WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface soil effect

  1. The effect of heterogeneity and surface roughness on soil hydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, I.; Bryant, R.; Doerr, S. H.; Douglas, P.

    2010-05-01

    Soil water repellency, or hydrophobicity, can develop under both natural and anthropogenic conditions. Forest fires, vegetation decomposition, microbial activity and oil spills can all promote hydrophobic behaviour in surrounding soils. Hydrophobicity can stabilize soil organic matter pools and decrease evapotranspiration, but there are many negative impacts of hydrophobicity as well: increased erosion of topsoil, an increasingly scarce resource; increased runoff, which can lead to flooding; and decreased infiltration, which directly affects plant health. The degree of hydrophobicity expressed by soil can vary greatly within a small area, depending partly on the type and severity of the disturbance as well as on temporal factors such as water content and microbial activity. To date, many laboratory investigations into soil hydrophobicity have focused on smooth particle surfaces. As a result, our understanding of how hydrophobicity develops on rough surfaces of macro, micro and nano-particulates is limited; we are unable to predict with certainty how these soil particles will behave on contact with water. Surface chemistry is the main consideration when predicting hydrophobic behaviour of smooth solids, but for particles with rough surfaces, hydrophobicity is believed to develop as a combination of surface chemistry and topography. Topography may reflect both the arrangement (aggregation) of soil particles and the distribution of materials adsorbed on particulate surfaces. Patch-wise or complete coverage of rough soil particles by hydrophobic material may result in solid/water contact angles ≥150° , at which point the soil may be classified as super-hydrophobic. Here we present a critical review of the research to date on the effects of heterogeneity and surface roughness on soil hydrophobicity in which we discuss recent advances, current trends, and future research areas. References: Callies, M., Y. Chen, F. Marty, A. Pépin and D. Quéré. 2005. Microfabricated

  2. Effect of Electrolytes on Surface Charge Characteristics of Red Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAOZONG-CHEN; HEQUN; 等

    1992-01-01

    The zero point of charge (ZPC) and the remaining charge σp at ZPC are two important parameters characterizing surface charge of red soils.Fourteen red soil samples of different soil type and parent material were treated with dithionite-citrate-dicarbonate (DCB) and Na2CO3 respectively.ZPC and σp of the samples in three indifferent electrolytes (NaCl,Na2SO4,and NaH2PO4) were determined.Kaolinite was used as reference.The results showed that ZPC of red soils was affected by the composition of parent materials and clay minerals and in significantly positive correlation with the content of total iron oxide (Fet),free iron oxide (Fed),amorphous iron oxide (Feo),aluminum oxide (Alo) and clay,but it was negatively correlated with the content of total silica (Sit).The σp of red soils was also markedly influenced by mineral components.Organic components were also contributing factor to the value of σp.The surface charges of red soils were evidently affected by the constitution of the electrolytes.Specific adsorption of anions in the electrolytes tended to make the ZPC of red soils shift to a higher pH value and to increase positive surface charges of the soils,thus leading to change of the σp value and decrease of the remaining net negative charges,even to the soils becoming net positive charge carriers.The effect of phosphate anion was greater than that of sulfate ion.

  3. Soil Surface Sealing Effect on Soil Moisture at a Semiarid Hillslope: Implications for Remote Sensing Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Sela

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Robust estimation of soil moisture using microwave remote sensing depends on extensive ground sampling for calibration and validation of the data. Soil surface sealing is a frequent phenomenon in dry environments. It modulates soil moisture close to the soil surface and, thus, has the potential to affect the retrieval of soil moisture from microwave remote sensing and the validation of these data based on ground observations. We addressed this issue using a physically-based modeling approach that accounts explicitly for surface sealing at the hillslope scale. Simulated mean soil moisture at the respective layers corresponding to both the ground validation probe and the radar beam’s typical effective penetration depth were considered. A cyclic pattern was found in which, as compared to an unsealed profile, the seal layer intensifies the bias in validation during rainfall events and substantially reduces it during subsequent drying periods. The analysis of this cyclic pattern showed that, accounting for soil moisture dynamics at the soil surface, the optimal time for soil sampling following a rainfall event is a few hours in the case of an unsealed system and a few days in the case of a sealed one. Surface sealing was found to increase the temporal stability of soil moisture. In both sealed and unsealed systems, the greatest temporal stability was observed at positions with moderate slope inclination. Soil porosity was the best predictor of soil moisture temporal stability, indicating that prior knowledge regarding the soil texture distribution is crucial for the application of remote sensing validation schemes.

  4. Effect of Management Practices on Soil Microstructure and Surface Microrelief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Garcia Moreno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil surface roughness (SSR and porosity were evaluated from soils located in two farms belonging to the Plant Breeding Institute of the University of Sidney. The sites differ in their soil management practices; the first site (PBI was strip-tilled during early fall (May 2010, and the second site (JBP was under power harrowed tillage at the end of July 2010. Both sites were sampled in mid-August. At each location, SSR was measured for three 1 m2 subplots using shadow analysis. To evaluate porosity and aggregation, soil samples were scanned using X-ray computed tomography with 5 μm resolution. The results show a strong negative correlation between SSR and porosity, 20.13% SSR and 41.38% porosity at PBI versus 42.00% SSR and 18.35% porosity at JBP. However, soil images show that when soil surface roughness is higher due to conservation and soil management practices, the processes of macroaggregation and structural porosity are enhanced. Further research must be conducted on SSR and porosity in different types of soils, as they provide complementary information on the evaluation of soil erosion susceptibility.

  5. Effects of soil surface roughness on interrill erosion processes and sediment particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenfeng; Huang, Chihua

    2017-10-01

    Soil surface roughness significantly impacts runoff and erosion under rainfall. Few previous studies on runoff generation focused on the effects of soil surface roughness on the sediment particle size distribution (PSD), which greatly affects interrill erosion and sedimentation processes. To address this issue, a rainfall-simulation experiment was conducted with treatments that included two different initial soil surface roughnesses and two rainfall intensities. Soil surface roughness was determined by using photogrammetric method. For each simulated event, runoff and sediment samples were collected at different experimental times. The effective (undispersed) PSD of each sediment sample and the ultimate (after dispersion) PSD were used to investigate the detachment and transport mechanisms involved in sediment movement. The results show that soil surface roughness significantly delayed runoff initiation, but had no significant effect on the steady runoff rate. However, a significant difference in the soil loss rate was observed between the smooth and rough soil surfaces. Sediments from smooth soil surfaces were more depleted in clay-size particles, but more enriched in sand-size particles than those from rough soil surfaces, suggesting that erosion was less selective on smooth than on rough soil surfaces. The ratio of different sizes of transported sediment to the soil matrix indicates that most of the clay was eroded in the form of aggregates, silt-size particles were transported mainly as primary particles, and sand-size particles were predominantly aggregates of finer particles. Soil surface roughness has a crucial effect on the sediment size distribution and erosion processes. Significant differences of the enrichment ratios for the effective PSD and the ultimate PSD were observed under the two soil surface roughness treatments. These findings demonstrate that we should consider each particle size separately rather than use only the total sediment discharge in

  6. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmondson, Jill L; Stott, Iain; Davies, Zoe G

    2016-01-01

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface...... in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce...... the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health....

  7. Effects of Near Soil Surface Characteristics on the Soil Detachment Process in a Chronological Series of Vegetation Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing

    2017-04-01

    The effects of near soil surface characteristics on the soil detachment process might be different at different stages of vegetation restoration. This study was performed to investigate the effects of the near soil surface factors of plant litter, biological soil crusts (BSCs), dead roots and live roots on the soil detachment process by overland flow at different stages of restoration. Soil samples (1 m long, 0.1 m wide, and 0.05 m high) under four treatment conditions were collected from 1-yr-old and 24-yr-old natural grasslands and subjected to flow scouring under five different shear stresses ranging from 5.3 to 14.6 Pa. The results indicated that the effects of near soil surface characteristics on soil detachment were substantial during the process of vegetation restoration. The total reduction in the soil detachment capacity of the 1-yr-old grassland was 98.1%, and of this total, 7.9%, 30.0% and 60.2% was attributed to the litter, BSCs and plant roots, respectively. In the 24-yr-old grassland, the soil detachment capacity decreased by 99.0%, of which 13.2%, 23.5% and 62.3% was caused by the litter, BSCs and plant roots, respectively. Combined with the previously published data of a 7-yr-old grassland, the influence of plant litter on soil detachment was demonstrated to increase with restoration time, but soil detachment was also affected by the litter type and composition. The role of BSCs was greater than that of plant litter in reducing soil detachment during the early stages of vegetation recovery. However, its contribution weakened with time since restoration. The influence of plant roots accounted for at least half or up to two-thirds of the total near soil surface factors, of which more than 72.6% was attributed to the physical binding effects of the roots. The chemical bonding effect of the roots increased with time since restoration and was greater than the effect of the litter on soil detachment in the late stages of vegetation restoration. The

  8. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, J L; Stott, I; Davies, Z G; Gaston, K J; Leake, J R

    2016-09-19

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a mid-sized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11 months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health.

  9. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, J. L.; Stott, I.; Davies, Z. G.; Gaston, K. J.; Leake, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a mid-sized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11 months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health.

  10. [Effects of soil crusts on surface hydrology in the semiarid Loess hilly area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Wen, Zhi; Chen, Li-Ding; Chen, Jin; Wu, Dong-Ping

    2012-11-01

    Soil crusts are distributed extensively in the Chinese Loess Plateau and play key roles in surface hydrological processes. In this study, a typical loess hilly region in Anjiagou catchment, Dingxi city, Gansu province was selected as the study region, and soil crusts in the catchment were investigated. Then, the hydrological effect of soil crusts was studied by using multi-sampling and hydrological monitoring experiments. Several key results were shown as follows. Firstly, compared with bared soil without crust cover, soil crusts can greatly reduce the bulk density, improve the porosity of soil, and raise the holding capacity of soil moisture which ranges from 1.4 to 1.9 times of that of bared soil. Secondly, the role of soil crust on rainfall interception was very significant. Moss crust was found to be strongest on rainfall interception, followed by synantectic crusts and lichen crusts. Bared soil without covering crusts was poorest in resisting rainfall splash. Thirdly, hydrological simulation experiments indicate that soil crusts play a certain positive role in promoting the water infiltration capacity, and the mean infiltration rate of the crusted soil was 2 times higher than that of the no-crust covered soils. While the accumulated infiltrated water amounts was also far higher than that of the bared soil.

  11. EFFECT OF SOIL TILLAGE AND PLANT RESIDUE ON SURFACE ROUGHNESS OF AN OXISOL UNDER SIMULATED RAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elói Panachuki

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface roughness of the soil is formed by mechanical tillage and is also influenced by the kind and amount of plant residue, among other factors. Its persistence over time mainly depends on the fundamental characteristics of rain and soil type. However, few studies have been developed to evaluate these factors in Latossolos (Oxisols. In this study, we evaluated the effect of soil tillage and of amounts of plant residue on surface roughness of an Oxisol under simulated rain. Treatments consisted of the combination of the tillage systems of no-tillage (NT, conventional tillage (CT, and minimum tillage (MT with rates of plant residue of 0, 1, and 2 Mg ha-1 of oats (Avena strigosa Schreb and 0, 3, and 6 Mg ha-1 of maize (Zea mays L.. Seven simulated rains were applied on each experimental plot, with intensity of 60±2 mm h-1 and duration of 1 h at weekly intervals. The values of the random roughness index ranged from 2.94 to 17.71 mm in oats, and from 5.91 to 20.37 mm in maize, showing that CT and MT are effective in increasing soil surface roughness. It was seen that soil tillage operations carried out with the chisel plow and the leveling disk harrow are more effective in increasing soil roughness than those carried out with the heavy disk harrow and leveling disk harrow. The roughness index of the soil surface decreases exponentially with the increase in the rainfall volume applied under conditions of no tillage without soil cover, conventional tillage, and minimum tillage. The oat and maize crop residue present on the soil surface is effective in maintaining the roughness of the soil surface under no-tillage.

  12. Effect of Vegetation Patterns on SAR derived Surface Soil Moisture Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, C. N.; Schneider, K.

    2012-12-01

    Soil moisture can be regarded as one of the important life sustaining entities on our planet. Among its various functions, the first is probably to enable the growth of vegetation on the land surface. Apart from this, water stored in soils plays many other important roles in the global water (and energy) cycle. In the past decades, radar imaging has proven its potential to quantitatively estimate the near surface water content of soils at high spatial resolutions. The use of active microwave data to measure surface soil moisture requires the consideration of several factors like e.g. soil texture, surface roughness, and vegetation. Among these factors, the presence of a vegetation cover is perhaps the major impediment to accurate quantitative retrievals of soil moisture. On the one hand, the vegetation has a disturbing effect on the radar reflectivity and thus causes errors in the soil moisture retrieval which is generally based on theoretical or experimental relationships between the dielectric properties of the soil surface and the radar backscattering coefficient. On the other hand, the spatial distribution of vegetation with e.g. different crop types with different transpiration coefficients and different phenological development, etc, can cause large variations in the plant water consumption and thus has a significant impact on the soil moisture patterns. We have developed methods to estimate the amount of biomass for different crop types and the underlying surface soil water content directly from polarimetric L-band SAR images. While the horizontally-transmit horizontally-receive co-polarization (hh) is most sensitive towards the dielectric soil properties, the horizontally-transmit vertically-receive cross-polarization (hv) is much more sensitive towards the backscattering from the vegetation canopy. In addition the polarimetric observables entropy (H), alpha angle (α), and the total reflected power (span), all of which are highly affected by the canopy

  13. Carbon black retention in saturated natural soils: Effects of flow conditions, soil surface roughness and soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohwacharin, J; Takizawa, S; Punyapalakul, P

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated factors affecting the transport, retention, and re-entrainment of carbon black nanoparticles (nCBs) in two saturated natural soils under different flow conditions and input concentrations using the two-site transport model and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Soil organic matter (SOM) was found to create unfavorable conditions for the retention. Despite an increased flow velocity, the relative stability of the estimated maximum retention capacity in soils may suggest that flow-induced shear stress forces were insufficient to detach nCB. The KPFM observation revealed that nCBs were retained at the grain boundary and on surface roughness, which brought about substantial discrepancy between theoretically-derived attachment efficiency factors and the ones obtained by the experiments using the two-site transport model. Thus, decreasing ionic strength and increasing solution pH caused re-entrainment of only a small fraction of retained nCB in the soil columns.

  14. Effects of soil heterogeneity on steady state soil water pressure head under a surface line source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. Fred; Parkin, Gary W.; Kachanoski, R. Gary; Smith, James E.

    2002-07-01

    There are numerous analytical solutions available for flow in unsaturated homogeneous porous media. In this paper, the stream tube model for one-dimensional water movement is extended to two-dimensional (2-D) water movement from a line source as the stream plane model. As well, new solutions are derived to predict the mean and variance of pressure head of water movement under a surface line source in heterogeneous soil using the perturbation method with first-order approximation (PM1) and with second-order approximation (PM2). A variance expression was also developed based on the spectral relationship presented by Yeh et al. [1985a]. The new solutions were tested using the 2-D stream plane model with parameters A = ln(α) and Y = ln(KS) and measurements from field experiments. Results show that the mean of steady state pressure head below the line source is not only a function of the mean parameter values but also a function of the variances of A and Y and the linear cross-correlation coefficient (ρ) between A and Y. The PM2 model can predict the mean pressure head accurately in heterogeneous soils at any level of correlation between A and Y, except when both the soil variability and ρ are high. The pressure head variance estimation based on the PM1 model predicts the measured variance well only when both the soil variability and ρ are low. The field experimental results show that both the PM1 and the spectral models give reasonable predictions of the pressure head variance. Both the measured and predicted values of the variance of pressure head using the two models increase with the depth of soil. Both models show that the variance of pressure head decreases as the source strength increases, but on average, the pressure head variance was underestimated by both models.

  15. Surface-Correlated Nanophase Iron Metal in Lunar Soils: Petrography and Space Weathering Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.

    1998-01-01

    Space weathering is a term used to include all of the processes that act on material exposed at the surface of a planetary or small body. In the case of the Moon, it includes a variety of processes that formed the lunar regolith, caused the maturation of lunar soils, and formed patina on rock surfaces. The processes include micrometeorite impact and reworking, implantation of solar wind and flare particles, radiation damage and chemical effects from solar particles and cosmic rays, interactions with the lunar atmosphere, and sputtering erosion and deposition. Space weathering effects collectively result in a reddened continuum slope, lowered albedo, and attenuated absorption features in reflectance spectra of lunar soils as compared to finely comminuted rocks from the same Apollo sites. Understanding these effects is critical in order to fully integrate the lunar sample collection with remotely sensed data from recent robotic missions (e.g., Lunar Prospector, Clementine, Galileo). Our objective is to determine the origin of space weathering effects in lunar soils through combined electron microscopy and microspectrophotometry techniques applied to individual soil particles from lunar soils. It has been demonstrated that it is the finest size fraction (lunar soils that dominates the optical properties of the bulk soils.

  16. Effective Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity for Representing Field-Scale Infiltration and Surface Soil Moisture in Heterogeneous Unsaturated Soils Subjected to Rainfall Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Ojha

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Spatial heterogeneity in soil properties has been a challenge for providing field-scale estimates of infiltration rates and surface soil moisture content over natural fields. In this study, we develop analytical expressions for effective saturated hydraulic conductivity for use with the Green-Ampt model to describe field-scale infiltration rates and evolution of surface soil moisture over unsaturated fields subjected to a rainfall event. The heterogeneity in soil properties is described by a log-normal distribution for surface saturated hydraulic conductivity. Comparisons between field-scale numerical and analytical simulation results for water movement in heterogeneous unsaturated soils show that the proposed expressions reproduce the evolution of surface soil moisture and infiltration rate with time. The analytical expressions hold promise for describing mean field infiltration rates and surface soil moisture evolution at field-scale over sandy loam and loamy sand soils.

  17. Shallow groundwater effect on land surface temperature and surface energy balance under bare soil conditions: modeling and description

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    F. Alkhaier

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding when and how groundwater affects surface temperature and energy fluxes is significant for utilizing remote sensing in groundwater studies and for integrating aquifers within land surface models. To investigate the shallow groundwater effect under bare soil conditions, we numerically exposed two soil profiles to identical metrological forcing. One of the profiles had shallow groundwater. The different responses that the two profiles manifested were inspected regarding soil moisture, temperature and energy balance at the land surface. The findings showed that the two profiles differed in three aspects: the absorbed and emitted amounts of energy, the portioning out of the available energy and the heat fluency in the soil. We concluded that due to their lower albedo, shallow groundwater areas reflect less shortwave radiation and consequently get a higher magnitude of net radiation. When potential evaporation demand is sufficiently high, a large portion of the energy received by these areas is consumed for evaporation. This increases the latent heat flux and reduces the energy that could have heated the soil. Consequently, lower magnitudes of both sensible and ground heat fluxes are caused to occur. The higher soil thermal conductivity in shallow groundwater areas facilitates heat transfer between the top soil and the subsurface, i.e. soil subsurface is more thermally connected to the atmosphere. For the reliability of remote sensors in detecting shallow groundwater effect, it was concluded that this effect can be sufficiently clear to be detected if at least one of the following conditions occurs: high potential evaporation and high contrast between day and night temperatures. Under these conditions, most day and night hours are suitable for shallow groundwater depth detection.

  18. Effects of bionic non-smooth surface on reducing soil resistance to disc ploughing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHIRENDE; Benard; SIMALENGA; Timothy; Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Past researches have shown that the non-smooth body surfaces of soil burrowing animals help to reduce soil resistance. In this research, this concept of bionic non-smooth surface was applied to disc ploughs and an experiment was conducted in an indoor soil bin to find out the effects of different bionic units on reducing soil resistance to disc ploughing. Horizontal force acting on the disc plough during soil deformation was measured using a 5 kN sensor. Convex and concave bionic units were used and the material used for making convex ones is ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) which is hydrophobic. From the experiment results, higher or deeper bionic units always resulted in less soil resistance. Convex bionic units gave the highest resistance reduction reaching a maximum of 19% reduction (from 1715.36 N to 1383.65 N) compared to concave bi-onic units. Also, samples with a bionic unit density of 30% gave the highest resistance reduction compared to the other two, which were either plain or had 10% density. In conclusion, the concept of bionic non-smooth units can be applied to disc ploughs in order to reduce soil resistance.

  19. Shallow groundwater effect on land surface temperature and surface energy balance under bare soil conditions: modeling and description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Alkhaier

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Appreciating when and how groundwater affects surface temperature and energy fluxes is important for utilizing remote sensing in groundwater studies and for integrating aquifers within land surface models. To explore the shallow groundwater effect, we numerically exposed two soil profiles – one having shallow groundwater – to the same meteorological forcing, and inspected their different responses regarding surface soil moisture, temperature and energy balance. We found that the two profiles differed in the absorbed and emitted amounts of energy, in portioning out the available energy and in heat fluency within the soil. We conclude that shallow groundwater areas reflect less shortwave radiation due to their lower albedo and therefore they get higher magnitude of net radiation. When potential evaporation demand is high enough, a large portion of the energy received by these areas is spent on evaporation. This makes the latent heat flux predominant, and leaves less energy to heat the soil. Consequently, this induces lower magnitudes of both sensible and ground heat fluxes. The higher soil thermal conductivity in shallow groundwater areas facilitates heat transfer between the top soil and the subsurface, i.e. soil subsurface is more thermally connected to the atmosphere. In view of remote sensors' capability of detecting shallow groundwater effect, we conclude that this effect can be sufficiently clear to be sensed if at least one of two conditions is met: high potential evaporation and big contrast in air temperature between day and night. Under these conditions, most day and night hours are suitable for shallow groundwater depth detection.

  20. Effect of Space Radiation Processing on Lunar Soil Surface Chemistry: X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukes, C.; Loeffler, M.J.; Baragiola, R.; Christoffersen, R.; Keller, J.

    2009-01-01

    Current understanding of the chemistry and microstructure of the surfaces of lunar soil grains is dominated by a reference frame derived mainly from electron microscopy observations [e.g. 1,2]. These studies have shown that the outermost 10-100 nm of grain surfaces in mature lunar soil finest fractions have been modified by the combined effects of solar wind exposure, surface deposition of vapors and accretion of impact melt products [1,2]. These processes produce surface-correlated nanophase Feo, host grain amorphization, formation of surface patinas and other complex changes [1,2]. What is less well understood is how these changes are reflected directly at the surface, defined as the outermost 1-5 atomic monolayers, a region not easily chemically characterized by TEM. We are currently employing X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to study the surface chemistry of lunar soil samples that have been previously studied by TEM. This work includes modification of the grain surfaces by in situ irradiation with ions at solar wind energies to better understand how irradiated surfaces in lunar grains change their chemistry once exposed to ambient conditions on earth.

  1. Space Weathering Effects in Lunar Soils: The Roles of Surface Exposure Time and Bulk Chemical Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shouliang; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering effects on lunar soil grains result from both radiation-damaged and deposited layers on grain surfaces. Typically, solar wind irradiation forms an amorphous layer on regolith silicate grains, and induces the formation of surficial metallic Fe in Fe-bearing minerals [1,2]. Impacts into the lunar regolith generate high temperature melts and vapor. The vapor component is largely deposited on the surfaces of lunar soil grains [3] as is a fraction of the melt [4, this work]. Both the vapor-deposits and the deposited melt typically contain nanophase Fe metal particles (npFe0) as abundant inclusions. The development of these rims and the abundance of the npFe0 in lunar regolith, and thus the optical properties, vary with the soil mineralogy and the length of time the soil grains have been exposed to space weathering effects [5]. In this study, we used the density of solar flare particle tracks in soil grains to estimate exposure times for individual grains and then perform nanometer-scale characterization of the rims using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The work involved study of lunar soil samples with different mineralogy (mare vs. highland) and different exposure times (mature vs. immature).

  2. Bacteria-mineral interactions in soil and their effect on particle surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltner, Anja; Achtenhagen, Jan; Goebel, Marc-Oliver; Bachmann, Jörg; Kästner, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Interactions between bacteria or their residues and mineral surfaces play an important role for soil processes and properties. It is well known that bacteria tend to grow attached to surfaces and that they get more hydrophobic when grown under stress conditions. In addition, bacterial and fungal biomass residues have recently been shown to contribute to soil organic matter formation. The attachment of bacteria or their residues to soil minerals can be expected to modify the surface properties of these particles, in particular the wettability. We hypothesize that the extent of the effect depends on the surface properties of the bacteria, which change depending on environmental conditions. As the wettability of soil particles is crucial for the distribution and the availability of water, we investigated the effect of both living cells and bacterial residues (cell envelope fragments and cytosol) on the wettability of model mineral particles in a simplified laboratory system. We grew Pseudomonas putida cells in mineral medium either without (unstressed) or with additional 1.5 M NaCl (osmotically stressed). After 2 h of incubation, the cells were disintegrated by ultrasonic treatment. Different amounts of either intact cells, cell envelope fragments or cytosol (each corresponding to 108, 109, or 1010 cells per gram of mineral) were mixed with quartz sand, quartz silt or kaolinite. The bacteria-mineral associations were air-dried for 2 hours and analyzed for their contact angle. We found that the surfaces of osmotically stressed cells were more hydrophobic than the surfaces of unstressed cells and that the bacteria-mineral associations had higher contact angles than the pure minerals. A rather low surface coverage (~10%) of the mineral surfaces by bacteria was sufficient to increase the contact angle significantly, and the different wettabilities of stressed and unstressed cells were reflected in the contact angles of the bacteria-mineral associations. The increases in

  3. Landscape position and surface curvature effects on soils developed in the Palouse area, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgin, Burhan N.; Frazier, Bruce E.

    1996-11-01

    The Palouse region of eastern Washington is characterized by complex rolling hills with high erosion susceptibility. Various aspect and slope classes along with different soil types also create complex patterns in soil fertility and crop productivity. Division of fields into different units and addressing each unit as a separate management zone has been gaining importance in recent years. Landscape modeling is one of the tools that helps define management zones based on the spatial variability of the soil and topographic characteristics. In addition to comprehensive models, there is an increasing demand for simpler techniques to assist planners with field scale, day-to-day land management. The objective of this study was to develop a simple landscape model within a geographical information systems (GIS) framework to evaluate the effects of spatial variability of topographic factors on soil genesis. For this purpose, a commercial wheat farm was chosen as the research site and a digital elevation model (DEM) of the site was prepared. Landscape parameters such as slope, aspect and tangential curvature were calculated. GIS overlay of these values were georeferenced and combined with other data layers such as soil maps and air photos. Soil samples were collected on three different transects and representative pits were opened for further evaluation of soil properties. Depth to E horizon was measured for all sampling locations. Results indicate that spatial distribution of E horizon can be estimated by surface curvature, slope and aspect. Study also shows that contrasting soils that are in close proximity to each other, too close to be separated on conventional soil maps, can be detected with the help of landscape parameters. Big map units that extend over several hillslope positions can be further divided into smaller units to receive separate agricultural management based on soil, water relationships defined by these landscape parameters.

  4. Soil fertility in deserts: a review on the influence of biological soil crusts and the effect of soil surface disturbance on nutrient inputs and losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R.; Phillips, S.; Duniway, M.; Belnap, J.

    2003-01-01

    Sources of desert soil fertility include parent material weathering, aeolian deposition, and on-site C and N biotic fixation. While parent materials provide many soil nutrients, aeolian deposition can provide up to 75% of plant-essential nutrients including N, P, K, Mg, Na, Mn, Cu, and Fe. Soil surface biota are often sticky, and help retain wind-deposited nutrients, as well as providing much of the N inputs. Carbon inputs are from both plants and soil surface biota. Most desert soils are protected by cyanobacterial-lichen-moss soil crusts, chemical crusts and/or desert pavement. Experimental disturbances applied in US deserts show disruption of soil surfaces result in decreased N and C inputs from soil biota by up to 100%. The ability to glue aeolian deposits in place is compromised, and underlying soils are exposed to erosion. The ability to withstand wind increases with biological and physical soil crust development. While most undisturbed sites show little sediment production, disturbance by vehicles or livestock produce up to 36 times more sediment production, with soil movement initiated at wind velocities well below commonly-occurring wind speeds. Soil fines and flora are often concentrated in the top 3 mm of the soil surface. Winds across disturbed areas can quickly remove this material from the soil surface, thereby potentially removing much of current and future soil fertility. Thus, disturbances of desert soil surfaces can both reduce fertility inputs and accelerate fertility losses.

  5. Effect of the overconsolidation ratio of soils in surface settlements due to tunneling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ludmila Strokova

    2013-01-01

    Construction of urban tunnels requires the control of surface subsidence to minimize any disturbance to nearby buildings and services. Past study of surface subsidence has been limited to mainly empirical solutions based on field studies, and very few analytical studies have been carried out. The available analytical solutions are not sufficient to include complex ground conditions;hence, a comprehensive analytical solution coupled with numerical modeling is necessary to model the effect of surface subsidence due to tunneling. This paper presents the results of modeling of surface settlements due to tunneling using the finite element method. The effect of the overconsolidation ratio of soils expressed in terms of the co-efficient of earth pressure at rest (K0) on surface subsidence due to tunneling is investigated. It is demonstrated that surface settlements appear to be sensitive to K0 values, and for geotechnical calculations pertaining to overconsolidated sand and clay soil, K0 values of 0.6 and 0.8, respectively, are proposed.

  6. Effect of Saturated Near Surface on Nitrate and Ammonia Nitrogen Losses in Surface Runoff at the Loess Soil Hillslope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-bin Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Water pollution from agricultural fields is a global problem and cause of eutrophication of surface waters. A laboratory study was designed to evaluate the effects of near-surface hydraulic gradients on NO3–N and NH4–N losses in surface runoff from soil boxes at 27% slope undersimulated rainfall of a loess soil hillslope. Experimental treatments included two near-surface hydraulic gradients (free drainage, FD; saturation, SA, three fertilizer application rates (control, no fertilizer input; low, 120 kg N ha-1; high, 240 kg N ha-1, and simulated rainfall of 100 mm h-1 was applied for 70 min. The results showed that saturated near-surface soil moisture had dramatic effects on NO3–N and NH4–N losses and water quality. Under the low fertilizer treatment, average NO3–N concentrations in runoff water of SA averaged 2.2 times greater than that of FD, 1.6 times greater for NH4–N. Under the high fertilizer treatment, NO3–N concentrations in runoff water from SA averaged 5.7 times greater than that of FD, 4.3 times greater for NH4–N. Nitrogen loss formed with NO3–N is dominant during the event, but not NH4–N. Under the SA condition, the total loss of NO3–N from low fertilizer treatment was 34.2 to 42.3% of applied nitrogen, while under the FD treatment that was 3.9 to 6.9%. However, the total loss of NH4–N was less than 1% of applied nitrogen. These results showed that saturated condition could make significant contribution to water quality problems.

  7. Study on Soil Magnetic Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIYAN-LI; LIUXIAO-YI

    1995-01-01

    A study on the effect of applied magnetic field was performed with six types of soils collected from northeastern China.Magnetic field was found to cause changes of soil physico-chemical properties and soil enzyme activities.An appropriate applied magnetic field could cut down soil zeta-potential,soil specific surface,soil water potential and soil swelling capacity;raise the charge density on soil colloids and the activities of invertase,hydrogen peroxidase and amylase in the soils;enhance soil aggregation and improve soil structural status and soil water-releasing capability.

  8. Effects of PV Module Soiling on Glass Surface Resistance and Potential-Induced Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, Peter; Button, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alex; Spataru, Sergiu; Glick, Stephen

    2015-06-14

    The goals of the project were: Determine applicability of transmission line method (TLM) to evaluate sheet resistance of soils on module glass;
    Evaluate various soils on glass for changes in surface resistance and their ability to promote potential-induced degradation with humidity (PID);
    Evaluate PID characteristics, rate, and leakage current increases on full-size mc-Si modules associated with a conductive soil on the surface.

  9. Temperature and biological soil effects on the survival of selected foodborne pathogens on a mortar surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, J T; Yan, Z; Genzlinger, L L; Kornacki, J L

    2004-12-01

    The survival of three foodborne pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Salmonella) attached to mortar surfaces, with or without biological soil (porcine serum) and incubated at either 4 or 10 degrees C in the presence of condensate, was evaluated. Soiled and unsoiled coupons were inoculated by immersion into a five-strain cocktail (approximately 10(7) CFU/ml) of each organism type and evaluated. Coupons were incubated at 25 degrees C for 2 h to allow attachment of cells, rinsed to remove unattached cells, and incubated at either 4 or 10 degrees C at high humidity to create condensate on the surface. Sonication was used to remove the attached cells, and bacteria (CFU per coupon) was determined at 9 to 10 sampling periods over 120 h. Yersinia populations decreased more than 5 log units in the presence of serum in a 24-h period. Listeria and Salmonella had better survival on mortar in the presence of serum than Yersinia throughout the 120-h incubation period. Populations of L. monocytogenes declined more rapidly at 10 than at 4 degree C after 24 h. In general, differences in temperature did not affect the survival of Salmonella or Yersinia. Serum had a protective effect on the survival of all three organisms, sustaining populations at significantly (P 0.05) among the mean number (CFU per coupon) of L. monocytogenes, Y. enterocolitica, or Salmonella on initial attachment onto the mortar surfaces (unsoiled). The results indicate relatively rapid destruction of selected pathogenic bacteria on unsoiled mortar surfaces compared with those that contained biological soil, thus highlighting the need for effective cleaning to reduce harborage of these microbes in the food factory environment.

  10. Effects of Spatial Sampling Interval on Roughness Parameters and Microwave Backscatter over Agricultural Soil Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías Ernesto Barber

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The spatial sampling interval, as related to the ability to digitize a soil profile with a certain number of features per unit length, depends on the profiling technique itself. From a variety of profiling techniques, roughness parameters are estimated at different sampling intervals. Since soil profiles have continuous spectral components, it is clear that roughness parameters are influenced by the sampling interval of the measurement device employed. In this work, we contributed to answer which sampling interval the profiles needed to be measured at to accurately account for the microwave response of agricultural surfaces. For this purpose, a 2-D laser profiler was built and used to measure surface soil roughness at field scale over agricultural sites in Argentina. Sampling intervals ranged from large (50 mm to small ones (1 mm, with several intermediate values. Large- and intermediate-sampling-interval profiles were synthetically derived from nominal, 1 mm ones. With these data, the effect of sampling-interval-dependent roughness parameters on backscatter response was assessed using the theoretical backscatter model IEM2M. Simulations demonstrated that variations of roughness parameters depended on the working wavelength and was less important at L-band than at C- or X-band. In any case, an underestimation of the backscattering coefficient of about 1-4 dB was observed at larger sampling intervals. As a general rule a sampling interval of 15 mm can be recommended for L-band and 5 mm for C-band.

  11. [Effects of different patterns surface mulching on soil properties and fruit trees growth and yield in an apple orchard].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Xie, Yong-Sheng; Hao, Ming-De; She, Xiao-Yan

    2010-02-01

    Taking a nine-year-old Fuji apple orchard in Loess Plateau as test object, this paper studied the effects of different patterns surface mulching (clean tillage, grass cover, plastic film mulch, straw mulch, and gravel mulch) on the soil properties and fruit trees growth and yield in this orchard. Grass cover induced the lowest differentiation of soil moisture profile, while gravel mulch induced the highest one. In treatment gravel mulch, the soil moisture content in apple trees root zone was the highest, which meant that there was more water available to apple trees. Surface mulching had significant effects on soil temperature, and generally resulted in a decrease in the maximum soil temperature. The exception was treatment plastic film mulch, in which, the soil temperature in summer exceeded the maximum allowable temperature for continuous root growth and physiological function. With the exception of treatment plastic film mulch, surface mulching increased the soil CO2 flux, which was the highest in treatment grass cover. Surface mulching also affected the proportion of various branch types and fruit yield. The proportion of medium-sized branches and fruit yield were the highest in treatment gravel mulch, while the fruit yield was the lowest in treatment grass cover. Factor analysis indicated that among the test surface mulching patterns, gravel mulch was most suitable for the apple orchards in gully region of Loess Plateau.

  12. Soil surface organic layers in Arctic Alaska: Spatial distribution, rates of formation, and microclimatic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Carson A.; Mann, Daniel H.; Verbyla, David L.; Kunz, Michael L.

    2015-06-01

    Organic layers of living and dead vegetation cover the ground surface in many permafrost landscapes and play important roles in ecosystem processes. These soil surface organic layers (SSOLs) store large amounts of carbon and buffer the underlying permafrost and its contained carbon from changes in aboveground climate. Understanding the dynamics of SSOLs is a prerequisite for predicting how permafrost and carbon stocks will respond to warming climate. Here we ask three questions about SSOLs in a representative area of the Arctic Foothills region of northern Alaska: (1) What environmental factors control the thickness of SSOLs and the carbon they store? (2) How long do SSOLs take to develop on newly stabilized point bars? (3) How do SSOLs affect temperature in the underlying ground? Results show that SSOL thickness and distribution correlate with elevation, drainage area, vegetation productivity, and incoming solar radiation. A multiple regression model based on these correlations can simulate spatial distribution of SSOLs and estimate the organic carbon stored there. SSOLs develop within a few decades after a new, sandy, geomorphic surface stabilizes but require 500-700 years to reach steady state thickness. Mature SSOLs lower the growing season temperature and mean annual temperature of the underlying mineral soil by 8 and 3°C, respectively. We suggest that the proximate effects of warming climate on permafrost landscapes now covered by SSOLs will occur indirectly via climate's effects on the frequency, extent, and severity of disturbances like fires and landslides that disrupt the SSOLs and interfere with their protection of the underlying permafrost.

  13. Soil surface organic layers in Arctic Alaska: spatial distribution, rates of formation, and microclimatic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Carson A.; Mann, Daniel H.; Verbyla, David L.; Kunz, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Organic layers of living and dead vegetation cover the ground surface in many permafrost landscapes and play important roles in ecosystem processes. These soil surface organic layers (SSOLs) store large amounts of carbon and buffer the underlying permafrost and its contained carbon from changes in aboveground climate. Understanding the dynamics of SSOLs is a prerequisite for predicting how permafrost and carbon stocks will respond to warming climate. Here we ask three questions about SSOLs in a representative area of the Arctic Foothills region of northern Alaska: (1) What environmental factors control the thickness of SSOLs and the carbon they store? (2) How long do SSOLs take to develop on newly stabilized point bars? (3) How do SSOLs affect temperature in the underlying ground? Results show that SSOL thickness and distribution correlate with elevation, drainage area, vegetation productivity, and incoming solar radiation. A multiple regression model based on these correlations can simulate spatial distribution of SSOLs and estimate the organic carbon stored there. SSOLs develop within a few decades after a new, sandy, geomorphic surface stabilizes but require 500–700 years to reach steady state thickness. Mature SSOLs lower the growing season temperature and mean annual temperature of the underlying mineral soil by 8 and 3°C, respectively. We suggest that the proximate effects of warming climate on permafrost landscapes now covered by SSOLs will occur indirectly via climate's effects on the frequency, extent, and severity of disturbances like fires and landslides that disrupt the SSOLs and interfere with their protection of the underlying permafrost.

  14. Effects of preferential flow on soil-water and surface runoff in a forested watershed in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhua CHENG; Hongjiang ZHANG; Youyan ZHANG; Yuhu SHI; Yun CHENG

    2009-01-01

    Preferential flow is a runoff mechanism intermediate between matrix flow and surface flow, transmitting water at high velocity through the subsurface zone. To assess the effect of preferential flow on soil-water flow and surface runoff in a forested watershed, precipitation and volumes of preferential flow, matrix flow and surface runoff were measured over a period of four years in a forested watershed in the Three Gorges area of southern China. Results show that preferential-flow hydrographs have gentler rises and steeper recessions than those for matrix flow and surface runoff. Preferential flow as a percentage of soil-water flow ranged from 2.40% to 8.72% and the maximum preferential-flow velocity exceeded as much as 5600 times that of matrix flow. This shows that preferential flow plays an important role in the movement of soil water. Preferential flow has a significant effect on peak surface runoff by increasing the surface runoff rate and accelerating the appearance of peak surface runoff. Preferential flow can also prolong the duration of surface runoff. Surface runoff was observed to be positively correlated with preferential flow. The greater the sum of rainfall amount and antecedent precipitation is, the greater the effect of preferential flow on surface runoff is.

  15. Oxidation of FGD-CaSO{sub 3} and effect on soil chemical properties when applied to the soil surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liming Chen; Cliff Ramsier; Jerry Bigham; Brian Slater; David Kost; Yong Bok Lee; Warren A. Dick [Ohio State University, Wooster, OH (United States). School of Environment and Natural Resources

    2009-07-15

    Use of high-sulfur coal for power generation in the United States requires the removal of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) produced during burning in order to meet clean air regulations. If SO{sub 2} is removed from the flue gas using a wet scrubber without forced air oxidation, much of the S product created will be sulfite (SO{sub 3}{sup 2-}). Plants take up S in the form of sulfate (SO{sub 2}{sup 2-}). Sulfite may cause damage to plant roots, especially in acid soils. For agricultural uses, it is thought that SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) products must first oxidize to SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in soils before crops are planted. However, there is little information about the oxidation of SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} in FGD product to SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} under field conditions. An FGD-CaSO{sub 3} was applied at rates of 0, 1.12, and 3.36 Mg ha{sup -1} to the surface of an agricultural soil (Wooster silt loam, Oxyaquic Fragiudalf). The SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in the surface soil (0-10 cm) was analyzed on days 3, 7, 17, 45, and 61. The distribution of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and Ca in the 0-90 cm soil layer was also determined on day 61. Results indicated that SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} in the FGD-CaSO{sub 3} rapidly oxidized to SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} on the field surface during the first week and much of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and Ca moved downward into the 0-50 cm soil layer during the experimental period of two months. It is safe to grow plants in soil treated with FGD-CaSO{sub 3} if the application is made at least three days to several weeks before planting. 20 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Predicting climate change effects on surface soil organic carbon of Louisiana, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Biao; Xu, Yi Jun

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the degree of potential temperature and precipitation change as predicted by the HadCM3 (Hadley Centre Coupled Model, version 3) climate model for Louisiana, and to investigate the effects of potential climate change on surface soil organic carbon (SOC) across Louisiana using the Rothamsted Carbon Model (RothC) and GIS techniques at the watershed scale. Climate data sets at a grid cell of 0.5° × 0.5° for the entire state of Louisiana were collected from the HadCM3 model output for three climate change scenarios: B2, A2, and A1F1, that represent low, higher, and even higher greenhouse gas emissions, respectively. Geo-referenced datasets including USDA-NRCS Soil Geographic Database (STATSGO), USGS Land Cover Dataset (NLCD), and the Louisiana watershed boundary data were gathered for SOC calculation at the watershed scale. A soil carbon turnover model, RothC, was used to simulate monthly changes in SOC from 2001 to 2100 under the projected temperature and precipitation changes. The simulated SOC changes in 253 watersheds from three time periods, 2001-2010, 2041-2050, and 2091-2100, were tested for the influence of the land covers and emissions scenarios using SAS PROC GLIMMIX and PDMIX800 macro to separate Tukey-Kramer (p change from 30.7 t/ha in 2001 to 25.4, 26.6, and 27.0 t/ha in 2100, respectively. Annual SOC changes will be significantly different among the land cover classes including evergreen forest, mixed forest, deciduous forest, small grains, row crops, and pasture/hay (p < 0.0001), emissions scenarios (p < 0.0001), and their interactions (p < 0.0001).

  17. The surface-pore integrated effect of soil organic matter on retention and transport of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qin; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie

    2017-12-01

    This study examines a surface-pore integrated mechanism that allows soil organic matter (SOM) to influence the retention and transport of three representative pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs)-ibuprofen, carbamazepine, and bisphenol A-in agricultural soil. A series of sorption-desorption batch tests and breakthrough column experiments were conducted using manured and non-manured soils. Results show that SOM could substantially influence the environmental behaviors of PPCPs via two mechanisms: surface-coating and pore-filling. Surface-coating with molecular SOM decreases the sorption of dissociated PPCPs (e.g., ibuprofen) but increases the sorption of non-dissociated PPCPs (e.g., carbamazepine and bisphenol A), while pore-filling with colloidal SOM enhances the retention of all the PPCPs by providing nano-/micro-pores that limit diffusion. The higher retention and lower mobility of PPCPs in soil microaggregates than in bulk soils suggest that SOM content and SOM-altered soil pore structure could exert a coupled effect on PPCP retention. Differences in the elution of PPCPs with low surface tension solution (i.e., 20% ethanol) in the presence and absence of SOM indicate that PPCPs prefer to remain in SOM-filled pores. Overall, ibuprofen has a high environmental risk, whereas carbamazepine and bisphenol A could be readily retarded in agricultural soils (with a loamy clay texture). This study implies that SOM accrual (particularly pore-filling SOM) has a high potential for reducing the off-site risks of PPCPs by increasing soil nano-/micro-porosity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of nitrogen sources and glucose on the consumption of ethylene and methane by temperate volcanic forest surface soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    There is limited knowledge with regard to the consumption of ethylene (C2H4) and methane (CH4) in volcanic forest soils containing low microbial carbon-to-organic carbon ratio, and to the responses of both consumptions to nitrogen and carbon additions. Temperate volcanic forest surface soils under three forest stands (e.g. Pinus sylvestris L., Cryptomeria japonica and Quercus serrata) were used to compare CH4 and C2H4 consumption by forest soils, and to study the effects of nitrogen sources and glucose on both consumptions. There was a good parallel between CH4 and C2H4 consumption by forest soils, but mineralization reduced CH4 consumption rather than C2H4 consumption in forest soils, particularly in a Pinus forest soil. The stimulatory effect of glucose addition on both CH4 and C2H4 consumption by forest soils was increased by increasing the pre-incubation period after glucose addition, and a largest stimulation occurred in the Pinus forest soil. The addition of KNO3-N at the rate of 100 (g·g-1 significantly reduced the consumptions of both C2H4 and CH4 by forest soils (P≤0.05). In the presence of urea plus dicyandiamide, the consumption rates of C2H4 and CH4 by forest soils were higher than those in the KNO3-N and urea-N treated soils at the same N rate (P≤0.05), but were similar to those of the control. Hence, under experimental conditions, there was a strong inhibitory effect of NO3- rather than NH4+ addition on the CH4 and C2H4 consumption in these forest soils. When amount of the added NO3-N increased up to more than 2―3 times the soil initial NO3-N concentrations, both C2H4 and CH4 consumption rates were reduced to 10%―20% of the rates in soils without nitrate addition. By comparing the three forest stands, it was shown that there was a smallest effective concentration of the added nitrate that could inhibit C2H4 and CH4 consumption in the Pinus forest soil, which indicated that C2H4 and CH4 consumption of the soil was more sensitive to NO3?-N

  19. Effects of forest road amelioration techniques on soil bulk density, surface runoff, sediment transport, soil moisture and seedling growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randy K. Kolka; Mathew F. Smidt

    2004-01-01

    Although numerous methods have been used to retire roads, new technologies have evolved that can potentially ameliorate soil damage, lessen ,the generation of nonpoint source pollution and increase tree productivity on forest roads. In this study we investigated the effects of three forest road amelioration techniques, subsoiling, recontouring and traditional...

  20. The groundwater-land-surface-atmosphere connection: soil moisture effects on the atmospheric boundary layer in fully-coupled simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, R M; Chow, F K; Kollet, S J

    2007-02-02

    This study combines a variably-saturated groundwater flow model and a mesoscale atmospheric model to examine the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on atmospheric boundary layer processes. This parallel, integrated model can represent spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. The development of atmospheric flow is studied in a series of idealized test cases with different initial soil moisture distributions generated by an offline spin-up procedure or interpolated from a coarse-resolution dataset. These test cases are performed with both the fully-coupled model (which includes 3D groundwater flow and surface water routing) and the uncoupled atmospheric model. The effects of the different soil moisture initializations and lateral subsurface and surface water flow are seen in the differences in atmospheric evolution over a 36-hour period. The fully-coupled model maintains a realistic topographically-driven soil moisture distribution, while the uncoupled atmospheric model does not. Furthermore, the coupled model shows spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating.

  1. Effects of photovoltaic module soiling on glass surface resistance and potential-induced degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hacke, Peter; Burton, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The sheet resistance of three soil types (Arizona road dust, soot, and sea salt) on glass were measured by the transmission line method as a function of relative humidity (RH) between 39% and 95% at 60°C. Sea salt yielded a 3.5 orders of magnitude decrease in resistance on the glass surface when...

  2. Specific surface area effect on adsorption of chlorpyrifos and TCP by soils and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adsorption of chlorpyrifos and TCP (3,5,6, trichloro-2-pyridinol) was determined in four soils (Mollisol, Inceptisol, Entisol, Alfisol) having different specific surface areas (19–84 m2/g) but rather similar organic matter content (2.4–3.5%). Adsorption isotherms were derived from batch equilibr...

  3. The effect of surface cover and soil devastation on infiltration rate in steep forest plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Y.; Hiraoka, M.; Kato, H.; Gomi, T.; Miyata, S.; Mizugaki, S.

    2008-12-01

    The Japanese cypress (Hinoki; Chamaecyparis obtusa) is a major commercial tree species in Japan, and without thinning of high-density stands, canopy closure prevents development of understory vegetation. Therefore there is a concern for overlandflow and sediment yield due to infiltration rate lowering. We developed a light-weight rainfall simulator based on the design of Meyer and Harmon (1979). A flat fan Veejet 80150 spraying nozzle (Spraying systems Co., USA) is mounted on the manifold at 2.13 m high from the plot surface. The nozzle oscillates so that the spray fan sweeps across the targeting 1 m x 1 m plot. The Veejet 80150 spraying nozzle produces large raindrops larger than 2 mm in diameter, and can simulate the high raindrop kinetic energy of natural throughfall. A targeted rainfall rate is 180 mm/h. About 30 sprinkling experiments have been conducted on 35-degree hillslopes with varying surface cover in 5 locations in Japan. We obtained the minimum infiltration rate of 14 mm/h where the surface cover is very little. The infiltration rates were plotted against the total understory vegetation and dry weight of total surface cover including litter. The infiltration rate increased with the increasing total surface cover, and generally higher regression coefficient was found for the case of the total surface cover. In some cases, high infiltration rates were obtained where surface cover is low. Two possible explanations can be made; 1) surface soil (especially fine particles) has been washed away, where soil is mostly composed of gravel and the percentage of fine fraction is low, or 2) because of long-term soil loss by raindrop detachment, remaining soil looks like "ghanging"h between exposed fine root networks of Japanese cypress, where soil bulk density is significantly lower than other site. Therefore the infiltration rate in the devastated Japanese cypress plantations is not only controlled by loss of surface vegetation by low light condition, but soil

  4. Surface modeling of soil antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wen-jiao; Yue, Tian-xiang; Du, Zheng-ping; Wang, Zong; Li, Xue-wen

    2016-02-01

    Large numbers of livestock and poultry feces are continuously applied into soils in intensive vegetable cultivation areas, and then some veterinary antibiotics are persistent existed in soils and cause health risk. For the spatial heterogeneity of antibiotic residues, developing a suitable technique to interpolate soil antibiotic residues is still a challenge. In this study, we developed an effective interpolator, high accuracy surface modeling (HASM) combined vegetable types, to predict the spatial patterns of soil antibiotics, using 100 surface soil samples collected from an intensive vegetable cultivation area located in east of China, and the fluoroquinolones (FQs), including ciprofloxacin (CFX), enrofloxacin (EFX) and norfloxacin (NFX), were analyzed as the target antibiotics. The results show that vegetable type is an effective factor to be combined to improve the interpolator performance. HASM achieves less mean absolute errors (MAEs) and root mean square errors (RMSEs) for total FQs (NFX+CFX+EFX), NFX, CFX and EFX than kriging with external drift (KED), stratified kriging (StK), ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW). The MAE of HASM for FQs is 55.1 μg/kg, and the MAEs of KED, StK, OK and IDW are 99.0 μg/kg, 102.8 μg/kg, 106.3 μg/kg and 108.7 μg/kg, respectively. Further, RMSE simulated by HASM for FQs (CFX, EFX and NFX) are 106.2 μg/kg (88.6 μg/kg, 20.4 μg/kg and 39.2 μg/kg), and less 30% (27%, 22% and 36%), 33% (27%, 27% and 43%), 38% (34%, 23% and 41%) and 42% (32%, 35% and 51%) than the ones by KED, StK, OK and IDW, respectively. HASM also provides better maps with more details and more consistent maximum and minimum values of soil antibiotics compared with the measured data. The better performance can be concluded that HASM takes the vegetable type information as global approximate information, and takes local sampling data as its optimum control constraints.

  5. The immediate effectiveness of barley straw mulch in reducing soil erodibility and surface runoff generation in Mediterranean vineyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosdocimi, Massimo; Jordán, Antonio; Tarolli, Paolo; Keesstra, Saskia; Novara, Agata; Cerdà, Artemi

    2016-03-15

    Soil and water loss in agriculture is a major problem throughout the world, and especially in Mediterranean areas. Non-conservation agricultural practices have further aggravated the situation, especially in vineyards, which are affected by one of the highest rates of soil loss among cultivated lands. Therefore, it is necessary to find the right soil practices for more sustainable viticulture. In this regard, straw mulching has proven to be effective in other crop and fire affected soils, but, nonetheless, little research has been carried out in vineyards. This research tests the effect of barley straw mulching on soil erosion and surface runoff on vineyards in Eastern Spain where the soil and water losses are non-sustainable. An experiment was setup using rainfall simulation tests at 55 mm h(-1) over 1h on forty paired plots of 0.24 m(2): twenty bare and twenty straw covered. Straw cover varied from 48 to 90% with a median value of 59% as a result of the application of 75 g of straw per m(2). The use of straw mulch resulted in delayed ponding and runoff generation and, as a consequence, the median water loss decreased from 52.59 to 39.27% of the total rainfall. The straw cover reduced the median sediment concentration in runoff from 9.8 to 3.0 g L(-1) and the median total sediment detached from 70.34 to 15.62 g per experiment. The median soil erosion rate decreased from 2.81 to 0.63 Mg ha(-1)h(-1) due to the straw mulch protection. Straw mulch is very effective in reducing soil erodibility and surface runoff, and this benefit was achieved immediately after the application of the straw.

  6. Effect of rainfall and tillage direction on the evolution of surface crusts, soil hydraulic properties and runoff generation for a sandy loam soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Babacar; Esteves, Michel; Vandervaere, Jean-Pierre; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Vauclin, Michel

    2005-06-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the effect of rainfall and tillage-induced soil surface characteristics on infiltration and runoff on a 2.8 ha catchment located in the central region of Senegal. This was done by simulating 30 min rain storms applied at a constant rate of about 70 mm h -1, on 10 runoff micro-plots of 1 m 2, five being freshly harrowed perpendicularly to the slope and five along the slope (1%) of the catchment. Runoff was automatically recorded at the outlet of each plot. Hydraulic properties such as capillary sorptivity and hydraulic conductivity of the sandy loam soil close to saturation were determined by running 48 infiltration tests with a tension disc infiltrometer. That allowed the calculation of a mean characteristic pore size hydraulically active and a time to ponding. Superficial water storage capacity was estimated using data collected with an electronic relief meter. Because the soil was subject to surface crusting, crust-types as well as their spatial distribution within micro-plots and their evolution with time were identified and monitored by taking photographs at different times after tillage. The results showed that the surface crust-types as well as their tillage dependent dynamics greatly explain the decrease of hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity as the cumulative rainfall since tillage increases. The exponential decaying rates were found to be significantly greater for the soil harrowed along the slope (where the runoff crust-type covers more than 60% of the surface after 140 mm of rain) than across to the slope (where crusts are mainly of structural (60%) and erosion (40%) types). That makes ponding time smaller and runoff more important. Also it was shown that soil hydraulic properties after about 160 mm of rain were close to those of untilled plot not submitted to any rain. That indicates that the effects of tillage are short lived.

  7. Effect of heavy metals on soil mineral surfaces and bioretention pond performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Olson, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    Haibo Zhang and Mira S. Olson Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 As urban stormwater runoff flows across impervious surfaces, it collects and accumulates pollutants that are detrimental to the quality of local receiving water bodies. Heavy metal pollution, such as copper, lead and zinc, has been a concern in urban stormwater runoff. In addition, the presence of bacteria in stormwater has been frequently reported. The co-existence of both heavy metals and bacteria in stormwater and their complex interactions determine their transport and removal through bioretention pond. Stormwater runoff was sampled from a bioretention pond in Philadelphia, PA. The concentration of copper, lead and zinc were measured as 0.086ppm, 0.083ppm and 0.365ppm, respectively. Batch experiments were conducted with solutions of pure copper, lead and zinc, and with a synthetic stormwater solution amended with copper, lead and zinc. The solution was buffered to pH 7, within the range of the observed stormwater pH. In pure heavy metal solutions, the sorption of copper, lead and zinc onto soil are 96%, 99% and 85%, respectively. In synthetic stormwater containing nutrients and all three metals, the sorption of lead is 97%, while copper and zinc decrease to 29% and 71%, respectively. Mineralogy of a soil sample taken from the bioretention pond was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and compared before and after sorption experiments. Sorption and complexation of heavy metals is likely to change the mineralogy of soil particle surfaces, which will affect the attachment of bacteria and therefore its transport through soil. This study will benefit long-term predictions of the performance of bioretention ponds for urban stormwater runoff treatment. Keyword: Heavy metal pollution, sorption, surface complexation, urban stormwater runoff, bioretention pond

  8. Experimental evaluation of effect on Cassie-Baxter equation of surface roughness with application to soil water repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sujung; Douglas, Peter; Doerr, Stefan; Gowenlock, Cathren; Hallin, Ingrid; Mabbett, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Manifestation of soil water repellency depends both on the surface chemistry and the physical structure of the particles making up the soil. In materials science the effect of physical structure on water repellency is often explained by the Cassie-Baxter equation. Recently, a few attempts have been made to explain water repellency of soil using the Cassie-Baxter equation for hexagonally-arrayed spheres on a flat plane. Experimental verification of this conceptual model using glass beads as model soil particles has been left somewhat incomplete, as the experimentally measured contact angles do not match well those expected from theory. This might be caused by a failure to generate a perfect arrangement of particles. Therefore, we have aimed to obtain highly precise arrangements of glass beads as model soil particles using 3D printing technology. Our aim is to generate particle frames of precise hexagonal arrangement with particles at differing separations, and to measure the water contact angles upon the particle arrays optically using a goniometer. In this contribution, we report our preliminary results in which we explore the applicability of the Cassie-Baxter equation to such regular arrays as both separation distance and surface roughness is varied. This research has been funded by Bridging the Gap in Swansea University, UK.

  9. The Effects of Different Tillage Methods on Available Soil Potassium Measured by Various Extractors in a Soil with High Specific Surface Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hosseini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effects of any tillage method on soil properties, depends on location (soil, water and air and the number of (years their implementation. Soil compaction reduces yield through increased soil mechanical resistance against root growth and lower water and nutrient use efficiency (Gamda et al. 18 & Ishagh et al 23. Soil surface and sub surface compaction both reduce yield due to limited root growth and plant potassium uptake (Doulan et al. 14. Sabt et al. (50 reported that in the study area, which the lands are mostly illite clay (high specific surface area with sufficient nitrogen, soil potassium is the most important limiting factor for the growth of wheat.Considering the point that loess soils in Golestan Province have a high specific surface area,they can provide potassium for plants to produce crop, but for a higher production, potassium fertilizers should be used. Previous studies indicated that production of wheat is limited due to potassium deficiency (4, 49, 54 and 57. In these soils with a high specific surface area, the speed of movement of potassium from the soil solution is low, and doing solimits wheat yield.In loess soils containing high illite and high specific surface area (eg, soilsin the series of Rahmat Abad of Gorgan, ammonium acetate measured potassium on exchange and solution surfaces, which is highly correlated with grain yield (54 . There is a high correlation between grain yield with overload of potassium and Na TPB extraction (57. The aim of this study was to absorb potassium (limiting factor for plant growth with different tillage systemsat different depths. International recommendations towards reducing the depth and intensity of tillage (from minimum tillage to no-tillage in order to reduce erosion and oxidation of organic substances plays an important role in determining the amount of greenhouse gases. If potassium absorption does not reduceafter reducing tillage intensity,low or no-tillage methods

  10. Rainfall intensity and phosphorus source effects on phosphorus transport in surface runoff from soil trays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigaki, Francirose; Sharpley, Andrew; Prochnow, Luis Ignacio

    2007-02-01

    Phosphorus runoff from agricultural fields amended with mineral fertilizers and manures has been linked to freshwater eutrophication. A rainfall simulation study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different rainfall intensities and P sources differing in water soluble P (WSP) concentration on P transport in runoff from soil trays packed with a Berks loam and grassed with annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.). Triple superphosphate (TSP; 79% WSP), low-grade super single phosphate (LGSSP; 50% WSP), North Carolina rock phosphate (NCRP; 0.5% WSP) and swine manure (SM; 70% WSP), were broadcast (100 kg total P ha-1) and rainfall applied at 25, 50 and 75 mm h-1 1, 7, 21, and 56 days after P source application. The concentration of dissolved reactive (DRP), particulate (PP), and total P (TP) was significantly (Prunoff with a rainfall intensity of 75 than 25 mm h-1 for all P sources. Further, runoff DRP increased as P source WSP increased, with runoff from a 50 mm h-1 rain 1 day after source application having a DRP concentration of 0.25 mg L-1 for NCRP and 28.21 mg L-1 for TSP. In contrast, the proportion of runoff TP as PP was greater with low (39% PP for NCRP) than high WSP sources (4% PP for TSP) averaged for all rainfall intensities. The increased PP transport is attributed to the detachment and transport of undissolved P source particles during runoff. These results show that P source water solubility and rainfall intensity can influence P transport in runoff, which is important in evaluating the long-term risks of P source application on P transport in surface runoff.

  11. The effectiveness of surface liming in ameliorating the phytotoxic effects of soil contaminated by copper acid leach pad solution in an arid ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golos, Peter

    2016-04-01

    collected at >10 cm depth than the control. Mean soil pH at 0-10 cm was higher (>7.2) at all sites treated with lime compared to uncontaminated soil (5.5). At depths greater than 10 cm soil pH was 16 mg/kg in all contaminated soil samples compared to 0.5 mg/kg in control. High seedling mortality in contaminated site is attributed to low soil pH and elevated soil copper levels which inhibited plant root growth and hence access to soil water. While surface liming of soil increased soil pH ameliorating the effect of elevated soil copper, this was only effective in the top 10 cm due to low solubility of hydrated lime. To improve seedling survival lime will need to be incorporated into the contaminated soil profile to allow plants to access soil water at depth. This study highlights the importance of the need to assess the phytotoxic effects of soil contamination and the effectiveness of amelioration treatments and with proper reference to its ecological context. To improve the success of vegetation restoration of sites contaminated with acidic copper solution, lime needs to be incorporated into the contaminated soil profile to allow plant roots to access soil water at depth. This study highlights the importance of the need to assess the phytotoxic effects of soil contamination and the effectiveness of amelioration treatments and with proper reference to its ecological context.

  12. Effects of Photovoltaic Module Soiling on Glass Surface Resistance and Potential-Induced Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, Peter; Burton, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alex; Spataru, Sergiu; Glick, Stephen; Terwilliger, Kent

    2015-06-14

    The sheet resistance of three soil types (Arizona road dust, soot, and sea salt) on glass were measured by the transmission line method as a function of relative humidity (RH) between 39% and 95% at 60 degrees C. Sea salt yielded a 3.5 orders of magnitude decrease in resistance on the glass surface when the RH was increased over this RH range. Arizona road dust showed reduced sheet resistance at lower RH, but with less humidity sensitivity over the range tested. The soot sample did not show significant resistivity change compared to the unsoiled control. Photovoltaic modules with sea salt on their faces were step-stressed between 25% and 95% RH at 60 degrees C applying -1000 V bias to the active cell circuit. Leakage current from the cell circuit to ground ranged between two and ten times higher than that of the unsoiled controls. Degradation rate of modules with salt on the surface increased with increasing RH and time.

  13. Effects of PV Module Soiling on Glass Surface Resistance and Potential-Induced Degradation: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, Peter; Burton, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alex; Spartaru, Sergiu; Glick, Stephen; Terwilliger, Kent

    2015-12-03

    The sheet resistance of three soil types (Arizona road dust, soot, and sea salt) on glass were measured by the transmission line method as a function of relative humidity (RH) between 39% and 95% at 60 degrees C. Sea salt yielded a 3.5 order of magnitude decrease in resistance on the glass surface when the RH was increased over this RH range. Arizona road dust showed reduced sheet resistance at lower RH, but with less humidity sensitivity over the range tested. The soot sample did not show significant resistivity change compared to the unsoiled control. Photovoltaic modules with sea salt on their faces were step-stressed between 25% and 95% RH at 60 degrees C applying -1000 V bias to the active cell circuit. Leakage current from the cell circuit to ground ranged between two and ten times higher than that of the unsoiled controls. Degradation rate of modules with salt on the surface increased with increasing RH and time.

  14. Soil Organic Carbon and Its Fractions Across Vegetation Types: Effects of Soil Mineral Surface Area and Microaggregates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qing-Biao; WANG Xiao-Ke; OUYANG Zhi-Yun

    2009-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) can act as a sink or source of atmospheric carbon dioxide;therefore,it is important to understand the amount and composition of SOC in terrestrial ecosystems,the spatial variation in SOC,and the underlying mechanisms that stabilize SOC.In this study,density fractionation and acid hydrolysis were used to assess the spatial variation in SOC,the heavy fraction of organic carbon (HFOC),and the resistant organic carbon (ROC) in soils of the southern Hulun Buir region,northeastern China,and to identify the major factors that contribute to this variation.The results showed that as the contents of clay and silt particles (0-50 μm) increased,both methylene blue (MB) adsorption by soil minerals and microaggregate contents increased in the 0-20 and 20-40 cm soil layers (P<0.05).Although varying with vegetation types,SOC,HFOC,and ROC contents increased significantly with the content of clay and silt particles,MB adsorption by soil minerals,and microaggregate content (P<0.05),suggesting that soil texture,the MB adsorption by soil minerals,and microaggregate abundance might be important factors influencing the spatial heterogeneity of carbon contents in soils of the southern Hulun Buir region.

  15. Speciation and fractionation of heavy metals in soil experimentally contaminated with Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn together and effects on soil negative surface charge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Speciation of heavy metals in soil subsamplesexperimentally loaded with Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn in orthogonal designwas investigated by sequential extraction, and operationallydefined as water-soluble and exchangeable(SE), weakly specificadsorbed(WSA), Fe and Mn oxides-bound(OX) and organic-bound(ORG).The results show that speciation of heavy metals in the soilsubsamples depended on their kinds. About 90% of Cd and 75% of Znexisted in soil subsamples in the SE fraction. Lead and Cu existedin soil subsamples as SE, WSA and OX fractions simultaneously,although SE was still the major fraction. Organic-bound heavymetals were not clearly apparent in all the soil subsamples. Theconcentration of some heavy metal speciation in soil subsamplesshowed good correlation with ionic impulsion of soil, especiallyfor the SE fraction. Continuous saturation of soil subsamples with0.20 mol/L NH4Cl, which is the first step for determination of thenegative surface charge of soil by the ion retention method, resulted in desorption of certain heavy metals from the soil. Itwas found that the percentage desorption of heavy metals from soilsubsamples depended greatly on pH, the composition and originalheavy metal content of the soil subsamples. However, most of theheavy metals in the soil subsamples were still retained aftermultiple saturation. Compared with the parent soil, the negativesurface charge of soil subsamples loaded with heavy metals did notshow differ significantly from that of the parent one bystatistical analysis. Heavy metals existed in the soil subsamplesmainly as exchangeable and precipitated simultaneously.

  16. The effect of leaf litter cover on surface runoff and soil erosion in Northern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    Full Text Available The role of leaf litter in hydrological processes and soil erosion of forest ecosystems is poorly understood. A field experiment was conducted under simulated rainfall in runoff plots with a slope of 10%. Two common types of litter in North China (from Quercus variabilis, representing broadleaf litter, and Pinus tabulaeformis, representing needle leaf litter, four amounts of litter, and five rainfall intensities were tested. Results revealed that the litter reduced runoff and delayed the beginning of runoff, but significantly reduced soil loss (p<0.05. Average runoff yield was 29.5% and 31.3% less than bare-soil plot, and for Q. variabilis and P. tabulaeformis, respectively, and average sediment yield was 85.1% and 79.9% lower. Rainfall intensity significantly affected runoff (R = 0.99, p<0.05, and the efficiency in runoff reduction by litter decreased considerably. Runoff yield and the runoff coefficient increased dramatically by 72.9 and 5.4 times, respectively. The period of time before runoff appeared decreased approximately 96.7% when rainfall intensity increased from 5.7 to 75.6 mm h-1. Broadleaf and needle leaf litter showed similarly relevant effects on runoff and soil erosion control, since no significant differences (p≤0.05 were observed in runoff and sediment variables between two litter-covered plots. In contrast, litter mass was probably not a main factor in determining runoff and sediment because a significant correlation was found only with sediment in Q. variabilis litter plot. Finally, runoff yield was significantly correlated (p<0.05 with sediment yield. These results suggest that the protective role of leaf litter in runoff and erosion processes was crucial, and both rainfall intensity and litter characteristics had an impact on these processes.

  17. Effect of soil surface salt on the density and distribution of the snail Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos in northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwannatrai, Apiporn; Suwannatrai, Kulwadee; Haruay, Surat; Piratae, Supawadee; Thammasiri, Chalida; Khampoosa, Panita; Kulsantiwong, Jutharat; Prasopdee, Sattrachai; Tarbsripair, Pairat; Suwanwerakamtorn, Rasamee; Sukchan, Somsak; Boonmars, Thidarut; Malone, John B; Kearney, Michael T; Tesana, Smarn

    2011-05-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini infection is associated with human cholangiocarcinoma and northeast Thailand has the highest incidence of this disease in the world. Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos is the major freshwater snail intermediate host of O. viverrini in this area and an analysis based on geographical information systems was used to determine the effect of variation in soil surface salt on the density and distribution of this snail. A malacological survey was carried out in 56 water bodies in the Khorat basin, northeast Thailand at locations with various soil surface salt levels. Mollusk samples were collected from 10 ecologically representative water body sites with 10-20 sampling stations in each. The shoreline of clear, shallow water bodies was found to be the preferred B. s. goniomphalos habitat. The snails were exclusively found in water with salinity levels ranging between 0.05 and 22.11 parts per thousand (ppt), which supports the notion that B. s. goniomphalos prefers water with some saline content over pure, freshwater. The highest snail population densities were in rice fields, ponds, road-side ditches and canals within a water salinity range of 2.5-5.0 ppt. However, the presence of B. s. goniomphalos was negatively correlated with water salinity (P ≤0.05), both with regard to density and distribution. The areas with the highest density of B. s. goniomphalos were those with less than 1% soil surface salt (potential index = 0.314), while the lowest densities were found in areas exceeding 50% soil surface salt (potential index = 0.015).

  18. Effect of soil surface salt on the density and distribution of the snail Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos in northeast Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apiporn Suwannatrai

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Opisthorchis viverrini infection is associated with human cholangiocarcinoma and northeast Thailand has the highest incidence of this disease in the world. Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos is the major freshwater snail intermediate host of O. viverrini in this area and an analysis based on geographical information systems was used to determine the effect of variation in soil surface salt on the density and distribution of this snail. A malacological survey was carried out in 56 water bodies in the Khorat basin, northeast Thailand at locations with various soil surface salt levels. Mollusk samples were collected from 10 ecologically representative water body sites with 10-20 sampling stations in each. The shoreline of clear, shallow water bodies was found to be the preferred B. s. goniomphalos habitat. The snails were exclusively found in water with salinity levels ranging between 0.05 and 22.11 parts per thousand (ppt, which supports the notion that B. s. goniomphalos prefers water with some saline content over pure, freshwater. The highest snail population densities were in rice fields, ponds, road-side ditches and canals within a water salinity range of 2.5-5.0 ppt. However, the presence of B. s. goniomphalos was negatively correlated with water salinity (P ≤0.05, both with regard to density and distribution. The areas with the highest density of B. s. goniomphalos were those with less than 1% soil surface salt (potential index = 0.314, while the lowest densities were found in areas exceeding 50% soil surface salt (potential index = 0.015.

  19. Quantifying the effect of lichen and bryophyte cover on permafrost soil within a global land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porada, Philipp; Ekici, Altug; Beer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation near the surface, such as bryophytes and lichens, has an insulating effect on the soil at high latitudes and it can therefore protect permafrost conditions. Warming due to climate change, however, may change the average surface coverage of bryophytes and lichens. This can result in permafrost thawing associated with a release of soil carbon to the atmosphere, which may lead to a positive feedback on atmospheric CO2. Thus, it is important to predict how the bryophyte and lichen cover at high latitudes will react to environmental change. However, current global land surface models so far contain mostly empirical approaches to represent bryophytes and lichens, which makes it impractical to predict their future state and function. For this reason, we integrate a process-based model of bryophyte and lichen growth into the global land surface model JSBACH. We explicitly represent dynamic thermal properties of the bryophyte and lichen cover and their relation to climate. Subsequently, we compare simulations with and without bryophyte and lichen cover to quantify the insulating effect. We estimate an annual average cooling effect of the bryophyte and lichen cover of 2.7 K on topsoil temperature for the northern high latitudes under current climate. Locally, the cooling may reach up to 5.7 K. Moreover, we show that neglecting dynamic properties of the bryophyte and lichen cover by using a simple, empirical scheme only results in an average cooling of around 0.5 K. This suggests that bryophytes and lichens have a significant impact on soil temperature in high-latitude ecosystems and also that a process-based description of their thermal properties is necessary for a realistic representation of the cooling effect.

  20. [Effects of ground surface mulching in tea garden on soil water and nutrient dynamics and tea plant growth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-tao; Wang, Yu; Ding, Zhao-tang

    2011-09-01

    Taking a 2-year-old tea garden in Qingdao of Shandong Province as test object, this paper studied the effects of different mulching modes on the soil water and nutrient dynamics and tea plant growth. Four treatments were installed, i.e., no mulching (CK), straw mulching (T1), plastic film mulching (T2), and straw plus plastic film mulching (T3). Comparing with CK, mulching could keep the soil water content at a higher level, and enhance the water use efficiency. In treatments T1 and T3, the tea growth water use efficiency and yield water use efficiency increased by 43%-48% and 7%-13%, respectively, compared with CK. Also in treatments T1 and T3, the contents of soil organic matter, available-N, nitrate-N, and ammonium-N increased significantly, with the soil fertility improved, and the leaf nitrate-N content and nitrate reductase activity increased, which promoted the tea growth and yield (12%-13% higher than CK) and made the peak period of bud growth appeared earlier. Considering the tea growth and yield, water and nutrient use efficiency, environment safety and economic benefit, straw mulching could be an effective ground surface mulching mode for young tea garden.

  1. [Occurrence form and ecological effect of selenium in soil and surface water of Kailuan Coalfield of Tangshan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiu-Zhi; Ma, Zhong-She; Wang, Yin-Nan; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Wei-Ming

    2012-10-01

    Mining induced generally adverse effect to the environmental ecosystems. This paper studied the beneficial element Se produced in the process of coal mining and burning. The occurrence form of Se in soil and surface water influx into the mine water and the enrichment of Se by crops such as wheat, maize and rice were analyzed. The results indicated that organic and residual forms are the dominant forms of Se in soil, with the soluble form accounting for only 1%. Se4+ and Se6+ accounted for 23.89% and 32.99% in total soluble Se in soil, respectively. In the surface water influx into the mine water, the percentages were 37.78% and 40.24%, respectively. The mean contents of Se in wheat, maize and rice were 0.169 mg x kg(-1), 0.094 mg x kg(-1) and 0.26 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Rice was irrigated using the mine water, which did not only solve the problem of waste water, but also produced Se-enriched rice, moreover, the contents of deleterious elements were not high. Therefore, making full use of the Se-enriched resource in the mining area would weaken the adverse effect of mining.

  2. Direct and indirect effects of atmospheric conditions and soil moisture on surface energy partitioning revealed by a prolonged drought at a temperate forest site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Meyers, T. P. [NOAA ATDD; Pallardy, Stephen G. [University of Missouri; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Yang, Bai [ORNL; Heuer, Mark [ATDD, NOAA; Hosman, K. P. [University of Missouri; Riggs, Jeffery S [ORNL; Sluss, Daniel Wayne [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the mechanism that controls the variation of surface energy partitioning between latent and sensible heat fluxes at a temperate deciduous forest site in central Missouri, USA. Taking advantage of multiple micrometeorological and ecophysiological measurements and a prolonged drought in the middle of the 2005 growing season at this site, we studied how soil moisture, atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and net radiation affected surface energy partitioning. We stratified these factors to minimize potential confounding effects of correlation among them. We found that all three factors had direct effects on surface energy partitioning, but more important, all three factors also had crucial indirect effects. The direct effect of soil moisture was characterized by a rapid decrease in Bowen ratio with increasing soil moisture when the soil was dry and by insensitivity of Bowen ratio to variations in soil moisture when the soil was wet. However, the rate of decrease in Bowen ratio when the soil was dry and the level of soil moisture above which Bowen ratio became insensitive to changes in soil moisture depended on atmospheric conditions. The direct effect of increased net radiation was to increase Bowen ratio. The direct effect of VPD was very nonlinear: Increased VPD decreased Bowen ratio at low VPD but increased Bowen ratio at high VPD. The indirect effects were much more complicated. Reduced soil moisture weakened the influence of VPD but enhanced the influence of net adiation on surface energy partitioning. Soil moisture also controlled how net radiation influenced the relationship between surface energy partitioning and VPD and how VPD affected the relationship between surface energy partitioning and net radiation. Furthermore, both increased VPD and increased net radiation enhanced the sensitivity of Bowen ratio to changes in soil moisture and the effect of drought on surface energy partitioning. The direct and indirect

  3. The microbiology of arable soil surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffery, Simon

    2007-01-01

    Whilst much is known about the physics and erosion of soil surfaces on a millimetre scale, little is known about the associated microbiology, particularly in temperate arable systems. The vast majority of research regarding microbial interactions at soil surfaces has concerned microbiotic crusts. However, such surface crusts take many years to form and then only in relatively undisturbed soil systems. Arable soil surfaces are subject to relatively extreme environmental conditio...

  4. Effects of surface application of calcium-magnesium silicate and gypsum on soil fertility and sugarcane yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lime application recommendations for amendment of soil acidity in sugarcane were developed with a burnt cane harvesting system in mind. Sugarcane is now harvested in most areas without burning, and lime application for amendment of soil acidity in this system in which the sugarcane crop residue remains on the ground has been carried out without a scientific basis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in soil acidity and stalk and sugar yield with different rates of surface application of calcium, magnesium silicate, and gypsum in ratoon cane. The experiment was performed after the 3rd harvest of the variety SP 81-3250 in a commercial green sugarcane plantation of the São Luiz Sugar Mill (47º 25' 33" W; 21º 59' 46" S, located in Pirassununga, São Paulo, in southeast Brazil. A factorial arrangement of four Ca-Mg silicate rates (0, 850, 1700, and 3400 kg ha-1 and two gypsum rates (0 and 1700 kg ha-1 was used in the experiment. After 12 months, the experiment was harvested and technological measurements of stalk and sugar yield were made. After harvest, soil samples were taken at the depths of 0.00-0.05, 0.05-0.10, 0.10-0.20, 0.20-0.40, and 0.40-0.60 m in all plots, and the following determinations were made: soil pH in CaCl2, organic matter, P, S, K, Ca, Mg, H+Al, Al, Si, and base saturation. The results show that the application of gypsum reduced the exchangeable Al3+ content and Al saturation below 0.05 m, and increased the Ca2+ concentration in the whole profile, the Mg2+ content below 0.10 m, K+ below 0.4 m, and base saturation below 0.20 m. This contributed to the effect of surface application of silicate on amendment of soil acidity reaching deeper layers. From the results of this study, it may be concluded that the silicate rate recommended may be too low, since the greater rates used in this experiment showed greater reduction in soil acidity, higher levels of nutrients at greater depths and an increase in stalk and sugar

  5. Observed and simulated effect of plant physiology and structure on land surface energy fluxes and soil conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yen-Sen; Rihani, Jehan; Langensiepen, Matthias; Simmer, Clemens

    2016-04-01

    The parameterization of stomatal conductance and leaf area index (LAI) in land surface models largely influence simulated terrestrial system states. While stomatal conductance mainly controls transpiration, latent heat flux, and root-water-uptake, LAI impacts additionally the radiative energy exchange. Thus both affect canopy evaporation and transpiration and land surface energy and water fluxes as a whole. Common parameterizations of stomatal conductance follow either semi-mechanistic forms based on photosynthesis (Ball-Berry Type (BB)) or forms which consider environmental factors such as impact of light, temperature, humidity and soil moisture (Jarvis-Stewart Type (JS)). Both approaches differ also in the interpretation of humidity effects and light-use efficiency. While soil moisture plays an important role for root-water-uptake there is no clear conclusion yet about how soil moisture interacts with stomata activity. Values for LAI can be obtained from field measurements, satellite estimates or modelling and are used as an essential model input. While field measurements are very time consuming and only represent single points, satellite estimates may have biases caused by variable albedo and sensor limitations. Representing LAI within land surface models requires complex schemes in order to represent all processes contributing to plant growth. We use the Terrestrial System Modelling Platform (TerrSysMP) over the Rur watershed in Germany for studying the influence of plant physiology and structure on the state of the terrestrial system. The Transregional Collaborative Research Center 32 (TR32) extensively monitors this catchment for almost a decade. The land surface (CLM3.5) and the subsurface (ParFlow) modules of TerrSysMP are conditioned based on satellite-retrieved land cover and the soil map from FAO and forced with a high-resolution reanalysis by DWD. For studying the effect of plant physiology, the Ball-Berry-Leuning, and Jarvis-Stewart stomatal

  6. Relationship between Mineral Soil Surface Area and the Biological Degradation of Biosolids Added to Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqi Wen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical and biological processes that operate in the soil matrix and on the soil surface are important to the degradation of biosolids in soil. Due to the large surface area of soils it is assumed that the microbial ecology is associated with mineral soil surface area. The total mineral surface areas were determined for soils from eight different fields selected from a long term study (1972–2006 of annual biosolids application to 41 fields in central Illinois varying in size from 3.6 to 66 ha. The surface areas for the soils varied from 1 to 9 m2/g of soil. The biological degradation rates for the eight soils were determined using a biological degradation rate model (DRM and varied from 0.02 to 0.20/year−1. Regression analysis revealed that the degradation rate was positively associated with mineral soil surface area (1 m2/g produces 0.018 year−1 increase in the degradation rate. The annual soil sequestration rate was calculated to increase from 1% to 6% when the soil total surface area increased from 1 to 9 m2/g of soil. Therefore, land application of biosolids is an effective way to enhance carbon sequestration in soils and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  7. Effect of land-use changes and site variables on surface soil organic carbon pool at Mediterranean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-hashim, Mohamed; Elsayed, Mohamed; Belal, Abd-ElAziz

    2016-02-01

    Soil organic carbon pool (SOCP) is affected by several factors particularly soil type, climate, topography, crop management, and anthropogenic factors. The study was carried out to clarify relationships between SOCP under different soil types and land-use changes in the Mediterranean region. Data of 26 pedons were investigated in Tanta catchment, middle Nile Delta, Egypt (30°45 N, 30°55 E), that the collected soil samples covered different soil types and land-uses. There were significant differences of SOCP among soils: loam and clay loams were rather similar. Clay soils were the most extensive and have mean SOCP of 4.08 ± 1.41 kg C m-2. The highest SOCP of 7.07 kg C m-2 was in clay loam soil associated with bare soil, while the lowest of 2.57 kg C m-2 in sandy clay loam soil associated with bare soil. Losing cropland showed highest increase from 1990 to 2015 with increasing urban encroachment by 15.3%. The overall average results of SOCP in cropland area showed 53.85 Mg C ha-1 under different soils. Losing the arable lands to urbanization resulted in a decrease of 285.421 Gg C of SOCP. With the decrease in SOCP sequestrated within the soil surface, carbon dioxide would be emitted to the atmosphere. The emitted CO2 resulted from losing the cropland equal to 1047.5 Gg CO2. Land-use changes have marked impact on surface SOCP and C sequestration.

  8. An investigation of the effects of spatial heterogeneity of initial soil moisture content on surface runoff simulation at a small watershed scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, Renato; Saltalippi, Carla; Flammini, Alessia; Corradini, Corrado; Brocca, Luca; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2016-08-01

    In addition to the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, the initial soil moisture content, θi, is the quantity commonly incorporated in rainfall infiltration models for simulation of surface runoff hydrographs. Previous studies on the effect of the spatial heterogeneity of initial soil water content in the generation of surface runoff were generally not conclusive, and provided no guidance on designing networks for soil moisture measurements. In this study, the role of the spatial variability of θi at the small watershed scale is examined through the use of a simulation model and measurements of θi. The model combines two existing components of infiltration and surface runoff to model the flow discharge at the watershed outlet. The observed values of soil moisture in three experimental plots are combined to determine seven different distributions of θi, each used to compute the hydrographs produced by four different rainfall patterns for two initial conditions classified as "dry" soil and "wet" soil. For rainfalls events typically associated with floods, the spatial variability of θi at the watershed scale does not cause significant variations in surface runoff for initially dry or wet soils. Furthermore, when the main objective is to represent flood events a single ground point measurement of θi in each area with the same land use may suffice to obtain adequate outflow hydrographs at the outlet.

  9. Effects of maquis clearing on the properties of the soil and on the near-surface hydrological processes in a semi-arid Mediterranean environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Pirastru

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many hillslopes covered with maquis in the semi-arid Mediterranean environment have been cleared in recent decades. There is little information on what effect this has on the hydrology of the soil. We compared the hydraulic properties of the soil and the subsurface hydrological dynamics on two adjacent sites on a hillslope. One site was covered with maquis, the other with grass. The grass started to grow some 10 years ago, after the maquis had been cleared and the soil had been ploughed. Our study found that the hydraulic properties and the hydrological dynamics of the maquis and the grassed soil differed greatly. The grassed soil had less organic matter and higher apparent density than did the soil covered in maquis. Moreover, the maquis soil retained more water than the grassed soil in the tension range from saturation to 50 cm of water. Infiltration tests performed in summer and in winter indicated that the field saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs of the maquis soil was higher than that of the grassy soil. However the data showed that the Kfs of the two soils changed with the season. In the maquis soil the Kfs increased from summer to winter. This was assumed to be due to water flowing more efficiently through wet soil. By contrast, in the grassy soil the Kfs decreased from summer to winter. This was because the desiccation cracks closed in the wet soil. As result, the influence of the land use change was clear from the Kfs measurements in winter, but less so from those in the summer. Changes in land use altered the dynamics of the infiltration, subsurface drainage and soil water storage of the soil. The maquis soil profile never saturated completely, and only short-lived, event based perched water tables were observed. By contrast, soil saturation and a shallow water table were observed in the grass covered site throughout the wet season. The differences were assumed to be due to the high canopy interception of the maquis cover, and to

  10. Surface Chemical Properties of Colloids in Main Soils of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAYI-JIE; YUANCHAO-LIANG

    1991-01-01

    Surface chemical properties of soil colloids are the important factor affecting soil fertility and genesis.To provide scientific basis for soil genetic classification,promotion of soil fertility and reasonable fertilizqation,the specific surface area and electric charge of soil colloids in relation to clay minerals and organic matter are further discussed on the basis of the results obtained from the studies on surface chemical properties of soil colloids in five main soils of China.Results from the studies show that the effect of clay minerals and organic matter on the surface chemical properties of soil colloids is very complicated because the siloxane surface,hydrated oxide surface and organic matter surface do not exist separately,but they are always mixed together and influenced each other.The understanding of the relationship among clay minerals,organic matter and surface chemical properties of soil colloids depends upon further study of the relevant disciplines of soil science,especially the study on the mechanisms of organo-mineral complexes.

  11. [Effect of Fe2O3 on photodegradation of gamma-666 in surface soils with low amount of organic substance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Junfeng; Quan, Xie; Chen, Jingwen; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Xue, Daming; Yang, Fenglin

    2002-03-01

    The photodegradation of gamma-666 on surface soils with low amount of organic substance was studied. The results showed that photodegradation rate of gamma-666 was fitted for pseudo one-order kinetics. The constants of photodegradation rates increased from 0.0052 h-1 to 0.0340 h-1 with the increase of Fe2O3 contents between 0.40% and 5.40% in soils. These results showed that Fe2O3 in soils with low amount of organic substance had remarkable catalysis on photodegradation of gamma-666.

  12. Effects of near surface soil moisture profiles during evaporation on far-field ground-penetrating radar data: A numerical study

    KAUST Repository

    Moghadas, Davood

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigated the effect of vapor flow on the drying front that develops in soils when water evaporates from the soil surface and on GPR data. The results suggest the integration of the full-wave GPR model with a coupled water, vapor, and heat flow model to accurately estimate the soil hydraulic properties. We investigated the Effects of a drying front that emerges below an evaporating soil surface on the far-field ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. First, we performed an analysis of the width of the drying front in soils with 12 different textures by using an analytical model. Then, we numerically simulated vertical soil moisture profiles that develop during evaporation for the soil textures. We performed the simulations using a Richards flow model that considers only liquid water flow and a model that considers coupled water, vapor, and heat flows. The GPR signals were then generated from the simulated soil water content profiles taking into account the frequency dependency of apparent electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity. The analytical approach indicated that the width of the drying front at the end of Stage I of the evaporation was larger in silty soils than in other soil textures and smaller in sandy soils. We also demonstrated that the analytical estimate of the width of the drying front can be considered as a proxy for the impact that a drying front could have on far-field GPR data. The numerical simulations led to the conclusion that vapor transport in soil resulted in S-shaped soil moisture profiles, which clearly influenced the GPR data. As a result, vapor flow needs to be considered when GPR data are interpreted in a coupled inversion approach. Moreover, the impact of vapor flow on the GPR data was larger for silty than for sandy soils. These Effects on the GPR data provide promising perspectives regarding the use of radars for evaporation monitoring. © Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI

  13. The effect of leaf litter cover on surface runoff and soil erosion in Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Niu, Jianzhi; Xie, Baoyuan

    2014-01-01

    The role of leaf litter in hydrological processes and soil erosion of forest ecosystems is poorly understood. A field experiment was conducted under simulated rainfall in runoff plots with a slope of 10%. Two common types of litter in North China (from Quercus variabilis, representing broadleaf litter, and Pinus tabulaeformis, representing needle leaf litter), four amounts of litter, and five rainfall intensities were tested. Results revealed that the litter reduced runoff and delayed the beginning of runoff, but significantly reduced soil loss (psoil plot, and for Q. variabilis and P. tabulaeformis, respectively, and average sediment yield was 85.1% and 79.9% lower. Rainfall intensity significantly affected runoff (R = 0.99, psoil erosion control, since no significant differences (p≤0.05) were observed in runoff and sediment variables between two litter-covered plots. In contrast, litter mass was probably not a main factor in determining runoff and sediment because a significant correlation was found only with sediment in Q. variabilis litter plot. Finally, runoff yield was significantly correlated (perosion processes was crucial, and both rainfall intensity and litter characteristics had an impact on these processes.

  14. The Effect of Compost and the Ripe Fruit Waste of Fig on some Physical Properties of Surface Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zahra dianat maharluei

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In arid and semi-arid soils, low organic matter is one of the barriers to achieving optimal performance. The soils with more organic matter have a better structure and are more resistant to erosive factors such as water and wind. Soil organic matter has a particular importance and has significant impact on the stability of soil aggregates, the extension of plant root system, carbon and water cycles and soil resistance to erosion. This substance acts as a cementing agent and plays an important role in soil flocculation and formation of resistant aggregates.Also, the addition of organic matter to the soil increases soil porosity and decreases soil bulk density. Materials and Methods: In this research, the effect of the two types of organic matter (compost and the ripe fruit waste of fig on some soil physical properties was studied. A factorial experiment based on completely randomized design, including the four levels of compost and the ripe fruit waste of fig (0, 1, 2 and 4 by weight % and three soil types (loamy sand, loam and silty clay loam with three replications was carried out. The soil samples were collected from the three territories of Fars Province: loamy sand soil from Shiraz, loamy soil from Maharlu and Silty clay loam soil from Zarghan area. The soil samples were air dried and passed through a 2 mm sieve. The physical properties including the bulk density, particle density, porosity, moisture content and soil crust strength was measured. In this research, the soil texture by hydrometer method, Electrical conductivity of the soil saturated paste extract by electrical conductivity meter, saturated paste pH by pH meter, seedling emergence test, soil crust strength by a pocket penetrometer (HUMBOLDT MFG.CO. bulk density by cylindrical sample and particle density by pycnometer method were measured. The fig fruit treatments were prepared by thoroughly mixing the dried powder of ripe fig fruit passed through a 2 mm sieve (with

  15. Surface Reactivity in Tropical Highly Weathered Soils and Implications for Rational Soil Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. MOREAU; J. PETARD

    2004-01-01

    Highly weathered soils are distributed in the humid and wet-dry tropics, as well as in the humid subtropics. As a result of strong weathering, these soils are characterized by low activity clays, which develop variable surface charge and related specific properties. Surface reactions regarding base exchange and soil acidification, heavy metal sorption and mobility, and phosphorus sorption and availability of the tropical highly weathered soils are reviewed in this paper.Factors controlling surface reactivity towards cations and anions, including ion exchange and specific adsorption processes, are discussed with consideration on practical implications for rational management of these soils. Organic matter content and pH value are major basic factors that should be controlled through appropriate agricultural practices, in order to optimise favorable effects of colloid surface properties on soil fertility and environmental quality.

  16. ubaegesi@yahoo.co.uk Effects of oil spillage on Soil and Surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL HORSFALL

    (Cd) lead (Pb), Zinc (Zn), chromium (Cr), Iron (Fe), phosphorus, (Pox) and sulphate (S04). The results of .... further atmospheric getting into this surface water .... Copper 36.0. 190. Mercury 0.3. 10. Lead. 85.0. 530. Nickel. 35.0. 210. Zinc. 140.0.

  17. Mining soil phosphorus by zero P-application: an effective method to reduce the risk of P loading to surface water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salm, van der C.; Chardon, W.J.; Koopmans, G.F.

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to find field evidence for the effectiveness of P-mining to reduce the risk of P leaching to surface water. In 2002, a P-mining was conducted on four grassland sites in the Netherlands on sand (two sites), peat and clay soils. The mining plots received no P and an annual N surplus of

  18. Effectiveness of submerged drains in reducing subsidence of peat soils in agricultural use, and their effects on water management and nutrient loading of surface water: modelling of a case study in the western peat soil area of The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Rob F. A.; van den Akker, Jan J. A.

    2017-04-01

    Effectiveness of submerged drains in reducing subsidence of peat soils in agricultural use, and their effects on water management and nutrient loading of surface water: modelling of a case study in the western peat soil area of The Netherlands In the Netherlands, about 8% of the area is covered by peat soils. Most of these soils are in use for dairy farming and, consequently, are drained. Drainage causes decomposition of peat by oxidation and accordingly leads to surface subsidence and greenhouse gas emission. Submerged drains that enhance submerged infiltration of water from ditches during the dry and warm summer half year were, and are still, studied in The Netherlands as a promising tool for reducing peat decomposition by raising groundwater levels. For this purpose, several pilot field studies in the Western part of the Dutch peat area were conducted. Besides the effectiveness of submerged drains in reducing peat decomposition and subsidence by raising groundwater tables, some other relevant or expected effects of these drains were studied. Most important of these are water management and loading of surface water with nutrients nitrogen, phosphorus and sulphate. Because most of these parameters are not easy to assess and all of them are strongly depending on the meteorological conditions during the field studies some of these studies were modelled. The SWAP model was used for evaluating the hydrological results on groundwater table and water discharge and recharge. Effects of submerged drains were assessed by comparing the results of fields with and without drains. An empirical relation between deepest groundwater table and subsidence was used to convert effects on groundwater table to effects on subsidence. With the SWAP-ANIMO model nutrient loading of surface water was modelled on the basis of field results on nutrient concentrations . Calibrated models were used to assess effects in the present situation, as thirty-year averages, under extreme weather

  19. Soil Surface Structure: A key factor for the degree of soil water repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, S.; Doerr, S. H.; Douglas, P.; Bryant, R.; Hamlett, C.; McHale, G.; Newton, M.; Shirtcliffe, N.

    2012-04-01

    Despite of considerable efforts, the degree of water repellency has not always been fully explained by chemical property of soil (termed hydrophobicity). That might be because the structure of a soil surface was not considered properly, which is another main factor determining the severity of soil water repellency. Surface structure has only recently been considered in soil science, whilst it has been paid attention for several decades in materials science due to its relevance to industrial applications. In this contribution, comparison of critical contact angles measured on different surface structures (made with glass beads, glass shards and beach sands) is presented and the effect of surface structure on manifestation of soil water repellency is discussed in terms of several different variables such as the individual particles shape, and areal and structural factors of the actual surface.

  20. Reflectance anisotropy for characterising fine-scale changes in soil surface condition across different soil types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Holly; Anderson, Karen; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2010-05-01

    Soils can experience rapid structural degradation in response to land cover changes, resulting in a reduction in soil productivity, an increased susceptibility to erosion and increased release of greenhouse gases. Soil surface roughness at the centimetre scale plays a fundamental role in affecting soil erosion and surface runoff pathways. A decline in surface roughness can also be used to infer soil degradation as soil aggregates are broken down through raindrop impact. However, due to the time and resources involved in using traditional field sampling techniques, there is a lack of spatially-distributed information on soil surface condition. Remotely sensed data can provide a cost-effective means of monitoring changes in soil surface condition over broad spatial extents. Furthermore, a growing recognition into the importance of the directional reflectance domain has led to an increasing number of satellites with multiple view angle (MVA) capabilities (e.g. MISR, CHRIS on Proba). This is potentially useful for monitoring soil degradation and susceptibility to erosion because changes in soil surface roughness, associated with the breakdown of macro-aggregates, have a measurable effect on directional reflectance factors. Consequently, field and laboratory data are required for an empirical understanding of soil directional reflectance characteristics, underpinning subsequent model development. This study assessed the extent to which a hyperspectral MVA approach (350-2500 nm) could detect fine-scale changes in soil crusting states across five different soil types. A series of soil crusting states were produced for all five soil types, using an artificial rainfall simulator. The controlled conditions allowed the production of a series of stages in the soil crusting process; showing progressively declining surface roughness values. Each soil state was then spatially characterised, using a laboratory laser device at 2 mm sample spacing, over a 10 x 10 cm area. Laser data

  1. Visually assessing the level of development and soil surface stability of cyanobacterially dominated biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.; Witwicki, D.L.; Miller, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are an integral part of dryland ecosystems and often included in long-term ecological monitoring programs. Estimating moss and lichen cover is fairly easy and non-destructive, but documenting cyanobacterial level of development (LOD) is more difficult. It requires sample collection for laboratory analysis, which causes soil surface disturbance. Assessing soil surface stability also requires surface disturbance. Here we present a visual technique to assess cyanobacterial LOD and soil surface stability. We define six development levels of cyanobacterially dominated soils based on soil surface darkness. We sampled chlorophyll a concentrations (the most common way of assessing cyanobacterial biomass), exopolysaccharide concentrations, and soil surface aggregate stability from representative areas of each LOD class. We found that, in the laboratory and field, LOD classes were effective at predicting chlorophyll a soil concentrations (R2=68-81%), exopolysaccharide concentrations (R2=71%), and soil aggregate stability (R2=77%). We took representative photos of these classes to construct a field guide. We then tested the ability of field crews to distinguish these classes and found this technique was highly repeatable among observers. We also discuss how to adjust this index for the different types of BSCs found in various dryland regions.

  2. HONO fluxes from soil surfaces: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dianming; Sörgel, Matthias; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodriguez-Caballero, Emilio; Cheng, Yafang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) contributes up to 80% of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) radicals and is also linked to health risks through reactions with tobacco smoke forming carcinogens. Field and modeling results suggested a large unknown HONO source in the troposphere during daytime. By measuring near ground HONO mixing ratio, up to 30% of HONO can be released from forest, rural and urban ground as well as snow surfaces. This source has been proposed to heterogeneous reactions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on humic acid surfaces or nitric acid photolysis. Laboratory studies showed that HONO emissions from bulk soil samples can reach 258 ng m-2 s-1 (in term of nitrogen), which corresponding to 1.1 × 1012 molecules cm-2 s-1and ˜ 100 times higher than most of the field studies, as measured by a dynamic chamber system. The potential mechanisms for soil HONO emissions include chemical equilibrium of acid-base reaction and gas-liquid partitioning between soil nitrite and HONO, but the positive correlation of HONO fluxes with pH (largest at neutral and slightly alkaline) points to the dominance of the formation process by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In general soil surface acidity, nitrite concentration and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria mainly regulate the HONO release from soil. A recent study showed that biological soil crusts in drylands can also emit large quantities of HONO and NO, corresponding to ˜20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. Due to large concentrations of microorganisms in biological soil crusts, particularly high HONO and NO emissions were measured after wetting events. Considering large areas of arid and arable lands as well as peatlands, up to 70% of global soils are able to emitting HONO. However, the discrepancy between large soil HONO emissions measured in lab and low contributions of HONO flux from ground surfaces in field as well as the role of microorganisms should be further investigated.

  3. Quantification of tillage, plant cover, and cumulative rainfall effects on soil surface microrelief by statistical, geostatistical and fractal indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Paz-Ferreiro

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Changes in soil surface microrelief with cumulative rainfall under different tillage systems and crop cover conditions were investigated in southern Brazil. Surface cover was none (fallow or the crop succession maize followed by oats. Tillage treatments were: 1 conventional tillage on bare soil (BS, 2 conventional tillage (CT, 3 minimum tillage (MT and 4 no tillage (NT under maize and oats. Measurements were taken with a manual relief meter on small rectangular grids of 0.234 and 0.156 m2, throughout growing season of maize and oats, respectively. Each data set consisted of 200 point height readings, the size of the smallest cells being 3×5 cm during maize and 2×5 cm during oats growth periods. Random Roughness (RR, Limiting Difference (LD, Limiting Slope (LS and two fractal parameters, fractal dimension (D and crossover length (l were estimated from the measured microtopographic data sets. Indices describing the vertical component of soil roughness such as RR, LD and l generally decreased with cumulative rain in the BS treatment, left fallow, and in the CT and MT treatments under maize and oats canopy. However, these indices were not substantially affected by cumulative rain in the NT treatment, whose surface was protected with previous crop residues. Roughness decay from initial values was larger in the BS treatment than in CT and MT treatments. Moreover, roughness decay generally tended to be faster under maize than under oats. The RR and LD indices decreased quadratically, while the l index decreased exponentially in the tilled, BS, CT and MT treatments. Crossover length was sensitive to differences in soil roughness conditions allowing a description of microrelief decay due to rainfall in the tilled treatments, although better correlations between

  4. BIOREMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SURFACE SOILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological remediation of soils contaminated with organic chemicals is an alternative treatment technology that can often meet the goal of achieving a permanent clean-up remedy at hazardous waste sites, as encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) for impl...

  5. Exchange Reaction Between Selenite and Hydroxyl Ion of Variable Charge Soil Surfaces:I.Electrolyte Species and pH Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU SHIWEI; ZHANG GANGYA; ZHANG XIAONIAN

    2003-01-01

    Hydroxyl release of red soil and latosol surfaces was quantitatively measured using a self-made constantpH automated titration instrument, to study the changes of hydroxyl release with different added seleniteamounts and pH levels, and to study the effects of electrolytes on hydroxyl release. Hydroxyl release increasedwith the selenite concentration, with a rapid increase at a low selenite concentration while slowing down ata high concentration. The pH where maximum of hydroxyl release appeared was not constant, shifting toa lower valus with increasing selenite concentration. Hydroxyl release decreased with increasing electrolyteconcentration, and the decrease was very rapid at a low electrolyte concentration but slow at a high electrolyteconcentration. For NaC1O4, NaC1 and Na2SO4, hydroxyl release was in the order of NaClO4 > NaCl >Na2SO4, and the difference was very significant. But for NaCl, KCl and CaCl2, the order of hydroxyl releasewas NaCl > KCl > CaCl2, and the difference was smaller. The amount of hydroxyl release from Xuwenlatosol was greater than that from Jinxian red soil. Hydroxyl release existed in a wider range of pH withXuwen latosol than with Jinxian red soil, due to their difference in soil properties. However, both soils hadsimilar curves of hydroxyl release, indicating the common characteristics of variable charge soils.

  6. Effects of mulching tolerant plant straw on soil surface on growth and cadmium accumulation of Galinsoga parviflora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijin Lin

    Full Text Available Pot and field experiments were conducted to study the effects of mulching with straw of cadmium (Cd tolerant plants (Ranunculus sieboldii, Mazus japonicus, Clinopodium confine and Plantago asiatica on growth and Cd accumulation of Galinsoga parviflora in Cd-contaminated soil. In the pot experiment, mulching with M. japonicus straw increased the root biomass, stem biomass, leaf biomass, shoot biomass, plant height and activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalase of G. parviflora compared with the control, whereas mulching with straws of R. sieboldii, C. confine and P. asiatica decreased these parameters. Straws of the four Cd-tolerant plants increased the Cd content in roots of G. parviflora compared with the control. However, only straws of M. japonicus and P. asiatica increased the Cd content in shoots of G. parviflora, reduced the soil pH, and increased the soil exchangeable Cd concentration. Straw of M. japonicus increased the amount of Cd extraction in stems, leaves and shoots of G. parviflora by 21.11%, 29.43% and 24.22%, respectively, compared with the control, whereas straws of the other three Cd-tolerant plants decreased these parameters. In the field experiment, the M. japonicus straw also increased shoot biomass, Cd content in shoots, and amount of Cd extraction in shoots of G. parviflora compared with the control. Therefore, straw of M. japonicus can be used to improve the Cd extraction ability of G. parviflora from Cd-contaminated soil.

  7. Novel Measurement and Monitoring Approaches for Surface and Near-Surface Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. B.; Sheng, W.; Zhou, R.; Sadeghi, M.; Tuller, M.

    2015-12-01

    The top inch of the earth's soil surface is a very dynamic and important layer where physical and biogeochemical processes take place under extreme diurnal and seasonal moisture and temperature variations. Some of these critical surfaces include biocrusts, desert pavements, agricultural lands, mine tailings, hydrophobic forest soils, all of which can significantly impact environmental conditions at large-scales. Natural hazards associated with surface conditions include dust storms, post-fire erosion and flooding in addition to crop failure. Less obvious, though continually occurring, are microbial-induced gas emissions that are also significantly impacted by surface conditions. With so much at stake, it is surprising that in today's technological world there are few if any sensors designed for monitoring the top few mm or cm of the soil surface. In particular, remotely sensed data is expected to provide near-real time surface conditions of our Earth, but we lack effective tools to measure and calibrate surface soil moisture. We are developing multiple methods for measurement and monitoring of surface and near-surface soil water content which include gravimetric as well as electromagnetic approaches. These novel measurement solutions and their prospects to improve soil surface water content determination will be presented.

  8. Turbulent characteristics of a semiarid atmospheric surface layer from cup anemometers – effects of soil tillage treatment (Northern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yahaya

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the characteristics of turbulent flow over two agricultural plots with various tillage treatments in a fallow, semiarid area (Central Aragon, Spain. The main dynamic characteristics of the Atmospheric Surface Layer (ASL measured over the experimental site (friction velocity, roughness length, etc., and energy budget, have been presented previously (Frangi and Richard, 2000. The current study is based on experimental measurements performed with cup anemometers located in the vicinity of the ground at 5 different levels (from 0.25 to 4 m and sampled at 1 Hz. It reveals that the horizontal wind variance, the Eulerian integral scales, the frequency range of turbulence and the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate are affected by the surface roughness. In the vicinity of the ground surface, the horizontal wind variance logarithmically increases with height, directly in relation to the friction velocity and the roughness length scale. It was found that the time integral scale (and subsequently the length integral scale increased with the surface roughness and decreased with the anemometer height. These variations imply some shifts in the meteorological spectral gap and some variations of the spectral peak length scale. The turbulent energy dissipation rate, affected by the soil roughness, shows a z-less stratification behaviour under stable conditions. In addition to the characterization of the studied ASL, this paper intends to show which turbulence characteristics, and under what conditions, are accessible through the cup anemometer.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (climatology, turbulence, instruments and techniques

  9. Effect of soil property on evaporation from bare soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenming; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying the actual evaporation rate from bare soils remains a challenging task as it not only associates with the atmospheric demand and liquid water saturation on the soil surface, but also the properties of the soils (e.g., porosity, pore size distribution). A physically based analytical model was developed to describe the surface resistance varying with the liquid water saturation near the soil surface. This model considers the soil pore size distribution, hydraulic connection between the main water cluster and capillary water in the soil surface when the soil surface is wet and the thickness of the dry soil layer when the soil surface is dry. The surface resistance model was then integrated to a numerical model based on water balance, heat balance and surface energy balance equations. The integrated model was validated by simulating water and heat transport processes during six soil column drying experiments. The analysis indicates that the when soil surface is wet, the consideration of pore size distribution in the surface resistance model offers better estimation of transient evaporation among different soil types than the estimations given by empirically based surface resistance models. Under fixed atmospheric boundary condition and liquid water saturation, fine sand has greater evaporation rate than coarse sand as stronger capillary force devlivers more water from the main water cluster. When the soil surface becomes dry, the impact of soil property to evaporation becomes trivial as the thickness of the dry soil layer turns to be the key factor to determine the evaporation rate.

  10. Effects of surface applications of biosolids on soil, crops, ground water, and streambed sediment near Deer Trail, Colorado, 1999-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Tracy J.B.; Smith, David B.; Crock, James G.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Metro Wastewater Reclamation District and North Kiowa Bijou Groundwater Management District, studied natural geochemical effects and the effects of biosolids applications to the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District properties near Deer Trail, Colorado, during 1999 through 2003 because of public concern about potential contamination of soil, crops, ground water, and surface water from biosolids applications. Parameters analyzed for each monitoring component included arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc (the nine trace elements regulated by Colorado for biosolids), gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity, and plutonium, as well as other parameters. Concentrations of the nine regulated trace elements in biosolids were relatively uniform and did not exceed applicable regulatory standards. All plutonium concentrations in biosolids were below the minimum detectable level and were near zero. The most soluble elements in biosolids were arsenic, molybdenum, nickel, phosphorus, and selenium. Elevated concentrations of bismuth, mercury, phosphorus, and silver would be the most likely inorganic biosolids signature to indicate that soil or streambed sediment has been affected by biosolids. Molybdenum and tungsten, and to a lesser degree antimony, cadmium, cobalt, copper, mercury, nickel, phosphorus, and selenium, would be the most likely inorganic 'biosolids signature' to indicate ground water or surface water has been affected by biosolids. Soil data indicate that biosolids have had no measurable effect on the concentration of the constituents monitored. Arsenic concentrations in soil of both Arapahoe and Elbert County monitoring sites (like soil from all parts of Colorado) exceed the Colorado soil remediation objectives and soil cleanup standards, which were determined by back-calculating a soil concentration equivalent to a one-in-a-million cumulative cancer risk. Lead concentrations

  11. The Effect of sewage sledge bio-char as mulch and top-soil incorporated on Soil Physical Characteristics and plant growth in a loss soil with high specific surface area in a temperate climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Hamed; Movahedi Naeini, Seyed Alireza; Mirzanejad, Mojan

    2015-04-01

    Incorporation of biochar into agricultural soils has been proposed as a potential best management practice (BMP) to increase crop yield and sequester atmospheric carbon (C). Furthermore, the production of biochar, referred to as pyrolysis, yields biofuel that can offset fossil fuels. Current research involving biochar and soil is field scale experiments. Here, sewage sledge biochar was incorporated into a field-scale soybean (Glycine max) system for analysis of soil mechanical and hydrological properties correlated with crop yield. A randomized complete block design was implemented with two biochar application rates: 0 Mg ha-1 (TC), and 25 Mg ha-1 (MTB25 Mulch and ITB25 Incorporated). All plots were tilled using a tractor and rotovator in order to attain uniform incorporation of biochar. A small adjacent field was managed with no-till practices (NTC) to quantify the effects of tillage. Biochar is an effective soil conditioner, evident by MTB25 soil bulk density 9% and 18.5% less than that of TC and NTC, respectively. Analysis of soil pore size distribution resulted in MTB25 with significantly increased macro-pores (1500 μm) related to water transmission and micro-pores (0.5 μm) related to water retention. Furthermore, plant available water capacity (AWC) of MTB25 significantly increased by 9.6% and 29% over TC and NTC, respectively. Biochar amendment (MTB25) increased saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) by 33% and 78% over TC and NTC, respectively. Soybean above-ground biomass and grain yield of MTB25 resulted in respective 12.3% and 12.5% increases over TC. The results also showed that the ITB25 was less effective than MTB25. Correlation and linear regression analysis revealed significant positive trends with AWC, soil bulk density, total porosity, among other properties. Results suggest biochar is an effective soil amendment for temperate agricultural soils, yet long-term research will provide additional insight into the potential for biochar to improve soil

  12. A multifractal approach to characterize cumulative rainfall and tillage effects on soil surface micro-topography and to predict depression storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vidal Vázquez

    2010-10-01

    discriminate data sets with similar values for the vertical component of roughness. Conversely, both, rough and smooth soil surfaces, with high and low roughness values, respectively, can display similar levels of spectral complexity. Although in most of the studied cases trend removal produces increasing homogeneity in the spatial configuration of height readings, spectral complexity of individual data sets may increase or decrease, when slope or slope plus tillage tool marks are filtered. Increased cumulative rainfall had significant effects on various parameters from the generalized dimension, Dq, and singularity spectrum, f(α. Overall, micro-topography decay by rainfall was reflected on a shift of the singularity spectra, f(α from the left side (q>>0 to the right side (q<<0 and also on a shift of the generalized dimension spectra from the right side (q>>0 to the left side (q<<0. The use of an exponential model of vertical roughness indices, RR, and multifractal parameters accounting for the spatial configuration such as D1 or D5 improved estimation of water stored in surface depressions.

  13. A multifractal approach to characterize cumulative rainfall and tillage effects on soil surface micro-topography and to predict depression storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vidal Vázquez

    2010-03-01

    sets with similar values for the vertical component of roughness. Both, rough and smooth soil surfaces, with high and low roughness values, respectively, can display similar levels of spectral complexity. Although in most of the studied cases trend removal produces increasing homogeneity in the spatial configuration of height readings, spectral complexity of individual data sets may increase or decrease, when slope or slope plus tillage tool marks are filtered. Increased cumulative rainfall had significant effects on various parameters from the generalized dimension, Dq, and singularity spectrum, f(α. Overall, micro-topography decay by rainfall produced was reflected on a shift of the singularity spectra, f(α from the left side (q>>0 to the right side (q<<0 and also on a shift of the generalized dimension spectra from the right side (q>>0 to the left side (q<<0. The use of an exponential model of vertical roughness indices, RR, and multifractal parameters accounting for the spatial configuration such as D1, D5, and D10 improved estimation of water stored in surface depressions.

  14. Effect of Soil Surface Evaporation with Fly Ash as Sandy Soil Amendment%施用粉煤灰对沙土土面蒸发的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成钢; 赵亮; 孙鹏程; 唐泽军

    2011-01-01

    Based on evaporation experiment in natural condition, research were carried out to study the effect of water retention capacity of sandy soil under four fly ash application rate (10%, 20%, 30%, 40%). Results showed that, the usage of fly ash reduced evaporation capability and enhance water reten- tion capacity of sandy soil. The evaporation capability always reduced by the effort of fly ash application throughout the experiment, and showed that less evaporation effect with increasing fly ash application rate. As total evaporation, compared with controlled experiment, the total evaporation of three treatments of 20%, 30%, 40% reduced 8.3%, 13.0%, 27.2% except 10% treatment has similar evaporation.%通过自然条件下蒸发试验,研究了4种粉煤灰施用率对沙土土面蒸发的影响。结果表明,粉煤灰的施用减弱了沙土土面蒸发水平,增强了沙土的保水性能。通过对蒸发过程的日观察,粉煤灰的施用始终表现出减弱沙土蒸发的能力,且呈现出随粉煤灰施用率增多而蒸发能力愈弱的特点。施用率10%处理土壤总蒸发量与对照试验大致相同,施用率20%、30%、40%三种处理总蒸发量分别较对照试验减少8.3%、13.0%、27.2%。

  15. On the use of surface neutron-gamma gauges to estimate soil water content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tominaga, T.T.; Cassaro, F.A.M.; Reichardt, K. E-mail: klaus@cena.usp.br; Bacchi, O.O.S.; Oliveira, J.C.M.; Timm, L.C

    2002-09-01

    Surface neutron-gamma gauges are handy instruments to measure soil water contents and bulk densities of surface layers. Although available for some decades, their optimal use is still not well established. This study is a contribution to improve their use, mainly in relation to calibration, and of the effect of soil dry bulk density on soil water content measurements.

  16. Surface runoff, subsurface drainflow and soil erosion as affected by tillage in a clayey Finnish soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turtola, Eila; Alakukku, Laura; Uusitalo, Risto; Kaseva, Antti

    2007-01-01

    Conservation tillage practices were tested against autumn mouldboard ploughing for differences in physical properties of soil, surface runoff, subsurface drainflow and soil erosion. The study (1991-2001...

  17. Soil moisture sensor calibration for organic soil surface layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bircher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper's objective is to present generic calibration functions for organic surface layers derived for the soil moisture sensors Decagon ECH2O 5TE and Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x, using material from northern regions, mainly from the Finish Meteorological Institute's Arctic Research Center in Sodankylä and the study area of the Danish Center for Hydrology HOBE. For the Decagon 5TE sensor such a function is currently not reported in literature. Data were compared with measurements from underlying mineral soils including laboratory and field measurements. Shrinkage and charring during drying were considered. For both sensors all field and lab data showed consistent trends. For mineral layers with low soil organic matter (SOM content the validity of the manufacturer's calibrations was demonstrated. Deviating sensor outputs in organic and mineral horizons were identified: for the Decagon 5TE apparent relative permittivities at a given moisture content decreased for increased SOM content, which was attributed to an increase of bound water in organic materials with large surface areas compared to the studied mineral soils. ThetaProbe measurements from organic horizons showed stronger non-linearity in the sensor response and signal saturation in the high level data. The derived calibration fit functions between sensor response and volumetric water content hold for samples spanning a wide range of humus types with differing SOM characteristics. This strengthens confidence in their validity under various conditions, rendering them highly suitable for large-scale applications in remote sensing and land surface modeling studies. Agreement between independent Decagon 5TE and ThetaProbe time series from an organic surface layer at the Sodankylä site was significantly improved when the here proposed fit functions were used. Decagon 5TE data also well-reflected precipitation events. Thus, Decagon 5TE network data from organic surface layers at the Sodankyl

  18. Soil moisture sensor calibration for organic soil surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Simone; Andreasen, Mie; Vuollet, Johanna; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Jonard, François; Weihermüller, Lutz; Zakharova, Elena; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Kerr, Yann H.

    2016-04-01

    This paper's objective is to present generic calibration functions for organic surface layers derived for the soil moisture sensors Decagon ECH2O 5TE and Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x, using material from northern regions, mainly from the Finnish Meteorological Institute's Arctic Research Center in Sodankylä and the study area of the Danish Center for Hydrology (HOBE). For the Decagon 5TE sensor such a function is currently not reported in the literature. Data were compared with measurements from underlying mineral soils including laboratory and field measurements. Shrinkage and charring during drying were considered. For both sensors all field and lab data showed consistent trends. For mineral layers with low soil organic matter (SOM) content the validity of the manufacturer's calibrations was demonstrated. Deviating sensor outputs in organic and mineral horizons were identified. For the Decagon 5TE, apparent relative permittivities at a given moisture content decreased for increased SOM content, which was attributed to an increase of bound water in organic materials with large specific surface areas compared to the studied mineral soils. ThetaProbe measurements from organic horizons showed stronger nonlinearity in the sensor response and signal saturation in the high-level data. The derived calibration fit functions between sensor response and volumetric water content hold for samples spanning a wide range of humus types with differing SOM characteristics. This strengthens confidence in their validity under various conditions, rendering them highly suitable for large-scale applications in remote sensing and land surface modeling studies. Agreement between independent Decagon 5TE and ThetaProbe time series from an organic surface layer at the Sodankylä site was significantly improved when the here-proposed fit functions were used. Decagon 5TE data also well-reflected precipitation events. Thus, Decagon 5TE network data from organic surface layers at the Sodankylä and

  19. Shallow Subsurface Soil Moisture Dynamics in the Root-Zone and Bulk Soil of Sparsely Vegetated Land Surfaces as Impacted by Near-Surface Atmospheric State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautz, A.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Tilton, N.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is a fundamental state variable that provides the water necessary for plant growth and evapotranspiration. Soil moisture has been extensively studied in the context of bare surface soils and root zones. Less attention has focused on the effects of sparse vegetation distributions, such as those typical of agricultural cropland and other natural surface environments, on soil moisture dynamics. The current study explores root zone, bulk soil, and near-surface atmosphere interactions in terms of soil moisture under different distributions of sparse vegetation using multi-scale laboratory experimentation and numerical simulation. This research is driven by the need to advance our fundamental understanding of soil moisture dynamics in the context of improving water conservation and next generation heat and mass transfer numerical models. Experimentation is performed in a two-dimensional 7.3 m long intermediate scale soil tank interfaced with a climate-controlled wind tunnel, both of which are outfitted with current sensor technologies for measuring atmospheric and soil variables. The soil tank is packed so that a sparsely vegetated soil is surrounded by bulk bare soil; the two regions are separated by porous membranes to isolate the root zone from the bulk soil. Results show that in the absence of vegetation, evaporation rates vary along the soil tank in response to longitudinal changes in humidity; soil dries fastest upstream where evaporation rates are highest. In the presence of vegetation, soil moisture in the bulk soil closest to a vegetated region decreases more rapidly than the bulk soil farther away. Evapotranspiration rates in this region are also higher than the bulk soil region. This study is the first step towards the development of more generalized models that account for non-uniformly distributed vegetation and land surfaces exhibiting micro-topology.

  20. Plutonium, (137)Cs and uranium isotopes in Mongolian surface soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, K; Kikawada, Y; Igarashi, Y; Fujiwara, H; Jugder, D; Matsumoto, Y; Oi, T; Nomura, M

    2017-01-01

    Plutonium ((238)Pu and (239,240)Pu), (137)Cs and plutonium activity ratios ((238)Pu/(239,240)Pu) as did uranium isotope ratio ((235)U/(238)U) were measured in surface soil samples collected in southeast Mongolia. The (239,240)Pu and (137)Cs concentrations in Mongolian surface soils (surface soils (0.013-0.06) coincided with that of global fallout. The (235)U/(238)U atom ratios in the surface soil show the natural one. There was a good correlation between the (239,240)Pu and (137)Cs concentrations in the surface soils. We introduce the migration depth to have better understanding of migration behaviors of anthropogenic radionuclides in surface soil. We found a difference of the migration behavior between (239,240)Pu and (137)Cs from (137)Cs/(239,240)Pu - (137)Cs plots for the Mongolian and Tsukuba surface soils; plutonium in surface soil is migrated easier than (137)Cs.

  1. Photolysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on soil surfaces under UV irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengbin Xu; Dianbo Dong; Xuelian Meng; Xin Su; Xu Zheng; Yaoyao Li

    2013-01-01

    Photolysis of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on soil surfaces may play an important role in the fate of PAHs in the environment.Photolysis of PAHs on soil surfaces under UV irradiation was investigated.The effects of oxygen,irradiation intensity and soil moisture on the degradation of the three PAHs were observed.The results showed that oxygen,soil moisture and irradiation intensity enhanced the photolysis of the three PAHs on soil surfaces.The degradation of the three PAHs on soil surfaces is related to their absorption spectra and the oxidation-half-wave potential.The photolysis of PAHs on soil surfaces in the presence of oxygen followed pseudo first-order kinetics.The photolysis half-lives ranged from 37.87 days for benzo[a]pyrene to 58.73 days for phenanthrene.The results indicate that photolysis is a successful way to remediate PAHs-contaminated soils.

  2. Surface soil factors and soil characteristics in geo-physical milieu of Kebbi State Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleiman Usman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil erodibility (K factor is the most important tool for estimation the erosion. The aim of this study Soil factors and surface soil characteristics are important components of agricultural environment. They support surface and subsurface soils to perform many functions to agriculture and economic human developments. Understanding these factors would aid to the recognition of the values that our soil and land offered to humanity. It is therefore, aim of this study to visualise and examine the soil factors and surface soil characteristics in Kebbi State Nigeria. An Integrated Surface Soil Approach (ISSA was used in the classification and description of soil environment in the study region. The factors constituted in the ISSA are important components of soil science that theories and practice(s noted to provide ideas on how soil environment functioned. The results indicate that the surface soil environments around Arewa, Argungu, Augie, Birnin Kebbi and Dandi are physically familiar with the following surface soil characteristics: bad-lands, blown-out-lands, cirque-lands, fertile-lands, gullied-lands, miscellaneous and rock-outcrops.The major soil factors observed hat played an important role in surface soil manipulations and soil formation are alluvial, colluvial, fluvial and lacustrine; ant, earthworms and termite; and various forms of surface relief supported by temperature, rainfall, relative humidity and wind. Overall, the surface soil environment of the region was describe according to their physical appearance into fadama clay soils, fadama clay-loam soils, dryland sandy soils, dryland sandy-loam soils, dryland stony soils and organic-mineral soils.

  3. Land management effects on near-surface soil properties of southern U.S. coastal plain kandiudults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Levi; J. Shaw; C. Wood; S. Herman; E. Carter; Y. Feng

    2010-01-01

    A comparative assessment of land management systems and relatively undisturbed ecosystems is useful for evaluating anthropogenic impacts on soil properties (Larson and Pierce, 1994). Such information is useful for the restoration and evaluation of C sequestration potential. Comparison of disturbed with natural ecosystems allows the measurement of soil properties...

  4. The immediate effectiveness of barley straw mulch in reducing soil erodibility and surface runoff generation in Mediterranean vineyards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prosdocimi, Massimo; Jordán, Antonio; Tarolli, Paolo; Keesstra, Saskia; Novara, Agata; Cerdà, Artemi

    2016-01-01

    Soil and water loss in agriculture is a major problem throughout the world, and especially in Mediterranean areas. Non-conservation agricultural practices have further aggravated the situation, especially in vineyards, which are affected by one of the highest rates of soil loss among cultivated l

  5. Actual laser removal of black soiling crust from siliceous sandstone by high pulse repetition rate equipment: effects on surface morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iglesias-Campos, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research project studies the role of pulse repetition rate in laser removal of black soiling crust from siliceous sandstone, and specifically, how laser fluence correlates with high pulse repetition rates in cleaning practice. The aim is to define practical cleaning processes and determine simple techniques for evaluation based on end-users’ perspective (restorers. Spot and surface tests were made using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser system with a wide range of pulse repetition rates (5–200 Hz, systematically analysed and compared by macrophotography, portable microscope, stereomicroscope with 3D visualizing and area roughness measurements, SEM imaging and spectrophotometry. The results allow the conclusion that for operation under high pulse repetition rates the average of total energy applied per spot on a treated surface should be attendant upon fluence values in order to provide a systematic and accurate description of an actual laser cleaning intervention.En este trabajo se estudia el papel de la frecuencia de repetición en la limpieza láser de costras de contaminación sobre una arenisca silícea, y concretamente, como se relaciona fluencia y frecuencias elevadas en una limpieza real. Se pretende definir un procedimiento práctico de limpieza y determinar técnicas sencillas de evaluación desde el punto de vista de los usuarios finales (restauradores. Para el estudio se realizaron diferentes ensayos en spot y en superficie mediante un equipo Q-switched Nd:YAG con un amplio rango de frecuencias (5–200 Hz, que se analizaron y compararon sistemáticamente mediante macrofotografía, microscopio portátil, estereomicroscopio con visualización 3D y mediciones de rugosidad en área, imágenes SEM y espectrofotometría. Los resultados permiten proponer que, al trabajar con altas frecuencias, la media de la energía total depositada por spot en la superficie debería acompañar los valores de fluencia para describir y comprender mejor una

  6. Remote Sensing and Synchronous Land Surface Measurements of Soil Moisture and Soil Temperature in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolev, N. V.; Penev, K. P.; Kirkova, Y. M.; Krustanov, B. S.; Nazarsky, T. G.; Dimitrov, G. K.; Levchev, C. P.; Prodanov, H. I.; Kraleva, L. H.

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents the results of remote sensing and synchronous land surface measurements for estimation of soil (surface and profile) water content and soil temperature for different soil types in Bulgaria. The relationship between radiometric temperature and soil surface water content is shown. The research is illustrated by some results from aircraft and land surface measurements carried out over three test areas near Pleven, Sofia and Plovdiv, respectively, during the period 1988-1990.

  7. Relations between soil surface roughness, tortuosity, tillage treatments, rainfall intensity and soil and water losses from a red yellow latosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Bramorski

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The soil surface roughness increases water retention and infiltration, reduces the runoff volume and speed and influences soil losses by water erosion. Similarly to other parameters, soil roughness is affected by the tillage system and rainfall volume. Based on these assumptions, the main purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of tillage treatments on soil surface roughness (RR and tortuosity (T and to investigate the relationship with soil and water losses in a series of simulated rainfall events. The field study was carried out at the experimental station of EMBRAPA Southeastern Cattle Research Center in São Carlos (Fazenda Canchim, in São Paulo State, Brazil. Experimental plots of 33 m² were treated with two tillage practices in three replications, consisting of: untilled (no-tillage soil (NTS and conventionally tilled (plowing plus double disking soil (CTS. Three successive simulated rain tests were applied in 24 h intervals. The three tests consisted of a first rain of 30 mm/h, a second of 30 mm/h and a third rain of 70 mm/h. Immediately after tilling and each rain simulation test, the surface roughness was measured, using a laser profile meter. The tillage treatments induced significant changes in soil surface roughness and tortuosity, demonstrating the importance of the tillage system for the physical surface conditions, favoring water retention and infiltration in the soil. The increase in surface roughness by the tillage treatments was considerably greater than its reduction by rain action. The surface roughness and tortuosity had more influence on the soil volume lost by surface runoff than in the conventional treatment. Possibly, other variables influenced soil and water losses from the no-tillage treatments, e.g., soil type, declivity, slope length, among others not analyzed in this study.

  8. Photodegradation of pesticides on plant and soil surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2004-01-01

    importance of an emission spectrum of the light source near its surface was clarified. Most photochemical information comes from photolysis in organic solvents or on glass surfaces and/or plant metabolism studies. Epicuticular waxes may be approximated by long-chain hydrocarbons as a very viscous liquid or solid, but the existing form of pesticide molecules in waxes is still obscure. Either coexistence of formulation agents or steric constraint in the rigid medium would cause a change of molecular excitation, deactivation, and photodegradation mechanisms, which should be further investigated to understand the dissipation profiles of a pesticide in or on crops in the field. A thin-layer system with a coat of epicuticular waxes extracted from leaves or isolated cuticles has been utilized as a model, but its application has been very limited. There appear to be gaps in our knowledge about the surface chemistry and photochemistry of pesticides in both rigid media and plant metabolism. Photodegradation studies, for example, by using these models to eliminate contribution from metabolic conversion as much as possible, should be extensively conducted in conjunction with wax chemistry, with the controlling factors being clarified. As with soil surfaces, the effects of atmospheric oxidants should also be investigated. Based on this knowledge, new methods of kinetic analysis or a device simulating the fate of pesticides on these surfaces could be more rationally developed. Concerning soil photolysis, detailed mechanistic analysis of the mobility and fate of pesticides together with volatilization from soil surfaces has been initiated and its spatial distribution with time has been simulated with reasonable precision on a laboratory scale. Although mechanistic analyses have been conducted on penetration of pesticides through cuticular waxes, its combination with photodegradation to simulate the real environment is awaiting further investigation.

  9. Effect of lead speciation on its oral bioaccessibility in surface dust and soil of electronic-wastes recycling sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Takashi; Taniguchi, Masaya; Agusa, Tetsuro; Shiota, Kenji; Takaoka, Masaki; Yoshida, Aya; Terazono, Atsushi; Ballesteros, Florencio C; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2018-01-05

    We measured bioaccessible lead (Pb) in simulated gastrointestinal fluids containing Pb-contaminated soil or dust from electronic waste (e-waste) recycling sites to assess the risk of Pb ingestion. The physiologically based extraction test (PBET) was used as in vitro bioaccessibility assay. Pb speciation was determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The total Pb concentrations in dusts (n=8) and soils (n=4) were in the range of 1630-131,000 and 239-7800mg/kg, respectively. Metallic Pb, a common component of e-waste, was ubiquitous in the samples. We also found Pb adsorbed onto goethite and as oxides and carbonate, implying soil mixing and weathering influences. Pb phosphate and organic species were only found in the soil samples, suggesting that formation was soil-specific. We identified other Pb compounds in several samples, including Pb silicate, Pb chromate, and Pb(II) hydrogen phosphate. A correlation analysis indicated that metallic Pb decreased bioaccessibility in the stomach, while a Pb speciation analysis revealed a low bioaccessibility for Pb phosphates and high bioaccessibility for organic Pb species. The health risk based on bioaccessible Pb was estimated to be much lower than that of total Pb due to the lower concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Inverse modeling of soil characteristics from surface soil moisture observations: potential and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Loew

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Land surface models (LSM are widely used as scientific and operational tools to simulate mass and energy fluxes within the soil vegetation atmosphere continuum for numerous applications in meteorology, hydrology or for geobiochemistry studies. A reliable parameterization of these models is important to improve the simulation skills. Soil moisture is a key variable, linking the water and energy fluxes at the land surface. An appropriate parameterisation of soil hydraulic properties is crucial to obtain reliable simulation of soil water content from a LSM scheme. Parameter inversion techniques have been developed for that purpose to infer model parameters from soil moisture measurements at the local scale. On the other hand, remote sensing methods provide a unique opportunity to estimate surface soil moisture content at different spatial scales and with different temporal frequencies and accuracies. The present paper investigates the potential to use surface soil moisture information to infer soil hydraulic characteristics using uncertain observations. Different approaches to retrieve soil characteristics from surface soil moisture observations is evaluated and the impact on the accuracy of the model predictions is quantified. The results indicate that there is in general potential to improve land surface model parameterisations by assimilating surface soil moisture observations. However, a high accuracy in surface soil moisture estimates is required to obtain reliable estimates of soil characteristics.

  11. Impacts of snow and organic soils parameterization on northern Eurasian soil temperature profiles simulated by the ISBA land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decharme, Bertrand; Brun, Eric; Boone, Aaron; Delire, Christine; Le Moigne, Patrick; Morin, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    In this study we analyzed how an improved representation of snowpack processes and soil properties in the multilayer snow and soil schemes of the Interaction Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model impacts the simulation of soil temperature profiles over northern Eurasian regions. For this purpose, we refine ISBA's snow layering algorithm and propose a parameterization of snow albedo and snow compaction/densification adapted from the detailed Crocus snowpack model. We also include a dependency on soil organic carbon content for ISBA's hydraulic and thermal soil properties. First, changes in the snowpack parameterization are evaluated against snow depth, snow water equivalent, surface albedo, and soil temperature at a 10 cm depth observed at the Col de Porte field site in the French Alps. Next, the new model version including all of the changes is used over northern Eurasia to evaluate the model's ability to simulate the snow depth, the soil temperature profile, and the permafrost characteristics. The results confirm that an adequate simulation of snow layering and snow compaction/densification significantly impacts the snowpack characteristics and the soil temperature profile during winter, while the impact of the more accurate snow albedo computation is dominant during the spring. In summer, the accounting for the effect of soil organic carbon on hydraulic and thermal soil properties improves the simulation of the soil temperature profile. Finally, the results confirm that this last process strongly influences the simulation of the permafrost active layer thickness and its spatial distribution.

  12. Effect of cryogel on soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunina, L. K.; Fufaeva, M. S.; Filatov, D. A.; Svarovskaya, L. I.; Rozhdestvenskii, E. A.; Gan-Erdene, T.

    2014-05-01

    Samples from the A1 and A1A2 horizons of sandy loamy gray forest soil containing 3.1% organic matter have been mixed with a 5% solution of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) at a ratio of 7 : 1 under laboratory conditions. The samples were frozen at -20°C in a refrigerator; after a freezing-thawing cycle, the evaporation of water from their surface, their thermal conductivity coefficient, their elasticity modulus, and other properties were studied. It has been experimentally found that the thermal conductivity coefficient of cryostructured soil is lower than that of common soil by 25%. It has been shown that the cryostructured soil retains water for a longer time and that the water evaporation rate from its surface is significantly lower compared to the control soil. Cryogel has no negative effect on the catalase activity of soil; it changes the physical properties of soils and positively affects the population of indigenous soil microflora and the growth of the sown plants.

  13. Gamma-ray computed tomography to characterize soil surface sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, L.F.Luiz F. E-mail: lfpires@cena.usp.br; Macedo, Jose R. de; Souza, Manoel D. de; Bacchi, Osny O.S.; Reichardt, Klaus

    2002-09-01

    The application of sewage sludge as a fertilizer on soils may cause compacted surface layers (surface sealing), which can promote changes on soil physical properties. The objective of this work was to study the use of gamma-ray computed tomography, as a diagnostic tool for the evaluation of this sealing process through the measurement of soil bulk density distribution of the soil surface layer of samples subjected to sewage sludge application. Tomographic images were taken with a first generation tomograph with a resolution of 1 mm. The image analysis opened the possibility to obtain soil bulk density profiles and average soil bulk densities of the surface layer and to detect the presence of soil surface sealing. The sealing crust thickness was estimated to be in the range of 2-4 mm.

  14. Variability of soil moisture and its relationship with surface albedo and soil thermal diffusivity at Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, south Kerala

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Roxy; V B Sumithranand; G Renuka

    2010-08-01

    Continuous observation data collected over the year 2008 at Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram in south Kerala (76° 59′E longitude and 8° 30′N latitude) are used to study the diurnal, monthly and seasonal soil moisture variations. The effect of rainfall on diurnal and seasonal soil moisture is discussed. We have investigated relationships of soil moisture with surface albedo and soil thermal diffusivity. The diurnal variation of surface albedo appears as a U-shaped curve on sunny days. Surface albedo decreases with the increase of solar elevation angle, and it tends to be a constant when solar elevation angle is greater than 40°. So the daily average surface albedo was calculated using the data when solar elevation angle is greater than 40°. The results indicate that the mean daily surface albedo decreases with increases in soil moisture content, showing a typical exponential relation between the surface albedo and the soil moisture. Soil thermal diffusivity increases firstly and then decreases with the increase of soil moisture.

  15. Divergent surface and total soil moisture projections under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Alexis; Sheffield, Justin; Milly, Paul C.D.

    2017-01-01

    Land aridity has been projected to increase with global warming. Such projections are mostly based on off-line aridity and drought metrics applied to climate model outputs but also are supported by climate-model projections of decreased surface soil moisture. Here we comprehensively analyze soil moisture projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5, including surface, total, and layer-by-layer soil moisture. We identify a robust vertical gradient of projected mean soil moisture changes, with more negative changes near the surface. Some regions of the northern middle to high latitudes exhibit negative annual surface changes but positive total changes. We interpret this behavior in the context of seasonal changes in the surface water budget. This vertical pattern implies that the extensive drying predicted by off-line drought metrics, while consistent with the projected decline in surface soil moisture, will tend to overestimate (negatively) changes in total soil water availability.

  16. Reconstruction of ploughed soil surface with 3D fractal interpolation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Lu, Z.; Hoogmoed, W.B.; Li, X.

    2014-01-01

    By using a laser profiler, the roughness of ploughed soil surface was obtained. 3D fractal interpolation method was used to interpolate several kinds of reduced measured surface data which were reduced from the original measured ploughed soil surface elevation data in different reduction rates. Also

  17. Changes in structural stability with soil surface degradation. Consequences for soil erosion processes

    OpenAIRE

    Darboux, Frédéric; Le Bissonnais, Yves

    2006-01-01

    Hydrological Science, section 39 - Soil Science Systems, section 23: Dryland hydrologySRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU06-A-07243; Erosion and sediment transport processes depend on the soil surface properties. Because of water flow and other processes (climate, agricultural practices, biological activity, etc.), the properties of the soil surface can undergo significant changes that affect erosion. As a consequence, understanding of the transport processes and improvement in soil erosion prediction...

  18. Soil Carbon Dioxide Production and Surface Fluxes: Subsurface Physical Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk, D.; Kellman, L.; Beltrami, H.

    Soil respiration is a critical determinant of landscape carbon balance. Variations in soil temperature and moisture patterns are important physical processes controlling soil respiration which need to be better understood. Relationships between soil respi- ration and physical controls are typically addressed using only surface flux data but other methods also exist which permit more rigorous interpretation of soil respira- tion processes. Here we use a combination of subsurface CO_{2} concentrations, surface CO_{2} fluxes and detailed physical monitoring of the subsurface envi- ronment to examine physical controls on soil CO_{2} production at four climate observatories in Eastern Canada. Results indicate that subsurface CO_{2} produc- tion is more strongly correlated to the subsurface thermal environment than the surface CO_{2} flux. Soil moisture was also found to have an important influence on sub- surface CO_{2} production, particularly in relation to the soil moisture - soil profile diffusivity relationship. Non-diffusive profile CO_{2} transport appears to be im- portant at these sites, resulting in a de-coupling of summertime surface fluxes from subsurface processes and violating assumptions that surface CO_{2} emissions are the result solely of diffusion. These results have implications for the study of soil respiration across a broad range of terrestrial environments.

  19. Effects of different mechanized soil fertilization methods on corn soil fertility under continuous cropping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qingwen; Wang, Huixin; Bai, Chunming; Wu, Di; Song, Qiaobo; Gao, Depeng; Dong, Zengqi; Cheng, Xin; Dong, Qiping; Zhang, Yahao; Mu, Jiahui; Chen, Qinghong; Liao, Wenqing; Qu, Tianru; Zhang, Chunling; Zhang, Xinyu; Liu, Yifei; Han, Xiaori

    2017-05-01

    Experiments for mechanized soil fertilization for corns were conducted in Faku demonstration zone. On this basis, we studied effects on corn soil fertility under continuous cropping due to different mechanized soil fertilization methods. Our study would serve as a theoretical basis further for mechanized soil fertilization improvement and soil quality improvement in brown soil area. Based on the survey of soil physical characteristics during different corn growth periods, we collected soil samples from different corn growth periods to determine and make statistical analysis accordingly. Stalk returning to field with deep tillage proved to be the most effective on available nutrient improvement for arable soil in the demonstration zone. Different mechanized soil fertilization methods were remarkably effective on total phosphorus improvement for arable soil in the demonstration zone, while less effective on total nitrogen or total potassium, and not so effective on C/N ratio in soil. Stalk returning with deep tillage was more favorable to improve content of organic matter in soil, when compared with surface application, and organic granular fertilizer more favorable when compared with decomposed cow dung for such a purpose, too.

  20. The use of physicochemical methods to detect organic food soils on stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, K A; Benson, P; Smith, L A; Verran, J

    2009-11-01

    Food processing surfaces fouled with organic material pose problems ranging from aesthetic appearance, equipment malfunction and product contamination. Despite the importance of organic soiling for subsequent product quality, little is known about the interaction between surfaces and organic soil components. A range of complex and defined food soils was applied to 304 stainless steel (SS) surfaces to determine the effect of type and concentration of soil on surface physicochemical parameters, viz surface hydrophobicity (DeltaG(iwi)), surface free energy (gamma(s)), Lifshitz van der Waals (gamma_LW(s)), Lewis acid base (gamma_AB(s)), electron acceptor (gamma_+(s) ) and electron donor (gamma_-(s) ) measurements. When compared to the control surface, changes in gamma_AB(s), gamma_+(s) and gamma_-(s) were indicative of surface soiling. However, soil composition and surface coverage were heterogeneous, resulting in complex data being generated from which trends could not be discerned. These results demonstrate that the retention of food soil produces changes in the physicochemical parameters of the surface that could be used to indicate the hygienic status of a surface.

  1. ANTHROPOGENIC EFFECTS ON SOIL MICROMYCETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragutin A. Đukić

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a synthesis of long-term investigations based on the effect of different (mineral and organic fertilisers, heavy metals, contaminated irrigation water, nitrification inhibitor and detergents on the dynamics of soil fungi number. The investigations were performed at the Microbiology Department and trial fields of the Faculty of Agronomy in Cacak on smonitza and alluvium soils in field and greenhouse conditions. Maize, wheat, barley and red clover were used as test plants in these studies. The quantitative composition of the fungi in the soils investigated was determined by the Czapek selective agar dilution method. The study results show that the number of soil fungi was dependent on the type and rate of agrochemicals used, on the growing season and the soil zone the samples were taken from for the analysis. Lower nitrogen fertiliser rates (80 and 120 kg?ha-1 and organic fertilisers stimulated the development of soil fungi, unlike the rate of 150 kg?ha- 1. Heavy metals, mercury and cadmium in particular, as well as high rates of the N-serve nitrification inhibitor inhibited the development of this group of soil microorganisms. Generally, the adverse effect of contaminated irrigation water on the soil fungi was recorded in both soil types, and particularly in the smonitza under red clover. Low detergent (Meril concentrations did not have any significant effect on this group of microorganisms. In this respect, it can be concluded that the soil fungi number dynamics can be used in monitoring soils polluted by different toxinogenic substances.

  2. Anthropogenic effects on soil micromycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Dragutin A.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a synthesis of long-term investigations based on the effect of different authropogenic pollutants (mineral and organic fertilizers, heavy metals, contaminated irrigation water, nitrification inhibitor and detergents on the dynamics of soil fungi number. The investigations were performed at the Microbiology Department and trial fields of the Faculty of Agronomy in Čačak on smonitza and alluvium soils in field and under greenhouse conditions. Maize, wheat, barley and red clover were used as test plants in these studies. The quantitative composition of the fungi in the soils investigated was determined by the Čapek selective agar dilution method. The study results show that the number of soil fungi was dependent on the type and rate of agrochemicals used, on the growing season, and the soil zone the samples were taken from for the analysis. Lower nitrogen fertiliser rates (80 and 120 kg x ha-1 and organic fertilizers stimulated the development of soil fungi, unlike the rate of 150 kg x ha-1. Heavy metals, mercury and cadmium in particular, as well as high rates of the N-serve nitrification inhibitor, inhibited the development of this group of soil microorganisms. Generally, the adverse effect of contaminated irrigation water on the soil fungi was recorded in both soil types, and particularly in the smonitza under red clover. Low detergent (Meril concentrations did not have any significant effect on this group of microorganisms. In this respect, it can be concluded that the soil fungi number dynamics can be used in monitoring soils polluted by different toxinogenic substances.

  3. The global distribution and dynamics of surface soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Kaighin A.; Alemohammad, Seyed Hamed; Akbar, Ruzbeh; Konings, Alexandra G.; Yueh, Simon; Entekhabi, Dara

    2017-01-01

    Surface soil moisture has a direct impact on food security, human health and ecosystem function. It also plays a key role in the climate system, and the development and persistence of extreme weather events such as droughts, floods and heatwaves. However, sparse and uneven observations have made it difficult to quantify the global distribution and dynamics of surface soil moisture. Here we introduce a metric of soil moisture memory and use a full year of global observations from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive mission to show that surface soil moisture--a storage believed to make up less than 0.001% of the global freshwater budget by volume, and equivalent to an, on average, 8-mm thin layer of water covering all land surfaces--plays a significant role in the water cycle. Specifically, we find that surface soil moisture retains a median 14% of precipitation falling on land after three days. Furthermore, the retained fraction of the surface soil moisture storage after three days is highest over arid regions, and in regions where drainage to groundwater storage is lowest. We conclude that lower groundwater storage in these regions is due not only to lower precipitation, but also to the complex partitioning of the water cycle by the surface soil moisture storage layer at the land surface.

  4. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Klopfer, D.C.

    1990-08-01

    Protective barriers have been identified as integral components of plans to isolate defense waste on the Hanford Site. The use of natural materials to construct protective barriers over waste site is being considered. Design requirements for protective barriers include preventing exposure of buried waste, and restricting penetration or percolation of surface waters through the waste zone. Studies were initiated to evaluate the effects of wind erosion on candidate protective barrier surfaces. A wind tunnel was used to provide controlled erosive stresses and to investigate the erosive effects of wind forces on proposed surface layers for protective barriers. Mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared and tested for resistance to wind erosion at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Aerosol Wind Tunnel Research Facility. These tests were performed to investigate surface deflation caused by suspension of soil from various surface layer configurations and to provide a comparison of the relative resistance of the different surfaces to wind erosion. Planning, testing, and analyzing phases of this wind erosion project were coordinated with other tasks supporting the development of protective barriers. These tasks include climate-change predictions, field studies and modeling efforts. This report provides results of measurements of deflation caused by wind forces over level surfaces. Section 2.0 reviews surface layer characteristics and previous relevant studies on wind erosion, describes effects of erosion, and discusses wind tunnel modeling. Materials and methods of the wind tunnel tests are discussed in Section 3.0. Results and discussion are presented in Section 4.0, and conclusions and recommendations Section 5.0. 53 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Cropping sequence and nitrogen fertilization impact on surface residue, soil carbon sequestration, and crop yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information is needed on the effect of management practices on soil C storage for obtaining C credit. The effects of tillage, cropping sequence, and N fertilization were evaluated on dryland crop and surface residue C and soil organic C (SOC) at the 0-120 cm depth in a Williams loam from 2006 to 201...

  6. Effect of Irrigation Water Quality on Soil Hydraulic Conductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAOZHEN-HUA; B.PRENDERGAST; 等

    1992-01-01

    The effect of irrigation water quality on unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (HC) of undisturbed soil in field was studied.Results show that within the operating soil suction range (0-1.6 KPa) of disc permeameters,the higher the electric conductivity (EC) of irrigation water,the higher the soil HC became.The soil HC doubled when EC increased from 0.1 to 6.0ds m-1.High sodium-adsorption ratio(SAR) of irrigation water would have an unfavorable effect on soil HC.Soil HC decreased with the increasing of SAR,especially in the case of higher soil suction.An interaction existed between the effects of EC and SAR of irrigation water on soil HC.The HC of unsaturated soil dependent upon the macropores in surface soil decreased by one order of magnitude with 1 KPa increase of soil suction.In the study on the effect of very low soluble salt concentration (EC=0.1 ds m-1 of irrigation water on soil HC,soil HC was found to be lowered by 30% as a consequence of blocking up of some continuous pores by the dispersed and migrated clay particles.Nonlinear successive regression analysis and significance test show that the effects of EC and SAR of irrigation water on soil HC reached the extremely significant level.

  7. Effect of mineral surface properties (alumina, kaolinite) on the sorptive fractionation mechanisms of soil fulvic acids: Molecular-scale ESI-MS studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Guillaume; Del Nero, Mirella; Barillon, Rémi

    2017-01-01

    We addressed the effects of mineral surface properties (kaolinite versus Al-oxide) on the sorption-driven fractionation of a soil fulvic acid (FA) at acidic pH, mainly by means of ESI(-)-FTMS analysis of initial and supernatant solutions of FA sorption batch experiments. The MS data provided clear molecular-scale evidence of distinct mechanisms and molecular parameters controlling the FA fractionation upon its sorption on clay and oxide surfaces, respectively. Identification of sorbing and not-sorbing FA compounds in kaolinite-solution systems revealed a weak fractionation among members of sbnd CO2 series of aliphatics or not-condensed aromatics (NCAs) at pH 3.8, and almost no sorption of poorly-oxygenated polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) and NCAs. This first molecular-scale description of a FA fractionation in a clay-solution system suggests that H-bonding with low affinity sites (aluminol/silanol) on the basal planes of the clay particles is the main mechanism of sorption. Due to the predominance of such weak and poorly-selective mechanism, the sorption of aliphatic and NCA molecules bearing oxygenated functionalities was prevented at pH 5, due to dissolved Al competing successfully for their coordination. In contrast, a strong FA fractionation was observed onto alumina, with a preferential retention of PACs and highly-oxygenated aliphatics and NCAs. The major part of the poorly oxygenated aliphatics was left in solution. The sorption degree of NCAs and aliphatics was strongly correlated with molecular acidity. For PACs and poorly-oxygenated NCAs, the sorption was driven by reactions of surface ligand exchange (for the most oxygenated compounds) or by hydrophobic interactions (for the least oxygenated compounds).

  8. Heterogeneity of soil surface temperature induced by xerophytic shrub in a revegetated desert ecosystem, northwestern China

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ya-Feng Zhang; Xin-Ping Wang; Yan-Xia PAN; Rui Hu; Hao Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Variation characteristics of the soil surface temperature induced by shrub canopy greatly affects the nearsurface biological and biochemical processes in desert ecosystems. However, information regarding the effects of shrub upon the heterogeneity of soil surface temperature is scarce. Here we aimed to characterize the effects of shrub (Caragana korshinskii) canopy on the soil surface temperature heterogeneity at areas under shrub canopy and the neighbouring bare ground. Diurnal variations of soil surface temperature were measured at areas adjacent to the shrub base (ASB), beneath the midcanopy (BMC), and in the bare intershrub spaces (BIS) at the eastern, southern, western and northern aspects of shrub, respectively. Results indicated that diurnal mean soil surface temperature under the C. korshinskii canopy (ASB and BMC) was significantly lower than in the BIS, with the highest in the BIS, followed by the BMC and ASB. The diurnal maximum and diurnal variations of soil surface temperatures under canopy vary strongly with different aspects of shrub with the diurnal variation in solar altitude, which could be used as cues to detect safe sites for under-canopy biota. A significant empirical linear relationship was found between soil surface temperature and solar altitude, suggesting an empirical predicator that solar altitude can serve for soil surface temperature. Lower soil surface temperatures under the canopy than in the bare intershrub spaces imply that shrubs canopy play a role of ‘cool islands’ in the daytime in terms of soil surface temperature during hot summer months in the desert ecosystems characterized by a mosaic of sparse vegetation and bare ground.

  9. Long-term effects of soil management on ecosystem services and soil loss estimation in olive grove top soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Lozano-García, Beatriz; Keesstra, Saskia; Cerdà, Artemi; Brevik, Eric C

    2016-11-15

    Soil management has important effects on soil properties, runoff, soil losses and soil quality. Traditional olive grove (OG) management is based on reduced tree density, canopy size shaped by pruning and weed control by ploughing. In addition, over the last several decades, herbicide use has been introduced into conventional OG management. These management strategies cause the soil surface to be almost bare and subsequently high erosion rates take place. To avoid these high erosion rates several soil management strategies can be applied. In this study, three strategies were assessed in OG with conventional tillage in three plots of 1ha each. Soil properties were measured and soil erosion rates were estimated by means of the RUSLE model. One plot was managed with no amendments (control), and the other two were treated with olive leaves mulch and oil mill pomace applied yearly from 2003 until 2013. The control plot experienced the greatest soil loss while the use of olive leaves as mulch and olive mill pomace as an amendment resulted in a soil loss reduction of 89.4% and 65.4% respectively (assuming a 5% slope). In addition, the chemical and physical soil properties were improved with the amendments. This combined effect will created a higher quality soil over the long term that it is more resilient to erosion and can provide better ecosystem services, as its functions are improved.

  10. Assimilation of neural network soil moisture in land surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Nemesio; de Rosnay, Patricia; Albergel, Clement; Aires, Filipe; Prigent, Catherine; Kerr, Yann; Richaume, Philippe; Muñoz-Sabater, Joaquin; Drusch, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    conducted here. Finally, the effect of the soil moisture analysis on the NWP is evaluated comparing experiments for different configurations of the system, with and without (Open Loop) soil moisture data assimilation. ssimilation of ASCAT soil moisture improves the forecast in the tropics and adds information with respect to the near surface conventional observations. In contrast, SMOS degrades the forecast in the Tropics in July-September. In the Southern hemisphere ASCAT degrades the forecast in July-September both alone and using 2m air temperature and relative humidity. On the other hand, experiments using SMOS (even without screen level variables) improve the forecast for all the seasons, in particular, in July-December. In the northern hemisphere both with ASCAT and SMOS, the experiments using 2m air temperature and relative humidity improve the forecast in April-September. SMOS alone has a significant positive effect in July-September for experiments with low observation error. Maps of the forecast skill with respect to the open loop experiment show that SMOS improves the forecast in North America and to a lesser extent in northern Asia for up to 72 hours.

  11. Definition and experimental determination of a soil-water retention surface

    OpenAIRE

    Salager, Simon; El Youssoufi, Moulay Saïd; Saix, Christian

    2010-01-01

    International audience; This paper deals with the definition and determination methods of the soil-water retention surface (SWRS), which is the tool used to present the hydromechanical behaviour of soils to highlight both the effect of suction on the change in water and total volumes and the effect of deformation with respect to the water retention capability. An experimental method is introduced to determine the SWRS and applied to a clayey silty sand. The determination of this surface is ba...

  12. Liquid Spills on Permeable Soil Surfaces: Experimental Confirmations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Carver S.; Keller, Jason M.

    2005-09-29

    Predictive tools for assessing the quantity of a spill on a soil from the observed spreading area could contribute to improving remediation when it is necessary. On a permeable soil, the visible spill area only hints about the amount of liquid that might reside below the surface. An understanding of the physical phenomena involved with spill propagation on a soil surface is key to assessing the liquid amount possibly present beneath the surface. The objective of this study is an improved prediction capability for spill behavior.

  13. Incorporation of water vapor transfer in the JULES land surface model: Implications for key soil variables and land surface fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Gonzalez, Raquel; Verhoef, Anne; Luigi Vidale, Pier; Braud, Isabelle

    2012-05-01

    This study focuses on the mechanisms underlying water and heat transfer in upper soil layers, and their effects on soil physical prognostic variables and the individual components of the energy balance. The skill of the JULES (Joint UK Environment Simulator) land surface model (LSM) to simulate key soil variables, such as soil moisture content and surface temperature, and fluxes such as evaporation, is investigated. The Richards equation for soil water transfer, as used in most LSMs, was updated by incorporating isothermal and thermal water vapor transfer. The model was tested for three sites representative of semiarid and temperate arid climates: the Jornada site (New Mexico, USA), Griffith site (Australia), and Audubon site (Arizona, USA). Water vapor flux was found to contribute significantly to the water and heat transfer in the upper soil layers. This was mainly due to isothermal vapor diffusion; thermal vapor flux also played a role at the Jornada site just after rainfall events. Inclusion of water vapor flux had an effect on the diurnal evolution of evaporation, soil moisture content, and surface temperature. The incorporation of additional processes, such as water vapor flux among others, into LSMs may improve the coupling between the upper soil layers and the atmosphere, which in turn could increase the reliability of weather and climate predictions.

  14. Effect of different soil washing solutions on bioavailability of residual arsenic in soils and soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jinwoo; Yang, Kyung; Jho, Eun Hea; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2015-11-01

    The effect of soil washing used for arsenic (As)-contaminated soil remediation on soil properties and bioavailability of residual As in soil is receiving increasing attention due to increasing interest in conserving soil qualities after remediation. This study investigates the effect of different washing solutions on bioavailability of residual As in soils and soil properties after soil washing. Regardless of washing solutions, the sequential extraction revealed that the residual As concentrations and the amount of readily labile As in soils were reduced after soil washing. However, the bioassay tests showed that the washed soils exhibited ecotoxicological effects - lower seed germination, shoot growth, and enzyme activities - and this could largely be attributed to the acidic pH and/or excessive nutrient contents of the washed soils depending on washing solutions. Overall, this study showed that treated soils having lower levels of contaminants could still exhibit toxic effects due to changes in soil properties, which highly depended on washing solutions. This study also emphasizes that data on the As concentrations, the soil properties, and the ecotoxicological effects are necessary to properly manage the washed soils for reuses. The results of this study can, thus, be utilized to select proper post-treatment techniques for the washed soils. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, R.; De Lannoy, G.; Liu, Q.; Ardizzone, J.; Kimball, J.; Koster, R.

    2017-01-01

    The SMAP Level 4 soil moisture (L4_SM) product provides global estimates of surface and root zone soil moisture, along with other land surface variables and their error estimates. These estimates are obtained through assimilation of SMAP brightness temperature observations into the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) land surface model. The L4_SM product is provided at 9 km spatial and 3-hourly temporal resolution and with about 2.5 day latency. The soil moisture and temperature estimates in the L4_SM product are validated against in situ observations. The L4_SM product meets the required target uncertainty of 0.04 m(exp. 3)m(exp. -3), measured in terms of unbiased root-mean-square-error, for both surface and root zone soil moisture.

  16. Formation and development of salt crusts on soil surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Sheng

    2015-12-14

    The salt concentration gradually increases at the soil free surface when the evaporation rate exceeds the diffusive counter transport. Eventually, salt precipitates and crystals form a porous sodium chloride crust with a porosity of 0.43 ± 0.14. After detaching from soils, the salt crust still experiences water condensation and salt deliquescence at the bottom, brine transport across the crust driven by the humidity gradient, and continued air-side precipitation. This transport mechanism allows salt crust migration away from the soil surface at a rate of 5 μm/h forming salt domes above soil surfaces. The surface characteristics of mineral substrates and the evaporation rate affect the morphology and the crystal size of precipitated salt. In particular, substrate hydrophobicity and low evaporation rate suppress salt spreading.

  17. Carbon mineralization in surface and subsurface soils in a subtropical mixed forest in central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F.; Tian, Q.

    2014-12-01

    About a half of soil carbon is stored in subsurface soil horizons, their dynamics have the potential to significantly affect carbon balancing in terrestrial ecosystems. However, the main factors regulating subsurface soil carbon mineralization are poorly understood. As affected by mountain humid monsoon, the subtropical mountains in central China has an annual precipitation of about 2000 mm, which causes strong leaching of ions and nutrition. The objectives of this study were to monitor subsurface soil carbon mineralization and to determine if it is affected by nutrient limitation. We collected soil samples (up to 1 m deep) at three locations in a small watershed with three soil layers (0-10 cm, 10-30 cm, below 30 cm). For the three layers, soil organic carbon (SOC) ranged from 35.8 to 94.4 mg g-1, total nitrogen ranged from 3.51 to 8.03 mg g-1, microbial biomass carbon (MBC) ranged from 170.6 to 718.4 μg g-1 soil. We measured carbon mineralization with the addition of N (100 μg N/g soil), P (50 μg P/g soil), and liable carbon (glucose labeled by 5 atom% 13C, at five levels: control, 10% MBC, 50% MBC, 100% MBC, 200% MBC). The addition of N and P had negligible effects on CO2 production in surface soil layers; in the deepest soil layer, the addition of N and P decreased CO2 production from 4.32 to 3.20 μg C g-1 soil carbon h-1. Glucose addition stimulated both surface and subsurface microbial mineralization of SOC, causing priming effects. With the increase of glucose addition rate from 10% to 200% MBC, the primed mineralization rate increased from 0.19 to 3.20 μg C g-1 soil carbon h-1 (fifth day of glucose addition). The magnitude of priming effect increased from 28% to 120% as soil layers go deep compare to the basal CO2 production (fifth day of 200% MBC glucose addition, basal CO2 production rate for the surface and the deepest soil was 11.17 and 2.88 μg C g-1 soil carbon h-1). These results suggested that the mineralization of subsurface carbon is more

  18. Stability analysis of slopes of expansive soils considering rainfall effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Fang-cai

    2007-01-01

    Typical failure types of slopes of expansive soils are divided to two kinds: slip in surface layer and slip in shallow layer. Based on total strength law of expansive soils, the relationship between its water content and shear strength inculding cohesion and friction angle, was studied in detail. Acoording to change of water content and depth effect during rainfall, distribution of shear strength in slopes of expansive soils was analyzed. Finally,with a slope of expansive soils in Nanning city of Guangxi Autonomous Region of China as a case, safety factor and slip surface was studied.

  19. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance – Part II: Development of an accelerated aging method for roofing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sleiman, Mohamad [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kirchstetter, Thomas W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Berdahl, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gilbert, Haley E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Quelen, Sarah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Marlot, Lea [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Preble, Chelsea V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Sharon [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Montalbano, Amandine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rosseler, Olivier [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Akbari, Hashem [Concordia Univ., Montreal (Canada); Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Destaillats, Hugo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-09

    Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products₋single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles₋and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. In conclusion, this accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

  20. Dynamic effects of wet-dry cycles and crust formation on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of surface soils in the constructed Hühnerwasser ("Chicken Creek") catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Christoph; Schümberg, Sabine; Kubitz, Anita; Frank, Franzi; Cheng, Zhang; Nanu Frechen, Tobias; Pohle, Ina

    2016-04-01

    Highly disturbed soils and substrates used in land rehabilitation undergo rapid changes after the first wetting events which in turn can lead to ecosystem degradation. Such changes were detected during the early development of the constructed Hühnerwasser ("Chicken Creek") catchment in Lusatia, Germany. Surface substrates consisting of quaternary sandy sediments formed surface seals during the first rainfall events leading to reduced infiltration and substantially increased surface runoff. Subsequently biological soil crusts formed and stabilised the surface. The aim of this study is to investigate the factors that cause the hydraulic conductivity to decrease using undisturbed and disturbed soil samples. Based on the hypothesis that physical and biological crusts lower the hydraulic conductivity, the first set of experiments with undisturbed soil cores from the Hühnerwasser catchment were carried out to measure the saturated hydraulic conductivity using the constant head method. Measurements were done with intact cores and repeated after the surface crust was removed. As the quaternary glacial sediments tend to display hard setting behaviour, we further hypothesised that the mobilisation of fine particles within the cores lead to pore clogging and that wet-dry cycles will therefore decrease hydraulic conductivity. A second set of experiments using the same methodology consisted of five repeated measurements of hydraulic conductivity after each drying cycle. These measurements were done with undisturbed core samples as well as repacked cores in order to assess how dry packing affects the dynamics of the hydraulic conductivity somewhat similar to the situation during the first wetting after completion of the catchment construction. For all experiments, the temporal evolution of hydraulic conductivity was measured and the turbidity of the effluent was recorded. The results clearly demonstrated that the substrate is highly unstable. The first set of experiments

  1. A Monte Carlo reflectance model for soil surfaces with three-dimensional structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K. D.; Smith, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A Monte Carlo soil reflectance model has been developed to study the effect of macroscopic surface irregularities larger than the wavelength of incident flux. The model treats incoherent multiple scattering from Lambertian facets distributed on a periodic surface. Resulting bidirectional reflectance distribution functions are non-Lambertian and compare well with experimental trends reported in the literature. Examples showing the coupling of the Monte Carlo soil model to an adding bidirectional canopy of reflectance model are also given.

  2. Directional reflectance factors for monitoring spatial changes in soil surface structure and soil organic matter erosion in agricultural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, H.; Anderson, K.

    2012-04-01

    Soils can experience rapid structural degradation in response to land cover changes, resulting in reduced soil productivity, increased erodibility and a loss of soil organic matter (SOM). The breakdown of soil aggregates through slaking and raindrop impact is linked to organic matter turnover, with subsequently eroded material often displaying proportionally more SOM. A reduction in aggregate stability is reflected in a decline in soil surface roughness (SSR), indicating that a soil structural change can be used to highlight soil vulnerability to SOM loss through mineralisation or erosion. Accurate, spatially-continuous measurements of SSR are therefore needed at a variety of spatial and temporal scales to understand the spatial nature of SOM erosion and deposition. Remotely-sensed data can provide a cost-effective means of monitoring changes in soil surface condition over broad spatial extents. Previous work has demonstrated the ability of directional reflectance factors to monitor soil crusting within a controlled laboratory experiment, due to changes in the levels of self-shadowing effects by soil aggregates. However, further research is needed to test this approach in situ, where other soil variables may affect measured reflectance factors and to investigate the use of directional reflectance factors for monitoring soil erosion processes. This experiment assesses the potential of using directional reflectance factors to monitor changes in SSR, aggregate stability and soil organic carbon (SOC) content for two agricultural conditions. Five soil plots representing tilled and seedbed soils were subjected to different durations of natural rainfall, producing a range of different levels of SSR. Directional reflectance factors were measured concomitantly with sampling for soil structural and biochemical tests at each soil plot. Soil samples were taken to measure aggregate stability (wet sieving), SOC (loss on ignition) and soil moisture (gravimetric method). SSM

  3. Greywater reuse for irrigation: effect on soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Micheal J; Wiel-Shafran, Alit; Weisbrod, Noam; Adar, Eilon; Gross, Amit

    2010-05-15

    A controlled study of the effect of greywater (GW) irrigation on soil properties was conducted. Containers of sand, loam and loess soils were planted with lettuce, and irrigated with fresh water, raw artificial GW or treated artificial GW. Greywater was treated using a recirculating vertical-flow constructed wetland. Soil samples were collected every 10 days for the 40-day duration of the study, and plant growth was measured. Soils were analysed for physicochemical and biological parameters to determine changes caused by the different treatments. It was demonstrated that raw artificial GW significantly increased the development of hydrophobicity in the sand and loam soils, as determined by water droplet penetration time. No significant changes were observed for the loess soil under all treatments. Observed hydrophobicity was correlated with increased oil and grease and surfactant concentrations in the soil. Zeta (zeta) potential of the soils was measured to determine changes in the soil particle surface properties as a result of GW irrigation. A significant change in zeta-potential (less negative) was observed in the raw artificial GW-irrigated sand, whereas no difference was observed in the loam or loess. Soils irrigated with fresh water or treated GW exhibited no increase in hydrophobicity. Fecal coliform bacteria were absent or <10 CFU g(-1) in soils irrigated with fresh water or treated GW, but at least 1 order of magnitude higher in raw artificial GW irrigated soils. Only in the last sampling event and only for the loess soil was plant growth significantly higher for fresh water irrigated vs. raw or treated GW irrigated soils. This study demonstrates that treated GW can be effectively irrigated without detrimental effects on soil or plant growth; however, raw GW may significantly change soil properties that can impact the movement of water in soil and the transport of contaminants in the vadose zone.

  4. SoilEffects - start characterization of the experimental soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løes, Anne-Kristin; Johansen, Anders; Pommeresche, Reidun

    Summary This report describes the establishment, experimental plan and initial soil characteristics of the field experiment linked to the project “Effects of anaerobically digested manure on soil fertility - establishment of a long-term study under Norwegian conditions” (SoilEffects, 2010......-14). The aim of the SoilEffects project is to identify potential risks and benefits for soil fertility when animal manure is anaerobically digested for biogas production. The field experiment was established on Tingvoll research farm in 2011. A biogas plant was built at this farm in 2010, to digest the manure...... from a herd of about 25 organically managed dairy cows. This report describes the initial characterization of the soil biology, chemistry and physics, along with the background of the project, the selection process of the research field and the project design. Effects of the manure treatment...

  5. Sound absorption at the soil surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, A.R.P.

    1969-01-01

    The properties of a soil structure may be examined in various manners. As well as a study of the stability, a knowledge of the geometry of the volume of air filled pores is often needed. The most common measurements, like those of porosity and flow resistance to gases do not permit a detailed

  6. Predicting root zone soil moisture using surface data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfreda, S.; Brocca, L.; Moramarco, T.; Melone, F.; Sheffield, J.; Fiorentino, M.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, much effort has been given to monitoring of soil moisture from satellite remote sensing. These tools represent an extraordinary source of information for hydrological applications, but they only provide information on near-surface soil moisture. In the present work, we developed a new formulation for the estimation of the soil moisture in the root zone based on the measured value of soil moisture at the surface. The method derives from a simplified form of the soil water balance equation and for this reason all parameters adopted are physically consistent. The formulation provides a closed form of the relationship between the root zone soil moisture and the surface soil moisture with a limited number of parameters, such as: the ratio between the depth of the surface layer and the deeper layer, the water loss coefficient, and the field capacity. The method has been tested using modeled soil moisture obtained from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). The NLDAS is a multi-institution partnership aimed at developing a retrospective data set, using available atmospheric and land surface meteorological observations to compute the land surface hydrological budget. The NLDAS database was extremely useful for the scope of the present research since it provides simulated data over an extended area with different climatic and physical condition and moreover it provides soil moisture data averaged over different depths. In particular, we used values in the top 10 cm and 100 cm layers. One year of simulation was used to test the ability of the developed method to describe soil moisture fluctuation in the 100cm layer over the entire NLDAS domain. The method was adopted by calibrating one of its three parameters and defining the remaining two based on physical characteristics of the site (using the potential evapotranspiration and ratio between the first and the second soil layer depth). In general, the method performed better than

  7. Titratable Acidity and Alkalinity of Red Soil Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAOZONG-CHEN; HEQUN; 等

    1993-01-01

    The surfaces of red soils have an apparent amphoteric character,carrying titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity simultaneously.The titratable acidity arises from deprotonation of hydroxyl groups of hydrous oxide-type surfaces and dissociation of weak-acid functional groups of soil organic matter,while the titratable alkalinity is derived from release of hydroxyl groups of hydrous oxide-type surfaces.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity mainly depended on the composition and content of iron and aluminum oxides in the soils.The results showed that the titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity were in significantly positive correlation not only with the content of amorphous aluminum oxide(Alo) and iron oxide(Feo) extracted with acid ammonium oxalate solution,free iron oxide(Fed) extracted with sodium dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate(DCB) and clays,but also with the zero point of charge (ZPC) of the samples.Organic matter made an important contribution to the titratable acidity.the titratable alkalinity was closely correlated with the amount of fluoride ions adsorbed.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity of red soils were influenced by parent materials,being in the order of red soil derived from basalt> that from tuff> that from granite.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity ware closely related with origination of the variable charges of red soils,and to a certain extent were responsible for variable negative and positive charges of the soils.

  8. Effect of Thickness of a Water Repellent Soil Layer on Soil Evaporation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, S.; Im, S.; Doerr, S.

    2012-04-01

    A water repellent soil layer overlying wettable soil is known to affect soil evaporation. This effect can be beneficial for water conservation in areas where water is scarce. Little is known, however, about the effect of the thickness of the water repellent layer. The thickness of this layer can vary widely, and particularly after wildfire, with the soil temperature reached and the duration of the fire. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of thickness of a top layer of water repellent soil on soil evaporation rate. In order to isolate the thickness from other possible factors, fully wettable standard sand (300~600 microns) was used. Extreme water repellency (WDPT > 24 hours) was generated by 'baking' the sand mixed with oven-dried pine needles (fresh needles of Pinus densiflora) at the mass ratio of 1:13 (needle:soil) at 185°C for 18 hours. The thicknesses of water repellent layers were 1, 2, 3 and 7 cm on top of wettable soil. Fully wettable soil columns were prepared as a control. Soil columns (8 cm diameter, 10 cm height) were covered with nylon mesh. Tap water (50 ml, saturating 3 cm of a soil column) was injected with hypoderm syringes from three different directions at the bottom level. The injection holes were sealed with hot-melt adhesive immediately after injection. The rate of soil evaporation through the soil surface was measured by weight change under isothermal condition of 40°C. Five replications were made for each. A trend of negative correlation between the thickness of water repellent top layer and soil evaporation rate is discussed in this contribution.

  9. Uncertainties of seasonal surface climate predictions induced by soil moisture biases in the La Plata Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensson, Anna; Berbery, E. Hugo

    2015-04-01

    This work examines the evolution of soil moisture initialization biases and their effects on seasonal forecasts depending on the season and vegetation type for a regional model over the La Plata Basin in South America. WRF/Noah model simulations covering multiple cases during a two-year period are designed to emphasize the conceptual nature of the simulations at the expense of statistical significance of the results. Analysis of the surface climate shows that the seasonal predictive skill is higher when the model is initialized during the wet season and the initial soil moisture differences are small. Large soil moisture biases introduce large surface temperature biases, particularly for Savanna, Grassland and Cropland vegetation covers at any time of the year, thus introducing uncertainty in the surface climate. Regions with Evergreen Broadleaf Forest have roots that extend to the deep layer whose moisture content affects the surface temperature through changes in the partitioning of the surface fluxes. The uncertainties of monthly maximum temperature can reach several degrees during the dry season in cases when: (a) the soil is much wetter in the reanalysis than in the WRF/Noah equilibrium soil moisture, and (b) the memory of the initial value is long due to scarce rainfall and low temperatures. This study suggests that responses of the atmosphere to soil moisture initialization depend on how the initial wet and dry conditions are defined, stressing the need to take into account the characteristics of a particular region and season when defining soil moisture initialization experiments.

  10. The effect of intrinsic soil properties on soil quality assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Samuel-Rosa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of soil quality is based on indicators and indices derived from soil properties. However, intrinsic soil properties may interfere with other soil properties that vary under different land uses and are used to calculate the indices. The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which intrinsic soil properties (clay and iron oxide contents explain variable soil properties (sum of bases, potential acidity, organic carbon, total porosity, and bulk density under different land uses (native forest, no-tillage and conventional agriculture on small family farms in Southern Brazil. The results showed that the five properties evaluated can be included in soil quality assessments and are not influenced by the clay and iron oxide contents. It was concluded that for little weathered 1:1 and 2:1 phyllosilicate rich-soils, if the difference between the maximum and the minimum clay content under the different land uses is less than about 200 g kg-1 and the iron oxide content less than about 15 g kg-1, the physico-chemical soil properties in the surface layer are determined mostly by the land use.

  11. Influence of soil moisture content on surface albedo and soil thermal parameters at a tropical station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugathan, Neena; Biju, V.; Renuka, G.

    2014-06-01

    Half hourly data of soil moisture content, soil temperature, solar irradiance, and reflectance are measured during April 2010 to March 2011 at a tropical station, viz., Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India (76°59'E longitude and 8°29'N latitude). The monthly, seasonal and seasonal mean diurnal variation of soil moisture content is analyzed in detail and is correlated with the rainfall measured at the same site during the period of study. The large variability in the soil moisture content is attributed to the rainfall during all the seasons and also to the evaporation/movement of water to deeper layers. The relationship of surface albedo on soil moisture content on different time scales are studied and the influence of solar elevation angle and cloud cover are also investigated. Surface albedo is found to fall exponentially with increase in soil moisture content. Soil thermal diffusivity and soil thermal conductivity are also estimated from the subsoil temperature profile. Log normal dependence of thermal diffusivity and power law dependence of thermal conductivity on soil moisture content are confirmed.

  12. Influence of soil moisture content on surface albedo and soil thermal parameters at a tropical station

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neena Sugathan; V Biju; G Renuka

    2014-07-01

    Half hourly data of soil moisture content, soil temperature, solar irradiance, and reflectance are measured during April 2010 to March 2011 at a tropical station, viz., Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India (76° 59’E longitude and 8°29’N latitude). The monthly, seasonal and seasonal mean diurnal variation of soil moisture content is analyzed in detail and is correlated with the rainfall measured at the same site during the period of study. The large variability in the soil moisture content is attributed to the rainfall during all the seasons and also to the evaporation/movement of water to deeper layers. The relationship of surface albedo on soil moisture content on different time scales are studied and the influence of solar elevation angle and cloud cover are also investigated. Surface albedo is found to fall exponentially with increase in soil moisture content. Soil thermal diffusivity and soil thermal conductivity are also estimated from the subsoil temperature profile. Log normal dependence of thermal diffusivity and power law dependence of thermal conductivity on soil moisture content are confirmed.

  13. Updated global soil map for the Weather Research and Forecasting model and soil moisture initialization for the Noah land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    DY, C. Y.; Fung, J. C. H.

    2016-08-01

    A meteorological model requires accurate initial conditions and boundary conditions to obtain realistic numerical weather predictions. The land surface controls the surface heat and moisture exchanges, which can be determined by the physical properties of the soil and soil state variables, subsequently exerting an effect on the boundary layer meteorology. The initial and boundary conditions of soil moisture are currently obtained via National Centers for Environmental Prediction FNL (Final) Operational Global Analysis data, which are collected operationally in 1° by 1° resolutions every 6 h. Another input to the model is the soil map generated by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations - United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (FAO-UNESCO) soil database, which combines several soil surveys from around the world. Both soil moisture from the FNL analysis data and the default soil map lack accuracy and feature coarse resolutions, particularly for certain areas of China. In this study, we update the global soil map with data from Beijing Normal University in 1 km by 1 km grids and propose an alternative method of soil moisture initialization. Simulations of the Weather Research and Forecasting model show that spinning-up the soil moisture improves near-surface temperature and relative humidity prediction using different types of soil moisture initialization. Explanations of that improvement and improvement of the planetary boundary layer height in performing process analysis are provided.

  14. Turbulent characteristics of a semiarid atmospheric surface layer from cup anemometers A~é effects of soil tillage treatment (Northern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, S.; Frangi, J. P.; Richard, D. C.

    2003-10-01

    This paper deals with the characteristics of turbulent flow over two agricultural plots with various tillage treatments in a fallow, semiarid area (Central Aragon, Spain). The main dynamic characteristics of the Atmospheric Surface Layer (ASL) measured over the experimental site (friction velocity, roughness length, etc.), and energy budget, have been presented previously (Frangi and Richard, 2000). The current study is based on experimental measurements performed with cup anemometers located in the vicinity of the ground at 5 different levels (from 0.25 to 4 m) and sampled at 1 Hz. It reveals that the horizontal wind variance, the Eulerian integral scales, the frequency range of turbulence and the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate are affected by the surface roughness. In the vicinity of the ground surface, the horizontal wind variance logarithmically increases with height, directly in relation to the friction velocity and the roughness length scale. It was found that the time integral scale (and subsequently the length integral scale) increased with the surface roughness and decreased with the anemometer height. These variations imply some shifts in the meteorological spectral gap and some variations of the spectral peak length scale. The turbulent energy dissipation rate, affected by the soil roughness, shows a z-less stratification behaviour under stable conditions. In addition to the characterization of the studied ASL, this paper intends to show which turbulence characteristics, and under what conditions, are accessible through the cup anemometer.

  15. Effects of winter irrigation and soil surface mulching during freezing-thawing period on soil water-heat-salt for cotton fields in south Xinjiang%冻融期灌水和覆盖对南疆棉田水热盐的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚宝林; 李光永; 王峰

    2016-01-01

    Scarce water resources and soil salinity are important limiting factors for agricultural production and environmental melioration in extremely drought area and fragile ecological environment of Tarim Basin in southern Xinjiang. The under-film drip irrigation has gained universal applications as an efficient and economically viable irrigation method for increasing water use efficiency and reducing the adverse effects of cotton growth. But for winter and spring irrigation quotas are relatively high and cause groundwater level to rise, after freezing-thawing in winter, salinization occurs on soil surface and it is harmful to the growth and development of cotton seedlings. Soil surface mulching can effectively reduce soil water loss and soil salt accumulation in winter fallow periods, reduce winter and spring irrigation quota, and achieve the purpose of water saving and salinity controlling. To explore the freezing-thawing characteristics in drip irrigation cotton fields under different soil surface mulching and winter irrigation quotas, field experiments were carried out, which included 3 soil surface mulching methods: bare fields (cotton stubble and plastic film were removed before winter irrigation), high stubble fields (cotton stubble and plastic film remained in fields before winter irrigation), corn straw mulching fields (cotton stubble, plastic film remained in fields and mulched corn residue had the length of about 5-10 cm length and the thickness of 5 cm, 400 kg/hm2), and 2 winter irrigation quotas: winter irrigation 200 mm quota and no winter irrigation.Theexperiment was composed of 6 treatments: winter irrigation with bare land (WIB), winter irrigation with high cotton stubble (WICS), winter irrigation with corn straw mulching (WICM), no winter irrigation with bare land (NWIB), no winter irrigation with high cotton stubble (NWICS), and no winter irrigation with corn straw mulching (NWICM). The soil temperatures in 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 60, 80 and 100 cm

  16. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific.

  17. Restoring the natural state of the soil surface by biocrusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaady, Eli; Ungar, Eugene D.; Stavi, Ilan; Shuker, Shimshon; Knoll, Yaakov M.

    2017-04-01

    In arid and semi-arid areas, with mean annual precipitation of 70-200 mm, the dominant component of the ground cover is biocrusts composed of cyanobacteria, moss and lichens. Biocrusts play a role in stabilizing the soil surface, which reduces erosion by water and wind. Human disturbances, such as heavy vehicular traffic, earthworks, overgrazing and land mining destroy the soil surface and promote erosion. The aim of the study was to evaluate restoration of the soil surface by the return of a biocrust layer. We examined the impact of disturbances on the creation of a stable crust and on the rate of recovery. Biocrust disturbance was studied in two sites in the northern Negev. The nine treatments included different rates of biocrust inoculum application and NPK fertilization. Recovery rates of the biocrusts were monitored for five years using chemical, physical and bio-physiological tests which determined infiltration rate, soil surface resistance to pressure, shear force of the soil surface, levels of chlorophyll, organic matter and polysaccharide, NDVI and aggregate stability. The results show that untreated disturbed biocrusts present long-term damage and a very slow rate of recovery, which may take decades, while most of the treatments showed a faster recovery. In particular, NDVI, polysaccharide levels and aggregate stability showed steady improvements over the research period.

  18. EFFECTS OF SOIL CRUSTING ON SOIL MOISTURE, RUNOFF AND EROSION: FIELD OBSERVATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tongxin ZHU

    2002-01-01

    Soil crusting may have significant impacts on infiltration, runoff generation and erosion in agricultural lands or semi-arid and arid soils. The previous investigations on soil crusting were often conducted under simulated rainfall conditions. This study aims to evaluate the effects of soil crusting on soil moisture during inter-storm periods and soil and water losses during storm periods under natural rainfalls. The study site was located in the Loess Plateau of China. Four plots with a uniform slope and size were selected. Soil crusts were kept intact on the two plots throughout the monitoring periods of 1999 and 2000,but were broken after each rain storm event on the other two plots. Soil moisture was measured on all plots with an interval of one week at three depths and total event runoff and sediment discharges were measured in each storm. It was found that no marked difference in soil moisture and runoff exists between the crusted and uncrusted plots. This is because the rapid development of new crusts on the uncrusted plots during the storm events. However, the erosion rate on the uncrusted plots was significantly higher than that on the crusted plots, which was mainly caused by the disturbance of the surface soils on the uncrusted plots. This study questions the effectiveness of a common agricultural practice in the Loess Plateau, hoeing lands after rainfall, in reducing runoff and erosion.

  19. Relationship Between Iron Oxides and Surface Charge Characteristics in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAOZONG-CHEN; WANGWEI-JUN

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between iron oxides and surface charge characteristics in variable charge soils (latosol and red earth) was studied in following three ways.(1)Remove free iron oxides (Fed) and amorphous iron oxides (Feo) from the soils with sodium dithionite and acid ammonium oxalate solution respectively.(2) Add 2% glucose (on the basis of air-dry soil weight) to soils and incubate under submerged condition to activate iron oxides,and then the mixtures are dehydrated and air-dried to age iron oxides.(3) Precipitate various crystalline forms of iron oxides onto kaolinite.The results showed that free iron oxides (Fed) were the chief carrier of variable positive charges.Of which crystalline iron oxides (Fed-Feo) presented mainly as discrete particles in the soils and could only play a role of the carrier of positive charges,and did little influence on negative charges.Whereas the amorphous iron oxides (Feo),which presented mainly fas a coating with a large specific surface area,not only had positive charges,but also blocked the negative charge sites in soils.Submerged incubation activated iron oxides in the soils,and increased the amount of amorphous iron oxides and the degree of activation of iron oxide,which resulted in the increase of positive and negative charges of soils.Dehydration and air-dry aged iron oxides in soils and decreased the amount of amorphous iron oxides and the degree of activation of iron oxide,and also led to the decrease of positive and negative charges.Both the submerged incubation and the dehydration and air-dry had no significant influence on net charges.Precipitation of iron oxides onto kaolinite markedly increased positive charges and decreased negative charges.Amorphous iron oxide having a larger surface area contributed more positive charge sites and blocked more negative charge sites in kaolinite than crystalline goethite.

  20. Effects of Cd and Pb pollution on soil enzymatic activities and soil microbiota

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shuqing; YANG Zhixin; WANG Xiaomin; ZHANG Xiaogui; GAO Rutai; LIU Xia

    2007-01-01

    Based on a representative sampling method and pot experiment with different concentrations of Cd and Pd,the enzymatic activities(urease,phosphatase,catalase,invertase),population of bacteria,fungus and actinomycete in the soil,the Cd and Pd pollution status of soil samples(from the wastewater-irrigated area of Baoding suburb)were appraised.Unitary linear and nonlinear curve-fitting optimization models were applied in the research,and the relationship between Pb and Cd causing pollution and enzymatic activities of the tested soils were discussed.The research may provide a theoretical basis for protecting the environment in the region of Baiyangdian Lake,Hebei province,prevent soil pollution,and ascertain biochemical indexes,which reflect soil heavy metal pollution levels.The research results indicated that:(1)there was obvious accumulation of Pb and Cd in the wastewater-irrigated area,also the accumulation in wastewater-irrigated soil is more than that in fresh water-irrigated soil,and accumulation on surface layer was more than that in the lower layer.Pb and Cd contents in the tested soils exceeded the standards of soil background values for some major cities at home and abroad and the world soil Cd and Pb contents range.This means that the tested soil had reached a lightly polluted level;(2)there existed an obvious negative correlation between soil enzymatic activities and Pb and Cd contents in wastewaterirrigated soil,where the soil urease and catalase activities decreased obviously with the increase of Pb and Cd contents in soil.Therefore,the urease and catalase can be considered as biochemical indexes that reflect the degree of soil Pb and Cd pollution;(3)the pot experiments indicated that the influence of Cd on soil enzymatic activities was greater than that of Pb.Generally,the effect of Cd on soil phosphatase,urease,catalase is more obvious than that on invertase,while Pb has a more obvious effect on invertase than Cd;(4)pot experiments of triple cropping

  1. Soil Tillage Conservation and its Effect on Soil Properties Bioremediation and Sustained Production of Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Teodor; Ioana Moraru, Paula; Muresan, Liliana; Andriuca, Valentina; Cojocaru, Olesea

    2017-04-01

    Soil Tillage Conservation (STC) is considered major components of agricultural technology for soil conservation strategies and part of Sustainable Agriculture (SA). Human action upon soil by tillage determines important morphological, physical-chemical and biological changes, with different intensities and evaluative directions. Nowadays, internationally is unanimous accepted the fact that global climatic changes are the results of human intervention in the bio-geo-chemical water and material cycle, and the sequestration of carbon in soil is considered an important intervention to limit these changes. STC involves reducing the number of tillage's (minimum tillage) to direct sowing (no-tillage) and plant debris remains at the soil surface in the ratio of at least 30%. Plant debris left on the soil surface or superficial incorporated contributes to increased biological activity and is an important source of carbon sequestration. STC restore soil structure and improve overall soil drainage, allowing more rapid infiltration of water into soil. The result is a soil bioremediation, more productive, better protected against wind and water erosion and requires less fuel for preparing the germinative bed. Carbon sequestration in soil is net advantageous, improving the productivity and sustainability. We present the influence of conventional plough tillage system on soil, water and organic matter conservation in comparison with an alternative minimum tillage (paraplow, chisel plow and rotary harrow) and no-tillage system. The application of STC increased the organic matter content 0.8 to 22.1% and water stabile aggregate content from 1.3 to 13.6%, in the 0-30 cm depth, as compared to the conventional system. For the organic matter content and the wet aggregate stability, the statistical analysis of the data showed, increasing positive significance of STC. While the soil fertility and the wet aggregate stability were initially low, the effect of conservation practices on the

  2. [Distribution of soil organic carbon in surface soil along a precipitation gradient in loess hilly area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Long; Zhang, Guang-hui; Luan, Li-li; Li, Zhen-wei; Geng, Ren

    2016-02-01

    Along the 368-591 mm precipitation gradient, 7 survey sites, i.e. a total 63 investigated plots were selected. At each sites, woodland, grassland, and cropland with similar restoration age were selected to investigate soil organic carbon distribution in surface soil (0-30 cm), and the influence of factors, e.g. climate, soil depth, and land uses, on soil organic carbon distribution were analyzed. The result showed that, along the precipitation gradient, the grassland (8.70 g . kg-1) > woodland (7.88 g . kg-1) > farmland (7.73 g . kg-1) in concentration and the grassland (20.28 kg . m-2) > farmland (19.34 kg . m-2) > woodland (17.14 kg . m-2) in density. The differences of soil organic carbon concentration of three land uses were not significant. Further analysis of pooled data of three land uses showed that the surface soil organic carbon concentration differed significantly at different precipitation levels (Psoil organic carbon concentration (r=0.838, Psoil organic carbon increased with annual precipitation 0. 04 g . kg-1 . mm-1, density 0.08 kg . m-2 . mm-1. The soil organic carbon distribution was predicted with mean annual precipitation, soil clay content, plant litter in woodland, and root density in farmland.

  3. Effects of Tillage Practices on Soil Organic Carbon and Soil Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Teodor; Ioana Moraru, Paula; Bogdan, Ileana; Ioan Pop, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Soil tillage system and its intensity modify by direct and indirect action soil temperature, moisture, bulk density, porosity, penetration resistance and soil structural condition. Minimum tillage and no-tillage application reduce or completely eliminate the soil mobilization, due to this, soil is compacted in the first years of application. The degree of compaction is directly related to soil type and its state of degradation. All this physicochemical changes affect soil biology and soil respiration. Soil respiration leads to CO2 emissions from soil to the atmosphere, in significant amounts for the global carbon cycle. Soil respiration is one measure of biological activity and decomposition. Soil capacity to produce CO2 varies depending on soil, season, intensity and quality of agrotechnical tillage, soil water, cultivated plant and fertilizer. Our research follows the effects of the three tillage systems: conventional system, minimum tillage and no-tillage on soil respiration and finally on soil organic carbon on rotation soybean - wheat - maize, obtained on an Argic Faeoziom from the Somes Plateau, Romania. To quantify the change in soil respiration under different tillage practices, determinations were made for each crop in four vegetative stages (spring, 5-6 leaves, bean forming, harvest). Soil monitoring system of CO2 and O2 included gradient method, made by using a new generation of sensors capable of measuring CO2 concentration in-situ and quasi-instantaneous in gaseous phase. At surface soil respiration is made by using ACE Automated Soil CO2 Exchange System. These areas were was our research presents a medium multi annual temperature of 8.20C medium of multi annual rain drowns: 613 mm. The experimental variants chosen were: i). Conventional system: reversible plough (22-25 cm) + rotary grape (8-10 cm); ii). Minimum tillage system: paraplow (18-22 cm) + rotary grape (8-10 cm); iii). No-tillage. The experimental design was a split-plot design with three

  4. Effect of Biochar on Soil Physical Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhencai; Møldrup, Per; Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad

    Biochar addition to agricultural soil has been reported to reduce climate gas emission, as well as improve soil fertility and crop productivity. Little, however, is known about biochar effects on soil structural characteristics. This study investigates if biochar-application changes soil structural...... characteristics, as indicated from water retention and gas transport measurements on intact soil samples. Soil was sampled from a field experiment on a sandy loam with four control plots (C) without biochar and four plots (B) with incorporated biochar at a rate of 20 tons per hectare (plot size, 6 x 8 m). The C......-gas diffusivity on intact 100cm3 soil samples (5 replicates in each plot). We found that biochar application significantly decreased soil bulk density, hereby creating higher porosity. At the same soil-water matric potential, all the soil-gas phase parameters (air-filled porosity, air permeability and gas...

  5. The effect of soil redistribution on soil organic carbon: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Van Hemelryck

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion, transport and deposition by water drastically affect the distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC within a landscape. Furthermore, soil redistribution is assumed to have a large impact on the exchange of carbon (C between the pedosphere and the atmosphere. There is, however, significant scientific disagreement concerning the relative importance of the key-mechanisms at play. One of the major uncertainties concerns the fraction of SOC that is mineralized when soil is eroded by water, from the moment when detachment takes place until the moment when the SOC becomes protected by burial. In this study, the changes in C-exchange between soil and atmosphere as affected by soil redistribution processes were experimentally quantified. During a laboratory experiment, three types of erosional events were simulated, each of which was designed to produce a different amount of eroded soil material with a different degree of aggregation. During a 98-day period, CO2-efflux was measured in-situ and under field conditions on undisturbed soils with a layer of deposited soil material. Depending on the initial conditions of the soil and the intensity of the erosion process, a significant fraction of eroded SOC was mineralized after deposition. However, results also suggest that deposition produces a dense stratified layer of sediment that caps the soil surface, leading to a decrease in SOC decomposition in deeper soil layers. As a result, the net effect of erosion on SOC can be smaller, depending on the functioning of the whole soil system. In this study, soil redistribution processes contributed an additional emission of 2 to 12% of total C contained in eroded sediment.

  6. The effect of soil redistribution on soil organic carbon: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Van Hemelryck

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion, transport and deposition by water drastically affect the distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC within a landscape. Furthermore, soil redistribution is assumed to have a large impact on the exchange of carbon (C between the pedosphere and the atmosphere. There is, however, significant scientific disagreement concerning the relative importance of the key-mechanisms at play. One of the major uncertainties concerns the fraction of SOC that is mineralized when soil is eroded by water, from the moment when detachment takes place until the moment when the SOC becomes protected by burial. In this study, the changes in C-exchange between soil and atmosphere as affected by soil redistribution processes were experimentally quantified. During a laboratory experiment, three types of erosional events were simulated, each of which was designed to produce a different amount of eroded soil material with a different degree of aggregation. During a 98-day period, CO2-efflux was measured in-situ and under field conditions on undisturbed soils with a layer of deposited soil material. Depending on the initial conditions of the soil and the intensity of the erosion process, a significant fraction of eroded SOC was mineralized after deposition (between 14 and 22%. However, results also suggest that deposition produces a dense stratified layer of sediment that caps the soil surface, leading to a decrease in SOC decomposition in deeper soil layers. As a result, the net effect of erosion on SOC can be smaller, depending on the functioning of the whole soil system. In this study, soil redistribution processes contributed an additional emission of 2 to 12% of total C contained in eroded sediment.

  7. Study on ozone treatment of soil for agricultural application of surface dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatomo, Takuya; Abiru, Tomoya; Mitsugi, Fumiaki; Ebihara, Kenji; Nagahama, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Recently, application of plasma technologies to the agricultural field has attracted much interest because residual pesticides and excessive nitrogen oxides contained in plants, soil, and groundwater have become a serious issue worldwide. Since almost all of the atmospheric discharge plasma generates ozone, the effects of ozone are among the key factors for their agricultural applications. We have proposed the use of ozone generated using surface barrier discharge plasma for soil disinfection or sterilization. In this work, the ozone consumption coefficient and diffusion coefficient in soil were measured by the ultraviolet absorption method. The pH(H2O) and amount of nitrogen nutrient in soil after ozone diffusion treatment were studied and plant growth was observed simultaneously. The effect of ozone treatment on the amount of DNA in soil was also investigated and compared with that determined from the obtained ozone consumption coefficient.

  8. Effect of soil reclamation process on soil C fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, V; Vega, F A; Covelo, E F

    2014-01-01

    Mine soils are notable for their low organic matter content. Soils in the depleted copper mine in Touro (Galicia, Spain) were vegetated with trees (eucalyptuses and pines) and amended with wastes (sewage sludge and paper mill residues) to increase their carbon concentration. Two different zones at the mine (settling pond and mine tailing) and their respective treated areas (vegetated and/or amended) were sampled and analysed with the aim of evaluating in depth the effect of the reclamation treatments on both the concentration and quality of soil organic matter under field conditions. The results showed that the two treatments (tree vegetation and waste amendment) significantly increased the organic C in the mine soils from 1.4-6.6 to 10-112 g kg(-1). However, only the soil amended with wastes in the settling pond reached the usual values of undisturbed soils (92-126 g TOC kg(-1) soil). Amending with wastes was also the only treatment that increased the soil humified organic C concentration to proper values and therefore also the microbial biomass C. We recommend the use of organic wastes for amending soils poor in organic matter as well as the regular application of this treatment, as the nitrogen supply can be more limiting for plant growth than the organic C. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Polyacrylamide molecular weight and phosphogypsum effects on infiltration and erosion in semi-arid soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal formation at the surface of semi-arid soils during rainstorms reduces soil infiltration rate (IR) and causes runoff and erosion. Surface application of dry anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) with high molecular weight (MW) has been found to be effective in stabilizing soil aggregates, and decreasing ...

  10. Denitrification 'hot spots' in soil following surface residue application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Marianne; Morley, Nicholas J.; Hallett, Paul D.; Watson, Christine; Baggs, Elizabeth M.

    2015-04-01

    The availability of organic C is an important driver for the production and reduction of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) during denitrification. Denitrification as a response to plant residue amendments to soil surfaces has been extensively researched. However, the nature of hotspot sites of N2O production and reduction within the soil profile, especially in relation to the location of applied residues, is unknown. In a laboratory experiment we investigated the relationship between denitrifier N2O surface fluxes and N2O production and reduction sites. Probes which equilibrate with the soil gas phase by diffusion were developed to quantify denitrification products and product ratios at 1-2 cm, 4.5-5.5 cm or 8-9 cm from the surface. 13C labelled barley straw was incorporated at rates of 0, 2 and 4 t ha-1 into the top 3 cm of soil and subsequently amended with 14NH415NO3. In a three week experiment the soil gas phase at the three depths was analysed for 15N-N2O, 15N-N2, 13C-CO2 and O2 concentrations. Additionally, cores were destructively sampled for mineral 15N as well as microbial C and dissolved C in the respective depths. 15N-N2O and CO2 surface fluxes peaked one day after N application, with residue application resulting in significantly higher 15N-N2O emission rates compared to the non-amended control. The timing of the 15N-N2O surface flux on day 1 was related to maximum 15N-N2O concentrations of 36.6 μg 15N L-1 within the pore space at 5 cm depth. Three days after fertilizer application 15N-N2O pore space concentrations had significantly increased to 193 μg 15N L-1 at 9 cm depth indicating denitrifier activity at greater depth. Denitrification below the soil surface could be explained by increased microbial activity, oxygen depletion with increasing depth and progressive downwards diffusion of fertilizer NO3-. However, C availability appeared to only affect denitrification in the surface layer in which the residue was incorporated. Our results provide

  11. Retrieval of Surface and Subsurface Moisture of Bare Soil Using Simulated Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaeenejad, A.; Moghaddam, M.

    2009-12-01

    Soil moisture is of fundamental importance to many hydrological and biological processes. Soil moisture information is vital to understanding the cycling of water, energy, and carbon in the Earth system. Knowledge of soil moisture is critical to agencies concerned with weather and climate, runoff potential and flood control, soil erosion, reservoir management, water quality, agricultural productivity, drought monitoring, and human health. The need to monitor the soil moisture on a global scale has motivated missions such as Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) [1]. Rough surface scattering models and remote sensing retrieval algorithms are essential in study of the soil moisture, because soil can be represented as a rough surface structure. Effects of soil moisture on the backscattered field have been studied since the 1960s, but soil moisture estimation remains a challenging problem and there is still a need for more accurate and more efficient inversion algorithms. It has been shown that the simulated annealing method is a powerful tool for inversion of the model parameters of rough surface structures [2]. The sensitivity of this method to measurement noise has also been investigated assuming a two-layer structure characterized by the layers dielectric constants, layer thickness, and statistical properties of the rough interfaces [2]. However, since the moisture profile varies with depth, it is sometimes necessary to model the rough surface as a layered structure with a rough interface on top and a stratified structure below where each layer is assumed to have a constant volumetric moisture content. In this work, we discretize the soil structure into several layers of constant moisture content to examine the effect of subsurface profile on the backscattering coefficient. We will show that while the moisture profile could vary in deeper layers, these layers do not affect the scattered electromagnetic field significantly. Therefore, we can use just a few layers

  12. Near surface soil vapor clusters for monitoring emissions of volatile organic compounds from soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergas, S J; Hinlein, E S; Reyes, P O; Ostendorf, D W; Tehrany, J P

    2000-01-01

    The overall objective of this research was to develop and test a method of determining emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other gases from soil surfaces. Soil vapor clusters (SVCs) were designed as a low dead volume, robust sampling system to obtain vertically resolved profiles of soil gas contaminant concentrations in the near surface zone. The concentration profiles, when combined with a mathematical model of porous media mass transport, were used to calculate the contaminant flux from the soil surface. Initial experiments were conducted using a mesoscale soil remediation system under a range of experimental conditions. Helium was used as a tracer and trichloroethene was used as a model VOC. Flux estimations using the SVCs were within 25% of independent surface flux estimates and were comparable to measurements made using a surface isolation flux chamber (SIFC). In addition, method detection limits for the SVC were an order of magnitude lower than detection limits with the SIFC. Field trials, conducted with the SVCs at a bioventing site, indicated that the SVC method could be easily used in the field to estimate fugitive VOC emission rates. Major advantages of the SVC method were its low detection limits, lack of required auxiliary equipment, and ability to obtain real-time estimates of fugitive VOC emission rates.

  13. A land surface soil moisture data assimilation framework in consideration of the model subgrid-scale heterogeneity and soil water thawing and freezing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is well known and widely used in land data assimilation for its high precision and simple operation. The land surface models used as the forecast operator in a land data assimilation system are usually designed to consider the model subgrid-heterogeneity and soil water thawing and freezing. To neglect their effects could lead to some errors in soil moisture assimilation. The dual EnKF method is employed in soil moisture data assimilation to build a soil moisture data as- similation framework based on the NCAR Community Land Model version 2.0 (CLM 2.0) in considera- tion of the effects of the model subgrid-heterogeneity and soil water thawing and freezing: Liquid volumetric soil moisture content in a given fraction is assimilated through the state filter process, while solid volumetric soil moisture content in the same fraction and solid/liquid volumetric soil moisture in the other fractions are optimized by the parameter filter. Preliminary experiments show that this dual EnKF-based assimilation framework can assimilate soil moisture more effectively and precisely than the usual EnKF-based assimilation framework without considering the model subgrid-scale heteroge- neity and soil water thawing and freezing. With the improvement of soil moisture simulation, the soil temperature-simulated precision can be also improved to some extent.

  14. A land surface soil moisture data assimilation framework in consideration of the model subgrid-scale heterogeneity and soil water thawing and freezing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN XiangJun; XIE ZhengHui

    2008-01-01

    The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is well known and widely used in land data assimilation for its high precision and simple operation. The land surface models used as the forecast operator in a land data assimilation system are usually designed to consider the model subgrid-heterogeneity and soil water thawing and freezing. To neglect their effects could lead to some errors in soil moisture assimilation.The dual EnKF method is employed in soil moisture data assimilation to build a soil moisture data assimilation framework based on the NCAR Community Land Model version 2.0 (CLM 2.0) in consideration of the effects of the model subgrid-heterogeneity and soil water thawing and freezing: Liquid volumetric soil moisture content in a given fraction is assimilated through the state filter process,while solid volumetric soil moisture content in the same fraction and solid/liquid volumetric soil moisture in the other fractions are optimized by the parameter filter. Preliminary experiments show that this dual EnKF-based assimilation framework can assimilate soil moisture more effectively and precisely than the usual EnKF-based assimilation framework without considering the model subgrid-scale heterogeneity and soil water thawing and freezing. With the improvement of soil moisture simulation,the soil temperature-simulated precision can be also improved to some extent.

  15. Effects of Incorporation of Nano-carbon into Slow-released Fertilizer on Rice Yield and Nitrogen Loss in Surface Water of Paddy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-yan Wu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of slow-released fertilizer has become a new trend to save fertilizer consumption and to minimize environmental pollution. Duo to its high surface energy and chemical activity, the application domain of nano-materials has significantly expanded with the development of nanotechnology in conjunction with biotechnology in various fields, such as water purification, wastewater treatment, environmental remediation and food processing and packaging, industrial and household purposes, medicine and in smart sensor development. However, use in agriculture, especially for plant production, is an under-explored area in the research community. In this study, nano-carbon was incorporated into slow-released fertilizer and the influence on rice yield and nitrogen loss in surface water of paddy soil was conducted by field experiment. The experiment was a randomized block design with five treatments and three replications, the Control (CK, Jingzhengda Slow-released fertilizer (JSCU, N 42%, Jingzhengda Slow-released fertilizer and nano-Carbon (JSCU+C, Stanley slow-released compound fertilizer (SSRF, N-P2O5-K2O = 20:9:11, Stanley Slow-Released compound Fertilizer and nano-carbon (SSRF+C, respectively. The results indicated that the total nitrogen concentration in surface water of paddy soil increased rapidly at the 2nd day after fertilization and decreased gradually after that in all treatments. Compare to JSCU, sampling at different times after fertilization, the total nitrogen concentration in surface water of paddy soil under JSCU+C treatment was declined in the range of 19.1-46.8%, the average was 31.0% and the time of nitrogen runoff loss due to rainfall was shorten 2.2 day. For SSCU+C treatment, the average total nitrogen concentration was decreased by 29.8% and the time of nitrogen runoff loss was shortening 1.8 day. The rice grain yield and nitrogen use efficiency were increased significantly after applying slow-released fertilizer added nano

  16. [Spatial variation characteristics of surface soil water content, bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity on Karst slopes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan; Chen, Hong-Song; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Yun-Peng; Ye, Ying-Ying; Wang, Ke-Lin

    2014-06-01

    Surface soil water-physical properties play a decisive role in the dynamics of deep soil water. Knowledge of their spatial variation is helpful in understanding the processes of rainfall infiltration and runoff generation, which will contribute to the reasonable utilization of soil water resources in mountainous areas. Based on a grid sampling scheme (10 m x 10 m) and geostatistical methods, this paper aimed to study the spatial variability of surface (0-10 cm) soil water content, soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity on a typical shrub slope (90 m x 120 m, projected length) in Karst area of northwest Guangxi, southwest China. The results showed that the surface soil water content, bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity had different spatial dependence and spatial structure. Sample variogram of the soil water content was fitted well by Gaussian models with the nugget effect, while soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity were fitted well by exponential models with the nugget effect. Variability of soil water content showed strong spatial dependence, while the soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity showed moderate spatial dependence. The spatial ranges of the soil water content and saturated hydraulic conductivity were small, while that of the soil bulk density was much bigger. In general, the soil water content increased with the increase of altitude while it was opposite for the soil bulk densi- ty. However, the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity had a random distribution of large amounts of small patches, showing high spatial heterogeneity. Soil water content negatively (P conductivity, while there was no significant correlation between the soil bulk density and saturated hydraulic conductivity.

  17. Enhancement of chromate reduction in soils by surface modified biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sanchita; Sarkar, Binoy; Bolan, Nanthi; Ok, Yong Sik; Naidu, Ravi

    2017-01-15

    Chromium (Cr) is one of the common metals present in the soils and may have an extremely deleterious environmental impact depending on its redox state. Among two common forms, trivalent Cr(III) is less toxic than hexavalent Cr(VI) in soils. Carbon (C) based materials including biochar could be used to alleviate Cr toxicity through converting Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Incubation experiments were conducted to examine Cr(VI) reduction in different soils (Soil 1: pH 7.5 and Soil 2: pH 5.5) with three manures from poultry (PM), cow (CM) and sheep (SM), three respective manure-derived biochars (PM biochar (PM-BC), CM biochar (CM-BC) and SM biochar (SM-BC)) and two modified biochars (modified PM-BC (PM-BC-M) and modified SM-BC (SM-BC-M)). Modified biochar was synthesized by incorporating chitosan and zerovalent iron (ZVI) during pyrolysis. Among biochars, highest Cr(VI) reduction was observed with PM-BC application (5%; w/w) (up to 88.12 mg kg(-1); 45% reduction) in Soil 2 (pH 5.5). The modified biochars enhanced Cr(VI) reduction by 55% (SM-BC-M) compared to manure (29%, SM) and manure-derived biochars (40% reduction, SM-BC). Among the modified biochars, SM-BC-M showed a higher Cr(VI) reduction rate (55%) than PM-BC-M (48%) in Soil 2. Various oxygen-containing surface functional groups such as phenolic, carboxyl, carbonyl, etc. on biochar surface might act as a proton donor for Cr(VI) reduction and subsequent Cr(III) adsorption. This study underpins the immense potential of modified biochar in remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Soil surface sealing reverse or promote desertification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouline, Shmuel; Thompson, Sally; Chen, Li; Svoray, Tal; Sela, Shai; Katul, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation cover in dry regions is a key variable determining desertification. Bare soils exposed to rainfall by desertification can form physical crusts that reduce infiltration, exacerbating water stress on the remaining vegetation. Paradoxically, field studies show that crust removal is associated with plant mortality in desert systems, while artificial biological crusts can improve plant regeneration. Here, it is shown how physical crusts can act as either drivers of, or buffers against desertification depending on their environmental context. The behavior of crusts is first explored using a simplified theory for water movement on a uniform, partly vegetated slope subject to stationary hydrologic conditions. Numerical model runs supplemented with field data from a semiarid Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site are then applied to represent more realistic environmental conditions. When vegetation cover is significant, crusts can drive desertification, but this process is potentially self-limiting. For low vegetation cover, crusts mitigate against desertification by providing water subsidy to plant communities through a runoff-runon mechanism.

  19. Exploring the potential of near-surface geophysical methods to delineate a shallow hardpan in a southeastern U.S. sandy coastal plain soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    A hardpan, which is a dense soil layer near the ground surface, is an undesirable feature of many soils in the Southeast U.S., especially sandy Coastal Plain soils. Shallow hardpans restrict root growth and water penetration through the soil profile, in turn reducing the effective crop root zone and...

  20. Vanadium Trineodecanoate Promoter for Fiberglass-Polyester Soil Surfacings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    surfaces for soils consists of a polyester resin, cumene hydroperoxide catalyst and a promoter solution containing a vanadium salt and N,N-dimethyl-p-tolui...4 Synthesis of Vanadium Trineodecanoate .. .... ......... 4 Reactions Using Various Reagents. ..... ........... 4 Analysis of Vanadium...polymer system consists of a polyester resin, a peroxide cata- lyst ( cumene hydroperoxide) and a two-part, premixed, promoter solution. The promoter

  1. Elevated soil CO2 efflux at the boundaries between impervious surfaces and urban greenspaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, XiaoGang; Hu, Dan; Ma, ShengLi; Zhang, Xia; Guo, Zhen; Gaston, Kevin J.

    2016-09-01

    Impervious surfaces and greenspaces have significant impacts on ecological processes and ecosystem services in urban areas. However, there have been no systematic studies of how the interaction between the two forms of land cover, and especially their edge effects, influence ecosystem properties. This has made it difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of urban greenspace design in meeting environmental goals. In this study, we investigated edge effects on soil carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes in Beijing and found that soil CO2 flux rates were averagely 73% higher 10 cm inwards from the edge of greenspaces. Distance, soil temperature, moisture, and their interaction significantly influenced soil CO2 flux rates. The magnitude and distance of edge effects differed among impervious structure types. Current greening policy and design should be adjusted to avoid the carbon sequestration service of greenspaces being limited by their fragmentation.

  2. The influence of surface reflectance anisotropy on estimation of soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomeus, Harm; Roosjen, Peter; Clevers, Jan

    2014-05-01

    The spatial variation in soil properties is an important factor for agricultural management. Unmanned airborne vehicles (UAV's) equipped with a hyperspectral mapping system may provide these data, but anisotropic reflectance effects may have an influence on the derived soil properties. Besides influencing the reflectance, angular observations may deliver added information about soil properties. We investigated the anisotropic behavior of 59 soil samples with a large variation in soil composition, by measuring their reflectance (350-2500 nm) over 92 different angles using a robot-based laboratory goniometer system. The results show that the anisotropic behavior of the soils influences the measured reflectance significantly, which limits the accurate prediction of soil properties (OM and clay especially). However, prediction accuracies of OM increase when spectra are measured under specific angles. Prediction accuracies further increase when a combination of observation angles is being used. Apart from that, using UAV's the wavelength range is limited to about 1000 nm. In general, this will decrease the model performance, but our results show that this effect can largely be compensated by combining multiple observation angles. Altogether, we demonstrate that surface anisotropy influences the prediction of soil properties negatively. This effect can be reduced by combining spectra acquired under different angles. Moreover, predictions can be improved if combinations of different observation angles are used.

  3. Tillage Effects on Soil Properties & Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Teodor; Bogdan, Ileana; Moraru, Paula; Pop, Adrian; Duda, Bogdan; Cacovean, Horea; Coste, Camelia

    2015-04-01

    Soil tillage systems can be able to influence soil compaction, water dynamics, soil temperature and soil structural condition. These processes can be expressed as changes of soil microbiological activity, soil respiration and sustainability of agriculture. Objectives of this study were: 1) to assess the effects of tillage systems (Conventional System-CS, Minimum Tillage-MT, No-Tillage-NT) on soil compaction, soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration and 2) to establish the relationship that exists in changing soil properties. Three treatments were installed: CS-plough + disc; MT-paraplow + rotary grape; NT-direct sowing. The study was conducted on an Argic-Stagnic Faeoziom. The MT and NT applications reduce or completely eliminate the soil mobilization, due to this, soil is compacted in the first year of application. The degree of compaction is directly related to soil type and its state of degradation. The state of soil compaction diminished over time, tending toward a specific type of soil density. Soil moisture was higher in NT and MT at the time of sowing and in the early stages of vegetation and differences diminished over time. Moisture determinations showed statistically significant differences. The MT and NT applications reduced the thermal amplitude in the first 15 cm of soil depth and increased the soil temperature by 0.5-2.20C. The determinations confirm the effect of soil tillage system on soil respiration; the daily average was lower at NT (315-1914 mmoli m-2s-1) and followed by MT (318-2395 mmoli m-2s-1) and is higher in the CS (321-2480 mmol m-2s-1). Comparing with CS, all the two conservation tillage measures decreased soil respiration, with the best effects of no-tillage. An exceeding amount of CO2 produced in the soil and released into the atmosphere, resulting from aerobic processes of mineralization of organic matter (excessive loosening) is considered to be not only a way of increasing the CO2 in the atmosphere, but also a loss of

  4. Potential applications of surface active compounds by Gordonia sp. strain BS29 in soil remediation technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzetti, Andrea; Caredda, Paolo; Ruggeri, Claudio; La Colla, Paolo; Tamburini, Elena; Papacchini, Maddalena; Bestetti, Giuseppina

    2009-05-01

    A wide range of structurally different surface active compounds (SACs) is synthesised by many prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. Due to their properties, microbial SACs have been exploited in environmental remediation techniques. From a diesel-contaminated soil, we isolated the Gordonia sp. strain BS29 which extensively grows on aliphatic hydrocarbons and produces two different types of SACs: extracellular bioemulsans and cell-bound biosurfactants. The aim of this work was to evaluate the potential applications of the strain BS29 and its SACs in the following environmental technologies: bioremediation of soils contaminated by aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, and washing of soils contaminated by crude oil, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals. Microcosm bioremediation experiments were carried out with soils contaminated by aliphatic hydrocarbons or PAHs, while batch soil washing experiments were carried out with soils contaminated by crude oil, PAHs or heavy metals. Bioremediation results showed that the BS29 bioemulsans are able to slightly enhance the biodegradation of recalcitrant branched hydrocarbons. On the other hand, we obtained the best results in soil washing of hydrocarbons. The BS29 bioemulsans effectively remove crude oil and PAHs from soil. Particularly, crude oil removal by BS29 bioemulsans is comparable to the rhamnolipid one in the same experimental conditions showing that the BS29 bioemulsans are promising washing agents for remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils.

  5. Assessing soil surface roughness decay during simulated rainfall by multifractal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vidal Vázquez

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding and describing the spatial characteristics of soil surface microrelief are required for modelling overland flow and erosion. We employed the multifractal approach to characterize topographical point elevation data sets acquired by high resolution laser scanning for assessing the effect of simulated rainfall on microrelief decay. Three soil surfaces with different initial states or composition and rather smooth were prepared on microplots and subjected to successive events of simulated rainfall. Soil roughness was measured on a 2×2 mm2 grid, initially, i.e. before rain, and after each simulated storm, yielding a total of thirteen data sets for three rainfall sequences. The vertical microrelief component as described by the statistical index random roughness (RR exhibited minor changes under rainfall in two out of three study cases, which was due to the imposed wet initial state constraining aggregate breakdown. The effect of cumulative rainfall on microrelief decay was also assessed by multifractal analysis performed with the box-count algorithm. Generalized dimension, Dq, spectra allowed characterization of the spatial variation of soil surface microrelief measured at the microplot scale. These Dq spectra were also sensitive to temporal changes in soil surface microrelief, so that in all the three study rain sequences, the initial soil surface and the surfaces disturbed by successive storms displayed great differences in their degree of multifractality. Therefore, Multifractal parameters best discriminate between successive soil stages under a given rain sequence. Decline of RR and multifractal parameters showed little or no association.

  6. Concentrations and geographic distribution of selected organic pollutants in Scottish surface soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhind, S M; Kyle, C E; Kerr, C; Osprey, M; Zhang, Z L; Duff, E I; Lilly, A; Nolan, A; Hudson, G; Towers, W; Bell, J; Coull, M; McKenzie, C

    2013-11-01

    Concentrations of selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) representing three chemical classes (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and the organic pollutant diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), were determined in surface soil samples (0-5 cm) collected at 20 km grid intersects throughout Scotland over a three-year period. Detectable amounts of all chemical classes and most individual congeners were present in all samples. There were no consistent effects of soil or vegetation type, soil carbon content, pH, altitude or distance from centres of population on concentrations which exhibited extreme variation, even in adjacent samples. It is concluded that soil POPs and DEHP concentrations and associated rates of animal and human exposure were highly variable, influenced by multiple, interacting factors, and not clearly related to local sources but possibly related to wet atmospheric deposition and the organic carbon content of the soil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Degradation and Sorption of Imidacloprid in Dissimilar Surface and Subsurface Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degradation and sorption/desorption are important processes affecting the leaching of pesticides through soil. Once pesticides move past the surface soil layers, subsurface soil physical, chemical, and biological properties significantly affect pesticide fate and the potential for groundwater contam...

  8. Land surface model performance using cosmic-ray and point-scale soil moisture measurements for calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2017-06-01

    At very high resolution scale (i.e. grid cells of 1 km2), land surface model parameters can be calibrated with eddy-covariance flux data and point-scale soil moisture data. However, measurement scales of eddy-covariance and point-scale data differ substantially. In our study, we investigated the impact of reducing the scale mismatch between surface energy flux and soil moisture observations by replacing point-scale soil moisture data with observations derived from Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNSs) made at larger spatial scales. Five soil and evapotranspiration parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) were calibrated against point-scale and Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensor soil moisture data separately. We calibrated the model for 12 sites in the USA representing a range of climatic, soil, and vegetation conditions. The improvement in latent heat flux estimation for the two calibration solutions was assessed by comparison to eddy-covariance flux data and to JULES simulations with default parameter values. Calibrations against the two soil moisture products alone did show an advantage for the cosmic-ray technique. However, further analyses of two-objective calibrations with soil moisture and latent heat flux showed no substantial differences between both calibration strategies. This was mainly caused by the limited effect of calibrating soil parameters on soil moisture dynamics and surface energy fluxes. Other factors that played a role were limited spatial variability in surface fluxes implied by soil moisture spatio-temporal stability, and data quality issues.

  9. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  10. Perennial crop phase effects on soil fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a need to develop agricultural management systems that enhance soil fertility and reduce reliance on external inputs. Perennial phases in crop rotations are effective at restoring soil fertility, though little information exists in the northern Great Plains regarding soil-based outcomes re...

  11. Effects of Seasonal Changes (The Spring and The Autumn on Microbial Population of the Surface Soils Planted the Various Tree Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hüseyin Koç

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial population of soil and its structure is affected with chemical and biological changes such as plant-root secretions. Upper layer of the soil is exposed to mixture of stems, fruiting bodies and leaves of trees. Seven trees growing at same area were chosen. Their upper layers of the soil were collected from depth 5-10 cm as samples in spring and autumn. Their microbial populations were investigated in order to determine in terms of climate changes. In order to determine the number of the total microorganisms, gram-negative bacteria and spore-forming bacteria (cfu/g were used by the serial dilution techniques. As a result, the highest numbers of microorganisms from the soil of the apple tree were determined as the total microbial count in the autumn, although the lowest number of microorganisms was obtained from the soil of the pine tree. However, the number of the gram-negative bacteria was the highest in the soil of linden tree, although the number of gram negative bacteria was the lowest in the soil of apricot, mulberry and apple trees. For spore - forming bacterium, the highest number from the mulberry soil and the lowest number from the linden tree have been obtained. In the spring, the highest numbers of microorganisms from the soil of the apple tree were obtained as the total microbial count, although the lowest number of microorganisms was obtained from the soil of the apricot tree. For the number of the gram-negative bacteria was the highest in the soil of walnut tree, although the number of gram negative bacteria was the lowest in the soil of apricot trees. However spore - forming bacterium, the highest number from the soil of the poplar tree and the lowest number from the mulberry tree have been obtained. In general, the rich diversity of the microbial population was shown morphologically in autumn.

  12. Physically plausible prescription of land surface model soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Mathias; Orth, René; Thiery, Wim; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Land surface hydrology is an important control of surface weather and climate, especially under extreme dry or wet conditions where it can amplify heat waves or floods, respectively. Prescribing soil moisture in land surface models is a valuable technique to investigate this link between hydrology and climate. It has been used for example to assess the influence of soil moisture on temperature variability, mean and extremes (Seneviratne et al. 2006, 2013, Lorenz et al., 2015). However, perturbing the soil moisture content artificially can lead to a violation of the energy and water balances. Here we present a new method for prescribing soil moisture which ensures water and energy balance closure by using only water from runoff and a reservoir term. If water is available, the method prevents soil moisture decrease below climatological values. Results from simulations with the Community Land Model (CLM) indicate that our new method allows to avoid soil moisture deficits in many regions of the world. We show the influence of the irrigation-supported soil moisture content on mean and extreme temperatures and contrast our findings with that of earlier studies. Additionally, we will assess how long into the 21st century the new method will be able to maintain present-day climatological soil moisture levels for different regions. Lorenz, R., Argüeso, D., Donat, M.G., Pitman, A.J., den Hurk, B.V., Berg, A., Lawrence, D.M., Chéruy, F., Ducharne, A., Hagemann, S. and Meier, A., 2015. Influence of land-atmosphere feedbacks on temperature and precipitation extremes in the GLACE-CMIP5 ensemble. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres. Seneviratne, S.I., Lüthi, D., Litschi, M. and Schär, C., 2006. Land-atmosphere coupling and climate change in Europe. Nature, 443(7108), pp.205-209. Seneviratne, S.I., Wilhelm, M., Stanelle, T., Hurk, B., Hagemann, S., Berg, A., Cheruy, F., Higgins, M.E., Meier, A., Brovkin, V. and Claussen, M., 2013. Impact of soil moisture

  13. Effect of discrete fibre reinforcement on soil tensile strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The tensile behaviour of soil plays a significantly important role in various engineering applications. Compacted soils used in geotechnical constructions such as dams and clayey liners in waste containment facilities can suffer from cracking due to tensile failure. In order to increase soil tensile strength, discrete fibre reinforcement technique was proposed. An innovative tensile apparatus was developed to determine the tensile strength characteristics of fibre reinforced soil. The effects of fibre content, dry density and water content on the tensile strength were studied. The results indicate that the developed test apparatus was applicable in determining tensile strength of soils. Fibre inclusion can significantly increase soil tensile strength and soil tensile failure ductility. The tensile strength basically increases with increasing fibre content. As the fibre content increases from 0% to 0.2%, the tensile strength increases by 65.7%. The tensile strength of fibre reinforced soil increases with increasing dry density and decreases with decreasing water content. For instance, the tensile strength at a dry density of 1.7 Mg/m3 is 2.8 times higher than that at 1.4 Mg/m3. It decreases by 30% as the water content increases from 14.5% to 20.5%. Furthermore, it is observed that the tensile strength of fibre reinforced soil is dominated by fibre pull-out resistance, depending on the interfacial mechanical interaction between fibre surface and soil matrix.

  14. Effect of discrete fibre reinforcement on soil tensile strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Li; Chaosheng Tang; Deying Wang; Xiangjun Pei; Bin Shi

    2014-01-01

    The tensile behaviour of soil plays a significantly important role in various engineering applications. Compacted soils used in geotechnical constructions such as dams and clayey liners in waste containment facilities can suffer from cracking due to tensile failure. In order to increase soil tensile strength, discrete fibre reinforcement technique was proposed. An innovative tensile apparatus was developed to deter-mine the tensile strength characteristics of fibre reinforced soil. The effects of fibre content, dry density and water content on the tensile strength were studied. The results indicate that the developed test apparatus was applicable in determining tensile strength of soils. Fibre inclusion can significantly in-crease soil tensile strength and soil tensile failure ductility. The tensile strength basically increases with increasing fibre content. As the fibre content increases from 0%to 0.2%, the tensile strength increases by 65.7%. The tensile strength of fibre reinforced soil increases with increasing dry density and decreases with decreasing water content. For instance, the tensile strength at a dry density of 1.7 Mg/m3 is 2.8 times higher than that at 1.4 Mg/m3. It decreases by 30% as the water content increases from 14.5% to 20.5%. Furthermore, it is observed that the tensile strength of fibre reinforced soil is dominated by fibre pull-out resistance, depending on the interfacial mechanical interaction between fibre surface and soil matrix.

  15. Computer Implementation of the Bounding Surface Plasticity Model for Cohesive Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    23 REFERENCES 1. Dafalias, Y.F., and L.R. Herrmann, "A Bounding Surface Soil Plasticity Model", Proceedings of the International Symposium of Soils...Herrmann, "Bounding Surface Formulatin of Soil Plasticity ", Chapter in Soil Mechanics - Transient and Cyclic Loads, John Wiley and Sons, Eds. O.C...Herrmann and Y.F. r)afalias, "User’s Manual for MODCAL-Bounding Surface Soil Plasticity Model Calibration and Prediction Code (Volume I)," Civil

  16. NH 3 soil and soil surface gas measurements in a triticale wheat field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neftel, A.; Blatter, A.; Gut, A.; Högger, D.; Meixner, F.; Ammann, C.; Nathaus, F. J.

    We present a new approach for a continuous determination of NH 3 concentration in the open pore space of the soil and on the soil surface. In a semi-permeable membrane of 0.5 m length a flow of 0.5 s1pm maintained. In the tube the NH 3 concentration adjusts itself to the surrounding air concentration by diffusion through the membrane. Continuous measurements have been performed in a triticale wheat field over a period of several weeks in a field experiment at Bellheim (FRG) during June and July 1995 within the frame of the European program EXAMINE (Exchange of Atmospheric Ammonia with European Ecosystems). Soil concentrations are generally below the detection limit of 0.1 μg m -3. We conclude, that the investigated soil is generally a sink for NH 3. The NH 3 concentration on the soil surface shows a diurnal variation due to a combination of physico-chemical desorption and adsorption phenomena associated with changes in wetness of the surrounding surfaces and the NH 3 concentration in the canopy.

  17. Effects of sulfadiazine on soil bacterial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hangler, Martin

    as fertilizers on agricultural lands they represent a route for antibiotics into the soil environment where they may persist and affect levels of antibiotic resistance in soil microbial communities over time. In this work the level of tolerance to the antibiotic sulfadiazine (SDZ) was studied in a number...... of soils applying the pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT)-approach. As SDZ is amphoteric and thus exist on either neutral, anionic or cationic form soil pH is likely to influence the toxicity and bioavailability of SDZ to soil bacteria. In manuscript I the aim was to set a baseline, a PICT...... designed to test effects on soil quality of a range of different fertilizers in agriculture. In manuscript II extracted bacteria from soil samples representing a broad range of natural soil pH values were tested for their toxicity response to SDZ when amended at different assay pH. Toxicity clearly...

  18. Effects of organic and inorganic amendments on soil erodibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutullah Özdemir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present investigation is to find out the effect of incorporating of various organic and inorganic matter sources such as lime (L, zeolit (Z, polyacrylamide (PAM and biosolid (BS on the instability index. A bulk surface (0–20 cm depth soil sample was taken from Samsun, in northern part of Turkey. Some soil properties were determined as follows; fine in texture, modarete in organic matter content, low in pH and free of alkaline problem. The soil samples were treated with the inorganic and organic materials at four different levels including the control treatments in a randomized factorial block design. The soil samples were incubated for ten weeks. After the incubation period, corn was grown in all pots. The results can be summarized as organic and inorganic matter treatments increased structure stability and decreased soil erodibility. Effectiveness of the treatments varied depending on the types and levels of organic and inorganic materials.

  19. Fourier and granulometry methods on 3D images of soil surfaces for evaluating soil aggregate size distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.; Green, O.; Munkholm, Lars Juhl;

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to present and compare two methods for evaluating soil aggregate size distribution based on high resolution 3D images of the soil surface. The methods for analyzing the images are discrete Fourier transform and granulometry. The results of these methods correlate...... with a measured weight distribution of the soil aggregates. The results have shown that it is possible to distinguish between the cultivated and the uncultivated soil surface. A sensor system suitable for capturing in-situ high resolution 3D images of the soil surface is also described. This sensor system...... is based on a SICK LMS111 laser range scanner....

  20. Effective Free Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapalparvi, Ramesh; Protas, Bartosz

    2010-11-01

    In this investigation we introduce the concept of an "effective free surface" arising as a solution of time--averaged equations in the presence of free boundaries. This work is motivated by applications of optimization theory to problems involving free surfaces, such as droplets impinging on the weld pool surface in welding processes. In such problems the time--dependent governing equations lead to technical difficulties, many of which are alleviated when methods of optimization are applied to a steady problem with effective free surfaces. The corresponding equations are obtained by performing the Reynolds decomposition and averaging of the time--dependent free--boundary equations based on the volume--of--fluid (VoF) formalism. We identify the terms representing the average effect of fluctuating free boundaries which, in analogy with the Reynolds stresses in classical turbulence models, need to be modelled and propose some simple algebraic closures for these terms. We argue that effective free boundaries can be computed using methods of shape optimization and present some results.

  1. Soil carbon sequestration by three perennial legume pastures is greater in deeper soil layers than in the surface soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-K. Guan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic carbon (SOC plays a vital role as both a sink for and source of atmospheric carbon. Revegetation of degraded arable land in China is expected to increase soil carbon sequestration, but the role of perennial legumes on soil carbon stocks in semiarid areas has not been quantified. In this study, we assessed the effect of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. and two locally adapted forage legumes, bush clover (Lespedeza davurica S. and milk vetch (Astragalus adsurgens Pall. on the SOC concentration and SOC stock accumulated annually over a 2 m soil profile, and to estimate the long-term potential for SOC sequestration in the soil under the three forage legumes. The results showed that the concentration of SOC of the bare soil decreased slightly over the 7 years, while 7 years of legume growth substantially increased the concentration of SOC over the 0–2.0 m soil depth measured. Over the 7 year growth period the SOC stocks increased by 24.1, 19.9 and 14.6 Mg C ha−1 under the alfalfa, bush clover and milk vetch stands, respectively, and decreased by 4.2 Mg C ha−1 under bare soil. The sequestration of SOC in the 1–2 m depth of soil accounted for 79, 68 and 74 % of SOC sequestered through the upper 2 m of soil under alfalfa, bush clover and milk vetch, respectively. Conversion of arable land to perennial legume pasture resulted in a significant increase in SOC, particularly at soil depths below 1 m.

  2. Patterns and scaling properties of surface soil moisture in an agricultural landscape: An ecohydrological modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korres, W.; Reichenau, T. G.; Schneider, K.

    2013-08-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable in hydrology, meteorology and agriculture. Soil moisture, and surface soil moisture in particular, is highly variable in space and time. Its spatial and temporal patterns in agricultural landscapes are affected by multiple natural (precipitation, soil, topography, etc.) and agro-economic (soil management, fertilization, etc.) factors, making it difficult to identify unequivocal cause and effect relationships between soil moisture and its driving variables. The goal of this study is to characterize and analyze the spatial and temporal patterns of surface soil moisture (top 20 cm) in an intensively used agricultural landscape (1100 km2 northern part of the Rur catchment, Western Germany) and to determine the dominant factors and underlying processes controlling these patterns. A second goal is to analyze the scaling behavior of surface soil moisture patterns in order to investigate how spatial scale affects spatial patterns. To achieve these goals, a dynamically coupled, process-based and spatially distributed ecohydrological model was used to analyze the key processes as well as their interactions and feedbacks. The model was validated for two growing seasons for the three main crops in the investigation area: Winter wheat, sugar beet, and maize. This yielded RMSE values for surface soil moisture between 1.8 and 7.8 vol.% and average RMSE values for all three crops of 0.27 kg m-2 for total aboveground biomass and 0.93 for green LAI. Large deviations of measured and modeled soil moisture can be explained by a change of the infiltration properties towards the end of the growing season, especially in maize fields. The validated model was used to generate daily surface soil moisture maps, serving as a basis for an autocorrelation analysis of spatial patterns and scale. Outside of the growing season, surface soil moisture patterns at all spatial scales depend mainly upon soil properties. Within the main growing season, larger scale

  3. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel: A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Tests of wind erosion were performed in a controlled-environment wind tunnel to support the development of natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. Barrier performance standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance are expected to mandate a surface layer that is resistant to wind erosion. The purpose of this study was to initiate a series of tests to determine suitable soil and gravel mixtures for such a barrier and to test worst-case surface layer conditions under the influence of high wind speeds. Six mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared, weathered to represent natural wind-blown desert areas, and subjected to controlled wind erosion forces in a wind tunnel. The applied erosive forces, including surface shear forces, were characterized to provide a means of relating wind tunnel results with actual field conditions. Soil particle losses from the surfaces caused by suspension, saltation, and surface creep were monitored by aerosol sample probes and mass balance measurements. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. The effect of soil on cork quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestana, Miguel N; Gomes, Alberto A

    2014-01-01

    The present work aimed to contribute for a better knowledge regarding soil features as cork quality indicators for stoppers. Cork sampling was made in eight Cork oak stands (montados de sobreiro) located in the Plio-Plistocene sedimentary formations of Península de Setúbal in southern Tagus River region. The samples used to classify the cork as stopper for wine bottles were obtained in eight cork oak stands, covering soils of different types of sandstones of the Plio-plistocene. In each stand, we randomly chose five circular plots with 30 m radius and five trees per plot with same stripping conditions determined by: dendrometric features (HD- height stipping, PBH- perimeter at breaster height), trees vegetative condition (defoliation degree); stand features (density, percentage canopy cover); site conditions (soil type and orientation). In the center of each plot a pit was open to characterize the soil profile and to classify the soil. Cork quality for stoppers was evaluated according to porosity, pores/per cm(2) and cork boards thickness. The soil was characterized according to morphological soil profile features (lithology, soil profound, and soil horizons) and chemical soil surface horizon features (organic matter, pH, macro, and micronutrients availability). Based on the variables studied and using the numerical taxonomy, we settled relationships between the cork quality and some soil features. The results indicate: (1) high correlation between the cork caliber and boron, cation exchange capacity, total nitrogen, exchange acidity, and exchangeable magnesium, potassium, calcium, and sodium in soils of theirs cork oaks; (2) the cork porosity is correlated with the number of pores/cm(2) and magnesium soil content; (3) the other soil features have a lower correlation with the caliber, porosity, and the number of pores per cm(2).

  5. Formation of Soil Water Repellency by Laboratory Burning and Its Effect on Soil Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sujung; Im, Sangjun

    2010-05-01

    Fire-induced soil water repellency can vary with burning conditions, and may lead to significant changes in soil hydraulic properties. However, isolation of the effects of soil water repellency from other factors is difficult, particularly under field conditions. This study was conducted to (i) investigate the effects of burning using different plant leaf materials and (ii) of different burning conditions on the formation of soil water repellency, and (iii) isolate the effects of the resulting soil water repellency on soil evaporation from other factors. Burning treatments were performed on the surface of homogeneous fully wettable sand soil contained in a steel frame (60 x 60 cm; 40 cm depth). As controls a sample without a heat treatment, and a heated sample without fuel, were also used. Ignition and heat treatments were carried out with a gas torch. For comparing the effects of different burning conditions, fuel types included oven-dried pine needles (fresh needles of Pinus densiflora), pine needle litter (litter on a coniferous forest floor, P. densiflora + P. rigida), and broad-leaf litter (Quercus mongolica + Q. aliena + Prunus serrulata var. spontanea + other species); fuel loads were 200 g, 300 g, and 500 g; and heating duration was 40 s, 90 s and 180 s. The heating duration was adjusted to control the temperature, based on previous experiments. The temperature was measured continuously at 3-second intervals and logged with two thermometers. After burning, undisturbed soil columns were sampled for subsequent experiments. Water Drop Penetration Time (WDPT) test was performed at every 1 mm depth of the soil columns to measure the severity of soil water repellency and its vertical extent. Soil water repellency was detected following all treatments. As the duration of heating increased, the thickness of the water repellent layer increased, whilst the severity of soil water repellency decreased. As regards fuel amount, the most severe soil water repellency was

  6. Testosterone sorption and desorption: Effects of soil particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yong, E-mail: yqi01@unomaha.edu [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Zhang, Tian C. [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Ren, Yongzheng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Smaller soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates. • The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand. • Small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. • Colloids (clays) have high potential to facilitate the transport of hormones in soil–water environments. - Abstract: Soils contain a wide range of particles of different diameters with different mobility during rainfall events. Effects of soil particles on sorption and desorption behaviors of steroid hormones have not been investigated. In this study, wet sieve washing and repeated sedimentation methods were used to fractionate the soils into five ranges. The sorption and desorption properties and related mechanisms of testosterone in batch reactors filled with fractionated soil particles were evaluated. Results of sorption and desorption kinetics indicate that small soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates than that of big ones. Thermodynamic results show the sorption processes are spontaneous and exothermal. The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand, depending mainly on specific surface area and surface functional groups. The urea control test shows that hydrogen bonding contributes to testosterone sorption onto clay and silt but not on sand. Desorption tests indicate sorption is 36–65% irreversible from clay to sand. Clays have highest desorption hysteresis among these five soil fractions, indicating small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. The results provide indirect evidence on the colloid (clay)-facilitated transport of hormones (micro-pollutants) in soil environments.

  7. Effects of different patterns surface mulching on ground temperature, humidity and soil moisture%不同地表覆盖对地表温度、湿度和土壤水分的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭超; 陈月华; 吴际友

    2014-01-01

    以土壤为对象,研究在高温下5种不同覆盖方式(清耕处理、地膜覆盖、秸秆覆盖、枝叶覆盖、灌木覆盖)对土壤性状的影响。结果表明,5种覆盖方式在高温下对土壤性状产生了影响:地膜覆盖提高了地表温度,且地膜覆盖下的地表温度上升最快,上升幅度最大,秸秆覆盖、枝叶覆盖和灌木覆盖则降低了地表温度,灌木覆盖的降温效果最好;地膜覆盖、秸秆覆盖、枝叶覆盖和灌木覆盖都能提高地表湿度,其中地膜覆盖前期保湿效果最好,后期则低于清耕处理;地膜覆盖的土壤水分散失最慢最少,秸秆覆盖和枝叶覆盖次之,灌木覆盖的水分散失最快最多。%Taking soil as testing object, the effects of different surface mulching patterns (clean tillage, plastic film mulch, straw mulch, litter mulch and shrub mulch) on soil properties have been studied. The results showed that the five surface mulching patterns all had influences on the soil properties under the condition of high temperature. With the patterns of clean tillage and plastic film mulch, the ground temperature were raised and was the fastest-growing and the largest increase;with the patterns of straw mulch, litter mulch and shrub mulch, the ground temperature lowed down and the cooling effect of shrub cover was the best;the patterns of plastic film mulch, straw mulch, litter mulch and shrub mulch all can improve the surface humidity, of them, the plastic film mulch in the earlier stage had the best moisturizing effect, later was lower than clean cultivation;the soil moisture loss covered with plastic film mulch had the least decrease in later stage and that of straw mulch and litter mulch were the next in turn, that of shrub mulch evaporated fastest and greatest.

  8. Massively Parallel Computation of Soil Surface Roughness Parameters on A Fermi GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojie; Song, Changhe

    2016-06-01

    Surface roughness is description of the surface micro topography of randomness or irregular. The standard deviation of surface height and the surface correlation length describe the statistical variation for the random component of a surface height relative to a reference surface. When the number of data points is large, calculation of surface roughness parameters is time-consuming. With the advent of Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) architectures, inherently parallel problem can be effectively solved using GPUs. In this paper we propose a GPU-based massively parallel computing method for 2D bare soil surface roughness estimation. This method was applied to the data collected by the surface roughness tester based on the laser triangulation principle during the field experiment in April 2012. The total number of data points was 52,040. It took 47 seconds on a Fermi GTX 590 GPU whereas its serial CPU version took 5422 seconds, leading to a significant 115x speedup.

  9. Effects of mushroom waste on improvement of reclaimed soil quality in coal mining areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Li GUO; Qian LI; Xin-Ju LI; Yao-Lun ZHAO; Xin-Gang WANG

    2013-01-01

    Restoring soil quality is the main evaluation norm of the reclamation.In order to reveal the effects of mushroom waste on the quality improvement of reclaimed soil in coal mining areas,the physical,chemical and microbial characteristics of soil are studied.The results show clear improvement in the soil after using mushroom waste.Because of human cultivation and fertilization,cultivated soil after reclamation exhibits high comprehensive quality and the index of quality of surface soil reaches 0.64 and 0.73.The average index of surface soil quality is as high as 0.52 and 0.54.In comparison,the quality of reclaimed soil of forest land is low,with average index of 0.40.The effects of mushroom waste are mainly on the surface soil in the first 2 years after the application.After that period,with the decomposition of mushroom waste,soil quality index tends to be the same as the original soil.The quality of surface soil is higher than that of subsoil,especially after the application of mushroom waste,at which point the soil quality reaches a peak at about 15 cm.Cultivated soil after reclamation has great variance in quality,after the coefficient of 24.74%.Mushroom waste can reduce such variation,particularly with long-term use.The variance efficient falls to 3.59% after 3-year application.

  10. The Effect of Row Structure on Soil Moisture Retrieval Accuracy from Passive Microwave Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Xingming

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Row structure causes the anisotropy of microwave brightness temperature (TB of soil surface, and it also can affect soil moisture retrieval accuracy when its influence is ignored in the inversion model. To study the effect of typical row structure on the retrieved soil moisture and evaluate if there is a need to introduce this effect into the inversion model, two ground-based experiments were carried out in 2011. Based on the observed C-band TB, field soil and vegetation parameters, row structure rough surface assumption (Qp model and discrete model, including the effect of row structure, and flat rough surface assumption (Qp model, ignoring the effect of row structure, are used to model microwave TB of soil surface. Then, soil moisture can be retrieved, respectively, by minimizing the difference of the measured and modeled TB. The results show that soil moisture retrieval accuracy based on the row structure rough surface assumption is approximately 0.02 cm3/cm3 better than the flat rough surface assumption for vegetated soil, as well as 0.015 cm3/cm3 better for bare and wet soil. This result indicates that the effect of row structure cannot be ignored for accurately retrieving soil moisture of farmland surface when C-band is used.

  11. The effect of row structure on soil moisture retrieval accuracy from passive microwave data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xingming, Zheng; Kai, Zhao; Yangyang, Li; Jianhua, Ren; Yanling, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Row structure causes the anisotropy of microwave brightness temperature (TB) of soil surface, and it also can affect soil moisture retrieval accuracy when its influence is ignored in the inversion model. To study the effect of typical row structure on the retrieved soil moisture and evaluate if there is a need to introduce this effect into the inversion model, two ground-based experiments were carried out in 2011. Based on the observed C-band TB, field soil and vegetation parameters, row structure rough surface assumption (Q p model and discrete model), including the effect of row structure, and flat rough surface assumption (Q p model), ignoring the effect of row structure, are used to model microwave TB of soil surface. Then, soil moisture can be retrieved, respectively, by minimizing the difference of the measured and modeled TB. The results show that soil moisture retrieval accuracy based on the row structure rough surface assumption is approximately 0.02 cm(3)/cm(3) better than the flat rough surface assumption for vegetated soil, as well as 0.015 cm(3)/cm(3) better for bare and wet soil. This result indicates that the effect of row structure cannot be ignored for accurately retrieving soil moisture of farmland surface when C-band is used.

  12. Microbial effect on soil hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Alex; Rosenzweig, Ravid; Volk, Elazar; Rosenkranz, Hella; Iden, Sascha; Durner, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Although largely ignored, the soil contains large amount of biofilms (attached microbes) that can affect many processes. While biochemical processes are studied, biophysical processes receive only little attention. Biofilms may occupy some of the pore space, and by that affect the soil hydraulic properties. This effect on unsaturated soils, however, was not intensively studied. In this research we directly measure the hydraulic properties, namely the soil's unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function and retention curve, for soils containing real biofilm. To do that we inoculate soil with biofilm-forming bacteria and incubate it with sufficient amounts of nutrient until biofilm is formed. The hydraulic properties of the incubated soil are then measured using several techniques, including multi-step outflow and evaporation method. The longer measurements (evaporation method) are conducted under refrigeration conditions to minimize microbial activity during the experiment. The results show a clear effect of the biofilm, where the biofilm-affected soil (sandy loam in our case) behaves like a much finer soil. This qualitatively makes sense as the biofilm generates an effective pore size distribution that is characterized by smaller pores. However, the effect is much more complex and needs to be studied carefully considering (for example) dual porosity models. We compare our preliminary results with other experiments, including flow-through column experiments and experiments with biofilm analogues. Clearly a better understanding of the way microbial activity alters the hydraulic properties may help designing more efficient bioremediation, irrigation, and other soil-related processes.

  13. Fire effects on soils: the human dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santín, Cristina; Doerr, Stefan H

    2016-06-05

    Soils are among the most valuable non-renewable resources on the Earth. They support natural vegetation and human agro-ecosystems, represent the largest terrestrial organic carbon stock, and act as stores and filters for water. Mankind has impacted on soils from its early days in many different ways, with burning being the first human perturbation at landscape scales. Fire has long been used as a tool to fertilize soils and control plant growth, but it can also substantially change vegetation, enhance soil erosion and even cause desertification of previously productive areas. Indeed fire is now regarded by some as the seventh soil-forming factor. Here we explore the effects of fire on soils as influenced by human interference. Human-induced fires have shaped our landscape for thousands of years and they are currently the most common fires in many parts of the world. We first give an overview of fire effect on soils and then focus specifically on (i) how traditional land-use practices involving fire, such as slash-and-burn or vegetation clearing, have affected and still are affecting soils; (ii) the effects of more modern uses of fire, such as fuel reduction or ecological burns, on soils; and (iii) the ongoing and potential future effects on soils of the complex interactions between human-induced land cover changes, climate warming and fire dynamics.This article is part of the themed issue 'The interaction of fire and mankind'.

  14. IMPROVEMENT EFFECT OF PLAYGROUND SURFACE BY WASTE CRUSHED SHELL MIXING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, Hiroaki; Oda, Kenichi; Higuchi, Emiko; Takano, Morihiro; Tasaki, Hiroshi

    If sandy soil with appropriate gradation is compacted, hard and dense ground will be generated. Even if the soil material is hard enough against shock load, the permeability of the soil decreases significantly. This paper examines the improvement effect of playground surface by waste crushed shell mixing technique. The following conclusions are obtained from the present study: 1. The maximum dry density of the sandy soil increases gradually by mixing the crushed shell. However, if the crushed shell is put into the soil too much, the density decreases conversely. 2. Although the density of the soil sample becomes high by mixing the crushed shell, the coefficient of permeability increases. 3. The soil particles once attached to the shell is not washed away easily. 4. The crushed shell doesn't change the quality of groundwater so much. 5. This repair method is applicable to improvement of playground surface.

  15. Modeling spatial and seasonal soil moisture in a semi arid hillslope: The impact of integrating soil surface seal parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, Shai; Svoray, Tal; Assouline, Shmuel

    2010-05-01

    Modeling hillslope hydrology and the complex and coupled reaction of runoff processes to rainfall, lies in the focus of a growing number of research studies. The ability to characterize and understand the mechanisms underlying the complex hillslope soil moisture patterns, which trigger spatially variable non linear runoff initiation, still remains a current hydrological challenge especially in ungauged catchments. In humid climates, connectivity of transient moisture patches was suggested as a unifying concept for studying thresholds for subsurface flow and redistribution of soil moisture at the hillslope scale. In semiarid areas, however, transient moisture patches control also the differentiation between evaporation and surface runoff and the ability to identify a unifying concept controlling the large variability of soil moisture at the hillslope scale remains an open research gap. At the LTER Lehavim site in the center of Israel (31020' N, 34045' E) a typical hillslope (0.115 km2) was chosen offering different aspects and a classic geomorphologic banding. The annual rainfall is 290 mm, the soils are brown lithosols and arid brown loess and the dominant rock formations are Eocenean limestone and chalk with patches of calcrete. The vegetation is characterised by scattered dwarf shrubs (dominant species Sarcopoterium spinosum) and patches of herbaceous vegetation, mostly annuals, are spread between rocks and dwarf shrubs. An extensive spatial database of soil hydraulic and environmental parameters (e.g. slope, radiation, bulk density) was measured in the field and interpolated to continuous maps using geostatistical techniques and physically based modelling. To explore the effect of soil surface sealing, Mualem and Assouline (1989) equations describing the change in hydraulic parameters resulting from soil seal formation were applied. Two simple indices were developed to describe local evaporation values and contribution of water from rock outcrops to the soil

  16. Effect of soil type and soil management on soil physical, chemical and biological properties in commercial organic olive orchards in Southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Jose Alfonso; Auxiliadora Soriano, Maria; Montes-Borrego, Miguel; Navas, Juan Antonio; Landa, Blanca B.

    2014-05-01

    One of the objectives of organic agriculture is to maintain and improve soil quality, while simultaneously producing an adequate yield. A key element in organic olive production is soil management, which properly implemented can optimize the use of rainfall water enhancing infiltration rates and controlling competition for soil water by weeds. There are different soil management strategies: eg. weed mowing (M), green manure with surface tillage in spring (T), or combination with animal grazing among the trees (G). That variability in soil management combined with the large variability in soil types on which organic olive trees are grown in Southern Spain, difficult the evaluation of the impact of different soil management on soil properties, and yield as well as its interpretation in terms of improvement of soil quality. This communications presents the results and analysis of soil physical, chemical and biological properties on 58 soils in Southern Spain during 2005 and 2006, and analyzed and evaluated in different studies since them. Those 58 soils were sampled in 46 certified commercial organic olive orchards with four soil types as well as 12 undisturbed areas with natural vegetation near the olive orchards. The four soil types considered were Eutric Regosol (RGeu, n= 16), Eutric Cambisol (CMeu, n=16), Calcaric Regosol (RGca, n=13 soils sampled) and Calcic Cambisol (CMcc), and the soil management systems (SMS) include were 10 light tillage (LT), 16 sheep grazing (G), 10 tillage (T), 10 mechanical mowing (M), and 12 undisturbed areas covered by natural vegetation (NV-C and NV-S). Our results indicate that soil management had a significant effect on olive yield as well as on key soil properties. Among these soil properties are physical ones, such as infiltration rate or bulk density, chemical ones, especially organic carbon concentration, and biological ones such as soil microbial respiration and bacterial community composition. Superimpose to that soil

  17. The effect of soil on cork quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Nugent Pestana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to contribute for a better knowledge regarding soil features as cork quality indicators for stoppers.Cork sampling was made in eight Cork oak stands (montados de sobreiro located in different Plio-Plistocene sedimentary formations of Península de Setúbal and Carbonic shistes from paleozoic periods in Saw Grândola, both in southern Tagus River regionThe samples used to classify the cork as stopper for wine bottles were obtained in eight cork oak stands located in Península de Setúbal, south of the River Tagus, covering soils of different types of sandstones of the Plio-plistoceneIn each stand, we randomly chose five circular plots with 30 m radius. Five trees with same stripping conditions determined by the dendrometric features: HD (height stipping, PBH (perimeter at breaster height, and percentage canopy cover, trees vegetative condition (defoliation degree stand features (density, and site conditions (soil type and orientation. In the center of each plot a pit was open to characterize the soil profile and to classify the soil of each plot sampling.Cork quality for stoppers was evaluated according to porosity, pores/per cm 2 and thickness. The soil was characterized according to morphological soil profile features (lithology, soil profound and soil horizons and chemical soil surface horizon features (organic matter, pH, macro and micronutrients availability.Based on the variables studied and using the numerical taxonomy, we settled relationships between the cork quality and some soil features. The results indicate: (1 high correlation between the cork caliber and boron, caption exchange capacity, total nitrogen, exchange acidity and exchangeable magnesium, potassium, calcium and sodium in soils of theirs cork oaks; (2 the cork porosity is correlated with the number of pores/cm2 and magnesium; (3 the other soil features have a lower correlation with the caliber, porosity and the number of pores per cm2.

  18. The effect of soil on cork quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestana, Miguel; Gomes, Alberto

    2014-10-01

    The present work aimed to contribute for a better knowledge regarding soil features as cork quality indicators for stoppers. Cork sampling was made in eight Cork oak stands (montados de sobreiro) located in different Plio-Plistocene sedimentary formations of Península de Setúbal and Carbonic shistes from paleozoic periods in Saw Grândola, both in southern Tagus River region The samples used to classify the cork as stopper for wine bottles were obtained in eight cork oak stands located in “Península de Setúbal”, south of the River Tagus, covering soils of different types of sandstones of the Plio-plistocene In each stand, we randomly chose five circular plots with 30 m radius. Five trees with same stripping conditions determined by the dendrometric features: HD (height stipping, PBH (perimeter at breaster height), and percentage canopy cover, trees vegetative condition (defoliation degree) stand features (density), and site conditions (soil type and orientation). In the center of each plot a pit was open to characterize the soil profile and to classify the soil of each plot sampling. Cork quality for stoppers was evaluated according to porosity, pores/per cm 2 and thickness. The soil was characterized according to morphological soil profile features (lithology, soil profound and soil horizons) and chemical soil surface horizon features (organic matter, pH, macro and micronutrients availability). Based on the variables studied and using the numerical taxonomy, we settled relationships between the cork quality and some soil features. The results indicate: (1) high correlation between the cork caliber and boron, caption exchange capacity, total nitrogen, exchange acidity and exchangeable magnesium, potassium, calcium and sodium in soils of theirs cork oaks; (2) the cork porosity is correlated with the number of pores/cm2 and magnesium; (3) the other soil features have a lower correlation with the caliber, porosity and the number of pores per cm2.

  19. Actual evaporation estimation from infrared measurement of soil surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Pognant

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the hydrological cycle, actual evaporation represents the second most important process in terms of volumes of water transported, second only to the precipitation phenomena. Several methods for the estimation of the Ea were proposed by researchers in scientific literature, but the estimation of the Ea from potential evapotranspiration often requires the knowledge of hard-to-find parameters (e.g.: vegetation morphology, vegetation cover, interception of rainfall by the canopy, evaporation from the canopy surface and uptake of water by plant roots and many existing database are characterized by missing or incomplete information that leads to a rough estimation of the actual evaporation amount. Starting from the above considerations, the aim of this study is to develop and validate a method for the estimation of the Ea based on two steps: i the potential evaporation estimation by using the meteorological data (i.e. Penman-Monteith; ii application of a correction factor based on the infrared soil surface temperature measurements. The dataset used in this study were collected during two measurement campaigns conducted both in a plain testing site (Grugliasco, Italy, and in a mountain South-East facing slope (Cogne, Italy. During those periods, hourly measurement of air temperature, wind speed, infrared surface temperature, soil heat flux, and soil water content were collected. Results from the dataset collected in the two testing sites show a good agreement between the proposed method and reference methods used for the Ea estimation.

  20. Effect of soil roughness on the inversion of off-ground monostatic GPR signal for noninvasive quantification of soil properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambot, S.; Antoine, M.; Vanclooster, M.; Slob, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a laboratory experiment that investigates the effect of soil surface roughness on the identification of the soil electromagnetic properties from full-wave inversion of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data in the frequency domain. The GPR system consists of an ultrawide band stepped-frequ

  1. Space Weathering in the Fine Size Fractions of Lunar Soils: Soil Maturity Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Taylor, L. A.; Pieters, C.; Morris, R. V.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of space weathering on the optical properties of lunar materials have been well documented. These effects include a reddened continuum slope, lowered albedo, and attenuated absorption features in reflectance spectra of lunar soils as compared to finely comminuted rocks from the same Apollo sites. However, the regolith processes that cause these effects are not well known, nor is the petrographic setting of the products of these processes fully understood. A Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium has been formed with the purpose of systematically integrating chemical and mineralogical data with the optical properties of lunar soils. Understanding space-weathering effects is critical in order to fully integrate the lunar sample collection with remotely-sensed data from recent robotic missions (e.g., Lunar Prospector, Clementine, and Galileo) We have shown that depositional processes (condensation of impact-derived vapors, sputter deposits, accreted impact material, e.g., splash glass, spherules, etc.) are a major factor in the modification of the optical surfaces of lunar regolith materials. In mature soils, it is the size and distribution of the nanophase metal in the soil grains that has the major effect on optical properties. In this report, we compare and contrast the space-weathering effects in an immature and a mature soil with similar elemental compositions. For this study, we analyzed effects). The nanophase Fe in these rims probably accounts for a significant fraction of the increase in Is/FeO measured in these size fractions. In addition to the rims, the majority of particles also show abundant accreted material in the form of glass splashes and spherules that also contain nanophase Fe. In stark contrast, the surfaces of the mineral grains in the 71061 sample are relatively prisitine, as only about 14% of the mineral grains in the sample exhibited amorphous rims. Furthermore, the mineral particles are more angular and show greater surface

  2. Assimilation of ASCAT near-surface soil moisture into the SIM hydrological model over France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Draper

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether the assimilation of remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture observations might benefit an operational hydrological model, specifically Météo-France's SAFRAN-ISBA-MODCOU (SIM model. Soil moisture data derived from ASCAT backscatter observations are assimilated into SIM using a Simplified Extended Kalman Filter (SEKF over 3.5 years. The benefit of the assimilation is tested by comparison to a delayed cut-off version of SIM, in which the land surface is forced with more accurate atmospheric analyses, due to the availability of additional atmospheric observations after the near-real time data cut-off. However, comparing the near-real time and delayed cut-off SIM models revealed that the main difference between them is a dry bias in the near-real time precipitation forcing, which resulted in a dry bias in the root-zone soil moisture and associated surface moisture flux forecasts. While assimilating the ASCAT data did reduce the root-zone soil moisture dry bias (by nearly 50%, this was more likely due to a bias within the SEKF, than due to the assimilation having accurately responded to the precipitation errors. Several improvements to the assimilation are identified to address this, and a bias-aware strategy is suggested for explicitly correcting the model bias. However, in this experiment the moisture added by the SEKF was quickly lost from the model surface due to the enhanced surface fluxes (particularly drainage induced by the wetter soil moisture states. Consequently, by the end of each winter, during which frozen conditions prevent the ASCAT data from being assimilated, the model land surface had returned to its original (dry-biased climate. This highlights that it would be more effective to address the precipitation bias directly, than to correct it by constraining the model soil moisture through data assimilation.

  3. Operational assimilation of ASCAT surface soil wetness at the Met Office

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dharssi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, no extensive global soil moisture observation network exists. Therefore, the Met Office global soil moisture analysis scheme has instead used observations of screen temperature and humidity. A number of new space-borne remote sensing systems, operating at microwave frequencies, have been developed that provide a more direct retrieval of surface soil moisture. These systems are attractive since they provide global data coverage and the horizontal resolution is similar to weather forecasting models. Several studies show that measurements of normalised backscatter (surface soil wetness from the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT on the meteorological operational (MetOp satellite contain good quality information about surface soil moisture. This note describes methods to convert ASCAT surface soil wetness measurements to volumetric surface soil moisture together with bias correction and quality control. A computationally efficient nudging scheme is used to assimilate the ASCAT volumetric surface soil moisture data into the Met Office global soil moisture analysis. This ASCAT nudging scheme works alongside a soil moisture nudging scheme that uses observations of screen temperature and humidity. Trials, using the Met Office global Unified Model, of the ASCAT nudging scheme show a positive impact on forecasts of screen temperature and humidity for the tropics, North America and Australia. A comparison with in-situ soil moisture measurements from the US also indicates that assimilation of ASCAT surface soil wetness improves the soil moisture analysis. Assimilation of ASCAT surface soil wetness measurements became operational during July 2010.

  4. A temperature prediction-correction method for estimating surface soil heat flux from soil temperature and moisture data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Surface soil heat flux is a component of surface energy budget and its estimation is needed in land-atmosphere interaction studies. This paper develops a new simple method to estimate soil heat flux from soil temperature and moisture observations. It gives soil temperature profile with the thermal diffusion equation and, then, adjusts the temperature profile with differences between observed and computed soil temperatures. The soil flux is obtained through integrating the soil temperature profile. Compared with previous methods, the new method does not require accurate thermal conductivity. Case studies based on observations, synthetic data, and sensitivity analyses show that the new method is preferable and the results obtained with it are not sensitive to the availability of temperature data in the topsoil. In addition, we pointed out that the soil heat flux measured with a heat-plate can be quite erroneous in magnitude though its phase is accurate.

  5. Fixation of soil surface contamination using natural polysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Natural polysaccharides were evaluated as alternatives to commercially available dust-control agents for application in buried-waste and contaminated-soil remediation situations. Materials were identified and evaluated with specific criteria in mind: the materials must be environmentally benign and must not introduce any additional hazardous materials; they must be effective for at least 2 or 3 days, but they do not necessarily have to be effective for more than 2 to 3 weeks; they should be relatively resistant to light traffic; they must not interfere with subsequent soil treatment techniques, especially soil washing; and they must be relatively inexpensive. Two products, a pregelled potato starch and a mixture of carbohydrates derived from sugar beets, were selected for evaluation. Testing included small- and large-scale field demonstrations, laboratory physical property analyses, and wind-tunnel evaluations.

  6. On the Soil Roughness Parameterization Problem in Soil Moisture Retrieval of Bare Surfaces from Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoest, Niko E C; Lievens, Hans; Wagner, Wolfgang; Álvarez-Mozos, Jesús; Moran, M Susan; Mattia, Francesco

    2008-07-15

    Synthetic Aperture Radar has shown its large potential for retrieving soil moisture maps at regional scales. However, since the backscattered signal is determined by several surface characteristics, the retrieval of soil moisture is an ill-posed problem when using single configuration imagery. Unless accurate surface roughness parameter values are available, retrieving soil moisture from radar backscatter usually provides inaccurate estimates. The characterization of soil roughness is not fully understood, and a large range of roughness parameter values can be obtained for the same surface when different measurement methodologies are used. In this paper, a literature review is made that summarizes the problems encountered when parameterizing soil roughness as well as the reported impact of the errors made on the retrieved soil moisture. A number of suggestions were made for resolving issues in roughness parameterization and studying the impact of these roughness problems on the soil moisture retrieval accuracy and scale.

  7. Tree species effects on calcium cycling: The role of calcium uptake in deep soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, F.A.; Smits, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Soil acidity and calcium (Ca) availability in the surface soil differ substantially beneath sugar maple (Acer saccharum) and eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) trees in a mixed forest in northwestern Connecticut. We determined the effect of pumping of Ca from deep soil (rooting zone below 20-cm

  8. Describing soil surface microrelief by crossover length and fractal dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vidal Vázquez

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurate description of soil surface topography is essential because different tillage tools produce different soil surface roughness conditions, which in turn affects many processes across the soil surface boundary. Advantages of fractal analysis in soil microrelief assessment have been recognised but the use of fractal indices in practice remains challenging. There is also little information on how soil surface roughness decays under natural rainfall conditions. The objectives of this work were to investigate the decay of initial surface roughness induced by natural rainfall under different soil tillage systems and to compare the performances of a classical statistical index and fractal microrelief indices. Field experiments were performed on an Oxisol at Campinas, São Paulo State (Brazil. Six tillage treatments, namely, disc harrow, disc plow, chisel plow, disc harrow + disc level, disc plow + disc level and chisel plow + disc level were tested. Measurements were made four times, firstly just after tillage and subsequently with increasing amounts of natural rainfall. Duplicated measurements were taken per treatment and date, yielding a total of 48 experimental surfaces. The sampling scheme was a square grid with 25×25 mm point spacing and the plot size was 1350×1350 mm, so that each data set consisted of 3025 individual elevation points. Statistical and fractal indices were calculated both for oriented and random roughness conditions, i.e. after height reading have been corrected for slope and for slope and tillage tool marks. The main drawback of the standard statistical index random roughness, RR, lies in its no spatial nature. The fractal approach requires two indices, fractal dimension, D, which describes how roughness changes with scale, and crossover length, l, specifying the variance of surface microrelief at a reference scale. Fractal parameters D and l, were estimated by two independent self-affine models

  9. Aging effects on molybdate lability in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Jason K; McLaughlin, Michael J; Ma, Yibing; Ajiboye, Babasola

    2012-10-01

    Aging reactions in soils can influence the lability and hence bioavailability of added metals in soils through their removal from labile pools into pools from which desorption is slow (non-labile pools). The aims of this study were to examine the effect of aging reactions on the lability of soluble molybdate (MoO(4)(2-)) added into soils with varying physical and chemical properties and develop models to predict changes in the labile pool of MoO(4)(2-) in soils with incubation time. Soils were spiked with soluble MoO(4)(2-) at quantities sufficient to inhibit barley root growth by 10% (EC(10)) or 90% (EC(90)) and incubated for up to 18 months. The labile pool of MoO(4)(2-) (E value) was observed to decrease in soils with incubation time, particularly in soils with high clay content. A strong relationship was observed between measures of MoO(4)(2-) lability in soils determined using E and L value techniques (R(2)=0.98) suggesting E values provided a good measure of the potential plant available pool of MoO(4)(2-) in soils. A regression model was developed that indicates clay content and incubation time were the most important factors affecting the labile pool of MoO(4)(2-) in soils with time after addition (R(2)=0.70-0.75). The aging model developed suggests soluble MoO(4)(2-) will be removed into non-labile pools more rapidly with time in neutral to alkaline clay soils than in acidic sandy soils. Labile MoO(4)(2-) concentrations in molybdenum (Mo) contaminated soils was found to be <10% of the total Mo concentrations in soils.

  10. Controlling factors of surface soil moisture temporal stability at watershed scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lingna; Chen, Xi; Dong, Jianzhi; Gao, Man

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture plays a significant role in the land surface-atmosphere interactions. Temporal stability was frequently used for estimating areal mean soil moisture using limited number of point measurements. This study investigated the factors that determine soil moisture temporal stability using simulated high spatial resolution soil moisture data at watershed scale. Results show locations under dominate vegetation cover and with low topographic wetness index (TI) values are likely to provide reasonable areal mean soil moisture estimates. We demonstrated that including the information of vegetation cover and TI can effectively reduce the number of the sampling locations that required for determining the representative point. The length of sampling period is also shown to be important in correctly determining the representative point. When 10 sampling points were used, a sampling period of approximately 300 days can provide robust areal mean soil moisture estimates of the entire study period of 9 years. The presented study may be useful for improving our skills in applying the temporal stability method for areal mean soil moisture estimating, and hence remote sensing product validation.

  11. A Variational Method for Estimating Near-Surface Soil Moisture and Surface Heat Fluxes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shuwen; ZHANG Weidong; QIU Chongjian

    2007-01-01

    A variational data assimilation method is proposed to estimate the near-surface soil moisture and surface sensible and latent heat fluxes. The method merges the five parts into a cost function, I.e., the differences of wind, potential temperature, and specific humidity gradient between observations and those computed by the profile method, the difference of latent heat fluxes calculated using the ECMWF land surface evaporation scheme and the profile method, and a weak constraint for surface energy balance. By using an optimal algorithm, the best solutions are found. The method is tested with the data collected at Feixi Station (31.41°N, 117.08°E) supported by the China Heavy Rain Experiment and Study (HeRES) during 7-30 June 2001. The results show that estimated near-surface soil moistures can quickly respond to rainfall, and their temporal variation is consistent with that of measurements of average soil moisture over 15-cm top depth with a maximum error less than 0.03 m3 m-3. The surface heat fluxes calculated by this method are consistent with those by the Bowen ratio method, but at the same time it can overcome the instability problem occurring in the Bowen ratio method when the latter is about -1. Meanwhile, the variational method is more accurate than the profile method in terms of satisfying the surface energy balance. The sensitivity tests also show that the variational method is the most stable one among the three methods.

  12. The Effects of Wildfire on Soil Moisture Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanarek, M.; Cardenas, M.

    2013-12-01

    Moisture dynamics in the critical zone have significant implications for a variety of hydrologic processes, from water availability to plants to infiltration and groundwater recharge rates. These processes are perturbed by events such as wildfires, which may have long-lasting impacts. In September 2011, the most destructive wildfire in Texas history occurred in and around Bastrop State Park, which was significantly affected; thus we take advantage of a rare opportunity to study soil moisture under such burned conditions. A 165 m long transect bridging burned and unburned areas was established within the 'Lost Pines' of the park. Soil moisture and soil temperature were monitored and estimated using a variety of methods, including 2D electrical resistivity imaging (using dipole-dipole and Schlumberger configurations), surface permittivity measurements (ThetaProbe), permittivity-based soil moisture profiling (PR2 profile probes), and installation of thermistors. Field measurements were collected at approximately one-month intervals to study temporal and seasonal effects on soil moisture and temperature in this area. Greater soil moisture and lower resistivity were found near the surface at the heavily burned end of the transect, where trees have been largely killed by the fire and grasses now dominate, and very low near-surface soil moisture and higher resistivity were found at the opposite end, which is still populated by pine trees. These variations can likely be attributed to the vegetative variations between the two ends of the transect, with trees consuming more water at one end and the ground cover of grasses and mosses consuming less water and helping reduce evaporation at the burned end. Higher clay content at the burned end of the transect could also be a factor in greater soil moisture retention there. Given the higher moisture content throughout the soil profile at the heavily burned end of the transect, this could be an indication of greater infiltration

  13. Legacy effects of grassland management on soil carbon to depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Susan E; Smart, Simon M; Quirk, Helen; Tallowin, Jerry R B; Mortimer, Simon R; Shiel, Robert S; Wilby, Andrew; Bardgett, Richard D

    2016-08-01

    The importance of managing land to optimize carbon sequestration for climate change mitigation is widely recognized, with grasslands being identified as having the potential to sequester additional carbon. However, most soil carbon inventories only consider surface soils, and most large-scale surveys group ecosystems into broad habitats without considering management intensity. Consequently, little is known about the quantity of deep soil carbon and its sensitivity to management. From a nationwide survey of grassland soils to 1 m depth, we show that carbon in grassland soils is vulnerable to management and that these management effects can be detected to considerable depth down the soil profile, albeit at decreasing significance with depth. Carbon concentrations in soil decreased as management intensity increased, but greatest soil carbon stocks (accounting for bulk density differences), were at intermediate levels of management. Our study also highlights the considerable amounts of carbon in subsurface soil below 30 cm, which is missed by standard carbon inventories. We estimate grassland soil carbon in Great Britain to be 2097 Tg C to a depth of 1 m, with ~60% of this carbon being below 30 cm. Total stocks of soil carbon (t ha(-1) ) to 1 m depth were 10.7% greater at intermediate relative to intensive management, which equates to 10.1 t ha(-1) in surface soils (0-30 cm), and 13.7 t ha(-1) in soils from 30 to 100 cm depth. Our findings highlight the existence of substantial carbon stocks at depth in grassland soils that are sensitive to management. This is of high relevance globally, given the extent of land cover and large stocks of carbon held in temperate managed grasslands. Our findings have implications for the future management of grasslands for carbon storage and climate mitigation, and for global carbon models which do not currently account for changes in soil carbon to depth with management.

  14. Assimilation of ASCAT near-surface soil moisture into the French SIM hydrological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Draper

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of assimilating near-surface soil moisture into the SAFRAN-ISBA-MODCOU (SIM hydrological model over France is examined. Specifically, the root-zone soil moisture in the ISBA land surface model is constrained over three and a half years, by assimilating the ASCAT-derived surface degree of saturation product, using a Simplified Extended Kalman Filter. In this experiment ISBA is forced with the near-real time SAFRAN analysis, which analyses the variables required to force ISBA from relevant observations available before the real time data cut-off. The assimilation results are tested against ISBA forecasts generated with a higher quality delayed cut-off SAFRAN analysis. Ideally, assimilating the ASCAT data will constrain the ISBA surface state to correct for errors in the near-real time SAFRAN forcing, the most significant of which was a substantial dry bias caused by a dry precipitation bias. The assimilation successfully reduced the mean root-zone soil moisture bias, relative to the delayed cut-off forecasts, by close to 50 % of the open-loop value. The improved soil moisture in the model then led to significant improvements in the forecast hydrological cycle, reducing the drainage, runoff, and evapotranspiration biases (by 17 %, 11 %, and 70 %, respectively. When coupled to the MODCOU hydrogeological model, the ASCAT assimilation also led to improved streamflow forecasts, increasing the mean discharge ratio, relative to the delayed cut off forecasts, from 0.68 to 0.76. These results demonstrate that assimilating near-surface soil moisture observations can effectively constrain the SIM model hydrology, while also confirming the accuracy of the ASCAT surface degree of saturation product. This latter point highlights how assimilation experiments can contribute towards the difficult issue of validating remotely sensed land surface observations over large spatial scales.

  15. Organic carbon and nutrients (N, P in surface soil horizons in a non-glaciated catchment, SW Spitsbergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymański Wojciech

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in the soils of the High Arctic play an important role in the context of global warming, biodiversity, and richness of tundra vegetation. The main aim of the present study was to determine the content and spatial distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC, total nitrogen (Ntot, and total phosphorus (Ptot in the surface horizons of Arctic soils obtained from the lower part of the Fuglebekken catchment in Spitsbergen as an example of a small non-glaciated catchment representing uplifted marine terraces of the Svalbard Archipelago. The obtained results indicate that surface soil horizons in the Fuglebekken catchment show considerable differences in content of SOC, Ntot, and Ptot. This mosaic is related to high variability of soil type, local hydrology, vegetation (type and quantity, and especially location of seabird nesting colony. The highest content of SOC, Ntot, and Ptot occurs in soil surface horizons obtained from sites fertilized by seabird guano and located along streams flowing from the direction of the seabird colony. The content of SOC, Ntot, and Ptot is strongly negatively correlated with distance from seabird colony indicating a strong influence of the birds on the fertility of the studied soils and indirectly on the accumulation of soil organic matter. The lowest content of SOC, Ntot, and Ptot occurs in soil surface horizons obtained from the lateral moraine of the Hansbreen glacier and from sites in the close vicinity of the lateral moraine. The content of Ntot, Ptot, and SOC in soil surface horizons are strongly and positively correlated with one another, i.e. the higher the content of nutrients, the higher the content of SOC. The spatial distribution of SOC, Ntot, and Ptot in soils of the Hornsund area in SW Spitsbergen reflects the combined effects of severe climate conditions and periglacial processes. Seabirds play a crucial role in nutrient enrichment in these weakly developed soils.

  16. Spatial and temporal distribution of cyanobacterial soil crusts in the Kalahari: Implications for soil surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A. D.; Dougill, A. J.

    2007-03-01

    Localised patterns of erosion and deposition in vegetated semi-arid rangelands have been shown to influence ecological change and biogeochemical cycles. In the flat, vegetated Kalahari rangelands of Southern Africa the factors regulating erodibility of the fine sand soils and the erosivity of wind regimes require further investigation. This paper reports on the spatial and temporal patterns of cyanobacterial soil crust cover from ten sites at five sampling locations in the semi-arid Kalahari and discusses the likely impact on factors regulating surface erodibility and erosivity. Cyanobacterial soil crust cover on Kalahari Sand varied between 11% and 95% of the ground surface and was higher than previously reported. Cover was inversely related to grazing with the lowest crust cover found close to boreholes and the highest in the Game Reserve and Wildlife Management Zone. In grazed areas, crusts form under the protective canopies of the thorny shrub Acacia mellifera. Fenced plot data showed that crusts recover quickly from disturbance, with a near complete surface crust cover forming within 15 months of disturbance. Crust development is restricted by burial by wind blown sediment and by raindrop impact. Crusts had significantly greater organic matter and total nitrogen compared to unconsolidated surfaces. Crusts also significantly increased the compressive strength of the surface (and thus decreased erodibility) and changed the surface roughness. Establishing exactly how these changes affect aeolian erosion requires further process-based studies. The proportion of shear velocity acting on the surface in this complex mixed bush-grass-crust environment will be the key to understanding how crusts affect erodibility.

  17. Plant and soil modifications by continuous surface effluent application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedesco, M.J.; Levien, R. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. of Solos; Mohrdieck, F.G.; Rodrigues, N.R. [CORSAN-SITEL, Triunfo, RS (Brazil). Polo Petroquimico do Sul. Dept. de Operacao e Manutencao; Flores, A.I.P.

    1993-12-31

    In order to study the effects on soil and plants of the liquid effluent generated by a the Integrated Liquid Effluent Treatment System of a large Brazilian petrochemical complex, a field study was conducted in four areas which received the effluent and compared to control sites. This work presents some results of this study. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. Calibration of effective soil hydraulic parameters of heterogeneous soil profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jhorar, R.K.; Dam, van J.C.; Bastiaanssen, W.G.M.; Feddes, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Distributed hydrological models are useful tools to analyse the performance of irrigation systems at different levels. For the successful application of these models, it is imperative that effective soil hydraulic parameters at the scale of model application are known. The majority of previous

  19. Modelling and interpreting biologically crusted dryland soil sub-surface structure using automated micropenetrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoon, Stephen R.; Felde, Vincent J. M. N. L.; Drahorad, Sylvie L.; Felix-Henningsen, Peter

    2015-04-01

    laboratory, and in-situ field studies. In particular, we discuss the nature and detection of surface and buried (fossil) subsurface Biological Soil Crusts (BSCs), voids, macroscopic particles and compositional layers. The strength of surface BSCs and the occurrence of buried BSCs and layers has been detected at sub millimetre scales to depths of 40mm. Our measurements and field observations of PR show the importance of morphological layering to overall BSC functions (Felde et al. 2015). We also discuss the effect of penetrometer shaft and probe-tip profiles upon the theoretical and experimental curves, EMP resolution and reproducibility, demonstrating how the model enables voids, buried biological soil crusts, exotic particles, soil horizons and layers to be distinguished one from another. This represents a potentially important contribution to advancing understanding of the relationship between BSCs and dryland soil structure. References: Drahorad SL, Felix-Henningsen P. (2012) An electronic micropenetrometer (EMP) for field measurements of biological soil crust stability, J. Plant Nutr. Soil Sci., 175, 519-520 Felde V.J.M.N.L., Drahorad S.L., Felix-Henningsen P., Hoon S.R. (2015) Ongoing oversanding induces biological soil crust layering - a new approach for BSC structure elucidation determined from high resolution penetration resistance data (submitted) Grunwald, S., Rooney D.J., McSweeney K., Lowery B. (2001) Development of pedotransfer functions for a profile cone penetrometer, Geoderma, 100, 25-47 Van Herwijnen A., Bellaire S., Schweizer J. (2009) Comparison of micro-structural snowpack parameters derived from penetration resistance measurements with fracture character observations from compression tests, Cold Regions Sci. {& Technol.}, 59, 193-201

  20. Effects of cattle-slurry treatment by acidification and separation on nitrogen dynamics and global warming potential after surface application to an acidic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangueiro, David; Pereira, José; Bichana, André; Surgy, Sónia; Cabral, Fernanda; Coutinho, João

    2015-10-01

    Cattle-slurry (liquid manure) application to soil is a common practice to provide nutrients and organic matter for crop growth but it also strongly impacts the environment. The objective of the present study was to assess the efficiency of cattle-slurry treatment by solid-liquid separation and/or acidification on nitrogen dynamics and global warming potential (GWP) following application to an acidic soil. An aerobic laboratory incubation was performed over 92 days with a Dystric Cambisol amended with raw cattle-slurry or separated liquid fraction (LF) treated or not by acidification to pH 5.5 by addition of sulphuric acid. Soil mineral N contents and NH3, N2O, CH4 and CO2 emissions were measured. Results obtained suggest that the acidification of raw cattle-slurry reduced significantly NH3 emissions (-88%) but also the GWP (-28%) while increased the N availability relative to raw cattle-slurry (15% of organic N applied mineralised against negative mineralisation in raw slurry). However, similar NH3 emissions and GWP were observed in acidified LF and non-acidified LF treatments. On the other hand, soil application of acidified cattle-slurry rather than non-acidified LF should be preferred attending the lower costs associated to acidification compared to solid-liquid separation. It can then be concluded that cattle-slurry acidification is a solution to minimise NH3 emissions from amended soil and an efficient strategy to decrease the GWP associated with slurry application to soil. Furthermore, the more intense N mineralisation observed with acidified slurry should lead to a higher amount of plant available N and consequently to higher crop yields.

  1. The Presence of Plants Alters the Effect of Soil Moisture on Soil C Decomposition in Two Different Soil Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, F. A.; Cheng, W.

    2005-12-01

    While it is well known that soil moisture directly affects microbial activity and soil C decomposition, it is unclear if the presence of plants alters these effects through rhizosphere processes. We studied soil moisture effects on soil C decomposition with and without sunflower and soybean. Plants were grown in two different soil types with soil moisture contents of 45 and 85% of field capacity in a greenhouse experiment. We continuously labeled plants with depleted 13C, which allowed us to separate plant-derived CO2-C from original soil-derived CO2-C in soil respiration measurements. We observed an overall increase in soil-derived CO2-C efflux in the presence of plants (priming effect) in both soils with on average a greater priming effect in the high soil moisture treatment (60% increase in soil-derived CO2-C compared to control) than in the low soil moisture treatment (37% increase). Greater plant biomass in the high soil moisture treatment contributed to greater priming effects, but priming effects remained significantly higher after correcting for plant biomass. Possibly, root exudation of labile C may have increased more than plant biomass and may have become more effective in stimulating microbial decomposition in the higher soil moisture treatment. Our results indicate that changing soil moisture conditions can significantly alter rhizosphere effects on soil C decomposition.

  2. EFFECTS OF SOIL FAUNA ON LITTER DECOMPOSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Forest litter is the physical makeup part of forest ecosystem. The rate of decomposition of forest litter is low in temperate and cool temperate zones. There is important significance to search and utilize the function of soil animals, in order to probe the material circulation and energy flow in forest ecosystem. We selected three kinds of mesh bag with different mesh size, in which, large pore mesh bag is large enough to permit the activities of all kinds of soil animals, medium mesh bag is designed to exclude the function of soil macrofauna, while small mesh bag is small enough to exclude the effects of any kind of soil animals as far as possible. The decomposition time is three years. The studying results show that: the decomposing speed of the bags with big meshes, under functions of all kinds of soil animals, faster than the bags with medium meshes, under functions of medium and small soil animals, as well as the bags with small meshes that excluding all possibility of functions of soil animals; in the process of decomposition of litter, relationship of the litter lost weight with number of soil animals is not obvious clearly; the degree of functions of soil animals to soft litter higher than hard litter; according to the analysis of diversity index, no regular changes will happen to the diversity of soil animals as the time of decomposing samples lengthen.

  3. Laboratory-Measured Rainfall Effects on LWIR Soil Reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howington, S. E.; Ballard, J., Jr.; Wilhelms, S.

    2012-12-01

    The long-wave infrared reflectance of soils will often have distinct spectral characteristics that depend on the soil's physical and spectral properties. Rainfall has the effect of sorting soil particles at the ground surface, thus changing its long-wave infrared reflectance. This study examines how rainfall alters the measured directional-hemispherical thermal infrared (8-14 μm) spectral reflectance by comparing disturbed soil with undisturbed soil and pre-rain with post-rain conditions. The study uses a soil with a specified sand/silt ratio and a calibrated, laboratory rainfall simulator. For an accumulated rainfall of 8 cm, the mean disturbed soil thermal infrared spectral reflectance within 8.1 - 9.2 μm waveband increases from an initial reflectance of 13 percent to a maximum reflectance of 31 percent. Sixty percent of this reflectance change occurred with only 1 cm accumulated rainfall. This study shows that, for this described disturbed sand/silt soil mixture, small accumulated rainfall amounts significantly alter the directional-hemispherical thermal infrared spectral reflectance.

  4. Multifactor analysis and simulation of the surface runoff and soil infiltration at different slope gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Kang, Q.; Yang, J. X.; Jin, P. W.

    2017-08-01

    The surface runoff and soil infiltration exert significant influence on soil erosion. The effects of slope gradient/length (SG/SL), individual rainfall amount/intensity (IRA/IRI), vegetation cover (VC) and antecedent soil moisture (ASM) on the runoff depth (RD) and soil infiltration (INF) were evaluated in a series of natural rainfall experiments in the South of China. RD is found to correlate positively with IRA, IRI, and ASM factors and negatively with SG and VC. RD decreased followed by its increase with SG and ASM, it increased with a further decrease with SL, exhibited a linear growth with IRA and IRI, and exponential drop with VC. Meanwhile, INF exhibits a positive correlation with SL, IRA and IRI and VC, and a negative one with SG and ASM. INF was going up and then down with SG, linearly rising with SL, IRA and IRI, increasing by a logit function with VC, and linearly falling with ASM. The VC level above 60% can effectively lower the surface runoff and significantly enhance soil infiltration. Two RD and INF prediction models, accounting for the above six factors, were constructed using the multiple nonlinear regression method. The verification of those models disclosed a high Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient and low root-mean-square error, demonstrating good predictability of both models.

  5. Loss of surface horizon of an irrigated soil detected by radiometric images of normalized difference vegetation index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian Sallesses, Leonardo; Aparicio, Virginia Carolina; Costa, Jose Luis

    2017-04-01

    The use of the soil in the Humid Pampa of Argentina has changed since the mid-1990s from agricultural-livestock production (that included pastures with direct grazing) to a purely agricultural production. Also, in recent years the area under irrigation by central pivot has been increased to 150%. The waters used for irrigation are sodium carbonates. The combination of irrigation and rain increases the sodium absorption ratio of soil (SARs), consequently raising the clay dispersion and reducing infiltration. This implies an increased risk of soil loss. A reduction in the development of white clover crop (Trifolium repens L.) was observed at an irrigation plot during 2015 campaign. The clover was planted in order to reduce the impact of two maize (Zea mays L.) campaigns under irrigation, which had increased soil SAR and deteriorated soil structure. SPOT-5 radiometric normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) images were used to determine two zones of high and low production. In each zone, four random points were selected for further geo-referenced field sampling. Two geo-referenced measures of effective depth and surface soil sampling were carried out in each point. Texture of soil samples was determined by Pipette Method of Sedimentation Analysis. Data exploratory analysis showed that low production zone had a media effective depth = 80 cm and silty clay loam texture, while high production zone had a media effective depth > 140 cm and silt loam texture. The texture class of the low production zone did not correspond to prior soil studies carried out by the INTA (National Institute of Agricultural Technology), which showed that those soil textures were silt loam at surface and silty clay loam at sub-surface. The loss of the A horizon is proposed as a possible explanation, but further research is required. Besides, the need of a soil cartography actualization, which integrates new satellite imaging technologies and geo-referenced measurements with soil sensors is

  6. Rhizosphere priming effects in two contrasting soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Davidson; Kirk, Guy; Ritz, Karl

    2015-04-01

    Inputs of fresh plant-derived carbon may stimulate the turnover of existing soil organic matter by so-called priming effects. Priming may occur directly, as a result of nutrient 'mining' by existing microbial communities, or indirectly via population adjustments. However the mechanisms are poorly understood. We planted C4 Kikuyu grass (Pennisetum clandestinum) in pots with two contrasting C3 soils (clayey, fertile TB and sandy, acid SH), and followed the soil CO2 efflux and its δ13C. The extent of C deposition in the rhizosphere was altered by intermittently clipping the grass in half the pots; there were also unplanted controls. At intervals, pots were destructively sampled for root and shoot biomass. Total soil CO2 efflux was measured using a gas-tight PVC chamber fitted over bare soil, and connected to an infra-red gas analyser; the δ13C of efflux was measured in air sub-samples withdrawn by syringe. The extent of priming was inferred from the δ13C of efflux and the δ13C of the plant and soil end-members. In unclipped treatments, in both soils, increased total soil respiration and rhizosphere priming effects (RPE) were apparent compared to the unplanted controls. The TB soil had greater RPE overall. The total respiration in clipped TB soil was significantly greater than in the unplanted controls, but in the clipped SH soil it was not significantly different from the controls. Clipping affected plant C partitioning with greater allocation to shoot regrowth from about 4 weeks after planting. Total plant biomass decreased in the order TB unclipped > SH unclipped >TB clipped > SH clipped. The results are consistent with priming driven by microbial activation stimulated by rhizodeposits and by nitrogen demand from the growing plants under N limited conditions. Our data suggest that photosynthesis drives RPE and soil differences may alter the rate and intensity of RPE but not the direction.

  7. Effects of olive mill wastes added to olive grove soils on erosion and soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-García, Beatriz; Parras-Alcántara, Luis

    2014-05-01

    ha-1 in CTa and 136.3 Mg ha-1 in CTol; and the TN stock 12.1, 13.9 and 16.1 Mg ha-1 in CT, CTa and CTol, respectively. In addition, both oil mill wastes contributed to delay runoff generation and erosion, enhancing the infiltration of rainwater. Furthermore, application of the wastes improved soil quality (SRs of SOC were greater than 2). So the addition of these oil mill wastes to agricultural soils has become a viable solution to their disposal; not only do they enrich deficient soils with organic matter, but also improve their physical and chemical properties, even decrease soil erosion, especially olive leaves. REFERENCES Lozano-García, B., Parras-Alcántara, L., del Toro, M., 2011. The effects of agricultural management with oil mill by-products on surface soil properties, runoff and soil losses in southern Spain. Catena 85, 187-193. Lozano-García, B., Parras-Alcántara, L., 2013. Short-term effects of olive mill by-products on soil organic carbon, total N, C:N ratio and stratification ratios in a Mediterranean olive grove. Agriculture Ecosystem and Environment 165, 68-73.

  8. Solute leaching in a sandy soil with a water-repellent surface layer: a simulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, de G.H.; Vries, de P.

    1996-01-01

    Many sandy soils in the Netherlands have a water-repellent surface layer covering a wettable soil with a shallow groundwater table. Fingers form in the water-repellent surface layer and rapidly transport water and solutes to the wettable soil in which the streamlines diverge. Although several field

  9. Soil Moisture and Vegetation Controls on Surface Energy Balance Using the Maximum Entropy Production Model of Evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Parolari, A.; Huang, S. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to formulate and test plant water stress parameterizations for the recently proposed maximum entropy production (MEP) model of evapotranspiration (ET) over vegetated surfaces. . The MEP model of ET is a parsimonious alternative to existing land surface parameterizations of surface energy fluxes from net radiation, temperature, humidity, and a small number of parameters. The MEP model was previously tested for vegetated surfaces under well-watered and dry, dormant conditions, when the surface energy balance is relatively insensitive to plant physiological activity. Under water stressed conditions, however, the plant water stress response strongly affects the surface energy balance. This effect occurs through plant physiological adjustments that reduce ET to maintain leaf turgor pressure as soil moisture is depleted during drought. To improve MEP model of ET predictions under water stress conditions, the model was modified to incorporate this plant-mediated feedback between soil moisture and ET. We compare MEP model predictions to observations under a range of field conditions, including bare soil, grassland, and forest. The results indicate a water stress function that combines the soil water potential in the surface soil layer with the atmospheric humidity successfully reproduces observed ET decreases during drought. In addition to its utility as a modeling tool, the calibrated water stress functions also provide a means to infer ecosystem influence on the land surface state. Challenges associated with sampling model input data (i.e., net radiation, surface temperature, and surface humidity) are also discussed.

  10. Sea level and turbidity controls on mangrove soil surface elevation change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Adame, Maria Fernanda; Bennion, Vicki; Hayes, Matthew; Reef, Ruth; Santini, Nadia; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2015-02-01

    Increases in sea level are a threat to seaward fringing mangrove forests if levels of inundation exceed the physiological tolerance of the trees; however, tidal wetlands can keep pace with sea level rise if soil surface elevations can increase at the same pace as sea level rise. Sediment accretion on the soil surface and belowground production of roots are proposed to increase with increasing sea level, enabling intertidal habitats to maintain their position relative to mean sea level, but there are few tests of these predictions in mangrove forests. Here we used variation in sea level and the availability of sediments caused by seasonal and inter-annual variation in the intensity of La Nina-El Nino to assess the effects of increasing sea level on surface elevation gains and contributing processes (accretion on the surface, subsidence and root growth) in mangrove forests. We found that soil surface elevation increased with mean sea level (which varied over 250 mm during the study) and with turbidity at sites where fine sediment in the water column is abundant. In contrast, where sediments were sandy, rates of surface elevation gain were high, but not significantly related to variation in turbidity, and were likely to be influenced by other factors that deliver sand to the mangrove forest. Root growth was not linked to soil surface elevation gains, although it was associated with reduced shallow subsidence, and therefore may contribute to the capacity of mangroves to keep pace with sea level rise. Our results indicate both surface (sedimentation) and subsurface (root growth) processes can influence mangrove capacity to keep pace with sea level rise within the same geographic location, and that current models of tidal marsh responses to sea level rise capture the major feature of the response of mangroves where fine, but not coarse, sediments are abundant.

  11. Fate and transport of selected estrogen compounds in Hawaii soils: Effect of soil type and macropores

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessio, Matteo; Vasudevan, Dharni; Lichwa, Joseph; Mohanty, Sanjay K.; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2014-10-01

    The fate and transport of estrogen compounds in the environment is of increasing concern due to their potential impact on freshwater organisms, ecosystems and human health. The behavior of these compounds in batch experiments suggests low mobility, while field studies indicate the persistence of estrogen compounds in the soil with the possibility of migration to surface water as well as groundwater. To better understand the movement of these chemicals through soils, we examined their transport in three different Hawaiian soils and two aqueous matrices. The three different soils used were an Oxisol, a Mollisol and a cinder, characterized by different mineralogical properties and collected at depths of 60-90 cm and 210-240 cm. Two liquid matrices were used; deionized (DI) water containing calcium chloride (CaCl2), and recycled water collected from a wastewater treatment facility. The experiments were conducted in packed and structured columns. Non-equilibrium conditions were observed during the study, especially in the structured soil. This is believed to be primarily related to the presence of macropores in the soil. The presence of macropores resulted in reduced contact time between soil and estrogens, which facilitated their transport. We found that the organic carbon content and mineralogical composition of the soils had a profound effect on the transport of the estrogens. The mobility of estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2) was greater in cinder than in the other soils. In column experiments with recycled water, earlier breakthrough peaks and longer tails of estrogens were produced compared to those observed using DI water. The use of recycled water for agricultural purposes and the siting of septic tanks and cesspools should be critically reviewed in light of these findings, especially in areas where groundwater is the primary source of potable water, such as Hawaii.

  12. Fate and transport of selected estrogen compounds in Hawaii soils: effect of soil type and macropores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessio, Matteo; Vasudevan, Dharni; Lichwa, Joseph; Mohanty, Sanjay K; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2014-10-01

    The fate and transport of estrogen compounds in the environment is of increasing concern due to their potential impact on freshwater organisms, ecosystems and human health. The behavior of these compounds in batch experiments suggests low mobility, while field studies indicate the persistence of estrogen compounds in the soil with the possibility of migration to surface water as well as groundwater. To better understand the movement of these chemicals through soils, we examined their transport in three different Hawaiian soils and two aqueous matrices. The three different soils used were an Oxisol, a Mollisol and a cinder, characterized by different mineralogical properties and collected at depths of 60-90 cm and 210-240 cm. Two liquid matrices were used; deionized (DI) water containing calcium chloride (CaCl2), and recycled water collected from a wastewater treatment facility. The experiments were conducted in packed and structured columns. Non-equilibrium conditions were observed during the study, especially in the structured soil. This is believed to be primarily related to the presence of macropores in the soil. The presence of macropores resulted in reduced contact time between soil and estrogens, which facilitated their transport. We found that the organic carbon content and mineralogical composition of the soils had a profound effect on the transport of the estrogens. The mobility of estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2) was greater in cinder than in the other soils. In column experiments with recycled water, earlier breakthrough peaks and longer tails of estrogens were produced compared to those observed using DI water. The use of recycled water for agricultural purposes and the siting of septic tanks and cesspools should be critically reviewed in light of these findings, especially in areas where groundwater is the primary source of potable water, such as Hawaii.

  13. Effects of environmental factors and soil properties on topographic variations of soil respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tamai

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil respiration rates were measured along different parts of a slope in (a an evergreen forest with common brown forest soil and (b a deciduous forest with immature soil. The effects of soil temperature, soil moisture and soil properties were estimated individually, and the magnitudes of these effects in the deciduous and evergreen forests were compared. In the evergreen forest with common brown forest soil, soil properties had the greatest effect on soil respiration rates, followed by soil moisture and soil temperature. These results may be explained by the fact that different soil properties matured within different environments. It can be argued that the low soil respiration rates in the low parts of the slope in the evergreen forest resulted from soil properties and not from wet soil conditions. In the deciduous forest, soil respiration rates were more strongly affected by soil moisture and soil temperature than by soil properties. These effects were likely due to the immaturity of the forest soil.

  14. Light structures phototroph, bacterial and fungal communities at the soil surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence O Davies

    Full Text Available The upper few millimeters of soil harbour photosynthetic microbial communities that are structurally distinct from those of underlying bulk soil due to the presence of light. Previous studies in arid zones have demonstrated functional importance of these communities in reducing soil erosion, and enhancing carbon and nitrogen fixation. Despite being widely distributed, comparative understanding of the biodiversity of the soil surface and underlying soil is lacking, particularly in temperate zones. We investigated the establishment of soil surface communities on pasture soil in microcosms exposed to light or dark conditions, focusing on changes in phototroph, bacterial and fungal communities at the soil surface (0-3 mm and bulk soil (3-12 mm using ribosomal marker gene analyses. Microbial community structure changed with time and structurally similar phototrophic communities were found at the soil surface and in bulk soil in the light exposed microcosms suggesting that light can influence phototroph community structure even in the underlying bulk soil. 454 pyrosequencing showed a significant selection for diazotrophic cyanobacteria such as Nostoc punctiforme and Anabaena spp., in addition to the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. The soil surface also harboured distinct heterotrophic bacterial and fungal communities in the presence of light, in particular, the selection for the phylum Firmicutes. However, these light driven changes in bacterial community structure did not extend to the underlying soil suggesting a discrete zone of influence, analogous to the rhizosphere.

  15. Soil and surface layer type affect non-rainfall water inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agam, Nurit; Berliner, Pedro; Jiang, Anxia

    2017-04-01

    Non-rainfall water inputs (NRWIs), which include fog deposition, dew formation, and direct water vapor adsorption by the soil, play a vital role in arid and semiarid regions. Environmental conditions, namely radiation, air temperature, air humidity, and wind speed, largely affect the water cycle driven by NRWIs. The substrate type (soil type and the existence/absence of a crust layer) may as well play a major role. Our objective was to quantify the effects of soil type (loess vs. sand) and surface layer (bare vs. crusted) on the gain and posterior evaporation of NRWIs in the Negev Highlands throughout the dry summer season. Four undisturbed soil samples (20 cm diameter and 50 cm depth) were excavated and simultaneously introduced into a PVC tube. Two samples were obtained in the Negev's Boker plain (loess soil) and two in the Nizzana sand dunes in the Western Negev. On one sample from each site the crust was removed while on the remaining one the natural crust was left in place. The samples were brought to the research site at the Jacob Bluestein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel (31˚08' N, 34˚53' E, 400 meter above the sea level) where they were exposed to the same environmental conditions. The four samples in their PVC tubes were placed on top of scales and the samples mass was continuously monitored. Soil temperatures were monitored at depths of 1, 2, 3, 5 and10 cm in each microlysimeter (ML) using Copper-Constantan thermocouples. The results of particle size distribution indicated that the crust of the loess soil is probably a physical crust, i.e., a crust that forms due to raindroplets impact; while the crust on the sand soil is biological. On most days, the loess soils adsorbed more water than their corresponding sand soil samples. For both soils, the samples for which the crust was removed adsorbed more water than the samples for which it was intact. The difference in daily water adsorption amount between crusted

  16. Effect of soil moisture on chlorine deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, John; Eichler, Jeffery; Hare, Christopher; Henley, Michael

    2014-02-28

    The effect of soil moisture on chlorine (Cl(2)) deposition was examined in laboratory chamber experiments at high Cl(2) exposures by measuring the concentration of chloride (Cl(-)) in soil columns. Soil mixtures with varying amounts of clay, sand, and organic matter and with moisture contents up to 20% (w/w) were exposed to ≈3×10(4)ppm Cl(2) vapor. For low water content soils, additional water increased the reaction rate as evidenced by higher Cl(-) concentration at higher soil moisture content. Results also showed that the presence of water restricted transport of Cl(2) into the soil columns and caused lower overall deposition of Cl(2) in the top 0.48-cm layer of soil when water filled ≈60% or more of the void space in the column. Numerical solutions to partial differential equations of Fick's law of diffusion and a simple rate law for Cl(2) reaction corroborated conclusions derived from the data. For the soil mixtures and conditions of these experiments, moisture content that filled 30-50% of the available void space yielded the maximum amount of Cl(2) deposition in the top 0.48cm of soil. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The Effect on Soil Erosion of Different Tillage Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gür, Kazım

    2016-04-01

    The Effects on Soil Erosion of Different Tillage Applications Kazım Gür1, Kazim Çarman2 and Wim M.Cornelis3 1Bahri Daǧdaş International Agricultural Research Instıtute, 42020 Konya, Turkey 2Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Machinery, University of Selçuk, 42031 Konya, Turkey 3Department of Soil Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, 653 Coupure Links, 9000 Gent, Belgium Traditional soil cultivation systems, with excessive and inappropriate soil tillage, will generally lead to soil degradation and loss of soil by wind erosion. Continuous reduced tillage and no-till maintaining soil cover with plant residues called Conservation Agriculture that is considered as effective in reducing erosion. There exist a wide variety of practices using different tools that comply with reduced tillage principles. However, few studies have compared the effect of several of such tools in reducing wind erosion and related soil and surface properties. We therefore measured sediment transport rates over bare soil surfaces (but with under stubbles of wheat, Triticum aestivum L.) subjected to three tillage practices using two pulling type machines and one type of power takeoff movable machines and generated with a portable field wind tunnel. At 10 ms-1, sediment transport rates varied from 107 to 573 gm-1h-1, and from 176 to 768 gm-1h-1 at 13 ms-1. The lowest transport rates were observed for N(no-tillage) and the highest for Rr(L-type rototiller). After tillage, surface roughness, mean weighted diameter, wind erodible fraction, mechanical stability and soil water content were measured as well and varied from 5.0 to 15.9%, 6.9 to 13.8 mm, 14.3 to 29.7%, 79.5 to 93.4% and 8.6 to 15.1%, respectively, with again N is being the most successful practice. In terms of conservation soil tillage technique, it can be said that the applications compared with each other; direct sowing machine is more appropriate and cause to the less erosion.

  18. The effects of different soil cover management practices on plant biodiversity and soil properties in Mediterranean ancient olive orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzaric, Suzana; Aly, Adel; Ladisa, Gaetano; Calabrese, Generosa

    2014-05-01

    The effects of different soil cover management practices on plant biodiversity and soil properties in Mediterranean ancient olive orchards Madzaric S., Aly A., Ladisa G. and Calabrese G. The loss of natural plant cover due to the inappropriate soil cover management is often a decisive factor for soil degradation in Mediterranean area. This accompanied with typical climate, characterized by cool, wet winters and hot and dry summers leads to soil erosion and loss of productivity. Due to simplification of agricultural practice and to the attempt to decrease cost of production, keeping soil bare is a widespread agricultural practice in Mediterranean ancient olive orchards (AOOs). The consequences of this are degradation of soil quality and reduction of plant biodiversity. In last year's some alternative practices are proposed in order to protect soil and biodiversity. One of these practices is the "grassing" i.e. covering the soil by selected autochthonous plant species. Objectives of our study are: (1) to evaluate impact of different soil cover management practices on soil properties and plant biodiversity in AOOs and (2) to define a minimum indicators' set (Minimum Data Set - MDS) to evaluate the effectiveness of different agricultural practices in environmental performance of AOOs. A comparison was carried on considering two management systems (conventional vs. organic) and three agricultural practices: conventional with bare soil (CON), organic with soil covered by selected autochthonous species (MIX) and organic left to the native vegetation (NAT). In general a clear positive influence of organic management system was recognized. Some soil quality indicators (physical, chemical and biological) showed responsiveness in describing the effects of management system and agricultural practices on soil properties. The both approaches with vegetation cover on the soil surface (either sowing of mixture or soil left to the natural plant cover) performed better than

  19. Heavy Metal Pollution of Surface Soil in Thrace Region (Turkey)

    CERN Document Server

    Cocskun, M; Frontasyeva, M V; Munevver, C; Eidhammer Sjobakk, T; Demkina, S V

    2004-01-01

    Samples of surface soil were collected at 73 sites in the Thrace region, northwest part of Turkey. Two complementary analytical techniques, epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) with flame and graphite furnace atomization were used to determine 37 elements in the soil samples. Concentrations of Cu, Zn, Ni, Cd, Mn, Co, Pb, and As were determined using AAS and GF AAS and ENAA was used for the remaining 29 elements. Results for As, Ba, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, I, In, K, La, Mn, Mo, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, Ti, U, and V are reported for the first time for soils from this region. The results show that concentrations of the most elements were little affected by the industrial and other anthropogenic activities performed in the region. Except for distinctly higher levels of Pb, Cu, Cd, and Zn in Istanbul district than the median values for the Thrace region, the observed distributions seem to be mainly associated with lithogenic variations. S...

  20. Effects of biochars on hydraulic properties of clayey soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Jingbo; Palladino, Mario; Lazarovitch, Naftali; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Battista Chirico, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    Biochar has gained popularity as an amendment to improve soil hydraulic properties. Since biochar properties depend on feedstocks and pyrolysis temperatures used for its production, proper selection of biochar type as soil amendment is of great importance for soil hydraulic properties improvement. This study investigated the effects of eight types of biochar on physical and hydraulic properties of clayey soil. Biochars were derived from four different feedstocks (Alfalfa hay, municipal organic waste, corn residues and wood chip) pyrolyzed at two different temperatures (300 and 550 °C). Clayey soil samples were taken from Leone farm (40° 26' 15.31" N, 14° 59' 45.54" E), Italy, and were oven-dried at 105 °C to determine dry bulk density. Biochars were mixed with the clayey soil at 5% by mass. Bulk densities of the mixtures were also determined. Saturated hydraulic conductivities (Ks) of the original clayey soil and corresponding mixtures were measured by means of falling-head method. Soil water retention measurements were conducted for clayey soil and mixtures using suction table apparatus and Richards' plate with the pressure head (h) up to 12000 cm. van Genuchten retention function was selected to evaluate the retention characteristics of clayey soil and mixtures. Available water content (AWC) was calculated by field capacity (h = - 500 cm) minus wilting pointing (h = -12000 cm). The results showed that biochar addition decreased the bulk density of clayey soil. The Ks of clayey soil increased due to the incorporation of biochars except for waste and corn biochars pyrolyzed at 550 °C. AWC of soils mixed with corn biochar pyrolyzed at 300 °C and wood biochar pyrolyzed at 550 °C, increased by 31% and 7%, respectively. Further analysis will be conducted in combination of biochar properties such as specific surface area and total pore volume. Better understanding of biochar impact on clayey soil will be helpful in biochar selection for soil amendment and

  1. Effects of soil amendment on soil characteristics and maize yield in Horqin Sandy Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Liu, J. H.; Zhao, B. P.; Xue, A.; Hao, G. C.

    2016-08-01

    A 4-year experiment was conducted to investigate the inter-annual effects of sandy soil amendment on maize yield, soil water storage and soil enzymatic activities in sandy soil in Northeast China in 2010 to 2014. We applied the sandy soil amendment in different year, and investigated the different effects of sandy soil amendment in 2014. There were six treatments including: (1) no sandy soil amendment application (CK); (2) one year after applying sandy soil amendment (T1); (3) two years after applying sandy soil amendment(T2); (4) three years after applying sandy soil amendment(T3); (5)four years after applying sandy soil amendment(T4); (6) five years after applying sandy soil amendment (T5). T refers to treatment, and the number refers to the year after application of the sandy soil amendment. Comparing with CK, sandy soil amendments improved the soil water storage, soil urease, invertase, and catalase activity in different growth stages and soil layers, the order of soil water storage in all treatments roughly performed: T3 > T5 > T4 > T2 > T1 > CK. the order of soil urease, invertase, and catalase activity in all treatments roughly performed: T5 > T3 > T4 > T2 > T1 > CK. Soil application of sandy soil amendment significantly (p≤⃒0.05) increased the grain yield and biomass yield by 22.75%-41.42% and 29.92%-45.45% respectively, and maize yield gradually increased with the years go by in the following five years. Sandy soil amendment used in poor sandy soil had a positive effect on soil water storage, soil enzymatic activities and maize yield, after five years applied sandy soil amendment (T5) showed the best effects among all the treatments, and deserves further research.

  2. Mapping Surface Soil Moisture With Synthetic Aperture Radar Data and Basin Indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, M.; Sorman, A.; Sorman, U.

    2008-12-01

    The soil moisture condition of a watershed plays a significant role in separation of infiltration and surface runoff, and hence is a key parameter for the majority of physical hydrological models. Due to the large difference in dielectric constants of dry soil and water, microwave remote sensing (particularly the commonly available synthetic aperture radar) is a potential tool for such studies. The main aim of this study is to compute a distributed soil moisture map of a catchment, which can be input to a hydrological model. For this purpose, nine field trips are performed and point surface soil moisture values are collected with a Time Domain Reflectometer. The field studies, which are carried out on a small catchment in western Anatolia, are planned to match radar image acquisitions and accomplished over a water year. First, the Dubois Model, a physical backscatter model is utilized in the reverse order to compute soil surface roughness values. This is accomplished for the field study dates which have two radar image acquisitions and with sparse vegetation cover. Then the first relationship of this study, between observed radar backscatter values and computed roughness values, is established with a correlation coefficient of 0.78. For bare soil surfaces, local incidence angle, soil moisture and roughness are the most dominant parameters effecting radar backscatter. After computing the incidence angle map of the study area, the second relationship, between observed radar backscatter values and the three governing parameters, is determined with a correlation coefficient of 0.87. The third and the last relationship of the study is estimated between the measured point soil moisture values and two basin indexes; topographic and solar radiation. In the last part of the study, the established three relationships, which are derived for point moisture measurements, are used to compute the soil moisture map of the whole catchment. This process is handled separately for the

  3. Soil fertility, nutrition and yield of maize and barley with gypsum application on soil surface in no-till

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Michalovicz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Annual crop yield and nutrition have shown differentiated responses to modifications in soil chemical properties brought about by gypsum application. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of gypsum application rates on the chemical properties of a Latossolo Bruno (Clayey Oxisol, as well as on the nutrition and yield of a maize-barley succession under no-till. The experiment was set up in November 2009 in Guarapuava, Parana, Brazil, applying gypsum rates of 0.0, 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, and 6.0 Mg ha-1 to the soil surface upon sowing maize, with crop succession of barley. Gypsum application decreased the levels of Al3+ and Mg2+ in the 0.0-0.1 m layer and increased soil pH in the layers from 0.2-0.6 m depth. Gypsum application has increased the levels of Ca2+ in all soil layers up to 0.6 m, and the levels of S-SO4(2- up to 0.8 m. In both crops, the leaf concentrations of Ca and S were increased while Mg concentrations have decreased as a function of gypsum rates. There was also an effect of gypsum rates on grain yield, with a quadratic response of maize and a linear increase for barley. Yield increases were up to 11 and 12 % in relation to control for the maximum technical efficiency (MTE rates of 3.8 and 6.0 Mg ha-1 of gypsum, respectively. Gypsum application improved soil fertility in the profile, especially in the subsurface, as well as plant nutrition, increasing the yields of maize and barley.

  4. Effect of heavy metals on soil fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosak-Świderska, Bożena

    2010-05-01

    Fungi constitute a high proportion of the microbial biomass in soil.Being widespread in soil their large surface-to-volume ratio and high metabolic activity, fungi can contribute significantly to heavy metal dynamics in soil. At neutral pH heavy metals in soils tend to be immobilized to precipitation and/or absorption to cation exchange sites of clay minerals. In the acidic soils, metals are more mobile and enter food webs easier. Microbial production of acids and chelating agents can mobilize to toxic metals. Mobilization is often by uptake and intracellular accumulation of the heavy metlas, and in this way, the bioavailability of metals towards other organisms can be more reduced. Fungi were isolated from soils from Upper Silesia in Poland and belonged to widespread genera: Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Penicillium and Trichoderma. Fungi from different taxonomic groups differ greatly in their tolerance to heavy metals. This could be related to their wall structure and chemistry as well as biochemical and physiological characteristics of fungi. Localization of metals in fungal cells was studied using electron microscopy analysis. Metal biosorption in the cell wall can be complex as melanin granules. Fungal vacuoles have an important role in the regulation of the cytosolic concentration of metal ions, and may contribute to heavy metal tolerance.In polluted soils with heavy metals, fungal species composition can be changed and their physiological activity can be changed, too.

  5. Effect of pH and soil structure on transport of sulfonamide antibiotics in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Yol; Huwe, Bernd

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effect of solution pH and soil structure on transport of sulfonamide antibiotics (sulfamethoxazole, sulfadimethoxine and sulfamethazine) in combination with batch sorption tests and column experiments. Sorption isotherms properly conformed to Freundlich model, and sorption potential of the antibiotics is as follows; sulfadimethoxine > sulfamethoxazole > sulfamethazine. Decreasing pH values led to increased sorption potential of the antibiotics on soil material in pH range of 4.0-8.0. This likely resulted from abundance of neutral and positive-charged sulfonamides species at low pH, which electrostatically bind to sorption sites on soil surface. Due to destruction of macropore channels, lower hydraulic conductivities of mobile zone were estimated in the disturbed soil columns than in the undisturbed soil columns, and eventually led to lower mobility of the antibiotics in disturbed column. The results suggest that knowledge of soil structure and solution condition is required to predict fate and distribution of sulfonamide antibiotics in environmental matrix.

  6. Assessment of Surface Soil Moisture Using High-Resolution Multi-Spectral Imagery and Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Hassan-Esfahani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Many crop production management decisions can be informed using data from high-resolution aerial images that provide information about crop health as influenced by soil fertility and moisture. Surface soil moisture is a key component of soil water balance, which addresses water and energy exchanges at the surface/atmosphere interface; however, high-resolution remotely sensed data is rarely used to acquire soil moisture values. In this study, an artificial neural network (ANN model was developed to quantify the effectiveness of using spectral images to estimate surface soil moisture. The model produces acceptable estimations of surface soil moisture (root mean square error (RMSE = 2.0, mean absolute error (MAE = 1.8, coefficient of correlation (r = 0.88, coefficient of performance (e = 0.75 and coefficient of determination (R2 = 0.77 by combining field measurements with inexpensive and readily available remotely sensed inputs. The spatial data (visual spectrum, near infrared, infrared/thermal are produced by the AggieAir™ platform, which includes an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV that enables users to gather aerial imagery at a low price and high spatial and temporal resolutions. This study reports the development of an ANN model that translates AggieAir™ imagery into estimates of surface soil moisture for a large field irrigated by a center pivot sprinkler system.

  7. Effects of toxaphene on soil organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezchlebová, Jitka; Cernohlávková, Jitka; Lána, Jan; Sochová, Ivana; Kobeticová, Klára; Hofman, Jakub

    2007-11-01

    The polychlorinated insecticide toxaphene belonged to the most used pesticides in the 20th century. Even recently, significant residues have been found in soils at various sites in the world. However, knowledge on toxicity to soil organisms is limited. In this study, the effects of toxaphene on soil invertebrates Folsomia candida, Eisenia fetida, Enchytraeus albidus, Enchytraeus crypticus, Caenorhabditis elegans, and microorganisms were investigated. Among the organisms tested, F. candida was the most sensitive. The 50% effect on survival and reproduction output (LC50 and EC50) was found at concentrations of 10.4 and 3.6 mg/kg, respectively. Sensitivity of other organisms was significantly lower with effective concentrations at tens or hundreds of mg/kg. Our data on soil toxicity were recalculated to soil pore-water concentrations and good accordance with available data reported for aquatic toxicity was found. Since soil concentrations at some sites are comparable to concentrations effective in our tests, toxaphene may negatively affect soil communities at these sites.

  8. Soil Specific Surface Area and Non-Singularity of Soil-Water Retention at Low Saturations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Møldrup, Per

    2013-01-01

    and Or (TO) and new single-parameter non-singularity (SPN) models; and evaluate estimates of SSA from water sorption, ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME), and N2–BET methods. The AquaSorp successfully measured water sorption isotherms (∼140 data points) within a reasonably short time (1–3 d). The SPN......The dry end of the soil water characteristic (SWC) is important for modeling vapor flow dynamics and predicting soil properties such as specific surface area (SSA) and clay content (CL). Verification of new instrumentation for rapid measurement of the dry end of the SWC is relevant to avoid long...... model well described the distinct non-singularity between the adsorption and desorption branches, while the TO model captured the adsorption data reasonably well (model were...

  9. Afforestation effects on soil carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bárcena, Teresa G

    Understanding carbon (C) dynamics has become increasingly important due to the major role of C in global warming. Soils store the largest amount of organic C in the biosphere; therefore, changes in this compartment can have a large impact on the C storage of an ecosystem. Land-use change is a main...... respiration. In Denmark chronosequences (i.e. space-for-time substitution) of oak and Norway spruce stands at the Vestskoven site were the tool used to explore these changes. Soil OC dynamics predicted by the chronosequence approach have often been used, however they never been validated by resampling before...... driver of changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) pools worldwide. In Europe, afforestation (i.e. the establishment of new forest on non-forested land), is a major land-use change driven by economic and environmental interests due to its role as a C sequestration tool following the ratification of the Kyoto...

  10. Soil Moisture Monitoring using Surface Electrical Resistivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamita, Giuseppe; Perrone, Angela; Brocca, Luca; Straface, Salvatore

    2017-04-01

    The relevant role played by the soil moisture (SM) for global and local natural processes results in an explicit interest for its spatial and temporal estimation in the vadose zone coming from different scientific areas - i.e. eco-hydrology, hydrogeology, atmospheric research, soil and plant sciences, etc... A deeper understanding of natural processes requires the collection of data on a higher number of points at increasingly higher spatial scales in order to validate hydrological numerical simulations. In order to take the best advantage of the Electrical Resistivity (ER) data with their non-invasive and cost-effective properties, sequential Gaussian geostatistical simulations (sGs) can be applied to monitor the SM distribution into the soil by means of a few SM measurements and a densely regular ER grid of monitoring. With this aim, co-located SM measurements using mobile TDR probes (MiniTrase), and ER measurements, obtained by using a four-electrode device coupled with a geo-resistivimeter (Syscal Junior), were collected during two surveys carried out on a 200 × 60 m2 area. Two time surveys were carried out during which Data were collected at a depth of around 20 cm for more than 800 points adopting a regular grid sampling scheme with steps (5 m) varying according to logistic and soil compaction constrains. The results of this study are robust due to the high number of measurements available for either variables which strengthen the confidence in the covariance function estimated. Moreover, the findings obtained using sGs show that it is possible to estimate soil moisture variations in the pedological zone by means of time-lapse electrical resistivity and a few SM measurements.

  11. Afforestation effects on soil carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bárcena, Teresa G

    Understanding carbon (C) dynamics has become increasingly important due to the major role of C in global warming. Soils store the largest amount of organic C in the biosphere; therefore, changes in this compartment can have a large impact on the C storage of an ecosystem. Land-use change is a main...... driver of changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) pools worldwide. In Europe, afforestation (i.e. the establishment of new forest on non-forested land), is a major land-use change driven by economic and environmental interests due to its role as a C sequestration tool following the ratification of the Kyoto...

  12. Electrical Capacitance Tomography Measurement of the Migration of Ice Frontal Surface in Freezing Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Suo, X. M.; Zhou, S. S.; Meng, S. Q.; Chen, S. S.; Mu, H. P.

    2016-12-01

    The tracking of the migration of ice frontal surface is crucial for the understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms in freezing soil. Owing to the distinct advantages, including non-invasive sensing, high safety, low cost and high data acquisition speed, the electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) is considered to be a promising visualization measurement method. In this paper, the ECT method is used to visualize the migration of ice frontal surface in freezing soil. With the main motivation of the improvement of imaging quality, a loss function with multiple regularizers that incorporate the prior formation related to the imaging objects is proposed to cast the ECT image reconstruction task into an optimization problem. An iteration scheme that integrates the superiority of the split Bregman iteration (SBI) method is developed for searching for the optimal solution of the proposed loss function. An unclosed electrodes sensor is designed for satisfying the requirements of practical measurements. An experimental system of one dimensional freezing in frozen soil is constructed, and the ice frontal surface migration in the freezing process of the wet soil sample containing five percent of moisture is measured. The visualization measurement results validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the ECT visualization method

  13. Long-term effects of soil management on ecosystem services and soil loss estimation in olive grove top soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Lozano-García, Beatriz; Keesstra, Saskia; Cerdà, Artemi; Brevik, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Soil management has important effects on soil properties, runoff, soil losses and soil quality. Traditional olive grove (OG) management is based on reduced tree density, canopy size shaped by pruning and weed control by ploughing. In addition, over the last several decades, herbicide use has been

  14. Uranium partition coefficients (Kd) in forest surface soil reveal long equilibrium times and vary by site and soil size fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Pinder, John E; Ibrahim, Shawki A; Stone, James M; Breshears, David D; Baker, Kristine N

    2007-07-01

    The environmental mobility of newly deposited radionuclides in surface soil is driven by complex biogeochemical relationships, which have significant impacts on transport pathways. The partition coefficient (Kd) is useful for characterizing the soil-solution exchange kinetics and is an important factor for predicting relative amounts of a radionuclide transported to groundwater compared to that remaining on soil surfaces and thus available for transport through erosion processes. Measurements of Kd for 238U are particularly useful because of the extensive use of 238U in military applications and associated testing, such as done at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Site-specific measurements of Kd for 238U are needed because Kd is highly dependent on local soil conditions and also on the fine soil fraction because 238U concentrates onto smaller soil particles, such as clays and soil organic material, which are most susceptible to wind erosion and contribute to inhalation exposure in off-site populations. We measured Kd for uranium in soils from two neighboring semiarid forest sites at LANL using a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-based protocol for both whole soil and the fine soil fraction (diametersKd values, which are those specified in the EPA protocol, ranged from 276-508 mL g-1 for whole soil and from 615-2249 mL g-1 for the fine soil fraction. Unexpectedly, the 30-d Kd values, measured to test for soil-solution exchange equilibrium, were more than two times the 7-d values. Rates of adsorption of 238U to soil from solution were derived using a 2-component (FAST and SLOW) exponential model. We found significant differences in Kd values among LANL sampling sites, between whole and fine soils, and between 7-d and 30-d Kd measurements. The significant variation in soil-solution exchange kinetics among the soils and soil sizes promotes the use of site-specific data for estimates of environmental transport rates and suggests possible differences in

  15. Wind-induced contaminant transport in near-surface soils with application to radon entry into buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, W J [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Indoor air exposures to gaseous contaminants originating in soil can cause large human health risks. To predict and control these exposures, the mechanisms that affect vapor transport in near-surface soils need to be understood. In particular, radon exposure is a concern since average indoor radon concentrations lead to much higher risks than are generally accepted for exposure to other environmental contaminants. This dissertation examines an important component of the indoor radon problem: the impacts of wind on soil-gas and radon transport and entry into buildings. The research includes experimental and modeling studies of wind`s interactions with a building`s superstructure and the resulting soil-gas and radon flows in the surrounding soil. In addition to exploring the effects of steady winds, a novel modeling technique is developed to examine the impacts of fluctuating winds on soil-gas and radon transport.

  16. Remediation of PCB contaminated soils in the Canadian Arctic: excavation and surface PRB technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinovich, Indra; Rutter, Allison; Poland, John S; Cairns, Graham; Rowe, R Kerry

    2008-12-15

    The site BAF-5 is located on the summit of Resolution Island, Nunavut, just southeast of Baffin Island at 61 degrees 35'N and 60 degrees 40'W. The site was part of a North American military defense system established in the 1950s that became heavily contaminated with PCBs during and subsequent, its operational years. Remediation through excavation of the PCB contaminated soil at Resolution Island began in 1999 and at its completion in 2006 approximately 5 tonnes of pure PCBs in approximately 20,000 m3 of soil were remediated. Remediation strategies were based on both quantity of soil and level of contamination in the soil. Excavation removed 96% of the PCB contaminated soil on site. In 2003, a surface funnel-and-gate permeable reactive barrier was design and constructed to treat the remaining contamination left in rock crevices and inaccessible areas of the site. Excavation had destabilized contaminated soil in the area, enabling contaminant migration through erosion and runoff pathways. The barrier was designed to maximize sedimentation through settling ponds. This bulk removal enabled the treatment of highly contaminated fines and water through a permeable gate. The increased sediment loading during excavation required both modifications to the funnel and a shift to a more permeable, granular system. Granulated activated charcoal was chosen for its ability to both act as a particle retention filter and adsorptive filter. The reduction in mass of PCB and volume of soils trapped by the funnel of the barrier indicate that soils are re-stabilizing. In 2007, nonwoven geotextiles were re-introduced back into the filtration system as fine filtering could be achieved without clogging. Monitoring sites downstream indicate that the barrier system is effective. This paper describes the field progress of PCB remediation at Resolution Island.

  17. Effects of Wood Ash on Soil Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruz Paredes, Carla

    in agricultural and forest soils focusing on soil microbial communities’ composition and function, particularly mycorrhizal fungi. Two study sites were used for this study, one in an agricultural field where different biomass ashes were evaluated as replacements for P fertilizers in barley, and a second one...... in a Norway spruce forest where different amounts of wood ash were spread on the soil to study the effects on ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, bioaccumulation of metals in sporocarps, and microbial communities. Laboratory microcosm experiments were run in parallel to the field studies, to compare the effects...... effects on barley or associated AM fungi. Furthermore, wood ash can also be re-distributed to the forest without representing any risks for ECM fungal communities, N leaching, Cd bioaccumulation in sporocarps or the general activity of the soil microbial community....

  18. Hydro-mechanical paths within unsaturated compacted soil framed through water retention surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelizzari Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compaction is a key issue of modern earthworks... From sustainable development, a need arise of using materials for compaction under given conditions that would normally be avoid due to unpredictable pathologies. The application of compaction on fine grained soils, without a change of gravimetric water content, lead to very important modifications of the void ratio and hence suction. Therefore the hydro-mechanical behaviour of fine grained soil need to be rendered around three variables: suction, void ratio, saturation degree or water content. The barring capacity of the soil is assessed through Penetrometers (In-situ manual penetrometer, CBR in order to assess gains through compaction. The three states variables are then assessed for in situ and frame through water retention surfaces, realized from Proctor tests, in which compaction effect and path could be described.

  19. Soil surface morphology evolution under spatiallynon-uniform rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi, M.; Rinaldo, A.; Sander, G. C.; Barry, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    We evaluated the applicability of a large-scale river network evolution modelused to simulate morphological changes of a laboratory-scale landscape onwhich there were no visible rills. Previously, such models were used onlyat the landscape scale, or in laboratory experiments where rills form in thesoils surface. The flume-scale experiment (1-m × 2-m surface area) was de-signed to allow model calibration. Low-cohesive fine sand was placed in theflume while the slope and relief height were 5% and 25 cm, respectively.Non-uniform rainfall with an average intensity of 85 mmh -1 and a stan-dard deviation of 26% was applied to the sediment surface for 16 h. Highresolution Digital Elevation Models were captured at intervals during theexperiment. Estimates of the overland flow drainage network were derivedand, using these, the river network evolution model was numerically solvedand calibrated. A noticeable feature of the experiment was a steep transitionzone in soil elevation that migrated upstream during the experiment. Physi-cally, this zone indicates where the shear stress is sufficient to cause sediment1erosion. The model was calibrated during the first 4 h of experiment. Af-terwards, it predicted the subsequent 12 h of measured surface morphologychanges. Therefore, the applicability of the landscape evolution model wasextended for non-uniform rainfall and in absence of visible rills.Keywords:Numerical simulation, Particle Swarm Optimization, Sediment transport,River network evolution model.

  20. Soil management effect on soil penetration resistance in the vineyard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Catania

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In environments characterized by steep slopes or arranged in terraces, among the shallow tillage systems, rototilling is extensively used. However, the effect of the repeated use of rototilling has a considerable influence on soil characteristics; it appears finely powdered, soft and without structure. In order to limit these inconveniences, an innovative self-propelled machine equipped with working tools as a spade, to be used in steep slopes or arranged in terraces areas, was designed by the Mechanics Section of the SAF (Scienze Agrarie e Forestali Department of the University of Palermo in cooperation with Agrotec company, Padua, Italy. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of three machines for shallow tillage: a chisel plough (CP, a rototilling (RT and a spading machine (SM on penetration resistance in semi-arid environments of the Mediterranean basin. No tillage was also included. Penetration resistance (PR was surveyed for all the treatments to a depth of 300 mm with an electronic dynamometer. The treatments consisted in the execution of a shallow tillage to a depth of 150 mm. SP treatment allowed us to obtain PR lower values throughout the tillage profile than RT, CP and NT. It follows that the type of machine used influences soil PR, and then the soil water storage capacity, key factor for the agricultural productions in semi-arid environments as in Sicily.

  1. Improving Soil Moisture and Temperature Profile and Surface Turbulent Fluxes Estimations in Irrigated Field by Assimilating Multi-source Data into Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijing; Huang, Chunlin; Shen, Huanfeng; Wang, Weizhen

    2016-04-01

    located in an artificial oasis in the semi-arid region of northwestern China. Land surface temperature (LST) and soil volumetric water content (SVW) at first layer measured at Daman station are taken as observations in the framework of data assimilation. The study demonstrates the feasibility of ESIL in improving the soil moisture and temperature profile under unknown irrigation. ESIL promotes the coefficient correlation with in-situ measurements for soil moisture and temperature at first layer from 0.3421 and 0.7027 (ensemble simulation) to 0.8767 and 0.8304 meanwhile all the RMSE of soil moisture and temperature in deeper layers dramatically decrease more than 40 percent in different degree. To verify the reliability of ESIL in practical application, thereby promoting the utilization of satellite data, we test ESIL with varying observation internal interval and standard deviation. As a consequence, ESIL shows stabilized and promising effectiveness in soil moisture and soil temperature estimation.

  2. Soil hydraulic parameters and surface soil moisture of a tilled bare soil plot inversely derived from l-band brightness temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Dimitrov, Marin

    2014-01-01

    We coupled a radiative transfer model and a soil hydrologic model (HYDRUS 1D) with an optimization routine to derive soil hydraulic parameters, surface roughness, and soil moisture of a tilled bare soil plot using measured brightness temperatures at 1.4 GHz (L-band), rainfall, and potential soil evaporation. The robustness of the approach was evaluated using five 28-d data sets representing different meteorological conditions. We considered two soil hydraulic property models: the unimodal Mualem-van Genuchten and the bimodal model of Durner. Microwave radiative transfer was modeled by three different approaches: the Fresnel equation with depth-averaged dielectric permittivity of either 2-or 5-cm-thick surface layers and a coherent radiative transfer model (CRTM) that accounts for vertical gradients in dielectric permittivity. Brightness temperatures simulated by the CRTM and the 2-cm-layer Fresnel model fitted well to the measured ones. L-band brightness temperatures are therefore related to the dielectric permittivity and soil moisture in a 2-cm-thick surface layer. The surface roughness parameter that was derived from brightness temperatures using inverse modeling was similar to direct estimates from laser profiler measurements. The laboratory-derived water retention curve was bimodal and could be retrieved consistently for the different periods from brightness temperatures using inverse modeling. A unimodal soil hydraulic property function underestimated the hydraulic conductivity near saturation. Surface soil moisture contents simulated using retrieved soil hydraulic parameters were compared with in situ measurements. Depth-specific calibration relations were essential to derive soil moisture from near-surface installed sensors. © Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA.

  3. Surface Effects in Magnetic Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorani, Dino

    2005-01-01

    This volume is a collection of articles on different approaches to the investigation of surface effects on nanosized magnetic materials, with special emphasis on magnetic nanoparticles. The book aims to provide an overview of progress in the understanding of surface properties and surface driven effects in magnetic nanoparticles through recent results of different modeling, simulation, and experimental investigations.

  4. Change of Soil Surface Roughness and Its Effects on Soil Erosion in Sloping Cropland During Maize Growing Season%玉米季坡耕地地表糙度的变化特征及其对土壤侵蚀的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦凤; 郑子成; 李廷轩; 孔祥东

    2013-01-01

    Based on field artificial rainfall experiments,the change of soil surface roughness on purple soils during the maize growing season was studied,and their effects on runoff and sediment yield were analyzed.The results showed that the soil surface roughness gradually decreased with increasing the growth period.The soil surface roughness reached minimum at tasseling stage and the average change range of surface roughness was cross ridge > longitudinal ridge > flat planting.The average change range of surface roughnessreached minimum at seeding stage and maximum at jointing stage or tasseling stage.The time of producing runoff was the earliest in longitudinal ridge and the latest in cross ridge during each maize growing stage.The total runoff initially increased,and then decreased with the change of growing stages,it was greater in cross ridge than in flat planting besides at seeding stages.In a word,the effect of surface roughness on runoff amount did not reach significant level.Erosion amount was exponential correlation function of surface roughness.Erosion amount decreased with increasing the surface roughness at seeding stage,while it increased with increasing the surface roughness during other periods.%通过野外模拟降雨试验,研究玉米种植下紫色土坡耕地地表糙度的变化特征,并分析地表糙度对产流产沙的影响.结果表明:随生育时期的推进,地表糙度逐渐衰退,在抽雄期时达到最小,地表糙度平均变幅大小为横坡垄作>顺坡垄作>平作,苗期时变化幅度最小,拔节期或抽雄期时最大;玉米长势越好地表产流时间越晚,各生育时期地表产流时间均为顺坡垄作最早,横坡垄作最晚;全生育期内地表径流量呈现先降低后增高的变化趋势,除苗期外横坡垄作产流量均低于平作,总体而言地表糙度对地表径流的影响未达到显著水平;苗期时土壤侵蚀量随地表糙度的增大呈指数递减,而其余3个生长时期均

  5. Intra-rainfall soil surface change detection using close-range photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Thomas; James, Michael R.; McShane, Gareth; Quinton, John N.; Strauss, Peter

    2015-04-01

    During precipitation events, the physical properties of soil surfaces change significantly. Such changes influence a large range of processes, e.g. surface runoff, soil erosion, water infiltration, soil-atmosphere interactions and plant growth. It has been proven that successive precipitation events change soil surfaces, but detailed studies on soil surface change within a single rainfall event do, to the best of our knowledge, not exist, due to a lack of suitable methods. However, recent developments in the use of photogrammetry are becoming a common tool in geoscience and can be utilized in soil surface detection. New concepts, developments in hardware and software allow a quick and user friendly calculation of surface models with close-range imagery and processing based on structure from motion (SfM) approaches. In this study we tested the potential of close range photogrammetry for detecting changes in soil surface topography within an artificial rainfall event. We used a photogrammetric approach to capture multiple images of the soil surface on two different soil types (loamy and sandy soil) under laboratory conditions while they were exposed to a 60 minute duration 47(60) mm hr-1 intensity rainfall event from a gravity driven rainfall simulator. The photographs were processed using Photoscan to produce point clouds which were then interpolated to produce DEM surfaces. Of the 126 surfaces produced during the rainfall event 125 were usable and able to demonstrate changes with a resolution of photogrammetry for surface detection within a precipitation event. The use of close-range photogrammetry opens new possibilities to monitor soil surfaces and could be developed for a range of other applications. Our results have the potential to lead to better understanding of infiltration, runoff, nutrient transport and soil erosion processes within precipitation event.

  6. On the soil roughness parameterization problem in soil moisture retrieval of bare surfaces from Synthetic Aperture Radar 1959

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synthetic Aperture Radar has shown its large potential for retrieving soil moisture maps at regional scales. However, since the backscattered signal is determined by several surface characteristics, the retrieval of soil moisture is an ill-posed problem when using single configuration imagery. Unles...

  7. Above- and below-ground responses of four tundra plant functional types to deep soil heating and surface soil fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Peng; Limpens, Juul; Mommer, Liesje; Ruijven, van Jasper; Nauta, Ake L.; Berendse, Frank; Schaepman-Strub, Gabriela; Blok, Daan; Maximov, Trofim C.; Heijmans, Monique M.P.D.

    2017-01-01

    Climate warming is faster in the Arctic than the global average. Nutrient availability in the tundra soil is expected to increase by climate warming through (i) accelerated nutrient mobilization in the surface soil layers, and (ii) increased thawing depths during the growing season which

  8. 不同覆盖措施下苹果园土壤水文差异%Effects of different patterns of surface mulching on soil hydrology in an apple orchard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张义; 谢永生

    2011-01-01

    Apples are one of the main agricultural crops on China's Loess Plateau. This study took a Fuji apple orchard in this region as a test object to study the effects of different patterns of surface mulching (clean tillage, grass cover, film mulching, straw mulching, and gravel mulching) on the soil hydrology and apple yield.Based on soil water storage, three seasonal periodscan be recognised annually; Water decreases in spring & summer, increases in summer & autumn, and stabilizes in winter & spring. Within the 0—600 cm soil profile,the highest average soil water content was in the film mulching treatment and the lowest was in the gravel mulching in all three periods. After rainfall, there was significant soil water recovery in the gravel mulching treatment (10.52 %), with straw mulching second (9.47 %), and least soil water recovery with clean tillage (6.53%). The depth of the water infiltration reached 260 cm. Based on apple yield, the water use efficiency in each treatment was: Clean tillage: 35.75 kg/(mm·ha), grass cover: 0.31 kg/(mm·ha), film mulching:47.81 kg/(mm · ha), straw mulching: 58.99 kg/(mm·ha), and gravel mulching: 80.25 kg/(mm·ha). In conclusion, of the mulching patterns tested, gravel mulching was the most suitable for apple orchards in the gully region of the Loess Plateau, China.%为探清不同地表覆盖措施(清耕处理、生草处理、地膜覆盖、秸秆覆盖和砂石覆盖)对苹果园土壤水文状况的影响,利用水分中子仪于2007年10月-2009年10月对黄土高原红富士苹果园土壤水分状况进行定位监测,并同时调查苹果产量.结果表明,果园土壤水分年周期可划分为春夏失墒期、夏秋增墒期和冬春稳墒期3个时期;3个时期中0~600 cm深土壤剖面水分均为砂石覆盖处理最低,地膜覆盖处理最高;雨季后,不同覆盖的土壤水分均得到恢复,其中,砂石覆盖处理恢复率最高(10.52%),其次为秸秆覆盖处理(9.47%),

  9. Characterization Investigation Study: Volume 3, Radiological survey of surface soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solow, A.J.; Phoenix, D.R.

    1987-12-01

    The Feed Materials Production Center was constructed to produce high purity uranium metal for use at various Department of Energy facilities. The waste products from these operations include general uncontaminated scrap and refuse, contaminated and uncontaminated metal scrap, waste oils, low-level radioactive waste, co-contaminated wastes, mixed waste, toxic waste, sludges from water treatment, and fly ash from the steam plant. This material is estimated to total more than 350,000 cubic meters. Other wastes stored in this area include laboratory chemicals and other combustible materials in the burn pit; fine waste stream sediments in the clear well; fly ash and waste oils in the two fly ash areas; lime-alum sludges and boiler plant blowdown in the lime sludge ponds; and nonradioactive sanitary waste, construction rubble, and asbestos in the sanitary landfill. A systematic survey of the surface soils throughout the Waste Storage Area, associated on-site drainages, and the fly ash piles was conducted using a Field Instrument for Detecting Low-Energy Radiation (FIDLER). Uranium is the most prevalent radioactive element in surface soil; U-238 is the principal radionuclide, ranging from 2.2 to 1790 pCi/g in the general Waste Storage Area. The maximum values for the next highest activity concentrations in the same area were 972 pCi/g for Th-230 and 298 pCi/g for U-234. Elevated activity concentrations of Th-230 were found along the K-65 slurry line, the maximum at 3010 pCi/g. U-238 had the highest value of 761 pCi/g in the drainage just south of pit no. 5. The upper fly ash area had the highest radionuclide activity concentrations in the surface soils with the maximum values for U-238 at 8600 pCi/g, U-235 at 2190 pCi/g, U-234 at 11,400 pCi/g, Tc-99 at 594 pCi/g, Ra-226 at 279 pCi/g, and Th-230 at 164 pCi/g.

  10. Effects of coastal afforestation on some soil properties in Lakshmipur coast of Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. M. Shaifullah; M. Mezbahuddin; M. Sujauddin; S. M. S. Haque

    2008-01-01

    Coastal zones comprising important intertidal tropical and subtropical ecosystems are characterized by high productivity, diversity and unique zonation of various plant and animal communities. The comparison of some selected physicochemical soil properties viz. Texture, particle density, moisture content, pH, organic carbon and total nitrogen between planted site (Telir char) and barren site (Boyar char) has been investigated at surface (0-10 cm) and subsurface (10-45 cm) soil across three different land strips viz. Inland, middle part and sea side in Lakshmipur coast of Bangladesh. Sand particles in the soil were lower in planted site than barren site. The reverse trend was found in case of both silt and clay percentage. Coastal afforestation had a significant effect on soil binding process since a common trend of increment in soil particle density was noticed. Maximum increment (20.43% to 23.30%) in soil moisture content was recorded in surface soil across the seaside while at subsurface soil both across the middle part (19.53% to 22.30%) and sea side (20.19% to 22.96%). Moreover, the highest reduction in soil pH was recorded at surface soil (7.27 to 6.60) across the sea side and subsurface soil (7.16 to 6.67) in inland due to the influence of coastal plantation. Across all the land strips and the soil depths studied, soil organic carbon was higher in planted site than in barren site with only exception at subsurface soil in the middle part (0.50% in both sites). Total soil nitrogen in the study area was increased at both depths due to forestation with the highest increment in the inland at both surface and subsurface soil.

  11. Effects of rainwater harvesting and afforestation on soil properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Effect of rainwater harvesting (RWH) structures like Contour trench (CT), ... conserving soil and water facilitating plant growth and helped restore the degraded hill. .... Soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC) soil organic ...... Field Crop Res.

  12. Significance of frost action and surface soil characteristics to wind erosion at Rocky Flats, Colorado. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caine, N.

    1978-09-01

    This study of the potential links between soil freezing and wind erosion was conducted at Rocky Flats during 4 winters. Most of the study has involved the conditions leading to the growth of segregation ice in the surface soil and the ground heave which that produces. This occurs about 15 times in the average winter at Rocky Flats, always on a diurnal cycle. Such frost action is preferentially distributed in time and space and cannot be estimated from air temperatures alone. November and March are the months of most frequent frost heave, and then only in the days following precipitation or snowmelt. The most marked frost effects are found on exposed interfluve and hillcrest situations, where there are patches of bare soil. Almost no effects are found on the valley floors. Soil disturbance by segregation ice leads to a marked decrease in soil bulk density, and presumably in soil strength though this change has not been quantitatively defined. However, this does not lead to wind erosion of the soil at the study site because that surface is more influenced by the vegetation cover than by the soil characteristics.

  13. Detergency of stainless steel surface soiled with human brain homogenate: an XPS study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, M. [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, UMR 5513 LTDS, 69 134 Ecully (France) and Laboratoires ANIOS, 59 260 Lille-Hellemmes (France)]. E-mail: marlene.richard@ec-lyon.fr; Le Mogne, Th. [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, UMR 5513 LTDS, 69 134 Ecully (France); Perret-Liaudet, A. [Hopital Neurologique de Lyon et INSERM U512, 69 394 Lyon (France); Rauwel, G. [Laboratoires ANIOS, 59 260 Lille-Hellemmes (France); Criquelion, J. [Laboratoires ANIOS, 59 260 Lille-Hellemmes (France); De Barros, M.I. [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, UMR 5513 LTDS, 69 134 Ecully (France); Cetre, J.C. [Unite d' Hygiene et d' Epidemiologie, Hopital de la Croix Rousse, 69 317 Lyon (France); Martin, J.M. [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, UMR 5513 LTDS, 69 134 Ecully (France)

    2005-02-15

    In the detergency field of re-usable medical devices, a special attention is focused on the non conventional transmissible agent called prions which is a proteinaceous infectious agent. Few cleaning procedures are effective against prions and few techniques are available to study cleaning effectiveness with respect to proteins in general. In our study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to evaluate the effectiveness of detergent formulations to remove proteins from stainless steel surface soiled with a brain homogenate (BH) from human origin. Our results showed that XPS is a reliable surface analysis technique to study chemical species remaining on surface and substrate properties after cleaning procedures. A semi-quantitative evaluation of the detergency effectiveness could also be performed.

  14. In-situ soil composition and moisture measurement by surface neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, C.; Smith, C.; Marks, A.

    2009-04-01

    Neutron activation analysis is widely known as a laboratory technique dependent upon a nuclear reactor to provide the neutron flux and capable of precise elemental analysis. Less well known in-situ geochemical analysis is possible with isotopic (252Cf & 241Am) or compact accelerator (D-T, D-D fusion reaction) neutron sources. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) geophysical borehole logging has been applied to mining issues for >15 years (CSIRO) using isotopic neutron sources and more recently to environmental and hydro-geological applications by ANSTO. Similarly, sophisticated geophysical borehole logging equipment based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS) has been applied in the oil and gas industry by large oilfield services companies to measure oil saturation indices (carbon/oxygen) using accelerator neutron sources. Recent advances in scintillation detector spectral performance has enabled improved precision and detection limits for elements likely to be present in soil profiles (H, Si, Al, Fe, Cl) and possible detection of many minor to trace elements if sufficiently abundant (Na, K, Mg, Ca, S, N, + ). To measure carbon an accelerator neutron source is required to provide fast neutrons above 4.8 MeV. CSIRO and ANSTO propose building a soil geochemical analysis system based on experience gained from building and applying PGNA borehole logging equipment. A soil geochemical analysis system could effectively map the 2D geochemical composition of the top 50cm of soil by dragging the 1D logging equipment across the ground surface. Substituting an isotopic neutron source for a D-T accelerator neutron source would enable the additional measurement of elemental carbon. Many potential ambiguities with other geophysical proxies for soil moisture may be resolved by direct geochemical measurement of H. Many other applications may be possible including time series in-situ measurements of soil moisture for differential drainage, hydrology, land surface

  15. Solar Ion Processing of Major Element Surface Compositions of Mature Mare Soils: Insights from Combined XPS and Analytical TEM Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C.; Keller, L. P.; Baragiola, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind ions are capable of altering the sur-face chemistry of the lunar regolith by a number of mechanisms including preferential sputtering, radiation-enhanced diffusion and sputter erosion of space weathered surfaces containing pre-existing compositional profiles. We have previously reported in-situ ion irradiation experiments supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytical TEM that show how solar ions potentially drive Fe and Ti reduction at the monolayer scale as well as the 10-100 nm depth scale in lunar soils [1]. Here we report experimental data on the effect of ion irradiation on the major element surface composition in a mature mare soil.

  16. Aggregation of surface mine soil by interaction between VAM fungi and lignin degradation products of lespedeza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothwell, F.M. (USDA Forest Service, Berea, KY (USA). Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, Forestry Sciences Laboratory)

    1984-01-01

    The external mycelium of a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus was effective in aggregating a sandy loam minesoil. The polysaccharide nature of the soil binding agent on hyphal surfaces and on the surfaces of sand particles in contact with the hyphae within the aggregate was demonstrated with the periodic acid-Schiff reagent staining reaction. A possible stabilizing mechanism for macroaggregates was proposed that involves a coupling reaction between glucosamines in the hyphal walls of the fungus with phenolic compounds released during lignin degradation of sericea lespedeza root tissue. 28 refs.

  17. Finite Element Analysis for Cohesive Soil, Stress and Consolidation Problems Using Bounding Surface Plasticity Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    Formulation of Soil Plasticity ," Chapter in Soils under Cyclic and Transient Loading, 3. Wiley and Sons, 0. C. Zienkiewiez and G. N. Pande, eds., 1982. 2...and . S. DeNatale, "Numerical ’-’. Implementation of a Bounding Surface Soil Plasticity Model," Proc. of theInt. Symp. on Num. Models in Geomech. , V2

  18. The SMAP level 4 surface and root zone soil moisture data assimilation product

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for launch in January 2015 and will provide L-band radar and radiometer observations that are sensitive to surface soil moisture (in the top few centimeters of the soil column). For several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, ho...

  19. Physical characterization, spectral response and remotely sensed mapping of Mediterranean soil surface crusts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, S.M. de; Addink, E.A.; Duijsing, D.; Beek, L.P.H. van

    2011-01-01

    Soil surface crusting and sealing are frequent but unfavorable processes in Mediterranean areas. Soil crust and seals form on bare soil subject to high-intensity rainfall, resulting in a hard, impenetrable layer that impedes infiltration and hampers the germination and establishment of plants. The a

  20. Calibration and validation of the COSMOS rover for surface soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mobile COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS) rover may be useful for validating satellite-based estimates of near surface soil moisture, but the accuracy with which the rover can measure 0-5 cm soil moisture has not been previously determined. Our objectives were to calibrate and va...

  1. Effects of Heavy, Tracked-Vehicle Disturbance on Forest Soil Properties at Fort Benning, Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garten, C.T.,JR.

    2004-05-20

    The purpose of this report is to describe the effects of heavy, tracked-vehicle disturbance on various measures of soil quality in training compartment K-11 at Fort Benning, Georgia. Predisturbance soil sampling in April and October of 2002 indicated statistically significant differences in soil properties between upland and riparian sites. Soil density was less at riparian sites, but riparian soils had significantly greater C and N concentrations and stocks than upland soils. Most of the C stock in riparian soils was associated with mineral-associated organic matter (i.e., the silt + clay fraction physically separated from whole mineral soil). Topographic differences in soil N availability were highly dependent on the time of sampling. Riparian soils had higher concentrations of extractable inorganic N than upland soils and also exhibited significantly greater soil N availability during the spring sampling. The disturbance experiment was performed in May 2003 by driving a D7 bulldozer through the mixed pine/hardwood forest. Post-disturbance sampling was limited to upland sites because training with heavy, tracked vehicles at Fort Benning is generally confined to upland soils. Soil sampling approximately one month after the experiment indicated that effects of the bulldozer were limited primarily to the forest floor (O-horizon) and the surface (0-10 cm) mineral soil. O-horizon dry mass and C stocks were significantly reduced, relative to undisturbed sites, and there was an indication of reduced mineral soil C stocks in the disturbance zone. Differences in the surface (0-10 cm) mineral soil also indicated a significant increase in soil density as a result of disturbance by the bulldozer. Although there was some tendency for greater soil N availability in disturbed soils, the changes were not significantly different from undisturbed controls. It is expected that repeated soil disturbance over time, which will normally occur in a military training area, would simply

  2. Statistical assessment of soil surface roughness for environmental applications using photogrammetric imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzahn, Philip; Rieke-Zapp, Dirk; Ludwig, Ralf

    2010-05-01

    Micro scale soil surface roughness is a crucial parameter in many environmental applications. Recent soil erosion studies have shown the impact of micro topography on soil erosion rates as well as overland flow generation due to soil crusting effects. Besides the above mentioned, it is widely recognized that the backscattered signal in SAR remote sensing is strongly influenced by soil surface roughness and by regular higher order tillage patterns. However, there is an ambiguity in the appropriate measurement technique and scale for roughness studies and SAR backscatter model parametrization. While different roughness indices depend on their measurement length, no satisfying roughness parametrization and measurement technique has been found yet, introducing large uncertainty in the interpretation of the radar backscatter. In the presented study, we computed high resolution digital elevation models (DEM) using a consumer grade digital camera in the frame of photogrammetric imaging techniques to represent soil micro topography from different soil surfaces (ploughed, harrowed, seedbed and crusted) . The retrieved DEMs showed sufficient accuracy, with an RMSE of a 1.64 mm compared to high accurate reference points,. For roughness characterization, we calculated different roughness indices (RMS height (s), autocorrelation length (l), tortuosity index (TB)). In an extensive statistical investigation we show the behaviour of the roughness indices for different acquisition sizes. Compared to results from profile measurements taken from literature and profiles generated out of the dataset, results indicate,that by using a three dimensional measuring device, the calculated roughness indices are more robust against outliers and even saturate faster with increasing acquisition size. Dependent on the roughness condition, the calculated values for the RMS-height saturate for ploughed fields at 2.3 m, for harrowed fields at 2.0 m and for crusted fields at 1.2 m. Results also

  3. Burn effects on soil properties associated to heat transfer under contrasting moisture content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badía, David; López-García, Sergio; Martí, Clara; Ortíz-Perpiñá, Oriol; Girona-García, Antonio; Casanova-Gascón, José

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the topsoil thickness affected by burning under contrasting soil moisture content (field capacity versus air-dried conditions). A mollic horizon of an Aleppo pine forest was sampled and burned in the laboratory, recording the temperature continuously at the topsoil surface and at soil depths of 1, 2, and 3cm. Changes in soil properties were measured at 0-1, 1-2, 2-3, and 3-4cm. Both the maximum temperature and the charring intensities were significantly lower in wet soils than in air-dried soils up to 3cm in depth. Moreover, soil heating was slower and cooling faster in wet soils as compared to dry soils. Therefore, the heat capacity increase of the soil moistened at field capacity plays a more important role than the thermal conductivity increase on heat transfer on burned soils. Burning did not significantly modify the pH, the carbonate content and the chroma, for either wet or dry soil. Fire caused an immediate and significant decrease in water repellency in the air-dried soil, even at 3cm depth, whereas the wet soil remained hydrophilic throughout its thickness, without being affected by burning. Burning depleted 50% of the soil organic C (OC) content in the air-dried soil and 25% in the wet soil at the upper centimeter, which was blackened. Burning significantly decreased the total N (TN) content only in the dry soil (to one-third of the original value) through the first centimeter of soil depth. Soluble ions, measured by electrical conductivity (EC), increased after burning, although only significantly in the first centimeter of air-dried soils. Below 2cm, burning had no significant effects on the brightness, OC, TN, or EC, for either wet or dry soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Incorporation of Nano-carbon into Slow-released Fertilizer on Rice Yield and Nitrogen Loss in Surface Water of Paddy Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Mei-yan Wu

    2013-01-01

    The use of slow-released fertilizer has become a new trend to save fertilizer consumption and to minimize environmental pollution. Duo to its high surface energy and chemical activity, the application domain of nano-materials has significantly expanded with the development of nanotechnology in conjunction with biotechnology in various fields, such as water purification, wastewater treatment, environmental remediation and food processing and packaging, industrial and household purposes, medici...

  5. Effects of initial soil condition on the effectiveness of biological geotextiles in reducing interrill runoff and erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, T.; Poesen, J.

    2009-04-01

    The effectiveness of a surface cover material (e.g. geotextiles, rock fragments, mulches, vegetation) in reducing runoff and soil erosion rates is often only assessed by the fraction of the soil surface covered. However, there are indications that soil structure has important effects on the runoff and erosion-reducing effectiveness of the cover materials. This study investigates the impact of initial soil condition (i.e. fine tilth versus sealed soil surface) on the effectiveness of biological geotextiles in increasing infiltration rates and in reducing runoff and interrill erosion rates on a medium and steep slope gradient. Rainfall was simulated during 60 minutes with an intensity of 67 mm h-1 on an interrill erosion plot having two slope gradients (i.e. 15 and 45%) and filled with an erodible sandy loam. Five biological and three simulated geotextiles with different cover percentage were tested on two simulated initial soil conditions (i.e. fine tilth and sealed soil surface). Final infiltration rates on a sealed soil surface (7.5-18.5 mm h-1) are observed after ca. 10 minutes of rainfall compared to ca. 50 minutes of rainfall on an initial seedbed (16.4-56.7 mm h-1). On the two tested slope gradients, significantly (α = 0.05) smaller runoff coefficients (RC) are observed on an initial seedbed (8.2% geotextile cover. However, on an initial sealed soil surface no significant effect of simulated geotextile cover on RC is observed. On a 15% slope gradient, calculated b-values from the mulch factor equation equalled 0.054 for an initial fine tilth and 0.022 for a sealed soil surface, indicating a higher effectiveness of geotextiles in reducing interrill erosion on a fine tilth compared to a sealed soil surface. Therefore, this study demonstrates the importance of applying geotextiles on the soil surface before the surface tilth is sealed due to rainfall. The effect of soil structure on the effectiveness of a surface cover in reducing runoff and interrill erosion

  6. Urban tree effects on soil organic carbon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill L Edmondson

    Full Text Available Urban trees sequester carbon into biomass and provide many ecosystem service benefits aboveground leading to worldwide tree planting schemes. Since soils hold ∼75% of ecosystem organic carbon, understanding the effect of urban trees on soil organic carbon (SOC and soil properties that underpin belowground ecosystem services is vital. We use an observational study to investigate effects of three important tree genera and mixed-species woodlands on soil properties (to 1 m depth compared to adjacent urban grasslands. Aboveground biomass and belowground ecosystem service provision by urban trees are found not to be directly coupled. Indeed, SOC enhancement relative to urban grasslands is genus-specific being highest under Fraxinus excelsior and Acer spp., but similar to grasslands under Quercus robur and mixed woodland. Tree cover type does not influence soil bulk density or C∶N ratio, properties which indicate the ability of soils to provide regulating ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling and flood mitigation. The trends observed in this study suggest that genus selection is important to maximise long-term SOC storage under urban trees, but emerging threats from genus-specific pathogens must also be considered.

  7. Urban tree effects on soil organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Jill L; O'Sullivan, Odhran S; Inger, Richard; Potter, Jonathan; McHugh, Nicola; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    Urban trees sequester carbon into biomass and provide many ecosystem service benefits aboveground leading to worldwide tree planting schemes. Since soils hold ∼75% of ecosystem organic carbon, understanding the effect of urban trees on soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil properties that underpin belowground ecosystem services is vital. We use an observational study to investigate effects of three important tree genera and mixed-species woodlands on soil properties (to 1 m depth) compared to adjacent urban grasslands. Aboveground biomass and belowground ecosystem service provision by urban trees are found not to be directly coupled. Indeed, SOC enhancement relative to urban grasslands is genus-specific being highest under Fraxinus excelsior and Acer spp., but similar to grasslands under Quercus robur and mixed woodland. Tree cover type does not influence soil bulk density or C∶N ratio, properties which indicate the ability of soils to provide regulating ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling and flood mitigation. The trends observed in this study suggest that genus selection is important to maximise long-term SOC storage under urban trees, but emerging threats from genus-specific pathogens must also be considered.

  8. Soil degradation effect on biological activity in Mediterranean calcareous soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Pérez, L.; Alcover-Sáez, S.; Mormeneo, S.; Boluda, R.

    2009-04-01

    Soil degradation processes include erosion, organic matter decline, compaction, salinization, landslides, contamination, sealing and biodiversity decline. In the Mediterranean region the climatological and lithological conditions, together with relief on the landscape and anthropological activity are responsible for increasing desertification process. It is therefore considered to be extreme importance to be able to measure soil degradation quantitatively. We studied soil characteristics, microbiological and biochemical parameters in different calcareous soil sequences from Valencia Community (Easter Spain), in an attempt to assess the suitability of the parameters measured to reflect the state of soil degradation and the possibility of using the parameters to assess microbiological decline and soil quality. For this purpose, forest, scrubland and agricultural soil in three soil sequences were sampled in different areas. Several sensors of the soil biochemistry and microbiology related with total organic carbon, microbial biomass carbon, soil respiration, microorganism number and enzyme activities were determined. The results show that, except microorganism number, these parameters are good indicators of a soil biological activity and soil quality. The best enzymatic activities to use like indicators were phosphatases, esterases, amino-peptidases. Thus, the enzymes test can be used as indicators of soil degradation when this degradation is related with organic matter losses. There was a statistically significant difference in cumulative O2 uptake and extracellular enzymes among the soils with different degree of degradation. We would like to thank Spanish government-MICINN for funding and support (MICINN, project CGL2006-09776).

  9. Stem-root flow effect on soil-atmosphere interactions and uncertainty assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzu-Hsien; Chen, Jen-Ping; Xue, Yongkang

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall that reaches the soil surface can rapidly move into deeper layers in the form of bulk flow through the stem-root flow mechanism. This study developed the stem-root flow parameterization scheme and coupled this scheme with the Simplified Simple Biosphere model (SSiB) to analyze its effects on land-atmospheric interactions. The SSiB model was tested in a single-column mode using the Lien Hua Chih (LHC) measurements conducted in Taiwan and HAPEX-Mobilhy (HAPEX) measurements in France. The results show that stem-root flow generally caused a decrease in soil moisture in the top soil layer and moistened the deeper soil layers. Such soil moisture redistribution results in substantial changes in heat flux exchange between land and atmosphere. In the humid environment at LHC, the stem-root flow effect on transpiration was minimal, and the main influence on energy flux was through reduced soil evaporation that led to higher soil temperature and greater sensible heat flux. In the Mediterranean environment of HAPEX, the stem-root flow substantially affected plant transpiration and soil evaporation, as well as associated changes in canopy and soil temperatures. However, the effect on transpiration could be either positive or negative depending on the relative changes in the soil moisture of the top soil vs. deeper soil layers due to stem-root flow and soil moisture diffusion processes.

  10. Differential effects of biochar on soils within an eroded field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Thomas; Chintala, Rajesh; Sandhu, Saroop; Kumar, Sandeep; Clay, Dave; Gelderman, Ron; Papiernik, Sharon; Malo, Douglas; Clay, Sharon; Julson, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Future uses of biochar will in part be dependent not only on the effects of biochar on soil processes but also on the availability and economics of biochar production. If pyrolysis for production of bio-oil and syngas becomes wide-spread, biochar as a by-product of bio-oil production will be widely available and relatively inexpensive compared to the production of biochar as primary product. Biochar produced as a by-product of optimized bio-oil production using regionally available feedstocks was examined for properties and for use as an amendment targeted to contrasting soils within an eroded field in an on-farm study initiated in 2013 at Brookings, South Dakota, USA. Three plant based biochar materials produced from carbon optimized gasification of corn stover (Zea mays L.), Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson and C. Lawson) wood residue, and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) were applied at a 1% (w/w) rate to a Maddock soil (Sandy, Mixed, Frigid Entic Hapludolls) located in an eroded upper landscape position and a Brookings soil (Fine-Silty, Mixed, Superactive, Frigid Pachic Hapludolls) located in a depositional landscape position. The cropping system within this agricultural landscape was a corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.) rotation. Biochar physical and chemical properties for each of the feedstocks were determined including pH, surface area, surface charge potential, C-distribution, ash content, macro and micro nutrient composition. Yields, nutrient content, and carbon isotope ratio measurements were made on the harvested seed. Soil physical properties measured included water retention, bulk density, and water infiltration from a ponded double ring infiltrometer. Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the effects of biochar on partitioning of nitrate and phosphorus at soil surface exchange complex and the extracellular enzymes activity of C and N cycles. Crop yields were increased only in the Maddock soil. Biochar interacted with each

  11. Changes in Temperature and Fate of Soil Organic Matter in an Andisol due to Soil Surface Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchi, Atsuko; Nishimura, Taku; Mizoguchi, Masaru; Imoto, Hiromi; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi

    This is a print of a camera-ready Japanese manuscript for the Transactions of JSIDRE. This will provide an example and directions for the layout and font size/style to be used. Please refer to this when preparing the headings, figures/table and text of your manuscript. The manuscript should be submitted on A4 size. Changes in temperature, soil moisture, and carbon and nitrogen contents were measured in Andisol under soil surface burning. Soil samples were packed into an unglazed cylinder of 15 cm inner diameter and 30 cm high. Charcoal was burned for 6 hours on the surface of the soil column. During the burning soil surface temperature rose to between 600-700°C. In initially wet soil, rise in soil temperature was retarded for a while at around 95-100°C. On the other hand, in initially dry Toyoura sand showed more rapid temperature increase without retardation. The temperature retardation in the wet soil could be caused by consumption of latent heat by vaporization of soil water. Rate of proceeding of the 100°C front was proportional to square root of the burning time. This indicates that higher the initial volumetric water content, shallower the depth affected by burning. Soil samples suffered temperature above 500°C still had total carbon and nitrogen contents of over 20 and 1 g kg-1, respectively, whereas the soil that was heated up to over 500°C by muffle furnace contained less than 0.4 and 0.1 g kg-1 of the carbon and nitrogen.

  12. [Dynamic changes of surface soil organic carbon and light-fraction organic carbon after mobile dune afforestation with Mongolian pine in Horqin Sandy Land].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Wen; Li, Yu-qiang; Wang, Shao-kun; Feng, Jing; Su, Na

    2011-08-01

    This paper studied the dynamic changes of surface (0-15 cm) soil organic carbon (SOC) and light-fraction organic carbon (LFOC) in 25- and 35-year-old sand-fixing Mongolian pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) plantations in Horqin Sandy Land, with a mobile dune as a comparison site. After the afforestation on mobile dune, the content of coarse sand in soil decreased, while that of fine sand and clay-silt increased significantly. The SOC and LFOC contents also increased significantly, but tended to decrease with increasing soil depth. Afforestation increased the storages of SOC and LFOC in surface soil, and the increment increased with plantation age. In the two plantations, the increment of surface soil LFOC storage was much higher than that of SOC storage, suggesting that mobile dune afforestation had a larger effect on surface soil LFOC than on SOC.

  13. Spatial Variability Some Physical and Chemical Prpperties Soil surface In Dasht-e-Tabriz Different Landforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughifar, Hamed; Asghar Jafarzadeh, Ali; Torabi, Hosien; Aliasgharzad, Naser; Toomanian, Norair

    2010-05-01

    Spatial distribution of soil properties at the field and watershed scale(region scale) affect yield potential, hydrologic responses , and transport of herbicides and No3 to surface or groundwater.The present study aim was to evaluate some physical and chemical properties spatial variability and frequency distribution within and between landforms of Dash-e-Tabriz in the northwest of Iran.For this evaluation 98 samples from soils surface of layer according to grid sampling design and with 500-1000 meters distance based on soils variability were selected and analysed.Landforms were hill, piedmont plain, plain, river alluvial plain and lowland.The study of soil variables frequency distribution showed that Bd, CEC, Caco3, pH,clay and silt follow normal distribution ,which to study their variation one can use parametric statistical method.Variables such as MWD, N(total), SAR, EC, P(available) and sand showed log-normal distribution,that for their variation study,should first be transformed to a logarithmic scale.The variables frequency distribution increase within landforms,which in lowland, hill, and river alluvial plain they showed normal distribution and only EC in piedmont plain and sand, OC and N(total) in plain had log-normal distributions.The results indicate significantly differences of soil properties distribution among landforms,which clay ,pH, EC ,SAR and MWD, CEC, Bd, N(total), OC, P(available), sand, silt were strongly and moderately spatial dependent respectively and Caco3 had no spatial dependence and it is following nugget model.These results indicate that strong spatial dependence due to the effects of intrinsic factors such as parent material, relief and soil types. Also soil properties variations result from variation in depositional environments and or differences in pedogenic or hydrologic processes for different landform positions,and so it can be affected by the flood irrigation,fertilizeir addition,high watertable level or agriculture practices

  14. Soil moisture, dielectric permittivity and emissivity of soil: effective depth of emission measured by the L-band radiometer ELBARA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Lukowski, Mateusz; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Jerzy; Lipiec, Jerzy; Rojek, Edyta; Slominska, Ewa; Slominski, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Due to the large variation of soil moisture in space and in time, obtaining soil water balance with an aid of data acquired from the surface is still a challenge. Microwave remote sensing is widely used to determine the water content in soil. It is based on the fact that the dielectric constant of the soil is strongly dependent on its water content. This method provides the data in both local and global scales. Very important issue that is still not solved, is the soil depth at which radiometer "sees" the incoming radiation and how this "depth of view" depends on water content and physical properties of soil. The microwave emission comes from its entire profile, but much of this energy is absorbed by the upper layers of soil. As a result, the contribution of each layer to radiation visible for radiometer decreases with depth. The thickness of the surface layer, which significantly contributes to the energy measured by the radiometer is defined as the "penetration depth". In order to improve the physical base of the methodology of soil moisture measurements using microwave remote sensing and to determine the effective emission depth seen by the radiometer, a new algorithm was developed. This algorithm determines the reflectance coefficient from Fresnel equations, and, what is new, the complex dielectric constant of the soil, calculated from the Usowicz's statistical-physical model (S-PM) of dielectric permittivity and conductivity of soil. The model is expressed in terms of electrical resistance and capacity. The unit volume of soil in the model consists of solid, water and air, and is treated as a system made up of spheres, filling volume by overlapping layers. It was assumed that connections between layers and spheres in the layer are represented by serial and parallel connections of "resistors" and "capacitors". The emissivity of the soil surface is calculated from the ratio between the brightness temperature measured by the ELBARA radiometer (GAMMA Remote

  15. Effects of Biochar Amendment on Soil Properties and Soil Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R.; Zhu, S.

    2015-12-01

    Biochar addition to soils potentially affects various soil properties and soil carbon sequestration, and these effects are dependent on biochars derived from different feedstock materials and pyrolysis processes. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of amendment of different biochars on soil physical and biological properties as well as soil carbon sequestration. Biochars were produced with dairy manure and woodchip at temperatures of 300, 500, and 700°C, respectively. Each biochar was mixed at 5% (w/w) with a forest soil and the mixture was incubated for 180 days, during which soil physical and biological properties, and soil respiration rates were measured. Results showed that the biochar addition significantly enhanced the formation of soil macroaggregates at the early incubation time. The biochar application significantly reduced soil bulk density, increased the amount of soil organic matter, and stimulated microbial activity and soil respiration rates at the early incubation stage. Biochar applications improved water retention capacity, with stronger effects by biochars produced at higher pyrolysis temperatures. At the same suction, the soil with woodchip biochars possessed higher water content than with the dairy manure biochars. Biochar addition significantly affected the soil physical and biological properties, which resulted in different soil carbon mineralization rates and the amount of soil carbon storage.

  16. Role of soil health in maintaining environmental sustainability of surface coal mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, Peter M; Fox, James F; Campbell, J Elliott; Jones, Alice L; Rowe, Harold; Martin, Darren; Bryson, Sebastian

    2011-12-01

    Mountaintop coal mining (MCM) in the Southern Appalachian forest region greatly impacts both soil and aquatic ecosystems. Policy and practice currently in place emphasize water quality and soil stability but do not consider upland soil health. Here we report soil organic carbon (SOC) measurements and other soil quality indicators for reclaimed soils in the Southern Appalachian forest region to quantify the health of the soil ecosystem. The SOC sequestration rate of the MCM soils was 1.3 MgC ha(-1) yr(-1) and stocks ranged from 1.3 ± 0.9 to 20.9 ± 5.9 Mg ha(-1) and contained only 11% of the SOC of surrounding forest soils. Comparable reclaimed mining soils reported in the literature that are supportive of soil ecosystem health had SOC stocks 2.5-5 times greater than the MCM soils and sequestration rates were also 1.6-3 times greater. The high compaction associated with reclamation in this region greatly reduces both the vegetative rooting depth and infiltration of the soil and increases surface runoff, thus bypassing the ability of soil to naturally filter groundwater. In the context of environmental sustainability of MCM, it is proposed that the entire watershed ecosystem be assessed and that a revision of current policy be conducted to reflect the health of both water and soil.

  17. Integration of multi-sensor data to measure soil surface changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltner, Anette; Schneider, Danilo

    2016-04-01

    Digital elevation models (DEM) of high resolution and accuracy covering a suitable sized area of interest can be a promising approach to help understanding the processes of soil erosion. Thereby, the plot under investigation should remain undisturbed. The fragile marl landscape in Andalusia (Spain) is especially prone to soil detachment and transport with unique sediment connectivity characteristics due to the soil properties and climatic conditions. A 600 m² field plot is established and monitored during three field campaigns (Sep. 2013, Nov. 2013 and Feb. 2014). Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) are suitable tools to generate high resolution topography data that describe soil surface changes at large field plots. Thereby, the advantages of both methods are utilised in a synergetic manner. On the one hand, TLS data is assumed to comprise a higher reliability regarding consistent error behaviour than DEMs derived from overlapping UAV images. Therefore, global errors (e.g. dome effect) and local errors (e.g. DEM blunders due to erroneous image matching) within the UAV data are assessed with the DEMs produced by TLS. Furthermore, TLS point clouds allow for fast and reliable filtering of vegetation spots, which is not as straightforward within the UAV data due to known image matching problems in areas displaying plant cover. On the other hand, systematic DEM errors linked to TLS are detected and possibly corrected utilising the DEMs reconstructed from overlapping UAV images. Furthermore, TLS point clouds are filtered corresponding to the degree of point quality, which is estimated from parameters of the scan geometry (i.e. incidence angle and footprint size). This is especially relevant for this study because the area of interest is located at gentle hillslopes that are prone to soil erosion. Thus, the view of the scanning device onto the surface results in an adverse angle, which is solely slightly improved by the

  18. Effects of Soil Compaction on Carbon and Nitrogen Sequestration in Soil and Wheat, Soil Physical Properties and Aggregates Stability (Case study: Northern of Aq Qala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Saieedifar

    2016-09-01

    recommendations must be considered: Increasing soil organic matter, leaving crop residue from the previous crop at the soil surface, using crops with deep-and-vertical-penetrating roots during crop rotation, tillage depth variation in different years, using super absorbent for better ventilation and reduces soil compaction, implementing no-tillage system to reduce traffic of farming machineries, maintaining plant residues at the soil surface, applying lacking nutrients to the soil, and subsoil operations to reduce the detrimental effects. As a field-based study, the results could be transferred to the local farmers. Authorities have to remove the obstacles to deliver the message to the farmers in order to enhance production and reach nation self-sufficiency.

  19. High-resolution hydraulic parameter maps for surface soils in tropical South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthews, T. R.; Quesada, C. A.; Galbraith, D. R.; Malhi, Y.; Mullins, C. E.; Hodnett, M. G.; Dharssi, I.

    2014-05-01

    Modern land surface model simulations capture soil profile water movement through the use of soil hydraulics sub-models, but good hydraulic parameterisations are often lacking, especially in the tropics. We present much-improved gridded data sets of hydraulic parameters for surface soil for the critical area of tropical South America, describing soil profile water movement across the region to 30 cm depth. Optimal hydraulic parameter values are given for the Brooks and Corey, Campbell, van Genuchten-Mualem and van Genuchten-Burdine soil hydraulic models, which are widely used hydraulic sub-models in land surface models. This has been possible through interpolating soil measurements from several sources through the SOTERLAC soil and terrain data base and using the most recent pedotransfer functions (PTFs) derived for South American soils. All soil parameter data layers are provided at 15 arcsec resolution and available for download, this being 20x higher resolution than the best comparable parameter maps available to date. Specific examples are given of the use of PTFs and the importance highlighted of using PTFs that have been locally parameterised and that are not just based on soil texture. We discuss current developments in soil hydraulic modelling and how high-resolution parameter maps such as these can improve the simulation of vegetation development and productivity in land surface models.

  20. Effects of Elevation on Surface Layer Soil Active Organic Carbon Content in Shennongjia Nature Reserve%海拔对神农架表层土壤活性有机碳含量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢慧; 丛静; 薛亚东; 杨敬元; 陈克龙; 李迪强; 张于光

    2014-01-01

    In this study,five typical vegetation types were selected along the elevational gradient in Shennongjia Nature Reserve,including shrubs, coniferous forest, mixed forest between coniferous and deciduous broad-leaved forest, deciduous broad-leaved forest,and evergreen broad-leaved forest. The content of soil organic carbon ( SOC ) ,water dissolved organic carbon ( WDOC ) ,labile organic carbon ( LOC ) ,and microbial biomass carbon ( MBC ) and their allocation proportions to SOC were analyzed. Furthermore,the Pearson relationship was analyzed between soil active organic carbon and plant diversity or soil physiochemical properties. The results showed that the soil organic carbon in the surface layer increased with the elevation increased, except for the deciduous broad-leaved forest. Distribution characteristics of MBC and LOC content along elevation gradient were obvious,but WDOC content was independent of the elevation gradient. The contents of the three kinds of active organic carbon in different elevational gradients were in the order of: LOC>MBC >WDOC. The allocation ratios of MBC,LOC and WDOC to SOC did not significantly alter with elevational gradient. Pearson relationship showed that SOC and MBC had a significant negative correlation with the diversity of trees and shrubs (P < 0. 05),while LOC and WDOC content had no significant correlation with plant diversity. In addition,SOC and MBC were significantly positively correlated with the content of soil moisture,total nitrogen,available nitrogen,total phosphorus and total sulfur (P<0. 01). LOC had a significant and positive correlation with the content of soil moisture,total nitrogen,available nitrogen and total sulfur (P <0. 01). There was a significant correlation between LOC and total phosphorus ( P<0 . 05 ) . The results revealed that these factors had a dominating impact on SOC,LOC and MBC. WDOC content had no obvious correlation with soil factors.

  1. Dissipation of triclosan, triclocarban, carbamazepine and naproxen in agricultural soil following surface or sub-surface application of dewatered municipal biosolids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rajab, Abdul Jabbar; Sabourin, Lyne [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON N5V 4T3 (Canada); Lapen, David R. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0C6 (Canada); Topp, Edward, E-mail: ed.topp@agr.gc.ca [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON N5V 4T3 (Canada); Department of Biology, Western University, London, ON N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    In many jurisdictions land application of municipal biosolids is a valued source of nutrients for crop production. The practice must be managed to ensure that crops and adjacent water are not subject to contamination by pharmaceuticals or other organic contaminants. The broad spectrum antimicrobial agents triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC), the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ), and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug naproxen (NAP) are widely used and are carried in biosolids. In the present study, the effect of biosolids and depth of placement in the soil profile on the rates of TCS, TCC, CBZ, and NAP dissipation were evaluated under semi-field conditions. Aggregates of dewatered municipal biosolids (DMBs) supplemented with {sup 14}C-labeled residues were applied either on the soil surface or in the subsurface of the soil profile, and incubated over several months under ambient outdoor conditions. The dissipation of TCS, TCC and NAP was significantly faster in sub-surface than surface applied biosolid aggregates. In contrast the dissipation rate for CBZ was the same in surface applied and incorporated aggregates. Overall, the present study has determined a significant effect of depth of placement on the dissipation rate of biodegradable molecules. - Highlights: • We characterized the soil fate of four organic contaminants carried in biosolids. • Biosolids were placed on the soil surface or incorporated within the soil profile. • Naproxen, triclosan and triclocarban were dissipated more rapidly when incorporated. • Depth of placement did not influence the rate of carbamazepine dissipation. • Soil incorporation of biosolids will result in more rapid dissipation of contaminants.

  2. Soil compaction effects on soil health and cropproductivity: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Adnan Noor; Tanveer, Mohsin; Shahzad, Babar; Yang, Guozheng; Fahad, Shah; Ali, Saif; Bukhari, Muhammad Adnan; Tung, Shahbaz Atta; Hafeez, Abdul; Souliyanonh, Biangkham

    2017-04-01

    Soil compaction causes substantial reduction in agriculture productivity and has always been of great distress for farmers. Intensive agriculture seems to be more crucial in causing compaction. High mechanical load, less crop diversification, intensive grazing, and irrigation methods lead to soil compaction. It is further exasperated when these factors are accompanied with low organic matter, animal trampling, engine vibrations, and tillage at high moisture contents. Soil compaction increases soil bulk density and soil strength, while decreases porosity, aggregate stability index, soil hydraulic conductivity, and nutrient availability, thus reduces soil health. Consequently, it lowers crop performance via stunted aboveground growth coupled with reduced root growth. This paper reviews the potential causes of compaction and its consequences that have been published in last two decades. Various morphological and physiological alterations in plant as result of soil compaction have also been discussed in this review.

  3. The Effect of Gasification Biochar on Soil Carbon Sequestration, Soil Quality and Crop Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Veronika

    have been raised about the potential negative impacts of incorporating bioenergy residuals (biochar) in soil and increasing the removal of crop residues such as straw, possibly reducing important soil functions and services for maintaining soil quality. Therefore, a combination of incubation studies...... and pot and field experiments was used to study the effect of straw and wood biochar on carbon sequestration, soil quality and crop growth. Overall, the biochar amendment improved soil chemical and physical properties and plant growth and showed a potential for soil carbon sequestration without having any...... negative impact on soil biota. However, the effects of biochar on soil quality and plant growth differed according to the biochar properties and the soil type used. Furthermore, the positive impact on some soil structural properties observed after straw incorporation was not achieved with biochar amendment...

  4. The Effect of Gasification Biochar on Soil Carbon Sequestration, Soil Quality and Crop Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Veronika

    have been raised about the potential negative impacts of incorporating bioenergy residuals (biochar) in soil and increasing the removal of crop residues such as straw, possibly reducing important soil functions and services for maintaining soil quality. Therefore, a combination of incubation studies...... negative impact on soil biota. However, the effects of biochar on soil quality and plant growth differed according to the biochar properties and the soil type used. Furthermore, the positive impact on some soil structural properties observed after straw incorporation was not achieved with biochar amendment...... and pot and field experiments was used to study the effect of straw and wood biochar on carbon sequestration, soil quality and crop growth. Overall, the biochar amendment improved soil chemical and physical properties and plant growth and showed a potential for soil carbon sequestration without having any...

  5. Development of a surface scanning soil analysis instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falahat, S; Köble, T; Schumann, O; Waring, C; Watt, G

    2012-07-01

    ANSTO is developing a nuclear field instrument for measurement of soil composition; particularly carbon. The instrument utilises the neutron activation approach with clear advantages over existing soil sampling and laboratory analysis. A field portable compact pulsed neutron generator and γ-ray detector are used for PGNAA and INS techniques simultaneously. Many elements can be quantified from a homogenised soil volume equivalent to the top soil layers. Results from first test experiments and current developments are reported.

  6. Thermal properties of soils: effect of biochar application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Lukowski, Mateusz; Lipiec, Jerzy

    2014-05-01

    Thermal properties (thermal conductivity, heat capacity and thermal diffusivity) have a significant effect on the soil surface energy partitioning and resulting in the temperature distribution. Thermal properties of soil depend on water content, bulk density and organic matter content. An important source of organic matter is biochar. Biochar as a material is defined as: "charcoal for application as a soil conditioner". Biochar is generally associated with co-produced end products of pyrolysis. Many different materials are used as biomass feedstock for biochar, including wood, crop residues and manures. Additional predictions were done for terra preta soil (also known as "Amazonian dark earth"), high in charcoal content, due to adding a mixture of charcoal, bone, and manure for thousands of years i.e. approximately 10-1,000 times longer than residence times of most soil organic matter. The effect of biochar obtained from the wood biomass and other organic amendments (peat, compost) on soil thermal properties is presented in this paper. The results were compared with wetland soils of different organic matter content. The measurements of the thermal properties at various water contents were performed after incubation, under laboratory conditions using KD2Pro, Decagon Devices. The measured data were compared with predictions made using Usowicz statistical-physical model (Usowicz et al., 2006) for biochar, mineral soil and soil with addition of biochar at various water contents and bulk densities. The model operates statistically by probability of occurrence of contacts between particular fractional compounds. It combines physical properties, specific to particular compounds, into one apparent conductance specific to the mixture. The results revealed that addition of the biochar and other organic amendments into the soil caused considerable reduction of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity. The mineral soil showed the highest thermal conductivity and diffusivity

  7. From near-surface to root-zone soil moisture using an exponential filter: an assessment of the method based on in-situ observations and model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Albergel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A long term data acquisition effort of profile soil moisture is under way in southwestern France at 13 automated weather stations. This ground network was developed in order to validate remote sensing and model soil moisture estimates. In this paper, both those in situ observations and a synthetic data set covering continental France are used to test a simple method to retrieve root zone soil moisture from a time series of surface soil moisture information. A recursive exponential filter equation using a time constant, T, is used to compute a soil water index. The Nash and Sutcliff coefficient is used as a criterion to optimise the T parameter for each ground station and for each model pixel of the synthetic data set. In general, the soil water indices derived from the surface soil moisture observations and simulations agree well with the reference root-zone soil moisture. Overall, the results show the potential of the exponential filter equation and of its recursive formulation to derive a soil water index from surface soil moisture estimates. This paper further investigates the correlation of the time scale parameter T with soil properties and climate conditions. While no significant relationship could be determined between T and the main soil properties (clay and sand fractions, bulk density and organic matter content, the modelled spatial variability and the observed inter-annual variability of T suggest that a weak climate effect may exist.

  8. [Priming Effects of Soil Moisture on Soil Respiration Under Different Tillage Practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Liang, Ai-zhen; Zhang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Sheng-long; Sun, Bing-jie; Liu, Si-yi

    2016-03-15

    In the early stage of an incubation experiment, soil respiration has a sensitive response to different levels of soil moisture. To investigate the effects of soil moisture on soil respiration under different tillage practices, we designed an incubation trial using air-dried soil samples collected from tillage experiment station established on black soils in 2001. The tillage experiment consisted of no-tillage (NT), ridge tillage (RT), and conventional tillage (CT). According to field capacity (water-holding capacity, WHC), we set nine moisture levels including 30%, 60%, 90%, 120%, 150%, 180%, 210%, 240%, 270% WHC. During the 22-day short-term incubation, soil CO₂ emission was measured. In the early stage of incubation, the priming effects occurred under all tillage practices. There were positive correlations between soil respiration and soil moisture. In addition to drought and flood conditions, soil CO₂ fluxes followed the order of NT > RT > CT. We fitted the relationship between soil moisture and soil CO₂ fluxes under different tillage practices. In the range of 30%-270% WHC, soil CO₂ fluxes and soil moisture fitted a quadratic regression equation under NT, and linear regression equations under RT and CT. Under the conditions of 30%-210% WHC of both NT and RT, soil CO₂ fluxes and soil moisture were well fitted by the logarithmic equation with fitting coefficient R² = 0.966 and 0.956, respectively.

  9. Potential fate of SOC eroded from natural crusted soil surface under simulated wind driven storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liangang; Fister, Wolfgang; Greenwood, Philip; Hu, Yaxian; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    Improving the assessment of the impact of soil erosion on carbon (C) cycling requires a better understanding of the redistribution of eroded sediment and associated soil organic carbon (SOC) across agricultural landscapes. Recent studies conducted on dry-sieved aggregates in the laboratory demonstrated that aggregation can profoundly skew SOC redistribution and its subsequent fate by accelerating settling velocities of aggregated sediment compared to mineral grains, which in turn can increase SOC mineralization into greenhouse gases. However, the erodibility of the soil in the field is more variable than in the laboratory due to tillage, crus formation, drying-wetting and freeze-thaw cycles, and biological effects. This study aimed to investigate the potential fate of the SOC eroded from naturally developed soil surface and to compare the observations with those made in the laboratory. Simulated, short, high intensity wind driven storms were conducted on a crusted loam in the field. The sediments were fractionated with a settling tube according to their potential transport distances. The soil mass, SOC concentration and cumulative 80-day CO2 emission of each fraction were identified. The results show: 1) 53% of eroded sediment and 62% of eroded SOC from the natural surface in the field would be deposited across landscapes, which is six times and three times higher compared to that implied by mineral grains, respectively; 2) the preferential deposition of SOC-rich fast-settling sediment potentially releases approximately 50% more CO2 than the same layer of the non-eroded soil; 3) the respiration of the slow-settling fraction that is potentially transported to the aquatic systems was much more active compared to the other fractions and the bulk soil. Our results confirm in general the conclusions drawn from laboratory and thus demonstrate that aggregation can affect the redistribution of sediment associated SOC under field conditions, including an increase in

  10. Measuring Probabilistic Dependences at Multiple Scales Between Soil Type and Surface Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatton, K. C.; Krekeler, C.; Cohen, M.; McKee, K. A.

    2005-12-01

    Accurate prediction of basin-scale hydrologic behavior is constrained by uncertainty in estimating soil hydraulic behavior. Extreme variability in hydraulic conductivity has been observed (>5 orders of magnitude) over relatively small areas, and studies that have examined the effects of heterogeneity on integrated hydrologic responses have observed substantial errors when structural variability is ignored. This has prompted spatially explicit representations of soil attributes in hydrologic and water quality models (e.g. TOPMODEL) that present significant parameterization constraints at high resolution. Our hypothesis is that elevation data (coarse and fine grain) can serve as a proximate predictor of soil hydraulic properties. We present an information-theoretic method to systematically rank the information contributions, with respect to soil properties (primarily texture), of several surficial and landcover structure features obtained from data at both coarse (~30m) and fine (~1m) spatial scales using a probabilistic measure known as mutual information. The method makes no a priori assumptions about the relative importance of features, thus allowing feature ranking to respond to variations in terrain and landcover. The study site is located in the riparian corridor of an urban watershed (Hogtown Creek) in the city of Gainesville, Florida. It is a surficially closed basin in the St. John's River Water Management District in Northeastern Florida. The area is low-relief and contains mixed land use (natural forested areas and urban development). Topographic data from the USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) and the NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), along with approximate stream locations from the USGS National Hydrography Dataset, are used to generate spatially distributed coarse-scale features regarding surface morphology and drainage. Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM) data are also used to generate features relating to under-canopy topography and

  11. Vertical distribution of soil moisture and surface sandy soil wind erosion for different types of sand dune on the southeastern margin of the Mu Us Sandy Land, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChaoFeng Fu; JingBo Zhao; FanMin Mei; TianJie Shao; Jun Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Soil moisture is a critical state affecting a variety of land surface and subsurface processes. We report investigation results of the factors controlling vertical variation of soil moisture and sand transport rate of three types of dunes on the south-eastern margin of the Mu Us Sandy Land. Samples were taken from holes drilled to a depth of 4 m at different topographic sites on the dunes, and were analyzed for soil moisture, grain-size distribution and surface sediment discharge. The results show that: (1) The average soil moisture varies in different types of dunes, with the following sequences ordered from highest to lowest: in the shrubs-covered dunes and the trees-covered dunes the sequence is from inter-dunes lowland to windward slope to leeward slope. The average moisture in the bare-migratory sand dunes is sequenced from inter-dunes lowland to leeward slope to windward slope. (2) Vegetation form and surface coverage affect the range of soil moisture of different types of dunes in the same topographic position. The coefficient of variation of soil moisture for shrubs-covered dunes is higher than that of other types of dune. (3) The effect of shrubs on dune soil moisture is explained in terms of the greater ability of shrubs to trap fine-grained atmospheric dust and hold moisture. (4) The estimated sand transport rates over sand dunes with sparse shrubs are less than those over bare-migratory dunes or sand dunes with sparse trees, indi-cating that shrubs are more effective in inhibiting wind erosion in the sandy land area.

  12. Surface effects in nucleation

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseechkin, Nikolay V

    2016-01-01

    The classical nucleation theory (CNT) concept of a nucleus as a fragment of the bulk new phase fails for nanosized nuclei. An extension of CNT taking into account the properties of the transition region between coexisting bulk phases is proposed. For this purpose, the finite-thickness layer method which is an alternative to the Gibbs one is used; the transition region is considered as a separate (surface) phase. An equation for the nucleation work is derived which is basic for the multivariable theory of nucleation.

  13. Spatial assessment of soil nitrogen availability and varying effects of related main soil factors on soil available nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mingkai; Li, Weidong; Zhang, Chuanrong; Huang, Biao; Zhao, Yongcun

    2016-11-09

    To effectively understand the availability of soil nitrogen and assist in soil nitrogen control at the regional scale, it is essential to understand the accurate spatial distribution patterns of the three soil nitrogen parameters [i.e., total nitrogen (TN), available nitrogen (AN) and nitrogen availability ratio (NAR)] and explore the spatially varying influences of major impact factors on soil AN. Land use affects the spatial distributions of soil TN, AN and NAR (i.e., AN/TN). To explore the effects of different land use types and improve mapping accuracy, residual kriging with land use information and ordinary kriging (without land use information) were compared based on the sample data of soil TN and AN in Hanchuan county, China. A local regression technique, geographically weighted regression (GWR), was adopted to explore the varying relationships between soil AN and its major impact factors in soil (i.e., soil TN and soil pH), due to the advantages of GWR over the traditional ordinary least squares regression (OLS) model. The results showed that (1) land use types as auxiliary information obviously improved the prediction accuracies of the three soil nitrogen parameters; (2) GWR performed much better than OLS in terms of fitting accuracy; and (3) GWR effectively revealed the spatially varying influences of the impact factors on soil AN, which were ignored by OLS. Based on the results, suggestions for soil nitrogen control measures in different subareas were proposed.

  14. Effects of physical soil crusts on infiltration and splash erosion in three typical Chinese soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong-feng BU; Shu-fang WU; Kai-bao YANG

    2014-01-01

    Physical soil crusts likely have significant effects on infiltration and soil erosion, however, little is known on whether the effects of the crusts change during a rainfall event. Further, there is a lack of discussions on the differences among the crusting effects of different soil types. The objectives of this study are as follows: (i) to study the effects of soil crusts on infiltration, runoff, and splash erosion using three typical soils in China, (ii) to distinguish the different effects on hydrology and erosion of the three soils and discuss the primary reasons for these differences, and (iii) to understand the variations in real soil shear strength of the three soils during rainfall events and mathematically model the effects of the crusts on soil erosion. This study showed that the soil crusts delayed the onset of infiltration by 5 to 15 min and reduced the total amount of infiltration by 42.9 to 53.4%during rainfall events. For a purple soil and a loess soil, the initial crust increased the runoff by 2.8%and 3.4%, respectively, and reduced the splash erosion by 3.1% and 8.9%, respectively. For a black soil, the soil crust increased the runoff by 42.9%and unexpectedly increased the splash erosion by 95.2%. In general, the effects of crusts on the purple and loess soils were similar and negligible, but the effects were significant for the black soil. The soil shear strength decreased dynamically and gradually during the rainfall events, and the values of crusted soils were higher than those of incrusted soils, especially during the early stage of the rainfall. Mathematical models were developed to describe the effects of soil crusts on the splash erosion for the three soils as follows:purple soil, 0.384Fc =0.002t− ; black soil, 3.060Fc =−0.022t+ ; and loess soil, Fc =0.233 ln t−1.239 . Combined with the equation 1)Rc=Fc⋅(Ruc− , the splash erosion of the crusted soil can be predicted over time.

  15. [Effect of Biochar Application on Soil Aggregates Distribution and Moisture Retention in Orchard Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yan; Ji, Qiang; Zhao, Shi-xiang; Wang, Xu-dong

    2016-01-15

    Applying biochar to soil has been considered to be one of the important practices in improving soil properties and increasing carbon sequestration. In order to investigate the effects of biochar application on soil aggregates distribution and its organic matter content and soil moisture constant in different size aggregates, various particle-size fractions of soil aggregates were obtained with the dry-screening method. The results showed that, compared to the treatment without biochar (CK), the application of biochar reduced the mass content of 5-8 mm and soil aggregates at 0-10 cm soil horizon, while increased the content of 1-2 mm and 2-5 mm soil aggregates at this horizon, and the content of 1-2 mm aggregates significantly increased along with the rates of biochar application. The mean diameter of soil aggregates was reduced by biochar application at 0-10 cm soil horizon. However, the effect of biochar application on the mean diameter of soil aggregates at 10-20 cm soil horizon was not significant. Compared to CK, biochar application significantly increased soil organic carbon content in aggregates, especially in 1-2 mm aggregates which was increased by > 70% compared to CK. Both the water holding capacity and soil porosity were significantly increased by biochar application. Furthermore, the neutral biochar was more effective than alkaline biochar in increasing soil moisture.

  16. SoilEffects - start characterization of the experimental soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løes, Anne-Kristin; Johansen, Anders; Pommeresche, Reidun

    from a herd of about 25 organically managed dairy cows. This report describes the initial characterization of the soil biology, chemistry and physics, along with the background of the project, the selection process of the research field and the project design. Effects of the manure treatment...... by ignition loss was 11.3 % in the grass and 6.6 % in the arable system. Analyzed by total-C measurements, the corresponding SOM values were 11.03 % and 5.97 %. In Norwegian soil, SOM values between 3 and 6 % are regarded as high humus contents (“moldrik”), whereas values between 6 and 12 % are regarded...... (CWEC), increasing to 1.7 mg by hot water extraction (HWEC). In the arable system, the corresponding values were 0.23 and 1.1 mg. The SOM content of the grass system was higher and more variable than that of the arable system,and differences between blocks were greater and more statistically significant...

  17. Effects of grass contour hedgerow systems on controlling soil erosion in red soil hilly areas, Southeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Fan; Lijiao Yan; Pei Zhang; Ge Zhang

    2015-01-01

    abstract Soil erosion by water is a well-recognized serious environmental problem in the world. While contour hedgerow systems are an effective method for soil water conservation, there are a few studies on its effect in the red soil hilly areas in Southeast China. With a fixed field experiment, we constructed a runoff plot at hilly area in Zhuji County, Zhejiang province, to evaluate the effect of the grass hedgerows in soil water conservation, and to determine the optimized hedgerow patterns. Hemerocallis citrine (HC) and Ophiopogon japonicas (OJ) were selected to build the hedgerows in patterns of one row and two rows. The REE method was used to trace the source of the sediment for a better understanding of the characteristic and mechanism of erosion with hedgerows control. Our results showed that (1) hedgerows reduced erosion and surface runoff by 31.99–67.22% and 15.44–45.11%, respectively; (2) hedgerows delayed the development of rills;(3) hedgerows reduced the soil nutrients loss;(4) hedgerows reshaped the soil physical properties, especially in increasing 4 0.25 mm water-stable aggregates. Taken together, our results suggest that two-row OJ is the optimized contour hedgerow pattern in the experiment condition, and downward sloping land should have the highest priority to take measures for soil water conservation. This research comprehensively studied the effects and mechanism of contour hedgerows in controlling soil and water loss in red soil hilly areas, Southeast China, so that the practice of soil and water conservation can be implemented more effectively in these areas.

  18. Soil heat flux and day time surface energy balance closure at astronomical observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, south Kerala

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Roxy; V B Sumithranand; G Renuka

    2014-06-01

    Soil heat flux is an important input component of surface energy balance. Estimates of soil heat flux were made in the year 2008 using soil temperature data at Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, south Kerala. Hourly values of soil heat flux from 00 to 24 LST are presented for selected days typical of the winter, pre-monsoon, SW monsoon and NE monsoon seasons. The diurnal variation is characterized by a cross-over from negative to positive values at 0700 h, occurrence of maximum around noon and return to negative values in the late evening. The energy storage term for the soil layer 0–0.05 m is calculated and the ground heat flux * is estimated in all seasons. Daytime surface energy balance at the surface on wet and dry seasons is investigated. The average Bowen’s ratio during the wet and dry seasons were 0.541 and 0.515, respectively indicating that considerable evaporation takes place at the surface. The separate energy balance components were examined and the mean surface energy balance closure was found to be 0.742 and 0.795 for wet and dry seasons, respectively. When a new method that accounts for both soil thermal conduction and soil thermal convection was adopted to calculate the surface heat flux, the energy balance closure was found to be improved. Thus on the land surface under study, the soil vertical water movement is significant.

  19. [Effects of returning straw to soil and different tillage methods on paddy field soil fertility and microbial population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wan-Jun; Liu, Dai-Yin; Wu, Jin-Xiu; Wu, Ju-Xian; De, Chen-Chun; Yang, Wen-Yu

    2009-04-01

    A field experiment was conducted on a paddy field to study the effects of returning straw to soil and different tillage methods (no-tillage + returning straw, no-tillage, tillage + returning straw, and tillage) on the fertility level and microbial quantities of different soil layers. The results showed that in upper soil layer, the organic matter content in treatment 'no-tillage + returning straw' was 5.33, 2.79, and 5.37 g x kg(-1) higher than that in treatments 'no-tillage', 'tillage + returning straw', and 'tillage', respectively, and the contents of total and available N, P and K in treatment 'no-tillage + returning straw' were also the highest, followed by in treatments 'no-tillage' and 'tillage + returning straw', and in treatment 'tillage'. In deeper soil layer, all the fertility indices were higher in treatment 'tillage + returning straw'. Treatments of 'returning straw to soil' had the highest quantities of soil microbes. The quantities of bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes in upper soil layer were the highest in treatment 'no-tillage + returning straw', and thus, the cellulose decomposition intensity in this treatment at maturity period was 26.44%, 79.01%, and 98. 15% higher than that in treatments 'tillage + returning straw', 'no-tillage', and 'tillage', respectively. In deeper soil layer, the quantities of bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes were the highest in treatment 'tillage + returning straw'. Treatment 'no-tillage + returning straw' had the features of high fertility and abundant microbes in surface soil layer. The quantities of soil bacteria and actinomycetes and the decomposition intensity of soil cellulose were significantly positively correlated with soil fertility level.

  20. Metals Accumulation and Leaf Surface Anatomy of Murdannia spectabilis Growing in Zn/Cd Contaminated Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladawan Rattanapolsan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Murdannia spectabilis (Kurz Faden was identified as a Zn/Cd hyperaccumulative plant. Leaf surface anatomy of the plant growing in non-contaminated soil (control and Zn/Cd contaminated soil,was studied and compared by a light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy combined with Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy(SEM/EDS. The similarities were reticulate cuticle on epidermises, uniform polygonal cell, stomatal arrangement in six surrounding subsidiary cells, and submarginal sclerenchyma. The dissimilarities were uniserate trichomes spreading on both adaxial and abaxial epidermis of the plants growing in non-contaminated soil, whereas the uniserate trichomes were only on the submarginal-adaxial epidermis of the control plants. The trichomes on leaves of the plants growing in non-contaminated soil were found to have both uniseriate non-glandular and uniseriate glandular trichomes;whereas, leaves of the plants growing in the contaminated soil were merely non-glandular trichomes. The different shape and location of trichomes, the number of stomata and trichome indicated the effect of Zn and Cd on M. spectabilis. The higher percentages of Zn and Cd in the vascular bundle than in the cross section and epidermis areas showed both solutes could move along each route, with diffusion through the symplast and apoplast. The increase of Ca in M. spectabilis growing in Zn/Cd contaminated soil corresponded to the Zn and Cd distributed in the leaves. Zn K-edge and S K-edge XANES spectra proposed that Zn2+ ions were accumulated and/or adsorbed on the epidermis of the tuber, and then absorbed into the root and transport to the xylem. The double peaks of Zn-cysteine in the leaf samples proposed the metal sequestration was by sulphur proteins.

  1. Using SMOS brightness temperature and derived surface-soil moisture to characterize surface conditions and validate land surface models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcher, Jan; Barella-Ortiz, Anaïs; Piles, Maria; Gelati, Emiliano; de Rosnay, Patricia

    2017-04-01

    The SMOS satellite, operated by ESA, observes the surface in the L-band. On continental surface these observations are sensitive to moisture and in particular surface-soil moisture (SSM). In this presentation we will explore how the observations of this satellite can be exploited over the Iberian Peninsula by comparing its results with two land surface models : ORCHIDEE and HTESSEL. Measured and modelled brightness temperatures show a good agreement in their temporal evolution, but their spatial structures are not consistent. An empirical orthogonal function analysis of the brightness temperature's error identifies a dominant structure over the south-west of the Iberian Peninsula which evolves during the year and is maximum in autumn and winter. Hypotheses concerning forcing-induced biases and assumptions made in the radiative transfer model are analysed to explain this inconsistency, but no candidate is found to be responsible for the weak spatial correlations. The analysis of spatial inconsistencies between modelled and measured TBs is important, as these can affect the estimation of geophysical variables and TB assimilation in operational models, as well as result in misleading validation studies. When comparing the surface-soil moisture of the models with the product derived operationally by ESA from SMOS observations similar results are found. The spatial correlation over the IP between SMOS and ORCHIDEE SSM estimates is poor (ρ 0.3). A single value decomposition (SVD) analysis of rainfall and SSM shows that the co-varying patterns of these variables are in reasonable agreement between both products. Moreover the first three SVD soil moisture patterns explain over 80% of the SSM variance simulated by the model while the explained fraction is only 52% of the remotely sensed values. These results suggest that the rainfall-driven soil moisture variability may not account for the poor spatial correlation between SMOS and ORCHIDEE products. Other reasons have to

  2. Phosphate Treatment of Lead-Contaminated Soil: Effects on Water Quality, Plant Uptake, and Lead Speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water quality threats associated with using phosphate-based amendments to remediate Pb-contaminated soils are a concern, particularly in riparian areas. This study investigated the effects of P application rates to a Pb-contaminated alluvial soil on Pb and P loss via surface wat...

  3. The Effects of Organic Pollutants in Soil on Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Lynn

    2013-04-01

    from soil very difficult, with the exposure from soil usually being chronic and at very low concentrations. The vastness of the soil has led to the dilution of these pollutants and most of the pollutants remain on or near the surface of the soil unless they have moved by the action of water, organisms, or mechanical mixing. This dilution has reduced the toxicity of these pollutants but the unknown factor is the action of the soil, its chemistry, and the combined action of all the microorganisms, plants, and invertebrates that live in the soil. This biological action combined with the influences of the soil components has the potential of creating new metabolites and chemicals. Toxicologists needs expand their studies to include the persistent organic pollutants and the organic pollutants that can bioaccumulate in organisms. We do not know if the addition of organics chemicals to the soil is creating very toxic xenobiotics and at very low concentrations but with important health effects to humans and other organisms. These unknown compounds could be accumulating in plants that we use for food or as forage for our livestock, then bioaccumulating in the livestock and then on into us.

  4. Parasitic contamination of surface and deep soil in different areas of Sari in north of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Ziaei Hezarjaribi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the parasitic contamination of soil in selected areas of Sari, north of Iran. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted to identify all available parasites in surface and deep soil. In this study 580 soil samples (278 deep soil and 302 topsoil samples from 21 different locations were collected from pathways, parks, greenhouses, estates around the city, cemetery, main squares, farmlands, fenced gardens and seashores. Depending on the soil type, two samples were prepared, from surface and deep soil at the depth of 3 to 5 cm. After performing various stages of preparation, including cleaning and washing, smoothing and flotation, parasitic elements were examined microscopically and quantitative parasite counting was done using a McMaster slide. Results: The results showed that the highest rate of parasitic contamination was related to nematodes larvae (26.11%. Other contaminants such as Entamoeba and Acanthamoeba cysts, vacuolization Blastocystis hominis form, oocyte containing sporocysts, Toxascaris eggs, nematoda larvae, Hymenolepis eggs, Ascaris eggs, Fasciola eggs, hookworm eggs, Toxocara eggs, insects' larvae and other ciliated and flagellated organisms were also observed. The results of this study showed that the highest contamination was found in public garden (25.80% both in surface (29.30% and in deep soil (21.12%, while the lowest level of contamination was observed in seashore surface soil (4.90%. Conclusions: The results showed that soil can provide a potential medium for the spread of soil transmitted parasitic diseases in the environment; therefore, preventive programs are needed.

  5. [Effects of different tillage methods on tea garden soil physical characteristics and tea yield].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, You-jian; Wang, Ye-jun; Zhang, Yong-li; Ding, Yong; Luo, Yi; Song, Li; Liao, Wan-you

    2015-12-01

    The effects of three tillage methods, i.e., no tillage, rotary tillage, deep tillage, on tea garden soil compaction, soil moisture, soil bulk density, yield component factors and tea yield were studied through field experiments in Langxi Country of Anhui Province. The results indicated that the effects of three tillage methods on soil bulk density and soil compaction were in order of deep tillage>rotary tillage>no tillage. Deep tillage and rotary tillage could effectively break the argillic horizon layer and decrease the soil compaction. Compared with no tillage, soil compaction and soil bulk density (0-30 cm) under deep tillage decreased 16.4% and 13.4%-27.5%, respectively. Deep tillage could significantly increase soil water storage space and enhance the water holding capacity of the soil. Compared with no tillage, the soil moisture of 15-30 cm soil layer was increased by 7.7% under deep tillage. The different tillage methods had little effect on soil porosity. Rotary tillage and deep tillage could increase soil specific surface area and the ratios of soil gas and soil liquid. The diurnal changes of photosynthetic rate and transpiration rate of tea both exhibited double-peak pattern. There was a significant midday depression caused principally by stomatal factors. Under deep tillage, the tea leaf transpiration rate decreased, shoot density increased, 100-bud dry mass and water use efficiency increased significantly, and the tea yield increased by 17.6% and 6.8% compared with no tillage and rotary tillage, respectively. Deep tillage was the most appropriate tillage practice in tea garden of east Anhui Province.

  6. Mechanisms influencing surface soil CO2 efflux in respect to elevation and vegetation gradients in a complex watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, J. W.; Epstein, H. E.; Welsch, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    Topographically complex watersheds exert spatial and temporal variations in the distribution of soil water due to horizontal flows. The redistribution of soil water has profound effects on biogeochemical cycles. Of keen interest is the impact this lateral redistribution has on carbon cycling and surface soil carbon efflux. We are currently employing a plot based study across an elevation gradient (950-1150 m) in the Weimer Run watershed located near Davis, West Virginia to evaluate carbon and water cycling dynamics. At each of three different elevation levels (high, middle, low) are three sites. At each site are three 4 m2 plots, each underneath a different vegetation cover type (open, closed tree canopy, shrub canopy), for a total of 27 plots across all elevations. At each plot, surface CO2 efflux, soil temperature, PAR, air temperature and volumetric soil water content at 0-12 cm are measured weekly during the growing season. Measurements of Leaf Area Index (LAI) and soil nutrient concentrations (NH4+, NO3-) have also been conducted for each plot. Each plot also has gas wells at both 5 and 20 cm to measure CO2 concentrations below the soil surface. Data collected from June through October, 2010, indicate a stronger control on soil CO2 efflux exerted by vegetation cover type than by elevation gradient. The impact of vegetation cover type on soil CO2 efflux increases with elevation. Based on data collected weekly from June through October, 2010, there is no significant relationship between surface soil CO2 efflux and the three elevation levels within our gradient (p = 0.47). However, a significant statistical relationship between surface soil CO2 efflux and vegetation type (p = impact that vegetation cover, elevation and micrometeorological controls exert on soil CO2 efflux is vital for accurate model inputs and carbon budgets.class="jpg" border=0 width=600px src="/meetings/fm11/program/tables/B33F-0525_T1.jpg"> * All values in columns represent means for

  7. Drought effects on soil COcacao agroforestry system in Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Straaten, O.; Veldkamp, E.; Köhler, M.; Anas, I.

    2009-12-01

    Climate change induced droughts pose a serious threat to ecosystems across the tropics and sub-tropics, particularly to those areas not adapted to natural dry periods. In order to study the vulnerability of cacao (Theobroma cacao) - Gliricidia sepium agroforestry plantations to droughts a large scale throughfall displacement roof was built in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia. In this 19-month replicated experiment, we measured soil surface CO2 efflux (soil respiration) in three simulated drought plots compared with three adjacent control plots. Soil respiration rates peaked at intermediate soil moisture and decreased under increasingly dry conditions (drought induced), but also decreased when soils became water saturated, as evidenced in control plots. The simulated drought plots exhibited a slight decrease in soil respiration compared to the control plots (average 13% decrease). The strength of the drought effect was spatially variable - while some measurement chamber sites reacted strongly ("responsive") to the decrease in soil water content (up to R2=0.70) (n=11), others did not react at all ("non-responsive") (n=7). The degree of soil CO2 respiration drought response was highest around cacao tree stems and decreased with distance from the stem (R2=0.22). A significant correlation was measured between "responsive" soil respiration chamber sites and sap flux density ratios of cacao (R=0.61) and Gliricidia (R=0.65). Leaf litter CO2 respiration decreased as conditions became drier. During dry periods the litter layer contributed approximately 3-4% of the total CO2 efflux and up to 40% during wet periods. A CO2 flush was recorded during the rewetting phase that lasted for approximately two weeks, during which time accumulated labile carbon stocks mineralized. The net effect on soil CO2 emissions over the duration of the experiment was neutral, control plots respired 11.1±0.5 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, while roof plots respired 10.5±0.5 Mg C ha-1 yr-1.

  8. Temporal Dynamics of Soil Moisture Variability at the Landscape Scale: Implications for Land Surface Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaldo, N.; Albertson, J. D.

    2001-12-01

    Meteorological and hydrological forecasting models share soil moisture as a critical boundary condition. Partitioning of received energy at the land surface depends directly on this variable, as does the partitioning of rainfall into its possible routes over and through the soil. In Land Surface Models (LSMs) the temporal dynamic of soil moisture spatial variability is a fundamental issue in large-scale flux predictions. From remote sensing observations soil moisture values are averaged in the horizontal over rather large regions (pixels). The averaging areas will be getting even larger as we move from aircraft mounted sensors to satellite mounting. These data are to be used ultimately to estimate spatial averages of other processes that depend on soil moisture, such as, runoff generation, drainage, evaporation, sensible heat fluxes, crop yield, microbial activity, etc. Consequently, the LSMs have to predict spatial averaged flux over large region from average values of the soil moisture. But soil moisture variances affect flux predictions, which depend nonlinearly on soil moisture, because many of the other processes possess distinct threshold aspects to their nonlinear dependence on soil moisture. Through application of well-developed Reynolds averaging rules from fluid mechanics to the equation of Richards and Darcy-Buckingham, we write a conservation equation for the horizontal variance of soil moisture. And, through closure arguments, we are able to describe the individual terms that produce and destroy spatial variance through time in terms of the mean soil moisture state and other observable system properties such as vegetation and soil properties variability. Finally, we calculate land surface fluxes from second order Taylor expansion, using our soil moisture variance closure model, and the other observable system properties. In this work, we demonstrate significant improvements in land surface large-scale flux predictions using the proposed soil moisture

  9. Temporal Dynamics of Soil Moisture Variability: Implications For Land Surface Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaldo, N.; Albertson, J. D.

    Meteorological and hydrological forecasting models share soil moisture as a critical boundary condition. Partitioning of received energy at the land surface depends di- rectly on this variable, as does the partitioning of rainfall into its possible routes over and through the soil. In Land Surface Models (LSMs) the temporal dynamic of soil moisture spatial variability is a fundamental issue in large-scale flux predictions. From remote sensing observations soil moisture values are averaged in the horizontal over rather large regions (pixels). The averaging areas will be getting even larger as we move from aircraft mounted sensors to satellite mounting. These data are to be used ultimately to estimate spatial averages of other processes that depend on soil moisture, such as, runoff generation, drainage, evaporation, sensible heat fluxes, crop yield, mi- crobial activity, etc. Consequently, the LSMs have to predict spatial averaged flux over large region from average values of the soil moisture. But soil moisture variances af- fect flux predictions, which depend nonlinearly on soil moisture, because many of the other processes possess distinct threshold aspects to their nonlinear dependence on soil moisture. Through application of well-developed Reynolds averaging rules from fluid mechanics to the equation of Richards and Darcy-Buckingham, we write a con- servation equation for the horizontal variance of soil moisture. And, through closure arguments, we are able to describe the individual terms that produce and destroy spa- tial variance through time in terms of the mean soil moisture state and other observable system properties such as vegetation and soil properties variability. Finally, we calcu- late land surface fluxes from second order Taylor expansion, using our soil moisture variance closure model, and the other observable system properties. In this work, we demonstrate significant improvements in land surface large-scale flux predictions us- ing the proposed

  10. Seasonal changes in soil water repellency and their effect on soil CO2 fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Emilia; Qassem, Khalid

    2016-04-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) is a seasonally variable phenomenon controlled by moisture content and at the same time a regulator of the distribution and conductivity of water in the soil. The distribution and availability of water in soil is also an important factor for microbial activity, decomposition of soil organic matter and exchange of gases like CO2 and CH4 between the soil and the atmosphere. It has been therefore hypothesised that SWR by restricting water availability in soil can affect the production and the transport of CO2 in the soil and between the soil and the atmosphere. This study investigates the effect of seasonal changes in soil moisture and water repellency on CO2 fluxes from soil. The study was conducted for 3 year at four grassland and pine forest sites in the UK with contrasting precipitation. The results show the temporal changes in soil moisture content and SWR are affected by rainfall intensity and the length of dry periods between the storms. Soils exposed to very high annual rainfall (>1200mm) can still exhibit high levels of SWR for relatively long periods of time. The spatial variation in soil moisture resulting from SWR affects soil CO2 fluxes, but the most profound effect is visible during and immediately after the rainfall events. Keywords: soil water repellency, CO2 flux, hydrophobicity, preferential flow, gas exchange, rainfall

  11. Estimating the Soil Moisture Profile by Assimilating Near-Surface Observations with the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The paper investigates the ability to retrieve the true soil moisture profile by assimilating near-surface soil moisture into a soil moisture model with an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) assimilation scheme,including the effect of ensemble size, update interval and nonlinearities in the profile retrieval, the required time for full retrieval of the soil moisture profiles, and the possible influence of the depth of the soil moisture observation. These questions are addressed by a desktop study using synthetic data. The "true"soil moisture profiles are generated from the soil moisture model under the boundary condition of 0.5 cm d-1 evaporation. To test the assimilation schemes, the model is initialized with a poor initial guess of the soil moisture profile, and different ensemble sizes are tested showing that an ensemble of 40 members is enough to represent the covariance of the model forecasts. Also compared are the results with those from the direct insertion assimilation scheme, showing that the EnKF is superior to the direct insertion assimilation scheme, for hourly observations, with retrieval of the soil moisture profile being achieved in 16 h as compared to 12 days or more. For daily observations, the true soil moisture profile is achieved in about 15 days with the EnKF, but it is impossible to approximate the true moisture within 18 days by using direct insertion. It is also found that observation depth does not have a significant effect on profile retrieval time for the EnKF. The nonlinearities have some negative influence on the optimal estimates of soil moisture profile but not very seriously.

  12. Effects of Rice Straw and Its Biochar Addition on Soil Labile Carbon and Soil Organic Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Yun-feng; HE Xin-hua; GAO Ren; MA Hong-liang; YANG Yu-sheng

    2014-01-01

    Whether the biochar amendment could affect soil organic matter (SOM) turnover and hence soil carbon (C) stock remains poorly understood. Effects of the addition of 13C-labelled rice straw or its pyrolysed biochar at 250 or 350°C to a sugarcane soil (Ferrosol) on soil labile C (dissolved organic C, DOC;microbial biomass C, MBC;and mineralizable C, MC) and soil organic C (SOC) were investigated after 112 d of laboratory incubation at 25°C. Four treatments were examined as (1) the control soil without amendment (Soil);(2) soil plus 13C-labelled rice straw (Soil+Straw);(3) soil plus 250°C biochar (Soil+B250) and (4) soil plus 350°C biochar (Soil+B350). Compared to un-pyrolysed straw, biochars generally had an increased aryl C, carboxyl C, C and nitrogen concentrations, a decreased O-alkyl C and C:N ratio, but similar alkyl C and d13C (1 742-1 877‰). Among treatments, signiifcant higher DOC, MBC and MC derived from the new C (straw or biochar) ranked as Soil+Straw>Soil+B250>Soil+B350, whilst signiifcant higher SOC from the new C as Soil+B250>Soil+Straw≈Soil+B350. Compared to Soil, DOC and MBC derived from the native soil were decreased under straw or biochar addition, whilst MC from the native soil was increased under straw addition but decreased under biochar addition. Meanwhile, native SOC was similar among the treatments, irrespective of the straw or biochar addition. Compared to Soil, signiifcant higher total DOC and total MBC were under Soil+Straw, but not under Soil+B250 and Soil+B350, whilst signiifcant higher total MC and total SOC were under straw or biochar addition, except for MC under Soil+B350. Our results demonstrated that the application of biochar to soil may be an appropriate management practice for increasing soil C storage.

  13. Leaching and Redistribution of Nutrients in Surface Layer of Red Soils in Southeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The leaching and redistribution of nutrients in the surface layer of 4 types of red soils in Southeast China were studied with a lysimeter experiment under field conditions. Results showed that the leaching concentrated in the rainy season (from April to June). Generally, the leaching of soil nutrients from the surface layer of red soils was in the order of Ca > Mg > K > NO3-N. In fertilization treatment, the total amount of soil nutrients leached out of the surface layer in a red soil derived from granite was the highest in all soils. The uptake by grass decreased the leaching of fertilizer ions in surface layer, particularly for NO3-N. Soil total N and exchangeable K, Ca and Mg in the surface layer decreased with leaching and grass uptake during the 2 years without new fertilization of urea, Ca(H2PO4)2, KCl, CaCO3 and MgCO3. Ca moved from the application layer (0~5 cm) of fertilizer and accumulated in the 10~30 cm depth in the soils studied except that derived from Quaternary red clay. The deficiency of soil exchangeable K will become a serious degradation process facing the Southeast China.

  14. Effects of nano-SiO2 on the adsorption of chiral metalaxyl to agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junxing; Liang, Chuanzhou; Zhang, Xu

    2017-06-01

    The application of nanotechnology in agriculture, pesticide delivery and other related fields increases the occurrence of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in soil. Since ENPs have larger surface areas and normally a high adsorption capacity for organic pollutants, they are thought to influence the transport of pesticides in soils and thereafter influence the uptake and transformation of pesticides. The adsorption pattern of racemic-metalaxyl on agricultural soils including kinetics and isotherms changed in the presence of nano-SiO2. The adsorption of racemic-metalaxyl on agricultural soil was not enantioselective, in either the presence or the absence of SiO2. The adsorption of racemic-metalaxyl on SiO2 decreased to some extent in soil-SiO2 mixture, and the absolute decrease was dependent on soil properties. The decreased adsorption of metalaxyl on SiO2 in soil-SiO2 mixture arose from the competitive adsorption of soil-dissolved organic matter and the different dispersion and aggregation behaviors of SiO2 in the presence of soil. Interactions between SiO2 and soil particles also contributed to the decreased adsorption of metalaxyl on SiO2, and the interactions were analyzed by extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory. The results showed that the presence of nano-particles in soils could decrease the mobility of pesticides in soils and that this effect varied with different soil compositions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Element concentrations in surface soils of the Coconino Plateau, Grand Canyon region, Coconino County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2016-09-15

    This report provides the geochemical analyses of a large set of background soils collected from the surface of the Coconino Plateau in northern Arizona. More than 700 soil samples were collected at 46 widespread areas, sampled from sites that appear unaffected by mineralization and (or) anthropogenic contamination. The soils were analyzed for 47 elements, thereby providing data on metal concentrations in soils representative of the plateau. These background concentrations can be used, for instance, for comparison to metal concentrations found in soils potentially affected by natural and anthropogenic influences on the Coconino Plateau in the Grand Canyon region of Arizona.The soil sampling survey revealed low concentrations for the metals most commonly of environmental concern, such as arsenic, cobalt, chromium, copper, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, lead, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. For example, the median concentrations of the metals in soils of the Coconino Plateau were found to be comparable to the mean values previously reported for soils of the western United States.

  16. The Soil Characteristic Curve at Low Water Contents: Relations to Specific Surface Area and Texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Resurreccion, Augustus; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per;

    Accurate description of the soil-water retention curve (SWRC) at low water contents is important for simulating water dynamics, plant-water relations, and microbial processes in surface soil. Soil-water retention at soil-water matric potential of less than -10 MPa, where adsorptive forces dominate...... that measurements by traditional pressure plate apparatus generally overestimated water contents at -1.5 MPa (plant wilting point). The 41 soils were classified into four textural classes based on the so-called Dexter index n (= CL/OC), and the Tuller-Or (TO) general scaling model describing the water film...... thickness at a given soil-water matric potential (low organic soils with n > 10, the estimated SA from the dry soil-water retention was in good agreement with the SA measured using ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (SA_EGME). A strong relationship between the ratio...

  17. Ectomycorrhizal Influence on Particle Size, Surface Structure, Mineral Crystallinity, Functional Groups, and Elemental Composition of Soil Colloids from Different Soil Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited data are available on the ectomycorrhizae-induced changes in surface structure and composition of soil colloids, the most active portion in soil matrix, although such data may benefit the understanding of mycorrhizal-aided soil improvements. By using ectomycorrhizae (Gomphidius viscidus and soil colloids from dark brown forest soil (a good loam and saline-alkali soil (heavily degraded soil, we tried to approach the changes here. For the good loam either from the surface or deep soils, the fungus treatment induced physical absorption of covering materials on colloid surface with nonsignificant increases in soil particle size (P>0.05. These increased the amount of variable functional groups (O–H stretching and bending, C–H stretching, C=O stretching, etc. by 3–26% and the crystallinity of variable soil minerals (kaolinite, hydromica, and quartz by 40–300%. However, the fungus treatment of saline-alkali soil obviously differed from the dark brown forest soil. There were 12–35% decreases in most functional groups, 15–55% decreases in crystallinity of most soil minerals but general increases in their grain size, and significant increases in soil particle size (P<0.05. These different responses sharply decreased element ratios (C : O, C : N, and C : Si in soil colloids from saline-alkali soil, moving them close to those of the good loam of dark brown forest soil.

  18. Ectomycorrhizal influence on particle size, surface structure, mineral crystallinity, functional groups, and elemental composition of soil colloids from different soil origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhong; Wang, Huimei; Wang, Wenjie; Yang, Lei; Zu, Yuangang

    2013-01-01

    Limited data are available on the ectomycorrhizae-induced changes in surface structure and composition of soil colloids, the most active portion in soil matrix, although such data may benefit the understanding of mycorrhizal-aided soil improvements. By using ectomycorrhizae (Gomphidius viscidus) and soil colloids from dark brown forest soil (a good loam) and saline-alkali soil (heavily degraded soil), we tried to approach the changes here. For the good loam either from the surface or deep soils, the fungus treatment induced physical absorption of covering materials on colloid surface with nonsignificant increases in soil particle size (P > 0.05). These increased the amount of variable functional groups (O-H stretching and bending, C-H stretching, C=O stretching, etc.) by 3-26% and the crystallinity of variable soil minerals (kaolinite, hydromica, and quartz) by 40-300%. However, the fungus treatment of saline-alkali soil obviously differed from the dark brown forest soil. There were 12-35% decreases in most functional groups, 15-55% decreases in crystallinity of most soil minerals but general increases in their grain size, and significant increases in soil particle size (P soil colloids from saline-alkali soil, moving them close to those of the good loam of dark brown forest soil.

  19. Effects of lignin on nitrification in soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The effects of two lignins isolated from black liquor from pulping process on nitrification in soils after addition of urea, (NH4)2SO4 and (NH4)2HPO4 were investigated by incubation at 20 or 30℃ for 7 or 14d. The effects of lignin on nitrous oxide emissions from soil were also determined. Results showed that both lignins were more effective for inhibiting nitrification of NH4+-N as (NH4)2SO4 or (NH4)2HPO4 as compared to urea-N. The effectiveness of lignin on nitrification was markedly affected by different soil type and temperature. Nitrous oxide emissions from soil declined when lignin was used. Urea plus 20 and 50 g/kg lignin reduced N2O emissions by about 83% and 96%, respectively, while (NH4)2HPO4 plus 20 and 50 g/kg lignin respectively reduced emissions by 83% and 93%. Because of its low cost and nonhazardous characteristics, lignin has potential value as a fertilizer amendment to improve N fertilizer efficiency.

  20. On the Comparison of the Global Surface Soil Moisture product and Land Surface Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, B., Jr.; Ottlé, C.; Peylin, P.; Polcher, J.

    2016-12-01

    Thanks to its large spatio-temporal coverage, the new ESA CCI multi-instruments dataset offers a good opportunity to assess and improve land surface models parametrization. In this study, the ESA CCI surface soil moisture (SSM) combined product (v2.2) has been compared to the simulated top first layers of the ORCHIDEE LSM (the continental part of the IPSL earth system model), in order to evaluate its potential of improvements with data assimilation techniques. The ambition of the work was to develop a comprehensive comparison methodology by analyzing simultaneously the temporal and spatial structures of both datasets. We analyzed the SSM synoptic, seasonal, and inter-annual variations by decomposing the signals into fast and slow components. ORCHIDEE was shown to adequately reproduce the observed SSM dynamics in terms of temporal correlation. However, these correlation scores are supposed to be strongly influenced by SSM seasonal variability and the quality of the model input forcing. Autocorrelation and spectral analyses brought out disagreements in the temporal inertia of the upper soil moisture reservoirs. By linking our results to land cover maps, we found that ORCHIDEE is more dependent on rainfall events compared to the observations in regions with sparse vegetation cover. These diflerences might be due to a wrong partition of rainfall between soil evaporation, transpiration, runofl and drainage in ORCHIDEE. To refine this analysis, a single value decomposition (SVD) of the co-variability between rainfall provided by WFDEI and soil moisture was pursued over Central Europe and South Africa. It showed that spatio-temporal co-varying patterns between ORCHIDEE and rainfall and the ESA-CCI product and rainfall are in relatively good agreement. However, the leading SVD pattern, which exhibits a strong annual cycle and explains the same portion of covariance for both datasets, explains a much larger fraction of variance for ORCHIDEE than for the ESA-CCI product

  1. Conservation agriculture effects on soil pore characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Abdollahi, Lotfollah

    of quantitative knowledge to support this statement. This study examines the long-term effects of crop rotations, residue management and tillage on soil pore characteristics of two sandy loam soils in Denmark. Results are reported from a split plot field experiment rotation as main plot factor and tillage...... air permeability and pore continuity index. Generally, residue input, especially when combined with direct drilling at the Foulum site, decreased bulk density and the volume of blocked air porosity, and increased air-filled porosity, volumetric water content, air permeability and gas diffusivity. Our...

  2. A land surface model incorporated with soil freeze/thaw and its application in GAME/Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Heping; YE Baisheng; ZHOU Yuhua; TIAN Fuqiang

    2006-01-01

    Land surface process is of great importance in global climate change,moisture and heat exchange in the interface of the earth and atmosphere,human impacts on the environment and ecosystem,etc.Soil freeze/thaw plays an important role in cold land surface processes.In this work the diurnal freeze/thaw effects on energy partition in the context of GAME/Tibet are studied.A sophisticated land surface model is developed,the particular aspect of which is its physical consideration of soil freeze/thaw and vapor flux.The simultaneous water and heat transfer soil sub-model not only reflects the water flow from unfrozen zone to frozen fringe in freezing/thawing soil,but also demonstrates the change of moisture and temperature field induced by vapor flux from high temperature zone to low temperature zone,which makes the model applicable for various circumstances.The modified Picard numerical method is employed to help with the water balance and convergence of the numerical scheme.Finally,the model is applied to analyze the diurnal energy and water cycle characteristics over the Tibetan Plateau using the Game/Tibet datasets observed in May and July of 1998.Heat and energy transfer simulation shows that: (i) There exists a negative feedback mechanism between soil freeze/thaw and soil temperature/ground heat flux; (ii) during freezing period all three heat fluxes do not vary apparently,in spite of the fact that the negative soil temperature is higher than that not considering soil freeze; (iii) during thawing period,ground heat flux increases,and sensible heat flux decreases,but latent heat flux does not change much; and (iv) during freezing period,soil temperature decreases,though ground heat flux increases.

  3. EFFECT OF ELECTRIC FERTILIZER ON SOIL PROPERTIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ya-qin; WANG Ji-hong

    2004-01-01

    Electric fertilizer, I. E. Exerting electric field on plants during growing season instead of chemical fertilizer, is a kind of physical fertilizer, and the third kind of fertilizer with developmental prospect after inorganic fertilizer and organic fertilizer. For the purpose of studying the changes of physical and chemical properties of soil after exerting electric field, five treatments with different applications of chemical fertilizer were arranged on the black soil in Yushu City of Jilin Province by randomized block method, and electric field was exerted on plants every ten days during the growing season. Through sample analysis the paper arrives at following conclusions: 1) Exerting electric field can make soil's granular structure increase, bulk density decrease, moisture capacity increase,thus improving the perviousness of soil. 2) Exerting electric field can make microorganism's number increase and activity strengthen, thus activating nutrient and increasing organic matter content. 3) Exerting electric field with 0.1A medium has the best effect. So the chemical fertilizer can be saved. Therefore, we can say that the application of electric fertilizer is favorable for decreasing chemical poison, improving soil, relaxing the contradiction between the supply and demand of chemical fertilizer, and decreasing production cost of agriculture and forestry.

  4. Cone model for two surface foundations on layered soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Wenhua

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the cone model is applied to the vibration analysis of two foundations on a layered soil half space. In the analysis, the total stress field in the subsoil is divided into the free-field and the scattering field. Seed's simplified method is adopted for the free-field analysis,while the cone model is proposed for analyzing the dynamic scattering stress wave field.The shear stress field and the compressive stress field in the layered stratum with two scattering sources are calculated by shear cone and compressive cone, respectively. Furthermore, the stress fields in the subsoil with two foundations are divided into six zones, and the P wave and S wave are analyzed in each zone. Numerical results are provided to illustrate features of the added stress field for two surface foundations under vertical and horizontal sinusoidal force excitation. The proposed cone model may be useful in handling some of the complex problems associated with multi-scattering sources.

  5. Concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and inorganic constituents in ambient surface soils, Chicago, Illinois, 2001-02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Robert T.; Arnold, Terri L.; Cannon, William F.; Graham, David; Morton, Eric; Bienert, Raymond

    2003-01-01

    compounds, which are present primarily in the particulate phase in the atmosphere, tended to be in higher concentrations in the surface soils. The apparent effect of the PAH phase in the atmosphere on the concentration of a PAH in ambient surface soils indicates that atmospheric settling of particulate matter is an important source of the PAH compounds in ambient surface soils in Chicago. The distribution of PAH compounds within the city was complex. Comparatively high concentrations were detected near Lake Michigan in the northern part of the city, in much of the western part of the city, and in isolated areas in the southern part of the city. Concentrations were lower in much of the northwestern, south-central, southwestern, and far southern parts of the city. The arithmetic mean concentration of arsenic, mercury, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, molybdenum, zinc, and selenium was from 2 to 6 times higher in ambient surface soils in the city of Chicago than in soils from surrounding agricultural areas. The arithmetic mean concentration of lead in Chicago soils was about 20 times higher. Concentrations of calcium and magnesium above those of surrounding agricultural areas appear to be related to the effects of dolomite bedrock on the chemical composition of the soil. Elevated concentrations of the remaining elements listed above indicate a potential anthropogenic source(s) of these elements in Chicago soils.

  6. Effects of soil compaction on the relationships between nematodes, grass production and soil physical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, L.A.; Arts, W.B.M.

    2000-01-01

    As farm machinery has become heavier, concern has grown about its direct effects on soil physical conditions and its indirect effects on crop yields and soil biota. To study the relationships between these parameters, non-grazed temporary grassland plots on a loamy sand soil were subjected to full-w

  7. Effect of soil pH on sorption of salinomycin in clay and sandy soils

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    Full Length Research Paper. Effect of ... In this study, sorption of salinomycin was measured in four agricultural soils, a clay soil with low organic ... Key words: Salinomycin, sorption, pH, desorption, environmental pollution, phosphate buffer.

  8. The Effect of Urban Fuel Stations on Soil Contamination with Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Parvizi Mosaed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:A critical environmental impact of the petroleum industry is the contamination of soil by oil and other related products which are highly toxic and exhibit molecular recalcitrance. Therefore, this study focused on investigating the total amount of petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs in soil of urban fuel stations in Hamedan City, Iran. Methods:Thirteen high traffic urban fuel stations were selected and random soil samples were collected from surface soils at selected fuel stations. The physical and chemical proper-ties of the soil samples were determined in the laboratory. The concentration of TPHs in soils was determined by GC/MC. Results: Results showed that concentration of TPHs in all stations was more than the stand-ard level in soil (2000 mg kg-1. The minimum and maximum TPHs concentration observed in No. 5 and No.13 fuel station, respectively. Conclusion: The results showed that spillage in urban fuel stations has clear effect on the content of TPH in soil, as concentration TPH in all of fuel stations was in the upper limit of the standard levels in soil. .Soil pollution with petroleum hydrocarbons has clear effects on soil biological, chemical and physical characteristics and results in decreasedg food elements, productivity and soil plant productions.

  9. Optimum soil frost depth to alleviate climate change effects in cold region agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Yosuke; Iwata, Yukiyoshi; Hirota, Tomoyoshi

    2017-03-01

    On-farm soil frost control has been used for the management of volunteer potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), a serious weed problem caused by climate change, in northern Japan. Deep soil frost penetration is necessary for the effective eradication of unharvested small potato tubers; however, this process can delay soil thaw and increase soil wetting in spring, thereby delaying agricultural activity initiation and increasing nitrous oxide emissions from soil. Conversely, shallow soil frost development helps over-wintering of unharvested potato tubers and nitrate leaching from surface soil owing to the periodic infiltration of snowmelt water. In this study, we synthesised on-farm snow cover manipulation experiments to determine the optimum soil frost depth that can eradicate unharvested potato tubers without affecting agricultural activity initiation while minimising N pollution from agricultural soil. The optimum soil frost depth was estimated to be 0.28–0.33 m on the basis of the annual maximum soil frost depth. Soil frost control is a promising practice to alleviate climate change effects on agriculture in cold regions, which was initiated by local farmers and further promoted by national and local research institutes.

  10. Upward mobilization of 137Cs in surface soils of Chamaecyparis obtusa Sieb. et Zucc. (hinoki) plantation in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Taijiro; Takenaka, Chisato

    2004-01-05

    The use of 137Cs has recently been adopted to estimate erosion in hinoki plantations in Japan. However, there have been several reports of the upward mobilization of 137Cs in forest humus layers. In this study, the vertical distribution of 137Cs within the soil profile was measured in a hinoki plantation. In order to confirm the upward migration of 137Cs from mineral soil to fresh surface litter and to identify mechanisms of the transfer, changes in 137Cs specific activity in the contents of litterbags were examined in a hinoki plantation. A controlled laboratory experiment was also conducted to assess the effect of microbial activity on the upward migration of 137Cs. As a result, the higher 137Cs activities in the surface organic layer of a hinoki plantation than in fresh litter and the increasing 137Cs total content of litterbags with time demonstrated the upward mobilization of 137Cs from mineral soil to the surface organic layer. Physical movement of soil particles by raindrop splash was considered an important process in 137Cs upward migration. The results of our laboratory experiment indicate an influence from soil microbial activity on the upward mobilization of 137Cs. Thus, upward migration of 137Cs and constant litter removal by runoff may induce 137Cs loss from steep forested catchments and underestimation of the 137Cs inventory leading to the overestimation of soil redistribution rates.

  11. A Model for Formation of Dust, Soil and Rock Coatings on Mars: Physical and Chemical Processes on the Martian Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice; Murchie, Scott L.; Pieters, Carle M.; Zent, Aaron P.

    2001-01-01

    . Reflectance spectra were measured of the initial particulate mixtures, the cemented products and ground versions of the cemented material. The spectral contrast in the visible/near-infrared and mid-infrared regions is significantly reduced for the cemented material compared to the initial soil, and somewhat reduced for the ground, cemented soil compared to the initial soil. The results of this study suggest that diurnal and seasonal cycling on Mars will have a profound effect on the texture and spectral properties of the dust/soil particles on the surface. The model developed in this study provides an explanation for the generation of cemented or crusted soil units and rock coatings on Mars and may explain albedo variations on the surface observed near large rocks or crater rims.

  12. The Effect of Soil Warming on Decomposition of Biochar, Wood, and Bulk Soil Organic Carbon in Contrasting Temperate and Tropical Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torn, Margaret; Tas, Neslihan; Reichl, Ken; Castanha, Cristina; Fischer, Marc; Abiven, Samuel; Schmidt, Michael; Brodie, Eoin; Jansson, Janet

    2013-04-01

    Biochar and wood are known to decay at different rates in soil, but the longterm effect of char versus unaltered wood inputs on soil carbon dynamics may vary by soil ecosystem and by their sensitivity to warming. We conducted an incubation experiment to explore three questions: (1) How do decomposition rates of char and wood vary with soil type and depth? (2) How vulnerable to warming are these slowly decomposing inputs? And (3) Do char or wood additions increase loss of native soil organic carbon (priming)? Soils from a Mediterranean grassland (Hopland Experimental Research Station, California) and a moist tropical forest (Tabunoco Forest, Puerto Rico) were collected from two soil depths and incubated at ambient temperature (14°C, 20°C for Hopland and Tabonuco respectively) and ambient +6°C. We added 13C-labeled wood and char (made from the wood at 450oC) to the soils and quantified CO2 and 13CO2 fluxes with continuous online carbon isotope measurements using a Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer (Picarro, Inc) for one year. As expected, in all treatments the wood decomposed much (about 50 times) more quickly than did the char amendment. With few exceptions, amendments placed in the surface soil decomposed more quickly than those in deeper soil, and in forest soil faster than that placed in grassland soil, at the same temperature. The two substrates were not very temperature sensitive. Both had Q10 less than 2 and char decomposition in particular was relatively insensitive to warming. Finally, the addition of wood caused a significant increase of roughly 30% in decomposition losses of the native soil organic carbon in the grassland and slightly less in forest. Char had only a slight positive priming effect but had a significant effect on microbial community. These results show that conversion of wood inputs to char through wildfire or intentional management will alter not only the persistence of the carbon in soil but also its temperature response and effect on

  13. A New Method of Environmental Assessment and Monitoring of Cu, Zn, As, and Pb Pollution in Surface Soil Using Terricolous Fruticose Lichens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Sueoka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Levels of trace element pollution in surface soil can be estimated using soil analyses and leaching tests. These methods may reveal different results due to the effect of soil properties, such as grain size and mineral composition, on elemental availability. Therefore, this study advocates an alternative method for monitoring and assessment of trace element pollution in surface soil using terricolous fruticose lichens. Lichens growing at abandoned mine sites and unpolluted areas in southwest Japan and their substrata were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to clarify the relationships between Cu, Zn, As, and Pb concentrations in lichens and soils, including their absorption properties. Concentrations of these elements in the lichens were positively correlated with those in the soils regardless of lichen species, location, habitat, or conditions of soils. The analyzed lichens had neither competitive nor antagonistic properties in their elemental absorption, which made them good biomonitors of trace element pollution in surface soil. The distribution maps of average Cu, Zn, As, and Pb concentrations at each sampling region detected almost all of the Cu, Zn, and As pollution of the soils. Therefore, lichens could be used in practical applications to monitor Cu, Zn, and As pollution in surface soils.

  14. Anaerobic methane oxidation may be more prevalent in surface soils than was originally thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Mathieu; Bradley, Robert L.; Šimek, Miloslav

    2013-04-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (CH4) (AOM) is a process that was first reported to occur in deep anoxic marine sediments. In this environment, CH4 is oxidized with sulphate (SO42-) as the terminal electron acceptor. It is mediated by a syntrophic consortium formed by SO42- reducing bacteria and anaerobic CH4 oxidizing Archaea, or by the latter alone. Since this landmark discovery, AOM was found to occur in other environments including freshwater lake sediments and water columns, mud volcanoes, landfill leachate, deep buried Holocene sediments and hydrocarbon contaminated aquifers. All of these situations are very specific and point to AOM as being primarily occurring in highly reducing conditions. Thus, observations of AOM in surface soils with fluctuating REDOX conditions are relatively scarce, although a few independent studies have reported AOM in surface peatlands as well as in a forest soil. Furthermore, AOM may follow different pathways, such as via the coupled oxidation of CH4 and reduction of manganese (Mn(IV)) or iron (Fe(III)), or by a lone denitrifying species that converts nitrite to nitric oxide in order to generate O2 that is then used internally to oxidize CH4. Thus, the goal of our study was to determine whether AOM is more prevalent than was thought in hydromorphic surface soils across different environments, and whether the addition of NO3- or SO4= as alternative electron acceptors may stimulate the process. We collected samples from 3 peatland soils in Scotland, 2 acid-sulphate soils in Finland, and shore sediments of 15 drained fish ponds in the Czech Republic. Subsamples were incubated in the absence of O2 and amended with either NO3-, SO42-, or left unamended (control). The net flux of CH4 and CO2 were assessed by gas chromatography after 2, 20, 40 and 60 days. We also used a 13C-CH4 isotope dilution technique to determine gross production and consumption rates of CH4. We detected AOM in all of our soils, with oxidation rates ranging between 0

  15. Soil type-depending effect of paddy management: composition and distribution of soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Livia; Kölbl, Angelika; Lehndorff, Eva; Houtermans, Miriam; Schad, Peter; Zhang, Gang-Lin; Rahayu Utami, Sri; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    Paddy soil management is assumed to promote soil organic matter accumulation and specifically lignin caused by the resistance of the aromatic lignin structure against biodegradation under anaerobic conditions during inundation of paddy fields. The present study investigates the effect of paddy soil management on soil organic matter composition compared to agricultural soils which are not used for rice production (non-paddy soils). A variety of major soil types, were chosen in Indonesia (Java), including Alisol, Andosol and Vertisol sites (humid tropical climate of Java, Indonesia) and in China Alisol sites (humid subtropical climate, Nanjing). This soils are typically used for rice cultivation and represent a large range of soil properties to be expected in Asian paddy fields. All topsoils were analysed for their soil organic matter composition by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and lignin-derived phenols by CuO oxidation method. The soil organic matter composition, revealed by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, was similar for the above named different parent soil types (non-paddy soils) and was also not affected by the specific paddy soil management. The contribution of lignin-related carbon groups to total SOM was similar in the investigated paddy and non-paddy soils. A significant proportion of the total aromatic carbon in some paddy and non-paddy soils was attributed to the application of charcoal as a common management practise. The extraction of lignin-derived phenols revealed low VSC (vanillyl, syringyl, cinnamyl) values for all investigated soils, being typical for agricultural soils. An inherent accumulation of lignin-derived phenols due to paddy management was not found. Lignin-derived phenols seem to be soil type-dependent, shown by different VSC concentrations between the parent soil types. The specific paddy management only affects the lignin-derived phenols in Andosol-derived paddy soils which are characterized by

  16. Thresholds and interactive effects of soil moisture on the temperature response of soil respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lellei-Kovács, Eszter; Kovács-Láng, Edit; Botta-Dukát, Zoltán;

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystem carbon exchange is poorly understood in low-productivity, semiarid habitats. Here we studied the controls of soil temperature and moisture on soil respiration in climate change field experiment in a sandy forest-steppe. Soil CO2 efflux was measured monthly from April to November in 2003......–2008 on plots receiving either rain exclusion or nocturnal warming, or serving as ambient control. Based on this dataset, we developed and compared empirical models of temperature and moisture effects on soil respiration. Results suggest that in this semiarid ecosystem the main controlling factor for soil CO2...... efflux is soil temperature, while soil moisture has less, although significant effect on soil respiration. Clear thresholds for moisture effects on temperature sensitivity were identified at 0.6, 4.0 and 7.0vol% by almost each model, which relate well to other known limits for biological activity...

  17. Soil particle tracing using RFID tags for elucidating the behavior of radiocesium on bare soil surfaces in Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manome, Ryo; Onda, Yuichi; Patin, Jeremy; Stefani, Chiara; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Parsons, Tony; Cooper, James

    2014-05-01

    Radioactive materials are generally associated with soil particles in terrestrial environment and therefore the better understanding soil erosion processes is expected to improve the mitigation of radioactive risks. Spatial variability in soil erosion has been one of critical issues for soil erosion management. This study attempts to track soil particle movement on soil surfaces by employing Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags for the better understanding radiocesium behavior. A RFID tag contains a specific electronically identifier and it permits tracing its movement by reading the identifier. In this study, we made artificial soil particles by coating the RFID tags with cement material. The particle diameters of the artificial soil particles approximately ranged from 3 to 5 mm. The artificial soil particles were distributed in a reticular pattern on a soil erosion plot (bare soil surface, 22.13 m length × 5 m width, 4.4° slope) in Kawamata town where radiocesium deposited because of the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant accident. After their distribution on October 2012, we had read the identifiers of RFID tags and recorded their locations on the plot for 14 times by September 2013. Moving distance (MD) was calculated based on the difference of the location for each sampling date. The topographical changes on the plot were also monitored with a laser scanner to describe interrill erosion and rill erosion area on 11occasions. Median MD is 10.8cm for all the observations. Median MD on interrill and rill erosion areas were 9.8 cm and 20.7 cm, respectively. Seasonal variation in MD was observed; an extremely large MD was found in May 2013, at the first reading after the winter season. This large MD after winter suggests that snowmelt runoff was the dominant process which transported the soil particles. Comparing the MD with the observed amounts of rainfall, sediment and runoff on the plot, significant positive correlation were found if the data of May, 2013

  18. Electroremediation of PCB contaminated soil combined with iron nanoparticles: Effect of the soil type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Helena I.; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.;

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) are carcinogenic and persistent organic pollutants that accumulate in soils and sediments. Currently, there is no cost-effective and sustainable remediation technology for these contaminants. In this work, a new combination of electrodialytic remediation and zero...... nanoparticles. Remediation experiments are made with two different historically PCB contaminated soils, which differ in both soil composition and contamination source. Soil 1 is a mix of soils with spills of transformer oils, while Soil 2 is a superficial soil from a decommissioned school where PCB were used...... as windows sealants. Saponin, a natural surfactant, was also tested to increase the PCB desorption from soils and enhance dechlorination. Remediation of Soil 1 (with highest pH, carbonate content, organic matter and PCB concentrations) obtained the maximum 83% and 60% PCB removal with the two...

  19. Effect of soil ageing on in vivo arsenic bioavailability in two dissimilar soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert L; Smith, Euan; Weber, John; Naidu, Ravi; Rees, Matthew; Rofe, Allan; Kuchel, Tim; Sansom, Lloyd

    2008-05-01

    Arsenic (As) bioavailability in spiked soils aged for up to 12 months was assessed using in vitro and in vivo methodologies. Ageing (natural attenuation) of spiked soils resulted in a decline in in vivo As bioavailability (swine assay) of over 75% in soil A (Red Ferrosol) but had no significant effect on in vivo As bioavailability even after 12 months of ageing in soil B (Brown Chromosol). Sequential fractionation, however, indicated that there was repartitioning of As within the soil fractions extracted during the time course investigated. In soil A, the As fraction associated with the more weakly bound soil fractions decreased while the residual fraction increased from 12% to 35%. In contrast, little repartitioning of As was observed in soil B indicating that natural attenuation may be only applicable for As in soils containing specific mineralogical properties.

  20. Homogenization of the soil surface following fire in semiarid grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carleton S. White

    2011-01-01

    Semiarid grasslands accumulate soil beneath plant "islands" that are raised above bare interspaces. This fine-scale variation in microtopographic relief is plant-induced and is increased with shrub establishment. Research found that fire-induced water repellency enhanced local-scale soil erosion that reduced variation in microtopographic relief, suggesting...

  1. Enhancing agricultural forecasting using SMOS surface soil moisture retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the onset of data availability from the ESA Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission (Kerr and Levine, 2008) and the expected 2015 launch of the NASA Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission (Entekhabi et al., 2010), the next five years should see a significant expansion in our ab...

  2. The effects of the physical and chemical properties of soils on the spectral reflectance of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, O. L.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of organic matter, free iron oxides, texture, moisture content, and cation exchange capacity on the spectral reflectance of soils were investigated along with techniques for differentiating soil orders by computer analysis of multispectral data. By collecting soil samples of benchmark soils from the different climatic regions within the United States and using the extended wavelength field spectroradiometer to obtain reflectance values and curves for each sample, average curves were constructed for each soil order. Results indicate that multispectral analysis may be a valuable tool for delineating and quantifying differences between soils.

  3. Spectral reflectance of surface soils - A statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, K. R.; Henninger, D. L.; Thompson, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of the physical and chemical properties of soils to their spectral reflectance as measured at six wavebands of Thematic Mapper (TM) aboard NASA's Landsat-4 satellite was examined. The results of performing regressions of over 20 soil properties on the six TM bands indicated that organic matter, water, clay, cation exchange capacity, and calcium were the properties most readily predicted from TM data. The middle infrared bands, bands 5 and 7, were the best bands for predicting soil properties, and the near infrared band, band 4, was nearly as good. Clustering 234 soil samples on the TM bands and characterizing the clusters on the basis of soil properties revealed several clear relationships between properties and reflectance. Discriminant analysis found organic matter, fine sand, base saturation, sand, extractable acidity, and water to be significant in discriminating among clusters.

  4. Effects of a waste paper product on soil phosphorus, carbon, and bulk density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, David; Aiken, Glen

    2006-01-01

    Applications of manures to agricultural fields have increased soil test values for P to high levels in parts of the USA and thus increased the likelihood that P will be transported to surface water and degrade its quality. Waste paper applications to soils with high STP (soil test P) may decrease the risk of P transport to surface water by decreasing DRP (dissolved reactive P) by the formation of insoluble Al-P complexes and providing organic matter to improve infiltration. A field experiment was conducted near Booneville, AR (USA) to assess the effects of different rates of a waste paper product addition on STP, soil bulk density, and total soil C with a soil with approximately 45 mg Bray1-P kg-1 soil (dry weight). A Leadvale silt loam soil (fine-silty, siliceous, thermic Typic Fragiudult) was amended with 0, 22, 44, or 88 Mg waste paper product ha-1 to supply approximately 90, 170, or 350 kg Al ha-1, respectively. One year after additions, there was a strong negative correlation between waste paper product application rates and soil bulk density, and a strong positive correlation between rates and total soil C content. Soil bulk density and total C 2 yr after additions, and soil DRP and Bray1-P were not affected by waste paper additions. These results support the hypothesis that decreases in DRP in runoff from soils receiving waste paper additions were probably due to changes in soil organic matter and bulk density, rather than changes in the chemical forms of soil P.

  5. Spacial characteristics of pyrene degradation and soil microbial activity with the distance from the ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) root surface in a multi-interlayer rhizobox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaomei; Liao, Min; Fang, Shu; Peng, Ying; Yang, Jing; Chai, Juanjuan

    2012-04-30

    To investigate rhizosphere effects on the biodegradation of pyrene with the distance away from root surface in the rhizosphere of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), a glasshouse experiment was conducted using a multi-interlayer rhizobox where ryegrass were grown in a soil spiked with pyrene. The largest and most rapid dissipation of pyrene in planted soil appeared at 2 mm zone from the root zone. The pyrene degradation gradient followed the order: near-rhizosphere>root compartment>far-rhizosphere soil zones. In contrast, there was no difference in pyrene concentration with distance in the unplanted soil. Dynamic changes of soil microbial biomass carbon (C(mic)) and the activities of both soil polyphenol oxidase and dehydrogenase were to some extent coincident with the degradation of pyrene with distance away from the root compartment in planted soils, which indicated the changes of soil microorganisms in different soil zones of rhizosphere were mainly responsible for the observed pyrene degradation. The largest C(mic) and activities of both soil polyphenol oxidase and dehydrogenase also occurred in near-rhizosphere, especially in 2mm zone from the root surface. The above results suggest that the effect of root proximity is important in the degradation of pyrene in ryegrass growing soil.

  6. Effects of the soil freeze-thaw process on the regional climate of the Tibet Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, S., Sr.; Chen, B.; Lu, S.; Zhang, Y.; Ma, D.

    2015-12-01

    Single-point and regional simulation experiments on the Tibet Plateau, both with and without consideration of the soil freeze-thaw process, were set up with CLM3.5 and RegCM4 models. Comparison of the simulated soil temperature and moisture, surface energy flux, and upper-lower atmospheric circulation showed that the regional climate can be influenced by the freeze-thaw process of soil. The results indicate that the freeze-thaw process is a buffer to the seasonal changes in soil and near-surface temperatures and strengthens the energy exchange between the soil and the atmosphere. During the freeze (thaw) process, releasing (absorbing) of phase change energy retards the cooling (heating) effect of air temperature on soil. The soil freeze-thaw process increases (decreases) the surface heat source of the plateau in winter (summer), which increases (decreases) the near-surface temperature in winter (summer). Promoted by atmospheric circulation, the soil freeze-thaw process influences climate at the high and low altitudes of the plateau; this may also contribute to the maintenance of the South Asia High. In the early stages of permafrost degradation, the regional climate effects of freezing and thawing may accelerate the degradation of permafrost.

  7. Satellite remote sensing applications for surface soil moisture monitoring: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingli WANG; John J.QU

    2009-01-01

    Surface soil moisture is one of the crucial variables in hydrological processes, which influences the exchange of water and energy fluxes at the land surface/ atmosphere interface. Accurate estimate of the spatial and temporal variations of soil moisture is critical for numerous environmental studies. Recent technological advances in satellite remote sensing have shown that soil moisture can be measured by a variety of remote sensing techniques,each with its own strengths and weaknesses. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the progress in remote sensing of soil moisture, with focus on technique approaches for soil moisture estimation from optical,thermal, passive microwave, and active microwave measurements. The physical principles and the status of current retrieval methods are summarized. Limitations existing in current soil moisture estimation algorithms and key issues that have to be addressed in the near future are also discussed.

  8. Experimental study on the relation between the water content of surface soil and the acoustic wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the relation between the water content changing of surface soil and micro-quake recorded before earthquakes, we carried out a simulation experiment in laboratory. Its purpose is to explore whether the acoustic wave generated by micro-fracturing before earthquake are able to change water content of surface soil, so as to understand the relation between thermal anomaly in the remote sensing image got from the seismogenic area and the coming earthquake. The result of the experiment shows that when the acoustic wave enters into the surface soil the water content here increases on the background of decreasing due to natural evaporation. In the meantime, temperature here decreases.

  9. Effects of biochar and elevated soil temperature on soil microbial activity and abundance in an agricultural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamminger, Chris; Poll, Christian; Marhan, Sven

    2014-05-01

    As a consequence of Global Warming, rising surface temperatures will likely cause increased soil temperatures. Soil warming has already been shown to, at least temporarily, increase microbial activity and, therefore, the emissions of greenhouse gases like CO2 and N2O. This underlines the need for methods to stabilize soil organic matter and to prevent further boost of the greenhouse gas effect. Plant-derived biochar as a soil amendment could be a valuable tool to capture CO2 from the atmosphere and sequestrate it in soil on the long-term. During the process of pyrolysis, plant biomass is heated in an oxygen-low atmosphere producing the highly stable solid matter biochar. Biochar is generally stable against microbial degradation due to its chemical structure and it, therefore, persists in soil for long periods. Previous experiments indicated that biochar improves or changes several physical or chemical soil traits such as water holding capacity, cation exchange capacity or soil structure, but also biotic properties like microbial activity/abundance, greenhouse gas emissions and plant growth. Changes in the soil microbial abundance and community composition alter their metabolism, but likely also affect plant productivity. The interaction of biochar addition and soil temperature increase on soil microbial properties and plant growth was yet not investigated on the field scale. To investigate whether warming could change biochar effects in soil, we conducted a field experiment attached to a soil warming experiment on an agricultural experimental site near the University of Hohenheim, already running since July 2008. The biochar field experiment was set up as two-factorial randomized block design (n=4) with the factors biochar amendment (0, 30 t ha-1) and soil temperature (ambient, elevated=ambient +2.5° C) starting from August 2013. Each plot has a dimension of 1x1m and is equipped with combined soil temperature and moisture sensors. Slow pyrolysis biochar from the C

  10. Mobility and degradation of trinitrotoluene/metabolites in soil columns: effect of soil organic carbon content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neera; Hennecke, Dieter; Hoerner, Jennifer; Koerdel, Werner; Schaeffer, Andreas

    2008-06-01

    There has been increasing interest in enhancing natural attenuation of munitions-contaminated soils. Present study reports the effect of increasing soil organic matter content on fate and mobility of trinitrotoluene (TNT) and metabolites in soil columns. This study was performed using 30-cm-long columns containing a top 5 cm of contaminated soil as a source layer and an uncontaminated soil (25 cm) adjusted to 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 3.0% organic carbon (OC) content using compost. Contaminated soil layer was fortified with uniformly ring-labeled (14)C-trinitrotoluene (TNT) or 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT); in total there were 8 treatments. Columns were leached with synthetic rain water under unsaturated flow conditions in downside up direction. There was significant increase in the retention of both (14)C-TNT and (14)C-DNT in soils with increasing soil OC content and in 3.0% soil OC content column degradation of TNT and metabolites from contaminated soil was significantly increased and resulted in greater soil-bound residues. Formation of monoamino-dinitrotoluene (ADNTs), diamino-mononitrotoluene (DANTs) and monoamino-mononitrotoluene (ANTs) metabolites was greatly enhanced with increase in OC content of soils. Study suggests that increasing OC content of contaminated soil to 3.0% significantly enhanced the reduction of nitroaromatics to more polar amine metabolites and the formation of soil-bound residues.

  11. Long-term application of winery wastewater - Effect on soil microbial populations and soil chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosse, Kim; Patti, Antonio; Smernik, Ron; Cavagnaro, Timothy

    2010-05-01

    The ability to reuse winery wastewater (WWW) has potential benefits both with respect to treatment of a waste stream, as well as providing a beneficial water resource in water limited regions such as south-eastern Australia, California and South Africa. Over an extended time period, this practice leads to changes in soil chemistry, and potentially, also to soil microbial populations. In this study, we compared the short term effects of WWW (both treated and untreated) application on soil biology and chemistry in two adjacent paired sites with the same soil type, one of which had received WWW for approximately 30 years, and the other which had not. The paired sites were treated with an industrially relevant quantity of WWW, and the soil microbial activity (measured as soil CO2 efflux) and common soil physicochemical properties were monitored over a 16-day period. In addition, Solid State 13C NMR was employed on whole soil samples from the two sites, to measure and compare the chemical nature of the soil organic matter at the paired sites. The acclimatised soil showed a high level of organic matter and a greater spike in microbial activity following WWW addition, in comparison with the non-acclimatised soil, suggesting differences in soil chemistry and soil microbial communities between the two sites. Soil nitrate and phosphorus levels showed significant differences between WWW treatments; these differences likely to be microbially mediated.

  12. Long Term Effects of Farming System on Soil Water Content and Dry Soil Layer in Deep Loess Proifle of Loess Tableland in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Li-ping; LIU Wen-zhao

    2014-01-01

    Soil water is strongly affected by land use/cover in the Loess Plateau in China. Water stored in thick loessal soils is one of the most important resources regulating vegetation growth. However, soil water in the deep loess proifle, which is critical for maintaining the function of the“soil water pool”is rarely studied because deep proifle soil samples are dififcult to collect. In this study, four experimental plots were established in 2005 to represent different farming systems on the Changwu Tableland:fallow land, fertilized cropland, unfertilized cropland, and continuous alfalfa. The soil water content in the 15-m-deep loess proifles was monitored continuously from 2007 to 2012 with the neutron probe technique. The results showed that temporal variations in soil water proifles differed among the four farming systems. Under fallow land, the soil water content increased gradually over time, ifrst in the surface layers and later in the deep soil layers. In contrast, the soil water content decreased gradually under continuous alfalfa. The distributions of soil water in deep soil layers under both fertilized and unfertilized cropland were relatively stable over time. Thus farming system signiifcantly affected soil water content. Seven years after the start of the experiment, the soil water contents in the 15-m-deep proifles averaged 23.4%under fallow land, 20.3%under fertilized cropland, 21.6%under unfertilized cropland, and 16.0%under continuous alfalfa. Compared to measurements at the start of the experiment, both fallow land and unfertilized cropland increased soil water storage in the 15-m loess proifles. In contrast, continuous alfalfa reduced soil water storage. Fertilized cropland has no signiifcant effect on soil water storage. These results suggest that deep soil water can be replenished under the fallow and unfertilized farming systems. Dry soil layers (i.e., those which have soil water content less than the stable ifeld water capacity) in the subsoil

  13. Effect of long-term farming strategies on soil microbiota and soil health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommermann, Loreen; Babin, Doreen; Sandmann, Martin; Smalla, Kornelia; Schellenberg, Ingo; Grosch, Rita; Geistlinger, Joerg

    2017-04-01

    Increasing food and energy demands have resulted in considerable intensification of farming practices, which brought about severe consequences for agricultural soils, e.g. loss of fertility, erosion and enrichment of soil-borne plant diseases. In order to maintain soil quality and health for the future, the development of more extensive and sustainable farming strategies is urgently needed. The soil microbiome is regarded as a key player in soil ecosystem functions, particularly the natural ability of soils to suppress plant pathogens (suppressiveness). Recent studies showed that soil microbial communities are influenced by agricultural management. To further analyze the effects of farming strategies on soil suppressiveness and plant performance, agricultural soils from three long-term field trials in Thyrow, Bernburg (both in Germany) and Therwil (Switzerland) were sampled and subjected to molecular profiling of soil bacteria and fungi using marker genes and high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Significant effects on bacterial as well as fungal community composition, including plant pathogenic and beneficial taxa, were observed among variants of tillage and crop rotation. The least effect on both communities had fertilization, with no significance between variants. Subsequently, the same soils were subjected to growth chamber pot experiments with lettuce as a model (Lactuca sativa). After a growth period of six weeks significant differences in lettuce shoot and soil microbial biomass were observed among soil samples of the different long-term trials. Furthermore, the lettuce rhizosphere exhibited diverse bacterial community compositions as observed by DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). Using group-specific PCR-DGGE fingerprints, bacterial responders to fertilization, soil management and crop rotation were identified among different taxonomic groups. Currently, bacterial and fungal amplicon sequencing of rhizosphere and bulk soil from these pot

  14. Surface Drainage and Mulching Drip-Irrigated Tomatoes Reduces Soil Salinity and Improves Fruit Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Maomao; Zhu, Lvdan; Jin, Qiu

    2016-01-01

    A study on the effects of mulched drip irrigation combined with surface drainage on saline soil and tomatoes was conducted in coastal areas of eastern China, where the crops are subjected to excessive salt. The treatments contained three irrigation rates—200, 250 and 300 m3/ha—and three drain ditch depths—10, 20 and 30 cm. The contents of soil salinity, organic matter and available nutrient were observed, and the tomato plant height, stem diameter and leaf area index during different growth periods were recorded. Results showed that the total removal rate of salt from soil at a 0–1 m depth was 8.7–13.2% for the three drainages. Compared with the control, the treatments increased the content of available N (by 12.1–47.1%) and available K (by 5.0–21.9%) in the soils inside the mulch and decreased the content of available N (by 3.4–22.1%) and available K (by 7.5–16.4%) in the soils outside the mulch. For tomatoes, the plant height and the stem diameter was increased significantly by the irrigations but was not significantly affected by the drainages, and the leaf area index was increased by 0.39~1.76, 1.10~2.90 and 2.80~6.86 respectively in corresponding to the seedling, flowering and fruit-set stage. Moreover, yield-increase rates of 7.9–27.6% were found for the treatments compared to the control with a similar amount of applied water. PMID:27153110

  15. Corn Stover Impacts on Near-Surface Soil Properties of No-Till Corn In Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Owens, L B.

    2006-01-06

    Corn stover is a primary biofuel feedstock and its expanded use could help reduce reliance on fossil fuels and net CO2 emissions. Excessive stover removal may, however, negatively impact near-surface soil properties within a short period after removal. We assessed changes in soil crust strength, bulk density, and water content over a 1-yr period following a systematic removal or addition of stover from three no-till soils under corn in Ohio.

  16. Density and stability of soil organic carbon beneath impervious surfaces in urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zongqiang; Wu, Shaohua; Yan, Xiao; Zhou, Shenglu

    2014-01-01

    Installation of impervious surfaces in urban areas has attracted increasing attention due to its potential hazard to urban ecosystems. Urban soils are suggested to have robust carbon (C) sequestration capacity; however, the C stocks and dynamics in the soils covered by impervious surfaces that dominate urban areas are still not well characterized. We compared soil organic C (SOC) densities and their stabilities under impervious surface, determined by a 28-d incubation experiment, with those in open areas in Yixing City, China. The SOC density (0-20 cm) under impervious surfaces was, on average, 68% lower than that in open areas. Furthermore, there was a significantly (Psoils, whereas the correlation was not apparent for the impervious-covered soils, suggesting that the artificial soil sealing in urban areas decoupled the cycle of C and N. Cumulative CO2-C evolved during the 28-d incubation was lower from the impervious-covered soils than from the open soils, and agreed well with a first-order decay model (Ct = C1+C0(1-e-kt)). The model results indicated that the SOC underlying capped surfaces had weaker decomposability and lower turnover rate. Our results confirm the unique character of urban SOC, especially that beneath impervious surface, and suggest that scientific and management views on regional SOC assessment may need to consider the role of urban carbon stocks.

  17. Effects of plant species identity, diversity and soil fertility on biodegradation of phenanthrene in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyelami, Ayodeji O; Okere, Uchechukwu V; Orwin, Kate H; De Deyn, Gerlinde B; Jones, Kevin C; Semple, Kirk T

    2013-02-01

    The work presented in this paper investigated the effects of plant species composition, species diversity and soil fertility on biodegradation of (14)C-phenanthrene in soil. The two soils used were of contrasting fertility, taken from long term unfertilised and fertilised grassland, showing differences in total nitrogen content (%N). Plant communities consisted of six different plant species: two grasses, two forbs, and two legume species, and ranged in species richness from 1 to 6. The degradation of (14)C-phenanthrene was evaluated by measuring indigenous catabolic activity following the addition of the contaminant to soil using respirometry. Soil fertility was a driving factor in all aspects of (14)C-phenanthrene degradation; lag phase, maximum rates and total extents of (14)C-phenanthrene mineralisation were higher in improved soils compared to unimproved soils. Plant identity had a significant effect on the lag phase and extents of mineralisation. Soil fertility was the major influence also on abundance of microbial communities.

  18. Residues of endosulfan in surface and subsurface agricultural soil and its bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odukkathil, Greeshma; Vasudevan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of many hydrophobic pesticides has been reported by various workers in various soil environments and its bioremediation is a major concern due to less bioavailability. In the present study, the pesticide residues in the surface and subsurface soil in an area of intense agricultural activity in Pakkam Village of Thiruvallur District, Tamilnadu, India, and its bioremediation using a novel bacterial consortium was investigated. Surface (0-15 cm) and subsurface soils (15-30 cm and 30-40 cm) were sampled, and pesticides in different layers of the soil were analyzed. Alpha endosulfan and beta endosulfan concentrations ranged from 1.42 to 3.4 mg/g and 1.28-3.1 mg/g in the surface soil, 0.6-1.4 mg/g and 0.3-0.6 mg/g in the subsurface soil (15-30 cm), and 0.9-1.5 mg/g and 0.34-1.3 mg/g in the subsurface soil (30-40 cm) respectively. Residues of other persistent pesticides were also detected in minor concentrations. These soil layers were subjected to bioremediation using a novel bacterial consortium under a simulated soil profile condition in a soil reactor. The complete removal of alpha and beta endosulfan was observed over 25 days. Residues of endosulfate were also detected during bioremediation, which was subsequently degraded on the 30th day. This study revealed the existence of endosulfan in the surface and subsurface soils and also proved that the removal of such a ubiquitous pesticide in the surface and subsurface environment can be achieved in the field by bioaugumenting a biosurfactant-producing bacterial consortium that degrades pesticides.

  19. Effects of plant species identity, diversity and soil fertility on biodegradation of phenanthrene in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyelami, A.O.; Okere, U.V.; Orwin, K.; Deyn, de G.B.; Jones, K.C.; Semple, K.T.

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this paper investigated the effects of plant species composition, species diversity and soil fertility on biodegradation of 14C-phenanthrene in soil. The two soils used were of contrasting fertility, taken from long term unfertilised and fertilised grassland, showing

  20. Multiscale analysis of surface soil moisture dynamics in a mesoscale catchment utilizing an integrated ecohydrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korres, W.; Reichenau, T. G.; Schneider, K.

    2012-12-01

    Soil moisture is one of the fundamental variables in hydrology, meteorology and agriculture, influencing the partitioning of solar energy into latent and sensible heat flux as well as the partitioning of precipitation into runoff and percolation. Numerous studies have shown that in addition to natural factors (rainfall, soil, topography etc.) agricultural management is one of the key drivers for spatio-temporal patterns of soil moisture in agricultural landscapes. Interactions between plant growth, soil hydrology and soil nitrogen transformation processes are modeled by using a dynamically coupled modeling approach. The process-based ecohydrological model components of the integrated decision support system DANUBIA are used to identify the important processes and feedbacks determining soil moisture patterns in agroecosystems. Integrative validation of plant growth and surface soil moisture dynamics serves as a basis for a spatially distributed modeling analysis of surface soil moisture patterns in the northern part of the Rur catchment (1100 sq km), Western Germany. An extensive three year dataset (2007-2009) of surface soil moisture-, plant- (LAI, organ specific biomass and N) and soil- (texture, N, C) measurements was collected. Plant measurements were carried out biweekly for winter wheat, maize, and sugar beet during the growing season. Soil moisture was measured with three FDR soil moisture stations. Meteorological data was measured with an eddy flux station. The results of the model validation showed a very good agreement between the modeled plant parameters (biomass, green LAI) and the measured parameters with values between 0.84 and 0.98 (Willmotts index of agreement). The modeled surface soil moisture (0 - 20 cm) showed also a very favorable agreement with the measurements for winter wheat and sugar beet with an RMSE between 1.68 and 3.45 Vol.-%. For maize, the RMSE was less favorable particularly in the 1.5 months prior to harvest. The modeled soil

  1. Soil surface moisture estimation over a semi-arid region using ENVISAT ASAR radar data for soil evaporation evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zribi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper proposes a method for the evaluation of soil evaporation, using soil moisture estimations based on radar satellite measurements. We present firstly an approach for the estimation and monitoring of soil moisture in a semi-arid region in North Africa, using ENVISAT ASAR images, over two types of vegetation covers. The first mapping process is dedicated solely to the monitoring of moisture variability related to rainfall events, over areas in the "non-irrigated olive tree" class of land use. The developed approach is based on a simple linear relationship between soil moisture and the backscattered radar signal normalised at a reference incidence angle. The second process is proposed over wheat fields, using an analysis of moisture variability due to both rainfall and irrigation. A semi-empirical model, based on the water-cloud model for vegetation correction, is used to retrieve soil moisture from the radar signal. Moisture mapping is carried out over wheat fields, showing high variability between irrigated and non-irrigated wheat covers. This analysis is based on a large database, including both ENVISAT ASAR and simultaneously acquired ground-truth measurements (moisture, vegetation, roughness, during the 2008–2009 vegetation cycle. Finally, a semi-empirical approach is proposed in order to relate surface moisture to the difference between soil evaporation and the climate demand, as defined by the potential evaporation. Mapping of the soil evaporation is proposed.

  2. Effects of Grazing Sorghum Stubble on Soil Physical Properties and Subsequent Crop Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Radford

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Two grazing trials were conducted on a Vertosol in central Queensland to assess the effects of stubble grazing by cattle on soil properties and subsequent crop performance. Two adjacent contour bays were selected for two treatments (grazed and ungrazed in each trial. Both trials were conducted following a grain sorghum crop. In trial 1 (during 1996 the surface soil was dry throughout grazing. In trial 2 (during 1998 the surface soil became saturated during grazing after 125 mm of rain. Soil physical properties including bulk density, shear strength, cone index and hydraulic conductivity were measured pre-and post-grazing in both trials and the response of wheat crops sown after grazing was assessed. The area was then double-cropped to sorghum to measure any further residual impacts. After grazing on dry soil, hoof marks were barely evident and no significant change was found in any soil physical property or the establishment or yield of a subsequent wheat crop. After grazing on saturated soil, there were visible hoof marks 49 mm deep and increases in soil shear strength, cone index and drawbar power requirement. The following wheat crop had reduced dry matter at 32 days and reduced grain yield. There was no immediate change in ground cover and no effect on wheat establishment following direct-drilling 37 days after the cattle were removed. In a sorghum crop following the wheat crop, there were no carryover effects on any soil physical property or on crop yield. We conclude that under a similar regime to that of trial 1 (dry soil and no rainfall during grazing, adverse effects of stubble grazing are unlikely. It follows that if grazing can be restricted to times when the surface soil is dry enough to minimise compaction by animals, there is little risk of adverse effects on subsequent crop performance.

  3. Organic matter composition of soil macropore surfaces under different agricultural management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Leue, Marin; Magid, Jacob; Gerke, Horst H.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the heterogeneous nature of soil, i.e. properties and processes occurring specifically at local scales is essential for best managing our soil resources for agricultural production. Examination of intact soil structures in order to obtain an increased understanding of how soil systems operate from small to large scale represents a large gap within soil science research. Dissolved chemicals, nutrients and particles are transported through the disturbed plow layer of agricultural soil, where after flow through the lower soil layers occur by preferential flow via macropores. Rapid movement of water through macropores limit the contact between the preferentially moving water and the surrounding soil matrix, therefore contact and exchange of solutes in the water is largely restricted to the surface area of the macropores. Organomineral complex coated surfaces control sorption and exchange properties of solutes, as well as availability of essential nutrients to plant roots and to the preferentially flowing water. DRIFT (Diffuse Reflectance infrared Fourier Transform) Mapping has been developed to examine composition of organic matter coated macropores. In this study macropore surfaces structures will be determined for organic matter composition using DRIFT from a long-term field experiment on waste application to agricultural soil (CRUCIAL, close to Copenhagen, Denmark). Parcels with 5 treatments; accelerated household waste, accelerated sewage sludge, accelerated cattle manure, NPK and unfertilized, will be examined in order to study whether agricultural management have an impact on the organic matter composition of intact structures.

  4. Effects of electrokinetic treatment of a heavy metal contaminated soil on soil enzyme activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cang Long [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou Dongmei, E-mail: dmzhou@issas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Wang Quanying; Wu Danya [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2009-12-30

    There is a growing concern on the potential application of a direct current (DC) electric field to soil for removing contaminants, but little is known about its impact on soil enzyme activities. This study investigated the change of enzyme activities of a heavy metal contaminated soil before and after electrokinetic (EK) treatments at lab-scale and the mechanisms of EK treatment to affect soil enzyme activities were explored. After treatments with 1-3 V cm{sup -1} of voltage gradient for 420 h, soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC), soil organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), soil heavy metal concentration and enzyme activities were analyzed. The results showed that the average removal efficiencies of soil copper were about 65% and 83% without and with pH control of catholyte, respectively, and all the removal efficiencies of cadmium were above 90%. The soil invertase and catalase activities increased and the highest invertase activity was as 170 times as the initial one. The activities of soil urease and acidic phosphatase were lower than the initial ones. Bivariate correlation analyses indicated that the soil invertase and acidic phosphatase activities were significantly correlated with soil pH, EC, and DOC at P < 0.05, but the soil urease activities had no correlation with the soil properties. On the other hand, the effects of DC electric current on solution invertase and catalase enzyme protein activities indicated that it had negative effect on solution catalase activity and little effect on solution invertase activity. From the change of invertase and catalase activities in soil and solution, the conclusion can be drawn that the dominant effect mechanism is the change of soil properties by EK treatments.

  5. Cover Crops Effects on Soil Chemical Properties and Onion Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Assis de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cover crops contribute to nutrient cycling and may improve soil chemical properties and, consequently, increase crop yield. The aim of this study was to evaluate cover crop residue decomposition and nutrient release, and the effects of these plants on soil chemical properties and on onion (Allium cepa L. yield in a no-tillage system. The experiment was carried out in an Inceptisol in southern Brazil, where cover crops were sown in April 2012 and 2013. In July 2013, shoots of weeds (WD, black oats (BO, rye (RY, oilseed radish (RD, oilseed radish + black oats (RD + BO, and oilseed radish + rye (RD + RY were cut at ground level and part of these material from each treatment was placed in litter bags. The litter bags were distributed on the soil surface and were collected at 0, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 days after distribution (DAD. The residues in the litter bags were dried, weighed, and ground, and then analyzed to quantify lignin, cellulose, non-structural biomass, total organic carbon (TOC, N, P, K, Ca, and Mg. In November 2012 and 2013, onion crops were harvested to quantify yield, and bulbs were classified according to diameter, and the number of rotted and flowering bulbs was determined. Soil in the 0.00-0.10 m layer was collected for chemical analysis before transplanting and after harvesting onion in December 2012 and 2013. The rye plant residues presented the highest half-life and they released less nutrients until 90 DAD. The great permanence of rye residue was considered a protection to soil surface, the opposite was observed with spontaneous vegetation. The cultivation and addition of dry residue of cover crops increased the onion yield at 2.5 Mg ha-1.

  6. Wind tunnel experimental study on the effect of PAM on soil wind erosion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ji-Jun; Cai, Qiang-Guo; Tang, Ze-Jun

    2008-10-01

    In recent years, high-molecular-weight anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) have been widely tested on a variety of soils, primarily in water erosion control. However, little information is available regarding the effectiveness of PAM on preventing soil loss from wind erosion. The research adopted room wind tunnel experiment, two kinds of soils were used which were from the agro-pastoral area of Inner Mongolia, the northwest of China, the clay content of soils were 22.0 and 13.7%, respectively. For these tests, all the treatments were performed under the condition of wind velocity of 14 m s(-1) and a blown angle of 8.75%, according to the actual situation of experimented area. The study results indicated that using PAM on the soil surface could enhance the capability of avoiding the wind erosion, at the same time, the effect of controlling wind soil erosion with 4 g m(-2) PAM was better than 2 g m(-2) PAM's. Economically, the 2 g m(-2) PAM used in soil surface can control wind erosion effectively in this region. The prophase PAM accumulated in soil could not improve the capability of avoiding the wind erosion, owing to the degradation of PAM in the soil and the continual tillage year after year. The texture of soil is a main factor influencing the capability of soil avoiding wind erosion. Soil with higher clay content has the higher capability of preventing soil from wind erosion than one with the opposite one under the together action of PAM and water.

  7. Sorption of a triazol derivative by soils: importance of surface acidity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The sorption of a triazol derivative, 1-(4-chlorophenyl)- 4,4-dimethyl-2-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)penten-3-ol with a common name of S3307D, on fifteen soils and three H2O2-treated soils was investigated. The sorption isotherm for each untreated and treated soil was non-linear, and was best fitted to Freundlich sorption equation. Soils containing high amount of clay content or organic matter or both sorbed much higher amounts of the chemical than soils that had low contents of these soil constituents. H2O2-treated soils showed considerable sorptive affinity for S3307D. It was concluded that both organic matter and mineral fraction in natural soils contributed to the sorption of the basic compound. Sorption by the H2O2 treated soils increased as suspension pH decreased, but all suspension pHs exceeded the pKa of the compound by more than two units. This implies that organic base protonation can occur on surfaces of soil components, and surface acidity (exchangeable acidity ) is important in sorption process of the organic base rather than suspension pH.

  8. Effects of biochar and manure amendments on water vapor sorption in a sandy loam soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per;

    2015-01-01

    properties of soils, especially on water retention at low matric potentials. To overcome this knowledge gap, the effects of combined BC (0 to 100 Mg ha-1) and manure (21 and 42 Mg ha-1) applications on water vapor sorption and specific surface area was investigated for a sandy loam soil. In addition......, potential impacts of BC aging were evaluated. All considered BC-amendment rates led to a distinct increase of water retention, especially for low matric potentials. The observed increases were attributed to a significant increase of soil organic matter contents and specific surface areas in BCamended soils......Over the last few years, the application of biochar (BC) as a soil amendment to sequester carbon and mitigate global climate change has received considerable attention. While positive effects of biochar on plant nutrition are well documented, little is known about potential impacts on the physical...

  9. Spatial Distribution of Surface Soil Moisture in a Small Forested Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predicting the spatial distribution of soil moisture is an important hydrological question. We measured the spatial distribution of surface soil moisture (upper 6 cm) using an Amplitude Domain Reflectometry sensor at the plot scale (2 × 2 m) and small catchment scale (0.84 ha) in...

  10. Spatial Distribution of Surface Soil Moisture in a Small Forested Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predicting the spatial distribution of soil moisture is an important hydrological question. We measured the spatial distribution of surface soil moisture (upper 6 cm) using an Amplitude Domain Reflectometry sensor at the plot scale (2 × 2 m) and small catchment scale (0.84 ha) in...

  11. Role of subsurface physics in the assimilation of surface soil moisture observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil moisture controls the exchange of water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere and exhibits memory that may be useful for climate prediction at monthly time scales. Though spatially distributed observations of soil moisture are increasingly becoming available from remotely sense...

  12. Physicochemical and microbiological effects of biosurfactant on the remediation of HOC-contaminated soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Guangming; ZHONG Hua; HUANG Guohe; FU Haiyan

    2005-01-01

    Remediation of soil contaminated by hydrophobic organic compounds using biosurfactants as additives involves interactions between soil matrix, hydrophobic organic compound contaminants, biosurfactants and microorganisms. In this paper, the mechanism for biosurfactants to enhance the contaminant degradation is basically revealed. Biosurfactants can enhance solubilization of the contaminants in the soil matrix, change their mass transfer properties into the aqueous phase, as well as affect their sorption properties. Furthermore, biosurfactants can act on microorganisms and change their surface properties, accordingly cause new growth and uptake behavior of the bacteria in the soil matrix. Both the physicochemical and the microbiological effects can basically increase the bioavailability of the contaminants and enhance their degradation.

  13. Response of soybean and corn to soil mechanical intervention and agricultural gypsum application to the soil surface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lucindo Somavilla; Marlo Adriano Bison Pinto; Claudir José Basso; Clovis Orlando Da Ros; Vanderlei Rodrigues da Silva; Thiarles Brun; Antônio Luis Santi

    2016-01-01

    ...; however, crop responses to its application are contradictory. Studies have shown that the physical effects of soil mechanical intervention is short-lasting and has little impact on grain yield...

  14. Effects of poultry manure on soil biochemical properties in phthalic acid esters contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Qin, Xiaojian; Ren, Xuqin; Zhou, Haifeng

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of poultry manure (PM) on soil biological properties in DBP- and DEHP-contaminated soils. An indoor incubation experiment was conducted. Soil microbial biomass C (Cmic), soil enzymatic activities, and microbial phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) concentrations were measured during incubation period. The results indicated that except alkaline phosphatase activity, DBP and DEHP had negative effects on Cmic, dehydrogenase, urease, protease activities, and contents of total PLFA. However, 5 % PM treatment alleviated the negative effects of PAEs on the above biochemical parameters. In DBP-contaminated soil, 5 % PM amendment even resulted in dehydroenase activity and Cmic content increasing by 17.8 and 11.8 % on the day 15 of incubation, respectively. During the incubation periods, the total PLFA contents decreased maximumly by 17.2 and 11.6 % in DBP- and DEHP-contaminated soils without PM amendments, respectively. Compared with those in uncontaminated soil, the total PLFA contents increased slightly and the value of bacPLFA/fugalPLFA increased significantly in PAE-contaminated soils with 5 % PM amendment. Nevertheless, in both contaminated soils, the effects of 5 % PM amendment on the biochemical parameters were not observed with 10 % PM amendment. In 10 % PM-amended soils, DBP and DEHP had little effect on Cmic, soil enzymatic activities, and microbial community composition. At the end of incubation, the effects of PAEs on these parameters disappeared, irrespective of PM amendment. The application of PM ameliorated the negative effect of PAEs on soil biological environment. However, further work is needed to study the effect of PM on soil microbial gene expression in order to explain the change mechanisms of soil biological properties.

  15. New methods to quantify NH3 volatilization from fertilized surface soil with urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Alves

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous N losses from soil are considerable, resulting mostly from ammonia volatilization linked to agricultural activities such as pasture fertilization. The use of simple and accessible measurement methods of such losses is fundamental in the evaluation of the N cycle in agricultural systems. The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantification methods of NH3 volatilization from fertilized surface soil with urea, with minimal influence on the volatilization processes. The greenhouse experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with 13 treatments and five replications, with the following treatments: (1 Polyurethane foam (density 20 kg m-3 with phosphoric acid solution absorber (foam absorber, installed 1, 5, 10 and 20 cm above the soil surface; (2 Paper filter with sulfuric acid solution absorber (paper absorber, 1, 5, 10 and 20 cm above the soil surface; (3 Sulfuric acid solution absorber (1, 5 and 10 cm above the soil surface; (4 Semi-open static collector; (5 15N balance (control. The foam absorber placed 1 cm above the soil surface estimated the real daily rate of loss and accumulated loss of NH3N and proved efficient in capturing NH3 volatized from urea-treated soil. The estimates based on acid absorbers 1, 5 and 10 cm above the soil surface and paper absorbers 1 and 5 cm above the soil surface were only realistic for accumulated N-NH3 losses. Foam absorbers can be indicated to quantify accumulated and daily rates of NH3 volatilization losses similarly to an open static chamber, making calibration equations or correction factors unnecessary.

  16. Predicting root zone soil moisture with soil properties and satellite near-surface moisture data across the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, D.; Manfreda, S.; Keller, K.; Smithwick, E. A. H.

    2017-03-01

    Satellite-based near-surface (0-2 cm) soil moisture estimates have global coverage, but do not capture variations of soil moisture in the root zone (up to 100 cm depth) and may be biased with respect to ground-based soil moisture measurements. Here, we present an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) hydrologic data assimilation system that predicts bias in satellite soil moisture data to support the physically based Soil Moisture Analytical Relationship (SMAR) infiltration model, which estimates root zone soil moisture with satellite soil moisture data. The SMAR-EnKF model estimates a regional-scale bias parameter using available in situ data. The regional bias parameter is added to satellite soil moisture retrievals before their use in the SMAR model, and the bias parameter is updated continuously over time with the EnKF algorithm. In this study, the SMAR-EnKF assimilates in situ soil moisture at 43 Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) monitoring locations across the conterminous U.S. Multivariate regression models are developed to estimate SMAR parameters using soil physical properties and the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) evapotranspiration data product as covariates. SMAR-EnKF root zone soil moisture predictions are in relatively close agreement with in situ observations when using optimal model parameters, with root mean square errors averaging 0.051 [cm3 cm-3] (standard error, s.e. = 0.005). The average root mean square error associated with a 20-fold cross-validation analysis with permuted SMAR parameter regression models increases moderately (0.082 [cm3 cm-3], s.e. = 0.004). The expected regional-scale satellite correction bias is negative in four out of six ecoregions studied (mean = -0.12 [-], s.e. = 0.002), excluding the Great Plains and Eastern Temperate Forests (0.053 [-], s.e. = 0.001). With its capability of estimating regional-scale satellite bias, the SMAR-EnKF system can predict root zone soil moisture over broad extents and has

  17. The Effect of Anthropogenic Disturbance in the Ecohydrology of Pinyon Juniper Woodlands with Soil Biocrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, I.; Chandler, D. G.; Robinson, D. A.; Belnap, J.; Madsen, M.

    2005-12-01

    The canopy and intercanopy in pinyon-juniper woodlands are intrinsically related and constitute an ecosystem of great importance in the arid lands in the United States. The integrity of this ecosystem is continually challenged by anthropogenic disturbances as oil exploration and recreation activities in these environments. An important feature in the intercanopy of pinyon juniper drylands is the soil biological crust or biocrust. Biocrust is important to the nutrient cycles and hydrology and sediment production of this system. To quantify the effect of disturbances in the soil physical properties in the interspace of a pinion-juniper woodland we measured soil bulk density, water content, and hydraulic conductivity in undisturbed and disturbed areas of sandy soil. The disturbance had minimal impact on the bulk soil properties in the interspace soils. We also analyzed chlorophyll and other pigments related with bacterial activity in top 4mm of the soil and found chlorophyll activity to be almost zero in the disturbed areas while the undisturbed ones showed several orders of magnitude higher concentrations. Subsequent analysis of the soil surface properties indicates that a drastic change in the surface roughness and structure at the surface due to disturbances can alter the microenvironment characteristics critical for the bacterial survival. Since cyanobacteria colonization is the first step in the formation of biocrust, we conclude that surface properties are critical for the preservation and establishment of biocrust in the intercanopy space of the pinyon-juniper woodlands ecosystems.

  18. Effect of Soil Physical State on the Earthworms in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Birkas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hungarian authors have long been discussing the role of earthworms in improving soil productivity. Earthworm counts in our higher quality soils are similar to those found in soils where more attention is paid to earthworm activity. Negative impacts that are independent of farming—such as sustained dry spells in the summer—also affect earthworm counts. Negative impacts that definitely depend on farming include land use causing soil moisture loss, deep stubble treatment leaving the soil without cover, and ploughing in the summer without subsequent pressing. The climate change is having both positive and negative impacts. Weather patterns are causing losses but adopting climate mitigating tillage are generating benefits. In the trials results so far show that tillage focusing on preserving soil moisture, structure, and organic materials, covering the surface in the critical months as well as adequate soil loosening are fundamental pre-requisites for making the soil a favourable habitat for earthworms.

  19. Effect of soil organic amendments on the behavior of bentazone and tricyclazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jaramillo, M; Cox, L; Cornejo, J; Hermosín, M C

    2014-01-01

    The effect of soil amendment with different organic residues from olive oil production on the sorption and leaching of two pesticides used in rice crops (bentazone and tricyclazole) was compared in order to understand their behavior and to improve soil properties by recycling an abundant agricultural residue in Andalucía (S. Spain). A residue from olive oil production (AJ), the organic compost derived from this organic waste (CA) and a biochar (BA) made from CA were used. A soil devoted to rice cultivation, IFAPA (I), was amended at 2% (w/w) of each amendment individually (I+AJ, I+CA and I+BA). In order to evaluate the effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from these amendments on bentazone and tricyclazole behavior, the DOM from the amendments was extracted, quantified and characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy and FT-IR. The affinity of DOM for soil surfaces was evaluated with (I) soil and two other soils of d