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Sample records for surface smos willow

  1. ENSO signature in the SMOS sea surface salinity maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabrera, J.; Umbert, M.; Hoareau, N.; Turiel, A.; Font, J.

    2012-12-01

    Until recently, the role of salinity observations in the operational simulation and prediction of ENSO was neglected because of the historical lack of observations and because leading intermediate coupled models had significant predictive skill without directly accounting for salinity effects. In Ballabrera-Poy et al., (2002), the potential role of sea surface salinity (SSS) observations on the statistical predictions of ENSO was investigated. It was shown that, although SSS observations would play little role in statistical nowcasts of ENSO, they would provide a significant role in the 6-12 month predictions. The European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Earth Explorer opportunity mission was launched on November 2, 2009, becoming the first satellite mission addressing the challenge of measuring SSS from space with the help of MIRAS (Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis), a novel two-dimensional interferometer operating at L-band (1.4 GHz). Although the L-band frequency is the optimal for ocean salinity measurements, the retrieval of SSS information requires special care because of the low sensitivity of the brightness temperature to SSS: from 0.2-0.8 K per salinity unit. Maps of 10-day averages of SSS in 1x1 degree boxes are distributed by the SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre on Radiometric Calibration and Ocean Salinity (SMOS-BEC, http://www.smos-bec.icm.csic.es). These maps are derived from the SMOS reprocessing campaign released to the SMOS user community in March 2011, and span the period from January 2010 through December 2011. The current accuracy of these SSS maps ranges from 0.2-0.4, depending on the ocean region being considered (Umbert et al., 2012). During the period of the reprocessing campaign, the equatorial Pacific has been in a quasi-continuous La Niña state. During the cold phases of ENSO, positive anomalies of SSS are expected with a largest anomalous values in the western warm-fresh pool. The anomalies

  2. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS) for Misawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    OS ADJ A151678 SUMMARY OF METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS SURFACE ISMOS ) ’/4 FOR MISAWA JAPANIUl NAVAL OCEANOGRAPHY COMMAND DETACHMENT ASHEVILLE NC MAR...34 ... , , ,, . - Ali A151 678 SUMMARY OF METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS SURFACE iSMOs ) 414 FOR MISAWA JAPANIUl NAVAL OCEANOGRAPHY COMMAND . DETACHMENT

  3. SMOS sea surface salinity maps of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Martinez, Justino; Portabella, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    Salinity and temperature gradients drive the thermohaline circulation of the oceans, and play a key role in the ocean-atmosphere coupling. The strong and direct interactions between the ocean and the cryosphere (primarily through sea ice and ice shelves) is also a key ingredient of the thermohaline circulation. The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, launched in 2009, has the objective measuring soil moisture over the continents and sea surface salinity over the oceans. Although the mission was originally conceived for hydrological and oceanographic studies [1], SMOS is also making inroads in the cryospheric monitoring. SMOS carries an innovative L-band (1.4 GHz, or 21-cm wavelength), passive interferometric radiometer (the so-called MIRAS) that measures the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the Earth's surface, at about 50 km spatial resolution wide swath (1200-km), and with a 3-day revisit time at the equator, but a more frequent one at the poles. Although the SMOS radiometer operating frequency offers almost the maximum sensitivity of the brightness temperature (TB) to sea surface salinity (SSS) variations, this is rather low, , i.e.,: 90% of ocean SSS values span a range of brightness temperatures of only 5K at L-band. This sensitivity is particularly low in cold waters. This implies that the SSS retrieval requires high radiometric performance. Since the SMOS launch, SSS Level 3 maps have been distributed by several expert laboratories including the Barcelona Expert Centre (BEC). However, since the TB sensitivity to SSS decreases with decreasing sea surface temperature (SST), large retrieval errors had been reported when retrieving salinity values at latitudes above 50⁰N. Two new processing algorithms, recently developed at BEC, have led to a considerable improvement of the SMOS data, allowing for the first time to derive SSS maps in cold waters. The first one is to empirically characterize and correct the systematic biases with six

  4. SMOS Sea Surface Salinity Validation in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yongzheng; Li, Xiaoming; Dong, Qing

    2013-01-01

    In November 2009, the European Space Agency (ESA) launched the first soil moisture and ocean salinity (SMOS) satellite, which represented the first use of spaceborne remote sensing tools to probe global sea surface salinity (SSS). The SMOS satellite carries a microwave imaging radiometer with aperture synthesis (MIRAS) for detection in the microwave L-band as the only payload. The MIRAS instrument is expected to provide a global SSS distribution with a spatial resolution of approximately 100 km and an accuracy of 0.1-0.2 practical salinity units (psu). The South China Sea is semi-enclosed, and the sea conditions are relatively complex. The suitability of ESA SMOS salinity products for the South China Sea has not been validated. Therefore, using SSS data measured during an expedition in the South China Sea, which was sponsored by China Natural Science Foundation and conducted in the fall of 2011, this paper validated the SSS products released by ESA, which were retrieved using three sea surface roughness models. To analyze the effect of the spatial resolution on the weekly average SMOS SSS distribution, the weekly average salinity data were averaged to reduce the spatial resolution to 0.25 ° x 0.25°. These average data were then compared to the measured data, followed by an analysis of the error variation. In addition, the effects of the orbital track (ascending or descending) on the SSS retrieval were analyzed.

  5. Validation of SMOS with Malaspina surface drifter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabrera, J.; Turiel, A.; Salvador, J.; Fernández, P.; Font, J.

    2014-12-01

    During the Spanish Malaspina oceanic expedition, a total of 20 surface drifting buoys, manufactured by the Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM) of the Spanish Council of Scientific Research (CSIC), were deployed. First developed in 2005, the various prototypes of these drifting buoys have been characterized by: 1) take measurements as close as 40 cm below the sea surface; 2) transmitting in real-time through several satellite networks; 3) long-lasting (about two years) energy source; 4) modular structure designed to host several sensors; 5) low-cost; and 6) small size. Since the mid 2000s, the deployment of the Argo automatic buoys is providing a quasi-global picture of the subsurface temperature and salinity structure. Currently, more than 3300 automatic profilers gather more than 9000 vertical profiles each month. However, few data just below the surface is being gathered by Argo because, to reduce the risk of sensor fouling, the pumping mechanism is switched off few meters before reaching the surface. Recently, two satellite missions (the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity, SMOS, of the European Space Agency, and Aquarius of National Aeronautics and Space Administration) have become a promising strategy to recover information about the sea surface salinity (SSS). Both instruments exploit the fact that significant information on sea surface dielectric properties (related to salinity) can be retrieved from ocean microwave emissions, particularly on L-band. With them, a new set of data may provide reliable information of the skin-depth surface salinity (Font et al. 2011). Three gridded products are currently being produced by the SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre (SMOS-BEC): i) binned weighted-average, ii) optimal interpolation; iii) Data fusion with OSTIA SST. In the SMOS -BEC, the validation of the SMOS salinity products has been carried out exclusively using Argo data. To fill the bridge between the skin depth (one cm penetration depth) of the satellite measurements and

  6. Sea surface freshening inferred from SMOS and ARGO salinity: impact of rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Boutin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The sea surface salinity (SSS measured from space by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission has recently been revisited by the European Space Agency first campaign reprocessing. We show that, with respect to the previous version, biases close to land and ice greatly decrease. The accuracy of SMOS SSS averaged over 10 days 100 × 100 km2 in the open ocean and estimated by comparison to ARGO SSS is on the order of 0.3–0.4 in tropical and subtropical regions and 0.5 in a cold region. The mean SSS −0.1 bias observed in the Tropical Pacific Ocean between 5° N and 15° N, relatively to other regions, is suppressed when SMOS rainy events, as detected on SSMIs rain rates, are removed from the SMOS-ARGO comparisons. The SMOS freshening is linearly correlated to SSMIs rain rate with a slope estimated to −0.14 mm−1 h, after correction for rain atmospheric contribution. This tendency is the signature of the temporal SSS variability between the time of SMOS and ARGO measurements linked to rain variability and of the vertical salinity stratification between the first centimeter of the sea surface layer sampled by SMOS and the 5 m depth sampled by ARGO. However, given that the whole set of collocations includes situations with rainy ARGO measurements collocated with non rainy SMOS measurements, the mean −0.1 bias and the negative skewness of the statistical distribution of SMOS minus ARGO SSS difference are very likely the mean signature of the vertical salinity stratification. In the future, the analysis of ongoing in situ salinity measurements in the top 50 cm of the sea surface and of Aquarius satellite SSS are expected to provide complementary information about the sea surface salinity stratification.

  7. Comparison of SMOS and Aquarius Sea Surface Salinity and Analysis of Possible Causes for the Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnat, E. P.; Boutin, J.; Yin, X.; Le Vine, D. M.; Waldteufel, P.; Vergely, J. -L.

    2014-01-01

    Two ongoing space missions share the scientific objective of mapping the global Sea Surface Salinity (SSS), yet their observations show significant discrepancies. ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and NASA's Aquarius use L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometers to measure emission from the sea surface and retrieve SSS. Significant differences in SSS retrieved by both sensors are observed, with SMOS SSS being generally lower than Aquarius SSS, except for very cold waters where SMOS SSS is the highest overall. Figure 1 is an example of the difference between the SSS retrieved by SMOS and Aquarius averaged over one month and 1 degree in longitude and latitude. Differences are mostly between -1 psu and +1 psu (psu, practical salinity unit), with a significant regional and latitudinal dependence. We investigate the impact of the vicarious calibration and some components of the retrieval algorithm used by both mission on these differences.

  8. A new method to retrieve salinity profiles from sea surface salinity observed by SMOS satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Tingting; CHEN Zhongbiao; HE Yijun

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method to retrieve salinity profiles from the sea surface salinity (SSS) observed by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. The main vertical patterns of the salinity profiles are firstly extracted from the salinity profiles measured by Argo using the empirical orthogonal function. To determine the time coefficients for each vertical pattern, two statistical models are developed. In the linear model, a transfer function is proposed to relate the SSS observed by SMOS (SMOS_SSS) with that measured by Argo, and then a linear relationship between the SMOS_SSS and the time coefficient is established. In the nonlinear model, the neural network is utilized to estimate the time coefficients from SMOS_SSS, months and positions of the salinity profiles. The two models are validated by comparing the salinity profiles retrieved from SMOS with those measured by Argo and the climatological salinities. The root-mean-square error (RMSE) of the linear and nonlinear model are 0.08–0.16 and 0.08–0.14 for the upper 400 m, which are 0.01–0.07 and 0.01–0.09 smaller than the RMSE of climatology. The error sources of the method are also discussed.

  9. Preliminary validation of SMOS sea surface salinity measurements in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yongzheng; Dong, Qing; He, Mingxia

    2015-01-01

    The SMOS (soil moisture and ocean salinity) mission undertaken by the European Space Agency (ESA) has provided sea surface salinity (SSS) measurements at global scale since 2009. Validation of SSS values retrieved from SMOS data has been done globally and regionally. However, the accuracy of SSS measurements by SMOS in the China seas has not been examined in detail. In this study, we compared retrieved SSS values from SMOS data with in situ measurements from a South China Sea (SCS) expedition during autumn 2011. The comparison shows that the retrieved SSS values using ascending pass data have much better agreement with in situ measurements than the result derived from descending pass data. Accuracy in terms of bias and root mean square error (RMS) of the SSS retrieved using three different sea surface roughness models is very consistent, regardless of ascending or descending orbits. When ascending and descending measurements are combined for comparison, the retrieved SSS using a semi-empirical model shows the best agreement with in situ measurements, with bias -0.33 practical salinity units and RMS 0.74. We also investigated the impact of environmental conditions of sea surface wind and sea surface temperature on accuracy of the retrieved SSS. The SCS is a semi-closed basin where radio frequencies transmitted from the mainland strongly interfere with SMOS measurements. Therefore, accuracy of retrieved SSS shows a relationship with distance between the validation sites and land.

  10. Enhancing agricultural forecasting using SMOS surface soil moisture retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the onset of data availability from the ESA Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission (Kerr and Levine, 2008) and the expected 2015 launch of the NASA Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission (Entekhabi et al., 2010), the next five years should see a significant expansion in our ab...

  11. The complementary role of SMOS sea surface salinity observations for estimating global ocean salinity state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zeting; Cheng, Lijing; Zhu, Jiang; Lin, Renping

    2016-06-01

    Salinity is a key ocean state property, changes in which reveal the variation of the water cycle and the ocean thermohaline circulation. However, prior to this century, in situ salinity observations were extremely sparse, which decreased the reliability of simulations of ocean general circulation by ocean and climate models. In 2009, sea surface salinity (SSS) observations covered the global ocean via the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, and several versions of global SSS products were subsequently released. How can these data benefit model performance? Previous studies found contradictory results. In this work, we assimilated SMOS-SSS data into the LASG/IAP Climate system Ocean Model (LICOM) using the Ensemble Optimum Interpolation (EnOI) assimilation scheme. To assess and quantify the contribution of SMOS-SSS data to model performance, several tests were conducted. The results indicate that the CECOS/CATDS 2010.V02 SMOS-SSS product can significantly improve model simulations of sea surface/subsurface salinity fields. This study provides the basis for the future assimilation of SMOS-SSS data for short-range climate forecasting.

  12. The Impact of Dielectric Constant Model and Surface Reference on Differences Between SMOS and Aquarius Sea Surface Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnat, E. P.; Boutin, J.; Yin, X.; LeVine, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Two ongoing space missions share the scientific objective of mapping the global Sea Surface Salinity (SSS), yet their observations show significant discrepancies. ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and NASA's Aquarius use L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometers to measure emission from the sea surface and retrieve SSS. Significant differences in SSS retrieved by both sensors are observed, with SMOS SSS being generally lower than Aquarius SSS, except for very cold waters where SMOS SSS is the highest overall. Figure 1 is an example of the difference between the SSS retrieved by SMOS and Aquarius averaged over one month and 1 degree in longitude and latitude. Differences are mostly between -1 psu and +1 psu (psu, practical salinity unit), with a significant regional and latitudinal dependence. We investigate the impact of the vicarious calibration and retrieval algorithm used by both mission on these differences.

  13. Sea surface freshening inferred from SMOS and ARGO salinity: impact of rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Boutin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The sea surface salinity (SSS measured from space by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission has recently been revisited by the European Space Agency first campaign reprocessing. We show that, with respect to the previous version, biases close to land and ice greatly decrease. The accuracy of SMOS SSS averaged over 10 days, 100 × 100 km2 in the open ocean and estimated by comparison to ARGO (Array for Real-Time Geostrophic Oceanography SSS is on the order of 0.3–0.4 in tropical and subtropical regions and 0.5 in a cold region. The averaged negative SSS bias (−0.1 observed in the tropical Pacific Ocean between 5° N and 15° N, relatively to other regions, is suppressed when SMOS observations concomitant with rain events, as detected from SSM/Is (Special Sensor Microwave Imager rain rates, are removed from the SMOS–ARGO comparisons. The SMOS freshening is linearly correlated to SSM/Is rain rate with a slope estimated to −0.14 mm−1 h, after correction for rain atmospheric contribution. This tendency is the signature of the temporal SSS variability between the time of SMOS and ARGO measurements linked to rain variability and of the vertical salinity stratification between the first centimeter of the sea surface layer sampled by SMOS and the 5 m depth sampled by ARGO. However, given that the whole set of collocations includes situations with ARGO measurements concomitant with rain events collocated with SMOS measurements under no rain, the mean −0.1 bias and the negative skewness of the statistical distribution of SMOS minus ARGO SSS difference are very likely the mean signature of the vertical salinity stratification. In the future, the analysis of ongoing in situ salinity measurements in the top 50 cm of the sea surface and of Aquarius satellite SSS are expected to provide complementary information about the sea surface salinity stratification.

  14. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Lemoore, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    D ; 𔄃 ŕ e. 0103 . 0" 3 -1* 91 - 0 L 4500 " 93.. 9302 9~3.2 3a. V3. 73.1I V3.6 93.6 4 A. # .I T VIh 1.?&Qj .16 c "! ~ S4000 74, 9 39 93 q 414, 46... OrAL NUI OP O.S9VA9IONS 1) T DIRNA VOCEANMET SMOS tN .. ) • 3300"++ , 4 1 1200虡) 91 :~ f Ic 0 L 1 1 l.O.Flf: it z.:1

  15. Using SMOS brightness temperature and derived surface-soil moisture to characterize surface conditions and validate land surface models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcher, Jan; Barella-Ortiz, Anaïs; Piles, Maria; Gelati, Emiliano; de Rosnay, Patricia

    2017-04-01

    The SMOS satellite, operated by ESA, observes the surface in the L-band. On continental surface these observations are sensitive to moisture and in particular surface-soil moisture (SSM). In this presentation we will explore how the observations of this satellite can be exploited over the Iberian Peninsula by comparing its results with two land surface models : ORCHIDEE and HTESSEL. Measured and modelled brightness temperatures show a good agreement in their temporal evolution, but their spatial structures are not consistent. An empirical orthogonal function analysis of the brightness temperature's error identifies a dominant structure over the south-west of the Iberian Peninsula which evolves during the year and is maximum in autumn and winter. Hypotheses concerning forcing-induced biases and assumptions made in the radiative transfer model are analysed to explain this inconsistency, but no candidate is found to be responsible for the weak spatial correlations. The analysis of spatial inconsistencies between modelled and measured TBs is important, as these can affect the estimation of geophysical variables and TB assimilation in operational models, as well as result in misleading validation studies. When comparing the surface-soil moisture of the models with the product derived operationally by ESA from SMOS observations similar results are found. The spatial correlation over the IP between SMOS and ORCHIDEE SSM estimates is poor (ρ 0.3). A single value decomposition (SVD) analysis of rainfall and SSM shows that the co-varying patterns of these variables are in reasonable agreement between both products. Moreover the first three SVD soil moisture patterns explain over 80% of the SSM variance simulated by the model while the explained fraction is only 52% of the remotely sensed values. These results suggest that the rainfall-driven soil moisture variability may not account for the poor spatial correlation between SMOS and ORCHIDEE products. Other reasons have to

  16. Assessment Of Sea Surface Salinity Obtain From SMOS And Aquarius Satellites Over Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calla, O. P. N.; Dadhich, Harendra Kumar; Singhal, Shruti

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, assessment is done of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) obtained from both SMOS and Aquarius satellites for couple of months over Indian Ocean (IO). The SSS values of the Southern Indian Ocean (SIO) are being investigated as the North Indian Ocean (NIO) is found much corrupted with the Radio Frequency Interference and even due to large variability of SSS in IO; the study area has been divided into different sub regions. The data of both the satellites at same location and of same processing level that is Level-2 have been procured and evaluated. The resolution factor is also being taken care for both onboard sensors. The resolution of SMOS L2 data products [1] is 15 X 15 Km and for Aquarius there are three different resolutions according to the BEAM's. BEAM 1 has a resolution of 76 X 94 Km, BEAM 2 has 84X120Km and BEAM3 has 96X156Km. The data have been averaged of SMOS [2] in the same way so as to match up with Aquarius resolution. By this paper we want to convince the readers that measuring SSS from space is a practical idea. SSS remote sensing now bears no more scientific perils than other remote sensing techniques did in their formative years. Advancing technology with proper resources has significantly reduced the errors.

  17. Assimilation of SMOS brightness temperatures or soil moisture retrievals into a land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lannoy, Gabriëlle J. M.; Reichle, Rolf H.

    2016-12-01

    Three different data products from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission are assimilated separately into the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, version 5 (GEOS-5) to improve estimates of surface and root-zone soil moisture. The first product consists of multi-angle, dual-polarization brightness temperature (Tb) observations at the bottom of the atmosphere extracted from Level 1 data. The second product is a derived SMOS Tb product that mimics the data at a 40° incidence angle from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission. The third product is the operational SMOS Level 2 surface soil moisture (SM) retrieval product. The assimilation system uses a spatially distributed ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) with seasonally varying climatological bias mitigation for Tb assimilation, whereas a time-invariant cumulative density function matching is used for SM retrieval assimilation. All assimilation experiments improve the soil moisture estimates compared to model-only simulations in terms of unbiased root-mean-square differences and anomaly correlations during the period from 1 July 2010 to 1 May 2015 and for 187 sites across the US. Especially in areas where the satellite data are most sensitive to surface soil moisture, large skill improvements (e.g., an increase in the anomaly correlation by 0.1) are found in the surface soil moisture. The domain-average surface and root-zone skill metrics are similar among the various assimilation experiments, but large differences in skill are found locally. The observation-minus-forecast residuals and analysis increments reveal large differences in how the observations add value in the Tb and SM retrieval assimilation systems. The distinct patterns of these diagnostics in the two systems reflect observation and model errors patterns that are not well captured in the assigned EnKF error parameters. Consequently, a localized optimization of the EnKF error parameters is needed to further improve Tb or SM retrieval

  18. Usage of satellite data SMOS in order to characterize Sea Surface Salinity in the western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Anna; Robins, Lotem; Olmedo Casal, Estrella

    2017-04-01

    Measuring the level of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) is a principle component in order to understand climate processes that occur today and for better understanding of climate change in the future; Different processes create different salt concentration in different places in the oceans. This different salinity level had a role in determining the vertical and horizontal water fluxes. As the first three meters of the ocean surface contain more heat than that in the whole atmosphere, the influence of the salinity level on the layering of the different water levels and the different fluxes, thus, it is an important factor determining air sea interaction. An existing problem in predicting the oceans is the lack of salinity samples in the oceans. While Sea surface Temperature (SST) could be evaluated easier from remote sensed devices, analyzing data at the Near Infra-Red and Visual wavelength. Measuring and locating salinity spectral signature was an obstacle. This lack of data caused problems running different models that describe different parameters of the ocean, both in depth and surface. One of the main goals of a program called: Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), is to deliver data on a global scale concerning the sea surface salinity (SSS). The main idea of the SMOS technology is based on the differences between the electro-magnetic properties (spectral signatures) of distilled water and salted water. High concentration of salt revealed by analyzing the energy emitted from the ocean's surface, using detectors that are sensitive for the wavelength at the range of 21 cm (L-band: 1.4 GHz). One of the main problems, measuring this wavelength, is that it requires very large antennas. In order to solve this problem, a Y shaped satellite was built, on each of its arms, 69 antennas were attached, with equal distances between each antenna. Each antenna is 165 mm on the diameter and their height is 19 mm. This antenna transmits all the information they receive to a

  19. SMOS: The Challenging Sea Surface Salinity Measurement From Space

    OpenAIRE

    Font, Jordi; Camps, Adriano; Borges, A; Martin-Neira, Manuel; Boutin, Jacqueline; Reul, Nicolas; Kerr, Yann; Hahne, A.; Mecklenburg, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity, European Space Agency, is the first satellite mission addressing the challenge of measuring sea surface salinity from space. It uses an L-band microwave interferometric radiometer with aperture synthesis (MIRAS) that generates brightness temperature images, from which both geophysical variables are computed. The retrieval of salinity requires very demanding performances of the instrument in terms of calibration and stability. This paper highlights the importa...

  20. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS) Beaufort, South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

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  1. Analysis of SMOS brightness temperature and vegetation optical depth data with coupled land surface and radiative transfer models in Southern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Schlenz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS L1c brightness temperature and L2 optical depth data are analysed with a coupled land surface (PROMET and radiative transfer model (L-MEB. The coupled models are validated with ground and airborne measurements under contrasting soil moisture, vegetation and land surface temperature conditions during the SMOS Validation Campaign in May and June 2010 in the SMOS test site Upper Danube Catchment in southern Germany. The brightness temperature root-mean-squared errors are between 6 K and 9 K. The L-MEB parameterisation is considered appropriate under local conditions even though it might possibly be further optimised. SMOS L1c brightness temperature data are processed and analysed in the Upper Danube Catchment using the coupled models in 2011 and during the SMOS Validation Campaign 2010 together with airborne L-band brightness temperature data. Only low to fair correlations are found for this comparison (R between 0.1–0.41. SMOS L1c brightness temperature data do not show the expected seasonal behaviour and are positively biased. It is concluded that RFI is responsible for a considerable part of the observed problems in the SMOS data products in the Upper Danube Catchment. This is consistent with the observed dry bias in the SMOS L2 soil moisture products which can also be related to RFI. It is confirmed that the brightness temperature data from the lower SMOS look angles and the horizontal polarisation are less reliable. This information could be used to improve the brightness temperature data filtering before the soil moisture retrieval. SMOS L2 optical depth values have been compared to modelled data and are not considered a reliable source of information about vegetation due to missing seasonal behaviour and a very high mean value. A fairly strong correlation between SMOS L2 soil moisture and optical depth was found (R = 0.65 even though the two variables are considered independent in the

  2. Inter-Comparison of SMOS and Aquarius Sea Surface Salinity: Effects of the Dielectric Constant and Vicarious Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Boutin, Jacqueline; Yin, Xiaobin; Le Vine, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Two spaceborne instruments share the scientific objective of mapping the global Sea Surface Salinity (SSS). ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and NASA's Aquarius use L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometry to retrieve SSS. We find that SSS retrieved by SMOS is generally lower than SSS retrieved by Aquarius, except for very cold waters where SMOS SSS is higher overall. The spatial distribution of the differences in SSS is similar to the distribution of sea surface temperature. There are several differences in the retrieval algorithm that could explain the observed SSS differences. We assess the impact of the dielectric constant model and the ancillary sea surface salinity used by both missions for calibrating the radiometers and retrieving SSS. The differences in dielectric constant model produce differences in SSS of the order of 0.3 psu and exhibit a dependence on latitude and temperature. We use comparisons with the Argo in situ data to assess the performances of the model in various regions of the globe. Finally, the differences in the ancillary sea surface salinity products used to perform the vicarious calibration of both instruments are relatively small (0.1 psu), but not negligible considering the requirements for spaceborne remote sensing of SSS.

  3. SMOS Cal/Val Activities in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiguo; Kerr, Yann

    2016-08-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission is to observe soil moisture over land and sea surface salinity over oceans with new technology (2D interferometry radiometer).Since its launch in November 2009, SMOS observations are being perturbed by radio frequency interferences (RFIs) that jeopardize part of its scientific retrieval in certain areas.In this paper, we describe calibration activities of SMOS and multiple years of SMOS data has been analyzed to validate the SMOS soil moisture products which shows good behavior of the instrument and algorithms. The results indicate that SMOS long term stability is within 1K and SMOS retrievals are with a high correlation coefficient (0.82) and closest to the ground measurements with a low average root mean square error within 0.04 m 3·m‑3 for the morning overpass at places, which represents an improvement by a factor of 2–3 compared with the other products.

  4. Seasonal variability in sea surface salinity (SSS) in the Tropical Atlantic from SMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzortzi, E.; Gommenginger, C. P.; Srokosz, M.; Josey, S.

    2012-12-01

    A natural indicator of changes in the hydrological cycle, salinity variations in recent decades have been linked to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) strength, and the tropics/subtropics are considered important regions in relation to the reversal of northern N. Atlantic freshening and MOC recovery. Benefiting from the advent of satellite SSS maps, this study focuses on the seasonal variability of sea surface salinity (SSS) from SMOS in the tropical Atlantic between 20°N-20°S. Encompassing both Precipitation-dominated (P) and Evaporation-dominated (E) regimes, this region features the influence of the ITCZ as well as large freshwater outflow from the Amazon/Orinoco and Niger/Congo river systems. Therefore, SSS is characterized by very strong variability through the year appearing as two "poles" in the western and eastern tropical Atlantic basin, respectively. Here, we examine how the area-weighted mean SSS in this tropical band 20°N-20°S relates to seasonal changes in riverine outflow and to the ITCZ movement north and south of the equator. By considering both the whole tropical region and the two basins separately, the analyses explore how the SSS seasonal cycle differs in each region, looking for e.g. differences in magnitude, speed of occurrence and spread, and timing of the strongest SSS changes between the eastern and western basins during the year. Accordingly, we relate this to the role of controlling mechanisms, particularly of E-P (using NCEP, OAFlux and GPCP datasets), on the seasonal variability of SSS, and the contribution of surface freshwater forcing in the different regions of the tropical Atlantic. Finally, this work contributes to a regional validation of SSS measurements from satellites and determines the value of satellite SSS data to help understand freshwater fluxes and SSS variability in the tropical Atlantic.

  5. Modelling the passive microwave signature from land surfaces: a review of recent results and application to the SMOS & SMAP soil moisture retrieval algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two passive microwave missions are currently operating at L-band to monitor surface soil moisture (SM) over continental surfaces. The SMOS sensor, based on an innovative interferometric technology enabling multi-angular signatures of surfaces to be measured, was launched in November 2009....

  6. The SMOS ocean salinity retrieval algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, J.

    2009-04-01

    SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) will be, from spring 2009, the first space mission attempting the determination of sea surface salinity using microwave L-band radiometry. The SMOS aperture synthesis technique poses strict requirements to instrument calibration and stability for a successful brightness temperature image reconstruction. Besides this, the low sensitivity of Tb to salinity, even at L-band, and the still not fully developed/validated emissivity models at this frequency taking into account all the physical processes that impact on it, mainly the effects of surface roughness, plus the need of removing from the recorded signal the contributions of scattered radiation from external sources (sun, galaxy) result in a really challenging salinity determination by SMOS. In this presentation we review the approach implemented in SMOS for salinity retrieval from the calibrated brightness temperature maps. The different processing steps are summarily described, as well as their implementation status and validation in the SMOS level 2 salinity processor.

  7. Long Term Global Surface Soil Moisture Fields Using an SMOS-Trained Neural Network Applied to AMSR-E Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemesio J. Rodríguez-Fernández

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A method to retrieve soil moisture (SM from Advanced Scanning Microwave Radiometer—Earth Observing System Sensor (AMSR-E observations using Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS Level 3 SM as a reference is discussed. The goal is to obtain longer time series of SM with no significant bias and with a similar dynamical range to that of the SMOS SM dataset. This method consists of training a neural network (NN to obtain a global non-linear relationship linking AMSR-E brightness temperatures ( T b to the SMOS L3 SM dataset on the concurrent mission period of 1.5 years. Then, the NN model is used to derive soil moisture from past AMSR-E observations. It is shown that in spite of the different frequencies and sensing depths of AMSR-E and SMOS, it is possible to find such a global relationship. The sensitivity of AMSR-E T b ’s to soil temperature ( T s o i l was also evaluated using European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast Interim/Land re-analysis (ERA-Land and Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications-Land (MERRA-Land model data. The best combination of AMSR-E T b ’s to retrieve T s o i l is H polarization at 23 and 36 GHz plus V polarization at 36 GHz. Regarding SM, several combinations of input data show a similar performance in retrieving SM. One NN that uses C and X bands and T s o i l information was chosen to obtain SM in the 2003–2011 period. The new dataset shows a low bias (<0.02 m3/m3 and low standard deviation of the difference (<0.04 m3/m3 with respect to SMOS L3 SM over most of the globe’s surface. The new dataset was evaluated together with other AMSR-E SM datasets and the Climate Change Initiative (CCI SM dataset against the MERRA-Land and ERA-Land models for the 2003–2011 period. All datasets show a significant bias with respect to models for boreal regions and high correlations over regions other than the tropical and boreal forest. All of the global SM datasets including AMSR-E NN were also

  8. The ESA SMOS+SOS Project: Oceanography using SMOS for innovative air-sea exchange studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Chris; Gommenginger, Christine; Boutin, Jacqueline; Reul, Nicolas; Martin, Matthew; Ash, Ellis; Reverdin, Gilles; Donlon, Craig

    2013-04-01

    We report on the work plan of the SMOS+Surface Ocean Salinity and Synergy (SMOS+SOS) project. SMOS+SOS is funded through the Support to Science Element (STSE) component of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Earth Observation Envelope Programme. The SMOS+SOS consortium consists of four organisations namely the National Oceanography Centre (UK), the LOCEAN/IFREMER/CATDS research team (France), the Met Office (UK) and Satellite Oceanographic Consultants Ltd (UK). The end of the SMOS+SOS project will be marked by a final open workshop most likely hosted by the UK Met Office in September/October 2014. The project is concerned with demonstrating the performance and scientific value of SMOS Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) products through a number of well-defined case studies. The case studies include: Amazon/Orinoco plumes (freshwater outflow); Agulhas and Gulf Stream (strong water mass boundary); Tropical Pacific/Atlantic (strong precipitation regime); sub-tropical North Atlantic (ie SPURS; strong evaporative regime); and Equatorial Pacific (equatorial upwelling). With SMOS measuring the SSS in the top cm of the ocean, validating SMOS against in situ salinity data taken typically at a few meters depth introduces assumptions about the vertical structure of salinity in the upper ocean. To address these issues, the project will examine and quantify discrepancies between SMOS and in situ surface salinity data at various depths in different regions characterised by strong precipitation or evaporation regimes. Equally, data editing and spatio-temporal averaging play a central role in determining the quality, errors and correlations in SMOS SSS data. The project will explore various processing and spatio-temporal averaging choices to define the SMOS SSS products that best address the needs of the oceanographic and data assimilation user community. One key aspect of this project is to determine how one can achieve useful accuracy/uncertainty in SSS without jeopardising SMOS's ability

  9. Modelling the Passive Microwave Signature from Land Surfaces: A Review of Recent Results and Application to the L-Band SMOS SMAP Soil Moisture Retrieval Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigneron, J.-P.; Jackson, T. J.; O'Neill, P.; De Lannoy, G.; De Rosnay, P.; Walker, J. P.; Ferrazzoli, P.; Mironov, V.; Bircher, S.; Grant, J. P.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Two passive microwave missions are currently operating at L-band to monitor surface soil moisture (SM) over continental surfaces. The SMOS sensor, based on an innovative interferometric technology enabling multi-angular signatures of surfaces to be measured, was launched in November 2009. The SMAP sensor, based on a large mesh reflector 6 m in diameter providing a conically scanning antenna beam with a surface incidence angle of 40deg, was launched in January of 2015. Over the last decade, an intense scientific activity has focused on the development of the SM retrieval algorithms for the two missions. This activity has relied on many field (mainly tower-based) and airborne experimental campaigns, and since 2010-2011, on the SMOS and Aquarius space-borne L-band observations. It has relied too on the use of numerical, physical and semi-empirical models to simulate the microwave brightness temperature of natural scenes for a variety of scenarios in terms of system configurations (polarization, incidence angle) and soil, vegetation and climate conditions. Key components of the inversion models have been evaluated and new parameterizations of the effects of the surface temperature, soil roughness, soil permittivity, and vegetation extinction and scattering have been developed. Among others, global maps of select radiative transfer parameters have been estimated very recently. Based on this intense activity, improvements of the SMOS and SMAP SM inversion algorithms have been proposed. Some of them have already been implemented, whereas others are currently being investigated. In this paper, we present a review of the significant progress which has been made over the last decade in this field of research with a focus on L-band, and a discussion on possible applications to the SMOS and SMAP soil moisture retrieval approaches.

  10. Coincident Retrieval of Sea Surface Salinity from the Northern Gulf of Mexico Using SMOS and STARRS During the 2011 COSSAR Airborne Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrage, D. M.; Wesson, J. C.; Wang, D. W.; Hwang, P. A.; Howden, S. D.

    2012-04-01

    Airborne mapping of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) using L-band radiometers has been practiced for over a decade. However, aircraft range has limited mapping to coastal regions with occasional extended offshore transects. With 2-years of successful SMOS operation and the launch of NASA's Aquarius mission on 10 June 2011, open ocean SSS remote sensing has become an operational reality. The spatial resolution of the L-band radiometers is limited by deployable antenna size, but the relatively fine (35 km) resolution of SMOS at nadir, provides unprecedented opportunities to study SSS variations in marginal seas. Here, the relatively high signal to noise ratio produced by freshwater inflows at the coast allows the averaging period needed to map open ocean SSS variations to be reduced; improving temporal resolution without significantly compromising sensitivity. We describe an airborne campaign that combined the high-resolution coastal mapping capabilities of NRL's airborne Salinity Temperature and Roughness Remote Scanner (STARRS) with the open ocean mapping capabilities of SMOS. The Color Surface Salinity and Roughness (COSSAR) airborne campaign was conducted under summertime conditions, by flying STARRS over the Northern Gulf of Mexico during 2-13 June, 2011. Campaign objectives were to map SSS over the continental shelf and fly offshore transects coincident with SMOS overpasses. The campaign started immediately following a record flood crest in the Mississippi River, with flows exceeding 42,500 m^3/s. This necessitated large diversions into the Atchafalaya River and Lake Ponchartrain, to avoid catastrophic flooding of New Orleans and Baton Rouge. The flood, and its diversion, produced large plumes from both rivers, which were observed by STARRS. Line transects crossing the plumes were flown along three ascending SMOS groundtracks and a descending one, at times coincident with satellite overpasses. Shorter zig-zag transects were flown along the coast. Intensive mapping

  11. Building a Learning Database for the Neural Network Retrieval of Sea Surface Salinity from SMOS Brightness Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Ammar, Adel; Obligis, Estelle; Crépon, Michel; Thiria, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with an important aspect of the neural network retrieval of sea surface salinity (SSS) from SMOS brightness temperatures (TBs). The neural network retrieval method is an empirical approach that offers the possibility of being independent from any theoretical emissivity model, during the in-flight phase. A Previous study [1] has proven that this approach is applicable to all pixels on ocean, by designing a set of neural networks with different inputs. The present study focuses on the choice of the learning database and demonstrates that a judicious distribution of the geophysical parameters allows to markedly reduce the systematic regional biases of the retrieved SSS, which are due to the high noise on the TBs. An equalization of the distribution of the geophysical parameters, followed by a new technique for boosting the learning process, makes the regional biases almost disappear for latitudes between 40{\\deg}S and 40{\\deg}N, while the global standard deviation remains between 0.6 psu (at t...

  12. Performance evaluation of WRF-Noah Land surface model estimated soil moisture for hydrological application: Synergistic evaluation using SMOS retrieved soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant K.; Han, Dawei; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel A.; O'Neill, Peggy; Islam, Tanvir; Gupta, Manika; Dai, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    This study explores the performance of soil moisture data from the global European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA interim reanalysis datasets using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather model coupled with the Noah Land surface model for hydrological applications. For evaluating the performance of WRF for soil moisture estimation, three domains are taken into account. The domain with best performance is used for estimating the soil moisture deficit (SMD). Further, several approaches are presented in this study to evaluate the efficiency of WRF simulated soil moisture for SMD estimation and compared against Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) downscaled and non-downscaled soil moisture. In this study, the first approach is based on the empirical relationship between WRF soil moisture and the SMD on a continuous time series basis, while the second approach is focused on the vegetation cover impact on SMD retrieval, depicted in terms of growing and non-growing seasons. The linear growing and non-growing seasonal model in combination performs well with the NSE = 0.79, RMSE = 0.011 m; Bias = 0.24 m, in comparison to linear model (NSE = 0.70, RMSE = 0.013 m; Bias = 0.01 m). The performance obtained using WRF soil moisture is comparable to SMOS level 2 product but lower than the downscaled SMOS datasets. The results indicate that methodologies could be useful for modelers working in the field of soil moisture information system and SMD estimation at a catchment scale. The study could be useful for ungauged basins that pose a challenge to hydrological modeling due to unavailability of datasets for proper model calibration and validation.

  13. A new space technology for ocean observation: the SMOS mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Font

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Capability for sea surface salinity observation was an important gap in ocean remote sensing in the last few decades of the 20th century. New technological developments during the 1990s at the European Space Agency led to the proposal of SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity, an Earth explorer opportunity mission based on the use of a microwave interferometric radiometer, MIRAS (Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis. SMOS, the first satellite ever addressing the observation of ocean salinity from space, was successfully launched in November 2009. The determination of salinity from the MIRAS radiometric measurements at 1.4 GHz is a complex procedure that requires high performance from the instrument and accurate modelling of several physical processes that impact on the microwave emission of the ocean’s surface. This paper introduces SMOS in the ocean remote sensing context, and summarizes the MIRAS principles of operation and the SMOS salinity retrieval approach. It describes the Spanish SMOS high-level data processing centre (CP34 and the SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre on Radiometric Calibration and Ocean Salinity (SMOS-BEC, and presents a preliminary validation of global sea surface salinity maps operationally produced by CP34.

  14. SMOS data and extreme events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Yann; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Ferrazzoli, Paolo; Mahmoodi, Ali; Al-Yaari, Amen; Parrens, Marie; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Nemesio; Bircher, Simone; Molero-rodenas, Beatriz; Drusch, Matthias; Mecklenburg, Susanne

    2017-04-01

    The SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) satellite was successfully launched in November 2009. This ESA led mission for Earth Observation is dedicated to provide soil moisture over continental surface (with an accuracy goal of 0.04 m3/m3), vegetation water content over land, and ocean salinity. These geophysical features are important as they control the energy balance between the surface and the atmosphere. Their knowledge at a global scale is of interest for climatic and weather researches, and in particular in improving model forecasts. The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission has now been collecting data for over 7 years. The whole data set has been reprocessed (Version 620 for levels 1 and 2 and version 3 for level 3 CATDS) while operational near real time soil moisture data is now available and assimilation of SMOS data in NWP has proved successful. After 7 years it seems important to start using data for having a look at anomalies and see how they can relate to large scale events. We have also produced a 15 year soil moisture data set by merging SMOS and AMSR using a neural network approach. The purpose of this communication is to present the mission results after more than seven years in orbit in a climatic trend perspective, as through such a period anomalies can be detected. Thereby we benefit from consistent datasets provided through the latest reprocessing using most recent algorithm enhancements. Using the above mentioned products it is possible to follow large events such as the evolution of the droughts in North America, or water fraction evolution over the Amazonian basin. In this occasion we will focus on the analysis of SMOS and ancillary products anomalies to reveal two climatic trends, the temporal evolution of water storage over the Indian continent in relation to rainfall anomalies, and the global impact of El Nino types of events on the general water storage distribution. This presentation shows in detail the use of long term data sets

  15. Binned level-3 Sea Surface Salinity from the European Space Agency Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) in support of the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) data quality monitoring system (DQMS) from 2010-06-01 to 2016-05-31 (NCEI Accession 0151732)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data quality monitoring system (DQMS) for the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellites level-2 sea surface salinity (SSS) swath data was developed by the...

  16. The NAFE'05/CoSMOS Data Set: Toward SMOS Soil Moisture Retrieval, Downscaling, and Assimilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panciera, Rocco; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Kalma, Jetse D.

    2008-01-01

    -resolution data from SMOS; and 3) testing its assimilation into land surface models for root zone soil moisture retrieval. This paper describes the NAFE'05 and COSMOS airborne data sets together with the ground data collected in support of both aircraft campaigns. The airborne L-band acquisitions included 40 km x...... was to provide simulated Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) observations using airborne L-band radiometers supported by soil moisture and other relevant ground data for the following: 1) the development of SMOS soil moisture retrieval algorithms; 2) developing approaches for downscaling the low....... The L-band data were accompanied by airborne thermal infrared and optical measurements. The ground data consisted of continuous soil moisture profile measurements at 18 monitoring sites throughout the 40 km x 40 km study area and extensive spatial near-surface soil moisture measurements concurrent...

  17. Validation of SMOS Satellite Soil Moisture Products over Tropical Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanniah, Kasturi; Siang, Kang Chuen

    2016-07-01

    Calibration and validation (cal/val) activities on Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite derived soil moisture products has been conducted worldwide since the data has become available but not over the tropical region . This study focuses on the installation of a soil moisture data collection network over an agricultural site in a tropical region in Peninsular Malaysia, and the validation of SMOS soil moisture products. The in-situ data over one year period was analysed and validation of SMOS Soil Moisture products with these in-situ data was conducted.Bias and root mean square errors (RMSE) were computed between SMOS soil moisture products and the in-situ surface soil moisture collected at the satellite passing time (6 am and 6 pm local time). Due to the known limitations of SMOS soil moisture retrieval over vegetated areas with vegetation water content higher than 5 kgm-2, overestimation of SMOS soil moisture products to in-situ data was noticed in this study. The bias is ranging from 0.064 to 0.119 m3m-3 and the RMSE is from 0.090 to 0.158 m3m-3, when both ascending and descending data were validated. This RMSE was found to be similar to a number of studies conducted previously at different regions. However a wet bias was found during the validation, while previous validation activities at other regions showed dry biases. The result of this study is useful to support the continuous development and improvement of SMOS soil moisture retrieval model, aims to produce soil moisture products with higher accuracy, especially in the tropical region.

  18. First soil moisture values from SMOS over a Sahelian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhier, Claire; Kerr, Yann; de Rosnay, Patricia; Pellarin, Thierry; Grippa, Manuela

    2010-05-01

    Soil moisture is a crucial variable which influences the land surface processes. Numerous studies shown microwaves at low frequency are particularly performed to access to soil moisture values. SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity), launched the November 2th 2009, is the first space mission dedicated to soil moisture observations. Before SMOS, several soil moisture products were provided, based on active or passive microwaves measurements. Gruhier et al. (2010) analyse five of them over a Sahelian area. The results show that the range of volumetric soil moisture values obtained over Sahel is drastically different depending on the remote sensing approach used to produce soil moisture estimates. Although microwave bands currently available are not optimal, some products are in very good agreement with ground data. The main goal of this study is to introduce the first soil moisture maps from SMOS over West Africa. A first analyse of values over a Sahelian region is investigated. The study area is located in Gourma region in Mali. This site has been instrumented in the context of the AMMA project (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) and was specifically designed to address the validation of remotely sensed soil moisture. SMOS soil moisture values was analysed with ground knowledge and placed in the context of previous soil moisture products. The high sensitivity of the L-band used by SMOS should provide very accurate soil moisture values.

  19. Preparing for SMOS: Sea Salinity Campaigns and Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup

    2006-01-01

    Mapping of sea surface salinity, based on L-band radiometric measurements, is presently investigated as a preparation for space missions. Special concern is on correction for effects caused by the sea surface roughness, and this paper will address two campaigns, LOSAC and CoSMOS, with the aim...

  20. SMOS validation in the Skjern River Catchment, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bircher, Simone

    model. This dissertation is not only a valuable contribution to SMOS validation, but can also be supportive for upcoming space missions such as NASA’s Soil Moisture Active and Passive, SMAP. Knowing the current caveats the use of SMOS data in regional and global modeling of water resources and climate......Soil moisture is a key variable for water resources management, weather and climate predictions as well as hazard analysis. It is highly variable in space and time across scales, and thus difficult to assess. The European Space Agency’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite...... with a passive L-band microwave radiometer on board is the first mission dedicated to surface soil moisture monitoring from space with global coverage every three days. By means of a complex retrieval algorithm, soil moisture is derived from the acquired brightness temperatures. Currently, data validation...

  1. The German SMOS project office - CAL/VAL activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittebrand, A.; Stammer, D.; Dransfeld, S.

    2009-04-01

    The SMOS remote sensing mission planned to be launched in July 2009 is part of the opportunity missions of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Earth Explorer programme. The role of the German SMOS project office (funded by the BMBF/DLR) is to inform the scientific community and the public about the current mission status as well as to promote the use of the SMOS data products within Germany. Within the framework of the project office scientific studies for the calibration and validation (cal/val) of the SMOS data are also supported. Our work includes the analysis of model-, shiptrack- and climatology determined salinity data as well as satellite, drifter and float measurements. The first comprehensive in situ data set suitable for global investigations of SSS characteristics is that provided by ARGO temperature and salinity profiles since 2000. The global ARGO float system (Gould et al., 2004) consisting of 3000 floats that provide temperature and salinity profiles, globally, from the top 2000 m every 10 days on approximately a 3 degree global grid. For our study we extract the near-surface values from ARGO salinity and temperature profiles to form a data set of near-surface salinity and temperature covering the years 2002 until 2008. All those ARGO data points are located at a depth of 0 to 5 m. Of importance for the justification of the SMOS mission is the deviation of the Argo-Measurements from climatologies, based on the bulk of the past global in situ salt content measurements, which renders the temporal condition of world oceans. Additionally a deployment of 25 drifters is planned in parallel to the SMOS launch, collecting data of temperature and salinity in the GIN SEA and the western Pacific.

  2. DOMECair: An Airborne Campaign in Antarctica Supporting SMOS Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl

    2013-01-01

    In search for a stable, well characterized terrestrial calibration target for SMOS, an airborne campaign was carried out in January 2013 over the Dome C area of Antarctica, and the surface was measured by an L-band radiometer. The focus was on homogeneity, and an area of 350 × 350 km around...

  3. SMOS Measurements Preliminary Validation: Objectives and Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabia, Roberto; Gourrion, Jerome; Gabarró, Carolina; Talone, Marco; Portabella, Marcos; Ballabrera, Joaquim; Lopez de Aretxabaleta, Alfredo; Camps, Adriano; Monerris, Alessandra; Font, Jordi

    2010-05-01

    The Earth Explorer Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission was successfully launched on November 2nd, 2009, in the framework of the European Space Agency Living Planet programme. It will provide long-awaited remotely-sensed Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) maps over the oceans with a 3-day revisiting time [1]. The SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre (SMOS-BEC) in Barcelona, Spain, will be involved in several activities at different levels of the salinity retrieval processing chain, which are classified according to the objectives/issues being addressed. In particular, those described hereafter refer to the validation of the products and the consolidation/improvement of the salinity retrieval procedure itself [2]. This will be carried out by performing specific comparisons against modelled brightness temperatures (TB) or external salinity data sources. Due to start at the beginning of the Commissioning Phase, the post-launch 6-month checkout and calibration period, these studies will continue through the nominal satellite operation phase. They will support the choice of an optimal data selection strategy in regard to the existing trade-off, for instance the Ascending/Descending tracks selection, the AF-FOV/EAF-FOV (Alias-Free Field Of View/Extended Alias-Free Field Of View) selection, and some possible across-track data filtering. Moreover, they will help in the definition of an optimal processing configuration (separated polarization retrieval versus first Stokes parameter retrieval). Concerning the TB, the approach is to perform inter-comparisons of the TB departures (SMOS TB minus modelled TB, assuming knowledge of auxiliary information and proper TB direct modelling). The TB departures statistics analysis will be performed at both Antenna and Earth-surface levels. In order to obtain the latter product, a surface TB module is being derived taking into account the various TB perturbing sources. The comparison with forward-modelled TB will help to devise an optimum

  4. Arctic sea ice concentration observed with SMOS during summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Martinez, Justino; Turiel, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is under profound transformation. Observations and model predictions show dramatic decline in sea ice extent and volume [1]. A retreating Arctic ice cover has a marked impact on regional and global climate, and vice versa, through a large number of feedback mechanisms and interactions with the climate system [2]. The launch of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, in 2009, marked the dawn of a new type of space-based microwave observations. Although the mission was originally conceived for hydrological and oceanographic studies [3,4], SMOS is also making inroads in the cryospheric sciences by measuring the thin ice thickness [5,6]. SMOS carries an L-band (1.4 GHz), passive interferometric radiometer (the so-called MIRAS) that measures the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the Earth's surface, at about 50 km spatial resolution, continuous multi-angle viewing, large wide swath (1200-km), and with a 3-day revisit time at the equator, but more frequently at the poles. A novel radiometric method to determine sea ice concentration (SIC) from SMOS is presented. The method uses the Bayesian-based Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) approach to retrieve SIC. The advantage of this approach with respect to the classical linear inversion is that the former takes into account the uncertainty of the tie-point measured data in addition to the mean value, while the latter only uses a mean value of the tie-point data. When thin ice is present, the SMOS algorithm underestimates the SIC due to the low opacity of the ice at this frequency. However, using a synergistic approach with data from other satellite sensors, it is possible to obtain accurate thin ice thickness estimations with the Bayesian-based method. Despite its lower spatial resolution relative to SSMI or AMSR-E, SMOS-derived SIC products are little affected by the atmosphere and the snow (almost transparent at L-band). Moreover L-band measurements are more robust in front of the

  5. SMOS L1C and L2 Validation in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudiger, Christoph; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Kerr, Yann H.; Mialon, Arnaud; Merlin, Olivier; Kim, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive airborne field campaigns (Australian Airborne Cal/val Experiments for SMOS - AACES) were undertaken during the 2010 summer and winter seasons of the southern hemisphere. The purpose of those campaigns was the validation of the Level 1c (brightness temperature) and Level 2 (soil moisture) products of the ESA-led Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. As SMOS is the first satellite to globally map L-band (1.4GHz) emissions from the Earth?s surface, and the first 2-dimensional interferometric microwave radiometer used for Earth observation, large scale and long-term validation campaigns have been conducted world-wide, of which AACES is the most extensive. AACES combined large scale medium-resolution airborne L-band and spectral observations, along with high-resolution in-situ measurements of soil moisture across a 50,000km2 area of the Murrumbidgee River catchment, located in south-eastern Australia. This paper presents a qualitative assessment of the SMOS brightness temperature and soil moisture products.

  6. Overview on Processing and Applying on the SMOS Satellite Remotely Sensed Sea Surface Salinity Products%SMOS卫星遥感海表盐度资料处理应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建; 张韧; 安玉柱; 马强; 杨代恒

    2013-01-01

    土壤湿度和海洋盐度卫星首次提供了覆盖全球的高频率、高精度、业务化的海表盐度产品,但其处理和延伸应用仍处于初级阶段,后续校准校正工作还将持续数年,如何及时把握其发展轨迹成为一个重要的科学问题.本研究从SMOS计划、数据概况、盐度反演算法、格点产品制作、多源数据融合和产品应用等方面,介绍和评述了SMOS计划及其海表盐度产品应用研究进展,着重分析了反演算法中的各种误差来源,对在轨2 a的运行情况进行了回顾、对未来的发展重点进行了展望,旨在为开发和应用SMOS产品提供参考.%SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) satellite has,for the first time,provided operational global-scale sea surface salinity products with high-frequency and high-precision,but their processing and application are still in a preliminary stage and the relevant calibration / validation may be sustained for several years.How to grasp the current status and future tendency has been an important scientific issue.An overview of SMOS project is given from several aspects,including general context,release products,inversion algorithm,gridding process,multi-source data fusion and application,and the analysis of error sources in the inversion algorithm are emphasized.Finally,the running performances of the products during the past two years are reviewed and their future development is prospected,aiming at offering valuable references for developing and applying the SMOS products.

  7. Blue Willow Story Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

  8. Living Willow Huts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Rusty

    2007-01-01

    Living Willow Huts are inexpensive to make, fun to plant, easy to grow, and make beautiful spaces for children. They involve planting dormant willow shoots in the ground and weaving them into shapes that will sprout and grow over time. People have been creating similar living architecture throughout the world for centuries in the forms of living…

  9. Response of weeping willows to linear alkylbenzene sulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, X.; Trapp, Stefan; Zhou, P.

    2006-01-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) is the most commonly used anionic surfactant in laundry detergents and cleaning agents. LAS compounds are found in surface waters and soils. The short-term acute toxicity of LAS to weeping willows (Salix babylonica L.) was investigated. Willow cuttings were grown...

  10. Willow ptarmigan study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Willow ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus; see Appendix I for scientific names of birds observed during this study) are a species of management interest because they are...

  11. A downscaling approach for SMOS land observations: evaluation of high-resolution soil moisture maps over the Iberian Peninsula

    OpenAIRE

    Piles Guillem, Maria; Sanchez, Nilda; Vall-Llossera Ferran, Mercedes Magdalena; Camps Carmona, Adriano José; Martinez Fernandez, Jose; Martinez, Justino; González Gambau, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission is the first satellite devoted to measure the Earth's surface soil moisture. It has a spatial resolution of similar to 40 km and a 3-day revisit. In this paper, a downscaling algorithm is presented as a new ability to obtain multiresolution soil moisture estimates from SMOS using visible-to-infrared remotely sensed observations. This algorithm is applied to combine 2 years of SMOS and MODIS Terra/Aqua data over the Iberian Peninsula in...

  12. Benefits of assimilating thin sea ice thickness from SMOS into the TOPAZ system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiping; Counillon, François; Bertino, Laurent; Tian-Kunze, Xiangshan; Kaleschke, Lars

    2016-11-01

    An observation product for thin sea ice thickness (SMOS-Ice) is derived from the brightness temperature data of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. This product is available in near-real time, at daily frequency, during the cold season. In this study, we investigate the benefit of assimilating SMOS-Ice into the TOPAZ coupled ocean and sea ice forecasting system, which is the Arctic component of the Copernicus marine environment monitoring services. The TOPAZ system assimilates sea surface temperature (SST), altimetry data, temperature and salinity profiles, ice concentration, and ice drift with the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). The conditions for assimilation of sea ice thickness thinner than 0.4 m are favorable, as observations are reliable below this threshold and their probability distribution is comparable to that of the model. Two parallel Observing System Experiments (OSE) have been performed in March and November 2014, in which the thicknesses from SMOS-Ice (thinner than 0.4 m) are assimilated in addition to the standard observational data sets. It is found that the root mean square difference (RMSD) of thin sea ice thickness is reduced by 11 % in March and 22 % in November compared to the daily thin ice thicknesses of SMOS-Ice, which suggests that SMOS-Ice has a larger impact during the beginning of the cold season. Validation against independent observations of ice thickness from buoys and ice draft from moorings indicates that there are no degradations in the pack ice but there are some improvements near the ice edge close to where the SMOS-Ice has been assimilated. Assimilation of SMOS-Ice yields a slight improvement for ice concentration and degrades neither SST nor sea level anomaly. Analysis of the degrees of freedom for signal (DFS) indicates that the SMOS-Ice has a comparatively small impact but it has a significant contribution in constraining the system (> 20 % of the impact of all ice and ocean

  13. Smos Land Product Validation Activities at the Valencia Anchor Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto

    ABSTRACT Soil moisture is a key parameter controlling the exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere. In spite of being important for weather and climate modeling, this parameter is not well observed at a global scale. The SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) Mission was designed by the European Space Agency (ESA) to measure soil moisture over continental surfaces as well as surface salinity over the oceans. Since 2001, the Valencia Anchor Station is currently being prepared for the validation of SMOS land products, namely soil moisture content and vegetation water content. The site has recently been selected by the Mission as a core validation site, mainly due to the reasonable homogeneous characteristics of the area which make it appropriate to undertake the validation of SMOS Level 2 land products during the Mission Commissioning Phase, before attempting more complex areas. Close to SMOS launch, ESA has defined and designed a SMOS V alidation Rehearsal C ampaign P lan which purpose is to repeat the Commissioning Phase execution with all centers, all tools, all participants, all structures, all data available, assuming all tools and structures are ready and trying to produce as close as possible the post-launch conditions. The aim is to test the readiness, the ensemble coordination and the speed of operations, and to avoid as far as possible any unexpected deficiencies of the plan and procedure during the real C ommissioning P hase campaigns. For the rehearsal activity, a control area of 10 x 10 km2 has been chosen at the Valencia Anchor Station study area where a network of ground soil moisture measuring stations is being set up based on the definition of homogeneous physio-hydrological units, attending to climatic, soil type, lithology, geology, elevation, slope and vegetation cover conditions. These stations are linked via a wireless communication system to a master post accessible via internet. The ground soil moisture stations will also be used

  14. Comparison Between AQUARIUS and SMOS brightness temperatures for Heterogeneous Land Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlloch, Amparo; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Tenjo, Carolina; Navarro, Enrique

    2016-07-01

    Intercomparison between Aquarius and SMOS brightness temperatures (TBs) over land surfaces is more challenging than over oceans because land footprints are more heterogeneous. In this work we are comparing Aquarius and SMOS TBs under coherente conditions obtained both by considering similar areas, according to land uses and by stratifying by means of TVDI (Temperature Vegetation Dryness Index) that accounts for the dynamics of the vegetation instead of assuming static characteristics as in the previous approches. The area of study was chosen in central Spain where we could get a significant number of matches between both instruments. The study period corresponded to 2012-2014. SMOS level-3 data were obtained from the Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS (CATDS) and Aquarius' from the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PODAAC). Land uses were obtained from the Spanish SIOSE facility (Sistema de Informacion de Ocupacion del Suelo en España) that uses a scale of 1:25.000 and polygon geometrical structure layer. SIOSE is based on panchromatic and multispectral 2.5 m resolution SPOT-5 images together with Landsat-5 images and orthophotos from the Spanish Nacional Plan of Aerial Orthophotography (PNOA). TVDI values were obtained from MODIS operational products of land surface temperature and NDVI. SMOS ascending TBs were compared to inner-beam Aquarius descending half-orbit TBs coinciding over the study area at 06:00 h. The Aquarius inner beam has an incidence angle of 28,7º and SMOS data were considered for the 27,5º incidence angle. The SMOS products corresponded to version 2.6x (data before 31st Oct 2013) and version 2.7x (data after 1st Jan 2014). Intersections between both footprints were analysed under conditions of similar areas, land uses and TVDI values. For the latter (land uses/TVDI), a linear combination of SMOS land uses/TVDI was obtained to match the larger Aquarius footprint. A more physical approach is also under way

  15. 2000 days of SMOS at the Barcelona Expert Centre: a tribute to the work of Jordi Font

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Turiel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS is the first satellite mission capable of measuring sea surface salinity and soil moisture from space. Its novel instrument (the L-band radiometer MIRAS has required the development of new algorithms to process SMOS data, a challenging task due to many processing issues and the difficulties inherent in a new technology. In the wake of SMOS, a new community of users has grown, requesting new products and applications, and extending the interest in this novel brand of satellite services. This paper reviews the role played by the Barcelona Expert Centre under the direction of Jordi Font, SMOS co-principal investigator. The main scientific activities and achievements and the future directions are discussed, highlighting the importance of the oceanographic applications of the mission.

  16. Snow thickness retrieval using SMOS satellite data: Comparison with airborne IceBridge and buoy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaß, N.; Kaleschke, L.; Tian-Kunze, X.

    2015-12-01

    The passive microwave mission SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) provides daily coverage of the polar regions and its data have been used to retrieve thin sea ice thickness up to about one meter. In addition, there has been an attempt to retrieve snow thickness over thick Arctic multi-year ice, which is a crucial parameter for the freeboard-based estimation of (thick) sea ice thickness from lidar and radar altimetry. SMOS provides measurements at a frequency of 1.4 GHz (L-band) at horizontal and vertical polarization for a range of incidence angles (0 to 60°). The retrieval of ice or snow parameters from SMOS measurements is based on an emission model that describes the 1.4 GHz brightness temperature of (snow-covered) sea ice as a function of the ice and snow thicknesses and the permittivities of these media, which are mainly determined by ice temperature and salinity and snow density, respectively. In the first attempts to retrieve snow thickness from SMOS data, these parameters were assumed to be constant in the emission model, and the resulting maps were compared with airborne ice and snow thickness measurements taken during NASA's Operation IceBridge mission in spring 2012. The present approach to produce SMOS snow thickness maps is more elaborate. For example, available information on the ice surface temperature from MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite images or from the IceBridge campaign itself are used, and the ice in the retrieval model is described by temperature and salinity profiles instead of using bulk values. As a first step we have produced (winter/spring) snow thickness maps of the Arctic, from 3-day-averages up to monthly means, using the available SMOS data from 2010 on. Here, we show how our spatial snow thickness distributions compare with IceBridge campaign data in the western Arctic from spring 2011 to 2015. In addition, we show how the temporal evolution of SMOS-retrieved snow thickness compares with snow

  17. The SMOS Mediterranean Ecosystem L-Band characterisation EXperiment (MELBEX-I) over natural shrubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cano, Aurelio; Saleh, Kauzar; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of ESA's SMOS mission (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity), many studies have been carried out over different land surface types to model their microwave emission at L-band (1.4GHz). Results of these studies have been integrated in the emission model L-MEB (L-Band Microwave Emission...... of the Biosphere), which is the core of the SMOS Level 2 soil moisture retrieval algorithm. The Mediterranean Ecosystem L-Band characterisation EXperiment (MELBEX-I) was carried out at the SMOS validation site near Valencia in autumn 2005. The main objective of MELBEX-I was to calibrate L-MEB over Mediterranean...... between 0.035m3m−3 (if only SM was retrieved) and 0.057m3m−3 (if SM, optical depth and a roughness parameter were simultaneously retrieved). Finally, no modelling improvements were observed when coarse estimates of the fraction of exposed rocks were accounted for in the model....

  18. A soil moisture and temperature network for SMOS validation in Western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bircher, Simone; Skou, Niels; Jensen, K. H.

    2011-01-01

    SMOS pixel (44 × 44 km), which is representative of the land surface conditions of the catchment and with minimal impact from open water (2) arrangement of three network clusters along the precipitation gradient, and (3) distribution of the stations according to respective fractions of classes...... capacitance sensors was established in the Skjern River Catchment, Denmark. The objectives of this article are to describe a method to implement a network suited for SMOS validation, and to present sample data collected by the network to verify the approach. The design phase included (1) selection of a single...

  19. Evaluation report. Willow; Evalueringsrapport. Pil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang Bilgaard, H. [AgroTech A/S, Skejby, Aarhus (Denmark); Eide, T.; Gertz, F. [Videncentret for Landbrug, Skejby, Aarhus (Denmark)] [and others

    2012-10-15

    This evaluation report brings together the main findings of willows activities in the BioM project in the period 2010-2012. The report contains sections relating to growing and cultivation conditions, energy production, environmental effects, landscape aspects, harvesting techniques, economics, and organization, marketing, and business effects, and a description of willow cultivation on a large scale in the project area in western Jutland, Denmark. The report concludes with an overall assessment of willow cultivation for the production of sustainable bioenergy. (LN)

  20. SMOS Level 3 and Level 4 Research Products Provided by the Barcelona Expert Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Martinez, Justino; Ballabrera, Joaquim; Piles, Maria; Umbert, Marta; Perez, Fernando; Turiel, Antonio; Font, Jordi; Portabella, Marcos; Huoareau, Nina; Olmedo, Estrella

    2013-04-01

    More than three years have passed since the launch, on November 2, 2009, of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite carrying a microwave synthetic aperture radiometer working at 1.4 GHz. The aim of the mission is to provide Sea Surface Salinity and Soil Moisture observations, with a spatial resolution of 30-50 km, and an accuracy suited for climate studies. From the brightness temperature observations, experimental sea surface salinity (SSS) and Soil Moisture (SM) maps are being developed and distributed at the SMOS Barcelona Expert Center (SMOS-BEC) to take the most out of SMOS observations. Data are distributed in NetCDF format using THREDDS and maps are served through a Web Map Service (ncWMS), both at the SMOS-BEC distribution data website (http://cp34-bec.cmima.csic.es/). For ocean applications the following SSS products are being served at spatial resolution of 0.25°: • Level 3 maps by spatial and temporal weighted average of level 2 SSS data. Three- and nine-day averaged maps are produced every 3 days. Monthly, seasonal and annual maps are also computed. • Level 3 maps from optimal interpolation of level 2 SSS data. Nine-day averaged maps are produced every 3 days, as well as monthly, seasonal and annual maps. • Level 4 maps from SMOS SSS fused with satellite-derived SST [1]. Similar to Level 3 data, nine-day averaged maps are produces every 3 days, as well as monthly, seasonal and annual maps. • Singularity Exponents products obtained by applying singularity analysis [1] on OSTIA SST products (http://myocean.eu/) are also served. Three versions of each product are generated using ascending passes, descending passes, and full orbit passes (i.e., ascending + descending). Both absolute salinity value and its anomaly (difference between the absolute value and climatology data (WOA 2009)) are stored in the product. L3 and L4 maps are validated with near-surface measurements provided by Argo profilers, and

  1. RFI in SMOS data detected by polarimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Balling, Jan E.; Skou, Niels

    2012-01-01

    ESA's soil moisture and ocean salinity mission, SMOS, has been found to suffer much more from radio frequency interference (RFI) than expected, and methods for detecting RFI in SMOS data are of vital importance. This paper describes a method using the 3rd and 4th Stokes parameters for the purpose....... Obvious hot-spots are detected, but also smaller, yet still detrimental RFI, spreading out over for example the ocean, is detected. It is also discussed how detected and flagged samples statistically deviate from their surroundings....

  2. An Intercomparison of RADARSAT-2, SMOS and Field Measured Soil Moisture in the Berambadi Watershed, South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, S. K.; Al Bitar, A.; Sekhar, M.; Merlin, O.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Kerr, Y. H.

    2012-12-01

    This study presents an intercomparison of the RADARSAT-2 derived soil moisture, SMOS derived soil moisture and field measured soil moisture in the Berambadi watershed, South India. Seventeen images of RADARSAT-2, SMOS products, and field data collected in the 50 field plots during 2010-2011 were used. The data were collected from field campaigns in the framework of AMBHAS project. A non parametric algorithm was developed based on the CDF transformation to retrieve the soil moisture from RADARSAT-2 backscatter coefficient at a spatial resolution of 100 m based on the measured soil moisture. The developed algorithm to retrieve surface soil moisture from RADARSAT-2 provided a good estimate of the field plot soil moisture with a RMSE of 0.05 cm3 cm-3. The average soil moisture from RADARSAT-2 and field measured soil moisture were compared to SMOS derived soil moisture at the watershed scale. Several averaging strategies were considered to take into account the surface heterogeneity and SMOS antenna patterns. Results were analysed by taking into consideration the soil texture heterogeneity, radio frequency interference effect and climatic effect. SMOS underestimated the soil moisture in compare to both RADARSAT-2 and field averaged soil moisture. A bias correction for the SMOS data is suggested using Clayton copula. SMOS showed a better correlation with the RADARSAT-2 watershed averaged soil moisture than directly averaged field soil moisture, as field campaign covered a smaller region of the watershed than RADARSAT-2 data. This shows the potential synergy between the use of active/passive microwave soil moisture for upscalling/downscalling soil moisture.

  3. Fertilization of SRC willow. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevel, L; Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Ingerslev, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Short rotation coppice (SRC) willow is often regarded as one of the most promising crops to increase biomass production and thereby meet the growing demand for renewable energy. This study is based on the hypotheses that biomass production of SRC willow responds positively to increasing doses...

  4. Development of willow harvesting machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Advanced development of a device for harvesting willow up to 50 mm diameter x 4 m length, driven from the power take off of a standard tractor.......Advanced development of a device for harvesting willow up to 50 mm diameter x 4 m length, driven from the power take off of a standard tractor....

  5. Impact of SMOS soil moisture data assimilation on NCEP-GFS forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, X.; Zheng, W.; Meng, J.; Dong, J.; Ek, M.

    2012-04-01

    Soil moisture is one of the few critical land surface state variables that have long memory to impact the exchanges of water, energy and carbon between the land surface and atmosphere. Accurate information about soil moisture status is thus required for numerical weather, seasonal climate and hydrological forecast as well as for agricultural production forecasts, water management and many other water related economic or social activities. Since the successful launch of ESA's soil moisture ocean salinity (SMOS) mission in November 2009, about 2 years of soil moisture retrievals has been collected. SMOS is believed to be the currently best satellite sensors for soil moisture remote sensing. Therefore, it becomes interesting to examine how the collected SMOS soil moisture data are compared with other satellite-sensed soil moisture retrievals (such as NASA's Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer -AMSR-E and EUMETSAT's Advanced Scatterometer - ASCAT)), in situ soil moisture measurements, and how these data sets impact numerical weather prediction models such as the Global Forecast System of NOAA-NCEP. This study implements the Ensemble Kalman filter in GFS to assimilate the AMSR-E, ASCAT and SMOS soil moisture observations after a quantitative assessment of their error rate based on in situ measurements from ground networks around contiguous United States. in situ soil moisture measurements from ground networks (such as USDA Soil Climate Analysis network - SCAN and NOAA's U.S. Climate Reference Network -USCRN) are used to evaluate the GFS soil moisture simulations (analysis). The benefits and uncertainties of assimilating the satellite data products in GFS are examined by comparing the GFS forecasts of surface temperature and rainfall with and without the assimilations. From these examinations, the advantages of SMOS soil moisture data products over other satellite soil moisture data sets will be evaluated. The next step toward operationally assimilating soil moisture

  6. Fertilization of SRC willow. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevel, L; Ingerslev, Morten; Nord-Larsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Short rotation coppice (SRC) willow is an emerging cropping system in focus for production of biomass for energy. To increase production, the willow is commonly fertilized, but studies have shown differing effects of fertilization on biomass production, ranging from almost no response...... impacts of different doses of mineral fertilizer, manure and sewage sludge in a commercially grown SRC willow stand. We examined macro nutrient and heavy metal leaching rates and calculated element balances to evaluate the environmental impact. Growth responses were reported in a former paper (Sevel et al....... “Fertilization of SRC Willow, I: Biomass Production Response” Bioenergy Research, 2013). Nitrogen leaching was generally low, between 1 and 7 kg N ha−1 year−1 when doses of up to 120 kg N ha−1 year−1 were applied. Higher doses of 240 and 360 kg N ha−1 as single applications caused leaching of 66 and 99 kg N ha−1...

  7. Optimization of a Radiative Transfer Forward Operator for Simulating SMOS Brightness Temperatures over the Upper Mississippi Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, H.; Verhoest, N. E. C.; Martens, B.; VanDenBerg, M. J.; Bitar, A. Al; Tomer, S. Kumar; Merlin, O.; Cabot, F.; Kerr, Y.; DeLannoy, G. J. M.; Drusch, M.; Hendricks-Franssen, H.-J.; Vereecken, H.; Pan, M.; Wood, E. F.; Dumedah, G.; Walker, J. P.; Pauwels, V. R. N.

    2014-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission is routinely providing global multi-angular observations of brightness temperature (TB) at both horizontal and vertical polarization with a 3-day repeat period. The assimilation of such data into a land surface model (LSM) may improve the skill of operational flood forecasts through an improved estimation of soil moisture (SM). To accommodate for the direct assimilation of the SMOS TB data, the LSM needs to be coupled with a radiative transfer model (RTM), serving as a forward operator for the simulation of multi-angular and multi-polarization top of atmosphere TBs. This study investigates the use of the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) LSM coupled with the Community Microwave Emission Modelling platform (CMEM) for simulating SMOS TB observations over the Upper Mississippi basin, USA. For a period of 2 years (2010-2011), a comparison between SMOS TBs and simulations with literature-based RTM parameters reveals a basin averaged bias of 30K. Therefore, time series of SMOS TB observations are used to investigate ways for mitigating these large biases. Specifically, the study demonstrates the impact of the LSM soil moisture climatology in the magnitude of TB biases. After CDF matching the SM climatology of the LSM to SMOS retrievals, the average bias decreases from 30K to less than 5K. Further improvements can be made through calibration of RTM parameters related to the modeling of surface roughness and vegetation. Consequently, it can be concluded that SM rescaling and RTM optimization are efficient means for mitigating biases and form a necessary preparatory step for data assimilation.

  8. Coyote Willow Mowing Project : Biological Summary Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The primary goal of the project is to enhance/promote the establishment, growth, spread, and survival of willow species (primarily coyote willow). Many...

  9. Monitoring the mesoscale circulation of the Western Mediterranean Sea using SSS derived from SMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Estrella; Isern-Fontanet, Jordi; Turiel, Antonio; Portabella, Marcos; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim

    2016-04-01

    The circulation in the Mediterranean Sea is characterized by the inflow of fresh waters from the Atlantic Ocean through the Strait of Gibraltar. These waters, characterized by their lower salinity, create baroclinic instabilities that spawn eddies with sizes of the order of 100 km. These eddies have been widely analyzed using Sea Surface Temperature (SST) observations. Recent improvements in the Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) retrieval and bias correction methodologies applied to the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite data have led, for the first time, to the generation of SSS maps that capture the signature of these structures. This opens the door for the generation of high spatial and temporal density maps in the Mediterranean, which can be used in a wide variety of oceanographic applications. In particular, the signature of the Alboran gyre and the eddy propagation across the Algerian coast are well reproduced, allowing for the first time to characterize the baroclinicity of the flow. The SMOS data are strongly affected by Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) and land-sea contamination in the Mediterranean Sea. Two important SSS retrieval algorithm improvements are proposed in this study. First, with more than six years of SMOS data acquisitions, there is enough data to empirically characterize and correct systematic biases. Second, the filtering criterion has been modified to account for the statistical distributions of SSS at each ocean grid point. This allows retrieving a value of SSS which is less affected by outliers originated from RFI and other effects. In this study, high level (spatio-temporally consistent) SSS maps are obtained by averaging the SMOS SSS retrievals using a classical objective analysis scheme and then combining the resulting maps with Sea Surface Temperature (SST) maps by means of multifractal fusion. The SSS fused maps contain well-defined spatial structures, suitable for studying the mesoscale activity in the Western

  10. Improving terrestrial evaporation estimates over continental Australia through assimilation of SMOS soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, B.; Miralles, D.; Lievens, H.; Fernández-Prieto, D.; Verhoest, N. E. C.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial evaporation is an essential variable in the climate system that links the water, energy and carbon cycles over land. Despite this crucial importance, it remains one of the most uncertain components of the hydrological cycle, mainly due to known difficulties to model the constraints imposed by land water availability on terrestrial evaporation. The main objective of this study is to assimilate satellite soil moisture observations from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission into an existing evaporation model. Our over-arching goal is to find an optimal use of satellite soil moisture that can help to improve our understanding of evaporation at continental scales. To this end, the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM) is used to simulate evaporation fields over continental Australia for the period September 2010-December 2013. SMOS soil moisture observations are assimilated using a Newtonian Nudging algorithm in a series of experiments. Model estimates of surface soil moisture and evaporation are validated against soil moisture probe and eddy-covariance measurements, respectively. Finally, an analogous experiment in which Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) soil moisture is assimilated (instead of SMOS) allows to perform a relative assessment of the quality of both satellite soil moisture products. Results indicate that the modelled soil moisture from GLEAM can be improved through the assimilation of SMOS soil moisture: the average correlation coefficient between in situ measurements and the modelled soil moisture over the complete sample of stations increased from 0.68 to 0.71 and a statistical significant increase in the correlations is achieved for 17 out of the 25 individual stations. Our results also suggest a higher accuracy of the ascending SMOS data compared to the descending data, and overall higher quality of SMOS compared to AMSR-E retrievals over Australia. On the other hand, the effect of soil moisture data

  11. 27 CFR 9.85 - Willow Creek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Willow Creek. 9.85 Section... THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.85 Willow Creek. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Willow Creek.”...

  12. An overview of new insights from 6 years of salinity data from SMOS mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, R.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of salt held in surface seawater are becoming ever-more important for oceanographers and climatologists to gain a deeper understanding of ocean circulation and Earth's water cycle. ESA's SMOS mission is proving essential for this aim. Launched in 2009, SMOS has provided the longest continuous record (now ~6 years) of sea-surface salinity measurements from space. The salinity of surface seawater is controlled largely by the balance between evaporation and precipitation, but freshwater from rivers and the freezing and melting of ice also cause changes in concentrations. Along with temperature, salinity drives ocean circulation - the thermohaline circulation - which, in turn, plays a key role in the global climate. With a wealth of salinity data from SMOS now in hand complemented by measurements from the NASA-CONAE Aquarius satellite, which uses a different measuring technique. In this talk we shall provide an overview of how the SMOS mission - now celebrating 6 years in orbit - is providing detailed global measurements of SSS. An ensemble of key ocean processes for climate and biochemistry can now be determined and monitored for the first time from space : the detailed salinity structure of tropical instability waves along the equator and the salt exchanged across major oceanic current fronts, the occurrences of large-scale salinity anomalies in the Pacific and Indian oceans related to important climate indexes are also well-evidenced in the six year-long data. In addition, the dispersal of freshwater into the ocean from the major large tropical rivers (Amazon, Orinoco and Congo), their impact on tropical cyclone (TC) intensification and the oceanic imprints of the intense rainfall in the ITCZ and under TC can now be regularly monitored to better understand the variability of the oceanic part of the global water cycle. We will present how SMOS data, along with concurrent in situ Argo ocean-profile data, other satellite observations of sea-surface

  13. Assimilation of SMOS Retrieved Soil Moisture into the Land Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Clay; Case, Jonathan; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Soil moisture retrievals from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) instrument are assimilated into the Noah land surface model (LSM) within the NASA Land Information System (LIS). Before assimilation, SMOS retrievals are bias-corrected to match the model climatological distribution using a Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF) matching approach. Data assimilation is done via the Ensemble Kalman Filter. The goal is to improve the representation of soil moisture within the LSM, and ultimately to improve numerical weather forecasts through better land surface initialization. We present a case study showing a large area of irrigation in the lower Mississippi River Valley, in an area with extensive rice agriculture. High soil moisture value in this region are observed by SMOS, but not captured in the forcing data. After assimilation, the model fields reflect the observed geographic patterns of soil moisture. Plans for a modeling experiment and operational use of the data are given. This work helps prepare for the assimilation of Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) retrievals in the near future.

  14. SMOS Instrument Performance and Calibration after 3 Years in Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Neira, Manuel; Corbella, Ignasi; Torres, Francesc; Kainulainen, Juha; Oliva, Roger; Closa, Josep; Cabot, François; Castro, Rita; Barbosa, Jose; Gutierrez, Antonio; Anterrieu, Eric; Tenerelli, Joe; Martin-Porqueras, Fernando; Buenadicha, Guillermo; Delwart, Steven; Crapolicchio, Raffaele; Suess, Martin

    2013-04-01

    ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission has been in orbit for already over 3 years which has allowed the calibration and data processing team consolidating both the calibration strategy and the Level-1 processor which transforms the raw visibility samples into polarimetric brightness temperature images. The payload on board SMOS, MIRAS, is quite unique in that it is the first microwave radiometer in space ever capable to generate wide field of view images at every snapshot measurement. This means that most of the calibration as well as image processing techniques are being developed for the first time with little heritage from any previous space mission. Issues intrinsically attached to its wide field of view such as spatial ripples across the snapshot images are particular to MIRAS and to no other earlier radiometer. Even the fundamental theory behind the instrument was put at test, first on ground inside an electromagnetic compatibility chamber, and now in orbit when imaging the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation of the cold sky. A groundbreaking effort is being carried out by the SMOS project team to understand and master all calibration and image reconstruction issues of this novel microwave interferometer payload. MIRAS in-orbit performance is driven by the amplitude of spatial ripples across the image and orbital and seasonal radiometer stability. Spatial ripples are unique to interferometric radiometers and are produced by (a) a limited knowledge of the antenna patterns and, in general, of the model of the instrument, (b) some fundamental limitations related to the inverse problem of image reconstruction in undetermined conditions and (c) subtle data processing inconsistencies which are discovered and corrected. To reduce the spatial ripples sea surface salinity retrievals are performed by first removing the brightness temperature spatial errors using a uniform region of the Pacific Ocean. However soil moisture retrievals cannot benefit of

  15. Willow Fire Near Payson, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    On July 3, 2004, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite acquired this image of the Willow fire near Payson, Arizona. The image is being used by the United States Department of Agriculture's Forest Service Remote Sensing Applications Center (RSAC). The image combines data from the visible and infrared wavelength regions to highlight: the burned areas in dark red; the active fires in red-orange; vegetation in green; and smoke in blue. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. The U.S. Science Team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort dedicated to understanding the Earth as an integrated system and applying Earth System Science to improve prediction of climate, weather, and natural hazards using the unique vantage point of space. Size: 34 by 41

  16. Evaluation of soil and vegetation response to drought using SMOS soil moisture satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piles, Maria; Sánchez, Nilda; Vall-llossera, Mercè; Ballabrera, Joaquim; Martínez, Justino; Martínez-Fernández, José; Camps, Adriano; Font, Jordi

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture plays an important role in determining the likelihood of droughts and floods that may affect an area. Knowledge of soil moisture distribution as a function of time and space is highly relevant for hydrological, ecological and agricultural applications, especially in water-limited or drought-prone regions. However, measuring soil moisture is challenging because of its high variability; point-scale in-situ measurements are scarce being remote sensing the only practical means to obtain regional- and global-scale soil moisture estimates. The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) is the first satellite mission ever designed to measuring the Earth's surface soil moisture at near daily time scales with levels of accuracy previously not attained. Since its launch in November 2009, significant efforts have been dedicated to validate and fine-tune the retrieval algorithms so that SMOS-derived soil moisture estimates meet the standards required for a wide variety of applications. In this line, the SMOS Barcelona Expert Center (BEC) is distributing daily, monthly, and annual temporal averages of 0.25-deg global soil moisture maps, which have proved useful for assessing drought and water-stress conditions. In addition, a downscaling algorithm has been developed to combine SMOS and NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data into fine-scale (stress conditions. In previous research, SMOS-derived Soil Moisture Anomalies (SSMA), calculated in a ten-day basis, were shown to be in close relationship with well-known drought indices (the Standardized Precipitation Index and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index). In this work, SSMA have been calculated for the period 2010-2013 in representative arid, semi-arid, sub-humid and humid areas across global land biomes. The SSMA reflect the cumulative precipitation anomalies and is known to provide 'memory' in the climate and hydrological system; the water retained in the soil

  17. Living Willow Huts--Part 2: Constructing a Living Willow Hut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Rusty

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a step-by-step "how-to" guide on the basics of living willow hut construction. While there certainly are time-tested techniques for building willow structures, the best advice the author has is to experiment. He also suggests that varieties of "salix vimnalis" can be an ideal type of willow to be used for constructing a…

  18. A soil miosture and temperature network for SMOS validation in Western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bircher, Simone; Skou, Niels; Jensen, Karsten Høgh

    2012-01-01

    pixel (44 x 44 km), which is representative of the land surface conditions of the catchment and with minimal impact from open water (2) arrangement of three network clusters along the precipitation gradient, and (3) distribution of the stations according to respective fractions of classes representing......The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity Mission (SMOS) acquires surface soil moisture data of global coverage every three days. Product validation for a range of climate and environmental conditions across continents is a crucial step. For this purpose, a soil moisture and soil temperature sensor...

  19. [From the willow to aspirin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafont, Olivier

    2007-07-01

    At the beginning was the willow bark, which was considered as a medicine by Hippocrates, Dioscorides and Plinus. During the XVIIIth century, the Reverend Edward Stone re-discovered the willow for the cure of agues. In 1829, the french pharmacist Pierre Joseph Leroux isolated salicin. Raffaelle Piria was the first to synthesize salicylic acid from salicin (salicoside). Hermann Kolbe prepared salicylic acid from sodium phenate and carbon dioxide. And then acetylsalicylic acid was first prepared by Charles Gerhardt in 1853, but he did not succeed in identifying its structure. Felix Hoffmann, Arthur Eichengrun and Heinrich Dresen from Bayer Laboratories were at the origin of the use of Aspirin as a medicine. In 1971, John Vane showed that aspirin-like drugs inhibited prostaglandine synthesis.

  20. Validation of SMOS L1C and L2 Products and Important Parameters of the Retrieval Algorithm in the Skjern River Catchment, Western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bircher, Simone; Skou, Niels; Kerr, Yann H.

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite with a passive L-band radiometer monitors surface soil moisture. In addition to soil moisture, vegetation optical thickness tau(NAD) is retrieved (L2 product) from brightness temperatures (T-B, L1C product) using an algorithm based on the L...... and the most sensitive algorithm parameters were analyzed by network and airborne campaign data collected within one SMOS pixel (44 km diameter). The SMOS retrieval is based on the prevailing low vegetation class. For the L1C comparison, T-B's were calculated from in situ soil moisture using L-MEB. Consistent......-band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere (L-MEB) model with initial guesses on the two parameters (derived from ECMWF products and ECOCLIMAP Leaf Area Index, respectively) and other auxiliary input. This paper presents the validation work carried out in the Skjern River Catchment, Denmark. L1C/L2 data...

  1. Severe Marine Weather Studies using SMOS L-band Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reul, Nicolas; Chapron, Bertrand; Zabolotskikh, Elizaveta

    2014-05-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission provides multi-angular L-band (1.4 GHz) brightness temperature images of the Earth. Because upwelling radiation at 1.4 GHz is significantly less affected by rain and atmospheric effects than at higher microwave frequencies, the SMOS measurements offer unique opportunities to complement existing ocean satellite high wind observations that are often erroneous in these extreme conditions. In this talk, we shall provide an overview of the results of an ESA project which aims to exploit the identified capability of SMOS L1 Brightness Temperatures to monitor wind speed and whitecap statistical properties beneath Tropical Cyclones and severe storms. We shall present an overview of these new capabilities and of the potential of the synergy between L-band and C-band sensor data for severe marine weather monitoring. In particular, we will show the results from SMOS for several Hurricanes and Typhoons since 2010 and an analysis of the combined SMOS and AMSR-2 data acquired during the passage of the Typhoon Haiyan, the strongest tropical storms to date and the second-deadliest Philippine typhoon on record.

  2. Natural wind drying of willow stems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gigler, J.K.; Loon, van W.K.P.; Berg, van den J.V.; Sonneveld, C.; Meerdink, G.

    2000-01-01

    The process of natural wind drying of willow (Salix viminalis) stems in large piles was investigated. A simple drying model was developed for stems. Large-scale drying experiments were conducted and drying data were statistically analysed. Whether drying in a pile of willow stems was uniform was inv

  3. 76 FR 13524 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA AGENCY: Federal Communications... FM Channel 258A at Willow Creek, California. Channel 258A can be allotted at Willow Creek, consistent... of FM Allotments under California, is amended by adding Channel 258A at Willow Creek....

  4. Synergies of the European Microwave Remote Sensing Missions SMOS and ASCAT for Monitoring Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scipal, K.; Wagner, W.

    2003-04-01

    The lack of global soil moisture observations is one of the most glaring and pressing deficiencies in current research activities of related fields, from climate monitoring and ecological applications to the quantification of biogeophysical fluxes. This has implications for important issues of the international political agenda like managing global water resources, securing food production and studying climate change. Currently it is held that only microwave remote sensing offers the potential to produce reliable global scale soil moisture information economically. Recognising the urgent need for a soil moisture mission several international initiatives are planning satellite missions dedicated to monitor the global hydrological cycle among them two European microwave satellites. ESA is planning to launch the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity Mission SMOS, in 2006. SMOS will measure soil moisture over land and ocean salinity over the oceans. The mission rests on a passive microwave sensor (radiometer) operated in L-band which is currently believed to hold the largest potential for soil moisture retrieval. One year before (2005) EUMETSAT will launch the Meteorological Operational satellite METOP which carries the active microwave system Advanced Scatterometer ASCAT on board. ASCAT has been designed to retrieve winds over the oceans but recent research has established its capability to retrieve soil moisture. Although currently it is hold that, using active microwave techniques, the effect of surface roughness dominates that of soil moisture (while the converse is true for radiometers), the ERS scatterometer was successfully used to derive global soil moisture information at a spatial resolution of 50 km with weekly to decadal temporal resolution. The quality of the soil moisture products have been assessed by independent experts in several pilot projects funded by the European Space Agency. There is evidence to believe that both missions will provide a flow of

  5. Response of weeping willows to linear alkylbenzene sulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaozhang; Trapp, Stefan; Zhou, Puhua; Peng, Xiaoying; Cao, Xi

    2006-06-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) is the most commonly used anionic surfactant in laundry detergents and cleaning agents. LAS compounds are found in surface waters and soils. The short-term acute toxicity of LAS to weeping willows (Salix babylonica L.) was investigated. Willow cuttings were grown in hydroponic solution spiked with LAS at 24.0+/-1 degrees C for 192 h. The normalized relative transpiration of plants was used to determine toxicity. Severe reduction of the transpiration was only found for high doses of LAS (240 mgl(-1)). Chlorophyll contents in leaves of treated plants varied with the dose of LAS, but there was no significant linear correlation. The activities of the enzymes superoxide dismutases (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) were quantified at the end of experiments. At higher concentrations of LAS (240 mgl(-1)), the activities of SOD and CAT were decreased. The correlation between the dose of LAS and the POD activity in leaf cells was the highest of all enzyme assays (R(2)=0.5). EC(50) values for a 50% inhibition of the transpiration of the trees were estimated to 374 mgl(-1) (72 h) and 166 mgl(-1) (192 h). Results from this experiment indicated that phytotoxic effects of LAS on willow trees are not expected for normal environmental conditions.

  6. Use of Physio-Hydrological Units for SMOS Validation at the Valencia Anchor Station Study Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán-Scheiding, C.; Antolín, C.; Marco, J.; Soriano, M. P.; Torre, E.; Requena, F.; Carbó, E.; Cano, A.; Lopez-Baeza, E.

    2009-04-01

    The SMOS space mission will soil moisture over the continents and ocean surface salinity with the sufficient resolution to be used in global climate change studies. With the aim of validating SMOS land data and products at the Valencia Anchor Station site (VAS) in a Mediterranean Ecosystem area of Spain, we have designed a sample methodology using a subdivision of the landscape in environmental units related to the spatial variability of soil moisture (Millán-Scheiding, 2006; Lopez-Baeza, et al. 2008). These physio-hydrological units are heterogeneously structured entities which present a certain degree of internal uniformity of hydrological parameters. The units are delimited by integrating areas with the same physio-morphology, soil type, vegetation, geology and topography (Flugel, et al 2003; Millán-Scheiding et al, 2007). Each of these units presented over the same pedological characteristics, vegetation cover, and landscape position should have a certain degree of internal uniformity in its hydrological parameters and therefore similar soil moisture (SM). The main assumption for each unit is that the dynamical variation of the hydrological parameters within one unit should be minimum compared to the dynamics of another unit. This methodology will hopefully provide an effective sampling design consisting of a reduced number of measuring points, sparsely distributed over the area, or alternatively, using SM validation networks where each sampling point is located where it is representative of the mean soil moisture of a complete unit area. The Experimental Plan for the SMOS Validation Rehearsal Campaign at the VAS area of April-May 2008 used this environmental subdivision in the selection and sampling of over 21.000 soil moisture points in a control area of 10 x 10 km2. The ground measurements were carried out during 4 nights corresponding to a drying out period of the soil. The sampling consisted of 700 plots with 4 volumetric SM cylinders and 7 Delta-T Theta

  7. Erratum to: Fertilization of SRC Willow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevel, L; Ingerslev, Morten; Nord-Larsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Short rotation coppice (SRC) willow is an emerging cropping system in focus for production of biomass for energy. To increase production, the willow is commonly fertilized, but studies have shown differing effects of fertilization on biomass production, ranging from almost no response...... impacts of different doses of mineral fertilizer, manure and sewage sludge in a commercially grown SRC willow stand. We examined macro nutrient and heavy metal leaching rates and calculated element balances to evaluate the environmental impact. Growth responses were reported in a former paper (Sevel et al....... “Fertilization of SRC Willow, I: Biomass Production Response” Bioenergy Research, 2013). Nitrogen leaching was generally low, between 1 and 7 kg N ha−1 year−1 when doses of up to 120 kg N ha−1 year−1 were applied. Higher doses of 240 and 360 kg N ha−1 as single applications caused leaching of 66 and 99 kg N ha−1...

  8. Coastal Energy Corporation, Willow Springs, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Coastal Energy Corporation, located at 232 Burnham Road, Willow Springs, Missouri, for alleged violations at the facility located at or near that facility.

  9. Soils organic C sequestration under poplar and willow agroforestry systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunina, Anna; Tariq, Azeem; Lamersdorf, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    SCR (4.5%). C content in the mineral fraction increased for SRC and AF 1.3-1.5 times compare to cropland, showing that the early stage of trees development lead to C accumulation in stable fractions. CO2 efflux from the surface 0-3 cm was in 2-3 times higher than from 3-20 cm. CO2 efflux did not follow soil C contents and was the highest for poplar SRC plot (1.8 mg C g-1 soil), followed by willow AF (1.6 mg C g-1 soil), willow SRC (1.4 mg C g-1 soil) and cropland (0.8 mg C g-1 soil). Estimated size of labile C pool for forest soils was two times higher and decomposition rates were 1.3 times faster than for the arable site. We conclude that afforestation in the first years mainly affects C accumulation in the top soil. Due to changing in soil structure most of the C was associated with large macroaggregates. Afforestation measures promoted C accumulation in the mineral fractions, whereas C associated with free POM even decreased in case of poplar SRC, compare to cropland soil.

  10. Sun L-Band Brightness Temperature Estimate from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Mission: A Potential New Space Weather Applications for SMOS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crapolicchio, Raffaele; Capolongo, Emiliano; Bigazzi, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the results of a validation study to assess the potentiality of the Level-1b (L1b) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Sun Brightness Temperature (BT) as a valuable L-band radio signal useful in the space weather context. The validation exercise, done for both eruptive and quite/active Sun, focused on SMOS data availability, coverage and statistical analysis with respect to the United States Air Force (USAF) Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN) recorded data. In both cases the comparison of the two data sets has shown a strong timing correlation and an impressive burst amplitude correspondence. The paper also presents main advantages and some caveats in the use of the SMOS dataset. The results obtained encourage to pursue further studies both on the SMOS L1 processing algorithm refinement and on the usage of SMOS BT as an additional, independent and important source of information for space weather applications.

  11. Soil moisture modelling of a SMOS pixel: interest of using the PERSIANN database over the Valencia Anchor Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Juglea

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val activities, this study addresses the use of the PERSIANN-CCS1database in hydrological applications to accurately simulate a whole SMOS pixel by representing the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the soil moisture fields over a wide area (50×50 km2. The study focuses on the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS experimental site, in Spain, which is one of the main SMOS Cal/Val sites in Europe.

    A faithful representation of the soil moisture distribution at SMOS pixel scale (50×50 km2 requires an accurate estimation of the amount and temporal/spatial distribution of precipitation. To quantify the gain of using the comprehensive PERSIANN database instead of sparsely distributed rain gauge measurements, comparisons between in situ observations and satellite rainfall data are done both at point and areal scale. An overestimation of the satellite rainfall amounts is observed in most of the cases (about 66% but the precipitation occurrences are in general retrieved (about 67%.

    To simulate the high variability in space and time of surface soil moisture, a Soil Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer (SVAT model – ISBA (Interactions between Soil Biosphere Atmosphere is used. The interest of using satellite rainfall estimates as well as the influence that the precipitation events can induce on the modelling of the water content in the soil is depicted by a comparison between different soil moisture data. Point-like and spatialized simulated data using rain gauge observations or PERSIANN – CCS database as well as ground measurements are used. It is shown that a good adequacy is reached in most part of the year, the precipitation differences having less impact upon the simulated soil moisture. The behaviour of simulated surface soil moisture at SMOS scale is verified by the use of remote sensing data from the Advanced

  12. Willow wood production on radionuclide polluted areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodkin Oleg I.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: One of the key environmental problems in Belarus is effective use of agricultural lands contaminated by radionuclide due to the Chernobyl disaster. The alternative method to traditional agricultural crops is fast growing willow cultivation. It is possible to use biomass of willow as renewable energy source. The goal of our investigation was the estimation of environmental aspects of willow wood production on polluted areas. The field study experiments (2007-2010 were conducted at Krichev district of Mogilev region in eastern Belarus. This region characterized by high level of Cs-137 contamination as well as high level of heavy metals pollution. In the first stage of experiments, the concentration of cesium-137 in different parts of willow biomass had been measured and transfer factor calculated. The measuring had been done for leaves, roots, and wood. To control cesium-137 accumulation in willow biomass we apply different types (nitrogen N, phosphorus P and potassium K and dose of fertilizer. The experiments show that potassium mineral fertilizer is the key factor for radionuclide accumulation control. The optimal dose of potassium is 90 kg per hectare. On the base of experimental results the model of cesium-137 accumulation in the wood for a 21 year has been developed. In accordance with calculation to the end of willow cultivation (21 year concentration of cesium-137 in wood will not be higher than permitted even with the level of cesium-137 contamination in the soil 1480 kBq/m2 (maximum 140 kqB/m2 with permitted level for firewood is 740 Bq/kg.. The concentration of cesium-137 in the roots increases gradually and get maximum in 21 year (3000 kqB/m2. Our results confirm that in the sum about 0.8 million hectares of radionuclide polluted arable lands partly excluded from agricultural practice in Belarus could be used for willow biomass production.

  13. Long time series of soil moisture obtained using neural networks: application to AMSR-E and SMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Nemesio J.; Kerr, Yann H.; de Jeu, Rcihard A. M.; van der Schalie, Robin; Wigneron, Jean Pierre; Ayaari, Amen al; Dolman, Han; Drusch, Matthias; Mecklenburg, Sussane

    2015-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite is the first mission specifically designed to measure soil moisture (hereafter SM) from space. The instrument on-board SMOS is a L-band aperture synthesis radiometer, with full-polarization and multi-angular capabilities (Mecklenburg et al. 2012). The operational SM retrieval algorithm is based on a physical model (Kerr et al. 2012). In addition, Rodriguez-Fernandez et al. (2014) have recently implemented an inverse model based in neural networks using the approach of Aires & Prigent (2006), which consists in training the neural networks with numerical weather prediction models (ECMWF, Balsamo et al. 2009). In the context of an ESA funded project (de Jeu et al, this conference, session CL 5.7), we have studied this neural network approach to create a consistent soil moisture dataset from 2003 to 2014 using NASA/JAXA Advanced Scanning Microwave Radiometer (AMSR-E) and ESA SMOS radiometers as input data. Two neural networks algorithms have been defined and optimized using AMSR-E or SMOS as input data in the periods 2003-Oct 2011 and 2010-2014, respectively. The two missions overlapping period has been used to demonstrate the consistency of the SM dataset produced with both algorithms by comparing monthly averages of SM and by comparing with time series of in situ measurements at selected locations and other SM products such as the SMOS operational SM, ECMWF model SM, and AMSR-E LPRM SM (Owe et al. 2008). Finally, the long time series of SM obtained with neural networks will be compared to in-situ measurements and ECMWF ERA-Interim SM at selected locations. This long-term soil moisture dataset can be used for hydrological and climate applications and it is the first step towards a longer dataset which will include additional sensors. References Aires, F. & Prigent, C. Toward a new generation of satellite surface products? Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984--2012), Wiley Online Library, 2006, 11

  14. Host Selection of the giant willow aphid (Tuberolachnus salignus)

    OpenAIRE

    Aradottir, G; Karp, A.; Hanley, SJ; Woodcock, C; Dewhirst, S.; Collins, CM; Leather, SR; Harrington, R.

    2009-01-01

    The giant willow aphid [Tuberolachnus salignus (Gmelin)] has recently become noteworthy as a potential pest species due to the increased uptake of willow, its host-plant, for use in growing biomass for energy production. In this paper we describe host selection studies of T. salignus on short rotation coppice (SRC) willow varieties in laboratory bioassays and field experiments. In laboratory olfactometry tests, T. salignus was significantly attracted to certain SRC willow varieties, but not t...

  15. The potential of biomonitoring of air quality using leaf characteristics of white willow (Salix alba L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuytack, Tatiana; Verheyen, Kris; Wuyts, Karen; Kardel, Fatemeh; Adriaenssens, Sandy; Samson, Roeland

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we assess the potential of white willow (Salix alba L.) as bioindicator for monitoring of air quality. Therefore, shoot biomass, specific leaf area, stomatal density, stomatal pore surface, and stomatal resistance were assessed from leaves of stem cuttings. The stem cuttings were introduced in two regions in Belgium with a relatively high and a relatively low level of air pollution, i.e., Antwerp city and Zoersel, respectively. In each of these regions, nine sampling points were selected. At each sampling point, three stem cuttings of white willow were planted in potting soil. Shoot biomass and specific leaf area were not significantly different between Antwerp city and Zoersel. Microclimatic differences between the sampling points may have been more important to plant growth than differences in air quality. However, stomatal pore surface and stomatal resistance of white willow were significantly different between Zoersel and Antwerp city. Stomatal pore surface was 20% lower in Antwerp city due to a significant reduction in both stomatal length (-11%) and stomatal width (-14%). Stomatal resistance at the adaxial leaf surface was 17% higher in Antwerp city because of the reduction in stomatal pore surface. Based on these results, we conclude that stomatal characteristics of white willow are potentially useful indicators for air quality.

  16. 75 FR 63431 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Willow Creek, CA AGENCY: Federal Communications... allotment of FM Channel 258A at Willow Creek, California. Petitioner, the auction winner and permittee of Channel 253A, Willow Creek, has submitted an application to specify operation of the station on...

  17. Error attribution and validation of SMOS high-level salinity products with Argo data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabrera, Joaquim

    2015-04-01

    In the context of the E-AIMS project (7FP Project No. 284391), the role and suggested improvements of the Argo array in the validation of SMOS sea surface salinity (SSS) have been investigated. Here, a summary of the main results is shown and discussed. The Argo array continues to be the sole component of the ocean observing system to provide routine observations of temperature and salinity profiles at global scale with a time sampling period of about ten days. The observations provided by an Argo profiler are publicly available a few days from being taken (Real Time Mode) after application of automatic quality control filters. Scientific quality data (Delayed Mode) is generated after a human supervised quality control. In this study, the highest quality, delayed mode, near-the-surface data are being used to validate the SSS Level 3 and Level 4 products generated by the SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre (http://cp34-bec.cmima.csic.es). The products being validated here are the weighted binned average (L3), an Optimal Interpolation (OI), and a data fused product exploiting the spatial variability of OSTIA SST. An Argo profile is considered if its quality flags of position and time are equal to one (good), two (probably good), five (value changes) or eight (value interpolated). However, temperature, salinity and pressure data are used only if their quality flags are equal to one (good). The uppermost (but deeper than 0.5 m) salinity measurement is taken as an approximation of the in-situ SSS, but only if the salinity profile allows a robust interpolation of the salinity at 7.5 m (this additional requirement is introduced to ensure that the salinity profile is properly sampled near the surface). At the moment of performing this study, the main drawbacks have been the lag in the Delayed Mode processing, and the lack of salinity observations in the first five meters below the ocean surface. While 5500 profiles in Delayed Mode were available for January 2011, about 1000 were

  18. Satellite-scale Estimates of the "b Parameter" Relating Vegetation Water Content and SMOS Optical Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, J. C.; Hornbuckle, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    Microwave radiation emitted by Earth's land surface is primarily determined by soil moisture and vegetation. One of the effects of vegetation on surface microwave emissions is often termed the "vegetation optical thickness" or "vegetation opacity" and is often abbreviated as tau. Retrievals of soil moisture from microwave radiometer measurements requires knowledge of tau. The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite measures microwave radiation at multiple incidence angles, enabling the simultaneous retrieval of soil moisture and tau. Other soil moisture satellites, such as the upcoming Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite, only measure at single incidence angles and may need auxiliary sources of tau data in order to retrieve soil moisture. One proposed method for estimating tau for these satellites is by relating reflectance data, e.g. the normalized difference vegetation index, to vegetation water content (VWC), then relating VWC to tau. VWC and tau can be related through the b parameter, i.e. tau = b x VWC. Values of b for different land cover types have been estimated from tower (~1 m) and airplane (~10-100 m) data, but have not been measured at the satellite scale (~10 km). Estimating b at the satellite scale from measurements at smaller scales is difficult because the effective value of b in a satellite pixel may not be well represented by linear weighted average based on the fraction of each land cover type in the pixel. However, by relating county crop yields, estimated by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, to measurements of SMOS tau, and by using certain allometric relationships, such as the ratio of water to dry matter and the harvest index of crops, we can estimate b at the satellite scale. We have used this method to estimate b for each Iowa county for the years 2010-2012. Initial results suggest that b may change year to year; our current estimates for b in Iowa range from 0.065 in 2010 to 0.100 in 2012. These

  19. The use of short rotation willows and poplars for the recycling of saline waste waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaconette Mirck; Ronald S. Jr. Zalesny; Ioannis Dimitriou; Jill A. Zalesny; Timothy A. Volk; Warren E. Mabee

    2009-01-01

    The production of high-salinity waste waters by landfills and other waste sites causes environmental concerns. This waste water often contains high concentrations of sodium and chloride, which may end up in local ground and surface waters. Vegetation filter systems comprised of willows and poplars can be used for the recycling of saline waste water. These vegetation...

  20. The CoSMOS L-band experiment in Southeast Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleh, K.; Kerr, Y.H.; Boulet, G.

    2007-01-01

    The CoSMOS (Campaign for validating the Operation of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission) campaign was conducted during November of 2005 in the Goulburn River Catchment, in SE Australia. The main objective of CoSMOS was to obtain a series of L-band measurements from the air in order...

  1. SMOS calibration and validation activities with airborne interferometric radiometer HUT-2D during spring 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kainulainen, J.; Rautiainen, K.; Sievinen, P.;

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present calibration and validation activities of European Space Agency’s SMOS mission, which utilize airborne interferomentric L-band radiometer system HUT-2D of the Aalto University. During spring 2010 the instrument was used to measure three SMOS validation target areas, one in...

  2. Towards an improved soil moisture retrieval for organic-rich soils from SMOS passive microwave L-band observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Simone; Richaume, Philippe; Mahmoodi, Ali; Mialon, Arnaud; Fernandez-Moran, Roberto; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Demontoux, François; Jonard, François; Weihermüller, Lutz; Andreasen, Mie; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Ikonen, Jaakko; Schwank, Mike; Drusch, Mattias; Kerr, Yann H.

    2017-04-01

    From the passive L-band microwave radiometer onboard the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) space mission global surface soil moisture data is retrieved every 2 - 3 days. Thus far, the empirical L-band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere (L-MEB) radiative transfer model applied in the SMOS soil moisture retrieval algorithm is exclusively calibrated over test sites in dry and temperate climate zones. Furthermore, the included dielectric mixing model relating soil moisture to relative permittivity accounts only for mineral soils. However, soil moisture monitoring over the higher Northern latitudes is crucial since these regions are especially sensitive to climate change. A considerable positive feedback is expected if thawing of these extremely organic soils supports carbon decomposition and release to the atmosphere. Due to differing structural characteristics and thus varying bound water fractions, the relative permittivity of organic material is lower than that of the most mineral soils at a given water content. This assumption was verified by means of L-band relative permittivity laboratory measurements of organic and mineral substrates from various sites in Denmark, Finland, Scotland and Siberia using a resonant cavity. Based on these data, a simple empirical dielectric model for organic soils was derived and implemented in the SMOS Soil Moisture Level 2 Prototype Processor (SML2PP). Unfortunately, the current SMOS retrieved soil moisture product seems to show unrealistically low values compared to in situ soil moisture data collected from organic surface layers in North America, Europe and the Tibetan Plateau so that the impact of the dielectric model for organic soils cannot really be tested. A simplified SMOS processing scheme yielding higher soil moisture levels has recently been proposed and is presently under investigation. Furthermore, recalibration of the model parameters accounting for vegetation and roughness effects that were thus far only

  3. A phytotoxicity test using transpiration of willows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Zambrano, Kim Cecilia; Kusk, Kresten Ole

    2000-01-01

    A short-term acute toxicity assay for willow trees growing in contaminated solution or in polluted soil was developed and tested. The test apparatus consists of an Erlenmeyer flask with a prerooted tree cutting growing in it. Growth and reduction of transpiration are used to determine toxicity.......8 and 9.6 mg/L were found. This is similar to the results from algal growth rate tests. The willow tree toxicity test may be useful for determining the site-specific toxicity of polluted soils and for terrestrial risk assessment of new chemicals and pesticides....

  4. Primary song by a juvenile willow flycatcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogge, M.K.

    1997-01-01

    The timing of song development in suboscines, in which song appears not to be learned from other adults is poorly known. The Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii) is a suboscine with a primary song typically referred to as fitz-bew. I report here an instance of very early singing by a 6-8-wk-old Willow Flycatcher, which sang in an aggressive context in response to a recording of adult flycatcher song. This is exceptionally early development of primary song, even among suboscines. Early song development may assist in the defense of winter territories.

  5. The effect of sewage sludge application on soil properties and willow (Salix sp.) cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbaniak, Magdalena; Wyrwicka, Anna; Tołoczko, Wojciech; Serwecińska, Liliana; Zieliński, Marek

    2017-05-15

    The aim of the study was to determine the impact of sewage sludge from three wastewater treatment plants of different sizes (small, medium and large) applied in two doses (3 and 9 tons per hectare) on soil properties, determined as the content of organic carbon and humus fractions, bacterial abundance, phytotoxicity and PCDD/PCDF TEQ concentrations. The study also evaluated the impact of this sewage sludge on the biometric and physiological parameters and detoxification reaction of willow (Salix sp.) as a typical crop used for the remediation of soil following sludge application. The cultivation of willow on soil treated with sludge was found to result in a gradual increase of humus fractions, total organic carbon content and bacterial abundance as well as soil properties measured using Lepidium sativum. However, it also produced an initial increase of soil phytotoxicity, indicated by Sinapis alba and Sorghum sacharatum, and PCDD/PCDF Toxic Equivalent (TEQ) concentrations, which then fell during the course of the experiment, particularly in areas planted by willow. Although the soil phytotoxicity and PCDD/PCDF TEQ content of the sewage sludge-amended soil initially increased, sludge application was found to have a positive influence on willow, probably due to its high nutrient and carbon content. The obtained results reveal increases in willow biomass, average leaf surface area and leaf length as well as chlorophyll a+b content. Moreover, a strong decline was found in the activity of the detoxifying enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GSTs), a multifunctional enzyme involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics in plants, again demonstrating the used sludge had a positive influence on willow performance.

  6. The global SMOS Level 3 daily soil moisture and brightness temperature maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Ahmad Al; Mialon, Arnaud; Kerr, Yann H.; Cabot, François; Richaume, Philippe; Jacquette, Elsa; Quesney, Arnaud; Mahmoodi, Ali; Tarot, Stéphane; Parrens, Marie; Al-Yaari, Amen; Pellarin, Thierry; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Nemesio; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the multi-orbit (MO) surface soil moisture (SM) and angle-binned brightness temperature (TB) products for the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission based on a new multi-orbit algorithm. The Level 3 algorithm at CATDS (Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS) makes use of MO retrieval to enhance the robustness and quality of SM retrievals. The motivation of the approach is to make use of the longer temporal autocorrelation length of the vegetation optical depth (VOD) compared to the corresponding SM autocorrelation in order to enhance the retrievals when an acquisition occurs at the border of the swath. The retrieval algorithm is implemented in a unique operational processor delivering multiple parameters (e.g. SM and VOD) using multi-angular dual-polarisation TB from MO. A subsidiary angle-binned TB product is provided. In this study the Level 3 TB V310 product is showcased and compared to SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) TB. The Level 3 SM V300 product is compared to the single-orbit (SO) retrievals from the Level 2 SM processor from ESA with aligned configuration. The advantages and drawbacks of the Level 3 SM product (L3SM) are discussed. The comparison is done on a global scale between the two datasets and on the local scale with respect to in situ data from AMMA-CATCH and USDA ARS Watershed networks. The results obtained from the global analysis show that the MO implementation enhances the number of retrievals: up to 9 % over certain areas. The comparison with the in situ data shows that the increase in the number of retrievals does not come with a decrease in quality, but rather at the expense of an increased time lag in product availability from 6 h to 3.5 days, which can be a limiting factor for applications like flood forecast but reasonable for drought monitoring and climate change studies. The SMOS L3 soil moisture and L3 brightness temperature products are delivered using an open licence and

  7. Assimilation of SMOS-derived soil moisture in a fully integrated hydrological and soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer model in Western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridler, Marc-Etienne Francois; Madsen, Henrik; Stisen, Simon

    2014-01-01

    in Denmark. The objective is to determine if any additional gains can be achieved by SMOS surface soil moisture assimilation beyond the optimized model. A series of assimilation experiments were designed to (1) determine how effectively soil moisture corrections propagate downward in the soil column, (2...... cover classes. Assimilation also brought modest gains in R2 at 25 cm depth but slightly degraded the correlation at 50 cm depth. Assimilation overcorrected discharge peaks....

  8. Assessment of SMOS Soil Moisture Retrieval Parameters Using Tau-Omega Algorithms for Soil Moisture Deficit Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant K.; Han, Dawei; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel A.; O'Neill, Peggy; Islam, Tanvir; Gupta, Manika

    2014-01-01

    Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) is the latest mission which provides flow of coarse resolution soil moisture data for land applications. However, the efficient retrieval of soil moisture for hydrological applications depends on optimally choosing the soil and vegetation parameters. The first stage of this work involves the evaluation of SMOS Level 2 products and then several approaches for soil moisture retrieval from SMOS brightness temperature are performed to estimate Soil Moisture Deficit (SMD). The most widely applied algorithm i.e. Single channel algorithm (SCA), based on tau-omega is used in this study for the soil moisture retrieval. In tau-omega, the soil moisture is retrieved using the Horizontal (H) polarisation following Hallikainen dielectric model, roughness parameters, Fresnel's equation and estimated Vegetation Optical Depth (tau). The roughness parameters are empirically calibrated using the numerical optimization techniques. Further to explore the improvement in retrieval models, modifications have been incorporated in the algorithms with respect to the sources of the parameters, which include effective temperatures derived from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) downscaled using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-NOAH Land Surface Model and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature (LST) while the s is derived from MODIS Leaf Area Index (LAI). All the evaluations are performed against SMD, which is estimated using the Probability Distributed Model following a careful calibration and validation integrated with sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The performance obtained after all those changes indicate that SCA-H using WRF-NOAH LSM downscaled ECMWF LST produces an improved performance for SMD estimation at a catchment scale.

  9. A weekly Arctic sea-ice thickness data record from merged CryoSat-2 and SMOS satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, Robert; Hendricks, Stefan; Kaleschke, Lars; Tian-Kunze, Xiangshan; King, Jennifer; Haas, Christian

    2017-07-01

    Sea-ice thickness on a global scale is derived from different satellite sensors using independent retrieval methods. Due to the sensor and orbit characteristics, such satellite retrievals differ in spatial and temporal resolution as well as in the sensitivity to certain sea-ice types and thickness ranges. Satellite altimeters, such as CryoSat-2 (CS2), sense the height of the ice surface above the sea level, which can be converted into sea-ice thickness. Relative uncertainties associated with this method are large over thin ice regimes. Another retrieval method is based on the evaluation of surface brightness temperature (TB) in L-band microwave frequencies (1.4 GHz) with a thickness-dependent emission model, as measured by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. While the radiometer-based method looses sensitivity for thick sea ice (> 1 m), relative uncertainties over thin ice are significantly smaller than for the altimetry-based retrievals. In addition, the SMOS product provides global sea-ice coverage on a daily basis unlike the altimeter data. This study presents the first merged product of complementary weekly Arctic sea-ice thickness data records from the CS2 altimeter and SMOS radiometer. We use two merging approaches: a weighted mean (WM) and an optimal interpolation (OI) scheme. While the weighted mean leaves gaps between CS2 orbits, OI is used to produce weekly Arctic-wide sea-ice thickness fields. The benefit of the data merging is shown by a comparison with airborne electromagnetic (AEM) induction sounding measurements. When compared to airborne thickness data in the Barents Sea, the merged product has a root mean square deviation (RMSD) of about 0.7 m less than the CS2 product and therefore demonstrates the capability to enhance the CS2 product in thin ice regimes. However, in mixed first-year (FYI) and multiyear (MYI) ice regimes as in the Beaufort Sea, the CS2 retrieval shows the lowest bias.

  10. Correcting satellite-based precipitation products from SMOS soil moisture data assimilation using two models of different complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román-Cascón, Carlos; Pellarin, Thierry; Gibon, François

    2017-04-01

    Real-time precipitation information at the global scale is quite useful information for many applications. However, satellite-based precipitation products in real time are known to be biased from real values observed in situ. On the other hand, the information about precipitation contained in soil moisture data can be very useful to improve precipitation estimation, since the evolution of this variable is highly influenced by the amount of rainfall at a certain area after a rain event. In this context, the soil moisture data from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite is used to correct the precipitation provided by real-time satellite-based products such as CMORPH, TRMM-3B42RT or PERSIANN. In this work, we test an assimilation algorithm based on the data assimilation of SMOS measurements in two models of different complexity: a simple hydrological model (Antecedent Precipitation Index (API)) and a state-of-the-art complex land-surface model (Surface Externalisée (SURFEX)). We show how the assimilation technique, based on a particle filter method, leads to the improvement of correlation and root mean squared error (RMSE) of precipitation estimates, with slightly better results for the simpler (and less expensive computationally) API model. This methodology has been evaluated for six years in ten sites around the world with different features, showing the limitations of the methodology in regions affected by mountainous terrain or by high radio-frequency interferences (RFI), which notably affect the quality of the soil moisture retrievals from brightness temperatures by SMOS. The presented results are promising for a potential near-real time application at the global scale.

  11. 76 FR 44258 - Removal of Class D and E Airspace; Willow Grove, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Removal of Class D and E Airspace; Willow Grove, PA AGENCY... and Class E airspace areas at Willow Grove, PA. The Willow Grove Naval Air Station (NAS) has closed... Class D and E airspace at Willow Grove, PA. The closing of the Willow Grove NAS and cancellation of...

  12. Willow supply strategies to energy plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gigler, J.K.; Meerdink, G.; Hendrix, E.M.T.

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop minimum cost supply strategies for willow to energy plants (two plant sizes: 0.5 and 30 MWe, two energy conversion technologies: combustion and gasification). Time span between harvest and energy conversion varied from 1 to 12 months. For a realistic c

  13. Willow Browse Survey 2015 : Biological Summary Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Browse pressure by ungulate species, primarily elk, is known to have a negative impact on the health of willow stands. On Baca and Alamosa NWR’s, it has been noticed...

  14. Drying of willow biomass in supply chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gigler, J.K.

    2000-01-01

    The drying process of willow ( Salix viminalis ) in biomass supply chains to energy plants is quantitatively described. Drying at particle level was modelled for chips and stems by a diffusion equation linked to the mass transfer of moisture to the air. Drying at bulk level is described by a deep be

  15. Willow Browse Survey 2016 : Biological Summary Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Browse pressure by ungulate species, primarily elk, is known to have a negative impact on the health of willow stands. On Baca and Alamosa NWR’s, it has been noticed...

  16. Drying of willow biomass in supply chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gigler, J.

    2000-01-01

    The drying process of willow ( Salix viminalis ) in biomass supply chains to energy plants is quantitatively described. Drying at particle level was modelled for chips and stems by a diffusion equation linked to the mass transfer of moisture to the air. Drying at bulk

  17. Extracellular enzyme activity in a willow sewage treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinska, Maria Swiontek; Lalke-Porczyk, Elżbieta; Kalwasińska, Agnieszka

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the results of studies on the activity of extra-cellular enzymes in soil-willow vegetation filter soil which is used in the post-treatment of household sewage in an onsite wastewater treatment system located in central Poland. Wastewater is discharged from the detached house by gravity into the onsite wastewater treatment system. It flows through a connecting pipe into a single-chamber septic tank and is directed by the connecting pipe to a control well to be further channelled in the soil-willow filter by means of a subsurface leaching system. Soil samples for the studies were collected from two depths of 5 cm and 1 m from three plots: close to the wastewater inflow, at mid-length of the plot and close to its terminal part. Soil samples were collected from May to October 2009. The activity of the extra-cellular enzymes was assayed by the fluorometric method using 4-methylumbelliferyl and 7-amido-4-methylcoumarin substrate. The ranking of potential activity of the assayed enzymes was the same at 5 cm and 1 m soil depths, i.e. esterase > phosphmomoesterase > leucine-aminopeptidase > β-glucosidase > α-glucosidase. The highest values of enzymatic activity were recorded in the surface layer of the soil at the wastewater inflow and decreased with increasing distance from that point.

  18. Comparison of remote sensing and in-situ soil moisture measurements: 6 years survey of SMOS data and agrometeorological stations in Eastern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlazak, Radoslaw; Rojek, Edyta; Lukowski, Mateusz; Marczewski, Wojciech; Slominski, Jan; Sagan, Joanna; Gluba, Lukasz; Usowicz, Jerzy; Usowicz, Boguslaw

    2017-04-01

    Long term measurements of soil moisture on a large scale provide important information about not only periodical changes in water content, but also its contribute to better understanding of water cycle in environment. In addition, if in the studied area occurred extreme weather conditions or even anomalies, it is scientifically challenging to compare and validate data from two such different techniques like remote sensing and in-situ measurements. The aim of our research was to compare data of independent soil moisture measurements from SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) satellite and 9 agrometeorological stations installed on Eastern Poland (Polesie and Podlasie regions). Those regions have similar climatic and topographic conditions, however, different vegetation covers and soil properties. Radiometric SMOS data contain surface water content values (approx. 45 km) for the area corresponding to the positions of chosen agrometeorological stations. For the purpose of those studies only morning satellite overpasses (ascending) were used. In-situ sensors in stations measure precisely soil moisture at 5-10 cm depth, but each only in one point. Both datasets were 7-days averaged in order to standardize. Analysis of a long term data is very interesting, especially because of occurrence of flood and drought events during the analyzed period of time. For example, the analyses revealed clear rainfall trend between ground and satellite data. Some shifts between SMOS and ground measurements were also observed, what may be explained by impact of different depths of SMOS measurements (Government of Poland through an ESA-PECS contract (Plan for European Cooperating States). 2) "Technical Support for the fabrication and deployment of the radiometer ELBARA-III in Bubnow, Poland" No. 4000113360/15/NL/FF/gp

  19. Sea Surface Salinity : Research Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, David; Lagerloef, Gary; Font, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) can be important in regulating sea surface temperature (SST). Two technological breakthrough satellite SSS missions, Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), are currently producing high-quality SSS data. This paper provides an overview of the importance of SSS for weather and climate applications and describes the Aquarius and SMOS missions. The newness of adequately sampled SSS data prompted a first-time at-sea field campaign devoted to improved understanding of SSS variations.

  20. Modelling soil moisture at SMOS scale by use of a SVAT model over the Valencia Anchor Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Juglea

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission is to deliver global fields of surface soil moisture and sea surface salinity using L-band (1.4 GHz radiometry. Within the context of the Science preparation for SMOS, the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS experimental site, in Spain, was chosen to be one of the main test sites in Europe for Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val activities. In this framework, the paper presents an approach consisting in accurately simulating a whole SMOS pixel by representing the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the soil moisture fields over the wide VAS surface (50×50 km2. Ground and meteorological measurements over the area are used as the input of a Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT model, SURFEX (Externalized Surface - module ISBA (Interactions between Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere to simulate the spatial and temporal distribution of surface soil moisture. The calibration as well as the validation of the ISBA model are performed using in situ soil moisture measurements. It is shown that a good consistency is reached when point comparisons between simulated and in situ soil moisture measurements are made.

    Actually, an important challenge in remote sensing approaches concerns product validation. In order to obtain an representative soil moisture mapping over the Valencia Anchor Station (50×50 km2 area, a spatialization method is applied. For verification, a comparison between the simulated spatialized soil moisture and remote sensing data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on Earth observing System (AMSR-E and from the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS-SCAT is performed. Despite the fact that AMSR-E surface soil moisture product is not reproducing accurately the absolute values, it provides trustworthy information on surface soil moisture temporal variability. However, during the vegetation growing season the signal is perturbed. By using the

  1. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Imperial Beach, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    64 ’ 5 .8 onu1n 9 6 . 6 . Z. 46.9l ill7ll"q. P11041 .1MARI Of d(IFOO IAt OBSFRVAIIONS SURFACF ISMOS 34 H PRIAI MACH CA IFRNIAIUI NAVAL OCEANOGRAPHY...72. 72.7 73.1 730;1 73.,1 7:3.1t 73.1 73.1 73.1 ’-"*1 73.1 t ismo 4*o 6S.4.-3 68.’ 71.3 72.1 72.3 13.1 73.4 71.4 73.4 73.4 73.4 73.4 7 3 .’.# 7 . 14...69.31 9,00 i ismo 43.2 63*4 71.2 75.6 83.6 64.7 87o2 39.. 89*0 3 9. 3 *1 a :"sv:; 89.3 59.3 $.3 a ie t 300o 41 66.1 73.O 77.6 85.4 86.5 89.0 90.8 90S9

  2. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), New River, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    0000000000000000000 ,aa z a- wim oieia N a z O.a -aaf0 W~~aC 0: OD00 0 0 0,o00 0 0 N Zha _I WW w ft a., u L W % 3 LACA 0: 00 EZW ~ ~ ~ ~ C P:N~ ’ m~-0 0 x xhad 0...1 01 0. CP9 0. O. 01 0.0 0’ 0. 0 01 000 4A p4.4.4 LD z - on M rP.00o 0*Y . In) ’P 0 - 0 N0Il4 4 0 0. z ka N 0 1 4X o :11 A 1 ZNC; 4O A f- D 1D N inOD0...0 0 A) 1 1D - 1- r -r 0 0 0 0 a 0 0 0 CY 0 0IN 0 0 0’ 01 0’ 0- In * V 011 𔃺 IAlll’ I-r -1- 010 .00’U*𔃺PI00-.t000 F., Ii %4 1 1 1 0000 0: 4! 9 6.9

  3. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Quantico, Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    PuOrOGRAl 1TMM AND iUNnxo EN40DAC OMc~~ nAu.~n~ *WIN shmo SUMARY OF oMETORIGIA OSERATION SUFCE S TATION: #13773 Quantleo, TA - 1E DAILY 2/45-1:2/82 OJoe no...3. 95go 91.6 98.5 o o 96. . 500 15.9 515 Goes .9o 97.1 95. 98.0 996 98.5 00.0 00.00 0000.0g 00.00 o.o 4" ’S ss a5. Ojos ALI** 91 95.: 121 to. d 96...34 . . , + ,.+ °_ " ..+ ,- ,, , ,-,, .,,-+, + "A ;+ " + + ’g " "’" ’ VE SERVICE DETACHMENT. ASHEVILLE NC CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY SYATTm 51 mal man son

  4. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS) for Moffett Field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    0* 0. e N W I a U 3 - 01, 0.~C Of CI 0. N I ILA LUz C6 I .. a Ia . . . a a a a . 0 * .al 0.. A I21, 11% 9- -4 CL) for 0n In~ %.AI D4 1a ,’ .24 o o0 0...Di N i Ci3 i-4 0 𔃺 L 0 0 4.0 0 iO .in cp. 4.0 .1I 4 - Dn D in D in Din D&n D In DiL in;i k- -4 o in- 00. Z D N Oi#AN N4 co N .4 cINe n N N N 0 At 0

  5. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS) Mayport, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    8217 a c, o ’ , a- o’ 1.. , L0* ; 1 .0.0.0 - ADNN N Cc0 ’C’ a a ’D ’ ’ ’ a0 cr z a. L 11 .. cr N~ N em - q N N m N N N N N "’ N N N r4 N N " cj eq NA N ’ N

  6. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Midway Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    7Ld VARK 1I.1 21 .. 4-." . ’. _ _. _ __ __ I -.- inZ. TOTAL. NUIt Of OI ONS ’ NWs....L ..... n. a ___ ____ ____ ____ ___ ANL...CEILING VISIBILITY (STATUTE MilLES ) -CEILING _____7__6.293 . -r -s,.77 (P"? ’, .) I ~ ~~ ",,. 1,. ?46, . ., .. .I , , o. 1 49 &1 4. ,,, 1 ?8;oz 𔃻...CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY ST ti ~flH Ig11 V.A.. nuIT . PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF OCCURRENCE . 9 (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) CE N VISISILITY (STATUTE MILES

  7. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Patuxent River, Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) SIm WTAT I@N M&IE VtlIM * 0KK ,L L LAT- - SPEED MEAN (KNTS) 1-3 4•6 7.10 11 -16 17 -21 22 • 27 28 - 33 34 -40 41...A• td * E.ŕ,I*2 __ ___ NAvAL WEATHER SERVICE DETACHW.!NT. ASHEVILLE. NC CEILING VERSUS

  8. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS) for Diego Garcia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    8217- P1 (d 9’-- w’ In.t -- eo 0’~ - .4) ta o-w 0 ni w2- 14 +0 (d0 ~~~~ .00 00 𔃺 .. nwd2- 0i 0-+ pa - w w .0 0-. 3. .01 4c4 >~ n >n-- - wv inA 4’ >> ,0...C00 0 0 CL 0 r-r- - - WW M WOD lo, 01()1 0000’ 0CL00 0 N0 .0t- - 0 r- W Q i 0, 0 0 0 00’ 0 P 0 C 0 0 000 0 0 0’a a A .0 ~ r- 0 P1 .- 0 w- .0 I’- t 0...01 ,L A L c acca , 0O𔃺 0O 0: 1- U 0I 0IDJ - cc C aj Go w Go )co 000) Goaaa a0 7 ,0, 0101 a,01 0 ’C a W I u ( 011 -.) U 0 mN 010 0 n00mmwonr -ma w

  9. Empirical sea ice thickness retrieval during the freeze up period from SMOS high incident angle observations

    OpenAIRE

    Huntemann, M.; G. Heygster; Kaleschke, L.; T. Krumpen; M. Mäkynen; M. Drusch

    2014-01-01

    Sea ice thickness information is important for sea ice modelling and ship operations. Here a method to detect the thickness of sea ice up to 50 cm during the freeze-up season based on high incidence angle observations of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite working at 1.4 GHz is suggested. By comparison of thermodynamic ice growth data with SMOS brightness temperatures, a high correlation to intensity and an anticorrelation to the difference bet...

  10. SMOS and climate data applicability for analyzing forest decline and forest fires

    OpenAIRE

    Chaparro Danon, David; Vayreda, Jordi; Martínez Vilalta, Jordi; Vall-Llossera Ferran, Mercedes Magdalena; Banque, Mireia; Camps Carmona, Adriano José; Piles Guillem, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Forests partially reduce climate change impact but, at the same time, this climate forcing threatens forest's health. In recent decades, droughts are becoming more frequent and intense implying an increase of forest decline episodes and forest fires. In this context, global and frequent soil moisture observations from the ESA's SMOS mission could be useful in controlling forest exposure to decline and fires. In this paper, SMOS observations and several climate variables are analyzed together ...

  11. Fresh Water River discharges as observed by SMOS in the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Estrella; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Turiel, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    The Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) are two peculiar regions in the Indian Ocean exhibiting a wide range of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) values. In the BoB, the strong summer monsoon rainfall and the continental run-offs into these semi-enclosed basins result in an intense dilution of the surface seawater in the northern part of the Bay, thereby inducing some of the lowest SSS water masses found in the tropical belt. In the AS, because of the intense variability associated with the monsoon cycle, water mass structure in the upper layers of the AS shows enormous variability in the space and time. As such, the role of the salinity in these regions is crucial in the ocean dynamics of these regions. After more than 7 years in orbit, the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission [1] continues to provide a series of salinity data that could be used to monitor the SSS variations in these climatically relevant regions, provided that systematic errors due to land contamination are reduced. Recently-developed algorithms for SSS retrieval [2] have improved the filtering criteria and the mitigation of the systematic bias, providing coherent SSS retrievals close to the land masses. In this work we have analyzed the SSS in 2-degree boxes located at the mouth of the main rivers in the BoB: Ganges-Brahmaputra, Irrawady, Mahanadi, Godovari; and in the AS: Indus. We have first tried to validate the SMOS salinity retrievals with in situ measurements. Since there is few available in situ data, we have also compared the climatological SSS behavior derived from SMOS with the ones provided by the World Ocean Atlas [3]. We have also compared the SMOS SSS data with historical data of discharges [4] and [5], ocean currents from the Ocean Surface Current Analyses Real-time (OSCAR) [6], Sea Surface Temperature from Operational Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Ice Analysis (OSTIA) [7],[8] and [9] and Chlorophyll data [10]. The conclusion of this work is that, when the proper

  12. On the synergy of SMOS and Terra/Aqua MODIS: high resolution soil moisture maps in near real-time

    OpenAIRE

    Piles Guillem, Maria; Vall-Llossera Ferran, Mercedes Magdalena; Camps Carmona, Adriano José; Sanchez, Nilda; Martinez Fernandez, Jose; Martinez, Justino; Gonzalez Gambau, Verónica; Riera, R.

    2013-01-01

    An innovative downscaling approach to obtain fine-scale soil moisture estimates from 40 km SMOS observations has been developed. It optimally blends SMOS multi-angular and full-polarimetric information with MODIS visible/data into high resolution soil moisture maps. The core of the algorithm is a model that linksmicrowave/optical sensitivity to soilmoisture and linearly relates the two instruments across spatial scales. This algorithm has been implemented at SMOS-BEC facilities and near real-...

  13. Spatial distribution of arsenic and heavy metals in willow roots from a contaminated floodplain soil measured by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, Dana, E-mail: dana.zimmer@uni-rostock.de [Soil Science, University of Rostock, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Kruse, Jens; Baum, Christel [Soil Science, University of Rostock, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Borca, Camelia [Paul Scherrer Institute, Swiss Light Source, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Laue, Michael [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Rostock, Medical Faculty, Strempelstr. 14, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Hause, Gerd [Microscopy Unit, Biocenter of the University of Halle, Weinbergweg 22, D-06120 Halle/Saale (Germany); Meissner, Ralph [UFZ-Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Soil Physics, Lysimeter Station, Dorfstrasse 55, D-39615 Falkenberg (Germany); Leinweber, Peter [Soil Science, University of Rostock, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2011-09-01

    Under changing redox conditions some plants create plaques at their root surface, which may affect the mobility and uptake of As and heavy metals but it is unknown to what extent this also holds true for willows in contaminated floodplain soils. Therefore, willow roots were sampled from a phytoremediation trial in the contaminated floodplain of the river Elbe (Germany), cryofixed, freeze-dried, and cross sections were mapped for the distribution of As, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mn, Ni, S and Zn by synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The elements Ca, Cu, Ni, S and Zn were concentrated in the aerenchymatic tissue, and not associated with Fe and Mn. Mixed Fe-Mn plaques covered the surface of the willow roots and As was accumulated in these plaques. The observed association pattern between As and Fe was explained by the different sorption/desorption properties of As(III) and As(V). The Cu and Zn intensities were not associated with the intensity of Fe in the plaque, which seems to be a willow-specific difference compared to other wetland plants. These results suggested that willows are especially suited to stabilize low-phytoextractable elements like Cu and As in their roots and rhizosphere. Thus, short rotation coppicing of willows may be a practical approach to mitigate the adverse effects of floodplain soil contamination. - Research highlights: {yields} Elemental distributions were mapped on willow roots for the first time by synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence. {yields} Ca, Cu, Ni, S and Zn were enriched in the aerenchyma but As, Fe and Mn formed root plaques. {yields} The Cu and Zn enrichments in aerenchyma but absence in plaques appeared to be willow-specific. {yields} In the plaques were three groups of pixels which strongly differed in the As to Fe and As to Mn ratios. {yields} This indicated different species of these redox-sensitive elements.

  14. Modelling soil moisture at SMOS scale by use of a SVAT model over the Valencia Anchor Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Juglea

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission is to deliver global fields of surface soil moisture and sea surface salinity using L-band (1.4 GHz radiometry. Within the context of the preparation for this mission over land, the Valencia Anchor Station experimental site, in Spain, was chosen to be one of the main test sites in Europe for the SMOS Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val activities. Ground and meteorological measurements over the area are used as the input of a Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT model, SURFEX (Externalized Surface-module ISBA (Interactions between Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere so as to simulate the surface soil moisture. The calibration as well as the validation of the ISBA model was made using in situ soil moisture measurements. It is shown that a good consistency was reached when point comparisons between simulated and in situ soil moisture measurements were made. In order to obtain an accurate soil moisture mapping over the Valencia Anchor Station (50×50 km2 area, a spatialization method has been applied. To validate the approach, a comparison with remote sensing data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on Earth observing System (AMSR-E and from the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS-Scat was performed. Despite the fact that AMSR-E surface soil moisture product is not reproducing accurately the absolute values, it provides trustworthy information on surface soil moisture temporal variability. However, during the vegetation growing season the signal is perturbed. By using the polarization ratio a better agreement is obtained. ERS-Scat soil moisture products were also used to be compared with the simulated spatialized soil moisture. The seasonal variations were well reproduced. However, the lack of soil moisture data over the area (45 observations for one year was a limit into completely understanding the soil moisture variability.

  15. Use of Willows in Evapotranspirative Systems for Onsite Wastewater Management – Theory and Experiences from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Hans; Arias, Carlos Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a method of onsite wastewater treatment and disposal that is an alternative to conventional soil absorption systems, particularly for sites where protecting surface water and ground water is essential or where soil infiltration is not possible. One of the most important...... of the nutrients can be recycled via the plant biomass, and the harvested biomass can serve as a source of bio-energy. In Denmark more than 500 ET systems planted with willows are in operation. The systems generally consist of a 1.5 m deep high-density polyethylene-lined basin filled with soil and planted...... with clones of willow (Salix viminalis L.). The surface area of the systems depends on the amount and quality of the sewage to be treated and the local annual rainfall. A single household in Denmark typically requires between 120 and 300 m2. The annual precipitation at the site of construction is an important...

  16. Towards an estimation of water masses formation areas from SMOS-based TS diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockmann, Marlene; Sabia, Roberto; Fernandez-Prieto, Diego; Donlon, Craig; Font, Jordi

    2014-05-01

    Temperature-Salinity (TS) diagrams emphasize the mutual variability of ocean temperature and salinity values, relating them to the corresponding density. Canonically used in oceanography, they provide a means to characterize and trace ocean water masses. In [1], a first attempt to estimate surface-layer TS diagrams based on satellite measurements has been performed, profiting from the recent availability of spaceborne salinity data. In fact, the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS, [2]) and the Aquarius/SAC-D [3] satellite missions allow to study the dynamical patterns of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) for the first time on a global scale. In [4], given SMOS and Aquarius salinity estimates, and by also using Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from the Operational Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Ice Analysis (OSTIA, [5]) effort, experimental satellite-based TS diagrams have been routinely derived for the year 2011. They have been compared with those computed from ARGO-buoys interpolated fields, referring to a customised partition of the global ocean into seven regions, according to the water masses classification of [6]. In [7], moreover, besides using TS diagrams as a diagnostic tool to evaluate the temporal variation of SST and SSS (and their corresponding density) as estimated by satellite measurements, the emphasis was on the interpretation of the geographical deviations with respect to the ARGO baseline (aiming at distinguishing between the SSS retrieval errors and the additional information contained in the satellite data with respect to ARGO). In order to relate these mismatches to identifiable oceanographic structures and processes, additional satellite datasets of ocean currents, evaporation/precipitation fluxes, and wind speed have been super-imposed. Currently, the main focus of the study deals with the exploitation of these TS diagrams as a prognostic tool to derive water masses formation areas. Firstly, following the approach described in [8], the surface

  17. Commercially Grown Short Rotation Coppice Willow in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Sevel, Lisbeth; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate biomass production in commercially grown short rotation coppice willow in Denmark and to investigate effects of site and management factors on willow yield. Biomass production assessed by non-destructive sampling on 296 plots from 25 plantations...

  18. Models in Educational Administration: Revisiting Willower's "Theoretically Oriented" Critique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Paul; Burgess, David; Burns, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Three decades ago, Willower (1975) argued that much of what we take to be theory in educational administration is in fact only theoretically oriented. If we accept Willower's assessment of the field as true, what implications does this statement hold for the academic study and practical application of the theoretically oriented aspects of our…

  19. Phytotoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to willow trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, R.S.; Trapp, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    The toxicity of PAH to willow trees (Salix alba, S. viminalis, S. viminalisx;schwerinii) was investigated. Willow cuttings were grown in PAH-saturated hydroponic solution (naphthalene NAP, phenanthrene PHEN and benzo(a)pyrene BaP). Toxicity was related to aqueous solubility and was highest for NAP...

  20. Precipitation fields interpolated from gauge stations versus a merged radar-gauge precipitation product: influence on modelled soil moisture at local scale and at SMOS scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. dall'Amico

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For the validation of coarse resolution soil moisture products from missions such as the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission, hydrological modelling of soil moisture is an important tool. The spatial distribution of precipitation is among the most crucial input data for such models. Thus, reliable time series of precipitation fields are required, but these often need to be interpolated from data delivered by scarcely distributed gauge station networks. In this study, a commercial precipitation product derived by Meteomedia AG from merging radar and gauge data is introduced as a novel means of adding the promising area-distributed information given by a radar network to the more accurate, but point-like measurements from a gauge station network. This precipitation product is first validated against an independent gauge station network. Further, the novel precipitation product is assimilated into the hydrological land surface model PROMET for the Upper Danube Catchment in southern Germany, one of the major SMOS calibration and validation sites in Europe. The modelled soil moisture fields are compared to those obtained when the operational interpolation from gauge station data is used to force the model. The results suggest that the assimilation of the novel precipitation product can lead to deviations of modelled soil moisture in the order of 0.15 m3 m−3 on small spatial (∼1 km2 and short temporal resolutions (∼1 day. As expected, after spatial aggregation to the coarser grid on which SMOS data are delivered (~195 km2, these differences are reduced to the order of 0.04 m3 m−3, which is the accuracy benchmark for SMOS. The results of both model runs are compared to brightness temperatures measured by the airborne L-band radiometer EMIRAD during the SMOS Validation Campaign 2010. Both comparisons yield equally good correlations, confirming the model's ability to

  1. Root-zone plant available water estimation using the SMOS-derived soil water index

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Zamora, Ángel; Sánchez, Nilda; Martínez-Fernández, José; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    Currently, there are several space missions capable of measuring surface soil moisture, owing to the relevance of this variable in meteorology, hydrology and agriculture. However, the Plant Available Water (PAW), which in some fields of application could be more important than the soil moisture itself, cannot be directly measured by remote sensing. Considering the root zone as the first 50 cm of the soil, in this study, the PAW at 25 cm and 50 cm and integrated between 0 and 50 cm of soil depth was estimated using the surface soil moisture provided by the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. For this purpose, the Soil Water Index (SWI) has been used as a proxy of the root-zone soil moisture, involving the selection of an optimal T (Topt), which can be interpreted as a characteristic soil water travel time. In this research, several tests using the correlation coefficient (R), the Nash-Sutcliffe score (NS), several error estimators and bias as predictor metrics were applied to obtain the Topt, making a comprehensive study of the T parameter. After analyzing the results, some differences were found between the Topt obtained using R and NS as decision metrics, and that obtained using the errors and bias, but the SWI showed good results as an estimator of the root-zone soil moisture. This index showed good agreement, with an R between 0.60 and 0.88. The method was tested from January 2010 to December 2014, using the database of the Soil Moisture Measurements Stations Network of the University of Salamanca (REMEDHUS) in Spain. The PAW estimation showed good agreement with the in situ measurements, following closely the dry-downs and wetting-up events, with R ranging between 0.60 and 0.92, and error values lower than 0.05 m3m-3. A slight underestimation was observed for both the PAW and root-zone soil moisture at the different depths; this could be explained by the underestimation pattern observed with the SMOS L2 soil moisture product, in line with previous

  2. 78 FR 15681 - Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, Dillon Ranger District; Montana; Birch, Willow, Lost Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... Forest Service Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, Dillon Ranger District; Montana; Birch, Willow, Lost... statement. SUMMARY: The Birch, Willow, Lost Project proposes to treat vegetation communities in the four sub.... FR 7476 (Lower Willow Creek) would have 1.7 miles Spot Reconstructed. FR 8200 (Willow Creek)...

  3. Test of aerobic TCE degradation by willows (Salix viminalis) and willows inoculated with TCE-cometabolizing strains of Burkholderia cepacia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lauge Peter Westergaard; Broholm, Mette Martina; Gosewinkel, Ulrich Bay

    2017-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widespread soil and groundwater pollutant and clean-up is often problematic and expensive. Phytoremediation may be a cost-effective solution at some sites. This study investigates TCE degradation by willows (S. viminalis) and willows inoculated with three strains of B...

  4. Puente Willow Creek en Monterrey, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1965-09-01

    Full Text Available Of the 10 awards given every year by the Prestressed Concrete Institute for the most outstanding prestressed concrete projects, two have been awarded in California this year, one of them to the Willow Creek bridge, near Monterrey. The prestressed, double T girders of this bridge were made at a workshop, a great distance from the bridge site. These are 24 m long, 1.35 m high, and are stabilized by transversal diaphragms, 20 cm in thickness. The table deck is of reinforced concrete, being 8.85 m wide and 20 cm thick. The structure is straightforward, slender, and adapts itself pleasantly to the background. It has seven spans and crosses over a secondary road, in addition to bridging the Willow stream. The supporting piles are hollow, of rectangular cross section, and over them a cross beam carries the five girders and the deck itself. The end abutments consist of vertical reinforced concrete walls, and supporting, soil filled, structures. The above information was supplied by the California Road Department.De los diez premios que anualmente concede el Prestressed Concrete Institute para las obras de hormigón pretensado más notables, dos han correspondido a California y uno de ellos al puente de Willow Creek, situado en la región de Monterrey. Las vigas de hormigón pretensado, con sección en forma de doble T, se prefabricaron en un taller situado a gran distancia del puente. Tienen 24 m de longitud y 1,35 m de canto, estando arriostradas con diafragmas transversales de 20 cm de espesor. La losa del tablero, de hormigón armado, tiene 8,85 m de anchura y 20 cm de espesor. La estructura es sencilla, esbelta y armoniza perfectamente con el paisaje que la circunda. Tiene siete tramos y salva un paso inferior secundario y el arroyo Willow. Los soportes, se apoyan sobre pilotes, algunos de gran altura; son huecos, de sección rectangular y terminan en una cruceta que sirve de sostén a las cinco vigas que soportan la losa del tablero. Los estribos

  5. Can energy willow (Salix sp.) remediate cadmium- and nickel-contaminated fish farm sludge?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marianne Bruus

    In Denmark, the sludge produced in fish farms is usually applied as agricultural fertiliser. However, in some areas of Denmark, the cadmium and nickel contents of the fish farm sludge exceed the Danish quality criteria for sludge, which means that the sludge has to be deposited or remedied until...... it meets the criteria. Phytoremediation by willow may combine accumulation of cadmium and nickel from the sludge with the production of an energy crop. The ability of eight selected willow clones to take up and tolerate cadmium and nickel was studied in pots under outdoor conditions. Fish farm sludge...... was added to the pots at different dosages, either on the soil surface, mixed into the soil or as pure sludge. The remediation potential of the single clones was estimated after one growing season by multiplying growth and heavy metal content. At leaf-fall leaves were collected for cadmium and nickel...

  6. Pathogenic and Ice-Nucleation Active (INA) Bacteria causing Dieback of Willows in Short Rotation Forestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nejad, Pajand

    2005-03-01

    To find out whether bacteria isolated from diseased plant parts can be the main causal agent for the dieback appearing in Salix energy forestry plantations in Sweden during the last few years, and if the joint effects of bacteria and frost injury are synergistic, extensive sampling of shoots from diseased Salix plants was performed. We performed several laboratory and greenhouse investigations and used evaluation techniques on the functions of the Ice-Nucleation Active (INA) bacteria. We carried out a comparison between spring and autumn bacterial communities isolated from within (endophytically) and surface (epiphytically) plant tissues of Salix viminalis. Seasonal variation of bacteria in willow clones with different levels of frost sensitivity and symptoms of bacterial damage was also investigated. We further focussed on possible effect of fertilisation and nutrient availability on the bacterial community in relation to plant dieback in Estonian willow plantations. The identification and detection of INA bacteria which cause damage in combination with frost to willow (Salix spp) plants in late fall, winter and spring was performed using BIOLOG MicroPlate, biochemical tests, selective INA primers and 16S rDNA analysis. To distinguish the character for differentiation between these bacteria morphologically and with respect to growing ability different culture media were used. We studied the temperature, at which ice nucleation occurred for individual bacteria, estimated the population of INA bacteria, effect of growth limiting factors, and evaluated the effect of chemical and physical agents for disruption and possible inhibition of INA among individual bacterial strains. The concentration of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus on INA is discussed. We demonstrate that among the bacterial isolates recovered from the willow plantations, there were many that were capable of ice nucleation at temperatures between -2 and -10 deg C, many that were capable of inducing a

  7. Winter distribution of willow flycatcher subspecies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, E.H.; Unitt, P.; Sogge, M.K.; Whitfield, M.; Keim, P.

    2011-01-01

    Documenting how different regions across a species' breeding and nonbreeding range are linked via migratory movements is the first step in understanding how events in one region can influence events in others and is critical to identifying conservation threats throughout a migratory animal's annual cycle. We combined two studies that evaluated migratory connectivity in the Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii), one using mitochondrial DNA sequences from 172 flycatchers sampled throughout their winter range, and another which examined morphological characteristics of 68 museum specimens collected in the winter range. Our results indicate that the four subspecies occupy distinct but overlapping regions of the winter range. Connectivity between specific breeding and winter grounds appears to be moderate to strong, with distributions that suggest migration patterns of both the chain and leap-frog types connecting the breeding and nonbreeding grounds. The Pacific lowlands of Costa Rica appear to be a key winter location for the endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (E. t. extimus), although other countries in Central America may also be important for the subspecies. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  8. [From willow bark to acetylsalicylic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norn, Svend; Permin, Henrik; Kruse, Poul R; Kruse, Edith

    2009-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid is one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Its ancestry the salicylates, including salicin and salicylic acid, are found in the bark and leaves of the willow and poplar trees. The ancient Sumerians and Egyptians, as well as Hippocrates, Celsus, Pliny the Elder, Dioscorides and Galen used these natural products as remedies for pain, fever and inflammation. In the Middle Ages these remedies were used for fever and rheumatism by Hildegard of Bingen and Henrik Harpestreng. The first "clinical trial" was reported by Edward Stone in 1763 with a successful treatment of malarial fever with the willow bark. In 1876 the antirheumatic effect of salicin was described by T. MacLagan, and that of salicylic acid by S. Stricker and L. Riess. Acetylsalicylic acid was synthesized by Charles Gerhardt in 1853 and in 1897 by Felix Hoffmann in the Bayer Company. The beneficial effect of acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin) on pain and rheumatic fever was recognized by K. Witthauer and J. Wohlgemuth, and the mechanism of action was explained in 1971 by John Vane. Today the antithrombotic effect of acetylsalicylic acid and new aspects of ongoing research demonstrates a still living drug.

  9. Selection of ectomycorrhizal willow genotype in phytoextraction of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynkiewicz, Katarzyna; Baum, Christel

    2013-01-01

    Willow clones are used for the phytoextraction of heavy metals from contaminated soils and are usually mycorrhizal. The receptiveness of willow clones for mycorrhizal inoculum varies specific to genotype; however, it is unknown if this might have a significant impact on their efficiency in phytoextraction of heavy metals. Therefore, a model system with mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal willows of two different genotypes--one with usually stronger natural mycorrhizal colonization (Salix dasyclados), and one with lower natural mycorrhizal colonization (S. viminalis)--was investigated for its efficiency of phytoextraction of heavy metals (Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn) from contaminated soil. Inoculation with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria significantly decreased the biomass of leaves of both inoculated willow clones, and increased or had no effect on the biomass of trunks and roots of S. dasyclados and S. viminalis, respectively. The concentrations of heavy metals in the biomass of S. dasyclados were in general higher than in S. viminalis irrespective of inoculation with the ectomycorrhizal fungus. Inoculation with A. muscaria significantly decreased the concentration of Cu in the trunks of both Salix taxa, but did not affected the concentrations of other heavy metals in the biomass. In conclusion, stronger receptiveness of willow clones for mycorrhizal inoculum was correlated with an increased total extraction of heavy metals from contaminated soils. Therefore, this seems to be a suitable criterion for effective willow clone selection for phytoremediation. Increased biomass production with relatively constant metal concentrations seems to be a major advantage of mycorrhizal formation of willows in phytoremediation of contaminated soils.

  10. Bioenergy from willow. 1995 Annual report, November 1987--December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, E.H.; Abrahamson, L.P.

    1997-07-01

    Experiments were established at Tully, New York, by the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, in cooperation with the University of Toronto and the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, to assess the potential of willows for wood biomass production. Specific objectives included determining the effects of clone type, fertilization, spacing, cutting cycle, and irrigation on biomass production. Production was high, with willow clone SV1 yielding nearly 32 oven dry tons per acre (odt ac{sup -1}) with three-year harvest cycle, irrigation, and fertilization. Clone type, fertilization, spacing, cutting cycle, and irrigation all significantly affected biomass production. Willow clone-site trials planted at Massena, and Tully, NY in 1993 grew well during 1994 and 1995, but some clones in the Massena trial were severely damaged by deer browse. Several new cooperators joined the project, broadening the funding base, and enabling establishment of additional willow plantings. Willow clone-site trials were planted at Himrod, King Ferry, Somerset, and Tully, NY, during 1995. A willow cutting orchard was planted during 1995 at the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation Saratoga Tree Nursery in Saratoga, NY. Plans are to begin site preparation for a 100+ acre willow bioenergy demonstration farm in central New York, and additional clone-site trials, in 1996.

  11. A Novel Bias Correction Method for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS Soil Moisture: Retrieval Ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Hyoung Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bias correction is a very important pre-processing step in satellite data assimilation analysis, as data assimilation itself cannot circumvent satellite biases. We introduce a retrieval algorithm-specific and spatially heterogeneous Instantaneous Field of View (IFOV bias correction method for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS soil moisture. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper to present the probabilistic presentation of SMOS soil moisture using retrieval ensembles. We illustrate that retrieval ensembles effectively mitigated the overestimation problem of SMOS soil moisture arising from brightness temperature errors over West Africa in a computationally efficient way (ensemble size: 12, no time-integration. In contrast, the existing method of Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF matching considerably increased the SMOS biases, due to the limitations of relying on the imperfect reference data. From the validation at two semi-arid sites, Benin (moderately wet and vegetated area and Niger (dry and sandy bare soils, it was shown that the SMOS errors arising from rain and vegetation attenuation were appropriately corrected by ensemble approaches. In Benin, the Root Mean Square Errors (RMSEs decreased from 0.1248 m3/m3 for CDF matching to 0.0678 m3/m3 for the proposed ensemble approach. In Niger, the RMSEs decreased from 0.14 m3/m3 for CDF matching to 0.045 m3/m3 for the ensemble approach.

  12. Canadian Oceans and Coaastal Socio-Econimic Initiatives Using Envisat, SMOS, CryoSat-2 and RADARSAT-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aube, Guy; Crevier, Yves

    2010-12-01

    Over the last decade, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) has been involved in the support of scientific initiatives, demonstration projects and operational activities related to oceans and coastal research, monitoring and management. Through the Government Related Initiatives Program (GRIP) and the Earth Observation Application Development Program (EOADP), the CSA and its public and private sector partners have fostered the development of Earth Observation (EO) information and services to monitor, understand and manage Canadian oceans (i.e. coastal zone, oil spills, ship detection, ocean colour, algae bloom, sea surface salinity, illegal fishing, etc.). The CSA understands the tremendous role and value that space-based EO systems and information have regarding oceans management and its environmental and socio-economic impacts and benefits. The proposed poster will provide a brief description of the Canadian EO initiatives and activities (i.e. ENVISAT/ MERIS & ASAR; SMOS, RADARSAT-2; etc.) affecting our oceans, focusing on existing EO programs, coordinated activities and assets.

  13. Recommendation of soil fertility levels for willow in the southern highlands of Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tássio Dresch Rech

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The species Salix x rubens is being grown on the Southern Plateau of Santa Catarina since the 1940s, but so far the soil fertility requirements of the crop have not been assessed. This study is the first to evaluate the production profile of willow plantations in this region, based on the modified method of Summer & Farina (1986, for the recommendation of fertility levels for willow. By this method, based on the law of Minimum and of Maximum for willow production for the conditions on the Southern Plateau of Santa Catarina, the following ranges could be recommended: pH: 5.0-6.5; P: 12-89 mg dm-3; Mg: 3.2-7.5 mg; Zn: 5.0-8.3 mg dm-3; Cu: 0.8-4.6 mg dm-3; and Mn; 20-164 mg dm-3. The Ca/Mg ratio should be between 1.2 and 2.9. For K and Ca only the lower (sufficiency level, but not the upper threshold (excess was established, with respectively 114 mg dm-3 and 5.3 cmol c dm-3. It was also possible to determine the upper threshold for Al and the Al/Ca ratio, i.e., 1.7 cmol c dm-3 and 0.28, respectively. For maximum yields, the clay in the soil surface layer should be below 320 g dm-3.

  14. Validation of SMOS Brightness Temperatures During the HOBE Airborne Campaign, Western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bircher, Simone; Balling, Jan E.; Skou, Niels

    2012-01-01

    of SMOS L1C brightness temperatures $T_{B}$ of the selected node. Data is stepwise compared from point via EMIRAD to SMOS scale. From ground soil moisture samples, $T_{B}$'s are pointwise estimated through the L-band microwave emission of the biosphere model using land cover specific model settings...... accordance on the single day where comparison is not prevented by strong radio-frequency interference (RFI) (May 2, avg. $hbox{RMSE} = 9.7 hbox{K}$). While the advantages of solid data sets of- - high spatial coverage and density throughout spatial scales for SMOS validation could be clearly demonstrated...... vegetation and higher open water fractions at surrounding grid nodes....

  15. Overview of SMOS L4 products under development and implementation at CATDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Ahmad Al; Kerr, Yann; Merlin, Olivier; Tomer, Sat; Molero, Beatriz; Chone, Audrey; Cabot, François; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Cherchali, Selma

    2014-05-01

    Higher end level 4 products for EOS (Earth observation satellites) are products obtained from the combination of sensors data with other sensors or models. Those products are obtained from the extension of remote sensing application studies to wider conditions and regions. This study concerns the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) level 4 products. Several level 4 products using the SMOS data are under development in the framework of the CATDS (Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS), the French national effort into the development of level 3 (time synthesis) and level 4 (higher-end products). Those products can be divided into two groups: Enhanced resolution products: Higher resolution products obtained from the combination of optical, thermal and microwave remote sensing products, Synergetic higher resolution products obtained from the combination of radar and microwave soil moisture products over India. Extreme event products: Global drought index obtained from the insertion of SMOS soil moisture L3 products and climate data from NCEP and ECMWF into a double bucket model, Flood prediction and monitoring at large scale based on the use of forecast precipitation data and SMOS soil moisture data before and during the flood events. A selection of those products like enhance drought index, Dispatch products, enhanced rainfall products are being implemented in an operational context . In this study the different algorithms behind each product are presented and detailed. Synthetic validation results and demonstration studies are shown, and quantitative comparison to other products are shown. Keywords: SMOS, SMAP, microwave, level 4, soil moisture, flooding, drought, Dispatch, disaggregation

  16. Validation of SMOS sea ice thickness retrieval in the northern Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Maaß

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission observes brightness temperatures at a low microwave frequency of 1.4 GHz (L-band with a daily coverage of the polar regions. L-band radiometry has been shown to provide information on the thickness of thin sea ice. Here, we apply a new emission model that has previously been used to investigate the impact of snow on thick Arctic sea ice. The model has not yet been used to retrieve ice thickness. In contrast to previous SMOS ice thickness retrievals, the new model allows us to include a snow layer in the brightness temperature simulations. Using ice thickness estimations from satellite thermal imagery, we simulate brightness temperatures during the ice growth season 2011 in the northern Baltic Sea. In both the simulations and the SMOS observations, brightness temperatures increase by more than 20 K, most likely due to an increase of ice thickness. Only if we include the snow in the model, the absolute values of the simulations and the observations agree well (mean deviations below 3.5 K. In a second comparison, we use high-resolution measurements of total ice thickness (sum of ice and snow thickness from an electromagnetic (EM sounding system to simulate brightness temperatures for 12 circular areas. While the SMOS observations and the simulations that use the EM modal ice thickness are highly correlated (r 2=0.95, the simulated brightness temperatures are on average 12 K higher than observed by SMOS. This would correspond to an 8-cm overestimation of the modal ice thickness by the SMOS retrieval. In contrast, if the simulations take into account the shape of the EM ice thickness distributions (r 2=0.87, the mean deviation between simulated and observed brightness temperatures is below 0.1 K.

  17. Coastal Energy Corporation, Willow Springs, MO - Public Notice Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Coastal Energy Corporation, located at 232 Burnham Road, Willow Springs, Missouri, for alleged violations at the facility located at or near that facility

  18. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge. 1963. [Willow Point Club].

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This aerial photograph shows a major portion of Willow Point Club tract no. 10, facing east. The eastern boundary dike trail of Pintail Marsh crosses the lower part...

  19. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Canastota`

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-05-15

    A distinct male cultivar of Salix sachalinensis.times.S. miyabeana named `Canastota`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 2.7-fold more woody biomass than its female parent (Salix sachalinensis `SX61`), 28% greater woody biomass yield than its male parent (Salix miyabeana `SX64`), and 20% greater woody biomass yield than a standard production cultivar, Salix dasyclados `SV1` when grown in the same field for the same length of time (two growing seasons after coppice) in Tully, N.Y. `Canastota` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. `Canastota` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by willow sawfly.

  20. Selection of Willows (Salix sp. for Biomass Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Kajba

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Willows compared with other species are the most suitable for biomass production in short rotations because of their very abundant growth during the first years. Nowadays, in Croatia, a large number of selected and registered willow clones are available. The main objective of the research should be to find genotypes which, with minimum nutrients, will produce the maximum quantity of biomass. Material and Methods: Clonal test of the arborescent willows include the autochthonous White Willow (Salix alba, interracial hybrids of the autochthonous White Willow and the English ‘cricket’ Willow (S. alba var. calva, interspecies hybrids (S. matsudana × S. alba, as well as multispecies hybrids of willows. Average production of dry biomass (DM∙ha-1∙a-1 per hectare was estimated in regard to the clone, survival, spacing and the number of shoots per stump. Results: The highest biomass production as well as the best adaptedness and phenotypic stability on testing site was shown by clones (‘V 374’, ‘V 461’, ‘V 578’ from 15.2 - 25.0 t∙DM∙ha-1∙a-1 originated from backcross hybrid S. matsudana × (S. matsudana × S. alba and by one S. alba clone (‘V 95’, 23.1 - 25.7 t∙DM∙ha-1∙a-1. These clones are now at the stage of registration and these results indicate significant potential for further breeding aimed at biomass production in short rotations. Conclusions: Willow clones showed high biomass production on marginal sites and dry biomass could be considerably increased with the application of intensive silvicultural and agro technical measures. No nutrition or pest control measures were applied (a practice otherwise widely used in intensive cultivation system, while weed vegetation was regulated only at the earliest age.

  1. Life Cycle Assessment of Willow Production; Livscykelanalys av Salixproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerjesson, Paal

    2006-05-15

    The aim of this study is to make a life cycle assessment (LCA) of willow production (Salix) based on current cultivation practices and commercial clones. The purpose is to describe the environmental impact of the different phases in the production system and identify phases which have a significant impact on the total life cycle emissions. The production of willow is assumed to take place in southern Sweden on good agricultural soils. The results show that the production of willow is an energy efficient biomass production system which gives 20 times more energy in the form of biomass than the required energy input. In comparison with cultivation of annual energy crops, such as rape and wheat, the energy balance (energy output/energy input) of willow production is more than 3 times higher. The emissions of greenhouse gases and pollutants leading to eutrophication, acidification and creation of photochemical oxidants are often 2 to 4 times lower in willow production. The phase in willow production which requires the highest energy input, some 50 %, is fertilisation. Fertilisation also causes the highest emissions, often between 50 to 80 %, of the total life cycle emissions. Thereafter comes harvesting, with about 30 % of the energy input and 7 to 15 % of the emissions (except for the emissions leading to the creation of photochemical oxidants, some 50%), followed by establishment and transportation which normally contribute to 2 to 10 % of the total life cycle emissions. A measure to efficiently reduce the life cycle emissions of willow production is through a higher efficiency in the production of commercial fertilisers including flue-gas cleaning, leading to reduced emissions, particularly of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). Other alternatives are utilising nutrient-rich organic waste products, such as sewage sludge and municipal waste water as fertilisers, which are already in practice in some willow cultivations today. Changed biomass yields, transportation distances

  2. Soil moisture variability over Odra watershed: Comparison between SMOS and GLDAS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Jaroslaw; Kędzior, Mateusz

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring of temporal and spatial soil moisture variability is an important issue, both from practical and scientific point of view. It is well known that passive, L-band, radiometric measurements provide best soil moisture estimates. Unfortunately as it was observed during Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, which was specially dedicated to measure soil moisture, these measurements suffer significant data loss. It is caused mainly by radio frequency interference (RFI) which strongly contaminates Central Europe and even in particularly unfavorable conditions, might prevent these data from being used for regional or watershed scale analysis. Nevertheless, it is highly awaited by researchers to receive statistically significant information on soil moisture over the area of a big watershed. One of such watersheds, the Odra (Oder) river watershed, lies in three European countries - Poland, Germany and the Czech Republic. The area of the Odra river watershed is equal to 118,861 km2 making it the second most important river in Poland as well as one of the most significant one in Central Europe. This paper examines the SMOS soil moisture data in the Odra river watershed in the period from 2010 to 2012. This attempt was made to check the possibility of assessing, from the low spatial resolution observations of SMOS, useful information that could be exploited for practical aims in watershed scale, for example, in water storage models even while moderate RFI takes place. Such studies, performed over the area of a large watershed, were recommended by researchers in order to obtain statistically significant results. To meet these expectations, Centre Aval de Traitement des Donnes SMOS (CATDS), 3-days averaged data, together with Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) National Centers for Environmental Prediction/Oregon State University/Air Force/Hydrologic Research Lab (NOAH) model 0.25 soil moisture values were used for statistical analyses and mutual

  3. History of late Holocene earthquakes at the Willow Creek site on the Nephi segment, Wasatch fault zone, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, Anthony J.; Personius, Stephen F.; Duross, Christopher; Machette, Michael N.; Mahan, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    This 43-page report presents new data from the Willow Creek site that provides well-defined and narrow bounds on the times of the three youngest earthquakes on the southern strand of the Nephi segment, Wasatch Fault zone, and refines the time of the youngest earthquake to about 200 years ago. This is the youngest surface rupture on the entire Wasatch fault zone, which occurred about a century or less before European settles arrived in Utah. Two trenches at the Willow Creek site exposed three scarp-derived colluvial wedges that are evidence of three paleoearthquakes. OxCal modeling of ages from Willow Creek indicate that paleoearthquake WC1 occurred at 0.2 ± 0.1 ka, WC2 occurred at 1.2 ± 0.1 ka, and WC3 occurred at 1.9 ± 0.6 ka. Stratigraphic constraints on the time of paleoearthquake WC4 are extremely poor, so OxCal modeling only yields a broadly constrained age of 4.7 ± 1.8 ka. Results from the Willow Creek site significantly refine the times of late Holocene earthquakes on the Southern strand of the Nephi segment, and this result, when combined with a reanalysis of the stratigraphic and chronologic information from previous investigations at North Creek and Red Canyon, yield a stronger basis of correlating individual earthquakes between all three sites.

  4. Songbird response to increased willow (Salix spp.) growth in Yellowstone's northern range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Lisa M; Hansen, Andrew J; Renkin, Roy; Lawrence, Rick

    2011-09-01

    After nearly a century of height suppression, willows (Salix spp.) in the northern range of Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A., are increasing in height growth as a possible consequence of wolf (Canis lupus) restoration, climate change, or other factors. Regardless of the drivers, the recent release of this rare but important habitat type could have significant implications for associated songbirds that are exhibiting declines in the region. Our objective was to evaluate bird response to releasing willows by comparing willow structure and bird community composition across three willow growth conditions: height suppressed, recently released, and previously tall (i.e., tall prior to the height increase of released willows). Released and previously tall willows exhibited high and similar vertical structure, but released willows were significantly lower in horizontal structure. Suppressed willows were significantly shorter and lower in horizontal cover than released or previously tall willows. Bird richness increased along a gradient from lowest in suppressed to highest in previously tall willows, but abundance and diversity were similar between released and previously tall willows, despite lower horizontal cover in the released condition. Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) and Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) were found in all three growth conditions; however, Yellow Warbler (Dendroica petechia), Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus), Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii), and Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodii) were present in released and previously tall willows only. Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla) was found in previously tall willows only, appearing to specialize on tall, dense willows. The results of our a priori habitat models indicated that foliage height diversity was the primary driver of bird richness, abundance, and diversity. These results indicate that vertical structure was a more important driver of bird community variables than horizontal

  5. Bottom-up factors influencing riparian willow recovery in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tercek, M.T.; Stottlemyer, R.; Renkin, R.

    2010-01-01

    After the elimination of wolves (Canis lupis L.) in the 1920s, woody riparian plant communities on the northern range of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) declined an estimated 50%. After the reintroduction of wolves in 19951996, riparian willows (Salix spp.) on YNP's northern range showed significant growth for the first time since the 1920s. However, the pace of willow recovery has not been uniform. Some communities have exceeded 400 cm, while others are still at pre-1995 levels of 250 cm max. height) willow sites where willows had escaped elk (Cervus elaphus L.) browsing with "short" willow sites that could still be browsed. Unlike studies that manipulated willow height with fences and artificial dams, we examined sites that had natural growth differences in height since the reintroduction of wolves. Tall willow sites had greater water availability, more-rapid net soil nitrogen mineralization, greater snow depth, lower soil respiration rates, and cooler summer soil temperatures than nearby short willow sites. Most of these differences were measured both in herbaceous areas adjacent to the willow patches and in the willow patches themselves, suggesting that they were not effects of varying willow height recovery but were instead preexisting site differences that may have contributed to increased plant productivity. Our results agree with earlier studies in experimental plots which suggest that the varying pace of willow recovery has been influenced by abiotic limiting factors that interact with top-down reductions in willow browsing by elk. ?? 2010 Western North American Naturalist.

  6. Budding willow branches shaped Na3V2(PO4)3/C nanofibers synthesized via an electrospinning technique and used as cathode material for sodium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Bai, Ying; Wu, Feng; Li, Yu; Wu, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Budding willow branches shaped Na3V2(PO4)3/C nanofibers were successfully synthesized by a simple electrospinning technique with Poly(vinyl pyrrilidone) (PVP). The Na3V2(PO4)3/C nanoparticles that anchored on the nanofibers surface seemed like the willow buds; the inner core of the nanofibers, which composed Na3V2(PO4)3, looked like willow twig and the uniform carbon layer was same with willow bark. Such special morphology played a vital role in improving cycle stability and rate capability of the electrode due to the conductive network built up by nanofibers. The Na3V2(PO4)3/C nanofibers cathode exhibited an initial specific capacity of 106.8 mAh g-1 at a current density of 0.2C, still stabling at 107.2 mAh g-1 after 125 cycles with excellent cycle stability. Moreover, a capacity retention of 95.7% was obtained when Na3V2(PO4)3/C nanofibers cycled stepwise from 0.2 to 2C. Good electrochemical performance should be ascribed to both the special morphology and preferential growth of the (113) plane. The simple synthesis technique and good electrochemical performance suggests that this material with the special shape of budding willow branches is a promising cathode for sodium ion batteries.

  7. Rainfall estimation by inverting SMOS soil moisture estimates: a comparison of different methods over Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remote sensing of soil moisture has reached a level of maturity and accuracy for which the retrieved products can be used to improve hydrological and meteorological applications. In this study, the soil moisture product from the European Space Agency’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) is used...

  8. Assimilation of SMOS Soil Moisture Retrievals in the Land Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakenship, Clay; Zavodsky, Bradley; Cae, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Soil moisture is a crucial variable for weather prediction because of its influence on evaporation. It is of critical importance for drought and flood monitoring and prediction and for public health applications. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT) has implemented a new module in the NASA Land Information System (LIS) to assimilate observations from the ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. SMOS Level 2 retrievals from the Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) instrument are assimilated into the Noah LSM within LIS via an Ensemble Kalman Filter. The retrievals have a target volumetric accuracy of 4% at a resolution of 35-50 km. Parallel runs with and without SMOS assimilation are performed with precipitation forcing from intentionally degraded observations, and then validated against a model run using the best available precipitation data, as well as against selected station observations. The goal is to demonstrate how SMOS data assimilation can improve modeled soil states in the absence of dense rain gauge and radar networks.

  9. CoSMOS: Performance of Kurtosis Algorithm for Radio Frequency Interference Detection and Mitigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misra, Sidharth; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Skou, Niels

    2007-01-01

    The performance of a previously developed algorithm for Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) detection and mitigation is experimentally evaluated. Results obtained from CoSMOS, an airborne campaign using a fully polarimetric L-band radiometer are analyzed for this purpose. Data is collected using two...

  10. 2006 Progress report: Riparian willow restoration along the Illinois river at Arapahoe NWR, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a progress report concerning riparian willow restoration on Arapahoe NWR. Riparian willow communities along the Illinois River at Arapaho NWR provide...

  11. 2005 Progress report: Riparian willow restoration along the Illinois river at Arapahoe NWR, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a progress report concerning riparian willow restoration on Arapahoe NWR. Riparian willow communities along the Illinois River at Arapaho NWR provide...

  12. Mitigation of biases in SMOS Level 2 soil moisture retrieval algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Ali; Richaume, Philippe; Kerr, Yann

    2017-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) relies on the L-band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere (L-MEB) radiative transfer models to retrieve soil moisture (SM). These models require, as input, parameters which characterize the target like soil water content and temperature. The Soil Water Volume at Level 1 (SWVL1) from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) is used in the SMOS Level 2 SM algorithms as both an initial guess for SM in the iterative retrieval process and to compute fixed contributions from the so called "default" fractions. In case of mixed fractions of nominal (low vegetation land) and forest, retrieval is performed over one fraction while the contribution of the other is assumed to be fixed and known based on ECMWF data. Studies have shown that ECMWF SWVL1 is biased when compared to SMOS SM and represents values at a deeper layer of soil ( 7 cm) than that represented by SMOS ( 2 to 5 cm). This study uses a well know bias reduction technique based on matching of the Cumulative Distribution Functions (CDF) of the two distributions to help reduce the biases. Early results using a linear matching method provide very encouraging results. A complication with respect to performing CDF matching is that SMOS SM values are not available where they are needed, i.e. over the default fractions. In order to remedy this, we treat mixed fractions as homogeneous targets to retrieve SM over the whole target. The obtained values are then used to derive the CDF matching coefficients. A set of CDF coefficients derived using average and standard deviation of soil moisture values for 2014 has been used in reprocessing SMOS data for 2014 and 2015, as well as over selected sites (with in-situ data) over a longer period. The 2014 was selected due to its lower Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) contamination in comparison with other years. The application of CDF coefficients has lead to a wetter SM for

  13. Competition favors elk over beaver in a riparian willow ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, B.W.; Peinetti, H.R.; Coughenour, M.C.; Johnson, T.L.

    2012-01-01

    Beaver (Castor spp.) conservation requires an understanding of their complex interactions with competing herbivores. Simulation modeling offers a controlled environment to examine long-term dynamics in ecosystems driven by uncontrollable variables. We used a new version of the SAVANNA ecosystem model to investigate beaver (C. Canadensis) and elk (Cervus elapses) competition for willow (Salix spp.). We initialized the model with field data from Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA, to simulate a 4-ha riparian ecosystem containing beaver, elk, and willow. We found beaver persisted indefinitely when elk density was or = 30 elk km_2. The loss of tall willow preceded rapid beaver declines, thus willow condition may predict beaver population trajectory in natural environments. Beaver were able to persist with slightly higher elk densities if beaver alternated their use of foraging sites in a rest-rotation pattern rather than maintained continuous use. Thus, we found asymmetrical competition for willow strongly favored elk over beaver in a simulated montane ecosystem. Finally, we discuss application of the SAVANNA model and mechanisms of competition relative to beaver persistence as metapopulations, ecological resistance and alternative state models, and ecosystem regulation.

  14. Phytotoxicity of landfill leachate on willow--Salix amygdalina L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialowiec, Andrzej; Randerson, Peter F

    2010-01-01

    Because of low investment and operational costs, interest is increasing in the use of willow plants in landfill leachate disposal. Toxic effects of leachate on the plants should be avoided in the initial period of growth and phytotoxicological testing may be helpful to select appropriate leachate dose rates. The aim of this study was to determine the phytotoxicity of landfill leachate on young willow (Salix amygdalina L.) cuttings, as a criterion for dose rate selection in the early phase of growth. Over a test period of 6 weeks plants were exposed to six concentrations of landfill leachate solutions (0%; 6.25%; 12.5%; 25%; 50% and 100%), under two different regimes. In regime A willow plants were cultivated in leachate solution from the beginning, whereas in regime B they were grown initially in clean water for 4 weeks, after which the water was exchanged for leachate solutions. The lowest effective concentration causing toxic effects (LOEC) was calculated (pWillow plants were able to survive in landfill leachate solutions with electrical conductivity (EC) values up to 5.0 mS/cm in regime A, whereas in regime B plants were killed when EC exceeded 3.0 mS/cm. This indicates an ability of willow plants to tolerate higher strengths of landfill leachate if they are cultivated in such concentrations from the beginning.

  15. 76 FR 179 - General Motors Company, Formerly Known as General Motors Corporation, Willow Run Transmission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... Corporation, Willow Run Transmission Plant, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Aerotek, Securitas, Knight..., formerly known as General Motors Corporation, Willow Run Transmission Plant, Ypsilanti, Michigan. The... known as General Motors Corporation, Willow Run Transmission Plant. The Department has determined...

  16. 75 FR 49527 - General Motors Company Formerly Known as General Motors Corporation, Willow Run Transmission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ..., Willow Run Transmission Plant Including On-Site Leased Workers From Aerotek; Ypsilanti, MI; Amended... General Motors Company, formerly known as General Motors Corporation, Willow Run Transmission Plant... location of General Motors Company, formerly known as General Motors Corporation, Willow Run...

  17. 75 FR 76038 - General Motors Company Formerly Known as General Motors Corporation Willow Run Transmission Plant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... Willow Run Transmission Plant Including On-Site Leased Workers From Aerotek, Securitas, Knight Management... Corporation, Willow Run Transmission Plant, Ypsilanti, Michigan. The notice was published in the Federal... Motors Corporation, Willow Run Transmission Plant. The Department has determined that on-site...

  18. 75 FR 56520 - Information on Surplus Land at a Military Installation Designated for Disposal: NASJRB Willow...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... Willow Grove, PA AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice provides information on the surplus property at Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base (NASJRB) Willow Grove located in... INFORMATION: In 2005, NASJRB Willow Grove, PA was designated for closure under the authority of the...

  19. SURFEX modeling of soil moisture fields over the Valencia Anchor Station and their comparison to different SMOS products and in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll Pajaron, M. Amparo; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Fernandez-Moran, Roberto; Samiro Khodayar-Pardo, D.

    2016-07-01

    Soil moisture is a difficult variable to obtain proper representation because of its high temporal and spatial variability. It is a significant parameter in agriculture, hydrology, meteorology and related disciplines. {it SVAT (Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer)} models can be used to simulate the temporal behaviour and spatial distribution of soil moisture in a given area. In this work, we use the {bf SURFEX (Surface Externalisée)} model developed at the {it Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques (CNRM)} at Météo-France (http://www.cnrm.meteo.fr/surfex/) to simulate soil moisture at the {bf Valencia Anchor Station}. SURFEX integrates the {bf ISBA (Interaction Sol-Biosphère-Atmosphère}; surfaces with vegetation) module to describe the land surfaces (http://www.cnrm.meteo.fr/isbadoc/model.html) that have been adapted to describe the land covers of our study area. The Valencia Anchor Station was chosen as a core validation site for the {it SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity)} mission and as one of the hydrometeorological sites for the {it HyMeX (HYdrological cycle in Mediterranean EXperiment)} programme. This site represents a reasonably homogeneous and mostly flat area of about 50x50 km2. The main cover type is vineyards (65%), followed by fruit trees, shrubs, and pine forests, and a few small scattered industrial and urban areas. Except for the vineyard growing season, the area remains mostly under bare soil conditions. In spite of its relatively flat topography, the small altitude variations of the region clearly influence climate. This oscillates between semiarid and dry sub-humid. Annual mean temperatures are between 12 ºC and 14.5 ºC, and annual precipitation is about 400-450 mm. The duration of frost free periods is from May to November, with maximum precipitation in spring and autumn. The first part of this investigation consists in simulating soil moisture fields over the Valencia Anchor Station to be compared with SMOS level-2

  20. Rainfall estimation over-land using SMOS soil moisture observations: SM2RAIN, LMAA and SMART algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Christian; Brocca, Luca; Pellarin, Thierry; Kerr, Yann; Crow, Wade; Cascon, Carlos; Ciabatta, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Recent advancements in the measurement of precipitation from space have provided estimates at scales that are commensurate with the needs of the hydrological and land-surface model communities. However, as demonstrated in a number of studies (Ebert et al. 2007, Tian et al. 2007, Stampoulis et al. 2012) satellite rainfall estimates are characterized by low accuracy in certain conditions and still suffer from a number of issues (e.g., bias) that may limit their utility in over-land applications (Serrat-Capdevila et al. 2014). In recent years many studies have demonstrated that soil moisture observations from ground and satellite sensors can be used for correcting satellite precipitation estimates (e.g. Crow et al., 2011; Pellarin et al., 2013), or directly estimating rainfall (SM2RAIN, Brocca et al., 2014). In this study, we carried out a detailed scientific analysis in which these three different methods are used for: i) estimating rainfall through satellite soil moisture observations (SM2RAIN, Brocca et al., 2014); ii) correcting rainfall through a Land surface Model Assimilation Algorithm (LMAA) (an improvement of a previous work of Crow et al. 2011 and Pellarin et al. 2013) and through the Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool (SMART, Crow et al. 2011). The analysis is carried within the ESA project "SMOS plus Rainfall" and involves 9 sites in Europe, Australia, Africa and USA containing high-quality hydrometeorological and soil moisture observations. Satellite soil moisture data from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission are employed for testing their potential in deriving a cumulated rainfall product at different temporal resolutions. The applicability and accuracy of the three algorithms is investigated also as a function of climatic and soil/land use conditions. A particular attention is paid to assess the expected limitations soil moisture based rainfall estimates such as soil saturation, freezing/snow conditions, SMOS RFI, irrigated areas

  1. Phenology and population dynamics of willow beetles (Coleoptera: chrysomelidae) in short-rotation coppiced willows at Long Ashton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The life cycles and phylogeny of three willow beetle pests, Phyllodecta vulgatissima, P. vitellinae and Galerucella lineola (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae), were investigated during 1994-95 in an experimental plantation of short-rotation coppiced willows (Salix viminalis Bowles Hybrid) at Pearces Farm, Long Ashton (Bristol), UK, Willow rods were sampled at regular intervals throughout the year and carefully search for eggs, larvae and adult beetles. An extensive survey was done in hedgerows around the site during February 1995 in order to identify the overwintering sites of adult beetles. In autumn 1995, hibernation trap-bands were used to study the onset of hibernation and the distribution of hibernating in the vicinity of the willow plantation. Adult flight activity was monitored each week throughout the year using window traps. Pot-grown willows were established in the field to augment observations on beetle behaviour in spring and autumn. Exclusion cages were used during the summer in an attempt to estimate the natural mortality of eggs larvae and pupae, but this technique had to be abandoned because all the cages were attacked and damaged by wasps. The fecundity of adult beetles and the development of eggs, larvae and pupae were measured in the laboratory under controlled environment conditions. (Author)

  2. Uptake, metabolism, accumulation and toxicity of cyanide in willow trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten; Ucisik, Ahmed Süheyl; Trapp, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Chemicals taken up into plants may be accumulated so leading to toxic effects. Uptake and phytotoxicity of free cyanide was determined with the willow-tree transpiration test. Willow sets were grown in sand and irrigated with varying levels of cyanide (CN). Toxicity was determined by measuring...... transpiration. At CN concentrations below 10 mg/L, no toxic effects were observed. At 20 mg/L, transpiration was reduced to approximately 50% after 96 h. With 30, 40 and 50 mg/L, the transpiration decreased with a similar rate to cyanide in plant...... tissue was observed at 40 and 50 mg/L. The kinetics of metabolism of cyanide by roots, stems and leaves of willows was determined by the closed-bottle metabolism test. The Michaelis−Menten parameters vmax and KM (maximal metabolic velocity and half-saturation constant, respectively) were determined...

  3. Comparison of measured brightness temperatures from SMOS with modelled ones from ORCHIDEE and H-TESSEL over the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barella-Ortiz, Anaïs; Polcher, Jan; de Rosnay, Patricia; Piles, Maria; Gelati, Emiliano

    2017-01-01

    L-band radiometry is considered to be one of the most suitable techniques to estimate surface soil moisture (SSM) by means of remote sensing. Brightness temperatures are key in this process, as they are the main input in the retrieval algorithm which yields SSM estimates. The work exposed compares brightness temperatures measured by the SMOS mission to two different sets of modelled ones, over the Iberian Peninsula from 2010 to 2012. The two modelled sets were estimated using a radiative transfer model and state variables from two land-surface models: (i) ORCHIDEE and (ii) H-TESSEL. The radiative transfer model used is the CMEM. Measured and modelled brightness temperatures show a good agreement in their temporal evolution, but their spatial structures are not consistent. An empirical orthogonal function analysis of the brightness temperature's error identifies a dominant structure over the south-west of the Iberian Peninsula which evolves during the year and is maximum in autumn and winter. Hypotheses concerning forcing-induced biases and assumptions made in the radiative transfer model are analysed to explain this inconsistency, but no candidate is found to be responsible for the weak spatial correlations at the moment. Further hypotheses are proposed and will be explored in a forthcoming paper. The analysis of spatial inconsistencies between modelled and measured TBs is important, as these can affect the estimation of geophysical variables and TB assimilation in operational models, as well as result in misleading validation studies.

  4. Empirical sea ice thickness retrieval during the freeze up period from SMOS high incident angle observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntemann, M.; Heygster, G.; Kaleschke, L.; Krumpen, T.; Mäkynen, M.; Drusch, M.

    2013-08-01

    Sea ice thickness information is needed for climate modeling and ship operations. Here a method to detect the thickness of sea ice up to 50 cm during the freezeup season based on high incidence angle observations of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite working at 1.4 GHz is suggested. By comparison of thermodynamic ice growth data with SMOS brightness temperatures, a high correlation to intensity and an anti correlation to the difference between vertically and horizontally polarised brightness temperatures at incidence angles between 40 and 50 ° are found and used to develop an empirical retrieval sensitive to thin sea ice up to 50 cm thickness. It shows high correlations with ice thickness data from airborne measurements and reasonable ice thickness patterns for the Arctic freeze up period.

  5. Empirical sea ice thickness retrieval during the freeze up period from SMOS high incident angle observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huntemann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice thickness information is needed for climate modeling and ship operations. Here a method to detect the thickness of sea ice up to 50 cm during the freezeup season based on high incidence angle observations of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS satellite working at 1.4 GHz is suggested. By comparison of thermodynamic ice growth data with SMOS brightness temperatures, a high correlation to intensity and an anti correlation to the difference between vertically and horizontally polarised brightness temperatures at incidence angles between 40 and 50 ° are found and used to develop an empirical retrieval sensitive to thin sea ice up to 50 cm thickness. It shows high correlations with ice thickness data from airborne measurements and reasonable ice thickness patterns for the Arctic freeze up period.

  6. SMOS sea ice product: Operational application and validation in the Barents Sea marginal ice zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaleschke, Lars; Tian-Kunze, Xiangshan; Maaß, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Brightness temperatures at 1.4. GHz (L-band) measured by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Mission have been used to derive the thickness of sea ice. The retrieval method is applicable only for relatively thin ice and not during the melting period. Hitherto, the availability of ground...... truth sea ice thickness measurements for validation of SMOS sea ice products was mainly limited to relatively thick ice. The situation has improved with an extensive field campaign in the Barents Sea during an anomalous ice edge retreat and subsequent freeze-up event in March 2014. A sea ice forecast...... system for ship route optimisation has been developed and was tested during this field campaign with the ice-strengthened research vessel RV Lance. The ship cruise was complemented with coordinated measurements from a helicopter and the research aircraft Polar 5. Sea ice thickness was measured using...

  7. Impact of phosphate on glyphosate uptake and toxicity in willow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marcelo Pedrosa; Le Manac'h, Sarah Gingras; Moingt, Matthieu; Smedbol, Elise; Paquet, Serge; Labrecque, Michel; Lucotte, Marc; Juneau, Philippe

    2016-03-05

    Phosphate (PO4(3-)) has been shown to increase glyphosate uptake by willow, a plant species known for its phytoremediation potential. However, it remains unclear if this stimulation of glyphosate uptake can result in an elevated glyphosate toxicity to plants (which could prevent the use of willows in glyphosate-remediation programs). Consequently, we studied the effects of PO4(3-) on glyphosate uptake and toxicity in a fast growing willow cultivar (Salix miyabeana SX64). Plants were grown in hydroponic solution with a combination of glyphosate (0, 0.001, 0.065 and 1 mg l(-1)) and PO4(3-) (0, 200 and 400 mg l(-1)). We demonstrated that PO4(3-) fertilization greatly increased glyphosate uptake by roots and its translocation to leaves, which resulted in increased shikimate concentration in leaves. In addition to its deleterious effects in photosynthesis, glyphosate induced oxidative stress through hydrogen peroxide accumulation. Although it has increased glyphosate accumulation, PO4(3-) fertilization attenuated the herbicide's deleterious effects by increasing the activity of antioxidant systems and alleviating glyphosate-induced oxidative stress. Our results indicate that in addition to the glyphosate uptake, PO4(3-) is involved in glyphosate toxicity in willow by preventing glyphosate induced oxidative stress.

  8. Root growth studies of willow cuttings using Rhizoboxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omarova, Dinara; Lammeranner, Walter; Florineth, Florin

    2014-05-01

    Riparian forests (Tugay forests) in Central Asia (Kazakhstan) play a significant in soil protection. However, unadapted forest use leads to damage and loss of these fragile ecosystems. Willows have a crucial function in the ecosystem of these riparian forests. Willows facilitate the colonization with other important tree species and furthermore they protect the soil from wind and water erosion. To propagate willows and to estimate the beneficial effects of these plants it is important to know the root growth development. The research design is planned as model experiment with rhizoboxes. Rhizoboxes are non-invasive investigation methods which offer the possibility to survey the root system growth dynamics in time and space. A total of 33 rhizoboxes in size of 50cm x 75 cm x 5 cm will be constructed. The rhizoboxes will be tilted by 45 degrees using the gravitropism of the roots. The willow cuttings (Salix purpurea) will be planted in three different soil types. Each test series (growth period) will take three months. Investigated parameters will be root architecture, dynamic of root growth and above and below ground biomass allocation. Data will be drawn from photographic surveys which will be performed once a week. The contribution will present the methodology of these rhizobox investigations.

  9. "The Wind in the Willows" and the Style of Romance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, R. B.

    2012-01-01

    The style of Kenneth Grahame's "The Wind in the Willows" arises from an alternative vision and choice of values characteristic of romance. Romance seeks fulfillment beyond the consequences of everyday relationships and the constrictions of ordinary life. Causal relationships give way to lists of independent items, unmotivated outcomes, and…

  10. Genetic Improvement of Willow for Bioenergy and Biofuels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Angela Karp; Steve J.Hanley; Sviatlana O.Trybush; William Macalpine; Ming Pei; lan Shield

    2011-01-01

    Willows(Salix spp.)are a very diverse group of catkin-bearing trees and shrubs that are widely distributed across temperate regions of the globe.Some species respond well to being grown in short rotation coppice(SRC)cycles,which are much shorter than conventional forestry.Coppicing reinvigorates growth and the biomass rapidly accumulated can be used as a source of renewable carbon for bioenergy and biofuels.As SRC willows re-distribute nutrients during the perennial cycle they require only minimal nitrogen fertilizer for growth.This results in fuel chains with potentially high greenhouse gas reductions.To exploit their potential for renewable energy,willows need to be kept free of pests and diseases and yields need to be improved without significantly increasing the requirements for fertilizers and water.The biomass composition needs to be optimized for different end-uses.Yields also need to be sustainable on land less productive for food crops to reduce conflicts over land use.Advances in understanding the physiology and growth of willow,and in the identification of genes underlying key traits,are now at the stage where they can start to be used in breeding programs to help achieve these goals.

  11. "The Wind in the Willows" and the Style of Romance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, R. B.

    2012-01-01

    The style of Kenneth Grahame's "The Wind in the Willows" arises from an alternative vision and choice of values characteristic of romance. Romance seeks fulfillment beyond the consequences of everyday relationships and the constrictions of ordinary life. Causal relationships give way to lists of independent items, unmotivated outcomes, and…

  12. Biofuel production from acid-impregnated willow and switchgrass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.R.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Maas, R.H.W.; Vrije, de T.; Jong, de E.; Groenestijn, van J.W.; Hazewinkel, J.H.O.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a broader technical and economic feasibility study, we studied production of bioethanol from two types of lignocellulosic biomass by way of concentrated acid impregnation at low temperature. Willow chips and switchgrass were submitted to various impregnation techniques with concentrated s

  13. Rainfall estimation by inverting SMOS soil moisture estimates: A comparison of different methods over Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocca, Luca; Pellarin, Thierry; Crow, Wade T.; Ciabatta, Luca; Massari, Christian; Ryu, Dongryeol; Su, Chun-Hsu; Rüdiger, Christoph; Kerr, Yann

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing of soil moisture has reached a level of maturity and accuracy for which the retrieved products can be used to improve hydrological and meteorological applications. In this study, the soil moisture product from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite is used for improving satellite rainfall estimates obtained from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission multisatellite precipitation analysis product (TMPA) using three different "bottom up" techniques: SM2RAIN, Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool, and Antecedent Precipitation Index Modification. The implementation of these techniques aims at improving the well-known "top down" rainfall estimate derived from TMPA products (version 7) available in near real time. Ground observations provided by the Australian Water Availability Project are considered as a separate validation data set. The three algorithms are calibrated against the gauge-corrected TMPA reanalysis product, 3B42, and used for adjusting the TMPA real-time product, 3B42RT, using SMOS soil moisture data. The study area covers the entire Australian continent, and the analysis period ranges from January 2010 to November 2013. Results show that all the SMOS-based rainfall products improve the performance of 3B42RT, even at daily time scale (differently from previous investigations). The major improvements are obtained in terms of estimation of accumulated rainfall with a reduction of the root-mean-square error of more than 25%. Also, in terms of temporal dynamic (correlation) and rainfall detection (categorical scores) the SMOS-based products provide slightly better results with respect to 3B42RT, even though the relative performance between the methods is not always the same. The strengths and weaknesses of each algorithm and the spatial variability of their performances are identified in order to indicate the ways forward for this promising research activity. Results show that the integration of bottom up and top down approaches

  14. Comparison of NOAA-CREST Soil Moisture Measurements with SMOS Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, H.; Forbes, A.

    2014-12-01

    In October 2014, the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission (SMAP) will launch into a near-polar and sun- synchronous orbit. SMAP includes the first 3 KM resolution product, by both radar and radiometer sensors which will transmit useful information concentrating on the global measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw cycles. NOAA- CREST (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration- Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology) deploys a series of in-situ devices into the soil, and an L-BAND Radiometer close to the site ground at the Cary Institute in Millbrook, NY. The site is important for future validation of SMAP mission. Comparing mathematical and ground based remote sensing of soil moisture is beneficial to ensure the accuracy of the measurements. The focus of this research is to analyze and compare soil moisture from ESA- SMOS (Europe Space Agency- Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity) mission and the Cary Institute's soil moisture measurements within the same time period, and location. In the interest of establishing superb authentication; comparing SMOS and ground measurements will justify the accuracy of the newly launch satellite. Discrepancies can be found between field point measurement and relatively large footprint of SMOS, which affects comparison and validation. Several techniques and statistical methods will provide a more meaningful comparison to analyze soil moisture data. The results of this project will help to provide a useful method to compare the NOAA-CREST soil moisture measurements and SMAP measurements. In conclusion, the SMAP advance technology will provide more accurate feedback for modeling numerical weather and climate models. Keywords: Soil Moisture, Precipitation, CREST-SMART, Cary Institute, In-situ, Remote Sensors Accurate Soil Moisture Data, Millbrook, N.Y., CATDS, Hydrology is the branch of science concerning properties of earth's water especially its movement in relation to land. SMOS MIRAS, SMAP, Sensors (Underground)

  15. SMOS derived sea ice thickness: algorithm baseline, product specifications and initial verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Tian-Kunze

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Following the launch of ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean salinity (SMOS mission it has been shown that brightness temperatures at a low microwave frequency of 1.4 GHz (L-band are sensitive to sea ice properties. In a first demonstration study, sea ice thickness has been derived using a semi-empirical algorithm with constant tie-points. Here we introduce a novel iterative retrieval algorithm that is based on a sea ice thermodynamic model and a three-layer radiative transfer model, which explicitly takes variations of ice temperature and ice salinity into account. In addition, ice thickness variations within a SMOS footprint are considered through a statistical thickness distribution function derived from high-resolution ice thickness measurements from NASA's Operation IceBridge campaign. This new algorithm has been used for the continuous operational production of a SMOS based sea ice thickness data set from 2010 on. This data set is compared and validated with estimates from assimilation systems, remote sensing data, and airborne electromagnetic sounding data. The comparisons show that the new retrieval algorithm has a considerably better agreement with the validation data and delivers a more realistic Arctic-wide ice thickness distribution than the algorithm used in the previous study.

  16. Establishment and growth of two willow species in a riparian zone impacted by mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret, Melody M; Brummer, Joe E; Leininger, Wayne C

    2009-01-01

    A field study was initiated to determine survival, growth characteristics, and metal uptake of two montane riparian willow species, Geyer (Salix geyeriana Andersson) and mountain (S. monticola Bebb) willow, grown in amended fluvial mine tailing deposits. Revegetation was done with staked and previously rooted cuttings to determine if planting method had an effect on successful establishment of willows. A second planting was done the following growing season which tested cuttings of different ages. The addition of lime increased the soil pH from 5.0 to 6.5 and effectively reduced bioavailability of most heavy metals below phytotoxic levels. However, both willow species, regardless of planting method, concentrated Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn in their leaf tissue above levels considered toxic to agronomic plants. Over the course of four growing seasons, prerooted mountain willows had a consistently higher survival rate compared to staked willows. At the end of the fourth growing season, mountain willow had a higher survival rate and produced greater aboveground growth for both planting methods, irrespective of year planted, compared with Geyer willow. Based on growth characteristics, the use of prerooted mountain willows would be recommended for successful revegetation of amended fluvial mine tailing deposits in riparian zones. However, because of the high Cd uptake into aboveground tissues, care should be taken in restoration efforts where wildlife and domestic livestock are likely to browse on the willows.

  17. Chemical composition of desert willow (Salix psammophila) grown in the Kubuqi Desert, Inner Mongolia, China: bark extracts associated with environmental adaptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Satoshi; Hashida, Koh; Makino, Rei; Magara, Kengo; Kenzo, Tanaka; Kato, Atsushi; Aorigele

    2013-12-18

    Bark of desert willow (Salix psammophila, Spsa) grown in Inner Mongolia was successively extracted with n-hexane, diethyl ether, acetone, methanol, and hot water to examine chemical components associated with its environmental adaptability to desert conditions. The yield of n-hexane extract (5.0% based on dry bark), mainly composed of wax, was higher than those of acetone and methanol extracts (3.7% and 4.2%, respectively), whereas the yields of n-hexane extract (1.4%) from willow bark grown in humid areas were much lower than those of acetone (17.4% and 19.9%) and methanol (12.5% and 14.0%) extracts. Unlike other willow bark samples, Spsa bark contained a certain amount of sugar alcohols. In particular, we identified arabinitol (0.21%), which has not previously been reported as a major component of extracts of willow bark. The high content of wax and sugar alcohol would be associated with the ability of Spsa to survive in desert conditions. Accumulation of wax on the outer bark surface would reduce water loss, while sugar alcohols might improve freezing tolerance.

  18. Sampling procedure in a willow plantation for chemical elements important for biomass combustion quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Na; Nielsen, Henrik Kofoed; Jørgensen, Uffe

    2015-01-01

    Willow (Salix spp.) is expected to contribute significantly to the woody bioenergy system in the future, so more information on how to sample the quality of the willow biomass is needed. The objectives of this study were to investigate the spatial variation of elements within shoots of a willow...... clone ‘Tordis’, and to reveal the relationship between sampling position, shoot diameters, and distribution of elements. Five Tordis willow shoots were cut into 10–50 cm sections from base to top. The ash content and concentration of twelve elements (Al, Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, and Zn......) in each section were determined. The results showed large spatial variation in the distribution of most elements along the length of the willow shoots. Concentrations of elements in 2-year old shoots of the willow clone Tordis were fairly stable within the range of 100–285 cm above ground and resembled...

  19. Use of willows in evapotranspirative systems for onsite wastewater management – theory and experiences from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Hans; Arias, Carlos Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a method of onsite wastewater treatment and disposal that is an alternative to conventional soil absorption systems, particularly for sites where protecting surface water and ground water is essential or where soil infiltration is not possible. One of the most important...... aspects of ET systems is their ability to evapotranspire all of the sewage discharged into the systems and the rain falling onto the systems. On an annual basis the ET should equal the amount of wastewater discharged into the system plus the amount of precipitation falling onto the system. Part...... with clones of willow (Salix viminalis L.). The surface area of the systems depends on the amount and quality of the sewage to be treated and the local annual rainfall. A single household in Denmark typically requires between 120 and 300 m2. The annual precipitation at the site of construction is an important...

  20. Willow yield is highly dependent on clone and site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugilt Larsen, Søren; Jørgensen, Uffe; Lærke, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    Use of high-yielding genotypes is one of the means to achieve high yield and profitability in willow (Salix spp.) short rotation coppice. This study investigated the performance of eight willow clones (Inger, Klara, Linnea, Resolution, Stina, Terra Nova, Tora, Tordis) on five Danish sites......, differing considerably in soil type, climatic conditions and management. Compared to the best clone, the yield was up to 36 % lower for other clones across sites and up to 51 % lower within sites. Tordis was superior to other clones with dry matter yields between 5.2 and 10.2 Mg ha−1 year−1 during the first...... 3-year harvest rotation, and it consistently ranked as the highest yielding clone on four of the five sites and not significantly lower than the highest yielding clone on the fifth site. The ranking of the other clones was more dependent on site with significant interaction between clone and site...

  1. Testing evolutionary hypotheses for DNA barcoding failure in willows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twyford, Alex D

    2014-10-01

    The goal of DNA barcoding is to enable the rapid identification of taxa from short diagnostic DNA sequence profiles. But how feasible is this objective when many evolutionary processes, such as hybridization and selective sweeps, cause alleles to be shared among related taxa? In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Percy et al. (2014) test the full suite of seven candidate plant barcoding loci in a broad geographic sample of willow species. They show exceptional plastid haplotype sharing between species across continents, with most taxa not possessing a unique barcode sequence. Using population genetic and molecular dating analyses, they implicate hybridization and selective sweeps, but not incomplete lineage sorting, as the historical processes causing widespread haplotype sharing among willow taxa. This study represents an exceptional case of how poorly barcoding can perform, and highlights methodological issues using universal organellar regions for species identification.

  2. Phytoextraction of risk elements by willow and poplar trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacálková, Lada; Tlustoš, Pavel; Száková, Jiřina

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the phytoextraction efficiency of two clones of willow trees (Salix x smithiana Willd., Salix rubens) and two clones of poplar trees (Populus nigra x maximowiczii, Populus nigra Wolterson) were planted in contaminated soil (0.4-2.0 mg Cd.kg(-1), 78-313 mg Zn.kg(-1), 21.3-118 mg Cu.kg(-1)). Field experiment was carried out in Czech Republic. The study investigated their ability to accumulate heavy metals (Cd, Zn, and Cu) in harvestable plant parts. The poplars produced higher amount of biomass than willows. Both Salix clones accumulated higher amount of Cd, Zn and Cu in their biomass (maximum 6.8 mg Cd.kg(-1), 909 mg Zn.kg(-1), and 17.7 mg Cu.kg(-1)) compared to Populus clones (maximum 2.06 mg Cd.kg(-1), 463 mg Zn.kg(-1), and 11.8 mg Cu.kg(-1)). There were no significant differences between clones of individual species. BCs for Cd and Zn were greater than 1 (the highest in willow leaves). BCs values of Cu were very low. These results indicate that Salix is more suitable plant for phytoextraction of Cd and Zn than Populus. The Cu phytoextraction potential of Salix and Populus trees was not confirmed in this experiment due to low soil availability of this element.

  3. Willow Flycatcher nonbreeding territory defense behavior in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogge, M.K.; Koronkiewicz, T.J.; van Riper, Charles; Durst, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    We studied the intraspecific territorial defense behavior of wintering Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii) in Costa Rica using a randomized playback experiment that exposed male and female birds to recordings of Willow Flycatcher songs and calls, Lesser Ground Cuckoo (Morococcyx erythropygius) vocalizations, and random noise. Flycatchers of both sexes responded most strongly to simulated conspecific territory intrusion, and the agonistic behaviors that we observed were similar to those seen during natural intraspecific encounters in winter. Both males and females engaged in song and aggressive behaviors in defense of territories, and there was no significant difference between the sexes in scored agonistic responses. The similarity between the sexes in intraspecific territorial defense behaviors and aggressiveness may account for both sexes of flycatchers using the same habitats at our study sites in Costa Rica, and wintering females defending territories against males. The Willow Flycatcher, a sexually monomorphic species, differs in this way from a number of sexually dimorphic passerines, in which behaviorally dominant males occur in more optimal winter habitats. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2007.

  4. Productivity of willow clones across an environmental gradient in Saskatchewan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, K.C.J.; Amichev, B.Y.; Hangs, R.D. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Dept. of Soil Science; Volk, T.A. [New York State Univ., NY (United States). College of Environmental Science and Forestry

    2010-07-01

    The province of Saskatchewan has over 2 million ha of marginal agricultural lands that could be used as biomass plantations. This study was conducted to determine willow growth patterns along an environmental gradient across Saskatchewan as a short rotation woody crop. Six willow clones were planted in 2007 at 4 different sites. The 500 km north-south gradient covered a range of soil and climatic conditions. Soil and environmental data were collected from each site. Biomass yields were estimated from measured diameters of each stem. Clones were coppiced after the first year. The second year yields of oven-dried biomass from the clones ranged from 8.1 to 13.6 Mg per ha for Canastota and Sherburne clones when averaged across all sites. The highest biomass yields were observed for Allegany, Sherburne, SX 61, and SX 62 clones at a site with higher rainfall, air and soil temperatures. Lower yields at other sites were attributed to heavy clay soils with moisture limitations. Results of the study suggested that willow biomass can be used for cofiring at a coal-fired power generating station located in the southeastern region of the province.

  5. Evaluation of random cascade hierarchical and statistical arrangement model in disaggregation of SMOS soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, M.; Magagi, R.; Goita, K.

    2013-12-01

    Soil moisture is an important parameter in hydrology that can be derived from remote sensing. In different studies, it was shown that optical-thermal, active and passive microwave remote sensing data can be used for soil moisture estimation. However, the most promising approach to estimate soil moisture in large areas is passive microwave radiometry. Global estimation of soil moisture is now operational by using remote sensing techniques. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System Sensor (AMSR-E) and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) passive microwave radiometers that were lunched on 2002 and 2009 respectively along with the upcoming Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) satellite that was planned to be lunched in the time frame of 2014-2015 make remote sensing to be more useful in soil moisture estimation. However, the spatial resolutions of AMSR-E, SMOS and SMAP are 60 km, 40 km and 10 km respectively. These very low spatial resolutions can not show the temporal and spatial variability of soil moisture in field or small scales. So, using disaggregation methods is required to efficiently using the passive microwave derived soil moisture information in different scales. The low spatial resolutions of passive microwave satellites can be improved by using disaggregation methods. Random Cascade (RC) model (Over and Gupta, 1996) is used in this research to downscale the 40 km resolution of SMOS satellite. By using this statistical method, the SMOS soil moisture resolutions are improved to 20 km, 10 km, 5 km and 2.5 km, respectively. The data that were measured during Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) field campaign are used to do the experiments. Totally the ground data and SMOS images that were obtained during 13 different days from 7-June-2012 to 13-July-2012 are used. By comparison with ground soil moisture, it is observed that the SMOS soil moisture is underestimated for all the images and so bias amounts

  6. Snow thickness retrieval over thick Arctic sea ice using SMOS satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Maaß

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The microwave interferometric radiometer of the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission measures at a frequency of 1.4 GHz in the L-band. In contrast to other microwave satellites, low frequency measurements in L-band have a large penetration depth in sea ice and thus contain information on the ice thickness. Previous ice thickness retrievals have neglected a snow layer on top of the ice. Here, we implement a snow layer in our emission model and investigate how snow influences L-band brightness temperatures and whether it is possible to retrieve snow thickness over thick Arctic sea ice from SMOS data. We find that the brightness temperatures above snow-covered sea ice are higher than above bare sea ice and that horizontal polarisation is more affected by the snow layer than vertical polarisation. In accordance with our theoretical investigations, the root mean square deviation between simulated and observed horizontally polarised brightness temperatures decreases from 20.9 K to 4.7 K, when we include the snow layer in the simulations. Although dry snow is almost transparent in L-band, we find brightness temperatures to increase with increasing snow thickness under cold Arctic conditions. The brightness temperatures' dependence on snow thickness can be explained by the thermal insulation of snow and its dependence on the snow layer thickness. This temperature effect allows us to retrieve snow thickness over thick sea ice. For the best simulation scenario and snow thicknesses up to 35 cm, the average snow thickness retrieved from horizontally polarised SMOS brightness temperatures agrees within 0.1 cm with the average snow thickness measured during the IceBridge flight campaign in the Arctic in spring 2012. The corresponding root mean square deviation is 5.5 cm, and the coefficient of determination is r2 = 0.58.

  7. Snow thickness retrieval over thick Arctic sea ice using SMOS satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Maaß

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The microwave interferometric radiometer of the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission measures at a frequency of 1.4 GHz in the L-band. In contrast to other microwave satellites, low frequency measurements in L-band have a large penetration depth in sea ice and thus contain information on the ice thickness. Previous ice thickness retrievals have neglected a snow layer on top of the ice. Here, we implement a snow layer in our emission model and investigate how snow influences L-band brightness temperatures and whether it is possible to retrieve snow thickness over thick Arctic sea ice from SMOS data. We find that the brightness temperatures above snow-covered sea ice are higher than above bare sea ice and that horizontal polarisation is more affected by the snow layer than vertical polarisation. In accordance with our theoretical investigations, the root mean square deviation between simulated and observed horizontally polarised brightness temperatures decreases from 20.0 K to 4.4 K, when we include the snow layer in the simulations. Under cold Arctic conditions we find brightness temperatures to increase with increasing snow thickness. Because dry snow is almost transparent in L-band, this brightness temperature's dependence on snow thickness origins from the thermal insulation of snow and its dependence on the snow layer thickness. This temperature effect allows us to retrieve snow thickness over thick sea ice. For the best simulation scenario and snow thicknesses up to 35 cm, the average snow thickness retrieved from horizontally polarised SMOS brightness temperatures agrees within 0.7 cm with the average snow thickness measured during the IceBridge flight campaign in the Arctic in spring 2012. The corresponding root mean square deviation is 6.3 cm, and the correlation coefficient is r2 = 0.55.

  8. Comparison of SMAP and SMOS Measurements to PALS Airborne Acquisitions in 2015 and 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliander, Andreas; Misra, Sidharth; Chae, Chunsik; Jackson, Thomas J.; Cosh, Michael H.; Powers, Jarrett; McNairn, Heather; Bullock, Paul; Berg, Aaron; Magagi, Ramata; Kerr, Yann; Yueh, Simon

    2017-04-01

    NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched in January 2015. The objective of the mission is global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state using L-band radiometer measurements. Well characterized sites with calibrated in situ soil moisture measurements are used to determine the quality of the soil moisture data products; these sites are designated as core validation sites (CVS). To support the CVS based validation airborne field experiments are used to provide high-fidelity validation data and to improve the SMAP retrieval algorithms. The SMAP project and NASA coordinated airborne field experiments at three CVS locations in 2015 and 2016. SMAP Validation Experiment 2015 (SMAPVEX15) was conducted around the Walnut Gulch CVS in Arizona in August, 2015. SMAPVEX16 was conducted at the South Fork CVS in Iowa and Carman CVS in Manitoba, Canada from May to August 2016. The main objective of SMAPVEX15 was to understand the effects and contribution of heterogeneity on the soil moisture retrievals, whereas the main objective of SMAPVEX16 was to understand the anomalous retrieval behavior observed over the South Fork and Carman CVS. Each campaign featured the airborne PALS (Passive Active L-band Sensor) instrument. PALS mapped the SMAPVEX15 experiment area 7 times and the SMAPVEX16 domains were each mapped 12 times. This makes altogether 30 coincidental measurements with SMAP. ESA's SMOS mission is another satellite making L-band brightness temperature measurements. The PALS flights coincided with 26 SMOS overpasses during these experiments. The area covered by PALS, at about 1 km resolution, was three adjacent SMAP pixels in SMAPVEX15 and one SMAP pixel over both of the domains in SMAPVEX16 (about 36 km). The spatial resolution of SMOS is similar to SMAP. Each field experiment was accompanied with intensive ground sampling regime consisting of manual sampling and augmentation of the CVS soil moisture

  9. The importance of willow thickets for ptarmigan and hares in shrub tundra: the more the better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrich, Dorothée; Henden, John-André; Ims, Rolf Anker; Doronina, Lilyia O; Killengren, Siw Turid; Lecomte, Nicolas; Pokrovsky, Ivan G; Skogstad, Gunnhild; Sokolov, Alexander A; Sokolov, Vasily A; Yoccoz, Nigel Gilles

    2012-01-01

    In patchy habitats, the relationship between animal abundance and cover of a preferred habitat may change with the availability of that habitat, resulting in a functional response in habitat use. Here, we investigate the relationship of two specialized herbivores, willow ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus) and mountain hare (Lepus timidus), to willows (Salix spp.) in three regions of the shrub tundra zone-northern Norway, northern European Russia and western Siberia. Shrub tundra is a naturally patchy habitat where willow thickets represent a major structural element and are important for herbivores both as food and shelter. Habitat use was quantified using feces counts in a hierarchical spatial design and related to several measures of willow thicket configuration. We document a functional response in the use of willow thickets by ptarmigan, but not by hares. For hares, whose range extends into forested regions, occurrence increased overall with willow cover. The occurrence of willow ptarmigan showed a strong positive relationship to willow cover and a negative relationship to thicket fragmentation in the region with lowest willow cover at landscape scale, where willow growth may be limited by reindeer browsing. In regions with higher cover, in contrast, such relationships were not observed. Differences in predator communities among the regions may contribute to the observed pattern, enhancing the need for cover where willow thickets are scarce. Such region-specific relationships reflecting regional characteristics of the ecosystem highlight the importance of large-scale investigations to understand the relationships of habitat availability and use, which is a critical issue considering that habitat availability changes quickly with climate change and human impact.

  10. Herbivores influence the growth, reproduction, and morphology of a widespread Arctic willow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Katie S; Ruess, Roger W; Lindberg, Mark S; Mulder, Christa P

    2014-01-01

    Shrubs have expanded in Arctic ecosystems over the past century, resulting in significant changes to albedo, ecosystem function, and plant community composition. Willow and rock ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus, L. muta) and moose (Alces alces) extensively browse Arctic shrubs, and may influence their architecture, growth, and reproduction. Furthermore, these herbivores may alter forage plants in such a way as to increase the quantity and accessibility of their own food source. We estimated the effect of winter browsing by ptarmigan and moose on an abundant, early-successional willow (Salix alaxensis) in northern Alaska by comparing browsed to unbrowsed branches. Ptarmigan browsed 82-89% of willows and removed 30-39% of buds, depending on study area and year. Moose browsed 17-44% of willows and browsed 39-55% of shoots. Browsing inhibited apical dominance and activated axillary and adventitious buds to produce new vegetative shoots. Ptarmigan- and moose-browsed willow branches produced twice the volume of shoot growth but significantly fewer catkins the following summer compared with unbrowsed willow branches. Shoots on browsed willows were larger and produced 40-60% more buds compared to unbrowsed shoots. This process of shoot production at basal parts of the branch is the mechanism by which willows develop a highly complex "broomed" architecture after several years of browsing. Broomed willows were shorter and more likely to be re-browsed by ptarmigan, but not moose. Ptarmigan likely benefit from the greater quantity and accessibility of buds on previously browsed willows and may increase the carrying capacity of their own habitat. Despite the observed tolerance of willows to browsing, their vertical growth and reproduction were strongly inhibited by moose and ptarmigan. Browsing by these herbivores therefore needs to be considered in future models of shrub expansion in the Arctic.

  11. 76 FR 44602 - Notice of Temporary Closure of Roads and Trails on Public Lands Adjacent to Big Willow Creek in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... Willow Creek in Payette County, ID AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Temporary Closure. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Big Willow closure to motorized vehicle use is...\\1/4\\NW\\1/4\\ north and west of Big Willow Road. T. 8 N., R. 3 W., Sec. 1, lots 1, 3, 4,...

  12. 77 FR 2603 - Public Notice for Waiver of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance; Willow Run Airport; Detroit, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Public Notice for Waiver of Aeronautical Land-Use Assurance; Willow Run... Willow Run Airport, Detroit, Michigan. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Exhibit ``A'' Part of Section 12, Town... Easterly and Southerly line of the General Motors Corporation, Hydra-Matic Division, Willow Run...

  13. Greenhouse gas emissions from willow-based electricity: a scenario analysis for Portugal and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebelo de Mira, R.; Kroeze, C.

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on greenhouse gas emissions from power plants using willow as fuel compared to those using fossil fuels. More specifically, we quantify emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) from soils on which willow is grown, and compare these to emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from fossil fuel-bas

  14. Valuation of ecosystem services of commercial shrub willow (Salix spp.) woody biomass crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressler, Alison; Vidon, Philippe; Hirsch, Paul; Volk, Timothy

    2017-04-01

    The development of shrub willow as a bioenergy feedstock contributes to renewable energy portfolios in many countries with temperate climates and marginal croplands due to excessive moisture. However, to fully understand the potential of shrub willow as an alternative crop on marginal cropland, more research is needed to understand the potential of shrub willow for providing a variety of ecosystem services. At the same time, there is much need for research developing strategies to value ecosystem services beyond conventional valuation systems (e.g., monetary, intrinsic). In this context, this project investigates the ecosystem services of shrub willow woody biomass from an environmental science perspective, and proposes a new avenue to assess ecosystem services for management purposes based on the relative value of key ecosystem services under various land management strategies (i.e., willow vs. corn vs. hay). On marginal cropland in the US Northeast, shrub willow may be used to replace crops like corn or hay. Transitioning from conventional corn or hay to willow tends to reduce nutrient loss and erosion, improve biodiversity and adaptability to climate change, and increase access to recreational activities. However, it is unlikely to change soil carbon pools or greenhouse gas emissions at the soil-atmosphere interface. By encouraging decision makers to weigh the pros and cons of each management decision (i.e., willow vs. corn vs. hay) based on the situation, the ecosystems services valuation method used here provides a clear framework for decision making in a watershed management context.

  15. Elk, beaver, and the persistence of willows in national parks: comment on Singer et al. (1998).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keigley, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Singer et al. (1998) propose that the decline in populations of beaver (Castor canadensis) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) has caused willow to be more vulnerable to browsing by clk (Alces alces). I do not believe that their scenario correctly characterizes the relationship between elk and willow in YNP

  16. Distribution of assimilated carbon in plants and rhizosphere soil of basket willow (Salix viminalis L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neergaard, de A.; Porter, J.R.; Gorissen, A.

    2002-01-01

    Willow is often used in bio-energy plantations for its potential to function as a renewable energy source, but knowledge about its effect on soil carbon dynamics is limited. Therefore, we investigated the temporal variation in carbon dynamics in willow, focusing on below-ground allocation and seques

  17. Removal of 4-chlorobenzoic acid from spiked hydroponic solution by willow trees (Salix viminalis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deavers, K.; Macek, T.; Karlson, U.

    2010-01-01

    . Methods The removal of 4-CBA by willow trees was investigated with intact, septic willow trees growing in hydroponic solution and with sterile cell suspensions at concentrations of 5 mg/L and 50 mg/L 4-CBA. Nutrient solutions with different levels of ammonium and nitrate were prepared to achieve different...

  18. The potential of willow for remediation of heavy metal polluted calcareous urban soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J K; Holm, P E; Nejrup, J

    2009-01-01

    Growth performance and heavy metal uptake by willow (Salix viminalis) from strongly and moderately polluted calcareous soils were investigated in field and growth chamber trials to assess the suitability of willow for phytoremediation. Field uptakes were 2-10 times higher than growth chamber...

  19. Inversion model validation of ground emissivity. Contribution to the development of SMOS algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Demontoux, François; Ruffié, Gilles; Wigneron, Jean Pierre; Grant, Jennifer; Hernandez, Daniel Medina

    2007-01-01

    SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity), is the second mission of 'Earth Explorer' to be developed within the program 'Living Planet' of the European Space Agency (ESA). This satellite, containing the very first 1.4GHz interferometric radiometer 2D, will carry out the first cartography on a planetary scale of the moisture of the grounds and the salinity of the oceans. The forests are relatively opaque, and the knowledge of moisture remains problematic. The effect of the vegetation can be corrected thanks a simple radiative model. Nevertheless simulations show that the effect of the litter on the emissivity of a system litter + ground is not negligible. Our objective is to highlight the effects of this layer on the total multi layer system. This will make it possible to lead to a simple analytical formulation of a model of litter which can be integrated into the calculation algorithm of SMOS. Radiometer measurements, coupled to dielectric characterizations of samples in laboratory can enable us to characterize...

  20. Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Breeding Site and Territory Summary - 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durst, Scott L.; Sogge, Mark K.; Stump, Shay D.; Walker, Hira A.; Kus, Barbara E.; Sferra, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    The Southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus; hereafter references to willow flycatcher and flycatcher refer to E.t. extimus, except where specifically noted) is an endangered bird that breeds only in dense riparian habitats in parts of six Southwestern states (Arizona, New Mexico, southern California, extreme southern Nevada, southern Utah, and southwestern Colorado). Since 1993, hundreds of Southwestern willow flycatcher surveys have been conducted each year, and many new flycatcher breeding sites located. This document synthesizes the most current information available on all known Southwestern willow flycatcher breeding sites. This rangewide data synthesis was designed to meet two objectives: (1) identify all known Southwestern willow flycatcher breeding sites and (2) assemble data to estimate population size, location, habitat, and other information for all breeding sites, for as many years as possible, from 1993 through 2007. This report provides data summaries in terms of the number of flycatcher sites and the number of territories. When interpreting and using this information, it must be kept in mind that a 'site' is a geographic location where one or more willow flycatchers establishes a territory. Sites with unpaired territorial males are considered breeding sites, even if no nesting attempts were documented. A site is often a discrete patch of riparian habitat but may also be a cluster of riparian patches; there is no standardized definition for site, and its use varies within and among states. For example, five occupied habitat patches along a 10-km stretch of river might be considered five different sites in one state but only a single site in another state. This lack of standardization makes comparisons based on site numbers problematic. Researchers for this report generally deferred to statewide summary documents or to local managers and researchers when delineating a site for inclusion in the database. However, to avoid inflating

  1. Response of Organ Structure and Physiology to Autotetraploidization in Early Development of Energy Willow Salix viminalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudits, Dénes; Török, Katalin; Cseri, András; Paul, Kenny; Nagy, Anna V; Nagy, Bettina; Sass, László; Ferenc, Györgyi; Vankova, Radomira; Dobrev, Petre; Vass, Imre; Ayaydin, Ferhan

    2016-03-01

    The biomass productivity of the energy willow Salix viminalis as a short-rotation woody crop depends on organ structure and functions that are under the control of genome size. Colchicine treatment of axillary buds resulted in a set of autotetraploid S. viminalis var. Energo genotypes (polyploid Energo [PP-E]; 2n = 4x = 76) with variation in the green pixel-based shoot surface area. In cases where increased shoot biomass was observed, it was primarily derived from larger leaf size and wider stem diameter. Autotetraploidy slowed primary growth and increased shoot diameter (a parameter of secondary growth). The duplicated genome size enlarged bark and wood layers in twigs sampled in the field. The PP-E plants developed wider leaves with thicker midrib and enlarged palisade parenchyma cells. Autotetraploid leaves contained significantly increased amounts of active gibberellins, cytokinins, salicylic acid, and jasmonate compared with diploid individuals. Greater net photosynthetic CO2 uptake was detected in leaves of PP-E plants with increased chlorophyll and carotenoid contents. Improved photosynthetic functions in tetraploids were also shown by more efficient electron transport rates of photosystems I and II. Autotetraploidization increased the biomass of the root system of PP-E plants relative to diploids. Sections of tetraploid roots showed thickening with enlarged cortex cells. Elevated amounts of indole acetic acid, active cytokinins, active gibberellin, and salicylic acid were detected in the root tips of these plants. The presented variation in traits of tetraploid willow genotypes provides a basis to use autopolyploidization as a chromosome engineering technique to alter the organ development of energy plants in order to improve biomass productivity.

  2. Elucidating spatially explicit behavioral landscapes in the Willow Flycatcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakian, Amanda V.; Sullivan, Kimberly A.; Paxton, Eben H.

    2012-01-01

    Animal resource selection is a complex, hierarchical decision-making process, yet resource selection studies often focus on the presence and absence of an animal rather than the animal's behavior at resource use locations. In this study, we investigate foraging and vocalization resource selection in a population of Willow Flycatchers, Empidonax traillii adastus, using Bayesian spatial generalized linear models. These models produce “behavioral landscapes” in which space use and resource selection is linked through behavior. Radio telemetry locations were collected from 35 adult Willow Flycatchers (n = 14 males, n = 13 females, and n = 8 unknown sex) over the 2003 and 2004 breeding seasons at Fish Creek, Utah. Results from the 2-stage modeling approach showed that habitat type, perch position, and distance from the arithmetic mean of the home range (in males) or nest site (in females) were important factors influencing foraging and vocalization resource selection. Parameter estimates from the individual-level models indicated high intraspecific variation in the use of the various habitat types and perch heights for foraging and vocalization. On the population level, Willow Flycatchers selected riparian habitat over other habitat types for vocalizing but used multiple habitat types for foraging including mountain shrub, young riparian, and upland forest. Mapping of observed and predicted foraging and vocalization resource selection indicated that the behavior often occurred in disparate areas of the home range. This suggests that multiple core areas may exist in the home ranges of individual flycatchers, and demonstrates that the behavioral landscape modeling approach can be applied to identify spatially and behaviorally distinct core areas. The behavioral landscape approach is applicable to a wide range of animal taxa and can be used to improve our understanding of the spatial context of behavior and resource selection.

  3. Estimation and relevance of bark proportion in a willow stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, Anneli [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Dept. of Short Rotation Forestry, Uppsala (Sweden); Estonian Agricultural Univ. (EAU), Inst. of Zoology and Botany, Tartu (Estonia); Verwijst, Theo; Aronsson, Paer [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Dept. of Short Rotation Forestry, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    We studied bark proportion of a willow (Salix viminalis) plantation established to produce biomass for energy, the vertical distribution of elements (N, P, K, Mg, Ca, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Si, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg and Ni) in bark and in wood of the shoots and the content of elements in the standing biomass. The study is based on 5-year-old shoots (clone 77-683) from a 12-year-old plantation. The bark proportion of the whole willow stand was 19% (9 tDM ha{sup -1}). The bark proportion of single shoots was constant after they had reached the size of 20 mm at stem diameter at 55 cm height. Compared to wood, bark had significantly higher concentrations of N, P, K, Mg, Ca, Cd, Pb, Co and Zn. The nutrient element (N, P, K, Mg) concentrations in the bark and in the wood of the current year shoot fractions (twigs) were significantly higher compared to the bark and the wood of other fractions. The accumulation of heavy metals occurred due to the accumulation of tree biomass and not due to the increase of heavy metal (Cd, Cr, Pb and Hg) concentrations in plant tissues over time. In summary, different management regimes give a possibility to influence shoot size frequency distribution of the crop and the chemical composition of biomass. For minimizing element removals from the soil and corrosion processes in power plants, energy willow stands should be managed in a way that promotes low bark proportion and thereby as little nutrient removal from the site by biomass harvest as possible. (Author)

  4. Woody plant willow in function of river water protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babincev Ljiljana M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coastal area surrounding the river Ibar, in the area between cities of Kosovska Mitrovica and Leposavić in the north of Kosovo and Metohija, is occupied with seven industrial waste dumps. These dumps were all part of the exploitation and flotation refinement of raw mineral materials, metallurgic refinement of concentrates, chemical industry, industrial refinement and energetic facilities of Trepča industrial complex. The existing waste dumps, both active and inactive, are of heterogenic chemical composition. Its impact on the river water is shown by the content of heavy metals found in it. Removal of lead, cadmium and zinc would be economically unrewarding, regardless of the technology used. Wooden plant that prevails in this area is white willow. This work is focused on the removal of heavy metals (Pb, Cd and Zn from the water of the river Ibar using white willow. Roots of the willow are cultivated using the method of water cultures in an individual solution of heavy metals and river water sample. The preparation of the samples for analysis was performed by burning the herbal material and dissolving ashes in the appropriate acids. The concentrations of metals were determined by the stripping analysis. In the investigated heavy metal solutions the biomass increase is 25.6% in lead solution, 27.3% in cadmium and 30.7% in zinc solution. The increase of biomass in nutritional solution, without the heavy metals, is 32.4% and in river water sample 27.5%. The coefficient of bioaccumulation in solutions with heavy metals is 1.6% in lead solution, 1.9% in cadmium and 2.2% in zinc solution. Heavy metals accumulation is 18.74 μg of lead, 20.09 μg of cadmium and 22.89 μg of zinc. The coefficient of bioaccumulation of the water samples, that contained 44.83 μg/dm3 of lead, 29.21 μg/dm3 of cadmium and 434.00 μg/dm3 of zinc, during the period of 45 days, was 30.3% for lead, 53.4% for cadmium and 3.9% for zinc. The concentrations of accumulated metals

  5. METHOD OF FERTILIZATION OF ENERGY WILLOW PLANTATION USING SEWAGE SLUDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Niemiec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sewage sludge deriving from biofiltrationof municipal waste abound in soil processed organic substances and mineral fertilization components which may be used for fertil-ization of energy willow plantations. In the article the potential of natural utilization of sewage sludge and the patented device for injection dosage of sludge has been pre-sented. The device enables putting into soil mineral and organic fertilizers with loose consistency and their immediate covering by soil in order to reduce unpleasant smell and limit loss of volatile components of fertilizer.

  6. Water tables constrain height recovery of willow on Yellowstone's northern range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilyeu, Danielle M; Cooper, David J; Hobbs, N Thompson

    2008-01-01

    Excessive levels of herbivory may disturb ecosystems in ways that persist even when herbivory is moderated. These persistent changes may complicate efforts to restore ecosystems affected by herbivores. Willow (Salix spp.) communities within the northern range in Yellowstone National Park have been eliminated or degraded in many riparian areas by excessive elk (Cervus elaphus L.) browsing. Elk browsing of riparian willows appears to have diminished following the reintroduction of wolves (Canis lupis L.), but it remains uncertain whether reduced herbivory will restore willow communities. The direct effects of elk browsing on willows have been accompanied by indirect effects from the loss of beaver (Castor canadensis Kuhl) activity, including incision of stream channels, erosion of fine sediments, and lower water tables near streams historically dammed by beaver. In areas where these changes have occurred, lowered water tables may suppress willow height even in the absence of elk browsing. We conducted a factorial field experiment to understand willow responses to browsing and to height of water tables. After four years of protection from elk browsing, willows with ambient water tables averaged only 106 cm in height, with negligible height gain in two of three study species during the last year of the experiment. Willows that were protected from browsing and had artificially elevated water tables averaged 147 cm in height and gained 19 cm in the last year of the experiment. In browsed plots, elevated water tables doubled height gain during a period of slightly reduced browsing pressure. We conclude that water availability mediates the rate of willow height gain and may determine whether willows grow tall enough to escape the browse zone of elk and gain resistance to future elk browsing. Consequently, in areas where long-term beaver absence has resulted in incised stream channels and low water tables, a reduction in elk browsing alone may not be sufficient for recovery

  7. The influence of canopy density on willow leaf rust (Melampsora epitea) severity in willow short rotation coppice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toome, M.; Heinsoo, K.; Holm, B.; Luik, A. [Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 1A, Tartu 51014 (Estonia)

    2010-08-15

    Willow short rotation coppice is used as a renewable energy source and also as a vegetation filter for purifying wastewater. Wastewater irrigation might change microclimatic conditions and increase the canopy density in plantations, which might decrease production due to leaf rust (Melampsora epitea). The aim of this study was to estimate the impact of the canopy density on rust abundance on willows. For that, we counted rust pustules on leaves of five different willow clones from dense and sparse areas in both the wastewater irrigated and control part of the plantation. The results demonstrated clear differences between clones; clone '81090' was very susceptible, '78183' susceptible, '78021' fairly tolerant and 'Tora' rust resistant. Clone 'Gudrun', which was previously reported resistant, had severe rust damages in Estonia. In the case of clones '78183' and '78021' there were significantly more rust pustules per leaf unit area at areas with denser canopy, which confirmed that higher plant density could result in biomass losses caused by leaf rust. No differences, however, were detected between dense and sparse areas of hybrid clone 'Gudrun', most probably because in this particular case leaves from upper canopy layer were used. There was a tendency detected that clones with a higher number of shoots per plant had more rust damages on their leaves, however, the correlation was not statistically confirmed. In conclusion, the impact of canopy density on rust abundance is clone-specific and significant in the case of clones on which infection starts from the lower part of the canopy. (author)

  8. Injury due to leg bands in willow flycatchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, J.A.; Klus, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    We report an apparently unusually high incidence of leg injury in Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii) as a result of banding and color banding. Color bands and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) bands applied to Willow Flycatchers from 1988-1995 resulted in an overall leg injury rate of 9.6% to birds returning to our study areas in subsequent years. Most injuries occurred on legs with only color band(s) (58.3%) or on legs with both a USFWS band and a color band (35%); only 6.7% of injuries (4/60) were due to USFWS bands alone, yielding an overall USFWS band injury rate of only 0.6%. Injuries ranged from severe (swollen, bleeding legs; a missing foot) to relatively minor (irritations on the tarsus). Amputation of the foot occurred in 33.9% of the cases. Return rates of adult injured birds in the year(s) following injury were significantly lower than for the population at large.

  9. Revegetation of Copper Mine Tailings with Ryegrass and Willow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Xiu-Zhen; ZHOU Dong-Mei; SI You-Bin

    2004-01-01

    To restore vegetation on metal mine tailings is very difficult because they often contain high concentrations of heavy metals, low nutrient content and low water retention capacity. This study involved 3 experiments that evaluated the effects of 4 treatment amendments: montmorillonite, rice straw, organic manure and chemical fertilizer on the growth of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and willow (Saliz viminalis L.) with Cu and Zn mine tailings from two mining areas. The results showed that ryegrass was the most tolerant of 4 crops to Cu toxicity. Also when organic manure, which contained high concentrations of inorganic salts, was added to the mine tailings, it significantly hindered ryegrass growth (P = 0.05).Meanwhile, with ryegrass organic manure significantly increased (P= 0.05) the extractable Cu concentration in both mine tailings. When montmorillonite was used as a mine tailings amendment with willow, the height and tress number at the 1st cut were significantly greater (P =- 0.05) than a control without montmorillonite. However there was no significant difference for height, tress number, dry weight or root dry weight at the 2nd cut. So, amendment applications to reduce metal toxicity and increase nutrients retention in mine tailings were essential during revegetation of mine tailings.

  10. Using Arabidopsis to study shoot branching in biomass willow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Sally P; Salmon, Jemma; Hanley, Steven J; Karp, Angela; Leyser, Ottoline

    2013-06-01

    The success of the short-rotation coppice system in biomass willow (Salix spp.) relies on the activity of the shoot-producing meristems found on the coppice stool. However, the regulation of the activity of these meristems is poorly understood. In contrast, our knowledge of the mechanisms behind axillary meristem regulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has grown rapidly in the past few years through the exploitation of integrated physiological, genetic, and molecular assays. Here, we demonstrate that these assays can be directly transferred to study the control of bud activation in biomass willow and to assess similarities with the known hormone regulatory system in Arabidopsis. Bud hormone response was found to be qualitatively remarkably similar in Salix spp. and Arabidopsis. These similarities led us to test whether Arabidopsis hormone mutants could be used to assess allelic variation in the cognate Salix spp. hormone genes. Allelic differences in Salix spp. strigolactone genes were observed using this approach. These results demonstrate that both knowledge and assays from Arabidopsis axillary meristem biology can be successfully applied to Salix spp. and can increase our understanding of a fundamental aspect of short-rotation coppice biomass production, allowing more targeted breeding.

  11. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-12-22

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows.

  12. Impact of Willow Invasion on Vegetation Water and Carbon Exchange in the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budny, M. L.; Benscoter, B.

    2014-12-01

    Southern coastal willow (Salix caroliniana) is native to the Florida Everglades, commonly found on drier landforms like levees and tree islands. Shortened periods of inundation due to water management have led to the encroachment and expansion of these shrubs in sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense) marsh communities. The broadleaf willow is morphologically and physiologically different from the graminoid sedge sawgrass, with possible consequence for microhabitat conditions and ecosystem function. Willow is often assumed to have greater rates of transpiration, thereby affecting wetland water management, and may have concurrent differences in photosynthesis and carbon exchange. However, the ecophysiological impact of the willow invasion has not been quantified. We assessed differences in plant water and carbon exchange between willow and sawgrass at Blue Cypress Conservation Area, an impounded sawgrass peatland within the St. John's River Water Management District (SJRWMD). Plant transpiration and net CO2 exchange (photosynthesis and autotrophic respiration) were measured on fully expanded, non-damaged leaves of sawgrass and willow using a portable infrared gas analyzer (LI-6400XT, LI-COR, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.). The results obtained from this study will provide a better understanding of ecophysiological changes that occur within marsh communities with shrub expansion, which will have cascading impacts on soil accretion and turnover, microclimate, and water quality Understanding the implications of willow expansion will improve landscape models of wetland water and carbon exchange as well as inform water management decisions.

  13. Ungulate herbivory on alpine willow in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigenfuss, L.C.; Schoenecker, K.A.; Amburg, L.K.V.

    2011-01-01

    In many areas of the Rocky Mountains, elk (Cervus elaphus) migrate from low-elevation mountain valleys during spring to high-elevation subalpine and alpine areas for the summer. Research has focused on the impacts of elk herbivory on winter-range plant communities, particularly on woody species such as willow and aspen; however, little information is available on the effects of elk herbivory on alpine willows. In the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of south central Colorado, select alpine areas appear to receive high levels of summer elk herbivory, while other areas are nearly unbrowsed. In 2005 and 2008, we measured willow height, cover, and utilization on sites that appeared to be used heavily by elk, as well as on sites that appeared to be used lightly, to determine differences between these communities over time. We found less willow cover and shorter willows at sites that received higher levels of browsing compared to those that had lower levels of browsing. Human recreational use was greater at lightly browsed sites than at highly browsed sites. From 2005 to 2008, willow utilization declined, and willow cover and height increased at sites with heavy browsing, likely owing to ownership change of adjacent valley land which led to (1) removal of grazing competition from, cattle at valley locations and (2) increased human use in alpine areas, which displaced elk. We discuss the implications of increased human use and climate change on elk use of these alpine habitats. ?? 2011.

  14. Phytoscreening and phytoextraction of heavy metals at Danish polluted sites using willow and poplar trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Algreen; Trapp, Stefan; Rein, Arno

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine typical concentrations of heavy metals (HM) in wood from willows and poplars, in order to test the feasibility of phytoscreening and phytoextraction of HM. Samples were taken from one strongly, one moderately, and one slightly polluted site and from....... Concentrations in wood from the highly polluted site were significantly elevated, compared to references, in particular for willow. The conclusion from these results is that tree coring could be used successfully to identify strongly heavy metal-polluted soil for Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn, and that willow trees were...

  15. Assimilation of neural network soil moisture in land surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Nemesio; de Rosnay, Patricia; Albergel, Clement; Aires, Filipe; Prigent, Catherine; Kerr, Yann; Richaume, Philippe; Muñoz-Sabater, Joaquin; Drusch, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    In this study a set of land surface data assimilation (DA) experiments making use of satellite derived soil moisture (SM) are presented. These experiments have two objectives: (1) to test the information content of satellite remote sensing of soil moisture for numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, and (2) to test a simplified assimilation of these data through the use of a Neural Network (NN) retrieval. Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) data were used. The SMOS soil moisture dataset was obtained specifically for this project training a NN using SMOS brightness temperatures as input and using as reference for the training European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) H-TESSEL SM fields. In this way, the SMOS NN SM dataset has a similar climatology to that of the model and it does not present a global bias with respect to the model. The DA experiments are computed using a surface-only Land Data Assimilation System (so-LDAS) based on the HTESSEL land surface model. This system is very computationally efficient and allows to perform long surface assimilation experiments (one whole year, 2012). SMOS NN SM DA experiments are compared to ASCAT SM DA experiments. In both cases, experiments with and without 2 m air temperature and relative humidity DA are discussed using different observation errors for the ASCAT and SMOS datasets. Seasonal, geographical and soil-depth-related differences between the results of those experiments are presented and discussed. The different SM analysed fields are evaluated against a large number of in situ measurements of SM. On average, the SM analysis gives in general similar results to the model open loop with no assimilation even if significant differences can be seen for specific sites with in situ measurements. The sensitivity to observation errors to the SM dataset slightly differs depending on the networks of in situ measurements, however it is relatively low for the tests

  16. Characterisation of the willow phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) gene family reveals expression differences compared with poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Femke; Hanley, Steven J; Beale, Michael H; Karp, Angela

    2015-09-01

    Willow is an important biomass crop for the bioenergy industry, and therefore optimal growth with minimal effects of biotic and abiotic stress is essential. The phenylpropanoid pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of not only lignin but also of flavonoids, condensed tannins, benzenoids and phenolic glycosides which all have a role in protecting the plant against biotic and abiotic stress. All products of the phenylpropanoid pathway are important for the healthy growth of short rotation cropping species such as willow. However, the phenylpropanoid pathway in willow remains largely uncharacterised. In the current study we identified and characterised five willow phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) genes, which encode enzymes that catalyse the deamination of l-phenylalanine to form trans-cinnamic acid, the entry point into the phenylpropanoid pathway. Willow PAL1, PAL2, PAL3 and PAL4 genes were orthologous to the poplar genes. However no orthologue of PAL5 appears to be present in willow. Moreover, two tandemly repeated PAL2 orthologues were identified in a single contig. Willow PALs show similar sub-cellular localisation to the poplar genes. However, the enzyme kinetics and gene expression of the willow PAL genes differed slightly, with willow PAL2 being more widely expressed than its poplar orthologues implying a wider role for PALs in the production of flavonoids, condensed tannins, benzenoids, and phenolic glycosides, in willow.

  17. Characterisation of the willow phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) gene family reveals expression differences compared with poplar

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Femke; Hanley, Steven J.; Beale, Michael H.; Karp, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Willow is an important biomass crop for the bioenergy industry, and therefore optimal growth with minimal effects of biotic and abiotic stress is essential. The phenylpropanoid pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of not only lignin but also of flavonoids, condensed tannins, benzenoids and phenolic glycosides which all have a role in protecting the plant against biotic and abiotic stress. All products of the phenylpropanoid pathway are important for the healthy growth of short rotation cropping species such as willow. However, the phenylpropanoid pathway in willow remains largely uncharacterised. In the current study we identified and characterised five willow phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) genes, which encode enzymes that catalyse the deamination of l-phenylalanine to form trans-cinnamic acid, the entry point into the phenylpropanoid pathway. Willow PAL1, PAL2, PAL3 and PAL4 genes were orthologous to the poplar genes. However no orthologue of PAL5 appears to be present in willow. Moreover, two tandemly repeated PAL2 orthologues were identified in a single contig. Willow PALs show similar sub-cellular localisation to the poplar genes. However, the enzyme kinetics and gene expression of the willow PAL genes differed slightly, with willow PAL2 being more widely expressed than its poplar orthologues implying a wider role for PALs in the production of flavonoids, condensed tannins, benzenoids, and phenolic glycosides, in willow. PMID:26070140

  18. Empirical sea ice thickness retrieval during the freeze-up period from SMOS high incident angle observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huntemann

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice thickness information is important for sea ice modelling and ship operations. Here a method to detect the thickness of sea ice up to 50 cm during the freeze-up season based on high incidence angle observations of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS satellite working at 1.4 GHz is suggested. By comparison of thermodynamic ice growth data with SMOS brightness temperatures, a high correlation to intensity and an anticorrelation to the difference between vertically and horizontally polarised brightness temperatures at incidence angles between 40 and 50° are found and used to develop an empirical retrieval algorithm sensitive to thin sea ice up to 50 cm thickness. The algorithm shows high correlation with ice thickness data from airborne measurements and reasonable ice thickness patterns for the Arctic freeze-up period.

  19. Quarterly Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake [National Wildlife Refuge] : February to April 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Willow Creek, Benton Lake, and Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from February to April of 1942. The report...

  20. Quarterly Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake [National Wildlife Refuge] : August to October 1941

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for WIllow Creek, Benton Lake, and Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from August to October of 1941. The report...

  1. Quarterly Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake [National Wildlife Refuge] : February to April 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Willow Creek, Benton Lake, and Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from February to April of 1940. The report...

  2. Quarterly Grain Report : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : January to April 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This grain report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge discusses all grain received, disposed of during the quarterly period of January to...

  3. Quarterly Grain Report : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : May to August 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This grain report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge discusses all grain received, disposed of during the quarterly period of May to...

  4. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September to December 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1955. The...

  5. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September to December 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1950. The...

  6. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : May to August 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Willow Creek, Pishkun, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August 1950. The report begins by...

  7. Effect of fertilisation on biomass yield, ash and element uptake in SRC willow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugilt Larsen, Søren; Jørgensen, Uffe; Kjeldsen, Jens Bonderup

    2016-01-01

    Optimal fertilization of short rotation coppice (SRC) willow is important both in terms of economic yield and environmental effect. We measured biomass yield and nutrient uptake in two willow clones, Inger and Tordis, grown on a coarse sandy soil and within six different fertilization regimes....... Fertilization treatments were carried out during two two-year harvest rotations, beginning in the 2nd growth year of the plantation. Willow was fertilized as follows with names referring to type of fertilizer and total quantities of nitrogen (kg ha−1) in first and second year within both rotations: 1) Control0...... related to the quantity of N applied but the effect depended on fertilizer type, harvest rotation and willow clone...

  8. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : May to August 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report...

  9. The Energy Efficiency Of Willow Biomass Production In Poland - A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczukowski, Stefan; Tworkowski, Józef; Stolarski, Mariusz J.; Krzyżaniak, Michał

    2015-01-01

    Field experiments with willow (Salix L.) coppice cultivation and Eko-Salix systems have been conducted at the University of Warmia and Mazury since 1992. In that wider context, the aim of the work described here was to compare energy inputs involved in setting up a plantation and producing biomass, and to assess the efficiency of willow-chips production under the coppice and Eko-Salix systems. The energy gain determined in the experiments was several to more than twenty times as great as the inputs needed to operate the plantation and to harvest willow biomass, this leaving both systems of willow cultivation under study attractive where setting up short-rotation coppices is concerned.

  10. Quarterly Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake [National Wildlife Refuge] : August to October 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for WIllow Creek, Benton Lake, and Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from August to October of 1940. The report...

  11. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : May to August 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1953. The report begins...

  12. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : May to August 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Willow Creek, Pishkun, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August 1947. The report begins by...

  13. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September to December 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1947. The...

  14. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September to December 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The...

  15. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September to December 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Willow Creek, Pishkun, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1943. The report...

  16. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September to December 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1959. The...

  17. Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuges : Narrative Report : January to December 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  18. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : January to April 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pishkun, Willow Creek, and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1954. The...

  19. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September to December 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The...

  20. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : May to August 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1955. The report...

  1. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : May to August 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Willow Creek, Pishkun, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August 1948. The report begins by...

  2. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : January to April 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pishkun, Willow Creek, and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1955. The...

  3. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September to December 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1957. The...

  4. Quarterly Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake [National Wildlife Refuge] : May to July 1941

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Willow Creek, Benton Lake, and Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to July 1941. The report begins by...

  5. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : January to April 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pishkun, Willow Creek, and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1947. The...

  6. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : January to April 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pishkun, Willow Creek, and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1948. The...

  7. Stream Temperature Data in the Willow-Whitehorse watershed of SE Oregon, 2011-15

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes stream temperatures from a network of 100 data loggers that was installed throughout the Willow-Whitehorse watershed of SE Oregon in September...

  8. Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuges : Narrative Report : January to December 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  9. Annual Report 1937 : Ninepipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake [National Wildlife] Refuges of Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for fiscal year 1937 covers Refuge activities on Ninepipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges....

  10. Annual Report 1938 : Ninepipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake [National Wildlife] Refuges of Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for fiscal year 1938 covers Refuge activities on Ninepipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges....

  11. Annual Report 1939 : Ninepipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake [National Wildlife] Refuges of Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for fiscal year 1939 covers Refuge activities on Ninepipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges....

  12. Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuges : Narrative Report : January to December 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  13. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : May to August 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1956. The report begins...

  14. Phytotoxicity of fresh and weathered diesel and gasoline to willow and poplar trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Köhler, A.; Larsen, L.C.

    2001-01-01

    The toxicity of fresh and weathered gasoline and diesel fuel to willow and poplar trees was studied using a tree transpiration toxicity test. Soils were taken from an abandoned filling station. Concentrations in the samples were measured as the sum of hydrocarbons from C5 to C10 (gasoline) and C12...... to C28 (diesel). Concentrations ranged from 145 to 921 mg/kg gasoline and 143 to 18231 mg/kg diesel. The correlation between log soil concentration and toxicity to willows (Salix viminalis x schwerinii) was highly significant for the diesel fraction (r2=0.81, n=19) and for the sum of hydrocarbons (r2...... diesel and gasoline contaminated soils, and two willow and one poplar species (S. viminalis, S. alba and Populus nigra). Fresh diesel at about 1000 mg/kg showed no effect on S. alba, although P. nigra was more sensitive. 10000 mg/kg seriously affected the transpiration of all species, silver willow (S...

  15. Evaluating growth effects from an imidacloprid treatment in black willow and eastern cottonwood cuttings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano de Sene Fernandes; Ray A. Souter; Theodor D. Leininger

    2015-01-01

    Black willow (Salix nigra Marsh.) and eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartram ex Marsh.), two species native in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley, have importance in short rotation woody crop (SRWC) systems for biomass production (Ruark 2006).

  16. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Benton, Pishkun, Willow Creek Lake National Wildlife Refuge : May to August 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Pishkun, Willow Creek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1963. The report begins...

  17. 2004 Progress report : Riparian willow restoration along the Illinois River at Arapaho NWR, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This progress report is concerning the riparian willow restoration along the Illinois river at Arapaho NWR. Included in the report is the background on the...

  18. Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuges : Narrative Report : January to December 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  19. Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuges : Narrative Report : January to December 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  20. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September to December 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The...

  1. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : January to April 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pishkun, Willow Creek, and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1949. The...

  2. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September to December 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1951. The...

  3. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : January to April 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Pishkun, Willow Creek, and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1950. The...

  4. Quarterly Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake [National Wildlife Refuge] : May to July 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Willow Creek, Benton Lake, and Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to July 1940. The report begins by...

  5. Tri Annual Narrative Reports : Pishkun, Willow Creek, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : September to December 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Benton Lake, Willow Creek, Pishkun National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1954. The...

  6. Willow inner bark as a potential source of fibres and chemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Dou, Jinze

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to acquire basic information on the physical and chemical structure of willow inner bark in order to assess its potential as a raw material for chemicals and fibres. Inner bark from four cultivated willow species/hybrids was studied and compared with their wood tissue. The cell and cell wall structure was studied by optical microscopy, SEM and TEM. The fibres were separated with an acid chlorite treatment and analyzed for their dimensions and morphology. The chemica...

  7. Quantitative analysis of flavanones and chalcones from willow bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freischmidt, A; Untergehrer, M; Ziegler, J; Knuth, S; Okpanyi, S; Müller, J; Kelber, O; Weiser, D; Jürgenliemk, G

    2015-09-01

    Willow bark extracts are used for the treatment of fever, pain and inflammation. Recent clinical and pharmacological research revealed that not only the salicylic alcohol derivatives, but also the polyphenols significantly contribute to these effects. Quantitative analysis of the European Pharmacopoeia still focuses on the determination of the salicylic alcohol derivatives. The objective of the present study was the development of an effective quantification method for the determination of as many flavanone and chalcone glycosides as possible in Salix purpurea and other Salix species as well as commercial preparations thereof. As Salix species contain a diverse spectrum of the glycosidated flavanones naringenin, eriodictyol, and the chalcone chalconaringenin, a subsequent acidic and enzymatic hydrolysis was developed to yield naringenin and eriodictyol as aglycones, which were quantified by HPLC. The 5-O-glucosides were cleaved with 11.5% TFA before subsequent hydrolysis of the 7-O-glucosides with an almond β-glucosidase at pH 6-7. The method was validated with regard to LOD, LOQ, intraday and interday precision, accuracy, stability, recovery, time of hydrolysis, robustness and applicability to extracts. All 5-O- and 7-O-glucosides of naringenin, eriodictyol and chalconaringenin were completely hydrolysed and converted to naringenin and eriodictyol. The LOD of the HPLC method was 0.77 μM of naringenin and 0.45 μM of eriodictyol. The LOQ was 2.34 μM of naringenin and 1.35 μM for eriodictyol. The method is robust with regard to sample weight, but susceptible concerning enzyme deterioration. The developed method is applicable to the determination of flavanone and chalcone glycosides in willow bark and corresponding preparations.

  8. Elevation of the Willow Road House. Ernö Goldfinger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Román Santiago

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe article proposes the approach to the house that the Hungarian architect Ernö Goldfinger built for himselfin the Hampstead neighborhood, London in 1939. The complex and unique exercise, in which Goldfingerbases the greatest part of his principles, is visible in this House at Willow Road and particularly evident in its façade. The study of the human experience in the architectonic space, in relationship with the building'senvelope, is fundamental for the architect. In this sense, its theoretical legacy is expressed in his writings for the Architectural Review magazine between 1941 and 1942: "The Sensation of Space", "Urbanism andSpatial Order" and "Elements of Enclosed Space".The analysis of this enigmatic elevation brings up a number of questions that are, in themselves, a true manifest in favor of an architecture free of any stylistic affi liation. Here, Goldfinger questions his own reflections about the spatial order, composition, scale, character and construction.This way, the proposal for Willow Road cannot be explained in functional or mechanistic terms. It needs a phenomenological vision and a precise approach to start to unveil its keys. This home can be understood as a bourgeois residence but also stands out a Modern exercise. It offers the opportunity to unveil a very particular way-of-doing, in which some rootless architects, free of the ruling English traditionalism and any dogmatism, step off the predictable path in that moment. Instead, they contaminate the English Modern architecture and originate a scene of different influences difficult to recognize in any other location. The footprint of this revised modernity of unmistakable Modern spirit, fi ltered from a Classical attitude, influenced the following generation of English architects, exemplary in many of the works of Denys Lasdun.

  9. Biocomposites based on poly(lactic acid/willow-fiber and their injection moulded microcellular foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Zafar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber reinforced biocomposites have recently attracted many researchers because of their biodegradability, cost effectiveness and ecofriendliness. The present study investigates the properties of willow-fiber reinforced poly(lactic acid based composites and their foam processability. Microcellular foams of the composites were prepared by foam injection moulding using nitrogen gas as the blowing agent. The effects of willow-fiber addition on the morphology, mechanical properties, thermal stability, crystallization, and heat deflection temperature (HDT were studied. At 30 weight percent [wt%] willow-fiber content, unfoamed composites showed good improvement in specific tensile and flexural moduli. Addition of willow-fiber increased crystallinity and the rate of crystallization and yielded narrow crystallite size distribution as observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM results of the foamed composites revealed that increase in willow-fiber content caused smaller average cell size and higher cell density. Specific notch impact strength of foamed composites at both 20 and 30 wt% willow-fiber content showed increasing trend compared to that of their unfoamed counterparts.

  10. Salt intrusion in tidal wetlands: European willow species tolerate oligohaline conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus-Michalczyk, Heike; Hanelt, Dieter; Ludewig, Kristin; Müller, David; Schröter, Brigitte; Jensen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Tidal wetlands experience salt intrusion due to the effects of climate change. This study clarifies that the European flood plain willows species Salix alba and Salix viminalis tolerate oligohaline conditions. Salix alba L. and Salix viminalis L. are distributed on flood plains up to transitional waters of the oligohaline to the mesohaline estuarine stretch in temperate climates. They experience spatial and temporal variations in flooding and salinity. In the past, willows dominated the vegetation above the mean high water line, attenuated waves and contributed to sedimentation. In recent centuries, human utilization reduced willow stands. Today, the Elbe estuary - a model system for an estuary in temperate zones - exhibits increasing flooding and salinity due to man-induced effects and climatic changes. Willows were described as having no salinity tolerance. In contrast, our soil water salinity measurements at willows in tidal wetlands prove that mature Salix individuals tolerate oligohaline conditions. To assess immature plant salinity tolerance, we conducted a hydroponic greenhouse experiment. Vegetative propagules originating from a freshwater and an oligohaline site were treated in four salinities. Related to growth rates and biomass production, we found interspecific similarities and a salinity tolerance up to salinity 2. Vitality and chlorophyll fluorescence indicated an acclimation of Salix viminalis to oligohaline conditions. We conclude, that the survival of S. alba and S. viminalis and the restoration of willow stands in estuarine flood plains - with regard to wave attenuation and sedimentation - might be possible, despite increasing salinity in times of climate change.

  11. Brenneria salicis, the bacterium causing watermark disease in willow, resides as an endophyte in wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Martine; Huvenne, Hanneke; Messens, Eric

    2009-06-01

    Brenneria salicis has been studied in willow wood only in relation to watermark disease. In this pathogenic condition, the bacterium occurs at high concentrations. Pathogenicity of B. salicis is still uncontrollable and the disease unpredictable because the plant-bacteria interaction is not understood. Thanks to molecular techniques B. salicis can be detected at low concentrations, which are found in most non-pathogenic interactions. Brenneria salicis was identified and traced with a new specific three-primer polymerase chain reaction and its identity and relative concentration in biological samples confirmed through denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling. Brenneria salicis was found in symptomless willows sampled randomly in Flanders agricultural areas, in young nursery willows, and also in poplar (Populus) and alder (Alnus). It harboured the nitrogenase reductase gene NifH and promoted growth and chlorophyll in willow. Inoculated luminescence-marked B. salicis circulated through the whole plant without inducing disease and exuded at the leaf margins. Other willow endophytes identified were Rahnella, Sphingomonas and Methylobacterium. In conclusion, because endophytic B. salicis is generally observed in willow, disease must not be dependent on infection. Leaf-to-leaf spread is proposed as an important mechanism for spread of B. salicis.

  12. The assessment of physiology parameters of willow plants as a criterion for selection of prospective clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodzkin Aleh I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioenergy production based on short rotation coppice willow plantations (SRC is an effective direction both for economic and environment profit. The yield of willow wood can amount to 10-15 tons per hectare of dry biomass per year and the cost of thus obtained energy is lower in comparison with other energy crops. In order to achieve high yield and profitability, the use of special willow clones is necessary. Species most often used in selection for biomass production are shrub type willows: Salix viminalis, Salix dasyclados and Salix schwerini, while the clones tested in this paper were also of tree species Salix alba. The productivity and some physiology characteristics of Serbian selection clones of Salix alba (Bačka, Volmianka and Drina and Swedish selection clone Jorr (Salix viminalis were investigated in greenhouses and in field conditions. As the result of testing three clones of Salix alba - Bačka, Volmianka and Drina, having special preferences and adaptability to different environmental conditions, these were included in State register of Republic of Belarus in 2013. In our experiment it was also satisfactory that specific properties of willows (intensity of transpiration and photosynthesis, water use efficiency and others, were conserved both in greenhouses and in field conditions. This factor gives opportunity to select prospective clones of willows at an early stage of ontogenesis for further testing.

  13. Genetic strategies for dissecting complex traits in biomass willows (Salix spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Steven J; Karp, Angela

    2014-11-01

    Willows are highly diverse catkin-bearing trees and shrubs of the genus Salix. They occur in many growth forms, from tall trees to creeping alpines, and successfully occupy a wide variety of ecological niches. Shrubby willows (sub-genus Vetrix) have many characteristics that render them suited to cultivation in much faster growth cycles than conventional forestry. They respond well to coppicing, can be propagated vegetatively as cuttings and achieve rapid growth with low fertilizer inputs. As a result, willows grown as short rotation coppice are now among the leading commercially grown biomass crops in temperate regions. However, although willows have a long history of cultivation for traditional uses, their industrial use is relatively recent and, compared with major arable crops, they are largely undomesticated. Breeding programmes initiated to improve willow as a biomass crop achieved a doubling of yields within a period of coppicing response (shoot number and shoot vigour), as well as resistance to pests, diseases and environmental stress, with little or no knowledge of the genetic basis of these traits. Genetics and genomics, combined with extensive phenotyping, have substantially improved our understanding of the basis of biomass traits in willow for more targeted breeding via marker-assisted selection. Here, we present the strategy we have adopted in which a genetic-based approach was used to dissect complex traits into more defined components for molecular breeding and gene discovery.

  14. Functional screening of willow alleles in Arabidopsis combined with QTL mapping in willow (Salix) identifies SxMAX4 as a coppicing response gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Jemma; Ward, Sally P; Hanley, Steven J; Leyser, Ottoline; Karp, Angela

    2014-05-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) are important biomass crops due to their ability to grow rapidly with low fertilizer inputs and ease of cultivation in short-rotation coppice cycles. They are relatively undomesticated and highly diverse, but functional testing to identify useful allelic variation is time-consuming in trees and transformation is not yet possible in willow. Arabidopsis is heralded as a model plant from which knowledge can be transferred to advance the improvement of less tractable species. Here, knowledge and methodologies from Arabidopsis were successfully used to identify a gene influencing stem number in coppiced willows, a complex trait of key biological and industrial relevance. The strigolactone-related More AXillary growth (MAX) genes were considered candidates due to their role in shoot branching. We previously demonstrated that willow and Arabidopsis show similar response to strigolactone and that transformation rescue of Arabidopsis max mutants with willow genes could be used to detect allelic differences. Here, this approach was used to screen 45 SxMAX1, SxMAX2, SxMAX3 and SxMAX4 alleles cloned from 15 parents of 11 mapping populations varying in shoot-branching traits. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies were locus dependent, ranging from 29.2 to 74.3 polymorphic sites per kb. SxMAX alleles were 98%-99% conserved at the amino acid level, but different protein products varying in their ability to rescue Arabidopsis max mutants were identified. One poor rescuing allele, SxMAX4D, segregated in a willow mapping population where its presence was associated with increased shoot resprouting after coppicing and colocated with a QTL for this trait.

  15. A study of Two English Versions of Mr. Five Willows(a fragment) in Per-spective of Reception Aesthetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ya-qin; CHEN Li-Na

    2015-01-01

    Mr. Five Willows is written by Tao Yuanming, an eminent proser and poet in the Eastern Jin Dynasty. Mr. Five Willows is one of the most famous essays to express Tao’s pursuit of countryside life.There are two important English versions of Mr. Five Willows:Sun Dayu’s version and Fang Zhong’s version.This paper compares the two English versions from the point of Recep⁃tion Aesthetics.

  16. Projected benefit-cost analysis of agri-silvicultural system: vegetable crops intercropping with Salix alba (Willow)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aijaz Hussain Mir; M.A. Khan

    2008-01-01

    An experiment upon an agri-silvicultural system involving Willow (Salix alba) tree,Kale (Brassica oleracea var.acephala) and Knol khol (Brassica oleracea var.caularapa) was laid in randomized block designed at farmers' willow field at Shalimar near Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology of Kashmir,Srinagar India during 2005 and 2006.The main plot was divided into sub-spots with 8 m ( 2 m in size each in which four two-year-old willow (Salix alba) trees were at a spacing of 2 m ( 2 m in a sub-spot.The intercrops were maintained at recommended spacing and supplied with recommended doses of fertilizers.The benefit-cost ratio in willow plantation intercropped with vegetable crops of Kale and Knol Khol was analyzed and compared with the benefit-cost ratio of sole willow tree forestry.The results showed that every rupee invested in plantation of agri-silvicultural system generates benefit-cost ratio of 2.78 and 2.79 in case of Willow intercropping with Kale and Willow with Knol khol,respectively,while as for sole crop of willows benefit-cost ratio was calculated to be 2.66.These results provided circumstantial evidence in favour of adopting agroforestry involving willow instead of Sole tree forestry.

  17. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Santa Ana, California/Tustin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    marks beginning sometime in 1945, but few stations have punched data prior to 1948. This summary will, of course , be limited to period of available data...0 •3 ,7•? r. ,78, - -7 ’.?•U.77 7.7 ,’ 200__7 7..j 7~Z t2 i, 7 o3 79o3 79*7 afu. n 1 c9Dt .r, spoc spec ag~og bc o.O -soo t 910 18000 I.7 ś -7. 3.3

  18. SRC-willow (Salix viminalis) as a resource for flower-visiting insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddersen, J. [National Environmental Research Institute, Ronde (Denmark). Dept. of Landscape Ecology

    2001-07-01

    The potential habitat value of commercial short rotation coppice (SRC)-willow plantations for flower-visiting insects was investigated. During 1998-2000, at a single typical intensive Danish farmland site, 11 Salix viminalis plantations were sampled by late April to quantify willow catkin abundance and flower sex. Mean plantation size was 1.1 ha and included one or more of clones: orm, rapp, ulv, jorr, christina and jorrun. Plot-year means of catkin abundance and of proportion of willows flowering were related to the coppicing cycle, i.e. the number of growth years since last harvest of plot ('year' 0-4). In 1998, the ground layer vegetation was sampled. Monitoring flower-visiting insects by means of line-transect counts failed due to the local scarcity of bees. At the plantation scale, flowering was discontinuous across the harvest cycle as it was totally absent in the year immediately following harvest. In successive years (1-4), individual willows flowered frequently and, occasionally, at high abundances, and catkin abundance increased with time. Within 3-4 year of harvest cycle, all plots flowered in most years with most plots exhibiting at least some flowering in any 1 year. Thus, willow catkin abundance was generally high in the total area due to: high frequency of flowering in plots, occasional high flowering abundance, plots not being harvested simultaneously and large total number of willows within plots and landscape. Similarly, flower sex ratio, and thus flower value, varied greatly between plots while variation was damped across plots. Alternative simultaneous flower resources in ground layer vegetation were few except for Dandelion. SRC willow may constitute an important resource for bees, even under the stress of the harvest cycle, and recommendations are given for improving this biodiversity aspect. (author)

  19. High capacitive performance of hollow activated carbon fibers derived from willow catkins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Song, Yan; Yan, Rui; Zhao, Ning; Tian, Xiaodong; Li, Xiao; Guo, Quangui; Liu, Zhanjun

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we prepared three different kinds of hollow activated carbon fibers (HACFs) from willow catkins (WCs), phenolic- and pitch-based hollow fibers, respectively. The morphology, pore structure, surface chemical composition and electrochemical properties of these hollow fibers were studied in parallel. Due to its high-hollow, cost-effective as well as eco-friendly nature, HACFs derived from WCs can be served as excellent electrode materials for electrochemical energy storage devices. Electrochemical measurements illustrate that the WCs derived HACFs exhibit not only high specific capacitance of 333 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 but also considerable rate capability with a retention of 62.7% (209 F g-1 at 10 A g-1). Symmetric supercapacitor devices that using WCs derived HACFs as electrodes deliver a maximum energy density of ∼8.8 Wh kg-1 at power density of 50 W kg-1 and good cycling performance with 95.5% retention over 3000 cycles at 5 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolytes.

  20. Simulation modeling to understand how selective foraging by beaver can drive the structure and function of a willow community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinetti, H.R.; Baker, B.W.; Coughenour, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Beaver-willow (Castor-Salix) communities are a unique and vital component of healthy wetlands throughout the Holarctic region. Beaver selectively forage willow to provide fresh food, stored winter food, and construction material. The effects of this complex foraging behavior on the structure and function of willow communities is poorly understood. Simulation modeling may help ecologists understand these complex interactions. In this study, a modified version of the SAVANNA ecosystem model was developed to better understand how beaver foraging affects the structure and function of a willow community in a simulated riparian ecosystem in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado (RMNP). The model represents willow in terms of plant and stem dynamics and beaver foraging in terms of the quantity and quality of stems cut to meet the energetic and life history requirements of beaver. Given a site where all stems were equally available, the model suggested a simulated beaver family of 2 adults, 2 yearlings, and 2 kits required a minimum of 4 ha of willow (containing about10 stems m-2) to persist in a steady-state condition. Beaver created a willow community where the annual net primary productivity (ANPP) was 2 times higher and plant architecture was more diverse than the willow community without beaver. Beaver foraging created a plant architecture dominated by medium size willow plants, which likely explains how beaver can increase ANPP. Long-term simulations suggested that woody biomass stabilized at similar values even though availability differed greatly at initial condition. Simulations also suggested that willow ANPP increased across a range of beaver densities until beaver became food limited. Thus, selective foraging by beaver increased productivity, decreased biomass, and increased structural heterogeneity in a simulated willow community.

  1. MIRAS characterization and monitoring during the SMOS In-Orbit Commissioning Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbella, I.; Torres, F.; Martin-Neira, M.; Duffo, N.; González-Gambau, V.; Camps, A.; Vall-Llossera, M.

    2009-04-01

    1 Introduction The Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) is the single payload of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. The instrument was completed in early 2007 and thoroughly tested both in anechoic chamber and vacuum thermal chamber during 2007. It was integrated to the platform in early 2008 and re-tested, including compatibility, during 2008. At present, the whole satellite is stowed and waiting to be launched during 2009. In two weeks after launch, the satellite will be in the final orbit with all deployments completed. Then the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase will start, having an estimated duration of 5.5 months. During this phase, the instrument modes of operation will be systematically checked and the calibration parameters will be fully characterized in real conditions. Also, the first brightness temperature images will be obtained in order to assess the overall retrieval procedures including inversion. In the end, the objective of the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase is to provide verification that the payload meets the scientific requirements of the mission. The general design and planning of the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase is given in [1]. This abstract presents the foreseen activities to be performed during this phase by the UPC team. Just after the start of the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase, the instrument will be commanded to perform a sequence of operations oriented at providing a full characterization in terms of calibration parameters. The idea is to reproduce the results obtained during the tests carried out on ground [2]. In particular, the following issues will be covered: Thermal Stability: To provide understanding of both the intra-orbit and inter-orbit temperature variations. The instrument will be continuously operating during a number of orbits while all temperature sensors being monitored. Electrical Stability: To re-compute all internal calibration parameters (gains, offsets, receiver noise temperatures

  2. Major Chromosomal Rearrangements Distinguish Willow and Poplar After the Ancestral "Salicoid" Genome Duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jing; Ye, Ning; Dong, Zhongyuan; Lu, Mengzhu; Li, Laigeng; Yin, Tongming

    2016-06-27

    Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) are sister genera in the Salicaceae family. In both lineages extant species are predominantly diploid. Genome analysis previously revealed that the two lineages originated from a common tetraploid ancestor. In this study, we conducted a syntenic comparison of the corresponding 19 chromosome members of the poplar and willow genomes. Our observations revealed that almost every chromosomal segment had a parallel paralogous segment elsewhere in the genomes, and the two lineages shared a similar syntenic pinwheel pattern for most of the chromosomes, which indicated that the two lineages diverged after the genome reorganization in the common progenitor. The pinwheel patterns showed distinct differences for two chromosome pairs in each lineage. Further analysis detected two major interchromosomal rearrangements that distinguished the karyotypes of willow and poplar. Chromosome I of willow was a conjunction of poplar chromosome XVI and the lower portion of poplar chromosome I, whereas willow chromosome XVI corresponded to the upper portion of poplar chromosome I. Scientists have suggested that Populus is evolutionarily more primitive than Salix. Therefore, we propose that, after the "salicoid" duplication event, fission and fusion of the ancestral chromosomes first give rise to the diploid progenitor of extant Populus species. During the evolutionary process, fission and fusion of poplar chromosomes I and XVI subsequently give rise to the progenitor of extant Salix species. This study contributes to an improved understanding of genome divergence after ancient genome duplication in closely related lineages of higher plants.

  3. Improving the water use efficiency of short rotation coppice (SRC) willows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, W.; Bonneau, L.; Groves, S.; Armstrong, A.; Lindegard, K.

    2003-07-01

    On the premise that biofuels will make a significant contribution to the UK's renewable energy sources by the year 2010, willow short rotation coppicing is being studied. The high water requirement of willow is seen as a potential problem in the drier regions of the UK and increasing the water use efficiency and/or draught resistance would extend the areas where willow coppicing would be profitable. The first part of the project was to investigate the water use of a number of near-market varieties of willow and evaluate techniques for early drought tolerance screening in a breeding program and for this, field studies were conducted. This report gives some very early results from the preliminary study. Since DTI funding ceased before the one-season study of the three-year program was complete, the results should be regarded as tentative only. The next phase of the program will be funded by DEFRA and will include efforts to identify how a range of high-yielding willows respond to water stress.

  4. Lead uptake and translocation by willows in pot and field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhivotovsky, Olena P; Kuzovkina, Yulia A; Schulthess, Cristian P; Morris, Tom; Pettinelli, Dawn

    2011-09-01

    Plant growth and lead (Pb) uptake by seven willow varieties were investigated in pot and field experiments to assess the suitability of willows for phytoremediation of Pb at heavily contaminated sites such as skeet ranges. Differences in uptake and translocation of Pb in Salix were observed between pot and field experiments. In the pot experiment, willows grown in Pb-contaminated field soil for 6 months showed tolerance to very high soil Pb concentration (21,360 mg kg(-1)), and with the addition of EDTA were able to take up and translocate more than 1000 mg kg(-1) Pb into above-ground tissues. In the field experiment, all willow varieties showed tolerance to heterogeneously high soil Pb concentrations. Plants were also able to take up and translocate Pb into above-ground tissues. However, after 4.5 months, the lead concentration in the above-ground tissues of willows grown in soil amended with EDTA was less than 200 mg kg(-1). The results from the pot experiment suggest that Salix varieties have the potential to take up and translocate significant amounts of Pb into above-ground tissues using EDTA. However, to verify the phytoextraction abilities of Salix in the field, additional research is needed.

  5. The potential of willow for remediation of heavy metal polluted calcareous urban soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Julie K. [Department of Basic Sciences and Environment, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Copenhagen Recycling Center, Selinevej 2, DK-2300 Kobenhavn S (Denmark)], E-mail: jje@life.ku.dk; Holm, Peter E. [Department of Basic Sciences and Environment, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Nejrup, Jens [Copenhagen Recycling Center, Selinevej 2, DK-2300 Kobenhavn S (Denmark); Larsen, Morten B. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Borggaard, Ole K. [Department of Basic Sciences and Environment, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark)

    2009-03-15

    Growth performance and heavy metal uptake by willow (Salix viminalis) from strongly and moderately polluted calcareous soils were investigated in field and growth chamber trials to assess the suitability of willow for phytoremediation. Field uptakes were 2-10 times higher than growth chamber uptakes. Despite high concentrations of cadmium ({>=}80 mg/kg) and zinc ({>=}3000 mg/kg) in leaves of willow grown on strongly polluted soil with up to 18 mg Cd/kg, 1400 mg Cu/kg, 500 mg Pb/kg and 3300 mg Zn/kg, it is unsuited on strongly polluted soils because of poor growth. However, willow proved promising on moderately polluted soils (2.5 mg Cd/kg and 400 mg Zn/kg), where it extracted 0.13% of total Cd and 0.29% of the total Zn per year probably representing the most mobile fraction. Cu and Pb are strongly fixed in calcareous soils. - Willow is suited for remediation of moderately heavy metal polluted calcareous soils.

  6. Available data support protection of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher under the Endangered Species Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theimer, Tad C.; Smith, Aaron D.; Mahoney, Sean M.; Ironside, Kirsten E.

    2016-01-01

    Zink (2015) argued there was no evidence for genetic, morphological, or ecological differentiation between the federally endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) and other Willow Flycatcher subspecies. Using the same data, we show there is a step-cline in both the frequency of a mtDNA haplotype and in plumage variation roughly concordant with the currently recognized boundary between E. t. extimus and E. t adastus, the subspecies with which it shares the longest common boundary. The geographical pattern of plumage variation is also concordant with previous song analyses differentiating those 2 subspecies and identified birds in one low-latitude, high-elevation site in Arizona as the northern subspecies. We also demonstrate that the ecological niche modeling approach used by Zink yields the same result whether applied to the 2 flycatcher subspecies or to 2 unrelated species, E. t. extimus and Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia). As a result, any interpretation of those results as evidence for lack of ecological niche differentiation among Willow Flycatcher subspecies would also indicate no differentiation among recognized species and would therefore be an inappropriate standard for delineating subspecies. We agree that many analytical techniques now available to examine genetic, morphological, and ecological differentiation would improve our understanding of the distinctness (or lack thereof) of Willow Flycatcher subspecies, but we argue that currently available evidence supports protection of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher under the Endangered Species Act.

  7. Evapotranspiration and crop coefficient of poplar and willow short-rotation coppice used as vegetation filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Werther; Piccioni, Emiliano; Bonari, Enrico

    2008-07-01

    Ten-day evapotranspiration (ETc) and crop coefficient (k(c)) of willow and poplar SRC used as vegetation filter and grown under fertilised (F) and unfertilised (NF) conditions, were determined for two successive growing seasons using volumetric lysimeters. During the first growing season, total ETc observed was, respectively, 620 (NF)-1190 (F)mm in willow and 590 (NF)-725 (F) in poplar. During the second growing season, ETc showed a general increase, mainly in fertilised lysimeters where it ranged between 890 (NF)-1790 mm (F) in willow and 710 (NF)-1100 mm (NF) in poplar. kc reached in both years its maximum between the end of August and the beginning of September. In 2004 maximum kc ranged from 1.25-2.84 in willow and 1.06-1.90 in poplar, whereas in 2005 it ranged from 1.97-5.30 in willow and 1.71-4.28 in poplar. ETc seemed to be strongly correlated to plant development and mainly dependent on its nutritional status rather than on the differences between the species.

  8. Treatment of landfill leachate by irrigation of willow coppice - Plant response and treatment efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronsson, Paer, E-mail: par.aronsson@vpe.slu.s [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Crop Production Ecology, P.O. Box 7043, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Dahlin, Torleif [Lund University, Department of Electrical Measurements, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Dimitriou, Ioannis [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Crop Production Ecology, P.O. Box 7043, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-03-15

    Landfill leachates usually need to be treated before discharged, and using soil-plant systems for this has gained substantial interest in Sweden and in the UK. A three-year field study was conducted in central Sweden to quantify plant response, treatment efficiency and impact on groundwater quality of landfill leachate irrigation of short-rotation willow coppice (Salix). Two willow varieties were tested and four irrigation regimes in sixteen 400-m{sup 2} plots. The willow plants did not react negatively, despite very high annual loads of nitrogen (<=2160 kg N/ha), chloride (<=8600 kg Cl/ha) and other elements. Mean annual growth was 1.5, 9.8 and 12.6 tonnes DM/ha during years 1-3. For one of two willow varieties tested, relative leaf length accurately predicted growth rate. Irrigation resulted in elevated groundwater concentrations of all elements applied. Treatment efficiency varied considerably for different elements, but was adequate when moderate loads were applied. - Short-rotation willow coppice was successfully used for treating a strong landfill leachate in central Sweden over three years.

  9. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  10. Glyphosate-Dependent Inhibition of Photosynthesis in Willow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marcelo P; Le Manac'h, Sarah G; Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Labrecque, Michel; Lucotte, Marc; Juneau, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    We studied the physiological mechanisms involved in the deleterious effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide (Factor(®) 540) on photosynthesis and related physiological processes of willow (Salix miyabeana cultivar SX64) plants. Sixty-day-old plants grown under greenhouse conditions were sprayed with different rates (0, 1.4, 2.1, and 2.8 kg a.e ha(-1)) of the commercial glyphosate formulated salt Factor(®) 540. Evaluations were performed at 0, 6, 24, 48, and 72 h after herbicide exposure. We established that the herbicide decreases chlorophyll, carotenoid and plastoquinone contents, and promotes changes in the photosynthetic apparatus leading to decreased photochemistry which results in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation. H2O2 accumulation triggers proline production which can be associated with oxidative protection, NADP(+) recovery and shikimate pathway stimulation. Ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione peroxidase appeared to be the main peroxidases involved in the H2O2 scavenging. In addition to promoting decreases of the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, the herbicide induced decreases in ascorbate pool. For the first time, a glyphosate-based herbicide mode of action interconnecting its effects on shikimate pathway, photosynthetic process and oxidative events in plants were presented.

  11. Glyphosate-Dependent Inhibition of Photosynthesis in Willow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marcelo P.; Le Manac’h, Sarah G.; Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Labrecque, Michel; Lucotte, Marc; Juneau, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    We studied the physiological mechanisms involved in the deleterious effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide (Factor® 540) on photosynthesis and related physiological processes of willow (Salix miyabeana cultivar SX64) plants. Sixty-day-old plants grown under greenhouse conditions were sprayed with different rates (0, 1.4, 2.1, and 2.8 kg a.e ha-1) of the commercial glyphosate formulated salt Factor® 540. Evaluations were performed at 0, 6, 24, 48, and 72 h after herbicide exposure. We established that the herbicide decreases chlorophyll, carotenoid and plastoquinone contents, and promotes changes in the photosynthetic apparatus leading to decreased photochemistry which results in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation. H2O2 accumulation triggers proline production which can be associated with oxidative protection, NADP+ recovery and shikimate pathway stimulation. Ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione peroxidase appeared to be the main peroxidases involved in the H2O2 scavenging. In addition to promoting decreases of the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, the herbicide induced decreases in ascorbate pool. For the first time, a glyphosate-based herbicide mode of action interconnecting its effects on shikimate pathway, photosynthetic process and oxidative events in plants were presented. PMID:28261257

  12. Yield models for commercial willow biomass plantations in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mola-Yudego, Blas [Faculty of Forestry, University of Joensuu, P.O. Box 111, FI-801 01 Joensuu (Finland); Aronsson, Paer [Department of Crop Production Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), P.O. Box 7016, S-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2008-09-15

    A yield model for willow plantations for bioenergy production in Sweden was developed based on recorded production of 2082 commercial plantations during the period 1989-2005. The model predicts yield for the first, second and third harvest using oats (avena) production as agro-climatic index. The mean annual yields were 2.6, 4.2 and 4.5 oven dry tonnes (odt) per hectare during the first, second and third cutting cycles, respectively. The yield correlated inversely with the length of the cutting cycle. The results of the study show significant differences between growers, which suggest the importance of proper management in the establishment and tending of the plantations. Model estimates for 25% of the best growers vary from 4.0 to 6.3 odt ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} in 5-year-rotation plantations during the first cutting cycle, and from 5.4 to 7.1 odt ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} in 4-year-rotations for the second cutting cycle. The proposed model can be applied in policy making and for management planning. (author)

  13. Connection between charge fluctuations and the coherent temperature in the heavy-fermion system SmOs4Sb12: a {121, 123}Sb NQR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotegawa, H; Hidaka, H; Kobayashi, T C; Kikuchi, D; Sugawara, H; Sato, H

    2007-10-12

    We report {121, 123}Sb nuclear quadrupole resonance measurements under pressure in a novel heavy fermion (HF) system SmOs4Sb12. The nuclear spin-spin relaxation rate 1/T{2} exhibits a distinct peak near the coherent temperature of the Kondo effect. The isotope effect of 121Sb and 123Sb indicates that the peak in 1/T{2} is electrical in origin. The connection between the peak in 1/T{2} and the development of coherency of the Kondo effect is robust even under pressure. It is conjectured that charge fluctuation plays an important role in forming the HF state in SmOs4Sb12.

  14. Can energy willow (Salix sp.) remediate cadmium- and nickel-contaminated fish farm sludge?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marianne Bruus

    it meets the criteria. Phytoremediation by willow may combine accumulation of cadmium and nickel from the sludge with the production of an energy crop. The ability of eight selected willow clones to take up and tolerate cadmium and nickel was studied in pots under outdoor conditions. Fish farm sludge...

  15. New methodology to estimate Arctic sea ice concentration from SMOS combining brightness temperature differences in a maximum-likelihood estimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Turiel, Antonio; Elosegui, Pedro; Pla-Resina, Joaquim A.; Portabella, Marcos

    2017-08-01

    Monitoring sea ice concentration is required for operational and climate studies in the Arctic Sea. Technologies used so far for estimating sea ice concentration have some limitations, for instance the impact of the atmosphere, the physical temperature of ice, and the presence of snow and melting. In the last years, L-band radiometry has been successfully used to study some properties of sea ice, remarkably sea ice thickness. However, the potential of satellite L-band observations for obtaining sea ice concentration had not yet been explored. In this paper, we present preliminary evidence showing that data from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission can be used to estimate sea ice concentration. Our method, based on a maximum-likelihood estimator (MLE), exploits the marked difference in the radiative properties of sea ice and seawater. In addition, the brightness temperatures of 100 % sea ice and 100 % seawater, as well as their combined values (polarization and angular difference), have been shown to be very stable during winter and spring, so they are robust to variations in physical temperature and other geophysical parameters. Therefore, we can use just two sets of tie points, one for summer and another for winter, for calculating sea ice concentration, leading to a more robust estimate. After analysing the full year 2014 in the entire Arctic, we have found that the sea ice concentration obtained with our method is well determined as compared to the Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF) dataset. However, when thin sea ice is present (ice thickness ≲ 0.6 m), the method underestimates the actual sea ice concentration. Our results open the way for a systematic exploitation of SMOS data for monitoring sea ice concentration, at least for specific seasons. Additionally, SMOS data can be synergistically combined with data from other sensors to monitor pan-Arctic sea ice conditions.

  16. Willow as fuel for district heating. Experiences from test combustion; Energipil som braendsel til fjernvarme - Erfaringsindsamling fra testfyringer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Joergen

    2012-10-15

    The project has been a study of the fuel characteristics of willow chips. The study was carried out on Trustrup-Lyngby Heating Plant and Assens District Heating Plant in the period 2011-12. Operating experiences were collected from the two plants. Furthermore, yield and crop data were collected from suppliers of willow chips to Assens District Heating Plant, and the analysis of particle size distribution of the willow chips is carried out. The collected data on yield and particle size distribution are compared with results from previous studies. The project has shown that willow chips generally are a suitable and attractive fuel in wood-fired heat and power plants. The plants are very aware of quality of willow chips and want chips with coarse structure. Furthermore, there is the wish that water content of willow chips are on par with the moisture content of wood chips, i.e. around 30-40%; woodchips are the vast majority of the chips used in the plants. Wood chips produced from fresh willow shoots with chopper will typically have a moisture content of 50-60 %. Such ''wet'' chips will of some plants be deselected during winter, where there is a requirement of safe and high boiler output. Other plants will simply mix the ''wet'' willow chips with other, drier types of chips and can use it almost all the year. If the willow shoots are harvested as branches, which subsequently are allowed to dry for a period before chipping, willow chips can be produced with a moisture content that is in line with what is typical in wood chips. Analysis of particle size distribution shows that willow chips harvested with a cutting machine usually can meet the requirements for quality classes ''fine'', ''medium'' and ''coarse''. An account of the harvested yields of willow among the growers who supplied willow chips to Assens Heating Plant, showed a relatively low yield of 5.1 tonnes dry

  17. Willow as fuel for district heating. Experiences from test combustion; Energipil som braendsel til fjernvarme - Erfaringsindsamling fra testfyringer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Joergen

    2012-10-15

    The project has been a study of the fuel characteristics of willow chips. The study was carried out on Trustrup-Lyngby Heating Plant and Assens District Heating Plant in the period 2011-12. Operating experiences were collected from the two plants. Furthermore, yield and crop data were collected from suppliers of willow chips to Assens District Heating Plant, and the analysis of particle size distribution of the willow chips is carried out. The collected data on yield and particle size distribution are compared with results from previous studies. The project has shown that willow chips generally are a suitable and attractive fuel in wood-fired heat and power plants. The plants are very aware of quality of willow chips and want chips with coarse structure. Furthermore, there is the wish that water content of willow chips are on par with the moisture content of wood chips, i.e. around 30-40%; woodchips are the vast majority of the chips used in the plants. Wood chips produced from fresh willow shoots with chopper will typically have a moisture content of 50-60 %. Such ''wet'' chips will of some plants be deselected during winter, where there is a requirement of safe and high boiler output. Other plants will simply mix the ''wet'' willow chips with other, drier types of chips and can use it almost all the year. If the willow shoots are harvested as branches, which subsequently are allowed to dry for a period before chipping, willow chips can be produced with a moisture content that is in line with what is typical in wood chips. Analysis of particle size distribution shows that willow chips harvested with a cutting machine usually can meet the requirements for quality classes ''fine'', ''medium'' and ''coarse''. An account of the harvested yields of willow among the growers who supplied willow chips to Assens Heating Plant, showed a relatively low yield of 5.1 tonnes dry

  18. Wastewater and sewage sludge application to willows and poplars grown in lysimeters-Plant response and treatment efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitriou, I.; Aronsson, P. [Department of Crop Production Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Ecology building, P.O. Box 7043, SE 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-01-15

    Adding nutrient-rich residues such as municipal wastewater and sludge to willow and poplar short-rotation coppice gives more cost-effective and sustainable cultivation, but leaching to groundwater and disturbance to plant growth must be avoided. The effects of adding municipal wastewater irrigation to willows and poplars and sewage sludge to willows were compared in a two-year experiment. Wastewater irrigation enhanced plant growth. Near-zero nitrate-N concentrations occurred in drainage water when the root system of both species was well-established. The ability to retain N and P was satisfactory when poplars and willows were irrigated with wastewater. Thus relatively high additions of N and P with wastewater will probably not contaminate groundwater, but potential P leaching should not be underestimated. The same applies for sewage sludge applications to willow. (author)

  19. Concentrations of Chemical Elements in Willow Biomass Depend on Clone, Site and Management in the Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Na; Jørgensen, Uffe; Lærke, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    Eight willow (Salix) clones (Inger, Klara, Linnea, Resolution, Stina, Terra Nova, Tora, Tordis) were planted on two soil types in Denmark. The biomass quality was evaluated after 3 years of growth by measuring differences in concentrations of 14 elements associated with ash behavior during...... to 22, 27, 35, and 23 % higher concentrations of K, S, Ca, and total ash than the other clones. In addition to clone and site, appropriate management could further improve the fuel quality of willow biomass. When shoots of Inger were harvested annually (1-year shoots) high concentrations of K and Cl...... plant densities (8000 and 12,000 trees ha−1) of the clones Inger and Tora after the first 3-year rotation when grown at the site with a coarse sandy soil. The study indicates considerable diversity in concentration of elements within commercially available willow cultivars and suggests breeders...

  20. Environmental performance of gasified willow from different lands including land-use changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saez de Bikuna Salinas, Koldo; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Pilegaard, Kim

    2017-01-01

    A life-cycle assessment (LCA) of a low-input, short rotation coppice (SRC) willow grown on different Danish lands was performed. Woodchips are gasified, producer gas is used for co-generation of heat and power (CHP) and the ash-char output is applied as soil amendment in the field. A hybrid model...... was developed for the estimation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from indirect land-use changes (iLUC) induced by willow cropping on arable land. For this, area expansion results from a general equilibrium economic model were combined with global LUC trends to differentiate between land transformation (as...... for abandoned farmland, as a relative C stock loss compared to natural regeneration. ILUC results show that area related GHG emissions are dominant (93% of iLUCfood and 80% of iLUCfeed), transformation being more important (82% of iLUCfood) than occupation (11%) impacts. LCA results show that CHP from willow...

  1. Flood of May 6, 2007, Willow Creek, west-central Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Edward E.; Eash, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Major flooding occurred May 6, 2007, in the Willow Creek drainage basin in Harrison County following severe thunderstorm activity over west-central Iowa. More than 7 inches of rain were recorded for the 72-hour period ending 7 a.m., May 6, at the Logan, Iowa weather station. The peak discharge in Willow Creek at Medford Avenue near Missouri Valley, Iowa, was 17,000 cubic feet per second. The recurrence interval of the flood is 160 years, which was estimated using regional regression equations. Information about the basin, the storms, the flooding, and a profile of high-water marks measured at 10 locations along Willow Creek between the mouth at the Boyer River and State Highway 37 in Monona County, a distance of almost 33 river miles, are presented in this report.

  2. Variation in copper and zinc tolerance and accumulation in 12 willow clones: implications for phytoextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei-dong; Wang, Yu-yan; Zhao, Feng-liang; Ding, Zhe-li; Zhang, Xin-cheng; Zhu, Zhi-qiang; Yang, Xiao-e

    2014-09-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) have shown high potential for the phytoextraction of heavy metals. This study compares variations in copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) tolerance and accumulation potential among 12 willow clones grown in a nutrient solution treated with 50 μmol/L of Cu or Zn, respectively. The results showed differences in the tolerance and accumulation of Cu and Zn with respect to different species/clones. The biomass variation among clones in response to Cu or Zn exposure ranged from the stimulation of growth to inhibition, and all of the clones tested showed higher tolerance to Cu than to Zn. The clones exhibited less variation in Cu accumulation but larger variation in Zn accumulation. Based on translocation factors, it was found that most of the Cu was retained in the roots and that Zn was more mobile than Cu for all clones. It is concluded that most willow clones are good accumulators of Zn and Cu.

  3. How to manage co-product inputs in emergy accounting exemplified by willow production for bioenergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Andreas; Østergård, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    algebra rules, we describe approaches to calculate solar transformities when co-production is involved and give guidelines on how to compare products and systems. The approaches are exemplified in a comparison between willow biomass, fertilised with manure, and natural gas used as feedstock for combined...... heat and power (CHP) production. A Danish willow-based CHP model system was assessed whereas data for the fossil-based system was from literature. When compared on a product-to-product basis using the reference approach, bio-based CHP production is inferior to fossil-based CHP with respect to resource...

  4. The role of EDTA in phytoextraction of hexavalent and trivalent chromium by two willow trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2008-04-01

    Effects of the synthetic chelator ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA) on uptake and internal translocation of hexavalent and trivalent chromium by plants were investigated. Two different concentrations of EDTA were studied for enhancing the uptake and translocation of Cr from the hydroponic solution spiked with K(2)CrO(4) or CrCl(3) maintained at 24.0 +/- 1 degrees C. Faster removal of Cr(3+) than Cr(6+) by hybrid willows (Salix matsudana Koidz x Salix alba L.) from the plant growth media was observed. Negligible effect of EDTA on the uptake of Cr(6+) was found, but significant decrease of the Cr concentration in roots was measured. Although the translocation of Cr(6+) within plant materials was detected in response to EDTA concentration, the amount of Cr(6+) translocated to the lower stems was considerably small. EDTA in the nutrient media showed a negative effect on the uptake of Cr(3+ )by hybrid willows; the removal rates of Cr(3+ )were significantly decreased. Translocation of Cr(3+) into the stems and leaves was undetectable, but roots were the exclusive sink for Cr(3+) accumulation. Weeping willows (Salix babylonica L.) showed lower removal rates for both chemical forms of Cr than hybrid willows. Although EDTA had a minor effect on Cr(6+ )uptake by weeping willows, positive effect on Cr(6+ )translocation within plant materials was observed. It was also determined that EDTA in plant growth media significantly decreased the amount of Cr(3+) taken up by plants, but significantly increased Cr(3+) mobilization from roots to stems. Results indicated that EDTA was unable to increase the uptake of Cr(6+) by both plant species, but translocation of Cr(6+)-EDTA within plant materials was possible. Addition of EDTA in the nutrient media showed a strong influence on the uptake and translocation of Cr(3+) in both willows. Cr(3+)-EDTA in tissues of weeping willows was more mobile than that in hybrid willows. The information has important implications for the use of metal

  5. Performance of shrub willows (Salix spp.) as an evapotranspiration cover on Solvay wastebeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirck, Jaconette

    2009-12-01

    Soda ash (Na2CO3) production in the Syracuse New York area created 607 ha of wastebeds over the course of about 100 years. Today the primary concern of the Solvay wastebeds is high chloride concentrations in the leachate and storm water that may end up in the groundwater and nearby Onondaga Lake. The potential of shrub willow evapotranspiration (ET) covers to minimize leaching and to manage storm water was assessed in two studies. A sap flow sensor field study to estimate transpiration rates of four shrub willow varieties over an entire growing season. A greenhouse study focused on recycling saline Solvay storm water onto shrub willows. Annual sap flow and crop coefficients (Kc) were similar among four shrub willows, but differences were present over the course of the growing season. Peak K c values did not coincide with peak leaf area index (LAI), as might be expected if LAI were the main driver of transpiration. Rather than solely being driven by LAI, coupling with the atmosphere was an important factor in stand level sap flow. Estimates of ET were measured during both experiments, the ET/sap flow rankings of the shrub willow varieties were similar; Salix miyabeana (SX64)Solvay storm water that contained 1,625 mg Cl - L-1 (close to the average storm water concentration) did not significantly decrease ET values or growth for any of the willow varieties. Mass balances of sodium and chloride were carried out to assess the potentials of recycling saline Solvay storm water back onto a shrub willow ET cover during the growing season. During a ten-week study the combination of a shallow depth soil (33 cm) and a high irrigation regime (170% of average precipitation in the Syracuse NY area) resulted in the accumulation of at least 62% of both sodium and chloride in the plant/soil system for all five Solvay storm water treatments. Both studies indicated that shrub willows have the characteristics to be part of a sustainable ET cover on the Solvay wastebeds, which will

  6. Uptake, removal, accumulation, and phytotoxicity of 4-chlorophenol in willow trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ucisik, Ahmed Süheyl; Trapp, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    of implementing phytoremediation as a treatment method for 4-CP contamination was investigated. Willows were exposed to 4-CP levels ≤79.9 mg/L in hydroponic solution. The transpiration of the trees was used to determine toxic effects. Almost no inhibition of transpiration was detected at concentrations ≥15 mg...... concentrations. The loss of chemical from the system in experiments with trees was high, ≤99.5%. In treeless experiments, the mass loss of 4-CP was only 6% to 10%. The results indicated that degradation in the root zone is the main reason for the removal of 4-CP from the media. Phytoremediation of 4-CP in willow...

  7. Storage and handling of willow from short rotation coppice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofman, P. D.; Spinelli, R.

    1997-07-01

    During the project two main storage and drying trials were organised. The first trial in 1996 consisted of 14 piles of 6 different size material (whole shoots, via 200 mm chunk, 100 mm chunk, 50 mm chip, 28 mm chips, 25 mm chips) and six different methods of covering: Open air storage, storage under plastic cover, storage under top-cover, airtight storage, unventilated storage under roof, and intermittent ventilation (cooling) under roof. The drying trial in 1997 which consisted of four piles was established in Horsens in the same building as the ventilated trials the year before. Only Austoft 50 mm chips were used for this trial. The four piles were established in February and removed in May. Based on all the results of the trials the following conclusions can be drawn: Storage of willow from short rotation coppice is very difficult. Fine chips, such as producted by the two main harvesting machines Claas and Austoft are not suitable for storage over prolonged periods of time (more than 2 months); fine chips loose a large amount of dry matter and a lot of their lower heating value; fine chips also have a heavy infestation of micro-organisms which might cause working environment problems; short rotation coppice is best delivered straight into the heating plants during harvest; if short rotation coppice has to be stored, then this should be done as whole shoots or large chunk; if short rotation coppice has to be stored as chips for a longer period of time (more than two months), then these chips should be sealed airtight as silage. (EG) EFP-94; EFP-95; EFP-96. 10 refs.

  8. Transcriptomic Response of Purple Willow (Salix purpurea to Arsenic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric Yanitch

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As is a toxic element for plants and one of the most common anthropogenic pollutants found at contaminated sites. Despite its severe effects on plant metabolism, several species can accumulate substantial amounts of arsenic and endure the associated stress. However, the genetic mechanisms involved in arsenic tolerance remains obscure in many model plant species used for land decontamination (phytoremediation, including willows. The present study assesses the potential of Salix purpurea cv. ‘Fish Creek’ for arsenic phytoextraction and reveals the genetic responses behind arsenic tolerance, phytoextraction and metabolism. Four weeks of hydroponic exposure to 0, 5, 30 and 100 mg/L revealed that plants were able to tolerate up to 5 mg/L arsenic. Concentrations of 0 and 5 mg/L of arsenic treatment were then used to compare alterations in gene expression of roots, stems and leaves using RNA sequencing. Differential gene expression revealed transcripts encoding proteins putatively involved in entry of arsenic into the roots, storage in vacuoles and potential transport through the plant as well as primary and secondary (indirect toxicity tolerance mechanisms. A major role for tannin as a compound used to relieve cellular toxicity is implicated as well as unexpected expression of the cadmium transporter CAX2, providing a potential means for internal arsenic mobility. These insights into the underpinning genetics of a successful phytoremediating species present novel opportunities for selection of dedicated arsenic tolerant crops as well as the potential to integrate such tolerances into a wider Salix ideotype alongside traits including biomass yield, biomass quality, low agricultural inputs and phytochemical production.

  9. The sequestration of trace elements by willow (Salix purpurea)--which soil properties favor uptake and accumulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier-Hurteau, Benoît; Turmel, Marie-Claude; Mercier, Catherine; Courchesne, François

    2014-03-01

    The effect of soil properties on trace element (TE) extraction by the Fish Creek willow cultivar was assessed in a 4-month greenhouse experiment with two contrasted soils and two mycorrhizal treatments (Rhizophagus irregularis and natives). Aboveground tissues represented more than 82 % of the willow biomass and were the major sink for TE. Cadmium and Zn were concentrated in leaves, while As, Cu, Ni, and Pb were mostly found in roots. Willow bioconcentration ratios were below 0.20 for As, Cu, Ni, and Pb and reached 10.0 for Cd and 1.97 for Zn. More significant differences in willow biomass, TE concentrations, and contents were recorded between soil types than between mycorrhizal treatments. A slight significant increase in Cu extraction by willow in symbiosis with Rhizophagus irregularis was observed and was linked to increased shoot biomass. Significant regression models between TE in willow and soil properties were found in leaves (As, Ni), shoots (As, Cd, Cu, Ni), and roots (As, Cu, Pb). Most of the explanation was shared between soil water-soluble TE and fertility variables, indicating that TE phytoextraction is related to soil properties. Managing interactions between TE and major nutrients in soil appeared as a key to improve TE phytoextraction by willows.

  10. Phytoremediation of soils contaminated with phenanthrene and cadmium by growing willow (Salix × aureo-pendula CL 'j1011').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y Y; Xu, H X; Li, J H; Shi, X Q; Wu, J C; Ji, R; Guo, H Y

    2016-01-01

    To assess the phytoremediation potential of an autochthonous willow (Salix × aureo-pendula CL 'J1011') for phenanthrene (PHE)-contaminated soils and PHE-cadmium (PHE-Cd) co-contaminated soils, we conducted field experiments in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River, China. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and ethyl lactate were tested for individual and combined effects on the phytoremediation efficiency. For PHE-contaminated soils, willow plus ethyl lactate resulted in significant removal of PHE from soils after 45 days, and the PHE concentration in the shoots was significantly higher with than without ethyl lactate. For PHE-Cd co-contaminated soils, both willow plus EDTA and willow plus EDTA and ethyl lactate led to a significant decrease in the concentrations of PHE and Cd in the soils after 45 days, whereas willow alone did not. The PHE and Cd concentrations in the willow shoots were significantly enhanced in the presence of EDTA alone and with ethyl lactate, except for the PHE concentration in stems with EDTA alone. Under the same treatment, the presence of Cd had no significant influence on the PHE removal from soils. The results indicate the feasibility of using this willow together with both EDTA and ethyl lactate for the simultaneous removal of PHE and Cd from soils.

  11. Evaluation of geophysical logs, Phase I, at Willow Grove Naval Air Station, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Between April and June 1997, the U.S. Navy contracted Brown and Root Environmental, Inc., to drill 20 monitor wells at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station in Horsham Township, Montgomery County, Pa. The wells were installed to monitor water levels and allow collection of water samples from shallow, intermediate, and deep water-bearing zones. Analysis of the samples will determine the horizontal and vertical distribution of any contaminated ground water migrating from known contaminant sources. Eight wells were drilled near the Fire Training Area (Site 5), five wells near the 9th Street Landfill (Site 3), four wells at the Antenna Field Landfill (Site 2), and three wells near Privet Road Compound (Site 1). Depths range from 73 to 167 feet below land surface. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted borehole-geophysical and borehole-video logging to identify water-bearing zones so that appropriate intervals could be screened in each monitor well. Geophysical logs were run on the 20 monitor wells and 1 existing well. Video logs were run on 16 wells. Caliper and video logs were used to locate fractures, inflections on fluid-temperature and fluid-resistivity logs were used to locate possible water-bearing fractures, and flowmeter measurements verified these locations. Single-point-resistance and natural-gamma logs provided information on stratigraphy. After interpretation of geophysical logs, video logs, and driller's notes, all wells were screened such that water-level fluctuations could be monitored and discrete water samples collected from one or more shallow and intermediate water-bearing zones in each borehole.

  12. Timber resource statistics for the Willow block, Susitna River Basin multiresource inventory unit, Alaska, 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore S. Setzer; Bert R. Mead; Gary L. Carroll

    1984-01-01

    A multiresource inventory of the Willow block, Susitna River basin inventory unit, was conducted in 1978. Statistics on forest area, timber volumes, and growth and mortality from this inventory are presented. Timberland area is estimated at 230,200 acres and net growing stock volume, mostly birch, at 231.9 million cubic feet. Net annual growth of growing stock is...

  13. Methods of limiting willow shrub re-growth after initial removal on fen meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimkowska, Agata; Dzierza, Paulina; Kotowski, Wiktor; Brzezinska, Kamila

    2010-01-01

    Shrub removal is commonly used for management and restoration of species-rich fen meadows. A common problem after initial shrub cutting of willow is a vigorous re-sprouting and quick re-growth. In this paper we test experimentally what is an effective management option, limiting the re-growth of wil

  14. The Caring Business: Lynch Community Homes, Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Robert

    This paper, one of a series of reports describing innovative practices in integrating people with disabilities into community life, describes the Lynch Community Homes in Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Lynch Homes is a for-profit organization that provides homes and supportive services for approximately 75 people with severe and profound…

  15. Sampling procedure in a willow plantation for estimation of moisture content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Kofoed; Lærke, Poul Erik; Liu, Na

    2015-01-01

    Heating value and fuel quality of wood is closely connected to moisture content. In this work the variation of moisture content (MC) of short rotation coppice (SRC) willow shoots is described for five clones during one harvesting season. Subsequently an appropriate sampling procedure minimising...

  16. A genetic linkage map of willow (Salix viminalis) based on AFLP and microsatelite markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanley, S.; Barker, J.H.A.; Ooijen, van J.W.; Aldam, C.; Harris, S.L.; Ahman, I.; Larsson, S.; Karp, A.

    2002-01-01

    The genus Salix (willow) contains a number of species of great value as biomass crops. Efforts to breed varieties with improved biomass yields and resistances to pests and diseases are limited by the lack of knowledge on the genetic basis of the traits. We have used AFLP and microsatellite markers t

  17. Experiment and modelling of parameters influencing natural wind drying of willow chunks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gigler, J.K.; Loon, van W.K.P.; Sonneveld, C.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the parameters that govern the drying process of willow chunks. Indicative chunk drying trials were conducted to assess the potential of natural wind drying. Supportive model simulations were conducted to gain insight into the influence of different pro

  18. 雪柳的引种栽培%Introduction and Cultivation of Snow Willow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐炳芳; 张虎林; 梁宏玉; 张佳奕; 牟建军

    2012-01-01

    雪柳既具有很高的观赏和商业价值,又具有很强的生存适应能力,其在园林绿化中的作用已日益明显,但东北地区将雪柳作为绿化树种还比较少见。介绍了雪柳的属性特点、生长环境及其用途,提出了“南柳北移”的设想,并对其进行了简要分析。%Snow willow is of high ornamental value and commercial value and has very strong survival adaptability. Its role in the landscape has become increasingly obvious, but snow willow is rarely found in Northeast China. Through the description of the attributes, growing environment and usage of snow willow, a view of "lanting the southern willow in the north" is presented and a brief summary and analysis of it is made.

  19. Hydroponic screening of shrub willow (Salix spp.) for arsenic tolerance and uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Jason J; Smart, Lawrence B

    2008-01-01

    Shrub willows have demonstrated potential in many types of phytoremediation applications. Hydroponic culture was used to assess arsenic (As) tolerance and uptake by four shrub willow clones and to determine the effects of phosphate on As accumulation. After 4 weeks of growth in the absence of As, plants received one of four treatments: 0.25X Hoagland's minus P (-P), 0.25X Hoagland's minus P plus 100 microM arsenate (As100(-P)), 0.25X Hoagland's minus P plus 250 microM arsenate (As250(-P)), and 0.25X Hoagland's plus 250 IM arsenate (As250(+P)). Except for treatment As250(+P), phosphate was excluded due to its tendency to interfere with As uptake. After 3 weeks of treatment, plants were separated into root, leaf, and stem tissues. Biomass production and transpiration were used to quantify As tolerance. There was wide variation among clones in As tolerance and uptake. The presence of phosphate in solution alleviated the negative impacts of As on biomass and transpiration and also increased above ground As accumulation, suggesting that phosphate may play a role in reducing toxicity and enhancing As uptake by willow shrubs. These findings offer insight into As tolerance and uptake in Salix spp. and add to the growing body of evidence supporting the use of shrub willow for phytoremediation.

  20. Simulated winter browsing may lead to induced susceptibility of willows to beavers in spring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veraart, A.J.; Nolet, B.A.; Rosell, F.; De Vries, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Browsing may lead to an induced resistance or susceptibility of the plant to the herbivore. We tested the effect of winter browsing by Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber L., 1758) on food quality of holme willows (Salix dasyclados Wimm.) in and after the following growth season. Shrubs were pruned in Fe

  1. Differential effects of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) on photosynthesis and chlorophyll metabolism in willow plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marcelo Pedrosa; Le Manac'h, Sarah Gingras; Maccario, Sophie; Labrecque, Michel; Lucotte, Marc; Juneau, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    We used a willow species (Salix miyabeana cultivar SX64) to examine the differential secondary-effects of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), the principal glyphosate by-product, on chlorophyll metabolism and photosynthesis. Willow plants were treated with different concentrations of glyphosate (equivalent to 0, 1.4, 2.1 and 2.8kgha(-1)) and AMPA (equivalent to 0, 0.28, 1.4 and 2.8kgha(-1)) and evaluations of pigment contents, chlorophyll fluorescence, and oxidative stress markers (hydrogen peroxide content and antioxidant enzyme activities) in leaves were performed after 12h of exposure. We observed that AMPA and glyphosate trigger different mechanisms leading to decreases in chlorophyll content and photosynthesis rates in willow plants. Both chemicals induced ROS accumulation in willow leaves although only glyphosate-induced oxidative damage through lipid peroxidation. By disturbing chlorophyll biosynthesis, AMPA induced decreases in chlorophyll contents, with consequent effects on photosynthesis. With glyphosate, ROS increases were higher than the ROS-sensitive threshold, provoking chlorophyll degradation (as seen by pheophytin accumulation) and invariable decreases in photosynthesis. Peroxide accumulation in both AMPA and glyphosate-treated plants was due to the inhibition of antioxidant enzyme activities. The different effects of glyphosate on chlorophyll contents and photosynthesis as described in the literature may be due to various glyphosate:AMPA ratios in those plants.

  2. PCR-Based detection of the causal agent of watermark disease in willows (Salix spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauben; Steenackers; Swings

    1998-10-01

    The watermark disease, caused by Brenneria salicis (formerly Erwinia salicis), is of significant concern wherever tree-forming willows are grown or occur naturally. The movement of infected, asymptomatic cuttings is a major cause of pathogen dispersal. A reliable and sensitive diagnostic procedure is necessary for the safe movement of willow planting material. We derived primers from the nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene of B. salicis for the development of a PCR to detect this pathogen. One set of primers, Es1a-Es4b, directed the amplification of a 553-bp fragment from B. salicis genomic DNA as well as B. salicis cells. PCR products were not observed when genomic DNA was tested for 27 strains of other, related plant-associated bacteria. Genomic fingerprinting by amplification fragment length polymorphism of B. salicis strains, originating from four different countries, and related Brenneria, Pectobacterium, and Erwinia strains revealed a very high similarity among the B. salicis genomes, indicating that the spread of the pathogen is mainly due to the transportation of infected cuttings. The PCR had to be preceded by a DNA extraction in order to detect the pathogen in the vascular fluid of willows. The minimum number of cells that could be detected from vascular fluid was 20 CFU/ml. The PCR assays proved to be very sensitive and reliable in detecting B. salicis in willow plant material.

  3. Longer black willow cuttings result in better initial height and diameter growth in biomass plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jake C. Camp; Randall J. Rousseau; Emile S. Gardiner

    2012-01-01

    Black willow (Salix nigra Marsh.) has the potential to be a viable plantation species for biomass production on heavy clay soils throughout the southern United States. The most favorable planting stock for woody biomass plantations is dormant unrooted cuttings, because they are easy to plant and use of clonal material allows for advancing genetic...

  4. Development of an applied black willow tree improvement program for biomass production in the south

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall J. Rousseau; Emile S. Gardiner; Theodor D. Leininger

    2012-01-01

    The development of rapidly growing biomass woody crops is imperative as the United States strives to meet renewable energy goals. The Department of Energy has indicated that biomass is a prime source for renewable energy for the southern United States. Black Willow (Salix nigra Marsh.) is a potential bioenergy/biofuels crop for dedicated short-...

  5. Methods of limiting willow shrub re-growth after initial removal on fen meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimkowska, Agata; Dzierza, Paulina; Kotowski, Wiktor; Brzezinska, Kamila

    2010-01-01

    Shrub removal is commonly used for management and restoration of species-rich fen meadows. A common problem after initial shrub cutting of willow is a vigorous re-sprouting and quick re-growth. In this paper we test experimentally what is an effective management option, limiting the re-growth of wil

  6. Phytotoxicity of Sodium Fluoride and Uptake of Fluoride in Willow Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lauge Peter Westergaard; Gosewinkel Karlson, Ulrich; Trapp, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The willow tree (Salix viminalis) toxicity test and a cress seed germination test (Lepidium sativum) were used to determine uptake and phytotoxicity of NaF. Concentrations in hydroponic solutions were 0-1000 mg F/L and 0-400 mg F/L in the preliminary and definitive test. A third test was done...

  7. Machinery management data for willow harvest with a bio-baler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoie, P. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Quebec City, PQ (Canada); Hebert, P.L. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. des sols et de genie agroalimentaire; Robert, F.S. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Sols et environnement

    2010-07-01

    Willow harvested in 2-to-3-year rotations has been touted as a reliable source of biomass. A newly designed harvester based on a round baler was developed in 2006. The third generation biobaler was evaluated in 2009 at 2 willow plantations in Quebec. The first site at Godmanchester was a three-year old regrowth with an estimated 52,000 stems/ha of large diameter willow. The biobaler with a flail cutter harvested three plots totalling 4,136 m{sup 2}. Total harvested biomass was 10.36 t DM in 42 bales. The harvest rate averaged 29 bale/h with an average bale size of 1.22 m wide by 1.30 m in diameter. Diesel fuel consumption averaged 0.81 L/bale. Measured losses averaged 11 per cent of the yield. The second site at Saint-Roch-del'Achigan was a two-year old growth with an estimated 49,000 stems/ha of large stem willow. The biobaler harvested seven plots totalling 15,740 m{sup 2}. Total harvest was 30.70 t DM in 148 bales. The first 14 bales were harvested with a saw blade header. All other bales were harvested with the flail cutter at a faster rate. Bale density averaged 129 kg DM/m{sup 3}. Fuel consumption averaged 0.72 L/bale. Losses averaged 20 per cent of the yield with the saw blade header.

  8. Comparing predicted yield and yield stability of willow and Miscanthus across Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren; Jaiswal, Deepak; Bentsen, Niclas Scott;

    2016-01-01

    . The semi-mechanistic crop model BioCro was used to simulate the production of both short rotation coppice (SRC) willow and Miscanthus across Denmark. Predictions were made from high spatial resolution soil data and weather records across this area for 1990-2010. The potential average, rain-fed mean yield...

  9. Short rotation coppice culture of willows and poplars as energy crops on metal contaminated agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttens, Ann; Boulet, Jana; Weyens, Nele; Smeets, Karen; Adriaensen, Kristin; Meers, Erik; Van Slycken, Stijn; Tack, Filip; Meiresonne, Linda; Thewys, Theo; Witters, Nele; Carleer, Robert; Dupae, Joke; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2011-01-01

    Phytoremediation, more precisely phytoextraction, has been placed forward as an environmental friendly remediation technique, that can gradually reduce increased soil metal concentrations, in particular the bioavailable fractions. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities of growing willows and poplars under short rotation coppice (SRC) on an acid, poor, sandy metal contaminated soil, to combine in this way soil remediation by phytoextraction on one hand, and production of biomass for energy purposes on the other. Above ground biomass productivities were low for poplars to moderate for willows, which was not surprising, taking into account the soil conditions that are not very favorable for growth of these trees. Calculated phytoextraction efficiency was much longer for poplars than these for willows. We calculated that for phytoextraction in this particular case it would take at least 36 years to reach the legal threshold values for cadmium, but in combination with production of feedstock for bioenergy processes, this type of land use can offer an alternative income for local farmers. Based on the data of the first growing cycle, for this particular case, SRC of willows should be recommended.

  10. Treatment of landfill leachate by irrigation of willow coppice--plant response and treatment efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronsson, Pär; Dahlin, Torleif; Dimitriou, Ioannis

    2010-03-01

    Landfill leachates usually need to be treated before discharged, and using soil-plant systems for this has gained substantial interest in Sweden and in the UK. A three-year field study was conducted in central Sweden to quantify plant response, treatment efficiency and impact on groundwater quality of landfill leachate irrigation of short-rotation willow coppice (Salix). Two willow varieties were tested and four irrigation regimes in sixteen 400-m2 plots. The willow plants did not react negatively, despite very high annual loads of nitrogen (willow varieties tested, relative leaf length accurately predicted growth rate. Irrigation resulted in elevated groundwater concentrations of all elements applied. Treatment efficiency varied considerably for different elements, but was adequate when moderate loads were applied.

  11. Phytoscreening and phytoextraction of heavy metals at Danish polluted sites using willow and poplar trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algreen, Mette; Trapp, Stefan; Rein, Arno

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine typical concentrations of heavy metals (HM) in wood from willows and poplars, in order to test the feasibility of phytoscreening and phytoextraction of HM. Samples were taken from one strongly, one moderately, and one slightly polluted site and from three reference sites. Wood from both tree species had similar background concentrations at 0.5 mg kg(-1) for cadmium (Cd), 1.6 mg kg(-1) for copper (Cu), 0.3 mg kg(-1) for nickel (Ni), and 25 mg kg(-1) for zinc (Zn). Concentrations of chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) were below or close to detection limit. Concentrations in wood from the highly polluted site were significantly elevated, compared to references, in particular for willow. The conclusion from these results is that tree coring could be used successfully to identify strongly heavy metal-polluted soil for Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn, and that willow trees were superior to poplars, except when screening for Ni. Phytoextraction of HMs was quantified from measured concentration in wood at the most polluted site. Extraction efficiencies were best for willows and Cd, but below 0.5% over 10 years, and below 1‰ in 10 years for all other HMs.

  12. Phytotoxicity of fresh and weathered diesel and gasoline to willow and poplar trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Köhler, A.; Larsen, L.C.

    2001-01-01

    The toxicity of fresh and weathered gasoline and diesel fuel to willow and poplar trees was studied using a tree transpiration toxicity test. Soils were taken from an abandoned filling station. Concentrations in the samples were measured as the sum of hydrocarbons from C5 to C10 (gasoline) and C1...

  13. Comparing predicted yield and yield stability of willow and Miscanthus across Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren; Jaiswal, Deepak; Bentsen, Niclas Scott

    2016-01-01

    . The semi-mechanistic crop model BioCro was used to simulate the production of both short rotation coppice (SRC) willow and Miscanthus across Denmark. Predictions were made from high spatial resolution soil data and weather records across this area for 1990-2010. The potential average, rain-fed mean yield...

  14. Treatment of log yard run-off by irrigation of grass and willows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Maria [Department of Forest Products and Markets, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7060, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)]. E-mail: maria.jonsson@spm.slu.se; Dimitriou, Ioannis [Department of Short Rotation Forestry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7016, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Aronsson, Paer [Department of Short Rotation Forestry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7016, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Elowson, Torbjoern [Department of Forest Products and Markets, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7060, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2006-01-15

    Log yard run-off is a potential environmental risk, among other things because it creates an oxygen deficiency in receiving watercourses. This study was conducted to investigate the purification efficiency of soil-plant systems with couchgrass (Elymus repens) and willows (Salix sp.) when intensively irrigated with run-off from an open sprinkling system at a Norway spruce (Picea abies) log yard. The purification efficiency was determined both at the field scale (couchgrass) and in 68-L lysimeters (couchgrass and willows). Groundwater in the field and drainage water from the lysimeters were analysed for Total Organic Carbon (TOC), distillable phenols, total P, and total N. Retention of TOC, phenols and P occurred but no difference between couchgrass and willows was observed. The system had better purification capacity at the field scale than in the lysimeters. -- By irrigating willow and couchgrass soil-plant systems with log yard run-off water, TOC, phenols, and phosphorus were reduced with 35% to 96% in the water.

  15. Large carbon-sink potential by Kyoto forests in Sweden - a case study on willow plantations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grelle, Achim [Dept. of Ecology, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Upp sala (Sweden)]. e-mail: Achim.Grelle@ekol.slu.se; Aronsson, Paer [Dept. of Crop Prod uction Ecology, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Weslien, Per; Klemedtsson, Leif [Dept. of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Gothenburg Univ. ( SE); Lindroth, Anders [Geobiospheric Science Centre, Physical Geography and Eco systems Analysis, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2007-11-15

    Fluxes of CO{sub 2} were measured in a 75-ha short-rotation willow plantation at Enkoeping, central Sweden. The plantation was irrigated with wastewater for fertilization and water-filtering purposes. The harvested biomass was used locally for combined heat and power production. The plantation was a sink of ca. 8 tonnes C/ha during 2003, of which ca. 50% was estimated to be attributed to fertilization. Biomass increment by shoot growth was 5 tonnes C/ha during the same year. Below ground carbon allocation was estimated to 3 tonnes C/ha/yr by a model that relates carbon allocation to shoot growth. Thus, the ecosystem carbon balance was closed by these estimations. The carbon uptake by the willow plantation was 5.5 times as high compared to a normally managed spruce forest, but only half as high as from an experimental, well-managed willow plantation in the same region. This illustrates the vast potential of short-rotation willow plantations for CO{sub 2} uptake from the atmosphere.

  16. Ultrathin willow-like CuO nanoflakes as an efficient catalyst for electro-oxidation of hydrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Li, Hao; Wang, Rongfang; Wang, Hui; Lv, Weizhong; Ji, Shan

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, preparation of ultrathin willow-like CuO nanoflakes via a one-step process was reported. X-ray diffraction pattern showed the formation of monoclinic CuO crystal, which was also confirmed by result of high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy showed that ultrathin willow-like CuO nanoflakes were formed. Catalytic testing indicated that the ultrathin willow-like CuO nanoflakes exhibited high electrocatalytic activity and durability toward the electro-oxidation of hydrazine in alkaline medium. The results suggested that the as-prepared CuO nanoflakes were potential electrode materials for hydrazine fuel cell.

  17. Integrating SMOS brightness temperatures with a new conceptual spatially distributed hydrological model for improving flood and drought predictions at large scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostache, Renaud; Rains, Dominik; Chini, Marco; Lievens, Hans; Verhoest, Niko E. C.; Matgen, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    , SUPERFLEX is capable of predicting runoff, soil moisture, and SMOS-like brightness temperature time series. Such a model is traditionally calibrated using only discharge measurements. In this study we designed a multi-objective calibration procedure based on both discharge measurements and SMOS-derived brightness temperature observations in order to evaluate the added value of remotely sensed soil moisture data in the calibration process. As a test case we set up the SUPERFLEX model for the large scale Murray-Darling catchment in Australia ( 1 Million km2). When compared to in situ soil moisture time series, model predictions show good agreement resulting in correlation coefficients exceeding 70 % and Root Mean Squared Errors below 1 %. When benchmarked with the physically based land surface model CLM, SUPERFLEX exhibits similar performance levels. By adapting the runoff routing function within the SUPERFLEX model, the predicted discharge results in a Nash Sutcliff Efficiency exceeding 0.7 over both the calibration and the validation periods.

  18. What do we learn about the impact of extreme hydrological events on tropical wetlands from the synergistic use of altimetry from Sentinel-3/SARAL-Altika and L-Band radiometry from SMOS/SMAP ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bitar, Ahmad; Parrens, Marie; Frappart, Frederic; Cauduro Dias de Paiva, Rodrigo; Papa, Fabrice; Kerr, Yann

    2017-04-01

    What do we learn about the impact of extreme hydrological events on tropical wetlands from the synergistic use of altimetry from Sentinel-3/SARAL-Altika and L-Band radiometry from SMOS/SMAP ? The question of the contribution of the tropical basins to the carbon and water cycle remains an open question in the science community. The tropical basins are highly impact by the wetlands dynamics but the also the link with extreme events like El-Nino are yet to be clarified. The main reason to this uncertainty is that the monitoring of inland water surfaces via remote sensing over tropical areas is a difficult task because of impact of vegetation and cloud cover. The most common solution is to use microwave remote sensing. In this study we combine the use of L-band microwave brightness temperatures and altimetric data from SARAL/ALTIKA and Sentinel-3 to derive water storage maps at relatively high (7days) temporal frequency. This study concerns the Amazon and Congo basin. The water fraction in inland are estimated by inversing a first order radiative model is used to derive surface water over land from the brightness temperature measured by ESA SMOS and SMAP mission at coarse resolution (25 km x 25 km) and 7-days frequency. The product is compared to the static land cover map such as ESA CCI and the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) and also dynamic maps from GIEMS and SWAPS products. Water storage is then obtained by combining the altimetric data from SARAL/ALTIKA and Sentinel-3 to the water surface fraction using an hypsometric approach. The water surfaces and water storage products are then compared to precipitation data from GPM TRMM datasets and river discharge data from field data. The amplitudes and time shifts of the signals is compared based on the sub-basin definition from Hydroshed database. The dataset is then divided into years of strong and weak El-Nino signal and the anomaly is between the two dataset is compared. The results show a strong

  19. Secondary cell wall composition and candidate gene expression in developing willow (Salix purpurea) stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yongfang; Gritsch, Cristina; Tryfona, Theodora; Ray, Mike J; Andongabo, Ambrose; Hassani-Pak, Keywan; Jones, Huw D; Dupree, Paul; Karp, Angela; Shewry, Peter R; Mitchell, Rowan A C

    2014-05-01

    The properties of the secondary cell wall (SCW) in willow largely determine the suitability of willow biomass feedstock for potential bioenergy and biofuel applications. SCW development has been little studied in willow and it is not known how willow compares with model species, particularly the closely related genus Populus. To address this and relate SCW synthesis to candidate genes in willow, a tractable bud culture-derived system was developed in Salix purpurea, and cell wall composition and RNA-Seq transcriptome were followed in stems during early development. A large increase in SCW deposition in the period 0-2 weeks after transfer to soil was characterised by a big increase in xylan content, but no change in the frequency of substitution of xylan with glucuronic acid, and increased abundance of putative transcripts for synthesis of SCW cellulose, xylan and lignin. Histochemical staining and immunolabeling revealed that increased deposition of lignin and xylan was associated with xylem, xylem fibre cells and phloem fibre cells. Transcripts orthologous to those encoding xylan synthase components IRX9 and IRX10 and xylan glucuronyl transferase GUX1 in Arabidopsis were co-expressed, and showed the same spatial pattern of expression revealed by in situ hybridisation at four developmental stages, with abundant expression in proto-xylem, xylem fibre and ray parenchyma cells and some expression in phloem fibre cells. The results show a close similarity with SCW development in Populus species, but also give novel information on the relationship between spatial and temporal variation in xylan-related transcripts and xylan composition.

  20. Uptake of ferrocyanide in willow and poplar trees in a long term greenhouse experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Tsvetelina; Repmann, Frank; Raab, Thomas; Freese, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    Phytoremediation of sites contaminated with iron cyanides can be performed using poplar and willow trees. Poplar and willow trees were grown in potting substrate spiked with ferrocyanide concentrations of up to 2,000 mg kg(-1) for 4 and 8 weeks respectively. Soil solution and leaf tissue of different age were sampled for total cyanide analysis every week. Chlorophyll content in the leaves was determined to quantify cyanide toxicity. Results showed that cyanide in the soil solution of spiked soils differed between treatments and on weekly basis and ranged from 0.5 to 1,200 mg l(-1). The maximum cyanide content in willow and poplar leaves was 518 mg kg(-1) fresh weight (FW) and 148 mg kg(-1) FW respectively. Cyanide accumulated in the leaves increased linearly with increasing cyanide concentration in the soil solution. On the long term, significantly more cyanide was accumulated in old leaf tissue than in young tissue. Chlorophyll content in poplar decreased linearly with increasing cyanide in the soil solution and in leaf tissue, and over time. The inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for poplars after 4 weeks of exposure was 173 mg l(-1) and for willow after 8 weeks of exposure-768 mg l(-1). Results show that willows tolerate much more cyanide and over a longer period than poplars, making them very appropriate for remediating sites highly contaminated with iron cyanides.

  1. White willow sexual regeneration capacity under estuarine conditions in times of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus-Michalczyk, Heike; Hanelt, Dieter; Denstorf, Julian; Jensen, Kai

    2016-10-01

    Tidal wetlands provide both habitats for coastal populations and wildlife, and ecosystem services for human welfare. Building with nature regarding cost-effective coastal protection is of increasing interest. Much research has been carried out on plant reproduction capacities in mangroves and salt marshes, but less is known on this issue in tidal freshwater wetlands. Willows are being successfully used for bank stabilization in riverine habitats, however, today white willow softwood forests in tidal wetlands are highly fragmented, and restoration is required e.g. by the European Habitats Directive. Recently, tolerance to increasing salinity and tidal flooding was found for vegetative propagules of floodplain willows. However, the establishment of autochthonous sexual recruits is necessary to conserve the genetic diversity of local populations, and thus may be preferable in restoration. The germination and early seedling establishment of Salix alba (white willow) was experimentally studied under simulated estuarine conditions. The species tolerance to increasing salinity (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2) was tested in a climate chamber, and its tolerance to flooding at different tidal treatments (control, spring tide, daily tide 15 min and 2 h flooding) in the greenhouse. Germination was neither affected by increasing salinity nor by tidal flooding. Salix seedlings established up to salinity 1.5, but cotyledon performance and radicle growth was largely reduced at salinity 2. Under tidal flooding, seedling growth was similar in all treatments. However, in the treatments with daily tides seedling anchorage in the substrate took more than two weeks, and fewer seedlings reached a suitable length to approach the high water line. We assess S. alba sexual regeneration under estuarine conditions as generally possible. Further studies are needed on the effects of sedimentation-erosion processes on willow establishment in the field, especially on feedbacks between Salix survival and

  2. Reaction wood – a key cause of variation in cell wall recalcitrance in willow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brereton Nicholas JB

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recalcitrance of lignocellulosic cell wall biomass to deconstruction varies greatly in angiosperms, yet the source of this variation remains unclear. Here, in eight genotypes of short rotation coppice willow (Salix sp. variability of the reaction wood (RW response and the impact of this variation on cell wall recalcitrance to enzymatic saccharification was considered. Results A pot trial was designed to test if the ‘RW response’ varies between willow genotypes and contributes to the differences observed in cell wall recalcitrance to enzymatic saccharification in field-grown trees. Biomass composition was measured via wet chemistry and used with glucose release yields from enzymatic saccharification to determine cell wall recalcitrance. The levels of glucose release found for pot-grown control trees showed no significant correlation with glucose release from mature field-grown trees. However, when a RW phenotype was induced in pot-grown trees, glucose release was strongly correlated with that for mature field-grown trees. Field studies revealed a 5-fold increase in glucose release from a genotype grown at a site exposed to high wind speeds (a potentially high RW inducing environment when compared with the same genotype grown at a more sheltered site. Conclusions Our findings provide evidence for a new concept concerning variation in the recalcitrance to enzymatic hydrolysis of the stem biomass of different, field-grown willow genotypes (and potentially other angiosperms. Specifically, that genotypic differences in the ability to produce a response to RW inducing conditions (a ‘RW response’ indicate that this RW response is a primary determinant of the variation observed in cell wall glucan accessibility. The identification of the importance of this RW response trait in willows, is likely to be valuable in selective breeding strategies in willow (and other angiosperm biofuel crops and, with further work to dissect

  3. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : January to April 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April...

  4. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : May to August 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August...

  5. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : January to April 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April...

  6. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : January to April 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April...

  7. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : May to August 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August...

  8. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : January to April 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April...

  9. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : May to August 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August...

  10. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : September to December 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December...

  11. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : September to December 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December...

  12. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : January to April 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April...

  13. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : September to December 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December...

  14. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : September to December 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December...

  15. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : May to August 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August...

  16. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : January to April 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April...

  17. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : September to December 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December...

  18. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : September to December 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December...

  19. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : January to April 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April...

  20. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : January to April 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April...

  1. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : September to December 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December...

  2. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : September to December 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December...

  3. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : January to April 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April...

  4. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : May to August 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August...

  5. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : May to August 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August...

  6. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : January to April 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April...

  7. Biomass production of four willow clones grown as short rotation coppice on two soil types in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevel, Lisbeth; Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Ambitious targets for reducing emissions of carbon dioxide have created a demand for renewable sources of energy. Short rotation coppice (SRC) willow has the potential for meeting part of this demand. In this study, an experiment including four commercial clones of willow grown on two different...... soil types in northern Denmark is reported. Annual biomass production was estimated after the first and second growing season in the first rotation using a non-destructive method and total biomass production was measured by harvesting of the willow after the second growing season. The non......-destructive method showed a large increase in annual biomass production from the first to the second growing season. Based on the harvested willow, average annual biomass production of the four clones ranged from 5.2 to 8.8 odt ha-1 yr-1 with a significant effect of both soil type and clone. The interaction between...

  8. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : September to December 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December...

  9. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : May - August 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek topics include grazing and fur harvesting. A progress report on field investigations and applied...

  10. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : January to April 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April...

  11. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : May to August 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August...

  12. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : May to August 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August...

  13. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : January to April 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April...

  14. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : May to August 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August...

  15. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : September to December 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December...

  16. Environmental life cycle assessment of producing willow, alfalfa and straw from spring barley as feedstocks for bioenergy or biorefinery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parajuli, Ranjan; Knudsen, Marie Trydeman; Djomo, Sylvestre Njakou

    2017-01-01

    and land occupation. Environmental impacts for straw were economically allocated from the impacts obtained for spring barley. The results obtained per ton dry matter showed a lower carbon footprint for willow and alfalfa compared to straw. It was due to higher soil carbon sequestration and lower N2O...... output to input ratio, willow performed better than other biomasses. On the basis of carbohydrate content of straw, the equivalent dry matter of alfalfa and willow would be requiring higher. The environmental impacts of the selected biomasses in biorefinery therefore would differ based on the conversion......The current study aimed at evaluating potential environmental impacts for the production of willow, alfalfa and straw from spring barley as feedstocks for bioenergy or biorefinery systems. A method of Life Cycle Assessment was used to evaluate based on the following impact categories: Global...

  17. Willow short-rotation coppice for energy and breeding birds: an exploration of potentials in relation to management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Londo, M.; Dekker, J. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Copernicus Inst.; Keurs, W. ter [Leiden Univ. (Netherlands). Inst. of Environmental Sciences

    2005-03-01

    Willow in short-rotation coppice (SRC) for energy may be an attractive habitat for many breeding bird species. In this study, we systematically explore the possible relations between design and management of willow SRC and the occurrence of individual species and ecological groups of breeding birds. Methods were literature review and expert consultation. For government steering strategies to enhance bird-friendly design and management of willow SRC, two approaches are evaluated in the framework of agency theory: rewarding behaviour versus rewarding actual results. The analysis indicates considerable opportunities to increase willow SRC potentials, with limited productivity reduction, especially for breeding birds of shrubs and hedges. Exemplary design and management packages were developed, with corresponding breeding bird species and appropriate policy strategy. Notwithstanding the uncertainties and qualitative nature of the results, the analysis offers starting points for managers willing to pay attention to breeding birds. (author)

  18. Narrative Report : Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek & Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuges : September to December 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Nine-pipe, Pablo, Pishkun, Willow Creek and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December...

  19. Final Report Ohio River Mussel Survey, River Mile 162.5 to 172.5 (Willow Island to Marietta)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Ecological Specialists, Inc. was contracted by the City of New Martinsville, West Virginia, to survey the Ohio River unionid molluscs downstream of the Willow Island...

  20. First Record Of Clytra Laeviuscula Ratzeburg As Potential Insect Pest Of Energy Willow (Salix Viminalis L.) In Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanovska Tatyana; Lewis Edwin; Pidlisnyuk Valentina; Smyrnykh Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Cultivation of short rotation coppice energy willow (SRC EW), Salix viminalis L., has a great potential in Ukraine as a source of biomass for biofuel production. Commercial production of this species was recently initiated in the country. The growing of SRC EW in Western and Northern Europe for a long time showed that leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are key pests causing significant biomass reduction. However, data about the pest complex for energy willow growing in Ukraine is not av...

  1. Using SMOS for validation and parameter estimation of a large scale hydrological model in Paraná river basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colossi, Bibiana; Fleischmann, Ayan; Siqueira, Vinicius; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Paiva, Rodrigo; Fan, Fernando; Ruhoff, Anderson; Pontes, Paulo; Collischonn, Walter

    2017-04-01

    Large scale representation of soil moisture conditions can be achieved through hydrological simulation and remote sensing techniques. However, both methodologies have several limitations, which suggests the potential benefits of using both information together. So, this study had two main objectives: perform a cross-validation between remotely sensed soil moisture from SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) L3 product and soil moisture simulated with the large scale hydrological model MGB-IPH; and to evaluate the potential benefits of including remotely sensed soil moisture for model parameter estimation. The study analyzed results in South American continent, where hydrometeorological monitoring is usually scarce. The study was performed in Paraná River Basin, an important South American basin, whose extension and particular characteristics allow the representation of different climatic, geological, and, consequently, hydrological conditions. Soil moisture estimated with SMOS was transformed from water content to a Soil Water Index (SWI) so it is comparable to the saturation degree simulated with MGB-IPH model. The multi-objective complex evolution algorithm (MOCOM-UA) was applied for model automatic calibration considering only remotely sensed soil moisture, only discharge and both information together. Results show that this type of analysis can be very useful, because it allows to recognize limitations in model structure. In the case of the hydrological model calibration, this approach can avoid the use of parameters out of range, in an attempt to compensate model limitations. Also, it indicates aspects of the model were efforts should be concentrated, in order to improve hydrological or hydraulics process representation. Automatic calibration gives an estimative about the way different information can be applied and the quality of results it might lead. We emphasize that these findings can be valuable for hydrological modeling in large scale South American

  2. Yield and Water Quality Impacts of Field-Scale Integration of Willow into a Continuous Corn Rotation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumpf, Colleen; Ssegane, Herbert; Negri, Maria Cristina; Campbell, Patty; Cacho, Julian

    2017-07-01

    Agricultural landscape design has gained recognition by the international environmental and development community as a strategy to address multiple goals in land, water, and ecosystem service management; however, field research is needed to quantify impacts on specific local environments. The production of bioenergy crops in specific landscape positions within a grain-crop field can serve the dual purpose of producing cellulosic biomass (nutrient recovery) while also providing regulating ecosystem services to improve water quality (nutrient reduction). The effectiveness of such a landscape design was evaluated by the strategic placement of a 0.8-ha short-rotation shrub willow ( Seemen) bioenergy buffer along marginal soils in a 6.5-ha corn ( L.) field in a 6-yr field study in central Illinois. The impact of willow integration on water quality (soil water, shallow groundwater leaching, and crop nutrient uptake) and quantity (soil moisture and transpiration) was monitored in comparison with corn in the willow's first cycle of growth. Willows significantly reduced nitrate leachate in shallow subsurface water by 88% while maintaining adequate nutrient and water usage. Results suggest that willows offer an efficient nutrient-reduction strategy and may provide additional ecosystem services and benefits, including enhanced soil health. However, low values for calculated willow biomass will need to be readdressed in the future as harvest data become available to understand contributing factors that affected productivity beyond nutrient availability. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  3. Hierarchical weeping willow nano-tree growth and effect of branching on dye-sensitized solar cell efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Indria; Yeo, Junyeob; Hong, Sukjoon; Lee, Daeho; Nam, Koo Hyun; Choi, Jun-ho; Hong, Won-hwa; Lee, Dongjin; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Ko, Seung Hwan

    2012-05-17

    In this paper we have demonstrated the simple, low cost, low temperature, hydrothermal growth of weeping willow ZnO nano-trees with very long branches to realize high efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). We also discuss the effects of branching on solar cell efficiency. By introducing branched growth on the backbone ZnO nanowires (NWs), the short circuit current density and the overall light conversion efficiency of the branched ZnO NW DSSCs increased to almost four times that for vertically grown ZnO NWs. The efficiency increase is attributed to the increase in surface area for higher dye loading and light harvesting and also to reduced charge recombination through direct conduction along the crystalline ZnO branches. As the length of the branches increased, the branches became flaccid and the increase in solar cell efficiency slowed down because the effective surface area increase was hindered by branch bundling during the drying process and subsequent decrease in the dye loading.

  4. Biomass production and control of nutrient leaching of willows using different planting methods with special emphasis on an appraisal of the electrical impedance for roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Cao

    2011-07-01

    Willow reproduction can be achieved through vertically or horizontally planted cuttings. Conventionally, plantations are established by inserting cuttings vertically into the soil. There is, however, a lack of information about the biomass production and nutrient leaching of plantations established through horizontally planted cuttings. A greenhouse experiment and a field trial were carried out to investigate whether horizontally planted Salix schwerinii cuttings have a positive effect on stem yield, root distribution and nutrient leaching in comparison with vertically planted cuttings with different planting densities. The shoots' height of horizontally planted cuttings was significantly smaller than that of vertically planted cuttings during the first two weeks after planting in the pot experiment. Thereafter, no significant effect of planting orientation on the stem biomass was observed in the two conducted experiments. In both experiments the total stem biomass increased with the planting density. It was also found that the fine root biomass and the specific root length were not affected by the planting orientation or density, while the fine root surface area and the absorbing root surface area (ARSA) were affected only by the planting density. The planting orientation did not affect the nutrient concentrations in the soil leachate, apart from SO{sub 4}-S and PO{sub 4}-P in the pot experiment. The ARSA in the pot experiment was assessed by using the earth impedance method. The applicability of this method was evaluated in a hydroponic study of willow cuttings where root and stem were measured independently. Electrical resistance had a good correlation with the contact area of the roots with the solution. However, the resistance depended strongly on the contact area of the stem with the solution, which caused a bias in the evaluation of root surface area. A similar experimental set-up with electrical impedance spectroscopy was employed to study the

  5. 高速公路行道柳树分析%Analysis on highway willow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴安平

    2015-01-01

    Combining with highway willow status,the article studies merits and defects of road willow,and puts forward specific solving strategies to problems including narrow road tree design concept,cost-orientation,and poor safety attention and so on,with a view to beautify highway envi-ronment and to improve highway quality as well.%结合高速公路行道树的现状,对行道柳树的利与弊进行了研究,针对行道树设计理念狭隘、过度强调成本、安全重视不够等管理问题提出了具体的解决策略,以美化公路沿线环境,提升公路品质。

  6. The flux of isoprene from a willow coppice plantation and the effect on local air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, M.; Ek-Olausson, B.; Jensen, N.O.

    2005-01-01

    Isoprene fluxes from a Salix viminalis (willow) plantation in western Sweden were measured using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) technique. Fluxes of up to 0.23 mu g m(-2) s(-1) could be observed. A standard emission factor at 303 K and a PAR flux of 1000 mu mol m(-2) s(-1) was estimated to 0.......98 mu g m(-2) s(-1) by using the G93 algorithm. The chemistry of an air parcel passing over a willow coppice plantation was investigated utilising a Lagrangian box model in which the measured isoprene fluxes were used as input data. Dispersion after the field was accounted for by a procedure based...

  7. Insignificant acute toxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles to willow trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeger, Eva Mareike; Baun, Anders; Kästner, M.

    2009-01-01

    , no results of toxicity tests with trees have been reported. Woody species, dominant in many ecosystems, may be vulnerable in particular due to the large porous wood compartment. This study tests the toxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles on trees with the short-term willow tree transpiration test. TiO2 particles....... The loss of nanoparticles from solution was faster for particles with larger diameter and in the presence of trees. Willow trees were not sensitive to short-term exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles. Similar results were obtained for other plant species. Effects of nanoparticles were observed for zinc and zinc...... oxide particles, but these effects were probably due to heavy metal toxicity and not nanosize specific. In summary, we came to the conclusion that woody species are not in particular vulnerable to nanosized TiO2 particles in the conditions, concentrations, and time periods used in this study...

  8. Heavy metals in the liver of black grouse and willow grouse; Tungmetaller i orrfugl- og lirypelever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    In 1990 - 1991, as a part of evaluating the state of environmental poison in the Norwegian wilderness, the concentrations of lead, cadmium, mercury, aluminium, copper and zinc in liver samples from black grouse and willow grouse were measured. Samples were taken from a network of about 100 localities. This was followed by a similar investigation in 2000 - 2001 in order to document possible changes in pollution that might be harmful to live organisms and that are added to nature in Norway by long-range air pollution. This new investigation includes arsen, selenium and rubidium in addition to the elements in the old investigation. None of the measured elements occur in concentrations high enough for directly negative effects on the birds to be expected. The concentrations of cadmium and to some extent of lead in the liver of black grouse and willow grouse exceed the maximum level recommended for human consumption.

  9. Nitrogen retention in vegetation filters of short-rotation willow coppice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronsson, Paer [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Short-Rotation Forestry

    2000-07-01

    Irrigation of short-rotation willow coppice (SRWC) is a potentially efficient way of treating various types of wastewaters. In this thesis the nitrogen retention capacity in such cropping systems (vegetation filters) is assessed both within season and for several years and rotations. In addition, the retention and potential leaching of viruses in such systems are assessed. The experimental work was carried out in two types of lysimeters and in experimental fields. Nitrogen leaching loads from wastewater irrigated willow vegetation filters can be high or very high during the establishment phase (i.e., the year of planting), and thus, during establishment, neither wastewater nor commercial fertilizers should be applied to the crop. However, once established, nitrogen leaching loads from willow vegetation filters are low or very low, enabling high inputs of nitrogen-rich wastewater. Within reasonable limits, nitrogen leaching loads are independent of irrigation rates and thus dosing of wastewater should be based of nitrogen loads. The nitrogen retention in a willow vegetation filter (up to in the order of 200 kg N/ha yr) is due to plant uptake and incorporation into woody tissue (including harvestable shoots), and to a build-up of the pool of soil organic matter. In addition, gaseous nitrogen losses (primarily due to denitrification) are probably substantial. Preferential flow of water in cracks and fissures can facilitate a rapid transport of viruses applied to a structured clay soil, and within a few hours viruses might reach the groundwater. However, in a sandy, non-structured soil, viruses are efficiently retained in the soil mainly as a result of strong electrostatic interaction between viruses and soil colloids.

  10. Effect of browsing on willow in the Steel Creek grazing allotment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keigley, R.B.; Gale, Gil

    2000-01-01

    The Steel Creek drainage serves as both wildlife range (primarily moose and elk) and as a livestock grazing allotment. For some years there has been concern about the effect of browsing on willows. Dense clusters of twigs have formed at the end of branches; entire stems of some plants have died. As of 1996, the relative impacts attributable to each of the ungulate species had not been documented.

  11. The Study of Interactions between Active Compounds of Coffee and Willow (Salix sp. Bark Water Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Durak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffee and willow are known as valuable sources of biologically active phytochemicals such as chlorogenic acid, caffeine, and salicin. The aim of the study was to determine the interactions between the active compounds contained in water extracts from coffee and bark of willow (Salix purpurea and Salix myrsinifolia. Raw materials and their mixtures were characterized by multidirectional antioxidant activities; however, bioactive constituents interacted with each other. Synergism was observed for ability of inhibition of lipid peroxidation and reducing power, whereas compounds able to scavenge ABTS radical cation acted antagonistically. Additionally, phytochemicals from willow bark possessed hydrophilic character and thermostability which justifies their potential use as an ingredient in coffee beverages. Proposed mixtures may be used in the prophylaxis or treatment of some civilization diseases linked with oxidative stress. Most importantly, strong synergism observed for phytochemicals able to prevent lipids against oxidation may suggest protective effect for cell membrane phospholipids. Obtained results indicate that extracts from bark tested Salix genotypes as an ingredient in coffee beverages can provide health promoting benefits to the consumers; however, this issue requires further study.

  12. The study of interactions between active compounds of coffee and willow (Salix sp.) bark water extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durak, Agata; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    Coffee and willow are known as valuable sources of biologically active phytochemicals such as chlorogenic acid, caffeine, and salicin. The aim of the study was to determine the interactions between the active compounds contained in water extracts from coffee and bark of willow (Salix purpurea and Salix myrsinifolia). Raw materials and their mixtures were characterized by multidirectional antioxidant activities; however, bioactive constituents interacted with each other. Synergism was observed for ability of inhibition of lipid peroxidation and reducing power, whereas compounds able to scavenge ABTS radical cation acted antagonistically. Additionally, phytochemicals from willow bark possessed hydrophilic character and thermostability which justifies their potential use as an ingredient in coffee beverages. Proposed mixtures may be used in the prophylaxis or treatment of some civilization diseases linked with oxidative stress. Most importantly, strong synergism observed for phytochemicals able to prevent lipids against oxidation may suggest protective effect for cell membrane phospholipids. Obtained results indicate that extracts from bark tested Salix genotypes as an ingredient in coffee beverages can provide health promoting benefits to the consumers; however, this issue requires further study.

  13. Polymorphism and Divergence in Two Willow Species, Salix viminalis L. and Salix schwerinii E. Wolf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Sofia; Fogelqvist, Johan; Lascoux, Martin; Lagercrantz, Ulf; Rönnberg-Wästljung, Ann Christin

    2011-10-01

    We investigated species divergence, present and past gene flow, levels of nucleotide polymorphism, and linkage disequilibrium in two willows from the plant genus Salix. Salix belongs together with Populus to the Salicaceae family; however, most population genetic studies of Salicaceae have been performed in Populus, the model genus in forest biology. Here we present a study on two closely related willow species Salix viminalis and S. schwerinii, in which we have resequenced 33 and 32 nuclear gene segments representing parts of 18 nuclear loci in 24 individuals for each species. We used coalescent simulations and estimated the split time to around 600,000 years ago and found that there is currently limited gene flow between the species. Mean intronic nucleotide diversity across gene segments was slightly higher in S. schwerinii (π(i) = 0.00849) than in S. viminalis (π(i) = 0.00655). Compared with other angiosperm trees, the two willows harbor intermediate levels of silent polymorphisms. The decay of linkage disequilibrium was slower in S. viminalis compared with S. schwerinii, and we speculate that this is due to different demographic histories as S. viminalis has been partly domesticated in Europe.

  14. Single locus sex determination and female heterogamety in the basket willow (Salix viminalis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucholt, P; Rönnberg-Wästljung, A-C; Berlin, S

    2015-06-01

    Most eukaryotes reproduce sexually and a wealth of different sex determination mechanisms have evolved in this lineage. Dioecy or separate sexes are rare among flowering plants but have repeatedly evolved from hermaphroditic ancestors possibly involving male or female sterility mutations. Willows (Salix spp.) and poplars (Populus spp.) are predominantly dioecious and are members of the Salicaceae family. All studied poplars have sex determination loci on chromosome XIX, however, the position differs among species and both male and female heterogametic system exists. In contrast to the situation in poplars, knowledge of sex determination mechanisms in willows is sparse. In the present study, we have for the first time positioned the sex determination locus on chromosome XV in S. viminalis using quantitative trait locus mapping. All female offspring carried a maternally inherited haplotype, suggesting a system of female heterogamety or ZW. We used a comparative mapping approach and compared the positions of the markers between the S. viminalis linkage map and the physical maps of S. purpurea, S. suchowensis and P. trichocarpa. As we found no evidence for chromosomal rearrangements between chromosome XV and XIX between S. viminalis and P. trichocarpa, it shows that the sex determination loci in the willow and the poplar most likely do not share a common origin and has thus evolved separately. This demonstrates that sex determination mechanisms in the Salicaceae family have a high turnover rate and as such it is excellent for studies of evolutionary processes involved in sex chromosome turnover.

  15. Removal of 4-chlorobenzoic acid from spiked hydroponic solution by willow trees (Salix viminalis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deavers, K.; Macek, T.; Karlson, U.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Chlorobenzoic acids (CBA) are intermediate products of the aerobic microbial degradation of PCB and several pesticides. This study explores the feasibility of using basket willows, Salix viminalis, to remove 4-CBA from polluted sites, which also might stimulate PCB degradation......-CBA from solution is by both passive processes (uptake with water, sorption to plant tissue) and metabolic processes of the plants. Recommendations and outlook Plants, such as willow trees, might assist in the degradation of PCB and their degradation products CBA. Keywords Chlorobenzoic acid...... pH levels. The concentration of 4-CBA was tracked over time and quantified by HPLC. Results and discussion At the low level of 4-CBA (5 mg/L), willows removed 70% (pH 4.2) to 90% (pH 6.8), while 48% (pH 4.2) to 52% (pH 6.8) of the water was transpired. At the high 4-CBA level (50 mg/L), the p...

  16. Breakdown of low-level total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in contaminated soil using grasses and willows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Patrick; Kuzovkina, Yulia A; Schulthess, Cristian P; Guillard, Karl

    2016-01-01

    A phytoremediation study targeting low-level total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was conducted using cool- and warm-season grasses and willows (Salix species) grown in pots filled with contaminated sandy soil from the New Haven Rail Yard, CT. Efficiencies of the TPH degradation were assessed in a 90-day experiment using 20-8.7-16.6 N-P-K water-soluble fertilizer and fertilizer with molasses amendments to enhance phytoremediation. Plant biomass, TPH concentrations, and indigenous microbes quantified with colony-forming units (CFU), were assessed at the end of the study. Switchgrass grown with soil amendments produced the highest aboveground biomass. Bacterial CFU's were in orders of magnitude significantly higher in willows with soil amendments compared to vegetated treatments with no amendments. The greatest reduction in TPH occurred in all vegetated treatments with fertilizer (66-75%) and fertilizer/molasses (65-74%), followed sequentially by vegetated treatments without amendments, unvegetated treatments with amendments, and unvegetated treatments with no amendment. Phytoremediation of low-level TPH contamination was most efficient where fertilization was in combination with plant species. The same level of remediation was achievable through the addition of grasses and/or willow combinations without amendment, or by fertilization of sandy soil.

  17. An Efficient High Throughput Metabotyping Platform for Screening of Biomass Willows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia I. Corol

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Future improvement of woody biomass crops such as willow and poplar relies on our ability to select for metabolic traits that sequester more atmospheric carbon into biomass, or into useful products to replace petrochemical streams. We describe the development of metabotyping screens for willow, using combined 1D 1H-NMR-MS. A protocol was developed to overcome 1D 1H-NMR spectral alignment problems caused by variable pH and peak broadening arising from high organic acid levels and metal cations. The outcome was a robust method to allow direct statistical comparison of profiles arising from source (leaf and sink (stem tissues allowing data to be normalised to a constant weight of the soluble metabolome. We also describe the analysis of two willow biomass varieties, demonstrating how fingerprints from 1D 1H-NMR-MS vary from the top to the bottom of the plant. Automated extraction of quantitative data of 56 primary and secondary metabolites from 1D 1H-NMR spectra was realised by the construction and application of a Salix metabolite spectral library using the Chenomx software suite. The optimised metabotyping screen in conjunction with automated quantitation will enable high-throughput screening of genetic collections. It also provides genotype and tissue specific data for future modelling of carbon flow in metabolic networks.

  18. Russian Arctic warming and ‘greening’ are closely tracked by tundra shrub willows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, B. C.; Macias Fauria, M.; Zetterberg, P.

    2009-12-01

    Growth in arctic vegetation is generally expected to increase under a warming climate, particularly among deciduous shrubs. We analyzed annual ring growth for an abundant and nearly circumpolar erect willow (Salix lanata L.) from the coastal zone of the northwest Russian Arctic (Nenets Autonomous Okrug). The resulting chronology is strongly related to summer temperature for the period 1942-2005. Remarkably high correlations occur at long distances (>1600 km) across the tundra and taiga zones of West Siberia and Eastern Europe. We also found a clear relationship with photosynthetic activity for upland vegetation at a regional scale for the period 1981-2005, confirming a parallel ‘greening’ trend reported for similarly warming North American portions of the tundra biome. The standardized growth curve suggests a significant increase in shrub willow growth over the last six decades. These findings are in line with field and remote sensing studies that have assigned a strong shrub component to the reported greening signal since the early 1980s. Furthermore, the growth trend agrees with qualitative observations by nomadic Nenets reindeer herders of recent increases in willow size in the region. The quality of the chronology as a climate proxy is exceptional. Given its wide geographic distribution and the ready preservation of wood in permafrost, S. lanata L. has great potential for extended temperature reconstructions in remote areas across the Arctic.

  19. Environmental assessment of energy production based on long term commercial willow plantations in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-García, Sara; Mola-Yudego, Blas; Dimitriou, Ioannis; Aronsson, Pär; Murphy, Richard

    2012-04-01

    The present paper analyzed the environmental assessment of short rotation willow plantations in Sweden based on the standard framework of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) from the International Standards Organisation. The analysis is focused on two alternative management regimes for willow plantations dedicated to biomass production for energy purposes. The data used included the averages of a large sample of commercial plantations. One of the scenarios is carried out under nitrogen based fertilized conditions and the other under non-fertilized management with total biomass yields (dry weight) of 140t/ha and 86t/ha over a 21 and 22-year life time respectively. The environmental profile was analyzed in terms of the potentials for abiotic depletion, acidification, eutrophication, global warming, ozone layer depletion, photochemical oxidant formation, human toxicity, fresh water aquatic ecotoxicity, marine aquatic ecotoxicity and terrestrial ecotoxicity. In addition, an energy analysis was performed using the cumulative energy demand method (CED). The application of nitrogen based fertilizers allows an increase in the biomass yield per ha of up to 40% although the contributions to almost all impact categories, particularly the eutrophication potential and toxicity potential impact categories are also considerably higher. Conversely, due to the higher biomass yields achieved with fertilization of these willow plantations, that regime presents a better overall environmental profile in terms of energy yield and global warming potential. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The fight against rheumatism: from willow bark to COX-1 sparing drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vane, J R

    2000-12-01

    Man has been fighting rheumatism for thousands of years. Early therapy began with the use around the world of decoctions or extracts of herbs or plants such as willow bark or leaves. Most or all of these turned out to contain salicylates. The first record was about 3,500 years ago in the Ebers papyrus. Hippocrates, Celsus, Pliny the Elder, Dioscorides and Galen all recommended decoctions containing salicylate for rheumatic pain. A country parson, the Reverend Edward Stone of Chipping Norton in Oxfordshire, made the first "clinical trial" of willow bark (1). He was surprised by its bitter taste, which reminded him of cinchona bark (containing quinine), then being used to treat malaria. He harvested a pound of willow bark, dried it, pulverized it and dispersed it in tea, small beer or water. He found in 50 patients that doses of 1 dram (1.8g) cured their fever. He concluded "I have no other motives for publishing this valuable specific, than that it may have a fair and full trial in all its variety of circumstances and situations, and that the world may reap the benefits accruing from it". Salicylic acid was chemically synthesised in 1860 by Kolbe in Germany and its ready supply led to even more extended usage as an external antiseptic, as an antipyretic and in the treatment of rheumatism.

  1. An economic analysis of leachate purification through willow-coppice vegetation filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenqvist, Håkan; Ness, Barry

    2004-09-01

    In this study an economic analysis of the purification of integrated solid waste treatment facility leachates through a willow-coppice (Salix) vegetation filter in southern Sweden was carried out. Calculations were based on the use of two computer models that were initially used in estimating a pump-and-pipe irrigation system for a 36-ha willow-coppice plantation to purify an average annual quantity of 195,000 m(3) of leachate with an average nitrogen content of 24 g/m(3). Results showed that facility leachates could be purified at US dollars 0.34/m(3) compared with US dollars 0.62/m(3) for that of conventional leachate treatment at a wastewater treatment plant. Furthermore, results revealed that the increased income from willow growing and sale of the biomass chips represented only a small factor in the overall cost of the purification technique--decreasing purification costs to US dollars 0.326/m(3). Sensitivity analyses also demonstrated that, because of the large leachate holding pond expense, only a fraction of facility leachate should be treated through a vegetation filter.

  2. Field evaluation of willow under short rotation coppice for phytomanagement of metal-polluted agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Slycken, Stijn; Witters, Nele; Meiresonne, Linda; Meers, Erik; Ruttens, Ann; Van Peteghem, Pierre; Weyens, Nele; Tack, Filip M G; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2013-01-01

    Short rotation coppice (SRC) of willow and poplar might be a promising phytoremediation option since it uses fast growing, high biomass producing tree species with often a sufficient metal uptake. This study evaluates growth, metal uptake and extraction potentials of eight willow clones (Belders, Belgisch Rood, Christina, Inger, Jorr, Loden, Tora and Zwarte Driebast) on a metal-contaminated agricultural soil, with total cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) concentrations of 6.5 +/- 0.8 and 377 +/- 69 mg kg(-1) soil, respectively. Although, during the first cycle, on average generally low productivity levels (3.7 ton DM (dry matter) ha(-1) y(-1)) were obtained on this sandy soil, certain clones exhibited quite acceptable productivity levels (e.g. Zwarte Driebast 12.5 ton DM ha(-1) y(-1)). Even at low biomass productivity levels, SRC of willow showed promising removal potentials of 72 g Cd and 2.0 kg Zn ha(-1) y(-1), which is much higher than e.g. energy maize or rapeseed grown on the same soil Cd and Zn removal can be increased by 40% if leaves are harvested as well. Nevertheless, nowadays the wood price remains the most critical factor in order to implement SRC as an acceptable, economically feasible alternative crop on metal-contaminated agricultural soils.

  3. Ernö Goldfinger and 2 Willow Road: inhabiting the modern utopia Hampstead, London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Mejía

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available 1-3 Willow Road, houses built by Ernö Goldfinger facing Hampstead Heath in London, stand out as a paradigmatic example of Modernist British Architecture. Displacing traditional notions and ideals of a modernist house and of modernist inhabitation, what they ‘are’ goes somehow against to what they represent. Domesticity as well as concepts such as private and public, or exterior and interior are dislocated. Considered as one of the most distinguished manifestations of Modernity, in 2 Willow Road Modernism is suggested, but also disrupted by postmodern gestures. In a lifelong process that fills the space with collected objects, modernity is replaced by a more bourgeois environment: the atmosphere experienced in the interior is that of an inhabited collage closer to a nineteenth century dwelling. The heterogeneity of random order and arbitrary juxtapositions is, for this case, an aesthetic procedure that most likely legitimates Goldfinger’s beliefs and understanding of what life is. What 2 Willow Road actually testifies is about the romantic utopia of Modern inhabitation.

  4. Wood ash effects on plant and soil in a willow bioenergy plantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byungbae Park; Yanai, Ruth D.; Sahm, James M.; Abrahamson, Lawrence P. [SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY (United States); Lee, Don K. [Seoul National Univ., Dept. of Forest Sciences, Seoul (Korea)

    2005-04-01

    Intensive management for biomass production results in high rates of nutrient removal by harvesting. We tested whether wood ash generated when burning wood for energy could be used to ameliorate negative soil effects of short-rotation harvesting practices. We measured the temporal and spatial dynamics of soil nutrient properties after wood ash applications in a willow plantation in central New York State and determined the influence of wood ash application on willow growth. Wood ash was applied annually for 3 years at the rates of 10 and 20 Mg ha{sup -1} to coppiced willow, Salix purpurea, clone SP3. Wood ash application significantly increased soil pH in the 0-10 cm soil layer from 6.1 in the control to 6.9 and 7.1 in the 10 and 20 Mg ha{sup -1} treated plots. Wood ash application significantly increased soil extractable phosphorus, potassium, calcium, and magnesium concentrations. Potassium was the element most affected by wood ash treatment at all soil depths. Wood ash had no significant effect on nutrient concentrations of foliar, litter, and stem tissue. Wood ash did not affect either individual plant growth or plot biomass production, which declined over the course of the study; it did increase the size of stems, but this effect was balanced by a decrease in the number of stems. Applying nitrogen as well as wood ash might be required to maintain the productivity of this SRIC system. (Author)

  5. UTILIZATION OF ANIMAL MEAL FOR GROWING OF WILLOW DEDICATED FOR ENERGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Nogalska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of increased rates of meat and bone meal (MBM to the soil on biomass yield, nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P content, and their accumulation in above ground biomass Salix viminalis, as well as the content of mineral N and available P forms in the soil. A two-year pot experiment was conducted at Warmia and Mazury University in Olsztyn (north-eastern Poland. Average biomass yield from two seasons of the studies was three higher from MBM treatments comparing to unfertilized control. Higher rates of MBM particularly in the second year showed higher yielding potential compared with mineral fertilizers. Willow biomass harvested from MBM treatments generally showed lower content of studied nutrients than willow from control treatment. It was found that in relation to the control accumulation of N in willow above ground biomass was significantly lower for 0.5% MBM treatment and significantly higher for the treatment with the highest rate (2.0%. The higher accumulation of P was found in the second year after MBM application, except treatment with the lowest MBM rate. Correlation coefficients values indicated that there is a relation between MBM rate and content of mineral N and available P in soil.

  6. An analysis on the error structure and mechanism of soil moisture and ocean salinity remotely sensed sea surface salinity products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian; ZHANG Ren; WANG Huizan; AN Yuzhu; WANG Luhua; WANG Gongjie

    2014-01-01

    For the application of soil moisture and ocean salinity (SMOS) remotely sensed sea surface salinity (SSS) products, SMOS SSS global maps and error characteristics have been investigated based on quality control information. The results show that the errors of SMOS SSS products are distributed zonally, i.e., relatively small in the tropical oceans, but much greater in the southern oceans in the Southern Hemisphere (negative bias) and along the southern, northern and some other oceanic margins (positive or negative bias). The physical elements responsible for these errors include wind, temperature, and coastal terrain and so on. Errors in the southern oceans are due to the bias in an SSS retrieval algorithm caused by the coexisting high wind speed and low temperature;errors along the oceanic margins are due to the bias in a brightness temperature (TB) reconstruction caused by the high contrast between L-band emissivities from ice or land and from ocean; in addition, some other systematic errors are due to the bias in TB observation caused by a radio frequency interference and a radiometer receivers drift, etc. The findings will contribute to the scientific correction and appropriate application of the SMOS SSS products.

  7. The investigation of morphological characteristics of willow species in different environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodzkin Aleh I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative or renewable energy is a modern strategy with a good per­spective in the nearest future. There are several directions of renewable energy development that depend on climatic, economic and technological opportunities of a region. The perspective choice for areas with moderate climate is bioenergy. One of the bioenergy directions is agro forestry based on short rotation coppice plantations (SRC of trees, like willow, poplar and others. The goal of experiments was the assessment of the potential of different willow species for the obtaining of energy in two climatic zones and on two types of soils of Belarus. For this purpose several morphological characteristics were metered: height of plants, biomass, diameter and number of sprouts. The field experiments were conducted on two types of soils: post-mining peaty soils in Grodno region and on degraded peaty soils in Brest region of Belarus. The same soils are very problematic for growing of traditional agricultural crops, thus willow production is a good alternative for biomass production of energy as well as for the reclamation of these soils. In our experiments the following species of willow were tested (Salix alba, Salix viminalis, Salix dasyclados, Salix aurita that may grow on peaty soils at the natural conditions. The most popular species for modern selection of SRC of willow is Salix viminalis. Nevertheless, the most suitable morphological characteristics on post-mining peaty soils were established for plants of Salix dasyclados and on degraded peaty soils for the plants of Salix alba. The unfavorable parameters at the both type of soils were identified for the plants of Salix aurita. However, it is necessary to take into account that the used species are more popular for natural wetlands and in our experiments plants have best results of survival of cutting and rates of growth at the beginning of vegetation. In accordance with these facts Salix aurita may not be used for energy

  8. Phytoremediation of groundwater contaminated with pesticides using short-rotation willow crops: A case study of an apple orchard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, Benoit; Sauvé, Sébastien; Duy, Sung Vo; Labrecque, Michel

    2016-11-01

    The occurrence of pesticides in groundwater represents an important health issue, notably for population whose drinking water supply source is located in agricultural areas. However, few solutions have been considered with regard to this issue. We tested the efficacy of a vegetal filtering system made of shrub willows planted at a high density (16,000 plants ha(-1)) to filter or degrade pesticides found in the groundwater flowing out of an apple orchard. Ethylene urea (EU), ethylene thiourea (ETU), tetrahydrophthalimide (THPI), atrazine, and desethylatrazine were monitored in the soil solution in willow and control plots over one growing season. ETU and atrazine concentrations were lower in the willow plots relative to the control plots, whereas desethylatrazine concentration was higher in the willow plots. No significant difference was detected for EU and THPI. Furthermore, pesticide concentrations displayed complex temporal patterns. These results suggest that willow filter systems can filter or degrade pesticides, notably ETU and atrazine, and could be used for phytoremediation purposes. Yet, this potential remains to be quantified with further studies using experimental settings allowing more estimation in time and space.

  9. Early Effects of Afforestation with Willow (Salix purpurea, “Hotel” on Soil Carbon and Nutrient Availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Farrell

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Willow (Salix spp. is currently being researched as a source of biomass energy in Canada. However, it is not certain whether afforestation with willow plantations will enhance or diminish soil C storage and nutrient availability. Trees are known to have pronounced effects on biologically mediated nutrient cycling processes which can increase nutrient availability, but willows are known to be nutrient demanding. In this paper, the net effect of plantation establishment is examined at nine sites across the prairie and southern Ontario regions of Canada. Carbon, N, P, K, Ca and Mg levels in soils and harvestable biomass were compared between willow plantations and paired reference sites at the end of the first three-year rotation. Soils were depleted in total C (−2.22 mg·g−1, p < 0.05, inorganic N (−3.12 μg·N·g−1, p < 0.10, exchangeable K (−0.11 cmolc·kg−1, p < 0.10 and leachable P (−0.03 mg·g−1, p < 0.10. Exchangeable Ca was found to be consistently depleted only at the 20–40 depth. Depletion of soil K was more heavily influenced by disturbance, whereas soil N was directly affected by willow N uptake. Sites with greater growth and biocycling stabilized soil P concentrations.

  10. First Record Of Clytra Laeviuscula Ratzeburg As Potential Insect Pest Of Energy Willow (Salix Viminalis L. In Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanovska Tatyana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of short rotation coppice energy willow (SRC EW, Salix viminalis L., has a great potential in Ukraine as a source of biomass for biofuel production. Commercial production of this species was recently initiated in the country. The growing of SRC EW in Western and Northern Europe for a long time showed that leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae are key pests causing significant biomass reduction. However, data about the pest complex for energy willow growing in Ukraine is not available. Our three-year experiment in Poltava region, Ukraine showed that foliar damage caused by Clytra laeviuscula Ratzeburg (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae occurred at energy willow plantations in the second year of production, which could have an effect on commercial production. Accordingly, information about seasonal activity, population dynamics, host range and the role of natural enemies in pest regulation are requested for developing pest control program.

  11. Conversion from cropland to short rotation coppice willow and poplar: Accumulation of soil organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Petros; Stupak, Inge; Vesterdal, Lars; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    2015-04-01

    Increased demand for bioenergy has intensified the production of Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) willow and poplar in temperate zones. We used a combined chronosequence and paired plot approach to study the potential of SRC willow and poplar stands to increase the soil carbon stock compared to stocks of the previous arable land-use. The study focused on well-drained soils. We sampled soil from 30 SRC stands in Denmark and southern Sweden including soils from their adjacent arable fields. The 18 willow and 12 poplar stands formed a chronosequence ranging between 4 and 29 years after conversion. The soil was sampled both with soil cores taken by fixed depths of 0-5, 5-10, 10-15, 15-25, and 25-40 cm and by genetic horizons from soil pits to 1m depth. The aim of the study was to estimate the difference and the ratio between soil carbon contents of the SRC and annual crop land and analyze the results as a chronosequence to examine the effect of age after conversion on the difference. Covariates such as soil type, fertilization type and harvest frequency were also taken into account. Preliminary results suggest an overall increase in carbon stocks over time with average accumulation rates ranging from 0.25 to 0.4 Mg ha-1 yr-1 in willow and poplar stands. Poplar stands had higher rates of C gain, probably due to less frequent harvesting. The differences in carbon between the SRC and the paired cropland were initially negative but changed to positive over time, implying loss of carbon after conversion and a later gain in soil carbon with stand age. Pairwise differences ranged from -25 Mg C ha-1 to 37 Mg C ha-1 for the top 40 cm. The carbon stock ratio of the SRC stand to the arable land was estimated to minimize the effect of site-related factors. The results of this analysis suggested that the ratio increased significantly with age after conversion for the top 10 cm of the soil, both for poplar and willow. A slight increase with age was also noticed at the deeper depths, but

  12. Uncertainty Quantification of GEOS-5 L-band Radiative Transfer Model Parameters Using Bayesian Inference and SMOS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Reichle, Rolf H.; Vrugt, Jasper A.

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainties in L-band (1.4 GHz) radiative transfer modeling (RTM) affect the simulation of brightness temperatures (Tb) over land and the inversion of satellite-observed Tb into soil moisture retrievals. In particular, accurate estimates of the microwave soil roughness, vegetation opacity and scattering albedo for large-scale applications are difficult to obtain from field studies and often lack an uncertainty estimate. Here, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation method is used to determine satellite-scale estimates of RTM parameters and their posterior uncertainty by minimizing the misfit between long-term averages and standard deviations of simulated and observed Tb at a range of incidence angles, at horizontal and vertical polarization, and for morning and evening overpasses. Tb simulations are generated with the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) and confronted with Tb observations from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. The MCMC algorithm suggests that the relative uncertainty of the RTM parameter estimates is typically less than 25 of the maximum a posteriori density (MAP) parameter value. Furthermore, the actual root-mean-square-differences in long-term Tb averages and standard deviations are found consistent with the respective estimated total simulation and observation error standard deviations of m3.1K and s2.4K. It is also shown that the MAP parameter values estimated through MCMC simulation are in close agreement with those obtained with Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO).

  13. Integrating a Numerical Taxonomic Method and Molecular Phylogeny for Species Delimitation of Melampsora Species (Melampsoraceae, Pucciniales on Willows in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhao

    Full Text Available The species in genus Melampsora are the causal agents of leaf rust diseases on willows in natural habitats and plantations. However, the classification and recognition of species diversity are challenging because morphological characteristics are scant and morphological variation in Melampsora on willows has not been thoroughly evaluated. Thus, the taxonomy of Melampsora species on willows remains confused, especially in China where 31 species were reported based on either European or Japanese taxonomic systems. To clarify the species boundaries of Melampsora species on willows in China, we tested two approaches for species delimitation inferred from morphological and molecular variations. Morphological species boundaries were determined based on numerical taxonomic analyses of morphological characteristics in the uredinial and telial stages by cluster analysis and one-way analysis of variance. Phylogenetic species boundaries were delineated based on the generalized mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC model analysis of the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2 regions including the 5.8S and D1/D2 regions of the large nuclear subunit of the ribosomal RNA gene. Numerical taxonomic analyses of 14 morphological characteristics recognized in the uredinial-telial stages revealed 22 morphological species, whereas the GMYC results recovered 29 phylogenetic species. In total, 17 morphological species were in concordance with the phylogenetic species and 5 morphological species were in concordance with 12 phylogenetic species. Both the morphological and molecular data supported 14 morphological characteristics, including 5 newly recognized characteristics and 9 traditionally emphasized characteristics, as effective for the differentiation of Melampsora species on willows in China. Based on the concordance and discordance of the two species delimitation approaches, we concluded that integrative taxonomy by using both morphological and

  14. Integrating a Numerical Taxonomic Method and Molecular Phylogeny for Species Delimitation of Melampsora Species (Melampsoraceae, Pucciniales) on Willows in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Wang, Qing-Hong; Tian, Cheng-Ming; Kakishima, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The species in genus Melampsora are the causal agents of leaf rust diseases on willows in natural habitats and plantations. However, the classification and recognition of species diversity are challenging because morphological characteristics are scant and morphological variation in Melampsora on willows has not been thoroughly evaluated. Thus, the taxonomy of Melampsora species on willows remains confused, especially in China where 31 species were reported based on either European or Japanese taxonomic systems. To clarify the species boundaries of Melampsora species on willows in China, we tested two approaches for species delimitation inferred from morphological and molecular variations. Morphological species boundaries were determined based on numerical taxonomic analyses of morphological characteristics in the uredinial and telial stages by cluster analysis and one-way analysis of variance. Phylogenetic species boundaries were delineated based on the generalized mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) model analysis of the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2) regions including the 5.8S and D1/D2 regions of the large nuclear subunit of the ribosomal RNA gene. Numerical taxonomic analyses of 14 morphological characteristics recognized in the uredinial-telial stages revealed 22 morphological species, whereas the GMYC results recovered 29 phylogenetic species. In total, 17 morphological species were in concordance with the phylogenetic species and 5 morphological species were in concordance with 12 phylogenetic species. Both the morphological and molecular data supported 14 morphological characteristics, including 5 newly recognized characteristics and 9 traditionally emphasized characteristics, as effective for the differentiation of Melampsora species on willows in China. Based on the concordance and discordance of the two species delimitation approaches, we concluded that integrative taxonomy by using both morphological and molecular variations was

  15. Environmental life cycle assessment of producing willow, alfalfa and straw from spring barley as feedstocks for bioenergy or biorefinery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Ranjan; Knudsen, Marie Trydeman; Djomo, Sylvestre Njakou; Corona, Andrea; Birkved, Morten; Dalgaard, Tommy

    2017-05-15

    The current study aimed at evaluating potential environmental impacts for the production of willow, alfalfa and straw from spring barley as feedstocks for bioenergy or biorefinery systems. A method of Life Cycle Assessment was used to evaluate based on the following impact categories: Global Warming Potential (GWP100), Eutrophication Potential (EP), Non-Renewable Energy (NRE) use, Agricultural Land Occupation (ALO), Potential Freshwater Ecotoxicity (PFWTox) and Soil quality. With regard to the methods, soil organic carbon (SOC) change related to the land occupation was calculated based on the net carbon input to the soil. Freshwater ecotoxicity was calculated using the comparative toxicity units of the active ingredients and their average emission distribution fractions to air and freshwater. Soil quality was based on the change in the SOC stock estimated during the land use transformation and land occupation. Environmental impacts for straw were economically allocated from the impacts obtained for spring barley. The results obtained per ton dry matter showed a lower carbon footprint for willow and alfalfa compared to straw. It was due to higher soil carbon sequestration and lower N2O emissions. Likewise, willow and alfalfa had lower EP than straw. Straw had lowest NRE use compared to other biomasses. PFWTox was lower in willow and alfalfa compared to straw. A critical negative effect on soil quality was found with the spring barley production and hence for straw. Based on the energy output to input ratio, willow performed better than other biomasses. On the basis of carbohydrate content of straw, the equivalent dry matter of alfalfa and willow would be requiring higher. The environmental impacts of the selected biomasses in biorefinery therefore would differ based on the conversion efficiency, e.g. of the carbohydrates in the related biorefinery processes.

  16. 竹柳引种试验初报%Introduction Experiment of Bamboo Willow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕德文

    2011-01-01

    The optimal growth condition of bamboo willow with different afforestation density different ways of mixture were studied.Result shows that: with the increase of afforestation density,the preservation rate of bamboo willow decrease linearly,so does the growth condition;the preservation rate growth condition are optimal with the afforestation density being 3 750 plants· hm-2 and with the proportion of mixture being 5∶5;bamboo willow whose preservation rate growth are better can be further popularized in forestation practice,but the difference among mixed species did not show significant difference.It may be relate to planting time being shorter their suitable properties being not fully performed.%对不同造林密度和不同混交方式竹柳的适生状况进行了初步研究,结果表明:随着造林密度的增加,竹柳的保存率呈线性下降趋势,生长状况也呈下降趋势,以3 750株.hm-2的造林密度具有较好的保存率和生长状况;当混交比例为5∶5时,竹柳的保存率和生长状况较好,可在造林实践中进一步推广,但不同混交树种间未表现出显著差异,可能跟造林时间较短,其适生性状未得到充分表现有关。

  17. A Natural History Summary and Survey Protocol for the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogge, Mark K.; ,; Ahlers, Darrell; ,; Sferra, Susan J.; ,

    2010-01-01

    The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) has been the subject of substantial research, monitoring, and management activity since it was listed as an endangered species in 1995. When proposed for listing in 1993, relatively little was known about the flycatcher's natural history, and there were only 30 known breeding sites supporting an estimated 111 territories rangewide (Sogge and others, 2003a). Since that time, thousands of presence/absences surveys have been conducted throughout the historical range of the flycatcher, and many studies of its natural history and ecology have been completed. As a result, the ecology of the flycatcher is much better understood than it was just over a decade ago. In addition, we have learned that the current status of the flycatcher is better than originally thought: as of 2007, the population was estimated at approximately 1,300 territories distributed among approximately 280 breeding sites (Durst and others, 2008a). Concern about the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher on a rangewide scale was brought to focus by Unitt (1987), who described declines in flycatcher abundance and distribution throughout the Southwest. E. t. extimus populations declined during the 20th century, primarily because of habitat loss and modification from activities, such as dam construction and operation, groundwater pumping, water diversions, and flood control. In 1991, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) designated the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher as a candidate category 1 species (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1991). In July 1993, the USFWS proposed to list E. t. extimus as an endangered species and to designate critical habitat under the Act (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1993). A final rule listing E. t. extimus as endangered was published in February 1995 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1995); critical habitat was designated in 1997 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1997). The USFWS Service released a Recovery Plan for

  18. 100μm厚的可弯曲玻璃材料—Willow Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.RJ

    2012-01-01

    美国康宁公司推出了厚度仅为100μm的可弯曲玻璃——Willow Glass,计划用于以下方面:液晶面板及有机电致发光(EL)面板用玻璃基板,可实现智能手机、平板终端及笔记本电脑的薄型轻量化;可弯曲柔性显示器基板,

  19. The influence of electrical charge and indolebutyric acid on rooting of willow cuttings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Domański

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Willow cuttings were treated by direct electrical current (DEC, with a negative or a positive electrode inserted inside them, and with the other being outside. Both directions of DEC flow between electrodes stimulated rooting as actively as growth stimulators. The mung bean or oat coleoptile straight growth test showed that the cuttings released some growth promoters into the surrounding water. However, the simultaneous release of some undetected rooting inhibitors was not excluded. The experiment, shows the possibility of changing the chemical regulatory mechanisms of tissues by the use of weak, direct electrical current which causes, the migration of particular substance{s into or from a definite tissue or organ.

  20. 3. Rethinking Borders in Empire and Nation at the Foot of the Willow Palisade

    OpenAIRE

    E.Bulag, Uradyn

    2015-01-01

    Prologue: stony wars at the foot of the willow palisade Every year, on the fifth day of the fifth lunar month, i.e. the traditional Duanwu Festival (also known as Dragon Boat Festival or Double Fifth Festival), people in Wangsiyingzi and the neighbouring village Sifangtai, just about one and half kilometres to the south, would climb atop a small mountain that lies between the two villages. Instead of racing dragon-headed boats as is the practice in south China, where the tradition first start...

  1. Environmental performance of gasified willow from different lands including land-use changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saez de Bikuna Salinas, Koldo; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Pilegaard, Kim

    2017-01-01

    A life-cycle assessment (LCA) of a low-input, short rotation coppice (SRC) willow grown on different Danish lands was performed. Woodchips are gasified, producer gas is used for co-generation of heat and power (CHP) and the ash-char output is applied as soil amendment in the field. A hybrid model...... the bioenergy potential without undesirable iLUC effects, especially relevant regarding biodiversity impacts, requires that part of the marginally used extensive grasslands are released from their current use or energy cropping on abandoned farmland incentivized....

  2. Different Seasonal Patterns in Song System Volume in Willow Tits and Great Tits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmoor, Georgia K; Lange, C Henrik; Darvell, Hannah; Walker, Lauren; Rytkönen, Seppo; Vatka, Emma; Hohtola, Esa; Orell, Markku; Smulders, Tom V

    2016-01-01

    In most species of seasonally breeding songbirds studied to date, the brain areas that control singing (i.e. the song control system, SCS) are larger during the breeding season than at other times of the year. In the family of titmice and chickadees (Paridae), one species, the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus), shows the typical pattern of seasonal changes, while another species, the black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus), shows, at best, very reduced seasonal changes in the SCS. To test whether this pattern holds up in the two Parid lineages to which these two species belong, and to rule out that the differences in seasonal patterns observed were due to differences in geography or laboratory, we compared the seasonal patterns in two song system nuclei volumes (HVC and Area X) in willow tits (Poecile montanus), closely related to black-capped chickadees, and in great tits (Parus major), more closely related to blue tits, from the same area around Oulu, Finland. Both species had larger gonads in spring than during the rest of the year. Great tit males had a larger HVC in spring than at other times of the year, but their Area X did not change in size. Willow tits showed no seasonal change in HVC or Area X size, despite having much larger gonads in spring than the great tits. Our findings suggest that the song system of willow tits and their relatives may be involved in learning and producing nonsong social vocalizations. Since these vocalizations are used year-round, there may be a year-round demand on the song system. The great tit and blue tit HVC may change seasonally because the demand is only placed on the song system during the breeding season, since they only produce learned vocalizations during this time. We suggest that changes were not observed in Area X because its main role is in song learning, and there is evidence that great tits do not learn new songs after their first year of life. Further study is required to determine whether our hypothesis

  3. Biomass yield and fuel characteristics of short-rotation coppice (willow, poplar, empress tree)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, J.; Vetter, R. [Institute for Land Management Compatible to Environmental Requirements, Muellheim (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    In two pedo-climatic different regions in the state of Baden-Wuerttemberg three shortrotation coppices willow, poplar and empress tree were tested with regard to their biomass productivity on arable land and to their properties for energetic use. Between 8 and 13 tons of dry matter per hectare and year could be produced under extensive cultivation conditions, over 15 tons with irrigation. Due to their composition, it can be assumed that their use as solid fuel in a biomass combustor is just as unproblematic as with forest timber. (orig.)

  4. Population genetic structure of Melampsora larici-epitea, a willow leaf rust fungus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samils, B. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Plant Biology

    2001-07-01

    The genetic structure of a pathogen population reflects the pathogen's evolutionary history and its potential to evolve. Such information can contribute both to resistance breeding efforts and to development of disease-control strategies. In this thesis, the population-genetic structure of one of the most damaging parasites for short-rotation coppice willow (Salix spp.), the leaf rust fungus Melampsora larici-epitea, was analysed using AFLP markers. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and F-statistics indicated large amounts of genetic variation within Swedish M. larici-epitea populations, and little geographic differentiation, probably reflecting frequent sexual reproduction (recombination) and substantial spore migration. The proximity of European larch (Larix), which is the alternate host and the place for sexual reproduction of M. larici-epitea, had no apparent effect on the genetic structure of Swedish populations in that genotypic diversity was high both with and without adjacent larches. However, disease epidemics might start earlier where larch and willow grow in proximity. A leaf rust fungus with markedly different AFLP fingerprints was found on S. viminalis in southern Sweden. Although morphologically similar, this rust was genetically distant from M. larici-epitea, as well as from the stem-infecting form of Melampsora on willow, based on this study. Analysing also the genetic composition of M. larici-epitea populations in a host-mixture trial in Northern Ireland, the high clonality of these populations, and loci in nonrandom association, as is typical for populations with predominant asexual reproduction, was in contrast with Swedish populations. Possible causes include seasonal population bottlenecks (connected with the sexual phase on larch) and the persistence of clonal lineages across years. Differences in genetic composition between M. larici-epitea populations on two S. viminalis clones were detected in monoculture and in mixed stands. A

  5. Application of multi-shoots cultures in micropropagation of willow herb (Chamaenerion angustifolium (L. Scop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreger Mariola

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Willow herb (Chamaenerion angustifolium (L. Scop. syn. Epilobium angustifolium L. from Onagraceae family is a valuable medicinal plant that has been used in the treatment of urogenital disorders including BPH (Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy. The raw material is a rich source of polyphenols as well as steroids, triterpenoids and fatty acids. Due to frequent interspecific hybridization, plants collected in wild display a very diverse and variable content of active compounds. This poses a challenge in obtaining high quality and homogenous raw material. Application of the in vitro cultures and micropropagation techniques may offer a solution for alternative methods of cultivation.

  6. Brightness Temperature and Soil Moisture Validation at Different Scales During the SMOS Validation Campaign in the Rur and Erft Catchments, Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montzka, Carsten; Bogena, Heye R.; Weihermüller, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    -band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere model. Measurements of the airborne L-band sensors EMIRAD and HUT-2D on-board a Skyvan aircraft as well as ground-based mobile measurements performed with the truck mounted JÜLBARA L-band radiometer were analyzed for calibration of the simulated brightness temperature...... developed an approach to validate spatial and temporal SMOS brightness temperature products. An area-wide brightness temperature reference was generated by using an area-wide modeling of top soil moisture and soil temperature with the WaSiM-ETH model and radiative transfer calculation based on the L...

  7. Microbial expression profiles in the rhizosphere of willows depend on soil contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yergeau, Etienne; Sanschagrin, Sylvie; Maynard, Christine; St-Arnaud, Marc; Greer, Charles W

    2014-02-01

    The goal of phytoremediation is to use plants to immobilize, extract or degrade organic and inorganic pollutants. In the case of organic contaminants, plants essentially act indirectly through the stimulation of rhizosphere microorganisms. A detailed understanding of the effect plants have on the activities of rhizosphere microorganisms could help optimize phytoremediation systems and enhance their use. In this study, willows were planted in contaminated and non-contaminated soils in a greenhouse, and the active microbial communities and the expression of functional genes in the rhizosphere and bulk soil were compared. Ion Torrent sequencing of 16S rRNA and Illumina sequencing of mRNA were performed. Genes related to carbon and amino-acid uptake and utilization were upregulated in the willow rhizosphere, providing indirect evidence of the compositional content of the root exudates. Related to this increased nutrient input, several microbial taxa showed a significant increase in activity in the rhizosphere. The extent of the rhizosphere stimulation varied markedly with soil contamination levels. The combined selective pressure of contaminants and rhizosphere resulted in higher expression of genes related to competition (antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation) in the contaminated rhizosphere. Genes related to hydrocarbon degradation were generally more expressed in contaminated soils, but the exact complement of genes induced was different for bulk and rhizosphere soils. Together, these results provide an unprecedented view of microbial gene expression in the plant rhizosphere during phytoremediation.

  8. On willow embankment design in Beihu Park%北湖公园柳堤设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵文

    2012-01-01

    从兵团垦区开发的历史及军垦文化大背景中去把握"柳堤"园林建筑的风格和特色,从北湖公园整体环境入手去把握"柳堤"的布局和环境特色。设计重点考虑了建筑环境的空间特色、建筑风格与尺度、建筑群的空间轮廓线,对今后同类项目设计具有一定指导意义。%From the history of corps reclamation and the corps cultural background,the paper indicates the styles and the features of the willow embankment garden buildings,illustrates the layout and the environmental features of the willow embankment from the general environment of Beihu Park,and considers the space features of the architectural environment,the architectural styles and sizes,and the space outline of the building group,so as to have the direction significance for the similar program design in future.

  9. Zn, Cd, S and trace metal bioaccumulation in willow (Salix spp.) cultivars grown hydroponically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, M B; Martinez, C E; Kim, B

    2016-12-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) can be used to phytoremediate soils contaminated by Zn and Cd under certain conditions. In this study, the ability of 14 Salix cultivars to concentrate Cd, Zn and S in leaves was measured in hydroponic culture with 10 and 200 µM Cd and Zn, respectively, in the nutrient medium. The cultivars showed a wide range of biomass yields, tolerance to metals, and foliar concentrations of Zn and Cd, with some cultivars accumulating up to 1000 mg kg(-1) Zn, 70 mg kg(-1) Cd and 10,000 mg kg(-1) S with only mild phytotoxicity symptoms attributable to excess Zn. Cultivars with higher foliar Zn concentrations tended to have higher foliar Cd concentrations as well, and competition between Zn and Cd for uptake was observed. Exposure of Salix cultivars to Cd and Zn did not affect foliar concentrations of secondary metabolites such as polyphenols, but trace metal concentrations in leaves were significantly reduced (Fe and Cu) or increased (Mn) by exposure to excess Zn and Cd. Sulfur-XANES spectroscopy showed foliar S to be predominantly in highly oxidized (sulfate plus sulfonate) and reduced (thiol) forms, with oxidized S more prevalent in willows with the highest total S content.

  10. Effect of temperature on the uptake and metabolism of cyanide by weeping willows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, X.-Z.; Trapp, Stefan; Zhou, P.-H.

    2007-01-01

    Plants’ uptake and metabolism of cyanide in response to changes in temperature was investigated. Pre-rooted weeping willows (Salix babylonica L.) were exposed to hydroponic solution spiked with potassium cyanide for 2–3 d. Ten different temperatures were used, ranging from 11◦C to 32◦C. Cyanide...... in water, plant tissue, and air was analyzed spectrophotometrically. The results revealed that significant amounts of the applied cyanide were removed from the aqueous solutions in the presence of plants. Small amounts of free cyanide were detected in plant materials in all treatments......, but there was no clear trend that showed an increase or decrease in the accumulation in plant material with temperature. The highest cyanide metabolism rate for weeping willows was found at 32◦C with a value of 2.78 mg CN/(kg·d), whereas the lowest value was 1.20 mg CN/(kg·d) at 11◦C. The temperature coefficient, Q10...

  11. Identification of quorum sensing signal molecules and oligolignols associated with watermark disease in willow (Salix sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huvenne, Hanneke; Goeminne, Geert; Maes, Martine; Messens, Eric

    2008-09-01

    The bacterium Brenneria salicis is the causal agent of watermark disease in willow. This work shows the importance of in situ studies and high-resolution separation of biological samples with ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography combined with ion trap mass spectrometry to unambiguously identify molecular compounds associated with this disease. Approximately 40 oligolignols accumulated in wood sap of watermark diseased willow, and are indicative for degradation of the xylem cell wall, of which 15 were structurally assigned based on an earlier study. Many bacteria are known to produce and release quorum sensing signal molecules that switch on the expression of specific, sometimes pathogenic functions. Two quorum sensing signal molecules, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-(hexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, were present in 4/1 ratios in diseased wood and in high-density in vitro cultures of B. salicis at 0.13-1.2 microM concentrations, and absent in healthy wood and in low-density in vitro cultures of B. salicis. Although it is not a proof, it can be an indication for involvement of quorum sensing in B. salicis pathogenesis. Cyclic dipeptides were present at high concentrations in high-density in vitro cultures of B. salicis, but not in situ, and were found not to be involved in quorum sensing signaling, therefore, the attribution of quorum signal properties to cyclic dipeptides isolated from in vitro cultures of pathogenic bacteria should be reconsidered.

  12. Spatially distinct responses within willow to bark stripping by deer: effects on insect herbivory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Motonobu; Nakamura, Masahiro

    2015-10-01

    Within individual plants, cervid herbivory may cause positive or negative plant-mediated effects on insect herbivores, depending on where it occurs. Using a combination of field observations and artificial bark-stripping experiments in Hokkaido, Japan, we examined the plant-mediated effects of bark stripping by sika deer ( Cervus nippon yesoensis) on insect herbivory in two spatially distinct parts of willow ( Salix udensis) trees: resprouting leaves below bark-stripping wounds and canopy leaves above. Natural and artificial bark stripping stimulated resprouting from trunks below wounds. Resprouting leaves on bark-stripped trees had lower total phenolics, condensed tannin, and C/N ratios than did canopy leaves on control trees. Herbivory rates were higher in resprouting leaves on bark-stripped trees than in canopy leaves on controls. Conversely, above-wound canopy leaves on bark-stripped trees had higher total phenolics than did those on controls, while herbivory rates were lower in the canopy leaves of bark-stripped trees than in those on controls. These results demonstrate that plant-mediated effects of bark stripping diverge between plant tissues below and above wounds in individual willow trees. We submit that focusing on multiple plant parts can elucidate plant-mediated effects at the whole-plant scale.

  13. Willow volatiles influence growth, development, and secondary metabolism in Aspergillus parasiticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze, Ludmila V; Koptina, Anna V; Laivenieks, Maris; Beaudry, Randolph M; Jones, Daniel A; Kanarsky, Albert V; Linz, John E

    2011-10-01

    Aflatoxin is a mycotoxin and the most potent naturally occurring carcinogen in many animals. Aflatoxin contamination of food and feed crops causes a significant global burden on human and animal health. However, available methods to eliminate aflatoxin from food and feed are not fully effective. Our goal is to discover novel, efficient, and practical methods to control aflatoxin contamination in crops during storage. In the present study, we tested the effect of volatiles produced by willow (Salix acutifolia and Salix babylonica) and maple (Acer saccharinum) bark on fungal growth, development, and aflatoxin production by the fungus Aspergillus parasiticus, one economically important aflatoxin producer. S. acutifolia bark volatiles nearly eliminated aflatoxin accumulation (>90% reduction) by A. parasiticus grown on a minimal agar medium. The decrease in aflatoxin accumulation correlated with a twofold reduction in ver-1 (encodes a middle aflatoxin pathway enzyme) transcript level. Expression data also indicate that one histone H4 acetyltransferase, MYST3, may play a role in epigenetic control of aflatoxin gene transcription in response to volatile exposure. Volatiles derived from wood bark samples also increased fungal growth up to 20% and/or enhanced conidiospore development. Solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of bark samples identified sets of shared and unique volatile compounds that may mediate the observed regulatory effects on growth, development, and aflatoxin synthesis. This work provides an experimental basis for the use of willow industry by-products to control aflatoxin contamination in food and feed crops.

  14. Seasonal Dynamics of N, P, and K in an Organic and Inorganic Fertilized Willow Biomass System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos K. Quaye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal variations in soil nutrient supply and bioavailability were assessed in a willow biomass crop (Salix miyabeana, SX64 treated with 150 and 200 kg available N ha−1 of commercial fertilizer (CF, biosolid compost (BC, dairy manure (DM, and control (CT0 at Delhi, NY. Plant root simulator probes were used to measure nutrient supply (inside and bioavailability (outside of root exclusion cylinders. Measurements were made in September 2008 and May, August, and October of 2009. Soil moisture content (θd and foliar nutrient concentrations were also determined. The BC treatments increased soil P supply more than CF and CT0. The supply of NH4+ and K in the soil increased in August but their bioavailability increased in May and October. Soil NO3- and P supply and bioavailability were both high in May. Foliar N and K concentrations were significantly high in May and low in August which could be due to dilution effect caused by increased soil moisture foliar dry weight. Foliar P concentrations increased in September and October. The observed higher soil NO3- mineralization and plant uptake in May suggest that in high soil NO3- conditions willow biomass crops can level and minimize leaching out of the root zone into groundwater.

  15. Thermogravimetry-Infrared Spectroscopy Analysis of the Pyrolysis of Willow Leaves, Stems, and Branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pyrolysis of willow samples from various plant positions was analysed using thermogravimetry-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR. The results indicate that pyrolysis can be divided into four stages. The first stage from 30 to 120°C involves free evaporation of moisture, with a mass loss of 5%. The second stage from 120 to 200°C involves the pyrolysis of hemicellulose and unstable cellulose, with a mass loss of 4%. The third stage is from 200 to 400°C, with a weight loss of 60%, in which the chemical components of wood thermally decompose and emit heat, carbon dioxide, and so on. In the final stage, which occurs above 400°C, the pyrolysis of lignin and charring of cellulose occur, with a mass loss of 10%. Moreover, in FTIR, the samples exhibit the highest absorbance during the main pyrolysis phase, from which wood vinegar ingredients mainly arise, including CO2, H2O, CO, and small amounts of hydrocarbons, alcohols, phenols, acids, esters, and aromatic compounds. Additionally, leaves are decomposed more thoroughly before the main pyrolysis phase, whereas decomposition of branches occurs fullest during this phase. Finally, we put forward some suggestions to support further research on conversion of willow into wood vinegar products.

  16. Yield and spatial supply of bioenergy poplar and willow short-rotation coppice in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylott, Matthew J; Casella, E; Tubby, I; Street, N R; Smith, P; Taylor, Gail

    2008-01-01

    Limited information on likely supply and spatial yield of bioenergy crops exists for the UK. Here, productivities are reported of poplar (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix spp.) grown as short-rotation coppice (SRC), using data from a large 49-site yield trial network. A partial least-squares regression technique was used to upscale actual field trial observations across England and Wales. Spatial productivity was then assessed under different land-use scenarios. Mean modelled yields ranged between 4.9 and 10.7 oven-dry tonnes (odt) ha(-1) yr(-1). Yields were generally higher in willow than in poplar, reflecting the susceptibility of older poplar genotypes to rust and their tendency for single stem dominance. Replacing 10% of arable land, 20% of improved grassland and 100% of set-aside grassland in England and Wales with the three most productive genotypes would yield 13 Modt of biomass annually (supplying 7% of UK electricity production or 48% of UK combined heat and power (CHP) production). Results show existing SRC genotypes have the immediate potential to be an important component of a mixed portfolio of renewables and that, in future, as new and improved genotypes become available, higher yields could extend this potential further.

  17. Potential of willow (Salix) as a resource of bioenergy in Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viglasky, J.; Suchomel, J. (Technical Univ. of Zvolen, Zvolen (Slovakia)), e-mail: viglasky@vsld.tuzvo.sk; Polak, M. (Univ. of Economics in Bratislawa, Kapusary (Slovakia)), e-mail: vvich@vvich.sk, e-mail: polak@euke.sk

    2010-07-01

    Short Rotation Plantations (SRPs) represent a perspective source of biomass for energy purposes. These plantations can be established on soils suitable for their growing, but also on contaminated soils, which cannot be used for food production. The present state of fuel and energy basis in the world as well as in Slovakia urges on the need for radical intervention to the energy sector. Biomass from fast growing tree species cultivated on SRPs or 'energy forests' has the potential to substantially contribute to the achievement of ambitious EU and national goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Agricultural production zones in Slovakia suitable for willow cultivation are corn, beet, potato and upland production zones with soils containing high groundwater table. It does not have high demands for soil quality, but it is intolerant to soils being flooded by backwater. It is also intolerant to dry or peat soils. Therefore, the most suitable soils for energy forests cultivation are heavy loam and clay soils with high groundwater table, eventually soils occasionally being flooded. This paper deals with development of SRP implementation in Slovakia. The results of energy balance evaluation of biomass gained from short rotation coppice willow (Salix spp.) carried out in recent years. (orig.)

  18. Volatile organic compound emissions from Miscanthus and short rotation coppice willow bioenergy crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Nichola; Cape, J. Neil; Heal, Mathew R.

    2012-12-01

    Miscanthus × giganteus and short rotation coppice (SRC) willow (Salix spp.) are increasingly important bioenergy crops. Above-canopy fluxes and mixing ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured in summer for the two crops at a site near Lincoln, UK, by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and virtual disjunct eddy covariance. The isoprene emission rate above willow peaked around midday at ˜1 mg m-2 h-1, equivalent to 20 μg gdw-1 h-1 normalised to 30 °C and 1000 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR, much greater than for conventional arable crops. Average midday peak isoprene mixing ratio was ˜1.4 ppbv. Acetone and acetic acid also showed small positive daytime fluxes. No measurable fluxes of VOCs were detected above the Miscanthus canopy. Differing isoprene emission rates between different bioenergy crops, and the crops or vegetation cover they may replace, means the impact on regional air quality should be taken into consideration in bioenergy crop selection.

  19. Survivorship across the annual cycle of a migratory passerine, the willow flycatcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Eben; Durst, Scott L; Sogge, Mark K.; Koronkiewicz, Thomas J.; Paxton, Kristina L.

    2017-01-01

    Annual survivorship in migratory birds is a product of survival across the different periods of the annual cycle (i.e. breeding, wintering, and migration), and may vary substantially among these periods. Determining which periods have the highest mortality, and thus are potentially limiting a population, is important especially for species of conservation concern. To estimate survival probabilities of the willow flycatcher Empidonax traillii in each of the different periods, we combined demographic data from a 10-year breeding season study with that from a 5-year wintering grounds study. Estimates of annual apparent survival for breeding and wintering periods were nearly identical (65–66%), as were estimates of monthly apparent survival for both breeding and wintering stationary periods (98–99%). Because flycatchers spend at least half the year on the wintering grounds, overall apparent survivorship was lower (88%) on the wintering grounds than on the breeding grounds (97%). The migratory period had the highest mortality rate, accounting for 62% of the estimated annual mortality even though it comprises only one quarter or less of the annual cycle. The migratory period in the willow flycatcher and many other neotropical migrants is poorly understood, and further research is needed to identify sources of mortality during this crucial period.

  20. Enzymatic Saccharification of Shrub Willow Genotypes with Differing Biomass Composition for Biofuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle J. Serapiglia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the conversion of woody biomass feedstocks into liquid fuel ethanol, the pretreatment process is the most critical and costly step. Variations in biomass composition based on genetic differences or environmental effects have a significant impact on the degree of accessibility accomplished by pretreatment and subsequent sugar release by enzymatic hydrolysis. To evaluate this, biomass from 10 genetically diverse, genotypes of shrub willow (Salix spp. was pretreated with a hot-water process at two levels of severity, hydrolyzed using a combination of two commercial enzyme cocktails, and the release of hexose and pentose monomers was quantified by HPLC. Among the genotypes selected for analysis, cellulose content ranged from 39 to 45% (w/w and lignin content ranged from 20 to 23% (w/w at harvest. Differences in the effectiveness of the pretreatment process were observed among the various willow genotypes. Correlations were identified between total sugar release and % cellulose and % lignin content. There was a significant effect of pretreatment severity on polysaccharide accessibility, but the response to pretreatments was different among the genotypes. At the high severity pretreatment ‘SV1’ was the least recalcitrant with sugar release representing as much as 60% of total biomass. These results suggest that structural, as well as chemical characteristics of the biomass may influence pretreatment and hydrolytic efficiency.

  1. Metabolic responses of willow (Salix purpurea L.) leaves to mycorrhization as revealed by mass spectrometry and 1H NMR spectroscopy metabolite profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliferis, Konstantinos A.; Chamoun, Rony; Jabaji, Suha

    2015-01-01

    The root system of most terrestrial plants form symbiotic interfaces with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), which are important for nutrient cycling and ecosystem sustainability. The elucidation of the undergoing changes in plants' metabolism during symbiosis is essential for understanding nutrient acquisition and for alleviation of soil stresses caused by environmental cues. Within this context, we have undertaken the task of recording the fluctuation of willow (Salix purpurea L.) leaf metabolome in response to AMF inoculation. The development of an advanced metabolomics/bioinformatics protocol employing mass spectrometry (MS) and 1H NMR analyzers combined with the in-house-built metabolite library for willow (http://willowmetabolib.research.mcgill.ca/index.html) are key components of the research. Analyses revealed that AMF inoculation of willow causes up-regulation of various biosynthetic pathways, among others, those of flavonoid, isoflavonoid, phenylpropanoid, and the chlorophyll and porphyrin pathways, which have well-established roles in plant physiology and are related to resistance against environmental stresses. The recorded fluctuation in the willow leaf metabolism is very likely to provide AMF-inoculated willows with a significant advantage compared to non-inoculated ones when they are exposed to stresses such as, high levels of soil pollutants. The discovered biomarkers of willow response to AMF inoculation and corresponding pathways could be exploited in biomarker-assisted selection of willow cultivars with superior phytoremediation capacity or genetic engineering programs. PMID:26042135

  2. Metabolic Responses of Willow (Salix purpurea L. Leaves to Mycorrhization as Revealed by Mass Spectrometry and 1H NMR Spectroscopy Metabolite Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos A Aliferis

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The root system of most terrestrial plants form symbiotic interfaces with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, which are important for nutrient cycling and ecosystem sustainability. The elucidation of the undergoing changes in plants’ metabolism during symbiosis is essential for understanding nutrient acquisition and for alleviation of soil stresses caused by environmental cues. Within this context, we have undertaken the task of recording the fluctuation of willow (Salix purpurea L. leaf metabolome in response to AMF inoculation. The development of an advanced metabolomics/bioinformatics protocol employing mass spectrometry (MS and 1H NMR analyzers combined with the in-house-built metabolite library for willow (http://willowmetabolib.research.mcgill.ca/index.html are key components of the research. Analyses revealed that AMF inoculation of willow causes up-regulation of various biosynthetic pathways, among others, those of flavonoid, isoflavonoid, phenylpropanoid, and the chlorophyll and porphyrin pathways, which have well-established roles in plant physiology and are related to resistance against environmental stresses. The recorded fluctuation in the willow leaf metabolism is very likely to provide AMF-inoculated willows with a significant advantage compared to non-inoculated ones when they are exposed to stresses such as, high levels of soil pollutants. The discovered biomarkers of willow response to AMF inoculation and corresponding pathways could be exploited in biomarker-assisted selection of willow cultivars with superior phytoremediation capacity or genetic engineering programs.

  3. Preliminary Study on Introduction of the Energy Willow Varieties of Salix jiangsuensis and Bamboo Willow%苏柳、竹柳等速生能源柳引种研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱继军; 陈必胜; 王玉勤; 黄梅

    2012-01-01

    [目的]筛选出上海适生的能源柳品种.[方法]引进苏柳、竹柳等4种乔木柳,进行栽植、地插繁育、盆栽、水培等试验,研究物候、生物量、适应性等.[结果]竹柳、J795、J172、J799移栽成活率均达90%以上,年平均单株生物量分别为0.80、0.85、0.87、0.75 kg/株,差异不显著;盆栽时,竹柳盐土盆栽成活率达100%,J172盆栽成活率达83.33%,且最长枝条长度及基径相对黄沙盆栽减幅小;水培耐盐试验,耐盐性强弱依次为竹柳>J795 >J172 >J799.[结论]4种柳树均可在上海应用,其中耐盐性强的品种为竹柳、J172、J795,J799耐盐性相对较弱,盐土地谨慎应用.%[Objective] To select the suitable varieties of energy willow to be planted in Shanghai. [ Method] Four willow varieties, including bamboo willow and Salix jiangsuensis J795, J172, J799, were introduced, after being planted, bred, and cultivated in water, their phenology, Biomass and adjustability were studied. [Result] The transplanting survival rate of bamboo willow and Salix jiangsuensis J795, J172, J799 was more than 90% and their single yearly biomasses were 0.8, 0. 85, 0.87 and 0.75 kg per plant respectively without a distinct difference. When planted in pots, the survival rate.of bamboo willow was 100% , and that of Salix jiangsuensis was 83. 33% , and the length of their longest bran-ches, basal diameter of their stocks decreased the least compared to that planted in the yellow sand. Their order of tolerance to salt from strong to weak was bamboo willow, Salix jiangsuensis 795, 172, 799. [ Conclusion] The four willow varieties can be applied in Shanghai, among which J799 showed the weakest tolerance to salt, thus should be carefully used in saline land.

  4. Evaluation of geophysical logs, Phase II, at Willow Grove Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Randall W.

    1999-01-01

    Between March and April 1998, the U.S. Navy contracted Tetra Tech NUS Inc., to drill two monitor wells in the Stockton Formation at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base, Horsham Township, Montgomery County, Pa. The wells MG-1634 and MG-1635 were installed to monitor water levels and sample contaminants in the shallow, intermediate, and deep water-producing zones of the fractured bedrock. Chemical analyses of the samples will help determine the horizontal and vertical distribution of any contaminated ground water migrating from known contaminant sources. Wells were drilled near the Fire Training Area (Site 5). Depths of all boreholes range from 69 to 149 feet below land surface. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted borehole geophysical logging and video surveys to identify water-producing zones in newly drilled monitor wells MG-1634 and MG-1635 and in wells MG-1675 and MG-1676. The logging was conducted from March 5, 1998, to April 16, 1998. This work is a continuation of the Phase I work. Caliper logs and video surveys were used to locate fractures; inflections on fluid-temperature and fluid-resistivity logs were used to locate possible water-producing fractures. Heatpulse-flowmeter measurements were used to verify the locations of water-producing or water-receiving zones and to measure rates of flow between water-bearing fractures. Single-point-resistance and natural-gamma logs provided information on stratigraphy. After interpretation of geophysical logs, video surveys, and driller's notes, wells MG-1634 and MG-1635 were screened such that water-levels fluctuations could be monitored and discrete water samples collected from one or more water-producing zones in each borehole.

  5. Impact of sea surface temperature on satellite retrieval of sea surface salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xuchen; Zhu, Qiankun; He, Xianqiang; Chen, Peng; Wang, Difeng; Hao, Zengzhou; Huang, Haiqing

    2016-10-01

    Currently, global sea surface salinity (SSS) can be retrieved by the satellite microwave radiometer onboard the satellite, such as the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity(SMOS) and the Aqurius. SMOS is an Earth Explorer Opportunity Mission from the European Space Agency(ESA). It was launched at a sun-synchronous orbit in 2009 and one of the payloads is called MIRAS(Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis), which is the first interferometric microwave radiometer designed for observing SSS at L-band(1.41 GHz).The foundation of the salinity retrieval by microwave radiometer is that the sea surface radiance at L-band has the most suitable sensitivity with the variation of the salinity. It is well known that the sensitivity of brightness temperatures(TB) to SSS depends on the sea surface temperature (SST), but the quantitative impact of the SST on the satellite retrieval of the SSS is still poorly known. In this study, we investigate the impact of the SST on the accuracy of salinity retrieval from the SMOS. First of all, The dielectric constant model proposed by Klein and Swift has been used to estimate the vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures(TV and TH) of a smooth sea water surface at L-band and derive the derivatives of TV and TH as a function of SSS to show the relative sensitivity at 45° incident angle. Then, we use the GAM(generalized additive model) method to evaluate the association between the satellite-measured brightness temperature and in-situ SSS at different SST. Moreover, the satellite-derived SSS from the SMOS is validated using the ARGO data to assess the RMSE(root mean squared error). We compare the SMOS SSS and ARGO SSS over two regions of Pacific ocean far from land and ice under different SST. The RMSE of retrieved SSS at different SST have been estimated. Our results showed that SST is one of the most significant factors affecting the accuracy of SSS retrieval. The satellite-measured brightness temperature has a

  6. The Willow Microbiome is Influenced by Soil Petroleum-Hydrocarbon Concentration with Plant Compartment-Specific Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacie Tardif

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between plants and microorganisms, which is the driving force behind the decontamination of petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC contamination in phytoremediation technology, is poorly understood. Here, we aimed at characterizing the variations between plant compartments in the microbiome of two willow cultivars growing in contaminated soils. A field experiment was set-up at a former petrochemical plant in Canada and, after two growing seasons, bulk soil, rhizosphere soil, roots and stems samples of two willow cultivars (Salix purpurea cv. FishCreek and Salix miyabeana cv. SX67 growing at three PHC contamination concentrations were taken. DNA was extracted and bacterial 16S rRNA gene and fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS regions were amplified and sequenced using an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Following multivariate statistical analyses, the level of PHC-contamination appeared as the primary factor influencing the willow microbiome with compartment-specific effects, with significant differences between the responses of bacterial and fungal communities. Increasing PHC contamination levels resulted in shifts in the microbiome composition, favoring putative hydrocarbon degraders and microorganisms previously reported as associated with plant health. These shifts were less drastic in the rhizosphere, root and stem tissues as compared to bulk soil, probably because the willows provided a more controlled environment and thus protected microbial communities against increasing contamination levels. Insights from this study will help to devise optimal plant microbiomes for increasing the efficiency of phytoremediation technology.

  7. Whole-genome sequences of 13 endophytic bacteria isolated from shrub willow (salix) grown in geneva, new york.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Huan You; Gan, Han Ming; Savka, Michael A; Triassi, Alexander J; Wheatley, Matthew S; Smart, Lawrence B; Fabio, Eric S; Hudson, André O

    2014-05-08

    Shrub willow, Salix spp. and hybrids, is an important bioenergy crop. Here we report the whole-genome sequences and annotation of 13 endophytic bacteria from stem tissues of Salix purpurea grown in nature and from commercial cultivars and Salix viminalis × Salix miyabeana grown in bioenergy fields in Geneva, New York.

  8. Integrated long-term responses of an arctic-alpine willow and associated ectomycorrhizal fungi to an altered environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Karina Engelbrecht; Michelsen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated ectomycorrhizal (ECM) colonization and morphotype community composition together with growth response and biomass distribution in the arctic-alpine, prostrate willow Salix herbacea L. x Salix polaris Wahlenb. after 11 seasons of shading, warming, and fertilization at a fellfield...

  9. On the Willow Image in YANG Jian’ s Poems%论杨键诗歌的柳意象

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷素娟

    2016-01-01

    当代著名诗人杨键在诗歌中多次写到柳树,其中不少是他的重要诗作。在杨键笔下,柳树或营造了现实的衰飒气氛,或蕴含了雍容华贵的王道气息,或被赋予谦逊温良人格美,或被升华成为残存的古典文化精神的象征,意蕴丰富多变,是白话诗发展至今很有代表性的对古典柳意象的继承与发展。%YANG Jian, a contemporary poet, has composed many willow poems, quite a few being his major works.In those poems, willows either create a real desolate atmosphere or embody a noble elegant flavor.With their rich and varied meanings, they are either given modest and gentle charm or seen as symbols of classical cultural spirits.The willow image in YANG Jian’s poems represents the heritage and development of classical willow images of vernacular poems produced so far .

  10. Eriosomatine aphids (Hemiptera, Aphididae, Eriosomatinae) associated with moss and roots of conifer and willow in forests of the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apterous adult morphs of eriosomatine aphids (Hemiptera, Aphididae, Eriosomatinae) associated with moss and/or roots of conifer or willow in forests of the Pacific Northwest including Alaska are described, illustrated, and keyed. In total, seven species (Clydesmithia canadensis Danielsson, Melaphis ...

  11. Evaluation of spectral light management on growth of container-grown willow oak, nuttall oak and summer red maple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant response to blue, red, gray or black shade cloth was evaluated with willow oak (Quercus phellos L.), Nuttall oak (Quercus nuttallii Palmer, Nuttall) and Summer Red maple (Acer rubrum L. ‘Summer Red’) liners. Light transmitted through the colored shade cloth had no influence on germination of ...

  12. The role of comptetitors for Chrysomela lapponica, a north Eurasian willow pest, in pioneering a new host plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gross, J.; Fatouros, N.E.; Neuvonen, S.; Hilker, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Palaearctic leaf beetle Chrysomela lapponica usually feeds upon willows in the northern region of its occurrence. However, in Central Europe, some populations are known that have specialised on birch. In this study, we investigated the significance of other herbivores occurring together on the s

  13. Integrated long-term responses of an arctic-alpine willow and associated ectomycorrhizal fungi to an altered environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Karina Engelbrecht; Michelsen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated ectomycorrhizal (ECM) colonization and morphotype community composition together with growth response and biomass distribution in the arctic-alpine, prostrate willow Salix herbacea L. x Salix polaris Wahlenb. after 11 seasons of shading, warming, and fertilization at a fellfield in s...

  14. Development of a black willow improvement program for biomass production in the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randell J. Rousseau; Emile S. Gardiner; Theodor D. Leininger

    2012-01-01

    Black willow (Salix nigra Marsh.) has the potential to be a significant feedstock source for bioenergy and biofuels production in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (LMAV). This potential is based on a number of primary factors including rapid growth, ease of vegetative propagation, excellent rooting, and the ability to regenerate from coppice...

  15. DESIGNING AN OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION AND COFIRING SAWDUST WITH COAL AT ALBRIGHT GENERATING STATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Payette; D. Tillman

    2003-07-01

    During the period April 1, 2003--June 30, 2003, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) proceeded with demonstration operations at the Willow Island Generating Station and improvements to the Albright Generating Station cofiring systems. The demonstration operations at Willow Island were designed to document integration of biomass cofiring into commercial operations. The Albright improvements were designed to increase the resource base for the projects, and to address issues that came up during the first year of operations. This report summarizes the activities associated with the Designer Opportunity Fuel program, and demonstrations at Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations.

  16. Using a Remote Sensing/GIS Model to Predict Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Breeding Habitat along the Rio Grande, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatten, James R.; Sogge, Mark K.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus; hereafter SWFL) is a federally endangered bird (USFWS 1995) that breeds in riparian areas in portions of New Mexico, Arizona, southwestern Colorado, extreme southern Utah and Nevada, and southern California (USFWS 2002). Across this range, it uses a variety of plant species as nesting/breeding habitat, but in all cases prefers sites with dense vegetation, high canopy, and proximity to surface water or saturated soils (Sogge and Marshall 2000). As of 2005, the known rangewide breeding population of SWFLs was roughly 1,214 territories, with approximately 393 territories distributed among 36 sites in New Mexico (Durst et al. 2006), primarily along the Rio Grande. One of the key challenges facing the management and conservation of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher is that riparian areas are dynamic, with individual habitat patches subject to cycles of creation, growth, and loss due to drought, flooding, fire, and other disturbances. Former breeding patches can lose suitability, and new habitat can develop within a matter of only a few years, especially in reservoir drawdown zones. Therefore, measuring and predicting flycatcher habitat - either to discover areas that might support SWFLs, or to identify areas that may develop into appropriate habitat - requires knowledge of recent/current habitat conditions and an understanding of the factors that determine flycatcher use of riparian breeding sites. In the past, much of the determination of whether a riparian site is likely to support breeding flycatchers has been based on qualitative criteria (for example, 'dense vegetation' or 'large patches'). These determinations often require on-the-ground field evaluations by local or regional SWFL experts. While this has proven valuable in locating many of the currently known breeding sites, it is difficult or impossible to apply this approach effectively over large geographic areas (for example, the

  17. Using a remote sensing/GIS model to predict southwestern Willow Flycatcher breeding habitat along the Rio Grande, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatten, James R.; Sogge, Mark K.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus; hereafter SWFL) is a federally endangered bird (USFWS 1995) that breeds in riparian areas in portions of New Mexico, Arizona, southwestern Colorado, extreme southern Utah and Nevada, and southern California (USFWS 2002). Across this range, it uses a variety of plant species as nesting/breeding habitat, but in all cases prefers sites with dense vegetation, high canopy, and proximity to surface water or saturated soils (Sogge and Marshall 2000). As of 2005, the known rangewide breeding population of SWFLs was roughly 1,214 territories, with approximately 393 territories distributed among 36 sites in New Mexico (Durst et al. 2006), primarily along the Rio Grande. One of the key challenges facing the management and conservation of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher is that riparian areas are dynamic, with individual habitat patches subject to cycles of creation, growth, and loss due to drought, flooding, fire, and other disturbances. Former breeding patches can lose suitability, and new habitat can develop within a matter of only a few years, especially in reservoir drawdown zones. Therefore, measuring and predicting flycatcher habitat - either to discover areas that might support SWFLs, or to identify areas that may develop into appropriate habitat - requires knowledge of recent/current habitat conditions and an understanding of the factors that determine flycatcher use of riparian breeding sites. In the past, much of the determination of whether a riparian site is likely to support breeding flycatchers has been based on qualitative criteria (for example, 'dense vegetation' or 'large patches'). These determinations often require on-the-ground field evaluations by local or regional SWFL experts. While this has proven valuable in locating many of the currently known breeding sites, it is difficult or impossible to apply this approach effectively over large geographic areas (for example, the

  18. DETERMINATION OF FLAVONOIDS OF WILLOW TRIANDRA (SALIX TRIANDRA L., GROWING IN THE NORTH CAUCASUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Sannikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants of willow genus are rich in various flavonoids. In 60-e years of the XX century the works of V. A. Kompantsev showed that leaves of willow triandra, growing in the North Caucasus, contain up to 5% of rutin. The method, which required long sample preparation (extraction of the raw material with TLC, chromatographic layer extraction with methanol, removal of the solvent, dissolution in ethanol, optical density measurements was used. Currently available and simple methods for the determination of rutin in plant material are described. Given that leaves of Salix triandra contain significant amounts of rutin and can be a potential raw material for the creation of medicines on their basis, it is essential to determine the amount of flavonoids in the leaves of Salix triandra and its branches.The purpose of this study is determination of the amount of flavonoids in the willow triandra, growing in the North Caucasus, depending on the place and time of collection.Methods. TLC and the method of differential spectrophotometry were used to study chemical reactions. Results. The presence of flavonoids in various vegetative plant organs was established using qualitative reactions (cyanidin test; boric-citric reaction; the reaction with solution of lead acetate and solution of ammonia. Rutin and quercetin flavonoids in the presence of standard samples were identified using TLC. the method of differential spectrophotometry, based on the reaction of flavonoids with aluminum chloride was used for the quantitative determination of the amount of flavonoids. It is shown that the greatest quantity of flavonoids amount accumulated in the leaves (up to 3.76%, its value in branches is slightly smaller (up to 3.26%. The branches without leaves have almost 10 times less flavonoids. It was established experimentally that the accumulation of flavonoids in raw material of Salix triandra is dependent on the place and time of

  19. A multilocus assay reveals high nucleotide diversity and limited differentiation among Scandinavian willow grouse (Lagopus lagopus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintela Maria

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is so far very little data on autosomal nucleotide diversity in birds, except for data from the domesticated chicken and some passerines species. Estimates of nucleotide diversity reported so far in birds have been high (~10-3 and a likely explanation for this is the generally higher effective population sizes compared to mammals. In this study, the level of nucleotide diversity has been examined in the willow grouse, a non-domesticated bird species from the order Galliformes, which also holds the chicken. The willow grouse (Lagopus lagopus has an almost circumpolar distribution but is absent from Greenland and the north Atlantic islands. It primarily inhabits tundra, forest edge habitats and sub-alpine vegetation. Willow grouse are hunted throughout its range, and regionally it is a game bird of great cultural and economical importance. Results We sequenced 18 autosomal protein coding loci from approximately 15–18 individuals per population. We found a total of 127 SNP's, which corresponds to 1 SNP every 51 bp. 26 SNP's were amino acid replacement substitutions. Total nucleotide diversity (πt was between 1.30 × 10-4 and 7.66 × 10-3 (average πt = 2.72 × 10-3 ± 2.06 × 10-3 and silent nucleotide diversity varied between 4.20 × 10-4and 2.76 × 10-2 (average πS = 9.22 × 10-3 ± 7.43 × 10-4. The synonymous diversity is approximately 20 times higher than in humans and two times higher than in chicken. Non-synonymous diversity was on average 18 times lower than the synonymous diversity and varied between 0 and 4.90 × 10-3 (average πa = 5.08 × 10-4 ± 7.43 × 103, which suggest that purifying selection is strong in these genes. FST values based on synonymous SNP's varied between -5.60 × 10-4 and 0.20 among loci and revealed low levels of differentiation among the four localities, with an overall value of FST = 0.03 (95% CI: 0.006 – 0.057 over 60 unlinked loci. Non-synonymous SNP's gave similar results. Low

  20. New Rust Disease of Korean Willow (Salix koreensis) Caused by Melampsora yezoensis, Unrecorded Pathogen in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yeo Hong; Ahn, Geum Ran; Yoon, Seong Kwon; Kim, Hoo Hyun; Son, Seung Yeol; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2016-12-01

    During the growing season of 2015, leaf specimens with yellow rust spots were collected from Salix koreensis Andersson, known as Korean willow, in riverine areas in Cheonan, Korea. The fungus on S. koreensis was identified as the rust species, Melampsora yezoensis, based on the morphology of urediniospores observed by light and scanning electron microscopy, and the molecular properties of the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region. Pathogenicity tests confirmed that the urediniospores are the causal agent of the rust symptoms on the leaves and young stems of S. koreensis. Here, we report a new rust disease of S. koreensis caused by the rust fungus, M. yezoensis, a previously unrecorded rust pathogen in Korea.

  1. Modification and characterization of fibers of three sandy willow shrub species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Xiao-feng; Xiao Bin; Mark S. Baird

    2006-01-01

    Periploca sepium, Salix psammophila and Tamarix spp. make up an important part of the local vegetation in the sandland of China. This paper described a novel method on modification of the three shrub fibers as oil sorbents. Natural and modified fibers were chemically studied by non-destructive methods, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and cross-polarization nuclear magnetic resonance (CP-MAS 13C-NMR). The results show that during the reaction with acetic anhydride under mild conditions, the use of N-bromoscciniamide (NBS) catalyst resulted in a high weight percent gain (WPG). The acetylation ofP. sepium fiber gave rise to the highest WPG (20.0%) compared with S. psammophila and Tamarix spp. fiber. IR and CP-MAS 13C-NMR analysis elaborates the chemical features of natural and acetylated willow fiber in detail.

  2. Variability of physiological and growth characteristics of white willow (Salix alba L. clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlović Saša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The samples from field experiment on five clones of white willow (Salix alba L. in the adult phase, was investigated as follows: net photosynthesis and dark respiration, content of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls a, b and carotenoids, number and size of stornata and elements of growth (tree diameters and heights. The aim of the research is to determine if there are any relations between these physiological characters and the elements of growth, i.e. if any of them can be utilized in the early selection for growth vigor. The results show that all the characters are characterized by low coefficients of variation, statistically highly significant differences and high coefficients of heritability in a broad sense. As for the net of photosynthesis, the number of stornata on the adaxial and abaxial sides of the leaf are in high correlation with the elements of growth, which indicates that they can be used in the early selection for growth vigor.

  3. Environmental performance of gasified willow from different lands including land-use changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saez de Bikuna Salinas, Koldo; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Pilegaard, Kim;

    2016-01-01

    derived from latest world deforestation statistics, while a commercial feed mix of equivalent nutritive value was assumed to substitute the displaced grass as fodder. Intensification effects were included in both iLUC factors as additional N-fertilizer consumption. Finally, DR impacts were considered...... was developed for the estimation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from indirect land-use changes (iLUC) induced by willow cropping on arable land. For this, area expansion results from a general equilibrium economic model were combined with global LUC trends to differentiate between land transformation (as...... additional agricultural expansion, in areas with historical deforestation) and occupation (as delayed relaxation, DR, in areas with historical land abandonment) impacts. A biophysical approach was followed to determine the iLUCfeed emissions factor from marginal grassland. Land transformation impacts were...

  4. Radiocaesium soil-to-wood transfer in commercial willow short rotation coppice on contaminated farm land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gommers, A; Gäfvert, T; Smolders, E; Merckx, R; Vandenhove, H

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of willow short rotation coppice (SRC) for energy production as a revaluation tool for severely radiocaesium-contaminated land was studied. The effects of crop age, clone and soil type on the radiocaesium levels in the wood were assessed following sampling in 14 existing willow SRC fields, planted on radiocaesium-contaminated land in Sweden following Chernobyl deposition. There was only one plot where willow stands of different maturity (R6S2 and R5S4: R, root age and S, shoot age) and clone (Rapp and L78183 both of age category R5S4) were sampled and no significant differences were found. The soils differed among others in clay fraction (3-34%), radiocaesium interception potential (515-6884 meq kg(-1)), soil solution K (0.09-0.95 mM), exchangeable K (0.58-5.77 meq kg(-1)) and cation exchange capacity (31-250 meq kg(-1)). The soil-to-wood transfer factor (TF) of radiocaesium differed significantly between soil types. The TF recorded was generally small (0.00086-0.016 kg kg(-1)), except for willows established on sandy soil (0.19-0.46 kg kg(-1)). Apart from the weak yet significant exponential correlation between the Cs-TF and the solid/liquid distribution coefficient (R2 = 0.54) or the radiocaesium interception potential, RIP (R2 = 0.66), no single significant correlations between soil characteristics and TF were found. The wood-soil solution 137Cs concentration factor (CF) was significantly related to the potassium concentration in the soil solution. A different relation was, however, found between the sandy Trödje soils (CF = 1078.8 x m(K)(-1.83), R2 = 0.99) and the other soils (CF = 35.75 x m(K)(-0.61), R2 =0.61). Differences in the ageing rate of radiocaesium in the soil (hypothesised fraction of bioavailable caesium subjected to fast ageing for Trödje soils only 1% compared to other soils), exchangeable soil K (0.8-1.8 meq kg(-1) for Trödje soils and 1.5-5.8 meq kg(-1) for the other soils) and the ammonium concentration in the soil solution

  5. Allelic variation in a willow warbler genomic region is associated with climate clines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith W Larson

    Full Text Available Local adaptation is an important process contributing to population differentiation which can occur in continuous or isolated populations connected by various amounts of gene flow. The willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus is one of the most common songbirds in Fennoscandia. It has a continuous breeding distribution where it is found in all forested habitats from sea level to the tree line and therefore constitutes an ideal species for the study of locally adapted genes associated with environmental gradients. Previous studies in this species identified a genetic marker (AFLP-WW1 that showed a steep north-south cline in central Sweden with one allele associated with coastal lowland habitats and the other with mountainous habitats. It was further demonstrated that this marker is embedded in a highly differentiated chromosome region that spans several megabases. In the present study, we sampled 2,355 individuals at 128 sites across all of Fennoscandia to study the geographic and climatic variables associated with the allele frequency distributions of WW1. Our results demonstrate that 1 allele frequency patterns significantly differ between mountain and lowland populations, 2 these allele differences coincide with extreme temperature conditions and the short growing season in the mountains, and milder conditions in coastal areas, and 3 the northern-allele or "altitude variant" of WW1 occurs in willow warblers that occupy mountainous habitat regardless of subspecies. Finally these results suggest that climate may exert selection on the genomic region associated with these alleles and would allow us to develop testable predictions for the distribution of the genetic marker based on climate change scenarios.

  6. Willow Bark为例探讨植物提取物的开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛迎春

    2004-01-01

    在北美市场,在药品和食品之间还有一块很大的市场份额,称之为食品补充剂。我国从20世纪90年代中期开始活跃的植物提取物行业正是为美国的食品补充剂提供原料的,因此这两个市场是休戚相关的。1997年,贯叶连翘提取物迅速走红之后,国内在植物提取物行业有了更快的发展。银杏、人参、绿茶、当归、贯叶连翘等提取物一直占据着提取物市场前10名的地位。根据目前国际市场的变化,终端客户也希望能找到一些新的利润增长点,寻找一些有别于其他公司的产品,对于植物提取物企业也存在着同样的问题,如何能快速抓住客户的需求,尽快推出产品也显得越来越重要。下面以White willow bark extract(以下简写willow bark,白柳皮提取物)为例予以探讨。

  7. Determinants of parasitoid communities of willow-galling sawflies: habitat overrides physiology, host plant and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Tommi; Leppänen, Sanna A; Várkonyi, Gergely; Shaw, Mark R; Koivisto, Reijo; Barstad, Trond Elling; Vikberg, Veli; Roininen, Heikki

    2015-10-01

    Studies on the determinants of plant-herbivore and herbivore-parasitoid associations provide important insights into the origin and maintenance of global and local species richness. If parasitoids are specialists on herbivore niches rather than on herbivore taxa, then alternating escape of herbivores into novel niches and delayed resource tracking by parasitoids could fuel diversification at both trophic levels. We used DNA barcoding to identify parasitoids that attack larvae of seven Pontania sawfly species that induce leaf galls on eight willow species growing in subarctic and arctic-alpine habitats in three geographic locations in northern Fennoscandia, and then applied distance- and model-based multivariate analyses and phylogenetic regression methods to evaluate the hierarchical importance of location, phylogeny and different galler niche dimensions on parasitoid host use. We found statistically significant variation in parasitoid communities across geographic locations and willow host species, but the differences were mainly quantitative due to extensive sharing of enemies among gallers within habitat types. By contrast, the divide between habitats defined two qualitatively different network compartments, because many common parasitoids exhibited strong habitat preference. Galler and parasitoid phylogenies did not explain associations, because distantly related arctic-alpine gallers were attacked by a species-poor enemy community dominated by two parasitoid species that most likely have independently tracked the gallers' evolutionary shifts into the novel habitat. Our results indicate that barcode- and phylogeny-based analyses of food webs that span forested vs. tundra or grassland environments could improve our understanding of vertical diversification effects in complex plant-herbivore-parasitoid networks. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Vegetation and flora of short-rotation willow stands from a conservation viewpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, L.

    1986-01-01

    The energy forests were studied using random 0.5 x 0.5 m quadrats in which cover for field- and bottom-layer species was recorded in a percentage scale. The data were analysed using various multivariate methods. The vegetation and flora of twelve coppices in southern Sweden were investigated. Also the succession during the establishment phase on a meadow on the west coast and on a peat bog in the east-central part of the country was studied. Moreover, the impact on fen vegetation downstream of an energy forest on a peat bog was investigated. The flora and vegetation of energy forests is dominated by common ruderal species like Cirsium arvense, Galeopsis tetrahit and Urtica dioica. Uncommon species from woodland and fen habitats are only occasionally found. The field layer of energy forests shows a clear seasonality with maximal cover in July. The species number and the composition of vegetation vary greatly between the coppices and is largely determined by the management system. Intense cultivation including fertilization and the use of herbicides depletes the flora. Long rotation times decrease both species diversity and the field-layer cover. Uncommon species are mostly found in old coppices, which also often have a rich spring flora. A change in flora and vegetation occurs when an energy forest is established. The change is great and the time needed for stabilization of the energy forest flora is long when the original flora is dissimilar to the coppice flora. Willow coppices can increase habitat diversity in regions dominated by coniferous forests or in large-scale agricultural areas. Structural heterogeneity of a stand promotes diversity of the flora. Such heterogeneity can be created if a stand is composed of a variety of willow clones, if it is harvested at intervals, contains gaps, open ditches and is surrounded by edge zones of various types.

  9. A short-term study to evaluate the uptake and accumulation of arsenic in Asian willow (Salix sp.) from arsenic-contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangcai; Zou, Xiaoli; Zhou, Yuan; Zhang, Jianfeng; Owens, Gary

    2014-03-01

    Five Asian willow species (Salix jiangsuensis J172, Salix matsudana, Salix integra Yizhibi, Salix integra Weishanhu, and Salix mongolica) were evaluated for their potential for phytofiltration of arsenic (As) from synthetically contaminated waters. Arsenic accumulation, tolerance, uptake influx, and phytofiltration ability of the five willow species were examined under hydroponic conditions in a glasshouse. Short-term exposure (2 weeks) to solutions containing 80 μmol L(-1) arsenate (As(V)), resulted in significant accumulation of As in all willow species. Arsenic concentration in plant roots ranged from 322 mg kg(-1) dry weight (DW) for S. matsudana to 604 mg kg(-1) (DW) for S. integra Yizhibi. S. integra Yizhibi decreased As(V) concentration in water from 3.87 to 1.89 μmol L(-1) (290 to 142 μg L(-1)) over 168 h, which is 50 % of the total As(V) in the solution. The results suggested that even though Asian willow was not a traditional aquatic species, it still had significant potential for phytofiltration of As from contaminated waters. Of the five willow species studied, S. integra Yizhibi had the greatest capacity to remove As from As-contaminated waters. Thus, Asian willow has significant potential for the phytofiltration of As and may also be suitable for practical phytoremediation of As in highly water-logged areas.

  10. Crop yield monitoring in the Sahel using root zone soil moisture anomalies derived from SMOS soil moisture data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibon, François; Pellarin, Thierry; Alhassane, Agali; Traoré, Seydou; Baron, Christian

    2017-04-01

    West Africa is greatly vulnerable, especially in terms of food sustainability. Mainly based on rainfed agriculture, the high variability of the rainy season strongly impacts the crop production driven by the soil water availability in the soil. To monitor this water availability, classical methods are based on daily precipitation measurements. However, the raingauge network suffers from the poor network density in Africa (1/10000km2). Alternatively, real-time satellite-derived precipitations can be used, but they are known to suffer from large uncertainties which produce significant error on crop yield estimations. The present study proposes to use root soil moisture rather than precipitation to evaluate crop yield variations. First, a local analysis of the spatiotemporal impact of water deficit on millet crop production in Niger was done, from in-situ soil moisture measurements (AMMA-CATCH/OZCAR (French Critical Zone exploration network)) and in-situ millet yield survey. Crop yield measurements were obtained for 10 villages located in the Niamey region from 2005 to 2012. The mean production (over 8 years) is 690 kg/ha, and ranges from 381 to 872 kg/ha during this period. Various statistical relationships based on soil moisture estimates were tested, and the most promising one (R>0.9) linked the 30-cm soil moisture anomalies from mid-August to mid-September (grain filling period) to the crop yield anomalies. Based on this local study, it was proposed to derive regional statistical relationships using 30-cm soil moisture maps over West Africa. The selected approach was to use a simple hydrological model, the Antecedent Precipitation Index (API), forced by real-time satellite-based precipitation (CMORPH, PERSIANN, TRMM3B42). To reduce uncertainties related to the quality of real-time rainfall satellite products, SMOS soil moisture measurements were assimilated into the API model through a Particular Filter algorithm. Then, obtained soil moisture anomalies were

  11. Towards a robust evaporation-based disaggregation method of SMOS soil moisture by combining high-resolution shortwave/thermal and available meteorological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiana Stefan, Vivien; Merlin, Olivier; José Escorihuela, Maria; AïtHssaine, Bouchra; Molero, Beatriz; Ezzahar, Jamal; Er-Raki, Salah; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Kerr, Yann

    2016-04-01

    The majority of hydrological and agricultural applications require high-resolution soil moisture (SM) information. To improve the spatial resolution of SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) SM, a downscaling algorithm is applied to the 40 km resolution SMOS level 3 product using 1 km resolution MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) shortwave and thermal data. The DISPATCH (DISaggregation based on a Physical and Theoretical Scale CHange) algorithm converts soil temperature data into SM data using a soil evaporative efficiency (SEE) model and a first order Taylor series expansion. The current version of DISPATCH is contextual, meaning that the MODIS-derived SEE is a function of temperature endmembers (Tends), which are determined from the image-based trapezoid method. However, limitations concerning the estimation of Tends arise when fully dry and fully wet conditions are not met within the scene at the observation resolution. Therefore, in order to improve DISPATCH's robustness in such conditions, the aim of this paper is to estimate Tends independently of shortwave/thermal data using an energy balance model forced by meteorological data. As a mean to evaluate the new algorithm, results are analyzed in terms of both disaggregated SM with respect to in situ 0-5 cm measurements and DISPATCH-derived SEE with respect to theoretical models. The approach is tested over a mixed irrigated and dry land area located in Catalunya, Spain, spanning 2011 and 2012. When comparing 40 km SMOS and 1 km disaggregated SM data with the in situ measurements, results indicate that DISPATCH improves the spatio-temporal correlation with in situ measurements. Moreover, disaggregation results are further improved by integrating the energy balance model in the methodology. The representation of SEE is also enhanced, proving that meteorological data foster the physical link between shortwave/thermal and SM data within the disaggregation method. The synergy between SEE modeling

  12. Comprehension Intoning Willow in the Poems -Appreciate Classical Poesies about the Subject Matter of Intoning Willow%诗中咏柳知多少——对咏柳题材古典诗歌的赏析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王正为

    2009-01-01

    古人倡导"诗言志",今人崇尚"言为心声".不管怎样,诗文中抒发作者感情、状物咏怀的题材很多,以"柳"为题材的诗歌尤其多.诗人借助"柳"之意象,或抒情怀,或展抱负,或浇块垒,或讽时事;可以说"咏柳"诗词是中国诗海中的艺术奇葩,值得探究.%The ancients propose "poems express aspiration", but the contemporaries advocate "One's words reflect one's thinking". Whether or no, there are many subject matters about expressing the author's feeling and intone bosom, especially poesies of the "willow" for subject matter have enough. In virtue of the imago of "willow", the poet expresses feeling, shows ambition, irrigates indignation, and mocks current affairs. Being able to say "intoning the willow" poesies are art inimitability in the Chinese poem sea, and are worth exploring.

  13. The neutral species of the weak base trimethoprim is more toxic to willow trees (Salix viminalis) than the cation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikes, O.; Trapp, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The acute toxicity of the veterinary antibiotic trimethoprim (TMP) to willow trees was tested at three different pH levels in hydroponic solutions with TMP concentrations of 1, 10, 100 or 1000 mg/L. The pH variation was achieved by using ammonium (pH 4.3, low) or nitrate (pH 6.4, medium) as nitro......The acute toxicity of the veterinary antibiotic trimethoprim (TMP) to willow trees was tested at three different pH levels in hydroponic solutions with TMP concentrations of 1, 10, 100 or 1000 mg/L. The pH variation was achieved by using ammonium (pH 4.3, low) or nitrate (pH 6.4, medium...

  14. Fertilization of Willow Coppice Over Three Consecutive 2-Year Rotations—Effects on Biomass Production, Soil Nutrients and Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgiadis, Petros; Sevel, Lisbeth; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    high yields, reducing risks of nutrient leaching and maintaining the soil nutrient stocks in SRC willow on a former arable land. Ten different fertilization treatments were applied, with different application frequencies, fertilizer types and doses over three consecutive 2-year rotations. The biomass......Short rotation coppice (SRC) willow is a promising bioenergy feedstock. Fertilization is an integrated part of the production system, but knowledge about the effects in consecutive rotations is scarce. The objective of this study was to identify an appropriate fertilization regime for achieving...... that nutrients were adequately available to maintain production for at least 6 years without fertilization. When adding 60 kg N ha−1 year−1, biomass production tended to be higher than the control, by 33% (p = 0.055), and the treatment where 360 kg N ha−1 rotation−1 was added, by 31% (p = 0.08). Treatments...

  15. Quantitative changes in secondary metabolites of dark-leave willow (Salix myrsinifolia) exposed to enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegelberg, R.; Julkunen-Tiitto, R. [Univ. of Joensuu, Dept. of Biology, Joensuu (Finland)

    2001-07-01

    This is a study of the impact of increased ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on the secondary chemistry of Salix myrsinifolia (dark-leave willow). For nearly two decades, the loss of stratospheric ozone above the high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere has increased UV-B radiation (280-320 nm) over the long-term mean. Willows (Salicaceae) are widely distributed in these northern regions. To determine the effects of increased UV-B radiation on willows, the plantlets of three clones of S. myrsinifolia were grown under ambient (3.6 kJ m{sup -2} day{sup -1}) or enhanced (7.18 kJ m{sup -2} day{sup -1}) UV-B irradiance. After the 2-week indoor experiment, the concentrations of UV-B-screening phenolics (flavonoids and phenolic acids) and low-UV-B-screening phenolics (salicylates and condensed tannins) in fresh leaves were investigated and the biomass of leaves, stems and roots was determined. As expected, the total amount of flavonoids in willow leaves clearly increased when plantlets were exposed to higher UV-B irradiation. However, the degree of increase of individual compounds varied: luteolin-7-glucoside, monomethyl-monocoumaryl-luteolin-7-glucoside and one myricetin derivative increased significantly, while the apigenin-7-glucuronide increased only slightly. The enhanced UV-B also increased the amount of p-hydroxycinnamic acid derivative. The UV-B effects on other phenolic acids and tannins were minor. In contrast to the other phenolics, the amounts of two salicylates, salicin and saligenin, decreased under enhanced UV-B irradiation. Our results indicate that the concentrations of both UV-B-screening and low-UV-B-screening phenolic compounds in leaves of S. myrsinifolia may vary in response to elevated UV-B radiation. However, while the UV-B protective flavonoids and phenolic acids accumulate during UV-B exposure, the concentrations of certain salicylates decrease. (au)

  16. The silviculture, nutrition and economics of short rotation willow coppice in the uplands of mid-Wales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, R.J.; Randerson, P.F.; Slater, F.M.

    2000-07-01

    The potential of short rotation coppice as a biomass crop on land over 250m (the uplands) of mid Wales was studied. The results found in this study indicate that growing short rotation coppice willow in the uplands is a viable proposition with regard to establishment success and yields. In the event of a secure wood chip market in Wales, returns to the grower would be comparable to those from sheep production. (author)

  17. Phytochemical and physical-chemical analysis of Polish willow (Salix spp.) honey: identification of the marker compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerković, Igor; Kuś, Piotr Marek; Tuberoso, Carlo Ignazio Giovanni; Šarolić, Mladenka

    2014-02-15

    The case study of Polish Salix spp. honey was compared with published data on willow honey from other regions. GC-FID/MS (after HS-SPME and ultrasonic solvent extraction) and targeted HPLC-DAD were applied. Phenolic content, FRAP/DPPH assays and the colour coordinates were determined spectrophotometrically. Beside ubiquitous linalool derivatives, borneol (up to 10.9%), bicyclic monoterpenes with pinane skeleton (pinocarvone up to 10.6%, myrtenal up to 4.8% and verbenone up to 3.4%) and trans-β-damascenone (up to 13.0%) dominated in the headspace. The main compounds of the extractives were vomifoliol (up to 39.6%) and methyl syringate (up to 16.5%) along with not common 4-hydroxy-3-(1-methylethyl)benzaldehyde (up to 11.1%). Abscisic acid (ABA) was found (up to 53.7 mg/kg) with the isomeric ratio (Z,E)-ABA:(E,E)-ABA=1:2. The honey exhibited low antioxidant potential with pale yellow colour. The composition of Polish willow honey is similar to Mediterranean willow honeys with several relevant differences.

  18. Insights into nitrogen allocation and recycling from nitrogen elemental analysis and 15N isotope labelling in 14 genotypes of willow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brereton, Nicholas J B; Pitre, Frederic E; Shield, Ian; Hanley, Steven J; Ray, Michael J; Murphy, Richard J; Karp, Angela

    2014-11-01

    Minimizing nitrogen (N) fertilization inputs during cultivation is essential for sustainable production of bioenergy and biofuels. The biomass crop willow (Salix spp.) is considered to have low N fertilizer requirements due to efficient recycling of nutrients during the perennial cycle. To investigate how successfully different willow genotypes assimilate and allocate N during growth, and remobilize and consequently recycle N before the onset of winter dormancy, N allocation and N remobilization (to and between different organs) were examined in 14 genotypes of a genetic family using elemental analysis and (15)N as a label. Cuttings were established in pots in April and sampled in June, August and at onset of senescence in October. Biomass yield of the trees correlated well with yields recorded in the field. Genotype-specific variation was observed for all traits measured and general trends spanning these sampling points were identified when trees were grouped by biomass yield. Nitrogen reserves in the cutting fuelled the entirety of the canopy establishment, yet earlier cessation of this dependency was linked to higher biomass yields. The stem was found to be the major N reserve by autumn, which constitutes a major source of N loss at harvest, typically every 2-3 years. These data contribute to understanding N remobilization in short rotation coppice willow and to the identification of traits that could potentially be selected for in breeding programmes to further improve the sustainability of biomass production.

  19. Influence of sewage sludge on the yield and biometric traits of selected clones of willow (Salix viminalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jama

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Willow gives us a lot of possibilities of using it in the protection of the environment. Nowadays this plant is an object as an energetic plant and the plant used in phytoremediation and is characterized by fast growth, high production of wood and high tolerance to accumulate heavy metals. The influence of sewage sludge on the growth, morphological traits and yield of four selected clones of Salix viminalis and its halfbreeds is presented in the paper. The experiment with willow and sewage sludge was carried out at the Experimental-Didactic Station in Wrocław in 2008-2010. The experiment with the clones of willow was established in 2003. Split-plot method was applied in three repetitions with two changeable factors. Analysis showed a significant influence of weather conditions, various doses of sewage sludge and genetic properties of clones on yield, the number and length of shoots and diameter. The highest productivity of clones concerned the object with a double dose of sewage sludge. Clone 1054 was characterized by the highest productivity and was the best biometric traits.  

  20. Screening of willow species for resistance to heavy metals: comparison of performance in a hydroponics system and field trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, C; Pulford, I D; Riddell-Black, D

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain whether metal resistance in willow (Salix) clones grown in a hydroponics screening test correlated with data from the same clones grown independently in a field trial. If so, results from a short-term, glasshouse-based system could be extrapolated to the field, allowing rapid identification of willows suitable for planting in metal-contaminated substrates without necessitating longterm field trials. Principal Components Analysis was used to show groups of clones and to assess the relative importance of the parameters measured in both the hydroponics system and the field; including plant response factors such as increase in stem height, as well as metal concentrations in plant tissues. The clones tested fell into two distinct groups. Salix viminalis clones and the basket willow Black Maul (S. triandra) were less resistant to elevated concentrations of heavy metals than a group of hardier clones, including S. burjatica 'Germany,' S.x dasyclados, S. candida and S. spaethii. The more resistant clones produced more biomass in the glasshouse and field, and had higher metal concentrations in the wood. The less resistant clones had greater concentrations of Cu and Ni in the bark, and produced less biomass in the glasshouse and field. Significant relationships were found between the response of the same clones grown the in short-term glasshouse hydroponics system and in the field.