfactants, the cationic surfactant CTAB demonstrates the best effect on the wettability alteration of oil-wet sandstone surface. The positively charged head groups of CTAB molecules and carboxylic acid groups from crude oil could interact to form ion pairs, which could be desorbed from the solid surface and solubilized into the micelle formed by CTAB. Thus, the water-wetness of the solid surface is improved. Nonionic surfactant TX-100 could be adsorbed on oil-wet sandstone surface through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interaction to alter the wettability of oil-wet solid surface. The wettability alteration of oil-wet sandstone surface using the anionic surfactant POE(1) is caused by hydrophobic interaction. Due to the electrostatic repulsion between the anionic surfactant and the negatively charged surface, POE(1) shows less effect on the wettability alteration of oil-wet sandstone surface.

  6. Hydromechanical behavior of a quasi-saturated compacted soils on drying-wetting paths-experimental and numerical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriantrehina Soanarivo Rinah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental and numerical investigation funded by the French National Project “Terredurable”, which is devoted to the study of soils in quasi-saturated state. The experimental study is focused on the behavior of compacted soils on drying-wetting paths and the macroscopic effect of the drying path on shrinkage and cracking. Furthermore, a protocol for image analysis of crack in drying tests was developed. Two approaches are used for the measurement of surface strains and identification of the ultimate stress before the formation of the first crack, using VIC-2D software, and for the monitoring of crack evolution, using ImageJ software. The aim of the numerical approach is to reproduce the drying experiments with a finite difference code (FLAC 3D, in order to understand the stress conditions that can explain crack initiation, without modeling the crack formation itself.

  7. Relationship between Spreading Rate and Wetting Behaviour of Oil on Surface of Surfactant Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Xi; CHENG Yang; HUANG Xue-Dong; MA Hong-Ru

    2007-01-01

    @@ We report a systematic investigation of the spreading of a polydimethylsiloxane oil layer on flat surfaces of solution containing anionic surfactant of sodium dodecylsulfate. The experiment reveals that different wetting behaviours of the oil follow different spreading rates. In the case of complete wetting, it obeys a 0. 75 power law, while in the pseudopartial wetting it follows a non-power law. The results can well be explained by a new simple theory of spreading. The theory further predicts that for a complete wetting state there exists another spreading rate.

  8. Statistical mechanics study on wetting behaviors of Ne on Mg surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S.; Zhang, M.

    2017-04-01

    Wetting behavior of Ne adsorbed on a Mg surface, first investigated by means of a grand canonical Monte Carlo method in a previous publication (M. J. Bojan, G. Stan, S. Curtarolo, W. A. Steele, and M. W. Cole, Phys. Rev. E, 1999, 59, 864), is again studied by means of classical density functional theory. The Ne-Ne interaction is taken to be of the Lennard-Jones form, while the Ne-surface interaction is derived from an electronic density functional theory. The wetting phase diagram is calculated, and the isotherm shapes, energy and structural properties of the adsorbed films are examined. The present calculations indicate that the system exhibits first-order pre-wetting transition at temperatures above a wetting temperature of Tw≈24 K, and below a critical pre-wetting temperature of Tpwc≈25.09 K. The present findings include (i) in the pre-wetting temperature region, the pre-wetting transition is mixed with many layering transitions; after pre-wetting, the film thickness discontinuously increases (due to frequent occurrences of the layering transitions) and eventually diverges as the chemical potential approaches and eventually equals the saturation value. (ii) Occurrence of the layering transition remains above Tpwc, and the increase of the film thickness with the chemical potential is discontinuous. (iii) Below the wetting temperature, the layering transitions frequently occur and tend to gather together more closely as the saturation is approached.

  9. Soil heat flux and day time surface energy balance closure at astronomical observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, south Kerala

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Roxy; V B Sumithranand; G Renuka

    2014-06-01

    Soil heat flux is an important input component of surface energy balance. Estimates of soil heat flux were made in the year 2008 using soil temperature data at Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, south Kerala. Hourly values of soil heat flux from 00 to 24 LST are presented for selected days typical of the winter, pre-monsoon, SW monsoon and NE monsoon seasons. The diurnal variation is characterized by a cross-over from negative to positive values at 0700 h, occurrence of maximum around noon and return to negative values in the late evening. The energy storage term for the soil layer 0–0.05 m is calculated and the ground heat flux * is estimated in all seasons. Daytime surface energy balance at the surface on wet and dry seasons is investigated. The average Bowen’s ratio during the wet and dry seasons were 0.541 and 0.515, respectively indicating that considerable evaporation takes place at the surface. The separate energy balance components were examined and the mean surface energy balance closure was found to be 0.742 and 0.795 for wet and dry seasons, respectively. When a new method that accounts for both soil thermal conduction and soil thermal convection was adopted to calculate the surface heat flux, the energy balance closure was found to be improved. Thus on the land surface under study, the soil vertical water movement is significant.

  10. Surface modeling of soil antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wen-jiao; Yue, Tian-xiang; Du, Zheng-ping; Wang, Zong; Li, Xue-wen

    2016-02-01

    Large numbers of livestock and poultry feces are continuously applied into soils in intensive vegetable cultivation areas, and then some veterinary antibiotics are persistent existed in soils and cause health risk. For the spatial heterogeneity of antibiotic residues, developing a suitable technique to interpolate soil antibiotic residues is still a challenge. In this study, we developed an effective interpolator, high accuracy surface modeling (HASM) combined vegetable types, to predict the spatial patterns of soil antibiotics, using 100 surface soil samples collected from an intensive vegetable cultivation area located in east of China, and the fluoroquinolones (FQs), including ciprofloxacin (CFX), enrofloxacin (EFX) and norfloxacin (NFX), were analyzed as the target antibiotics. The results show that vegetable type is an effective factor to be combined to improve the interpolator performance. HASM achieves less mean absolute errors (MAEs) and root mean square errors (RMSEs) for total FQs (NFX+CFX+EFX), NFX, CFX and EFX than kriging with external drift (KED), stratified kriging (StK), ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW). The MAE of HASM for FQs is 55.1 μg/kg, and the MAEs of KED, StK, OK and IDW are 99.0 μg/kg, 102.8 μg/kg, 106.3 μg/kg and 108.7 μg/kg, respectively. Further, RMSE simulated by HASM for FQs (CFX, EFX and NFX) are 106.2 μg/kg (88.6 μg/kg, 20.4 μg/kg and 39.2 μg/kg), and less 30% (27%, 22% and 36%), 33% (27%, 27% and 43%), 38% (34%, 23% and 41%) and 42% (32%, 35% and 51%) than the ones by KED, StK, OK and IDW, respectively. HASM also provides better maps with more details and more consistent maximum and minimum values of soil antibiotics compared with the measured data. The better performance can be concluded that HASM takes the vegetable type information as global approximate information, and takes local sampling data as its optimum control constraints.

  11. Robust Initial Wetness Condition Framework of an Event-Based Rainfall–Runoff Model Using Remotely Sensed Soil Moisture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooyeon Sunwoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Runoff prediction in limited-data areas is vital for hydrological applications, such as the design of infrastructure and flood defenses, runoff forecasting, and water management. Rainfall–runoff models may be useful for simulation of runoff generation, particularly event-based models, which offer a practical modeling scheme because of their simplicity. However, there is a need to reduce the uncertainties related to the estimation of the initial wetness condition (IWC prior to a rainfall event. Soil moisture is one of the most important variables in rainfall–runoff modeling, and remotely sensed soil moisture is recognized as an effective way to improve the accuracy of runoff prediction. In this study, the IWC was evaluated based on remotely sensed soil moisture by using the Soil Conservation Service-Curve Number (SCS-CN method, which is one of the representative event-based models used for reducing the uncertainty of runoff prediction. Four proxy variables for the IWC were determined from the measurements of total rainfall depth (API5, ground-based soil moisture (SSMinsitu, remotely sensed surface soil moisture (SSM, and soil water index (SWI provided by the advanced scatterometer (ASCAT. To obtain a robust IWC framework, this study consists of two main parts: the validation of remotely sensed soil moisture, and the evaluation of runoff prediction using four proxy variables with a set of rainfall–runoff events in the East Asian monsoon region. The results showed an acceptable agreement between remotely sensed soil moisture (SSM and SWI and ground based soil moisture data (SSMinsitu. In the proxy variable analysis, the SWI indicated the optimal value among the proposed proxy variables. In the runoff prediction analysis considering various infiltration conditions, the SSM and SWI proxy variables significantly reduced the runoff prediction error as compared with API5 by 60% and 66%, respectively. Moreover, the proposed IWC framework with

  12. Pitch Wetting on Model Basal and Edge-Plane Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-04

    spin coating and then utilize the films as model substrates for pitch wetting studies. Experimental Films from indanthrone disulfonate (Optiva...Inc. South San Francisco) were formed on quartz from 7.5 wt% aqueous solution either by spin coating (rotation rate: 500 rmp for 20 seconds and then...formed by spin coating (Figs. 3,4) and Meyer-bar-coating (Fig. 5) of indanthrone disulfonate aqueous solutions followed by drying and direct

  13. "Breath figures" on leaf surfaces-formation and effects of microscopic leaf wetness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Juergen; Hunsche, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    "Microscopic leaf wetness" means minute amounts of persistent liquid water on leaf surfaces which are invisible to the naked eye. The water is mainly maintained by transpired water vapor condensing onto the leaf surface and to attached leaf surface particles. With an estimated average thickness of less than 1 μm, microscopic leaf wetness is about two orders of magnitude thinner than morning dewfall. The most important physical processes which reduce the saturation vapor pressure and promote condensation are cuticular absorption and the deliquescence of hygroscopic leaf surface particles. Deliquescent salts form highly concentrated solutions. Depending on the type and concentration of the dissolved ions, the physicochemical properties of microscopic leaf wetness can be considerably different from those of pure water. Microscopic leaf wetness can form continuous thin layers on hydrophobic leaf surfaces and in specific cases can act similar to surfactants, enabling a strong potential influence on the foliar exchange of ions. Microscopic leaf wetness can also enhance the dissolution, the emission, and the reaction of specific atmospheric trace gases e.g., ammonia, SO2, or ozone, leading to a strong potential role for microscopic leaf wetness in plant/atmosphere interaction. Due to its difficult detection, there is little knowledge about the occurrence and the properties of microscopic leaf wetness. However, based on the existing evidence and on physicochemical reasoning it can be hypothesized that microscopic leaf wetness occurs on almost any plant worldwide and often permanently, and that it significantly influences the exchange processes of the leaf surface with its neighboring compartments, i.e., the plant interior and the atmosphere. The omission of microscopic water in general leaf wetness concepts has caused far-reaching, misleading conclusions in the past.

  14. The Role of Surface Chemistry in Adhesion and Wetting of Gecko Toe Pads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badge, Ila; Stark, Alyssa Y.; Paoloni, Eva L.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-10-01

    An array of micron-sized setal hairs offers geckos a unique ability to walk on vertical surfaces using van der Waals interactions. Although many studies have focused on the role of surface morphology of the hairs, very little is known about the role of surface chemistry on wetting and adhesion. We expect that both surface chemistry and morphology are important, not only to achieve optimum dry adhesion but also for increased efficiency in self-cleaning of water and adhesion under wet conditions. Here, we used a plasma-based vapor deposition process to coat the hairy patterns on gecko toe pad sheds with polar and non-polar coatings without significantly perturbing the setal morphology. By a comparison of wetting across treatments, we show that the intrinsic surface of gecko setae has a water contact angle between 70-90°. As expected, under wet conditions, adhesion on a hydrophilic surface (glass) was lower than that on a hydrophobic surface (alkyl-silane monolayer on glass). Surprisingly under wet and dry conditions the adhesion was comparable on the hydrophobic surface, independent of the surface chemistry of the setal hairs. This work highlights the need to utilize morphology and surface chemistry in developing successful synthetic adhesives with desirable adhesion and self-cleaning properties.

  15. Biochar effects on wet and dry regions of the soil water retention curve of a sandy loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Moldrup, Per; Sun, Zhencai

    2014-01-01

    Reported beneficial effects of biochar on soil physical properties and processes include decreased soil density, and increased soil water transport, water holding capacity and retention (mainly for the wet region). Research is limited on biochar effects on the full soil water retention curve (wet...... and dry regions) for a given soil and biochar amendment scenarios. This study evaluates how biochar applied to a sandy loam field at rates from 0 to 50 Mg ha−1 yr–1 in 2011, 2012, or both years (2011+2012) influences the full water retention curve. Inorganic fertilizer and pig slurry were added to all...... treatments. Six months after the last biochar application, intact and disturbed soil samples were collected for analyses. Soil water retention was measured from −1 kPa to −100 kPa using tension tables and ceramic plates and from −10 MPa to −480 MPa using a Vapor Sorption Analyzer. Soil specific area...

  16. Characterization of Polymer Surfaces by the Use of Different Wetting Theories Regarding Acid-Base Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Kraus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The existing wetting methods for the determination of acid-base properties on solid surfaces are discussed. Striving for a better understanding of the adhesive polymer interactions in adhesively joined polymers, the methods of Berger and van Oss-Chaudhury-Good were found as the most suitable methods for the investigation of wetting on solid polymer surfaces. Methods of nonlinear systems by Della Volpe and Siboni were adapted and evaluated on plastic surfaces. In the context of these investigations various data of the surface free energy as well as its components have been identified for a number of polymer surfaces by application of spatial equation solutions.

  17. Utilizing dynamic tensiometry to quantify contact angle hysteresis and wetting state transitions on nonwetting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleingartner, Justin A; Srinivasan, Siddarth; Mabry, Joseph M; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H

    2013-11-05

    Goniometric techniques traditionally quantify two parameters, the advancing and receding contact angles, that are useful for characterizing the wetting properties of a solid surface; however, dynamic tensiometry, which measures changes in the net force on a surface during the repeated immersion and emersion of a solid into a probe liquid, can provide further insight into the wetting properties of a surface. We detail a framework for analyzing tensiometric results that allows for the determination of wetting hysteresis, wetting state transitions, and characteristic topographical length scales on textured, nonwetting surfaces, in addition to the more traditional measurement of apparent advancing and receding contact angles. Fluorodecyl POSS, a low-surface-energy material, was blended with commercially available poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and then dip- or spray-coated onto glass substrates. These surfaces were probed with a variety of liquids to illustrate the effects of probe liquid surface tension, solid surface chemistry, and surface texture on the apparent contact angles and wetting hysteresis of nonwetting surfaces. Woven meshes were then used as model structured substrates to add a second, larger length scale for the surface texture. When immersed into a probe liquid, these spray-coated mesh surfaces can form a metastable, solid-liquid-air interface on the largest length scale of surface texture. The increasing hydrostatic pressure associated with progressively greater immersion depths disrupts this metastable, composite interface and forces penetration of the probe liquid into the mesh structure. This transition is marked by a sudden change in the wetting hysteresis, which can be systematically probed using spray-coated, woven meshes of varying wire radius and spacing. We also show that dynamic tensiometry can accurately and quantitatively characterize topographical length scales that are present on microtextured surfaces.

  18. Relationship between Wetting Hysteresis and Contact Time of a Bouncing Droplet on Hydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yizhou; Tao, Jie; Tao, Haijun; Chen, Shanlong; Pan, Lei; Wang, Tao

    2015-09-23

    The contact time of impacting water droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces directly reflects the extent of thermal and energy conversions between the water droplet and the surface, which is also considered to be crucial to the practical applications. The purpose of this study was to reveal the relationship between the contact time and the wetting hysteresis. We designed and fabricated six classes of surfaces with different extent of hydrophobicity through modifying the microscale/nanoscale hierarchical textured titanium surfaces with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrimethoxysilane, and we filmed the contact process of the water droplet impacting on these surfaces using a high-speed camera. It can be concluded that wetting hysteresis played a significant role in determining how long the impacting water droplet can bounce off the surface, based on the interfacial wetting mechanism and the work done against the resistance force generated by contact angle hysteresis during the dynamic process.

  19. Wetting, prewetting and surface freezing transitions in fluid Ga-based alloys a surface light scattering study

    CERN Document Server

    Freyland, W; Mechdiev, I

    2003-01-01

    The surface energy and entropy of liquid Ga-Bi and Ga-Pb alloys have been studied by means of surface light scattering measurements at various compositions and temperatures between the respective eutectic and monotectic points. Analysis of these results using the Gibbs adsorption equation gives evidence for wetting and prewetting transitions in these alloys completely consistent with a tetra-point wetting scenario (Dietrich S and Schick M 1997 Surf. Sci. 382 178). Surface freezing transitions are observed for conditions near the liquidus curves. In view of their viscoelastic properties and their relation with the wetting film characteristics, we suggest a simple explanation for the observed surface freezing phenomena in terms of nucleation of strongly undercooled wetting films.

  20. The importance of soil drying and re-wetting in crop phytohormonal and nutritional responses to deficit irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Ian C; Puértolas, Jaime; Huber, Katrin; Pérez-Pérez, Juan Gabriel; Wright, Hannah R; Blackwell, Martin S A

    2015-04-01

    Soil drying and re-wetting (DRW) occurs at varying frequencies and intensities during crop production, and is deliberately used in water-saving irrigation techniques that aim to enhance crop water use efficiency. Soil drying not only limits root water uptake which can (but not always) perturb shoot water status, but also alters root synthesis of phytohormones and their transport to shoots to regulate leaf growth and gas exchange. Re-wetting the soil rapidly restores leaf water potential and leaf growth (minutes to hours), but gas exchange recovers more slowly (hours to days), probably mediated by sustained changes in root to shoot phytohormonal signalling. Partial rootzone drying (PRD) deliberately irrigates only part of the rootzone, while the remainder is allowed to dry. Alternating these wet and dry zones (thus re-wetting dry soil) substantially improves crop yields compared with maintaining fixed wet and dry zones or conventional deficit irrigation, and modifies phytohormonal (especially abscisic acid) signalling. Alternate wetting and drying (AWD) of rice can also improve yield compared with paddy culture, and is correlated with altered phytohormonal (including cytokinin) signalling. Both PRD and AWD can improve crop nutrition, and re-wetting dry soil provokes both physical and biological changes which affect soil nutrient availability. Whether this alters crop nutrient uptake depends on competition between plant and microbes for nutrients, with the rate of re-wetting determining microbial dynamics. Nevertheless, studies that examine the effects of soil DRW on both crop nutritional and phytohormonal responses are relatively rare; thus, determining the cause(s) of enhanced crop yields under AWD and PRD remains challenging. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. EFFECT OF FLUCTUATION OF WETTING AND DRYING PHENOMENA ON SOIL FERTILITY STATUS UNDER RICE CULTIVATION IN WETLAND SOIL IN RWANDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamudu Rukangantambara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1980, wetland s in Rwanda have been considered as important areas for agriculture intensification through improving food security and incomes to the farmers. However, changes in the soil nutrient status due to repeatedly wetting and drying phenomena may considerably affect soil fertility status thus leading to low crop productivity of the wetlands. This has consequently created fear to the wetland users especially the local farmers, extension workers and agronomists. The comparative study was conducted to assess the effect of drained and irrigated phenomena at Mamba, Rwasave and Rugeramigozi marshlands on soil fertility change under rice growing. 24 samples were taken with 12 samples under drained and 12 under irrigated areas. The samples were collected randomly from top soil ( 0- 20 cm. The following parameters were quantified; soil pH( H 2O in soil water suspension with ratio 1:2.5; Al exchangeable( 1N Kcl, organic carbon( walkely and black method in Sumner method modified (1984, Total nitrogen kjeldahl (TNK in Bremner modified method, available phosphorus ( bray 1. Bases exchangeable with 1 N ammonium acetate following AAS and CEC and available Fe, Zn, Cu and Mn (DTDA diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Data analyses were processed with GEN STAT version 3. The results showed that the fluctuation of wet and dry water have significantly affected soil fertility status at p= 0,05. The phosphorus and potassium are in the low levels of deficiency 2.32 ppm and 47.72 ppm in irrigated area while crop requirement nutrients are 20 ppm and 200 ppm respectively. And Al is in toxic level conditions, 27.5% in drained area while rice tolerance is 20%. Fe was 641.51 ppm in irrigated area while requirement narrowed to 300 ppm. As conclusion, the soil fertility is low and toxic which constitutes a limitation. The wetland soil in Rwanda should offer opportunities for paddy growing ( rice, etc, if soil fertility factors would be amended by lime for its

  2. ‘Breath figures’ on leaf surfaces – formation and effects of microscopic leaf wetness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen eBurkhardt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ‘Microscopic leaf wetness’ means minute amounts of persistent liquid water on leaf surfaces which are invisible to the naked eye. The water is mainly maintained by transpired water vapor condensing onto the leaf surface and to attached leaf surface particles. With an estimated average thickness of less than 1 µm, microscopic leaf wetness it is about 2 orders of magnitude thinner than morning dewfall. The most important physical processes which reduce the saturation vapor pressure and promote condensation are cuticular absorption and the deliquescence of hygroscopic leaf surface particles. Deliquescent salts form highly concentrated solutions. Depending on the amount and concentration of the dissolved ions, the physicochemical properties of microscopic leaf wetness can be considerably different from those of pure water. Microscopic leaf wetness can form continuous thin layers on hydrophobic leaf surfaces and in specific cases can act similar to surfactants, enabling a strong potential influence on the foliar exchange of ions. Microscopic leaf wetness can also enhance the dissolution, the emission, and the reaction of specific atmospheric trace gases e.g. ammonia, SO2, or ozone, leading to a strong potential role for microscopic leaf wetness in plant/atmosphere interaction. Due to its difficult detection, there is little knowledge about the occurrence and the properties of microscopic leaf wetness. However, based on the existing evidence and on physicochemical reasoning it can be hypothesized that microscopic leaf wetness occurs on almost any plant worldwide and often permanently, and that it significantly influences the exchange processes of the leaf surface with its neighboring compartments, i.e., the plant interior and the atmosphere. The omission of microscopic water in general leaf wetness concepts has caused far-reaching, misleading conclusions in the past.

  3. Modeling the Effects of Nanopatterned Surfaces on Wetting States of Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ke; Zhao, Yanping; Ouyang, Gang; Li, Xinlei

    2017-04-01

    An analytic thermodynamic model has been established to quantitatively investigate the wetting states of droplets on nanopatterned surfaces. Based on the calculations for the free energies of droplets with the Wenzel state and the Cassie-Baxter state, it is found that the size and shape of nanostructured surfaces play crucial roles in wetting states. In detail, for nanohole-patterned surfaces, the deep and thin nanoholes lead to the Cassie-Baxter state, and contrarily, the shallow and thick nanoholes result in the Wenzel state. However, the droplets have the Wenzel state on the patterned surfaces with small height and radii nanopillars and have the Cassie-Baxter state when the height and radii of nanopillars are large. Furthermore, the intuitive phase diagrams of the wetting states of the droplet in the space of surface geometrical parameters are obtained. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental observations and reveal physical mechanisms involved in the effects of nanopatterned surfaces on wetting states, which implies that these studies may provide useful guidance to the conscious design of patterned surfaces to control the wetting states of droplets.

  4. Evaporation and wetted area of single droplets on waxy and hairy leaf surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H; Yu, Y; Ozkan, H E; Derksen, R C; Krause, C R

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the evaporation of pesticide droplets and wetting of Leaf surfaces can increase foliar application efficiency and reduce pesticide use. Evaporation time and wetted area of single pesticide droplets on hairy and waxy geranium leaf surfaces were measured under the controlled conditions for five droplet sizes and three relative humidities. The sprays used to form droplets included water, a nonionic colloidal polymer drift retardant, an alkyl polyoxyethylene surfactant, and an insecticide. Adding the surfactant into spray mixtures greatly increased droplet wetted area on the surfaces while droplet evaporation time was greatly reduced. Adding the drift retardant into spray mixture slightly increased the droplet evaporation time and the wetted area. Also, droplets had Longer evaporation times on waxy leaves than on hairy leaves for all droplet diameters and all relative humidity conditions. Increasing relative humidity could increase the droplet evaporation time greatly but did not change the the wetted area. The droplet evaporation time and wetted area increased exponentially as the droplet size increased. Therefore, droplet size, surface characteristics of the target, relative humidity, and chemical composition of the spray mixtures (water alone, pesticide, additives) should be included as important factors that affect the efficacy and efficiency of pesticide applications.

  5. Dissolved Organic Matter as a Mechanism for Carbon Stabilization at Depth in Wet Tropical Forest Volcanic Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Spiotta, E.; Kramer, M. G.; Chadwick, O. A.

    2007-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in many biological and chemical processes in soils. Our understanding of the types of plant and microbially-derived organic matter that accumulate in soils and the mechanisms responsible for their transformation and stabilization is still limited. In particular, we know very little about how microbial activity and water movement contribute to the production of DOM and the formation of stable C in soils. In well-drained soils under wet climates, DOM is potentially a primary pathway for the transport of C from the surface litter layers and the zones of highest microbial activity to deeper horizons in the soil profile where the potential for long-term storage increases. The mechanisms for long-term stabilization of organic C in deep mineral horizons include an accumulation of chemically recalcitrant C, strong sorption of soluble and otherwise labile C to mineral and/or metals making them inaccessible to decomposers, and microenvironmental conditions (low pH, low O2) which result in incomplete decomposition and persistence of labile C. Although most work to date has focused on the role of dissolved organic C and N (DOC and DON) in the C and N cycles of temperate forests, DOM fluxes may be even more important in forests in the wet tropics, where high rainfall and high primary productivity could lead to greater DOM production. In order to address the role of DOC in the transport and stabilization of C in mineral horizons, we are studying DOC production, transformation, and loss pathways in volcanic soils dominated by highly reactive, non-crystalline minerals (allophane). We are quantifying flux and solute concentrations (C, N, cations, anions) in rainwater, throughfall, and in soil water. We have installed tension and zero tension lysimeters throughout sequentially deeper organic and mineral horizons in an intermediate aged soil (ca. 350k years) under wet (ca. 3000 mm mean annual rainfall) native tropical forest

  6. Soil Carbon Dioxide and Methane Fluxes in a Costa Rican Premontane Wet Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, L. A.; Schade, G. W.; Pfohl, A.

    2011-12-01

    A significant amount of the global terrestrial biomass is found in tropical forests, and soil respiration is a vital part of its carbon cycling. However, data on soil trace gas flux rates in the tropics are sparse, especially from previously disturbed regions. To expand the database on carbon cycling in the tropics, this study examined soil flux rate and its variability for CO2 and CH4 in a secondary premontane wet forest south of Arenal Volcano in Costa Rica. Data were collected over a six-week period in June and July 2011 during the transition from dry to wet season. Trace gas sampling was performed at three sub-canopy sites of different elevations. The soil is of volcanic origin with a low bulk density, likely an Andisol. An average KCl pH of 4.8 indicates exchangeable aluminum is present, and a NaF pH>11 indicates the soil is dominated by short-range order minerals. Ten-inch diameter PVC rings were used as static flux chambers without soil collars. To find soil CO2 efflux rates, a battery-powered LICOR 840A CO2-H2O Gas Analyzer was used to take measurements in the field, logging CO2 concentration every ten seconds. Additionally, six, 10-mL Nylon syringes were filled with gas samples at 0, 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 minutes after closing the chambers. These samples were analyzed the same day with a SRI 8610 Gas Chromatograph for concentrations of CO2 and CH4. The average CO2 efflux calculated was 1.7±0.8E-2 g/m2/min, and did not differ between the applied analytical methods. Soil respiration depended strongly on soil moisture, with decreasing efflux rates at higher water-filled pore space values. An annual soil respiration rate of 8.5E3 g/m2/yr was estimated by applying the observed relationship between soil moisture and CO2 efflux to annual soil moisture measurements. The relatively high respiration rates could be caused by the high soil moisture and low soil bulk density, providing optimal conditions for microbial respiration. Several diurnal sampling periods at

  7. The Influence of Surface Anisotropy Crystalline Structure on Wetting of Sapphire by Molten Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Santillan, Joaquin

    2013-05-01

    The wetting of sapphire by molten aluminum was investigated by the sessile drop technique from 1073 K to 1473 K (800 °C to 1200 °C) at PO2 <10-15 Pa under Ar atmosphere. This study focuses on sapphire crystalline structure and its principle to the interface. The planes " a" and " b" are oxygen terminated structures and wet more by Al, whereas the " c" plane is an aluminum terminated structure. A wetting transition at 1273 K (1000 °C) was obtained and a solid surface tension proves the capillarity trends of the couple.

  8. Increases in mean annual temperature do not alter soil bacterial community structure in tropical montane wet forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul C. Selmants; Karen L. Adair; Creighton M. Litton; Christian P. Giardina; Egbert Schwartz

    2016-01-01

    Soil bacteria play a key role in regulating terrestrial biogeochemical cycling and greenhouse gas fluxes across the soil-atmosphere continuum. Despite their importance to ecosystem functioning, we lack a general understanding of how bacterial communities respond to climate change, especially in relatively understudied ecosystems like tropical montane wet...

  9. Hydroglyphics: Demonstration of Selective Wetting on Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Philseok; Alvarenga, Jack; Aizenberg, Joanna; Sleeper, Raymond S.

    2013-01-01

    A visual demonstration of the difference between hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces has been developed. It involves placing a shadow mask on an optically clear hydrophobic plastic dish, corona treating the surface with a modified Tesla coil, removing the shadow mask, and visualizing the otherwise invisible message or pattern by applying water,…

  10. Fabrication of Nanostructured Polymer Surfaces and Characterization of their Wetting Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nis Korsgaard

    micro- and nanostructuring of commerical injection molding tools to create the desired surface structures directly in the molding process. The aim of this project was to enable the fabrication of surfaces with controlled wetting by injection molding. During the project, I have demonstrated improvements....... • Simulations of wetting transitions. • Clean room fabrication of functional surfaces, and production of micro- and nanostructured mold inserts. • Injection molding of micro- and nanostructured polymer parts on a commercial injection molding machine. • Co-invented a patented technique for microstructuring steel...

  11. Wetting property of smooth and textured hydrophobic surfaces under condensation condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO PengFei; LV CunJing; YAO ZhaoHui; NIU FengLei

    2014-01-01

    Static and dynamic wetting behaviors of sessile droplet on smooth,microstructured and micro/nanostructured surface under condensation condition are systematically studied.In contrast to the conventional droplet wetting on such natural materials by dropping,we demonstrate here that when dropwise condensation occurs,the sessile droplet will transit from the Cassie-Baxter wetting state to the Wenzel wetting state or partial Cassie-Baxter wetting state on the microstructured surface or the micro/nanostructured surface,which leads to a strong adhesion between the droplet and the substrate.In contrast,the apparent contact angle and the sliding angle on the smooth surface changes a little before and after the condensation because of small roughness.Theoretical analysis shows that the roughness factor controls the adhesion force of the droplet during condensation,and a theoretical model is constructed which will be helpful for us to understand the relationship between the adhesion force and the geometry of the surface.

  12. Water and Ethanol Droplet Wetting Transition during Evaporation on Omniphobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuemei; Weibel, Justin A.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2015-11-01

    Omniphobic surfaces with reentrant microstructures have been investigated for a range of applications, but the evaporation of high- and low-surface-tension liquid droplets placed on such surfaces has not been rigorously studied. In this work, we develop a technique to fabricate omniphobic surfaces on copper substrates to allow for a systematic examination of the effects of surface topography on the evaporation dynamics of water and ethanol droplets. Compared to a water droplet, the ethanol droplet not only evaporates faster, but also inhibits Cassie-to-Wenzel wetting transitions on surfaces with certain geometries. We use an interfacial energy-based description of the system, including the transition energy barrier and triple line energy, to explain the underlying transition mechanism and behaviour observed. Suppression of the wetting transition during evaporation of droplets provides an important metric for evaluating the robustness of omniphobic surfaces requiring such functionality.

  13. Universal wetting transition of an evaporating water droplet on superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Peichun Amy; Bussonnière, Adrien; Bigdeli, Masoud; Chueh, Di-Yen; Liu, Qingxia; Chen, Peilin

    2016-11-01

    An evaporating water droplet on a superhydrophobic surface undergoes a wetting transition from a heterogeneous wetting (Cassie-Baxter) to homogeneous wetting (Wenzel) state. The critical transition is manifested by a sudden decrease of contact angle, when "Fakir" water drop permeates the minute hydrophobic cavities. This breakdown of superhydrophobicity would hinder various applications of self-cleaning, low-frictional, and potentially ice-phobic properties of superhydrophobic materials. In this work, we experimentally investigate such wetting transition using hydrophobic nanostructures. With a theoretical model, we find a universal criterion of the critical contact angle at the transition point. The prediction of critical contact angle, which solely depends on the geometrical parameters of the hydrophobic pillars, agree well with various data for both micro- and nano-structures.

  14. Wetting Angle and Surface Tension of Germanium Melts on Different Substrate Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, N.; Croell, A.; Szofran, F. R.; Benz, K. W.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The sessile drop technique has been used to measure the wetting angle and the surface tension of molten germanium (Ge) on various substrate materials. Sapphire, fused silica, glassy carbon, graphite, SiC, carbon-based aerogel, pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN), AlN, Si3N4, and CVD diamond were used as substrate materials. In addition, the effects of different cleaning procedures and surface treatments on the wetting behavior were investigated. The highest wetting angles with values around 170 deg. were found for pBN substrates under active vacuum or with a slight overpressure of 5N Argon or forming gas (2% Hydrogen in 5N Argon). The measurement of the surface tension and its temperature dependence for Ge under a forming gas atmosphere resulted in gamma(T) = 591 - 0.077 (T-T(sub m).

  15. Mapping soil water dynamics and a moving wetting front by spatiotemporal inversion of electromagnetic induction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Monteiro Santos, F. A.; Triantafilis, J.

    2016-11-01

    Characterization of the spatiotemporal distribution of soil volumetric water content (θ) is fundamental to agriculture, ecology, and earth science. Given the labor intensive and inefficient nature of determining θ, apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) measured by electromagnetic induction has been used as a proxy. A number of previous studies have employed inversion algorithms to convert ECa data to depth-specific electrical conductivity (σ) which could then be correlated to soil θ and other soil properties. The purpose of this study was to develop a spatiotemporal inversion algorithm which accounts for the temporal continuity of ECa. The algorithm was applied to a case study where time-lapse ECa was collected on a 350 m transect on seven different days on an alfalfa farm in the USA. Results showed that the approach was able to map the location of moving wetting front along the transect. Results also showed that the spatiotemporal inversion algorithm was more precise (RMSE = 0.0457 cm3/cm3) and less biased (ME = -0.0023 cm3/cm3) as compared with the nonspatiotemporal inversion approach (0.0483 cm3/cm3 and ME = -0.0030 cm3/cm3, respectively). In addition, the spatiotemporal inversion algorithm allows for a reduced set of ECa surveys to be used when non abrupt changes of soil water content occur with time. To apply this spatiotemporal inversion algorithm beyond low induction number condition, full solution of the EM induction phenomena can be studied in the future.

  16. Wetting on micro-structured surfaces: modelling and optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalli, Andrea

    liquid spreading and spontaneous drop removal on superhydrophobic surfaces. We do this by applying different numerical techniques, suited for the specific topic. We first consider superhydrophobicity, a condition of extreme water repellency associated with very large static contact angles and low roll...

  17. NH 3 soil and soil surface gas measurements in a triticale wheat field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neftel, A.; Blatter, A.; Gut, A.; Högger, D.; Meixner, F.; Ammann, C.; Nathaus, F. J.

    We present a new approach for a continuous determination of NH 3 concentration in the open pore space of the soil and on the soil surface. In a semi-permeable membrane of 0.5 m length a flow of 0.5 s1pm maintained. In the tube the NH 3 concentration adjusts itself to the surrounding air concentration by diffusion through the membrane. Continuous measurements have been performed in a triticale wheat field over a period of several weeks in a field experiment at Bellheim (FRG) during June and July 1995 within the frame of the European program EXAMINE (Exchange of Atmospheric Ammonia with European Ecosystems). Soil concentrations are generally below the detection limit of 0.1 μg m -3. We conclude, that the investigated soil is generally a sink for NH 3. The NH 3 concentration on the soil surface shows a diurnal variation due to a combination of physico-chemical desorption and adsorption phenomena associated with changes in wetness of the surrounding surfaces and the NH 3 concentration in the canopy.

  18. Substrate Wetting Under the Conditions of Drop Free Falling on a Heated Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batischeva Ksenia A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted an experimental study of a heated substrate wetting by drops of distilled water under the conditions of their free-falling. The studies were conducted using a shadow system, which consists of a light source, lens and high-speed video camera. It was found that the maximum wetted area of drop is directly proportional to its volume. The main ranges of evolution of distilled water drop behavior on the heated surface (change of geometry at contact with the surface have been conditionally divided.

  19. Study of Synchrotron Radiation from Wet Electrode Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-30

    the Electrochemical Society meeting, in Atlanta, May 15-19, 1988. "Geometrical Structure of Adlayers on Immersed Electrodes," 41h International Vischer...In Situ Structural )etermination of Electrochemical Interfaces", Electrochemical Society mecting, May 15-20, 1988, Atlinta Ga. ’I’wo )imensional...Compressibility of Electrochemically Adsorbe ILcad on Silver (I 11)’, symposium on ’Substrate Morphology - Single Crystal Surfaces’ Electrochemical Society meeting

  20. Microbial mediated soil structure formation under wetting and drying cycles along a climate gradient (arid to humid) on hillslopes in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Nadine; Moskwa, Lisa-Marie; Kühn, Peter; Mueller, Carsten W.; Wagner, Dirk; Scholten, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    It is well-known that the land surface resistance against erosion is largely controlled by the structure stability of the soil given by its inherent properties. Microbial activity plays a vital role in soil structure development, and thus affecting soil physical parameters. Accordingly the influence of biota shaping the earth's surface has been described through mechanisms such as mineral weathering, formation of ions and biofilms controlling land surface resistance against erosion. However the role of microorganisms for the development of soil stabilizing properties is still unclear and a precise quantitative understanding of the mechanisms under different climate conditions is widely missing. The objectives of our study are to examine to which extend microbiological processes control soil structure formation and stability and whether this is influenced by climate and topographic position. Soil samples were taken along a climate gradient and from different topographic positions of hillslopes in the Chilean Coastal Cordillera in austral autumn 2016. The variables of lithology, human disturbances and relief were held as far as possible constant whereas climate varies along the transect. We implemented 10 wet-dry cycles on air dried and sieved natural and sterile samples to enhance particle aggregation and increase structure stability. Throughout the entire experiment temperature is held constant at 20 °C to avoid changes in microbial activity. Samples are moistened and dried and each kept at the same respective pF-values for the same duration to add the same stress to each sample. Aggregate stability will be measured using wet sieving, ultrasonic dispersion and simulated rainfall. The results will be compared with on-site rainfall simulation experiments on hillslopes in the Chilean Coastal Cordillera to link laboratory results with natural field conditions. The experiment gives first insight into the aggregate formation process over time with and without

  1. Mimicking natural superhydrophobic surfaces and grasping the wetting process: a review on recent progress in preparing superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Y Y; Gao, N; Barthlott, W

    2011-12-12

    A typical superhydrophobic (ultrahydrophobic) surface can repel water droplets from wetting itself, and the contact angle of a water droplet resting on a superhydrophobic surface is greater than 150°, which means extremely low wettability is achievable on superhydrophobic surfaces. Many superhydrophobic surfaces (both manmade and natural) normally exhibit micro- or nanosized roughness as well as hierarchical structure, which somehow can influence the surface's water repellence. As the research into superhydrophobic surfaces goes deeper and wider, it is becoming more important to both academic fields and industrial applications. In this work, the most recent progress in preparing manmade superhydrophobic surfaces through a variety of methodologies, particularly within the past several years, and the fundamental theories of wetting phenomena related to superhydrophobic surfaces are reviewed. We also discuss the perspective of natural superhydrophobic surfaces utilized as mimicking models. The discussion focuses on how the superhydrophobic property is promoted on solid surfaces and emphasizes the effect of surface roughness and structure in particular. This review aims to enable researchers to perceive the inner principles of wetting phenomena and employ suitable methods for creation and modification of superhydrophobic surfaces. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Wetting effects of surface treatments on inlay wax-investment combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, J T; Duncanson, M G; Shillingburg, H T

    1981-11-01

    Gypsum-bonded and phosphate-bonded investments were applied to wax surfaces which were untreated, treated by buffing with cotton moistened with a die lubricant containing organic solvent, or treatment with a wax pattern cleaner. Contact angles between the investment material and wax surfaces were measured and compared. The treatment of a wax pattern with a surface tension reducing agent significantly increases the degree of wetting by both gypsum- and phosphate-bonded investments.

  3. Measuring the specific surface area of wet snow using 1310 nm reflectance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-C. Gallet

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The specific surface area (SSA of snow can be used as an objective measurement of grain size and is therefore a central variable to describe snow physical properties such as albedo. Snow SSA can now be easily measured in the field using optical methods based on infrared reflectance. However, existing optical methods have only been validated for dry snow. Here we test the possibility to use the DUFISSS instrument, based on the measurement of the 1310 nm reflectance of snow with an integrating sphere, to measure the SSA of wet snow. We perform cold room experiments where we measure the SSA of a wet snow sample, freeze it and measure it again, to quantify the difference in reflectance between frozen and wet snow. We study snow samples in the SSA range 12–37 m2 kg−1 and in the mass liquid water content range 5–32%. We conclude that the SSA of wet snow can be obtained from the measurement of its 1310 nm reflectance using three simple steps. In most cases, the SSA thus obtained is less than 10% different from the value that would have been obtained if the sample had been considered dry, so that the three simple steps constitute a minor correction. We also run two optical models to interpret the results, but no model reproduces correctly the water-ice distribution in wet snow, so that their predictions of wet snow reflectance are imperfect.

  4. Description and testing of three moisture sensors for measuring surface wetness on carbonate building stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, R.B.; Reddy, M.M.; Martin, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Three moisture sensors were tested as a means for determining the surface wetness on carbonate building stones exposed to conditions that produce deposition of moisture. A relative-humidity probe, a gypsum-coated circuit grid, and a limestone-block resistor were tested as sensors for determining surface wetness. Sensors were tested under laboratory conditions of constant relative humidity and temperature and also under on-site conditions of variable relative humidity and temperature for eight weeks at Newcomb, NY. Laboratory tests indicated that relative humidity alone did not cause sensors to become saturated with water. However, the rates of drying indicated by the sensors after an initial saturation were inversely related to the relative humidity. On-site testing of the relative-humidity probe and the gypsum-coated ciruit grid indicated that they respond to a diurnal wetting and drying cycle; the limestone-block resistor responded only to rainfall.

  5. Modeling the Maximum Spreading of Liquid Droplets Impacting Wetting and Nonwetting Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Bong; Derome, Dominique; Guyer, Robert; Carmeliet, Jan

    2016-02-09

    Droplet impact has been imaged on different rigid, smooth, and rough substrates for three liquids with different viscosity and surface tension, with special attention to the lower impact velocity range. Of all studied parameters, only surface tension and viscosity, thus the liquid properties, clearly play a role in terms of the attained maximum spreading ratio of the impacting droplet. Surface roughness and type of surface (steel, aluminum, and parafilm) slightly affect the dynamic wettability and maximum spreading at low impact velocity. The dynamic contact angle at maximum spreading has been identified to properly characterize this dynamic spreading process, especially at low impact velocity where dynamic wetting plays an important role. The dynamic contact angle is found to be generally higher than the equilibrium contact angle, showing that statically wetting surfaces can become less wetting or even nonwetting under dynamic droplet impact. An improved energy balance model for maximum spreading ratio is proposed based on a correct analytical modeling of the time at maximum spreading, which determines the viscous dissipation. Experiments show that the time at maximum spreading decreases with impact velocity depending on the surface tension of the liquid, and a scaling with maximum spreading diameter and surface tension is proposed. A second improvement is based on the use of the dynamic contact angle at maximum spreading, instead of quasi-static contact angles, to describe the dynamic wetting process at low impact velocity. This improved model showed good agreement compared to experiments for the maximum spreading ratio versus impact velocity for different liquids, and a better prediction compared to other models in literature. In particular, scaling according to We(1/2) is found invalid for low velocities, since the curves bend over to higher maximum spreading ratios due to the dynamic wetting process.

  6. Contact angle dynamics in droplets impacting on flat surfaces with different wetting characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Ilker S.; Megaridis, Constantine M.

    2006-07-01

    An experimental study is presented on contact angle dynamics during spreading/recoiling of mm-sized water droplets impacting orthogonally on various surfaces with We {=} O(0.1)-O(10), Ca {=} O(0.001)-O(0.01), Re {=} O(100)-O(1000), Oh {=} O(0.001) and Bo {=} O(0.1). In this impact regime, inertial, viscous and capillary phenomena act in unison to influence contact angle dynamics. The wetting properties of the target surfaces range from wettable to non-wettable. The experiments feature accelerating and decelerating wetting lines, capillary surface waves in the early impact stages, contact angle hysteresis, and droplet rebound under non-wetting conditions. The objective of the work is to provide insight into the dynamic behaviour of the apparent (macroscopic) contact angle theta and its dependence on contact line velocity V_{scriptsizeCL} at various degrees of surface wetting. By correlating the temporal behaviours of theta and V_{scriptsizeCL}, the angle vs. speed relationship is established for each case examined. The results reveal that surface wettability has a critical influence on dynamic contact angle behaviour. The hydrodynamic wetting theory of Cox (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 357, 1998, p. 249) and the molecular-kinetic theory of wetting by Blake & Haynes (J. Colloid Interface Sci.) vol. 30, 1969, p. 421) are implemented to extract values of the corresponding microscopic wetting parameters required to match the experimentally observed theta vs. V_{scriptsizeCL} data. Application of hydrodynamic theory indicates that in the slow stage of forced spreading the slip length and the microscopic contact angle should be contact line velocity dependent. The hydrodynamic theory performs well during kinematic (fast) spreading, in which solid/liquid interactions are weak. Application of the molecular kinetic theory yields physically reasonable molecular wetting parameters, which, however, vary with impact conditions. The results indicate that even for a single liquid there is

  7. Wet chemical silver treatment of endotracheal tubes to produce antibacterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstedt, Madeleine; Houriet, Raymond; Mossialos, Dimitris; Haas, Dieter; Mathieu, Hans Jörg

    2007-10-01

    Mechanically ventilated patients in hospitals are subjected to an increased risk of acquiring nosocomial pneumonia that sometimes has a lethal outcome. One way to minimize the risk could be to make the surfaces on endotracheal tubes antibacterial. In this study, bacterial growth was inhibited or completely prevented by silver ions wet chemically and deposited onto the tube surface. Through the wet chemical treatment developed here, a surface precipitate was formed containing silver chloride and a silver stearate salt. The identity and morphology of the surface precipitate was studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray powder diffraction. Leaching of silver ions into solution was examined, and bacterial growth on the treated surfaces was assayed using Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild type (PAO1) bacteria. Furthermore, the minimum inhibitory concentration of silver ions was determined in liquid- and solid-rich growth medium as 23 and 18 microM, respectively, for P. aeruginosa.

  8. Spectra and vegetation index variations in moss soil crust in different seasons, and in wet and dry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shibo; Yu, Weiguo; Qi, Yue

    2015-06-01

    Similar to vascular plants, non-vascular plant mosses have different periods of seasonal growth. There has been little research on the spectral variations of moss soil crust (MSC) over different growth periods. Few studies have paid attention to the difference in spectral characteristics between wet MSC that is photosynthesizing and dry MSC in suspended metabolism. The dissimilarity of MSC spectra in wet and dry conditions during different seasons needs further investigation. In this study, the spectral reflectance of wet MSC, dry MSC and the dominant vascular plant (Artemisia) were characterized in situ during the summer (July) and autumn (September). The variations in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), biological soil crust index (BSCI) and CI (crust index) in different seasons and under different soil moisture conditions were also analyzed. It was found that (1) the spectral characteristics of both wet and dry MSCs varied seasonally; (2) the spectral features of wet MSC appear similar to those of the vascular plant, Artemisia, whether in summer or autumn; (3) both in summer and in autumn, much higher NDVI values were acquired for wet than for dry MSC (0.6 ∼ 0.7 vs. 0.3 ∼ 0.4 units), which may lead to misinterpretation of vegetation dynamics in the presence of MSC and with the variations in rainfall occurring in arid and semi-arid zones; and (4) the BSCI and CI values of wet MSC were close to that of Artemisia in both summer and autumn, indicating that BSCI and CI could barely differentiate between the wet MSC and Artemisia.

  9. Changes in Temperature and Fate of Soil Organic Matter in an Andisol due to Soil Surface Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchi, Atsuko; Nishimura, Taku; Mizoguchi, Masaru; Imoto, Hiromi; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi

    This is a print of a camera-ready Japanese manuscript for the Transactions of JSIDRE. This will provide an example and directions for the layout and font size/style to be used. Please refer to this when preparing the headings, figures/table and text of your manuscript. The manuscript should be submitted on A4 size. Changes in temperature, soil moisture, and carbon and nitrogen contents were measured in Andisol under soil surface burning. Soil samples were packed into an unglazed cylinder of 15 cm inner diameter and 30 cm high. Charcoal was burned for 6 hours on the surface of the soil column. During the burning soil surface temperature rose to between 600-700°C. In initially wet soil, rise in soil temperature was retarded for a while at around 95-100°C. On the other hand, in initially dry Toyoura sand showed more rapid temperature increase without retardation. The temperature retardation in the wet soil could be caused by consumption of latent heat by vaporization of soil water. Rate of proceeding of the 100°C front was proportional to square root of the burning time. This indicates that higher the initial volumetric water content, shallower the depth affected by burning. Soil samples suffered temperature above 500°C still had total carbon and nitrogen contents of over 20 and 1 g kg-1, respectively, whereas the soil that was heated up to over 500°C by muffle furnace contained less than 0.4 and 0.1 g kg-1 of the carbon and nitrogen.

  10. Mathematical Investigation of the Cavitation Phenomenon in the Nozzle with Partially Surface Wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jablonská Jana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Partially surface wetting has a great influence on friction losses in the fluid flow in both the pipeline system and the complex shape of hydraulic elements. In many hydraulic elements (valves, pump impellers, cavitation is generated, which significantly changes the hydraulic flow parameters, so the last part of the article is devoted to the mathematical solution of this phenomena and evaluates the impact of wall wetting on the size and shape of the cavitation area which appears in the nozzle and in small gaps at special conditions. If the cavitation appears e. g. near the wall of pipes, the blades of turbine or a pump, then it destroys the material surface. On the basis of this physical experiment (nozzle, a two-dimensional (2D mathematical cavitation model of Schnerr-Sauer was made and calculated shape and size of the cavitation region was compared with the experiment. Later this verified model of cavitation was used for cavitation research flow with partial surface wetting. The pressure drop and the size of the cavitation area as it flows from partially surface wetting theory was tested depending on the adhesion coefficient.

  11. The study of surface wetting, nanobubbles and boundary slip with an applied voltage: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlu Pan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The drag of fluid flow at the solid–liquid interface in the micro/nanoscale is an important issue in micro/nanofluidic systems. Drag depends on the surface wetting, nanobubbles, surface charge and boundary slip. Some researchers have focused on the relationship between these interface properties. In this review, the influence of an applied voltage on the surface wettability, nanobubbles, surface charge density and slip length are discussed. The contact angle (CA and contact angle hysteresis (CAH of a droplet of deionized (DI water on a hydrophobic polystyrene (PS surface were measured with applied direct current (DC and alternating current (AC voltages. The nanobubbles in DI water and three kinds of saline solution on a PS surface were imaged when a voltage was applied. The influence of the surface charge density on the nanobubbles was analyzed. Then the slip length and the electrostatic force on the probe were measured on an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS surface with applied voltage. The influence of the surface charge on the boundary slip and drag of fluid flow has been discussed. Finally, the influence of the applied voltage on the surface wetting, nanobubbles, surface charge, boundary slip and the drag of liquid flow are summarized. With a smaller surface charge density which could be achieved by applying a voltage on the surface, larger and fewer nanobubbles, a larger slip length and a smaller drag of liquid flow could be found.

  12. Integrated In Situ Sensing and Modeling to Assess Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Tropical Wet Forest Soils: The Role of Leaf Cutter Ant Atta Cepholotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, T. C.; Fernandez Bou, A. S.; Dierick, D.; Oberbauer, S. F.; Schwendenmann, L.; Swanson, A. C.; Zelikova, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    This project focuses on the role of leaf cutter ants (LCA) Atta cepholotes in carbon cycling in neotropical wet forests. LCA are abundant in these forests and workers cut and carry vegetation fragments to their nests, where symbiotic fungi break down the plant material and produce the fungal hyphae on which the ants feed. LCA are the dominant herbivores in tropical forest ecosystems, removing 10-50% of vegetation annually. Their nests can achieve large sizes, extending several meters belowground and covering 50 square meters or more of the forest floor. We monitored soil moisture, temperature, and soil CO2 concentrations continuously in nest and control sites at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Intermittently, we also assessed soil respiration and LCA nest vent fluxes. Observed soil CO2 concentrations varied markedly with soil moisture conditions, ranging from a few thousand to over 60,000 ppm(v). Accordingly, soil CO2 surface efflux varied temporally by an order of magnitude or more (typical range 0.5 to 5 mmol CO2 m-2 s-1) for the same location as a consequence of soil moisture fluctuations. LCA nest vents equivalent CO2 efflux rates (accounting for vent diameter) can be substantially greater than soil surface values, with observed values ranging from about 1 to 50 mmol m-2 s-1 (it is worth noting that correcting for vent diameters yields equivalent CO2 efflux rates greater than 1000 mmol m-2 s-1). Similar to the soil surface efflux, vent efflux varied temporally by factors of 3 or more, suggesting a potential link between the vent productivity and nest activity, moisture content of surrounding soil, and atmospheric conditions (e.g., air temperature, wind). Using a soil model (Hydrus-1D) to account for unsaturated flow, heat transfer, CO2 production and diffusive transport, we captured moisture and temperature dynamics and the order of magnitude of observed CO2 concentration. Modelled surface fluxes also agreed well with observed soil surface CO2 efflux

  13. Wetting on a deformable substrate with finite deformations and asymmetrical substrate surface energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limat, Laurent; de Pascalis, Riccardo; Dervaux, Julien; Ionescu, Ioan; Perthame, Benoit

    2016-11-01

    Wetting on soft compounds is still imperfectly understood, especially when the dry and wetted parts of the substrate have two different values of surface energies (contact angle different than 90 degrees). The problem is made very complex by geometrical non-linearities arising from finite slope of the substrate and finite deformations, that must be absolutely considered, to distinguish at second order between Young law and Neuman equilibrium of surface tensions. We have developed a numerical, finite element, code that allows one to minimize surface and bulk energies, with finite deformations and asymmetry of the surface energies. The results are compared to a linear theory based on Green function theory and Fredholm integrals, and with recent experiments using X-ray visualization. The non-linear numerics reproduce very well the observed profiles, while the linear approach gives helpful analytical approximates.

  14. The Role of Substrate Electrons in the Wetting of a Metal Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiros, T.; Takahashi, O.; Andersson, K.J.; Ostrom, H.; Pettersson, L.G.M.; Nilsson, A.; Ogasawara, H.; /SLAC

    2012-04-18

    We address how the electronic and geometric structures of metal surfaces determine water-metal bonding by affecting the balance between Pauli repulsion and electrostatic attraction. We show how the rigid d-electrons and the softer s-electrons utilize different mechanisms for the redistribution of charge that enables surface wetting. On open d-shell Pt(111), the ligand field of water alters the distribution of metal d-electrons to reduce the repulsion. The closed-shell Cu d{sup 10} configuration of isostructural Cu(111), however, does not afford this mechanism, resulting in a hydrophobic surface and three-dimensional ice cluster formation. On the geometrically corrugated Cu(110) surface, however, charge depletion involving the mobile sp-electrons at atomic rows reduces the exchange repulsion sufficiently such that formation of a two-dimensional wetting layer is still favored in spite of the d{sup 10} electronic configuration.

  15. Short-Range Wetting at Liquid Gallium-Bismuth Alloy Surfaces: X-Ray Measurements and Square-Gradient Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Patrick; Shpyrko, Oleg; Pershan, Peter S.; Ocko, Ben; DiMasi, Elaine; Deutsch, Moshe

    2003-01-01

    We present an x-ray reflectivity study of wetting at the free surface of the binary liquid metal alloy gallium-bismuth (Ga-Bi) in the region where the bulk phase separates into Bi-rich and Ga-rich liquid phases. The measurements reveal the evolution of the microscopic structure of the wetting films of the Bi-rich, low-surface-tension phase along several paths in the bulk phase diagram. The wetting of the Ga-rich bulk’s surface by a Bi-rich wetting film, the thickness of which is limited by gr...

  16. Applications of asymmetric nanotextured parylene surface using its wetting and transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekeroglu, Koray

    In this thesis, basic digital fluidics devices were introduced using polymeric nanorods (nano-PPX) inspired from nature. Natural inspiration ignited this research by observing butterfly wings, water strider legs, rye grass leaves, and their asymmetric functions. Nano-PPX rods, manufactured by an oblique angle polymerization (OAP) method, are asymmetrically aligned structures that have unidirectional wetting properties. Nano-PPX demonstrates similar functions to the directional textured surfaces of animals and plants in terms of wetting, adhesion, and transport. The water pin-release mechanism on the asymmetric nano-PPX surface with adhesion function provides a great transport property. How the asymmetry causes transport is discussed in terms of hysteresis and interface contact of water droplets. In this study, the transport property of nano-PPX rods is used to guide droplets as well as transporting cargo such as microgels. With the addition of tracks on the nano-PPX rods, the surfaces were transformed into basic digital fluidics devices. The track-assisted nano-PPX has been employed to applications (i.e. sorting, mixing, and carrying cargo particles). Thus, digital fluidics devices fabricated on nano-PPX surface is a promising pathway to assemble microgels in the field of bioengineering. The characterization of the nano textured surface was completed using methods such as Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Contact Angle Goniometry, and Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy. These methods helped to understand the physical and chemical properties of nano-PPX. Parameters such as advancing and receding contact angles, nanorod tilt angle, and critical drop volumes were utilized to investigate the anisotropic wetting properties of nano-PPX surface. This investigation explained the directional wetting behavior of the surface as well as approaching new design parameters for adjusting surface properties. The nanorod tilt angle was a key parameter

  17. Wettability of Sanded and Aged Fast-growing Poplar Wood Surfaces: II. Dynamic Wetting Models

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiyong Qin; Qian Zhang; Qiang Gao; Shifeng Zhang; Jianzhang Li

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic wettability of adhesive on sanded and aged wood surfaces was measured using the sessile drop method. Four different models were used to evaluate and compare the wetting process. It was shown that the wettability of freshly sanded wood and aged wood both decreased compared to the control wood. There was no evidence of change in wettability with increasing grit number. Aging reduced the wettability of the wood surface. The coefficients of determination (R2) for all four models were ...

  18. Surface properties and wetting behavior of liquid Ag-Sb-Sn alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sklyarchuk V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface tension and density measurements of liquid Ag-Sb-Sn alloys were carried out over a wide temperature range by using the sessile drop method. The surface tension experimental data were analyzed by the Butler thermodynamic model in the regular solution approximation. The wetting characteristics of these alloys on Cu and Ni substrates have been also determined. The new experimental results were compared with the calculated values as well as with data available in the literature.

  19. Uncertainties of seasonal surface climate predictions induced by soil moisture biases in the La Plata Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensson, Anna; Berbery, E. Hugo

    2015-04-01

    This work examines the evolution of soil moisture initialization biases and their effects on seasonal forecasts depending on the season and vegetation type for a regional model over the La Plata Basin in South America. WRF/Noah model simulations covering multiple cases during a two-year period are designed to emphasize the conceptual nature of the simulations at the expense of statistical significance of the results. Analysis of the surface climate shows that the seasonal predictive skill is higher when the model is initialized during the wet season and the initial soil moisture differences are small. Large soil moisture biases introduce large surface temperature biases, particularly for Savanna, Grassland and Cropland vegetation covers at any time of the year, thus introducing uncertainty in the surface climate. Regions with Evergreen Broadleaf Forest have roots that extend to the deep layer whose moisture content affects the surface temperature through changes in the partitioning of the surface fluxes. The uncertainties of monthly maximum temperature can reach several degrees during the dry season in cases when: (a) the soil is much wetter in the reanalysis than in the WRF/Noah equilibrium soil moisture, and (b) the memory of the initial value is long due to scarce rainfall and low temperatures. This study suggests that responses of the atmosphere to soil moisture initialization depend on how the initial wet and dry conditions are defined, stressing the need to take into account the characteristics of a particular region and season when defining soil moisture initialization experiments.

  20. The impact of surface geometry, cavitation, and condensation on wetting transitions: posts and reentrant structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter, J. R.; Kusumaatmaja, H.

    2017-03-01

    The fundamental impacts of surface geometry on the stability of wetting states, and the transitions between them are elucidated for square posts and reentrant structures in three dimensions. We identify three principal outcomes of particular importance for future surface design of liquid-repellent surfaces. Firstly, we demonstrate and quantify how capillary condensation and vapour cavitation affect wetting state stabilities. At high contact angles, cavitation is enhanced about wide, closely-spaced square posts, leading to the existence of suspended states without an associated collapsed state. At low contact angles, narrow reentrant pillars suppress condensation and enable the suspension of even highly wetting liquids. Secondly, two distinct collapse mechanisms are observed for 3D reentrant geometries, base contact and pillar contact, which are operative at different pillar heights. As well as morphological differences in the interface of the penetrating liquid, each mechanism is affected differently by changes in the contact angle with the solid. Finally, for highly-wetting liquids, condensates are shown to critically modify the transition pathways in both the base contact and pillar contact modes.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of wetting behavior of water droplets on polytetrafluorethylene surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuai; Wang, Jiadao; Ma, Tianbao; Chen, Darong

    2014-03-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to simulate the wetting behavior of nanosized water droplets on flat and pillar polytetrafluorethylene surfaces. The results show that the cutoff of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential has a large effect on the simulated value of the contact angle and some suggestions are given on how to choose an appropriate cutoff. On flat surfaces, the contact angle is independent of the size of the water droplet, which was determined by the energy parameters of the LJ potential. Furthermore, on pillar surfaces, two different equilibrium states are present: wetted contact and cross contact. For the wetted contact state, the contact angle increases with increasing droplet size and pillar size within a certain range. However, for the cross contact state, the contact angle and droplet size are uncorrelated, which results from the layering and structuring of molecules after their penetration into the hollows between pillars. However, additional simulations show that the final state depends on the initial geometry and the cross contact state is a metastable wetting state.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of incompressible liquid-gas systems on partial wetting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Wu, Cheng-Long; Chang, Li-Chen; Lin, Chao-An

    2011-06-28

    A three-dimensional Lattice Boltzmann two-phase model capable of dealing with large liquid and gas density ratios and with a partial wetting surface is introduced. This is based on a high density ratio model combined with a partial wetting boundary method. The predicted three-dimensional droplets at different partial wetting conditions at equilibrium are in good agreement with analytical solutions. Despite the large density ratio, the spurious velocity around the interface is not substantial, and is rather insensitive to the examined liquid and gas density and viscosity ratios. The influence of the gravitational force on the droplet shape is also examined through the variations of the Bond number, where the droplet shape migrates from spherical to flattened interface in tandem with the increase of the Bond number. The predicted interfaces under constant Bond number are also validated against measurements with good agreements.

  3. Effect of droplet size on wetting behavior on laser textured SiC surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Bai, Shaoxian

    2015-10-01

    Effect of droplet size on wetting behavior on laser textured SiC surface was studied in this work. The micro-square-convex surface was processed on smooth surface with intrisinc contact angle 101°. Then contact angles were measured on both smooth and textured surface by sessile drop method using deionized water with different droplet volume. It was found that there was significant droplet size effect on wetting behaviors for the textured SiC surface. Contact angles on smooth surface kept stable for different water droplet volume with a variation amplitude 13°. However, contact angles increased significantly from 42.25° to 131.25° with increasing droplet volume from 0.001 μL to 1 μL, then remained unchanged when the droplet volume exceeds 1 μL. The correlation analysis shows that contact angles increase with the increasing ratio of base diameter and groove width, then keep stable when the ratio exceeds 25, which explains the wetting behavior for different droplet volume.

  4. Slip-stick wetting and large contact angle hysteresis on wrinkled surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowsky, Colton; Torres, Jessica M; Vogt, Bryan D

    2011-02-15

    Wetting on a corrugated surface that is formed via wrinkling of a hard skin layer formed by UV oxidation (UVO) of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) slab is studied using advancing and receding water contact angle measurements. The amplitude of the wrinkled pattern can be tuned through the pre-strain of the PDMS prior to surface oxidation. These valleys and peaks in the surface topography lead to anisotropic wetting by water droplets. As the droplet advances, the fluid is free to move along the direction parallel to the wrinkles, but the droplet moving orthogonal to the wrinkles encounters energy barriers due to the topography and slip-stick behavior is observed. As the wrinkle amplitude increases, anisotropy in the sessile droplet increases between parallel and perpendicular directions. For the drops receding perpendicular to the wrinkles formed at high strains, the contact angle tends to decrease steadily towards zero as the drop volume decreases, which can result in apparent hysteresis in the contact angle of over 100°. The wrinkled surfaces can exhibit high sessile and advancing contact angles (>115°), but the receding angle in these cases is generally vanishing as the drop is removed. This effect results in micrometer sized drops remaining in the grooves for these highly wrinkled surfaces, while the flat analogous UVO-treated PDMS shows complete removal of all macroscopic water drops under similar conditions. These wetting characteristics should be considered if these wrinkled surfaces are to be utilized in or as microfluidic devices.

  5. On the influence of the intermolecular potential on the wetting properties of water on silica surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafong, E.; Geske, J.; Drossel, B.

    2016-09-01

    We study the wetting properties of water on silica surfaces using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To describe the intermolecular interaction between water and silica atoms, two types of interaction potential models are used: the standard BródkA and Zerda (BZ) model and the Gulmen and Thompson (GT) model. We perform an in-depth analysis of the influence of the choice of the potential on the arrangement of the water molecules in partially filled pores and on top of silica slabs. We find that at moderate pore filling ratios, the GT silica surface is completely wetted by water molecules, which agrees well with experimental findings, while the commonly used BZ surface is less hydrophilic and is only partially wetted. We interpret our simulation results using an analytical calculation of the phase diagram of water in partially filled pores. Moreover, an evaluation of the contact angle of the water droplet on top of the silica slab reveals that the interaction becomes more hydrophilic with increasing slab thickness and saturates around 2.5-3 nm, in agreement with the experimentally found value. Our analysis also shows that the hydroaffinity of the surface is mainly determined by the electrostatic interaction, but the van der Waals interaction nevertheless is strong enough that it can turn a hydrophobic surface into a hydrophilic surface.

  6. Slash Incorporation for Amelioration of Site, Soil and Hydrologic Properties on Pocosins and Wet Flats in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    William A. Lakel; W. Michael Aust; Emily A. Carter; Bryce J. Stokes; Marilyn A. Buford; Felipe G. Sanchez

    1999-01-01

    It was hypothesized that mulching and incorporation of slash as part of site preparation treatments could affect soil water characteristics. Two forested wetland sites, an organic pocosin and a mineral wet flat. located in the lower coastal plain of North Carolina, were selected for treatments. Treatments consisted of slash mulching and incorporation in comoinations...

  7. BIOREMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SURFACE SOILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological remediation of soils contaminated with organic chemicals is an alternative treatment technology that can often meet the goal of achieving a permanent clean-up remedy at hazardous waste sites, as encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) for impl...

  8. Influence of the work of adhesion on the dynamic wetting of chemically heterogeneous surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Santanu; Sedev, Rossen; Priest, Craig; Ralston, John

    2008-11-18

    The velocity dependence of the dynamic contact angle for a glycerol-water mixture wetting two different chemically heterogeneous surfaces (mixed thiols on gold and partially methylated titania, 16 samples in all) was studied. The molecular kinetic theory (MKT) of wetting was used to interpret the dynamic contact angle data. The equilibrium displacement frequency ( K 0) was predominantly determined by the viscous contribution from the bulk liquid, with a minor contribution from the surface. The mean distance between surface sites (lambda) decreased with increasing work of adhesion. The contact line friction coefficient zeta 0 was found to vary exponentially with the work of adhesion, enabling the unit flow volume of the liquid to be obtained.

  9. A simple strategy to realize biomimetic surfaces with controlled anisotropic wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong; Chen, Qi-Dai; Yao, Jia; Guan, Yong-Chao; Wang, Jian-Nan; Niu, Li-Gang; Fang, Hong-Hua; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2010-02-01

    The study of anisotropic wetting has become one of the most important research areas in biomimicry. However, realization of controlled anisotropic surfaces remains challenging. Here we investigated anisotropic wetting on grooves with different linewidth, period, and height fabricated by laser interference lithography and found that the anisotropy strongly depended on the height. The anisotropy significantly increased from 9° to 48° when the height was changed from 100 nm to 1.3 μm. This was interpreted by a thermodynamic model as a consequence of the increase of free energy barriers versus the height increase. According to the relationship, controlled anisotropic surfaces were rapidly realized by adjusting the grooves' height that was simply accomplished by changing the resin thickness. Finally, the perpendicular contact angle was further enhanced to 131°±2° by surface modification, which was very close to 135°±3° of a common grass leaf.

  10. Surface Resistance of Jute Fibre/Polylactic Acid Biocomposite to Wet Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandvliet, Clio; Bandyopadhyay, N. R.; Ray, Dipa

    2016-04-01

    Jute fibre/polylactic acid (PLA) composite is of special interest because both resin and reinforcement come from renewable resources. Thus, it could be a more eco-friendly alternative to glass fibre composite [1] and to conventional wood-based panels made with phenol-formaldehyde resin which present many drawbacks for the workers and the environment [2]. Yet the water affinity of the natural fibres, the susceptibility of PLA towards hydrolysis and the low glass transition of the PLA raise a question about the surface resistance of such composites to wet heat in service condition for a furniture application [3]. In this work, the surface resistance of PLA/jute composite alone and with two different varnishes are investigated in regard to an interior application following the standard test method in accordance to BS EN 18721:2009: "Furniture: assessment of surface resistance to wet heat". It is compared to two common wood based panels, plywood and hardboard. After test, the composite material surface is found to be more affected than plywood and hardboard, but it becomes resistant to wet heat when a layer of biosourced varnish or petrol-based polyurethane varnish are applied on the surface.

  11. Soil CO2 Efflux Dynamics in the Northern Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil during the Wet-Dry Season Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Jr, O. B.; Vourlitis, G. L.; Hentz, C. S.; Arruda, P. H. Z. D.; Santanna, F. B.; Dias, M. D. F.; de Musis, C. R.; Nogueira, J. D. S.

    2014-12-01

    The roles of tropical wetlands in the global carbon (C) cycle are still poorly understood, especially in seasonally flooded forests that are expected to be important sinks for atmospheric CO2. We measured soil CO2 efflux during the wet-dry transition period in a seasonally flooded palm-dominated forest (locally known as Acorizal) to determine the effect of litter input and seasonal hydrology. Measurements were performed monthly as part of a field litter manipulation experiment consisting of three treatments (litter removal, litter addition, and control; n = 6 plots per treatment), and our research objectives were to determine how soil CO2 efflux varied as a function of (1) litter input, (2) root density, and (3) seasonal variation in soil water content. We found that litter addition significantly increased soil CO2 efflux, but there was no relationship between root density and soil CO2 efflux. Efflux was highest during the wet season and declined as soil water content declined. Our data demonstrate that variations in litter inputs and soil water content are important controls on soil CO2 efflux in seasonally flooded tropical forests.

  12. Effects of Hurricane-Felled Tree Trunks on Soil Carbon, Nitrogen, Microbial Biomass, and Root Length in a Wet Tropical Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jean Lodge

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Decaying coarse woody debris can affect the underlying soil either by augmenting nutrients that can be exploited by tree roots, or by diminishing nutrient availability through stimulation of microbial nutrient immobilization. We analyzed C, N, microbial biomass C and root length in closely paired soil samples taken under versus 20–50 cm away from large trunks of two species felled by Hugo (1989 and Georges (1998 three times during wet and dry seasons over the two years following the study conducted by Georges. Soil microbial biomass, % C and % N were significantly higher under than away from logs felled by both hurricanes (i.e., 1989 and 1998, at all sampling times and at both depths (0–10 and 10–20 cm. Frass from wood boring beetles may contribute to early effects. Root length was greater away from logs during the dry season, and under logs in the wet season. Root length was correlated with microbial biomass C, soil N and soil moisture (R = 0.36, 0.18, and 0.27, respectively; all p values < 0.05. Microbial biomass C varied significantly among seasons but differences between positions (under vs. away were only suggestive. Microbial C was correlated with soil N (R = 0.35. Surface soil on the upslope side of the logs had significantly more N and microbial biomass, likely from accumulation of leaf litter above the logs on steep slopes. We conclude that decaying wood can provide ephemeral resources that are exploited by tree roots during some seasons.

  13. Nucleate boiling performance on nano/microstructures with different wetting surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    A study of nucleate boiling phenomena on nano/microstructures is a very basic and useful study with a view to the potential application of modified surfaces as heating surfaces in a number of fields. We present a detailed study of boiling experiments on fabricated nano/microstructured surfaces used as heating surfaces under atmospheric conditions, employing identical nanostructures with two different wettabilities (silicon-oxidized and Teflon-coated). Consequently, enhancements of both boiling heat transfer (BHT) and critical heat flux (CHF) are demonstrated in the nano/microstructures, independent of their wettability. However, the increment of BHT and CHF on each of the different wetting surfaces depended on the wetting characteristics of heating surfaces. The effect of water penetration in the surface structures by capillary phenomena is suggested as a plausible mechanism for the enhanced CHF on the nano/microstructures regardless of the wettability of the surfaces in atmospheric condition. This is supported by comparing bubble shapes generated in actual boiling experiments and dynamic contact angles under atmospheric conditions on Teflon-coated nano/microstructured surfaces. PMID:22559173

  14. Nucleate boiling performance on nano/microstructures with different wetting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hangjin; Kim, Seolha; Kim, Hyungmo; Kim, Joonwon; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2012-05-06

    A study of nucleate boiling phenomena on nano/microstructures is a very basic and useful study with a view to the potential application of modified surfaces as heating surfaces in a number of fields. We present a detailed study of boiling experiments on fabricated nano/microstructured surfaces used as heating surfaces under atmospheric conditions, employing identical nanostructures with two different wettabilities (silicon-oxidized and Teflon-coated). Consequently, enhancements of both boiling heat transfer (BHT) and critical heat flux (CHF) are demonstrated in the nano/microstructures, independent of their wettability. However, the increment of BHT and CHF on each of the different wetting surfaces depended on the wetting characteristics of heating surfaces. The effect of water penetration in the surface structures by capillary phenomena is suggested as a plausible mechanism for the enhanced CHF on the nano/microstructures regardless of the wettability of the surfaces in atmospheric condition. This is supported by comparing bubble shapes generated in actual boiling experiments and dynamic contact angles under atmospheric conditions on Teflon-coated nano/microstructured surfaces.

  15. Physically plausible prescription of land surface model soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Mathias; Orth, René; Thiery, Wim; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Land surface hydrology is an important control of surface weather and climate, especially under extreme dry or wet conditions where it can amplify heat waves or floods, respectively. Prescribing soil moisture in land surface models is a valuable technique to investigate this link between hydrology and climate. It has been used for example to assess the influence of soil moisture on temperature variability, mean and extremes (Seneviratne et al. 2006, 2013, Lorenz et al., 2015). However, perturbing the soil moisture content artificially can lead to a violation of the energy and water balances. Here we present a new method for prescribing soil moisture which ensures water and energy balance closure by using only water from runoff and a reservoir term. If water is available, the method prevents soil moisture decrease below climatological values. Results from simulations with the Community Land Model (CLM) indicate that our new method allows to avoid soil moisture deficits in many regions of the world. We show the influence of the irrigation-supported soil moisture content on mean and extreme temperatures and contrast our findings with that of earlier studies. Additionally, we will assess how long into the 21st century the new method will be able to maintain present-day climatological soil moisture levels for different regions. Lorenz, R., Argüeso, D., Donat, M.G., Pitman, A.J., den Hurk, B.V., Berg, A., Lawrence, D.M., Chéruy, F., Ducharne, A., Hagemann, S. and Meier, A., 2015. Influence of land-atmosphere feedbacks on temperature and precipitation extremes in the GLACE-CMIP5 ensemble. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres. Seneviratne, S.I., Lüthi, D., Litschi, M. and Schär, C., 2006. Land-atmosphere coupling and climate change in Europe. Nature, 443(7108), pp.205-209. Seneviratne, S.I., Wilhelm, M., Stanelle, T., Hurk, B., Hagemann, S., Berg, A., Cheruy, F., Higgins, M.E., Meier, A., Brovkin, V. and Claussen, M., 2013. Impact of soil moisture

  16. Non-destructive image analysis of soil surface porosity and bulk density dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, L.F., E-mail: lfpires@uepg.b [Laboratory of Soil Physics and Environmental Sciences, State University of Ponta Grossa, UEPG, C.E.P. 84.030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Cassaro, F.A.M. [Laboratory of Soil Physics and Environmental Sciences, State University of Ponta Grossa, UEPG, C.E.P. 84.030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Bacchi, O.O.S.; Reichardt, K. [Laboratory of Soil Physics, Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, USP/CENA, C.P. 96, C.E.P. 13.400-970, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2011-04-15

    A gamma-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner was used to evaluate changes in the structure of clayey soil samples with surface compaction submitted to wetting and drying (W-D) cycles. The obtained results indicate that W-D cycles promoted an increasing of about 10% in soil porosity with a decreasing of about 6% in soil bulk density of this compacted region. With the use of the CT it was also possible to define the thickness of the compacted region that in our case was of about 8.19 mm. This last information is very important, for instance, to estimate hydraulic parameters in infiltration models. Finally, CT analysis showed that the compacted region remained at the surface samples, even after the application of the W-D cycles. -- Research highlights: {yields} Gamma-ray tomography allowed non-destructive analysis of soil bulk density and porosity changes. {yields} Soil porosity increased about 10% with the wetting and drying cycles. {yields} Soil bulk density in the compacted region decreased about 6% with the wetting and drying cycles. {yields} Detailed bulk density and porosity analysis changes were obtained for layers of 1.17 mm.

  17. Nitrogen chemistry in surface waters and wet deposition at high altitude in the Sagarmatha (Mt Everest) National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, R.; Polesello, S.; Rusconi, M.

    2012-04-01

    The knowledge of the nitrogen cycle is mainly based on studies conducted in relatively human-altered zones located in the north-western hemisphere. Therefore it is of great interest to identify the limits of natural variations of nitrogen in ecosystems that have not experienced the nitrogen pollution, and have undergone minor alterations from human activities. Among the alpine environments of the world, the region of Mount Everest, is a unique ecosystem with a degree of biodiversity among the highest existing, but characterized by a recognized fragility and low resilience. The extreme climate, the slow growing seasons and the thin soils make this ecosystem very sensitive to any environmental change. A yearly sampling campaign was conducted in the Sagarmatha National Park (Nepal) during the monsoon season in 2008 to collect surface water samples at high elevation from 4300 to 5500 m asl. In addition during 2007 and 2008 the sampling of wet deposition was carried on at 5050 m asl at the Nepal Climate Observatory - Pyramid ABC site. The nitrate concentration in the running waters fell in the lower range of the values reported for comparable environments in Europe. As well, the wet deposition load of nitrogen was remarkable lower than those observed in high elevation areas in Europe and North America. A comparison among running waters, precipitations and small lakes, located in the same area, revealed significant higher nitrate concentrations in running waters compared to the other two matrixes. Conversely, ammonia level resulted higher in the rain compared to surface waters. The spatial and temporal variation of the chemical species in running waters were analyzed taking in account the use of soil in the basins and the hydrological regime.

  18. Three-gradient regular solution model for simple liquids wetting complex surface topologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Akerboom

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We use regular solution theory and implement a three-gradient model for a liquid/vapour system in contact with a complex surface topology to study the shape of a liquid drop in advancing and receding wetting scenarios. More specifically, we study droplets on an inverse opal: spherical cavities in a hexagonal pattern. In line with experimental data, we find that the surface may switch from hydrophilic (contact angle on a smooth surface θY 90°. Both the Wenzel wetting state, that is cavities under the liquid are filled, as well as the Cassie–Baxter wetting state, that is air entrapment in the cavities under the liquid, were observed using our approach, without a discontinuity in the water front shape or in the water advancing contact angle θ. Therefore, air entrapment cannot be the main reason why the contact angle θ for an advancing water front varies. Rather, the contact line is pinned and curved due to the surface structures, inducing curvature perpendicular to the plane in which the contact angle θ is observed, and the contact line does not move in a continuous way, but via depinning transitions. The pinning is not limited to kinks in the surface with angles θkink smaller than the angle θY. Even for θkink > θY, contact line pinning is found. Therefore, the full 3D-structure of the inverse opal, rather than a simple parameter such as the wetting state or θkink, determines the final observed contact angle.

  19. Hydrophobic pore array surfaces: wetting and interaction forces in water/ethanol mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Petra M; Hormozan, Yashar; Brandner, Birgit D; Linnros, Jan; Claesson, Per M; Swerin, Agne; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Gane, Patrick A C; Thormann, Esben

    2013-04-15

    Interactions between and wetting behavior of structured hydrophobic surfaces using different concentrations of water/ethanol mixtures have been investigated. Silica surfaces consisting of pore arrays with different pore spacings and pore depths were made hydrophobic by silanization. Their static and dynamic contact angles were found to be independent of the pore depth while fewer pores on the surface, i.e. a closer resemblance to a flat surface, gave a lower contact angle. As expected, a higher amount of ethanol facilitated wetting on all the surfaces tested. Confocal Raman microscopy measurements proved both water and ethanol to penetrate into the pores. AFM colloidal probe force measurements clearly showed that formation of air cavitation was hindered between the hydrophobic surfaces in presence of ethanol, and an increase in ethanol concentration was followed by a smaller jump-in distance and a weaker adhesion force. On separation, an immediate jump-out of contact occurred. The measured forces were interpreted as being due to capillary condensation of ethanol between the surfaces giving rise to very unstable cavities immediately rupturing on surface separation.

  20. Modification of wetting property of Inconel 718 surface by nanosecond laser texturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Tian, Y. L.; Yang, C. J.; Wang, F. J.; Liu, X. P.

    2017-08-01

    Topographic and wetting properties of Inconel 718 (IN718) surfaces were modified via nanosecond laser treatment. In order to investigate surface wetting behavior without additional post treatment, three kinds of microstructures were created on IN718 surfaces, including line pattern, grid pattern and spot pattern. From the viewpoint of surface morphology, the results show that laser ablated grooves and debris significantly altered the surface topography as well as surface roughness compared with the non-treated surfaces. The effects of laser parameters, such as laser scanning speed and laser power, on surface features were also discussed. We have observed the laser treated surfaces of IN718 showed very high hydrophilicity just after laser ablation under ambient air condition. And this hydrophilic property has changed rapidly to the other state, very high hydrophobicity over about 20 days. Further experiments and analysis have been carried out so as to investigate this phenomenon. Based on the XPS analysis, the results indicate that the change of wetting property from hydrophilic to hydrophobic over time may be due to the surface chemistry modifications, especially carbon content. After the contact angles reached steady state, the maximum water contact angle (WCA) for line-patterned and grid-patterned surfaces increased to 152.3 ± 1.2° and 156.8 ± 1.1° with the corresponding rolling angle (RA) of 8.8 ± 1.1° and 6.5 ± 0.8°, respectively. These treated IN718 surfaces exhibited superhydrophobic property. However, the maximum WCA for the spot-patterned surfaces just increased to 140.8 ± 2.8° with RA above 10°. Therefore, it is deduced that laser-inscribed modification of surface wettability has high sensitivity to surface morphology and surface chemical compositions. This work can be utilized to optimize the laser processing parameters so as to fabricate desired IN718 surfaces with hydrophobic or even superhydrophobic property and thus extend the applications

  1. Thresholds in soil response to water stress: intensity and duration of dry-wet cycles induce differential soil C and bacterial diversity dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaisermann, Aurore; Nunan, Naoise; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Terrat, Sébastien; Lata, Jean-Christophe

    2013-04-01

    After the wetting of dry soils, a CO2 flush (known as the 'Birch effect') is often observed. Although the Birch effect can often result in large CO2 fluxes, the process is not sufficiently well understood to predict its intensity. In particular, the impact of dry-wet cycles on microbial communities is poorly understood, as are the consequences of the possible changes for soil functioning. Using microcosm-based experiments, we investigated different climate change scenarios, such as drying periods of different durations (with co-variation of drying intensity and drought duration) and different rainfall intensities. The effects of four dry-wet cycles on the (i) immediate intensity of the Birch effect, (ii) rate of return to basal C mineralisation (functional resilience), (iii) total amount of CO2 released during a 5-month incubation and (iv) the dynamics of bacterial diversity were determined. Bacterial diversity was measured by pyrosequencing. The CO2 flush increased as a function of drying intensity, drought duration and wetting intensity but was not affected by the number of dry-wet cycles. However, the functional resilience was slower after the first dry-wet cycle than subsequent cycles, suggesting an adaptation of the microbial communities to water-stress. However, this was not associated with a higher stability of bacterial community since the pyrosequencing data showed that drying decreased bacterial diversity after each dry-wet cycle, but only if a threshold of minimal moisture is exceeded. These modifications were permanent over the long term and suggest that the communities were characterised by functional redundancy. Moderate droughts had no effect on overall CO2 emissions but severe droughts led to a lower loss of soil C due to the absence of mineralisation during the longer periods of desiccation that was not compensated by over-mineralisation during Birch effect. The study highlighted moisture threshold beyond which it can be observed a Birch effect and

  2. Polyelectrolyte complexes : Preparation, characterization, and use for control of wet and dry adhesion between surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Ankerfors, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    This thesis examines polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) preparation, adsorption behaviour, and potential use for control of wet and dry adhesion between surfaces. PEC formation was studied using a jet-mixing method not previously used for mixing polyelectrolytes. The PECs were formed using various mixing times, and the results were compared with those for PECs formed using the conventional polyelectrolyte titration method. The results indicated that using the jet mixer allowed the size of the form...

  3. Surface changes of biopolymers PHB and PLLA induced by Ar+ plasma treatment and wet etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepičková Kasálková, N.; Slepička, P.; Sajdl, P.; Švorčík, V.

    2014-08-01

    Polymers, especially group of biopolymers find potential application in a wide range of disciplines due to their biodegradability. In biomedical applications these materials can be used as a scaffold or matrix. In this work, the influence of the Ar+ plasma treatment and subsequent wet etching (acetone/water) on the surface properties of polymers were studied. Two biopolymers - polyhydroxybutyrate with 8% polyhydroxyvalerate (PHB) and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) were used in these experiments. Modified surface layers were analyzed by different methods. Surface wettability was characterized by determination of water contact angle. Changes in elemental composition of modified surfaces were performed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Surface morphology and roughness was examined using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Gravimetry method was used to study the mass loss. It was found that the modification from both with plasma and wet etching leads to dramatic changes of surface properties (surface chemistry, morphology and roughness). Rate of changes of these features strongly depends on the modification parameters.

  4. Surface topography and contact mechanics of dry and wet human skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E. Kovalev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The surface topography of the human wrist skin is studied by using optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM methods. By using these techniques the surface roughness power spectrum is obtained. The Persson contact mechanics theory is used to calculate the contact area for different magnifications, for the dry and wet skin. The measured friction coefficient between a glass ball and dry and wet skin can be explained assuming that a frictional shear stress σf ≈ 13 MPa and σf ≈ 5 MPa, respectively, act in the area of real contact during sliding. These frictional shear stresses are typical for sliding on surfaces of elastic bodies. The big increase in friction, which has been observed for glass sliding on wet skin as the skin dries up, can be explained as result of the increase in the contact area arising from the attraction of capillary bridges. Finally, we demonstrated that the real contact area can be properly defined only when a combination of both AFM and optical methods is used for power spectrum calculation.

  5. Analysis of surface soil moisture patterns in agricultural landscapes using empirical orthogonal functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Korres

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture is one of the fundamental variables in hydrology, meteorology and agriculture. Nevertheless, its spatio-temporal patterns in agriculturally used landscapes affected by multiple natural (rainfall, soil, topography etc. and agronomic (fertilisation, soil management etc. factors are often not well known. The aim of this study is to determine the dominant factors governing the spatio-temporal patterns of surface soil moisture in a grassland and an arable land test site within the Rur catchment in Western Germany. Surface soil moisture (0–6 cm has been measured in an approx. 50×50 m grid at 14 and 17 dates (May 2007 to November 2008 in both test sites. To analyse spatio-temporal patterns of surface soil moisture, an Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF analysis was applied and the results were correlated with parameters derived from topography, soil, vegetation and land management to connect the pattern to related factors and processes. For the grassland test site, the analysis results in one significant spatial structure (first EOF, which explains about 57.5% of the spatial variability connected to soil properties and topography. The weight of the first spatial EOF is stronger on wet days. The highest temporal variability can be found in locations with a high percentage of soil organic carbon (SOC. For the arable land test site, the analysis yields two significant spatial structures, the first EOF, explaining 38.4% of the spatial variability, shows a highly significant correlation to soil properties, namely soil texture. The second EOF, explaining 28.3% of the spatial variability, is connected to differences in land management. The soil moisture in the arable land test site varies more during dry and wet periods on locations with low porosity.

  6. Effects of surface topography and vibrations on wetting: Superhydrophobicity, icephobicity and corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Rahul

    Concrete and metallic materials are widely used in construction and water industry. The interaction of both these materials with water and ice (or snow) produces undesirable results and is therefore of interest. Water that gets absorbed into the pores of dry concrete expands on freezing and can lead to crack formation. Also, the ice accretion on concrete surfaces such as roadways can have disastrous consequence. Metallic components used in the water industry undergo corrosion due to contact with aqueous corrosive solutions. Therefore, it is desirable to make concrete water/ice-repellent, and to make metallic surfaces corrosion-resistant. Recent advances in micro/nanotechnology have made it possible to design functional micro/nanostructured surfaces with micro/nanotopography providing low adhesion. Some examples of such surfaces are superhydrophobic surfaces, which are extremely water repellent, and icephobic surfaces, which have low ice adhesion, repel incoming water droplets before freezing, or delay ice nucleation. This dissertation investigates the effects of surface micro/nanotopography and small amplitude fast vibrations on the wetting and adhesion of concrete with the goal of producing hydrophobic and icephobic concrete, and on the wetting of metallic surfaces to prevent corrosion. The relationship between surface micro/nanotopography and small fast vibrations is established using the method of separation of motions. Both these small scale effects can be substituted by an effective force or energy. The structure-property relationships in materials and surfaces are established. Both vibrations as well as surface micro/nanopatterns can affect wetting properties such as contact angle and surface free energy. Hydrophobic engineered cementitious composite samples are produced by controlling their surface topography and surface free energy. The surface topography is controlled by varying the concrete mixture composition. The surface free energy of concrete is

  7. Nucleation, wetting and agglomeration of copper and copper-alloy thin films on metal liner surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBarbera, Stephanie Florence

    One of the key challenges in fabricating narrower and higher aspect ratio interconnects using damascene technology has been achieving an ultra-thin (˜2 nm) and continuous Cu seed coverage on trench sidewalls. The thin seed is prone to agglomeration because of poor Cu wetting on the Ta liner. Using in-situ conductance measurements, the effect of lowering the substrate temperature during Cu seed deposition has been studied on tantalum (Ta) and ruthenium (Ru) liner surfaces. On a Ta surface, it was found that lowering the deposition temperature to --65°C increases the nucleation rate of the Cu thin film, and reduces the minimum coalescing thickness for Cu on Ta liner from ˜4.5 nm (at room temperature) to ˜2 nm. On a Ru surface, Cu coalesces at wetting angle, coalescing thickness, and agglomeration resistance of thin Cu-3% Au, Cu-3% Mn, and Cu-3% Al layers on a Ta liner surface have been studied. It was found that the alloying increases the wetting angle of Cu on Ta at high temperature, as a result of either reduction in Cu alloy surface energy, solute surface segregation, or solute-liner interactions. In addition, the Cu alloys were found to be less agglomeration resistive as compared to pure Cu; their smaller grain size, interaction with the liner surface, and tendency to oxidize were found to accelerate their agglomeration. The coalescing thickness of the Cu alloys was found to be reduced from that of Cu (˜4.5 nm) to ˜2 nm.

  8. Static friction of biomimetic surface microstructure of PDMS under wet and dry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiwu; Jia, Hongduo; Gong, Ling; Li, Rong; Wang, Caiping; Wang, Xiaojie

    2016-04-01

    Smooth adhesive pad found among arthropods, amphibians, particularly tree frogs, are usually covered with surface microstructure of different shape to enhance the attachment abilities on the smooth substrate. During the last decade, it has gained more attentions in the development of anti-slippery systems by mimicking these unique characteristics. In this paper, we studied a new amphibian species newt by observing their climbing abilities on wet and dry vertical smooth surface, and found that the newts can even hang on the surface with an inclination angle more than 90° without falling. We investigated the toe pad micro-structured surface of the newt by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and found that an array of hexagonal cells with micro-ridges on cell borders exists for the larvae; while an array of hexagonal cells separated by microgrooves is for the adult. Inspired by these features, the biomimetic micro-structured surfaces were fabricated using a soft elastomeric material polydimethysiloxane (PDMS). Four different microstructures were chosen to study their tribological properties with a solid substrate under wet and dry conditions. The patterns of the microstructures include round pillar, hexagonal pillar, round pillars surrounded by a closed hexagonal ridge, and round pillars surrounded by a semi-closed hexagonal ridge. The static friction tests were carried out using the multi-functional surface meter TYPE12. The results showed that the area ratio of the micro pillar plays a major role in enhancing the static friction for both wet and dry conditions, while the numerical density of the micro pillar has less effect on the friction enhancement. Among the four kind specimens, the specimen with hexagonal pillars would increase the static friction more than others at the same test conditions when the pillar area ratio is lower than 40%.

  9. Assessment of methane emission and oxidation at Air Hitam Landfill site cover soil in wet tropical climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushammala, Mohammed F M; Basri, Noor Ezlin Ahmad; Elfithri, Rahmah

    2013-12-01

    Methane (CH₄) emissions and oxidation were measured at the Air Hitam sanitary landfill in Malaysia and were modeled using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change waste model to estimate the CH₄ generation rate constant, k. The emissions were measured at several locations using a fabricated static flux chamber. A combination of gas concentrations in soil profiles and surface CH₄ and carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions at four monitoring locations were used to estimate the CH₄ oxidation capacity. The temporal variations in CH₄ and CO₂ emissions were also investigated in this study. Geospatial means using point kriging and inverse distance weight (IDW), as well as arithmetic and geometric means, were used to estimate total CH₄ emissions. The point kriging, IDW, and arithmetic means were almost identical and were two times higher than the geometric mean. The CH₄ emission geospatial means estimated using the kriging and IDW methods were 30.81 and 30.49 gm(−2) day(−1), respectively. The total CH₄ emissions from the studied area were 53.8 kg day(−1). The mean of the CH₄ oxidation capacity was 27.5 %. The estimated value of k is 0.138 year(−1). Special consideration must be given to the CH₄ oxidation in the wet tropical climate for enhancing CH₄ emission reduction.

  10. Wetting hysteresis induced by temperature changes: Supercooled water on hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Golrokh; Sedighi Moghaddam, Maziar; Tuominen, Mikko; Fielden, Matthew; Haapanen, Janne; Mäkelä, Jyrki M; Claesson, Per M

    2016-04-15

    The state and stability of supercooled water on (super)hydrophobic surfaces is crucial for low temperature applications and it will affect anti-icing and de-icing properties. Surface characteristics such as topography and chemistry are expected to affect wetting hysteresis during temperature cycling experiments, and also the freezing delay of supercooled water. We utilized stochastically rough wood surfaces that were further modified to render them hydrophobic or superhydrophobic. Liquid flame spraying (LFS) was utilized to create a multi-scale roughness by depositing titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The coating was subsequently made non-polar by applying a thin plasma polymer layer. As flat reference samples modified silica surfaces with similar chemistries were utilized. With these substrates we test the hypothesis that superhydrophobic surfaces also should retard ice formation. Wetting hysteresis was evaluated using contact angle measurements during a freeze-thaw cycle from room temperature to freezing occurrence at -7°C, and then back to room temperature. Further, the delay in freezing of supercooled water droplets was studied at temperatures of -4°C and -7°C. The hysteresis in contact angle observed during a cooling-heating cycle is found to be small on flat hydrophobic surfaces. However, significant changes in contact angles during a cooling-heating cycle are observed on the rough surfaces, with a higher contact angle observed on cooling compared to during the subsequent heating. Condensation and subsequent frost formation at sub-zero temperatures induce the hysteresis. The freezing delay data show that the flat surface is more efficient in enhancing the freezing delay than the rougher surfaces, which can be rationalized considering heterogeneous nucleation theory. Thus, our data suggests that molecular flat surfaces, rather than rough superhydrophobic surfaces, are beneficial for retarding ice formation under conditions that allow condensation and frost

  11. Fabrication of Nanostructured Polymer Surfaces and Characterization of their Wetting Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nis Korsgaard

    molds able to produce superhydrophobic polymer parts. The patented microstructuring technique generates microstructures similar to those found on the leaf of the lotus flower, without the overlaying nanostructure. Despite the lack of hierarchical structures, the microstructured surface shows excellent....... • Simulations of wetting transitions. • Clean room fabrication of functional surfaces, and production of micro- and nanostructured mold inserts. • Injection molding of micro- and nanostructured polymer parts on a commercial injection molding machine. • Co-invented a patented technique for microstructuring steel...

  12. Improvement of surface wetting properties of poly(p-phenylene benzoxazole) by incorporation of ionic groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Kaiqing [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China); Jin Junhong [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China); Yang Shenglin [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China); Li Guang [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China)]. E-mail: lig@dhu.edu.cn; Jiang Jianming [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China)

    2006-07-25

    Modified poly(p-phenylene benzoxazole), SPBO, containing ionic sulfonate groups was synthesized by polycondensation of the corresponding monomers in polyphosphoric acid. SPBO fiber was spun via a dry-jet wet-spinning technique. The wetting property of poly(p-phenylene benzoxazole) (PBO) fiber and SPBO fiber were measured by contact angle analysis, and the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) between fibers and epoxy was determined by microbond pull-out testing. The contact angles of water and ethanol on SPBO fiber surface get smaller, and the wetting process becomes faster. The surface free energy of SPBO fiber increases to 38.9 mJ m{sup -2}, which is 9.6% higher than that of PBO fiber. Furthermore the ionic introducing leads to a 23% increase in IFSS from 8.2 MPa for PBO/epoxy to 10.1 MPa for SPBO/epoxy. It could be expected that the failure mode may change from fiber/matrix interface adhesive failure to partly cohesive failure mode.

  13. The repeated drying-wetting and freezing-thawing cycles affect only the active pool of soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Vyacheslav; Zinyakova, Natalya; Tulina, Anastasiya

    2016-04-01

    The decrease in the content of soil organic carbon, particularly in active form, is one of the major problems of the 21st century, which is closely related to the disturbance of the biogeochemical carbon cycle and to the increase in the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The main reasons for the SOM losses are the surplus of the SOM active pool losses due to mineralization, erosion, and infiltration over the input of fresh organic matter to the soil, as well as the changes in the soil conditions and processes due to natural and anthropogenic disturbing impacts. Experiments were carried out with mixed samples from the upper layers of soddy-podzolic soil, gray forest soil, and typical chernozems. Soil samples as controls were incubated after wetting for 150 days. The dynamics and cumulative production of C-CO2 under stable temperature (22°C) and moisture conditions were determined; the initial content of potentially mineralizable organic matter (C0) in the soil at the beginning of the incubation was then calculated to use these data as the control. Other soil samples were exposed in flasks to the following successive treatments: wetting →incubation → freezing → thawing → incubation →drying. Six repeated cycles of disturbing impacts were performed for 140 days of the experiment. After six cycles, the soil samples were incubated under stable temperature and moisture conditions for 150 days. The wetting of dried soils and the thawing of frozen soils are accompanied by the pulsed dynamics of the C-CO2 production with an abrupt increase in the rate of the C-CO2 emission within several days by 2.7-12.4 and 1.6-2.7 times, respectively, compared to the stable incubation conditions. The rate of the C-CO2 production pulses under each subsequent impact decreased compared to the preceding one similarly for all studied soils, which could be due to the depletion in potentially mineralizable soil organic matter (C0). The cumulative extra C-CO2 production by

  14. Effect of sessile drop volume on the wetting anisotropy observed on grooved surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Rose, Felicity R A J; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Alexander, Morgan R

    2009-03-03

    This study reports experimental measurements of the water contact angle (WCA) measured on surfaces with grooves of different widths using drop volumes ranging from 400 pL to 4.5 microL. These measurements were carried out on both relatively hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface chemistry formed using a conformal plasma polymer coating of topographically embossed poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Anisotropic wetting of the grooved surfaces was found to be more marked for larger drops on both the hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. Above a certain drop base diameter to groove width ratio, topography had no effect on the measured WCA; this ratio was found to be dependent on the water drop volume. The WCA measured from the direction perpendicular to the grooves using submicroliter water drops is found to be a good indicator of the WCA on the flat surface with equivalent wettabilities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study on the phenomenon of anisotropic wetting using picoliter water drops.

  15. Wetting behaviour during evaporation and condensation of water microdroplets on superhydrophobic patterned surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Y C; Bhushan, B

    2008-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have considerable technological potential for various applications due to their extreme water repellent properties. The superhydrophobic surfaces may be generated by the use of hydrophobic coating, roughness and air pockets between solid and liquid. The geometric effects and dynamic effects, such as surface waves, can destroy the composite solid-air-liquid interface. The relationship between the water droplet size and geometric parameters governs the creation of composite interface and affects transition from solid-liquid interface to composite interface. Therefore, it is necessary to study the effect of droplets of various sizes. We have studied the effect of droplet size on contact angle by evaporation using droplets with radii ranging from about 300 to 700 microm. Experimental and theoretical studies of the wetting properties of silicon surfaces patterned with pillars of two different diameters and heights with varying pitch values are presented. We propose a criterion where the transition from Cassie and Baxter regime to Wenzel regime occurs when the droop of the droplet sinking between two asperities is larger than the depth of the cavity. The trends are explained based on the experimental data and the proposed transition criteria. An environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) is used to form smaller droplets of about 20 microm radius and measure the contact angle on the patterned surfaces. The investigation has shown that ESEM provides a new approach to wetting studies on the microscale.

  16. Compound microstructures and wax layer of beetle elytral surfaces and their influence on wetting properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxia Sun

    Full Text Available A beetles' first line of defense against environmental hazards is their mesothoracic elytra--rigid, protective forewings. In order to study the interaction of these wings with water, the surface microstructures of various beetles' elytra were observed by Environment Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. Chemistry components were ascertained using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. All the beetles of various habitats (including desert, plant, dung, land and water exhibited compound microstructures on their elytra. The wetting properties of these elytra were identified using an optical contact angle meter. In general the native elytra exhibited hydrophilic or weak hydrophobic properties with contact angles (CAs ranging from 47.5° to 109.1°. After treatment with chloroform, the CAs all increased on the rougher elytral surfaces. The presence of wax is not the only determinant of hydrophobic properties, but rather a combination with microscopic structures found on the surfaces. Irregularities and the presence or absence of tiny cracks, hairs (or setae, pores and protrusions are important factors which influence the wetting properties. Rougher elytral surfaces tended to present a stronger hydrophobicity. Effects on hydrophobicity, such as surface microstructures, chemistry, environment and aging (referring to the time after emergence, are also included and discussed. Our results also provide insights into the motion of water droplets when in contact with beetle elytra.

  17. Tyre contact length on dry and wet road surfaces measured by three-axial accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilainen, Mika; Tuononen, Ari

    2015-02-01

    We determined the tyre contact length on dry and wet roads by measuring the accelerations of the inner liner with a three-axial accelerometer. The influence of the tyre pressure, driving velocity, and tread depth on the contact length was studied in both types of road surface conditions. On dry asphalt the contact length was almost constant, regardless of the driving velocity. On wet asphalt the presence of water could be detected even at low driving velocities (e.g. 20 km/h for a worn tyre) as the contact length began to decrease from that found in the dry asphalt situation. In addition to improving the performance of active safety systems and driver warning systems, the contact length information could be beneficial for classifying and studying the aquaplaning behaviour of tyres.

  18. Theory of wetting-induced fluid entrainment by advancing contact lines on dry surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Aguilar, R; Hernández-Machado, A; Pagonabarraga, I

    2013-06-28

    We report on the onset of fluid entrainment when a contact line is forced to advance over a dry solid of arbitrary wettability. We show that entrainment occurs at a critical advancing speed beyond which the balance between capillary, viscous, and contact-line forces sustaining the shape of the interface is no longer satisfied. Wetting couples to the hydrodynamics by setting both the morphology of the interface at small scales and the viscous friction of the front. We find that the critical deformation that the interface can sustain is controlled by the friction at the contact line and the viscosity contrast between the displacing and displaced fluids, leading to a rich variety of wetting-entrainment regimes. We discuss the potential use of our theory to measure contact-line forces using atomic force microscopy and to study entrainment under microfluidic conditions exploiting colloid-polymer fluids of ultralow surface tension.

  19. U-ages in soils and groundwater evidencing wet periods 400-600 kyr ago in southeast Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonotto, D.M. [Departamento de Petrologia e Metalogenia, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Av. 24-A No. 1515, C.P. 178, CEP 13506-900, Rio Claro, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: dbonotto@rc.unesp.br; Jimenez-Rueda, J.R. [Departamento de Petrologia e Metalogenia, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Av. 24-A No. 1515, C.P. 178, CEP 13506-900, Rio Claro, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-07-15

    {sup 238}U and its radiogenic daughter {sup 234}U have been utilized for dating soil formation and groundwater residence time during the last 1.5 million years, in this case based on the U-dissolution/precipitation occurring during modifications of the oxidation-reduction conditions. In this paper, we report a 400-600 kyr proxy of wet periods from sediments occurring in a soil profile developed over rocks outcropping at the Parana sedimentary basin in Brazil, and from groundwater exploited of Guarani aquifer at the same basin. The approaches indicated successful use of the U-modeled ages for suggesting wet periods exceeding the past 116-210 kyr from previous studies.

  20. Influence of prevailing disturbances on soil biology and biochemistry of montane habitats at Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve, India during wet and dry seasons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, S.K.; Singh, Anoop; Rai, J.P.N.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of prevailing disturbances in montane habitats of Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve (NDBR) was studied on soil microbial population, biomass, soil respiration and enzyme activities during wet and dry seasons. The physico-chemical characteristics of soils exhibited conspicuous variation in t...

  1. Adaptable bioinspired special wetting surface for multifunctional oil/water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavalenka, Maryna N.; Vüllers, Felix; Kumberg, Jana; Zeiger, Claudia; Trouillet, Vanessa; Stein, Sebastian; Ava, Tanzila T.; Li, Chunyan; Worgull, Matthias; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by the multifunctionality of biological surfaces necessary for the survival of an organism in its specific environment, we developed an artificial special wetting nanofur surface which can be adapted to perform different functionalities necessary to efficiently separate oil and water for cleaning accidental oil spills or separating industrial oily wastewater. Initial superhydrophobic nanofur surface is fabricated using a hot pulling method, in which nano- and microhairs are drawn out of the polymer surface during separation from a heated sandblasted steel plate. By using a set of simple modification techniques, which include microperforation, plasma treatment and subsequent control of storage environment, we achieved selective separation of either water or oil, variable oil absorption and continuous gravity driven separation of oil/water mixtures by filtration. Furthermore, these functions can be performed using special wetting nanofur made from various thermoplastics, including biodegradable and recyclable polymers. Additionally, nanofur can be reused after washing it with organic solvents, thus, further helping to reduce the environmental impacts of oil/water separation processes.

  2. Using δ15 N- and δ18 O-NO to Evaluate Mechanisms of Nitric Oxide Production Following the Wetting of Dry Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homyak, P. M.; Schimel, J.; Sickman, J. O.

    2014-12-01

    In xeric environments, where soils can remain dry for more than 6 months, abrupt transitions from dry-to-wet conditions produce NO pulses within seconds after soils wet up. During these periods of intense gaseous N production, biological processes (nitrification and denitrification) are known to control NO fluxes, but it is not clear how soil microbes can recover from drought-induced stress within seconds after soils wet up. Are NO pulses immediately following rewetting more so controlled by abiotic NO-producing reactions? Because biotic and abiotic mechanisms can occur simultaneously, distinguishing between these processes can be problematic. To understand the contribution of biotic and abiotic processes to NO pulses, and to better inform biogeochemical models, we measured the δ15N- and δ18O-NO following a field soil rewetting experiment in a California annual grassland. In October, during the end of the dry season, we artificially watered soils and captured NO emissions for up to 15 minutes, 1 hour, 1 day, and 3 days after wet-up. Pulses of NO following the wetting of dry soil were explained by a two-component mixing model, where two distinct sources or processes produced NO. Within 15 minutes after soil wet-up, the isotopic composition of soil NO (δ15N =-8.95 ‰, δ18O=14.28 ‰) was similar to that of atmospheric samples (δ15N =-4.45 ‰, δ18O=15.20 ‰), but became increasingly depleted after 1 hour (δ15N =-21.08 ‰, δ18O=0.53 ‰), and more so after 1 day (δ15N =-37.44 ‰, δ18O=-9.45 ‰). After 3 days, the isotopic composition of NO (δ15N =-28.31 ‰, δ18O=-2.07 ‰) began to return to pre-wet-up conditions closely following the two-component mixing line. We conclude that NO-producing reactions immediately after the wetting of dry soil (up to 15 min) are different than those occurring after 1 hour post-wetting. We hypothesize that abiotic processes control the initial response to wetting, but that biological processes, which discriminate

  3. Surface runoff, subsurface drainflow and soil erosion as affected by tillage in a clayey Finnish soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turtola, Eila; Alakukku, Laura; Uusitalo, Risto; Kaseva, Antti

    2007-01-01

    Conservation tillage practices were tested against autumn mouldboard ploughing for differences in physical properties of soil, surface runoff, subsurface drainflow and soil erosion. The study (1991-2001...

  4. Soil moisture sensor calibration for organic soil surface layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bircher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper's objective is to present generic calibration functions for organic surface layers derived for the soil moisture sensors Decagon ECH2O 5TE and Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x, using material from northern regions, mainly from the Finish Meteorological Institute's Arctic Research Center in Sodankylä and the study area of the Danish Center for Hydrology HOBE. For the Decagon 5TE sensor such a function is currently not reported in literature. Data were compared with measurements from underlying mineral soils including laboratory and field measurements. Shrinkage and charring during drying were considered. For both sensors all field and lab data showed consistent trends. For mineral layers with low soil organic matter (SOM content the validity of the manufacturer's calibrations was demonstrated. Deviating sensor outputs in organic and mineral horizons were identified: for the Decagon 5TE apparent relative permittivities at a given moisture content decreased for increased SOM content, which was attributed to an increase of bound water in organic materials with large surface areas compared to the studied mineral soils. ThetaProbe measurements from organic horizons showed stronger non-linearity in the sensor response and signal saturation in the high level data. The derived calibration fit functions between sensor response and volumetric water content hold for samples spanning a wide range of humus types with differing SOM characteristics. This strengthens confidence in their validity under various conditions, rendering them highly suitable for large-scale applications in remote sensing and land surface modeling studies. Agreement between independent Decagon 5TE and ThetaProbe time series from an organic surface layer at the Sodankylä site was significantly improved when the here proposed fit functions were used. Decagon 5TE data also well-reflected precipitation events. Thus, Decagon 5TE network data from organic surface layers at the Sodankyl

  5. Soil moisture sensor calibration for organic soil surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Simone; Andreasen, Mie; Vuollet, Johanna; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Jonard, François; Weihermüller, Lutz; Zakharova, Elena; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Kerr, Yann H.

    2016-04-01

    This paper's objective is to present generic calibration functions for organic surface layers derived for the soil moisture sensors Decagon ECH2O 5TE and Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x, using material from northern regions, mainly from the Finnish Meteorological Institute's Arctic Research Center in Sodankylä and the study area of the Danish Center for Hydrology (HOBE). For the Decagon 5TE sensor such a function is currently not reported in the literature. Data were compared with measurements from underlying mineral soils including laboratory and field measurements. Shrinkage and charring during drying were considered. For both sensors all field and lab data showed consistent trends. For mineral layers with low soil organic matter (SOM) content the validity of the manufacturer's calibrations was demonstrated. Deviating sensor outputs in organic and mineral horizons were identified. For the Decagon 5TE, apparent relative permittivities at a given moisture content decreased for increased SOM content, which was attributed to an increase of bound water in organic materials with large specific surface areas compared to the studied mineral soils. ThetaProbe measurements from organic horizons showed stronger nonlinearity in the sensor response and signal saturation in the high-level data. The derived calibration fit functions between sensor response and volumetric water content hold for samples spanning a wide range of humus types with differing SOM characteristics. This strengthens confidence in their validity under various conditions, rendering them highly suitable for large-scale applications in remote sensing and land surface modeling studies. Agreement between independent Decagon 5TE and ThetaProbe time series from an organic surface layer at the Sodankylä site was significantly improved when the here-proposed fit functions were used. Decagon 5TE data also well-reflected precipitation events. Thus, Decagon 5TE network data from organic surface layers at the Sodankylä and

  6. Active gas replenishment and sensing of the wetting state in a submerged superhydrophobic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Ben P; Bartlett, Philip N; Wood, Robert J K

    2017-02-15

    Previously superhydrophobic surfaces have demonstrated effective drag reduction by trapping a lubricious gas layer on the surface with micron-sized hydrophobic features. However, prolonged reduction of drag is hindered by the dissolution of the gas into the surrounding water. This paper demonstrates a novel combination of superhydrophobic surface design and electrochemical control methods which allow quick determination of the wetted area and a gas replenishment mechanism to maintain the desirable gas filled state. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is used to measure the capacitance of the surface which is shown to be proportional to the solid/liquid interface area. To maintain a full gas coverage for prolonged periods the surface is held at an electrical potential which leads to hydrogen evolution. In the desired gas filled state the water does not touch the metallic area of the surface, however after gas has dissolved the water touches the metal which closes the electrochemical circuit causing hydrogen to be produced replenishing the gas in the surface and returning to the gas filled state; in this way the system is self-actuating. This type of surface and electrochemical control shows promise for applications where the gas filled state of superhydrophobic surfaces must be maintained when submerged for long periods of time.

  7. Biomimetic design of elastomer surface pattern for friction control under wet conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolei

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, an observation on the toe pad of a newt was carried out. It was found that the pad surface is covered with an array of polygonal cells separated by channels, similar to those of a tree frog's pad. With this micro-structure, a newt can move on wet and smooth surfaces without slipping. Inspired by the surface structure of newt toe pads, elastic micro-patterned surfaces were fabricated to understand the function of such micro-structures in friction systems. The tribological performance of the patterned surfaces was evaluated using a tribometer. Different tribological performances between micro-dimple and -pillar patterned surfaces were observed. The area density (r) of the micro-pattern is crucial for controlling the friction of the elastic surface. Distinguished from unpatterned and micro-dimple patterned surfaces, the pillar patterned surface with high area density can remain high friction at high sliding speed. It could be one of the reasons of such polygonal structures on newt's toe pads.

  8. Tribology of thin wetting films between bubble and moving solid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakashev, Stoyan I; Stöckelhuber, Klaus W; Tsekov, Roumen; Phan, Chi M; Heinrich, Gert

    2014-08-01

    This work shows a successful example of coupling of theory and experiment to study the tribology of bubble rubbing on solid surface. Such kind of investigation is reported for the first time in the literature. A theory about wetting film intercalated between bubble and moving solid surface was developed, thus deriving the non-linear evolution differential equation which accounted for the friction slip coefficient at the solid surface. The stationary 3D film thickness profile, which appears to be a solution of the differential equation, for each particular speed of motion of the solid surface was derived by means of special procedure and unique interferometric experimental setup. This allowed us to determine the 3D map of the lift pressure within the wetting film, the friction force per unit area and the friction coefficient of rubbing at different speeds of motion of the solid surface. Thus, we observed interesting tribological details about the rubbing of the bubble on the solid surface like for example: 1. A regime of mixed friction between dry and lubricated friction exists in the range of 6-170 μm/s, beyond which the rubbing between the bubble and solid becomes completely lubricated and passes through the maximum; 2. The friction coefficient of rubbing has high values at very small speeds of solid's motion and reduces substantially with the increase of the speed of the solid motion until reaching small values, which change insignificantly with the further increase of the speed of the solid. Despite the numerous studies on the motion of bubble/droplet in close proximity to solid wall in the literature, the present investigation appears to be a step ahead in this area as far as we were able to derive 3D maps of the bubble close to the solid surface, which makes the investigation more profound.

  9. Mechano-activated surface modification of calcium carbonate in wet stirred mill and its properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Surface modification of calcium carbonate particles using sodium stearate(SDS) as a modification agent incorporated with the simultaneous wet ultra-fine grinding in the laboratory stirred mill was investigated. The physical properties and application properties of modified calcium carbonate were measured and evaluated. The action mechanism between SDS and calcium carbonate in the modification was studied by infrared spectrometry(IR) and X-ray photoelectron energy spectroscopy(XPS). The results indicate that the crushing mechanic force intensity can obviously influence the modification effect of calcium carbonate because of mechano-chemical effect. The hydrophilic surface of calcium carbonate is turned into hydrophobic after modification. The properties of polyethylene(PE) filled by modified calcium carbonate powder is markedly improved. And the adsorption of SDS could occur by chemical reaction with calcium carbonate surface.

  10. Atomistic simulations of surface coverage effects in anisotropic wet chemical etching of crystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosalvez, M.A.; Foster, A.S.; Nieminen, R.M

    2002-12-30

    Atomistic simulations of anisotropic wet chemical etching of crystalline silicon have been performed in order to determine the dependence of the etch rates of different crystallographic orientations on surface coverage and clustering of OH radicals. We show that the etch rate is a non-monotonic function of OH coverage and that there always exists a coverage value at which the etch rate reaches a maximum. The dependence of the anisotropy of the etching process on coverage, including the dependence of the fastest-etched plane orientation, is implicitly contained in the model and predictions of convex corner under-etching structures are made. We show that the whole etching process is controlled by only a few surface configurations involving a particular type of next-nearest neighbours. The relative value of the removal probabilities of these confitions determines the balance in the occurrence of step propagation and etch pitting for all surface orientations.

  11. Plutonium, (137)Cs and uranium isotopes in Mongolian surface soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, K; Kikawada, Y; Igarashi, Y; Fujiwara, H; Jugder, D; Matsumoto, Y; Oi, T; Nomura, M

    2017-01-01

    Plutonium ((238)Pu and (239,240)Pu), (137)Cs and plutonium activity ratios ((238)Pu/(239,240)Pu) as did uranium isotope ratio ((235)U/(238)U) were measured in surface soil samples collected in southeast Mongolia. The (239,240)Pu and (137)Cs concentrations in Mongolian surface soils (surface soils (0.013-0.06) coincided with that of global fallout. The (235)U/(238)U atom ratios in the surface soil show the natural one. There was a good correlation between the (239,240)Pu and (137)Cs concentrations in the surface soils. We introduce the migration depth to have better understanding of migration behaviors of anthropogenic radionuclides in surface soil. We found a difference of the migration behavior between (239,240)Pu and (137)Cs from (137)Cs/(239,240)Pu - (137)Cs plots for the Mongolian and Tsukuba surface soils; plutonium in surface soil is migrated easier than (137)Cs.

  12. Concentrations and geographic distribution of selected organic pollutants in Scottish surface soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhind, S M; Kyle, C E; Kerr, C; Osprey, M; Zhang, Z L; Duff, E I; Lilly, A; Nolan, A; Hudson, G; Towers, W; Bell, J; Coull, M; McKenzie, C

    2013-11-01

    Concentrations of selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) representing three chemical classes (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and the organic pollutant diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), were determined in surface soil samples (0-5 cm) collected at 20 km grid intersects throughout Scotland over a three-year period. Detectable amounts of all chemical classes and most individual congeners were present in all samples. There were no consistent effects of soil or vegetation type, soil carbon content, pH, altitude or distance from centres of population on concentrations which exhibited extreme variation, even in adjacent samples. It is concluded that soil POPs and DEHP concentrations and associated rates of animal and human exposure were highly variable, influenced by multiple, interacting factors, and not clearly related to local sources but possibly related to wet atmospheric deposition and the organic carbon content of the soil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Vertical Distribution of Soil Denitrifying Communities in a Wet Sclerophyll Forest under Long-Term Repeated Burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian; Chen, Chengrong; Wang, Weijin; Hughes, Jane M; Lewis, Tom; Hou, Enqing; Shen, Jupei

    2015-11-01

    Soil biogeochemical cycles are largely mediated by microorganisms, while fire significantly modifies biogeochemical cycles mainly via altering microbial community and substrate availability. Majority of studies on fire effects have focused on the surface soil; therefore, our understanding of the vertical distribution of microbial communities and the impacts of fire on nitrogen (N) dynamics in the soil profile is limited. Here, we examined the changes of soil denitrification capacity (DNC) and denitrifying communities with depth under different burning regimes, and their interaction with environmental gradients along the soil profile. Results showed that soil depth had a more pronounced impact than the burning treatment on the bacterial community size. The abundance of 16S rRNA and denitrification genes (narG, nirK, and nirS) declined exponentially with soil depth. Surprisingly, the nosZ-harboring denitrifiers were enriched in the deeper soil layers, which was likely to indicate that the nosZ-harboring denitrifiers could better adapt to the stress conditions (i.e., oxygen deficiency, nutrient limitation, etc.) than other denitrifiers. Soil nutrients, including dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total soluble N (TSN), ammonium (NH(4)(+)), and nitrate (NO(3)(-)), declined significantly with soil depth, which probably contributed to the vertical distribution of denitrifying communities. Soil DNC decreased significantly with soil depth, which was negligible in the depths below 20 cm. These findings have provided new insights into niche separation of the N-cycling functional guilds along the soil profile, under a varied fire disturbance regime.

  14. Fabricating nanostructures through a combination of nano-oxidation and wet etching on silicon wafers with different surface conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Ching

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the surface conditions of silicon wafers with native oxide layers (NOL) or hydrogen passivated layers (HPL) and how they influence the processes of nano-oxidation and wet etching. We also explore the combination of nano-oxidation and wet etching processes to produce nanostructures. Experimental results reveal that the surface conditions of silicon wafers have a considerable impact on the results of nano-oxidation when combined with wet etching. The height and width of oxides on NOL samples exceeded the dimensions of oxides on HPL samples, and this difference became increasingly evident with an increase in applied bias voltage. The height of oxidized nanolines on the HPL sample increased after wet etching; however, the width of the lines increased only marginally. After wet etching, the height and width of oxides on the NOL were more than two times greater than those on the HPL. Increasing the applied bias voltage during nano-oxidation on NOL samples increased both the height and width of the oxides. After wet etching however, the increase in bias voltage appeared to have little effect on the height of oxidized nanolines, but the width of oxidized lines increased. This study also discovered that the use of higher applied bias voltages on NOL samples followed by wet etching results in nanostructures with a section profile closely resembling a curved surface. The use of this technique enabled researchers to create molds in the shape of a silicon nanolens array and an elegantly shaped nanoscale complex structures mold.

  15. Surface soil factors and soil characteristics in geo-physical milieu of Kebbi State Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleiman Usman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil erodibility (K factor is the most important tool for estimation the erosion. The aim of this study Soil factors and surface soil characteristics are important components of agricultural environment. They support surface and subsurface soils to perform many functions to agriculture and economic human developments. Understanding these factors would aid to the recognition of the values that our soil and land offered to humanity. It is therefore, aim of this study to visualise and examine the soil factors and surface soil characteristics in Kebbi State Nigeria. An Integrated Surface Soil Approach (ISSA was used in the classification and description of soil environment in the study region. The factors constituted in the ISSA are important components of soil science that theories and practice(s noted to provide ideas on how soil environment functioned. The results indicate that the surface soil environments around Arewa, Argungu, Augie, Birnin Kebbi and Dandi are physically familiar with the following surface soil characteristics: bad-lands, blown-out-lands, cirque-lands, fertile-lands, gullied-lands, miscellaneous and rock-outcrops.The major soil factors observed hat played an important role in surface soil manipulations and soil formation are alluvial, colluvial, fluvial and lacustrine; ant, earthworms and termite; and various forms of surface relief supported by temperature, rainfall, relative humidity and wind. Overall, the surface soil environment of the region was describe according to their physical appearance into fadama clay soils, fadama clay-loam soils, dryland sandy soils, dryland sandy-loam soils, dryland stony soils and organic-mineral soils.

  16. Extreme Wetting-Resistant Multiscale Nano-/Microstructured Surfaces for Viscoelastic Liquid Repellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoythip Chunglok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate exceptional wetting-resistant surfaces capable of repelling low surface tension, non-Newtonian, and highly viscoelastic liquids. Theoretical analysis and experimental result confirm that a higher level of multiscale roughness topography composed of at least three structural length scales, ranging from nanometer to supermicron sizes, is crucial for the reduction of liquid-solid adhesion hysteresis. With Cassie-Baxter nonwetting state satisfied at all roughness length scales, the surface has been proven to effectively repel even highly adhesive liquid. Practically, this high-level hierarchical structure can be achieved through fractal-like structures of silica aggregates induced by siloxane oligomer interparticle bridges. The induced aggregation and surface functionalization of the silica particles can be performed simultaneously within a single reaction step, by utilizing trifunctional fluoroalkylsilane precursors that largely form a disordered fluoroalkylsiloxane grafting layer under the presence of sufficient native moisture preadsorbed at the silica surface. Spray-coating deposition of a particle surface layer on a precoated primer layer ensures facile processability and scalability of the fabrication method. The resulting low-surface-energy multiscale roughness exhibits outstanding liquid repellent properties, generating equivalent lotus effect for highly viscous and adhesive natural latex concentrate, with apparent contact angles greater than 160°, and very small roll-off angles of less than 3°.

  17. Influence of substrate particle size and wet oxidation on physical surface structures and enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mads; Meyer, Anne S

    2009-01-01

    In the worldwide quest for producing biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, the importance of the substrate pretreatment is becoming increasingly apparent. This work examined the effects of reducing the substrate particle sizes of wheat straw by grinding prior to wet oxidation and enzymatic hydrolysis. The yields of glucose and xylose were assessed after treatments with a benchmark cellulase system consisting of Celluclast 1.5 L (Trichoderma reesei) and Novozym 188 beta-glucosidase (Aspergillus niger). Both wet oxidized and not wet oxidized wheat straw particles gave increased glucose release with reduced particle size. After wet oxidation, the glucose release from the smallest particles (53-149 mum) reached 90% of the theoretical maximum after 24 h of enzyme treatment. The corresponding glucose release from the wet oxidized reference samples (2-4 cm) was approximately 65% of the theoretical maximum. The xylose release only increased (by up to 39%) with particle size decrease for the straw particles that had not been wet oxidized. Wet oxidation pretreatment increased the enzymatic xylose release by 5.4 times and the glucose release by 1.8 times across all particle sizes. Comparison of scanning electron microscopy images of the straw particles revealed edged, nonspherical, porous particles with variable surface structures as a result of the grinding. Wet oxidation pretreatment tore up the surface structures of the particles to retain vascular bundles of xylem and phloem. The enzymatic hydrolysis left behind a significant amount of solid, apparently porous structures within all particles size groups of both the not wet oxidized and wet oxidized particles.

  18. Air-side performance of a micro-channel heat exchanger in wet surface conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srisomba Raviwat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of operating conditions on the air-side heat transfer, and pressure drop of a micro-channel heat exchanger under wet surface conditions were studied experimentally. The test section was an aluminum micro-channel heat exchanger, consisting of a multi-louvered fin and multi-port mini-channels. Experiments were conducted to study the effects of inlet relative humidity, air frontal velocity, air inlet temperature, and refrigerant temperature on air-side performance. The experimental data were analyzed using the mean enthalpy difference method. The test run was performed at relative air humidities ranging between 45% and 80%; air inlet temperature ranges of 27, 30, and 33°C; refrigerant-saturated temperatures ranging from 18 to 22°C; and Reynolds numbers between 128 and 166. The results show that the inlet relative humidity, air inlet temperature, and the refrigerant temperature had significant effects on heat transfer performance and air-side pressure drop. The heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop for the micro-channel heat exchanger under wet surface conditions are proposed in terms of the Colburn j factor and Fanning f factor.

  19. Apparent-contact-angle model at partial wetting and evaporation: Impact of surface forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeček, V.; Nikolayev, V. S.

    2013-01-01

    This theoretical and numerical study deals with evaporation of a fluid wedge in contact with its pure vapor. The model describes a regime where the continuous wetting film is absent and the actual line of the triple gas-liquid-solid contact appears. A constant temperature higher than the saturation temperature is imposed at the solid substrate. The fluid flow is solved in the lubrication approximation. The introduction of the surface forces in the case of the partial wetting is discussed. The apparent contact angle (the gas-liquid interface slope far from the contact line) is studied numerically as a function of the substrate superheating, contact line velocity, and parameters related to the solid-fluid interaction (Young and microscopic contact angles, Hamaker constant, etc.). The dependence of the apparent contact angle on the substrate temperature is in agreement with existing approaches. For water, the apparent contact angle may be 20∘ larger than the Young contact angle for 1 K superheating. The effect of the surface forces on the apparent contact angle is found to be weak.

  20. Silane Modification of Glass and Silica Surfaces to Obtain Equally Oil-Wet Surfaces in Glass-Covered Silicon Micromodel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Dehoff, Karl J.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus

    2013-08-05

    The wettability of silicon and glass surfaces can be modified by silanization. However, similar treatments of glass and silica surfaces using the same silane do not necessarily yield the same wettability as determined by the oil-water contact angle. In this technical note, surface cleaning pretreatments were investigated to determine conditions that would yield oil-wet surfaces on glass with similar wettability to silica surfaces treated with the same silane, and both air-water and oil-water contact angles were determined. Air-water contact angles were less sensitive to differences between silanized silica and glass surfaces, often yielding similar values while the oil-water contact angles were quite different. Borosilicate glass surfaces cleaned with standard cleaning solution 1 (SC1) yield intermediate-wet surfaces when silanized with hexamethyldisilazane, while the same cleaning and silanization yields oil-wet surfaces on silica. However, cleaning glass in boiling concentrated nitric acid creates a surface that can be silanized to obtain oil-wet surfaces using HDMS. Moreover, this method is effective on glass with prior thermal treatment at an elevated temperature of 400oC. In this way, silica and glass can be silanized to obtain equally oil-wet surfaces using HMDS. It is demonstrated that pretreatment and silanization is feasible in silicon-silica/glass micromodels previously assembled by anodic bonding, and that the change in wettability has a significant observable effect on immiscisble fluid displacements in the pore network.

  1. Nile red: Alternative to physical developer for the detection of latent fingermarks on wet porous surfaces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, Karl; de la Hunty, Mackenzie; Deppe, Janina; Spindler, Xanthe; Cantu, Antonio A; Maynard, Philip; Lennard, Chris; Roux, Claude

    2013-07-10

    This paper describes the application of a luminescent lipid stain, nile red, for the development of latent fingermarks on porous surfaces. An optimised formulation is presented that provides rapid development of latent fingermarks on porous surfaces that are or have been wet. A comparison with physical developer (PD), the method of choice to enhance such fingermarks, indicated that nile red was a simpler and more stable technique for the development of fingermarks. The nile red formulation showed similar performance to PD across a range of substrates and ageing conditions, although PD still showed greater sensitivity on five-year-old examination booklets used in a pseudo-operational study. The pseudo-operational trial also indicated that nile red consistently developed different fingermarks to those enhanced by PD, suggesting that it preferentially targets a different fraction of the latent fingermark deposit. Significantly, the compatibility of nile red in a detection sequence with indanedione-zinc, ninhydrin and PD is reported.

  2. Enhancement of dynamic wetting properties by direct fabrication on robust micro-micro hierarchical polymer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Donghui; Nemoto, Akihiko; Ito, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    Understanding evaporation phenomena on hierarchical surfaces is of crucial importance for the design of robust superhydrophobic polymer structures for various applications. This fabrication method enables precise control of the dimensions to elucidate the dynamic wetting behavior affected by geometric parameters. That behavior exhibits three distinct evaporation modes: a constant contact line (CCL), a constant contact angle (CCA), and mixed mode during the droplet evaporation. The droplet evaporation results show that the sticky CCL mode and the Cassie-Wenzel transition can be prevented by engineering hierarchy integration. Moreover, the CCL-CCA transition point time scale exhibits remarkable dependence on surface dimensions such as the area fraction and solid-liquid contact line. Finally, the fabricated hierarchical structures indicate remarkable superhydrophobic properties, static contact angle above 160° and low sliding angle under 10°, with good durability in terms of aging effect and mechanical robustness for 2 months.

  3. Profile Prediction and Fabrication of Wet-Etched Gold Nanostructures for Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dispersed nanosphere lithography can be employed to fabricate gold nanostructures for localized surface plasmon resonance, in which the gold film evaporated on the nanospheres is anisotropically dry etched to obtain gold nanostructures. This paper reports that by wet etching of the gold film, various kinds of gold nanostructures can be fabricated in a cost-effective way. The shape of the nanostructures is predicted by profile simulation, and the localized surface plasmon resonance spectrum is observed to be shifting its extinction peak with the etching time. (See supplementary material 1 Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11671-009-9486-4 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. Click here for file

  4. Tunable wetting mechanism of polypyrrole surfaces and low-voltage droplet manipulation via redox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yao-Tsan; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Gao, Ning; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2011-04-05

    This paper presents the experimental results and analyses on a controlled manipulation of liquid droplets upon local reduction and oxidation (redox) of a smart polymer-dodecylbenzenesulfonate doped polypyrrole (PPy(DBS)). The electrochemically tunable wetting property of PPy(DBS) permitted liquid droplet manipulation at very low voltages (-0.9 to 0.6 V). A dichloromethane (DCM) droplet was flattened upon PPy(DBS) reduction. It was found that the surface tension gradient across the droplet contact line induced Marangoni stress, which caused this deformation. Further observation of PPy(DBS)'s color change upon the redox process confirmed that the surface tension gradient was the driving force for the droplet shape change.

  5. Adhesion energy between mica surfaces: Implications for the frictional coefficient under dry and wet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    frictional strength of faults is a critical factor that contributes to continuous fault slip and earthquake occurrence. Frictional strength can be reduced by the presence of sheet-structured clay minerals. In this study, two important factors influencing the frictional coefficient of minerals were quantitatively analyzed by a newly developed computational method based on a combination of first-principles study and thermodynamics. One factor that helps reduce the frictional coefficient is the low adhesion energy between the layers under dry conditions. Potassium ions on mica surfaces are easily exchanged with sodium ions when brought into contact with highly concentrated sodium-halide solutions. We found that the surface ion exchange with sodium ions reduces the adhesion energy, indicating that the frictional coefficient can be reduced under dry conditions. Another factor is the lubrication caused by adsorbed water films on mineral surfaces under wet conditions. Potassium and sodium ions on mica surfaces have a strong affinity for water molecules. In order to remove the adsorbed water molecules confined between mica surfaces, a differential compressive stress of the order of tens of gigapascals was necessary at room temperature. These water molecules inhibit direct contact between mineral surfaces and reduce the frictional coefficient. Our results imply that the frictional coefficient can be modified through contact with fluids depending on their salt composition. The low adhesion energy between fault-forming minerals and the presence of an adsorbed water film is a possible reason for the low frictional coefficient observed at continuous fault slip zones.

  6. Wet etching of InSb surfaces in aqueous solutions: Controlled oxide formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aureau, D., E-mail: damien.aureau@chimie.uvsq.fr [Institut Lavoisier UVSQ-CNRS UMR 8180, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, Versailles, 78035 (France); Chaghi, R.; Gerard, I. [Institut Lavoisier UVSQ-CNRS UMR 8180, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, Versailles, 78035 (France); Sik, H.; Fleury, J. [Sagem Defense Sécurité, 72-74, rue de la tour Billy, 95101, Argenteuil Cedex (France); Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier UVSQ-CNRS UMR 8180, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, Versailles, 78035 (France)

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the wet etching of InSb surfaces by two different oxidant agents: Br{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the consecutive oxides generation onto the surfaces. The strong dependence between the chemical composition of the etching baths and the nature of the final surface chemistry of this low band-gap III–V semiconductor will be especially highlighted. One aqueous etching solution combined hydrobromic acid and Bromine (HBr–Br{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O) with adjusted concentrations. The other solution combines orthophosphoric and citric acids with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O). Depending on its composition, each formulation gave rise to variable etching rate. The dosage of Indium traces in the etching solution by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) gives the kinetic variation of the dissolution process. The variations on etching rates are associated to the properties and the nature of the formed oxides on InSb surfaces. Surface characterization is specifically performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A clear evidence of the differences between the formed oxides is highlighted. Atomic force microscopy is used to monitor the surface morphology and pointed out that very different final morphologies can be reached. This paper presents new results on the strong variability of the InSb oxides in relation with the InSb reactivity toward environment interaction.

  7. Leaf Cutter Ant (Atta cephalotes) Soil Modification and In Situ CO2 Gas Dynamics in a Neotropical Wet Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Bou, A. S.; Carrasquillo Quintana, O.; Dierick, D.; Harmon, T. C.; Johnson, S.; Schwendenmann, L.; Zelikova, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    The goal of this work is to advance our understanding of soil carbon cycling in highly productive neotropical wet forests. More specifically, we are investigating the influence of leaf cutter ants (LCA) on soil CO2 gas dynamics in primary and secondary forest soils at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. LCA are the dominant herbivore in tropical Americas, responsible for as much as 50% of the total herbivory. Their presence is increasing and their range is expanding because of forest fragmentation and other human impacts. We installed gas sampling wells in LCA (Atta cephalotes) nest and control sites (non-nests in the same soil and forest settings). The experimental design encompassed land cover (primary and secondary forest) and soil type (residual and alluvial). We collected gas samples monthly over an 18-month period. Several of the LCA nests were abandoned during this period. Nevertheless, we continued to sample these sites for LCA legacy effects. In several of the sites, we also installed sensors to continuously monitor soil moisture content, temperature, and CO2 levels. Within the 18-month period we conducted a 2-month field campaign to collect soil and nest vent CO2 efflux data from 3 of the nest-control pairs. Integrating the various data sets, we observed that for most of the sites nest and control soils behaved similarly during the tropical dry season. However, during the wet season gas well CO2 concentrations increased in the control sites while levels in the nests remained at dry season levels. This outcome suggests that ants modify soil gas transport properties (e.g., tortuosity). In situ time series and efflux sampling campaign data corroborated these findings. Abandoned nest CO2 levels were similar to those of the active nests, supporting the notion of a legacy effect from LCA manipulations. For this work, the period of abandonment was relatively short (several months to 1 year maximum), which appears to be insufficient for estimating the

  8. Analysis of surface soil moisture patterns in agricultural landscapes using Empirical Orthogonal Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Korres

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture is one of the fundamental variables in hydrology, meteorology and agriculture. Nevertheless, its spatio-temporal patterns in agriculturally used landscapes that are affected by multiple natural (rainfall, soil, topography etc. and agronomic (fertilisation, soil management etc. factors are often not well known. The aim of this study is to determine the dominant factors governing the spatio-temporal patterns of surface soil moisture in a grassland and an arable test site that are located within the Rur catchment in Western Germany. Surface soil moisture (0–6 cm was measured in an approx. 50×50 m grid during 14 and 17 measurement campaigns (May 2007 to November 2008 in both test sites. To analyse the spatio-temporal patterns of surface soil moisture, an Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF analysis was applied and the results were correlated with parameters derived from topography, soil, vegetation and land management to link the patterns to related factors and processes. For the grassland test site, the analysis resulted in one significant spatial structure (first EOF, which explained 57.5% of the spatial variability connected to soil properties and topography. The statistical weight of the first spatial EOF is stronger on wet days. The highest temporal variability can be found in locations with a high percentage of soil organic carbon (SOC. For the arable test site, the analysis resulted in two significant spatial structures, the first EOF, which explained 38.4% of the spatial variability, and showed a highly significant correlation to soil properties, namely soil texture and soil stone content. The second EOF, which explained 28.3% of the spatial variability, is linked to differences in land management. The soil moisture in the arable test site varied more strongly during dry and wet periods at locations with low porosity. The method applied is capable of identifying the dominant parameters controlling spatio-temporal patterns of

  9. Influence of Substrate Particle Size and Wet Oxidation on Physical Surface Structures and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Wheat Straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads; Meyer, Anne S.

    2009-01-01

    In the worldwide quest for producing biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, the importance of the substrate pretreatment is becoming increasingly apparent. This work examined the effects of reducing the substrate particle sizes of wheat straw by grinding prior to wet oxidation and enzymatic...... release only increased (by up to 39%) with particle size decrease for the straw particles that had not been wet oxidized. Wet oxidation pretreatment increased the enzymatic xylose release by 5.4 times and the glucose release by 1.8 times across all particle sizes. Comparison of scanning electron...... microscopy images of the straw particles revealed edged, nonspherical, porous particles with variable surface structures as a result of the grinding. Wet oxidation pretreatment tore up the surface structures of the particles to retain vascular bundles of xylem and phloem. The enzymatic hydrolysis left behind...

  10. Silane modification of glass and silica surfaces to obtain equally oil-wet surfaces in glass-covered silicon micromodel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, Jay W.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Dehoff, Karl J.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Mart

    2013-08-01

    Wettability is a key parameter influencing capillary pressures, permeabilities, fingering mechanisms, and saturations in multiphase flow processes within porous media. Glass-covered silicon micromodels provide precise structures in which pore-scale displacement processes can be visualized. The wettability of silicon and glass surfaces can be modified by silanization. However, similar treatments of glass and silica surfaces using the same silane do not necessarily yield the same wettability as determined by the oil-water contact angle. In this study, surface cleaning pretreatments were investigated to determine conditions that yield oil-wet surfaces on glass with similar wettability to silica surfaces treated with the same silane, and both air-water and oil-water contact angles were determined. Borosilicate glass surfaces cleaned with standard cleaning solution 1 (SC1) yield intermediate-wet surfaces when silanized with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), while the same cleaning and silanization yields oil-wet surfaces on silica. However, cleaning glass in boiling concentrated nitric acid creates a surface that can be silanized to obtain oil-wet surfaces using HMDS. Moreover, this method is effective on glass with prior thermal treatment at an elevated temperature of 400°C. In this way, silica and glass can be silanized to obtain equally oil-wet surfaces using HMDS. It is demonstrated that pretreatment and silanization is feasible in silicon-silica/glass micromodels previously assembled by anodic bonding, and that the change in wettability has a significant observable effect on immiscible fluid displacements in the pore network.

  11. Time-Dependent Wetting Behavior of PDMS Surfaces with Bio-Inspired, Hierarchical Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Mishra, Himanshu

    2015-12-28

    Wetting of rough surfaces involves time-dependent effects, such as surface deformations, non-uniform filling of surface pores within or outside the contact area, and surface chemistries, but the detailed impact of these phenomena on wetting is not entirely clear. Understanding these effects is crucial for designing coatings for a wide range of applications, such as membrane-based oil-water separation and desalination, waterproof linings/windows for automobiles, aircrafts, and naval vessels, and antibiofouling. Herein, we report on time-dependent contact angles of water droplets on a rough polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface that cannot be completely described by the conventional Cassie-Baxter or Wenzel models or the recently proposed Cassie-impregnated model. Shells of sand dollars (Dendraster excentricus) were used as lithography-free, robust templates to produce rough PDMS surfaces with hierarchical, periodic features ranging from 10-7-10-4 m. Under saturated vapor conditions, we found that in the short-term (<1 min), the contact angle of a sessile water droplet on the templated PDMS, θSDT = 140° ± 3°, was accurately described by the Cassie-Baxter model (predicted θSDT = 137°); however, after 90 min, θSDT fell to 110°. Fluorescent confocal microscopy confirmed that the initial reduction in θSDT to 110° (the Wenzel limit) was primarily a Cassie-Baxter to Wenzel transition during which pores within the contact area filled gradually, and more rapidly for ethanol-water mixtures. After 90 min, the contact line of the water droplet became pinned, perhaps caused by viscoelastic deformation of the PDMS around the contact line, and a significant volume of water began to flow from the droplet to pores outside the contact region, causing θSDT to decrease to 65° over 48 h on the rough surface. The system we present here to explore the concept of contact angle time dependence (dynamics) and modeling of natural surfaces provides insights into the design and

  12. Remote Sensing and Synchronous Land Surface Measurements of Soil Moisture and Soil Temperature in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolev, N. V.; Penev, K. P.; Kirkova, Y. M.; Krustanov, B. S.; Nazarsky, T. G.; Dimitrov, G. K.; Levchev, C. P.; Prodanov, H. I.; Kraleva, L. H.

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents the results of remote sensing and synchronous land surface measurements for estimation of soil (surface and profile) water content and soil temperature for different soil types in Bulgaria. The relationship between radiometric temperature and soil surface water content is shown. The research is illustrated by some results from aircraft and land surface measurements carried out over three test areas near Pleven, Sofia and Plovdiv, respectively, during the period 1988-1990.

  13. Cell adhesive and antifouling polyvinyl chloride surfaces via wet chemical modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Matthias; Strand, Dennis; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich

    2012-09-01

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is one of the most frequently used polymers for the manufacturing of medical devices. Limitations for its usage are based upon unfavorable surface properties of the polymer including its hydrophobicity and lack of functionalities in order to increase its versatility. To address this issue, wet chemical modification of PVC was performed through surface amination using the bifunctional compound ethylene diamine. The reaction was conducted in order to achieve maximum surface amination while leaving the bulk material unaffected. The initial activation step was characterized by means of various methods including contact angle measurements, colorimetric amine quantification, infrared spectroscopy, and gel permeation chromatography. Depth profiles were obtained by a confocal microscopic method using fluorescence labeling. Exclusive surface modification was thus confirmed. To demonstrate biological applications of the presented technique, two examples were chosen: The covalent immobilization of the cell adhesive Asp-Gly-Asp-Ser-peptide (RGD) onto PVC samples yielded a surface that strongly supported cellular adhesion and proliferation of fibroblasts. In contrast, the decoration of PVC with the hydrophilic polymer polyethylene glycol prevented cellular adhesion to a large extent. The impact of these modifications was demonstrated by cell culture experiments.

  14. Wetting behaviour of laser synthetic surface microtextures on Ti-6Al-4V for bioapplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahotre, Narendra B; Paital, Sameer R; Samant, Anoop N; Daniel, Claus

    2010-04-28

    Wettability at the surface of an implant material plays a key role in its success as it modulates the protein adsorption and thereby influences cell attachment and tissue integration at the interface. Hence, surface engineering of implantable materials to enhance wettability to physiological fluid under in vivo conditions is an area of active research. In light of this, in the present work, laser-based optical interference and direct melting techniques were used to develop synthetic microtextures on Ti-6Al-4V alloys, and their effects on wettability were studied systematically. Improved wettability to simulated body fluid and distilled water was observed for Ca-P coatings obtained by direct melting technique. This superior wettability was attributed to both the appropriate surface chemistry and the three-dimensional surface features obtained using this technique. To assert a better control on surface texture and wettability, a three-dimensional thermal model based on COMSOL's multiphysics was employed to predict the features obtained by laser melting technique. The effect of physical texture and wetting on biocompatibility of laser-processed Ca-P coatings was evaluated in the preliminary efforts on culturing of mouse MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells.

  15. A new approach of tailoring wetting properties of TiO2 nanotubular surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Isimjan, Tayirjan T.

    2012-11-01

    TiO2 nanotube layers were grown on a Ti surface by electrochemical anodization. As prepared, these layers showed a superhydrophilic wetting behavior. Modified with 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane (PTES), the layers showed a superhydrophobic behavior. We demonstrate how to change the surface characteristics of the TiO2 nanotube layers in order to achieve any desirable degree of hydrophobicity between 100° to 170°. The treated superhydrophobic TiO2 nanotube layers have an advanced contact angle exceeding 165°, a receding angle more than 155°and a slide angle less than 5°. It is found that the surface morphology of the film which depends on anodization time among other variables, has a great influence on the superhydrophobic properties of the surface after PTES treatment. The hydrodynamic properties of the surface are discussed in terms of both Cassie and Wenzel mechanisms. The layers are characterized with dynamic contact angle measurements, SEM, and XPS analyses. © 2012 American Scientific Publishers.

  16. Spatial and temporal estimation of soil loss for the sustainable management of a wet semi-arid watershed cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejani, R; Rao, K V; Osman, M; Srinivasa Rao, Ch; Reddy, K Sammi; Chary, G R; Pushpanjali; Samuel, Josily

    2016-03-01

    The ungauged wet semi-arid watershed cluster, Seethagondi, lies in the Adilabad district of Telangana in India and is prone to severe erosion and water scarcity. The runoff and soil loss data at watershed, catchment, and field level are necessary for planning soil and water conservation interventions. In this study, an attempt was made to develop a spatial soil loss estimation model for Seethagondi cluster using RUSLE coupled with ARCGIS and was used to estimate the soil loss spatially and temporally. The daily rainfall data of Aphrodite for the period from 1951 to 2007 was used, and the annual rainfall varied from 508 to 1351 mm with a mean annual rainfall of 950 mm and a mean erosivity of 6789 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1) year(-1). Considerable variation in land use land cover especially in crop land and fallow land was observed during normal and drought years, and corresponding variation in the erosivity, C factor, and soil loss was also noted. The mean value of C factor derived from NDVI for crop land was 0.42 and 0.22 in normal year and drought years, respectively. The topography is undulating and major portion of the cluster has slope less than 10°, and 85.3% of the cluster has soil loss below 20 t ha(-1) year(-1). The soil loss from crop land varied from 2.9 to 3.6 t ha(-1) year(-1) in low rainfall years to 31.8 to 34.7 t ha(-1) year(-1) in high rainfall years with a mean annual soil loss of 12.2 t ha(-1) year(-1). The soil loss from crop land was higher in the month of August with an annual soil loss of 13.1 and 2.9 t ha(-1) year(-1) in normal and drought year, respectively. Based on the soil loss in a normal year, the interventions recommended for 85.3% of area of the watershed includes agronomic measures such as contour cultivation, graded bunds, strip cropping, mixed cropping, crop rotations, mulching, summer plowing, vegetative bunds, agri-horticultural system, and management practices such as broad bed furrow, raised sunken beds, and harvesting available water

  17. Microbial responses and nitrous oxide emissions during wetting and drying of organically and conventionally managed soil under tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, M.; Jackson, L.E.; Lundquist, E.J.; Louie, D.T.; Miller, R.L.; Rolston, D.E.; Scow, K.M.

    2005-01-01

    The types and amounts of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) inputs, as well as irrigation management are likely to influence gaseous emissions and microbial ecology of agricultural soil. Carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) efflux, with and without acetylene inhibition, inorganic N, and microbial biomass C were measured after irrigation or simulated rainfall in two agricultural fields under tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum). The two fields, located in the California Central Valley, had either a history of high organic matter (OM) inputs ("organic" management) or one of low OM and inorganic fertilizer inputs ("conventional" management). In microcosms, where short-term microbial responses to wetting and drying were studied, the highest CO2 efflux took place at about 60% water-filled pore space (WFPS). At this moisture level, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) indicative of microbial nutrient availability were elevated and a PLFA stress indicator was depressed, suggesting peak microbial activity. The highest N 2O efflux in the organically managed soil (0.94 mg N2O-N m-2 h-1) occurred after manure and legume cover crop incorporation, and in the conventionally managed soil (2.12 mg N2O-N m-2 h-1) after inorganic N fertilizer inputs. Elevated N2O emissions occurred at a WFPS >60% and lasted <2 days after wetting, probably because the top layer (0-150 mm) of this silt loam soil dried quickly. Therefore, in these cropping systems, irrigation management might control the duration of elevated N2O efflux, even when C and inorganic N availability are high, whereas inorganic N concentrations should be kept low during times when soil moisture cannot be controlled.

  18. Impacts of grass removal on wetting and actual water repellency in a sandy soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klaas Oostindie; Louis W. Dekker; Jan G. Wesseling; Violette Geissen; Coen J. Ritsema

    2017-01-01

    Soil water content and actual water repellency were assessed for soil profiles at two sites in a bare and grasscovered plot of a sand pasture, to investigate the impact of the grass removal on both properties...

  19. A simulation study on the thermal and wetting behavior of alkane thiol SAM on gold (111) surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Meena Devi

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the structural, thermal and wetting properties of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of alkane thiol on gold surface. The specific heat capacity of the gold SAM surface was found to linearly increase with the temperature in the range 100-300 K. It was found to drop down at 400 K and this decrease might be attributed to the disorder of the SAM chains. Hydration of gold SAM surface for two different terminal groups, namely methyl (hydrophobic), and hydroxy (hydrophilic) was studied at room temperature. The difference in their wetting behavior and the structure of their interfacial water were examined from the estimation of the z density profile, radial distribution function, hydrogen bonds and orientation of water dipoles in the interfacial region. The present simulation results suggest that the wetting behavior of the gold SAM surface can be modified by altering the terminal functional group of the SAM chains.

  20. Wetting and evaporative aggregation of nanofluid droplets on CVD-synthesized hydrophobic graphene surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae S; Kihm, Kenneth D; Kim, Honggoo; Lim, Gyumin; Cheon, Sosan; Lee, Joon S

    2014-07-22

    The wetting and evaporative aggregation of alumina nanofluids (Al2O3) are examined for CVD-synthesized graphene-coated (GC) surfaces that are known as strongly hydrophobic (θcontact ≈ 90°). Our findings are compared to those associated with a hydrophilic cover glass (CG) substrate (θcontact ≈ 45°). The nanofluidic self-assemblies on the GC substrate are elaborately characterized in terms of the droplet wetting/crack formation, the particle migration time over the evaporative time (CR), the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek forces (FDLVO), and the relative thermal conductivity (KR). The GC substrate forms relatively thicker and larger cracks and requires a longer evaporation time. Both the GC and CG substrates share approximately the same time constant CR, which suggests the formation of coffee-ring patterns for both substrates. The GC shows negative FDLVO, which implies a repulsive force between the nanoparticles and the substrate, and the CG shows a positive FDLVO of attraction. Furthermore, a more than 3 order of magnitude larger thermal conductivity of GC compared to that of CG drives significantly different particle/fluid motions near the drop edge areas between the two substrates.

  1. Soil dehydrogenase in a land degradation-rehabilitation gradient: observations from a savanna site with a wet/dry seasonal cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Ryoichi; Ranamukhaarachchi, Senaratne Leelananda

    2009-01-01

    Soil dehydrogenase activity is a good indicator of overall microbial activity in soil, and it can serve as a good indicator of soil condition. However, seasonal changes in soil moisture content may have an effect on soil dehydrogenase activity, making an accurate assessment of soil condition difficult. In this study, we attempted to determine the significance of soil dehydrogenase activity for assessing soil condition, and we attempted to find a way to account for the influence of soil moisture content on soil dehydrogenase activity.' Soils were sampled in dry evergreen forest (original vegetation), bare ground (severely degraded) and Acacia plantation plots established on bare ground in 1986 and 1987 in Sakaerat, Thailand. Soil physico-chemical characteristics and dehydrogenase activity in the Acacia plantation soil had few differences from those in the evergreen forest soil. Soil dehydrogenase activity varied significantly between the bare ground and the forests regardless of the season (wet or dry), while the season did not produce a significant variation in soil dehydrogenase activity, as determined by repeated measures analysis of variance (p=0.077). The physico-chemical data provided the first principal component as a good measure of soil fertility. Values of soil dehydrogenase activity significantly correlated to scores of the soil samples of the first principal component (R=0.787, pThailand.

  2. GaAs surface wet cleaning by a novel treatment in revolving ultrasonic atomization solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zaijin; Hu Liming; Wang Ye; Yang Ye; Peng Hangyu; Zhang Jinlong; Qin Li; Liu Yun; Wang Lijun, E-mail: lizaijin@126.co [Key Laboratory of Excited State Processes, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)

    2010-03-15

    A novel process for the wet cleaning of GaAs surface is presented. It is designed for technological simplicity and minimum damage generated within the GaAs surface. It combines GaAs cleaning with three conditions consisting of (1) removal of thermodynamically unstable species and (2) surface oxide layers must be completely removed after thermal cleaning, and (3) a smooth surface must be provided. Revolving ultrasonic atomization technology is adopted in the cleaning process. At first impurity removal is achieved by organic solvents; second NH{sub 4}OH:H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O = 1:1:10 solution and HCl: H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O = 1:1:20 solution in succession to etch a very thin GaAs layer, the goal of the step is removing metallic contaminants and forming a very thin oxidation layer on the GaAs wafer surface; NH{sub 4}OH:H{sub 2}O = 1:5 solution is used as the removed oxide layers in the end. The effectiveness of the process is demonstrated by the operation of the GaAs wafer. Characterization of the oxide composition was carried out by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Metal-contamination and surface morphology was observed by a total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and atomic force microscope. The research results show that the cleaned surface is without contamination or metal contamination. Also, the GaAs substrates surface is very smooth for epitaxial growth using the rotary ultrasonic atomization technology. (semiconductor technology)

  3. Susceptibility of Opportunistic Burkholderia glumae to Copper Surfaces Following Wet or Dry Surface Contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouqi Cui

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia glumae has been proposed to have a potential risk to vulnerable communities. In this work, we investigated the antibacterial activity and mechanism of copper surfaces against multi-drug resistant B. glumae from both patients and rice plants. The susceptibility of B. glumae to copper surfaces was noted by a significant decline in viable bacterial counts, relative to the slight reduction of stainless steel and polyvinylchloride, both of which were used as control surfaces. The mode of action of bacterial killing was determined by examing the mutagenicity, DNA damage, copper ions accumulation, and membrane damage in bacterial cells. The results indicated that the cells exposed to copper surfaces did not cause severe DNA lesions or increase the mutation frequencies, but resulted in a loss of cell membrane integrity within minutes. Furthermore, bacterial cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated significantly higher amounts of copper compared to control surfaces. Overall, this study showed that metallic copper had strong antibacterial effect against B. glumae by causing DNA and membrane damage, cellular accumulation of copper, and cell death following DNA degradation, which could be utilized to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination and infection.

  4. Susceptibility of opportunistic Burkholderia glumae to copper surfaces following wet or dry surface contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhouqi; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Yang, Chunlan; Fang, Yuan; Annam, Hussain; Li, Bin; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Guan-Lin; Sun, Guochang

    2014-07-09

    Burkholderia glumae has been proposed to have a potential risk to vulnerable communities. In this work, we investigated the antibacterial activity and mechanism of copper surfaces against multi-drug resistant B. glumae from both patients and rice plants. The susceptibility of B. glumae to copper surfaces was noted by a significant decline in viable bacterial counts, relative to the slight reduction of stainless steel and polyvinylchloride, both of which were used as control surfaces. The mode of action of bacterial killing was determined by examing the mutagenicity, DNA damage, copper ions accumulation, and membrane damage in bacterial cells. The results indicated that the cells exposed to copper surfaces did not cause severe DNA lesions or increase the mutation frequencies, but resulted in a loss of cell membrane integrity within minutes. Furthermore, bacterial cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated significantly higher amounts of copper compared to control surfaces. Overall, this study showed that metallic copper had strong antibacterial effect against B. glumae by causing DNA and membrane damage, cellular accumulation of copper, and cell death following DNA degradation, which could be utilized to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination and infection.

  5. Effect of SUS316L stainless steel surface conditions on the wetting of molten multi-component oxides ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin, E-mail: wangjinustb@gmail.com [Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 808-0196 (Japan); Matsuda, Nozomu [Bar and Wire Product Unit, Nippon steel and Sumitomo Metal Corporation, Fukuoka, 802-8686 (Japan); Shinozaki, Nobuya [Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 808-0196 (Japan); Miyoshi, Noriko [The Center for Instrumental Analysis, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 804-8550 (Japan); Shiraishi, Takanobu [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, 852-8588 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • Multi-component oxides had a good wetting on stainless substrates with pretreatments. • Various substrates surface roughness caused the difference of final contact angles. • The wetting rate was slow on polished substrate due to the slow surface oxidation. - Abstract: A study on the effect of SUS316L stainless steel surface conditions on the wetting behavior of molten multi-component oxides ceramic was performed and aimed to contribute to the further understanding of the application of oxides ceramic in penetration treatment of stainless steel coatings and the deposition of stainless steel cermet coatings. The results show that at 1273 K, different surface pre-treatments (polishing and heating) had an important effect on the wetting behavior. The molten multi-component oxides showed good wettability on both stainless steel substrates, however, the wetting process on the polished substrate was significantly slower than that on the heated substrates. The mechanism of the interfacial reactions was discussed based on the microscopic and thermodynamic analysis, the substrates reacted with oxygen generated from the decomposition of the molten multi-component oxides and oxygen contained in the argon atmosphere, and the oxide film caused the molten multi-component oxides ceramic to spread on the substrates surfaces. For the polished substrate, more time was required for the surface oxidation to reach the surface composition of Heated-S, which resulted in relatively slow spreading and wetting rates. Moreover, the variance of the surface roughness drove the final contact angles to slightly different values following the sequence Polished-S > Heated-S.

  6. Hourly Fluctuations in Labile Soil Phosphorus in Response to Climate Variability in a Wet Tropical Forest, La Selva, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandecar, K. L.; Lawrence, D. C.; Das, R.; Clark, D. A.; Oberbauer, S. F.; Schwendenmann, L.

    2007-05-01

    Tropical rain forests are one of the most productive ecosystems in the world and play a significant role in the global carbon budget. Changes in phosphorus cycling dynamics as a result of on-going climate change have the potential to limit productivity in this ecosystem. Our objective was to determine hourly patterns in labile soil phosphorus throughout the day and explore possible mechanisms driving these patterns. We conducted an in situ experiment on soils from a wet tropical forest at La Selva Biological Station located in N.E. Costa Rica. A variety of climatic and biotic variables including temperature, precipitation, PAR, soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration were measured in order to determine their effect on labile phosphorus. Our results indicate that labile phosphorus does vary significantly throughout the day in response to a combination of climatic variables. An understanding of the mechanisms driving phosphorus availability at fine temporal scales can provide a valuable indicator of long term trends in phosphorus cycling dynamics.

  7. Surface and tribological behaviors of the bioinspired polydopamine thin films under dry and wet conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yang, Fut K; Han, Yougun; Gaikwad, Ravi; Leonenko, Zoya; Zhao, Boxin

    2013-02-11

    Dopamine is a "sticky" biomolecule containing the typical functional groups of mussel adhesive proteins. It can self-polymerize into a nanoscale thin film on various surfaces. We investigated the surface, adhesion, friction, and cracking properties of polydopamine (PDA) thin films for their effective transfer to functional devices and biocompatible coatings. A series of surface characterizations and mechanical tests were performed to reveal the static and dynamic properties of PDA films coated on glass, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and epoxy. We found that PDA films are highly hydrated under wet conditions because of their porous membrane-like nanostructures and hydrophilic functional groups. Upon dehydration, the films form cracks when they are coated on soft substrates due to internal stresses and the large mismatch in elastic modulus. The adhesive pull-off force or the effective work of adhesion increased with the contact time, suggesting dynamic interactions at the interface. A significant decrease in friction forces in water was observed on all three material surfaces coated with PDA; thus, the film might serve as a water-based lubrication coating. We attributed the different behavior of PDA films in air and in water to its hydration effects. These research findings provide insight into the stability, mechanical, and adhesive properties of the PDA films, which are critical for their applications.

  8. Effects of Wet and Dry Finishing and Polishing on Surface Roughness and Microhardness of Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Nasoohi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of wet and dry finishing and polishing on microhardness and roughness of microhybrid and nanohybrid composites.Materials and Methods: Thirty samples were fabricated of each of the Polofil Supra and Aelite Aesthetic All-Purpose Body microhybrid and Grandio and Aelite Aesthetic Enamel nanohybrid composite resins. Each group (n=30 was divided into three subgroups of D, W and C (n=10. Finishing and polishing were performed dry in group D and under water coolant in group W. Group C served as the control group and did not receive finishing and polishing. Surface roughness of samples was measured by a profilometer and their hardness was measured by a Vickers hardness tester. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (P<0.05.Results: The smoothest surfaces with the lowest microhardness were obtained under Mylar strip without finishing/polishing for all composites (P<0.0001. The highest surface roughness was recorded for dry finishing/polishing for all composites (P<0.0001. Dry finishing/polishing increased the microhardness of all composites (P<0.0001.Conclusions: Dry finishing and polishing increases the microhardness and surface roughness of microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. Keywords: Composite Resins; Dental Polishing; Hardness

  9. Wetting Properties of Liquid Lithium on Stainless Steel and Enhanced Stainless Steel Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiflis, P.; Xu, W.; Raman, P.; Andruczyk, D.; Ruzic, D. N.; Curreli, D.

    2012-10-01

    Research into lithium as a first wall material has proven its ability to effectively getter impurities and reduce recycling of hydrogen ions at the wall. Current schemes for introducing lithium into a fusion device consist of lithium evaporators, however, as these devices evolve from pulsed to steady state, new methods will need to be employed such as the LIMIT concept of UIUC, or thin flowing film lithium walls. Critical to their implementation is understanding the interactions of liquid lithium with various surfaces. One such interaction is the wetting of materials by lithium, which may be characterized by the contact angle between the lithium and the surface. Experiments have been performed at UIUC into the contact angle of liquid lithium with a given surface, as well as methods to increase it. To reduce the oxidation rate of the droplets, the experiments were performed in vacuum, using a lithium injector to deposit drops on each surface. Among the materials investigated are stainless steel, both untreated and coated with a diamond like carbon (DLC) layer, molybdenum, and boronized molybdenum. The contact angle and its dependence on temperature is measured.

  10. Droplet impact upon a wet surface with varied fluid and surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Hung, Chun-Yu

    2010-12-01

    The transition boundaries of various regimes characterizing the impact outcomes of a droplet upon a liquid layer of small thickness were investigated experimentally. With careful control of film thickness, the onset of these regimes in terms of a Weber number (We), which expresses the ratio between the droplet inertia and surface force, specifically when the layer depth is smaller than the droplet diameter, has been further clarified, as compared to prior studies. Several turning, non-monotonic trends between We and the film thickness normalized by the droplet diameter, H, were thus identified as H≲1. Furthermore, by adding various percentages of glycerine, the effects of liquid viscosity were revealed, which inhibited disintegration into secondary droplets. We also added surfactant to change the surface tension, leading to further complication of the collision outcome that would be related to the interaction between the crater and the bottom surface. The material effect of the solid surface was hence studied for further demonstration of such interplays. The results showed that increasing viscosity would essentially delay the occurrence of these transitions whereas reducing surface tension might encourage the onset. Therefore a possibility of using additives to manipulate the collision outcomes, while not changing much the constituent fluid properties, is presented. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimizing Oily Wastewater Treatment Via Wet Peroxide Oxidation Using Response Surface Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jianzhong; Wang, Xiuqing; Wang, Xiaoyin [Wuhan Textile Univ., Wuhan (China)

    2014-02-15

    The process of petroleum involves in a large amount of oily wastewater that contains high levels of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and toxic compounds. So they must be treated before their discharge into the receptor medium. In this paper, wet peroxide oxidation (WPO) was adopted to treat the oily wastewater. Central composite design, an experimental design for response surface methodology (RSM), was used to create a set of 31 experimental runs needed for optimizing of the operating conditions. Quadratic regression models with estimated coefficients were developed to describe the COD removals. The experimental results show that WPO could effectively reduce COD by 96.8% at the optimum conditions of temperature 290 .deg. C, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} excess (HE) 0.8, the initial concentration of oily wastewater 3855 mg/L and reaction time 9 min. RSM could be effectively adopted to optimize the operating multifactors in complex WPO process.

  12. Understanding Controls on Wetting at Fluorinated Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane/Polymer Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yi; Tian, Ming; Zhang, Chen; Du, Zhongjie; Mi, Jianguo

    2016-01-12

    Fluorinated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (F-POSS) nanoparticles have been widely used to enhance the hydrophobicity or oleophobicity of polymer films via constructing the specific micro/nanoscale roughness. In this work, we study the oleophobicity of pure and F-POSS-decorated poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films using a dynamic density functional theory approach. The role of nanoparticle size and coverage and the chemical features of F-POSS and the polymer film in the wetting behavior of diiodomethane droplets has been integrated to the remaining ratio of surface potential to quantitatively characterize the corner effect. It is shown that, on the basis of universal force field parameters, the theoretically predicted contact angles are in general agreement with the available experimental data.

  13. Spatial Distribution and Pattern Persistence of Surface Soil Moisture and Temperature Over Prairie from Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daoyi; Engman, Edwin T.; Brutsaert, Wilfried

    1997-01-01

    Images remotely sensed aboard aircraft during FIFE, namely, PBMR (microwave) soil moisture and NS001 thermal infrared surface temperature, were mapped on the same coordinate system covering the 20 km x 20 km experimental site. For both kinds of image data, the frequency distributions were close to symmetric, and the area average compared reasonably well with the ground based measurements. For any image on any given day, the correlation between the remotely sensed values and collocated ground based measurements over the area was usually high in the case of NS001 surface temperature but low in the case of PBMR soil moisture. On the other hand, at any given flux station the correlation between the PBMR and gravimetric soil moisture over all available days was usually high. The correlation pixel by pixel between images of PBMR on different days was generally high. The preservation of the spatial patterns of soil moisture was also evaluated by considering the correlation station by station between ground-based soil moisture measurements on different days; no persistence of spatial pattern was apparent during wet periods, but a definite pattern gradually established itself toward the end of each drying episode. The spatial patterns of surface temperature revealed by NS001 were not preserved even within a single day. The cross-correlations among the two kinds of images and the vegetation index NDVI were normally poor. This suggests that different processes of vegetation growth, and of the near-surface soil water and energy budgets.

  14. Relationship between Mineral Soil Surface Area and the Biological Degradation of Biosolids Added to Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqi Wen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical and biological processes that operate in the soil matrix and on the soil surface are important to the degradation of biosolids in soil. Due to the large surface area of soils it is assumed that the microbial ecology is associated with mineral soil surface area. The total mineral surface areas were determined for soils from eight different fields selected from a long term study (1972–2006 of annual biosolids application to 41 fields in central Illinois varying in size from 3.6 to 66 ha. The surface areas for the soils varied from 1 to 9 m2/g of soil. The biological degradation rates for the eight soils were determined using a biological degradation rate model (DRM and varied from 0.02 to 0.20/year−1. Regression analysis revealed that the degradation rate was positively associated with mineral soil surface area (1 m2/g produces 0.018 year−1 increase in the degradation rate. The annual soil sequestration rate was calculated to increase from 1% to 6% when the soil total surface area increased from 1 to 9 m2/g of soil. Therefore, land application of biosolids is an effective way to enhance carbon sequestration in soils and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  15. Surface wet-ability modification of thin PECVD silicon nitride layers by 40 keV argon ion treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridi, F.; Picciotto, A.; Vanzetti, L.; Iacob, E.; Scolaro, C.

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of wet-ability of liquid drops have been performed on a 30 nm silicon nitride (Si3N4) film deposited by a PECVD reactor on a silicon wafer and implanted by 40 keV argon ions at different doses. Surface treatments by using Ar ion beams have been employed to modify the wet-ability. The chemical composition of the first Si3N4 monolayer was investigated by means of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The surface morphology was tested by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Results put in evidence the best implantation conditions for silicon nitride to increase or to reduce the wet-ability of the biological liquid. This permits to improve the biocompatibility and functionality of Si3N4. In particular experimental results show that argon ion bombardment increases the contact angle, enhances the oxygen content and increases the surface roughness.

  16. Impacts of grass removal on wetting and actual water repellency in a sandy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oostindie Klaas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil water content and actual water repellency were assessed for soil profiles at two sites in a bare and grasscovered plot of a sand pasture, to investigate the impact of the grass removal on both properties. The soil of the plots was sampled six times in vertical transects to a depth of 33 cm between 23 May and 7 October 2002. On each sampling date the soil water contents were measured and the persistence of actual water repellency was determined of field-moist samples. Considerably higher soil water contents were found in the bare versus the grass-covered plots. These alterations are caused by differences between evaporation and transpiration rates across the plots. Noteworthy are the often excessive differences in soil water content at depths of 10 to 30 cm between the bare and grass-covered plots. These differences are a consequence of water uptake by the roots in the grass-covered plots. The water storage in the upper 19 cm of the bare soil was at least two times greater than in the grass-covered soil during dry periods. A major part of the soil profile in the grass-covered plots exhibited extreme water repellency to a depth of 19 cm on all sampling dates, while the soil profile of the bare plots was completely wettable on eight of the twelve sampling dates. Significant differences in persistence of actual water repellency were found between the grass-covered and bare plots.

  17. Estimating surface turbulent heat fluxes from land surface temperature and soil moisture observations using the particle batch smoother

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Dong, Jianzhi; Steele-Dunne, Susan C.; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-11-01

    Surface heat fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere and play a crucial role in meteorology, hydrology, and climate change studies, but in situ observations are costly and difficult. It has been demonstrated that surface heat fluxes can be estimated from assimilation of land surface temperature (LST). One approach is to estimate a neutral bulk heat transfer coefficient (CHN) to scale the sum of turbulent heat fluxes, and an evaporative fraction (EF) that represents the partitioning between fluxes. Here the newly developed particle batch smoother (PBS) is implemented. The PBS makes no assumptions about the prior distributions and is therefore well-suited for non-Gaussian processes. It is also particularly advantageous for parameter estimation by tracking the entire prior distribution of parameters using Monte Carlo sampling. To improve the flux estimation on wet or densely vegetated surfaces, a simple soil moisture scheme is introduced to further constrain EF, and soil moisture observations are assimilated simultaneously. This methodology is implemented with the FIFE 1987 and 1988 data sets. Validation against observed fluxes indicates that assimilating LST using the PBS significantly improves the flux estimates at both daily and half-hourly timescales. When soil moisture is assimilated, the estimated EFs become more accurate, particularly when the surface heat flux partitioning is energy-limited. The feasibility of extending the methodology to use remote sensing observations is tested by limiting the number of LST observations. Results show that flux estimates are greatly improved after assimilating soil moisture, particularly when LST observations are sparse.

  18. Inverse modeling of soil characteristics from surface soil moisture observations: potential and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Loew

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Land surface models (LSM are widely used as scientific and operational tools to simulate mass and energy fluxes within the soil vegetation atmosphere continuum for numerous applications in meteorology, hydrology or for geobiochemistry studies. A reliable parameterization of these models is important to improve the simulation skills. Soil moisture is a key variable, linking the water and energy fluxes at the land surface. An appropriate parameterisation of soil hydraulic properties is crucial to obtain reliable simulation of soil water content from a LSM scheme. Parameter inversion techniques have been developed for that purpose to infer model parameters from soil moisture measurements at the local scale. On the other hand, remote sensing methods provide a unique opportunity to estimate surface soil moisture content at different spatial scales and with different temporal frequencies and accuracies. The present paper investigates the potential to use surface soil moisture information to infer soil hydraulic characteristics using uncertain observations. Different approaches to retrieve soil characteristics from surface soil moisture observations is evaluated and the impact on the accuracy of the model predictions is quantified. The results indicate that there is in general potential to improve land surface model parameterisations by assimilating surface soil moisture observations. However, a high accuracy in surface soil moisture estimates is required to obtain reliable estimates of soil characteristics.

  19. Gamma-ray computed tomography to characterize soil surface sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, L.F.Luiz F. E-mail: lfpires@cena.usp.br; Macedo, Jose R. de; Souza, Manoel D. de; Bacchi, Osny O.S.; Reichardt, Klaus

    2002-09-01

    The application of sewage sludge as a fertilizer on soils may cause compacted surface layers (surface sealing), which can promote changes on soil physical properties. The objective of this work was to study the use of gamma-ray computed tomography, as a diagnostic tool for the evaluation of this sealing process through the measurement of soil bulk density distribution of the soil surface layer of samples subjected to sewage sludge application. Tomographic images were taken with a first generation tomograph with a resolution of 1 mm. The image analysis opened the possibility to obtain soil bulk density profiles and average soil bulk densities of the surface layer and to detect the presence of soil surface sealing. The sealing crust thickness was estimated to be in the range of 2-4 mm.

  20. Directional reflectance factors for monitoring spatial changes in soil surface structure and soil organic matter erosion in agricultural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, H.; Anderson, K.

    2012-04-01

    Soils can experience rapid structural degradation in response to land cover changes, resulting in reduced soil productivity, increased erodibility and a loss of soil organic matter (SOM). The breakdown of soil aggregates through slaking and raindrop impact is linked to organic matter turnover, with subsequently eroded material often displaying proportionally more SOM. A reduction in aggregate stability is reflected in a decline in soil surface roughness (SSR), indicating that a soil structural change can be used to highlight soil vulnerability to SOM loss through mineralisation or erosion. Accurate, spatially-continuous measurements of SSR are therefore needed at a variety of spatial and temporal scales to understand the spatial nature of SOM erosion and deposition. Remotely-sensed data can provide a cost-effective means of monitoring changes in soil surface condition over broad spatial extents. Previous work has demonstrated the ability of directional reflectance factors to monitor soil crusting within a controlled laboratory experiment, due to changes in the levels of self-shadowing effects by soil aggregates. However, further research is needed to test this approach in situ, where other soil variables may affect measured reflectance factors and to investigate the use of directional reflectance factors for monitoring soil erosion processes. This experiment assesses the potential of using directional reflectance factors to monitor changes in SSR, aggregate stability and soil organic carbon (SOC) content for two agricultural conditions. Five soil plots representing tilled and seedbed soils were subjected to different durations of natural rainfall, producing a range of different levels of SSR. Directional reflectance factors were measured concomitantly with sampling for soil structural and biochemical tests at each soil plot. Soil samples were taken to measure aggregate stability (wet sieving), SOC (loss on ignition) and soil moisture (gravimetric method). SSM

  1. Numerical study of the effects of surface topography and chemistry on the wetting transition using the string method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanan, E-mail: ynzhang@suda.edu.cn [School of Mathematical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Ren, Weiqing, E-mail: matrw@nus.edu.sg [Department of Mathematics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119076 (Singapore); Institute of High Performance Computing, Singapore 138632 (Singapore)

    2014-12-28

    Droplets on a solid surface patterned with microstructures can exhibit the composite Cassie-Baxter (CB) state or the wetted Wenzel state. The stability of the CB state is determined by the energy barrier separating it from the wetted state. In this work, we study the CB to Wenzel transition using the string method [E et al., J. Chem. Phys. 126, 164103 (2007); W. Ren and E. Vanden-Eijnden, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134105 (2013)]. We compute the transition states and energy barriers for a three-dimensional droplet on patterned surfaces. The liquid-vapor coexistence is modeled using the mean field theory. Numerical results are obtained for surfaces patterned with straight pillars and nails, respectively. It is found that on both type of surfaces, wetting occurs via infiltration of the liquid in a single groove. The reentrant geometry of nails creates large energy barrier for the wetting of the solid surface compared to straight pillars. We also study the effect of surface chemistry, pillar height, and inter-pillar spacing on the energy barrier and compare it with nails.

  2. Analysis of Wetting and Contact Angle Hysteresis on Chemically Patterned Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xianmin

    2011-01-01

    Wetting and contact angle hysteresis on chemically patterned surfaces in two dimensionsare analyzed from a stationary phase-field model for immiscible two phase fluids. We first study the sharp-interface limit of the model by the method of matched asymptotic expansions. We then justify the results rigorously by the γ-convergence theory for the related variational problem and study the properties of the limiting minimizers. The results also provide a clear geometric picture of the equilibrium configuration of the interface. This enables us to explicitly calculate the total surface energy for the two phase systems on chemically patterned surfaces with simple geometries, namely the two phase flow in a channel and the drop spreading. By considering the quasi-staticmotion of the interface described by the change of volume (or volume fraction), we can follow the change-of-energy landscape which also reveals the mechanism for the stick-slip motion of the interface and contact angle hysteresis on the chemically patterned surfaces. As the interface passes throughpatterned surfaces, we observe not only stick-slip of the interface and switching of the contact angles but also the hysteresis of contact point and contact angle. Furthermore, as the size of the patternde creases to zero, the stick-slip becomes weaker but the hysteresis becomes stronger in the sense that one observes either the advancing contact angle or the receding contact angle (when the interface ismoving in the opposite direction) without the switching in between. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  3. Sampling for Beryllium Surface Contamination using Wet, Dry and Alcohol Wipe Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, Kent

    2004-12-17

    This research project was conducted at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Kansas City Plant, operated by Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, in conjunction with the Safety Sciences Department of Central Missouri State University, to compare relative removal efficiencies of three wipe sampling techniques currently used at Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling with dry Whatman 42 filter paper, with water-moistened (Ghost Wipe) materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Test plates were prepared using 100 mm X 15 mm Pyrex Petri dishes with interior surfaces spray painted with a bond coat primer. To achieve uniform deposition over the test plate surface, 10 ml aliquots of solution containing 1 beryllium and 0.1 ml of metal working fluid were transferred to the test plates and subsequently evaporated. Metal working fluid was added to simulate the slight oiliness common on surfaces in metal working shops where fugitive oil mist accumulates over time. Sixteen test plates for each wipe method (dry, water, and methanol) were processed and sampled using a modification of wiping patterns recommended by OSHA Method 125G. Laboratory and statistical analysis showed that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed significantly more (about twice as much) beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes (p< 0.001), which removed significantly more (about twice as much) residue as dry wipes (p <0.001). Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced residue removal efficiency.

  4. Sampling for Beryllium Surface Contamination using Wet, Dry and Alcohol Wipe Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, Kent [Central Missouri State Univ., Warrensburg, MO (United States)

    2004-12-01

    This research project was conducted at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Kansas City Plant, operated by Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, in conjunction with the Safety Sciences Department of Central Missouri State University, to compare relative removal efficiencies of three wipe sampling techniques currently used at Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling with dry Whatman 42 filter paper, with water-moistened (Ghost Wipe) materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Test plates were prepared using 100 mm X 15 mm Pyrex Petri dishes with interior surfaces spray painted with a bond coat primer. To achieve uniform deposition over the test plate surface, 10 ml aliquots of solution containing 1 beryllium and 0.1 ml of metal working fluid were transferred to the test plates and subsequently evaporated. Metal working fluid was added to simulate the slight oiliness common on surfaces in metal working shops where fugitive oil mist accumulates over time. Sixteen test plates for each wipe method (dry, water, and methanol) were processed and sampled using a modification of wiping patterns recommended by OSHA Method 125G. Laboratory and statistical analysis showed that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed significantly more (about twice as much) beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes (p< 0.001), which removed significantly more (about twice as much) residue as dry wipes (p <0.001). Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced residue removal efficiency.

  5. Evidence for Carbonate Surface Complexation during Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, John S.; Chen, Jeffrey; Benezeth Ep Gisquet, Pascale; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S.; Washton, Nancy M.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2015-07-14

    Continental flood basalts are attractive formations for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide because of their reactive divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4), suitable for long-term trapping of CO2 mineralized as metal carbonates. The goal of this study was to investigate at a molecular level the carbonation products formed during the reaction of forsterite with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) as a function of the concentration of H2O adsorbed to the forsterite surface. Experiments were performed at 50 °C and 90 bar using an in situ IR titration capability, and post-reaction samples were examined by ex situ techniques, including SEM, XPS, FIB-TEM, TGA-MS, and MAS-NMR. Carbonation products and reaction extents varied greatly with adsorbed H2O. We show for the first time evidence of Mg-carbonate surface complexation under wet scCO2 conditions. Carbonate is found to be coordinated to Mg at the forsterite surface in a predominately bidentate fashion at adsorbed H2O concentrations below 27 µmol/m2. Above this concentration and up to 76 µmol/m2, monodentate coordinated complexes become dominant. Beyond a threshold adsorbed H2O concentration of 76 µmol/m2, crystalline carbonates continuously precipitate as magnesite, and the particles that form are hundreds of times larger than the estimated thicknesses of the adsorbed water films of about 7 to 15 Å. At an applied level, these results suggest that mineral carbonation in scCO2 dominated fluids near the wellbore and adjacent to caprocks will be insignificant and limited to surface complexation, unless adsorbed H2O concentrations are high enough to promote crystalline carbonate formation. At a fundamental level, the surface complexes and their dependence on adsorbed H2O concentration give insights regarding forsterite dissolution processes and magnesite nucleation and growth.

  6. Evidence for Carbonate Surface Complexation during Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, John S.; Chen, Jeffrey; Benezeth, Pascale; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S.; Washton, Nancy M.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2015-06-16

    Continental flood basalts are attractive formations for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide because of their reactive divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4), suitable for long-term trapping of CO2 mineralized as metal carbonates. The goal of this study was to investigate at a molecular level the carbonation products formed during the reaction of forsterite with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) as a function of the concentration of H2O adsorbed to the forsterite surface. Experiments were performed at 50 °C and 90 bar using an in situ IR titration capability, and post-reaction samples were examined by ex situ techniques, including SEM, XPS, FIB-TEM, TGA-MS, and MAS-NMR. Carbonation products and reaction extents varied greatly with adsorbed H2O. We show for the first time evidence of Mg-carbonate surface complexation under wet scCO2 conditions. Carbonate is found to be coordinated to Mg at the forsterite surface in a predominately bidentate fashion at adsorbed H2O concentrations below 27 µmol/m2. Above this concentration and up to 76 µmol/m2, monodentate coordinated complexes become dominant. Beyond a threshold adsorbed H2O concentration of 76 µmol/m2, crystalline carbonates continuously precipitate as magnesite, and the particles that form are hundreds of times larger than the estimated thicknesses of the adsorbed water films of about 7 to 15 Å. At an applied level, the implication of these results is that mineral trapping in scCO2 dominated fluids will be insignificant and limited to surface complexation unless adsorbed H2O concentrations are high enough to promote crystalline carbonate formation. At a fundamental level, the surface complexes and their dependence on adsorbed H2O concentration give insights regarding forsterite dissolution processes and magnesite nucleation and growth.

  7. Surface force measurements and simulations of mussel-derived peptide adhesives on wet organic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Zachary A; Rapp, Michael V; Wei, Wei; Mullen, Ryan Gotchy; Wu, Chun; Zerze, Gül H; Mittal, Jeetain; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2016-04-19

    Translating sticky biological molecules-such as mussel foot proteins (MFPs)-into synthetic, cost-effective underwater adhesives with adjustable nano- and macroscale characteristics requires an intimate understanding of the glue's molecular interactions. To help facilitate the next generation of aqueous adhesives, we performed a combination of surface forces apparatus (SFA) measurements and replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations on a synthetic, easy to prepare, Dopa-containing peptide (MFP-3s peptide), which adheres to organic surfaces just as effectively as its wild-type protein analog. Experiments and simulations both show significant differences in peptide adsorption on CH3-terminated (hydrophobic) and OH-terminated (hydrophilic) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), where adsorption is strongest on hydrophobic SAMs because of orientationally specific interactions with Dopa. Additional umbrella-sampling simulations yield free-energy profiles that quantitatively agree with SFA measurements and are used to extract the adhesive properties of individual amino acids within the context of MFP-3s peptide adhesion, revealing a delicate balance between van der Waals, hydrophobic, and electrostatic forces.

  8. The influence of soil type, vegetation cover and soil moisture on spin up behaviour of a land surface model in a monsoonal region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Anwesha; Mandal, Manabottam

    2015-04-01

    Model spin-up is the process through which the model is adequately equilibrated to ensure balance between the mass fields and velocity fields. In this study, an offline one dimensional Noah land surface model is integrated recursively for three years to assess its spin-up behavior at different sites over the Indian Monsoon domain. Several numerical experiments are performed to investigate the impact of soil category, vegetation cover, initial soil moisture and subsequent dry or wet condition on model spin-up. These include simulations with the dominant soil and vegetation covers of this region, different initial soil moisture content (observed soil moisture; dry soil; moderately wet soil; saturated soil), simulations initialized at different rain conditions (no rain; infrequent rain; continuous rain) and different seasons (Winter, Spring, Summer/Pre-Monsoon, Monsoon and Autumn). It is seen that the spin-up behavior of the model depends on the soil type and vegetation cover with soil characteristics having the larger influence. Over India, the model has the longest spin-up in the case of simulations with loamy soil covered with mixed-shrub. It is noted that the model has a significantly longer spin-up when initialized with very low initial soil moisture content than with higher soil moisture content. It is also seen that in general, simulations initialized just before a continuous rainfall event have the least spin-up time. This observation is reinforced by the results from the simulations initialized in different seasons. It is seen that for monsoonal region, the model spin-up time is least for simulations initialized just before the Monsoon. Model initialized during the Monsoon rain episodes has a longer spin-up than that initialized in any other season. Furthermore, it is seen that the model has a shorter spin-up if it reaches the equilibrium state predominantly via drying process and could be as low as two months under quasi-equilibrium condition depending on

  9. Upland soil charcoal in the wet tropical forests of central Guyana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammond, D.S.; ter Steege, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075217120; van der Borg, K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067895298

    2007-01-01

    A soil charcoal survey was undertaken across 60,000 ha of closed-canopy tropical forest in central Guyana to determine the occurrence, ubiquity, and age of past forest fires across a range of terra firme soil types. Samples were clustered around six centers consisting of spatially nested sample stat

  10. Divergent surface and total soil moisture projections under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Alexis; Sheffield, Justin; Milly, Paul C.D.

    2017-01-01

    Land aridity has been projected to increase with global warming. Such projections are mostly based on off-line aridity and drought metrics applied to climate model outputs but also are supported by climate-model projections of decreased surface soil moisture. Here we comprehensively analyze soil moisture projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5, including surface, total, and layer-by-layer soil moisture. We identify a robust vertical gradient of projected mean soil moisture changes, with more negative changes near the surface. Some regions of the northern middle to high latitudes exhibit negative annual surface changes but positive total changes. We interpret this behavior in the context of seasonal changes in the surface water budget. This vertical pattern implies that the extensive drying predicted by off-line drought metrics, while consistent with the projected decline in surface soil moisture, will tend to overestimate (negatively) changes in total soil water availability.

  11. Reconstruction of ploughed soil surface with 3D fractal interpolation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Lu, Z.; Hoogmoed, W.B.; Li, X.

    2014-01-01

    By using a laser profiler, the roughness of ploughed soil surface was obtained. 3D fractal interpolation method was used to interpolate several kinds of reduced measured surface data which were reduced from the original measured ploughed soil surface elevation data in different reduction rates. Also

  12. Surface Chemical Properties of Colloids in Main Soils of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAYI-JIE; YUANCHAO-LIANG

    1991-01-01

    Surface chemical properties of soil colloids are the important factor affecting soil fertility and genesis.To provide scientific basis for soil genetic classification,promotion of soil fertility and reasonable fertilizqation,the specific surface area and electric charge of soil colloids in relation to clay minerals and organic matter are further discussed on the basis of the results obtained from the studies on surface chemical properties of soil colloids in five main soils of China.Results from the studies show that the effect of clay minerals and organic matter on the surface chemical properties of soil colloids is very complicated because the siloxane surface,hydrated oxide surface and organic matter surface do not exist separately,but they are always mixed together and influenced each other.The understanding of the relationship among clay minerals,organic matter and surface chemical properties of soil colloids depends upon further study of the relevant disciplines of soil science,especially the study on the mechanisms of organo-mineral complexes.

  13. A novel technique for investigation of complete and partial anisotropic wetting on structured surface by X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, M.; Guilizzoni, M.; Fest-Santini, S.; Lorenzi, M.

    2015-02-01

    An experimental study about the anisotropic wetting behavior of a surface patterned with parallel grooves is presented as an application example of a novel technique for investigation of complete and partial anisotropic wetting on structured surface by X-ray microtomography. Shape of glycerin droplets on such surface is investigated by X-ray micro computed tomography (microCT) acting as a non-intrusive, full volume 3D microscope with micrometric spatial resolution. The reconstructed drop volumes enable to estimate the exact volumes of the drops, their base contours, and 3D static contact angles, based on true cross-sections of the drop-surface couple. Droplet base contours are compared to approximate geometrical contour shapes proposed in the literature. Contact angles along slices parallel and perpendicular to the grooves direction are compared with each other. The effect of the sessile drop volume on the wetting behavior is discussed. The proposed technique, which is applicable for any structured surface, enables the direct measure of Wenzel ratio based on the microCT scan in the wetted region usually inapproachable by any others. Comparisons with simplified models are presented and congruence of results with respect to the minimum resolution needed is evaluated and commented.

  14. A novel technique for investigation of complete and partial anisotropic wetting on structured surface by X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santini, M., E-mail: maurizio.santini@unibg.it [Department of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Bergamo, Bergamo (Italy); Guilizzoni, M. [Department of Energy, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Fest-Santini, S. [Department of Engineering, University of Bergamo, Bergamo (Italy); Lorenzi, M. [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University London, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    An experimental study about the anisotropic wetting behavior of a surface patterned with parallel grooves is presented as an application example of a novel technique for investigation of complete and partial anisotropic wetting on structured surface by X-ray microtomography. Shape of glycerin droplets on such surface is investigated by X-ray micro computed tomography (microCT) acting as a non-intrusive, full volume 3D microscope with micrometric spatial resolution. The reconstructed drop volumes enable to estimate the exact volumes of the drops, their base contours, and 3D static contact angles, based on true cross-sections of the drop-surface couple. Droplet base contours are compared to approximate geometrical contour shapes proposed in the literature. Contact angles along slices parallel and perpendicular to the grooves direction are compared with each other. The effect of the sessile drop volume on the wetting behavior is discussed. The proposed technique, which is applicable for any structured surface, enables the direct measure of Wenzel ratio based on the microCT scan in the wetted region usually inapproachable by any others. Comparisons with simplified models are presented and congruence of results with respect to the minimum resolution needed is evaluated and commented.

  15. Asymmetric liquid wetting and spreading on surfaces with slanted micro-pillar arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Uni-directional liquid spreading on asymmetric silicone-fabricated nanostructured surfaces has recently been reported. In this work, uniformly deflected polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro-pillars covered with silver films were fabricated. Asymmetric liquid wetting and spreading behaviors in a preferential direction were observed on the slanted micro-pillar surfaces and a micro-scale thin liquid film advancing ahead of the bulk liquid droplet was clearly observed by high-speed video imaging. It is found that the slanted micro-pillar array is able to promote or inhibit the propagation of this thin liquid film in different directions by the asymmetric capillary force. The spreading behavior of the bulk liquid was guided and finally controlled by this micro-scale liquid film. Different spreading regimes are defined by the relationship between the liquid intrinsic contact angle and the critical angles, which were determined by the pillar height, pillar deflection angle and inter-pillar spacing. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  16. Influence of wet oxidation on the surface area and the porosity of some lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Karatepe, N.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    2000-07-01

    Influence of wet oxidation on the surface area and the porosity of lignites was investigated using five different Turkish lignites. Lignite samples were oxidised in aqueous medium in a 1 l Parr autoclave at 423 K under 1.5 MPa partial pressure of oxygen for 60 min. Some physical properties such as surface area, bulk density, apparent density, mean pore radius, and porosity of the original and oxidised lignite samples were determined. For this purpose, BET and mercury intrusion porosimetry techniques were performed. In order to examine the effects of oxidation on the functional groups, FT-IR technique was applied for both original and oxidised lignite samples. On the other hand, some inorganic constituents were eliminated from the samples as a result of in situ formation of sulphuric acid from oxidation of sulphur compounds. The changes taken place in the physical properties were studied considering chemical compositions of the samples and the extent of the interaction between the samples and oxygen. 6 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Superhydrophobic aluminium-based surfaces: Wetting and wear properties of different CVD-generated coating types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, M.; Streller, F.; Simon, F.; Frenzel, R.; White, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    In view of generating superhydrophobic aluminium-based surfaces, this work presents further results for the combination of anodic oxidation as the primary pretreatment method and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) variants for chemical modification producing coatings of 250-1000 nm thickness. In detail, CVD involved the utilisation of i - hexafluoropropylene oxide as precursor within the hot filament CVD process for the deposition of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) coatings at alternative conditions (PTFE-AC) and ii - 1,3,5-trivinyltrimethylcyclotrisiloxane for the deposition of polysiloxane coatings (PSi) by initiated CVD. The substrate material was Al Mg1 subjected to usual or intensified sulphuric acid anodisation pretreatments (SAAu, SAAi, respectively) affording various degrees of surface micro-roughness (SAAu weathering and/or mild wear testing. Superhydrophobicity (SH) was observed with the system SAAi + PTFE-AC similarly to former findings with the standard hot filament CVD PTFE coating variant (SAAi + PTFE-SC). The results indicated that the specific coating morphology made an important contribution to the water-repellency, because even some of the SAAu-based samples tended to reveal SH. Subjecting samples to weathering treatment resulted in a general worsening of the wetting behaviour, primarily limited to the receding contact angles. These tendencies were correlated with the chemical composition of the sample surfaces as analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The wear tests showed, as evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and contact angle measurement, that the PTFE coatings were relatively sensitive to friction. This was connected with a dramatic deterioration of the water-repelling properties. PSi-coated surfaces generally showed rather poor water-repellency, but this coating type was surprisingly resistant towards the applied friction test. From these findings it may be concluded that the combination of hydrophobic fluorine containing structure

  18. Influence of short chain organic acids and bases on the wetting properties and surface energy of submicrometer ceramic powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neirinck, Bram; Soccol, Dimitri; Fransaer, Jan; Van der Biest, Omer; Vleugels, Jef

    2010-08-15

    The effect of short chained organic acids and bases on the surface energy and wetting properties of submicrometer alumina powder was assessed. The surface chemistry of treated powders was determined by means of Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform spectroscopy and compared to untreated powder. The wetting of powders was measured using a modified Washburn method, based on the use of precompacted powder samples. The geometric factor needed to calculate the contact angle was derived from measurements of the porous properties of the powder compacts. Contact angle measurements with several probe liquids before and after modification allowed a theoretical estimation of the surface energy based on the surface tension component theory. Trends in the surface energy components were linked to observations in infrared spectra. The results showed that the hydrophobic character of the precompacted powder depends on both the chain length and polar group of the modifying agent. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Vegetation Patterns on SAR derived Surface Soil Moisture Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, C. N.; Schneider, K.

    2012-12-01

    conditions, are used to derive biomass information independently from the soil moisture retrieval. Nevertheless, the canopy still has an attenuation effect on the co-polarized backscattering, but this can be corrected by using the vegetation information obtained from the other SAR observables. For constant permittivity states of the soil surface the canopy can have a disturbing effect of up to 6dB. This is the same order of magnitude of dynamic range as observed for soil moisture values ranging from 10 - 40 Vol.-% over bare surfaces. The present study is focused on the Rur catchment (Germany) where the effect of different vegetation patterns on the spatial distribution of near-surface soil water content is investigated by comparison between ALOS PALSAR derived biomass and soil moisture maps. The findings show that the impact of vegetation on the near-surface moisture contents may vary considerably. For wet and intermediate soil conditions where enough water is available for transpiration it was observed that the near-surface moisture content tends to be higher on vegetated fields. This may be explained by the fact that the canopy hampers evaporations due to lack of air movement while the plants uptake water from deeper soil layers. However if the water supply is low the plant water consumption can also lead to accelerated drying of the soil surface. This was especially observed for cereal crops.

  20. Changes in structural stability with soil surface degradation. Consequences for soil erosion processes

    OpenAIRE

    Darboux, Frédéric; Le Bissonnais, Yves

    2006-01-01

    Hydrological Science, section 39 - Soil Science Systems, section 23: Dryland hydrologySRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU06-A-07243; Erosion and sediment transport processes depend on the soil surface properties. Because of water flow and other processes (climate, agricultural practices, biological activity, etc.), the properties of the soil surface can undergo significant changes that affect erosion. As a consequence, understanding of the transport processes and improvement in soil erosion prediction...

  1. Assessing soil surface roughness decay during simulated rainfall by multifractal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vidal Vázquez

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding and describing the spatial characteristics of soil surface microrelief are required for modelling overland flow and erosion. We employed the multifractal approach to characterize topographical point elevation data sets acquired by high resolution laser scanning for assessing the effect of simulated rainfall on microrelief decay. Three soil surfaces with different initial states or composition and rather smooth were prepared on microplots and subjected to successive events of simulated rainfall. Soil roughness was measured on a 2×2 mm2 grid, initially, i.e. before rain, and after each simulated storm, yielding a total of thirteen data sets for three rainfall sequences. The vertical microrelief component as described by the statistical index random roughness (RR exhibited minor changes under rainfall in two out of three study cases, which was due to the imposed wet initial state constraining aggregate breakdown. The effect of cumulative rainfall on microrelief decay was also assessed by multifractal analysis performed with the box-count algorithm. Generalized dimension, Dq, spectra allowed characterization of the spatial variation of soil surface microrelief measured at the microplot scale. These Dq spectra were also sensitive to temporal changes in soil surface microrelief, so that in all the three study rain sequences, the initial soil surface and the surfaces disturbed by successive storms displayed great differences in their degree of multifractality. Therefore, Multifractal parameters best discriminate between successive soil stages under a given rain sequence. Decline of RR and multifractal parameters showed little or no association.

  2. Control on wetting properties of spin-deposited silica films by surface silylation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, A. Venkateswara, E-mail: avrao2012@gmail.com [Air Glass Laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, Maharashtra (India); Latthe, Sanjay S.; Dhere, Sunetra L.; Pawar, Swapnali S. [Air Glass Laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, Maharashtra (India); Imai, Hiroaki [Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Ganesan, V. [CSR, Indore Centre, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017, Madhyapradesh (India); Gupta, Satish C.; Wagh, Pratap B. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2010-01-15

    Control on the wettability of solid materials by liquid is a classical and key issue in surface engineering. Optically transparent water-repellent silica films have been spin-deposited on glass substrates at room temperature ({approx}27 deg. C). The wetting behavior of silica films was controlled by surface silylation method using dimethylchlorosilane (DMCS) as a silylating reagent. A coating sol was prepared by keeping the molar ratio of methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) precursor, methanol (MeOH) solvent, water (H{sub 2}O) constant at 1:8.8:2.64 respectively, with 4 M NH{sub 4}OH as a catalyst throughout the experiments and the amount of DMCS in hexane was varied from 0 to 12 vol.%. It was found that with an increase in vol.% of DMCS, the water contact angle values of the films increased from 78 deg. to 136 deg. At 12 vol.% of DMCS, the film shows static water contact angle as high as 136 deg. and water sliding angle as low as 18 deg. The hydrophobic silica films retained their water repellency up to a temperature 295 deg. C and above this temperature the films show superhydrophilic behavior. These results are compared with our earlier research work done on silylation of silica surface using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDZ) and trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS). The hydrophobic silica films were characterized by taking into consideration the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermo gravimetric-differential thermal (TG-DT) analyses, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), % of optical transmission, thermal and chemical aging tests, humidity tests, static and dynamic water contact angle measurements.

  3. Control on wetting properties of spin-deposited silica films by surface silylation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, A. Venkateswara; Latthe, Sanjay S.; Dhere, Sunetra L.; Pawar, Swapnali S.; Imai, Hiroaki; Ganesan, V.; Gupta, Satish C.; Wagh, Pratap B.

    2010-01-01

    Control on the wettability of solid materials by liquid is a classical and key issue in surface engineering. Optically transparent water-repellent silica films have been spin-deposited on glass substrates at room temperature (˜27 °C). The wetting behavior of silica films was controlled by surface silylation method using dimethylchlorosilane (DMCS) as a silylating reagent. A coating sol was prepared by keeping the molar ratio of methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) precursor, methanol (MeOH) solvent, water (H 2O) constant at 1:8.8:2.64 respectively, with 4 M NH 4OH as a catalyst throughout the experiments and the amount of DMCS in hexane was varied from 0 to 12 vol.%. It was found that with an increase in vol.% of DMCS, the water contact angle values of the films increased from 78° to 136°. At 12 vol.% of DMCS, the film shows static water contact angle as high as 136° and water sliding angle as low as 18°. The hydrophobic silica films retained their water repellency up to a temperature 295 °C and above this temperature the films show superhydrophilic behavior. These results are compared with our earlier research work done on silylation of silica surface using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDZ) and trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS). The hydrophobic silica films were characterized by taking into consideration the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermo gravimetric-differential thermal (TG-DT) analyses, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), % of optical transmission, thermal and chemical aging tests, humidity tests, static and dynamic water contact angle measurements.

  4. Wetting Splashing

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Peichun; Dijkstra, Remko; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    We present fluid dynamics videos illustrating wetting splashing-produced by water drop impact onto hydrophobic microstructures at high impact velocity ($\\sim 3$ ms$^{-1}$). The substrate consists of regular and transparent microtextures in square or hexagonal lattice, yielding a high contact angle of $\\sim 150 ^\\circ$. Our high speed top-or-bottom view recordings through the transparent surface shed light on the solid-liquid-air interfaces at impact. Despite the superhydrophobicity of the latticed micropillars (of a periodicity of $10 {\\mu}m), water droplet wets a certain central area and moreover entraps an air bubble beneath the droplet. Besides the central wet area, lamella surf on air splashing outward at high impinging velocity. The effects of micropatterns and air pressure on the impact outcome are also examined. We show that microscopic boundary condition, imposed by the solid texture, profoundly influences the macroscopic flow dynamics upon superhydrophobic surfaces at high impinging velocity. In addi...

  5. Understanding the wetting properties of nanostructured selenium coatings: the role of nanostructured surface roughness and air-pocket formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran PA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Phong A Tran,1,2 Thomas J Webster31Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2The Particulate Fluid Processing Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 3Department of Chemical Engineering and Program in Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Wetting properties of biomaterials, in particular nanomaterials, play an important role, as these influence interactions with biological elements, such as proteins, bacteria, and cells. In this study, the wetting phenomenon of titanium substrates coated with selenium nanoparticles was studied using experimental and mathematical modeling tools. Importantly, these selenium-coated titanium substrates were previously reported to increase select protein adsorption (such as vitronectin and fibronectin, to decrease bacteria growth, and increase bone cell growth. Increased selenium nanoparticle coating density resulted in higher contact angles but remained within the hydrophilic regime. This trend was found in disagreement with the Wenzel model, which is widely used to understand the wetting properties of rough surfaces. The trend also did not fit well with the Cassie–Baxter model, which was developed to understand the wetting properties of composite surfaces. A modified wetting model was thus proposed in this study, to understand the contributing factors of material properties to the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of these nanostructured selenium-coated surfaces. The analysis and model created in this study can be useful in designing and/or understanding the wetting behavior of numerous biomedical materials and in turn, biological events (such as protein adsorption as well as bacteria and mammalian cell functions.Keywords: hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity, Wenzel model, Cassie–Baxter model, free energy, implant material, proteins, cells, bacteria

  6. Influence of structured sidewalls on the wetting states and superhydrophobic stability of surfaces with dual-scale roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huaping; Zhu, Kai; Wu, Bingbing; Lou, Jia; Zhang, Zheng; Chai, Guozhong

    2016-09-01

    The superhydrophobicity of biological surfaces with dual-scale roughness has recently received considerable attention because of the unique wettability of such surfaces. Based on this, artificial micro/nano hierarchical structures with structured sidewalls and smooth sidewalls were designed and the influences of sidewall configurations (i.e., structured and smooth) on the wetting state of micro/nano hierarchical structures were systematically investigated based on thermodynamics and the principle of minimum free energy. Wetting transition and superhydrophobic stability were then analyzed for a droplet on dual-scale rough surfaces with structured and smooth sidewalls. Theoretical analysis results show that dual-scale rough surfaces with structured sidewalls have a larger "stable superhydrophobic region" than those with smooth sidewalls. The dual-scale rough surfaces with smooth sidewalls can enlarge the apparent contact angle (ACA) without improvement in the superhydrophobic stability. By contrast, dual-scale rough surfaces with structured sidewalls present an advantage over those with smooth sidewalls in terms of enlarging ACA and enhancing superhydrophobic stability. The proposed thermodynamic model is valid when compared with previous experimental data and numerical analysis results, which is helpful for designing and understanding the wetting states and superhydrophobic stability of surfaces with dual-scale roughness.

  7. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ju-pei; Chen, C R; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-20

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0-10 cm) was significantly higher in the B2 treatment compared with the B0 and B4 treatments. Non-metric multidimensional analysis (NMDS) of bacterial community showed clear separation of the soil bacterial community structure among different fire frequency regimes and between the depths. Different frequency fire did not have a substantial effect on bacterial composition at phylum level or bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance. Soil pH and C:N ratio were the major drivers for bacterial community structure in the most frequent fire treatment (B2), while other factors (EC, DOC, DON, MBC, NH4(+), TC and TN) were significant in the less frequent burning and no burning treatments (B4 and B0). This study suggested that burning had a dramatic impact on bacterial diversity but not abundance with more frequent fire.

  8. Assessment of seasonal soil moisture forecasts over Southern South America with emphasis on dry and wet events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spennemann, Pablo; Rivera, Juan Antonio; Osman, Marisol; Saulo, Celeste; Penalba, Olga

    2017-04-01

    The importance of forecasting extreme wet and dry conditions from weeks to months in advance relies on the need to prevent considerable socio-economic losses, mainly in regions of large populations and where agriculture is a key value for the economies, like Southern South America (SSA). Therefore, to improve the understanding of the performance and uncertainties of seasonal soil moisture and precipitation forecasts over SSA, this study aims to: 1) perform a general assessment of the Climate Forecast System version-2 (CFSv2) soil moisture and precipitation forecasts; and 2) evaluate the CFSv2 ability to represent an extreme drought event merging observations with forecasted Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) and the Standardized Soil Moisture Anomalies (SSMA) based on GLDAS-2.0 simulations. Results show that both SPI and SSMA forecast skill are regionally and seasonally dependent. In general a fast degradation of the forecasts skill is observed as the lead time increases with no significant metrics for forecast lead times longer than 2 months. Based on the assessment of the 2008-2009 extreme drought event it is evident that the CFSv2 forecasts have limitations regarding the identification of drought onset, duration, severity and demise, considering both meteorological (SPI) and agricultural (SSMA) drought conditions. These results have some implications upon the use of seasonal forecasts to assist agricultural practices in SSA, given that forecast skill is still too low to be useful for lead times longer than 2 months.

  9. Long term repeated fire disturbance alters soil bacterial diversity but not the abundance in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ju-Pei; Chen, C. R.; Lewis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Effects of fire on biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem are widely acknowledged, while few studies have focused on the bacterial community under the disturbance of long-term frequent prescribed fire. In this study, three treatments (burning every two years (B2), burning every four years (B4) and no burning (B0)) were applied for 38 years in an Australian wet sclerophyll forest. Results showed that bacterial alpha diversity (i.e. bacterial OTU) in the top soil (0–10 cm) was significantly higher in the B2 treatment compared with the B0 and B4 treatments. Non-metric multidimensional analysis (NMDS) of bacterial community showed clear separation of the soil bacterial community structure among different fire frequency regimes and between the depths. Different frequency fire did not have a substantial effect on bacterial composition at phylum level or bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance. Soil pH and C:N ratio were the major drivers for bacterial community structure in the most frequent fire treatment (B2), while other factors (EC, DOC, DON, MBC, NH4+, TC and TN) were significant in the less frequent burning and no burning treatments (B4 and B0). This study suggested that burning had a dramatic impact on bacterial diversity but not abundance with more frequent fire.

  10. Soil Carbon Dioxide Production and Surface Fluxes: Subsurface Physical Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk, D.; Kellman, L.; Beltrami, H.

    Soil respiration is a critical determinant of landscape carbon balance. Variations in soil temperature and moisture patterns are important physical processes controlling soil respiration which need to be better understood. Relationships between soil respi- ration and physical controls are typically addressed using only surface flux data but other methods also exist which permit more rigorous interpretation of soil respira- tion processes. Here we use a combination of subsurface CO_{2} concentrations, surface CO_{2} fluxes and detailed physical monitoring of the subsurface envi- ronment to examine physical controls on soil CO_{2} production at four climate observatories in Eastern Canada. Results indicate that subsurface CO_{2} produc- tion is more strongly correlated to the subsurface thermal environment than the surface CO_{2} flux. Soil moisture was also found to have an important influence on sub- surface CO_{2} production, particularly in relation to the soil moisture - soil profile diffusivity relationship. Non-diffusive profile CO_{2} transport appears to be im- portant at these sites, resulting in a de-coupling of summertime surface fluxes from subsurface processes and violating assumptions that surface CO_{2} emissions are the result solely of diffusion. These results have implications for the study of soil respiration across a broad range of terrestrial environments.

  11. Wetting properties of fungi mycelium alter soil infiltration and soil water repellency in a γ-sterilized wettable and repellent soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Henry Wai; Goh, Yit Kheng; Vujanovic, Vladimir; Si, Bing Cheng

    2012-12-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) has a drastic impact on soil quality resulting in reduced infiltration, increased runoff, increased leaching, reduced plant growth, and increased soil erosion. One of the causes of SWR is hydrophobic fungal structures and exudates that change the soil-water relationship. The objective of this study was to determine whether SWR and infiltration could be manipulated through inoculation with fungi. The effect of fungi on SWR was investigated through inoculation of three fungal strains (hydrophilic -Fusarium proliferatum, chrono-amphiphilic -Trichoderma harzianum, and hydrophobic -Alternaria sp.) on a water repellent soil (WR-soil) and a wettable soil (W-soil). The change in SWR and infiltration was assessed by the water repellency index and cumulative infiltration respectively. F. proliferatum decreased the SWR on WR-soil and slightly increased SWR in W-soil, while Alternaria sp. increased SWR in both the W-soil and the WR-soil. Conversely T. harzianum increased the SWR in the W-soil and decreased the SWR in the WR-soil. All strains showed a decrease in infiltration in W-soil, while only the F. proliferatum and T. harzianum strain showed improvement in infiltration in the WR-soil. The ability of fungi to alter the SWR and enmesh soil particles results in changes to the infiltration dynamics in soil. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of biochar addition on short-term N2O and CO2 emissions during repeated drying and wetting of an anthropogenic alluvial soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Lee, Xinqing; Theng, Benny K G; Wang, Bing; Cheng, Jianzhong; Wang, Qian

    2016-06-07

    Agricultural soils are an important source of greenhouse gases (GHG). Biochar application to such soils has the potential of mitigating global anthropogenic GHG emissions. Under irrigation, the topsoils in arid regions experience repeated drying and wetting during the crop growing season. Biochar incorporation into these soils would change the soil microbial environment and hence affect GHG emissions. Little information, however, is available regarding the effect of biochar addition on carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from agricultural soils undergoing repeated drying and wetting. Here, we report the results of a 49-day aerobic incubation experiment, incorporating biochar into an anthropogenic alluvial soil in an arid region of Xinjiang Province, China, and measuring CO2 and N2O emissions. Under both drying-wetting and constantly moist conditions, biochar amendment significantly increased cumulative CO2 emission. At the same time, there was a significant reduction (up to ~20 %) in cumulative N2O emission, indicating that the addition of biochar to irrigated agricultural soils may effectively slow down global warming in arid regions of China.

  13. Borneol Is a TRPM8 Agonist that Increases Ocular Surface Wetness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gui-Lan; Lei, Ming; Zhou, Lu-Ping; Zou, Fangdong

    2016-01-01

    Borneol is a compound widely used in ophthalmic preparations in China. Little is known about its exact role in treating eye diseases. Here we report that transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel is a pharmacological target of borneol and mediates its therapeutic effect in the eyes. Ca2+ measurement and electrophysiological recordings revealed that borneol activated TRPM8 channel in a temperature- and dose-dependent manner, which was similar to but less effective than the action of menthol, an established TRPM8 agonist. Borneol significantly increased tear production in guinea pigs without evoking nociceptive responses at 25°C, but failed to induce tear secretion at 35°C. In contrast, menthol evoked tearing response at both 25 and 35°C. TRPM8 channel blockers N-(3-Aminopropyl)-2-[(3-methylphenyl)methoxy]-N-(2-thienylmethyl)benzamide hydrochloride (AMTB) and N-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-4-(3-chloropyridin-2-yl)piperazine-1-carboxamide (BCTC) abolished borneol- and menthol-induced tear secretion. Borneol at micromolar concentrations did not affect the viability of human corneal epithelial cells. We conclude that borneol can activate the cold-sensing TRPM8 channel and modestly increase ocular surface wetness, which suggests it is an active compound in ophthalmic preparations and particularly useful in treating dry eye syndrome. PMID:27448228

  14. Motion and shape of partially non-wetting drops on inclined surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthenveettil, Baburaj A.; Senthilkumar K, Vijaya; Hopfinger, E. J.; IIT Madras-LEGI Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    We study high Reynolds number (Re) motion of partially non- wetting liquid drops on inclined surfaces using (i) water on Fluoro-Alkyl Silane (FAS) coated glass and (ii) mercury on glass. The high hysteresis (35°) water drop experiments have been conducted for a range of inclination angles 26° mercury on glass experiments, 5 .5° >103 for water and Re >> 19 for mercury, the observed velocities are accounted for by a boundary layer flow model. The dimensionless velocity in the inertial regime, Ca√{ Re } scales as the modified Bond number (Bom), while Ca Bom at low Re . We show that even at high Re , the dynamic contact angles (θd) depend only on Ca , similar to that in low Re drops. Only the model by Shikhmurzaev is consistent with the variation of dynamic contact angles in both mercury and water drops. We show that the corner transition at the rear of the mercury drop occurs at a finite, receding contact angle, which is predicted by a wedge flow model that we propose. For water drops, there is a direct transition to a rivulet from the oval shape at a critical ratio of receding to static contact angles.

  15. Effect of Wet Surface Treated Nano-SiO2 on Mechanical Properties of Polypropylene Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dongbo; FENG Yujie; HAN Liwei; TIAN Yan

    2008-01-01

    Nano-SiO2/polypropylene composite was prepared by melt-blending process. The nano-SiO2 particles were organized by wet process surface treatment with silane coupling agent KH-570. The effect of mass fraction of nano-SiO2 particles and dosage of KH-570 on the toughening and strengthening of PP matrix were investigated based on the fractography of impact notch and the analysis of crystal structure by X-ray and dispersive structure of nano-SiO2 by TEM. Results show that the impact and flexural strength and modulus of the composite are improved obviously with low loading of nano-SiO2 (3wt%-5wt%), and the izod impact strength of PP increases twice with 4wt% nano-SiO2. The nano-SiO2 particles treated can disperse into the matrix resin, which has evident heterogeneous nucleation effects on the crystallization of PP. The optimal toughening and strengthening effects of PP matrix can be obtained when the content of nano-SiO2 and KH-570 are 4wt% and 3wt%, respectively.

  16. Borneol Is a TRPM8 Agonist that Increases Ocular Surface Wetness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-Lan Chen

    Full Text Available Borneol is a compound widely used in ophthalmic preparations in China. Little is known about its exact role in treating eye diseases. Here we report that transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8 channel is a pharmacological target of borneol and mediates its therapeutic effect in the eyes. Ca2+ measurement and electrophysiological recordings revealed that borneol activated TRPM8 channel in a temperature- and dose-dependent manner, which was similar to but less effective than the action of menthol, an established TRPM8 agonist. Borneol significantly increased tear production in guinea pigs without evoking nociceptive responses at 25°C, but failed to induce tear secretion at 35°C. In contrast, menthol evoked tearing response at both 25 and 35°C. TRPM8 channel blockers N-(3-Aminopropyl-2-[(3-methylphenylmethoxy]-N-(2-thienylmethylbenzamide hydrochloride (AMTB and N-(4-tert-butylphenyl-4-(3-chloropyridin-2-ylpiperazine-1-carboxamide (BCTC abolished borneol- and menthol-induced tear secretion. Borneol at micromolar concentrations did not affect the viability of human corneal epithelial cells. We conclude that borneol can activate the cold-sensing TRPM8 channel and modestly increase ocular surface wetness, which suggests it is an active compound in ophthalmic preparations and particularly useful in treating dry eye syndrome.

  17. Influence of structured sidewalls on the wetting states and superhydrophobic stability of surfaces with dual-scale roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huaping, E-mail: wuhuaping@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of E& M (Zhejiang University of Technology), Ministry of Education & Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou 310014 (China); State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhu, Kai; Wu, Bingbing [Key Laboratory of E& M (Zhejiang University of Technology), Ministry of Education & Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Lou, Jia [Piezoelectric Device Laboratory, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China); Zhang, Zheng [Key Laboratory of E& M (Zhejiang University of Technology), Ministry of Education & Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Chai, Guozhong, E-mail: chaigz@zjut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of E& M (Zhejiang University of Technology), Ministry of Education & Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou 310014 (China)

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Apparent contact angle equation of all wetting states on dual-scale rough surfaces is derived. • Structured sidewalls can improve superhydrophobicity than smooth sidewalls. • Structured sidewalls can enlarge ACA than smooth sidewalls. • Structured sidewalls present an advantage over smooth sidewalls in terms of enhancing superhydrophobic stability. - Abstract: The superhydrophobicity of biological surfaces with dual-scale roughness has recently received considerable attention because of the unique wettability of such surfaces. Based on this, artificial micro/nano hierarchical structures with structured sidewalls and smooth sidewalls were designed and the influences of sidewall configurations (i.e., structured and smooth) on the wetting state of micro/nano hierarchical structures were systematically investigated based on thermodynamics and the principle of minimum free energy. Wetting transition and superhydrophobic stability were then analyzed for a droplet on dual-scale rough surfaces with structured and smooth sidewalls. Theoretical analysis results show that dual-scale rough surfaces with structured sidewalls have a larger “stable superhydrophobic region” than those with smooth sidewalls. The dual-scale rough surfaces with smooth sidewalls can enlarge the apparent contact angle (ACA) without improvement in the superhydrophobic stability. By contrast, dual-scale rough surfaces with structured sidewalls present an advantage over those with smooth sidewalls in terms of enlarging ACA and enhancing superhydrophobic stability. The proposed thermodynamic model is valid when compared with previous experimental data and numerical analysis results, which is helpful for designing and understanding the wetting states and superhydrophobic stability of surfaces with dual-scale roughness.

  18. Evidence for Carbonate Surface Complexation during Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, John S; Chen, Jeffrey; Bénézeth, Pascale; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S; Washton, Nancy M; Thompson, Christopher J; Martin, Paul F; McGrail, B Peter; Rosso, Kevin M; Felmy, Andrew R; Schaef, Herbert T

    2015-07-14

    Continental flood basalts are attractive formations for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide because of their reactive divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4), suitable for long-term trapping of CO2 mineralized as metal carbonates. The goal of this study was to investigate at a molecular level the carbonation products formed during the reaction of forsterite with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) as a function of the concentration of H2O adsorbed to the forsterite surface. Experiments were performed at 50 °C and 90 bar using an in situ IR titration capability, and postreaction samples were examined by ex situ techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), focused ion beam transmission electron microscopy (FIB-TEM), thermal gravimetric analysis mass spectrometry (TGA-MS), and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). Carbonation products and reaction extents varied greatly with adsorbed H2O. We show for the first time evidence of Mg-carbonate surface complexation under wet scCO2 conditions. Carbonate is found to be coordinated to Mg at the forsterite surface in a predominately bidentate fashion at adsorbed H2O concentrations below 27 μmol/m(2). Above this concentration and up to 76 μmol/m(2), monodentate coordinated complexes become dominant. Beyond a threshold adsorbed H2O concentration of 76 μmol/m(2), crystalline carbonates continuously precipitate as magnesite, and the particles that form are hundreds of times larger than the estimated thicknesses of the adsorbed water films of about 7 to 15 Å. At an applied level, these results suggest that mineral carbonation in scCO2 dominated fluids near the wellbore and adjacent to caprocks will be insignificant and limited to surface complexation, unless adsorbed H2O concentrations are high enough to promote crystalline carbonate formation. At a fundamental level, the surface complexes and their dependence on adsorbed H2O

  19. Controlling factors of surface soil moisture temporal stability at watershed scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lingna; Chen, Xi; Dong, Jianzhi; Gao, Man

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture plays a significant role in the land surface-atmosphere interactions. Temporal stability was frequently used for estimating areal mean soil moisture using limited number of point measurements. This study investigated the factors that determine soil moisture temporal stability using simulated high spatial resolution soil moisture data at watershed scale. Results show locations under dominate vegetation cover and with low topographic wetness index (TI) values are likely to provide reasonable areal mean soil moisture estimates. We demonstrated that including the information of vegetation cover and TI can effectively reduce the number of the sampling locations that required for determining the representative point. The length of sampling period is also shown to be important in correctly determining the representative point. When 10 sampling points were used, a sampling period of approximately 300 days can provide robust areal mean soil moisture estimates of the entire study period of 9 years. The presented study may be useful for improving our skills in applying the temporal stability method for areal mean soil moisture estimating, and hence remote sensing product validation.

  20. Low adhesion, non-wetting phosphonate self-assembled monolayer films formed on copper oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, E; DeRose, J A; Bhushan, B; Hipps, K W

    2009-07-01

    Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films have been formed on oxidized copper (Cu) substrates by reaction with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecylphosphonic acid (PFDP), octadecylphosphonic acid (ODP), decylphosphonic acid (DP), and octylphosphonic acid (OP) and then investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurement (CAM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The presence of alkyl phosphonate molecules, PFDP, ODP, DP, and OP, on Cu were confirmed by CAM and XPS analysis. No alkyl phosphonate molecules were seen by XPS on unmodified Cu as a control. The PFDP/Cu and ODP/Cu SAMs were found to be very hydrophobic having water sessile drop static contact angles of more than 140 degrees , while DP/Cu and OP/Cu have contact angles of 119 degrees and 76 degrees , respectively. PFDP/Cu, ODP/Cu, DP/Cu, and OP/Cu SAMs were studied by friction force microscopy, a derivative of AFM, to better understand their micro/nanotribological properties. PFDP/Cu, ODP/Cu, and DP/Cu had comparable adhesive force, which is much lower than that for unmodified Cu. ODP/Cu had the lowest friction coefficient followed by PFDP/Cu, DP/Cu, and OP/Cu while unmodified Cu had the highest. XPS data gives some indication that a bidentate bond forms between the alkyl phosphonate molecules and the oxidized Cu surface. Hydrophobic phosphonate SAMs could be useful as corrosion inhibitors in micro/nanoelectronic devices and/or as promoters for anti-wetting, low adhesion surfaces.

  1. Effect of Wet Settlement on Mercury in Alpine Soil in Mercury Mining Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEJIN-LIN; TANHONG

    1995-01-01

    There is abundance of Mercury mine resurces in the Fanjinshan Mountain,Mining mercury has a long history there,The concentration of geseous Hg produced in smelting He reaches 20-50mg/m3 in the tail gas.Because mercury element is an easily transferring microelement,the paper talks about the effect of mercury in Hg mining in Guizhou Province on alpine soil,analyses Hg content in alpine soil at 2000 m of relative elevation in the Hg mining area,and explores for causes of the Hg pollution.

  2. The global distribution and dynamics of surface soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Kaighin A.; Alemohammad, Seyed Hamed; Akbar, Ruzbeh; Konings, Alexandra G.; Yueh, Simon; Entekhabi, Dara

    2017-01-01

    Surface soil moisture has a direct impact on food security, human health and ecosystem function. It also plays a key role in the climate system, and the development and persistence of extreme weather events such as droughts, floods and heatwaves. However, sparse and uneven observations have made it difficult to quantify the global distribution and dynamics of surface soil moisture. Here we introduce a metric of soil moisture memory and use a full year of global observations from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive mission to show that surface soil moisture--a storage believed to make up less than 0.001% of the global freshwater budget by volume, and equivalent to an, on average, 8-mm thin layer of water covering all land surfaces--plays a significant role in the water cycle. Specifically, we find that surface soil moisture retains a median 14% of precipitation falling on land after three days. Furthermore, the retained fraction of the surface soil moisture storage after three days is highest over arid regions, and in regions where drainage to groundwater storage is lowest. We conclude that lower groundwater storage in these regions is due not only to lower precipitation, but also to the complex partitioning of the water cycle by the surface soil moisture storage layer at the land surface.

  3. A lattice Boltzmann method for incompressible two-phase flows on partial wetting surface with large density ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Y. Y.; Zu, Y. Q.

    2007-11-01

    This paper reports a new numerical scheme of the lattice Boltzmann method for calculating liquid droplet behaviour on particle wetting surfaces typically for the system of liquid-gas of a large density ratio. The method combines the existing models of Inamuro et al. [T. Inamuro, T. Ogata, S. Tajima, N. Konishi, A lattice Boltzmann method for incompressible two-phase flows with large density differences, J. Comput. Phys. 198 (2004) 628-644] and Briant et al. [A.J. Briant, P. Papatzacos, J.M. Yeomans, Lattice Boltzmann simulations of contact line motion in a liquid-gas system, Philos. Trans. Roy. Soc. London A 360 (2002) 485-495; A.J. Briant, A.J. Wagner, J.M. Yeomans, Lattice Boltzmann simulations of contact line motion: I. Liquid-gas systems. Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 031602; A.J. Briant, J.M. Yeomans, Lattice Boltzmann simulations of contact line motion: II. Binary fluids, Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 031603] and has developed novel treatment for partial wetting boundaries which involve droplets spreading on a hydrophobic surface combined with the surface of relative low contact angles and strips of relative high contact angles. The interaction between the fluid-fluid interface and the partial wetting wall has been typically considered. Applying the current method, the dynamics of liquid drops on uniform and heterogeneous wetting walls are simulated numerically. The results of the simulation agree well with those of theoretical prediction and show that the present LBM can be used as a reliable way to study fluidic control on heterogeneous surfaces and other wetting related subjects.

  4. Superhydrophobic aluminium-based surfaces: Wetting and wear properties of different CVD-generated coating types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, M., E-mail: michael.thieme@tu-dresden.de [Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Streller, F., E-mail: streller@seas.upenn.edu [Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Simon, F., E-mail: frsimon@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden, Postfach 120 411, 01005 Dresden (Germany); Frenzel, R., E-mail: frenzelr@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden, Postfach 120 411, 01005 Dresden (Germany); White, A.J. [GVD Corporation, 45 Spinelli Place, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    In view of generating superhydrophobic aluminium-based surfaces, this work presents further results for the combination of anodic oxidation as the primary pretreatment method and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) variants for chemical modification producing coatings of 250–1000 nm thickness. In detail, CVD involved the utilisation of i – hexafluoropropylene oxide as precursor within the hot filament CVD process for the deposition of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) coatings at alternative conditions (PTFE-AC) and ii – 1,3,5-trivinyltrimethylcyclotrisiloxane for the deposition of polysiloxane coatings (PSi) by initiated CVD. The substrate material was Al Mg1 subjected to usual or intensified sulphuric acid anodisation pretreatments (SAAu, SAAi, respectively) affording various degrees of surface micro-roughness (SAAu < SAAi) to the oxidic layers. Performance characteristics were evaluated in the original as-coated states and after standardised artificial weathering and/or mild wear testing. Superhydrophobicity (SH) was observed with the system SAAi + PTFE-AC similarly to former findings with the standard hot filament CVD PTFE coating variant (SAAi + PTFE-SC). The results indicated that the specific coating morphology made an important contribution to the water-repellency, because even some of the SAAu-based samples tended to reveal SH. Subjecting samples to weathering treatment resulted in a general worsening of the wetting behaviour, primarily limited to the receding contact angles. These tendencies were correlated with the chemical composition of the sample surfaces as analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The wear tests showed, as evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and contact angle measurement, that the PTFE coatings were relatively sensitive to friction. This was connected with a dramatic deterioration of the water-repelling properties. PSi-coated surfaces generally showed rather poor water-repellency, but this coating type was surprisingly

  5. Variation in soil water uptake and its effect on plant water status in Juglans regia L. during dry and wet seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shou-Jia; Meng, Ping; Zhang, Jin-Song; Wan, Xianchong

    2011-12-01

    Temporal and spatial variations in the water status of walnut trees (Juglans regia L.) and the soil in which they were growing were traced by analyzing the differences in hydrogen isotopes during spring and summer in a 7-year-old walnut stand. Walnut root dynamics were measured in both dry and wet seasons. Walnut roots were mainly distributed in the upper soil (0-30 cm depth), with around 60% of the total root mass in upper soil layers and 40% in deep soil layers (30-80 cm depth). The upper soil layers contributed 68% of the total tree water requirement in the wet season, but only 47% in the dry season. In the wet season, total roots, living roots and new roots were all significantly more abundant than in the dry season. There were significant differences in pre-dawn branch percentage loss of hydraulic conductance (PLC), pre-dawn leaf water potential and transpiration between the dry and wet seasons. Water content in the upper soil layers remarkably influenced xylem water stable-hydrogen isotope (δD) values. Furthermore, there were linear relationships between the xylem water δD value and pre-dawn branch PLC, pre-dawn leaf water potential, transpiration rate and photosynthetic rate. In summary, J. regia was compelled to take a larger amount of water from the deep soil layers in the dry season, but this shift could not prevent water stress in the plant. The xylem water δD values could be used as an indicator to investigate the water stress of plants, besides probing profiles of soil water use.

  6. The influence of regional surface soil moisture anomalies on forest fires in Siberia observed from satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, A.; Balzter, H.; George, C.

    2009-10-01

    Forest fires are frequent in the Siberian taiga and are predicted to increase in frequency as a result of increased fire risk under drought conditions, and prolonged fire seasons caused by climate change. There is, however, some uncertainty as to the extent to which drought influences forest fire frequency at a regional scale. Here, we present an analysis of satellite derived soil moisture anomaly data from ERS-1/2 (ERS: Earth Resources Satellite) scatterometer data and burned area maps from MODIS/AVHRR/ATSR (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer/Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer/Along-Track Scanning Radiometer) over Central Siberia for the years 1992-2000. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship of remotely sensed soil moisture deviations from the long-term mean and fire within the boreal biome on a sub-continental scale. Results show that wet surface soil moisture conditions limit the extent of burned area. They can prevent the outbreak of fires but the magnitude of a negative (dry) deviation does not determine the maximum size of fire affected areas. It is known from the literature, however, that an ignition is more likely to occur under low surface wetness conditions, such as those that we observed during July and August in both permafrost and non-permafrost regions. Although the burned area under drier conditions in July is lowest over non-permafrost, the actual number of fires is as high as over continuous permafrost. Approximately 80% of all events occurred under such conditions during that month. The fire size was below 50 km2 under moist conditions. Larger burned areas have in general not been detected when the surface wetness deviation exceeded +5%.

  7. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  8. Influence of Surface Segregation on Wetting of Sn-Ag-Cu (SAC) Series and Pb-Containing Solder Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozack, M. J.; Suhling, J. C.; Zhang, Y.; Cai, Z.; Lall, P.

    2011-10-01

    Wetting of Sn-Ag-Cu (SAC) series solder alloys to solid substrates is strongly influenced by surface segregation of low-level bulk impurities in the alloys. We report in situ and real-time Auger electron spectroscopy measurements of SAC alloy surface compositions as a function of temperature as the alloys are taken through the melting point. A dramatic increase in the amount of surface C (and frequently O) is observed with temperature, and in some cases the alloy surface is nearly 80 at.% C at the melting point. The C originates from low-level impurities incorporated during alloy synthesis and inhibits wetting because C acts as a blocking layer to reaction between the alloy and substrate. A similar phenomenon has been observed over a wide range of (SAC and non-SAC) alloys synthesized by a variety of techniques. That solder alloy surfaces at melting have a radically different composition from the bulk uncovers a key variable that helps to explain the wide variability in contact angles reported in previous studies of wetting and adhesion.

  9. Effect of low-concentration chlorine dioxide gas against bacteria and viruses on a glass surface in wet environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, H; Fukuda, T; Miura, T; Shibata, T

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of low-concentration chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) gas against model microbes in the wet state on a glass surface. We set up a test room (39 m(3)) and the ClO(2) gas was produced by a ClO(2) gas generator that continuously releases a constant low-concentration ClO(2) gas. Influenza A virus (Flu-A), feline calicivirus (FCV), Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were chosen as the model microbes. The low-concentration ClO(2) gas (mean 0.05 ppmv, 0.14 mg m(-3)) inactivated Flu-A and E. coli (>5 log(10) reductions) and FCV and S. aureus (>2 log(10) reductions) in the wet state on glass dishes within 5 h. The treatment of wet environments in the presence of human activity such as kitchens and bathrooms with the low-concentration ClO(2) gas would be useful for reducing the risk of infection by bacteria and viruses residing on the environmental hard surfaces without adverse effects. This study demonstrates that the low-concentration ClO(2) gas (mean 0.05 ppmv) inactivates various kinds of microbes such as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, enveloped and nonenveloped viruses in the wet state. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Surface atmosphere exchange in dry and a wet regime over the Ganges valley: a comprehensive investigation with direct observations and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanadh, Anusha; Prabhakaran, Thara; Karipot, Anandakumar

    2017-04-01

    Land atmosphere interactions in the Ganges Valley basin is a topic of significant importance as it is most vulnerable region due to extreme weather, air pollution, etc. The complete energy balance observations over this region was conducted as part of the CAIPEEX-IGOC (Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment - Integrated Ground based Observational Campaign) experiment for an entire year. These observations give first insight into the partitioning of energy in this vulnerable environment during the dry and wet regimes, which are typically part of the intraseasonal oscillations during the Indian monsoon season. These transitions wet-dry and dry-wet are poorly represented in GCMs and is the motivation for the detailed investigation here. Observations conducted with micrometeorological tower instrumented with eddy covariance sensors, radiation balance, soil heat flux measurements, microwave radiometer, sodar, radiosonde data are used in the present study. A set of numerical investigations of different Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) schemes is also carried out to investigate features of the diurnal cycle during the wet and dry regimes. General behaviour of both local and nonlocal PBL schemes found from the investigation is to accomplish enhanced mixing, leading to a deeper PBL in the valley. However, observations give clear evidence of residual boundary layer characterised by a weak stratification, playing a key role in the exchange of PBL air mass with that of free atmosphere. Impact of changes in parameterization and controlling factors on the PBL height are investigated. Case studies for a dry phase during the incidence of a heat wave and a wet phase during a land depression are presented. Observed diurnal features of the surface meteorological parameters including the surface energy budget components were well captured by local and nonlocal PBL schemes during both the cases. Vertical profiles of temperature, mixing ratio and winds from

  11. Predictive mapping of soil organic carbon in wet cultivated lands using classification-tree based models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kheir, Rania Bou; Greve, Mogens Humlekrog; Bøcher, Peder Klith

    2010-01-01

    the geographic distribution of SOC across Denmark using remote sensing (RS), geographic information systems (GISs) and decision-tree modeling (un-pruned and pruned classification trees). Seventeen parameters, i.e. parent material, soil type, landscape type, elevation, slope gradient, slope aspect, mean curvature...... field measurements in the area of interest (Denmark). A large number of tree-based classification models (588) were developed using (i) all of the parameters, (ii) all Digital Elevation Model (DEM) parameters only, (iii) the primary DEM parameters only, (iv), the remote sensing (RS) indices only, (v......) selected pairs of parameters, (vi) soil type, parent material and landscape type only, and (vii) the parameters having a high impact on SOC distribution in built pruned trees. The best constructed classification tree models (in the number of three) with the lowest misclassification error (ME...

  12. Functional levels of floor surface roughness for the prevention of slips and falls: clean-and-dry and soapsuds-covered wet surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Ju; Hsiao, Hongwei; Simeonov, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Literature has shown a general trend that slip resistance performance improves with floor surface roughness. However, whether slip resistance properties are linearly correlated with surface topographies of the floors or what roughness levels are required for effective slip resistance performance still remain to be answered. This pilot study aimed to investigate slip resistance properties and identify functional levels of floor surface roughness for practical design applications in reducing the risk of slip and fall incidents. A theory model was proposed to characterize functional levels of surface roughness of floor surfaces by introducing a new concept of three distinctive zones. A series of dynamic friction tests were conducted using 3 shoes and 9 floor specimens under clean-and-dry as well as soapsuds-covered slippery wet environments. The results showed that all the tested floor-shoe combinations provided sufficient slip resistances performance under the clean-and-dry condition. A significant effect of floor type (surface roughness) on dynamic friction coefficient (DFC) was found in the soapsuds-covered wet condition. As compared to the surface roughness effects, the shoe-type effects were relatively small. Under the soapsuds-covered wet condition, floors with 50 μm in Ra roughness scale seemed to represent an upper bound in the functional range of floor surface roughness for slip resistance because further increase of surface roughness provided no additional benefit. A lower bound of the functional range for slip resistance under the soapsuds-covered wet condition was estimated from the requirement of DFC > 0.4 at Ra ≅ 17 μm. Findings from this study may have potential safety implications in the floor surface design for reducing slip and fall hazards.

  13. 涌泉根灌多点源交汇入渗湿润体试验研究%Experimental Study on Soil Wetted Volume of Multiple Point Sources from Surge Root Irrigation Interference Infiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎朋红; 汪有科; 马理辉; 赵颖娜; 黎朋军

    2011-01-01

    在米脂山地微灌枣树示范基地进行原状土涌泉根灌入渗试验,研究了多点源交汇入渗条件下涌泉根灌湿润体特征值的变化规律.结果表明,涌泉根灌多点源交汇入渗孔洞处和交汇面处的湿润锋运移距离与入渗时间均符合幂函数关系,交汇面处的湿润锋运移速度比孔洞处的快,最终交汇入渗湿润土体沿孔洞布置方向的剖面形状近似带状;在孔洞底部周围的中间区域土壤含水率等值线分布相对复杂,等值线的分布类似于地形图上的"鞍部";涌泉根灌双点源灌溉比单点源、四点源灌溉效果好.%Undisturbed soil surge root irrigation infiltration experiment was carried out at mountain microirrigation demonstration base for jujube at Mizhi, and the variation of eigenvalues of wetted soil is studied under the condition of multi-point source interference infiltration. Results show: the infiltration distance of soil wetted front were good power functional relation with infiltration time on the intersection surface side and the holes surface side under surge root irrigation, and the wetting front migration velocity at the intersection surface was faster than that at the hole, and that is, finally the profile shape of wetting soil under interference infiltration in the direction of hole arrangement would nearly become a ribbon. In the middle area around the hole bottom, the soil water content contour distribution was relatively complicated and the contour distribution was similar to the“saddle” on the topography. The double point sources irrigation got the best irrigation effect under surge root irrigation.

  14. Soil physical properties changed induced by dry-wet cycles in the water-level fluctuation zone of Three Gorges Reservoir region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Junfang; Tang, Xiangyu; Zhang, Wei

    2017-04-01

    In southwest China, a grand hydraulic engineering called Three Gorges Dam (TGD) was completed and under full power run since 2009, making a total area of 349 km2 along Yangtze River exposing the dry-wet cycles by its impounding of water step by step from the elevations of 135 m in summer season to 175 m in winter season at each year. As populated area, the environmental issues aroused by the TGR have centered on water quality, biodiversity, sedimentation, downstream riverbed erosion and pollutants (both heavy metals and organic pollutants) transportation. All these are regulated or affected by soil structure and pore network, directly or indirectly. Thus, the study of soil physical quality changed induced by these seasonal dry-wet cycles is crucial. The objective of this study is: (1) to describe soil structural status in WLF zone of TGR by combination of laboratory measures and visual evaluation method; (2) to describe the pore system in this zone by both SWRC and CT images; and (3) to address the changes of soil physical quality changed by seasonal dry-wet cycles. Our results showed a deterioration of soil structure (indicated by a high Sq score in VESS) and soil aggregate stability (indicated by low MWD and the mass fractal dimension Dm) in lower land of TGR. The data from both soil water retention curve and micro-CT image demonstrates a going -worse of soil physical quality by decreasing of soil pore number and porosity as well as a shift of drainable micro-pores (0.1 < r < 125 µm) to non-drainable micro-pores (r < 0.1 µm) in the lower land of TGR.

  15. Wetting and Interfacial Tension Dynamics of Oil-Nanofluids-Surface Minerals System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, L.; Li, C.; Darnault, C. J. G.; Korte, C.; Ladner, D.; Daigle, H.

    2015-12-01

    Among the techniques used in enhanced oil recovery (EOR), chemical injection involves the injection of surfactants to increase the oil mobility and decrease the interfacial tension (IFT). With the nanotechnology revolution, the use of nanoparticles has shown unique opportunities in petroleum engineering due to their physico-chemical properties. Our research examines the potential application of nanoparticles as a means of EOR by studying the influence of silicon oxide nanoparticles on the wettability and IFT of oil-nanofluids-surface systems. Batch studies were conducted to assess the stability of the nanoparticle suspensions of different concentrations (0, 0.001, 0.005, 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1 wt. %) in different reservoir conditions with and without the addition of surfactants (i.e. 5% brine, and Tween 20 at 0.5 and 2 cmc). Testing of oil-nanofluids and oil-nanofluids-minerals interactions was performed using crude oils from West Texas (light, API 40), Prudhoe Bay (medium, API 28), and Lloydminster (heavy, API 20). The dynamic behavior of IFT was measured using a pendant drop method. Results for 5% brine-nanoparticle systems indicated that 0.001 and 0.01 wt.% of nanoparticles contributed to a significant decrease of IFT for West Texas and Prudhoe Bay oils, while the highest decrease of IFT for Lloydminster was reported with 0.1 wt.% nanoparticles. IFT decrease was also enhanced by surfactant, and the addition of nanoparticles at 0.001 wt.% to surfactant resulted in significant decrease of IFT in most of the tested oil-nanofluid systems. The sessile drop method was used to measure the dynamic behavior of the contact angle of these oil droplets on minerals surface made of thin sections from Berea and Boise sandstone cores through a wetting test. Different nanofluid and surfactant concentrations were tested for the optimization of changes in wettability, which is a critical phase in assessing the behavior of nanofluids for optimal EOR with the selected crude oils.

  16. Reflectance anisotropy for characterising fine-scale changes in soil surface condition across different soil types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Holly; Anderson, Karen; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2010-05-01

    Soils can experience rapid structural degradation in response to land cover changes, resulting in a reduction in soil productivity, an increased susceptibility to erosion and increased release of greenhouse gases. Soil surface roughness at the centimetre scale plays a fundamental role in affecting soil erosion and surface runoff pathways. A decline in surface roughness can also be used to infer soil degradation as soil aggregates are broken down through raindrop impact. However, due to the time and resources involved in using traditional field sampling techniques, there is a lack of spatially-distributed information on soil surface condition. Remotely sensed data can provide a cost-effective means of monitoring changes in soil surface condition over broad spatial extents. Furthermore, a growing recognition into the importance of the directional reflectance domain has led to an increasing number of satellites with multiple view angle (MVA) capabilities (e.g. MISR, CHRIS on Proba). This is potentially useful for monitoring soil degradation and susceptibility to erosion because changes in soil surface roughness, associated with the breakdown of macro-aggregates, have a measurable effect on directional reflectance factors. Consequently, field and laboratory data are required for an empirical understanding of soil directional reflectance characteristics, underpinning subsequent model development. This study assessed the extent to which a hyperspectral MVA approach (350-2500 nm) could detect fine-scale changes in soil crusting states across five different soil types. A series of soil crusting states were produced for all five soil types, using an artificial rainfall simulator. The controlled conditions allowed the production of a series of stages in the soil crusting process; showing progressively declining surface roughness values. Each soil state was then spatially characterised, using a laboratory laser device at 2 mm sample spacing, over a 10 x 10 cm area. Laser data

  17. Wetting Angles and Surface Tension of Ge(1-x)Si(x) Melts on Different Substrate Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croell, A.; Kaiser, N.; Szofran, F. R.; Cobb, S. D.; Volz, M. P.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The wetting angles and the surface tension of Ge(1-x)Si(x) melts (0.02 less than x less than 0.13) have been measured on various substrate materials using the sessile drop technique. Fused quartz, sapphire, SiC, glassy carbon, pBN, AIN, and Si3N4 have been used as substrates. The highest and most stable wetting angles were found for pBN substrates with 164 +/- 8 deg., either under forming gas with an additional carbon getter in the system or under active vacuum. The surface tension measurements resulted in a value of +2.2 x 10(exp -3) N/m.at%Si for the concentration dependence delta(gamma)/(delta)C. For the composition range measured, the temperature dependence (delt)gamma/(delta)T showed values similar to those of pure Ge, on average -0.07 x 10(exp -3) N/mK.

  18. The Effect of Disinfectants and a Surface Wetting Agent on the Wettability of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, Pritam P; Gurjar, Minal; Gunda, Sachin; Gurjar, Vivek; Rao, Nandan K

    2015-06-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of two commercially available chemical disinfectants namely sodium hypochlorite and glutaraldehyde and a surface wetting agent on the wettability of three high precision elastomeric impression materials, addition silicone, condensation silicone and polyether. Three different types of elastomeric impression materials commonly used in prosthodontic practice were selected. The glutaraldehyde and sodium hypochloride solutions were employed to disinfect the impressions made with the above-mentioned elastomeric impression materials. True Blue surface wetting agent was selected. GBX contact angle analyzer was used to measure advancing and receding contact angle. The results of this study have demonstrated that the polyether impression material was the most hydrophilic of all the materials, followed by hydrophilic addition silicone. Condensation silicone was least hydrophilic. All materials showed improvement in the wettability when a topical surfactant was used. The short term disinfection of the three elastomeric impression materials does not affect the wettability of these impression materials.

  19. Correlation signatures of wet soils and snows. [algorithm development and computer programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    Interpretation, analysis, and development of algorithms have provided the necessary computational programming tools for soil data processing, data handling and analysis. Algorithms that have been developed thus far, are adequate and have been proven successful for several preliminary and fundamental applications such as software interfacing capabilities, probability distributions, grey level print plotting, contour plotting, isometric data displays, joint probability distributions, boundary mapping, channel registration and ground scene classification. A description of an Earth Resources Flight Data Processor, (ERFDP), which handles and processes earth resources data under a users control is provided.

  20. Visually assessing the level of development and soil surface stability of cyanobacterially dominated biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.; Witwicki, D.L.; Miller, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are an integral part of dryland ecosystems and often included in long-term ecological monitoring programs. Estimating moss and lichen cover is fairly easy and non-destructive, but documenting cyanobacterial level of development (LOD) is more difficult. It requires sample collection for laboratory analysis, which causes soil surface disturbance. Assessing soil surface stability also requires surface disturbance. Here we present a visual technique to assess cyanobacterial LOD and soil surface stability. We define six development levels of cyanobacterially dominated soils based on soil surface darkness. We sampled chlorophyll a concentrations (the most common way of assessing cyanobacterial biomass), exopolysaccharide concentrations, and soil surface aggregate stability from representative areas of each LOD class. We found that, in the laboratory and field, LOD classes were effective at predicting chlorophyll a soil concentrations (R2=68-81%), exopolysaccharide concentrations (R2=71%), and soil aggregate stability (R2=77%). We took representative photos of these classes to construct a field guide. We then tested the ability of field crews to distinguish these classes and found this technique was highly repeatable among observers. We also discuss how to adjust this index for the different types of BSCs found in various dryland regions.

  1. Conditioning of Si-interfaces by wet-chemical oxidation: Electronic interface properties study by surface photovoltage measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermann, Heike

    2014-09-01

    The field-modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) method, a very surface sensitive technique, was utilized to determine electronic interface properties on wet-chemically oxidized and etched silicon (Si) interfaces. The influence of preparation-induced surface micro-roughness and un-stoichiometric oxides on the resulting the surface charge, energetic distribution Dit(E), and density Dit,min of rechargeable states was studied by simultaneous, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements on polished Si(111) and Si(100) substrates. Based on previous findings and new research, a study of conventional and newly developed wet-chemical oxidation methods was established, correlating the interactions between involved oxidizing and etching solutions and the initial substrate morphology to the final surface conditioning. It is shown, which sequences of wet-chemical oxidation and oxide removal, have to be combined in order to achieve atomically smooth, hydrogen terminated surfaces, as well as ultra-thin oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states on flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si substrates, as commonly applied in silicon device and solar cell manufacturing. These conventional strategies for wet-chemical pre-treatment are mainly based on concentrated solutions. Therefore, special attention was put on the development of more environmentally acceptable processes, utilizing e.g. hot pure water with low contents of oxygen or hydrochloric acid, and of ozone, working at ambient temperatures. According to our results, these methods could be a high quality and low cost alternative to current approaches with liquid chemicals for the preparation of hydrophobic Si substrate surfaces and ultra-thin passivating oxide layers. As demonstrated for selected examples, the effect of optimized wet-chemical pre-treatments can be preserved during subsequent soft plasma enhanced chemical vapor depositions of Si oxides (SiOx), or amorphous materials such as Si (a-Si:H), Si nitride (a

  2. Soil Surface Structure: A key factor for the degree of soil water repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, S.; Doerr, S. H.; Douglas, P.; Bryant, R.; Hamlett, C.; McHale, G.; Newton, M.; Shirtcliffe, N.

    2012-04-01

    Despite of considerable efforts, the degree of water repellency has not always been fully explained by chemical property of soil (termed hydrophobicity). That might be because the structure of a soil surface was not considered properly, which is another main factor determining the severity of soil water repellency. Surface structure has only recently been considered in soil science, whilst it has been paid attention for several decades in materials science due to its relevance to industrial applications. In this contribution, comparison of critical contact angles measured on different surface structures (made with glass beads, glass shards and beach sands) is presented and the effect of surface structure on manifestation of soil water repellency is discussed in terms of several different variables such as the individual particles shape, and areal and structural factors of the actual surface.

  3. Electrical Capacitance Tomography Measurement of the Migration of Ice Frontal Surface in Freezing Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Suo, X. M.; Zhou, S. S.; Meng, S. Q.; Chen, S. S.; Mu, H. P.

    2016-12-01

    The tracking of the migration of ice frontal surface is crucial for the understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms in freezing soil. Owing to the distinct advantages, including non-invasive sensing, high safety, low cost and high data acquisition speed, the electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) is considered to be a promising visualization measurement method. In this paper, the ECT method is used to visualize the migration of ice frontal surface in freezing soil. With the main motivation of the improvement of imaging quality, a loss function with multiple regularizers that incorporate the prior formation related to the imaging objects is proposed to cast the ECT image reconstruction task into an optimization problem. An iteration scheme that integrates the superiority of the split Bregman iteration (SBI) method is developed for searching for the optimal solution of the proposed loss function. An unclosed electrodes sensor is designed for satisfying the requirements of practical measurements. An experimental system of one dimensional freezing in frozen soil is constructed, and the ice frontal surface migration in the freezing process of the wet soil sample containing five percent of moisture is measured. The visualization measurement results validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the ECT visualization method

  4. Surface changes of biopolymers PHB and PLLA induced by Ar{sup +} plasma treatment and wet etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slepičková Kasálková, N. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Slepička, P., E-mail: petr.slepicka@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Sajdl, P. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Švorčík, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-01

    Polymers, especially group of biopolymers find potential application in a wide range of disciplines due to their biodegradability. In biomedical applications these materials can be used as a scaffold or matrix. In this work, the influence of the Ar{sup +} plasma treatment and subsequent wet etching (acetone/water) on the surface properties of polymers were studied. Two biopolymers – polyhydroxybutyrate with 8% polyhydroxyvalerate (PHB) and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) were used in these experiments. Modified surface layers were analyzed by different methods. Surface wettability was characterized by determination of water contact angle. Changes in elemental composition of modified surfaces were performed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Surface morphology and roughness was examined using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Gravimetry method was used to study the mass loss. It was found that the modification from both with plasma and wet etching leads to dramatic changes of surface properties (surface chemistry, morphology and roughness). Rate of changes of these features strongly depends on the modification parameters.

  5. Liquid Spills on Permeable Soil Surfaces: Experimental Confirmations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Carver S.; Keller, Jason M.

    2005-09-29

    Predictive tools for assessing the quantity of a spill on a soil from the observed spreading area could contribute to improving remediation when it is necessary. On a permeable soil, the visible spill area only hints about the amount of liquid that might reside below the surface. An understanding of the physical phenomena involved with spill propagation on a soil surface is key to assessing the liquid amount possibly present beneath the surface. The objective of this study is an improved prediction capability for spill behavior.

  6. Soil Surface Sealing Effect on Soil Moisture at a Semiarid Hillslope: Implications for Remote Sensing Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Sela

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Robust estimation of soil moisture using microwave remote sensing depends on extensive ground sampling for calibration and validation of the data. Soil surface sealing is a frequent phenomenon in dry environments. It modulates soil moisture close to the soil surface and, thus, has the potential to affect the retrieval of soil moisture from microwave remote sensing and the validation of these data based on ground observations. We addressed this issue using a physically-based modeling approach that accounts explicitly for surface sealing at the hillslope scale. Simulated mean soil moisture at the respective layers corresponding to both the ground validation probe and the radar beam’s typical effective penetration depth were considered. A cyclic pattern was found in which, as compared to an unsealed profile, the seal layer intensifies the bias in validation during rainfall events and substantially reduces it during subsequent drying periods. The analysis of this cyclic pattern showed that, accounting for soil moisture dynamics at the soil surface, the optimal time for soil sampling following a rainfall event is a few hours in the case of an unsealed system and a few days in the case of a sealed one. Surface sealing was found to increase the temporal stability of soil moisture. In both sealed and unsealed systems, the greatest temporal stability was observed at positions with moderate slope inclination. Soil porosity was the best predictor of soil moisture temporal stability, indicating that prior knowledge regarding the soil texture distribution is crucial for the application of remote sensing validation schemes.

  7. The effect of heterogeneity and surface roughness on soil hydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, I.; Bryant, R.; Doerr, S. H.; Douglas, P.

    2010-05-01

    Soil water repellency, or hydrophobicity, can develop under both natural and anthropogenic conditions. Forest fires, vegetation decomposition, microbial activity and oil spills can all promote hydrophobic behaviour in surrounding soils. Hydrophobicity can stabilize soil organic matter pools and decrease evapotranspiration, but there are many negative impacts of hydrophobicity as well: increased erosion of topsoil, an increasingly scarce resource; increased runoff, which can lead to flooding; and decreased infiltration, which directly affects plant health. The degree of hydrophobicity expressed by soil can vary greatly within a small area, depending partly on the type and severity of the disturbance as well as on temporal factors such as water content and microbial activity. To date, many laboratory investigations into soil hydrophobicity have focused on smooth particle surfaces. As a result, our understanding of how hydrophobicity develops on rough surfaces of macro, micro and nano-particulates is limited; we are unable to predict with certainty how these soil particles will behave on contact with water. Surface chemistry is the main consideration when predicting hydrophobic behaviour of smooth solids, but for particles with rough surfaces, hydrophobicity is believed to develop as a combination of surface chemistry and topography. Topography may reflect both the arrangement (aggregation) of soil particles and the distribution of materials adsorbed on particulate surfaces. Patch-wise or complete coverage of rough soil particles by hydrophobic material may result in solid/water contact angles ≥150° , at which point the soil may be classified as super-hydrophobic. Here we present a critical review of the research to date on the effects of heterogeneity and surface roughness on soil hydrophobicity in which we discuss recent advances, current trends, and future research areas. References: Callies, M., Y. Chen, F. Marty, A. Pépin and D. Quéré. 2005. Microfabricated

  8. Study on Surface Integrity of AISI 1045 Carbon Steel when machined by Carbide Cutting Tool under wet conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamin N. Fauzi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the evaluation of surface roughness and roughness profiles when machining carbon steel under wet conditions with low and high cutting speeds. The workpiece materials and cutting tools selected in this research were AISI 1045 carbon steel and canela carbide inserts graded PM25, respectively. The cutting tools undergo machining tests by CNC turning operations and their performances were evaluated by their surface roughness value and observation of the surface roughness profile. The machining tests were held at varied cutting speeds of 35 to 53 m/min, feed rate of 0.15 to 0.50 mm/rev and a constant depth of cut of 1 mm. From the analysis, it was found that surface roughness increased as the feed rate increased. Varian of surface roughness was suspected due to interaction between cutting speeds and feed rates as well as nose radius conditions; whether from tool wear or the formation of a built-up edge. This study helps us understand the effect of cutting speed and feed rate on surface integrity, when machining AISI 1045 carbon steel using carbide cutting tools, under wet cutting conditions.

  9. APPLICATION OF FILLERS IN CELLULOSIC PAPER BY SURFACE FILLING: AN INTERESTING ALTERNATIVE OR SUPPLEMENT TO WET-END ADDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shen,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of fillers at the surface of cellulosic paper is an interesting and industrially-commercialized but not very well-known concept, in which the filler particles are essentially added to the voids of the fibrous matrixes. This so-called “surface filling” can be achieved by the use of fillers together with a polymer solution via film press or size press, an approach that is distinct from both wet-end filling and conventional coating of paper. As an easily practicable process, surface filling has some advantages over direct wet-end addition of fillers, such as minimizing the adverse effects of filler addition on paper strength. Efficient surface filling is somewhat dependent on the specific characteristics of both fillers and fibrous matrixes. Surface filling may provide interesting possibilities for the papermaking discipline; for example, it would open the door to maximizing the cost-effectiveness of paper mills, and efficiently adding new functionalities to cellulosic paper. From both practical and fundamental points of view, systematic exploration and understanding of surface filling of cellulosic paper would be of great significance to the papermaking industry.

  10. The incorporation of an organic soil layer in the Noah-MP land surface model and its evaluation over a boreal aspen forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Li, Yanping; Chen, Fei; Barr, Alan; Barlage, Michael; Wan, Bingcheng

    2016-07-01

    A thick top layer of organic matter is a dominant feature in boreal forests and can impact land-atmosphere interactions. In this study, the multi-parameterization version of the Noah land surface model (Noah-MP) was used to investigate the impact of incorporating a forest-floor organic soil layer on the simulated surface energy and water cycle components at the BERMS Old Aspen site (OAS) field station in central Saskatchewan, Canada. Compared to a simulation without an organic soil parameterization (CTL), the Noah-MP simulation with an organic soil (OGN) improved Noah-MP-simulated soil temperature profiles and soil moisture at 40-100 cm, especially the phase and amplitude (Seasonal cycle) of soil temperature below 10 cm. OGN also enhanced the simulation of sensible and latent heat fluxes in spring, especially in wet years, which is mostly related to the timing of spring soil thaw and warming. Simulated top-layer soil moisture is better in OGN than that in CTL. The effects of including an organic soil layer on soil temperature are not uniform throughout the soil depth and are more prominent in summer. For drought years, the OGN simulation substantially modified the partitioning of water between direct soil evaporation and vegetation transpiration. For wet years, the OGN-simulated latent heat fluxes are similar to CTL except for the spring season when OGN produced less evaporation, which was closer to observations. Including organic soil produced more subsurface runoff and resulted in much higher runoff throughout the freezing periods in wet years.

  11. Hydrophobic Surfaces: Topography Effects on Wetting by Supercooled Water and Freezing Delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydari, Golrokh; Thormann, Esben; Järn, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Hydrophobicity, and in particular superhydrophobicity, has been extensively considered to promote ice-phobicity. Dynamic contact angle measurements above 0 °C have been widely used to evaluate the water repellency. However, it is the wetting properties of supercooled water at subzero temperatures...

  12. Visibility of road markings on wet road surfaces : a literature study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The English version of B 14153 is presented. Road markings, notably lane markers, are often only poorly visible when the road is wet. This is particularly a problem at night on unlit roads. A study is made of whether a solution for this problem can be found on the basis of the known, published li

  13. The Influence of the Partial Surface Wetting on the Flow Field in a Pipe with Circular Cross-Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš ZAVADIL

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the study of laminar flow in a pipe with a slip boundary is presented. The influ-ence of the partial surface wetting on shear and velocity profile as well as pressure drop has been investigated numerically. Steady, isothermal, incompressible flow was modelled in 2D and 3D geom-etry. Wall boundary condition was modified through the user defined function to account for partial surface wettability based on the theory proposed by Pochylý [1-10]. The results obtained by numeri-cal modelling in Fluent were compared with theoretical assumptions.

  14. Decadal co-variability of the summer surface air temperature and soil moisture in China under global warming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU MingFeng; WANG HuiJun

    2007-01-01

    The self-calibrating Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) is calculated using newly updated ground observations of monthly surface air temperature (SAT) and precipitation in China. The co-variabilities of PDSI and SAT are examined for summer for the period 1961-2004. The results show that there exist decadal climate co-variabilities and strong nonlinear interactions between SAT and soil moisture in many regions of China. Some of the co-variabilities can be linked to global warming. In summer, significant decadal co-variabilities from cool-wet to warm-dry conditions are found in the east region of Northwest China, North China, and Northeast China. An important finding is that in the west region of Northwest China and Southeast China, pronounced decadal co-variabilities take place from warm-dry to cool-wet conditions. Because significant warming was observed over most areas of the global land surface during the past 20-30 years, the shift to cool-wet conditions is a unique phenomenon which may deserve much scientific attention. The nonlinear interactions between SAT and soil moisture may partly account for the observed decadal co-variabilities. It is shown that anomalies of SAT will greatly affect the climatic co-variabilities, and changes of SAT may bring notable influence on the PDSI in China. These results provide observational evidence for increasing risks of decadal drought and wetness as anthropogenic global warming progresses.

  15. Oxidation of FGD-CaSO{sub 3} and effect on soil chemical properties when applied to the soil surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liming Chen; Cliff Ramsier; Jerry Bigham; Brian Slater; David Kost; Yong Bok Lee; Warren A. Dick [Ohio State University, Wooster, OH (United States). School of Environment and Natural Resources

    2009-07-15

    Use of high-sulfur coal for power generation in the United States requires the removal of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) produced during burning in order to meet clean air regulations. If SO{sub 2} is removed from the flue gas using a wet scrubber without forced air oxidation, much of the S product created will be sulfite (SO{sub 3}{sup 2-}). Plants take up S in the form of sulfate (SO{sub 2}{sup 2-}). Sulfite may cause damage to plant roots, especially in acid soils. For agricultural uses, it is thought that SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) products must first oxidize to SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in soils before crops are planted. However, there is little information about the oxidation of SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} in FGD product to SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} under field conditions. An FGD-CaSO{sub 3} was applied at rates of 0, 1.12, and 3.36 Mg ha{sup -1} to the surface of an agricultural soil (Wooster silt loam, Oxyaquic Fragiudalf). The SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in the surface soil (0-10 cm) was analyzed on days 3, 7, 17, 45, and 61. The distribution of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and Ca in the 0-90 cm soil layer was also determined on day 61. Results indicated that SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} in the FGD-CaSO{sub 3} rapidly oxidized to SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} on the field surface during the first week and much of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and Ca moved downward into the 0-50 cm soil layer during the experimental period of two months. It is safe to grow plants in soil treated with FGD-CaSO{sub 3} if the application is made at least three days to several weeks before planting. 20 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, R.; De Lannoy, G.; Liu, Q.; Ardizzone, J.; Kimball, J.; Koster, R.

    2017-01-01

    The SMAP Level 4 soil moisture (L4_SM) product provides global estimates of surface and root zone soil moisture, along with other land surface variables and their error estimates. These estimates are obtained through assimilation of SMAP brightness temperature observations into the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) land surface model. The L4_SM product is provided at 9 km spatial and 3-hourly temporal resolution and with about 2.5 day latency. The soil moisture and temperature estimates in the L4_SM product are validated against in situ observations. The L4_SM product meets the required target uncertainty of 0.04 m(exp. 3)m(exp. -3), measured in terms of unbiased root-mean-square-error, for both surface and root zone soil moisture.

  17. Formation and development of salt crusts on soil surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Sheng

    2015-12-14

    The salt concentration gradually increases at the soil free surface when the evaporation rate exceeds the diffusive counter transport. Eventually, salt precipitates and crystals form a porous sodium chloride crust with a porosity of 0.43 ± 0.14. After detaching from soils, the salt crust still experiences water condensation and salt deliquescence at the bottom, brine transport across the crust driven by the humidity gradient, and continued air-side precipitation. This transport mechanism allows salt crust migration away from the soil surface at a rate of 5 μm/h forming salt domes above soil surfaces. The surface characteristics of mineral substrates and the evaporation rate affect the morphology and the crystal size of precipitated salt. In particular, substrate hydrophobicity and low evaporation rate suppress salt spreading.

  18. An investigation of the effects of spatial heterogeneity of initial soil moisture content on surface runoff simulation at a small watershed scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, Renato; Saltalippi, Carla; Flammini, Alessia; Corradini, Corrado; Brocca, Luca; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2016-08-01

    In addition to the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, the initial soil moisture content, θi, is the quantity commonly incorporated in rainfall infiltration models for simulation of surface runoff hydrographs. Previous studies on the effect of the spatial heterogeneity of initial soil water content in the generation of surface runoff were generally not conclusive, and provided no guidance on designing networks for soil moisture measurements. In this study, the role of the spatial variability of θi at the small watershed scale is examined through the use of a simulation model and measurements of θi. The model combines two existing components of infiltration and surface runoff to model the flow discharge at the watershed outlet. The observed values of soil moisture in three experimental plots are combined to determine seven different distributions of θi, each used to compute the hydrographs produced by four different rainfall patterns for two initial conditions classified as "dry" soil and "wet" soil. For rainfalls events typically associated with floods, the spatial variability of θi at the watershed scale does not cause significant variations in surface runoff for initially dry or wet soils. Furthermore, when the main objective is to represent flood events a single ground point measurement of θi in each area with the same land use may suffice to obtain adequate outflow hydrographs at the outlet.

  19. Singlet Oxygen Generation on Porous Superhydrophobic Surfaces: Effect of Gas Flow and Sensitizer Wetting on Trapping Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We describe physical-organic studies of singlet oxygen generation and transport into an aqueous solution supported on superhydrophobic surfaces on which silicon–phthalocyanine (Pc) particles are immobilized. Singlet oxygen (1O2) was trapped by a water-soluble anthracene compound and monitored in situ using a UV–vis spectrometer. When oxygen flows through the porous superhydrophobic surface, singlet oxygen generated in the plastron (i.e., the gas layer beneath the liquid) is transported into the solution within gas bubbles, thereby increasing the liquid–gas surface area over which singlet oxygen can be trapped. Higher photooxidation rates were achieved in flowing oxygen, as compared to when the gas in the plastron was static. Superhydrophobic surfaces were also synthesized so that the Pc particles were located in contact with, or isolated from, the aqueous solution to evaluate the relative effectiveness of singlet oxygen generated in solution and the gas phase, respectively; singlet oxygen generated on particles wetted by the solution was trapped more efficiently than singlet oxygen generated in the plastron, even in the presence of flowing oxygen gas. A mechanism is proposed that explains how Pc particle wetting, plastron gas composition and flow rate as well as gas saturation of the aqueous solution affect singlet oxygen trapping efficiency. These stable superhydrophobic surfaces, which can physically isolate the photosensitizer particles from the solution may be of practical importance for delivering singlet oxygen for water purification and medical devices. PMID:24885074

  20. Effect of Management Practices on Soil Microstructure and Surface Microrelief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Garcia Moreno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil surface roughness (SSR and porosity were evaluated from soils located in two farms belonging to the Plant Breeding Institute of the University of Sidney. The sites differ in their soil management practices; the first site (PBI was strip-tilled during early fall (May 2010, and the second site (JBP was under power harrowed tillage at the end of July 2010. Both sites were sampled in mid-August. At each location, SSR was measured for three 1 m2 subplots using shadow analysis. To evaluate porosity and aggregation, soil samples were scanned using X-ray computed tomography with 5 μm resolution. The results show a strong negative correlation between SSR and porosity, 20.13% SSR and 41.38% porosity at PBI versus 42.00% SSR and 18.35% porosity at JBP. However, soil images show that when soil surface roughness is higher due to conservation and soil management practices, the processes of macroaggregation and structural porosity are enhanced. Further research must be conducted on SSR and porosity in different types of soils, as they provide complementary information on the evaluation of soil erosion susceptibility.

  1. Effect of soil property on evaporation from bare soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenming; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying the actual evaporation rate from bare soils remains a challenging task as it not only associates with the atmospheric demand and liquid water saturation on the soil surface, but also the properties of the soils (e.g., porosity, pore size distribution). A physically based analytical model was developed to describe the surface resistance varying with the liquid water saturation near the soil surface. This model considers the soil pore size distribution, hydraulic connection between the main water cluster and capillary water in the soil surface when the soil surface is wet and the thickness of the dry soil layer when the soil surface is dry. The surface resistance model was then integrated to a numerical model based on water balance, heat balance and surface energy balance equations. The integrated model was validated by simulating water and heat transport processes during six soil column drying experiments. The analysis indicates that the when soil surface is wet, the consideration of pore size distribution in the surface resistance model offers better estimation of transient evaporation among different soil types than the estimations given by empirically based surface resistance models. Under fixed atmospheric boundary condition and liquid water saturation, fine sand has greater evaporation rate than coarse sand as stronger capillary force devlivers more water from the main water cluster. When the soil surface becomes dry, the impact of soil property to evaporation becomes trivial as the thickness of the dry soil layer turns to be the key factor to determine the evaporation rate.

  2. Experimental study on characters of wetted soil in moistube irrigation%微润灌溉线源入渗湿润体特性试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张俊; 牛文全; 张琳琳; 史丽艳

    2012-01-01

    为探明微润灌溉线源入渗水分运移规律,通过室内土箱试验对微润灌溉土壤水分分布进行研究,分析土壤质地和土壤密度对湿润体特性的影响.结果表明:微润灌溉湿润体是以微润带为轴心的柱状体,黏壤土为近似圆柱体,砂土湿润体横剖面为“倒梨”形,黏壤土R∶X∶H(R为水平运移距离,X为垂直向上运移距离,H为垂直向下运移距离)平均为1.00∶0.90∶0.99,砂土为1.00∶0.81∶0.95.湿润锋水平和垂直(向上和向下)运移距离均与灌水时间呈显著的幂函数关系,土壤密度和质地是影响湿润体特性的主要因素;微润带流量小,单位长度流量不超过210 mL/(m·h),可适应土壤含水率变化自动调整,累计入渗量与灌水时间呈线性关系;湿润体内含水率以微润管带为轴心呈同心圆面分布,大部分土壤含水率介于田间持水量的80%~90%之间,微润灌溉均匀度高,达95.62%.因此,微润灌溉技术节水效果显著,适宜旱区作物用水需求.%This study was conducted to investigate the soil water movement of line source infiltration under miostube-irrigation. Soil box experiments was used to study soil water distribution and analyze the effect of the soil texture and bulk density on the characteristic of wetted soil. The results showed that the wetted soil looked like cylindrical object which with pipe as it' s axle centre and clay loam soil was approximate with cylinder, the cross section of sandy soil as obpyriform shape. The ratio of R: X: H was 1: 0. 90: 0. 99 in clay loam soil and 1: 0. 81: 0. 95 in sandy soil, respectively. ( R: horizontal migration distance; X: vertical upward distance; Y: vertical downward distance). The relationship between the horizontal or vertical moving distance of wetting front with irrigation time appeared as a power function. The effects of the soil texture and bulk density on the characteristic of wetted soil were significant in moistube irrigation

  3. Effect of Wetting-Drying Cycles on Redistribution of Lead in Some Semi-Arid Zone Soils Spiked with a Lead Salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.KHODAVERDILOO; M.RAHMANIAN; S.REZAPOUR; S.GHORBANI DASHTAKI; H.HADI; F.X.HAN

    2012-01-01

    Mobility and bioavailability of lead (Pb) could be affected considerably by soil physicochemical properties; however,less is known about the effect of Pb levels and aging time.This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of Pb levels and wetting-drying (WD) cycles on distribution and bioavailability of Pb in three semi-arid zone soils treated with different levels of Pb(NO3)2.Wetting-drying cycles simulated the actual field irrigation in the semi-arid soils.A soil with a long history of Pb contamination was also taken as a reference soil.The soils were spiked with various levels of Pb and incubated under WD cycles for 160 d.Sequential extractions and batch sorption experiments were performed to assess the fractionation of Pb in the spiked soils.Redistribution index (Uts) and reduced partitioning parameter (IR) were applied to semi-quantify the distribution of Pb in the spiked soils.A small amount of Pb sorbed was desorbed by the soils,indicating a strong and irreversible binding of Pb in the studied soils.Contribution of carbonate-bound (Car) and residual (Res) Pb fractions to the total Pb of the soils was more than 97%.The Car,soluble plus exchangeable (SE),and organic matter-bound (OMB) fractions of Pb were transferred to the Res fraction under the WD cycles.The IR and Uts values were influenced by Pb loading levels and WD; therefore,the Pb lability and/or redistribution pattern could semi-quantitatively be assessed via these parameters.At the end of the experiment,the IR and Uts values for the Pb salt-spiked soils did not show the quasiequilibrium state.The lability of Pb in the soils decreased with increasing incubation time and showed a strong dependence on Pb levels and soil chemical composition.WD cycles significantly affected the overall lability of Pb in soils through influencing the redistribution of Pb among solid-phase components.

  4. U0{sub 2} pellets surface properties and environmental conditions effects on the wet adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junqueira, Fabio da S.; Carnaval, Joao Paulo R., E-mail: fabiojunqueira@inb.gov.br, E-mail: joaocarnaval@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil S.A. (INB), Resende, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Angra power plants fuels are made bye en riche uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) pellets which are assembled inside metal tubes. These tubes are welded and arranged in order to perform the final product, the fuel assembly. The UO{sub 2} pellets have a specified humidity tolerance designed to comply with security and performance requirements when working under operating conditions in the reactor. This work intends to verify the pellet opened porosity and the environmental conditions (relative humidity and temperature) influence on the wet adsorption by UO{sub 2} pellet. The work was done in 2 parts: Firstly, pallets groups from 3 opened porosity levels were tested under a fixed relative humidity, temperature and time. In the second part of the work, the most critical pallet group upon wet adsorption was tested under different relative humidity and temperature conditions, regarding design of experiments. The opened porosity and environmental conditions tests allowed the evolution of the wet adsorption by the UO{sub 2} pallet. (author)

  5. Ordered Micro/Nanostructures with Geometric Gradient: From Integrated Wettability "Library" to Anisotropic Wetting Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Peihong; Nan, Jingjie; Wang, Tieqiang; Wang, Shuli; Ye, Shunsheng; Zhang, Junhu; Cui, Zhanchen; Yang, Bai

    2017-01-01

    Geometric gradients within ordered micro/nanostructures exhibit unique wetting properties. Well-defined and ordered microsphere arrays with geometric gradient (OMAGG) are successfully fabricated through combining colloidal lithography and inclined reactive ion etching (RIE). During the inclined RIE, the graded etching rates in vertical direction of etcher chamber are the key to generating a geometric gradient. The OMAGG can be used as an effective mask for the preparation of micro/nanostructure arrays with geometric gradient by selective RIE. Through this strategy, a well-defined wettability "library" with graded silicon cone arrays is fabricated, and the possibility of screening one desired "book" from the designated wettability "library" is demonstrated. Meanwhile, the silicon cone arrays with geometric gradient (SCAGG) can be applied to control the wetting behavior of water after being modified by hydrophilic or hydrophobic chemical groups. Based on this result, a temperature-responsive wetting substrate is fabricated by modifying poly n-isopropyl acrylamide (PNIPAM) on the SCAGG. These wettability gradients have great potential in tissue engineering, microfluidic devices, and integrated sensors. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Sound absorption at the soil surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, A.R.P.

    1969-01-01

    The properties of a soil structure may be examined in various manners. As well as a study of the stability, a knowledge of the geometry of the volume of air filled pores is often needed. The most common measurements, like those of porosity and flow resistance to gases do not permit a detailed

  7. Study of the dynamic growth of wetting layers in the confined Ising model with competing surface fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Ezequiel V.; DeVirgiliis, Andres; Müller, Marcus; Binder, Kurt

    2006-03-01

    A two-dimensional magnetic Ising system confined in an L × D geometry (L \\ll D ) in the presence of competing magnetic fields (h) acting at opposite walls along the D-direction exhibits an interface between domains of different orientation that runs parallel to the walls. In the limit of infinite film thickness (L \\to \\infty ) this interface undergoes a wetting transition that occurs at the critical curve Tw(h), so that for Tinterface is bound to the walls, while for Tw(h)interface is freely fluctuating around the centre of the film, where Tcb is the bulk critical temperature. Starting from a monodomain structure with the interface bound to one wall, we study the onset of the interface unbinding by considering both short- and long-range magnetic fields acting at the walls. It is shown that, within the critical wetting regime, in both cases the correlation length of interfacial fluctuations \\xi _{\\parallel } grows with time t as \\xi_{\\parallel } \\propto t^{1/z} with z = 2, while the interfacial position follows Z_{0}(t) \\propto t^{1/2z}=t^{1/4} both in the case of short-range and long-range surface fields, respectively, consistent with dynamic scaling predictions. Furthermore, considering the complete wetting regime and in the presence of a bulk magnetic field, we find that the interface location also obeys standard dynamic scaling behaviour for both short-range and long-range fields.

  8. Investigation of defects and surface polarity in GaN using hot wet etching together with microscopy and diffraction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visconti, P.; Huang, D.; Reshchikov, M.A.; Yun, F.; Cingolani, R.; Smith, D.J.; Jasinski, J.; Swider, W.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Morkoc, H.

    2002-04-08

    The availability of reliable and quick methods to determine defect density and polarity in GaN films is of great interest. We have used photo-electrochemical (PEC) and hot wet etching using H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and molten KOH to estimate the defect density in GaN films grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Free-standing whiskers and hexagonal etch pits are formed by PEC and wet etching respectively. Using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), we found the whisker density to be similar to etch pit densities for samples etched under precise conditions. Additionally Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) observations confirmed dislocation densities obtained by etching which increased our confidence in the consistency of methods used. Hot wet etching was used also to investigate the polarity of GaN films together with Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction (CBED) and AFM imaging. We found that hot H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} etches N-polarity GaN films very quickly resulting in the complete removal or drastic change of surface morphology as revealed by AFM or optical microscopy. On the contrary, the acid attacks only defect sites in Ga-polarity films producing nanometer-scale pits but leaving the defect-free GaN intact and the morphology unchanged. Additionally, the polarity assignments were related to the as-grown morphology and to the growth conditions of the buffer layer and the subsequent GaN layer.

  9. Predicting root zone soil moisture using surface data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfreda, S.; Brocca, L.; Moramarco, T.; Melone, F.; Sheffield, J.; Fiorentino, M.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, much effort has been given to monitoring of soil moisture from satellite remote sensing. These tools represent an extraordinary source of information for hydrological applications, but they only provide information on near-surface soil moisture. In the present work, we developed a new formulation for the estimation of the soil moisture in the root zone based on the measured value of soil moisture at the surface. The method derives from a simplified form of the soil water balance equation and for this reason all parameters adopted are physically consistent. The formulation provides a closed form of the relationship between the root zone soil moisture and the surface soil moisture with a limited number of parameters, such as: the ratio between the depth of the surface layer and the deeper layer, the water loss coefficient, and the field capacity. The method has been tested using modeled soil moisture obtained from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). The NLDAS is a multi-institution partnership aimed at developing a retrospective data set, using available atmospheric and land surface meteorological observations to compute the land surface hydrological budget. The NLDAS database was extremely useful for the scope of the present research since it provides simulated data over an extended area with different climatic and physical condition and moreover it provides soil moisture data averaged over different depths. In particular, we used values in the top 10 cm and 100 cm layers. One year of simulation was used to test the ability of the developed method to describe soil moisture fluctuation in the 100cm layer over the entire NLDAS domain. The method was adopted by calibrating one of its three parameters and defining the remaining two based on physical characteristics of the site (using the potential evapotranspiration and ratio between the first and the second soil layer depth). In general, the method performed better than

  10. Vibration characteristics of aluminum surface subjected to ultrasonic waves and their effect on wetting behavior of solder droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lin; Xu, Zhiwu; Zheng, Kun; Yan, Jiuchun; Yang, Shiqin

    2014-03-01

    The vibration characteristics of an aluminum surface subjected to ultrasonic waves were investigated with a combination of numerical simulation and experimental testing. The wetting behavior of solder droplets on the vibrating aluminum surface was also examined. The results show that the vibration pattern of the aluminum surface is inhomogeneous. The amplitude of the aluminum surface exceeds the excitation amplitude in some zones, while the amplitude decreases nearly to zero in other zones. The distribution of the zero-amplitude zones is much less dependent on the strength of the vibration than on the location of the vibration source. The surface of the liquid solder vibrates at an ultrasonic frequency that is higher than the vibration source, and the amplitude of the liquid solder is almost twice that of the aluminum surface. The vibration of the surface of the base metal (liquid solder) correlates with the oxide film removal effect. Significant removal of the oxide film can be achieved within 2s when the amplitude of the aluminum surface is higher than 5.4 μm or when the amplitude of the liquid solder surface is higher than 10.2 μm.

  11. Titratable Acidity and Alkalinity of Red Soil Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAOZONG-CHEN; HEQUN; 等

    1993-01-01

    The surfaces of red soils have an apparent amphoteric character,carrying titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity simultaneously.The titratable acidity arises from deprotonation of hydroxyl groups of hydrous oxide-type surfaces and dissociation of weak-acid functional groups of soil organic matter,while the titratable alkalinity is derived from release of hydroxyl groups of hydrous oxide-type surfaces.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity mainly depended on the composition and content of iron and aluminum oxides in the soils.The results showed that the titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity were in significantly positive correlation not only with the content of amorphous aluminum oxide(Alo) and iron oxide(Feo) extracted with acid ammonium oxalate solution,free iron oxide(Fed) extracted with sodium dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate(DCB) and clays,but also with the zero point of charge (ZPC) of the samples.Organic matter made an important contribution to the titratable acidity.the titratable alkalinity was closely correlated with the amount of fluoride ions adsorbed.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity of red soils were influenced by parent materials,being in the order of red soil derived from basalt> that from tuff> that from granite.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity ware closely related with origination of the variable charges of red soils,and to a certain extent were responsible for variable negative and positive charges of the soils.

  12. Impact of surface roughness and soil texture on mineral dust emission fluxes modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menut, Laurent; PéRez, Carlos; Haustein, Karsten; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Prigent, Catherine; Alfaro, StéPhane

    2013-06-01

    Dust production models (DPM) used to estimate vertical fluxes of mineral dust aerosols over arid regions need accurate data on soil and surface properties. The Laboratoire Inter-Universitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques (LISA) data set was developed for Northern Africa, the Middle East, and East Asia. This regional data set was built through dedicated field campaigns and include, among others, the aerodynamic roughness length, the smooth roughness length of the erodible fraction of the surface, and the dry (undisturbed) soil size distribution. Recently, satellite-derived roughness length and high-resolution soil texture data sets at the global scale have emerged and provide the opportunity for the use of advanced schemes in global models. This paper analyzes the behavior of the ERS satellite-derived global roughness length and the State Soil Geographic data base-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (STATSGO-FAO) soil texture data set (based on wet techniques) using an advanced DPM in comparison to the LISA data set over Northern Africa and the Middle East. We explore the sensitivity of the drag partition scheme (a critical component of the DPM) and of the dust vertical fluxes (intensity and spatial patterns) to the roughness length and soil texture data sets. We also compare the use of the drag partition scheme to a widely used preferential source approach in global models. Idealized experiments with prescribed wind speeds show that the ERS and STATSGO-FAO data sets provide realistic spatial patterns of dust emission and friction velocity thresholds in the region. Finally, we evaluate a dust transport model for the period of March to July 2011 with observed aerosol optical depths from Aerosol Robotic Network sites. Results show that ERS and STATSGO-FAO provide realistic simulations in the region.

  13. Effects of maquis clearing on the properties of the soil and on the near-surface hydrological processes in a semi-arid Mediterranean environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Pirastru

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many hillslopes covered with maquis in the semi-arid Mediterranean environment have been cleared in recent decades. There is little information on what effect this has on the hydrology of the soil. We compared the hydraulic properties of the soil and the subsurface hydrological dynamics on two adjacent sites on a hillslope. One site was covered with maquis, the other with grass. The grass started to grow some 10 years ago, after the maquis had been cleared and the soil had been ploughed. Our study found that the hydraulic properties and the hydrological dynamics of the maquis and the grassed soil differed greatly. The grassed soil had less organic matter and higher apparent density than did the soil covered in maquis. Moreover, the maquis soil retained more water than the grassed soil in the tension range from saturation to 50 cm of water. Infiltration tests performed in summer and in winter indicated that the field saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs of the maquis soil was higher than that of the grassy soil. However the data showed that the Kfs of the two soils changed with the season. In the maquis soil the Kfs increased from summer to winter. This was assumed to be due to water flowing more efficiently through wet soil. By contrast, in the grassy soil the Kfs decreased from summer to winter. This was because the desiccation cracks closed in the wet soil. As result, the influence of the land use change was clear from the Kfs measurements in winter, but less so from those in the summer. Changes in land use altered the dynamics of the infiltration, subsurface drainage and soil water storage of the soil. The maquis soil profile never saturated completely, and only short-lived, event based perched water tables were observed. By contrast, soil saturation and a shallow water table were observed in the grass covered site throughout the wet season. The differences were assumed to be due to the high canopy interception of the maquis cover, and to

  14. Simulation study of free-energy barriers in the wetting transition of an oily fluid on a rough surface with reentrant geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoy, Elizabeth S; Escobedo, Fernando A

    2012-11-20

    When in contact with a rough solid surface, fluids with low surface tension, such as oils and alkanes, have their lowest free energy in the fully wetted state. For applications where nonwetting by these phillic fluids is desired, some barrier must be introduced to maintain the nonwetted composite state. One way to create this free-energy barrier is to fabricate roughness with reentrant geometry, but the question remains as to whether the free-energy barrier is sufficiently high to prevent wetting. Our goal is to quantify the free-energy landscape for the wetting transition of an oily fluid on a surface of nails and identify significant surface features and conditions that maximize the wetting free-energy barrier (ΔGfwd*). This is a departure from most work on wetting, which focuses on the equilibrium composite and wetted states. We use boxed molecular dynamics (BXD) (Glowacki, D. R.; Paci, E.; Shalashilin, D. V. J. Phys. Chem. B2009, 113, 16603-16611) with a modified control scheme to evaluate both the thermodynamics and kinetics of the transition over a range of surface affinities (chemistry). We find that the reentrant geometry of the nails does create a free-energy barrier to transition for phillic chemistry whereas a corresponding system on straight posts wets spontaneously and, that doubling the nail height more than doubles ΔGfwd*. For neutral to phillic chemistry, the dewetting free-energy barrier is at least an order of magnitude higher than that for wetting, indicating an essentially irreversible wetting transition. Transition rates from BXD simulations and the associated trends agree well with those in our previous study that used forward flux sampling to compute transition rates for similar systems.

  15. Wetting effects on the spreading of a liquid droplet colliding with a flat surface: Experiment and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukai, J.; Shiiba, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Miyatake, O.; Poulikakos, D.; Megaridis, C. M.; Zhao, Z.

    1995-02-01

    In this paper an experimental and theoretical study of the deformation of a spherical liquid droplet colliding with a flat surface is presented. The theoretical model accounts for the presence of inertia, viscous, gravitation, surface tension, and wetting effects, including the phenomenon of contact-angle hysteresis. Experiments with impingement surfaces of different wettability were performed. The study showed that the maximum splat radius decreased as the value of the advancing contact angle increased. The effect of impact velocity on droplet spreading was more pronounced when the wetting was limited. The experimental results were compared to the numerical predictions in terms of droplet deformation, splat radius, and splat height. The theoretical model predicted well the deformation of the impacting droplet, not only in the spreading phase, but also during recoiling and oscillation. The wettability of the substrate upon which the droplet impinges was found to affect significantly all phases of the spreading process, including the formation and development of a ring structure around the splat.

  16. Surface Order Parameter Interface Hamiltonian: Renormalization of the Capillary Parameter at Complete Wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulter, C. J.; Parry, A. O.

    1995-04-01

    We consider a model of the complete wetting transition in three dimensions with short-ranged forces which allows for coupling between fluctuations in the order parameter near a substrate and the depinning interface. A renormalization group analysis shows that the effective value of our capillary parameter determining nonuniversal critical amplitudes is renormalized due to this coupling. Our results are in excellent quantitative agreement with the latest Ising model simulation studies of Binder, Landau, and Ferrenberg, which are inexplicable using a standard effective interfacial Hamiltonian model.

  17. Low-loss slot waveguides with silicon (111 surfaces realized using anisotropic wet etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Debnath

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate low-loss slot waveguides on silicon-on-insulator (SOI platform. Waveguides oriented along the (11-2 direction on the Si (110 plane were first fabricated by a standard e-beam lithography and dry etching process. A TMAH based anisotropic wet etching technique was then used to remove any residual side wall roughness. Using this fabrication technique propagation loss as low as 3.7dB/cm was realized in silicon slot waveguide for wavelengths near 1550nm. We also realized low propagation loss of 1dB/cm for silicon strip waveguides.

  18. Low-loss slot waveguides with silicon (111) surfaces realized using anisotropic wet etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Kapil; Khokhar, Ali; Boden, Stuart; Arimoto, Hideo; Oo, Swe; Chong, Harold; Reed, Graham; Saito, Shinichi

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate low-loss slot waveguides on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. Waveguides oriented along the (11-2) direction on the Si (110) plane were first fabricated by a standard e-beam lithography and dry etching process. A TMAH based anisotropic wet etching technique was then used to remove any residual side wall roughness. Using this fabrication technique propagation loss as low as 3.7dB/cm was realized in silicon slot waveguide for wavelengths near 1550nm. We also realized low propagation loss of 1dB/cm for silicon strip waveguides.

  19. Novel Measurement and Monitoring Approaches for Surface and Near-Surface Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. B.; Sheng, W.; Zhou, R.; Sadeghi, M.; Tuller, M.

    2015-12-01

    The top inch of the earth's soil surface is a very dynamic and important layer where physical and biogeochemical processes take place under extreme diurnal and seasonal moisture and temperature variations. Some of these critical surfaces include biocrusts, desert pavements, agricultural lands, mine tailings, hydrophobic forest soils, all of which can significantly impact environmental conditions at large-scales. Natural hazards associated with surface conditions include dust storms, post-fire erosion and flooding in addition to crop failure. Less obvious, though continually occurring, are microbial-induced gas emissions that are also significantly impacted by surface conditions. With so much at stake, it is surprising that in today's technological world there are few if any sensors designed for monitoring the top few mm or cm of the soil surface. In particular, remotely sensed data is expected to provide near-real time surface conditions of our Earth, but we lack effective tools to measure and calibrate surface soil moisture. We are developing multiple methods for measurement and monitoring of surface and near-surface soil water content which include gravimetric as well as electromagnetic approaches. These novel measurement solutions and their prospects to improve soil surface water content determination will be presented.

  20. Influence of soil moisture content on surface albedo and soil thermal parameters at a tropical station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugathan, Neena; Biju, V.; Renuka, G.

    2014-06-01

    Half hourly data of soil moisture content, soil temperature, solar irradiance, and reflectance are measured during April 2010 to March 2011 at a tropical station, viz., Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India (76°59'E longitude and 8°29'N latitude). The monthly, seasonal and seasonal mean diurnal variation of soil moisture content is analyzed in detail and is correlated with the rainfall measured at the same site during the period of study. The large variability in the soil moisture content is attributed to the rainfall during all the seasons and also to the evaporation/movement of water to deeper layers. The relationship of surface albedo on soil moisture content on different time scales are studied and the influence of solar elevation angle and cloud cover are also investigated. Surface albedo is found to fall exponentially with increase in soil moisture content. Soil thermal diffusivity and soil thermal conductivity are also estimated from the subsoil temperature profile. Log normal dependence of thermal diffusivity and power law dependence of thermal conductivity on soil moisture content are confirmed.

  1. Influence of soil moisture content on surface albedo and soil thermal parameters at a tropical station

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neena Sugathan; V Biju; G Renuka

    2014-07-01

    Half hourly data of soil moisture content, soil temperature, solar irradiance, and reflectance are measured during April 2010 to March 2011 at a tropical station, viz., Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India (76° 59’E longitude and 8°29’N latitude). The monthly, seasonal and seasonal mean diurnal variation of soil moisture content is analyzed in detail and is correlated with the rainfall measured at the same site during the period of study. The large variability in the soil moisture content is attributed to the rainfall during all the seasons and also to the evaporation/movement of water to deeper layers. The relationship of surface albedo on soil moisture content on different time scales are studied and the influence of solar elevation angle and cloud cover are also investigated. Surface albedo is found to fall exponentially with increase in soil moisture content. Soil thermal diffusivity and soil thermal conductivity are also estimated from the subsoil temperature profile. Log normal dependence of thermal diffusivity and power law dependence of thermal conductivity on soil moisture content are confirmed.

  2. Plot and field scale soil moisture dynamics and subsurface wetness control on runoff generation in a headwater in the Ore Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zehe

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an application of an innovative sampling strategy to assess soil moisture dynamics in a headwater of the Weißeritz in the German eastern Ore Mountains. A grassland site and a forested site were instrumented with two Spatial TDR clusters (STDR that consist of 39 and 32 coated TDR probes of 60 cm length. Distributed time series of vertically averaged soil moisture data from both sites/ensembles were analyzed by statistical and geostatistical methods. Spatial variability and the spatial mean at the forested site were larger than at the grassland site. Furthermore, clustering of TDR probes in combination with long-term monitoring allowed identification of average spatial covariance structures at the small field scale for different wetness states. The correlation length of soil water content as well as the sill to nugget ratio at the grassland site increased with increasing average wetness and but, in contrast, were constant at the forested site. As soil properties at both the forested and grassland sites are extremely variable, this suggests that the correlation structure at the forested site is dominated by the pattern of throughfall and interception. We also found a very strong correlation between antecedent soil moisture at the forested site and runoff coefficients of rainfall-runoff events observed at gauge Rehefeld. Antecedent soil moisture at the forest site explains 92% of the variability in the runoff coefficients. By combining these results with a recession analysis we derived a first conceptual model of the dominant runoff mechanisms operating in this catchment. Finally, we employed a physically based hydrological model to shed light on the controls of soil- and plant morphological parameters on soil average soil moisture at the forested site and the grassland site, respectively. A homogeneous soil setup allowed, after fine tuning of plant morphological parameters, most of the time unbiased predictions of the observed

  3. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY: GaAs surface wet cleaning by a novel treatment in revolving ultrasonic atomization solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaijin, Li; Liming, Hu; Ye, Wang; Ye, Yang; Hangyu, Peng; Jinlong, Zhang; Li, Qin; Yun, Liu; Lijun, Wang

    2010-03-01

    A novel process for the wet cleaning of GaAs surface is presented. It is designed for technological simplicity and minimum damage generated within the GaAs surface. It combines GaAs cleaning with three conditions consisting of (1) removal of thermodynamically unstable species and (2) surface oxide layers must be completely removed after thermal cleaning, and (3) a smooth surface must be provided. Revolving ultrasonic atomization technology is adopted in the cleaning process. At first impurity removal is achieved by organic solvents; second NH4OH:H2O2:H2O = 1:1:10 solution and HCl: H2O2:H2O = 1:1:20 solution in succession to etch a very thin GaAs layer, the goal of the step is removing metallic contaminants and forming a very thin oxidation layer on the GaAs wafer surface; NH4OH:H2O = 1:5 solution is used as the removed oxide layers in the end. The effectiveness of the process is demonstrated by the operation of the GaAs wafer. Characterization of the oxide composition was carried out by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Metal-contamination and surface morphology was observed by a total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and atomic force microscope. The research results show that the cleaned surface is without contamination or metal contamination. Also, the GaAs substrates surface is very smooth for epitaxial growth using the rotary ultrasonic atomization technology.

  4. Control of hydrophobic surface and wetting states in ultra-flat ZnO films by GLAD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Po-Wei; Su, Chih-Wei; Wei, Da-Hua

    2017-05-01

    Ultra-flat Zinc oxide (ZnO) films with natural hydrophobicity were sputtered onto glass substrates by glancing angle deposition (GLAD) method without addition of active oxygen at room temperature under different glancing angles relating to the sample holder. The sample holder was positioned at glancing angles of 0° and 30°, and the sputtering power was fixed at 75 W with low argon (Ar) pressure of 1 × 10-2 Torr during deposition process. According to analysis of surface composition and structure, the naturally hydrophobic wetting state can be attributed to the different grain structure and hydrocarbon adsorbates on the top of the film surface. On the other hand, the interfacial water molecules near the surface of ultra-flat ZnO films are confirmed belong to the hydrophobic hydrogen structure by Fourier transform infrared/attenuated total reflection. In addition, the water contact angle was significantly improved by a simple factor of glancing angle. The water contact angle value of ultra-flat ZnO films increased from 90° to 98° while the sample holder is with glancing angle of 30°. Moreover, our present ultra-flat ZnO films also exhibited excellent transparency over 80%, and the surface wetting switched from hydrophobic to hydrophilic states after exposing in ultraviolet (UV) surroundings. Then, the ZnO films could be freely and stably reversed back to hydrophobicity after stored in dark surroundings. This present study not only demonstrates that the natural wettability of ultra-flat ZnO films is strongly associated with surface composition and structure, but also provides an easy way to modulate and improve the surface wettability. This also extends the potential applications of ultra-flat ZnO thin films and aids a profound understanding for device design and material development.

  5. Water and Ethanol Droplet Wetting Transition during Evaporation on Omniphobic Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Xuemei Chen; Weibel, Justin A.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2015-01-01

    Omniphobic surfaces with reentrant microstructures have been investigated for a range of applications, but the evaporation of high- and low-surface-tension liquid droplets placed on such surfaces has not been rigorously studied. In this work, we develop a technique to fabricate omniphobic surfaces on copper substrates to allow for a systematic examination of the effects of surface topography on the evaporation dynamics of water and ethanol droplets. Compared to a water droplet, the ethanol dr...

  6. Restoring the natural state of the soil surface by biocrusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaady, Eli; Ungar, Eugene D.; Stavi, Ilan; Shuker, Shimshon; Knoll, Yaakov M.

    2017-04-01

    In arid and semi-arid areas, with mean annual precipitation of 70-200 mm, the dominant component of the ground cover is biocrusts composed of cyanobacteria, moss and lichens. Biocrusts play a role in stabilizing the soil surface, which reduces erosion by water and wind. Human disturbances, such as heavy vehicular traffic, earthworks, overgrazing and land mining destroy the soil surface and promote erosion. The aim of the study was to evaluate restoration of the soil surface by the return of a biocrust layer. We examined the impact of disturbances on the creation of a stable crust and on the rate of recovery. Biocrust disturbance was studied in two sites in the northern Negev. The nine treatments included different rates of biocrust inoculum application and NPK fertilization. Recovery rates of the biocrusts were monitored for five years using chemical, physical and bio-physiological tests which determined infiltration rate, soil surface resistance to pressure, shear force of the soil surface, levels of chlorophyll, organic matter and polysaccharide, NDVI and aggregate stability. The results show that untreated disturbed biocrusts present long-term damage and a very slow rate of recovery, which may take decades, while most of the treatments showed a faster recovery. In particular, NDVI, polysaccharide levels and aggregate stability showed steady improvements over the research period.

  7. Effect of Electrolytes on Surface Charge Characteristics of Red Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAOZONG-CHEN; HEQUN; 等

    1992-01-01

    The zero point of charge (ZPC) and the remaining charge σp at ZPC are two important parameters characterizing surface charge of red soils.Fourteen red soil samples of different soil type and parent material were treated with dithionite-citrate-dicarbonate (DCB) and Na2CO3 respectively.ZPC and σp of the samples in three indifferent electrolytes (NaCl,Na2SO4,and NaH2PO4) were determined.Kaolinite was used as reference.The results showed that ZPC of red soils was affected by the composition of parent materials and clay minerals and in significantly positive correlation with the content of total iron oxide (Fet),free iron oxide (Fed),amorphous iron oxide (Feo),aluminum oxide (Alo) and clay,but it was negatively correlated with the content of total silica (Sit).The σp of red soils was also markedly influenced by mineral components.Organic components were also contributing factor to the value of σp.The surface charges of red soils were evidently affected by the constitution of the electrolytes.Specific adsorption of anions in the electrolytes tended to make the ZPC of red soils shift to a higher pH value and to increase positive surface charges of the soils,thus leading to change of the σp value and decrease of the remaining net negative charges,even to the soils becoming net positive charge carriers.The effect of phosphate anion was greater than that of sulfate ion.

  8. Relationship Between Iron Oxides and Surface Charge Characteristics in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAOZONG-CHEN; WANGWEI-JUN

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between iron oxides and surface charge characteristics in variable charge soils (latosol and red earth) was studied in following three ways.(1)Remove free iron oxides (Fed) and amorphous iron oxides (Feo) from the soils with sodium dithionite and acid ammonium oxalate solution respectively.(2) Add 2% glucose (on the basis of air-dry soil weight) to soils and incubate under submerged condition to activate iron oxides,and then the mixtures are dehydrated and air-dried to age iron oxides.(3) Precipitate various crystalline forms of iron oxides onto kaolinite.The results showed that free iron oxides (Fed) were the chief carrier of variable positive charges.Of which crystalline iron oxides (Fed-Feo) presented mainly as discrete particles in the soils and could only play a role of the carrier of positive charges,and did little influence on negative charges.Whereas the amorphous iron oxides (Feo),which presented mainly fas a coating with a large specific surface area,not only had positive charges,but also blocked the negative charge sites in soils.Submerged incubation activated iron oxides in the soils,and increased the amount of amorphous iron oxides and the degree of activation of iron oxide,which resulted in the increase of positive and negative charges of soils.Dehydration and air-dry aged iron oxides in soils and decreased the amount of amorphous iron oxides and the degree of activation of iron oxide,and also led to the decrease of positive and negative charges.Both the submerged incubation and the dehydration and air-dry had no significant influence on net charges.Precipitation of iron oxides onto kaolinite markedly increased positive charges and decreased negative charges.Amorphous iron oxide having a larger surface area contributed more positive charge sites and blocked more negative charge sites in kaolinite than crystalline goethite.

  9. Influence of nonuniform surface magnetic fields in wetting transitions in a confined two-dimensional Ising ferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trobo, Marta L.; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2013-11-01

    Wetting transitions are studied in the two-dimensional Ising ferromagnet confined between walls where competitive surface fields act. In our finite samples of size L×M, the walls are separated by a distance L, M being the length of the sample. The surface fields are taken to be short-range and nonuniform, i.e., of the form H1,δH1,H1,δH1,..., where the parameter -1≤δ≤1 allows us to control the nonuniformity of the fields. By performing Monte Carlo simulations we found that those competitive surface fields lead to the occurrence of an interface between magnetic domains of different orientation that runs parallel to the walls. In finite samples, such an interface undergoes a localization-delocalization transition, which is the precursor of a true wetting transition that takes place in the thermodynamic limit. By exactly working out the ground state (T=0), we found that besides the standard nonwet and wet phases, a surface antiferromagnetic-like state emerges for δ3), H1tr/J=3, δtr=-1/3,T=0, being a triple point where three phases coexist. By means of Monte Carlo simulations it is shown that these features of the phase diagram remain at higher temperatures; e.g., we examined in detail the case T=0.7×Tcb. Furthermore, we also recorded phase diagrams for fixed values of δ, i.e., plots of the critical field at the wetting transition (H1w) versus T showing, on the one hand, that the exact results of Abraham [Abraham, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.44.1165 44, 1165 (1980)] for δ=1 are recovered, and on the other hand, that extrapolations to T→0 are consistent with our exact results. Based on our numerical results we conjectured that the exact result for the phase diagram worked out by Abraham can be extended for the case of nonuniform fields. In fact, by considering a nonuniform surface field of some period λ, with λ≪M, e.g., [H1(x,λ)>0], one can obtain the effective field Heff at a λ coarse-grained level given by Heff=(1)/(λ)∑x=1

  10. Influence of nonuniform surface magnetic fields in wetting transitions in a confined two-dimensional Ising ferromagnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trobo, Marta L; Albano, Ezequiel V

    2013-11-01

    Wetting transitions are studied in the two-dimensional Ising ferromagnet confined between walls where competitive surface fields act. In our finite samples of size L×M, the walls are separated by a distance L, M being the length of the sample. The surface fields are taken to be short-range and nonuniform, i.e., of the form H(1),δH(1),H(1),δH(1),..., where the parameter -1≤δ≤1 allows us to control the nonuniformity of the fields. By performing Monte Carlo simulations we found that those competitive surface fields lead to the occurrence of an interface between magnetic domains of different orientation that runs parallel to the walls. In finite samples, such an interface undergoes a localization-delocalization transition, which is the precursor of a true wetting transition that takes place in the thermodynamic limit. By exactly working out the ground state (T=0), we found that besides the standard nonwet and wet phases, a surface antiferromagnetic-like state emerges for δ3), H(1)(tr)/J=3, δ(tr)=-1/3,T=0, being a triple point where three phases coexist. By means of Monte Carlo simulations it is shown that these features of the phase diagram remain at higher temperatures; e.g., we examined in detail the case T=0.7×T(cb). Furthermore, we also recorded phase diagrams for fixed values of δ, i.e., plots of the critical field at the wetting transition (H(1w)) versus T showing, on the one hand, that the exact results of Abraham [Abraham, Phys. Rev. Lett. 44, 1165 (1980)] for δ=1 are recovered, and on the other hand, that extrapolations to T→0 are consistent with our exact results. Based on our numerical results we conjectured that the exact result for the phase diagram worked out by Abraham can be extended for the case of nonuniform fields. In fact, by considering a nonuniform surface field of some period λ, with λ0], one can obtain the effective field H(eff) at a λ coarse-grained level given by H(eff)=1/λ∑(x=1)(λ)H(1)(x,λ). Then we conjectured that the

  11. Dynamic behavior of water droplet impact on microtextured surfaces: the effect of geometrical parameters on anisotropic wetting and the maximum spreading diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiying; Mao, Liqun; Ma, Xuehu

    2013-01-29

    Textured silicon surfaces decorated by square arrays of pillars with adjustable pitch were fabricated. The wetting behavior, especially for direction-dependent water contact angles on textured silicon surfaces after silanization, was investigated by incorporating the contact line fraction into a modified Wenzel model. Also, the effect of geometrical parameters on the anisotropic wetting behavior of water was examined with respect to water droplet impact on the textured surface. Moreover, the maximum spreading factor was studied theoretically in terms of energy conservation, allowing for surface topography and viscous friction of the liquid flowing among the arrays of the posts. Theoretical models were found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  12. [Distribution of soil organic carbon in surface soil along a precipitation gradient in loess hilly area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Long; Zhang, Guang-hui; Luan, Li-li; Li, Zhen-wei; Geng, Ren

    2016-02-01

    Along the 368-591 mm precipitation gradient, 7 survey sites, i.e. a total 63 investigated plots were selected. At each sites, woodland, grassland, and cropland with similar restoration age were selected to investigate soil organic carbon distribution in surface soil (0-30 cm), and the influence of factors, e.g. climate, soil depth, and land uses, on soil organic carbon distribution were analyzed. The result showed that, along the precipitation gradient, the grassland (8.70 g . kg-1) > woodland (7.88 g . kg-1) > farmland (7.73 g . kg-1) in concentration and the grassland (20.28 kg . m-2) > farmland (19.34 kg . m-2) > woodland (17.14 kg . m-2) in density. The differences of soil organic carbon concentration of three land uses were not significant. Further analysis of pooled data of three land uses showed that the surface soil organic carbon concentration differed significantly at different precipitation levels (Psoil organic carbon concentration (r=0.838, Psoil organic carbon increased with annual precipitation 0. 04 g . kg-1 . mm-1, density 0.08 kg . m-2 . mm-1. The soil organic carbon distribution was predicted with mean annual precipitation, soil clay content, plant litter in woodland, and root density in farmland.

  13. Probing the intrinsically oil-wet surfaces of pores in North Sea chalk at subpore resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassenkam, Tue; Skovbjerg, Lone Lindbæk; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2009-01-01

    Ultimate Oil recovery from chalk reservoirs is limited by many factors - including the grain size and the surface properties of the small mainly biogenic calcite particles that chalk is made off . Wettability, the tendency for water or oil to spread over a surface, of the particle surfaces is one...

  14. Study of variation in surface morphology, chemical composition, crystallinity and hardness of laser irradiated silver in dry and wet environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nisar; Bashir, Shazia; Umm-i-Kalsoom; Begum, Narjis; Hussain, Tousif

    2017-07-01

    Variation in surface morphology, chemical composition, crystallinity and hardness of laser irradiated silver in dry and wet ambient environments has been investigated. For this purpose, the silver targets were exposed for various number of laser pulses in ambient environment of air, ethanol and de-ionized water for various number of laser pulses i.e. 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was employed to investigate the surface morphology of irradiated silver. SEM analysis reveals significant surface variations for both dry and wet ambient environments. For lower number of pulses, in air environment significant mass removal is observed but in case of ethanol no significant change in surface morphology is observed. In case of de-ionized water small sized cavities are observed with formation of protrusions with spherical top ends. For higher number of laser pulses, refilling of cavities by shock liquefied material, globules and protrusions are observed in case of dry ablation. For ablation in ethanol porous and coarse periodic ripples are observed whereas, for de-ionized water increasing density of protrusions is observed for higher number of pulses. EDS analysis exhibits the variation in chemical composition along with an enhanced diffusion of oxygen under both ambient conditions. The crystal structure of the exposed targets were explored by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) technique. XRD results support the EDS results. Formation of Ag2O in case of air and ethanol whereas, Ag2O and Ag3O in case of de-ionized water confirms the diffusion of oxygen into the silver surface after irradiation. Vickers Hardness tester was employed to measure the hardness of laser treated targets. Enhanced hardness is observed after irradiation in both dry and wet ambient environments. Initial decrease and then increase in hardness is observed with increase in number of laser pulses in air environment. In case of ethanol, increase in number of laser pulses results in

  15. The onset of cavitation during the collision of a sphere with a wetted surface

    KAUST Repository

    Mansoor, Mohammad M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the onset of cavitation during the collision of a sphere with a solid surface covered with a layer of Newtonian liquid. The conventional theory dictates cavitation to initiate during depressurization, i.e. when the sphere rebounds from the solid surface. Using synchronized dual-view high-speed imaging, we provide conclusive experimental evidence that confirms this scenario- namely-that cavitation occurs only after the sphere makes initial contact with the solid surface. Similar to previous experimental observations for spheres released above the liquid surface, bubbles are formed on the sphere surface during entry into the liquid layer. These were found to squeeze radially outwards with the liquid flow as the sphere approached the solid surface, producing an annular bubble structure unrelated to cavitation. In contrast, spheres released below the liquid surface did not exhibit these patterns. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014.

  16. The onset of cavitation during the collision of a sphere with a wetted surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, M. M.; Uddin, J.; Marston, J. O.; Vakarelski, I. U.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the onset of cavitation during the collision of a sphere with a solid surface covered with a layer of Newtonian liquid. The conventional theory dictates cavitation to initiate during depressurization, i.e. when the sphere rebounds from the solid surface. Using synchronized dual-view high-speed imaging, we provide conclusive experimental evidence that confirms this scenario—namely—that cavitation occurs only after the sphere makes initial contact with the solid surface. Similar to previous experimental observations for spheres released above the liquid surface, bubbles are formed on the sphere surface during entry into the liquid layer. These were found to squeeze radially outwards with the liquid flow as the sphere approached the solid surface, producing an annular bubble structure unrelated to cavitation. In contrast, spheres released below the liquid surface did not exhibit these patterns.

  17. Controlled anisotropic wetting behaviour of multi-scale slippery surface structure of non fluoro polymer composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sabarish

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A facile process for in-situ modification of surface properties of Waste Expanded Polystyrene (WEP/graphite film produced by spin coating technique has been described. The additives undergo spontaneous surface agglomeration with formation of islands of forest of flake structure during the spinning process. This results in polymer films with enhanced roughness and highly hydrophobic surfaces. Wettability was analyzed using static water contact angle, surface morphology was observed using atomic force microscopy (AFM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM. The polymer composite exhibited maximum water contact angle (WCA of 129°. Surface texture reveals the variation of surface roughness which enables anisotropic surface wettability property. The present work exhibits promising approach for fabricating nano flake forest in polymer structures for various industrial applications.

  18. 湿纺和干湿纺炭纤维的表面结构分析%Surface Structure Analysis of Carbon Fiber Prepared by Wet Spinning and Dry-jet Wet Spinning Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李阳; 杨永岗; 刘朗

    2011-01-01

    The surface topography, microstructure and surface chemical composition of carbon fiber prepared by wet spinning and dry-jet wet spinning method were characterized by scanning electron microscope(SEM), atomic force microscope(AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS). The effect of microstructure of composite on the interface of composite was analyzed. SEM and AFM results show that the surface roughness of carbon fiber prepared by wet spinning method was higher. The depth of grooves was non-uniform along the axis of fiber and the orientation of grooves was disordered. It was beneficial to the mechanical inventions which promote the coherence of the interface. The concentration of oxygen and nitrogen on the surface of carbon fiber prepared by wet spinning method was higher than carbon fiber prepared by dry-jet wet spinning method. The surface activity of the former was also higher than the latter. It contributed to the chemical reaction with the resin which result in stronger interface. The interlami-nar shear strength (ILSS) of composite prepared by carbon fiber from wet spinning method increases by 13. 92% than that from dry-jet wet spinning method.%采用SEM、AFM及XPS等测试技术对湿法和干湿法制备的炭纤维的表面形貌、组织结构及化学组成进行了表征,分析材料的微观组织对复合材料界面的影响.研究结果发现,湿法炭纤维表面粗糙度大,沿纤维轴向沟槽深浅不均匀,且走向杂乱,有利于与复合材料中的基体树脂产生物理机械锁合作用,促进界面粘结;湿法炭纤维的表面含氧量和含氮量高于干湿法炭纤维,且表面活性同样高于干湿法炭纤维,有利于与基体树脂发生化学反应,形成较强的界面作用,从而使湿法炭纤维复合材料的层间剪切强度比干湿法炭纤维提高了13.92%.

  19. Wetting and spreading of nanofluids on solid surfaces driven by the structural disjoining pressure: statics analysis and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondiparty, Kirti; Nikolov, Alex; Wu, Stanley; Wasan, Darsh

    2011-04-05

    The wetting and spreading of nanofluids composed of liquid suspensions of nanoparticles have significant technological applications. Recent studies have revealed that, compared to the spreading of base liquids without nanoparticles, the spreading of wetting nanofluids on solid surfaces is enhanced by the structural disjoining pressure. Here, we present our experimental observations and the results of the statics analysis based on the augmented Laplace equation (which takes into account the contribution of the structural disjoining pressure) on the effects of the nanoparticle concentration, nanoparticle size, contact angle, and drop size (i.e., the capillary and hydrostatic pressure); we examined the effects on the displacement of the drop-meniscus profile and spontaneous spreading of a nanofluid as a film on a solid surface. Our analyses indicate that a suitable combination of the nanoparticle concentration, nanoparticle size, contact angle, and capillary pressure can result not only in the displacement of the three-phase contact line but also in the spontaneous spreading of the nanofluid as a film on a solid surface. We show here, for the first time, that the complete wetting and spontaneous spreading of the nanofluid as a film driven by the structural disjoining pressure gradient (arising due to the nanoparticle ordering in the confined wedge film) is possible by decreasing the nanoparticle size and the interfacial tension, even at a nonzero equilibrium contact angle. Experiments were conducted on the spreading of a nanofluid composed of 5, 10, 12.5, and 20 vol % silica suspensions of 20 nm (geometric diameter) particles. A drop of canola oil was placed underneath the glass surface surrounded by the nanofluid, and the spreading of the nanofluid was monitored using an advanced optical technique. The effect of an electrolyte, such as sodium chloride, on the nanofluid spreading phenomena was also explored. On the basis of the experimental results, we can conclude

  20. Study of the dynamic growth of wetting layers in the confined Ising model with competing surface fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albano, Ezequiel V [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), UNLP, CONICET, Casilla de Correo 16, Sucursal 4 (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Institut fuer Physik, WA331, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Staudingerweg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Virgiliis, Andres de [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), UNLP, CONICET, Casilla de Correo 16, Sucursal 4 (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Institut fuer Physik, WA331, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Staudingerweg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Mueller, Marcus [Institut fuer Physik, WA331, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Staudingerweg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Georg-August Universitaet, Friedrich Hund Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Binder, Kurt [Institut fuer Physik, WA331, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Staudingerweg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    A two-dimensional magnetic Ising system confined in an L x D geometry (L<wetting transition that occurs at the critical curve T{sub w}(h), so that for Twetting regime, in both cases the correlation length of interfacial fluctuations {xi}{sub parallel} grows with time t as {xi}{sub parallel} {proportional_to} t{sup 1/z} with z = 2, while the interfacial position follows Z{sub 0}(t) {proportional_to} t{sup 1/2z}=t{sup 1/4} both in the case of short-range and long-range surface fields, respectively, consistent with dynamic scaling predictions. Furthermore, considering the complete wetting regime and in the presence of a bulk magnetic field, we find that the interface location also obeys standard dynamic scaling behaviour for both short-range and long-range fields.

  1. Indirect methods to measure wetting and contact angles on spherical convex and concave surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extrand, C W; Moon, Sung In

    2012-05-22

    In this work, a method was developed for indirectly estimating contact angles of sessile liquid drops on convex and concave surfaces. Assuming that drops were sufficiently small that no gravitational distortion occurred, equations were derived to compute intrinsic contact angles from the radius of curvature of the solid surface, the volume of the liquid drop, and its contact diameter. These expressions were tested against experimental data for various liquids on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polycarbonate (PC) in the form of flat surfaces, spheres, and concave cavities. Intrinsic contact angles estimated indirectly using dimensions and volumes generally agreed with the values measured directly from flat surfaces using the traditional tangent method.

  2. Soil fertility in deserts: a review on the influence of biological soil crusts and the effect of soil surface disturbance on nutrient inputs and losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R.; Phillips, S.; Duniway, M.; Belnap, J.

    2003-01-01

    Sources of desert soil fertility include parent material weathering, aeolian deposition, and on-site C and N biotic fixation. While parent materials provide many soil nutrients, aeolian deposition can provide up to 75% of plant-essential nutrients including N, P, K, Mg, Na, Mn, Cu, and Fe. Soil surface biota are often sticky, and help retain wind-deposited nutrients, as well as providing much of the N inputs. Carbon inputs are from both plants and soil surface biota. Most desert soils are protected by cyanobacterial-lichen-moss soil crusts, chemical crusts and/or desert pavement. Experimental disturbances applied in US deserts show disruption of soil surfaces result in decreased N and C inputs from soil biota by up to 100%. The ability to glue aeolian deposits in place is compromised, and underlying soils are exposed to erosion. The ability to withstand wind increases with biological and physical soil crust development. While most undisturbed sites show little sediment production, disturbance by vehicles or livestock produce up to 36 times more sediment production, with soil movement initiated at wind velocities well below commonly-occurring wind speeds. Soil fines and flora are often concentrated in the top 3 mm of the soil surface. Winds across disturbed areas can quickly remove this material from the soil surface, thereby potentially removing much of current and future soil fertility. Thus, disturbances of desert soil surfaces can both reduce fertility inputs and accelerate fertility losses.

  3. Denitrification 'hot spots' in soil following surface residue application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Marianne; Morley, Nicholas J.; Hallett, Paul D.; Watson, Christine; Baggs, Elizabeth M.

    2015-04-01

    The availability of organic C is an important driver for the production and reduction of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) during denitrification. Denitrification as a response to plant residue amendments to soil surfaces has been extensively researched. However, the nature of hotspot sites of N2O production and reduction within the soil profile, especially in relation to the location of applied residues, is unknown. In a laboratory experiment we investigated the relationship between denitrifier N2O surface fluxes and N2O production and reduction sites. Probes which equilibrate with the soil gas phase by diffusion were developed to quantify denitrification products and product ratios at 1-2 cm, 4.5-5.5 cm or 8-9 cm from the surface. 13C labelled barley straw was incorporated at rates of 0, 2 and 4 t ha-1 into the top 3 cm of soil and subsequently amended with 14NH415NO3. In a three week experiment the soil gas phase at the three depths was analysed for 15N-N2O, 15N-N2, 13C-CO2 and O2 concentrations. Additionally, cores were destructively sampled for mineral 15N as well as microbial C and dissolved C in the respective depths. 15N-N2O and CO2 surface fluxes peaked one day after N application, with residue application resulting in significantly higher 15N-N2O emission rates compared to the non-amended control. The timing of the 15N-N2O surface flux on day 1 was related to maximum 15N-N2O concentrations of 36.6 μg 15N L-1 within the pore space at 5 cm depth. Three days after fertilizer application 15N-N2O pore space concentrations had significantly increased to 193 μg 15N L-1 at 9 cm depth indicating denitrifier activity at greater depth. Denitrification below the soil surface could be explained by increased microbial activity, oxygen depletion with increasing depth and progressive downwards diffusion of fertilizer NO3-. However, C availability appeared to only affect denitrification in the surface layer in which the residue was incorporated. Our results provide

  4. Near surface soil vapor clusters for monitoring emissions of volatile organic compounds from soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergas, S J; Hinlein, E S; Reyes, P O; Ostendorf, D W; Tehrany, J P

    2000-01-01

    The overall objective of this research was to develop and test a method of determining emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other gases from soil surfaces. Soil vapor clusters (SVCs) were designed as a low dead volume, robust sampling system to obtain vertically resolved profiles of soil gas contaminant concentrations in the near surface zone. The concentration profiles, when combined with a mathematical model of porous media mass transport, were used to calculate the contaminant flux from the soil surface. Initial experiments were conducted using a mesoscale soil remediation system under a range of experimental conditions. Helium was used as a tracer and trichloroethene was used as a model VOC. Flux estimations using the SVCs were within 25% of independent surface flux estimates and were comparable to measurements made using a surface isolation flux chamber (SIFC). In addition, method detection limits for the SVC were an order of magnitude lower than detection limits with the SIFC. Field trials, conducted with the SVCs at a bioventing site, indicated that the SVC method could be easily used in the field to estimate fugitive VOC emission rates. Major advantages of the SVC method were its low detection limits, lack of required auxiliary equipment, and ability to obtain real-time estimates of fugitive VOC emission rates.

  5. An Elastic-plastic Adhesion Model for Contacting Fractal Rough Surface and Perfectly Wetted Plane with Meniscus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yunfeng; GUO Yinbiao

    2009-01-01

    The strong stiction of adjacent surfaces with meniscus is a major design concern in the devices with a micro-sized interface.Today, more and more research works are devoted to understand the adhesion mechanism. This paper concerns the elastic-plastic adhesion of a fractal rough surface contacting with a perfectly wetted rigid plane. The topography of rough surface is modeled with a two-variable Weierstrass-Mandelbrot fractal function. The Laplace pressure is dealt with the Dugdale approximation. Then the adhesion model of the plastically deformed asperities with meniscus can be established with the fractal microcontact model. According to the plastic flow criterion, the elastic-plastic adhesion model of the contacting rough surfaces with meniscus can be solved by combining the Maugis-Dugdale (MD) model and its extension with the Morrow method. The necessity for considering the asperities' plastic deformation has been validated by comparing the simulation result of the presented model with that of the elastic adhesion model. The stiction mechanism of rough surfaces with meniscus is also discussed.

  6. Wetting and nanodroplet contact angle of the clay 2:1 surface: The case of Na-montmorillonite (001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.; Zaoui, A.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation method is performed to study the wetting and contact angle between a water nanodroplet and a surface of Na-montmorillonite (Na-MMT). The nanodroplet of 256, 500 and 1000 water molecules, based on SPC and TIP4P water models, is handled by means of Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics simulation methods The spreading of water molecules on Na-MMT's surface is not uniform. In fact, the contact line is not perfectly circlar; it depends on the distribution of cations on clay's surface. The average contact angle of air/water/clay corresponds to 25° for all cases of nanodroplets studied here, which reveals that Na-MMT is definitely hydrophilic. In the nanodroplet, most of water molecules remain at a distance between 3.5 and ∼4 Å to the clay's surface. However, at the edge of nanodroplet, water molecules are caught by the clay's surface oxygen and thus enter into the 0-3 Å zone, which blocks the spreading of nanodroplet.

  7. Characterization of the surface of protein-adsorbed dental materials by wetting and streaming potential measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsumura, H.; Kawasaki, K.; Okumura, N.; Kambara, M.; Norde, W.

    2003-01-01

    In this study we have elucidated the water-wettability and the electrokinetic surface potential of protein-covered dental materials. The proteins used here as typical proteins were human serum albumin and lysozyme from hen*s egg. The wettability (hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) and the surface potent

  8. Characterization of the surface of protein-adsorbed dental materials by wetting and streaming potential measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsumura, H; Kawasaki, K; Okumura, N; Kambara, M; Norde, W

    2003-01-01

    In this study we have elucidated the water-wettability and the electrokinetic surface potential of protein-covered dental materials. The proteins used here as typical proteins were human serum albumin and lysozyme from hen's egg. The wettability (hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) and the surface potent

  9. Enhancement of chromate reduction in soils by surface modified biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sanchita; Sarkar, Binoy; Bolan, Nanthi; Ok, Yong Sik; Naidu, Ravi

    2017-01-15

    Chromium (Cr) is one of the common metals present in the soils and may have an extremely deleterious environmental impact depending on its redox state. Among two common forms, trivalent Cr(III) is less toxic than hexavalent Cr(VI) in soils. Carbon (C) based materials including biochar could be used to alleviate Cr toxicity through converting Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Incubation experiments were conducted to examine Cr(VI) reduction in different soils (Soil 1: pH 7.5 and Soil 2: pH 5.5) with three manures from poultry (PM), cow (CM) and sheep (SM), three respective manure-derived biochars (PM biochar (PM-BC), CM biochar (CM-BC) and SM biochar (SM-BC)) and two modified biochars (modified PM-BC (PM-BC-M) and modified SM-BC (SM-BC-M)). Modified biochar was synthesized by incorporating chitosan and zerovalent iron (ZVI) during pyrolysis. Among biochars, highest Cr(VI) reduction was observed with PM-BC application (5%; w/w) (up to 88.12 mg kg(-1); 45% reduction) in Soil 2 (pH 5.5). The modified biochars enhanced Cr(VI) reduction by 55% (SM-BC-M) compared to manure (29%, SM) and manure-derived biochars (40% reduction, SM-BC). Among the modified biochars, SM-BC-M showed a higher Cr(VI) reduction rate (55%) than PM-BC-M (48%) in Soil 2. Various oxygen-containing surface functional groups such as phenolic, carboxyl, carbonyl, etc. on biochar surface might act as a proton donor for Cr(VI) reduction and subsequent Cr(III) adsorption. This study underpins the immense potential of modified biochar in remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Soil surface sealing reverse or promote desertification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouline, Shmuel; Thompson, Sally; Chen, Li; Svoray, Tal; Sela, Shai; Katul, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation cover in dry regions is a key variable determining desertification. Bare soils exposed to rainfall by desertification can form physical crusts that reduce infiltration, exacerbating water stress on the remaining vegetation. Paradoxically, field studies show that crust removal is associated with plant mortality in desert systems, while artificial biological crusts can improve plant regeneration. Here, it is shown how physical crusts can act as either drivers of, or buffers against desertification depending on their environmental context. The behavior of crusts is first explored using a simplified theory for water movement on a uniform, partly vegetated slope subject to stationary hydrologic conditions. Numerical model runs supplemented with field data from a semiarid Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site are then applied to represent more realistic environmental conditions. When vegetation cover is significant, crusts can drive desertification, but this process is potentially self-limiting. For low vegetation cover, crusts mitigate against desertification by providing water subsidy to plant communities through a runoff-runon mechanism.

  11. Wetting of potassium surfaces by superfluid 4He: A study using variational properties of the chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szybisz, Leszek

    2000-08-01

    The wetting of planar surfaces of K by superfluid 4He films at T=0 K is theoretically studied. In order to examine the consistency of numerical results, new variational properties of the chemical potential μ are derived. Two substrate-adsorbate interactions are analyzed: (a) the standard ``3-9'' one and (b) the more elaborated potential recently proposed by Chizmeshya, Cole, and Zaremba (CCZ). New results calculated within the framework of two different nonlocal density functionals (namely, those known as the Orsay-Paris and Orsay-Trento formalisms) are reported. It is demonstrated that the numerical solutions obtained from the theoretical equations verify with high accuracy the derived variational conditions. The main output of this investigation is the finding that, for both analyzed adsorption potentials, thick enough helium films exhibit a positive square of the third-sound velocity. The wetting of a potassium substrate by superfluid 4He at T=0 K suggested by experimental data is guaranteed in the case of the recent CCZ potential.

  12. Ruthenium catalysts supported on high-surface-area zirconia for the catalytic wet oxidation of N,N-dimethyl formamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guanglu; Xu, Aihua; He, Yu; Yang, Min; Du, Hongzhang; Sun, Chenglin

    2008-08-15

    Three weight percent ruthenium catalysts were prepared by incipient-wet impregnation of two different zirconium oxides, and characterized by BET, XRD and TPR. Their activity was evaluated in the catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) in an autoclave reactor. Due to a better dispersion, Ru catalyst supported on a high-surface-area zirconia (Ru/ZrO(2)-A) possessed higher catalytic properties. Due to over-oxidation of Ru particles, the catalytic activity of the both catalysts decreased during successive tests. The effect of oxygen partial pressure and reaction temperature on the DMF reactivity in the CWO on Ru/ZrO(2)-A was also investigated. 98.6% of DMF conversion was obtained through hydrothermal decomposition within 300 min at conditions of 200 degrees C and 2.0 MPa of nitrogen pressure. At 240 degrees C and 2.0 MPa of oxygen pressure 98.3% of DMF conversion was obtained within 150 min.

  13. A coupled force-restore model of surface temperature and soil moisture using the maximum entropy production model of heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S.-Y.; Wang, J.

    2016-07-01

    A coupled force-restore model of surface soil temperature and moisture (FRMEP) is formulated by incorporating the maximum entropy production model of surface heat fluxes and including the gravitational drainage term. The FRMEP model driven by surface net radiation and precipitation are independent of near-surface atmospheric variables with reduced sensitivity to the uncertainties of model input and parameters compared to the classical force-restore models (FRM). The FRMEP model was evaluated using observations from two field experiments with contrasting soil moisture conditions. The modeling errors of the FRMEP predicted surface temperature and soil moisture are lower than those of the classical FRMs forced by observed or bulk formula based surface heat fluxes (bias 1 ~ 2°C versus ~4°C, 0.02 m3 m-3 versus 0.05 m3 m-3). The diurnal variations of surface temperature, soil moisture, and surface heat fluxes are well captured by the FRMEP model measured by the high correlations between the model predictions and observations (r ≥ 0.84). Our analysis suggests that the drainage term cannot be neglected under wet soil condition. A 1 year simulation indicates that the FRMEP model captures the seasonal variation of surface temperature and soil moisture with bias less than 2°C and 0.01 m3 m-3 and correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.9 with observations, respectively.

  14. Potential fate of SOC eroded from natural crusted soil surface under simulated wind driven storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liangang; Fister, Wolfgang; Greenwood, Philip; Hu, Yaxian; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    Improving the assessment of the impact of soil erosion on carbon (C) cycling requires a better understanding of the redistribution of eroded sediment and associated soil organic carbon (SOC) across agricultural landscapes. Recent studies conducted on dry-sieved aggregates in the laboratory demonstrated that aggregation can profoundly skew SOC redistribution and its subsequent fate by accelerating settling velocities of aggregated sediment compared to mineral grains, which in turn can increase SOC mineralization into greenhouse gases. However, the erodibility of the soil in the field is more variable than in the laboratory due to tillage, crus formation, drying-wetting and freeze-thaw cycles, and biological effects. This study aimed to investigate the potential fate of the SOC eroded from naturally developed soil surface and to compare the observations with those made in the laboratory. Simulated, short, high intensity wind driven storms were conducted on a crusted loam in the field. The sediments were fractionated with a settling tube according to their potential transport distances. The soil mass, SOC concentration and cumulative 80-day CO2 emission of each fraction were identified. The results show: 1) 53% of eroded sediment and 62% of eroded SOC from the natural surface in the field would be deposited across landscapes, which is six times and three times higher compared to that implied by mineral grains, respectively; 2) the preferential deposition of SOC-rich fast-settling sediment potentially releases approximately 50% more CO2 than the same layer of the non-eroded soil; 3) the respiration of the slow-settling fraction that is potentially transported to the aquatic systems was much more active compared to the other fractions and the bulk soil. Our results confirm in general the conclusions drawn from laboratory and thus demonstrate that aggregation can affect the redistribution of sediment associated SOC under field conditions, including an increase in

  15. Wet-electron Enhanced Surface Dissociative Electron Attachment Chemistry of Halocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    photocatalysis , TiO2, decontamination, electron spectroscopy Hrvoje Petek, Xuefeng Cui, Chungwei Lin, and Jin Zhao University of Pittsburgh 123 University...reduction processes on TiO2 surfaces. Therefore it is relevant to the mechanism of photocatalytic decontamination with TiO2 photocatalysis . (a... photocatalysis  with H2O and CH3OH  overlayers.    For a clean TiO2 surface at 90 K O2 molecules do not adsorb on  stoichiometric TiO2 surfaces; they

  16. Defining the Catechol-Cation Synergy for Enhanced Wet Adhesion to Mineral Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Michael V; Maier, Greg P; Dobbs, Howard A; Higdon, Nicholas J; Waite, J Herbert; Butler, Alison; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2016-07-27

    Mussel foot proteins (Mfps) exhibit remarkably adaptive adhesion and bridging between polar surfaces in aqueous solution despite the strong hydration barriers at the solid-liquid interface. Recently, catechols and amines-two functionalities that account for >50 mol % of the amino acid side chains in surface-priming Mfps-were shown to cooperatively displace the interfacial hydration and mediate robust adhesion between mineral surfaces. Here we demonstrate that (1) synergy between catecholic and guanidinium side chains similarly promotes adhesion, (2) increasing the ratio of cationic amines to catechols in a molecule reduces adhesion, and (3) the catechol-cation synergy is greatest when both functionalities are present within the same molecule.

  17. Vanadium Trineodecanoate Promoter for Fiberglass-Polyester Soil Surfacings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    surfaces for soils consists of a polyester resin, cumene hydroperoxide catalyst and a promoter solution containing a vanadium salt and N,N-dimethyl-p-tolui...4 Synthesis of Vanadium Trineodecanoate .. .... ......... 4 Reactions Using Various Reagents. ..... ........... 4 Analysis of Vanadium...polymer system consists of a polyester resin, a peroxide cata- lyst ( cumene hydroperoxide) and a two-part, premixed, promoter solution. The promoter

  18. Photodegradation of pesticides on plant and soil surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2004-01-01

    importance of an emission spectrum of the light source near its surface was clarified. Most photochemical information comes from photolysis in organic solvents or on glass surfaces and/or plant metabolism studies. Epicuticular waxes may be approximated by long-chain hydrocarbons as a very viscous liquid or solid, but the existing form of pesticide molecules in waxes is still obscure. Either coexistence of formulation agents or steric constraint in the rigid medium would cause a change of molecular excitation, deactivation, and photodegradation mechanisms, which should be further investigated to understand the dissipation profiles of a pesticide in or on crops in the field. A thin-layer system with a coat of epicuticular waxes extracted from leaves or isolated cuticles has been utilized as a model, but its application has been very limited. There appear to be gaps in our knowledge about the surface chemistry and photochemistry of pesticides in both rigid media and plant metabolism. Photodegradation studies, for example, by using these models to eliminate contribution from metabolic conversion as much as possible, should be extensively conducted in conjunction with wax chemistry, with the controlling factors being clarified. As with soil surfaces, the effects of atmospheric oxidants should also be investigated. Based on this knowledge, new methods of kinetic analysis or a device simulating the fate of pesticides on these surfaces could be more rationally developed. Concerning soil photolysis, detailed mechanistic analysis of the mobility and fate of pesticides together with volatilization from soil surfaces has been initiated and its spatial distribution with time has been simulated with reasonable precision on a laboratory scale. Although mechanistic analyses have been conducted on penetration of pesticides through cuticular waxes, its combination with photodegradation to simulate the real environment is awaiting further investigation.

  19. Analysis of Wetting Characteristics on Microstructured Hydrophobic Surfaces for the Passive Containment Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the heat transfer surface in the passive containment cooling system, the anticorrosion coating (AC of steel containment vessel (CV must meet the requirements on heat transfer performance. One of the wall surface ACs with simple structure, high mechanical strength, and well hydrophobic characteristics, which is conductive to form dropwise condensation, is significant for the heat removal of the CV. In this paper, the grooved structures on silicon wafers by lithographic methods are systematically prepared to investigate the effects of microstructures on the hydrophobic property of the surfaces. The results show that the hydrophobicity is dramatically improved in comparison with the conventional Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter model. In addition, the experimental results are successfully explained by the interface state effect. As a consequence, it is indicated that favorable hydrophobicity can be obtained even if the surface is with lower roughness and without any chemical modifications, which provides feasible solutions for improving the heat transfer performance of CV.

  20. Surface tension of polytetrafluoroethylene and its wetting by aqueous solution of some surfactants and their mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mańko, Diana; Zdziennicka, Anna; Jańczuk, Bronisław

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the contact angle of aqueous solution of rhamnolipid (RL) mixture with n-octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (OGP), Triton X-100 (TX-100) or/and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDDS) on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were made. To this aim there was used a plate whose surface topography was analyzed by means of optical profilometry method. Additionally, plate surface chemistry was studied employing the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The obtained values of contact angle were discussed based on the PTFE surface tension (γSV) as well as the Lifshitz-van der Waals component of the water surface tension (γWLW). The contact angle of aqueous solution of several surfactants and their mixtures on PTFE was also considered on the basis of γSV and γWLW . It occured that by using the values of γSV , γWLW and surface tension of the aqueous solution of surfactants and their mixtures, the contact angle on PTFE can be predicted. It also occured that changes of adhesion tension of aqueous solutions of surfactants as a function of their concentration can be determined by the exponential function of the first or second order. Using such functions Gibbs surface excess concentration of surfactants at the PTFE-water interface, mole fraction of surfactant in the mixed monolayer and fraction of the area occupied by given surfactants in the monolayer were determined. Gibbs surface free energy of adsorption of a given surfactant in the presence of another one and adhesion work of the aqueous solution of surfactants to the PTFE surface were also evaluated.

  1. Effect of temperature difference between manikin and wet fabric skin surfaces on clothing evaporative resistance: how much error is there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Faming; Kuklane, Kalev; Gao, Chuansi; Holmér, Ingvar

    2012-01-01

    Clothing evaporative resistance is one of the inherent factors that impede heat exchange by sweating evaporation. It is widely used as a basic input in physiological heat strain models. Previous studies showed a large variability in clothing evaporative resistance both at intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory testing. The errors in evaporative resistance may cause severe problems in the determination of heat stress level of the wearers. In this paper, the effect of temperature difference between the manikin nude surface and wet textile skin surface on clothing evaporative resistance was investigated by both theoretical analysis and thermal manikin measurements. It was found that the temperature difference between the skin surface and the manikin nude surface could lead to an error of up to 35.9% in evaporative resistance of the boundary air layer. Similarly, this temperature difference could also introduce an error of up to 23.7% in the real clothing total evaporative resistance ( R et_real textile fabric skin temperature.

  2. Degradation and Sorption of Imidacloprid in Dissimilar Surface and Subsurface Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degradation and sorption/desorption are important processes affecting the leaching of pesticides through soil. Once pesticides move past the surface soil layers, subsurface soil physical, chemical, and biological properties significantly affect pesticide fate and the potential for groundwater contam...

  3. Landscape and Seasonal Variability in CO2 Efflux from Soil and Water Surfaces in the Northern Pantanal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, E. G.; Pinto-Jr, O. B.; Lathuilliere, M. J.; Dalmagro, H. J.; Johnson, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Pantanal is one of the largest wetlands in the world, with an area of 150,000 km2. It extends over three countries (Brazil, Paraguay and Bolivia) with 80% located in the Brazilian states of Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul. Ecosystems in the Northern Pantanal rely on a seasonal flood pulse in phase with the wet season, which inundates grasslands and forests between January and May. This pulse results in an important change in local biogeochemistry. Inundation saturates the Pantanal's soils with changes in the balance of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. This study summarize the main CO2 effluxes measured from a variety of landscape in the Northern Pantanal during dry and wet seasons, fully or partially inundated soils, as part of Project 2.01 of the Brazilian Institute for Science and Technology in Wetlands (Monitoring aquatic carbon fluxes and water quality). Using a network of dataloggers installed in 4 environments, we have been modeling soil CO2 efflux on a half hourly basis through a combination of infrared gas analyzers measurements and laboratory soil physical parameter estimates. The selected environments presented unique biogeochemical behavior as they relate to inundation and soil type. So far, we have estimated average CO2 efflux in 3 environments with mean values of 3.53 µmol m-2 s-1 (soil CO2 efflux for the "Carrapatal" tree island), 3.41 µmol m-2 s-1 (soil CO2 efflux for the "Baia das Pedras" tree island), and 1.79 µmol m-2 s-1 (aquatic CO2 evasion from the water surface of the "Cambarazal" flooded forest). More measurements are currently underway to complete the landscape variability in CO2 effluxes in the Northern Pantanal.

  4. Small particle reagent based on crystal violet dye for developing latent fingerprints on non-porous wet surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Rohatgi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Small particle reagent (SPR is a widely used method for developing latent fingerprints on non-porous wet surfaces. SPR based on zinc carbonate hydroxide monohydrate, ZnCo3·2Zn(OH2·H2O – also called basic zinc carbonate – has been formulated. The other ingredients of the formulation are crystal violet dye and a commercial liquid detergent. The composition develops clear, sharp and detailed fingerprints on non-porous items, after these were immersed separately in clean and dirty water for variable periods of time. The ability of the present formulation to detect weak and faint chance prints not only enhances its utility, but also its potentiality in forensic case work investigations. The raw materials used to prepare the SPR are cost-effective and non-hazardous.

  5. Droplet hysteresis investigation on non-wetting striped textured surfaces: A lattice Boltzmann study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Rongye; Liu, Haihu; Sun, Jinju; Ba, Yan

    2014-10-01

    The Cassie-Baxter model is widely used to predict the apparent contact angles on textured super-hydrophobic surfaces. However, it has been challenged by some recent studies, since it does not consider contact angle hysteresis and surface structure characteristics near the contact line. The present study is to investigate the contact angle hysteresis on striped textured surfaces, and its elimination through vibrating the substrate. The two-phase flow is simulated by a recently proposed lattice Boltzmann model for high-density-ratio flows. Droplet evolutions under various initial contact angles are simulated, and it is found that different contact angles exist for the same textured surface. The importance of the contact line structure for droplet pinning is underlined via a study of droplet behavior on a composite substrate, with striped textured structure inside and flat structure outside. A “stick-jump” motion is found for the advancing contact line on the striped textured surface. Due to hysteresis, the contact angles after advancing are not consistent with the Cassie-Baxter model. The stable equilibrium is obtained through properly vibrating the substrate, and the resulted contact angles are consistent with Cassie's predictions.

  6. What happens when iron becomes wet? Observation of reactions at interfaces between liquid and metal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, M

    2003-01-01

    Synchrotron-radiation has been applied to investigation of interfaces between liquid and metal surfaces, with a special attention to corrosion. Three topics are shown: (1) nano structures of rusts formed on steel after atmospheric corrosion. Evolution of 'Fe(O, OH) sub 6 network' is the key to understand how the durable rusts prevent from formation of more rusts. (2) In situ observation of reactions at the interface has been carried out for localized corrosion of stainless steel. It is shown that change in states of Cr sup 3 sup + and Br sup - ions near the interface is deeply related with a breakout of the passivation film. (3) A structural phase transformation on a Cu sub 3 Au(001) surface was investigated. Ordering remains even at a temperature higher than the bulk-critical temperature, showing surface-induced ordering. These approaches gives us crucial information for a new steel-product. (author)

  7. A new model for thermodynamic analysis on wetting behavior of superhydrophobic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hongyun [Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials and Application Technology of Ministry of Education and Faculty of Materials, Optoelectronics and Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Li Wen, E-mail: liwen@xtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials and Application Technology of Ministry of Education and Faculty of Materials, Optoelectronics and Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Fang Guoping [Department of mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2G8 (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have shown inspiring applications in microfluidics, and self-cleaning coatings owing to water-repellent and low-friction properties. However, thermodynamic mechanism responsible for contact angle hysteresis (CAH) and free energy barrier (FEB) have not been understood completely yet. In this work, we propose an intuitional 3-dimension (3D) droplet model along with a reasonable thermodynamic approach to gain a thorough insight into the physical nature of CAH. Based on this model, the relationships between radius of three-phase contact line, change in surface free energy (CFE), average or local FEB and contact angle (CA) are established. Moreover, a thorough theoretical consideration is given to explain the experimental phenomena related to the superhydrophobic behavior. The present study can therefore provide some guidances for the practical fabrications of the superhydrophobic surfaces.

  8. The Hydroelastic Response of a Flexible Surface-Piercing Strut in Wetted, Ventilated, and Cavitating Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Casey; Ward, Jacob; Young, Yin Lu; Felli, Mario; Falchi, Massimo; Ceccio, Steven

    2016-11-01

    High-speed and highly loaded lifting surfaces are prone to ventilation and cavitation. Increasing use of compliant materials (e.g. composites) in such systems necessitates a better understanding of the fluid-structure interactions of lifting surfaces in multiphase flow. Experiments on a flexible surface-piercing hydrofoil have been performed in a towing tank and a free-surface cavitation tunnel. The objectives are (i) to demonstrate the effects of material compliance upon hydrodynamic performance and stability of multiphase flow regimes, and (ii) to quantify the effects of multiphase flow upon the structural response and hydroelastic stability of flexible lifting bodies. A non-optical shape-sensing method is developed, which permits 3D bending and twisting deformations of the hydrofoil to be accurately inferred. The effects of the foil's compliance on hydrodynamic loads, structural motions and flow regimes are discussed. Partial immersion of the hydrofoil causes a mode-dependent change in added-mass that can encourage coalescence of higher modes. At the same time, increasing flow speed and ventilated flow decrease the damping associated with certain modes. Unsteady cavity shedding modulates the system parameters, causing a broadening of the frequency response. The authors would like to acknowledge the support of Dr. Ki-Han Kim under ONR Grant Number N00014-13-1-0383 and N00014-16-1-2433.

  9. Effect of nanocrystalline surface of substrate on microstructure and wetting of PEO coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H R Masiha; H R Bagheri; M Gheytani; M Aliofkhazraei; A Sabour Rouhaghdam; T Shahrabi

    2015-08-01

    In this research, effect of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) was studied on characteristics of the coatings formed using plasma electrolyte oxidation (PEO) on AA1230 aluminium. To do so, first, the samples were coated with and without SMAT pre-process. Coating by PEO method was carried out in two phosphate-based and silicate-based suspensions of silicon nitride nanoparticles for 10 min. Next, to study the distribution of the nanoparticles and elements inside the coating, surface morphology of the samples was examined using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. In addition, wettability test was performed on all samples using the deionized water. Also, droplet expansion manner on the porous oxide coating surface and its relation with fine structure of the coating was investigated. The results indicated that samples coated in silicate-based electrolyte have a relatively rougher microstructure as compared to samples coated in phosphate-based electrolyte. The average surface pores area percentage of the samples coated in silicate-based electrolytes was 13.9% greater than that of samples coated in phosphate-based electrolyte. Moreover, the average height to diameter (h/d) value obtained from wettability test for samples coated in silicate-based electrolyte was 13.3% greater than that of phosphate-based electrolyte.

  10. Wetting of a liquid surface by another immiscible liquid in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Gilles; Ross, Guy G.; Andrzejewski, Lukasz

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of interfacial properties is essential to the development of new drugs either on earth or, particularly, in the absence of gravity. Under the reduced gravity conditions of parabolic flights, we have shown that, using an appropriate cell setup in order to control liquid surfaces, a liquid drop can be expanded onto and withdrawn from another immiscible liquid, which permits the measurement of the contact angle of this system. Surface energies of liquids being easily measurable, this technique allows a verification of numerous models used in interface science. During each parabola, 20 s of microgravity measurements permitted the acquisition of video pictures of these drops. Contact angles have been obtained from goniometric analysis of the recorded images. Generally, the drops obtained satisfied the equilibrium state predicted by Neumann's equations. However, unexpected long lasting metastable drops have also been observed on a curved unconfined liquid surface. The existence of a drop-sinking barrier, larger for a curved liquid surface, is proposed to explain this observation.

  11. The role of substrate electrons in the wetting of a metal surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Takahashi, O.; Andersson, Klas Jerker;

    2010-01-01

    We address how the electronic and geometric structures of metal surfaces determine water-metal bonding by affecting the balance between Pauli repulsion and electrostatic attraction. We show how the rigid d-electrons and the softer s-electrons utilize different mechanisms for the redistribution of...

  12. A Model for Formation of Dust, Soil and Rock Coatings on Mars: Physical and Chemical Processes on the Martian Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice; Murchie, Scott L.; Pieters, Carle M.; Zent, Aaron P.

    2001-01-01

    This model is one of many possible scenarios to explain the generation of the current surface material on Mars using chemical, magnetic and spectroscopic data From Mars and geologic analogs from terrestrial sites. One basic premise of this model is that the dust/soil units are not derived exclusively from local rocks, but are rather a product of global, and possibly remote, weathering processes. Another assumption in this model is that there are physical and chemical interactions of the atmospheric dust particles and that these two processes create distinctly different results on the surface. Physical processes distribute dust particles on rocks and drift units, forming physically-aggregated layers; these are reversible processes. Chemical reactions of the dust/soil particles create alteration rinds on rock surfaces and cohesive, crusted surface units between rocks, both of which are relatively permanent materials. According to this model the dominant components of the dust/soil particles are derived from alteration of volcanic ash and tephra, and contain primarily nanophase and poorly crystalline ferric oxides/oxyhydroxide phases as well as silicates. These phases are the alteration products that formed in a low moisture environment. These dust/soil particles also contain a smaller amount of material that was exposed to more water and contains crystalline ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides, sulfates and clay silicates. These components could have formed through hydrothermal alteration at steam vents or fumeroles, thermal fluids, or through evaporite deposits. Wet/dry cycling experiments are presented here on mixtures containing poorly crystalline and crystalline ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides, sulfates and silicates that range in size from nanophase to 1-2 pm diameter particles. Cemented products of these soil mixtures are formed in these experiments and variation in the surface texture was observed for samples containing smectites, non-hydrated silicates or sulfates

  13. Computer Implementation of the Bounding Surface Plasticity Model for Cohesive Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    23 REFERENCES 1. Dafalias, Y.F., and L.R. Herrmann, "A Bounding Surface Soil Plasticity Model", Proceedings of the International Symposium of Soils...Herrmann, "Bounding Surface Formulatin of Soil Plasticity ", Chapter in Soil Mechanics - Transient and Cyclic Loads, John Wiley and Sons, Eds. O.C...Herrmann and Y.F. r)afalias, "User’s Manual for MODCAL-Bounding Surface Soil Plasticity Model Calibration and Prediction Code (Volume I)," Civil

  14. Carbon black retention in saturated natural soils: Effects of flow conditions, soil surface roughness and soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohwacharin, J; Takizawa, S; Punyapalakul, P

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated factors affecting the transport, retention, and re-entrainment of carbon black nanoparticles (nCBs) in two saturated natural soils under different flow conditions and input concentrations using the two-site transport model and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Soil organic matter (SOM) was found to create unfavorable conditions for the retention. Despite an increased flow velocity, the relative stability of the estimated maximum retention capacity in soils may suggest that flow-induced shear stress forces were insufficient to detach nCB. The KPFM observation revealed that nCBs were retained at the grain boundary and on surface roughness, which brought about substantial discrepancy between theoretically-derived attachment efficiency factors and the ones obtained by the experiments using the two-site transport model. Thus, decreasing ionic strength and increasing solution pH caused re-entrainment of only a small fraction of retained nCB in the soil columns.

  15. Fourier and granulometry methods on 3D images of soil surfaces for evaluating soil aggregate size distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.; Green, O.; Munkholm, Lars Juhl;

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to present and compare two methods for evaluating soil aggregate size distribution based on high resolution 3D images of the soil surface. The methods for analyzing the images are discrete Fourier transform and granulometry. The results of these methods correlate...... with a measured weight distribution of the soil aggregates. The results have shown that it is possible to distinguish between the cultivated and the uncultivated soil surface. A sensor system suitable for capturing in-situ high resolution 3D images of the soil surface is also described. This sensor system...... is based on a SICK LMS111 laser range scanner....

  16. BIOLOGICAL ADHESIVES. Adaptive synergy between catechol and lysine promotes wet adhesion by surface salt displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Greg P; Rapp, Michael V; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Butler, Alison

    2015-08-01

    In physiological fluids and seawater, adhesion of synthetic polymers to solid surfaces is severely limited by high salt, pH, and hydration, yet these conditions have not deterred the evolution of effective adhesion by mussels. Mussel foot proteins provide insights about adhesive adaptations: Notably, the abundance and proximity of catecholic Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and lysine residues hint at a synergistic interplay in adhesion. Certain siderophores—bacterial iron chelators—consist of paired catechol and lysine functionalities, thereby providing a convenient experimental platform to explore molecular synergies in bioadhesion. These siderophores and synthetic analogs exhibit robust adhesion energies (E(ad) ≥-15 millijoules per square meter) to mica in saline pH 3.5 to 7.5 and resist oxidation. The adjacent catechol-lysine placement provides a "one-two punch," whereby lysine evicts hydrated cations from the mineral surface, allowing catechol binding to underlying oxides.

  17. Surface improvement of asbestos by wet process. Shisshiki shori ni yoru asbesto no hyomen kaishitsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasue, T.; Kojima, Y.; Obata, H.; Ogura, T.; Arai, Y. (Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering)

    1991-09-01

    The eluting process of each ion in asbestos was pursued up to the decomposition by processing with hydrochloric acid and phosphoric acid to verify the acid processing condition making asbestos harmless and holding the fibrous structure. The decomposition of asbestos is significantly affected by the eluting condition. When treated by 3N hydrochloric acid, Mg{sup 2+} in asbestos elutes perfectly after 7days at 20 centigrade and after 30 minutes at 100 centigrade, remaining amorphous silica of comparatively high purity. When asbestos fiber which was acid-processed to exchange almost all sites with Ca{sup 2+} ion after Mg{sup 2+} in the first to fifth layers eluted, is put in Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} solution, hydroxyapatite is formed on the surface. When this asbestos is hydrothermally processed in the Ca(OH){sub 2} solution adjusted so that the atomic ratio of Ca{sup 2+}/Si{sup 4+} to silicate radical remained on the surface becomes 0.8, calcium silicate hydrate is formed on the surface. 22 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Characterization of wet granulation process parameters using response surface methodology. 1. Top-spray fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipps, D M; Sakr, A M

    1994-07-01

    Randomized full-factorial designs (3(2)) were used to investigate the effects of processing conditions in the top-spray fluidized bed (TSFB) on the granulation of acetaminophen powder (USP) using 5% polyvinylpyrrolidone (w/w) as the binder. Measured granule properties included the following: mean size and size distribution, specific surface area, bulk density, tapped density, flow rate through an orifice, angle of repose, residual moisture content, and percent overs (> 2 mm). The granules were then compressed (500, 1000, 1500 lbs) into tablets (9-mm shallow concave) using an instrumented rotary press and analyzed for both physical properties and drug-release characteristics. All experimental batches were run in triplicate to reduce the possibility of erroneous results and to increase the confidence in the resulting empirical relationships derived using response-surface methodology. Measured responses were then related to process parameters using two-factor and three-factor linear, interactions, and quadratic regression models. These models were used to generate three-dimensional response surfaces for use in the final analyses. Coefficients of determination (R2) ranging from 0.08 to 0.81 were obtained, indicating that only a portion of the variation in the data could be explained by the changes in process parameter settings during granulation and tableting. The best overall model fits were observed for mean granule size, size distribution, bulk density, tapped density, percent drug dissolution, tablet disintegration time, and tablet friability.

  19. Soil methane oxidation in both dry and wet temperate eucalypt forests shows a near-identical relationship with soil air-filled porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fest, Benedikt J.; Hinko-Najera, Nina; Wardlaw, Tim; Griffith, David W. T.; Livesley, Stephen J.; Arndt, Stefan K.

    2017-01-01

    Well-drained, aerated soils are important sinks for atmospheric methane (CH4) via the process of CH4 oxidation by methane-oxidising bacteria (MOB). This terrestrial CH4 sink may contribute towards climate change mitigation, but the impact of changing soil moisture and temperature regimes on CH4 uptake is not well understood in all ecosystems. Soils in temperate forest ecosystems are the greatest terrestrial CH4 sink globally. Under predicted climate change scenarios, temperate eucalypt forests in south-eastern Australia are predicted to experience rapid and extreme changes in rainfall patterns, temperatures and wild fires. To investigate the influence of environmental drivers on seasonal and inter-annual variation of soil-atmosphere CH4 exchange, we measured soil-atmosphere CH4 exchange at high-temporal resolution (Ecological Research site, 1700 mm yr-1). Both forest soil systems were continuous CH4 sinks of -1.79 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 in Victoria and -3.83 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 in Tasmania. Soil CH4 uptake showed substantial temporal variation and was strongly controlled by soil moisture at both forest sites. Soil CH4 uptake increased when soil moisture decreased and this relationship explained up to 90 % of the temporal variability. Furthermore, the relationship between soil moisture and soil CH4 flux was near-identical at both forest sites when soil moisture was expressed as soil air-filled porosity (AFP). Soil temperature only had a minor influence on soil CH4 uptake. Soil nitrogen concentrations were generally low and fluctuations in nitrogen availability did not influence soil CH4 uptake at either forest site. Our data suggest that soil MOB activity in the two forests was similar and that differences in soil CH4 exchange between the two forests were related to differences in soil moisture and thereby soil gas diffusivity. The differences between forest sites and the variation in soil CH4 exchange over time could be explained by soil AFP as an indicator of soil moisture

  20. Characterization of wet pad surface in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process with full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo June; Jung, Sung Pyo; Shin, Jun Geun; Yang, Danning; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2011-07-04

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is a key process for global planarization of silicon wafers for semiconductors and AlTiC wafers for magnetic heads. Removal rate of wafer material is directly dependent on the surface roughness of a CMP pad, thus the structure of the pad surface has been evaluated with variable techniques. However, under in situ CMP process, the measurements have been severely limited due to the existence of polishing fluids including the slurry on the pad surface. In here, we newly introduce ultra-high resolution full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) to investigate the surface of wet pads. With FF-OCT, the wet pad surface could be quantitatively characterized in terms of the polishing pad lifetime, and also be three-dimensionally visualized. We found that reasonable polishing span could be evaluated from the surface roughness measurement and the groove depth measurement made by FF-OCT.

  1. A new top boundary condition for modeling surface diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer: theoretical analysis and application to soil evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. Tang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new top boundary condition (TBC for representing the air–soil diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer. This new TBC (1 accounts for the multi-phase flow of a generic tracer; (2 accounts for effects of soil temperature, pH, solubility, sorption, and desorption processes; (3 enables a smooth transition between wet and dry soil conditions; (4 is compatible with the conductance formulation for modeling air–water volatile tracer exchange; and (5 is applicable to site, regional, and global land models.

    Based on the new TBC, we developed new formulations for bare-soil resistance and corresponding soil evaporation efficiency. The new soil resistance is predicted as the reciprocal of the harmonic sum of two resistances: (1 gaseous and aqueous molecular diffusion and (2 liquid mass flow resulting from the hydraulic pressure gradient between the soil surface and center of the topsoil control volume. We compared the predicted soil evaporation efficiency with those from several field and laboratory soil evaporation measurements and found good agreement with the typically observed two-stage soil evaporation curves. Comparison with the soil evaporation efficiency equation of Lee and Pielke (1992; hereafter LP92 indicates that their equation can overestimate soil evaporation when the atmospheric resistance is low and underestimate soil evaporation when the soil is dry. Using a synthetic inversion experiment, we demonstrated that using inverted soil resistance data from field measurements to derive empirical soil resistance formulations resulted in large uncertainty because (1 the inverted soil resistance data are always severely impacted by measurement error and (2 the derived empirical equation is very sensitive to the number of data points and the assumed functional form of the resistance.

    We expect the application of our new TBC in land models will provide a consistent representation for the diffusive tracer

  2. Model-based surface soil moisture (SSM) retrieval algorithm using multi-temporal RISAT-1 C-band SAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Dharmendra K.; Maity, Saroj; Bhattacharya, Bimal; Misra, Arundhati

    2016-05-01

    Accurate measurement of surface soil moisture of bare and vegetation covered soil over agricultural field and monitoring the changes in surface soil moisture is vital for estimation for managing and mitigating risk to agricultural crop, which requires information and knowledge to assess risk potential and implement risk reduction strategies and deliver essential responses. The empirical and semi-empirical model-based soil moisture inversion approach developed in the past are either sensor or region specific, vegetation type specific or have limited validity range, and have limited scope to explain physical scattering processes. Hence, there is need for more robust, physical polarimetric radar backscatter model-based retrieval methods, which are sensor and location independent and have wide range of validity over soil properties. In the present study, Integral Equation Model (IEM) and Vector Radiative Transfer (VRT) model were used to simulate averaged backscatter coefficients in various soil moisture (dry, moist and wet soil), soil roughness (smooth to very rough) and crop conditions (low to high vegetation water contents) over selected regions of Gujarat state of India and the results were compared with multi-temporal Radar Imaging Satellite-1 (RISAT-1) C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data in σ°HH and σ°HV polarizations, in sync with on field measured soil and crop conditions. High correlations were observed between RISAT-1 HH and HV with model simulated σ°HH & σ°HV based on field measured soil with the coefficient of determination R2 varying from 0.84 to 0.77 and RMSE varying from 0.94 dB to 2.1 dB for bare soil. Whereas in case of winter wheat crop, coefficient of determination R2 varying from 0.84 to 0.79 and RMSE varying from 0.87 dB to 1.34 dB, corresponding to with vegetation water content values up to 3.4 kg/m2. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) methods were adopted for model-based soil moisture inversion. The training datasets for the NNs were

  3. Potential feedbacks between snow cover, soil moisture and surface energy fluxes in Southern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brox Nilsen, Irene; Tallaksen, Lena M.; Stordal, Frode

    2017-04-01

    At high latitudes, the snow season has become shorter during the past decades because snowmelt is highly sensitive to a warmer climate. Snowmelt influences the energy balance by changing the albedo and the partitioning between latent and sensible heat fluxes. It further influences the water balance by changing the runoff and soil moisture. In a previous study, we identified southern Norway as a region where significant temperature changes in summer could potentially be explained by land-atmosphere interactions. In this study we hypothesise that changes in snow cover would influence the summer surface fluxes in the succeeding weeks or months. The exceptionally warm summer of 2014 was chosen as a test bed. In Norway, evapotranspiration is not soil moisture limited, but energy limited, under normal conditions. During warm summers, however, such as in 2014, evapotranspiration can be restricted by the available soil moisture. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model we replace the initial ground conditions for 2014 with conditions representative of a snow-poor spring and a snow-rich spring. WRF was coupled to Noah-MP at 3 km horizontal resolution in the inner domain, and the simulations covered mid-May through September 2014. Boundary conditions used to force WRF were taken from the Era-Interim reanalysis. Snow, runoff, soil moisture and soil temperature observational data were provided by the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate for validation. The validation shows generally good agreement with observations. Preliminary results show that the reduced snowpack, hereafter "sim1" increased the air temperature by up to 5 K and the surface temperature by up to 10 K in areas affected by snow changes. The increased snowpack, hereafter "sim2", decreased the air and surface temperature by the same amount. These are weekly mean values for the first eight simulation weeks from mid May. Because of the higher net energy available ( 100 Wm-2) in sim 1, both

  4. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel: A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Tests of wind erosion were performed in a controlled-environment wind tunnel to support the development of natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. Barrier performance standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance are expected to mandate a surface layer that is resistant to wind erosion. The purpose of this study was to initiate a series of tests to determine suitable soil and gravel mixtures for such a barrier and to test worst-case surface layer conditions under the influence of high wind speeds. Six mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared, weathered to represent natural wind-blown desert areas, and subjected to controlled wind erosion forces in a wind tunnel. The applied erosive forces, including surface shear forces, were characterized to provide a means of relating wind tunnel results with actual field conditions. Soil particle losses from the surfaces caused by suspension, saltation, and surface creep were monitored by aerosol sample probes and mass balance measurements. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. The wetting problem of fluids on solid surfaces: Dynamics of lines and contact angle hysteresis

    OpenAIRE

    Gouin, Henri

    2001-01-01

    8 pages; International audience; In 1805, Young was the first who introduced an expression for contact angle in static, but today, the motion of the contact-line formed at the intersection of two immiscible fluids and a solid is still subject to dispute. By means of the new physical concept of line viscosity, the equations of motions and boundary conditions for fluids in contact on a solid surface together with interface and contact-line are revisited. A new Young-Dupré equation for the dynam...

  6. [Chemical Characteristics of Atmospheric Wet Deposition in Winter and Its Forestry Canopy Interception Mechanism in Red Soil Hilly Area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhuo; Gao, Yang; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Yu, Gui-rui

    2015-12-01

    In order to disclose the interception mechanism of forestry canopy to atmospheric wet deposition, the concentrations of nutrients (C, N, P, S) and trace elements (K, Ca, Na, Mg, Al, Fe, Mn, Zn) in wet deposition and through fall in winter were monitored in Subtropical Qiananzhou basin. The results showed that the wet deposition in this area was mainly acid deposition, the pH of which ranged from 3.49 to 7.0. The major components of wet deposition were nitrate (NO₃⁻) and sulfate ions (SO₄²⁻), the monthly average deposition fluxes of which were 4.68 kg · hm⁻² and 0.36 kg · hm⁻², and trace elements (Zn, K, Ca) with monthly average deposition fluxes of 1.72, 0.56 and 0.36 kg · hm⁻², respectively. Non-metallic nutrients such as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) , dissolved total nitrogen (DTN), total phosphorus (TP), Ca, Mg and Mn were easy to leach, the dilution rate could reach up to 64.69%, 206.75%, 301.38%, 137.94%, 405.25% and 1226.60%, respectively. Moreover, the Zn and sulfate ion (SO₄²⁻) could be well absorbed by forests canopy, the absorption proportions of which were 73.50% and 12.51%, respectively.

  7. Analytical aspects of the remediation of soil by wet oxidation - Characterisation of tar contaminants and their degradation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Nielsen, T.; Plöger, A.;

    1999-01-01

    Wet oxidation of tar compounds gives rise to a wide range of products. Due to the incorporation of oxygen, these products become increasingly more water soluble and the analytical strategy has to take into account the different physical/chemicalproperties of the compounds. An interplay between gas...

  8. Polymer Droplet Dynamic Wetting Measurement at the Nanometer Scale on Smooth Surfaces Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymaniha, Mohammadreza; Felts, Jonathan Robert; Anml Team

    2016-11-01

    Fluid spreading is a complex phenomenon driven strongly by intermolecular forces that requires nanometer scale microscopy to observe and understand. We present a technique for measuring molten polymer spreading dynamics with nanometer scale spatial resolution at elevated temperatures on sapphire, silicon oxide and mica using tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The experimental setup is used to measure the spreading dynamics of polystyrene droplets with 2 μ m diameters at 115-175 C. Custom image processing algorithms realize the droplet height, radius, volume and contact angle of the droplet over time. The contact angle evolution followed a power law with time with experimental exponent values of -0.26, -0.08, and -0.2 for sapphire, silicon oxide, and mica, respectively at 115 C. The non-zero steady state contact angles result in a slower evolution of contact angle with time compared to Tanner's Law, as expected. We observe local crystallinity on the molten droplet surface, where crystalline structures appear to nucleate at the contact line and migrate toward the top of the droplet. Increasing the temperature from 115 C to 175 C reduced surface crystallinity from 35% to 12%, consistent with increasingly energetically favorable amorphous phase as the temperature approaches the melting temperature. This platform provides a way to measure spreading dynamics of extremely small volumes of heterogeneously complex fluids not possible through other means. Dr.Jonathan Felts is the principal investigator of the ANML research group in Mechanical Engineering Department of Texas A&M University.

  9. Shallow Subsurface Soil Moisture Dynamics in the Root-Zone and Bulk Soil of Sparsely Vegetated Land Surfaces as Impacted by Near-Surface Atmospheric State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautz, A.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Tilton, N.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is a fundamental state variable that provides the water necessary for plant growth and evapotranspiration. Soil moisture has been extensively studied in the context of bare surface soils and root zones. Less attention has focused on the effects of sparse vegetation distributions, such as those typical of agricultural cropland and other natural surface environments, on soil moisture dynamics. The current study explores root zone, bulk soil, and near-surface atmosphere interactions in terms of soil moisture under different distributions of sparse vegetation using multi-scale laboratory experimentation and numerical simulation. This research is driven by the need to advance our fundamental understanding of soil moisture dynamics in the context of improving water conservation and next generation heat and mass transfer numerical models. Experimentation is performed in a two-dimensional 7.3 m long intermediate scale soil tank interfaced with a climate-controlled wind tunnel, both of which are outfitted with current sensor technologies for measuring atmospheric and soil variables. The soil tank is packed so that a sparsely vegetated soil is surrounded by bulk bare soil; the two regions are separated by porous membranes to isolate the root zone from the bulk soil. Results show that in the absence of vegetation, evaporation rates vary along the soil tank in response to longitudinal changes in humidity; soil dries fastest upstream where evaporation rates are highest. In the presence of vegetation, soil moisture in the bulk soil closest to a vegetated region decreases more rapidly than the bulk soil farther away. Evapotranspiration rates in this region are also higher than the bulk soil region. This study is the first step towards the development of more generalized models that account for non-uniformly distributed vegetation and land surfaces exhibiting micro-topology.

  10. The concurrent use of novel soil surface microclimate measurements to evaluate CO2 pulses in biocrusted interspaces in a cool desert ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Colin; McHugh, Theresa A.; Howell, Armin; Gill, Richard; Weber, Bettina; Belnap, Jayne; Grote, Ed; Reed, Sasha C.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon cycling associated with biological soil crusts, which occupy interspaces between vascular plants in drylands globally, may be an important part of the coupled climate-carbon cycle of the Earth system. A major challenge to understanding CO2 fluxes in these systems is that much of the biotic and biogeochemical activity occurs in the upper few mm of the soil surface layer (i.e., the ‘mantle of fertility’), which exhibits highly dynamic and difficult to measure temperature and moisture fluctuations. Here, we report a multi-sensor approach to simultaneously measuring temperature and moisture of this biocrust surface layer (0–2 mm), and the deeper soil profile, concurrent with automated measurement of surface soil CO2effluxes. Our results illuminate robust relationships between biocrust water content and field CO2 pulses that have previously been difficult to detect and explain. All observed CO2 pulses over the measurement period corresponded to surface wetting events, including when the wetting events did not penetrate into the soil below the biocrust layer (0–2 mm). The variability of temperature and moisture of the biocrust surface layer was much greater than even in the 0–5 cm layer of the soil beneath the biocrust, or deeper in the soil profile. We therefore suggest that coupling surface measurements of biocrust moisture and temperature to automated CO2flux measurements may greatly improve our understanding of the climatic sensitivity of carbon cycling in biocrusted interspaces in our study region, and that this method may be globally relevant and applicable.

  11. ASSESSMENT OF EARLY SEASON AGRICULTURAL DROUGHT THROUGH LAND SURFACE WATER INDEX (LSWI AND SOIL WATER BALANCE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Chandrasekar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An attempt was made to address the early season agriculture drought, by monitoring the surface soil wetness during 2010 cropping seasons in the states of Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu. Short Wave Infrared (SWIR based Land Surface Water Index (LSWI and Soil Water Balance (SWB model using inputs from remote sensing and ancillary data were used to monitor early season agriculture drought. During the crop season, investigation was made on LSWI characteristics and its response to the rainfall. It was observed that the Rate of Increase (RoI of LSWI was the highest during the fortnights when the onset of monsoon occurred. The study showed that LSWI is sensitive to the onset of monsoon and ini